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Sample records for chronic plantar heel

  1. Plantar heel pain and fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Plantar heel pain causes soreness or tenderness of the sole of the foot under the heel, which sometimes extends into the medial arch. The prevalence and prognosis are unclear, but the symptoms seem to resolve over time in most people. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for plantar heel pain? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to January 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 15 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: casted orthoses (custom-made insoles), corticosteroid injection (alone, or plus non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), extracorporeal shock wave therapy, heel cups, heel pads (alone or with corticosteroid injection), lasers, local anaesthetic injection (alone or with corticosteroid injection), night splints plus non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, stretching exercises, surgery, taping, and ultrasound. PMID:19450330

  2. Plantar Fasciitis—Heel Pain in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Jeffery A.; Kolodin, Eric L.

    1992-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is the most frequent hind foot problem that affects runners. It occurs when repetitive stress is placed on the heel from a chronic or acute condition. Athletes with biomechanical imbalances are most susceptible to this condition. They exhibit pain in the morning upon weight bearing and, frequently, in the acute stage, have discoloration of the injured area. Management includes preventive and therapeutic exercise, physical therapy, strengthening routines, taping, and the use of orthotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Although injections and NSAIDs bring relief, their effects are often only temporary. This condition is best treated with therapeutic exercises and orthotics in order to correct the athlete's biomechanical faults. This article presents principles and techniques that can be used to effectively prevent and treat plantar fasciitis. ImagesFig 2.Fig 3.Fig 4.Fig 5.Fig 6.Fig 7.Fig 8.Fig 9.Fig 11. PMID:16558136

  3. Proximal plantar fibroma as an etiology of recalcitrant plantar heel pain.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Shaun; Han, Nancy; Pressman, Martin M; Wallace, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Prompted by repeated pathology reports of fibromas at the origin of the plantar fascia after fasciectomy for chronic plantar heel pain, this study examined the incidence of proximal plantar fibroma. A retrospective study of 100 pathology specimens from 97 patients with the preoperative diagnosis of recalcitrant plantar fasciitis was performed. Patients ranged in age from 36 to 82, and included 31 males and 66 females. The specimens consisted of medial and central bands of the fascia obtained from transverse plantar fasciectomies. The fasciectomies were performed by 4 surgeons between July 1994 and March 2008. One quarter of the cases studied had a histological appearance of plantar fibroma. This new finding has not been reported in any literature in connection with recalcitrant heel pain. Histologic findings of the specimens were placed into 3 groups: neoplastic involvement (25%, 21 female and 6 male), inflammation without neoplastic involvement (21%, 13 female and 6 male), and other, which consisted of having no inflammatory or neoplastic response (54%, 32 female and 19 male). All of the patients ailed a 3- to 6-month conservative treatment regimen, which included anti-inflammatory medication, modification of activities, injection of corticosteroids, night splints, custom molded orthotics, and physical therapy. Only 3 patients underwent bilateral plantar fasciectomies. No patient required a revisional procedure. The authors conclude that 25% of recalcitrant heel pain is neoplastic in origin, and that patients presenting with these lesions require excision and not fasciotomy. PMID:21353998

  4. Comparison between extracorporeal shockwave therapy, placebo ESWT and endoscopic plantar fasciotomy for the treatment of chronic plantar heel pain in the athlete

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Amol; Fournier, Magali; Gerdesmeyer, Ludger; Gollwitzer, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Summary Plantar fasciitis can be a chronic and debilitating condition affecting athletes of all levels. The aim of this study is to compare treatment outcomes for the treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis in athletes, comparing focused extra corporeal sound wave therapy (ESWT) and the surgical endoscopic plantar fasciotomy (EPF). A total of 37 eligible patients were enrolled in the study between May 2006 and December 2008 at a single institution. Patients were either enrolled in the surgical group, or to the ESWT group which included a placebo controlled, randomized group (P-ESWT). Pre and post Visual Analog Scores (VAS) and Roles and Maudlsey (RM) scores were recorded and compared between the three groups. The patient’s return to activity (RTA) was also documented. The results showed statistical improvement within the EPF and ESWT groups with both VAS & RM scores, with EPF being significantly better than both ESWT and P-ESWT in terms of treatment outcomes. Patients enrolled in the ESWT were able though to continue with their exercise regimen, while the EPF group was able to return to their athletic activity in an average of 2.8 months. In conclusion, EPF and ESWT are both effective forms of treatment for chronic plantar fasciitis; EPF being superior in outcomes yet ESWT treatment could be preferable since the athlete can remain active during treatment. Level of Evidence: II PMID:23738317

  5. Heel lipoma mimicking plantar fasciitis in a ballroom dancer.

    PubMed

    Taweel, Nicholas R; Raikin, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    The present case illustrates a lipoma as an unusual cause of heel pain. A 64-year-old female ballroom dancer presented with 8 months of pain that was unresponsive to previous treatment of plantar fasciitis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a heel lipoma. Her pain was fully resolved after surgical excision. Soft tissue tumors should be included in the differential diagnosis of heel pain, especially when symptoms and treatment response do not follow the typical course of plantar fasciitis. PMID:25624040

  6. Treatment of Chronic Plantar Fasciitis With Percutaneous Latticed Plantar Fasciotomy.

    PubMed

    Yanbin, Xu; Haikun, Chu; Xiaofeng, Ji; Wanshan, Yang; Shuangping, Liu

    2015-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis, the most common cause of pain in the inferior heel, accounts for 11% to 15% of all foot symptoms requiring professional care among adults. The present study reports the results of a minimally invasive surgical treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis. All patients with plantar fasciitis who had undergone percutaneous latticed plantar fasciotomy at 3 clinical sites from March 2008 to March 2009 were included in the present study. The follow-up evaluations for this treatment were conducted using the Mayo clinical scoring system. We investigated 17 patients with recalcitrant chronic plantar fasciitis who had undergone this treatment within a follow-up period of ?13 months. All procedures were performed in the clinic with the patient under local anesthesia. No wound infections or blood vessel or nerve damage occurred. At a mean follow-up period of 16.0 ± 2.29 (range 13 to 21) months, significant improvement was seen in the preoperative mean Mayo score (from 12.06 ± 2.54 to 89.76 ± 4.28, p < .001) and no patient had developed symptom recurrence. Also, none of the patients had developed complex regional pain syndrome. All patients were able to return to regular shoe wear by 3 weeks postoperatively. The technique of plantar fasciitis with percutaneous latticed plantar fasciotomy could be a promising treatment option for patients with recalcitrant chronic plantar fasciitis. PMID:26058817

  7. Plantar heel pain and foot loading during normal walking.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Justin; Burns, Joshua; Adams, Roger; Pappas, Evangelos; Crosbie, Jack

    2015-02-01

    Plantar heel pain is aggravated by weight-bearing, yet limited evidence exists regarding how people with heel pain load their feet during walking. Knowledge of loading patterns in people with plantar heel pain would enhance the understanding of their foot function and assist in developing intervention strategies. Plantar pressure using the Emed-AT platform (Novel Gmbh, Germany) was collected from 198 people with plantar heel pain and 70 asymptomatic controls during normal walking. Maximum force, force-time integral, peak pressure, pressure-time integral and contact time were measured in four quadrants of the heel, the midfoot and the medial and lateral forefoot. The symptomatic group was sub-divided into equal low-pain and high-pain groups using the Foot Health Status Questionnaire pain score. Following age and body mass comparison, multivariate analyses of covariance were performed to compare the heel pain group to the controls, and the low-pain group to the high-pain group, for each loading variable. The heel pain group displayed lower maximum force beneath the heel, lower peak pressure beneath the postero-lateral heel and lower maximum force beneath the medial forefoot. Force-time integrals were lower beneath the posterior heel regions and higher at the lateral forefoot. People with heel pain also had longer midfoot and forefoot contact time. Higher pain level was associated with lower peak pressure and maximum force beneath regions of the heel. Compared to the controls, people with plantar heel pain demonstrated reduced heel loading and modified forefoot loading consistent with a strategy to offload the painful heel. PMID:25724260

  8. Clinical Characteristics of the Causes of Plantar Heel Pain

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Tae Im; Seo, In Seok; Huh, Won Seok; Yoon, Tae Hee; Kim, Bo Ra

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study were to investigate the causes of plantar heel pain and find differences in the clinical features of plantar fasciitis (PF) and fat pad atrophy (FPA), which are common causes of plantar heel pain, for use in differential diagnosis. Method This retrospective study analyzed the medical records of 250 patients with plantar heel pain at the Foot Clinic of Rehabilitation Medicine at Bundang Jesaeng General Hospital from January to September, 2008. Results The subjects used in this study were 114 men and 136 women patients with a mean age of 43.8 years and mean heel pain duration of 13.3 months. Causes of plantar heel pain were PF (53.2%), FPA (14.8%), pes cavus (10.4%), PF with FPA (9.2%), pes planus (4.8%), plantar fibromatosis (4.4%), plantar fascia rupture (1.6%), neuropathy (0.8%), and small shoe syndrome (0.8%). PF and FPA were most frequently diagnosed. First-step pain in the morning, and tenderness on medial calcaneal tuberosity correlated with PF. FPA mainly involved bilateral pain, pain at night, and pain that was aggravated by standing. Heel cord tightness was the most common biomechanical abnormality of the foot. Heel spur was frequently seen in X-rays of patients with PF. Conclusion Plantar heel pain can be provoked by PF, FPA, and other causes. Patients with PF or FPA typically show different characteristics in clinical features. Plantar heel pain requires differential diagnosis for appropriate treatment. PMID:22506166

  9. Customized heel pads and soft orthotics to treat heel pain and plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Seligman, Deborah A; Dawson, Deirdre R

    2003-10-01

    We describe the design of a new cost-effective, comfortable orthotic designed to treat heel pain associated with plantar fasciitis. The heel pad is fabricated from a 4 degrees Sorbothane medial wedge with a customized insertion of low-density Plastazote. The orthotic is medium-density Plastazote reinforced with cork in the medial longitudinal arch. One pair of orthotics takes less than 1 hour to make. Pilot data were collected retrospectively to evaluate the efficacy of the orthotic for reducing pain. Ten clients at a hand and foot orthotic clinic with a mean age of 71+/-9.1 years and with unilateral or bilateral heel pain associated with plantar fasciitis were provided with customized heel pads and soft, molded orthotics at their initial visit. Pain levels were recorded with verbal and Likert-type scales. After 5 weeks of heel pad and orthotic use, all patients showed a reduction in pain, with the overall reduction being highly significant (Pheel pads and soft molded orthotics are an effective first-line treatment for the heel pain and loss of function associated with plantar fasciitis. PMID:14586928

  10. Heel pain-plantar fasciitis: revision 2014.

    PubMed

    Martin, Robroy L; Davenport, Todd E; Reischl, Stephen F; McPoil, Thomas G; Matheson, James W; Wukich, Dane K; McDonough, Christine M

    2014-11-01

    The Orthopaedic Section of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) has an ongoing effort to create evidence-based practice guidelines for orthopaedic physical therapy management of patients with musculoskeletal impairments described in the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF). The purpose of these revised clinical practice guidelines is to review recent peer-reviewed literature and make recommendations related to nonarthritic heel pain. PMID:25361863

  11. The effect of heel elevation on strain within the plantar aponeurosis: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Kogler, G F; Veer, F B; Verhulst, S J; Solomonidis, S E; Paul, J P

    2001-05-01

    Mild, temporary reduction of symptoms from plantar fasciitis have been reported with the use of high heeled shoes (i.e. cowboy boots, ladies pumps). However, little is known on how heel elevation may contribute to a decrease in the pain and inflammation. The aim of this study was to quantify strain in the plantar aponeurosis in cadaveric feet with the use of various heel elevation configurations. An in vitro method that simulated "static" stance was used to determine the loading characteristics of the plantar aponeurosis (n = 12). Heel elevation was evaluated with blocks placed beneath the heel and with a contoured platform that simulated the arch profile of a shoe at three different heel heights (2.0, 4.0, 6.0 cm) with a level plane serving as the control. Strain in the plantar aponeurosis decreased with elevations of the heel that simulated the arch profile of a shoe at load levels (337, 450 N) (P < 0.05). Elevations of the heel with blocks did not significantly affect strain in the plantar aponeurosis (P < 0.05). Contrasting results of some specimen limbs compared with the overall means suggests that the influence of heel elevation on loading of the plantar aponeurosis may be dependent on individual variation and foot structure differences. Therefore, clinicians should be cautious in recommending heel elevation as a treatment for plantar fasciitis since some subjects may not achieve the desired decrease in plantar aponeurosis strain. PMID:11428764

  12. Regional plantar foot pressure distributions on high-heeled shoes-shank curve effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Yan; Lee, Winson; Zhang, Ming

    2011-12-01

    Forefoot pain is common in high-heeled shoe wearers due to the high pressure caused by the center of body mass moving forward and the increased arch height with heel elevation. Sufficient arch support could reduce the high pressure over forefoot. However, too much arch support could lead to abnormal foot alignment and pain over midfoot. Little information is reported on the relationship among plantar arch height, shank curve design and plantar pressure. This study aimed at quantifying the plantar arch height changes at different heel heights and investigating the effect of shank curve on plantar pressure distribution. The plantar arch height increased to (7.6±1.3)mm at heel height of 75 mm. The Chinese standard suggests the depth of last should be 8.5mm for heel height of 75 mm. When a shank curve with higher depth of last (11 mm) was used, the peak pressure over forefoot further decreased in midstance phase, which might ease the forefoot problems, while the peak pressure over midfoot increased but not exceeded the discomfort pressure thresholds. To achieve a more ideal pressure distribution in high-heeled shoes, a higher than expected depth of last would be suggested that would not cause discomfort over midfoot.

  13. Effect of Monophasic Pulsed Current on Heel Pain and Functional Activities caused by Plantar Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Alotaibi, Abdullah K.; Petrofsky, Jerrold S.; Daher, Noha S.; Lohman, Everett; Laymon, Michael; Syed, Hasan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Plantar fasciitis (PF) is a soft tissue disorder considered to be one of the most common causes of inferior heel pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of monophasic pulsed current (MPC) and MPC coupled with plantar fascia-specific stretching exercises (SE) on the treatment of PF. Material/Methods Forty-four participants (22 women and 22 men, with a mean age of 49 years) diagnosed with PF were randomly assigned to receive MPC (n=22) or MPC coupled with plantar fascia-specific SE (n=22). Prior to and after 4 weeks of treatment, participants underwent baseline evaluation; heel pain was evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS), heel tenderness threshold was quantified using a handheld pressure algometer (PA), and functional activities level was assessed using the Activities of Daily Living subscale of the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (ADL/FAAM). Results Heel pain scores showed a significant reduction in both groups compared to baseline VAS scores (P<0.001). Heel tenderness improved significantly in both groups compared with baseline PA scores (P<0.001). Functional activity level improved significantly in both groups compared with baseline (ADL/FAAM) scores (P<0.001). However, no significant differences existed between the 2 treatment groups in all post-intervention outcome measures. Conclusions This trial showed that MPC is useful in treating inferior heel symptoms caused by PF. PMID:25791231

  14. Plantar Fasciitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... version Plantar Fasciitis Overview What is the plantar fascia? The plantar fascia is a band of tissue, much like a ... form the ball of your foot. The plantar fascia works like a rubber band between the heel ...

