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Sample records for chronic plantar heel

  1. Treatment of Chronic Plantar Heel Pain With Radiofrequency Neural Ablation of the First Branch of the Lateral Plantar Nerve and Medial Calcaneal Nerve Branches.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Aydın; Koca, Tuba Tulay; Utkan, Ali; Sevimli, Resit; Akel, İbrahim

    2016-01-01

    From March 2012 to February 2013, 37 patients experiencing plantar heel pain for ≥6 months despite treatment with physical therapy and other conservative treatment modalities were followed up. If neurogenic heel pain originating from the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve was present, with or without the medial calcaneal nerve, diagnostic nerve blocks to these nerves were performed for confirmation. If the pain was determined to be of neurogenic origin, radiofrequency neural ablation (RFNA) was applied to the corresponding sensory nerve endings. Pain was evaluated using the visual analog scale, and patients were followed for at least one year. A total of 41 feet from 37 patients (30 [81.1%] females, 7 [18.9%] males; mean age, 50.7 ± 1.6 years; mean body mass index, 30.6 ± 0.7 kg/m(2)) were included. The mean visual analog scale scores improved significantly from 1 to 6 to 12 months after the procedure relative to before the procedure, with 88% of all patients rating the treatment as either very successful or successful at 12 months postoperatively. RFNA applied to both the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve and the medial calcaneal nerve sensory branches (16 [39%] feet) and only the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve sensory branches (25 [61%] feet) showed similarly high levels of success. Of the 41 feet, 28 [68.3%] had received extracorporeal shockwave therapy, 35 [85.4%] had received steroid injections, and 22 [53.7%] had received both extracorporeal shockwave therapy and steroid injections before RFNA as an index procedure. All were unresponsive to these previous treatments. In contrast, almost all (88%) were treated successfully with RFNA. Despite a high incidence of neurologic variations, with a precise diagnosis and good application of the technique using the painful points, chronic plantar heel pain can be treated successfully with RFNA. PMID:27073185

  2. Plantar Fasciitis—Heel Pain in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Jeffery A.; Kolodin, Eric L.

    1992-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is the most frequent hind foot problem that affects runners. It occurs when repetitive stress is placed on the heel from a chronic or acute condition. Athletes with biomechanical imbalances are most susceptible to this condition. They exhibit pain in the morning upon weight bearing and, frequently, in the acute stage, have discoloration of the injured area. Management includes preventive and therapeutic exercise, physical therapy, strengthening routines, taping, and the use of orthotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Although injections and NSAIDs bring relief, their effects are often only temporary. This condition is best treated with therapeutic exercises and orthotics in order to correct the athlete's biomechanical faults. This article presents principles and techniques that can be used to effectively prevent and treat plantar fasciitis. ImagesFig 2.Fig 3.Fig 4.Fig 5.Fig 6.Fig 7.Fig 8.Fig 9.Fig 11. PMID:16558136

  3. Treatment of Chronic Plantar Fasciitis With Percutaneous Latticed Plantar Fasciotomy.

    PubMed

    Yanbin, Xu; Haikun, Chu; Xiaofeng, Ji; Wanshan, Yang; Shuangping, Liu

    2015-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis, the most common cause of pain in the inferior heel, accounts for 11% to 15% of all foot symptoms requiring professional care among adults. The present study reports the results of a minimally invasive surgical treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis. All patients with plantar fasciitis who had undergone percutaneous latticed plantar fasciotomy at 3 clinical sites from March 2008 to March 2009 were included in the present study. The follow-up evaluations for this treatment were conducted using the Mayo clinical scoring system. We investigated 17 patients with recalcitrant chronic plantar fasciitis who had undergone this treatment within a follow-up period of ≥13 months. All procedures were performed in the clinic with the patient under local anesthesia. No wound infections or blood vessel or nerve damage occurred. At a mean follow-up period of 16.0 ± 2.29 (range 13 to 21) months, significant improvement was seen in the preoperative mean Mayo score (from 12.06 ± 2.54 to 89.76 ± 4.28, p < .001) and no patient had developed symptom recurrence. Also, none of the patients had developed complex regional pain syndrome. All patients were able to return to regular shoe wear by 3 weeks postoperatively. The technique of plantar fasciitis with percutaneous latticed plantar fasciotomy could be a promising treatment option for patients with recalcitrant chronic plantar fasciitis. PMID:26058817

  4. Customized heel pads and soft orthotics to treat heel pain and plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Seligman, Deborah A; Dawson, Deirdre R

    2003-10-01

    We describe the design of a new cost-effective, comfortable orthotic designed to treat heel pain associated with plantar fasciitis. The heel pad is fabricated from a 4 degrees Sorbothane medial wedge with a customized insertion of low-density Plastazote. The orthotic is medium-density Plastazote reinforced with cork in the medial longitudinal arch. One pair of orthotics takes less than 1 hour to make. Pilot data were collected retrospectively to evaluate the efficacy of the orthotic for reducing pain. Ten clients at a hand and foot orthotic clinic with a mean age of 71+/-9.1 years and with unilateral or bilateral heel pain associated with plantar fasciitis were provided with customized heel pads and soft, molded orthotics at their initial visit. Pain levels were recorded with verbal and Likert-type scales. After 5 weeks of heel pad and orthotic use, all patients showed a reduction in pain, with the overall reduction being highly significant (Pheel pads and soft molded orthotics are an effective first-line treatment for the heel pain and loss of function associated with plantar fasciitis. PMID:14586928

  5. Impaired Foot Plantar Flexor Muscle Performance in Individuals With Plantar Heel Pain and Association With Foot Orthosis Use.

    PubMed

    McClinton, Shane; Collazo, Christopher; Vincent, Ebonie; Vardaxis, Vassilios

    2016-08-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Background Plantar heel pain is one of the most common foot and ankle conditions seen in clinical practice, and many individuals continue to have persisting or recurrent pain after treatment. Impaired foot plantar flexor muscle performance is a factor that may contribute to limited treatment success, but reliable methods to identify impairments in individuals with plantar heel pain are needed. In addition, foot orthoses are commonly used to treat this condition, but the implications of orthosis use on muscle performance have not been assessed. Objectives To assess ankle plantar flexor and toe flexor muscle performance in individuals with plantar heel pain using clinically feasible measures and to examine the relationship between muscle performance and duration of foot orthosis use. Methods The rocker-board plantar flexion test (RBPFT) and modified paper grip test for the great toe (mPGTGT) and lesser toes (mPGTLT) were used to assess foot plantar flexor muscle performance in 27 individuals with plantar heel pain and compared to 27 individuals without foot pain who were matched according to age, sex, and body mass. Pain ratings were obtained before and during testing, and self-reported duration of foot orthosis use was recorded. Results Compared to the control group, individuals with plantar heel pain demonstrated lower performance on the RBPFT (P = .001), the mPGTGT (P = .022), and the mPGTLT (P = .037). Longer duration of foot orthosis use was moderately correlated to lower performance on the RBPFT (r = -0.52, P = .02), the mPGTGT (r = -0.54, P = .01), and the mPGTLT (r = -0.43, P = .03). Conclusion Ankle plantar flexor and toe flexor muscle performance was impaired in individuals with plantar heel pain and associated with longer duration of self-reported foot orthosis use. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(8):681-688. Epub 3 Jul 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6482. PMID:27374013

  6. A retrospective comparison of percutaneous plantar fasciotomy and open plantar fasciotomy with heel spur resection.

    PubMed

    Fallat, Lawrence M; Cox, J Todd; Chahal, Ruby; Morrison, Pamela; Kish, John

    2013-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery for the treatment of recalcitrant heel pain is a relatively new approach. To compare the 2 approaches, a retrospective chart review was conducted of 53 patients (55 feet) who had undergone surgical treatment of plantar fasciitis by either open fasciotomy with heel spur resection or percutaneous medial fascial release. The outcomes measures included perioperative pain and the interval to return to full activity. Pain was measured on a subjective 10-point visual analog scale. Of the 55 fasciotomies performed, 23 were percutaneous and 32 were open, with adjunctive heel spur resection. The percutaneous group experienced a mean pain reduction of 5.69 points at the first postoperative visit, whereas open fasciotomy group experienced a mean pain reduction of 3.53 points. At 12 months postoperatively, no statistically significant difference was found in the pain levels between the 2 groups. The results also showed that the percutaneous group returned to normal activity an average of 2.82 weeks (p < .001) faster than the open group. In the patient cohorts studied, percutaneous medial fascial release was as effective at resolving recalcitrant plantar fasciitis pain as the open procedure and involved less postoperative pain and a faster return to full activity. PMID:23473671

  7. Endoscopic Plantar Fascia Debridement for Chronic Plantar Fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Cottom, James M; Baker, Joseph S

    2016-10-01

    When conservative therapy fails for chronic plantar fasciitis, surgical intervention may be an option. Surgical techniques that maintain the integrity of the plantar fascia will have less risk of destabilizing the foot and will retain foot function. Endoscopic debridement of the plantar fascia can be performed reproducibly to reduce pain and maintain function of the foot. PMID:27599439

  8. An optimized design of in-shoe heel lifts reduces plantar pressure of healthy males.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianyi; Li, Bo; Liang, Kaiyun; Wan, Qiufeng; Vanwanseele, Benedicte

    2016-06-01

    Conventional heel lift with a flat surface increases the risk of foot problems related to higher plantar pressure and decreased stability. In this study, an optimized design of in-shoe heel lifts developed to maintain the midfoot function was tested to investigate if the plantar pressure distribution was improved. The design was based on three dimensional foot plantar contour which was captured by an Infoot 3D scanning system while the heel was elevated by a heel wedge. To facilitate midfoot function, an arch support was designed to support the lateral longitudinal arch, while allowing functional movement of the medial longitudinal arch. Twenty healthy male subjects were asked to walk along an 8m walkway while wearing high-cut footwear with and without the optimized heel lift. Peak pressure, contact area and force-time integral were measured using the Pedar insole system. Range and velocity of medial-lateral center of pressure during forefoot contact phase and foot flat phase were collected using a Footscan pressure plate. Compared to the shoe only condition, peak pressure under the rearfoot decreased with the optimized heel lift, while no increase of peak pressure was observed under the forefoot and midfoot regions, indicating improved plantar pressure distribution. The findings of this study suggest that this optimized heel lift has better biomechanical performance than a conventional flat heel lift. Results from this study may have implications for insole and shoe last design, especially for people who need additional heel height without sacrificing midfoot function. PMID:27264401

  9. Regional plantar foot pressure distributions on high-heeled shoes-shank curve effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Yan; Lee, Winson; Zhang, Ming

    2011-12-01

    Forefoot pain is common in high-heeled shoe wearers due to the high pressure caused by the center of body mass moving forward and the increased arch height with heel elevation. Sufficient arch support could reduce the high pressure over forefoot. However, too much arch support could lead to abnormal foot alignment and pain over midfoot. Little information is reported on the relationship among plantar arch height, shank curve design and plantar pressure. This study aimed at quantifying the plantar arch height changes at different heel heights and investigating the effect of shank curve on plantar pressure distribution. The plantar arch height increased to (7.6±1.3)mm at heel height of 75 mm. The Chinese standard suggests the depth of last should be 8.5mm for heel height of 75 mm. When a shank curve with higher depth of last (11 mm) was used, the peak pressure over forefoot further decreased in midstance phase, which might ease the forefoot problems, while the peak pressure over midfoot increased but not exceeded the discomfort pressure thresholds. To achieve a more ideal pressure distribution in high-heeled shoes, a higher than expected depth of last would be suggested that would not cause discomfort over midfoot.

  10. Effect of Monophasic Pulsed Current on Heel Pain and Functional Activities caused by Plantar Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Alotaibi, Abdullah K.; Petrofsky, Jerrold S.; Daher, Noha S.; Lohman, Everett; Laymon, Michael; Syed, Hasan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Plantar fasciitis (PF) is a soft tissue disorder considered to be one of the most common causes of inferior heel pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of monophasic pulsed current (MPC) and MPC coupled with plantar fascia-specific stretching exercises (SE) on the treatment of PF. Material/Methods Forty-four participants (22 women and 22 men, with a mean age of 49 years) diagnosed with PF were randomly assigned to receive MPC (n=22) or MPC coupled with plantar fascia-specific SE (n=22). Prior to and after 4 weeks of treatment, participants underwent baseline evaluation; heel pain was evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS), heel tenderness threshold was quantified using a handheld pressure algometer (PA), and functional activities level was assessed using the Activities of Daily Living subscale of the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (ADL/FAAM). Results Heel pain scores showed a significant reduction in both groups compared to baseline VAS scores (P<0.001). Heel tenderness improved significantly in both groups compared with baseline PA scores (P<0.001). Functional activity level improved significantly in both groups compared with baseline (ADL/FAAM) scores (P<0.001). However, no significant differences existed between the 2 treatment groups in all post-intervention outcome measures. Conclusions This trial showed that MPC is useful in treating inferior heel symptoms caused by PF. PMID:25791231

  11. Effectiveness of trigger point dry needling for plantar heel pain: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Plantar heel pain (plantar fasciitis) is a common and disabling condition, which has a detrimental impact on health-related quality of life. Despite the high prevalence of plantar heel pain, the optimal treatment for this disorder remains unclear. Consequently, an alternative therapy such as dry needling is increasingly being used as an adjunctive treatment by health practitioners. Only two trials have investigated the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain, however both trials were of a low methodological quality. This manuscript describes the design of a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain. Methods Eighty community-dwelling men and woman aged over 18 years with plantar heel pain (who satisfy the inclusion and exclusion criteria) will be recruited. Eligible participants with plantar heel pain will be randomised to receive either one of two interventions, (i) real dry needling or (ii) sham dry needling. The protocol (including needling details and treatment regimen) was formulated by general consensus (using the Delphi research method) using 30 experts worldwide that commonly use dry needling for plantar heel pain. Primary outcome measures will be the pain subscale of the Foot Health Status Questionnaire and "first step" pain as measured on a visual analogue scale. The secondary outcome measures will be health related quality of life (assessed using the Short Form-36 questionnaire - Version Two) and depression, anxiety and stress (assessed using the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale - short version). Primary outcome measures will be performed at baseline, 2, 4, 6 and 12 weeks and secondary outcome measures will be performed at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Data will be analysed using the intention to treat principle. Conclusion This study is the first randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain. The trial will be reported in

  12. Plantar Fasciitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... version Plantar Fasciitis Overview What is the plantar fascia? The plantar fascia is a band of tissue, much like a ... form the ball of your foot. The plantar fascia works like a rubber band between the heel ...

  13. Vertical ground reaction forces in patients with unilateral plantar heel pain - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Liddle, D; Rome, K; Howe, T

    2000-02-01

    Plantar heel pain (PHP) is a foot pathology commonly reported in both athletic and non-athletic populations. The etiology of PHP is complex and identification of risk factors associated with PHP is required to predict who is at increased risk of injury. Excessive plantar heel force and pressures are intrinsic risk factors that may play a contributing role in the development of PHP. Limited research, however, has been undertaken in terms of ground reaction forces associated with PHP. The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that there were significant differences in the vertical ground reaction forces and loading rates at rearfoot contact between symptomatic and contra-lateral asymptomatic feet in 23 subjects diagnosed with unilateral PHP. The equipment consisted of a portable force plate using a 10-m modular walkway sampled at 200 Hz by an independent observer. Paired t-tests demonstrated no significant difference (P0.05) in the vertical ground reaction forces and loading rates between the symptomatic and contra-lateral asymptomatic feet. The results suggest that single risk factors such as vertical ground reaction force and loading rates do not contribute to PHP. The authors conclude that a model that incorporates a multi-factorial approach to risk factors may lead to a better understanding into the etiology and management of those individuals who suffer from heel pathologies. PMID:10664487

  14. Psychological variables associated with foot function and foot pain in patients with plantar heel pain.

    PubMed

    Cotchett, Matthew P; Whittaker, Glen; Erbas, Bircan

    2015-05-01

    It is widely accepted that psychological variables are associated with self-reported pain and self-reported physical function in patients with musculoskeletal pain. However, the relationship between psychological variables and foot pain and foot function has not been evaluated in people with plantar heel pain. Eighty-four participants with plantar heel pain completed the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale short version (DASS-21) and Foot Health Status Questionnaire. Using a hierarchical regression analysis, a baseline model with age, sex and BMI explained 10 % of the variability in foot function. The addition of depression and stress in separate models explained an additional 7.3 % and 8.1 % of foot function scores, respectively. In the respective models, depression was a significant predictor (β = -0.28; p = 0.009) as was stress (β = -0.29; p = 0.006). Females drove the effect between stress and foot function (β = -0.50; p = 0.001) and depression and foot function (β = -0.53; p < 0.001). In regression models for foot pain, depression, anxiety and stress did not contribute significantly to pain scores. When the data was stratified by sex, stress (β = -0.36; p = 0.024) and depression (β = -0.41; p = 0.013) were significantly associated with foot pain in females but not in males. For participants with plantar heel pain, stress and depression scores were significantly associated with foot function but not foot pain. When the data was stratified by sex, stress and depression were significant predictors of foot pain and function in females. PMID:24647980

  15. Comparison of ankle plantar flexor activity between double-leg heel raise and walking.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiroto; Nishiyama, Toru; Suzuki, Makoto

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] We aimed to evaluate the difference in the muscle activity between the double-leg heel raise (DHR) and treadmill walking. [Subjects] Thirty healthy males aged 21.5 ± 1.6 years (body mass 63.6 ± 9.3 kg, height 171.0 ± 4.5 cm) participated in the study. [Methods] Electromyograms were simultaneously recorded from both heads of the gastrocnemius and the soleus of the right side during the DHR and treadmill walking. The DHR conditions were maximum plantar flexion (MPF), 3/4 MPF, 2/4 MPF, and 1/4 MPF, and the walking speeds were 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 m/min. [Results] The muscle activity during the DHR and walking significantly increased with increments in the height of the heel raise and walking speed, respectively. Comparison of the muscle activity at MPF with that at each walking speed revealed that the muscle activity in the soleus and gastrocnemius medial head during walking exceeded that during the DHR in less than 3.3% of cases. [Conclusion] The DHR test is useful for evaluating the ankle plantar flexor activity necessary for walking. PMID:26157255

  16. Effects of heel support banding using an elastic band on chronic pain at the achilles tendon in a mountaineer

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study developed heel support banding (HSB) using an elastic band for flexible heel support and investigated its effect on chronic Achilles tendon pain of a mountaineer. [Subject] A 40-year-old male mountaineer with chronic Achilles tendon pain [Methods] Ankle dorsiflexion and plantar flexion angles, VISA-A questionnaire, load-induced pain, total pain threshold and tenderness at 3 kg of pressure were measured before and after applying HSB. [Results] After one month of applying HSB, the dorsiflexion and plantar flexion angles increased; the VISA-A questionnaire score increased; the load-induced pain assessment score decreased; the pain threshold increased; and tenderness at 3 kg decreased. [Conclusion] These results indicate that HSB use improves ankle range of motion, decreases pressure and pain, and could provide a new approach for effective intervention and management of chronic Achilles tendon pain. PMID:26957781

  17. Effects of heel support banding using an elastic band on chronic pain at the achilles tendon in a mountaineer.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study developed heel support banding (HSB) using an elastic band for flexible heel support and investigated its effect on chronic Achilles tendon pain of a mountaineer. [Subject] A 40-year-old male mountaineer with chronic Achilles tendon pain [Methods] Ankle dorsiflexion and plantar flexion angles, VISA-A questionnaire, load-induced pain, total pain threshold and tenderness at 3 kg of pressure were measured before and after applying HSB. [Results] After one month of applying HSB, the dorsiflexion and plantar flexion angles increased; the VISA-A questionnaire score increased; the load-induced pain assessment score decreased; the pain threshold increased; and tenderness at 3 kg decreased. [Conclusion] These results indicate that HSB use improves ankle range of motion, decreases pressure and pain, and could provide a new approach for effective intervention and management of chronic Achilles tendon pain. PMID:26957781

  18. A review of 105 consecutive uniport endoscopic plantar fascial release procedures for the treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Morton, Troy N; Zimmerman, Jeffrey P; Lee, Michael; Schaber, John D

    2013-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is a common cause of heel pain in the U.S. Army soldier, resulting in a significant loss of man hours. Given the heavy operations tempo of the U.S. military, successful treatment options need to be considered and used as quickly as possible. Plantar fasciitis can be successfully treated in up to 90% of patients using conservative measures. Operative intervention might need to be considered for those in whom conservative measures have failed. The present report is a review of 105 consecutive uniport endoscopic plantar fascial release procedures performed by the principal investigator during a 9-year period. The following data were collected and analyzed: gender, age, weight, height, body mass index, medical treatment facility, procedure laterality, preoperative pain levels, postoperative pain levels at 3 months, first ambulatory day in the controlled ankle motion boot, return to activity as tolerated, and complications. Three major points were of interest: evidence of improvement in chronic plantar fasciitis when treated with uniport endoscopic procedures; the patient attributes associated with self-reported pain levels 90 days postoperatively; and the patient attributes associated with the average time until patients were able to return to activities as tolerated in a controlled ankle motion boot. It was noted that 44.5% of those with a body mass index of 29.80 kg/m(2) or greater reported a postoperative pain level of 0; and 96.3% of those with a body mass index of 25.53 kg/m(2) or less reported postoperative pain levels of 0. The analyzed data were used to characterize the clinical outcomes of the procedure, identify changes in outcome with surgeon experience, and identify whether certain patient subgroups have better outcomes, allowing surgeons to identify which patient might be the best candidates for an endoscopic release procedure. PMID:23177328

  19. Diagnosis and treatment of plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Goff, James D; Crawford, Robert

    2011-09-15

    Plantar fasciitis, a self-limiting condition, is a common cause of heel pain in adults. It affects more than 1 million persons per year, and two-thirds of patients with plantar fasciitis will seek care from their family physician. Plantar fasciitis affects sedentary and athletic populations. Obesity, excessive foot pronation, excessive running, and prolonged standing are risk factors for developing plantar fasciitis. Diagnosis is primarily based on history and physical examination. Patients may present with heel pain with their first steps in the morning or after prolonged sitting, and sharp pain with palpation of the medial plantar calcaneal region. Discomfort in the proximal plantar fascia can be elicited by passive ankle/first toe dorsiflexion. Diagnostic imaging is rarely needed for the initial diagnosis of plantar fasciitis. Use of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging is reserved for recalcitrant cases or to rule out other heel pathology; findings of increased plantar fascia thickness and abnormal tissue signal the diagnosis of plantar fasciitis. Conservative treatments help with the disabling pain. Initially, patient-directed treatments consisting of rest, activity modification, ice massage, oral analgesics, and stretching techniques can be tried for several weeks. If heel pain persists, then physician-prescribed treatments such as physical therapy modalities, foot orthotics, night splinting, and corticosteroid injections should be considered. Ninety percent of patients will improve with these conservative techniques. Patients with chronic recalcitrant plantar fasciitis lasting six months or longer can consider extracorporeal shock wave therapy or plantar fasciotomy. PMID:21916393

  20. Chronic Plantar Fasciitis: Effect of Platelet-Rich Plasma, Corticosteroid, and Placebo.

    PubMed

    Mahindra, Pankaj; Yamin, Mohammad; Selhi, Harpal S; Singla, Sonia; Soni, Ashwani

    2016-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is a common cause of heel pain. It is a disabling disease in its chronic form. It is a degenerative tissue condition of the plantar fascia rather than an inflammation. Various treatment options are available, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroid injections, orthosis, and physiotherapy. This study compared the effects of local platelet-rich plasma, corticosteroid, and placebo injections in the treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis. In this double-blind study, patients were divided randomly into 3 groups. Local injections of platelet-rich plasma, corticosteroid, or normal saline were given. Patients were assessed with the visual analog scale for pain and with the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle and Hindfoot score before injection, at 3 weeks, and at 3-month follow-up. Mean visual analog scale score in the platelet-rich plasma and corticosteroid groups decreased from 7.44 and 7.72 preinjection to 2.52 and 3.64 at final follow-up, respectively. Mean AOFAS score in the platelet-rich plasma and corticosteroid groups improved from 51.56 and 55.72 preinjection to 88.24 and 81.32 at final follow-up, respectively. There was a significant improvement in visual analog scale score and AOFAS score in the platelet-rich plasma and corticosteroid groups at 3 weeks and at 3-month follow-up. There was no significant improvement in visual analog scale score or AOFAS score in the placebo group at any stage of the study. The authors concluded that local injection of platelet-rich plasma or corticosteroid is an effective treatment option for chronic plantar fasciitis. Platelet-rich plasma injection is as effective as or more effective than corticosteroid injection in treating chronic plantar fasciitis. PMID:26913766

  1. Amniotic Tissues for the Treatment of Chronic Plantar Fasciosis and Achilles Tendinosis.

    PubMed

    Werber, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Allogeneic amniotic tissue and fluid may be used to treat chronic plantar fasciosis and Achilles tendinosis. This innovative approach involves delivering a unique allograft of live human cells in a nonimmunogenic structural tissue matrix to treat chronic tendon injury. These tissues convey very positive regenerative attributes; procurement is performed with maternal consent during elective caesarian birth. Materials and Methods. In the present investigation all patients were unresponsive to multiple standard therapies for a minimum of 6 months and were treated with one implantation of PalinGen SportFLOW around the plantar fascia and/or around the Achilles paratenon. The patients were given a standard protocol for postimplant active rehabilitation. Results. The analogue pretreatment pain score (VAS) of 8. By the fourth week after treatment, all patients had significantly reduced self-reported pain. Twelve weeks following the procedure the average pain level had reduced to only 2. No adverse reactions were reported in any of the patients. Conclusion. All patients in this study experienced heel or Achilles pain, unresponsive to standard therapy protocols. After treatment all patients noted significant pain reduction, indicating that granulized amniotic membrane and amniotic fluid can be successfully used to treat both chronic plantar fasciosis and Achilles tendinosis. PMID:26491722

  2. Amniotic Tissues for the Treatment of Chronic Plantar Fasciosis and Achilles Tendinosis

    PubMed Central

    Werber, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Allogeneic amniotic tissue and fluid may be used to treat chronic plantar fasciosis and Achilles tendinosis. This innovative approach involves delivering a unique allograft of live human cells in a nonimmunogenic structural tissue matrix to treat chronic tendon injury. These tissues convey very positive regenerative attributes; procurement is performed with maternal consent during elective caesarian birth. Materials and Methods. In the present investigation all patients were unresponsive to multiple standard therapies for a minimum of 6 months and were treated with one implantation of PalinGen SportFLOW around the plantar fascia and/or around the Achilles paratenon. The patients were given a standard protocol for postimplant active rehabilitation. Results. The analogue pretreatment pain score (VAS) of 8. By the fourth week after treatment, all patients had significantly reduced self-reported pain. Twelve weeks following the procedure the average pain level had reduced to only 2. No adverse reactions were reported in any of the patients. Conclusion. All patients in this study experienced heel or Achilles pain, unresponsive to standard therapy protocols. After treatment all patients noted significant pain reduction, indicating that granulized amniotic membrane and amniotic fluid can be successfully used to treat both chronic plantar fasciosis and Achilles tendinosis. PMID:26491722

  3. Plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Onuba, O; Ireland, J

    1986-12-01

    Thirty patients presenting with the heel pain syndrome, commonly referred to as "plantar fasciitis", were studied prospectively over a two year period. The pain was associated with a calcaneal spur in 21 patients (70%). In a control series of 25 patients without heel symptoms, calcaneal spurs were present in only 4 out of 50 heels (8%). This difference is highly significant (p 0.001). Seven patients (22%) in the plantar fasciitis group complained of ipsilateral sciatica. PMID:3610621

  4. Are Repeated Single-Limb Heel Raises and Manual Muscle Testing Associated With Peak Plantar-Flexor Force in People With Inclusion Body Myositis?

    PubMed Central

    Shrader, Joseph A.; Davenport, Todd E.; Joe, Galen; Rakocevic, Goran; McElroy, Beverly; Dalakas, Marinos

    2014-01-01

    Background Repeated heel raises have been proposed as a method of ankle plantar-flexor strength testing that circumvents the limitations of manual muscle testing (MMT). Objective The study objective was to examine the relationships among ankle plantar-flexion isometric maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), repeated single-limb heel raises (SLHRs), and MMT in people with myositis. Design This was a cross-sectional study with a between-group design. The ability to complete 1 SLHR determined group assignment (SLHR group, n=24; no-SLHR group, n=19). Methods Forty-three participants with myositis (13 women; median age=64.9 years) participated. Outcome measures included MVC, predicted MVC, Kendall MMT, and Daniels-Worthingham MMT. Results The Kendall MMT was unable to detect significant ankle plantar-flexor weakness established by quantitative methods and was unable to discriminate between participants who could and those who could not perform the SLHR task. Ankle plantar-flexion MVC was not associated with the number of heel-raise repetitions in the SLHR group (pseudo R2=.13). No significant relationship was observed between MVC values and MMT grades in the SLHR and no-SLHR groups. However, a moderate relationship between MVC values and MMT grades was evident in a combined-group analysis (ρ=.50–.67). Limitations The lower half of both MMT grading scales was not represented in the study despite the profound weakness of the participants. Conclusions Both Kendall MMT and Daniels-Worthingham MMT had limited utility in the assessment of ankle plantar-flexor strength. Repeated SLHRs should not be used as a proxy measure of ankle plantar-flexion MVC in people with myositis. PMID:24309617

  5. Evaluation of ultrasound-guided extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in the treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Hyer, Christopher F; Vancourt, Robert; Block, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Thirty patients (39 heels) were evaluated to determine the success of ultrasound-guided ESWT for treatment of recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. All patients had been diagnosed and treated for plantar fasciitis for greater than 6 months and had failed at least 3 conservative treatment modalities. Each patient received 3800 shockwaves into the treated heel using the Dornier Epos Ultra ESWT machine. The average postoperative follow-up was 124 days (range, 33 to 255). Written subjective surveys evaluated pre- and posttreatment pain levels using a visual analog scoring system. The mean pretreatment score was 8.51 (range, 5 to 10), which improved to a mean follow-up score of 3.75 (range, 0 to 10). This represents an improvement in the mean VAS of 4.76, which is statistically significant ( P = .0002). Twenty-five of 30 patients reported some degree of improvement, with 5 experiencing no change. These early results indicate ultrasound-guided ESWT may be a useful tool in the treatment armamentarium for chronic plantar fasciitis. PMID:15768363

  6. Orthosis-Shaped Sandals Are as Efficacious as In-Shoe Orthoses and Better than Flat Sandals for Plantar Heel Pain: A Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vicenzino, Bill; McPoil, Thomas G.; Stephenson, Aoife; Paul, Sanjoy K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate efficacy of a contoured sandal being marketed for plantar heel pain with comparison to a flat flip-flop and contoured in-shoe insert/orthosis. Method 150 volunteers aged 50 (SD: 12) years with plantar heel pain (>4 weeks) were enrolled after responding to advertisements and eligibility determined by telephone and at first visit. Participants were randomly allocated to receive commercially available contoured sandals (n = 49), flat flip-flops (n = 50) or over the counter, pre-fabricated full-length foot orthotics (n = 51). Primary outcomes were a 15-point Global Rating of Change scale (GROC: 1 = a very great deal worse, 15 = a very great deal better), 13 to 15 representing an improvement and the 20-item Lower Extremity Function Scale (LEFS) on which participants rate 20 common weight bearing activities and activities of daily living on a 5-point scale (0 = extreme difficulty, 4 = no difficulty). Secondary outcomes were worst level of heel pain in the preceding week, and the foot and ankle ability measure. Outcomes were collected blind to allocation. Analyses were done on an intention to treat basis with 12 weeks being the primary outcome time of interest. Results The contoured sandal was 68% more likely to report improvement in terms of GROC compared to flat flip-flop. On the LEFS the contoured sandal was 61% more likely than flat flip-flop to report improvement. The secondary outcomes in the main reflected the primary outcomes, and there were no differences between contoured sandal and shoe insert. Conclusions and Relevance Physicians can have confidence in supporting a patient's decision to wear contoured sandals or in-shoe orthoses as one of the first and simple strategies to manage their heel pain. Trial Registration The Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612000463875 PMID:26669302

  7. Comparison of usual podiatric care and early physical therapy intervention for plantar heel pain: study protocol for a parallel-group randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A significant number of individuals suffer from plantar heel pain (PHP) and many go on to have chronic symptoms and continued disability. Persistence of symptoms adds to the economic burden of PHP and cost-effective solutions are needed. Currently, there is a wide variation in treatment, cost, and outcomes of care for PHP with limited information on the cost-effectiveness and comparisons of common treatment approaches. Two practice guidelines and recent evidence of effective physical therapy intervention are available to direct treatment but the timing and influence of physical therapy intervention in the multidisciplinary management of PHP is unclear. The purpose of this investigation is to compare the outcomes and costs associated with early physical therapy intervention (ePT) following initial presentation to podiatry versus usual podiatric care (uPOD) in individuals with PHP. Methods A parallel-group, block-randomized clinical trial will compare ePT and uPOD. Both groups will be seen initially by a podiatrist before allocation to a group that will receive physical therapy intervention consisting primarily of manual therapy, exercise, and modalities, or podiatric care consisting primarily of a stretching handout, medication, injections, and orthotics. Treatment in each group will be directed by practice guidelines and a procedural manual, yet the specific intervention for each participant will be selected by the treating provider. Between-group differences in the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure 6 months following the initial visit will be the primary outcome collected by an independent investigator. In addition, differences in the European Quality of Life – Five Dimensions, Numeric Pain Rating Scale, Global Rating of Change (GROC), health-related costs, and cost-effectiveness at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year will be compared between groups. The association between successful outcomes based on GROC score and participant expectations of recovery

  8. Intervention with Formulated Collagen Gel for Chronic Heel Pressure Ulcers in Older Adults with Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Agosti, Jennifer K; Chandler, Lois A

    2015-11-01

    Chronic pressure ulcers (PrUs), ulcers that fail to progress through the expected phases of wound healing in a timely fashion, are not only a concern for the patients afflicted with them, but are also a significant burden for the long-term-care facilities in which patients reside. The heel is the second most common location for PrUs. Morbidity and mortality rates for heel PrUs, particularly in the diabetic population, are alarming. Therefore, a consistently effective, cost-conscious, and user-friendly topical treatment for heel ulcers would be welcomed by patients and clinicians. This article describes a marked and rapid improvement in wound granulation in 3 older adult patients following weekly treatment for 8 weeks of chronic (≥1-year duration) heel ulcers with an easy-to-use, cost-effective, topical, formulated collagen gel. PMID:26479694

  9. [Characterization of chronic plantar ulcers in former leprosy patients].

    PubMed

    Grauwin, M Y; Gentile, B; Chevallard, A; Cartel, J L

    1994-01-01

    Between 1988 and 1992, 21 biopsies for pathological examination were taken from 20 Senegalese leprosy patients suffering from chronic plantar ulcers (CPU) suspected of malignant transformation. The diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma was effectively made in 13 cases and that of pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia in the remaining 8 cases. The mean period of time between the onset of CPU and that of malignant transformation was 10 years (range: 1 to 15 years); the mean annual frequency of the malignant transformation was 2 per 1,000 CPU. In countries where pathological examination is not available, below knee amputation could be considered whenever main clinical signs of malignant transformation are present. In countries where pathological examination is available, the therapeutic decision may differ according to the diagnosis: below knee amputation supplemented with block dissection of inguinal lymph nodes whenever possible in cases of carcinoma; below knee amputation depending on the function status of the foot and on the volume of tumor in case of pseudo-epitheliomatous hyperplasia. PMID:8209625

  10. [Tumoral proliferations in chronic plantar ulcers: how to treat?].