  15. Plantar fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Tahririan, Mohammad Ali; Motififard, Mehdi; Tahmasebi, Mohammad Naghi; Siavashi, Babak

    2012-01-01

    Heel pain, mostly caused by plantar fasciitis (PF), is a common complaint of many patients who requiring professional orthopedic care and are mostly suffering from chronic pain beneath their heels. The present article reviews studies done by preeminent practitioners related to the anatomy of plantar fasciitis and their histo-pathological features, factors associated with PF, clinical features, imaging studies, differential diagnoses, and diverse treatment modalities for treatment of PF, with special emphasis on non-surgical treatment. Anti-inflammatory agents, plantar stretching, and orthosis proved to have highest priority; corticosteroid injection, night splints and extracorporeal shock wave therapy were of next priority, in patients with PF. In patients resistant to the mentioned treatments surgical intervention should be considered. PMID:23798950

  16. Plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Tahririan, Mohammad Ali; Motififard, Mehdi; Tahmasebi, Mohammad Naghi; Siavashi, Babak

    2012-08-01

    Heel pain, mostly caused by plantar fasciitis (PF), is a common complaint of many patients who requiring professional orthopedic care and are mostly suffering from chronic pain beneath their heels. The present article reviews studies done by preeminent practitioners related to the anatomy of plantar fasciitis and their histo-pathological features, factors associated with PF, clinical features, imaging studies, differential diagnoses, and diverse treatment modalities for treatment of PF, with special emphasis on non-surgical treatment. Anti-inflammatory agents, plantar stretching, and orthosis proved to have highest priority; corticosteroid injection, night splints and extracorporeal shock wave therapy were of next priority, in patients with PF. In patients resistant to the mentioned treatments surgical intervention should be considered. PMID:23798950

  17. A review of 105 consecutive uniport endoscopic plantar fascial release procedures for the treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Morton, Troy N; Zimmerman, Jeffrey P; Lee, Michael; Schaber, John D

    2013-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is a common cause of heel pain in the U.S. Army soldier, resulting in a significant loss of man hours. Given the heavy operations tempo of the U.S. military, successful treatment options need to be considered and used as quickly as possible. Plantar fasciitis can be successfully treated in up to 90% of patients using conservative measures. Operative intervention might need to be considered for those in whom conservative measures have failed. The present report is a review of 105 consecutive uniport endoscopic plantar fascial release procedures performed by the principal investigator during a 9-year period. The following data were collected and analyzed: gender, age, weight, height, body mass index, medical treatment facility, procedure laterality, preoperative pain levels, postoperative pain levels at 3 months, first ambulatory day in the controlled ankle motion boot, return to activity as tolerated, and complications. Three major points were of interest: evidence of improvement in chronic plantar fasciitis when treated with uniport endoscopic procedures; the patient attributes associated with self-reported pain levels 90 days postoperatively; and the patient attributes associated with the average time until patients were able to return to activities as tolerated in a controlled ankle motion boot. It was noted that 44.5% of those with a body mass index of 29.80 kg/m(2) or greater reported a postoperative pain level of 0; and 96.3% of those with a body mass index of 25.53 kg/m(2) or less reported postoperative pain levels of 0. The analyzed data were used to characterize the clinical outcomes of the procedure, identify changes in outcome with surgeon experience, and identify whether certain patient subgroups have better outcomes, allowing surgeons to identify which patient might be the best candidates for an endoscopic release procedure. PMID:23177328

  18. Effectiveness of low-Dye taping for the short-term treatment of plantar heel pain: a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Radford, Joel A; Landorf, Karl B; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Cook, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    Background Plantar heel pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders of the foot and ankle. Treatment of the condition is usually conservative, however the effectiveness of many treatments frequently used in clinical practice, including supportive taping of the foot, has not been established. We performed a participant-blinded randomised trial to assess the effectiveness of low-Dye taping, a commonly used short-term treatment for plantar heel pain. Methods Ninety-two participants with plantar heel pain (mean age 50 ± 14 years; mean body mass index 30 ± 6; and median self-reported duration of symptoms 10 months, range of 2 to 240 months) were recruited from the general public between February and June 2005. Participants were randomly allocated to (i) low-Dye taping and sham ultrasound or (ii) sham ultrasound alone. The duration of follow-up for each participant was one week. No participants were lost to follow-up. Outcome measures included 'first-step' pain (measured on a 100 mm Visual Analogue Scale) and the Foot Health Status Questionnaire domains of foot pain, foot function and general foot health. Results Participants treated with low-Dye taping reported a small improvement in 'first-step' pain after one week of treatment compared to those who did not receive taping. The estimate of effect on 'first-step' pain favoured the low-Dye tape (ANCOVA adjusted mean difference -12.3 mm; 95% CI -22.4 to -2.2; P = 0.017). There were no other statistically significant differences between groups. Thirteen participants in the taping group experienced an adverse event however most were mild to moderate and short-lived. Conclusion When used for the short-term treatment of plantar heel pain, low-Dye taping provides a small improvement in 'first-step' pain compared with a sham intervention after a one-week period. PMID:16895612

  19. Amniotic Tissues for the Treatment of Chronic Plantar Fasciosis and Achilles Tendinosis.

    PubMed

    Werber, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Allogeneic amniotic tissue and fluid may be used to treat chronic plantar fasciosis and Achilles tendinosis. This innovative approach involves delivering a unique allograft of live human cells in a nonimmunogenic structural tissue matrix to treat chronic tendon injury. These tissues convey very positive regenerative attributes; procurement is performed with maternal consent during elective caesarian birth. Materials and Methods. In the present investigation all patients were unresponsive to multiple standard therapies for a minimum of 6 months and were treated with one implantation of PalinGen SportFLOW around the plantar fascia and/or around the Achilles paratenon. The patients were given a standard protocol for postimplant active rehabilitation. Results. The analogue pretreatment pain score (VAS) of 8. By the fourth week after treatment, all patients had significantly reduced self-reported pain. Twelve weeks following the procedure the average pain level had reduced to only 2. No adverse reactions were reported in any of the patients. Conclusion. All patients in this study experienced heel or Achilles pain, unresponsive to standard therapy protocols. After treatment all patients noted significant pain reduction, indicating that granulized amniotic membrane and amniotic fluid can be successfully used to treat both chronic plantar fasciosis and Achilles tendinosis. PMID:26491722

  20. Amniotic Tissues for the Treatment of Chronic Plantar Fasciosis and Achilles Tendinosis

    PubMed Central

    Werber, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Allogeneic amniotic tissue and fluid may be used to treat chronic plantar fasciosis and Achilles tendinosis. This innovative approach involves delivering a unique allograft of live human cells in a nonimmunogenic structural tissue matrix to treat chronic tendon injury. These tissues convey very positive regenerative attributes; procurement is performed with maternal consent during elective caesarian birth. Materials and Methods. In the present investigation all patients were unresponsive to multiple standard therapies for a minimum of 6 months and were treated with one implantation of PalinGen SportFLOW around the plantar fascia and/or around the Achilles paratenon. The patients were given a standard protocol for postimplant active rehabilitation. Results. The analogue pretreatment pain score (VAS) of 8. By the fourth week after treatment, all patients had significantly reduced self-reported pain. Twelve weeks following the procedure the average pain level had reduced to only 2. No adverse reactions were reported in any of the patients. Conclusion. All patients in this study experienced heel or Achilles pain, unresponsive to standard therapy protocols. After treatment all patients noted significant pain reduction, indicating that granulized amniotic membrane and amniotic fluid can be successfully used to treat both chronic plantar fasciosis and Achilles tendinosis. PMID:26491722

  1. Effects of heel base size, walking speed, and slope angle on center of pressure trajectory and plantar pressure when wearing high-heeled shoes.

    PubMed

    Luximon, Yan; Cong, Yan; Luximon, Ameersing; Zhang, Ming

    2015-06-01

    High-heeled shoes are associated with instability and a high risk of fall, fracture, and ankle sprain. This study investigated the effects of heel base size (HBS) on walking stability under different walking speeds and slope angles. The trajectory of the center of pressure (COP), maximal peak pressure, pressure time integral, contact area, and perceived stability were analyzed. The results revealed that a small HBS increased the COP deviations, shifting the COP more medially at the beginning of the gait cycle. The slope angle mainly affected the COP in the anteroposterior direction. An increased slope angle shifted the COP posterior and caused greater pressure and a larger contact area in the midfoot and rearfoot regions, which can provide more support. Subjective measures on perceived stability were consistent with objective measures. The results suggested that high-heeled shoes with a small HBS did not provide stable plantar support, particularly on a small slope angle. The changes in the COP and pressure pattern caused by a small HBS might increase joint torque and muscle activity and induce lower limb problems. PMID:25910862

  2. Diagnosis and management of plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, John V; Saini, Sundeep S; Reb, Christopher W; Daniel, Joseph N

    2014-12-01

    Plantar fasciitis, a chronic degenerative process that causes medial plantar heel pain, is responsible for approximately 1 million physician visits each year. Individuals with plantar fasciitis experience pain that is most intense during their first few steps of the day or after prolonged standing. The authors provide an overview of the diagnosis and management of a common problem encountered in the primary care setting. Routine imaging is not initially recommended for the evaluation of plantar fasciitis but may be required to rule out other pathologic conditions. Overall, plantar fasciitis carries a good prognosis when patients use a combination of several conservative treatment modalities. Occasionally, referral to a specialist may be necessary. PMID:25429080

  3. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) in patients with chronic proximal plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Dietrich S; Rupp, Stefan; Kreutz, Andreas; Pape, Dietrich; Kohn, Dieter; Seil, Romain

    2002-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) in patients with chronically painful proximal plantar fasciitis with a conventional conservative treatment consisting of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, heel cup, orthoses and/or shoe modifications, local steroid injections and electrotherapy. Forty-seven patients (49 feet) with a previously unsuccessful conservative treatment of at least six months were randomized to two groups. Treatment of Group 1 (25 heels) started immediately with three sessions of ESWT (3000 shockwaves/session of 0.2 mJ/mm2) at weekly intervals. In the patients of Group 2 (24 heels) treatment was continued for 12 weeks. After this period they were treated using the protocol of Group 1. No significant difference of pain and walking time after further non-ESWT treatment (three months) was seen. Six months after ESWT pain decreased by 64% to 88% on the visual analog scale (VAS) and the comfortable walking time had increased significantly in both groups. PMID:11991475

  4. Endoscopic Plantar Fasciotomy: A Minimally Traumatic Procedure for Chronic Plantar Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Hake, Daniel H.

    2000-01-01

    Endoscopic plantar fasciotomy (EPF) is a minimally invasive and minimally traumatic surgical treatment for the common problem of chronic plantar fasciitis. This procedure is indicated only for the release of the proximal medial aspect of the fascia in cases that do not respond to aggressive conservative, nonsurgical treatment. In the literature, an overall 87% success rate has been reported in 1228 procedures, in addition to an 83% success rate reported by Burke at the Northwest Podiatric Foundation Surgical Seminar in January 2000. The author's personal experience with 41 procedures over 5 years is consistent with an overall average success of 90%. EPF complications are reduced in comparison with traditional open procedures and can be avoided in many cases when identified early and treated properly. EPF is recommended as the procedure of choice when conservative treatment measures have been exhausted. PMID:21765689

  5. Low-Level Laser Therapy at 635 nm for Treatment of Chronic Plantar Fasciitis: A Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Study.

    PubMed

    Macias, David M; Coughlin, Michael J; Zang, Kerry; Stevens, Faustin R; Jastifer, James R; Doty, Jesse F

    2015-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis affects nearly 1 million persons in the United States at any one time. Conservative therapies have been reported to successfully treat 90% of plantar fasciitis cases; however, for the remaining cases, only invasive therapeutic solutions remain. This investigation studied newly emerging technology, low-level laser therapy. From September 2011 to June 2013, 69 subjects were enrolled in a placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind, multicenter study that evaluated the clinical utility of low-level laser therapy for the treatment of unilateral chronic fasciitis. The volunteer participants were treated twice a week for 3 weeks for a total of 6 treatments and were evaluated at 5 separate time points: before the procedure and at weeks 1, 2, 3, 6, and 8. The pain rating was recorded using a visual analog scale, with 0 representing "no pain" and 100 representing "worst pain." Additionally, Doppler ultrasonography was performed on the plantar fascia to measure the fascial thickness before and after treatment. Study participants also completed the Foot Function Index. At the final follow-up visit, the group participants demonstrated a mean improvement in heel pain with a visual analog scale score of 29.6 ± 24.9 compared with the placebo subjects, who reported a mean improvement of 5.4 ± 16.0, a statistically significant difference (p < .001). Although additional studies are warranted, these data have demonstrated that low-level laser therapy is a promising treatment of plantar fasciitis. PMID:25769363

  6. Plantar fasciitis

    MedlinePLUS

    The plantar fascia is the thick tissue on the bottom of the foot. It connects the heel bone to the toes ... inserts. Use night splints to stretch the injured fascia and allow it to heal. If these treatments ...

  7. Plantar fasciitis: a degenerative process (fasciosis) without inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lemont, Harvey; Ammirati, Krista M; Usen, Nsima

    2003-01-01

    The authors review histologic findings from 50 cases of heel spur surgery for chronic plantar fasciitis. Findings include myxoid degeneration with fragmentation and degeneration of the plantar fascia and bone marrow vascular ectasia. Histologic findings are presented to support the thesis that "plantar fasciitis" is a degenerative fasciosis without inflammation, not a fasciitis. These findings suggest that treatment regimens such as serial corticosteroid injections into the plantar fascia should be reevaluated in the absence of inflammation and in light of their potential to induce plantar fascial rupture. PMID:12756315

  8. Treatment of chronic plantar fasciopathy with extracorporeal shock waves (review)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing interest by doctors and patients in extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for chronic plantar fasciopathy (PF), particularly in second generation radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (RSWT). The present review aims at serving this interest by providing a comprehensive overview on physical and medical definitions of shock waves and a detailed assessment of the quality and significance of the randomized clinical trials published on ESWT and RSWT as it is used to treat chronic PF. Both ESWT and RSWT are safe, effective, and technically easy treatments for chronic PF. The main advantages of RSWT over ESWT are the lack of need for any anesthesia during the treatment and the demonstrated long-term treatment success (demonstrated at both 6 and 12 months after the first treatment using RSWT, compared to follow-up intervals of no more than 12 weeks after the first treatment using ESWT). In recent years, a greater understanding of the clinical outcomes in ESWT and RSWT for chronic PF has arisen in relationship not only in the design of studies, but also in procedure, energy level, and shock wave propagation. Either procedure should be considered for patients 18 years of age or older with chronic PF prior to surgical intervention. PMID:24004715

  9. Treatment of chronic plantar fasciopathy with extracorporeal shock waves (review).

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Christoph; Császár, Nikolaus B M; Rompe, Jan-Dirk; Chaves, Humberto; Furia, John P

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing interest by doctors and patients in extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for chronic plantar fasciopathy (PF), particularly in second generation radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (RSWT). The present review aims at serving this interest by providing a comprehensive overview on physical and medical definitions of shock waves and a detailed assessment of the quality and significance of the randomized clinical trials published on ESWT and RSWT as it is used to treat chronic PF. Both ESWT and RSWT are safe, effective, and technically easy treatments for chronic PF. The main advantages of RSWT over ESWT are the lack of need for any anesthesia during the treatment and the demonstrated long-term treatment success (demonstrated at both 6 and 12 months after the first treatment using RSWT, compared to follow-up intervals of no more than 12 weeks after the first treatment using ESWT). In recent years, a greater understanding of the clinical outcomes in ESWT and RSWT for chronic PF has arisen in relationship not only in the design of studies, but also in procedure, energy level, and shock wave propagation. Either procedure should be considered for patients 18 years of age or older with chronic PF prior to surgical intervention. PMID:24004715

  10. Orthosis-Shaped Sandals Are as Efficacious as In-Shoe Orthoses and Better than Flat Sandals for Plantar Heel Pain: A Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vicenzino, Bill; McPoil, Thomas G.; Stephenson, Aoife; Paul, Sanjoy K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate efficacy of a contoured sandal being marketed for plantar heel pain with comparison to a flat flip-flop and contoured in-shoe insert/orthosis. Method 150 volunteers aged 50 (SD: 12) years with plantar heel pain (>4 weeks) were enrolled after responding to advertisements and eligibility determined by telephone and at first visit. Participants were randomly allocated to receive commercially available contoured sandals (n = 49), flat flip-flops (n = 50) or over the counter, pre-fabricated full-length foot orthotics (n = 51). Primary outcomes were a 15-point Global Rating of Change scale (GROC: 1 = a very great deal worse, 15 = a very great deal better), 13 to 15 representing an improvement and the 20-item Lower Extremity Function Scale (LEFS) on which participants rate 20 common weight bearing activities and activities of daily living on a 5-point scale (0 = extreme difficulty, 4 = no difficulty). Secondary outcomes were worst level of heel pain in the preceding week, and the foot and ankle ability measure. Outcomes were collected blind to allocation. Analyses were done on an intention to treat basis with 12 weeks being the primary outcome time of interest. Results The contoured sandal was 68% more likely to report improvement in terms of GROC compared to flat flip-flop. On the LEFS the contoured sandal was 61% more likely than flat flip-flop to report improvement. The secondary outcomes in the main reflected the primary outcomes, and there were no differences between contoured sandal and shoe insert. Conclusions and Relevance Physicians can have confidence in supporting a patient's decision to wear contoured sandals or in-shoe orthoses as one of the first and simple strategies to manage their heel pain. Trial Registration The Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612000463875 PMID:26669302

  11. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy for chronic painful heel syndrome: a prospective, double blind, randomized trial assessing the efficacy of a new electromagnetic shock wave device.