    PubMed

    Grauwin, M Y; Mane, I; Cartel, J L

    1996-01-01

    Between 1983 and 1994, 66 Senegalese leprosy patients were seen for cauliflower growths developed in chronic plantar ulcer (CPU), (2 patients had each 2 tumors). 68 biopsies for pathological examination were taken: the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma was effectively made in 39 cases (38 patients) and that of pseudo-epitheliomatous hyperplasia in the remaining 29 cases (28 patients). The mean annual frequency of cauliflower growths was 0.45 per 100 CPU. Among these tumors, the percentage of carcinoma was 57%. Of the 38 patients with a carcinoma, 5 refused amputation and all of them died. The 33 others were amputated and of these 8 died as a direct result of their carcinoma (24%). In the case of the 28 patients with hyperplasia, amputation was carried out on 18 patients and local excision on 10. In the months following the operation 8 recurrences were observed in 10 of the patients on whom excision had been carried out. These recurrences were treated by amputation. This gives a total of 93% of amputations in the cases of hyperplasia. These facts lead as to conclude that at least in countries where pathological examination is not available below knee amputation is the most reasonable action to take in the proliferative tumors developed on a CPU. PMID:9054196

  11. Management of plantar fasciitis in the outpatient setting

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ang Tee; How, Choon How; Tan, Benedict

    2016-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is a very common cause of inferior heel pain that can be triggered and aggravated by prolonged standing, walking, running and obesity, among other factors. Treatments are largely noninvasive and efficacious. Supportive treatments, including the plantar fascia-specific stretch, calf stretching, appropriate orthotics and night dorsiflexion splinting, can alleviate plantar fascia pain. While local injections of corticosteroids can help with pain relief, the effects are short-lived and must be weighed against the risk of fat pad atrophy and plantar fascia rupture. Ultrasonography-guided focal extracorporeal shock wave therapy is useful for patients with chronic plantar fasciitis and referrals for this treatment can be made in recalcitrant cases. Activity modification to decrease cyclical repetitive loading of the plantar fascia should be advised during the treatment phase regardless of the chosen treatment modality. PMID:27075037

  12. Management of plantar fasciitis in the outpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ang Tee; How, Choon How; Tan, Benedict

    2016-04-01

    Plantar fasciitis is a very common cause of inferior heel pain that can be triggered and aggravated by prolonged standing, walking, running and obesity, among other factors. Treatments are largely noninvasive and efficacious. Supportive treatments, including the plantar fascia-specific stretch, calf stretching, appropriate orthotics and night dorsiflexion splinting, can alleviate plantar fascia pain. While local injections of corticosteroids can help with pain relief, the effects are short-lived and must be weighed against the risk of fat pad atrophy and plantar fascia rupture. Ultrasonography-guided focal extracorporeal shock wave therapy is useful for patients with chronic plantar fasciitis and referrals for this treatment can be made in recalcitrant cases. Activity modification to decrease cyclical repetitive loading of the plantar fascia should be advised during the treatment phase regardless of the chosen treatment modality. PMID:27075037

  13. Primary Care Management of Plantar Fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Melvin, Thomas J; Tankersley, Zach J; Qazi, Zain N; Jasko, John J; Odono, Russell; Shuler, Franklin D

    2015-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis (PF) is present in 10% of the population and is the most common cause of plantar heel pain. PF is painful, can alter daily activities and presents as a sharp pain localized to the plantar foot and medial heel. The underlying etiology involves microtrauma to the plantar fascia, specifically at its insertion point on the calcaneus. Successful management of plantar fasciitis is typically achieved with the conservative therapy approaches discussed. PMID:26665894

  14. How I Manage Heel Spur Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seder, Joseph I.

    1987-01-01

    This article discusses plantar fascitis and heel spurs, the two contributing causes of heel spur syndrome. Treatment methods, which include rest, anti-inflammatory medication, shoe padding, and, as a last resort, surgery are described. (Author/MT)

  15. Endoscopic Debridement for Treatment of Chronic Plantar Fasciitis: An Innovative Technique and Prospective Study of 46 Consecutive Patients.

    PubMed

    Cottom, James M; Maker, Jared M; Richardson, Phillip; Baker, Joseph S

    2016-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is one the most common pathologies treated by foot and ankle surgeons. When nonoperative therapy fails, surgical intervention might be warranted. Various surgical procedures are available for the treatment of recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. The most common surgical management typically consists of open versus endoscopic plantar fascia release. Comorbidities associated with the release of the plantar fascia have been documented, including lateral column overload and metatarsalgia. We present an innovative technique for this painful condition that is minimally invasive, allows visualization of the plantar fascia, and maintains the integrity of the fascia. Our hypothesis was that the use of endoscopic debridement of the plantar fascia with or without heel spur resection would provide a minimally invasive technique with acceptable patient outcomes. PMID:27066869

  16. Heel pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - heel ... Heel pain is most often the result of overuse. Rarely, it may be caused by an injury. Your heel ... on the heel Conditions that may cause heel pain include: When the tendon that connects the back ...

  17. Relationships between static foot alignment and dynamic plantar loads in runners with acute and chronic stages of plantar fasciitis: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Ana P.; Sacco, Isabel C. N.; Dinato, Roberto C.; João, Silvia M. A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The risk factors for the development of plantar fasciitis (PF) have been associated with the medial longitudinal arch (MLA), rearfoot alignment and calcaneal overload. However, the relationships between the biomechanical variables have yet to be determined. OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to investigate the relationships between the MLA, rearfoot alignment, and dynamic plantar loads in runners with unilateral PF in acute and chronic phases. METHOD: Cross-sectional study which thirty-five runners with unilateral PF were evaluated: 20 in the acute phase (with pain) and 15 with previous chronic PF (without pain). The MLA index and rearfoot alignment were calculated using digital images. The contact area, maximum force, peak pressure, and force-time integral over three plantar areas were acquired with Pedar X insoles while running at 12 km/h, and the loading rates were calculated from the vertical forces. RESULTS: The multiple regression analyses indicated that both the force-time integral (R 2=0.15 for acute phase PF; R 2=0.17 for chronic PF) and maximum force (R 2=0.35 for chronic PF) over the forefoot were predicted by an elevated MLA index. The rearfoot valgus alignment predicted the maximum force over the rearfoot in both PF groups: acute (R 2=0.18) and chronic (R 2=0.45). The rearfoot valgus alignment also predicted higher loading rates in the PF groups: acute (R 2=0.19) and chronic (R 2=0.40). CONCLUSION: The MLA index and the rearfoot alignment were good predictors of plantar loads over the forefoot and rearfoot areas in runners with PF. However, rearfoot valgus was demonstrated to be an important clinical measure, since it was able to predict the maximum force and both loading rates over the rearfoot. PMID:26786073

  18. Effects of an auditory biofeedback device on plantar pressure in patients with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Luke; Feger, Mark A; Hart, Joseph M; Saliba, Susan; Park, Joseph; Hertel, Jay

    2016-02-01

    Chronic ankle instability (CAI) patients have been shown to have increased lateral column plantar pressure throughout the stance phase of gait. To date, traditional CAI rehabilitation programs have been unable to alter gait. We developed an auditory biofeedback device that can be worn in shoes that elicits an audible cue when an excessive amount of pressure is applied to a sensor. This study determined whether using this device can decrease lateral plantar pressure in participants with CAI and alter surface electromyography (sEMG) amplitudes (anterior tibialis, peroneus longus, medial gastrocnemius, and gluteus medius). Ten CAI patients completed baseline treadmill walking while in-shoe plantar pressures and sEMG were measured (baseline condition). Next, the device was placed into the shoe and set to a threshold that would elicit an audible cue during each step of the participant's normal gait. Then, participants were instructed to walk in a manner that would not trigger the audible cue, while plantar pressure and sEMG measures were recorded (auditory feedback (AUD FB) condition). Compared to baseline, there was a statistically significant reduction in peak pressure in the lateral midfoot-forefoot and central forefoot during the AUD FB condition. In addition, there were increases in peroneus longus and medial gastrocnemius sEMG amplitudes 200ms post-initial contact during the AUD FB condition. The use of this auditory biofeedback device resulted in decreased plantar pressure in the lateral column of the foot during treadmill walking in CAI patients and may have been caused by the increase in sEMG activation of the peroneus longus. PMID:27004629

  19. Heel Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... inch. When there is no indication of bone enlargement, the condition is sometimes referred to as "heel ... heel spur; Haglund's deformity ("pump bump"), a bone enlargement at the back of the heel bone in ...

  20. Heel pain: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Agyekum, Edward Kwame; Ma, Kaiyu

    2015-01-01

    Heel pain is a very common foot disease. Varieties of names such as plantar fasciitis, jogger's heel, tennis heal, policeman's heel are used to describe it. Mechanical factors are the most common etiology of heel pain. Common causes of hell pain includes: Plantar Fasciitis, Heel Spur, Sever's Disease, Heel bump, Achilles Tendinopathy, Heel neuritis, Heel bursitis. The diagnosis is mostly based on clinical examination. Normally, the location of the pain and the absence of associated symptoms indicating a systemic disease strongly suggest the diagnosis. Several therapies exist including rest, physical therapy, stretching, and change in footwear, arch supports, orthotics, night splints, anti-inflammatory agents, and surgery. Almost all patients respond to conservative nonsurgical therapy. Surgery is the last treatment option if all other treatments had failed. Rest, ice, massage, the use of correct exercise and complying with a doctor's advice all play important part in helping to recover from this hell pain condition, but getting good quality, suitable shoes with the appropriate amount of support for the whole foot is the most important. PMID:26643244

  1. Treatment of chronic plantar ulcer of the diabetic foot using an irremovable windowed fibreglass cast boot: prospective study of 177 patients.

    PubMed

    Ha Van, Georges; Michaux, Caroline; Parquet, Hugues; Bourron, Olivier; Pradat-Diehl, Pascale; Hartemann, Agnes

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the level of healing of chronic neuropathic plantar ulcers, using an irremovable windowed fibreglass cast boot, which is only opened after healing. A single-centre prospective study of a cohort of 177 diabetic patients with chronic neuropathic plantar ulcers was carried out. The duration of neuropathic plantar ulcers was 604 ± 808 days, with a mean surface area of 4.6 ± 6.5 cm(2) , a mean depth of 1.04 ± 1.08 cm and a mean volume of 5.9 ± 17.7 cm(3) . After a mean of 96 days of wearing a windowed fibreglass cast boot (min 9 days, max 664 days and median 68 days), the level of healing reached 83.6%, although 29 patients did not heal (16.4%). The compliance was at 95%. NPUs with bigger volumes (p = 0.037) and those located at the heels ( p = 0.004) had significantly lower healing levels. Twenty-one patients had moderate peripheral arterial disease (12%), and 24 patients were ostectomized for underlying osteomyelitis (14%), before inclusion. Moderate peripheral arterial disease (p = 0.970) or operated osteomyelitis (p = 0.128) did not modify the level of healing significantly, which were of 81% and 70.8%, respectively. Complications include 12 ulcers due to the windowed fibreglass cast boot (i.e. 7%) and two other ulcers being moderately infected, resulting in 2% of toe amputation, but there was no major amputation or phlebitis. The treatment of old and deep NPUs of the diabetic foot by wearing a windowed fibreglass cast boot without opening the boot prior to healing offers very high ulcer recovery levels. Windowed fibreglass cast boots were changed in only 26 cases (14.6%). In addition, compliance was excellent and of the order of 95%. Furthermore, moderate peripheral arterial disease or a recent ostectomy did not affect the efficacy of windowed fibreglass cast boot. PMID:25941091

  2. Heel Pain in Recreational Runners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazzoli, Allan S.; Pollina, Frank S.

    1989-01-01

    Provides physicians with the signs, symptoms, and management of heel/sole pain in recreational runners (usually due to plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinitis, and calcaneal stress fractures). Remedies involve palliative treatment of symptoms, correction of underlying biomechanical problems, and flexibility exercises. (SM)

  3. Endoscopic Debridement for Treatment of Chronic Plantar Fasciitis: An Innovative Surgical Technique.

    PubMed

    Cottom, James M; Maker, Jared M

    2016-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is one the most common pathologies seen by foot and ankle surgeons. When nonoperative therapy fails, surgical intervention is warranted. Various surgical procedures are available for the treatment of recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. The most common surgical management typically consists of open versus endoscopic plantar fascia release. The documented comorbidities associated with the release of the plantar fascia include lateral column overload and metatarsalgia. We present a new technique for this painful condition that is minimally invasive, allows visualization of the plantar fascia, and maintains the integrity of this fascia. Our hypothesis was that the use of endoscopic debridement of the plantar fascia would provide a minimally invasive technique with acceptable patient outcomes. PMID:26952313

  4. Imaging study of the painful heel syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.L.; Smibert, J.G.; Cox, R.; Mitchell, R.; Klenerman, L.

    1987-06-01

    A total of 45 patients with the painful heel syndrome without evidence of an associated inflammatory arthritis, seven of whom had pain in both heels, were studied using technetium-99 isotope bone scans and lateral and 45 degrees medial oblique radiographs of both feet. Of the 52 painful heels 31 (59.6%) showed increased uptake of tracer at the calcaneum. Patients with scans showing increased uptake tended to have more severe heel pain and responded more frequently to a local hydrocortisone injection. On plain x-ray, 39 of 52 painful heels (75%) and 24 of the 38 opposite nonpainful heels (63%) showed plantar spurs, compared with five of 63 (7.9%) heels in 59 age- and sex-matched controls. No evidence of stress fractures was seen.

  5. Orthotics Compared to Conventional Therapy and Other Non-Surgical Treatments for Plantar Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Rebecca D.; Wright, Paul; McCarthy, Laine H.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical Question In adults with acute plantar fasciitis whose symptoms have not been relieved with the conventional regimen of NSAIDS, stretching and lifestyle modification, do the addition of orthotics (prefabricated or custom fitted) reduce pain and improve function compared with other non-surgical treatments (manipulative chiropractic, physical therapy and/or heel steroid injections)? Answer Yes. Studies have shown that orthotics, both prefabricated and custom fitted, reduce pain and improve function in adults with acute plantar fasciitis with few risks or side effects. Used alone or in addition to conventional therapy (NSAIDs, stretching, lifestyle modification), orthotics are effective and well tolerated by patients for short-term pain relief and improved function. Prefabricated orthotics are less costly and provide similar relief to more expensive custom orthotics. Level of Evidence of the Answer A Search Terms Plantar fasciitis, heel pain, treatment, orthotics, Limits Adult, human, English, Review, Randomized-Control Trials, Systematic Reviews, adults age 18 or more, publication dates 2004 to present. Date Search was Conducted January 16, 2014; updated January 20, 2015 Inclusion Criteria Recent published systematic reviews, randomized controlled, meta-analyses; adults with confirmed acute or recent diagnosis of plantar fasciitis. Exclusion Criteria Studies older than 10 years, children, adolescents less than 18 years of age, chronic or recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. PMID:26855444

  6. Targeting the Plantar Fascia for Corticosteroid Injection.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Andrea Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is often a difficult condition to treat. It is related to repetitive strain of the fascia at its attachment to the heel bone. This condition quite often appears with the concomitant presence of a plantar calcaneal heel spur. Corticosteroid injection is a popular treatment choice for plantar fasciitis, and accurate localization of the injected medication is essential for successful resolution of symptoms after the injection. In the present brief technical communication, a method for targeting the attachment of the plantar fascia to the medial tubercle of the tuberosity of the calcaneus is described. The targeting method uses the lateral radiograph of the foot to aid in localization of the proximal attachment of the plantar fascia to the calcaneus. PMID:25432461

  7. Gastrocnemius shortening and heel pain.

    PubMed

    Solan, Matthew C; Carne, Andrew; Davies, Mark S

    2014-12-01

    Pain and reduced function caused by disorders of either the plantar fascia or the Achilles tendon are common. Although heel pain is not a major public health problem it affects millions of people each year. For most patients, time and first-line treatments allow symptoms to resolve. A proportion of patients have resistant symptoms. Managing these recalcitrant cases is a challenge. Gastrocnemius contracture produces increased strain in both the Achilles tendon and the plantar fascia. This biomechanical feature must be properly assessed otherwise treatment is compromised. PMID:25456718

  8. Autologous platelet-rich plasma compared with whole blood for the treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis; a comparative clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Vahdatpour, Babak; Kianimehr, Lida; Ahrar, Mohmmad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intralesional injection of autologous blood-derived products has recently gained attention as a potential treatment for plantar fasciitis (PF). We compared platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and whole blood (WB) for the treatment of chronic PF. Materials and Methods: Patients with chronic PF received either an intralesional injection of 3 cc PRP prepared by double centrifuge technique or WB (n = 17 in each group). Overall, morning and walking pain severity were assessed by 11-point numerical rating scale, and function was assessed by the Roles and Maudsley score (RMS) at baseline and 1-month and 3 months after treatment. Ultrasonography was performed to measure plantar fascia thickness at baseline and 3 months after treatment. Results: Pain scores were reduced over the study in the PRP (mean change = −5.00 ± 1.17 to −5.47 ± 1.46) and WB groups (mean change = −5.29 ± 2.56 to −6.47 ± 2.83), with no difference between groups (P > 0.05). One month and 3 months after treatment, successful treatment (RMS of ≤ 2) was respectively observed in 29.4% and 82.3% of the PRP and in 47.1% and 76.4% of the WB groups (P > 0.05). Also, fascia thickness was decreased in both the PRP and WB groups (mean change = −1.74 ± 1.11 vs. −1.21 ± 0.73 mm, respectively, P = 0.115). Conclusions: Significant improvement in pain and function, as well as decrease in plantar fascia thickness, was observed by intralesional injection of the PRP and WB in patients with chronic PF. The study results indicate similar effectiveness between PRP and WB for the treatment of chronic PF in short-term. PMID:27274499

  9. Cracked Heels

    MedlinePlus

    ... as diabetes or loss of nerve function (autonomic neuropathy). Heels should be kept well moisturized with a ... shoe materials to accommodate for conditions, such as neuropathy (numb feet), poor circulation and foot... Diabetic Peripheral ...

  10. Finite element modelling of radial shock wave therapy for chronic plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Alkhamaali, Zaied K; Crocombe, Andrew D; Solan, Matthew C; Cirovic, Srdjan

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic use of high-amplitude pressure waves, or shock wave therapy (SWT), is emerging as a popular method for treating musculoskeletal disorders. However, the mechanism(s) through which this technique promotes healing are unclear. Finite element models of a shock wave source and the foot were constructed to gain a better understanding of the mechanical stimuli that SWT produces in the context of plantar fasciitis treatment. The model of the shock wave source was based on the geometry of an actual radial shock wave device, in which pressure waves are generated through the collision of two metallic objects: a projectile and an applicator. The foot model was based on the geometry reconstructed from magnetic resonance images of a volunteer and it comprised bones, cartilage, soft tissue, plantar fascia, and Achilles tendon. Dynamic simulations were conducted of a single and of two successive shock wave pulses administered to the foot. The collision between the projectile and the applicator resulted in a stress wave in the applicator. This wave was transmitted into the soft tissue in the form of compression-rarefaction pressure waves with an amplitude of the order of several MPa. The negative pressure at the plantar fascia reached values of over 1.5 MPa, which could be sufficient to generate cavitation in the tissue. The results also show that multiple shock wave pulses may have a cumulative effect in terms of strain energy accumulation in the foot. PMID:26465270

  11. Mechanical Information of Plantar Fascia during Normal Gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yaodong; Li, Zhiyong

    The plantar fascia is an important foot tissue in stabilizing the longitudinal arch of human foot. Direct measurement to monitor the mechanical situation of plantar fascia at human locomotion is difficult. The purpose of this study was to construct a three-dimensional finite element model of the foot to calculate the internal stress/strain value of plantar fascia during different stage of gait. The simulated stress distribution of plantar fascia was the lowest at heel-strike, which concentrated on the medial side of calcaneal tubercle. The peak stress of plantar fascia was appeared at push-off, and the value is more than 5 times of the heel-strike position. Current FE model was able to explore the plantar fascia tension trend at the main sub-phases of foot. More detailed fascia model and intrinsic muscle forces could be developed in the further study.

  12. Narcissistic rage: The Achilles’ heel of the patient with chronic physical illness

    PubMed Central

    Hyphantis, Thomas; Almyroudi, Augustina; Paika, Vassiliki; Goulia, Panagiota; Arvanitakis, Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    Based on the psychoanalytic reading of Homer’s Iliad whose principal theme is “Achilles’ rage” (the semi-mortal hero invulnerable in all of his body except for his heel, hence “Achilles’ heel” has come to mean a person’s principal weakness), we aimed to assess whether “narcissistic rage” has an impact on several psychosocial variables in patients with severe physical illness across time. In 878 patients with cancer, rheumatological diseases, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, and glaucoma, we assessed psychological distress (SCL-90 and GHQ-28), quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF), interpersonal difficulties (IIP-40), hostility (HDHQ), and defense styles (DSQ). Narcissistic rage comprised DSQ “omnipotence” and HDHQ “extraverted hostility”. Hierarchical multiple regressions analyses were performed. We showed that, in patients with disease duration less than one year, narcissistic rage had a minor impact on psychosocial variables studied, indicating that the rage was rather part of a “normal” mourning process. On the contrary, in patients with longer disease duration, increased rates of narcissistic rage had a great impact on all outcome variables, and the opposite was true for patients with low rates of narcissistic rage, indicating that narcissistic rage constitutes actually an “Achilles’ Heel” for patients with long-term physical illness. These findings may have important clinical implications. PMID:19936167

  13. Subcalcaneal Bursitis With Plantar Fasciitis Treated by Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yamakado, Kotaro

    2013-01-01

    We report the successful arthroscopic treatment of a case of subcalcaneal bursitis with plantar fasciitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report on arthroscopic excision of a subcalcaneal bursa. Right heel pain developed in a 50-year-old woman, without any obvious cause. She reported that the heel pain occurred immediately after waking and that the heel ached when she walked. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an extra-articular, homogeneous, high-intensity lesion in the fat pad adjacent to the calcaneal tubercle on T2-weighted sagittal and coronal images and thickening of the plantar fascia on T2-weighted sagittal images. A diagnosis of a recalcitrant subcalcaneal bursitis with plantar fasciitis was made, and surgery was performed. The arthroscope was placed between the calcaneus and the plantar fascia. With the surgeon viewing from the lateral portal and working from the medial portal, the dorsal surface of the degenerative plantar fascia was debrided and the medial half of the plantar fascia was released, followed by debridement of the subcalcaneal bursal cavity through the incised plantar fascia. Full weight bearing and gait were allowed immediately after the operation. At the latest follow-up, the patient had achieved complete resolution of heel pain without a recurrence of the mass, confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:23875139

  14. Chronic Plantar Fasciitis is Mediated by Local Hemodynamics: Implications for Emerging Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Larry E.; Latt, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis (PF) is a common, disabling condition affecting millions of patients each year. With early diagnosis and timely application of traditional nonsurgical treatments, symptoms generally resolve over time. However, despite adequate treatment, 20% of patients will experience persistent symptoms. In these patients, minimally invasive therapies that augment local hemodynamics to initiate a regenerative tissue-healing cascade have the greatest potential to resolve long-standing symptoms. We performed a narrative review based on a best evidence evaluation of manuscripts published in Medline-indexed journals to determine the mechanisms involved in soft tissue injury and healing. This evaluation also highlights emerging minimally invasive therapies that exploit these mechanisms in recalcitrant PF. PMID:25709971

  15. Plantar fasciitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 70. It is one of the most common orthopedic foot complaints. Plantar fasciitis was commonly thought to ... JA, Moeller JL, Hutchinson MR.Common issues in orthopedics. In: Rakel RE, ed. Textbook of Family Medicine . ...

  16. Changes in the activation and function of the ankle plantar flexor muscles due to gait retraining in chronic stroke survivors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A common goal of persons post-stroke is to regain community ambulation. The plantar flexor muscles play an important role in propulsion generation and swing initiation as previous musculoskeletal simulations have shown. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that simulation results quantifying changes in plantar flexor activation and function in individuals post-stroke were consistent with (1) the purpose of an intervention designed to enhance plantar flexor function and (2) expected muscle function during gait based on previous literature. Methods Three-dimensional, forward dynamic simulations were created to determine the changes in model activation and function of the paretic ankle plantar flexor muscles for eight patients post-stroke after a 12-weeks FastFES gait retraining program. Results An median increase of 0.07 (Range [−0.01,0.22]) was seen in simulated activation averaged across all plantar flexors during the double support phase of gait from pre- to post-intervention. A concurrent increase in walking speed and plantar flexor induced forward center of mass acceleration by the plantar flexors was seen post-intervention for seven of the eight subject simulations. Additionally, post-training, the plantar flexors had an simulated increase in contribution to knee flexion acceleration during double support. Conclusions For the first time, muscle-actuated musculoskeletal models were used to simulate the effect of a gait retraining intervention on post-stroke muscle model predicted activation and function. The simulations showed a new pattern of simulated activation for the plantar flexor muscles after training, suggesting that the subjects activated these muscles with more appropriate timing following the intervention. Functionally, simulations calculated that the plantar flexors provided greater contribution to knee flexion acceleration after training, which is important for increasing swing phase knee flexion and foot clearance. PMID

  17. Long distance running and acute effects on plantar foot sensitivity and plantar foot loading.

    PubMed

    Alfuth, Martin; Rosenbaum, Dieter

    2011-09-26

    The plantar surface of the foot senses local pressures during stance and locomotion. These foot loading characteristics may be affected by long distance running. Little is known about the physiological effects of sports-related loading on plantar sensitivity and their relationship with plantar foot loading. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of long distance running on plantar sensitivity to touch and their relationship with foot loading characteristics. It was hypothesized that plantar sensation would decrease after long distance running and may be related to foot loading characteristics. In 15 middle-aged runners, sensory detection thresholds to light touch and plantar pressures were measured before and after a 10 km run. After the run, no significant changes in sensory perception thresholds were observed so that correlations between foot sensitivity and foot loading could not be calculated. A significant decrease of force-time integrals and maximum forces was demonstrated in the whole foot (-6.2%, p=0.003; -3.9%, p=0.001) and the heel (-10.5%, p=0.003; -8.5%, p=0.002). Furthermore, maximum force was significantly reduced in the lateral midfoot (-6.4%, p=0.002). In conclusion, a sub-maximal 10 km running exercise appears to have no significant acute effects on plantar sensitivity, plantar pressure distribution and peak forces. PMID:21871535

  18. Plantar Wart (Verruca Plantaris)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Plantar Wart (Verruca Plantaris) Text Size Print Bookmark Plantar Wart (Verruca Plantaris) What is a Plantar Wart? A wart is a small growth on ... foot, but typically they appear on the bottom (plantar side) of the foot. Plantar warts most commonly ...

  19. Randomized, Multicenter Trial on the Effect of Radiation Therapy on Plantar Fasciitis (Painful Heel Spur) Comparing a Standard Dose With a Very Low Dose: Mature Results After 12 Months' Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Niewald, Marcus; Micke, Oliver; Graeber, Stefan; Schaefer, Vera; Scheid, Christine; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Licht, Norbert; Ruebe, Christian

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To conduct a randomized trial of radiation therapy for painful heel spur, comparing a standard dose with a very low dose. Methods and Materials: Sixty-six patients were randomized to receive radiation therapy either with a total dose of 6.0 Gy applied in 6 fractions of 1.0 Gy twice weekly (standard dose) or with a total dose of 0.6 Gy applied in 6 fractions of 0.1 Gy twice weekly (low dose). In all patients lateral opposing 4- to 6-MV photon beams were used. The results were measured using a visual analogue scale, the Calcaneodynia score, and the SF12 health survey. The fundamental phase of the study ended after 3 months, and the follow-up was continued up to 1 year. Patients with insufficient pain relief after 3 months were offered reirradiation with the standard dosage at any time afterward. Results: Of 66 patients, 4 were excluded because of withdrawal of consent or screening failures. After 3 months the results in the standard arm were highly significantly superior compared with those in the low-dose arm (visual analogue scale, P=.001; Calcaneodynia score, P=.027; SF12, P=.045). The accrual of patients was stopped at this point. Further evaluation after 12 months' follow-up showed the following results: (1) highly significant fewer patients were reirradiated in the standard arm compared with the low-dose arm (P<.001); (2) the results of patients in the low-dose arm who were reirradiated were identical to those in the standard arm not reirradiated (reirradiation as a salvage therapy if the lower dose was ineffective); (3) patients experiencing a favorable result after 3 months showed this even after 12 months, and some results even improved further between 3 and 12 months. Conclusions: This study confirms the superior analgesic effect of radiation therapy with 6-Gy doses on painful heel spur even for a longer time period of at least 1 year.

  20. Compressive neuropathy of the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve: a study by magnetic resonance imaging*

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Rogéria Nobre; Lopes, Alexia Abuhid; Torres, Jardélio Mendes; Mundim, Marina Franco; Silva, Lênio Lúcio Gavio; Silva, Breno Rabelo de Carvalho e

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the prevalence of isolated findings of abnormalities leading to entrapment of the lateral plantar nerve and respective branches in patients complaining of chronic heel pain, whose magnetic resonance imaging exams have showed complete selective fatty atrophy of the abductor digiti quinti muscle. Materials and Methods Retrospective, analytical, and cross-sectional study. The authors selected magnetic resonance imaging of hindfoot of 90 patients with grade IV abductor digiti quinti muscle atrophy according to Goutallier and Bernageau classification. Patients presenting with minor degrees of fatty muscle degeneration (below grade IV) and those who had been operated on for nerve decompression were excluded. Results A female prevalence (78.8%) was observed, and a strong correlation was found between fatty muscle atrophy and plantar fasciitis in 21.2%, and ankle varices, in 16.8% of the patients. Conclusion Fatty atrophy of the abductor digiti quinti muscle is strongly associated with neuropathic alterations of the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve. The present study showed a significant association between plantar fasciitis and ankle varices with grade IV atrophy of the abductor digiti quinti muscle. PMID:26811554

  1. How We Manage Plantar Fasciitis (With Memory Jogger).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Suzanne M.; Harvey, Jack S.

    1988-01-01

    Common among runners and athletes who participate in jumping sports, plantar fasciitis is an overuse injury that is potentially incapacitating, causes heel and arch pain, and usually occurs after sudden increases in running mileage, frequency, or speed. Therapy is described. (Author/CB)

  2. Plantar Pressure Distribution Patterns of Individuals with Prediabetes in Comparison with Healthy Individuals and Individuals with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Caroline Cabral; Balbinot, Luciane Fachin; Silva, Marcelo Faria; Achaval, Matilde; Zaro, Milton Antônio

    2013-01-01

    Background Since elevated mechanical stress along with loss of plantar protective sensation are considered relevant factors in skin breakdown resulting in diabetic foot ulcerations, the assessment of plantar pressure is important for the prevention of diabetic foot complications. Prediabetes subjects are at risk of chronic hyperglycemia complications, among them neuropathy, but information about plantar loading in this population is not available. We aimed to compare baropodometric parameters of individuals with prediabetes versus healthy persons and persons with diabetes mellitus (DM). Methods Baropodometric data from 73 subjects (15 with prediabetes (pre-DM), 28 with type 2 DM, 30 healthy) aged between 29 and 69 years of both genders were registered through a pressure platform with self-selected gait speed and first-step protocol. Peak plantar pressure, stance time, percentage of contact time, percentage of contact area and pressure-time integral were assessed in five plantar foot regions: heel, midfoot, metatarsals, hallux, and toes 2 to 5. Groups were compared by one-way analysis of variance with Scheffé post hoc (α = 0.05). Results Age, body mass index, gender, and arch height index did not differ between groups. Pre-DM and DM subjects presented increased peak pressure and pressure-time integral in metatarsals (p = .010; p > .001), as well as increased percentage of contact time in midfoot (p = .006) and metatarsals (p = .004) regions when compared with healthy subjects. Stance time was significantly higher (p = .017) in DM subjects. Conclusions Pre-DM subjects seem to exhibit an altered plantar pressure distribution pattern similar to that often found in DM subjects. PMID:24124936

  3. The effects of fatigue on plantar pressure distribution in walking.

    PubMed

    Bisiaux, M; Moretto, P

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess plantar pressure deviations due to fatigue. Plantar pressure was assessed using a portable system while eleven healthy subjects performed three walking tests, one before, one immediately after and another 30-min after intensive running. Pressure peak, intra-subject coefficient of variation and relative impulse were recorded. Significant decrease in pressure peak and the relative impulse under the heel and the midfoot along with significant increase in pressure peak and relative impulse under the forefoot were observed 30 min after the run. After a 30-min rest, the heel and forefoot loading remained significantly affected compared to the pre-test conditions while variability, step length and frequency remained unchanged. The study demonstrates short- and long-term plantar pressure deviations due to fatigue induced by an intensive 30-min run, while previous studies showed negligible deviation of the ground reaction force. PMID:18586495

  4. Biomechanical evaluation of heel elevation on load transfer — experimental measurement and finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luximon, Yan; Luximon, Ameersing; Yu, Jia; Zhang, Ming

    2012-02-01

    In spite of ill-effects of high heel shoes, they are widely used for women. Hence, it is essential to understand the load transfer biomechanics in order to design better fit and comfortable shoes. In this study, both experimental measurement and finite element analysis were used to evaluate the biomechanical effects of heel height on foot load transfer. A controlled experiment was conducted using custom-designed platforms. Under different weight-bearing conditions, peak plantar pressure, contact area and center of pressure were analyzed. A three-dimensional finite element foot model was used to simulate the high-heel support and to predict the internal stress distributions and deformations for different heel heights. Results from both experiment and model indicated that heel elevations had significant effects on all variables. When heel elevation increased, the center of pressure shifted from the midfoot region to the forefoot region, the contact area was reduced by 26% from 0 to 10.2 cm heel and the internal stress of foot bones increased. Prediction results also showed that the strain and total tension force of plantar fascia was minimum at 5.1 cm heel condition. This study helps to better understand the biomechanical behavior of foot, and to provide better suggestions for design parameters of high heeled shoes.

  5. Explicit finite element modelling of heel pad mechanics in running: inclusion of body dynamics and application of physiological impact loads.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ming; Lee, Peter Vee-Sin

    2015-01-01

    Many heel pathologies including plantar heel pain may result from micro tears/trauma in the subcutaneous tissues, in which internal tissue deformation/stresses within the heel pad play an important role. Previously, many finite element models have been proposed to evaluate stresses inside the heel pad, but the majority of these models only focus on static loading boundary conditions. This study explored a dynamics modelling approach to the heel pad subjected to realistic impact loads during running. In this model, the inertial property and action of the body are described by a lumped parameter model, while the heel/shoe interactions are modelled using a viscoelastic heel pad model with contact properties. The impact force pattern, dynamic heel pad deformation and stress states predicted by the model were compared with published experimental data. Further parametrical studies revealed the model responses, in terms of internal stresses in the skin and fatty tissue, change nonlinearly when body dynamics changes. A reduction in foot's touchdown velocity resulted in a less severe impact landing and stress relief inside the heel pad, for example peak von-Mises stress in fatty tissue, was reduced by 11.3%. Applications of the model may be extendable to perform iterative analyses to further understand the complex relationships between body dynamics and stress distributions in the soft tissue of heel pad during running. This may open new opportunities to study the mechanical aetiology of plantar heel pain in runners. PMID:24980181

  6. Children with ADHD Show No Deficits in Plantar Foot Sensitivity and Static Balance Compared to Healthy Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlee, Gunther; Neubert, Tom; Worenz, Andreas; Milani, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate plantar foot sensitivity and balance control of ADHD (n = 21) impaired children compared to age-matched healthy controls (n = 25). Thresholds were measured at 200 Hz at three anatomical locations of the plantar foot area of both feet (hallux, first metatarsal head (METI) and heel). Body balance was…

  7. Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided TOPAZ Radiofrequency Coblation: A Novel Coaxial Technique for the Treatment of Recalcitrant Plantar Fasciitis-Our Experience.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amit; Best, Alistair J; Rennie, Winston J

    2016-06-01

    Various therapeutic options are available for treatment of recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. Studies using TOPAZ coblation (ArthroCare, Sunnyvale, CA) have had good early results. The current coblation technique involves a surgical incision or breach of the highly specialized plantar fat pad, which can be associated with risks. We describe a novel technique of ultrasound-guided percutaneous coblation with a lateral heel approach. Advantages include precise targeting of the plantar fascia by direct dynamic visualization of the coblation tip, a true percutaneous approach with a needle skin puncture (<5 mm), and preservation of the plantar fat pad by using a lateral heel approach. PMID:27162283

  8. Identification of Foot Pathologies Based on Plantar Pressure Asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Wafai, Linah; Zayegh, Aladin; Woulfe, John; Aziz, Syed Mahfuzul; Begg, Rezaul

    2015-01-01

    Foot pathologies can negatively influence foot function, consequently impairing gait during daily activity, and severely impacting an individual’s quality of life. These pathologies are often painful and correspond with high or abnormal plantar pressure, which can result in asymmetry in the pressure distribution between the two feet. There is currently no general consensus on the presence of asymmetry in able-bodied gait, and plantar pressure analysis during gait is in dire need of a standardized method to quantify asymmetry. This paper investigates the use of plantar pressure asymmetry for pathological gait diagnosis. The results of this study involving plantar pressure analysis in fifty one participants (31 healthy and 20 with foot pathologies) support the presence of plantar pressure asymmetry in normal gait. A higher level of asymmetry was detected at the majority of the regions in the feet of the pathological population, including statistically significant differences in the plantar pressure asymmetry in two regions of the foot, metatarsophalangeal joint 3 (MPJ3) and the lateral heel. Quantification of plantar pressure asymmetry may prove to be useful for the identification and diagnosis of various foot pathologies. PMID:26295239

  9. Identification of Foot Pathologies Based on Plantar Pressure Asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Wafai, Linah; Zayegh, Aladin; Woulfe, John; Aziz, Syed Mahfuzul; Begg, Rezaul

    2015-01-01

    Foot pathologies can negatively influence foot function, consequently impairing gait during daily activity, and severely impacting an individual's quality of life. These pathologies are often painful and correspond with high or abnormal plantar pressure, which can result in asymmetry in the pressure distribution between the two feet. There is currently no general consensus on the presence of asymmetry in able-bodied gait, and plantar pressure analysis during gait is in dire need of a standardized method to quantify asymmetry. This paper investigates the use of plantar pressure asymmetry for pathological gait diagnosis. The results of this study involving plantar pressure analysis in fifty one participants (31 healthy and 20 with foot pathologies) support the presence of plantar pressure asymmetry in normal gait. A higher level of asymmetry was detected at the majority of the regions in the feet of the pathological population, including statistically significant differences in the plantar pressure asymmetry in two regions of the foot, metatarsophalangeal joint 3 (MPJ3) and the lateral heel. Quantification of plantar pressure asymmetry may prove to be useful for the identification and diagnosis of various foot pathologies. PMID:26295239

  10. Effect of Field Size and Length of Plantar Spur on Treatment Outcome in Radiation Therapy of Plantar Fasciitis: The Bigger the Better?

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, Robert Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Reible, Michael; Carl, Ulrich Martin; Nitsche, Mirko

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is well established in the treatment of painful plantar fasciitis or heel spur. A retrospective analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of field definition on treatment outcome and to determine the impact of factors potentially involved. Methods and Materials: A review of treatment data of 250 patients (285 heels) with a mean follow-up time of 11 months showed that complete symptom remission occurred in 38%, partial remission in 32%, and no change in 19% (11% were lost to follow-up). Variables such as radiologic evidence of plantar spurs, their length, radiation dose, field size, age, sex, and onset of pain before administration of radiation therapy were investigated in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Results: Treatment response depended upon age >53 years, length of heel spur ≤6.5 mm (or no radiologic evidence of a heel spur), and onset of pain <12 months before radiation therapy. Patients with these clinical prerequisites stood a 93% chance of clinical response. Without these prerequisites, only 49% showed any impact. No influence of field size on treatment outcome became evident. Conclusion: Patients with short plantar heel spurs benefit from radiation therapy equally well as patients without any radiologic evidence. Moreover, smaller field sizes have the same positive effect as commonly used large field definitions covering the entire calcaneal bone. This leads to a recommendation of a considerable reduction of field size in future clinical practice.

  11. Slip-Related Changes in Plantar Pressure Distribution, and Parameters for Early Detection of Slip Events

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seungyoung; Cho, Hyungpil; Kang, Boram; Lee, Dong Hun; Kim, Mi Jung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate differences in plantar pressure distribution between a normal gait and unpredictable slip events to predict the initiation of the slipping process. Methods Eleven male participants were enrolled. Subjects walked onto a wooden tile, and two layers of oily vinyl sheet were placed on the expected spot of the 4th step to induce a slip. An insole pressure-measuring system was used to monitor plantar pressure distribution. This system measured plantar pressure in four regions (the toes, metatarsal head, arch, and heel) for three events: the step during normal gait; the recovered step, when the subject recovered from a slip; and the uncorrected, harmful slipped step. Four variables were analyzed: peak pressure (PP), contact time (CT), the pressure-time integral (PTI), and the instant of peak pressure (IPP). Results The plantar pressure pattern in the heel was unique, as compared with other parts of the sole. In the heel, PP, CT, and PTI values were high in slipped and recovered steps compared with normal steps. The IPP differed markedly among the three steps. The IPPs in the heel for the three events were, in descending order (from latest to earliest), slipped, recovered, and normal steps, whereas in the other regions the order was normal, recovered, and slipped steps. Finally, the metatarsal head-to-heel IPP ratios for the normal, recovered, and slipped steps were 6.1±2.9, 3.1±3.0, and 2.2±2.5, respectively. Conclusion A distinctive plantar pressure pattern in the heel might be useful for early detection of a slip event to prevent slip-related injuries. PMID:26798603

  12. Distally Based Abductor Hallucis Adipomuscular Flap for Forefoot Plantar Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanglim; Kim, Min Bom; Lee, Young Ho; Baek, Jeong Kook; Baek, Goo Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Soft tissue and bone defects of the lower leg, ankle, and heel region often require coverage by local or distant flaps. The authors successfully used the distally based adipomuscular abductor hallucis flap for the treatment of 7 patients with soft tissue defect on the plantar forefoot after diabetic ulcer (n = 2), excision of melanoma at the medial forefoot (n = 3), and posttraumatic defects of the plantar forefoot (n = 2). The size of the defects ranged from 6 to 36 cm. All defects were covered successfully without major complications. The distally based adipomuscular flap from the abductor hallucis muscle provides a reliable coverage for small and moderate defects of the plantar and medial forefoot. This flap is often preferable to the use of free flaps because the surgery is rapidly performed and does not require microsurgical expertise. PMID:25565013

  13. A novel treatment for refractory plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mihir M

    2015-03-01

    Chronic plantar fasciitis is a major health care problem worldwide and affects nearly 10% of the US population. Although most cases resolve with conservative care, the numerous treatments for refractory plantar fasciitis attest to the lack of consensus regarding these cases. The emerging goals for this condition are a minimally invasive percutaneous intervention that is safe, effective, and well-tolerated and has minimal morbidity and a low complication rate. We conducted a prospective study in which patients were allowed either to continue with noninvasive treatment or to undergo focal aspiration and partial fasciotomy with an ultrasonic probe. This is the first report of a plantar fascia partial release guided by ultrasonic energy delivered by a percutaneously inserted probe under local anesthesia. The procedure appears to be a safe, effective, well-tolerated treatment for a condition that is refractory to other options. PMID:25750942

  14. Plantar fascia (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The plantar fascia is a very thick band of tissue that covers the bones on the bottom of the foot. It ... band of tissue causes a high arch. This fascia can become inflamed and painful in some people, ...

  15. Orthotic Heel Wedges Do Not Alter Hindfoot Kinematics and Achilles Tendon Force During Level and Inclined Walking in Healthy Individuals.

    PubMed

    Weinert-Aplin, Robert A; Bull, Anthony M J; McGregor, Alison H

    2016-04-01

    Conservative treatments such as in-shoe orthotic heel wedges to treat musculoskeletal injuries are not new. However, weak evidence supporting their use in the management of Achilles tendonitis suggests the mechanism by which these heel wedges works remains poorly understood. It was the aim of this study to test the underlying hypothesis that heel wedges can reduce Achilles tendon load. A musculoskeletal modeling approach was used to quantify changes in lower limb mechanics when walking due to the introduction of 12-mm orthotic heel wedges. Nineteen healthy volunteers walked on an inclinable walkway while optical motion, force plate, and plantar pressure data were recorded. Walking with heel wedges increased ankle dorsiflexion moments and reduced plantar flexion moments; this resulted in increased peak ankle dorsiflexor muscle forces during early stance and reduced tibialis posterior and toe flexor muscle forces during late stance. Heel wedges did not reduce overall Achilles tendon force during any walking condition, but did redistribute load from the medial to lateral triceps surae during inclined walking. These results add to the body of clinical evidence confirming that heel wedges do not reduce Achilles tendon load and our findings provide an explanation as to why this may be the case. PMID:26502456

  16. Comparison of Plantar Pressure Distribution between Different Speed and Incline During Treadmill Jogging

    PubMed Central

    Ho, I-Ju; Hou, Yi-You; Yang, Chich-Haung; Wu, Wen-Lan; Chen, Sheng-Kai; Guo, Lan-Yuen

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of changes in speed and incline slope on plantar pressure distribution of the foot during treadmill jogging. Plantar pressure parameters were measured with the Pedar-X system in twenty healthy girls (mean age of 20.7 years, mean height of 1.60m, and a mean weight of 53.35kg). Because variations in walking speed or slope can significantly change the magnitude of plantar pressure, comparisons of plantar pressure distribution between the two independent protocols during treadmill jogging were considered in this study. First, the subjects ran at the same speed of 2 m·s-1 with different incline slopes of 0%, 5%, 10%, and 15%. Second, they ran on the same slope of 0% with different speeds of 1.5 m·s-1, 2.0 m·s-1, and 2.5 m·s-1. The peak pressure of the eight plantar surface areas, apart from the medial forefoot and the hallux, significantly increased (p < 0.05) with an increase of 33% of peak pressure from 1.5 m·s-1 to 2.5 m·s-1 (speed) at heel region. In contrast, the peak pressures at the heel, medial fore-foot, toe and hallux decreased significantly (p < 0. 05) with increasing incline slope. At the heel, peak pressure reduced by 27% from 0% to 15% incline, however, pressure at the lateral midfoot region increased as following. Different speeds and incline slopes during jogging were associated with changes in plantar pressures. By systematic investigation of foot kinematics and plantar pressure during jogging with varying incline slope and speed, the results of this study provided further insight into foot biomechanics during jogging. Key points The study aimed to compare the plantar pressure distribution of the foot between different incline and speed during treadmill jogging by using plantar insole measurement system. With the increase of speed, apart from the hallux and medical forefoot, the peak pressure of all regions was raised significantly. As the slope increased, there was reduced peak pressure of the heel

  17. Current evidence of extracorporeal shock wave therapy in chronic Achilles tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Gerdesmeyer, Ludger; Mittermayr, Rainer; Fuerst, Martin; Al Muderis, Munjed; Thiele, Richard; Saxena, Amol; Gollwitzer, Hans

    2015-12-01

    Chronic Achilles tendinopathy has been described as the most common overuse injury in sports medicine. Several treatment modalities such as activity modification, heel lifts, arch supports, stretching exercises, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, and eccentric loading are known as standard treatment mostly without proven evidence. After failed conservative therapy, invasive treatment may be considered. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has been successfully used in soft-tissue pathologies like lateral epicondylitis, plantar fasciitis, tendinopathy of the shoulder and also in bone and skin disorders. Conclusive evidence recommending ESWT as a treatment for Achilles tendinopathy is still lacking. In plantar fasciitis as well as in calcific shoulder tendinopathy shock wave therapy is recently the best evaluated treatment option. This article analysis the evidence based literature of ESWT in chronic Achilles tendinopathy. Recently published data have shown the efficacy of focused and radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy. PMID:26327530

  18. Platelet-Rich-Plasma injection seems to be effective in treatment of plantar fasciitis: a case series.

    PubMed

    van Egmond, Jeroen C; Breugem, Stefan J M; Driessen, Marcel; Bruijn, Daniel J

    2015-06-01

    Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain. Diverse non-operative treatment options are available. The purpose of this study was to determine if a single platelet-rich-plasma injection at the origin of the plantar fascia in patients with plantar fasciitis gives a functional improvement. Patients with plantar fasciitis and failed conservative treatment were included in this retrospective study. Included patients were sent four questionnaires after platelet-rich-plasma injection. Primary outcome is functional improvement, determined by foot function index in which lower scores correlates with a better foot function. A total of 61 feet in 58 patients were included. The median foot function index before treatment was 69.4 and after treatment 31.8, which is a significant decrease. In 80.3% of the patients the foot function index decreased. Therefore platelet-rich-plasma injection seems to be effective in treatment of patients with plantar fasciitis when conservative treatment failed. PMID:26280973

  19. Foot kinematics in patients with two patterns of pathological plantar hyperkeratosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Root paradigm of foot function continues to underpin the majority of clinical foot biomechanics practice and foot orthotic therapy. There are great number of assumptions in this popular paradigm, most of which have not been thoroughly tested. One component supposes that patterns of plantar pressure and associated hyperkeratosis lesions should be associated with distinct rearfoot, mid foot, first metatarsal and hallux kinematic patterns. Our aim was to investigate the extent to which this was true. Methods Twenty-seven subjects with planter pathological hyperkeratosis were recruited into one of two groups. Group 1 displayed pathological plantar hyperkeratosis only under metatarsal heads 2, 3 and 4 (n = 14). Group 2 displayed pathological plantar hyperkeratosis only under the 1st and 5th metatarsal heads (n = 13). Foot kinematics were measured using reflective markers on the leg, heel, midfoot, first metatarsal and hallux. Results The kinematic data failed to identify distinct differences between these two groups of subjects, however there were several subtle (generally <3°) differences in kinematic data between these groups. Group 1 displayed a less everted heel, a less abducted heel and a more plantarflexed heel compared to group 2, which is contrary to the Root paradigm. Conclusions There was some evidence of small differences between planter pathological hyperkeratosis groups. Nevertheless, there was too much similarity between the kinematic data displayed in each group to classify them as distinct foot types as the current clinical paradigm proposes. PMID:21306644

  20. The role of extracorporeal shock wave on plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Roehrig, Gregory J; Baumhauer, Judith; DiGiovanni, Benedict F; Flemister, Adolph S

    2005-12-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy for chronic plantar fasciitis has been under investigation since its advent in the early 1990s. Its use has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration; however, much controversy exists surrounding its mechanism of action, treatment protocols, and clinical efficacy. This article reviews some of the existing theories, opinions, and data in an attempt to summarize the current role that shock wave therapy plays in the treatment of plantar fasciitis. PMID:16297828

  1. Plantar Hyperhidrosis: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Vlahovic, Tracey C

    2016-07-01

    Plantar hyperhidrosis, excessive sweating on the soles of feet, can have a significant impact on patients' quality of life and emotional well-being. Hyperhidrosis is divided into primary and secondary categories, depending on the cause of the sweating, with plantar hyperhidrosis typically being primary and idiopathic. There is an overall increased risk of cutaneous infection in the presence of hyperhidrosis, including fungal, bacterial, and viral infections. This article discusses a range of treatment options including topical aluminum chloride, iontophoresis, injectable botulinum toxin A, glycopyrrolate, oxybutynin, laser, and endoscopic lumbar sympathectomy. Lifestyle changes regarding hygiene, shoe gear, insoles, and socks are also discussed. PMID:27215162

  2. Talalgia: plantar fasciitis☆

    PubMed Central

    Cardenuto Ferreira, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is a very common painful syndrome, but its exact etiology still remains obscure. The diagnosis is essentially clinical, based on history-taking and physical examination. Complementary laboratory tests and imaging examinations may be useful for differential diagnoses. The treatment is essentially conservative, with a high success rate (around 90%). The essence of the conservative treatment is the home-based program of exercises to stretch the plantar fascia. Indications for surgical treatment are only made when the symptoms persist without significant improvement, after at least six months of conservative treatment supervised directly by the doctor. PMID:26229803

  3. Comparison of plantar loads during running on different overground surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Hong, Youlian; Li, Jing-Xian; Zhou, Ji-He

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this study is to compare plantar loads during running on different overground surfaces. Fifteen heel-to-toe runners participated in the study. Plantar load data were collected and analyzed using an insole sensor system during running on concrete, synthetic rubber, and grass surfaces at a running speed of 3.8 m/s. Compared with running on concrete surface, running on natural grass showed a lower magnitude of maximum plantar pressure at the total foot (451.8 kPa vs. 401.7 kPa, p = 0.016), lateral midfoot (175.3 kPa vs. 148.0 kPa, p = 0.004), central forefoot (366.3 kPa vs. 336.8 kPa, p = 0.003), and lateral forefoot (290.2 kPa vs. 257.9 kPa, p = 0.004). Moreover, running on natural grass showed a longer relative contact time compared with running on a concrete surface at the central forefoot (81.9% vs. 78.8%, p = 0.017) and lateral forefoot (75.2% vs. 73.1%, p = 0.007). No significant difference was observed in other multiple comparisons. Different surfaces affected the plantar loads while running. The differences may help us to understand potential injury mechanisms. PMID:22458825

  4. Objective assessment of corticosteroid effect in plantar fasciitis: additional utility of ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Asmaa Mahmoud Ali; Hassanein, Eshrak; Foti, Calogero

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background although plantar fascia thickening is well documented as a sonographic criterion for the diagnosis of plantar fasciitis (PF), however it was less evaluated as an objective measure of response to treatment. It is unknown to what extent if any different responses to different treatments are related to the ultrasound (US) morphology changes. We aimed to evaluate changes in US findings in correlation to pain reported. Methods this prospective observational trial included 21 plantar fasciitis patients (26 feet), resistant to conservative treatment for at least 2 months. Plantar fascia thickness and echogenicity were evaluated, compared to asymptomatic feet and correlated with visual analogue scale (VAS) and Heel Tenderness Index (HTI), before and after dexam-ethasone (DXM) iontophoresis in group I, and DXM injection in group II. Results increased thickness and reduced echogenicity were constant in symptomatic feet, with high statistical significant difference compared to asymptomatic side. Correlation between plantar fascia thickness with VAS and HTI before and after treatment showed statistically significant positive correlation (p<0.05). ROC curve test showed that reduction of plantar fascia thickness by US in response to DXM had 100% sensitivity, 65.2% specificity and 69% accuracy, with higher specificity and accuracy than VAS. Conclusion US changes showed concurrent validity correlated with self-reported clinical improvement. Accordingly, ultrasound can be considered an objective useful tool for monitoring response to corticosteroid in patients with plantar fasciitis. PMID:26958538

  5. Heel Pain in the Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Kenneth John; Anderson, Robert B.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Heel pain, a relatively common problem in the athlete, can present a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. The purpose of this article is to review treatment techniques for common causes of heel pain in the athlete. Evidence Acquisition: Articles in the English literature through August 2008 were selected and reviewed in the context of the management of heel pain in the athlete. Clinical and surgical photographs are presented as an illustration of preferred techniques and pertinent pathologic findings. Results: Although nonoperative treatment remains the mainstay for most painful heel pathologies, a number of surgical interventions have shown encouraging results in carefully selected patients. Conclusions: The management of heel pain in the athlete requires diagnostic skill, appropriate imaging evaluation, and a careful, initially conservative approach to treatment. Surgical treatment can be successful in carefully selected patients. PMID:23015903

  6. Percutaneous Ultrasonic Fasciotomy for Refractory Plantar Fasciopathy After Failure of a Partial Endoscopic Release Procedure.

    PubMed

    Pourcho, Adam M; Hall, Mederic M

    2015-11-01

    Plantar fasciopathy is a painful, degenerative condition of the plantar fascia that affects 2 million people annually and has an estimated 10% lifetime prevalence. When both nonoperative and operative management fails, patients have limited therapeutic options. We present a case of an active 47-year-old male runner who was successfully treated with songraphically guided percutaneous ultrasonic fasciotomy after undergoing a prolonged course of nonoperative management and an endoscopic plantar fascia release procedure. Percutaneous ultrasonic fasciotomy may be considered in patients with chronic, refractory plantar fasciopathy, including those for whom a prior operative release procedure has failed. PMID:25857590

  7. Predictors of Barefoot Plantar Pressure during Walking in Patients with Diabetes, Peripheral Neuropathy and a History of Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Barn, Ruth; Waaijman, Roelof; Nollet, Frans; Woodburn, James; Bus, Sicco A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Elevated dynamic plantar foot pressures significantly increase the risk of foot ulceration in diabetes mellitus. The aim was to determine which factors predict plantar pressures in a population of diabetic patients who are at high-risk of foot ulceration. Methods Patients with diabetes, peripheral neuropathy and a history of ulceration were eligible for inclusion in this cross sectional study. Demographic data, foot structure and function, and disease-related factors were recorded and used as potential predictor variables in the analyses. Barefoot peak pressures during walking were calculated for the heel, midfoot, forefoot, lesser toes, and hallux regions. Potential predictors were investigated using multivariate linear regression analyses. 167 participants with mean age of 63 years contributed 329 feet to the analyses. Results The regression models were able to predict between 6% (heel) and 41% (midfoot) of the variation in peak plantar pressures. The largest contributing factor in the heel model was glycosylated haemoglobin concentration, in the midfoot Charcot deformity, in the forefoot prominent metatarsal heads, in the lesser toes hammer toe deformity and in the hallux previous ulceration. Variables with local effects (e.g. foot deformity) were stronger predictors of plantar pressure than global features (e.g. body mass, age, gender, or diabetes duration). Conclusion The presence of local deformity was the largest contributing factor to barefoot dynamic plantar pressure in high-risk diabetic patients and should therefore be adequately managed to reduce plantar pressure and ulcer risk. However, a significant amount of variance is unexplained by the models, which advocates the quantitative measurement of plantar pressures in the clinical risk assessment of the patient. PMID:25647421

  8. A three-dimensional inverse finite element analysis of the heel pad.

    PubMed

    Chokhandre, Snehal; Halloran, Jason P; van den Bogert, Antonie J; Erdemir, Ahmet

    2012-03-01

    Quantification of plantar tissue behavior of the heel pad is essential in developing computational models for predictive analysis of preventive treatment options such as footwear for patients with diabetes. Simulation based studies in the past have generally adopted heel pad properties from the literature, in return using heel-specific geometry with material properties of a different heel. In exceptional cases, patient-specific material characterization was performed with simplified two-dimensional models, without further evaluation of a heel-specific response under different loading conditions. The aim of this study was to conduct an inverse finite element analysis of the heel in order to calculate heel-specific material properties in situ. Multidimensional experimental data available from a previous cadaver study by Erdemir et al. ("An Elaborate Data Set Characterizing the Mechanical Response of the Foot," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 131(9), pp. 094502) was used for model development, optimization, and evaluation of material properties. A specimen-specific three-dimensional finite element representation was developed. Heel pad material properties were determined using inverse finite element analysis by fitting the model behavior to the experimental data. Compression dominant loading, applied using a spherical indenter, was used for optimization of the material properties. The optimized material properties were evaluated through simulations representative of a combined loading scenario (compression and anterior-posterior shear) with a spherical indenter and also of a compression dominant loading applied using an elevated platform. Optimized heel pad material coefficients were 0.001084 MPa (μ), 9.780 (α) (with an effective Poisson's ratio (ν) of 0.475), for a first-order nearly incompressible Ogden material model. The model predicted structural response of the heel pad was in good agreement for both the optimization (<1.05% maximum tool force, 0.9% maximum tool

  9. Comparison of custom and prefabricated orthoses in the initial treatment of proximal plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, G; Bacchetti, P; Deland, J; Lewis, A; Anderson, R; Davis, W; Alvarez, R; Brodsky, J; Cooper, P; Frey, C; Herrick, R; Myerson, M; Sammarco, J; Janecki, C; Ross, S; Bowman, M; Smith, R

    1999-04-01

    Fifteen centers for orthopaedic treatment of the foot and ankle participated in a prospective randomized trial to compare several nonoperative treatments for proximal plantar fasciitis (heel pain syndrome). Included were 236 patients (160 women and 76 men) who were 16 years of age or older. Most reported duration of symptoms of 6 months or less. Patients with systemic disease, significant musculoskeletal complaints, sciatica, or local nerve entrapment were excluded. We randomized patients prospectively into five different treatment groups. All groups performed Achilles tendon- and plantar fascia-stretching in a similar manner. One group was treated with stretching only. The other four groups stretched and used one of four different shoe inserts, including a silicone heel pad, a felt pad, a rubber heel cup, or a custom-made polypropylene orthotic device. Patients were reevaluated after 8 weeks of treatment. The percentages improved in each group were: (1) silicone insert, 95%; (2) rubber insert, 88%; (3) felt insert, 81%; (4)stretching only, 72%; and (5) custom orthosis, 68%. Combining all the patients who used a prefabricated insert, we found that their improvement rates were higher than those assigned to stretching only (P = 0.022) and those who stretched and used a custom orthosis (P = 0.0074). We conclude that, when used in conjunction with a stretching program, a prefabricated shoe insert is more likely to produce improvement in symptoms as part of the initial treatment of proximal plantar fasciitis than a custom polypropylene orthotic device. PMID:10229276

  10. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy of gastroc-soleus trigger points in patients with plantar fasciitis: A randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Moghtaderi, Alireza; Khosrawi, Saeid; Dehghan, Farnaz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is an alternative treatment for refractory cases of plantar fasciitis. Studies also demonstrated that ESWT may be an appropriate treatment for myofascial trigger points. This study was designed to evaluate its effectiveness by comparing the ESWT of Gastrocnemius/Soleus (gastroc-soleus) trigger points and heel region with the ESWT of the heel region alone. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out among 40 patients with a clinical diagnosis of plantar fasciitis, divided randomly to case (n = 20) and control (n = 20) groups. The case group received ESWT for the heel region and for the gastroc-soleus trigger points. The control group received ESWT just for the heel region. The protocol was the same in both groups and they were treated for three sessions every week. The pain score (100 mm visual analog score [VAS]) and the modified Roles and Maudsley score was evaluated before the first session and eight weeks after the last session. Results: Eight weeks after the last session, although the mean VAS had decreased significantly in both groups, this decrement was more significant in the case group. (P = 0.04). According to the modified Roles and Maudsley score, there was a significant improvement in both the case (P < 0.001) and control (P = 0.01) groups, eight weeks after treatment, but there were significantly better results in the case group. Conclusion: The combination of ESWT for both plantar fasciitis and gastroc-soleus trigger points in treating patients with plantar fasciitis is more effective than utilizing it solely for plantar fasciitis. PMID:24800188

  11. Redistribution of joint moments is associated with changed plantar pressure in diabetic polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Savelberg, Hans HCM; Schaper, Nicolaas C; Willems, Paul JB; de Lange, Ton LH; Meijer, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Background Patients with diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) are often confronted with ulceration of foot soles. Increased plantar pressure under the forefoot has been identified as a major risk factor for ulceration. This study sets out to test the hypothesis that changes in gait characteristics induced by DPN related muscle weakness are the origin of the elevated plantar pressures. Methods Three groups of subjects participated: people diagnosed with diabetes without polyneuropathy (DC), people diagnosed with diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) and healthy, age-matched controls (HC). In all subjects isometric strength of plantar and dorsal flexors was assessed. Moreover, joint moments at ankle, knee and hip joints were determined while walking barefoot at a velocity of 1.4 m/s. Simultaneously plantar pressure patterns were measured. Results Compared to HC-subjects, DPN-participants walked with a significantly increased internal plantar flexor moment at the first half of the stance phase. Also in DPN-subjects the maximal braking and propelling force applied to the floor was decreased. Moreover, in DPN-subjects the ratio of forefoot-to-rear foot plantar pressures was increased. Body-mass normalized strength of dorsal flexors showed a trend to be reduced in people with diabetes, both DC and DPN, compared to HC-subjects. Plantar flexors tended to be less weak in DC compared to HC and in DPN relative to DC. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that adverse plantar pressure patterns are associated with redistribution of joint moments, and a consequent reduced capacity to control forward velocity at heel strike. PMID:19192272

  12. High Heels Increase Women's Attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Guéguen, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    Research has found that the appearance of women's apparel helps increase their attractiveness as rated by men and that men care more about physical features in potential opposite-sex mates. However, the effect of sartorial appearance has received little interest from scientists. In a series of studies, the length of women's shoe heels was examined. A woman confederate wearing black shoes with 0, 5, or 9 cm heels asked men for help in various circumstances. In Study 1, she asked men to respond to a short survey on gender equality. In Study 2, the confederate asked men and women to participate in a survey on local food habit consumption. In Study 3, men and women in the street were observed while walking in back of the female confederate who dropped a glove apparently unaware of her loss. It was found that men's helping behavior increased as soon as heel length increased. However, heel length had no effect on women's helping behavior. It was also found that men spontaneously approached women more quickly when they wore high-heeled shoes (Study 4). Change in gait, foot-size judgment, and misattribution of sexiness and sexual intent were used as possible explanations. PMID:25408499

  13. Acute Medial Plantar Fascia Tear.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Stephanie C; Mazzola, Timothy J

    2016-06-01

    A 32-year-old man who participated in competitive soccer came to physical therapy via direct access for a chief complaint of plantar foot pain. The clinical examination findings and mechanism of injury raised a concern for a plantar fascia tear, so the patient was referred to the physician and magnetic resonance imaging was obtained. The magnetic resonance image confirmed a high-grade, partial-thickness, proximal plantar fascia tear with localized edema at the location of the medial band. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(6):495. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0409. PMID:27245491

  14. On muscle, tendon and high heels.

    PubMed

    Csapo, R; Maganaris, C N; Seynnes, O R; Narici, M V

    2010-08-01

    Wearing high heels (HH) places the calf muscle-tendon unit (MTU) in a shortened position. As muscles and tendons are highly malleable tissues, chronic use of HH might induce structural and functional changes in the calf MTU. To test this hypothesis, 11 women regularly wearing HH and a control group of 9 women were recruited. Gastrocnemius medialis (GM) fascicle length, pennation angle and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), the Achilles' tendon (AT) length, cross-sectional area (CSA) and mechanical properties, and the plantarflexion torque-angle and torque-velocity relationships were assessed in both groups. Shorter GM fascicle lengths were observed in the HH group (49.6+/-5.7 mm vs 56.0+/-7.7 mm), resulting in greater tendon-to-fascicle length ratios. Also, because of greater AT CSA, AT stiffness was higher in the HH group (136.2+/-26.5 N mm(-1) vs 111.3+/-20.2 N mm(-1)). However, no differences in the GM PCSA to AT CSA ratio, torque-angle and torque-velocity relationships were found. We conclude that long-term use of high-heeled shoes induces shortening of the GM muscle fascicles and increases AT stiffness, reducing the ankle's active range of motion. Functionally, these two phenomena seem to counteract each other since no significant differences in static or dynamic torques were observed. PMID:20639419

  15. Effects of hallux limitus on plantar foot pressure and foot kinematics during walking.

    PubMed

    Van Gheluwe, Bart; Dananberg, Howard J; Hagman, Friso; Vanstaen, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    The effects of hallux limitus on plantar foot pressure and foot kinematics have received limited attention in the literature. Therefore, a study was conducted to assess the effects of limited first metatarsophalangeal joint mobility on plantar foot pressure. It was equally important to identify detection criteria based on plantar pressures and metatarsophalangeal joint kinematics, enabling differentiation between subjects affected by hallux limitus and people with normal hallux function. To further our understanding of the relation between midtarsal collapse and hallux limitus, kinematic variables relating to midtarsal pronation were also included in the study. Two populations of 19 subjects each, one with hallux limitus and the other free of functional abnormalities, were asked to walk at their preferred speed while plantar foot pressures were recorded along with three-dimensional foot kinematics. The presence of hallux limitus, structural or functional, caused peak plantar pressure under the hallux to build up significantly more and at a faster rate than under the first metatarsal head. Additional discriminators for hallux limitus were peak dorsiflexion of the first metatarsophalangeal joint, time to this peak value, peak pressure ratios of the first metatarsal head and the more lateral metatarsal heads, and time to maximal pressure under the fourth and fifth metatarsal heads. Finally, in approximately 20% of the subjects, with and without hallux limitus, midtarsal pronation occurred after heel lift, validating the claim that retrograde midtarsal pronation does occur. PMID:16988174

  16. Can the Foot Posture Index or their individual criteria predict dynamic plantar pressures?

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, Raquel; Martínez-Nova, Alfonso; Escamilla-Martínez, Elena; Pedrera-Zamorano, Juan Diego

    2012-07-01

    The Foot Posture Index (FPI) quantifies foot posture through the evaluation of six individual criteria. The objective of the present study was then to establish the plantar pressure differences between types of feet, and to study the capacity of the whole FPI value and the six individual criteria to predict the pattern of plantar pressures. In a sample of 400 healthy subjects (201 men and 199 women), the FPI was evaluated and plantar pressures were measured in 10 zones using the Footscan(®) platform. Five plantar pressures measurements were made for each foot, using for the study the mean of these measurements for each subject's left foot. The hallux and the lesser toes had lower pressure indices in highly supinated feet, with the values increasing progressively toward the highly pronated feet (p<0.001 and p=0.019 respectively). The fifth metatarsal head (MTH) values were greater in highly supinated feet, and decreased in the highly pronated feet (p<0.001). The FPI value predicts low variability of plantar pressures, mainly in the heel and midfoot, while the individual criteria predict higher variability in the forefoot. The talonavicular prominence and the calcaneal frontal plane position was the most influential criterion, explaining 8.5% of the hallux pressure and 11.1% of the fifth MTH pressure. Neither talar head palpation nor the supra and infra malleolar curvature predicted any of the plantar pressures variables. The FPI can distinguish three groups of feet--pronated, neutral, and supinated. Its individual criteria predict moderate or low plantar pressures variability, with the talonavicular prominence being the most influential criterion. PMID:22727718

  17. Success and Recurrence Rate after Radial Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy for Plantar Fasciopathy: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Malliaropoulos, Nikos; Meke, Maria; Korakakis, Vasileios; Nauck, Tanja; Lohrer, Heinz; Padhiar, Nat