    PubMed

    Gollwitzer, Hans; Diehl, Peter; von Korff, Alexej; Rahlfs, Volker W; Gerdesmeyer, Ludger

    2007-01-01

    Published data describing the efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave therapy for the treatment of plantar heel pain provide conflicting results, and optimal treatment guidelines are yet to be determined. To assess the efficacy and safety of extracorporeal shockwave therapy compared with placebo in the treatment of chronic painful heel syndrome with a new electromagnetic device, we undertook a prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial conducted among 40 participants who were randomly allocated to either active, focused extracorporeal shockwave therapy (0.25 mJ/mm(2)) or sham shockwave therapy. Both groups received 3 applications of 2000 shockwave impulses, each session 1 week apart. The primary outcome was the change in composite heel pain (morning pain, pain with activities of daily living, and pain upon application of pressure with a focal force meter) as quantified using a visual analog pain scale at 12 weeks after completion of the interventions compared with baseline. Secondary endpoints included changes in morning pain, pain with activities of daily living, and pain upon application of pressure with a focal force meter, as measured on a visual analog pain scale, as well as the change in the Roles and Maudsley score, at 12 weeks after the baseline measurement. Active extracorporeal shockwave therapy resulted in a 73.2% reduction in composite heel pain, and this was a 32.7% greater reduction than that achieved with placebo. The difference was not statistically significant (1-tailed Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney U test, P =.0302), but reached clinical relevance (Mann-Whitney effect size = 0.6737). In regard to the secondary outcomes, active extracorporeal shockwave therapy displayed relative superiority in comparison with the sham intervention. No relevant adverse events occurred in either intervention group. The results of the present study support the use of electromagnetically generated extracorporeal shockwave therapy for the treatment of refractory plantar heel pain. PMID:17761319

  12. Plantar fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Cutts, S; Obi, N; Pasapula, C; Chan, W

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In this article we look at the aetiology of plantar fasciitis, the other common differentials for heel pain and the evidence available to support each of the major management options. We also review the literature and discuss the condition. METHODS A literature search was performed using PubMed and MEDLINE®. The following keywords were used, singly or in combination: ‘plantar fasciitis’, ‘plantar heel pain’, ‘heel spur’. To maximise the search, backward chaining of reference lists from retrieved papers was also undertaken. FINDINGS Plantar fasciitis is a common and often disabling condition. Because the natural history of plantar fasciitis is not understood, it is difficult to distinguish between those patients who recover spontaneously and those who respond to formal treatment. Surgical release of the plantar fascia is effective in the small proportion of patients who do not respond to conservative measures. New techniques such as endoscopic plantar release and extracorporeal shockwave therapy may have a role but the limited availability of equipment and skills means that most patients will continue to be treated by more traditional techniques. PMID:23131221

  13. Intervention with Formulated Collagen Gel for Chronic Heel Pressure Ulcers in Older Adults with Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Agosti, Jennifer K; Chandler, Lois A

    2015-11-01

    Chronic pressure ulcers (PrUs), ulcers that fail to progress through the expected phases of wound healing in a timely fashion, are not only a concern for the patients afflicted with them, but are also a significant burden for the long-term-care facilities in which patients reside. The heel is the second most common location for PrUs. Morbidity and mortality rates for heel PrUs, particularly in the diabetic population, are alarming. Therefore, a consistently effective, cost-conscious, and user-friendly topical treatment for heel ulcers would be welcomed by patients and clinicians. This article describes a marked and rapid improvement in wound granulation in 3 older adult patients following weekly treatment for 8 weeks of chronic (?1-year duration) heel ulcers with an easy-to-use, cost-effective, topical, formulated collagen gel. PMID:26479694

  14. Comparison of usual podiatric care and early physical therapy intervention for plantar heel pain: study protocol for a parallel-group randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A significant number of individuals suffer from plantar heel pain (PHP) and many go on to have chronic symptoms and continued disability. Persistence of symptoms adds to the economic burden of PHP and cost-effective solutions are needed. Currently, there is a wide variation in treatment, cost, and outcomes of care for PHP with limited information on the cost-effectiveness and comparisons of common treatment approaches. Two practice guidelines and recent evidence of effective physical therapy intervention are available to direct treatment but the timing and influence of physical therapy intervention in the multidisciplinary management of PHP is unclear. The purpose of this investigation is to compare the outcomes and costs associated with early physical therapy intervention (ePT) following initial presentation to podiatry versus usual podiatric care (uPOD) in individuals with PHP. Methods A parallel-group, block-randomized clinical trial will compare ePT and uPOD. Both groups will be seen initially by a podiatrist before allocation to a group that will receive physical therapy intervention consisting primarily of manual therapy, exercise, and modalities, or podiatric care consisting primarily of a stretching handout, medication, injections, and orthotics. Treatment in each group will be directed by practice guidelines and a procedural manual, yet the specific intervention for each participant will be selected by the treating provider. Between-group differences in the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure 6 months following the initial visit will be the primary outcome collected by an independent investigator. In addition, differences in the European Quality of Life – Five Dimensions, Numeric Pain Rating Scale, Global Rating of Change (GROC), health-related costs, and cost-effectiveness at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year will be compared between groups. The association between successful outcomes based on GROC score and participant expectations of recovery generally, and specific to physical therapy and podiatry treatment, will also be analyzed. Discussion This study will be the first pragmatic trial to investigate the clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of ePT and uPOD in individuals with PHP. The results will serve to inform clinical practice decisions and management guidelines of multiple disciplines. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01865734 PMID:24299257

  15. Plantar fasciitis (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... immune cells) of the plantar fascia can cause heel pain and make walking difficult. Some risk factors for development of this problem include foot arch problems (both flat foot and high arches), obesity, sudden weight gain, running and a ...

  16. Medial Plantar Nerve Entrapment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Fibromatosis Medial and lateral plantar nerve entrapment is compression of nerve branches at the inner heel (the ... nerve or surgery to free the nerve from compression may help relieve pain. Foot Problems Overview of ...

  17. How I Manage Heel Spur Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seder, Joseph I.

    1987-01-01

    This article discusses plantar fascitis and heel spurs, the two contributing causes of heel spur syndrome. Treatment methods, which include rest, anti-inflammatory medication, shoe padding, and, as a last resort, surgery are described. (Author/MT)

  18. Plantar Fasciitis: A Concise Review

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Emily N; Su, John

    2014-01-01

    One challenge in the treatment of plantar fasciitis is that very few high-quality studies exist comparing different treatment modalities to guide evidence-based management. Current literature suggests a change to the way that plantar fasciitis is managed. This article reviews the most current literature on plantar fasciitis and showcases recommended treatment guidelines. This serves to assist physicians in diagnosing and treating heel pain with plantar fasciitis. PMID:24626080

  19. Treatment of chronic plantar ulcer of the diabetic foot using an irremovable windowed fibreglass cast boot: prospective study of 177 patients.

    PubMed

    Ha Van, Georges; Michaux, Caroline; Parquet, Hugues; Bourron, Olivier; Pradat-Diehl, Pascale; Hartemann, Agnes

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the level of healing of chronic neuropathic plantar ulcers, using an irremovable windowed fibreglass cast boot, which is only opened after healing. A single-centre prospective study of a cohort of 177 diabetic patients with chronic neuropathic plantar ulcers was carried out. The duration of neuropathic plantar ulcers was 604?±?808 days, with a mean surface area of 4.6?±?6.5 cm(2) , a mean depth of 1.04?±?1.08 cm and a mean volume of 5.9?±?17.7 cm(3) . After a mean of 96 days of wearing a windowed fibreglass cast boot (min 9 days, max 664 days and median 68 days), the level of healing reached 83.6%, although 29 patients did not heal (16.4%). The compliance was at 95%. NPUs with bigger volumes (p?=?0.037) and those located at the heels (?p?=?0.004) had significantly lower healing levels. Twenty-one patients had moderate peripheral arterial disease (12%), and 24 patients were ostectomized for underlying osteomyelitis (14%), before inclusion. Moderate peripheral arterial disease (p?=?0.970) or operated osteomyelitis (p?=?0.128) did not modify the level of healing significantly, which were of 81% and 70.8%, respectively. Complications include 12 ulcers due to the windowed fibreglass cast boot (i.e. 7%) and two other ulcers being moderately infected, resulting in 2% of toe amputation, but there was no major amputation or phlebitis. The treatment of old and deep NPUs of the diabetic foot by wearing a windowed fibreglass cast boot without opening the boot prior to healing offers very high ulcer recovery levels. Windowed fibreglass cast boots were changed in only 26 cases (14.6%). In addition, compliance was excellent and of the order of 95%. Furthermore, moderate peripheral arterial disease or a recent ostectomy did not affect the efficacy of windowed fibreglass cast boot. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25941091

  20. Heel pain: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Agyekum, Edward Kwame; Ma, Kaiyu

    2015-06-01

    Heel pain is a very common foot disease. Varieties of names such as plantar fasciitis, jogger's heel, tennis heal, policeman's heel are used to describe it. Mechanical factors are the most common etiology of heel pain. Common causes of hell pain includes: Plantar Fasciitis, Heel Spur, Sever's Disease, Heel bump, Achilles Tendinopathy, Heel neuritis, Heel bursitis. The diagnosis is mostly based on clinical examination. Normally, the location of the pain and the absence of associated symptoms indicating a systemic disease strongly suggest the diagnosis. Several therapies exist including rest, physical therapy, stretching, and change in footwear, arch supports, orthotics, night splints, anti-inflammatory agents, and surgery. Almost all patients respond to conservative nonsurgical therapy. Surgery is the last treatment option if all other treatments had failed. Rest, ice, massage, the use of correct exercise and complying with a doctor's advice all play important part in helping to recover from this hell pain condition, but getting good quality, suitable shoes with the appropriate amount of support for the whole foot is the most important. PMID:26643244

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of jogger's heel.

    PubMed

    Horobin, Laura

    2015-02-01

    Plantar fasciitis, the most common cause of heel pain, is a self-limiting condition exacerbated by weight bearing after episodes at rest that usually resolves within 12 months after conservative treatment. This article outlines the aetiology of plantar fasciitis and refers to a case study in discussing diagnosis, examination and management. PMID:25659794

  2. Heel Pain in Recreational Runners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazzoli, Allan S.; Pollina, Frank S.

    1989-01-01

    Provides physicians with the signs, symptoms, and management of heel/sole pain in recreational runners (usually due to plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinitis, and calcaneal stress fractures). Remedies involve palliative treatment of symptoms, correction of underlying biomechanical problems, and flexibility exercises. (SM)

  3. Plantar fasciitis: current diagnostic modalities and treatments.

    PubMed

    Healey, Kevin; Chen, Katherine

    2010-07-01

    Plantar fasciitis is a common cause of heel pain. The diagnosis is made clinically and validated with different diagnostic modalities ranging from ultrasound to magnetic resonance imaging. Treatments vary from stretching exercises to different surgical options. No single treatment is guaranteed to alleviate the heel pain. PMID:20691370

  4. Heel Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... inflammation of the band of fibrous connective tissue (fascia) running along the bottom (plantar surface) of the ... quite painful. The condition occurs when the plantar fascia is strained over time beyond its normal extension, ...

  5. Plantar Fibroma

    MedlinePLUS

    The official consumer website of: Visit ACFAS.org | About ACFAS | Información en Español Advanced Search Home » Foot & Ankle Conditions » Plantar Fibroma Text Size Print Bookmark Plantar Fibroma What is the Plantar Fibroma? A plantar fibroma is a fibrous knot (nodule) in the ...

  6. The integration of acetic acid iontophoresis, orthotic therapy and physical rehabilitation for chronic plantar fasciitis: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Ivano A; Dyson, Anita

    2007-01-01

    A 15-year-old female soccer player presented with chronic plantar fasciitis. She was treated with acetic acid iontophoresis and a combination of rehabilitation protocols, ultrasound, athletic taping, custom orthotics and soft tissue therapies with symptom resolution and return to full activities within a period of 6 weeks. She reported no significant return of symptoms post follow-up at 2 months. Acetic acid iontophoresis has shown promising results and further studies should be considered to determine clinical effectiveness. The combination of acetic acid iontophoresis with conservative treatments may promote recovery within a shorter duration compared to the use of one-method treatment approaches. PMID:17885679

  7. Targeting the Plantar Fascia for Corticosteroid Injection.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Andrea Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is often a difficult condition to treat. It is related to repetitive strain of the fascia at its attachment to the heel bone. This condition quite often appears with the concomitant presence of a plantar calcaneal heel spur. Corticosteroid injection is a popular treatment choice for plantar fasciitis, and accurate localization of the injected medication is essential for successful resolution of symptoms after the injection. In the present brief technical communication, a method for targeting the attachment of the plantar fascia to the medial tubercle of the tuberosity of the calcaneus is described. The targeting method uses the lateral radiograph of the foot to aid in localization of the proximal attachment of the plantar fascia to the calcaneus. PMID:25432461

  8. Heel pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... often Tightness in your calf muscle or the Achilles tendon Sudden inward or outward turning of your ... the back of the heel bone under the Achilles tendon (bursitis) Bone spurs in the heel Swelling ...

  9. Cracked Heels

    MedlinePLUS

    The official consumer website of: Visit ACFAS.org | About ACFAS | Información en Español Advanced Search Home » Foot & Ankle Conditions » Cracked Heels Text Size Print Bookmark Cracked Heels There are many potential causes of " cracked heels ." Dry skin (xerosis) is common and can ...

  10. Gastrocnemius shortening and heel pain.

    PubMed

    Solan, Matthew C; Carne, Andrew; Davies, Mark S

    2014-12-01

    Pain and reduced function caused by disorders of either the plantar fascia or the Achilles tendon are common. Although heel pain is not a major public health problem it affects millions of people each year. For most patients, time and first-line treatments allow symptoms to resolve. A proportion of patients have resistant symptoms. Managing these recalcitrant cases is a challenge. Gastrocnemius contracture produces increased strain in both the Achilles tendon and the plantar fascia. This biomechanical feature must be properly assessed otherwise treatment is compromised. PMID:25456718

  11. Lung cancer presenting as heel pain: A case report

    PubMed Central

    DAI, HAO; QIANG, MINFEI; CHEN, YANXI; ZHAI, WEITAO; ZHANG, KUN

    2014-01-01

    Bone metastasis as the first symptom of lung cancer is common, particularly in the axial skeleton. The calcaneus is an unusual site of metastatic involvement. Chronic plantar heel pain (CPHP) is one of the most common complaints of the foot requiring medical treatment. The most typical symptom of CPHP is pain under the medial heel during weight-bearing, and this symptom is therefore generally initially diagnosed as CPHP by clinicians. The current case study reports a female patient never-smoker with non-small cell lung cancer accompanied by calcaneal metastasis presenting as heel pain. The patient was initially diagnosed with CPHP without any imaging examinations. As there was no relief from the heel pain six months later, a foot X-ray was performed, which revealed a lesion of the calcaneus. The analysis of a biopsy obtained from the lesion resulted in a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma. The present case indicates that patients suspected to have CPHP should be conventionally examined with radiography of the foot during the initial diagnosis. Similarly, if a patient with lung cancer has symptoms such as CPHP, distant metastasis should be accounted for; despite their rarity, clinicians should maintain a high level of suspicion, since accurate diagnosis and timely treatment is important in management and outcome. PMID:25009652

  12. Lung cancer presenting as heel pain: A case report.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hao; Qiang, Minfei; Chen, Yanxi; Zhai, Weitao; Zhang, Kun

    2014-08-01

    Bone metastasis as the first symptom of lung cancer is common, particularly in the axial skeleton. The calcaneus is an unusual site of metastatic involvement. Chronic plantar heel pain (CPHP) is one of the most common complaints of the foot requiring medical treatment. The most typical symptom of CPHP is pain under the medial heel during weight-bearing, and this symptom is therefore generally initially diagnosed as CPHP by clinicians. The current case study reports a female patient never-smoker with non-small cell lung cancer accompanied by calcaneal metastasis presenting as heel pain. The patient was initially diagnosed with CPHP without any imaging examinations. As there was no relief from the heel pain six months later, a foot X-ray was performed, which revealed a lesion of the calcaneus. The analysis of a biopsy obtained from the lesion resulted in a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma. The present case indicates that patients suspected to have CPHP should be conventionally examined with radiography of the foot during the initial diagnosis. Similarly, if a patient with lung cancer has symptoms such as CPHP, distant metastasis should be accounted for; despite their rarity, clinicians should maintain a high level of suspicion, since accurate diagnosis and timely treatment is important in management and outcome. PMID:25009652

  13. Percutaneous bipolar radiofrequency microdebridement for recalcitrant proximal plantar fasciosis.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Matthew D; Hyer, Christopher F; Philbin, Terrence M

    2011-01-01

    Success rates for traditional methods of surgical intervention for chronic plantar fasciosis are low, and associated with high rates of complications and long recovery times. The purpose of this prospective case series was to assess the effectiveness of percutaneous bipolar radiofrequency microfasciotomy for the treatment of recalcitrant proximal plantar fasciosis in 21 patients. The mean preoperative American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot score was 22.10 ± 12.96 (out of a possible 68 points) and the mean postoperative AOFAS hindfoot score was 59.57 ± 13.23 points, and this difference was statistically significant (P < .0001). A total of 7 (33.33%) patients experienced satisfactory pain relief within 1 to 4 weeks and 10 (47.62%) did so within 1 to 4 months, whereas 2 (9.52%) patients required longer than 4 months, and 2 (9.52%) others never attained satisfactory relief of symptoms. Fourteen (66.67%) patients subjectively rated their outcome as excellent, 4 (19.05%) as good, 1 (4.76%) as fair, and 2 (9.52%) as poor. One (4.76%) patient experienced iatrogenic flexor hallucis longus tendonitis. The results of this clinical investigation indicate that bipolar radiofrequency microdebridement plantar fasciotomy safely alleviates recalcitrant heel pain. The technique is minimally invasive and simple to perform, and it spares the overall integrity of the plantar fascia without being associated with undue complications. PMID:21354000

  14. [A jogger with painful heels].

    PubMed

    Van Gool, Arthur R; Pepels, Wout R J

    2012-01-01

    A 54-year-old man had chronic pain of his left heel region, which was initially diagnosed as 'tendinopathy'. An X-ray of the ankle joint showed a Haglund deformity. After successful surgery, he developed pain on his right heel, where again a Haglund deformity was diagnosed. PMID:22551752

  15. Reliability and Validity of the Standing Heel-Rise Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yocum, Allison; McCoy, Sarah Westcott; Bjornson, Kristie F.; Mullens, Pamela; Burton, Gay Naganuma

    2010-01-01

    A standardized protocol for a pediatric heel-rise test was developed and reliability and validity are reported. Fifty-seven children developing typically (CDT) and 34 children with plantar flexion weakness performed three tests: unilateral heel rise, vertical jump, and force measurement using handheld dynamometry. Intraclass correlation…

  16. Mechanical Information of Plantar Fascia during Normal Gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yaodong; Li, Zhiyong

    The plantar fascia is an important foot tissue in stabilizing the longitudinal arch of human foot. Direct measurement to monitor the mechanical situation of plantar fascia at human locomotion is difficult. The purpose of this study was to construct a three-dimensional finite element model of the foot to calculate the internal stress/strain value of plantar fascia during different stage of gait. The simulated stress distribution of plantar fascia was the lowest at heel-strike, which concentrated on the medial side of calcaneal tubercle. The peak stress of plantar fascia was appeared at push-off, and the value is more than 5 times of the heel-strike position. Current FE model was able to explore the plantar fascia tension trend at the main sub-phases of foot. More detailed fascia model and intrinsic muscle forces could be developed in the further study.

  17. Chronic Plantar Fasciitis is Mediated by Local Hemodynamics: Implications for Emerging Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Larry E.; Latt, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis (PF) is a common, disabling condition affecting millions of patients each year. With early diagnosis and timely application of traditional nonsurgical treatments, symptoms generally resolve over time. However, despite adequate treatment, 20% of patients will experience persistent symptoms. In these patients, minimally invasive therapies that augment local hemodynamics to initiate a regenerative tissue-healing cascade have the greatest potential to resolve long-standing symptoms. We performed a narrative review based on a best evidence evaluation of manuscripts published in Medline-indexed journals to determine the mechanisms involved in soft tissue injury and healing. This evaluation also highlights emerging minimally invasive therapies that exploit these mechanisms in recalcitrant PF. PMID:25709971

  18. Chronic Plantar Fasciitis is Mediated by Local Hemodynamics: Implications for Emerging Therapies.

    PubMed

    Miller, Larry E; Latt, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis (PF) is a common, disabling condition affecting millions of patients each year. With early diagnosis and timely application of traditional nonsurgical treatments, symptoms generally resolve over time. However, despite adequate treatment, 20% of patients will experience persistent symptoms. In these patients, minimally invasive therapies that augment local hemodynamics to initiate a regenerative tissue-healing cascade have the greatest potential to resolve long-standing symptoms. We performed a narrative review based on a best evidence evaluation of manuscripts published in Medline-indexed journals to determine the mechanisms involved in soft tissue injury and healing. This evaluation also highlights emerging minimally invasive therapies that exploit these mechanisms in recalcitrant PF. PMID:25709971

  19. Baropodometric Evaluations and Sensitivity Alterations in Plantar Ulcer Formation in Leprosy.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Thania Loiola; Frade, Marco Andrey Cipriani; Barros, Ana Regina S B; Foss, Norma Tiraboschi

    2014-05-25

    Leprosy is a chronically evolving granulomatous disease caused by the bacillus Mycobacterium leprae, which exhibits tropism for peripheral and motor nerves and slow-growing inflammation that affects the peripheral nervous system, especially the sensory fibers. The aim of this study was to observe the relationship between peak pressure and abnormal sensitivity for the formation of plantar ulcers in patients with multibacillary (MB) and paucibacillary (PB) leprosy. A total of 51 individuals with leprosy were evaluated and classified as either MB or PB and then submitted to the Semmes-Weinstein sensitivity test; 20 normal individuals were examined as a control group and took a baropodometric test. The pressure peaks and sensitivity alterations were noted and compared within groups. Leprosy patients exhibited a greater loss of sensitivity at the heel area that might compromise gait. During dynamic analysis, the MB group with altered sensitivity for right and left feet and PB (left feet) group showed the highest plantar pressure values. Skin damage (calluses or ulcers) did not occur within the areas of high plantar pressure in 80% of MB patients, whereas skin damage was observed in 38% of PB patients in the areas of higher peak pressures. According to these findings, baropodometry and sensitivity tests play an important role in the understanding of ulcer biodynamics. In addition, it could be inferred that the loss of protective sensibility in MB patients is predictive of plantar ulcers, whereas plantar pressure peaks seem to be of greater importance in PB patients. PMID:24861093

  20. Subcalcaneal Bursitis With Plantar Fasciitis Treated by Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yamakado, Kotaro

    2013-01-01

    We report the successful arthroscopic treatment of a case of subcalcaneal bursitis with plantar fasciitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report on arthroscopic excision of a subcalcaneal bursa. Right heel pain developed in a 50-year-old woman, without any obvious cause. She reported that the heel pain occurred immediately after waking and that the heel ached when she walked. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an extra-articular, homogeneous, high-intensity lesion in the fat pad adjacent to the calcaneal tubercle on T2-weighted sagittal and coronal images and thickening of the plantar fascia on T2-weighted sagittal images. A diagnosis of a recalcitrant subcalcaneal bursitis with plantar fasciitis was made, and surgery was performed. The arthroscope was placed between the calcaneus and the plantar fascia. With the surgeon viewing from the lateral portal and working from the medial portal, the dorsal surface of the degenerative plantar fascia was debrided and the medial half of the plantar fascia was released, followed by debridement of the subcalcaneal bursal cavity through the incised plantar fascia. Full weight bearing and gait were allowed immediately after the operation. At the latest follow-up, the patient had achieved complete resolution of heel pain without a recurrence of the mass, confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:23875139

  1. A simple technique for assessing heel contact in orthoses.

    PubMed

    Grant, A D; Sala, D A; Kummer, F J; Kiriakatis, A

    1996-01-01

    Orthoses are used by patients with neuromuscular disorders to control their ankle and foot position. Heel contact inside an orthosis is difficult to determine. A simple, inexpensive device was constructed that could be positioned between the heel and the inside of the orthosis. It consists of a thin, single-cell pressure sensor connected to a low-cost, digital multimeter. The resistance reading was used to determine the presence or absence of heel contact during a controlled standing protocol. The device was evaluated in 23 patients. The majority of patients did not weightbear on their heels. The heel contact of five patients was reassessed by using a computerized F-scan system, which determines plantar weightbearing forces. A 100% agreement was found between the single-cell sensor and the F-scan system. This single-cell sensor is a simple, inexpensive, and easily used device to determine the presence or absence of heel contact within an orthosis. PMID:8728643

  2. Ultrasound guided injection of dexamethasone versus placebo for treatment of plantar fasciitis: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plantar fasciitis is the most commonly reported cause of chronic pain beneath the heel. Management of this condition commonly involves the use of corticosteroid injection in cases where less invasive treatments have failed. However, despite widespread use, only two randomised trials have tested the effect of this treatment in comparison to placebo. These trials currently offer the best available evidence by which to guide clinical practice, though both were limited by methodological issues such as insufficient statistical power. Therefore, the aim of this randomised trial is to compare the effect of ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection versus placebo for treatment of plantar fasciitis. Methods The trial will be conducted at the La Trobe University Podiatry Clinic and will recruit 80 community-dwelling participants. Diagnostic ultrasound will be used to diagnose plantar fasciitis and participants will be required to meet a range of selection criteria. Participants will be randomly allocated to one of two treatment arms: (i) ultrasound-guided injection of the plantar fascia with 1 mL of 4 mg/mL dexamethasone sodium phosphate (experimental group), or (ii) ultrasound-guided injection of the plantar fascia with 1 mL normal saline (control group). Blinding will be applied to participants and the investigator performing procedures, measuring outcomes and analysing data. Primary outcomes will be pain measured by the Foot Health Status Questionnaire and plantar fascia thickness measured by ultrasound at 4, 8 and 12 weeks. All data analyses will be conducted on an intention-to-treat basis. Conclusion This will be a randomised trial investigating the effect of dexamethasone injection on pre-specified treatment outcomes in people with plantar fasciitis. Within the parameters of this protocol, the trial findings will be used to make evidence-based recommendations regarding the use of corticosteroid injection for treatment of this condition. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry. ACTRN12610000239066. PMID:20633300

  3. Plantar Fibroma and Plantar Fibromatosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Contact Us FootCareMD About Us Overview of Foot & Ankle Glossary of Foot & Ankle Terms Adult Foot Health Children's Foot Health The ... During Pregnancy Conditions Currently selected Ailments of the Ankle Ailments of the Midfoot Ailments of the Heel ...

  4. Randomized, Multicenter Trial on the Effect of Radiation Therapy on Plantar Fasciitis (Painful Heel Spur) Comparing a Standard Dose With a Very Low Dose: Mature Results After 12 Months' Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Niewald, Marcus; Micke, Oliver; Graeber, Stefan; Schaefer, Vera; Scheid, Christine; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Licht, Norbert; Ruebe, Christian

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To conduct a randomized trial of radiation therapy for painful heel spur, comparing a standard dose with a very low dose. Methods and Materials: Sixty-six patients were randomized to receive radiation therapy either with a total dose of 6.0 Gy applied in 6 fractions of 1.0 Gy twice weekly (standard dose) or with a total dose of 0.6 Gy applied in 6 fractions of 0.1 Gy twice weekly (low dose). In all patients lateral opposing 4- to 6-MV photon beams were used. The results were measured using a visual analogue scale, the Calcaneodynia score, and the SF12 health survey. The fundamental phase of the study ended after 3 months, and the follow-up was continued up to 1 year. Patients with insufficient pain relief after 3 months were offered reirradiation with the standard dosage at any time afterward. Results: Of 66 patients, 4 were excluded because of withdrawal of consent or screening failures. After 3 months the results in the standard arm were highly significantly superior compared with those in the low-dose arm (visual analogue scale, P=.001; Calcaneodynia score, P=.027; SF12, P=.045). The accrual of patients was stopped at this point. Further evaluation after 12 months' follow-up showed the following results: (1) highly significant fewer patients were reirradiated in the standard arm compared with the low-dose arm (P<.001); (2) the results of patients in the low-dose arm who were reirradiated were identical to those in the standard arm not reirradiated (reirradiation as a salvage therapy if the lower dose was ineffective); (3) patients experiencing a favorable result after 3 months showed this even after 12 months, and some results even improved further between 3 and 12 months. Conclusions: This study confirms the superior analgesic effect of radiation therapy with 6-Gy doses on painful heel spur even for a longer time period of at least 1 year.

  5. How We Manage Plantar Fasciitis (With Memory Jogger).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Suzanne M.; Harvey, Jack S.

    1988-01-01

    Common among runners and athletes who participate in jumping sports, plantar fasciitis is an overuse injury that is potentially incapacitating, causes heel and arch pain, and usually occurs after sudden increases in running mileage, frequency, or speed. Therapy is described. (Author/CB)

  6. Plantar fasciitis. Etiology, treatment, surgical results, and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Schepsis, A A; Leach, R E; Gorzyca, J

    1991-05-01

    Plantar fasciitis is a common orthopedic syndrome among athletes and nonathletes. The etiology of the pain is multifactorial but usually involves inflammation and degeneration of the plantar fascia origin. The majority of patients will respond to conservative measures. Surgical treatment is reserved for those patients who do not respond. A complete plantar fascia release is performed through a medial longitudinal incision. Prominent heel spurs and degenerated areas in the plantar fascia are resected. Of 27 surgically treated cases followed from one to three years, satisfactory results were obtained in 24 cases. Histologically, localized fibrosis or granulomatous changes or both were noted in several cases. PMID:2019049

  7. Bursitis of the heel

    MedlinePLUS

    ... by the heel. It is where the large Achilles tendon connects the calf muscles to the heel ... jumping. This condition is very often linked to Achilles tendinitis . Sometimes retrocalcaneal bursitis may be mistaken for ...

  8. Children with ADHD Show No Deficits in Plantar Foot Sensitivity and Static Balance Compared to Healthy Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlee, Gunther; Neubert, Tom; Worenz, Andreas; Milani, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate plantar foot sensitivity and balance control of ADHD (n = 21) impaired children compared to age-matched healthy controls (n = 25). Thresholds were measured at 200 Hz at three anatomical locations of the plantar foot area of both feet (hallux, first metatarsal head (METI) and heel). Body balance was…

  9. Biomechanical evaluation of heel elevation on load transfer — experimental measurement and finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luximon, Yan; Luximon, Ameersing; Yu, Jia; Zhang, Ming

    2012-02-01

    In spite of ill-effects of high heel shoes, they are widely used for women. Hence, it is essential to understand the load transfer biomechanics in order to design better fit and comfortable shoes. In this study, both experimental measurement and finite element analysis were used to evaluate the biomechanical effects of heel height on foot load transfer. A controlled experiment was conducted using custom-designed platforms. Under different weight-bearing conditions, peak plantar pressure, contact area and center of pressure were analyzed. A three-dimensional finite element foot model was used to simulate the high-heel support and to predict the internal stress distributions and deformations for different heel heights. Results from both experiment and model indicated that heel elevations had significant effects on all variables. When heel elevation increased, the center of pressure shifted from the midfoot region to the forefoot region, the contact area was reduced by 26% from 0 to 10.2 cm heel and the internal stress of foot bones increased. Prediction results also showed that the strain and total tension force of plantar fascia was minimum at 5.1 cm heel condition. This study helps to better understand the biomechanical behavior of foot, and to provide better suggestions for design parameters of high heeled shoes.