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. The exploration of an individualised protocol of radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (rESWT) for plantar fasciopathy, assessing success rates and the recurrence rate over a 1-year period after treatment, is not yet identified in literature. Methods and Results. Between 2006 and 2013, 68 patients (78 heels) were assessed for plantar fasciopathy. An individualised rESWT treatment protocol was applied and retrospectively analysed. Heels were analysed for mean number of shock wave impulses, mean pressure, and mean frequency applied. Significant mean pain reductions were assessed through Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) after 1-month, 3-month, and 1-year follow-up. Success rates were estimated as the percentage of patients having more than 60% VAS pain decrease at each follow-up. 1-year recurrence rate was estimated. The mean VAS score before treatment at 6.9 reduced to 3.6, 1 month after the last session, and to 2.2 and 0.9, after 3 months and 1 year, respectively. Success rates were estimated at 19% (1 month), 70% (3 months), and 98% (1 year). The 1-year recurrence rate was 8%. Moderate positive Spearman's rho correlation (r = 0.462, p < 0.001) was found between pretreatment pain duration and the total number of rESWT sessions applied. Conclusions. Individualised rESWT protocol constitutes a suitable treatment for patients undergoing rESWT for plantar fasciitis. PMID:27478843

  18. Success and Recurrence Rate after Radial Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy for Plantar Fasciopathy: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Malliaropoulos, Nikos; Crate, Georgina; Meke, Maria; Korakakis, Vasileios; Nauck, Tanja; Lohrer, Heinz; Padhiar, Nat

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. The exploration of an individualised protocol of radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (rESWT) for plantar fasciopathy, assessing success rates and the recurrence rate over a 1-year period after treatment, is not yet identified in literature. Methods and Results. Between 2006 and 2013, 68 patients (78 heels) were assessed for plantar fasciopathy. An individualised rESWT treatment protocol was applied and retrospectively analysed. Heels were analysed for mean number of shock wave impulses, mean pressure, and mean frequency applied. Significant mean pain reductions were assessed through Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) after 1-month, 3-month, and 1-year follow-up. Success rates were estimated as the percentage of patients having more than 60% VAS pain decrease at each follow-up. 1-year recurrence rate was estimated. The mean VAS score before treatment at 6.9 reduced to 3.6, 1 month after the last session, and to 2.2 and 0.9, after 3 months and 1 year, respectively. Success rates were estimated at 19% (1 month), 70% (3 months), and 98% (1 year). The 1-year recurrence rate was 8%. Moderate positive Spearman's rho correlation (r = 0.462, p < 0.001) was found between pretreatment pain duration and the total number of rESWT sessions applied. Conclusions. Individualised rESWT protocol constitutes a suitable treatment for patients undergoing rESWT for plantar fasciitis. PMID:27478843

  19. Changes in plantar load distribution and gait pattern following foot drop correction in leprosy affected patients.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Mrinmoy; Joshua, Jerry; Mahato, Nidhu

    2015-09-01

    This study was done to compare the changes in plantar load (weight distribution) and gait patterns before and after tibialis posterior transfer surgery in people affected by leprosy. Changes in gait patterns were observed and proportionate changes in plantar load were quantified using data captured by a baropodometer. All the eight patients who underwent tibialis posterior transfer surgery in 2013 in our hospital were included in the study. In addition to the regular pre-operative and post-operative assessments, the patients also underwent baropodometric evaluation. There was a significant change in plantar load at the heel, lateral border and forefoot. Using the foot pressure scan, it was noted that the progression of the centre of mass (displayed graphically as 'the gait line') was also affected by the altered pattern of weight distribution. This study reiterates the importance of tibialis posterior transfer because: it restores the normal gait pattern of 1, 2, 3 (where 1 is heel strike, 2 is mid foot contact and 3 is forefoot contact) and provides a more uniform distribution of planter load. PMID:26665356

  20. Computer Modeling Studies to Assess Whether a Prophylactic Dressing Reduces the Risk for Deep Tissue Injury in the Heels of Supine Patients with Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Levy, Ayelet; Gefen, Amit

    2016-04-01

    Heels are susceptible to pressure ulcer (PU) development. Some evidence suggests dressings may provide mechanical cushioning, reduce friction with support, and lower localized internal tissue loading, which together may minimize the risk for heel ulcers (HUs). To examine the effect of dressing application on pressure ulcer prevention, 20 computer simulations were performed. Volumetric exposure of soft tissues to effective and shear strains and stresses, with and without a multilayered foam dressing, were assessed, with the extent of tissue exposure considered as measures of the theoretical risk for PUs. The simulations, conducted using the finite element method, provided the mechanical strain and stress magnitudes and distributions in the weight-bearing tissues of the heel, which were visualized and analyzed post-hoc for comparing diabetic to healthy tissue loads with/without prophylactic dressings and at different foot (plantar flexion) postures. The volumetric exposure of the soft tissues of the heel to elevated strains and stresses was considerably reduced by the presence of the dressing, whether diabetic or nondiabetic tissue conditions existed, and for the entire range of the simulated plantar flexion positions. Further, greater plantar flexion, which occurs with elevation of the head of the bed, reduced the volumetric exposure of subcutaneous fat to increased effective strains and stresses, again, particularly when the dressing was on. Specifically, peak (maximum of raw data) effective strains in the soft tissues of the heel decreased by 14.8% and 13.5% with the use of the dressing for healthy persons and persons with diabetes, respectively. Additionally, volumetric exposures of the soft tissues to large effective strains, defined as exposures to >50% strain, decreased substantially, by at least a factor of 2, with the angle of plantar flexion and with respect to a neutral foot posture. Volumetric exposures to midrange (less than 50%) strains were more mildly

  1. Miniscalpel-Needle versus Steroid Injection for Plantar Fasciitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial with a 12-Month Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuming; Shen, Tong; Liang, Yongshan; Zhang, Ying; Bai, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain in adults. A novel alternative medical instrument, the miniscalpel-needle (MSN), which is based on an acupuncture needle, has been recently developed in China. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the MSN release treatment versus that of traditional steroid injection for plantar fasciitis. Patients with plantar fasciitis were randomly assigned to 2 groups and followed up for 12 months, with 29 receiving MSN treatment and 25 receiving steroid injection treatment. The results showed that visual analog scale scores for morning pain, active pain, and overall heel pain all were decreased significantly in the MSN group from 1 to 12 months after treatment. In contrast, treatment with steroid injection showed a significant effect only at the 1-month follow-up but not at 6 or 12 months after treatment. Moreover, the MSN group achieved more rapid and sustained improvements than the steroid group throughout the duration of this study. No severe side effects were observed with MSN treatment. Our data suggest that the MSN release treatment is safe and has a significant benefit for plantar fasciitis compared to steroid injection. PMID:25114704

  2. A comparative study of efficacy of oral nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents and locally injectable steroid for the treatment of plantar fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Chaitali; Pal, Anirban; Acharya, Amita

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the effectiveness of oral nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and locally injectable steroid (methylprednisolone) in the treatment of plantar fasciitis. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty subjects with unilateral plantar fasciitis were recruited and randomly allocated to two study groups. Group I (NSAIDs group) (n=60) received oral tablet diclofenac (50 mg) and paracetamol (500 mg) twice a day (BD) along with tab. ranitidine 150 mg BD. Group II (injectable steroid group) (n=60) received injection of 1 ml of methylprednisolone (Depomedrol) (40 mg) and 2 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine into the inflammed plantar fascia. Pain intensity was measured using 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS). Subjects were evaluated clinically before, and 1 week, 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks (2 months) after the initiation of treatment in both the groups. The outcome was assessed in terms of VAS score and recurrence of the heel pain. Statistical Analysis Used: “Z” test and Chi-square test were used wherever applicable. Results: Pain relief was significant after steroid injection (P<0.001) and the improvement was sustained. The recurrence of heel pain was significantly higher in the oral NSAIDS group (P<0.001). Conclusion: Local injection of steroid is more effective in the treatment of plantar fasciitis than oral NSAIDs. PMID:25885380

  3. Plantar soft tissue thickness during ground contact in walking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavanagh, P. R.

    1999-01-01

    A technique is introduced for the measurement of plantar soft tissue thickness during barefoot walking. Subjects stepped into an adjustable Plexiglas frame which ensured that the required bony landmarks were appropriately positioned relative to a linear ultrasound probe connected to a conventional 7.5 MHz ultrasound scanner. Clear images of the metatarsal condyles or other foot bones were obtained throughout ground contact. Subsequent analysis of the video taped images using a motion analysis system allowed the tissue displacement to be calculated as a function of time. The tissue underneath the second metatarsal head was shown to undergo an average maximum compression of 45.7% during the late stages of ground contact during first step gait in a group of five normal subjects with a mean unloaded tissue thickness of 15.2 mm. The technique has a number of applications, including use in the validation of deformation predicted by finite element models of the soft tissue of the foot, and the study of alterations in the cushioning properties of the heel by devices which constrain the displacement of the heel pad.

  4. Plantar pressures in the tennis serve.

    PubMed

    Girard, Olivier; Eicher, Frank; Micallef, Jean-Paul; Millet, Grégoire

    2010-06-01

    In-shoe loading patterns were examined in each foot (back and front) separately during two types of tennis serve [first (or flat) and second (or twist) serve] and two service stance styles [foot-up (back foot is moved forward next to front foot for push-off) and foot-back (feet remain at the same relative level)]. Ten competitive tennis players completed five trials for each type of serve and service stance style in random order. Plantar pressure distribution was recorded using Pedar insoles divided into nine areas for analysis. Mean and peak pressures (+15.2%, P < 0.01 and +12.8%, P < 0.05) as well as maximal forces (+20.2%, P < 0.01) were higher under the lateral forefoot of the front foot in first than in second serves, while mean forces were higher (+17.2%, P < 0.05) under the lesser toes. Relative load was higher on the lateral forefoot (+20.4%, P < 0.05) but lower (-32.5%, P < 0.05) on the medial heel of the front foot with foot-up compared with foot-back stance. Using a foot-up stance, loading of the back foot was higher (+31.8%, P < 0.01) under the lateral mid-foot but lower (-29.9%, P < 0.01) under the medial forefoot. The type of serve and the stance style adopted have a significant effect on foot loading. Such findings might help improve mechanical efficiency of the serve. PMID:20496222

  5. Effects of indoor slippers on plantar pressure and lower limb EMG activity in older women.

    PubMed

    Yick, K L; Tse, L T; Lo, W T; Ng, S P; Yip, J

    2016-09-01

    Open-toe mule slippers are popular footwear worn at home especially by older women. However, their biomechanical effects are still poorly understood. The objective of this study is to therefore evaluate the physical properties of two typical types of open-toe mule slippers and the changes in plantar pressure and lower limb muscle activity of older women when wearing these slippers. Five walking trials have been carried out by ten healthy women. The results indicate that compared to barefoot, wearing slippers results in significant increases in the contact area of the mid-foot regions which lead to plantar pressure redistribution from metatarsal heads 2-3 and the lateral heel to the midfoot regions. However, there is no significant difference in the selected muscle activity across all conditions. The findings enhance our understanding of slipper features associated with changes in biomechanical measures thereby providing the basis of slipper designs for better foot protection and comfort. PMID:27184323

  6. How to classify plantar plate injuries: parameters from history and physical examination☆

    PubMed Central

    Nery, Caio; Coughlin, Michael; Baumfeld, Daniel; Raduan, Fernando; Mann, Tania Szejnfeld; Catena, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Objective To find the best clinical parameters for defining and classifying the degree of plantar plate injuries. Method Sixty-eight patients (100 metatarsophalangeal joints) were classified in accordance with the Arthroscopic Anatomical Classification for plantar plate injuries and were divided into five groups (0 to IV). Their medical files were reviewed and the incidence of each parameter for the respective group was correlated. These parameters were: use of high heels, sports, acute pain, local edema, Mulder's sign, widening of the interdigital space, pain in the head of the corresponding metatarsal, touching the ground, “drawer test”, toe grip and toe deformities (in the sagittal, coronal and transversal planes). Results There were no statistically significant associations between the degree of injury and use of high-heel shoes, sports trauma, pain at the head of the metatarsal, Mulder's sign, deformity in pronation or displacement in the transversal and sagittal planes (although their combination, i.e. “cross toe”, showed a statistically significant correlation). Positive correlations with the severity of the injuries were found in relation to initial acute pain, progressive widening of the interdigital space, loss of “touching the ground”, positive results from the “drawer test” on the metatarsophalangeal joint, diminished grip strength and toe deformity in supination. Conclusions The “drawer test” was seen to be the more reliable and precise tool for classifying the degree of plantar plate injury, followed by “touching the ground” and rotational deformities. It is possible to improve the precision of the diagnosis and the predictions of the anatomical classification for plantar plate injuries through combining the clinical history and data from the physical examination. PMID:27218086

  7. The potential influence of the heel counter on internal stress during static standing: a combined finite element and positional MRI investigation.

    PubMed

    Spears, I R; Miller-Young, J E; Sharma, J; Ker, R F; Smith, F W

    2007-01-01

    Confinement of the heel due to the counter of the shoe is believed to influence heel pad biomechanics. Using a two-dimensional finite element model of the heel pad and shoe during a simulation of static standing, the aim of this study was to quantify the potential effect of confinement on internal heel pad stress. Non-weightbearing MRI and weightbearing MRI with plantar pressure and ground reaction force data were recorded for a single subject. The non-weightbearing MRI was used to create two FE models of the heel pad, using either homogeneous or composite material properties. The composite model included a distinction in material properties between fat pad and skin. Vertical and medial-lateral forces, as measured on the subject's heel, were applied to the models and vertical compressive strains for both models were comparable with those observed by weightbearing MRI. However, only for the composite model was the predicted plantar pressure distribution comparable with measured data. The composite model was therefore used in further analyses. In this composite model, the internal stresses were located mainly in the skin and were predominantly tensile in nature, whereas the stress state in the fat pad approached hydrostatic conditions. A representation of a running shoe, including an insole, midsole and heel counter was then added to the composite heel pad to form the shod model. In order to investigate the counter effect, the load was applied to the shod model with and without the heel counter. The effect of the counter on peak stress was to elevate compression (0-50%), reduce tension (22-34%) and reduce shear (22-28%) in the skin. In addition, the counter reduced both compressive (20-40%) and shear (58-80%) stress in the fat pad and tension in the fat pad remained negligible. Taken together the results indicate that a well-fitted counter works in sympathy with the internal structure of the heel pad and could be an effective reducer of heel pad stress. However

  8. Plantar Fasciitis: Prescribing Effective Treatments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Michael; Fields, Karl B.

    2002-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is an extremely common, painful injury seen among people in running and jumping sports. While prognosis for recovery with conservative care is excellent, prolonged duration of symptoms affects sports participation. Studies on treatment options show mixed results, so finding effective treatments can be challenging. A logical…

  9. Kinematics and Kinetics of Single-Limb Heel Rise in Diabetes Related Medial Column Foot Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, Mary K.; Woodburn, James; Mueller, Michael J.; Strube, Michael J; Johnson, Jeffrey E.; Sinacore, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes-related medial column foot deformities contribute to high plantar pressure, joint instability, ulceration and amputation. Impaired foot function may be an early indicator of foot structural incompetence and contribute to deformity progression. This study examines the ability of single-limb heel rise multi-segmental kinematics and kinetics to identify midfoot and hindfoot dysfunction in those with diabetes-related medial column foot deformity. Methods Single-limb heel rise foot kinematics and kinetics were examined in adults with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy with and without medial column foot deformity and age-, weight-matched controls. Findings Hindfoot relative to shank plantarflexion, peak and excursion, were reduced in bothdiabetes groups compared to controls (P<0.017). Controls' initial forefoot relative to hindfoot position was plantarflexed 31 degrees and plantarflexed an additional 13 degrees during heel rise. The initial forefoot relative to hindfoot position for the diabetes group without deformity was similarly plantarflexed as controls (34 degrees) while the diabetes deformity group was less plantarflexed (lower arch position: 23 degrees, P<0.017). During the heel rise task both diabetes groups demonstrated less ability to plantarflex the forefoot relative to the hindfoot compared to controls (2 and 5 degrees respectively, P<0.017). Ankle plantarflexion power was reduced in the diabetes deformity group compared to controls (P<0.017). Interpretation The single-limb heel rise task identified movement dysfunction in those with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy. Failure to plantarflex the forefoot relative to hindfoot may compromise midfoot joint stability and increase the risk of injury and arch collapse. PMID:25218437

  10. On high heels and short muscles: A multiscale model for sarcomere loss in the gastrocnemius muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zöllner, Alexander M.; Pok, Jacquelynn M.; McWalter, Emily J.; Gold, Garry E.; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    High heels are a major source of chronic lower limb pain. Yet, more than one third of all women compromise health for looks and wear high heels on a daily basis. Changing from flat footwear to high heels induces chronic muscle shortening associated with discomfort, fatigue, reduced shock absorption, and increased injury risk. However, the long-term effects of high-heeled footwear on the musculoskeletal kinematics of the lower extremities remain poorly understood. Here we create a multiscale computational model for chronic muscle adaptation to characterize the acute and chronic effects of global muscle shortening on local sarcomere lengths. We perform a case study of a healthy female subject and show that raising the heel by 13 cm shortens the gastrocnemius muscle by 5% while the Achilles tendon remains virtually unaffected. Our computational simulation indicates that muscle shortening displays significant regional variations with extreme values of 22% in the central gastrocnemius. Our model suggests that the muscle gradually adjusts to its new functional length by a chronic loss of sarcomeres in series. Sarcomere loss varies significantly across the muscle with an average loss of 9%, virtually no loss at the proximal and distal ends, and a maximum loss of 39% in the central region. These changes reposition the remaining sarcomeres back into their optimal operating regime. Computational modeling of chronic muscle shortening provides a valuable tool to shape our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of muscle adaptation. Our study could open new avenues in orthopedic surgery and enhance treatment for patients with muscle contracture caused by other conditions than high heel wear such as paralysis, muscular atrophy, and muscular dystrophy. PMID:25451524

  11. On high heels and short muscles: a multiscale model for sarcomere loss in the gastrocnemius muscle.

    PubMed

    Zöllner, Alexander M; Pok, Jacquelynn M; McWalter, Emily J; Gold, Garry E; Kuhl, Ellen

    2015-01-21

    High heels are a major source of chronic lower limb pain. Yet, more than one third of all women compromise health for looks and wear high heels on a daily basis. Changing from flat footwear to high heels induces chronic muscle shortening associated with discomfort, fatigue, reduced shock absorption, and increased injury risk. However, the long-term effects of high-heeled footwear on the musculoskeletal kinematics of the lower extremities remain poorly understood. Here we create a multiscale computational model for chronic muscle adaptation to characterize the acute and chronic effects of global muscle shortening on local sarcomere lengths. We perform a case study of a healthy female subject and show that raising the heel by 13cm shortens the gastrocnemius muscle by 5% while the Achilles tendon remains virtually unaffected. Our computational simulation indicates that muscle shortening displays significant regional variations with extreme values of 22% in the central gastrocnemius. Our model suggests that the muscle gradually adjusts to its new functional length by a chronic loss of sarcomeres in series. Sarcomere loss varies significantly across the muscle with an average loss of 9%, virtually no loss at the proximal and distal ends, and a maximum loss of 39% in the central region. These changes reposition the remaining sarcomeres back into their optimal operating regime. Computational modeling of chronic muscle shortening provides a valuable tool to shape our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of muscle adaptation. Our study could open new avenues in orthopedic surgery and enhance treatment for patients with muscle contracture caused by other conditions than high heel wear such as paralysis, muscular atrophy, and muscular dystrophy. PMID:25451524

  12. Effects of the height of shoe heels on muscle activation of cervical and lumbar spine in healthy women

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kisu; Kim, Young; Chung, Yijung; Hwang, Sujin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of different height of high heels on muscle activation of the paraspinalis cervicis and erector spinae in healthy young women. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy women were recruited in this study. To examine the effects of different heights of heels on muscle activation, the paraspinalis cervicis (cervical spine) and erector spinae (lumbar spine) were measured at the time of heel strike and toe off during gait on three different conditions (barefoot, 4 cm high heels, and 10 cm high heels). There are no previous trials or reports that have evaluated this approach in patients with chronic neck pain. [Results] A significant increase in muscle activation of the paraspinalis cervicis and erector spinae at heel strike and toe off (except that of the paraspinalis cervicis at toe off in healthy subjects) was observed in the under 10 cm high heel condition as, compared to that with barefoot condition, in all the subjects. [Conclusion] The height of the high heels affects to the activation demand of the paraspinalis cervicis and erector spinae in patients with neck pain. PMID:27134392

  13. Effects of the height of shoe heels on muscle activation of cervical and lumbar spine in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Park, Kisu; Kim, Young; Chung, Yijung; Hwang, Sujin

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of different height of high heels on muscle activation of the paraspinalis cervicis and erector spinae in healthy young women. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy women were recruited in this study. To examine the effects of different heights of heels on muscle activation, the paraspinalis cervicis (cervical spine) and erector spinae (lumbar spine) were measured at the time of heel strike and toe off during gait on three different conditions (barefoot, 4 cm high heels, and 10 cm high heels). There are no previous trials or reports that have evaluated this approach in patients with chronic neck pain. [Results] A significant increase in muscle activation of the paraspinalis cervicis and erector spinae at heel strike and toe off (except that of the paraspinalis cervicis at toe off in healthy subjects) was observed in the under 10 cm high heel condition as, compared to that with barefoot condition, in all the subjects. [Conclusion] The height of the high heels affects to the activation demand of the paraspinalis cervicis and erector spinae in patients with neck pain. PMID:27134392

  14. Finite element modelling of plantar pressure beneath the second ray with flexor muscle loading.

    PubMed

    Lemmon, DR; Cavanagh, PR

    1997-04-01

    INTRODUCTION:: Little is understood about the effects of flexor loading on plantar pressure distribution. The goal of the current work is to model flexor muscle loading applied to the distal phalanges in order to study the effect of these loads on plantar normal stress (pressure) beneath the metatarsal head. METHODS:: The finite element model is a two-dimensional, plane strain sagittal section incorporating the second metatarsal, proximal phalanx, and plantar and dorsal soft tissue (Figure 1). The metatarsophalangeal joint is simulated by a nodal hinge that transfers loads and produces reasonable kinematic motion between the articular surfaces of the proximal[Figure: see text] phalanx and metatarsal head. Soft tissues are simulated by a uniform continuum. A single flexor tendon passes over the condyle of the metatarsal heads with sliding contact against intervening soft tissue, and is attached to the distal end of the proximal phalanx. A rigid element at the proximal end is fixed by boundary conditions to simulate reactions at the distal cuneiform joint. Material properties of bone are from published values, one tenth the stiffness of bone is used for the flexor tendon, and the soft tissue continuum is hyperelastic using coefficients obtained from compression of the heel plantar fat pad. A 188 N vertical ground reaction force and a flexor tendon load at a 10 degree angle from the X (horizontal) axis are applied to the model. RESULTS:: Figure 2 shows Y direction normal stress distribution along the plantar surface for two load cases: no load and a 250 N load to the flexor tendon. DISCUSSION:: Bending moments at the proximal metatarsal correspond to values obtained by Sharkey et al. Tension in the flexor tendon served to counter the moment in the metatarsal created by the vertical load, and at the same time, to apply an additional axial load. Under flexor loading, focal plantar pressure shifts toward the proximal phalanx and yields a 60% reduction in peak pressure

  15. Investigating the Effects of Knee Flexion during the Eccentric Heel-Drop Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Weinert-Aplin, Robert A.; Bull, Anthony M.J.; McGregor, Alison H.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to characterise the biomechanics of the widely practiced eccentric heel-drop exercises used in the management of Achilles tendinosis. Specifically, the aim was to quantify changes in lower limb kinematics, muscle lengths and Achilles tendon force, when performing the exercise with a flexed knee instead of an extended knee. A musculoskeletal modelling approach was used to quantify any differences between these versions of the eccentric heel drop exercises used to treat Achilles tendinosis. 19 healthy volunteers provided a group from which optical motion, forceplate and plantar pressure data were recorded while performing both the extended and flexed knee eccentric heel-drop exercises over a wooden step when barefoot or wearing running shoes. This data was used as inputs into a scaled musculoskeletal model of the lower limb. Range of ankle motion was unaffected by knee flexion. However, knee flexion was found to significantly affect lower limb kinematics, inter-segmental loads and triceps muscle lengths. Peak Achilles load was not influenced despite significantly reduced peak ankle plantarflexion moments (p < 0.001). The combination of reduced triceps lengths and greater ankle dorsiflexion, coupled with reduced ankle plantarflexion moments were used to provide a basis for previously unexplained observations regarding the effect of knee flexion on the relative loading of the triceps muscles during the eccentric heel drop exercises. This finding questions the role of the flexed knee heel drop exercise when specifically treating Achilles tendinosis. Key points A more dorsiflexed ankle and a flexing knee are characteristics of performing the flexed knee heel-drop eccentric exercise. Peak ankle plantarflexion moments were reduced with knee flexion, but did not reduce peak Achilles tendon force. Kinematic changes at the knee and ankle affected the triceps muscle length and resulted in a reduction in the amount of Achilles tendon work performed. A version

  16. Practice recommendations for preventing heel pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Evonne; Scott-Williams, Suzy; McGuire, James B

    2008-10-01

    Heels are the second most common anatomical location for pressure ulcers. A combination of risk factors, including pressure, may cause ulceration. Heel pressure ulcers are a particular concern for surgical patients. A review of the literature, including poster presentations, shows that controlled clinical studies to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of available interventions are not available. Case series (with or without historical controls) as well as pressure ulcer guideline recommendations suggest the most important aspect of heel ulcer prevention is pressure relief (offloading). It also has been documented that the incidence of heel ulcers can be reduced using a total-patient care approach and heel offloading devices. Guidelines, observational studies, and expert opinion intimate that reducing heel ulceration rates can be expected to improve patient outcomes, decrease costs associated with their care, and avoid costs related to hospital-acquired pressure ulcers. The heel pressure ulcer prevention strategies reviewed should be implemented until the results of prospective, randomized controlled studies to compare the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of these strategies are available. PMID:18927483

  17. The Three Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Hyperkeratotic Plantar Mycosis Fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun Young; Kwon, Hyoung Cheol; Cho, Yong-Sun; Nam, Kyung-Hwa; Ihm, Chull-Wan

    2011-01-01

    The localized early-stage of Mycosis fungoides (MF) (stage IA-IIA) is usually treated with topical agents, such as nitrogen mustard, steroids, and phototherapy (UVB/PUVA) as first line therapy; response to these initial treatments is usually good. However, hyperkeratotic plantar lesions are clinically rare and have decreased responsiveness to topical agents. For such cases, physicians may consider local radiotherapy. Here, a case of an 18-year-old Korean woman who was treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for hyperkeratotic plantar lesions that were refractory to UVA-1, methotrexate, and topical steroids is reported. Complete remission was attained after radiotherapy. During the one-year follow-up period, there has been no evidence of disease recurrence and no chronic complications have been observed. PMID:22028574

  18. Investigation of the mechanical behaviour of the plantar soft tissue during gait cycle: Experimental and numerical activities.

    PubMed

    Fontanella, Chiara G; Forestiero, Antonella; Carniel, Emanuele L; Natali, Arturo N

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the mechanical response of the plantar soft tissue from the heel strike to the midstance, developing both experimental and numerical activities. Using force plates and motion tracking system, the dynamic and kinematic data of 10 subjects are evaluated. The average kinematics data obtained from the experimental tests are assumed as boundary and loading conditions for the computational analyses. A three-dimensional virtual solid model of the foot is developed from the analysis of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine images from computed tomography and magnetic resonance. Constitutive formulations that interpret the mechanical response of the biological tissues are defined. Because of the major role of plantar soft tissue in the proposed analysis, a specific visco-hyperelastic constitutive formulation is provided considering the typical features of the tissue mechanics. The three-dimensional numerical model permits to evaluate the capability of the plantar soft tissue to redistribute the deformations, especially during the midstance, and to define quantitative aspects related to the energy absorption. The numerical results highlight the stress distribution from the heel strike to the midstance. The values of stress and strain reached are more intensive during the midstance, when there is a single support of the foot. PMID:26405096

  19. The effect of customised and sham foot orthoses on plantar pressures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of foot orthoses has been evaluated in many clinical trials with sham foot orthoses used as the control intervention in at least 10 clinical trials. However, the mechanical effects and credibility of sham orthoses has been rarely quantified. This study aimed to: (i) compare the effects on plantar pressures of three sham foot orthoses to a customised foot orthosis, and (ii) establish the perceived credibility and the expected benefit of each orthotic condition. Methods Thirty adults aged between 18 and 51 participated in this study. At 0 and 4 weeks, plantar pressure data were collected for the heel, midfoot and forefoot using the pedar®-X in-shoe system for the following five randomly assigned conditions: (i) shoe alone, (ii) customised foot orthosis, (iii) contoured polyethylene sham foot orthosis, (iv) contoured EVA sham foot orthosis, and (v) flat EVA sham foot orthosis. At the initial data collection session, each participant completed a Credibility/Expectancy Questionnaire (CEQ) to determine the credibility and expected benefit of each orthotic condition. Results Compared to the shoe alone at week 0, the contoured polyethylene sham orthosis was the only condition to not significantly effect peak pressure at any region of the foot. In contrast, the contoured EVA sham orthosis, the flat EVA sham orthosis and the customised orthosis significantly reduced peak pressure at the heel. At the medial midfoot, all sham orthoses provided the same effect as the shoe alone, which corresponded to effects that were significantly different to the customised orthosis. There were no differences in peak pressure between conditions at the other mask regions, the lateral midfoot and forefoot. When the conditions were compared at week 4, the differences between the conditions were generally similar to the findings observed at week 0. With respect to credibility and expected benefit, all orthotic conditions were considered the same with the exception

  20. Biomechanical behavior of plantar fat pad in healthy and degenerative foot conditions.

    PubMed

    Fontanella, Chiara Giulia; Nalesso, Federica; Carniel, Emanuele Luigi; Natali, Arturo N

    2016-04-01

    The plantar fat pad of the human foot is a specific tissue made up of adipose chambers enveloped by fibrous septa. Aging, pathology or trauma may affect its histo-morphological configuration and mechanical response. The correlation between histo-morphological configuration and mechanical properties is analyzed by a computational approach, aiming to identify the influence of degenerative phenomena on plantar fat pad mechanics. Finite element meso-models, as numerical model of an intermediate-length scale, are developed for healthy and degenerative conditions, considering the different properties that degenerative phenomena may affect, such as the adipose chambers dimension, the fibrous septa thickness, the fibers orientation and the sub-components mechanical behavior. Histo-morphometric data are analyzed to identify average configurations of the fat chambers and fibrous septa, while specific constitutive formulations are provided to define their mechanical response. Numerical analyses are performed to identify the stress-strain behavior of the plantar fat pad considering healthy and degenerative configurations. The results from meso-models are applied to identify the parameters of a phenomenological constitutive formulation that interprets the overall human fat pad tissue mechanics. The constitutive formulation is implemented within a 3D finite element model of the heel region that is applied to evaluate the influence of degenerative phenomena on the overall mechanical functionality of the foot. PMID:26272439

  1. The effectiveness of corticosteroid injection in the treatment of plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Ang, Teck Wee Andrew

    2015-08-01

    Plantar fasciitis is a common cause of heel pain in adults. Although it is usually a self-limiting condition, the pain may become prolonged and severe enough to cause significant distress and disruption to the patient's daily activities and work. PubMed and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases were searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and a total of ten RCTs were selected for evaluation. These RCTs involved the use of either palpation- or ultrasonography-guided corticosteroid injections in patients diagnosed with plantar fasciitis. All placebo-controlled RCTs showed a significant reduction in pain with the use of corticosteroid injections. Some studies also showed that corticosteroid injections yielded better results than other treatment modalities. However, it is evident from these studies that the effects of corticosteroid injections are usually short-term, lasting 4-12 weeks in duration. Complications such as plantar fascia rupture are uncommon, but physicians need to weigh the treatment benefits against such risks. PMID:26311907

  2. Prediction of plantar soft tissue stiffness based on sex, age, bodyweight, height and body mass index.

    PubMed

    Teoh, Jee Chin; Lee, Taeyong

    2016-02-01

    15% of Diabetes Mellitus (DM) patients suffer high risk of ulceration and 85% of the amputation involving DM population is caused by non-healing ulcers. These findings elucidate the fact that foot ulcer can result in major amputation especially to the DM and elderly population. Therefore, early diagnosis of abnormally stiffened plantar soft tissue is needed to prevent the catastrophic tissue damage. In order to differentiate between normal and pathological tissues, a threshold reference value that defines healthy tissue is required. The objective of this study is to perform a multivariate analysis to estimate the healthy plantar tissue stiffness values based on the individuals physical attributes such as bodyweight (BW), height and body mass index (BMI) as well as their age and sex. 100 healthy subjects were recruited. Indentation was performed on 2nd metatarsal head pad at 3 different dorsiflexion angles of 0°, 20°, 40° and the hallux and heel at 0°. The results showed the important influences of BW, height and BMI in determining the plantar tissue stiffness. On the other hand, age and sex only play minimal roles. The study can be further extended to increase the reliability and accuracy of the proposed predictive model by evaluating several other related parameters such as body fat content, footwear usage, frequency of sports participation, etc. PMID:26474035

  3. Histomorphological Evaluation of Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Plantar Soft Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yak-Nam; Lee, Kara; Ledoux, William R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetic foot ulceration has a complex and multi-factorial etiology and can involve changes in the pathophysiology of the plantar soft tissue. In the current study, histomorphological analyses of diabetic and non-diabetic plantar tissue were performed. It was hypothesized that the diabetic tissue would have thicker skin (epidermis and dermis), less interdigitation between the dermis and epidermis, thicker elastic septa and decreased adipose cell size. Materials and Methods Two locations of the foot (the heel and the first metatarsal) were examined, both of which have been reported to be locations with a high incidence of ulceration. Stereological methods and quantitative morphological techniques were used to evaluate the skin thickness, interdigitation index, elastic septae thickness and adipocyte cell size. Results The diabetic donors had a greater body mass index (BMI) than the non-diabetic donors. The diabetic tissue had significantly thicker elastic septae and dermis. However, no significant difference was observed in the interdigitation index or adipocyte size. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that morphological changes can be evaluated histologically to give a better understanding of the pathological changes in the plantar soft tissue with diabetes. These evaluations can then be associated with biomechanical changes that occur in diabetes to provide new insight into how microstructural changes can alter macroscopic properties. Clinical Relevance An understanding of the histomorphological changes in the soft tissue in relationship to the location on the foot could help to explain the biomechanical changes that occur in diabetes and the subsequent increase in susceptibility to breakdown. PMID:22049867

  4. Plantar pressure of clipless and toe-clipped pedals in cyclists - A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Davis, Andrea; Pemberton, Troy; Ghosh, Subhajit; Maffulli, Nicola; Padhiar, Nat

    2011-01-01

    To determine the effect of clipless and toe-clipped pedals on plantar foot pressure while cycling. Seven bikers and 11 healthy volunteers were tested on a Giant ATX Team mountain bike, Tekscan Clinical 5.24 F-scan® system with an inner sole pressure sensor, a Tacx Cycle force One Turbo Trainer and a Cateye Mity 8 computerized speedometer were used. The subjects wore Shimano M037 shoes and used a standard clipless and toe-clipped pedal. The seat height was set at 100% of subject's trochanteric height. Plantar pressures were recorded over 12 consecutive crank cycles at a constant speed for each of the power outputs. The videos were analysed to record the pressure exerted at 12 positions on the foot for each variable. Whether there is any dominance of any of the metatarsals, and any difference in plantar pressures between clipped and clipless pedal. There was a significant difference in the pressure at many positions of the foot, but the sites were different for each individual. General regression analysis indicated that pedal type had a statistically significant effect on plantar pressure at the sites of 1(st) metatarsal (p=0.042), 3(rd) metatarsal (p<0.001), 5(th) metatarsal (<0.001), 2(nd) (p=0.018) and 5(th) toe (p<0.001), lateral midfoot (p<0.001) and central heel (p<0.001) areas. Clipless pedals produce higher pressures which are more spread across the foot than toe-clipped pedals. This may have implications for their use in the prevention and/or management of overuse injuries in the knee and foot. PMID:23738240

  5. Quantifying Dynamic Changes in Plantar Pressure Gradient in Diabetics with Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lung, Chi-Wen; Hsiao-Wecksler, Elizabeth T.; Burns, Stephanie; Lin, Fang; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers remain one of the most serious complications of diabetes. Peak plantar pressure (PPP) and peak pressure gradient (PPG) during walking have been shown to be associated with the development of diabetic foot ulcers. To gain further insight into the mechanical etiology of diabetic foot ulcers, examination of the pressure gradient angle (PGA) has been recently proposed. The PGA quantifies directional variation or orientation of the pressure gradient during walking and provides a measure of whether pressure gradient patterns are concentrated or dispersed along the plantar surface. We hypothesized that diabetics at risk of foot ulceration would have smaller PGA in key plantar regions, suggesting less movement of the pressure gradient over time. A total of 27 participants were studied, including 19 diabetics with peripheral neuropathy and 8 non-diabetic control subjects. A foot pressure measurement system was used to measure plantar pressures during walking. PPP, PPG, and PGA were calculated for four foot regions – first toe (T1), first metatarsal head (M1), second metatarsal head (M2), and heel (HL). Consistent with prior studies, PPP and PPG were significantly larger in the diabetic group compared with non-diabetic controls in the T1 and M1 regions, but not M2 or HL. For example, PPP was 165% (P = 0.02) and PPG was 214% (P < 0.001) larger in T1. PGA was found to be significantly smaller in the diabetic group in T1 (46%, P = 0.04), suggesting a more concentrated pressure gradient pattern under the toe. The proposed PGA may improve our understanding of the role of pressure gradient on the risk of diabetic foot ulcers. PMID:27486576

  6. Plantar pressure of clipless and toe-clipped pedals in cyclists - A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Andrea; Pemberton, Troy; Ghosh, Subhajit; Maffulli, Nicola; Padhiar, Nat

    2011-01-01

    Summary To determine the effect of clipless and toe-clipped pedals on plantar foot pressure while cycling. Seven bikers and 11 healthy volunteers were tested on a Giant ATX Team mountain bike, Tekscan Clinical 5.24 F-scan® system with an inner sole pressure sensor, a Tacx Cycle force One Turbo Trainer and a Cateye Mity 8 computerized speedometer were used. The subjects wore Shimano M037 shoes and used a standard clipless and toe-clipped pedal. The seat height was set at 100% of subject’s trochanteric height. Plantar pressures were recorded over 12 consecutive crank cycles at a constant speed for each of the power outputs. The videos were analysed to record the pressure exerted at 12 positions on the foot for each variable. Whether there is any dominance of any of the metatarsals, and any difference in plantar pressures between clipped and clipless pedal. There was a significant difference in the pressure at many positions of the foot, but the sites were different for each individual. General regression analysis indicated that pedal type had a statistically significant effect on plantar pressure at the sites of 1st metatarsal (p=0.042), 3rd metatarsal (p<0.001), 5th metatarsal (<0.001), 2nd (p=0.018) and 5th toe (p<0.001), lateral midfoot (p<0.001) and central heel (p<0.001) areas. Clipless pedals produce higher pressures which are more spread across the foot than toe-clipped pedals. This may have implications for their use in the prevention and/or management of overuse injuries in the knee and foot. PMID:23738240

  7. Can We Measure the Heel Bump? Radiographic Evaluation of Haglund's Deformity.

    PubMed

    Bulstra, Gythe H; van Rheenen, Thijs A; Scholtes, Vanessa A B

    2015-01-01

    Haglund's deformity is a symptomatic posterosuperior deformity of the heel. The lateral radiograph of the ankle will show a prominent, large, posterosuperior part of the calcaneus, which can be measured using the Fowler and Philips angle (FPA, the angle between the posterior and plantar surface of the calcaneus) and the calcaneal pitch angle (CPA, the angle between the sole of the foot and the plantar part of the calcaneus). Although these angles are commonly used, these radiographic angle measurements have never shown a relationship with Haglund's deformity. In 78 patients (51% male) with symptomatic Haglund's deformity and a control group of 100 patients (41% male) with no heel complaints, we measured the FPA and CPA on weightbearing lateral radiographs of the foot. Using an unpaired t tests, no significant difference was found between the 2 groups in the FPA (p = .40). We measured a significant difference in the CPA between the Haglund group and the control group (p = .014). Subgroup analysis showed that this difference was mainly found in females (p < .00), with no significant difference seen in the males (p < .48). Females with Haglund's deformity will have a greater CPA than will females without Haglund's deformity. The CPA showed a difference between the Haglund and non-Haglund groups, although mainly in females. Although the evidence from our study is limited, it would be interesting to study the CPA further, because it implicates the verticalization of the calcaneus. This change in position results in extra traction on the Achilles tendon and can eventually cause tendinitis and bursitis. Radiographic measurement should be used as an auxiliary tool. If the calcaneus tends to change position, it would be interesting to understand this process, which could eventually lead to improvement in the treatment of Haglund's deformity. PMID:25179453

  8. Foot Plantar Pressure Measurement System: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Razak, Abdul Hadi Abdul; Zayegh, Aladin; Begg, Rezaul K.; Wahab, Yufridin

    2012-01-01

    Foot plantar pressure is the pressure field that acts between the foot and the support surface during everyday locomotor activities. Information derived from such pressure measures is important in gait and posture research for diagnosing lower limb problems, footwear design, sport biomechanics, injury prevention and other applications. This paper reviews foot plantar sensors characteristics as reported in the literature in addition to foot plantar pressure measurement systems applied to a variety of research problems. Strengths and limitations of current systems are discussed and a wireless foot plantar pressure system is proposed suitable for measuring high pressure distributions under the foot with high accuracy and reliability. The novel system is based on highly linear pressure sensors with no hysteresis. PMID:23012576

  9. Effect of heel pressure pad attached to ankle-foot orthosis on the energy conversion efficiency in post-stroke hemiplegic gait

    PubMed Central

    Kon, Keisuke; Hayakawa, Yasuyuki; Shimizu, Shingo; Tsuruga, Takeshi; Murahara, Shin; Haruna, Hirokazu; Ino, Takumi; Inagaki, Jun; Yamamoto, Sumiko

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to analyze the effect of heel pads in ankle-foot orthoses on dynamic motion aspects of gait in stroke patients from the viewpoint of energy conversion efficiency. [Subjects] Fourteen chronic stroke patients who were ambulatory and had lower extremity motor function categorized as Brunnstrom stage IV participated in the study. [Methods] A three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to assess the effect of heel pad intervention on dynamic motion gait parameters using a single-system A-B-A design. [Results] The results showed that a heel pad attached to the ankle-foot orthosis caused significant retention of the center-of-pressure at the heel during the heel rocker function and significant increase in the dorsiflexion moment and the height of the center of gravity. [Conclusion] The present study showed that a heel pad attached to the calcaneal region of an ankle-foot orthosis caused slight retention of the center-of-pressure at the heel during the heel rocker function along with center of gravity elevation in the stance phase and improved the energy conversion efficiency, especially on the non-paretic side. PMID:26157215

  10. Analysis of heel pad tissues mechanics at the heel strike in bare and shod conditions.

    PubMed

    Fontanella, C G; Forestiero, A; Carniel, E L; Natali, A N

    2013-04-01

    A combined experimental and numerical approach is used to investigate the interaction phenomena occurring between foot and footwear during the heel strike phase of the gait. Two force platforms are utilised to evaluate the ground reaction forces of a subject in bare and shod walking. The reaction forces obtained from the experimental tests are assumed as loading conditions for the numerical analyses using three dimensional models of the heel region and of the running shoe. The heel pad region, as fat and skin tissues, is described by visco-hyperelastic and fibre-reinforced hyperelastic formulations respectively and bone region by a linear orthotropic formulation. Different elastomeric foams are considered with regard to the outsole, the midsole and the insole layers. The mechanical properties are described by a hyperfoam formulation. The evaluation of the mechanical behaviour of the heel pad tissues at the heel strike in bare and shod conditions is performed considering different combinations of materials for midsole and insole layers. Results allow for the definition of the influence of different material characteristics on the mechanical response of the heel pad region, in particular showing the compressive stress differentiation in the bare and shod conditions. PMID:22789809

  11. In the clinic. Plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Young, Craig

    2012-01-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of plantar fasciitis focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, practice improvement, and patient information. Readers can complete the accompanying CME quiz for 1.5 credits. Only ACP members and individual subscribers can access the electronic features of In the Clinic. Non-subscribers who wish to access this issue of In the Clinic can elect "Pay for View." Subscribers can receive 1.5 category 1 CME credits by completing the CME quiz that accompanies this issue of In the Clinic. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including PIER (Physicians' Information and Education Resource) and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing division and with assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from PIER and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult www.acponline.org, http://pier.acponline.org, and other resources referenced within each issue of In the Clinic. PMID:22213510

  12. Effect of overground vs treadmill running on plantar pressure: influence of fatigue.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, José A; Pérez-Soriano, Pedro; Llana, Salvador; Martínez-Nova, Alfonso; Sánchez-Zuriaga, Daniel

    2013-09-01

    The differences produced when running on a treadmill vs overground may call into question the use and validity of the treadmill as a piece of equipment commonly used in research, training, and rehabilitation. The aim of the present study was to analyze under pre/post fatigue conditions the effect of treadmill vs overground on plantar pressures. Twenty-seven recreational runners (17 men and 10 women) ran on a treadmill and overground at two speeds: S1=3.33 m/s and S2=4.00 m/s, before and after a fatigue protocol consisting of a 30-min run at 85% of their individual maximal aerobic speed (MAS). Contact time (CT in seconds), peak pressure (PP in kPa), and relative load (RL in %) were analyzed under nine foot zones of the left foot using an in-shoe plantar pressure device. A two-way repeated measures ANOVA showed that running on a treadmill increases CT (7.70% S1 and 9.91% S2), modifies the pressure distribution and reduces PP (25.98% S1 and 31.76% S2), especially under the heel, medial metatarsals, and hallux, compared to running overground. Moreover, on both surfaces, fatigue (S2) led to a reduced stride frequency (2.78%) and reduced PP on the lateral heel and hallux (15.96% and 16.35%, respectively), and (S1) increased relative load on the medial arch (9.53%). There was no significant interaction between the two factors analyzed (surface and fatigue). Therefore, the aforementioned surface effect, which occurs independently of the fatigue state, should be taken into account when interpreting the results of studies that use the treadmill in their experimental protocols, and when prescribing physical exercise on a treadmill. PMID:23746487

  13. A 4-week instructed minimalist running transition and gait-retraining changes plantar pressure and force.

    PubMed

    Warne, J P; Kilduff, S M; Gregan, B C; Nevill, A M; Moran, K A; Warrington, G D

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare changes in plantar pressure and force using conventional running shoes (CRS) and minimalist footwear (MFW) pre and post a 4-week MFW familiarization period. Ten female runners (age: 21 ± 2 years; stature: 165.8 ± 4.5 cm; mass: 55.9 ± 3.2 kg) completed two 11 km/h treadmill runs, 24 hours apart, in both CRS and MFW (pretest). Plantar data were measured using sensory insoles for foot strike patterns, stride frequency, mean maximum force ( M ⁢ F ¯ ), mean maximum pressure ( M ⁢ P ¯ ) and eight mean maximum regional pressures. Subjects then completed a 4-week familiarization period consisting of running in MFW and simple gait-retraining, before repeating the tests (posttest). During the pretests, 30% of subjects adopted a forefoot strike in MFW, following familiarization this increased to 80%; no change occurred in CRS. A significant decrease in M ⁢ F ¯ in both MFW and CRS (P = 0.024) was observed from pre-post, and a significant decrease in heel pressures in MFW. M ⁢ P ¯ was higher in MFW throughout testing (P < 0.001).A 4-week familiarization to MFW resulted in a significant reduction in M ⁢ F ¯ in both the CRS and MFW conditions, as well as a reduction in heel pressures. Higher M ⁢ P ¯ was observed throughout testing in the MFW condition. PMID:24004458

  14. The Heel Pad in Congenital Idiopathic Clubfoot: Implications of Empty Heel for Clinical Severity Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Adegbehingbe, Olayinka O.; Asuquo, J. E.; Joseph, Mejabi O.; Alzahrani, Mohammed; Morcuende, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clubfoot has been evaluated in many ways, including the most common classifications of clubfoot, described by Caterrall and Piraniis based on six clinical signs. The purpose of this study was to gain better understanding of the heel pad in relation to the term “empty heel”, and to propose modification of clubfoot severity scoring system based on “empty heel”. Methods A combination of prospective study of 79 clubfoot patients treated with Ponseti method and literature review of heel pad anatomy and biomechanics. The setting was a university teaching hospital. The ethical research committee approved study protocol and informed consent of patients' parent obtained. The selection criteria included patients' diagnosed congenital idiopathic clubfoot, age < 2years, no history of previous treatment and tenotomy indicated. An evaluation of patient was assessed by orthopaedic surgeons trained on Ponseti method and has above 5 years experience. Data analysis performed on the age, sex, Pirani scores at onset of treatment, tenotomy, and 6 month after initial full correction. Results One hundred and thirty-two clubfeet in 79 patients (56 males, 23 females) completed Ponseti protocol. The median age at presentation was 5.2 months (range 0.1–23.7 months). The mean right foot abduction after correction 57.30(S.D. 9.20), and for the left foot, was 56.30 (S.D. 9.40). The mean right foot dorsiflexion was −13.70 (S.D. 18.40) before correction while after correction, it was 20.00 (S.D. 4.50) and for the left, the mean was −8.50 (S.D. 9.60) before correction and 21.00 (S.D. 4.30) after correction. Eighteen (22.8%) patients (10 bilateral, 9 unilateral) had clubfeet with empty heel score above zero point at initial full correction (p<0.001). Clinic anatomy shows the heel pad is a solid complex structure existing in normal, moderate and severe atrophied form. Heel pad is attached tightly to calcaneus without a cavity for the calcaneus to drop. Conclusions Heel pad

  15. The effect of a long-distance run on plantar pressure distribution during running.

    PubMed

    Willems, Tine Marieke; De Ridder, Roel; Roosen, Philip

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess plantar pressure alterations after long-distance running. Prior to and after a 20 km run, force distribution underneath the feet of 52 participants was registered using Footscan(®) pressure plates while the participants ran shod at a constant self-selected pace. Peak force, mean force and impulse were registered underneath different zones of the foot. In addition, temporal data as total foot contact time, time of contact and end of contact were derived for these zones. Furthermore, a medio-lateral pressure distribution ratio was calculated in different phases of the roll-off. After the run, increases in the loading of the forefoot, midfoot and medial heel were noted and decreases in loading of the lateral toes. In the forefoot push off phase a more lateral pressure distribution was observed. The results of this study demonstrated plantar pressure deviations after long-distance running which could give additional information related to several running injuries. PMID:22153665

  16. Influence of activity on plantar force distribution.

    PubMed

    Reinschmidt, C; Nigg, B M; Hamilton, G R

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to quantify the influence of physical activity on force distribution on the plantar surface of the foot. Eleven healthy subjects each performed 10 walking trials over a force distribution platform: five trials before and five trials after a 30-min run. For the analysis the foot was divided into three different regions (rearfoot, midfoot, forefoot), and maximal and average forces were determined for each region. The only statistically significant difference was found in the maximal force in the forefoot, but the difference was relatively small (<3%). The results suggested that the half-hour run did not have a large effect on the plantar force distribution. Differences between subjects were significant for all variables, indicating that relevant information on individual foot structure and/or gait may be obtained from the plantar force distribution. PMID:23916132

  17. Plantar Foot Surface Temperatures with Use of Insoles

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Michelle; Shurr, Donald G; Zimmerman, M Bridget; Saltzman, Charles L

    2004-01-01

    Purpose- Patients with diabetes are often prescribed foot orthoses to help prevent foot ulcer formation. Orthotics are used to redistribute normal and shear stress. Shear stresses are not easily measurable and considered to be responsible for skin breakdown. Local elevation of skin temperature has been implicated as an early sign of impending ulceration especially in regions of high shear stress. The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of commonly prescribed insole materials on local changes in plantar foot temperature during normal gait. Methods- Six commonly used foot orthosis materials were tested using the Thermo Trace™ infrared thermometer to measure foot temperature. Ten healthy adult volunteers without any history of diabetes or abnormal sensation participated in the study. During each trial the subject walked on a treadmill with the test material in the dominant foot's shoe, for six minutes at a speed of four miles per hour and rested for six minutes between trials. Four locations on the foot (hallux, first and fifth metatarsal heads, and heel) and the contralateral bicep temperatures were measured at 0, 1, 3, 5 minutes during the rest period. The order of material and skin location testing was randomized. Results- Significant differences were found between baseline temperatures and foot temperatures for all materials. However, no differences were found between materials for any location on the foot. Conclusion- Previous studies have attempted to characterize materials based on laboratory and clinical testing, while other studies have attempted to characterize the effect of pressure on skin temperature. However, no study has previously attempted to characterize foot orthosis materials based on foot temperatures. This study compared foot temperatures of healthy adults based on the material tested. Although this study was unable to distinguish between materials based on foot temperatures, it was able to show a rise in foot temperature with any

  18. Plantar Pressure Changes and Correlating Risk Factors in Chinese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: Preliminary 2-year Results of a Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xuan; Tian, De-Hu; Han, Chang-Ling; Chen, Wei; Wang, Zhan-Jian; Mu, Zhen-Yun; Liu, Kuan-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Plantar pressure serves as a key factor for predicting ulceration in the feet of diabetes patients. We designed this study to analyze plantar pressure changes and correlating risk factors in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: We recruited 65 patients with type 2 diabetes. They were invited to participate in the second wave 2 years later. The patients completed identical examinations at the baseline point and 2 years later. We obtained maximum force, maximum pressure, impulse, pressure-time integral, and loading rate values from 10 foot regions. We collected data on six history-based variables, six anthropometric variables, and four metabolic variables of the patients. Results: Over the course of the study, significant plantar pressure increases in some forefoot portions were identified (P < 0.05), especially in the second to forth metatarsal heads. Decreases in heel impulse and pressure-time integral levels were also found (P < 0.05). Plantar pressure parameters increased with body mass index (BMI) levels. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) changes were positively correlated with maximum force (β = 0.364, P = 0.001) and maximum pressure (β = 0.366, P = 0.002) changes in the first metatarsal head. Cholesterol changes were positively correlated with impulse changes in the lateral portion of the heel (β = 0.179, P = 0.072) and pressure-time integral changes in the second metatarsal head (β = 0.236, P = 0.020). Ankle-brachial index (ABI) changes were positively correlated with maximum force changes in the first metatarsal head (β = 0.137, P = 0.048). Neuropathy symptom score (NSS) and common peroneal nerve sensory nerve conduction velocity (SCV) changes were positively correlated with some plantar pressure changes. In addition, plantar pressure changes had a correlation with the appearance of infections, blisters (β = 0.244, P = 0.014), and calluses over the course of the study. Conclusions: We should pay attention to the BMI, HbA1c, cholesterol, ABI

  19. Sectioning the plantar fascia. Effect on first metatarsophalangeal joint motion.

    PubMed

    Harton, Francois M; Weiskopf, Steven A; Goecker, Robert M

    2002-01-01

    A study on the effect of sectioning the plantar fascia on the range of motion at the first metatarsophalangeal joint is presented. Dorsiflexion and plantarflexion range-of-motion data from 18 patients who had no first metatarsophalangeal joint pathology and had undergone an in-step plantar fasciotomy for recalcitrant plantar fasciitis were analyzed. The average increase in dorsiflexion of the first metatarsophalangeal joint after plantar fascia release was 9.8 degrees, which represented a statistically significant increase using a paired t-test. Thus release of the plantar fascia can be considered a potential adjunct to hallux limitus surgery. PMID:12438498

  20. Neglected isolated plantar dislocation of middle cuneiform : a case report

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Ashu; Sharma, Vinod Kumar; Batra, Sumit; Rohria, Mahender Singh

    2007-01-01

    Background Four cases of plantar dislocation of middle cuneiform have been reported in the english literature. All of them were fresh cases and treated with open reduction. We are reporting a case of neglected plantar dislocation of middle cuneiform which was treated with excision. Case presentation A farmer presented with a painful plantar dislocation of middle cuneiform bone after 9 months of injury. The bone was deformed and was excised by a plantar incision. It resulted in painless foot with no disability. Conclusion The neglected plantar dislocated middle cuneiform bone becomes deformed due to repeated weight bearing. The gap gets filled with Fibrous tissue. Excision of the cuneiform gives good results. PMID:17229316

  1. The lateral calcaneal flap for sensate heel reconstruction revisited.

    PubMed

    Korentager, R

    1994-06-01

    Defects of the heel can be difficult to treat because they require a thin, sensate, soft-tissue cover. The lateral calcaneal flap can provide this type of reconstruction in selected patients. A 27-year-old man had a painful defect in a grafted heel that prevented him from working. A satisfactory painless heel was provided by resurfacing the area with a lateral calcaneal flap. The donor defect was minimized by interfascicular dissection of the sural nerve. PMID:8199942

  2. Squamous cell carcinoma of the heel with free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap reconstruction: case report and technical note.

    PubMed

    Al Maksoud, Ahmed Mahmoud; Barsoum, Adel K; Moneer, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the second most common skin cancer; however, it is relatively rare on the foot. Wide excision of SCC is the recommended surgical treatment. The extent of the excision may involve resection of muscles and bone in cases of deep lesions. The functional and anatomic properties and lack of sufficient locally available tissues make the reconstruction of post-oncosurgical defects of the foot a challenging process. Heel reconstruction poses the biggest challenge due to the unique weight-bearing requirements. We present a case of a Marjolin's ulcer on the heel in a 62-year-old woman complicating a chronic non-healing wound. The heel defect was reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap with delayed secondary closure. The outcome was successful both functionally and cosmetically. No further procedures were needed. PMID:27161144

  3. Squamous cell carcinoma of the heel with free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap reconstruction: case report and technical note

    PubMed Central

    Al Maksoud, Ahmed Mahmoud; Barsoum, Adel K.; Moneer, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the second most common skin cancer; however, it is relatively rare on the foot. Wide excision of SCC is the recommended surgical treatment. The extent of the excision may involve resection of muscles and bone in cases of deep lesions. The functional and anatomic properties and lack of sufficient locally available tissues make the reconstruction of post-oncosurgical defects of the foot a challenging process. Heel reconstruction poses the biggest challenge due to the unique weight-bearing requirements. We present a case of a Marjolin’s ulcer on the heel in a 62-year-old woman complicating a chronic non-healing wound. The heel defect was reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap with delayed secondary closure. The outcome was successful both functionally and cosmetically. No further procedures were needed. PMID:27161144

  4. PLANTAR THROMBOPHLEBITIS: MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FINDINGS

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Frederico Celestino; Carneiro, Renato Duarte; Longo, Carlos Henrique; Fernandes, Túlio Diniz; Rosemberg, Laércio Alberto; de Gusmão Funari, Marcelo Buarque

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Demonstrate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in plantar thrombophlebitis. Methods: Retrospective review of twenty patients with pain in the plantar region of the foot, in which the MRI findings indicated plantar thrombophlebitis. Results: A total of fourteen men and six women, mean age 46.7 years were evaluated. Eight of these patients also underwent Doppler ultrasonography, which confirmed the thrombophlebitis. The magnetic resonance images were evaluated in consensus by two radiologists with experience in musculoskeletal radiology (more than 10 years each), showing perivascular edema in all twenty patients (100%) and muscle edema in nineteen of the twenty patients (95%). All twenty patients had intraluminal intermediate signal intensity on T2-weighted (100%) and venous ectasia was present in seventeen of the twenty cases (85%). Collateral veins were visualized in one of the twenty patients (5%). All fourteen cases (100%), in which intravenous contrast was administered, showed perivenular tissues enhancement and intraluminal filling defect. Venous ectasia, loss of compressibility and no flow on Doppler ultrasound were also observed in all eight cases examined by the method. Conclusion: MRI is a sensitive in the evaluation of plant thrombophlebitis in patients with plantar foot pain. PMID:27047898

  5. Plantar pressure distribution in older people with osteoarthritis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (hallux limitus/rigidus).

    PubMed

    Zammit, Gerard V; Menz, Hylton B; Munteanu, Shannon E; Landorf, Karl B

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate differences in dynamic plantar pressure distribution between older people with and without radiographically confirmed osteoarthritis (OA) of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (first MPJ) of the foot. Dynamic plantar pressure recordings using the TekScan MatScan system were obtained during barefoot level walking in 40 older participants; 20 with radiographically confirmed OA of the first MPJ displaying less than 55 degrees of passive dorsiflexion, and 20 with no evidence of OA in the first MPJ displaying greater than 55 degrees of passive dorsiflexion. Group comparisons between the variables maximum force and peak pressure were made for seven different regions underneath the right foot (heel, midfoot, first MPJ, second MPJ, third to fifth MPJs, hallux, and lesser toes). Compared to the control group, participants with OA of the first MPJ exhibited 34% greater maximum force (7.9 +/- 2.5 vs. 5.9 +/- 1.7 kg, p = 0.005) and 23% higher peak pressure (1.6 +/- 0.3 vs. 1.3 +/- 0.3 kg/cm(2), p = 0.001) under the hallux. Similar results were also found under the lesser toes with 43% greater maximum force (5.0 +/- 1.9 vs. 3.5 +/- 1.4 kg; p = 0.006) and 29% higher peak pressure (0.9 +/- 0.2 vs. 0.7 +/- 0.2 kg/cm(2), p = 0.018). No significant differences were found to exist between groups for any other plantar region. These findings indicate that OA of the first MPJ is associated with significant changes in load-bearing function of the foot, which may contribute to the development of secondary pathological changes associated with the condition, such as plantar callus formation and hyperextension of the hallux interphalangeal joint. PMID:18634037

  6. The "Heel Hook"-A Climbing-Specific Technique to Injure the Leg.

    PubMed

    Schöffl, Volker; Lutter, Christoph; Popp, Dominik

    2016-06-01

    Acute injuries in rock climbing either come from a fall onto the lower leg or from performing a hard move and injuring the upper extremity. Further evaluations of lower leg injuries in rock climbing athletes have been performed recently finding sport characteristics such as peroneal tendon dislocations or chronic deformations of the feet. One injury mechanism described in case reports is the so-called heel hook position, which is used more frequently today compared with the beginngs of rock climbing. In addition, the number of these injuries is expected to rise with the increase in popularity of climbing and bouldering. Therefore, it is important to further analyze this pathology. We investigated 17 patients with injuries of the lower extremities after performing a heel hook. PMID:27009908

  7. The effects of high heeled shoes on female gait: a review.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Neil J

    2014-04-01

    Walking is the most common form of human locomotion. From a motor control perspective, human bipedalism makes the task of walking extremely complex. For parts of the step cycle, there is only one foot on the ground, so both balance and propulsion are required in order for the movement to proceed smoothly. One condition known to compound the difficulty of walking is the use of high heeled shoes, which alter the natural position of the foot-ankle complex, and thereby produce a chain reaction of (mostly negative) effects that travels up the lower limb at least as far as the spine. This review summarises recent studies that have examined acute and chronic effects of high heels on balance and locomotion in young, otherwise healthy women. Controversial issues, common study limitations and directions for future research are also addressed in detail. PMID:24508305

  8. Waste Tank Heel Chemical Cleaning Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.J.

    2003-12-02

    At the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, there are approximately 40 million gallons of legacy High Level Waste stored in large capacity sub-surface tanks. Twelve of these tanks are single-containment, non-conforming tanks with leaks. These tanks were built in the 1950s. Some of these tanks contain sludge heels and are being considered for near-term removal efforts and vitrification. Currently, only mechanical methods (i.e., pumps) are used to remove the sludge waste with varying degrees of success. To provide for additional levels of removal, chemically-aided techniques are being considered. The objective of the was to collect and evaluate information available on chemical-based methods for removing residual solids from the Site's waste tanks. As part of this study, the team was requested to develop recommendations for chemical treatments to remove residual heels (primarily sludge). Ideally, one agent alone would be efficient at dissolving all residual tank heels and yet satisfy all safety and process concerns. No such chemical cleaning agent was found. The cleaning agents identified from the literature, included oxalic acid, a mixture of oxalic acid and citric acid, a combination of oxalic acid with hydrogen peroxide, nitric acid, formic acid, and organics. A criteria matrix for evaluating the various cleaning agents was developed. The results of the evaluation conclusively support oxalic acid as the cleaning agent of choice for the immediate future. Oxalic acid scored nearly double the next closest cleaning agent. Nitric acid, formic acid, and oxalic acid with hydrogen peroxide were all closely grouped for the next best choice. The mixture of oxalic acid and citric acid rated poorly. Organics rated even more poorly due to large uncertainties in performance and downstream impacts.

  9. Foot Kinematics During a Bilateral Heel Rise Test in Participants With Stage II Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    HOUCK, JEFF; NEVILLE, CHRISTOPHER; TOME, JOSHUA; FLEMISTER, ADOLPH

    2010-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Experimental laboratory study using a cross-sectional design. OBJECTIVES To compare foot kinematics, using 3-dimensional tracking methods, during a bilateral heel rise between participants with posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) and participants with a normal medial longitudinal arch (MLA). BACKGROUND The bilateral heel rise test is commonly used to assess patients with PTTD; however, information about foot kinematics during the test is lacking. METHODS Forty-five individuals volunteered to participate, including 30 patients diagnosed with unilateral stage II PTTD (mean ± SD age, 59.8 ± 11.1 years; body mass index, 29.9 ± 4.8 kg/m2) and 15 controls (mean ± SD age, 56.5 ± 7.7 years; body mass index, 30.6 ± 3.6 kg/m2). Foot kinematic data were collected during a bilateral heel rise task from the calcaneus (hindfoot), first metatarsal, and hallux, using an Optotrak motion analysis system and Motion Monitor software. A 2-way mixed-effects analysis of variance model, with normalized heel height as a covariate, was used to test for significant differences between the normal MLA and PTTD groups. RESULTS The patients in the PTTD group exhibited significantly greater ankle plantar flexion (mean difference between groups, 7.3°; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.1° to 9.5°), greater first metatarsal dorsiflexion (mean difference between groups, 9.0°; 95% CI: 3.7° to 14.4°), and less hallux dorsiflexion (mean difference, 6.7°; 95% CI: 1.7° to 11.8°) compared to controls. At peak heel rise, hindfoot inversion was similar (P = .130) between the PTTD and control groups. CONCLUSION Except for hindfoot eversion/inversion, the differences in foot kinematics in participants with stage II PTTD, when compared to the control group, mainly occur as an offset, not an alteration in shape, of the kinematic patterns. PMID:19648723

  10. [Plantar pruritus after trip to Vietnam].

    PubMed

    Tanneberger, O; Fehr, J; Nuesch, R

    2007-10-01

    A 33 year old man is evaluated for a pruriginous plantar eruption on the right foot. Three weeks ago he walked across a river barefoot in the south of Vietnam. In the clinical examination of the foot a red, serpiginuous dermatitis was seen. Patient history and clinical picture were typical for a larva migrans. After starting a treatment with albendazol the patient felt well and the lesions disappeared. PMID:17966826

  11. [A woman with palmar and plantar hyperpigmentation].