  10. Plantar Fasciitis and the Windlass Mechanism: A Biomechanical Link to Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Terry R.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Plantar fasciitis is a prevalent problem, with limited consensus among clinicians regarding the most effective treatment. The purpose of this literature review is to provide a systematic approach to the treatment of plantar fasciitis based on the windlass mechanism model. Data Sources: We searched MEDLINE, SPORT Discus, and CINAHL from 1966 to 2003 using the key words plantar fasciitis, windlass mechanism, pronation, heel pain, and heel spur. Data Synthesis: We offer a biomechanical application for the evaluation and treatment of plantar fasciitis based on a review of the literature for the windlass mechanism model. This model provides a means for describing plantar fasciitis conditions such that clinicians can formulate a potential causal relationship between the conditions and their treatments. Conclusions/Recommendations: Clinicians' understanding of the biomechanical causes of plantar fasciitis should guide the decision-making process concerning the evaluation and treatment of heel pain. Use of this approach may improve clinical outcomes because intervention does not merely treat physical symptoms but actively addresses the influences that resulted in the condition. Principles from this approach might also provide a basis for future research investigating the efficacy of plantar fascia treatment. PMID:16558682

  11. Variation of plantar pressure in Chinese diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chuan; Xiao, Huisheng; Wang, Chuan; Mai, LiFang; Liu, Dan; Qi, Yiqing; Ren, Meng; Yan, Li

    2015-11-12

    To investigate dynamic changes in plantar pressure in Chinese diabetes mellitus patients and to provide a basis for further preventing diabetic foot. This is a cross-sectional investigation including 649 Chinese diabetes mellitus patients (diabetes group) and 808 "normal" Chinese persons (nondiabetes group) with normal blood glucose levels. All the subjects provided a complete medical history and underwent a physical examination and a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. All subjects walked barefoot with their usual gait, and their dynamic plantar forces were measured using the one-step method with a plantar pressure measurement instrument; 5 measurements were performed for each foot. No significant differences were found in age, height, body weight, or body mass index between the two groups. The fasting blood glucose levels, plantar contact time, maximum force, pressure-time integrals and force-time integrals in the diabetes group were significantly higher than those in the nondiabetes group (p??0.05). The maximum plantar force distributions were essentially the same, with the highest force found for the medial heel, followed by the medial forefoot and the first toe. The peak plantar pressure was located at the medial forefoot for the nondiabetes group and at the hallucis for the diabetes group. In the diabetes group, the momentum in each plantar region was higher than that in the nondiabetes group; this difference was especially apparent in the heel, the lateral forefoot and the hallucis. The dynamic plantar pressures in diabetic patients differ from those in nondiabetic people with increased maximum force and pressure, a different distribution pattern and significantly increased momentum, which may lead to the formation of foot ulcers. PMID:26084591

  12. Identification of Foot Pathologies Based on Plantar Pressure Asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Wafai, Linah; Zayegh, Aladin; Woulfe, John; Aziz, Syed Mahfuzul; Begg, Rezaul

    2015-01-01

    Foot pathologies can negatively influence foot function, consequently impairing gait during daily activity, and severely impacting an individual’s quality of life. These pathologies are often painful and correspond with high or abnormal plantar pressure, which can result in asymmetry in the pressure distribution between the two feet. There is currently no general consensus on the presence of asymmetry in able-bodied gait, and plantar pressure analysis during gait is in dire need of a standardized method to quantify asymmetry. This paper investigates the use of plantar pressure asymmetry for pathological gait diagnosis. The results of this study involving plantar pressure analysis in fifty one participants (31 healthy and 20 with foot pathologies) support the presence of plantar pressure asymmetry in normal gait. A higher level of asymmetry was detected at the majority of the regions in the feet of the pathological population, including statistically significant differences in the plantar pressure asymmetry in two regions of the foot, metatarsophalangeal joint 3 (MPJ3) and the lateral heel. Quantification of plantar pressure asymmetry may prove to be useful for the identification and diagnosis of various foot pathologies. PMID:26295239

  13. Identification of Foot Pathologies Based on Plantar Pressure Asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Wafai, Linah; Zayegh, Aladin; Woulfe, John; Aziz, Syed Mahfuzul; Begg, Rezaul

    2015-01-01

    Foot pathologies can negatively influence foot function, consequently impairing gait during daily activity, and severely impacting an individual's quality of life. These pathologies are often painful and correspond with high or abnormal plantar pressure, which can result in asymmetry in the pressure distribution between the two feet. There is currently no general consensus on the presence of asymmetry in able-bodied gait, and plantar pressure analysis during gait is in dire need of a standardized method to quantify asymmetry. This paper investigates the use of plantar pressure asymmetry for pathological gait diagnosis. The results of this study involving plantar pressure analysis in fifty one participants (31 healthy and 20 with foot pathologies) support the presence of plantar pressure asymmetry in normal gait. A higher level of asymmetry was detected at the majority of the regions in the feet of the pathological population, including statistically significant differences in the plantar pressure asymmetry in two regions of the foot, metatarsophalangeal joint 3 (MPJ3) and the lateral heel. Quantification of plantar pressure asymmetry may prove to be useful for the identification and diagnosis of various foot pathologies. PMID:26295239

  14. Examining the degree of pain reduction using a multielement exercise model with a conventional training shoe versus an ultraflexible training shoe for treating plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Michael; Fraser, Scott; McDonald, Kymberly; Taunton, Jack

    2009-12-01

    Plantar fasciitis is a common injury to the plantar aponeurosis, manifesting as pain surrounding its proximal insertion at the medial calcaneal tubercle. Pain is typically worse in the morning when getting out of bed, and may subside after the tissue is sufficiently warmed up. For running-based athletes and individuals who spend prolonged periods of time on their feet at work, plantar fasciitis may become recalcitrant to conservative treatments such as ice, rest, and anti-inflammatory medication. Exercise-based therapies have received only limited attention in the literature for this common problem, yet they are becoming increasingly validated for pain relief and positive tissue remodeling at other sites of similar soft-tissue overuse injury. This study reports on pain outcomes in individuals experiencing chronic plantar fasciitis while wearing a shoe with an ultraflexible midsole (Nike Free 5.0) (FREE) versus a conventional training (CON) shoe in a 12-week multielement exercise regimen, and after a 6-month follow-up. Adults with >or= 6-month history of painful heel pain were recruited and randomly assigned to wear 1 of the 2 shoes. All subjects completed the same exercise protocol. A visual analogue scale item tracked peak pain in the preceding 24 hours taken at baseline, 6- and 12-week points, and at the 6-month follow-up. Twenty-one subjects completed the program (9 FREE; 12 CON). Both groups reported significant improvements in pain by the 6-month follow-up, and the FREE group reported an overall reduced level of pain throughout the study as a result of lower mean pain scores at the midpoint and post-test compared with the CON group. The exercise regimen employed in this study appears to reduce pain associated with chronic plantar fasciitis, and in doing so, the Nike 5.0 shoe may result in reductions in pain earlier than conventional running shoes. PMID:20048543

  15. TL-61 versus Rohadur orthoses in heel spur syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, H; Raskowsky, M; Blake, R L; Denton, J A

    1991-08-01

    The authors present the subjective responses of 40 patients with heel spur syndrome or plantar fascitis to orthotic treatment. Twenty patients had Rohadur orthoses and 20 patients had TL-61 orthoses. These data show no difference in the response to or problems created by either TL-61 or Rohadur orthoses. The authors recommend TL-61 as one alternative to Rohadur, now that that latter is unavailable. PMID:1920106

  16. Detachable high heel shoe construction

    E-print Network

    Morales, Alfredo Louis

    2007-01-01

    The goal on this investigation was to develop a detachable high heel shoe construction that could enter the current high heel market. The impact of high heel shoes on women's fashion is enormous but there are associated ...

  17. Classification of Calcaneal Spurs and Their Relationship With Plantar Fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Binghua; Zhou, You; Tao, Xu; Yuan, Chengsong; Tang, Kanglai

    2015-01-01

    Calcaneal spurs, as a cause of plantar fasciitis, are currently debatable. A prospective study was performed to classify calcaneal spurs according to the findings from an investigation of the relationship between calcaneal spurs and plantar fasciitis. Thirty patients with calcaneal spurs and plantar heel pain underwent calcaneal spur removal and endoscopic plantar fasciotomy. The relationship between the classification of calcaneal spurs and plantar fasciitis was evaluated by endoscopic findings, clinical symptoms, radiographic images, and biopsy findings. The visual analog scale for pain and the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scores for functional evaluation were used preoperatively and postoperatively, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 24 months. Two separate types of calcaneal spurs were recognized. Type A calcaneal spurs were located superior to the plantar fascia insertion, and type B calcaneal spurs were located within the plantar fascia. Magnetic resonance imaging results showed a more severe plantar fasciitis grade in type B calcaneal spurs preoperatively. Histologic examination showed that the numbers of granulocytes per image in type B spurs were significantly increased compared with those in type A spurs. Statistically significant improvements were found in the mean visual analog scale and American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society scores and magnetic resonance imaging results in both groups. The amount of change in the visual analog scale score and American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society score, the number of granulocytes per image, and calcaneal spur length showed a high association with the classification of the calcaneal spurs. Calcaneal spurs were completely removed and did not recur in any of the patients on radiographic assessment during the follow-up period. Calcaneal spurs can be classified into 2 distinct types that are indicative of the severity of plantar fasciitis. PMID:25771476

  18. Diabetic foot ulcer incidence in relation to plantar pressure magnitude and measurement location?,??,?

    PubMed Central

    Ledoux, William R.; Shofer, Jane B.; Cowley, Matthew S.; Ahroni, Jessie H.; Cohen, Victoria; Boyko, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Aims We prospectively examined the relationship between site-specific peak plantar pressure (PPP) and ulcer risk. Researchers have previously reported associations between diabetic foot ulcer and elevated plantar foot pressure, but the effect of location-specific pressures has not been studied. Methods Diabetic subjects (n = 591) were enrolled from a single VA hospital. Five measurements of in-shoe plantar pressure were collected using F-Scan. Pressures were measured at 8 areas: heel, lateral midfoot, medial midfoot, first metatarsal, second through fourth metatarsal, fifth metatarsal, hallux, and other toes. The relationship between incident plantar foot ulcer and PPP or pressure–time integral (PTI) was assessed using Cox regression. Results During follow-up (2.4 years), 47 subjects developed plantar ulcers (10 heel, 12 metatarsal, 19 hallux, 6 other). Overall mean PPP was higher for ulcer subjects (219 vs. 194 kPa), but the relationship differed by site (the metatarsals with ulcers had higher pressure, while the opposite was true for the hallux and heel). A statistical analysis was not performed on the means, but hazard ratios from a Cox survival analysis were nonsignificant for PPP across all sites and when adjusted for location. However, when the metatarsals were considered separately, higher baseline PPP was significantly associated with greater ulcer risk; at other sites, this relationship was nonsignificant. Hazard ratios for all PTI data were nonsignificant. Conclusions Location must be considered when assessing the relationship between PPP and plantar ulceration. PMID:24012295

  19. Effect of Field Size and Length of Plantar Spur on Treatment Outcome in Radiation Therapy of Plantar Fasciitis: The Bigger the Better?

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, Robert Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Reible, Michael; Carl, Ulrich Martin; Nitsche, Mirko

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is well established in the treatment of painful plantar fasciitis or heel spur. A retrospective analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of field definition on treatment outcome and to determine the impact of factors potentially involved. Methods and Materials: A review of treatment data of 250 patients (285 heels) with a mean follow-up time of 11 months showed that complete symptom remission occurred in 38%, partial remission in 32%, and no change in 19% (11% were lost to follow-up). Variables such as radiologic evidence of plantar spurs, their length, radiation dose, field size, age, sex, and onset of pain before administration of radiation therapy were investigated in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Results: Treatment response depended upon age >53 years, length of heel spur ?6.5 mm (or no radiologic evidence of a heel spur), and onset of pain <12 months before radiation therapy. Patients with these clinical prerequisites stood a 93% chance of clinical response. Without these prerequisites, only 49% showed any impact. No influence of field size on treatment outcome became evident. Conclusion: Patients with short plantar heel spurs benefit from radiation therapy equally well as patients without any radiologic evidence. Moreover, smaller field sizes have the same positive effect as commonly used large field definitions covering the entire calcaneal bone. This leads to a recommendation of a considerable reduction of field size in future clinical practice.

  20. Plantar calcaneal spurs in older people: longitudinal traction or vertical compression?

    PubMed Central

    Menz, Hylton B; Zammit, Gerard V; Landorf, Karl B; Munteanu, Shannon E

    2008-01-01

    Background Plantar calcaneal spurs are common, however their pathophysiology is poorly understood. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and correlates of plantar calcaneal spurs in a large sample of older people. Methods Weightbearing lateral foot radiographs of 216 people (140 women and 76 men) aged 62 to 94 years (mean age 75.9, SD 6.6) were examined for plantar calcaneal and Achilles tendon spurs. Associations between the presence of spurs and sex, body mass index, radiographic measures of foot posture, self-reported co-morbidities and current or previous heel pain were then explored. Results Of the 216 participants, 119 (55%) had at least one plantar calcaneal spur and 103 (48%) had at least one Achilles tendon spur. Those with plantar calcaneal spurs were more likely to have Achilles tendon spurs (odds ratio [OR] = 2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2 to 3.5). Prevalence of spurs did not differ according to sex. Participants with plantar calcaneal spurs were more likely to be obese (OR = 7.9, 95% CI 3.6 to 17.0), report osteoarthritis (OR = 2.6, 95% CI 1.6 to 4.8) and have current or previous heel pain (OR = 4.6, 95% CI 2.3 to 9.4). No relationship was found between the presence of calcaneal spurs and radiographic measures of foot posture. Conclusion Calcaneal spurs are common in older men and women and are related to obesity, osteoarthritis and current or previous heel pain, but are unrelated to radiographic measurements of foot posture. These findings support the theory that plantar calcaneal spurs may be an adaptive response to vertical compression of the heel rather than longitudinal traction at the calcaneal enthesis. PMID:18822162

  1. Plantar fasciitis: diagnosis and therapeutic considerations.

    PubMed

    Roxas, Mario

    2005-06-01

    Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of inferior heel pain. The pain and discomfort associated with this condition can have a dramatic impact on physical mobility. The etiology of this condition is not clearly understood and is probably multi-factorial in nature. Weight gain, occupation-related activity, anatomical variations, poor biomechanics, overexertion, and inadequate footwear are contributing factors. Although plantar fasciitis is generally regarded as a self-limited condition, it can take months to years to resolve, presenting a challenge for clinicians. Many treatment options are available that demonstrate variable levels of efficacy. Conservative therapies include rest and avoidance of potentially aggravating activities, stretching and strengthening exercises, orthotics, arch supports, and night splinting. Other considerations include use of anti-inflammatory agents, ultrasonic shockwave therapy, and, in the most extreme cases, surgery. This article reviews plantar fasciitis, presents the most effective treatment options currently available, and proposes nutritional considerations that may be beneficial in the management of this condition. PMID:15989378

  2. A novel treatment for refractory plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mihir M

    2015-03-01

    Chronic plantar fasciitis is a major health care problem worldwide and affects nearly 10% of the US population. Although most cases resolve with conservative care, the numerous treatments for refractory plantar fasciitis attest to the lack of consensus regarding these cases. The emerging goals for this condition are a minimally invasive percutaneous intervention that is safe, effective, and well-tolerated and has minimal morbidity and a low complication rate. We conducted a prospective study in which patients were allowed either to continue with noninvasive treatment or to undergo focal aspiration and partial fasciotomy with an ultrasonic probe. This is the first report of a plantar fascia partial release guided by ultrasonic energy delivered by a percutaneously inserted probe under local anesthesia. The procedure appears to be a safe, effective, well-tolerated treatment for a condition that is refractory to other options. PMID:25750942

  3. Current evidence of extracorporeal shock wave therapy in chronic Achilles tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Gerdesmeyer, Ludger; Mittermayr, Rainer; Fuerst, Martin; Al Muderis, Munjed; Thiele, Richard; Saxena, Amol; Gollwitzer, Hans

    2015-12-01

    Chronic Achilles tendinopathy has been described as the most common overuse injury in sports medicine. Several treatment modalities such as activity modification, heel lifts, arch supports, stretching exercises, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, and eccentric loading are known as standard treatment mostly without proven evidence. After failed conservative therapy, invasive treatment may be considered. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has been successfully used in soft-tissue pathologies like lateral epicondylitis, plantar fasciitis, tendinopathy of the shoulder and also in bone and skin disorders. Conclusive evidence recommending ESWT as a treatment for Achilles tendinopathy is still lacking. In plantar fasciitis as well as in calcific shoulder tendinopathy shock wave therapy is recently the best evaluated treatment option. This article analysis the evidence based literature of ESWT in chronic Achilles tendinopathy. Recently published data have shown the efficacy of focused and radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy. PMID:26327530

  4. Surgery for Patients With Recalcitrant Plantar Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Patrick; Boyd, Kevin; Shipton, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Background: Plantar fasciitis is a common cause of foot pain, and although many episodes are self-limiting with short duration, 10% leave chronic symptoms. Recalcitrant cases can be managed surgically, with studies demonstrating good results in the short term but uncertainties over longer term outcomes. Purpose: To assess the outcome following surgical intervention for patients with plantar fasciitis. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Seventy-nine patients were identified from operative diaries undergoing plantar fasciotomy surgery between 1993 and 2009. They were contacted to investigate long-term results using self-reported outcome measures. Results: Sixty-eight responses were received (86% response rate), with an average of 7 years (range, 1-15 years) of follow-up. Patients reported an average reduction in pain by visual analog scale of 79%, and 84% of patients were happy with the surgical results. Greater success was achieved in patients with shorter duration of symptoms preoperatively. No deterioration in success was seen over time. Conclusion: Plantar fasciotomy surgery for plantar fasciitis remains controversial, with biomechanical arguments against surgery; however, this article reports good success following surgery over a long follow-up period. The results of current operative techniques need to be fully investigated for longer term success, as do the outcomes of newer nonoperative management strategies. PMID:26535314

  5. [Treatment of plantar fasciopathy].