    PubMed

    van Tienhoven, Geertjan; Wilmink, J W Hanneke

    2011-01-01

    A 60-year-old Ghanese woman was treated with radiotherapy and capecitabine for metastatic breast cancer. 6 weeks after starting capecitabine she developed palmar and plantar hyperpigmentation, which preceded symptoms of hand-foot syndrome, a known adverse effect of capecitabine. After a dose reduction, the hand-foot syndrome diminished but the hyperpigmentation remained. 8 months later the patient was well and stable. PMID:22085578

  12. Screening Method Based on Walking Plantar Impulse for Detecting Musculoskeletal Senescence and Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yifang; Fan, Yubo; Li, Zhiyu; Newman, Tony; Lv, Changsheng; Zhou, Yi

    2013-01-01

    No consensus has been reached on how musculoskeletal system injuries or aging can be explained by a walking plantar impulse. We standardize the plantar impulse by defining a principal axis of plantar impulse. Based upon this standardized plantar impulse, two indexes are presented: plantar pressure record time series and plantar-impulse distribution along the principal axis of plantar impulse. These indexes are applied to analyze the plantar impulse collected by plantar pressure plates from three sources: Achilles tendon ruptures; elderly people (ages 62–71); and young people (ages 19–23). Our findings reveal that plantar impulse distribution curves for Achilles tendon ruptures change irregularly with subjects’ walking speed changes. When comparing distribution curves of the young, we see a significant difference in the elderly subjects’ phalanges plantar pressure record time series. This verifies our hypothesis that a plantar impulse can function as a means to assess and evaluate musculoskeletal system injuries and aging. PMID:24386288

  13. Time to Onset of Pain: Effects of Magnitude and Location for Static Pressures Applied to the Plantar Foot

    PubMed Central

    Wiggermann, Neal; Keyserling, W. Monroe

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms that cause foot discomfort during prolonged standing are poorly understood. There is currently no method for evaluating discomfort associated with low levels of static pressure that are typical during standing. Pain thresholds were measured for 20 healthy participants by applying five levels of static pressure at different plantar foot locations. A survival analysis was performed to determine the effects of pressure magnitude and foot location on the time until pain onset. Time to pain onset was significantly affected by pressure magnitude (P<0.001); time decreased as pressure increased. Foot location was also significant (P<0.001); greatest times to pain onset (least sensitive) were observed under the heel and fifth metatarsal head, shortest times (most sensitive) were found under the midfoot. This research presents a novel methodology for evaluating static pressure that may be applicable to product design. PMID:25118168

  14. Reliability and limitations of the durometer and PressureStat to measure plantar foot characteristics in Native Americans with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cuaderes, Elena; Khan, Myrna M; Azzarello, Joseph; Lamb, W Lyndon

    2009-01-01

    Neuropathy with excessive weight-bearing activity may lead to foot changes that place it at risk for ulceration. Information about instruments to measure plantar skin hardness and pressures of the foot in adult Native Americans with diabetes is presented. Skin hardness was measured at 10 sites (plantar side of the hallux, third and fifth toes, first, third, and fifth metatarsal heads, medial and lateral midfoot, heel, and the dorsal aspect between the hallux and second toe) with a durometer. The PressureStat yielded data about barefoot, static pressures. The durometer was shown to be reliable (r = .62 to .91) at all sites of the foot except at the third and fifth toe, the medial midsection of both feet, and at the third metatarsal head and between the hallux and second toe, the dorsal aspect of the left foot. With four raters, concordance was found to be acceptable at the hallux, the third toe, the first, third, and fifth metatarsal heads and the heel (W = .61 to .86) for the PressureStat. Since most diabetic foot ulcers occur at the hallux, first, third, and fifth metatarsal heads, both the PressureStat and durometer may be reliable screening tools to determine the degree of risk. PMID:19902656

  15. In-shoe plantar tri-axial stress profiles during maximum-effort cutting maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yan; Lam, Wing Kai; Cheung, Jason Tak-Man; Zhang, Ming

    2014-12-18

    Soft tissue injuries, such as anterior cruciate ligament rupture, ankle sprain and foot skin problems, frequently occur during cutting maneuvers. These injuries are often regarded as associated with abnormal joint torque and interfacial friction caused by excessive external and in-shoe shear forces. This study simultaneously investigated the dynamic in-shoe localized plantar pressure and shear stress during lateral shuffling and 45° sidestep cutting maneuvers. Tri-axial force transducers were affixed at the first and second metatarsal heads, lateral forefoot, and heel regions in the midsole of a basketball shoe. Seventeen basketball players executed both cutting maneuvers with maximum efforts. Lateral shuffling cutting had a larger mediolateral braking force than 45° sidestep cutting. This large braking force was concentrated at the first metatarsal head, as indicated by its maximum medial shear stress (312.2 ± 157.0 kPa). During propulsion phase, peak shear stress occurred at the second metatarsal head (271.3 ± 124.3 kPa). Compared with lateral shuffling cutting, 45° sidestep cutting produced larger peak propulsion shear stress (463.0 ± 272.6 kPa) but smaller peak braking shear stress (184.8 ± 181.7 kPa), of which both were found at the first metatarsal head. During both cutting maneuvers, maximum medial and posterior shear stress occurred at the first metatarsal head, whereas maximum pressure occurred at the second metatarsal head. The first and second metatarsal heads sustained relatively high pressure and shear stress and were expected to be susceptible to plantar tissue discomfort or injury. Due to different stress distribution, distinct pressure and shear cushioning mechanisms in basketball footwear might be considered over different foot regions. PMID:25468303

  16. Performance of insole in reducing plantar pressure on diabetic patients in the early stages of the disease.

    PubMed

    Zequera, Martha L; Solomonidis, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    It has been well documented that subjects with peripheral neuropathy resulting from diabetes mellitus are at high risk of developing foot ulceration. Decreased sensation, in combination with high underfoot pressures, have been identified as prime etiology factors in the cause of plantar naturopathic ulceration [1]. This study presents the effect of four orthotic treatment techniques in reducing metatarsal head, heel and toes pressure during walking. A pressure measurement study was carried out on a diabetic patients group wearing four insoles, including the insole designed by the computer model proposed in this project. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect on plantar pressure in diverse insoles prescribed and manufactured with various techniques on a random group of patients with diabetes mellitus in the early stages of the disease. Four types of insoles were designed and manufactured by methods available in the market; the computer model proposed on this project was used in order to design and manufacture the insole. The results show that every patient requires an individual assessment and often a personalized insole. PMID:21095715

  17. Don't Ignore Your Kid's Heel Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size Print Bookmark Don’t Ignore Your Kid’s Heel Pain Address Pain Early, Avoid Long Recovery ... and ankle surgeon. The good news is that kids are good healers and treatment may be simple ...

  18. The heel-contact gait pattern of habitual toe walkers.

    PubMed

    Crenna, P; Fedrizzi, E; Andreucci, E; Frigo, C; Bono, R

    2005-04-01

    We used kinematic, kinetic and EMG analysis to compare the spontaneous heel-contact gait patterns of 13 children classified as habitual toe walkers (HTWs) and age-matched controls. In the HTWs, the incidence of spontaneous heel-contact strides during a single recording session ranged from 15% to 92%, with no correlation with age, passive ankle joint excursion, walking speed and trial order. Hallmarks of the heel-contact strides were premature heel-rise, reversal of the second rocker, relative shortening of the loading response and anticipation and enhancement of the electromyographic (EMG) activity normally observed in the triceps surae (TS) during the first half of the stance phase. This variant of the locomotor program is different from the walking patterns observed in normally developing toddlers and children with cerebral palsy (CP). It does not necessarily reflect a functional adaptation to changes in the rheological properties of the muscle-tendon complex. PMID:15760747

  19. [Research on Adaptive Balance Reaction for Gait Slippery Instability Events on Level Walk Based on Plantar Pressure and Gait Parameter Analysis].

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Junxia; Si, Ying

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, for gait instability phenomenon, many researches have been carried out at home and abroad. However, the relationship between plantar pressure and gait parameters in the process of balance adjustment is still unclear. This study describes the human body adaptive balance reaction during slip events on slippery level walk by plantar pressure and gait analysis. Ten healthy male subjects walked on a level path wearing shoes with two contrastive contaminants (dry, oil). The study collected and analyzed the change rule of spatiotemporal parameters, plantar pressure parameters, vertical ground reaction force (VGRF), etc. The results showed that the human body adaptive balance reaction during slip events on slippery level walk mainly included lighter touch at the heel strikes, tighter grip at the toe offs, a lower velocity, a shorter stride length and longer support time. These changes are used to maintain or recover body balance. These results would be able to explore new ideas and provide reference value for slip injury prevention, walking rehabilitation training design, research and development of walking assistive equipments, etc. PMID:27079090

  20. Management of subcalcaneal pain and Achilles tendonitis with heel inserts

    PubMed Central

    Maclellan, G. E.; Vyvyan, Barbara

    1981-01-01

    Soft tissue symptoms in the leg due to sporting activity are commonly associated with the force of heel strike. Conventional training shoes compromise between comfort and performance; few models are suitably designed for both considerations. Using a visco-elastic polymer insert the symptoms of heel pain and Achilles tendonitis have been largely or completely abolished in a preliminary study. Imagesp117-ap117-bp117-cp118-a PMID:7272653

  1. Ultrasound-assisted endoscopic partial plantar fascia release.

    PubMed

    Ohuchi, Hiroshi; Ichikawa, Ken; Shinga, Kotaro; Hattori, Soichi; Yamada, Shin; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2013-01-01

    Various surgical treatment procedures for plantar fasciitis, such as open surgery, percutaneous release, and endoscopic surgery, exist. Skin trouble, nerve disturbance, infection, and persistent pain associated with prolonged recovery time are complications of open surgery. Endoscopic partial plantar fascia release offers the surgeon clear visualization of the anatomy at the surgical site. However, the primary medial portal and portal tract used for this technique have been shown to be in close proximity to the posterior tibial nerves and their branches, and there is always the risk of nerve damage by introducing the endoscope deep to the plantar fascia. By performing endoscopic partial plantar fascia release under ultrasound assistance, we could dynamically visualize the direction of the endoscope and instrument introduction, thus preventing nerve damage from inadvertent insertion deep to the fascia. Full-thickness release of the plantar fascia at the ideal position could also be confirmed under ultrasound imaging. We discuss the technique for this new procedure. PMID:24265989

  2. Dynamic Patterns of Forces and Loading Rate in Runners with Unilateral Plantar Fasciitis: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Ana Paula; João, Silvia Maria Amado; Dinato, Roberto Casanova; Tessutti, Vitor Daniel; Sacco, Isabel Camargo Neves

    2015-01-01

    Aim/Hypothesis The etiology of plantar fasciitis (PF) has been related to several risk factors, but the magnitude of the plantar load is the most commonly described factor. Although PF is the third most-common injury in runners, only two studies have investigated this factor in runners, and their results are still inconclusive regarding the injury stage. Objective Analyze and compare the plantar loads and vertical loading rate during running of runners in the acute stage of PF to those in the chronic stage of the injury in relation to healthy runners. Methods Forty-five runners with unilateral PF (30 acute and 15 chronic) and 30 healthy control runners were evaluated while running at 12 km/h for 40 meters wearing standardized running shoes and Pedar-X insoles. The contact area and time, maximum force, and force-time integral over the rearfoot, midfoot, and forefoot were recorded and the loading rate (20–80% of the first vertical peak) was calculated. Groups were compared by ANOVAs (p<0.05). Results Maximum force and force-time integral over the rearfoot and the loading rate was higher in runners with PF (acute and chronic) compared with controls (p<0.01). Runners with PF in the acute stage showed lower loading rate and maximum force over the rearfoot compared to runners in the chronic stage (p<0.01). Conclusion Runners with PF showed different dynamic patterns of plantar loads during running over the rearfoot area depending on the injury stage (acute or chronic). In the acute stage of PF, runners presented lower loading rate and forces over the rearfoot, possibly due to dynamic mechanisms related to pain protection of the calcaneal area. PMID:26375815

  3. Temperature as a predictive tool for plantar triaxial loading.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Metin; Brem, Ryan W; Davis, Brian L; Patel, Jalpa; Osbourne, Abe; Matassini, Megan R; Wood, David A; Nwokolo, Irene O

    2014-11-28

    Diabetic foot ulcers are caused by moderate repetitive plantar stresses in the presence of peripheral neuropathy. In severe cases, the development of these foot ulcers can lead to lower extremity amputations. Plantar pressure measurements have been considered a capable predictor of ulceration sites in the past, but some investigations have pointed out inconsistencies when solely relying on this method. The other component of ground reaction forces/stresses, shear, has been understudied due to a lack of adequate equipment. Recent articles reported the potential clinical significance of shear in diabetic ulcer etiology. With the lack of adequate tools, plantar temperature has been used as an alternative method for determining plantar triaxial loading and/or shear. However, this method has not been previously validated. The purpose of this study was to analyze the potential association between exercise-induced plantar temperature increase and plantar stresses. Thirteen healthy individuals walked on a treadmill for 10 minutes at 3.2km/h. Pre and post-exercise temperature profiles were obtained with a thermal camera. Plantar triaxial stresses were quantified with a custom-built stress plate. A statistically significant correlation was observed between peak shear stress (PSS) and temperature increase (r=0.78), but not between peak resultant stress (PRS) and temperature increase (r=0.46). Plantar temperature increase could predict the location of PSS and PRS in 23% and 39% of the subjects, respectively. Only a moderate linear relationship was established between triaxial plantar stresses and walking-induced temperature increase. Future research will investigate the value of nonlinear models in predicting plantar loading through foot temperature. PMID:25446272

  4. Variation in the location of the shoe sole flexion point influences plantar loading patterns during gait

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Several footwear design characteristics are known to have detrimental effects on the foot. However, one characteristic that has received relatively little attention is the point where the sole flexes in the sagittal plane. Several footwear assessment forms assume that this should ideally be located directly under the metarsophalangeal joints (MTPJs), but this has not been directly evaluated. The aim of this study was therefore to assess the influence on plantar loading of different locations of the shoe sole flexion point. Method Twenty-one asymptomatic females with normal foot posture participated. Standardised shoes were incised directly underneath the metatarsophalangeal joints, proximal to the MTPJs or underneath the midfoot. The participants walked in a randomised sequence of the three shoes whilst plantar loading patterns were obtained using the Pedar® in-shoe pressure measurement system. The foot was divided into nine anatomically important masks, and peak pressure (PP), contact time (CT) and pressure time integral (PTI) were determined. A ratio of PP and PTI between MTPJ2-3/MTPJ1 was also calculated. Results Wearing the shoe with the sole flexion point located proximal to the MTPJs resulted in increased PP under MTPJ 4–5 (6.2%) and decreased PP under the medial midfoot compared to the sub-MTPJ flexion point (−8.4%). Wearing the shoe with the sole flexion point located under the midfoot resulted in decreased PP, CT and PTI in the medial and lateral hindfoot (PP: −4.2% and −5.1%, CT: −3.4% and −6.6%, PTI: −6.9% and −5.7%) and medial midfoot (PP: −5.9% CT: −2.9% PTI: −12.2%) compared to the other two shoes. Conclusion The findings of this study indicate that the location of the sole flexion point of the shoe influences plantar loading patterns during gait. Specifically, shoes with a sole flexion point located under the midfoot significantly decrease the magnitude and duration of loading under the midfoot and hindfoot, which

  5. Unilobed Rotational Flap for Plantar Hallux Interphalangeal Joint Ulceration Complicated by Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Boffeli, Troy J; Hyllengren, Shelby B

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes-related neuropathic ulcers located at the plantar aspect of the hallux interphalangeal joint are often chronic or recurrent and frequently become complicated by osteomyelitis. Once infected, treatment will typically involve hallux amputation. Although intended as a definitive procedure, amputation of the first toe is not desirable from a cosmetic or functional standpoint and often leads to transfer ulcers at adjacent locations of the foot. Reconstructive wound surgery, combined with limited bone resection, is possible if the infection is caught early before the local tissue and bone have become necrotic. In addition to neuropathy, biomechanical issues, including ankle equinus, hallux limitus, hallux extensus, and hallux valgus, predispose patients with diabetes mellitus to developing plantar hallux ulcers. We commonly employ a proximal based unilobed plantar rotational flap combined with hallux interphalangeal joint arthroplasty as an alternative to hallux amputation. We present a typical case with long-term follow-up to highlight our flap protocol, including patient selection criteria, flap design, surgical technique, bone resection and biopsy pearls, staging timeline, and a typical postoperative course. Periodic follow-up during the next 72 months for unrelated conditions allowed long-term monitoring with no recurrence of osteomyelitis or subsequent amputation. The foot remained ulcer free 6 years later. The benefits of this surgical approach include complete excision of the ulcer, adequate exposure for bone resection, early bone biopsy before the spread of infection or necrosis of local tissue, flap coverage with viable soft tissue, and partial offloading of mechanical pressure at the plantar interphalangeal joint. PMID:25681281

  6. Plantar fascia anatomy and its relationship with Achilles tendon and paratenon

    PubMed Central

    Stecco, Carla; Corradin, Marco; Macchi, Veronica; Morra, Aldo; Porzionato, Andrea; Biz, Carlo; De Caro, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    Although the plantar fascia (PF) has been studied quite well from a biomechanical viewpoint, its microscopic properties have been overlooked: nothing is known about its content of elastic fibers, the features of the extracellular matrix or the extent of innervation. From a functional and clinical standpoint, the PF is often correlated with the triceps surae muscle, but the anatomical grounds for this link are not clear. The aim of this work was to focus on the PF macroscopic and microscopic properties and study how Achilles tendon diseases might affect it. Twelve feet from unembalmed human cadavers were dissected to isolate the PF. Specimens from each PF were tested with various histological and immunohistochemical stains. In a second stage, 52 magnetic resonance images (MRI) obtained from patients complaining of aspecific ankle or foot pain were analyzed, dividing the cases into two groups based on the presence or absence of signs of degeneration and/or inflammation of the Achilles tendon. The thickness of PF and paratenon was assessed in the two groups and statistical analyses were conducted. The PF is a tissue firmly joined to plantar muscles and skin. Analyzing its possible connections to the sural structures showed that this fascia is more closely connected to the paratenon of Achilles tendon than to the Achilles tendon, through the periosteum of the heel. The PF extended medially and laterally, continuing into the deep fasciae enveloping the abductor hallucis and abductor digiti minimi muscles, respectively. The PF was rich in hyaluronan, probably produced by fibroblastic-like cells described as ‘fasciacytes’. Nerve endings and Pacini and Ruffini corpuscles were present, particularly in the medial and lateral portions, and on the surface of the muscles, suggesting a role for the PF in the proprioception of foot. In the radiological study, 27 of the 52 MRI showed signs of Achilles tendon inflammation and/or degeneration, and the PF was 3.43 ± 0.48 mm

  7. Plantar fascia anatomy and its relationship with Achilles tendon and paratenon.

    PubMed

    Stecco, Carla; Corradin, Marco; Macchi, Veronica; Morra, Aldo; Porzionato, Andrea; Biz, Carlo; De Caro, Raffaele

    2013-12-01

    Although the plantar fascia (PF) has been studied quite well from a biomechanical viewpoint, its microscopic properties have been overlooked: nothing is known about its content of elastic fibers, the features of the extracellular matrix or the extent of innervation. From a functional and clinical standpoint, the PF is often correlated with the triceps surae muscle, but the anatomical grounds for this link are not clear. The aim of this work was to focus on the PF macroscopic and microscopic properties and study how Achilles tendon diseases might affect it. Twelve feet from unembalmed human cadavers were dissected to isolate the PF. Specimens from each PF were tested with various histological and immunohistochemical stains. In a second stage, 52 magnetic resonance images (MRI) obtained from patients complaining of aspecific ankle or foot pain were analyzed, dividing the cases into two groups based on the presence or absence of signs of degeneration and/or inflammation of the Achilles tendon. The thickness of PF and paratenon was assessed in the two groups and statistical analyses were conducted. The PF is a tissue firmly joined to plantar muscles and skin. Analyzing its possible connections to the sural structures showed that this fascia is more closely connected to the paratenon of Achilles tendon than to the Achilles tendon, through the periosteum of the heel. The PF extended medially and laterally, continuing into the deep fasciae enveloping the abductor hallucis and abductor digiti minimi muscles, respectively. The PF was rich in hyaluronan, probably produced by fibroblastic-like cells described as 'fasciacytes'. Nerve endings and Pacini and Ruffini corpuscles were present, particularly in the medial and lateral portions, and on the surface of the muscles, suggesting a role for the PF in the proprioception of foot. In the radiological study, 27 of the 52 MRI showed signs of Achilles tendon inflammation and/or degeneration, and the PF was 3.43 ± 0.48 mm thick

  8. Effects of high heeled shoes wearing experience and heel height on human standing balance and functional mobility.

    PubMed

    Hapsari, Vaniessa Dewi; Xiong, Shuping

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of high heeled shoes (HHS) wearing experience and heel height on human standing balance and functional mobility. Thirty young and healthy females (ten experienced and twenty inexperienced HHS wearers) participated in a series of balance tests when they wore shoes of four different heel heights: 1 cm (flat), 4 cm (low), 7 cm (medium) and 10 cm (high). Experimental results show that regardless of the wearing experience, the heel elevation induces more effort from lower limb muscles (particularly calf muscles) and results in worse functional mobility starting at 7 cm heel height. While the heel height increased to 10 cm, the standing balance also becomes worse. Experienced HHS wearers do not show significantly better overall performance on standing balance and functional mobility than inexperienced controls, even though they have better directional control (76.8% vs. 74.4%) and larger maximum excursion (93.3% vs. 89.7%). To maintain standing balance, experienced wearers exert less effort on tibialis anterior, vastus lateralis and erector spinae muscles at the cost of more intensive effort from gastrocnemius medialis muscle. PMID:26155823

  9. High-Intensity Running and Plantar-Flexor Fatigability and Plantar-Pressure Distribution in Adolescent Runners

    PubMed Central

    Fourchet, François; Kelly, Luke; Horobeanu, Cosmin; Loepelt, Heiko; Taiar, Redha; Millet, Grégoire

    2015-01-01

    Context: Fatigue-induced alterations in foot mechanics may lead to structural overload and injury. Objectives: To investigate how a high-intensity running exercise to exhaustion modifies ankle plantar-flexor and dorsiflexor strength and fatigability, as well as plantar-pressure distribution in adolescent runners. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: Academy research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Eleven male adolescent distance runners (age = 16.9 ± 2.0 years, height = 170.6 ± 10.9 cm, mass = 54.6 ± 8.6 kg) were tested. Intervention(s): All participants performed an exhausting run on a treadmill. An isokinetic plantar-flexor and dorsiflexor maximal-strength test and a fatigue test were performed before and after the exhausting run. Plantar-pressure distribution was assessed at the beginning and end of the exhausting run. Main Outcome Measure(s): We recorded plantar-flexor and dorsiflexor peak torques and calculated the fatigue index. Plantar-pressure measurements were recorded 1 minute after the start of the run and before exhaustion. Plantar variables (ie, mean area, contact time, mean pressure, relative load) were determined for 9 selected regions. Results: Isokinetic peak torques were similar before and after the run in both muscle groups, whereas the fatigue index increased in plantar flexion (28.1%; P = .01) but not in dorsiflexion. For the whole foot, mean pressure decreased from 1 minute to the end (−3.4%; P = .003); however, mean area (9.5%; P = .005) and relative load (7.2%; P = .009) increased under the medial midfoot, and contact time increased under the central forefoot (8.3%; P = .01) and the lesser toes (8.9%; P = .008). Conclusions: Fatigue resistance in the plantar flexors declined after a high-intensity running bout performed by adolescent male distance runners. This phenomenon was associated with increased loading under the medial arch in the fatigued state but without any excessive pronation. PMID:25531143

  10. Medial and Lateral Plantar Artery Angiosome Rotational Flaps for Transmetatarsal and Lisfranc Amputation in Patients With Compromised Plantar Tissue.

    PubMed

    Boffeli, Troy J; Waverly, Brett J

    2016-01-01

    Traditional incision techniques for midfoot amputation might not provide immediate soft tissue coverage of the underlying metatarsal and tarsal bones in the presence of a large plantar soft tissue defect. Patients undergoing transmetatarsal and Lisfranc amputation frequently have compromised plantar tissue in association with neuropathic ulcers, forefoot gangrene, and infection, necessitating wide resection as a part of the amputation procedure. Open amputation will routinely be performed under these circumstances, although secondary healing could be compromised owing to residual bone exposure. Alternatively, the surgeon might elect to perform a more proximal lower extremity amputation, which will allow better soft tissue coverage but compromises function of the lower extremity. A third option for this challenging situation is to modify the plantar flap incision design to incorporate a medial or lateral plantar artery angiosome-based rotational flap, which will provide immediate coverage of the forefoot and midfoot soft tissue defects without excessive shortening of the bone structure. A plantar medial soft tissue defect is treated with the lateral plantar artery angiosome flap, and a plantar lateral defect is treated with the medial plantar artery angiosome flap. Medial and lateral flaps can be combined to cover a central plantar wound defect. Incorporating large rotational flaps requires knowledge of the applicable angiosome anatomy and specific modifications to incision planning and dissection techniques to ensure adequate soft tissue coverage and preservation of the blood supply to the flap. A series of 4 cases with an average follow-up duration of 5.75 years is presented to demonstrate our patient selection criteria, flap design principles, dissection pearls, and surgical staging protocol. PMID:25681945

  11. Fiber optic plantar pressure/shear sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soetanto, William; Nguyen, Ngoc T.; Wang, Wei-Chih

    2011-04-01

    A full-scale foot pressure/shear sensor that has been developed to help diagnose the cause of ulcer formation in diabetic patients is presented. The design involves a tactile sensor array using intersecting optical fibers embedded in soft elastomer. The basic configuration incorporates a mesh that is comprised of two sets of parallel optical fiber plane; the planes are configured so the parallel rows of fiber of the top and bottom planes are perpendicular to each other. Threedimensional information is determined by measuring the loss of light from each of the waveguide to map the overall pressure distribution and the shifting of the layers relative to each other. In this paper we will present the latest development on the fiber optic plantar pressure/shear sensor which can measure normal force up from 19.09 kPa to 1000 kPa.

  12. Muscle activation of paraspinal muscles in different types of high heels during standing

    PubMed Central

    Han, Dongwook

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study researched the effects of different types of high heels on the muscles surrounding the cervical spine, the thoracic spine, and the lumbar spine by analyzing muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles during standing while wearing high heels. The high heels were all of the same height: 8 cm. [Subjects and Methods] The 28 subjects in this experiment were females in their 20s with a foot size of 225–230 mm and a normal gait pattern. To measure the muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles, EMG electrodes were attached on the paraspinal muscles around C6, T7, and L5. The muscle activation during standing while wearing 8-cm-high wedge heels, setback heels, and French heels was then measured. The measurements were performed 3 times each, and the mean value was used for analysis. [Results] The levels of muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles induced by standing on wedge heels, setback heels, and French heels in the cervical and lumbar areas were significantly higher than those induced by standing on bare feet. But there was no significant difference according to the heel types. [Conclusion] The height of the heels presented a greater variable than the width of the heels on the muscle activation of paraspinal muscles. Therefore, wearing high heels is not recommended for those who have pain or functional problems in the cervical and/or lumbar spine. PMID:25642040

  13. Foot Modeling and Smart Plantar Pressure Reconstruction from Three Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Ghaida, Hussein Abou; Mottet, Serge; Goujon, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    In order to monitor pressure under feet, this study presents a biomechanical model of the human foot. The main elements of the foot that induce the plantar pressure distribution are described. Then the link between the forces applied at the ankle and the distribution of the plantar pressure is established. Assumptions are made by defining the concepts of a 3D internal foot shape, which can be extracted from the plantar pressure measurements, and a uniform elastic medium, which describes the soft tissues behaviour. In a second part, we show that just 3 discrete pressure sensors per foot are enough to generate real time plantar pressure cartographies in the standing position or during walking. Finally, the generated cartographies are compared with pressure cartographies issued from the F-SCAN system. The results show 0.01 daN (2% of full scale) average error, in the standing position. PMID:25400713

  14. Effect of revised high-heeled shoes on foot pressure and static balance during standing

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Young-Hyeon; Ko, Mansoo; Park, Young-Soul; Lee, Suk-Min

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of revised high-heeled shoes on the foot pressure ratio and static balance during standing. [Subjects and Methods] A single-subject design was used, 15 healthy women wearing revised high-heeled shoes and general high-heeled shoes in a random order. The foot pressure ratio and static balance scores during standing were measured using a SpaceBalance 3D system. [Results] Forefoot and rearfoot pressures were significantly different between the 2 types of high-heeled shoes. Under the 3 conditions tested, the static balance score was higher for the revised high-heeled shoes than for the general high-heeled shoes, but this difference was not statistically significant. [Conclusion] Revised high-heeled shoes are preferable to general high-heeled shoes, as they result in normalization of normalized foot pressure and a positive effect on static balance. PMID:25995572

  15. Assessment of plantar pressure and balance in patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Anjos, Daniela M.C.; Gomes, Luciana P.O.; Sampaio, Luciana M.M.; Correa, João C.F.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Patients with diabetes for more than 10 years may have an increase in peak plantar pressure, considerable postural oscillation, balance deficit, alterations in gait pattern and an increased risk of falls. The aim of the present study was to assess the correlation between plantar pressure distribution and balance in patients with diabetes using a pressure platform (Footwork). Material and methods The study was carried out at the Human Movement Clinic of the Centro Universitário de Belo Horizonte (Brazil). The sample was made up of 18 right-handed individuals with type 2 diabetes – 14 females and 4 males – with an average age of 58.72 ±9.54 and an average of 18.56 ±6.61 years since diagnosis. Result Data analysis revealed that greater peak plantar pressure on the right hindfoot led to greater radial displacement (Rd) (r = 0.2022) and greater displacement velocity (r = 0.2240). Greater peak plantar pressure on the left hindfoot also led to greater displacement velocity (P) (r = 0.5728) and radial displacement (RD) (r = 0.1972). A positive correlation was found between time elapsed since diagnosis and peak midfoot pressure (r = 0.3752) on the right and left side as well as between BMI and plantar pressure on all regions of the foot. Conclusions The data reveal a correlation between postural oscillation and peak plantar pressure on the hindfoot. PMID:22371719

  16. The effects of the application of low-dye taping on paretic side plantar pressure among patients with plantar fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan; Lee, Sangyong; Kim, Shingyun; Hwangbo, Gak

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of low-dye taping on paretic side plantar pressure in patients with plantar fasciitis. [Subjects] The 30 patients in this study were randomly allocated to a low-dye taping group (n = 15) or a conservative treatment group (n =15). [Methods] Both groups received treatment thrice a week for six weeks. BioRescue was used to measure the weight distribution of the patients’ paretic side. [Results] Within-group comparison showed that the posterior weight distribution significantly increased among patients in both groups. However, comparison between the two groups showed that the low-dye taping group’s posterior weight distribution was significantly higher than that of the conservative treatment group. [Conclusion] These findings show that the application of low-dye taping is an effective intervention for paretic-side plantar pressure among patients with plantar fasciitis. PMID:26696737

  17. The effects of the application of low-dye taping on paretic side plantar pressure among patients with plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan; Lee, Sangyong; Kim, Shingyun; Hwangbo, Gak

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of low-dye taping on paretic side plantar pressure in patients with plantar fasciitis. [Subjects] The 30 patients in this study were randomly allocated to a low-dye taping group (n = 15) or a conservative treatment group (n =15). [Methods] Both groups received treatment thrice a week for six weeks. BioRescue was used to measure the weight distribution of the patients' paretic side. [Results] Within-group comparison showed that the posterior weight distribution significantly increased among patients in both groups. However, comparison between the two groups showed that the low-dye taping group's posterior weight distribution was significantly higher than that of the conservative treatment group. [Conclusion] These findings show that the application of low-dye taping is an effective intervention for paretic-side plantar pressure among patients with plantar fasciitis. PMID:26696737

  18. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section... SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Special Rules Pertaining to Mobile Offshore Drilling Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in...

  19. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section... SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Special Rules Pertaining to Mobile Offshore Drilling Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in...

  20. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section... SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Special Rules Pertaining to Mobile Offshore Drilling Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in...

  1. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section... SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Special Rules Pertaining to Mobile Offshore Drilling Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in...

  2. Heart rate detection from plantar bioimpedance measurements.

    PubMed

    González Landaeta, R; Casas, O; Pallàs-Areny, R

    2006-01-01

    The heart rate is a basic health indicator, useful in both clinical measurements and home health care. Current home care systems often require the attachment of electrodes or other sensors to the body, which can be cumbersome to the patient. Moreover, some measurements are sensitive to movement artifacts, are not user-friendly and require a specialized supervision. In this paper, a novel technique for heart rate measurement for a standing subject is proposed, which is based on plantar bioimpedance measurements, such as those performed by some bathroom weighting scales for body composition analysis. Because of the low level of heart-related impedance variations, the measurement system has a gain of 1400. We have implemented a fully differential AC amplifier with a common-mode rejection ratio (CMRR) of 105 dB at 10 kHz. Coherent demodulation based on synchronous sampling yields a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 55 dB. The system has a sensitivity of 1.9 V/Omega. The technique has been demonstrated on 18 volunteers, whose bioimpedance signal and ECG were simultaneously measured to validate the results. The average cross-correlation coefficient between the heart rates determined from these two signals was 0.998 (std. dev. 0.001). PMID:17946677

  3. Anticancer Drug Induced Palmar Plantar Erythrodysesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasamurthy, Sureshkumar; Dubashi, Biswajit; Chandrasekaran, Adithan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Palmar plantar erythrodysesthesia (PPE) is a dose limiting toxicity of anticancer agents. In some cases it may mandate for discontinuation of anticancer agents. Evaluation of data of PPE among reported adverse drug reactions (ADRs) from the Department of Medical Oncology could quantify the burden. Aim: To evaluate and analyse the PPE among reported ADRs from medical Oncology. Materials and Methods: The data of all cases of reported PPE were collected during January 2012 to September 2013 and were analysed with WHO causality assessment scale. The severity was clinically graded. The follow-up data regarding outcome of ADRs were also noted. Results: During the study period of 21 months a total of 1418 ADRs have been reported from 1076 patients. Among them PPE was reported from 31 cases (2.9%). Majority (32.2%) of these patients were on chemotherapy for breast cancer. Patient’s age ranged from 17 to 68 y and the median age was 50 y. There were 18 female (58%) and 13 male patients (42%). Capecitabine was the leading drug involved in PPE, reported with 20 cases (64.5%), and followed by docetaxel with 5 cases (16.1%). Majority (67.7%) of the reactions was categorized as certain and 64.5% was grade II severity clinically. Conclusion: Our findings show that PPE accounts for 2.9% of total reported ADRs from Medical Oncology during 21 months. Majority of the reactions were classified as certain. Capecitabine is commonly implicated drug. PMID:25478366

  4. Changes in Achilles tendon mechanical properties following eccentric heel drop exercise are specific to the free tendon.

    PubMed

    Obst, S J; Newsham-West, R; Barrett, R S

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical loading of the Achilles tendon during isolated eccentric contractions could induce immediate and region-dependent changes in mechanical properties. Three-dimensional ultrasound was used to examine the immediate effect of isolated eccentric exercise on the mechanical properties of the distal (free tendon) and proximal (gastrocnemii) regions of the Achilles tendon. Participants (n = 14) underwent two testing sessions in which tendon measurements were made at rest and during a 30% and 70% isometric plantar flexion contractions immediately before and after either: (a) 3 × 15 eccentric heel drops or (b) 10-min rest. There was a significant time-by-session interaction for free tendon length and strain for all loading conditions (P < 0.05). Pairwise comparisons revealed a significant increase in free tendon length and strain at all contraction intensities after eccentric exercise (P < 0.05). There was no significant time-by-session interaction for the gastrocnemii (medial or lateral) aponeurosis or tendon for any of the measured parameters. Immediate changes in Achilles tendon mechanical properties were specific to the free tendon and consistent with changes due to mechanical creep. These findings suggest that the mechanical properties of the free tendon may be more vulnerable to change with exercise compared with the gastrocnemii aponeurosis or tendon. PMID:25919320

  5. Skin-to-skin contact (Kangaroo Care) analgesia for preterm infant heel stick.

    PubMed

    Ludington-Hoe, Susan M; Hosseini, Robert; Torowicz, Deborah L

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare a heel stick conducted during Kangaroo Care (skin-to-skin contact) with the mother to a heel stick in a warmer in reducing premature infant physiologic and behavioral pain responses. Twenty-four premature infants in a university-based neonatal intensive care unit were recruited and randomized to 2 sequences: sequence A group received 3 hours of Kangaroo Care (with a heel stick in Kangaroo Care) followed by 3 hours in a warmer (with a heel stick in the warmer). Sequence B group had warmer care and a heel stick (in the warmer) before Kangaroo Care and a heel stick (in Kangaroo Care). Heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, crying time, and behavioral state were measured before, during, and after heel stick. Repeated measures ANOVA and Mann Whitney U statistics were performed. Heart rate and length of crying in response to pain were significantly reduced during Kangaroo Care and the Kangaroo Care heel stick as compared to when infants were in the warmer and had a heel stick in the warmer. Three infants did not cry at all during the Kangaroo Care heel stick; infants slept more during Kangaroo Care than in the warmer. Kangaroo Care positioning before and during heel stick is a simple and inexpensive analgesic intervention to ameliorate pain in stable premature infants. PMID:16082239

  6. Using heel protectors for the prevention of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Rajpaul, Kumal; Acton, Claire

    2016-03-01

    Pressure ulcers are a frequent, but often preventable, occurrence among patients in acute care facilities, and the heel is one of the anatomical locations most commonly affected. Multiple clinical guidelines recommend the use of robust assessments to identify at-risk patients and the application of heel protection devices to reduce the likelihood of developing heel pressure ulcers. A quality improvement initiative involving robust skin-assessment practices, staff education, and the use of heel protection devices was analysed retrospectively to evaluate the efficacy of current practice interventions. These analyses revealed that the incidence of heel pressure ulcers was inversely correlated with the number of heel protectors used at two large acute NHS teaching hospitals in inner London, and that the consistent and early use of heel protectors improved patient outcomes and reduced costs of care. PMID:27019180

  7. Reliability of the TekScan MatScan® system for the measurement of plantar forces and pressures during barefoot level walking in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plantar pressure systems are increasingly being used to evaluate foot function in both research settings and in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability of the TekScan MatScan® system in assessing plantar forces and pressures during barefoot level walking. Methods Thirty participants were assessed for the reliability of measurements taken one week apart for the variables maximum force, peak pressure and average pressure. The following seven regions of the foot were investigated; heel, midfoot, 3rd-5th metatarsophalangeal joint, 2nd metatarsophalangeal joint, 1st metatarsophalangeal joint, hallux and the lesser toes. Results Reliability was assessed using both the mean and the median values of three repeated trials. The system displayed moderate to good reliability of mean and median calculations for the three analysed variables across all seven regions, as indicated by intra-class correlation coefficients ranging from 0.44 to 0.95 for the mean and 0.54 to 0.97 for the median, and coefficients of variation ranging from 5 to 20% for the mean and 3 to 23% for the median. Selecting the median value of three repeated trials yielded slightly more reliable results than the mean. Conclusions These findings indicate that the TekScan MatScan® system demonstrates generally moderate to good reliability. PMID:20565812

  8. Endoscopic Plantar Fasciotomy Improves Early Postoperative Results: A Retrospective Comparison of Outcomes After Endoscopic Versus Open Plantar Fasciotomy.