    PubMed

    Kaikkonen, Mira; Joukainen, Antti; Sahlman, Janne

    2012-01-01

    Plantar fasciopathy is the most frequent reason for foot pain. It is characterized by degeneration of the insertion of the plantar fascia on the medial process of the calcaneal tuberosity. Palpation over plantar fascia insertion reproduces the pain and may reveal swelling. Conservative treatment is almost always successful. Initial treatment consists of anti-inflammatory medication, stretching exercises, night splints and shoe inserts. If these fail, steroid injections, custom made orthotics, and extra corporeal shock wave therapy may be tried. If disabling pain persists for more than one year, surgery may be indicated. PMID:23033788

  6. The efficacy of a pneumatic compression device in the treatment of plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Kavros, Steven J

    2005-11-01

    Plantar fasciitis is a common foot disorder that affects more than two million Americans each year. Conservative management of plantar fasciitis is the first line of treatment by the medical specialist who frequently encounters this common foot complaint. In this study, 50 patients with plantar fasciitis of 4 weeks duration but less than 12 weeks were randomized into two groups. One group of 25 patients used the AirHeel (Aircast, Inc.) and the second group of 25 used the 1st Step prefabricated foot insert (Wrymark, Inc). Standardized weight-bearing radiographs were obtained in order to categorize the foot type: normal arch, pes planus, or pes cavus. Patients were initially evaluated and at 12 weeks they returned for a subsequent visit. The contact area of the foot with the AirHeel and 1st Step insert were similar, an increase of 27% and 26%, respectively, over the contact area barefoot. There was a noted difference in force reduction with the two devices. The AirHeel reduced the midstance force by 20.19%, as compared to the 1st Step insert which showed a 1.03% increase in midstance force. Patients with a higher initial pain score seemed to respond better initially to the AirHeel (p = 0.015) than the 1st Step insert (p = 0.035). This study demonstrates the benefits of offloading the foot at midstance with two devices to relieve the discomfort associated with plantar fasciitis. The Aircast AirHeel is a new modality for dynamic, functional treatment of proximal plantar fasciitis. PMID:16498185

  7. Plantar fascia (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    The plantar fascia is a very thick band of tissue that covers the bones on the bottom of the foot. It ... band of tissue causes a high arch. This fascia can become inflamed and painful in some people, ...

  8. Heel pain and HIV-associated lipodystrophy: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Stupar, Maja; Tibbles, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is diagnosed based on a pathognomonic clinical presentation and physical examination including plantar heel pain with the initial few steps after a period of inactivity. People living with HIV/AIDS, who are taking anti-retroviral medications, often have an associated redistribution of body fat (lipodystrophy). Lipoatrophy of the extremities may involve the heel fat-pad in this population and result in the signs and symptoms of plantar fasciitis. Two cases of plantar heel pain in HIV-associated lipodystrophy are presented to discuss the possible clinical association between the two conditions. Although conservative therapies have limited evidence, they are commonly used and have been seen, clinically, to result in a resolution of symptoms. In the presented cases, the individuals benefited from soft tissue therapy, modalities, activity modification and education on proper footwear. Clinicians should be aware that the association between these two conditions may be a significant cause of morbidity in a population of patients with HIV. PMID:18516231

  9. Platelet-Rich-Plasma injection seems to be effective in treatment of plantar fasciitis: a case series.

    PubMed

    van Egmond, Jeroen C; Breugem, Stefan J M; Driessen, Marcel; Bruijn, Daniel J

    2015-06-01

    Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain. Diverse non-operative treatment options are available. The purpose of this study was to determine if a single platelet-rich-plasma injection at the origin of the plantar fascia in patients with plantar fasciitis gives a functional improvement. Patients with plantar fasciitis and failed conservative treatment were included in this retrospective study. Included patients were sent four questionnaires after platelet-rich-plasma injection. Primary outcome is functional improvement, determined by foot function index in which lower scores correlates with a better foot function. A total of 61 feet in 58 patients were included. The median foot function index before treatment was 69.4 and after treatment 31.8, which is a significant decrease. In 80.3% of the patients the foot function index decreased. Therefore platelet-rich-plasma injection seems to be effective in treatment of patients with plantar fasciitis when conservative treatment failed. PMID:26280973

  10. Ultrasound evaluation of a spontaneous plantar fascia rupture.

    PubMed

    Louwers, Michael J; Sabb, Brian; Pangilinan, Percival H

    2010-11-01

    Plantar fascia rupture is an occasional complication in patients with chronic plantar fasciitis or in patients with plantar fasciitis treated with steroid injection. Very few cases of spontaneous plantar fascia rupture have been reported in the literature (Herrick and Herrick, Am J Sports Med 1983;11:95; Lun et al, Clin J Sports Med 1999;9:48-9; Rolf et al, J Foot Ankle Surg 1997;36:112-4; Saxena and Fullem, Am J Sports Med 2004;32:662-5). Spontaneous medial plantar fascia rupture in a 37-yr-old man with no preceding symptoms or steroid injections was confirmed with diagnostic ultrasound, which revealed severe fasciitis at the calcaneal insertion with partial tearing. After conservative treatment, the patient returned to full activities. We discuss the anatomy, risk factors, examination findings, and treatment for this condition, as well as the unique benefits that ultrasound offers over magnetic resonance imaging. It is important to consider plantar fascia rupture in patients with hindfoot pain and medioplantar ecchymosis, particularly if an injury occurred during acceleration maneuvers. Ultrasound in these cases can be used to diagnose a plantar fascia tear quickly, accurately, and cost-effectively. PMID:20962604

  11. Plantar pressures in individuals with normal and pronated feet according to static squat depths

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Da Hyun; Lee, Jong Dae; Kim, Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to investigate differences in plantar pressure between individuals with normal and pronated feet according to 3 static squat depths. [Subjects and Methods] Study subjects were 10 young adults with normal and pronated feet. Plantar pressures were measured in the standing position and static squat positions at 45° (semi-squat) and 90° (half-squat) knee flexion using the F-Mat. Subjects’ plantar pressures were analyzed by dividing the foot into 4 areas: forefoot medial, forefoot lateral, midfoot, and heel. [Results] In the half-squat position, the pronated foot group showed a higher foot pressure in the forefoot medial than was seen in the normal group, whereas the normal group exhibited a higher foot pressure in the heel than was seen in the pronated foot group. [Conclusion] An increase in squat depth led to the transfer of plantar pressure to the heel in normal feet and to the forefoot medial in pronated feet. PMID:26504304

  12. Predictors of Barefoot Plantar Pressure during Walking in Patients with Diabetes, Peripheral Neuropathy and a History of Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Barn, Ruth; Waaijman, Roelof; Nollet, Frans; Woodburn, James; Bus, Sicco A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Elevated dynamic plantar foot pressures significantly increase the risk of foot ulceration in diabetes mellitus. The aim was to determine which factors predict plantar pressures in a population of diabetic patients who are at high-risk of foot ulceration. Methods Patients with diabetes, peripheral neuropathy and a history of ulceration were eligible for inclusion in this cross sectional study. Demographic data, foot structure and function, and disease-related factors were recorded and used as potential predictor variables in the analyses. Barefoot peak pressures during walking were calculated for the heel, midfoot, forefoot, lesser toes, and hallux regions. Potential predictors were investigated using multivariate linear regression analyses. 167 participants with mean age of 63 years contributed 329 feet to the analyses. Results The regression models were able to predict between 6% (heel) and 41% (midfoot) of the variation in peak plantar pressures. The largest contributing factor in the heel model was glycosylated haemoglobin concentration, in the midfoot Charcot deformity, in the forefoot prominent metatarsal heads, in the lesser toes hammer toe deformity and in the hallux previous ulceration. Variables with local effects (e.g. foot deformity) were stronger predictors of plantar pressure than global features (e.g. body mass, age, gender, or diabetes duration). Conclusion The presence of local deformity was the largest contributing factor to barefoot dynamic plantar pressure in high-risk diabetic patients and should therefore be adequately managed to reduce plantar pressure and ulcer risk. However, a significant amount of variance is unexplained by the models, which advocates the quantitative measurement of plantar pressures in the clinical risk assessment of the patient. PMID:25647421

  13. Heel Pain in the Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Kenneth John; Anderson, Robert B.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Heel pain, a relatively common problem in the athlete, can present a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. The purpose of this article is to review treatment techniques for common causes of heel pain in the athlete. Evidence Acquisition: Articles in the English literature through August 2008 were selected and reviewed in the context of the management of heel pain in the athlete. Clinical and surgical photographs are presented as an illustration of preferred techniques and pertinent pathologic findings. Results: Although nonoperative treatment remains the mainstay for most painful heel pathologies, a number of surgical interventions have shown encouraging results in carefully selected patients. Conclusions: The management of heel pain in the athlete requires diagnostic skill, appropriate imaging evaluation, and a careful, initially conservative approach to treatment. Surgical treatment can be successful in carefully selected patients. PMID:23015903

  14. Rearward movement of the heel at heel strike.

    PubMed

    McGorry, Raymond W; Chang, Chien-Chi; DiDomenico, Angela

    2008-11-01

    This paper describes the observation of rearward movement (RM) of the heel following heel strike occurring during normal gait. Thirty-one participants recruited as part of a larger study on slip kinematics walked the length of an 8-m runway at a speed of 1.5 m/s. Several floor surfaces, presented dry and with contaminant, were used for the purpose of eliciting a wide range of small slip distances. The normal force applied to a forceplate mounted in the runway was used to identify heel strike, as well as to calculate the utilized coefficient of friction during early stance phase. A motion analysis system tracked the displacement of two heel-mounted markers, and the data were used to derive kinematic variables related to the heel strike event. Results showed that RMs occurred in 18.1% of 494 trials, with a mean rearward displacement of 5.02 (+/-3.68) mm. When present, RMs occurred in close temporal proximity to heel strike, typically completing RM within 40 ms of the heel strike event. When divided into groups by age, older participants (>40 years) were more than twice as likely to have RMs as younger participants. When grouped by height or weight, differences in the proportion of trials with RMs were small. In trials where RMs were observed, forward slip distances were significantly less than for trials with no RMs, 2.17 (+/-3.87) mm vs. 12.58 (+/-10.71) mm, respectively. The time until the heel stopped moving during the post-heel strike period was not significantly different between RM and non-RM trials. Further investigation of this gait feature may improve understanding of normal gait patterns and may have implications for future slipmeter development. PMID:18280459

  15. Comparison of custom and prefabricated orthoses in the initial treatment of proximal plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, G; Bacchetti, P; Deland, J; Lewis, A; Anderson, R; Davis, W; Alvarez, R; Brodsky, J; Cooper, P; Frey, C; Herrick, R; Myerson, M; Sammarco, J; Janecki, C; Ross, S; Bowman, M; Smith, R

    1999-04-01

    Fifteen centers for orthopaedic treatment of the foot and ankle participated in a prospective randomized trial to compare several nonoperative treatments for proximal plantar fasciitis (heel pain syndrome). Included were 236 patients (160 women and 76 men) who were 16 years of age or older. Most reported duration of symptoms of 6 months or less. Patients with systemic disease, significant musculoskeletal complaints, sciatica, or local nerve entrapment were excluded. We randomized patients prospectively into five different treatment groups. All groups performed Achilles tendon- and plantar fascia-stretching in a similar manner. One group was treated with stretching only. The other four groups stretched and used one of four different shoe inserts, including a silicone heel pad, a felt pad, a rubber heel cup, or a custom-made polypropylene orthotic device. Patients were reevaluated after 8 weeks of treatment. The percentages improved in each group were: (1) silicone insert, 95%; (2) rubber insert, 88%; (3) felt insert, 81%; (4)stretching only, 72%; and (5) custom orthosis, 68%. Combining all the patients who used a prefabricated insert, we found that their improvement rates were higher than those assigned to stretching only (P = 0.022) and those who stretched and used a custom orthosis (P = 0.0074). We conclude that, when used in conjunction with a stretching program, a prefabricated shoe insert is more likely to produce improvement in symptoms as part of the initial treatment of proximal plantar fasciitis than a custom polypropylene orthotic device. PMID:10229276

  16. A new minimally invasive technique for treating plantar fasciosis using bipolar radiofrequency: a prospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Weil, Lowell; Glover, Jason P; Weil, Lowell Scott

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a new minimally invasive technique using bipolar radiofrequency in the treatment of plantar fasciosis. A prospective study was performed on 10 patients with recalcitrant plantar fasciosis that failed conservative care. A percutaneous microtenotomy was performed unilaterally with a Topaz microdebrider. Outcome measures included visual analog scale, American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) Hindfoot and Midfoot Scale, and patient satisfaction assessment. All patients had statistical improvement in outcome measures at 6 months and 1 year. One patient developed recurrent heel pain at the 1-year mark. There were no postoperative complications. This minimally invasive technique is a viable surgical treatment option in patients with plantar fasciosis that failed conservative care. PMID:19825686

  17. Plantar fasciitis: etiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Cornwall, M W; McPoil, T G

    1999-12-01

    Plantar fasciitis is a common pathological condition of the foot and can often be a challenge for clinicians to successfully treat. The purpose of this article is to present and discuss selected literature on the etiology and clinical outcome of treating plantar fasciitis. Surgical and nonsurgical techniques have been used in the treatment of plantar fasciitis. Nonsurgical management for the treatment of the symptoms and discomfort associated with plantar fasciitis can be classified into 3 broad categories: reducing pain and inflammation, reducing tissue stress to a tolerable level, and restoring muscle strength and flexibility of involved tissues. Each of these treatments has demonstrated some level of effectiveness in alleviating the symptoms of plantar fasciitis. Previous studies have grouped all forms of nonsurgical therapy together. It is, therefore, difficult to determine if one type of treatment is more effective compared with another. Until such research is available, the clinician would be wise to include treatments from all 3 categories. PMID:10612073

  18. Using an optimization approach to design an insole for lowering plantar fascia stress--a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yu-Chun; Gung, Yih-Wen; Shih, Shih-Liang; Feng, Chi-Kuang; Wei, Shun-Hwa; Yu, Chung-Huang; Chen, Chen-Sheng

    2008-08-01

    Plantar heel pain is a commonly encountered orthopedic problem and is most often caused by plantar fasciitis. In recent years, different shapes of insole have been used to treat plantar fasciitis. However, little research has been focused on the junction stress between the plantar fascia and the calcaneus when wearing different shapes of insole. Therefore, this study aimed to employ a finite element (FE) method to investigate the relationship between different shapes of insole and the junction stress, and accordingly design an optimal insole to lower fascia stress.A detailed 3D foot FE model was created using ANSYS 9.0 software. The FE model calculation was compared to the Pedar device measurements to validate the FE model. After the FE model validation, this study conducted parametric analysis of six different insoles and used optimization analysis to determine the optimal insole which minimized the junction stress between plantar fascia and calcaneus. This FE analysis found that the plantar fascia stress and peak pressure when using the optimal insole were lower by 14% and 38.9%, respectively, than those when using the flat insole. In addition, the stress variation in plantar fascia was associated with the different shapes of insole. PMID:18481179

  19. Effect of antipronation foot orthosis geometry on compression of heel and arch soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Declan; Nester, Christopher; Preece, Stephen; Mickle, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to understand how systematic changes in arch height and two designs of heel wedging affect soft tissues under the foot. Soft tissue thickness under the heel and navicular was measured using ultrasound. Heel pad thickness was measured when subjects were standing on a flat surface and standing on an orthosis with 4 and 8 degree extrinsic wedges and 4 mm and 8 mm intrinsic wedges (n = 27). Arch soft tissue thickness was measured when subjects were standing and when standing on an orthosis with -6 mm, standard, and +6 mm increments in arch height (n = 25). Extrinsic and intrinsic heel wedges significantly increased soft tissue thickness under the heel compared with no orthosis. The 4 and 8 degree extrinsic wedges increased tissue thickness by 28% and 27.6%, respectively, while the 4 mm and 8 mm intrinsic wedges increased thickness by 23% and 14.6%, respectively. Orthotic arch height significantly affected arch soft tissue thickness. Compared with the no orthosis condition, the -6 mm, standard, and +6 mm arch heights decreased arch tissue thickness by 9%, 10%, and 11.8%, respectively. This study demonstrates that change in orthotic geometry creates different plantar soft tissue responses that we expect to affect transmission of force to underlying foot bones. PMID:26465089

  20. High Heels Increase Women's Attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Guéguen, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    Research has found that the appearance of women's apparel helps increase their attractiveness as rated by men and that men care more about physical features in potential opposite-sex mates. However, the effect of sartorial appearance has received little interest from scientists. In a series of studies, the length of women's shoe heels was examined. A woman confederate wearing black shoes with 0, 5, or 9 cm heels asked men for help in various circumstances. In Study 1, she asked men to respond to a short survey on gender equality. In Study 2, the confederate asked men and women to participate in a survey on local food habit consumption. In Study 3, men and women in the street were observed while walking in back of the female confederate who dropped a glove apparently unaware of her loss. It was found that men's helping behavior increased as soon as heel length increased. However, heel length had no effect on women's helping behavior. It was also found that men spontaneously approached women more quickly when they wore high-heeled shoes (Study 4). Change in gait, foot-size judgment, and misattribution of sexiness and sexual intent were used as possible explanations. PMID:25408499

  1. On muscle, tendon and high heels.

    PubMed

    Csapo, R; Maganaris, C N; Seynnes, O R; Narici, M V

    2010-08-01

    Wearing high heels (HH) places the calf muscle-tendon unit (MTU) in a shortened position. As muscles and tendons are highly malleable tissues, chronic use of HH might induce structural and functional changes in the calf MTU. To test this hypothesis, 11 women regularly wearing HH and a control group of 9 women were recruited. Gastrocnemius medialis (GM) fascicle length, pennation angle and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), the Achilles' tendon (AT) length, cross-sectional area (CSA) and mechanical properties, and the plantarflexion torque-angle and torque-velocity relationships were assessed in both groups. Shorter GM fascicle lengths were observed in the HH group (49.6+/-5.7 mm vs 56.0+/-7.7 mm), resulting in greater tendon-to-fascicle length ratios. Also, because of greater AT CSA, AT stiffness was higher in the HH group (136.2+/-26.5 N mm(-1) vs 111.3+/-20.2 N mm(-1)). However, no differences in the GM PCSA to AT CSA ratio, torque-angle and torque-velocity relationships were found. We conclude that long-term use of high-heeled shoes induces shortening of the GM muscle fascicles and increases AT stiffness, reducing the ankle's active range of motion. Functionally, these two phenomena seem to counteract each other since no significant differences in static or dynamic torques were observed. PMID:20639419

  2. Heel Erosion in Dairy Cattle ANIMAL WELFARE

    E-print Network

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    Heel Erosion in Dairy Cattle ANIMAL WELFARE PROGRAM Heel Erosion in Dairy Cattle Lorna Baird, Luis erosion is a common problem in dairy cattle. An eroded heel provides less shock absorbance and increases erosion is associated with standing in moisture and manure, but little is known about other risk factors

  3. Effect of variable body mass on plantar foot pressure and off-loading device efficacy.

    PubMed

    Pirozzi, Kelly; McGuire, James; Meyr, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence has implicated obesity as having a negative effect on the development, treatment, and outcome of lower extremity pathologic entities, including diabetic foot disease. The objective of the present study was to increase the body of knowledge with respect to the effects of obesity on foot function. Specifically, we attempted to (1) describe the relationship between an increasing body mass index (BMI) on plantar foot pressures during gait, and (2) evaluate the efficacy of commonly prescribed off-loading devices with an increasing BMI. A repeated measures design was used to compare the peak plantar foot pressures under multiple test conditions, with the volunteers acting as their own controls. The primary outcome measure was the mean peak plantar pressure in the heel, midfoot, forefoot, and first metatarsal, and the 2 variables were modification of patient weight (from "normal" BMI to "overweight," "obese," and "morbidly obese") and footwear (from an athletic sneaker to a surgical shoe, controlled ankle motion walker, and total contact cast). Statistically significant increases in the peak plantar pressures were observed with increasing volunteer BMI weight class, regardless of the off-loading device used. The present investigation has provided unique and specific data with respect to the changes that occur in the peak plantar pressures with variable BMIs across different anatomic levels and with commonly used off-loading devices. From our results, we have concluded that although the plantar pressures increase with increasing weight, it appears that at least some reduction in pressure can be achieved with an off-loading device, most effectively with the total contact cast, regardless of the patient's BMI. PMID:24735742

  4. Plantar soft tissue thickness during ground contact in walking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavanagh, P. R.

    1999-01-01

    A technique is introduced for the measurement of plantar soft tissue thickness during barefoot walking. Subjects stepped into an adjustable Plexiglas frame which ensured that the required bony landmarks were appropriately positioned relative to a linear ultrasound probe connected to a conventional 7.5 MHz ultrasound scanner. Clear images of the metatarsal condyles or other foot bones were obtained throughout ground contact. Subsequent analysis of the video taped images using a motion analysis system allowed the tissue displacement to be calculated as a function of time. The tissue underneath the second metatarsal head was shown to undergo an average maximum compression of 45.7% during the late stages of ground contact during first step gait in a group of five normal subjects with a mean unloaded tissue thickness of 15.2 mm. The technique has a number of applications, including use in the validation of deformation predicted by finite element models of the soft tissue of the foot, and the study of alterations in the cushioning properties of the heel by devices which constrain the displacement of the heel pad.

  5. The use of night splints for treatment of recalcitrant plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Wapner, K L; Sharkey, P F

    1991-12-01

    This study reports the results of the use of molded ankle foot orthosis night splints for the treatment of recalcitrant plantar fasciitis on 14 patients with a total of 18 symptomatic feet. All patients had symptoms for greater than 1 year and had previously undergone treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicines, cortisone injections, shoe modifications, and physical therapy without resolution. All patients were provided with custom-molded polypropylene ankle foot orthoses in 5 degrees of dorsiflexion to be used as a night splint. With continued use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication, Tuli heel cups, Spenco liners, and general stretching exercises, successful resolution occurred in 11 patients in less than 4 months. There were three failures. It is felt that the use of night splints provides a useful, cost-effective adjunct to current therapeutic regimens of plantar fasciitis. PMID:1791004

  6. Effect of metatarsal phalangeal joint extension on plantar soft tissue stiffness and thickness

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Christopher A.; Goebel, Shannon L.; Hastings, Mary K.; Klaesner, Joseph W.; Mueller, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Plantar soft tissue stiffness and thickness are important biomechanical variables to understand stress concentrations that may contribute to tissue injury. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of passive metatarsal phalangeal joint (MPJ) extension on plantar soft tissue stiffness and thickness. Methods Seventeen healthy participants (7 male, 10 female, mean age 25.3 y, SD 4.4 y, mean BMI 24.7 kg/m2, SD 3.2 kg/m2) were tested. Plantar soft tissue stiffness and thickness were measured at the metatarsal heads, midfoot and heel using a custom-built indentor device and an ultrasound machine. Results Indicators of soft tissue stiffness (K1 values) at the metatarsal heads and midfoot showed increases in stiffness of 81–88% (SD 20–33%) in the MPJ extension position compared with the MPJ neutral position. Soft tissue thickness measures at the metatarsal heads with the MPJ in neutral ranged from a mean of 8.9–13.5 mm and decreased, on average, by 8.8% (SD 2.9%) with MPJ extension. Conclusions MPJ extension has a profound effect on increasing forefoot plantar soft tissue stiffness and a consistent but minimal effect on reducing soft tissue thickness. These changes may help transform the foot into a rigid lever at push-off consistent with the theory of the windlass mechanism. PMID:19492011

  7. Plantar Fasciitis: Prescribing Effective Treatments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Michael; Fields, Karl B.

    2002-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is an extremely common, painful injury seen among people in running and jumping sports. While prognosis for recovery with conservative care is excellent, prolonged duration of symptoms affects sports participation. Studies on treatment options show mixed results, so finding effective treatments can be challenging. A logical…

  8. On high heels and short muscles: a multiscale model for sarcomere loss in the gastrocnemius muscle.

    PubMed

    Zöllner, Alexander M; Pok, Jacquelynn M; McWalter, Emily J; Gold, Garry E; Kuhl, Ellen

    2015-01-21

    High heels are a major source of chronic lower limb pain. Yet, more than one third of all women compromise health for looks and wear high heels on a daily basis. Changing from flat footwear to high heels induces chronic muscle shortening associated with discomfort, fatigue, reduced shock absorption, and increased injury risk. However, the long-term effects of high-heeled footwear on the musculoskeletal kinematics of the lower extremities remain poorly understood. Here we create a multiscale computational model for chronic muscle adaptation to characterize the acute and chronic effects of global muscle shortening on local sarcomere lengths. We perform a case study of a healthy female subject and show that raising the heel by 13cm shortens the gastrocnemius muscle by 5% while the Achilles tendon remains virtually unaffected. Our computational simulation indicates that muscle shortening displays significant regional variations with extreme values of 22% in the central gastrocnemius. Our model suggests that the muscle gradually adjusts to its new functional length by a chronic loss of sarcomeres in series. Sarcomere loss varies significantly across the muscle with an average loss of 9%, virtually no loss at the proximal and distal ends, and a maximum loss of 39% in the central region. These changes reposition the remaining sarcomeres back into their optimal operating regime. Computational modeling of chronic muscle shortening provides a valuable tool to shape our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of muscle adaptation. Our study could open new avenues in orthopedic surgery and enhance treatment for patients with muscle contracture caused by other conditions than high heel wear such as paralysis, muscular atrophy, and muscular dystrophy. PMID:25451524

  9. Kinematics and Kinetics of Single-Limb Heel Rise in Diabetes Related Medial Column Foot Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, Mary K.; Woodburn, James; Mueller, Michael J.; Strube, Michael J; Johnson, Jeffrey E.; Sinacore, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes-related medial column foot deformities contribute to high plantar pressure, joint instability, ulceration and amputation. Impaired foot function may be an early indicator of foot structural incompetence and contribute to deformity progression. This study examines the ability of single-limb heel rise multi-segmental kinematics and kinetics to identify midfoot and hindfoot dysfunction in those with diabetes-related medial column foot deformity. Methods Single-limb heel rise foot kinematics and kinetics were examined in adults with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy with and without medial column foot deformity and age-, weight-matched controls. Findings Hindfoot relative to shank plantarflexion, peak and excursion, were reduced in bothdiabetes groups compared to controls (P<0.017). Controls' initial forefoot relative to hindfoot position was plantarflexed 31 degrees and plantarflexed an additional 13 degrees during heel rise. The initial forefoot relative to hindfoot position for the diabetes group without deformity was similarly plantarflexed as controls (34 degrees) while the diabetes deformity group was less plantarflexed (lower arch position: 23 degrees, P<0.017). During the heel rise task both diabetes groups demonstrated less ability to plantarflex the forefoot relative to the hindfoot compared to controls (2 and 5 degrees respectively, P<0.017). Ankle plantarflexion power was reduced in the diabetes deformity group compared to controls (P<0.017). Interpretation The single-limb heel rise task identified movement dysfunction in those with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy. Failure to plantarflex the forefoot relative to hindfoot may compromise midfoot joint stability and increase the risk of injury and arch collapse. PMID:25218437

  10. Homeopathic treatment of plantar warts.

    PubMed Central

    Labrecque, M; Audet, D; Latulippe, L G; Drouin, J

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of a homeopathic treatment of plantar warts. DESIGN: Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial. SETTING: Hospital-based family medicine unit. PATIENTS: Patients were recruited from the unit, through advertisements in the local media and through personal contacts with colleagues. Of the 853 people screened between December 1987 and January 1989, 174 met the eligibility criteria (age 6 to 59 years and presence of one or more plantar warts untreated during the previous 3 months) and agreed to participate; 162 (93%) completed the 18-week follow-up. INTERVENTIONS: The 6-week homeopathic treatment consisted of thuya 30 "centésimal hahnemannien" (CH) (one tube containing 200 pellets weekly), antimonium crudum 7 CH (5 pellets daily) and nitricum acidum 7 CH (one tube containing 200 pellets daily). The placebo pellets were identical to the treatment pellets in appearance and taste. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The proportion of healed patients; a patient was considered healed if all of the warts had disappeared. MAIN RESULTS: The rates of healing at 6, 12 and 18 weeks were 4.8%, 13.4% and 20.0% respectively in the homeopathic treatment group and 4.6%, 13.1% and 24.4% in the placebo treatment group. CONCLUSION: The homeopathic treatment was no more effective than the placebo treatment of plantar warts. PMID:1596811

  11. A 4-week instructed minimalist running transition and gait-retraining changes plantar pressure and force.

    PubMed

    Warne, J P; Kilduff, S M; Gregan, B C; Nevill, A M; Moran, K A; Warrington, G D

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare changes in plantar pressure and force using conventional running shoes (CRS) and minimalist footwear (MFW) pre and post a 4-week MFW familiarization period. Ten female runners (age: 21?±?2 years; stature: 165.8?±?4.5?cm; mass: 55.9?±?3.2?kg) completed two 11?km/h treadmill runs, 24 hours apart, in both CRS and MFW (pretest). Plantar data were measured using sensory insoles for foot strike patterns, stride frequency, mean maximum force ( M ? F ¯ ), mean maximum pressure ( M ? P ¯ ) and eight mean maximum regional pressures. Subjects then completed a 4-week familiarization period consisting of running in MFW and simple gait-retraining, before repeating the tests (posttest). During the pretests, 30% of subjects adopted a forefoot strike in MFW, following familiarization this increased to 80%; no change occurred in CRS. A significant decrease in M ? F ¯ in both MFW and CRS (P?=?0.024) was observed from pre-post, and a significant decrease in heel pressures in MFW. M ? P ¯ was higher in MFW throughout testing (P?heel pressures. Higher M ? P ¯ was observed throughout testing in the MFW condition. PMID:24004458

  12. Investigating the Effects of Knee Flexion during the Eccentric Heel-Drop Exercise.

    PubMed

    Weinert-Aplin, Robert A; Bull, Anthony M J; McGregor, Alison H

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to characterise the biomechanics of the widely practiced eccentric heel-drop exercises used in the management of Achilles tendinosis. Specifically, the aim was to quantify changes in lower limb kinematics, muscle lengths and Achilles tendon force, when performing the exercise with a flexed knee instead of an extended knee. A musculoskeletal modelling approach was used to quantify any differences between these versions of the eccentric heel drop exercises used to treat Achilles tendinosis. 19 healthy volunteers provided a group from which optical motion, forceplate and plantar pressure data were recorded while performing both the extended and flexed knee eccentric heel-drop exercises over a wooden step when barefoot or wearing running shoes. This data was used as inputs into a scaled musculoskeletal model of the lower limb. Range of ankle motion was unaffected by knee flexion. However, knee flexion was found to significantly affect lower limb kinematics, inter-segmental loads and triceps muscle lengths. Peak Achilles load was not influenced despite significantly reduced peak ankle plantarflexion moments (p < 0.001). The combination of reduced triceps lengths and greater ankle dorsiflexion, coupled with reduced ankle plantarflexion moments were used to provide a basis for previously unexplained observations regarding the effect of knee flexion on the relative loading of the triceps muscles during the eccentric heel drop exercises. This finding questions the role of the flexed knee heel drop exercise when specifically treating Achilles tendinosis. Key pointsA more dorsiflexed ankle and a flexing knee are characteristics of performing the flexed knee heel-drop eccentric exercise.Peak ankle plantarflexion moments were reduced with knee flexion, but did not reduce peak Achilles tendon force.Kinematic changes at the knee and ankle affected the triceps muscle length and resulted in a reduction in the amount of Achilles tendon work performed.A version of the heel-drop exercise which reduces the muscle length change will also reduce the amount of tendon stretch, reducing the clinical efficacy of the exercise. PMID:25983597