    PubMed

    Chou, Andrew Chia Chen; Ng, Sean Yung Chuan; Koo, Kevin Oon Thien

    2016-01-01

    Plantar fasciotomy is offered to patients with recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. Few studies have characterized the functional outcomes over time for the endoscopic approach compared with the open approach. We hypothesized that patients undergoing endoscopic surgery will have better postoperative functional outcomes early in the postoperative period but equivalent long-term outcomes compared with patients undergoing open surgery. We analyzed the prospectively collected data of all patients undergoing plantar fasciotomy at our institution from December 2007 to August 2014. A total of 42 feet of 38 patients were included in the analysis. The clinical data were collected preoperatively and at 3 and 6 months and 1 year. The functional outcomes analyzed included the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Ankle-Hindfoot scale, the Medical Outcomes Study, Short-Form, 36-item Health Survey, and patient satisfaction and expectations. Patients undergoing endoscopic surgery had significantly greater American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Ankle-Hindfoot and SF-36 Health Survey scores and lower pain scores at the 3-month period. They were also significantly more likely to be satisfied with and have had their expectations met by surgery. Compared with the open approach, the patients who had undergone endoscopic plantar fasciotomy experienced significantly greater improvements in the subjective and objective functional outcomes, with less pain and greater satisfaction, and had had their expectations met earlier in the recovery period, with equivalent long-term outcomes, compared with the patients who had undergone open plantar fasciotomy. PMID:26007627

  9. A Case of Recalcitrant Plantar Warts Associated with Statin Use

    PubMed Central

    Wernham, Aaron G.; Velangi, Shireen S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Plantar warts are a common presenting skin complaint caused by the human papillomavirus. 1st line therapies include cryotherapy and topical salicylic acid. Where there is resistance to these treatments, consideration is made for 2nd line therapies, including intralesional bleomycin, imiquimod, 5-fluorouracil, and photodynamic therapy. We present a case of bilateral persistent plantar warts, resistant to treatment with repeated cryotherapy and topical salicylic acid over a 6-year period. Following a patient initiated decision to discontinue their statin medication, we observed rapid clearance of plantar warts without change to standard therapy or their environment. This case correlates with emerging literature demonstrating a link between statin medication and proliferation of HPV through increased levels of FOXP3+ regulatory T cells. PMID:25789179

  10. Recurrent plantar ulceration following pan metatarsal head resection.

    PubMed

    Petrov, O; Pfeifer, M; Flood, M; Chagares, W; Daniele, C

    1996-01-01

    Although the pan metatarsal head resection, since it was originally described and performed by Hoffman in 1911, has proven to be an effective and viable procedure in treating many forefoot deformities, it is not without its own complications. The authors provide an historical perspective of the pan metatarsal head resection, a discussion on the complication of recurrent plantar ulceration after the pan metatarsal head resection, and a review of their own experience with this procedure. A retrospective review was performed of all patients having undergone pan metatarsal resections between August 1980 and April 1993. Twenty procedures were performed on 12 patients with diabetic neuropathy, and 21 procedures were performed on 15 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The incidence of recurrent plantar ulceration after surgical correction was 25% and 28%, respectively. All 27 patients underwent primary healing. The authors, therefore, conclude that the complication of recurrent plantar ulceration after this procedure is a very likely and distinct possibility. PMID:8986897

  11. Plantar Fat Grafting and Tendon Balancing for the Diabetic Foot Ulcer in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Cynthia A.; Larson, Ethan; Rankin, Timothy M.; Pappalardo, Jennifer L.; Slepian, Marvin J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: We report on the use of free fat grafting as a means of redistributing normal and shear stress after healing of plantar diabetic foot wounds. Although fat augmentation (lipofilling) has been described previously as an approach to supplement defects and prevent atrophy, including use as an adjunct to wound healing and to mitigate pain in the foot, we are unaware of any reports in the medical literature that have described its use in the high-risk diabetic foot in remission. An active 37-year-old man with type 2 diabetes and neuropathy presented with gangrene of his fifth ray, which was amputated. He subsequently developed a chronic styloid process ulceration that progressed despite treatment. We performed a tibialis anterior tendon transfer and total contact casting. He went on to heal but with residual fat pad atrophy and recalcitrant preulcerative lesions. We then used autologous fat grafting for the plantar atrophy. The patient was able to successfully transition to normal shoe gear after 4 weeks with successful engraftment without complication or recurrence of the wound at 6 weeks. This therapy may provide a promising adjunct to increase ulcer-free days to the patient in diabetic foot remission. PMID:27536489

  12. Dynamic plantar pressure analysis. Comparing common insole materials.

    PubMed

    Sanfilippo, P B; Stess, R M; Moss, K M

    1992-10-01

    A comparison of five commonly used insole materials (Spenco, PPT, Plastazote, Nickelplast, and Pelite) was made to evaluate their effectiveness in reducing plantar vertical pressures on human subjects during walking. With the use of the EMED-SF pedograph force plate system, dynamic measures of vertical force, force-time integral, peak plantar pressure, pressure-time integral, and area of foot-to-ground contact were compared with the force plate covered with each of the insole materials and without any interface material. PMID:1474483

  13. Heel and toe driving on fuel cell vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Tayoung; Chen, Dongmei

    2012-12-11

    A system and method for providing nearly instantaneous power in a fuel cell vehicle. The method includes monitoring the brake pedal angle and the accelerator pedal angle of the vehicle, and if the vehicle driver is pressing both the brake pedal and the accelerator pedal at the same time and the vehicle is in a drive gear, activating a heel and toe mode. When the heel and toe mode is activated, the speed of a cathode compressor is increased to a predetermined speed set-point, which is higher than the normal compressor speed for the pedal position. Thus, when the vehicle brake is removed, the compressor speed is high enough to provide enough air to the cathode, so that the stack can generate nearly immediate power.

  14. Abductor Hallucis: Anatomical Variation and Its Clinical Implications in the Reconstruction of Chronic Nonhealing Ulcers and Defects of Foot

    PubMed Central

    Chittoria, Ravi Kumar; Pratap, Harsha; Yekappa, Suma Hottigoudar

    2015-01-01

    Abductor hallucis (AH) is an intrinsic muscle of sole of the foot. It is commonly used in the coverage of ankle and heel defects and chronic nonhealing ulcers of the foot; its use is reported to have a favorable long-term outcome. The muscle's apt bulk and size, its simple surgical isolation, absence of donor-site defect, unvaried anatomy, and long neurovascular pedicle are some of the advantages that make it a promising muscle flap. During routine cadaver dissection in the Department of Anatomy of Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Pondicherry, India, we identified an anatomical variation in AH in both feet of a 45-year-old embalmed male Indian cadaver. The variant muscle had innumerable proximal attachments, a majority of them arising atypically in the form of tough tendinous slips from the medial intermuscular septum at the junction of central and tibial components of plantar aponeurosis, the medial surface of first metatarsal and the intermuscular septum separating AH from the flexor hallucis brevis. The tendon: muscle ratio was 1.76, higher than the normal reported ratio of 0.56±0.07. This article highlights the variation noted and its implication for clinicians. On Internet search, we did not come across the variations described in our article. Findings of the anatomical variation reported in this article could benefit surgeons who decide to use AH flaps in the future. PMID:26634184

  15. Effects of high heel wear and increased weight on the knee during walking.

    PubMed

    Titchenal, Matthew R; Asay, Jessica L; Favre, Julien; Andriacchi, Thomas P; Chu, Constance R

    2015-03-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA), a leading cause of disability, is more prevalent in women than men. Wearing high heeled shoes has been implicated as a potential contributing factor for the higher lifetime risk of osteoarthritis in women. This study tests the hypotheses that changes to knee kinematics and kinetics observed during high heeled walking increase in magnitude with increasing heel height and are accentuated by a 20% increase in weight. Fourteen healthy females were tested using marker-based gait analysis in combinations of footwear (flat athletic shoe, 3.8 cm and 8.3 cm heeled shoes) and weight (with and without 20% bodyweight vest). At preferred walking speed, knee flexion angle at heel-strike and midstance increased with increasing heel height and weight. Maximum knee extension moment during loading response decreased with added weight; maximum knee extension moment during terminal stance decreased with heel height; maximum adduction moments increased with heel height. Many of the changes observed with increasing heel height and weight were similar to those seen with aging and OA progression. This suggests that high heel use, especially in combination with additional weight, may contribute to increased OA risk in women. PMID:25532875

  16. Eccrine Syringofibroadenoma of the Heel: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Doobay, Nathalia; Mallette, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Eccrine syringofibroadenoma is a rare, benign tumor of eccrine ductal differentiation, typically presenting in the extremities. Herein we report a case of a 77-year-old man with pain in the lateral midfoot and the presence of an eccrine syringofibroadenoma lesion in the lateral heel. On surgical excision of the lesion, the foot pain promptly resolved, and at the most recent follow-up visit, the patient remained pain free. PMID:26895365

  17. Quantitative scintigraphy in diagnosis and management of plantar fasciitis (Calcaneal periostitis): concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Sewell, J.R.; Black, C.M.; Chapman, A.H.; Statham, J.; Hughes, G.R.V.; Lavender, J.P.

    1980-07-01

    We have found that Tc-99m methylene diphosphonate imaging of the heel is of diagnostic value in the painful heel syndrome, permitting positive identification of the site of inflammation in cases where radiography is unhelpful. With this technique, tracer uptake in the heel is susceptible to quantification, allowing a serial and objective assessment of response to therapy.

  18. Cement mantle stress under retroversion torque at heel-strike.

    PubMed

    Afsharpoya, B; Barton, D C; Fisher, J; Purbach, B; Wroblewski, M; Stewart, T D

    2009-12-01

    The paper presents a theory of fixation failure and loosening in cemented total hip prostheses and proceeds to investigate this using an experimentally validated finite element model and two prosthesis types, namely the Charnley and the C-Stem. The study investigates the effects of retroversion torque occurring at heel-strike in combination with a loss of proximal cement/bone support and distal implant/cement support with a good distal cement/bone interface. A 3D finite element model was validated by comparison of femoral surface strains with those measured in an in vitro experimental simulation using an implanted Sawbone femur loaded in the heel-strike position and including a simplified representation of muscle forces. Results showed that the heel-strike position applies a high retroversion torque to the femoral stem that when combined with proximal debonding of the cement/bone interface and distal debonding of the implant/cement interface increases the strain transfer to the cement that may ultimately lead to the breakdown of the cement mantle leading on to osteolysis and loosening of the prostheses. Experimental fatigue testing of the implanted Charnley stem in a Sawbone femur produced cracks within the cement mantle that were located in positions of maximum stress supporting the finite element analysis results and theory of failure. PMID:19879794

  19. Heel-region properties of prosthetic feet and shoes.

    PubMed

    Klute, Glenn K; Berge, Jocelyn S; Segal, Ava D

    2004-07-01

    The properties of the prosthetic components prescribed to amputees have the potential to ameliorate or exacerbate their comfort, mobility, and health. To measure the difference in heel-region structural properties of currently available prosthetic feet and shoes, we simulated the period of initial heel-ground contact with a pendulum apparatus. The energy dissipation capacity of the various prosthetic feet ranged from 33.6% to 52.6% of the input energy. Donning a shoe had a large effect. Energy dissipation of a Seattle Lightfoot 2 prosthetic foot was 45.3%, while addition of a walking, running, and orthopedic shoe increased energy dissipation to 63.0%, 73.0%, and 82.4%, respectively. The force versus deformation response to impact was modeled as a hardening spring in parallel with a position-dependent damping element. A nonlinear least-squares curve fit produced model coefficients useful for predicting the heel-region impact response of both prosthetic feet and shoes. PMID:15558382

  20. Relationship between elevated plantar pressure of toes and forefoot and gait features in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Amemiya, Ayumi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Oe, Makoto; Takehara, Kimie; Yamada, Amika; Ohashi, Yumiko; Ueki, Kohjiro; Kadowaki, Takashi; Mori, Taketoshi; Sanada, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    This cross-sectional observational study is to reveal what kind of gait feature is relevant to elevated segment and its plantar pressure for prevention of diabetic foot ulcers. In 57 diabetic patients, the relationship between elevated plantar pressure and gait features was analyzed. To conduct this investigation, a simultaneous measurement system of plantar pressure and gait features was constructed. Plantar pressure distribution was measured by F-scan with customized footwear, and gait features were mainly measured using wireless motion sensors attached to the sacrum and feet. Several gait features of small rolling during the mid-stance phase were relevant to the elevated plantar pressure. PMID:24110767

  1. Nordic Walking Practice Might Improve Plantar Pressure Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Soriano, Pedro; Llana-Belloch, Salvador; Martinez-Nova, Alfonso; Morey-Klapsing, G.; Encarnacion-Martinez, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Nordic walking (NW), characterized by the use of two walking poles, is becoming increasingly popular (Morgulec-Adamowicz, Marszalek, & Jagustyn, 2011). We studied walking pressure patterns of 20 experienced and 30 beginner Nordic walkers. Plantar pressures from nine foot zones were measured during trials performed at two walking speeds (preferred…

  2. Calculation of plantar pressure time integral, an alternative approach.

    PubMed

    Melai, Tom; IJzerman, T Herman; Schaper, Nicolaas C; de Lange, Ton L H; Willems, Paul J B; Meijer, Kenneth; Lieverse, Aloysius G; Savelberg, Hans H C M

    2011-07-01

    In plantar pressure measurement, both peak pressure and pressure time integral are used as variables to assess plantar loading. However, pressure time integral shows a high concordance with peak pressure. Many researchers and clinicians use Novel software (Novel GmbH Inc., Munich, Germany) that calculates this variable as the summation of the products of peak pressure and duration per time sample, which is not a genuine integral of pressure over time. Therefore, an alternative calculation method was introduced. The aim of this study was to explore the relevance of this alternative method, in different populations. Plantar pressure variables were measured in 76 people with diabetic polyneuropathy, 33 diabetic controls without polyneuropathy and 19 healthy subjects. Peak pressure and pressure time integral were obtained using Novel software. The quotient of the genuine force time integral over contact area was obtained as the alternative pressure time integral calculation. This new alternative method correlated less with peak pressure than the pressure time integral as calculated by Novel. The two methods differed significantly and these differences varied between the foot sole areas and between groups. The largest differences were found under the metatarsal heads in the group with diabetic polyneuropathy. From a theoretical perspective, the alternative approach provides a more valid calculation of the pressure time integral. In addition, this study showed that the alternative calculation is of added value, along peak pressure calculation, to interpret adapted plantar pressures patterns in particular in patients at risk for foot ulceration. PMID:21737281

  3. Efficacy of a single-formula acupuncture treatment for horses with palmar heel pain

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Katherine A.; Manning, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture is used without strong scientific evidence to treat many diseases of the horse, including palmar heel pain. Research is needed to provide evidence for the application of these treatments. Within the confines of our study, acupuncture did not reliably modulate palmar heel pain in horses. PMID:26663921

  4. Efficacy of a single-formula acupuncture treatment for horses with palmar heel pain.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Katherine A; Manning, Stephen T

    2015-12-01

    Acupuncture is used without strong scientific evidence to treat many diseases of the horse, including palmar heel pain. Research is needed to provide evidence for the application of these treatments. Within the confines of our study, acupuncture did not reliably modulate palmar heel pain in horses. PMID:26663921

  5. Reliability of the Kinetic Measures under Different Heel Conditions during Normal Walking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yuanlong; Wang, Yong Tai

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the reliability of 3 dimension reaction forces and impulses in walking with 3 different heel shoe conditions. These results suggest that changing the height of the heels affects mainly the reliability of the ground reaction force and impulse measures on the medial and lateral dimension and not…

  6. Careful assessment the key to diagnosing adolescent heel pain.

    PubMed

    Davison, Martin J; David-West, S Kenneth; Duncan, Roderick

    2016-05-01

    The most common cause of adolescent heel pain is calcaneal apophysitis also known as Sever's disease. The condition may occur in adolescent athletes, particularly those involved in running or jumping activities, during the pubertal growth spurt. The mean age of presentation in Sever's disease is ten, (range 7-15). It presents with posterior heel pain that is worse with activity and relieved by rest in most cases. Sever's disease, Osgood Schlatter's disease (tibial tuberosity) and Sinding-Larsen Johansson syndrome (distal patella) are all overuse syndromes brought about by repetitive submaximal loading and microtrauma. They are, however, entirely self-limiting and resolve at skeletal maturity or earlier. Careful assessment is required to differentiate them from other rare pathologies. Achilles tendinitis is rare under the age of 14. As in Sever's disease, it may occur in jumping athletes, those who suddenly increase their sporting activities and in individuals with relative gastrosoleus tightness. It may also occur in those with inflammatory arthropathies and merit rheumatological investigation if there are other suggestive signs or symptoms. Benign and malignant tumours of the adolescent calcaneus are extremely rare In a unilateral case, atypical features such as night pain or absence of a precipitating activity should raise the index of suspicion. There may be localised swelling and bony expansion. PMID:27382917

  7. Finite element analysis of heel pad with insoles.

    PubMed

    Luo, Gangming; Houston, Vern L; Garbarini, Mary Anne; Beattie, Aaron C; Thongpop, Chaiya

    2011-05-17

    To design optimal insoles for reduction of pedal tissue trauma, experimental measurements and computational analyses were performed. To characterize the mechanical properties of the tissues, indentation tests were performed. Pedal tissue geometry and morphology were obtained from magnetic resonance scan of the subject's foot. Axisymmetrical finite element models of the heel of the foot were created with 1/4 of body weight load applied. The stress, strain and strain energy density (SED) fields produced in the pedal tissues were computed. The effects of various insole designs and materials on the resulting stress, strain, and SED in the soft pedal tissues were analyzed. The results showed: (a) Flat insoles made of soft material provide some reductions in the maximum stress, strain and SED produced in the pedal tissues. These maximum values were computed near the calcaneus. (b) Flat insoles, with conical/cylindrical reliefs, provided more reductions in these maximum values than without reliefs. (c) Custom insoles, contoured to match the pedal geometry provide most reductions in the maximum stress, strain and SED. Also note, the maximum stress, strain and SED computed near the calcaneus were found to be about 10 times the corresponding peak values computed on the skin surface. Based on the FEA analysis, it can be concluded that changing insole design and using different material can significantly redistribute the stress/strain inside the heel pad as well as on the skin surface. PMID:21420682

  8. The effect of flat horseshoes, raised heels and lowered heels on the biomechanics of the equine hoof assessed by finite element analysis (FEA).

    PubMed

    Hinterhofer, C; Stanek, C; Haider, H

    2000-03-01

    The biomechanical effects of lowering and raising the heels were studied using a finite element (FE) computer model of the equine hoof capsule consisting of 18,635 finite elements. A static load of 3000 N was distributed to nodes of the inner hoof wall (80%) according to the suspension of the coffin bone, 20% loaded sole and frog. When loaded the FE hoof capsules showed the following deformations: the proximal dorsal wall moves back, the quarters flare to the side and sole and frog perform a downward movement. Stresses are high in the material surrounding the quarter nails, in the heels and in the proximal dorsal wall. Three types of horseshoes were simulated, a regular shoe with flat branches, a shoe with 5 degrees raised heels and a shoe with 5 degrees lowered heels. Raising the heels resulted in significantly (P < 0.05) low stress and displacement values. The lowered heels model calculated highest stress and displacement values and the results of the FE model with the regular horseshoe were found in between. PMID:10803106

  9. Plantar pitted keratolysis: a study from non-risk groups

    PubMed Central

    Kaptanoglu, Asli Feride; Yuksel, Ozlem; Ozyurt, Selcuk

    2012-01-01

    Pitted keratolysis is an acquired, superficial bacterial infection of the skin which is characterized by typical malodor and pits in the hyperkeratotic areas of the soles. It is more common in barefooted people in tropical areas, or those who have to wear occlusive shoes, such as soldiers, sailors and athletes. In this study, we evaluated 41 patients who had been diagnosed with plantar pitted keratolysis. The patients were of high socioeconomic status, were office-workers, and most had a university degree. Malodor and plantar hyperhydrosis were the most frequently reported symptoms. The weight-bearing metatarsal parts of the feet were those most affected. Almost half the women in the study gave a history of regular pedicure and foot care in a spa salon. Mean treatment duration was 19 days. All patients were informed about the etiology of the disease, predisposing factors and preventive methods. Recurrences were observed in only 17% of patients during the one year follow-up period. This study emphasizes that even malodorous feet among non-risk city dwellers may be a sign of plantar pitted keratolysis. A study of the real incidence of the disease in a large population-based series is needed. PMID:25386314

  10. The influence of heel height on utilized coefficient of friction during walking.

    PubMed

    Blanchette, Mark G; Brault, John R; Powers, Christopher M

    2011-05-01

    Wearing high heel shoes has been associated with an increased potential for slips and falls. The association between wearing high heels and the increased potential for slipping suggests that the friction demand while wearing high heels may be greater when compared to wearing low heel shoes. The purpose of this study was to determine if heel height affects utilized friction (uCOF) during walking. A secondary purpose of this study was to compare kinematics at the ankle, knee, and hip that may explain uCOF differences among shoes with varied heel heights. Fifteen healthy women (mean age 24.5±2.5yrs) participated. Subjects walked at self-selected velocity under 3 different shoe conditions that varied in heel height (low: 1.27cm, medium: 6.35cm, and high: 9.53cm). Ground reaction forces (GRFs) were recorded using a force platform (1560Hz). Kinematic data were obtained using an 8 camera motion analysis system (120Hz). Utilized friction was calculated as the ratio of resultant shear force to vertical force. One-way repeated measures ANOVAs were performed to test for differences in peak uCOF, GRFs at peak uCOF and lower extremity joint angles at peak uCOF. On average, peak uCOF was found to increase with heel height. The increased uCOF observed in high heel shoes was related to an increase in the resultant shear force and decrease in the vertical force. Our results signify the need for proper public education and increased footwear industry awareness of how high heel shoes affect slip risk. PMID:21536444

  11. The Human Papillomavirus and Its Role in Plantar Warts: A Comprehensive Review of Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Vlahovic, Tracey C; Khan, M Tariq

    2016-07-01

    Viral warts or verruca pedis (plantar warts) are common skin conditions seen in both children and adults. Human papilloma virus (HPV), a DNA virus, is responsible for plantar verrucae. It needs an epidermal abrasion and a transiently impaired immune system to inoculate a keratinocyte. These entities are a therapeutic conundrum for many practitioners. This article discusses HPV infiltration and its subtypes involved in plantar warts; the evaluation of patients with plantar warts; and subsequent treatment options, such as laser, Candida albicans immunotherapy, topical therapy such as phytotherapy, and surgical excision. PMID:27215155

  12. Reproducibility test on a children's insole for measuring the dynamic plantar pressure distribution.

    PubMed

    Hayes, A; Seitz, P

    1997-04-01

    INTRODUCTION:: This study aimed to establish the reproducibility of a insole measuring system specifically designed for use inside children's shoes. It is important to carry out such an investigation before any measurements are taken in order to ensure that any errors associated with the system are known and quantified. The children's insole had 84 pressure sensors, compared to the adult insoles, with 99 pressure sensors. The sensor technology was essentially the same as used in the adult Pedar system, and incorporated capacitance-based pressure transducers. MATERIALS AND METHOD:: An eight year old boy, height 123 cm, weight 29 kg, was used in the study. Dynamic tests were carried out with the Pedar insole measuring system. The subject walked on a treadmill, at a speed comfortable for him (3 km/h), with the insoles placed between the foot and the shoe. No fixation of the insole to the shoe was used. Seven runs were completed, each with four tests recorded of more than twenty steps. In between each run the insoles were completely removed from the shoe and then replaced. A zero measurement was also taken before the continuation of the next run. Before analysis of the data, twenty steps were selected. The first two steps in each sequence were ignored and the following twenty steps were used in the analysis, ten each for the left and the right foot. Any additional steps recorded were also ignored. The average force for the test data file was initially noted, together with the local pressure for each of the forefoot, midfoot, heel and toe regions, for both the left and the right foot, separately. RESULTS:: The within test data and in-between test data when walking on a treadmill at constant speed was found to be reproducible (F(0.01)) for 6 out of 7 tests for the left and the right foot. The standard deviation of the average force for the left and the right foot was 3%. The 95% confidence intervals for the mean of the peak pressure in the total object was within 6% for

  13. The Malaria Parasite's Achilles' Heel: Functionally-relevant Invasion Structures.

    PubMed

    Patarroyo, Manuel E; Alba, Martha P; Reyes, Cesar; Rojas-Luna, Rocio; Patarroyo, Manuel A

    2016-01-01

    Malaria parasites have their Achilles' heel; they are vulnerable in small parts of their relevant molecules where they can be wounded and killed. These are sporozoite and merozoite protein conserved high activity binding peptides (cHABPs), playing a critical role in binding to and invasion of host cells (hepatocytes and erythrocytes, respectively). cHABPs can be modified by specific amino acid replacement, according to previously published physicochemical rules, to produce analogues (mHABPs) having left-handed polyproline II (PPIIL)-like structures which can modulate an immune response due to fitting perfectly into the HLA-DRβ1* peptide binding region (PBR) and having an appropriate presentation to the T-cell receptor (TCR). PMID:25830771

  14. Radiation levels on empty cylinders containing heel material

    SciTech Connect

    Shockley, C.W.

    1991-12-31

    Empty UF{sub 6} cylinders containing heel material were found to emit radiation levels in excess of 200 mr/hr, the maximum amount stated in ORO-651. The radiation levels were as high as 335 mr/hr for thick wall (48X and 48Y) cylinders and 1050 mr/hr for thin wall (48G and 48H) cylinders. The high readings were found only on the bottom of the cylinders. These radiation levels exceeded the maximum levels established in DOT 49 CFR, Part 173.441 for shipment of cylinders. Holding periods of four weeks for thick-wall cylinders and ten weeks for thin-wall cylinders were established to allow the radiation levels to decay prior to shipment.

  15. Trypanosome resistance to human innate immunity: targeting Achilles' heel.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Natalie A; Kieft, Rudo; Macleod, Annette; Hajduk, Stephen L

    2012-12-01

    Trypanosome lytic factors (TLFs) are powerful, naturally occurring toxins in humans that provide sterile protection against infection by several African trypanosomes. These trypanocidal complexes predominantly enter the parasite by binding to the trypanosome haptoglobin/hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR), trafficking to the lysosome, causing membrane damage and, ultimately, cell lysis. Despite TLF-mediated immunity, the parasites that cause human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, have developed independent mechanisms of resistance to TLF killing. In this review we describe the parasite defenses that allow trypanosome infections of humans and discuss how targeting these apparent strengths of the parasite may reveal their Achilles' heel, leading to new approaches in the treatment of HAT. PMID:23059119

  16. Trypanosome resistance to human innate immunity: targeting Achilles’ heel

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Natalie A.; Kieft, Rudo; MacLeod, Annette; Hajduk, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosome lytic factors (TLFs) are powerful, naturally-occurring toxins in humans that provide sterile protection against infection by several African trypanosomes. These trypanocidal complexes predominantly enter the parasite by binding to the trypanosome haptoglobin/hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR), trafficking to the lysosome, causing membrane damage and ultimately, cell lysis. Despite TLF-mediated immunity, the parasites that cause human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, have developed independent mechanisms of resistance to TLF killing. Here we describe the parasite defenses that allow trypanosome infections of humans and discuss how targeting these apparent strengths of the parasite may reveal their Achilles’ heel, leading to new approaches in the treatment of HAT. PMID:23059119

  17. Heel Ultrasound Scan in Detecting Osteoporosis in Low Trauma Fracture Patients.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Faiz R; Elfandi, Khaled O

    2016-06-27

    Osteoporosis is the most common metabolic disease with significant impact on the morbidity and mortality of affected patients. Osteoporosis has a significant impact on the economy worldwide. The aim of this study was to find out whether heel ultrasound is as good as central bone densitometry scanning in diagnosing osteoporosis in patients who are at high risk of osteoporosis. This was a prospective study of patients comparing heel ultrasound to central bone densitometry scanning (dual X-ray absorptiometry, DEXA) in patients. The recruited patients attended for a DEXA scan of the left hip and lumbar spine. All subjects had an ultrasound of the left heel using the quantitative heel ultrasound machine. The results of DEXA scan were blinded from the results of ultrasound and vice versa. There were 59 patients who took part in the study, 12 men and 47 women. The mean age was 66 years (SD 11.9) and mean weight was 62.5 kg (SD 10.7). The sensitivity and specificity of the ultrasound heel test to predict osteoporosis were 53% (95%CI: 29-77) and 86% (95%CI: 75-96) respectively. Specificity for predicting bone mineral density (BMD)-defined osteoporosis was high (86%), but sensitivity was low (53%). A heel ultrasound result in the osteoporotic range was highly predictive of BMD-defined osteoporosis. A positive ultrasound heel test in high risk patients is more useful in ruling in osteoporosis than a negative test to rule out osteoporosis. PMID:27433300

  18. Heel Ultrasound Scan in Detecting Osteoporosis in Low Trauma Fracture Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Faiz R.; Elfandi, Khaled O.

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is the most common metabolic disease with significant impact on the morbidity and mortality of affected patients. Osteoporosis has a significant impact on the economy worldwide. The aim of this study was to find out whether heel ultrasound is as good as central bone densitometry scanning in diagnosing osteoporosis in patients who are at high risk of osteoporosis. This was a prospective study of patients comparing heel ultrasound to central bone densitometry scanning (dual X-ray absorptiometry, DEXA) in patients. The recruited patients attended for a DEXA scan of the left hip and lumbar spine. All subjects had an ultrasound of the left heel using the quantitative heel ultrasound machine. The results of DEXA scan were blinded from the results of ultrasound and vice versa. There were 59 patients who took part in the study, 12 men and 47 women. The mean age was 66 years (SD 11.9) and mean weight was 62.5 kg (SD 10.7). The sensitivity and specificity of the ultrasound heel test to predict osteoporosis were 53% (95%CI: 29-77) and 86% (95%CI: 75-96) respectively. Specificity for predicting bone mineral density (BMD)-defined osteoporosis was high (86%), but sensitivity was low (53%). A heel ultrasound result in the osteoporotic range was highly predictive of BMD-defined osteoporosis. A positive ultrasound heel test in high risk patients is more useful in ruling in osteoporosis than a negative test to rule out osteoporosis. PMID:27433300

  19. Foot deformities, function in the lower extremities, and plantar pressure in patients with diabetes at high risk to develop foot ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ulla Hellstrand; Zügner, Roland; Lisovskaja, Vera; Karlsson, Jon; Hagberg, Kerstin; Tranberg, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Objective Foot deformities, neuropathy, and dysfunction in the lower extremities are known risk factors that increase plantar peak pressure (PP) and, as a result, the risk of developing foot ulcers in patients with diabetes. However, knowledge about the prevalence of these factors is still limited. The aim of the present study was to describe the prevalence of risk factors observed in patients with diabetes without foot ulcers and to explore possible connections between the risk factors and high plantar pressure. Patients and methods Patients diagnosed with type 1 (n=27) or type 2 (n=47) diabetes (mean age 60.0±15.0 years) were included in this cross-sectional study. Assessments included the registration of foot deformities; test of gross function at the hip, knee, and ankle joints; a stratification of the risk of developing foot ulcers according to the Swedish National Diabetes Register; a walking test; and self-reported questionnaires including the SF-36 health survey. In-shoe PP was measured in seven regions of interests on the sole of the foot using F-Scan®. An exploratory analysis of the association of risk factors with PP was performed. Results Neuropathy was present in 28 (38%), and 39 (53%) had callosities in the heel region. Low forefoot arch was present in 57 (77%). Gait-related parameters, such as the ability to walk on the forefoot or heel, were normal in all patients. Eighty percent had normal function at the hip and ankle joints. Gait velocity was 1.2±0.2 m/s. All patients were stratified to risk group 3. Hallux valgus and hallux rigidus were associated with an increase in the PP in the medial forefoot. A higher body mass index (BMI) was found to increase the PP at metatarsal heads 4 and 5. Pes planus was associated with a decrease in PP at metatarsal head 1. Neuropathy did not have a high association with PP. Conclusions This study identified several potential risk factors for the onset of diabetic foot ulcers (DFU). Hallux valgus and hallux

  20. The Changes of COP and Foot Pressure after One Hour's Walking Wearing High-heeled and Flat Shoes

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Dong Yeol; Lee, Han Suk

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the most appropriate height for shoe heels by measuring the displacement of the COP (center of pressure) and changes in the distribution of foot pressure after walking in flat (0.5 cm), middle-heeled (4 cm), and high-heeled (9 cm) shoes for 1 hour. [Methods] A single-subject design was used, with 15 healthy women wearing shoes with heels of each height in a random order. The foot pressure and displacement of COP before and after walking in an ordinary environment for 1 hour were measured using an FDM-S (zebris Medical GmbH, Germany). [Results] The distribution of foot pressure did not change significantly after walking in middle-heeled (4 cm) shoes but did change significantly after walking in either flat (0.5 cm) or high-heeled (9 cm) shoes. Similarly, the COP was not significantly displaced after walking in middle-heeled (4 cm) shoes but was significantly displaced after walking in either flat (0.5 cm) or high-heeled (9 cm) shoes. [Conclusion] Both flat and high-heeled shoes had adverse effects on the body. Middle-heeled (4 cm) shoes are preferable to both flat (0.5 cm) and high-heeled (9 cm) shoes for the health and comfort of the feet. PMID:24259782

  1. Heel pain due to psoriatic arthritis in a 50 year old recreational male athlete: case report

    PubMed Central

    Yedon, Dominique Forand; Howitt, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Heel pain is a common presentation in a sports injury practice, with a list of common differentials including achilles tendinopathy and retrocalcaneal bursitis. However, seronegative arthritis can also cause enthesopathies that produce heel pain and should be considered in a differential diagnosis list. In this case, a 50 year old recreationally active male presented with non-traumatic insidious heel pain and without history of any skin conditions or any other symptoms of seronegative spondyloarthritis. Clinical suspicion led to laboratory testing and radiographs/bone scan which yielded the diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. PMID:22131565

  2. Sensory conduction in medial and lateral plantar nerves.

    PubMed Central

    Ponsford, S N

    1988-01-01

    A simple and reliable method of recording medial and lateral plantar nerve sensory action potentials is described. Potentials are recorded with surface electrodes at the ankle using surface electrodes stimulating orthodromically at the sole. The normal values obtained are higher in amplitude than those obtained by the method described by Guiloff and Sherratt and are detectable in older subjects aged over 80 years. The procedure is valuable in the diagnosis of early peripheral neuropathy, mononeuritis multiplex, tarsal tunnel syndrome and in differentiation between pre and post ganglionic L5 S1 lesions. PMID:2831304

  3. Resistance exercise prevents plantar flexor deconditioning during bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamman, M. M.; Hunter, G. R.; Stevens, B. R.; Guilliams, M. E.; Greenisen, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    Because resistance exercise (REX) and unloading induce opposing neuromuscular adaptations, we tested the efficacy of REX against the effects of 14 d of bed rest unloading (BRU) on the plantar flexor muscle group. Sixteen men were randomly assigned to no exercise (NOE, N = 8) or REX (N = 8). REX performed 5 sets x 6-10 repetitions to failure of constant resistance concentric/eccentric plantar flexion every other day during BRU. One-repetition maximum (1RM) strength was tested on the training device. The angle-specific torque-velocity relationship across 5 velocities (0, 0.52, 1.05, 1.75, and 2.97 rad.s-1) and the full range-of-motion power-velocity relationship were assessed on a dynamometer. Torque-position analyses identified strength changes at shortened, neutral, and stretched muscle lengths. Concentric and eccentric contractile work were measured across ten repetitions at 1.05 rad.s-1. Maximal neural activation was measured by surface electromyography (EMG). 1RM decreased 9% in NOE and improved 11% in REX (P < 0.05). Concentric (0.52 and 1.05 rad.s-1), eccentric (0.52 and 2.97 rad.s-1), and isometric angle-specific torques decreased (P < 0.05) in NOE, averaging 18%, 17%, and 13%, respectively. Power dropped (P < 0.05) in NOE at three eccentric (21%) and two concentric (14%) velocities. REX protected angle-specific torque and average power at all velocities. Concentric and eccentric strength decreased at stretched (16%) and neutral (17%) muscle lengths (P < 0.05) in NOE while REX maintained or improved strength at all joint positions. Concentric (15%) and eccentric (11%) contractile work fell in NOE (P < 0.05) but not in REX. Maximal plantar flexor EMG did not change in either group. In summary, constant resistance concentric/eccentric REX completely prevented plantar flexor performance deconditioning induced by BRU. The reported benefits of REX should prove useful in prescribing exercise for astronauts in microgravity and for patients susceptible to functional

  4. Plantar cutaneous function in Parkinson's disease patients ON and OFF L-dopa.

    PubMed

    McKeown, Monica D; Peters, Ryan M; Pasman, Elizabeth P; McKeown, Martin J; Carpenter, Mark G; Inglis, J Timothy

    2016-08-26

    While Parkinson's disease (PD) is traditionally viewed as a motor disorder, there is mounting evidence that somatosensory function becomes affected as well. However, conflicting reports exist regarding whether plantar sensitivity is reduced in early-onset PD patients. Plantar sensitivity was assessed using monofilaments and a gold-standard, two-interval two-alternative forced choice vibrotactile detection task at both 30 and 250Hz. Lower-limb cutaneous reflexes were assessed by delivering continuous, sinusoidal vibration at 30 and 250Hz while recording muscle activity in Tibialis Anterior. We found no evidence of elevated plantar thresholds or dysfunctional lower-limb cutaneous reflexes in PD patients ON medication. We also found no acute effect of ceasing L-dopa intake on either plantar sensitivity or cutaneous reflexes. Our finding of intact cutaneous function in PD supports the further exploration of therapeutics that enhance plantar sensitivity to minimize postural instability, a source of considerable morbidity in this clinical population. PMID:27424795

  5. Design and test of a soft plantar force measurement system for gait detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Zhao, Yulong; Duan, Zhengyong; Liu, Yan

    2012-01-01

    This work describes a plantar force measurement system. The MEMS pressure sensor, as the key sensing element, is designed, fabricated and embedded into a flexible silicon oil-filled bladder made of silicon rubber to constitute a single sensing unit. A conditioning circuit is designed for signal processing and data acquisition. The characteristics of the plantar force sensing unit are investigated by both static and dynamic tests. A comparison of characteristics between the proposed plantar force sensing unit and a commercial flexible force sensor is presented. A practical experiment of plantar force measurement has been carried out to validate the system. The results demonstrate that the proposed measurement system has a potential for success in the application of plantar force measurement during normal gait. PMID:23208558

  6. Design and Test of a Soft Plantar Force Measurement System for Gait Detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Zhao, Yulong; Duan, Zhengyong; Liu, Yan

    2012-01-01

    This work describes a plantar force measurement system. The MEMS pressure sensor, as the key sensing element, is designed, fabricated and embedded into a flexible silicon oil-filled bladder made of silicon rubber to constitute a single sensing unit. A conditioning circuit is designed for signal processing and data acquisition. The characteristics of the plantar force sensing unit are investigated by both static and dynamic tests. A comparison of characteristics between the proposed plantar force sensing unit and a commercial flexible force sensor is presented. A practical experiment of plantar force measurement has been carried out to validate the system. The results demonstrate that the proposed measurement system has a potential for success in the application of plantar force measurement during normal gait. PMID:23208558

  7. How Plantar Exteroceptive Efficiency Modulates Postural and Oculomotor Control: Inter-Individual Variability

    PubMed Central

    Foisy, Arnaud; Kapoula, Zoï

    2016-01-01

    In a previous experiment, we showed that among young and healthy subjects, thin plantar inserts improve postural control and modify vergence amplitudes. In this experiment, however, significant inter-individual variability was observed. We hypothesize that its origin could be attributed to a different reliance upon feet cutaneous afferents. In order to test this hypothesis, we re-analyzed the data relative to 31 young (age 25.7 ± 3.8) and healthy subjects who participated in the first experiment after having classified them into two groups depending on their Plantar Quotient (PQ = Surface area of CoPfoam/Surface area of CoPfirm ground × 100). Foam decreases the information arising from the feet, normally resulting in a PQ > 100. Hence, the PQ provides information on the weight of plantar cutaneous afferents used in postural control. Twelve people were Plantar-Independent Subjects, as indicated by a PQ < 100. These individuals did not behave like the Normal Plantar Quotient Subjects: they were almost insensitive to the plantar stimulations in terms of postural control and totally insensitive in terms of oculomotor control. We conclude that the inter-individual variability observed in our first experiment is explained by the subjects' degree of plantar reliance. We propose that plantar independence is a dysfunctional situation revealing inefficiency in plantar cutaneous afferents. The latter could be due to a latent somatosensory dysfunction generating a noise which prevents the CNS from correctly processing and using feet somatosensory afferents both for balance and vergence control: Plantar Irritating Stimulus. Considering the non-noxious nature and prevalence of this phenomenon, these results can be of great interest to researchers and clinicians who attempt to trigger postural or oculomotor responses through mechanical stimulation of the foot sole. PMID:27242490

  8. How Plantar Exteroceptive Efficiency Modulates Postural and Oculomotor Control: Inter-Individual Variability.

    PubMed

    Foisy, Arnaud; Kapoula, Zoï

    2016-01-01

    In a previous experiment, we showed that among young and healthy subjects, thin plantar inserts improve postural control and modify vergence amplitudes. In this experiment, however, significant inter-individual variability was observed. We hypothesize that its origin could be attributed to a different reliance upon feet cutaneous afferents. In order to test this hypothesis, we re-analyzed the data relative to 31 young (age 25.7 ± 3.8) and healthy subjects who participated in the first experiment after having classified them into two groups depending on their Plantar Quotient (PQ = Surface area of CoPfoam/Surface area of CoPfirm ground × 100). Foam decreases the information arising from the feet, normally resulting in a PQ > 100. Hence, the PQ provides information on the weight of plantar cutaneous afferents used in postural control. Twelve people were Plantar-Independent Subjects, as indicated by a PQ < 100. These individuals did not behave like the Normal Plantar Quotient Subjects: they were almost insensitive to the plantar stimulations in terms of postural control and totally insensitive in terms of oculomotor control. We conclude that the inter-individual variability observed in our first experiment is explained by the subjects' degree of plantar reliance. We propose that plantar independence is a dysfunctional situation revealing inefficiency in plantar cutaneous afferents. The latter could be due to a latent somatosensory dysfunction generating a noise which prevents the CNS from correctly processing and using feet somatosensory afferents both for balance and vergence control: Plantar Irritating Stimulus. Considering the non-noxious nature and prevalence of this phenomenon, these results can be of great interest to researchers and clinicians who attempt to trigger postural or oculomotor responses through mechanical stimulation of the foot sole. PMID:27242490

  9. Differences in Plantar Flexor Fascicle Length and Pennation Angle between Healthy and Poststroke Individuals and Implications for Poststroke Plantar Flexor Force Contributions

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, John W.; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Higginson, Jill S.

    2014-01-01

    Poststroke plantar flexor muscle weakness has been attributed to muscle atrophy and impaired activation, which cannot collectively explain the limitations in force-generating capability of the entire muscle group. It is of interest whether changes in poststroke plantar flexor muscle fascicle length and pennation angle influence the individual force-generating capability and whether plantar flexor weakness is due to uniform changes in individual muscle force contributions. Fascicle lengths and pennation angles for the soleus, medial, and lateral gastrocnemius were measured using ultrasound and compared between ten hemiparetic poststroke subjects and ten healthy controls. Physiological cross-sectional areas and force contributions to poststroke plantar flexor torque were estimated for each muscle. No statistical differences were observed for any muscle fascicle lengths or for the lateral gastrocnemius and soleus pennation angles between paretic, nonparetic, and healthy limbs. There was a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in the paretic medial gastrocnemius pennation angle compared to both nonparetic and healthy limbs. Physiological cross-sectional areas and force contributions were smaller on the paretic side. Additionally, bilateral muscle contributions to plantar flexor torque remained the same. While the architecture of each individual plantar flexor muscle is affected differently after stroke, the relative contribution of each muscle remains the same. PMID:25147753

  10. Effects of bridging plus exercises with heel lift on lower extremity muscles

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of the bridging plus exercise with heel lift on lower extremity muscles. [Subjects and Methods] Nine healthy males participated. The subjects performed bridging exercises under two conditions. Surface electromyography was used to measure the electrical activities of the medial hamstring (MH) and the gluteus maximus (GM) muscles. [Results] Activation of the MH muscle during bridging with heel lift decreased, and activation of the GM muscle during bridging with heel lift increased compared to those with the bridging exercise. [Conclusion] This result showed that bridging plus exercises with heel lift could be an effective exercise for patients with compensatory mechanisms during bridging exercises, such as weak GM with hamstring tightness. PMID:27313376

  11. Analysis of Factors Affecting Stress Solution at Concrete Gravity Dam Heel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Vu Hoang; Quoc Cong, Trinh; Tongchun, Li

    2010-05-01

    Along with Vietnam's development, various hydraulic constructions including concrete gravity dams have been being built. In some of these dams, the fractures occurred at the heel of the dams are even in small and media dams. There are various reasons cause the factures at dam heel but the main reason is the stress states at dam heel are not determined correctly while designing dam. In this paper, several factors affecting stress solution at concrete gravity dam heel such as element mesh size, crack joints of upstream foundation, execution process are investigated by using finite element model of Banve concrete gravity dam. This work is very significant when the more high concrete gravity dams will be constructed in Vietnam year after year.

  12. Heel effect adaptive flat field correction of digital x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yongjian; Wang, Jue

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Anode heel effect renders large-scale background nonuniformities in digital radiographs. Conventional offset/gain calibration is performed at mono source-to-image distance (SID), and disregards the SID-dependent characteristic of heel effect. It results in a residual nonuniform background in the corrected radiographs when the SID settings for calibration and correction differ. In this work, the authors develop a robust and efficient computational method for digital x-ray detector gain correction adapted to SID-variant heel effect, without resorting to physical filters, phantoms, complicated heel effect models, or multiple-SID calibration and interpolation.Methods: The authors present the Duo-SID projection correction method. In our approach, conventional offset/gain calibrations are performed only twice, at the minimum and maximum SIDs of the system in typical clinical use. A fast iterative separation algorithm is devised to extract the detector gain and basis heel patterns from the min/max SID calibrations. The resultant detector gain is independent of SID, while the basis heel patterns are parameterized by the min- and max-SID. The heel pattern at any SID is obtained from the min-SID basis heel pattern via projection imaging principles. The system gain desired at a specific acquisition SID is then constructed using the projected heel pattern and detector gain map.Results: The method was evaluated for flat field and anatomical phantom image corrections. It demonstrated promising improvements over interpolation and conventional gain calibration/correction methods, lowering their correction errors by approximately 70% and 80%, respectively. The separation algorithm was able to extract the detector gain and heel patterns with less than 2% error, and the Duo-SID corrected images showed perceptually appealing uniform background across the detector.Conclusions: The Duo-SID correction method has substantially improved on conventional offset/gain corrections for

  13. Ostectomy and Medial Plantar Artery Flap Reconstruction for Charcot Foot Ulceration Involving the Midfoot.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tomoya; Ichioka, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Charcot foot is a serious complication of diabetes, characterized by deformity and overlying ulceration. The condition most commonly affects the midfoot. However, little information is available on the use of a medial plantar artery flap to treat diabetic midfoot ulceration. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the versatility of ostectomy and medial plantar flap reconstruction for midfoot plantar ulceration associated with rocker-bottom deformity secondary to Charcot foot. Four patients underwent ostectomy and medial plantar flap reconstruction. Before flap reconstruction, the devitalized soft tissues and bone were radically resected. After the infection had been controlled, the ulcerated portion was minimally excised, and the bony prominence underlying the ulcer was removed. A medial plantar artery flap was applied to the ulcer. The donor site was covered with a split-thickness skin graft or artificial dermis. In all patients, the ulcers healed and independent ambulation was achieved. However, 1 patient experienced ulcer recurrence, and subsequent infection necessitated a major amputation. Limb salvage is challenging in the setting of deformity and intractable plantar ulceration. The advantages of medial plantar artery flap reconstruction are that tissues with a rich blood supply are used to cover the exposed bone, and the flap can withstand the pressure and shear stress of the patient's body weight. However, a dominant artery in the foot is sacrificed. Therefore, the patency of the dorsalis pedis artery must be confirmed in every patient. The results of the present study have demonstrated that a medial plantar artery can be an effective alternative for diabetic patients with a plantar ulcer secondary to Charcot foot. PMID:26190780

  14. Plantar flexor moment arm and muscle volume predict torque-generating capacity in young men

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Josh R.

    2013-01-01

    Muscle volume is known to correlate with maximal joint torque in humans, but the role of muscle moment arm in determining maximal torque is less clear. Moderate correlations have been reported between maximal isometric knee extensor torque and knee extensor moment arm, but no such observations have been made for the ankle joint. It has been suggested that smaller muscle moment arms may enhance force generation at high rates of joint rotation, but this has not yet been observed for ankle muscles in vivo. The purpose of the present study was to correlate plantar flexor moment arm and plantar flexor muscle volume with maximal plantar flexor torque measured at different rates of plantar flexion. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to quantify the plantar flexor moment arm and muscle volume of the posterior compartment in 20 healthy young men. Maximal plantar flexor torque was measured isometrically and at three plantar flexion speeds using an isokinetic dynamometer. Plantar flexor torque was significantly correlated with muscle volume (0.222 < R2 < 0.322) and with muscle moment arm at each speed (0.323 < R2 < 0.494). While muscle volume was strongly correlated with body mass and stature, moment arm was not. The slope of the torque-moment arm regression line decreased as the rate of joint rotation increased, indicating that subjects with small moment arms experienced smaller reductions in torque at high speeds. The findings of this study suggest that plantar flexor moment arm is a determinant of joint strength that is at least as important as muscle size. PMID:24371016

  15. Differential impact of visual feedback on plantar- and dorsi-flexion maximal torque output.

    PubMed

    Toumi, Anis; Jakobi, Jennifer M; Simoneau-Buessinger, Emilie

    2016-05-01

    The effect of visual feedback on enhancing isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) was evaluated. Twelve adults performed plantar-flexion and dorsi-flexion MVCs in 3 conditions (no visual feedback, visual feedback, and visual feedback with target). There was no significant effect of visual conditions on dorsi-flexion MVC but there was an effect on plantar-flexion. Irrespective of whether a target was evident, visual feedback increased plantar-flexion MVC by ∼15%. This study highlights the importance of optimal feedback to enhance MVC. PMID:27031663

  16. The Artificial Gravity Bed Rest Pilot Project: Effects on Knee Extensor and Plantar Flexor Muscle Groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiozzo, V. J.; Haddad, F.; Lee, S.; Baker, M.; Baldwin, K. M.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this project was to examine the effects of artificial gravity (2.5 g) on skeletal muscle strength and key anabolic/catabolic markers known to regulate muscle mass. Two groups of subjects were selected for study: 1) a 21 day-bed rest (BR) control (C) group (N=7); and 2) an AG group (N=8), which was exposed to 21 days of bed-rest plus daily 1 hr exposures to AG (2.5 g). This particular experiment was part of an integrated AG Pilot Project sponsored by NASA/Johnson Space Center. The in vivo torque-velocity relationships of the knee extensors and plantar flexors of the ankle were determined pre and post treatment. Also, pre- and post treatment biopsy samples were obtained from both the vastus lateralis and soleus muscles and were used, in part, for a series of analyses on gene expression (mRNA abundance) of key factors implicated in the anabolic versus catabolic state of the muscle. Post/Pre toque-velocity determinations revealed greater decrements in knee extensor performance in the C versus AG group (P less than 0.04). The plantar flexor muscle group of the AG subjects actually demonstrated a net gain in torque-velocity relationship; whereas, in the C group the overall post/pre responses declined (AG vs C; P less than 0.001). Measurements of muscle fiber cross-sectional area (for both muscles) demonstrated a loss of approx. 20% in the C group while no losses were evident in the AG group. RT-PCR analyses of muscle biopsy specimens demonstrated that markers of growth and cytoskeletal integrity (IGF-1, IGF-1 BP4, mechano growth factor, total RNA, and pro-collagen 3a) were higher in the AG group, whereas catabolic markers (myostatin and atrogen) were elevated in the C group. Importantly, these patterns were seen in both muscles. Based on these observations we conclude that paradigms of AG have the potential to maintain the functional, biochemical, and structural homeostasis of skeletal muscle in the face of chronic unloading states. These findings also

  17. [Simplification and codification of treatment for leprous plantar ulcers].

    PubMed

    Grauwin, M Y; Hirzel, C; Mane, I; Cartel, J L; Lepers, J P

    1997-01-01

    Practically leprous plantar ulcers (PU) are difficult to treat and heal under field condition. Considering the important number of patients showing a PU, the directors of national leprosy control programmes are determined, within the programmes on prevention of disabilities (POD), to treat the PU in the field. Therefore it appears to be essential to codify and simplify their treatment thus enabling it to be effective. The healing of PU being the only criteria of effectiveness of the technique. Four clinical stages were defined, each corresponding to a precise way of treatment using only essential and basic products at low cost. During the trainings about the treatment techniques and attitudes much emphasize is given on the discharge of the PU, on the trimming of the wound and on the products to use according to PU's evolutionary stage. PMID:9281295

  18. Microsurgical Reconstruction of Plantar Ulcers of the Insensate Foot.

    PubMed

    Kadam, Dinesh

    2016-06-01

    Background Plantar, neuropathic, or trophic ulcers are often found in patients with decreased sensation in the foot. These ulcers can be complicated by infection, deformity, and increased patient morbidity. Excision results in wider defects and local tissues are often insufficient for reconstruction Methods Total 26 free flaps were used in 25 patients to reconstruct plantar ulcers between years 2007 and 2013. The etiology included diabetic neuropathy (n = 13), leprosy (n = 3), spinal/peripheral nerve injury (n = 7), spina bifida (n = 1), and peripheral neuropathy (n = 1). The duration of the ulcer ranged from 1 to 18 years. Fifteen patients had associated systemic comorbidities and six had previous attempts. Free flaps used in reconstruction were the anterolateral thigh flap (n = 18), radial artery forearm flap (n = 4), and the gracilis muscle flap (n = 4). Recipient vessels were the posterior tibial artery (end to side) in 19 and the dorsalis pedis artery in 7. Results The average age at presentation was 44.6 years with mean duration of ulcer of 5.8 years predominantly located over weight-bearing areas. Mean size of ulcer was 59.45 cm(2) and mean follow-up period was 48 months. All flaps survived except a partial loss. Average time to resume ambulation was 6 weeks. Three patients had recurrence with mean follow-up of 48 months. Secondary flap reduction and bony resection was done in four. Conclusion Microvascular reconstruction of the sole has advantages of vascularity, adequate tissue, and leaving rest of the foot undisturbed for offloading. Three significant local conditions influencing selection and transfer of the flap include (1) distally located forefoot ulcers, (2) extensive subcutaneous fibrosis secondary to frequent inflammation, and (3) Charcot arthropathy. In our series, the anterolateral thigh flap is our first choice for reconstruction of these defects. PMID:26910652

  19. [The use of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of plantar fibromatosis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Halefoğlu, Ahmet Mesrur

    2005-01-01

    Plantar fibromatosis is a benign but infiltrative neoplasm, presenting as a slow-growing nodular thickening most often within the central band of the plantar aponeurosis. In this case report, we presented a 43-year-old male patient who had a tender nodule in the sole of the right foot for two years. On magnetic resonance images, the location and signal intensity characteristics of the lesion were suggestive of plantar fibromatosis, which was histologically confirmed following an incisional biopsy. Magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive method for confirmation of the clinical diagnosis of plantar fibromatosis and also has an important role in planning surgical treatment by delineating the extent of the lesion. PMID:15925942

  20. Traumatic Lateral Plantar Artery Pseudoaneurysm and the Use of Time-Resolved MR Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Anthony; Foo, Li Foong

    2010-01-01

    Vascular injury resulting in pseudoaneurysm formation in the plantar aspect of the foot is an uncommon injury after trauma. Such injuries are more often reported in the lateral plantar artery rather than the medial plantar artery, most likely because of its more superficial location. Traditional modalities in diagnosis have included ultrasound and digital subtraction angiography. We present a case of traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the lateral plantar artery following a foot laceration. Diagnosis was made by the use of high-resolution, time-resolved contrast-enhanced 3D magnetic resonance angiography, also referred to as “TRICKS” (time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics). This technique provided high spatial resolution for the arterial anatomy as well as temporal resolution which allowed better delineation of the hemodynamic characteristics of the pseudoaneurysm. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11420-010-9170-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:21886538

  1. A mathematical method for quantifying in vivo mechanical behaviour of heel pad under dynamic load.

    PubMed

    Naemi, Roozbeh; Chatzistergos, Panagiotis E; Chockalingam, Nachiappan

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical behaviour of the heel pad, as a shock attenuating interface during a foot strike, determines the loading on the musculoskeletal system during walking. The mathematical models that describe the force deformation relationship of the heel pad structure can determine the mechanical behaviour of heel pad under load. Hence, the purpose of this study was to propose a method of quantifying the heel pad stress-strain relationship using force-deformation data from an indentation test. The energy input and energy returned densities were calculated by numerically integrating the area below the stress-strain curve during loading and unloading, respectively. Elastic energy and energy absorbed densities were calculated as the sum of and the difference between energy input and energy returned densities, respectively. By fitting the energy function, derived from a nonlinear viscoelastic model, to the energy density-strain data, the elastic and viscous model parameters were quantified. The viscous and elastic exponent model parameters were significantly correlated with maximum strain, indicating the need to perform indentation tests at realistic maximum strains relevant to walking. The proposed method showed to be able to differentiate between the elastic and viscous components of the heel pad response to loading and to allow quantifying the corresponding stress-strain model parameters. PMID:26044551

  2. Oral Sucrose for Heel Lance Increases ATP Utilization and Oxidative Stress in Preterm Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Asmerom, Yayesh; Slater, Laurel; Boskovic, Danilo S.; Bahjri, Khaled; Plank, Megan S; Phillips, Raylene; Deming, Douglas; Ashwal, Stephen; Fayard, Elba; Angeles, Danilyn M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of sucrose on pain and biochemical markers of adenosine trisphosphate(ATP) degradation and oxidative stress in preterm neonates experiencing a clinically required heel lance. Study design Preterm neonates that met study criteria (n=131) were randomized into three groups: (1) control; (2) heel lance treated with placebo and non-nutritive sucking (NNS); and (3) heel lance treated with sucrose and NNS. Plasma markers of ATP degradation (hypoxanthine, xanthine and uric acid) and oxidative stress (allantoin) were measured before and after the heel lance. Pain was measured using the Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP). Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA and Spearman rho. Results We found significant increases in plasma hypoxanthine and uric acid over time in neonates who received sucrose. We also found a significant negative correlation between plasma allantoin concentration and PIPP in a subgroup of neonates who received sucrose. Conclusion A single dose of oral sucrose, given before heel lance, significantly increased ATP utilization and oxidative stress in premature neonates. Because neonates are given multiple doses of sucrose per day, randomized trials are needed to examine the effect of repeated sucrose administration on ATP degradation, oxidative stress and cell injury. PMID:23415615

  3. The influence of a yacht's heeling stability on optimum sail design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneyd, A. D.; Sugimoto, T.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents fundamental results concerning the optimum design of yacht sails and masts. The aerodynamics of a high aspect ratio sail in uniform flow is analysed using lifting line theory to maximise thrust for a given sail area. The novel feature of this work is that thrust is optimised subject to the constraint that the aerodynamic heeling moment generated by the sail is balanced by the righting moment due to hull buoyancy (and the weight of the keel). Initially, the heel angle is therefore unknown, and determined as part of the solution process. Under the assumption of small heel angle, the problem reduces to minimising a quadratic form in the Fourier coefficients for the circulation distribution along the mast, and a simple analytic solution can be derived. It is found that if the mast is too high, the upper section is unused, and as a consequence there is a theoretically ideal mast height for a yacht of given heeling stability. Under the constraints of given sail area and heeling equilibrium it is found that no advantage is to be gained by allowing reverse circulation near the top of the mast. Various implications for yacht performance are discussed.

  4. Oral sucrose for heel lance enhances adenosine triphosphate use in preterm neonates with respiratory distress

    PubMed Central

    Angeles, Danilyn M; Asmerom, Yayesh; Boskovic, Danilo S; Slater, Laurel; Bacot-Carter, Sharon; Bahjri, Khaled; Mukasa, Joseph; Holden, Megan; Fayard, Elba

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of oral sucrose on procedural pain, and on biochemical markers of adenosine triphosphate utilization and oxidative stress in preterm neonates with mild to moderate respiratory distress. Study design: Preterm neonates with a clinically required heel lance that met study criteria (n = 49) were randomized into three groups: (1) control (n = 24), (2) heel lance treated with placebo and non-nutritive sucking (n = 15) and (3) heel lance treated with sucrose and non-nutritive sucking (n = 10). Plasma markers of adenosine triphosphate degradation (hypoxanthine, xanthine and uric acid) and oxidative stress (allantoin) were measured before and after the heel lance. Pain was measured using the Premature Infant Pain Profile. Data were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance, chi-square and one-way analysis of variance. Results: We found that in preterm neonates who were intubated and/or were receiving ⩾30% FiO2, a single dose of oral sucrose given before a heel lance significantly increased markers of adenosine triphosphate use. Conclusion: We found that oral sucrose enhanced adenosine triphosphate use in neonates who were intubated and/or were receiving ⩾30% FiO2. Although oral sucrose decreased pain scores, our data suggest that it also increased energy use as evidenced by increased plasma markers of adenosine triphosphate utilization. These effects of sucrose, specifically the fructose component, on adenosine triphosphate metabolism warrant further investigation. PMID:26770807

  5. Stimulation of the medial plantar nerve for complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mobbs, Ralph J; Lazarro, Amanda

    2010-11-01

    We describe a 47-year old male with complex regional pain syndrome II in the distribution of the medial plantar nerve following metatarsal fracture, which was treated with peripheral nerve stimulation. Using a new technique of nerve stimulation with a percutaneous-type electrode, the patient experienced sustained relief at 12 months follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the first report of peripheral neurostimulation effectively managing pain for the medial plantar nerve. PMID:20708936

  6. Plantar-flexion of the ankle joint complex in terminal stance is initiated by subtalar plantar-flexion: A bi-planar fluoroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Koo, Seungbum; Lee, Kyoung Min; Cha, Young Joo

    2015-10-01

    Gross motion of the ankle joint complex (AJC) is a summation of the ankle and subtalar joints. Although AJC kinematics have been widely used to evaluate the function of the AJC, the coordinated movements of the ankle and subtalar joints are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to accurately quantify the individual kinematics of the ankle and subtalar joints in the intact foot during ground walking by using a bi-planar fluoroscopic system. Bi-planar fluoroscopic images of the foot and ankle during walking and standing were acquired from 10 healthy subjects. The three-dimensional movements of the tibia, talus, and calcaneus were calculated with a three-dimensional/two-dimensional registration method. The skeletal kinematics were quantified from 9% to 86% of the full stance phase because of the limited camera speed of the X-ray system. At the beginning of terminal stance, plantar-flexion of the AJC was initiated in the subtalar joint on average at 75% ranging from 62% to 76% of the stance phase, and plantar-flexion of the ankle joint did not start until 86% of the stance phase. The earlier change to plantar-flexion in the AJC than the ankle joint due to the early plantar-flexion in the subtalar joint was observed in 8 of the 10 subjects. This phenomenon could be explained by the absence of direct muscle insertion on the talus. Preceding subtalar plantar-flexion could contribute to efficient and stable ankle plantar-flexion by locking the midtarsal joint, but this explanation needs further investigation. PMID:26238571

  7. Plantar Pressures During Long Distance Running: An Investigation of 10 Marathon Runners.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Erik; Reaburn, Peter; Tetsworth, Kevin; Imhoff, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to record plantar pressures using an in-shoe measuring system before, during, and after a marathon run in ten experienced long-distance runners with a mean age of 37.7 ± 11.5 years. Peak and mean plantar pressures were recorded before, after, and every three km during a marathon race. There were no significant changes over time in peak and mean plantar pressures for either the dominant or non-dominant foot. There were significant between foot peak and mean plantar pressure differences for the total foot (p = 0.0001), forefoot (p = 0.0001), midfoot (p = 0.02 resp. p = 0.006), hindfoot (p = 0.0001), first ray (p = 0.01 resp. p = 0.0001) and MTP (p = 0.05 resp. p = 0.0001). Long-distance runners do not demonstrate significant changes in mean or peak plantar foot pressures over the distance of a marathon race. However, athletes consistently favoured their dominant extremity, applying significantly higher plantar pressures through their dominant foot over the entire marathon distance. Key pointsFatigue does not increase foot pressuresEvery runner has a dominant foot where pressures are higher and that he/she favoursFoot pressures do not increase over the distance of a marathon run. PMID:27274662

  8. Plantar Pressures During Long Distance Running: An Investigation of 10 Marathon Runners

    PubMed Central

    Hohmann, Erik; Reaburn, Peter; Tetsworth, Kevin; Imhoff, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to record plantar pressures using an in-shoe measuring system before, during, and after a marathon run in ten experienced long-distance runners with a mean age of 37.7 ± 11.5 years. Peak and mean plantar pressures were recorded before, after, and every three km during a marathon race. There were no significant changes over time in peak and mean plantar pressures for either the dominant or non-dominant foot. There were significant between foot peak and mean plantar pressure differences for the total foot (p = 0.0001), forefoot (p = 0.0001), midfoot (p = 0.02 resp. p = 0.006), hindfoot (p = 0.0001), first ray (p = 0.01 resp. p = 0.0001) and MTP (p = 0.05 resp. p = 0.0001). Long-distance runners do not demonstrate significant changes in mean or peak plantar foot pressures over the distance of a marathon race. However, athletes consistently favoured their dominant extremity, applying significantly higher plantar pressures through their dominant foot over the entire marathon distance. Key points Fatigue does not increase foot pressures Every runner has a dominant foot where pressures are higher and that he/she favours Foot pressures do not increase over the distance of a marathon run PMID:27274662

  9. The Role of Arch Compression and Metatarsophalangeal Joint Dynamics in Modulating Plantar Fascia Strain in Running

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Kirsty A.; Stearne, Sarah M.; Alderson, Jacqueline A.; North, Ian; Pires, Neville J.; Rubenson, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Elastic energy returned from passive-elastic structures of the lower limb is fundamental in lowering the mechanical demand on muscles during running. The purpose of this study was to investigate the two length-modulating mechanisms of the plantar fascia, namely medial longitudinal arch compression and metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) excursion, and to determine how these mechanisms modulate strain, and thus elastic energy storage/return of the plantar fascia during running. Eighteen runners (9 forefoot and 9 rearfoot strike) performed three treadmill running trials; unrestricted shod, shod with restricted arch compression (via an orthotic-style insert), and barefoot. Three-dimensional motion capture and ground reaction force data were used to calculate lower limb kinematics and kinetics including MPJ angles, moments, powers and work. Estimates of plantar fascia strain due to arch compression and MPJ excursion were derived using a geometric model of the arch and a subject-specific musculoskeletal model of the plantar fascia, respectively. The plantar fascia exhibited a typical elastic stretch-shortening cycle with the majority of strain generated via arch compression. This strategy was similar in fore- and rear-foot strike runners. Restricting arch compression, and hence the elastic-spring function of the arch, was not compensated for by an increase in MPJ-derived strain. In the second half of stance the plantar fascia was found to transfer energy between the MPJ (energy absorption) and the arch (energy production during recoil). This previously unreported energy transfer mechanism reduces the strain required by the plantar fascia in generating useful positive mechanical work at the arch during running. PMID:27054319

  10. Plantar fasciitis – to jab or to support? A systematic review of the current best evidence

    PubMed Central

    Uden, Hayley; Boesch, Eva; Kumar, Saravana

    2011-01-01

    Background: Plantar fasciitis is a common condition routinely managed by podiatrists in the community and is widely treated conservatively. Two commonly used treatments for plantar fasciitis are customized functional foot orthoses and corticosteroid injections. While common to clinical practice, the evidence base underpinning these treatment strategies is unknown. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review was to assess the effectiveness and safety of customized functional foot orthoses and corticosteroid injections in the treatment of plantar fasciitis. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted. Experimental studies, in English, from 1998 to 2010 were accepted for inclusion in this review. The PEDro quality assessment tool and the National Health and Medical Research Council’s hierarchy of evidence were used to assess the quality of the included studies. Results: Six randomized controlled trials which met the selection criteria were included in this review. Four reported on customized functional foot orthoses and 2 on corticosteroid injections. Current best available evidence highlights that both customized functional foot orthoses and corticosteroid injections can lead to a decrease in pain associated with plantar fasciitis. Additionally, customized functional foot orthoses may also provide an additional benefit in terms of increased functional ability in patients with plantar fasciitis. Corticosteroid injections may have side effects, especially pain (from the injection). Conclusion: Both customized functional foot orthoses and corticosteroid injections can lead to reduction in pain associated with plantar fasciitis. While customized functional foot orthoses may increase the functional outcomes in patients with plantar fasciitis, corticosteroid injections may have side effects (especially pain as a result of the injection), which may limit its acceptability. PMID:21655342