  13. The effect of customised and sham foot orthoses on plantar pressures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of foot orthoses has been evaluated in many clinical trials with sham foot orthoses used as the control intervention in at least 10 clinical trials. However, the mechanical effects and credibility of sham orthoses has been rarely quantified. This study aimed to: (i) compare the effects on plantar pressures of three sham foot orthoses to a customised foot orthosis, and (ii) establish the perceived credibility and the expected benefit of each orthotic condition. Methods Thirty adults aged between 18 and 51 participated in this study. At 0 and 4 weeks, plantar pressure data were collected for the heel, midfoot and forefoot using the pedar®-X in-shoe system for the following five randomly assigned conditions: (i) shoe alone, (ii) customised foot orthosis, (iii) contoured polyethylene sham foot orthosis, (iv) contoured EVA sham foot orthosis, and (v) flat EVA sham foot orthosis. At the initial data collection session, each participant completed a Credibility/Expectancy Questionnaire (CEQ) to determine the credibility and expected benefit of each orthotic condition. Results Compared to the shoe alone at week 0, the contoured polyethylene sham orthosis was the only condition to not significantly effect peak pressure at any region of the foot. In contrast, the contoured EVA sham orthosis, the flat EVA sham orthosis and the customised orthosis significantly reduced peak pressure at the heel. At the medial midfoot, all sham orthoses provided the same effect as the shoe alone, which corresponded to effects that were significantly different to the customised orthosis. There were no differences in peak pressure between conditions at the other mask regions, the lateral midfoot and forefoot. When the conditions were compared at week 4, the differences between the conditions were generally similar to the findings observed at week 0. With respect to credibility and expected benefit, all orthotic conditions were considered the same with the exception of the contoured polyethylene sham orthosis, which was perceived as being less credible and less likely to provide benefits. Conclusion The findings of this study indicate that all of the sham orthoses tested provided the same effect on plantar pressures at the midfoot and forefoot as a shoe alone. However, the contoured EVA sham orthosis and the flat EVA sham orthosis significantly reduced peak pressure under the heel, which was similar to the customised orthosis. In contrast, the contoured polyethylene sham orthosis had no significant effect on plantar pressure and was comparable to the shoe alone at all regions of the foot. Hence, lower plantar pressures were found under the heel with some sham orthoses, but not with others. Importantly, participants perceived the polyethylene sham orthosis – the sham that had no effect on plantar pressure – to be the least credible orthosis and the least likely to provide benefits. This may be critical for the design of future clinical trials as it may introduce confounding effects that produce inaccurate results. These findings provide some evidence for the mechanical effects, treatment credibility and expected benefit of sham foot orthoses, which should be considered when they are used as a control intervention in a clinical trial. PMID:23680496

  14. Prediction of plantar soft tissue stiffness based on sex, age, bodyweight, height and body mass index.

    PubMed

    Teoh, Jee Chin; Lee, Taeyong

    2016-02-01

    15% of Diabetes Mellitus (DM) patients suffer high risk of ulceration and 85% of the amputation involving DM population is caused by non-healing ulcers. These findings elucidate the fact that foot ulcer can result in major amputation especially to the DM and elderly population. Therefore, early diagnosis of abnormally stiffened plantar soft tissue is needed to prevent the catastrophic tissue damage. In order to differentiate between normal and pathological tissues, a threshold reference value that defines healthy tissue is required. The objective of this study is to perform a multivariate analysis to estimate the healthy plantar tissue stiffness values based on the individuals physical attributes such as bodyweight (BW), height and body mass index (BMI) as well as their age and sex. 100 healthy subjects were recruited. Indentation was performed on 2nd metatarsal head pad at 3 different dorsiflexion angles of 0°, 20°, 40° and the hallux and heel at 0°. The results showed the important influences of BW, height and BMI in determining the plantar tissue stiffness. On the other hand, age and sex only play minimal roles. The study can be further extended to increase the reliability and accuracy of the proposed predictive model by evaluating several other related parameters such as body fat content, footwear usage, frequency of sports participation, etc. PMID:26474035

  15. Histomorphological Evaluation of Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Plantar Soft Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yak-Nam; Lee, Kara; Ledoux, William R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetic foot ulceration has a complex and multi-factorial etiology and can involve changes in the pathophysiology of the plantar soft tissue. In the current study, histomorphological analyses of diabetic and non-diabetic plantar tissue were performed. It was hypothesized that the diabetic tissue would have thicker skin (epidermis and dermis), less interdigitation between the dermis and epidermis, thicker elastic septa and decreased adipose cell size. Materials and Methods Two locations of the foot (the heel and the first metatarsal) were examined, both of which have been reported to be locations with a high incidence of ulceration. Stereological methods and quantitative morphological techniques were used to evaluate the skin thickness, interdigitation index, elastic septae thickness and adipocyte cell size. Results The diabetic donors had a greater body mass index (BMI) than the non-diabetic donors. The diabetic tissue had significantly thicker elastic septae and dermis. However, no significant difference was observed in the interdigitation index or adipocyte size. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that morphological changes can be evaluated histologically to give a better understanding of the pathological changes in the plantar soft tissue with diabetes. These evaluations can then be associated with biomechanical changes that occur in diabetes to provide new insight into how microstructural changes can alter macroscopic properties. Clinical Relevance An understanding of the histomorphological changes in the soft tissue in relationship to the location on the foot could help to explain the biomechanical changes that occur in diabetes and the subsequent increase in susceptibility to breakdown. PMID:22049867

  16. The effectiveness of corticosteroid injection in the treatment of plantar fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Teck Wee Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is a common cause of heel pain in adults. Although it is usually a self-limiting condition, the pain may become prolonged and severe enough to cause significant distress and disruption to the patient’s daily activities and work. PubMed and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases were searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and a total of ten RCTs were selected for evaluation. These RCTs involved the use of either palpation- or ultrasonography-guided corticosteroid injections in patients diagnosed with plantar fasciitis. All placebo-controlled RCTs showed a significant reduction in pain with the use of corticosteroid injections. Some studies also showed that corticosteroid injections yielded better results than other treatment modalities. However, it is evident from these studies that the effects of corticosteroid injections are usually short-term, lasting 4–12 weeks in duration. Complications such as plantar fascia rupture are uncommon, but physicians need to weigh the treatment benefits against such risks. PMID:26311907

  17. The effectiveness of corticosteroid injection in the treatment of plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Ang, Teck Wee Andrew

    2015-08-01

    Plantar fasciitis is a common cause of heel pain in adults. Although it is usually a self-limiting condition, the pain may become prolonged and severe enough to cause significant distress and disruption to the patient's daily activities and work. PubMed and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases were searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and a total of ten RCTs were selected for evaluation. These RCTs involved the use of either palpation- or ultrasonography-guided corticosteroid injections in patients diagnosed with plantar fasciitis. All placebo-controlled RCTs showed a significant reduction in pain with the use of corticosteroid injections. Some studies also showed that corticosteroid injections yielded better results than other treatment modalities. However, it is evident from these studies that the effects of corticosteroid injections are usually short-term, lasting 4-12 weeks in duration. Complications such as plantar fascia rupture are uncommon, but physicians need to weigh the treatment benefits against such risks. PMID:26311907

  18. The impact of increasing body mass on peak and mean plantar pressure in asymptomatic adult subjects during walking

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, John B.; Causby, Ryan; Pod, Grad Dip; Jones, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The implication of high peak plantar pressure on foot pathology in individuals both with and without diabetes has been recognized. The aim of this study was to investigate and clarify the relationship between increasing body mass and peak and mean plantar pressure in an asymptomatic adult population during walking. Methods Thirty adults without any relevant medical history, structural foot deformities or foot posture assessed as highly pronated or supinated, and within a normal body mass index range were included in the study. An experimental, same subjects, repeated measures design was used. Peak and mean plantar pressure were evaluated with the F-Scan in-shoe plantar pressure measurement system under four different loading conditions (0, 5, 10, and 15 kg) simulated with a weighted vest. Pressure data were gathered from three stances utilizing the mid-gait protocol. Results There were statistically significant increases in peak pressure between the 10 and 15 kg load conditions compared to the control (0 kg) within the heel and second to fifth metatarsal regions. The first metatarsal and hallux regions only displayed statistically significant increases in peak pressure between 15 kg and the control (0 kg). The midfoot and lesser digits regions did not display any statistically significant differences in peak pressure between any load conditions compared to the control (0 kg). The second to fifth metatarsal region displayed statistically significant increases in mean pressure in the 5, 10 and 15 kg groups compared to the control (0 kg). A statistically significant increase in peak pressure between the 15 kg and control (0 kg) group was evident in all other regions. Conclusion The relationship between increasing body mass and peak and mean plantar pressure was dependent upon the plantar region. This study provides more detail outlining the response of peak and mean pressure to different loading conditions than previously reported in the literature. Further research including measurement of temporal parameters is warranted. PMID:22396809

  19. Heel pain and Achilles tendonitis - aftercare

    MedlinePLUS

    ... inflammation and pain. Wear a walking boot or heel lifts if recommended by your provider. Talk with your provider before using pain medicines if you have heart disease, high blood pressure, kidney disease, or have had stomach ...

  20. High-load strength training improves outcome in patients with plantar fasciitis: A randomized controlled trial with 12-month follow-up.

    PubMed

    Rathleff, M S; Mølgaard, C M; Fredberg, U; Kaalund, S; Andersen, K B; Jensen, T T; Aaskov, S; Olesen, J L

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of shoe inserts and plantar fascia-specific stretching vs shoe inserts and high-load strength training in patients with plantar fasciitis. Forty-eight patients with ultrasonography-verified plantar fasciitis were randomized to shoe inserts and daily plantar-specific stretching (the stretch group) or shoe inserts and high-load progressive strength training (the strength group) performed every second day. High-load strength training consisted of unilateral heel raises with a towel inserted under the toes. Primary outcome was the foot function index (FFI) at 3 months. Additional follow-ups were performed at 1, 6, and 12 months. At the primary endpoint, at 3 months, the strength group had a FFI that was 29 points lower [95% confidence interval (CI): 6-52, P?=?0.016] compared with the stretch group. At 1, 6, and 12 months, there were no differences between groups (P?>?0.34). At 12 months, the FFI was 22 points (95% CI: 9-36) in the strength group and 16 points (95% CI: 0-32) in the stretch group. There were no differences in any of the secondary outcomes. A simple progressive exercise protocol, performed every second day, resulted in superior self-reported outcome after 3 months compared with plantar-specific stretching. High-load strength training may aid in a quicker reduction in pain and improvements in function. PMID:25145882

  1. Foot Plantar Pressure Measurement System: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Razak, Abdul Hadi Abdul; Zayegh, Aladin; Begg, Rezaul K.; Wahab, Yufridin

    2012-01-01

    Foot plantar pressure is the pressure field that acts between the foot and the support surface during everyday locomotor activities. Information derived from such pressure measures is important in gait and posture research for diagnosing lower limb problems, footwear design, sport biomechanics, injury prevention and other applications. This paper reviews foot plantar sensors characteristics as reported in the literature in addition to foot plantar pressure measurement systems applied to a variety of research problems. Strengths and limitations of current systems are discussed and a wireless foot plantar pressure system is proposed suitable for measuring high pressure distributions under the foot with high accuracy and reliability. The novel system is based on highly linear pressure sensors with no hysteresis. PMID:23012576

  2. Plantar fasciitis in runners. Treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Warren, B L

    1990-11-01

    Plantar fasciitis is a common overuse injury found in runners. The plantar fascia, which is responsible for maintaining the integrity of the longitudinal arch, becomes irritated, inflamed or torn by repetitive stresses placed upon it. Commonly cited predisposers of plantar fasciitis are excessive pronation, a flat or cavus foot, tight Achilles tendon, type of training shoes worn, and errors in the training routine. Once the plantar fascia becomes irritated a myriad of conservative measures may be used, including everything from rest, ice and elevation to steroid injections and, if all else fails, surgery. In most cases conservative treatment of one kind or another will alleviate the symptoms of plantar fasciitis. However, it is essential to determine and correct the cause of the problem in order for the runner to resume normal activity levels. Controlling anatomical/biomechanical inefficiencies of the feet, stretching and strengthening exercises for the lower extremity, proper training shoes, and reasonable training routines will alleviate the symptoms of plantar fasciitis in a large percentage of sufferers. To prevent this injury, runners should be aware of the potential overuse injury and take precautionary measures, e.g. seek a biomechanical/anatomical evaluation from a qualified practitioner. The practitioner can then offer suggestions as to the specific steps the runner should follow to prevent the injury condition. PMID:1979886

  3. Effect of heel pressure pad attached to ankle-foot orthosis on the energy conversion efficiency in post-stroke hemiplegic gait.

    PubMed

    Kon, Keisuke; Hayakawa, Yasuyuki; Shimizu, Shingo; Tsuruga, Takeshi; Murahara, Shin; Haruna, Hirokazu; Ino, Takumi; Inagaki, Jun; Yamamoto, Sumiko

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to analyze the effect of heel pads in ankle-foot orthoses on dynamic motion aspects of gait in stroke patients from the viewpoint of energy conversion efficiency. [Subjects] Fourteen chronic stroke patients who were ambulatory and had lower extremity motor function categorized as Brunnstrom stage IV participated in the study. [Methods] A three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to assess the effect of heel pad intervention on dynamic motion gait parameters using a single-system A-B-A design. [Results] The results showed that a heel pad attached to the ankle-foot orthosis caused significant retention of the center-of-pressure at the heel during the heel rocker function and significant increase in the dorsiflexion moment and the height of the center of gravity. [Conclusion] The present study showed that a heel pad attached to the calcaneal region of an ankle-foot orthosis caused slight retention of the center-of-pressure at the heel during the heel rocker function along with center of gravity elevation in the stance phase and improved the energy conversion efficiency, especially on the non-paretic side. PMID:26157215

  4. Effect of heel pressure pad attached to ankle-foot orthosis on the energy conversion efficiency in post-stroke hemiplegic gait

    PubMed Central

    Kon, Keisuke; Hayakawa, Yasuyuki; Shimizu, Shingo; Tsuruga, Takeshi; Murahara, Shin; Haruna, Hirokazu; Ino, Takumi; Inagaki, Jun; Yamamoto, Sumiko

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to analyze the effect of heel pads in ankle-foot orthoses on dynamic motion aspects of gait in stroke patients from the viewpoint of energy conversion efficiency. [Subjects] Fourteen chronic stroke patients who were ambulatory and had lower extremity motor function categorized as Brunnstrom stage IV participated in the study. [Methods] A three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to assess the effect of heel pad intervention on dynamic motion gait parameters using a single-system A-B-A design. [Results] The results showed that a heel pad attached to the ankle-foot orthosis caused significant retention of the center-of-pressure at the heel during the heel rocker function and significant increase in the dorsiflexion moment and the height of the center of gravity. [Conclusion] The present study showed that a heel pad attached to the calcaneal region of an ankle-foot orthosis caused slight retention of the center-of-pressure at the heel during the heel rocker function along with center of gravity elevation in the stance phase and improved the energy conversion efficiency, especially on the non-paretic side. PMID:26157215

  5. Improved method for determining tank heel volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, S.H.; Livingston, R.R.; Nave, S.E.

    1994-07-01

    As part of the tank calibration process, the instrument heel is that part of the tank that cannot be measured by the liquid level instrumentation. if the tank being calibrated is not a bottom drain tank, some volume of fluid will be present in the bottom of the tank after draining as much as possible. The amount of fluid remaining in the tank at the start of each run can be estimated by measuring a concentration change of an added spiking material. With the great improvement of liquid level measuring instruments, the total error associated with the instrument heel determination can be greatly affected by the laboratory method used to measure the concentration difference. At the Savannah River Site, the laboratory method used has historically been Direct Current Plasma Emission Spectroscopy, which yielded very marginal results at best. In the most recent tank calibrations, the laboratory method was changed to Absorption Spectrophotometry, which reduces the total error on the instrument heel measurement by a factor of 2.5 times. This paper describes the method used to determine tank instrument heels and the improvements made to this process.

  6. Effect of rocker shoes on plantar pressure pattern in healthy female runners.

    PubMed

    Sobhani, Sobhan; van den Heuvel, Edwin; Bredeweg, Steef; Kluitenberg, Bas; Postema, Klaas; Hijmans, Juha M; Dekker, Rienk

    2014-03-01

    Rocker profile shoes (rocker shoes) are one of the treatment options of metatarsalgia and forefoot stress fractures. The efficacy of rocker shoes in unloading the forefoot pressure has been shown in walking. In running, however, the effect of rocker shoes on forefoot pressure is unknown. Eighteen healthy female runners participated in this study. In-shoe plantar pressures were recorded during running with the standard running shoes and rocker shoes. Shoe comfort was assessed after each shoe measurement. Peak pressure (PP), maximum mean pressure (MMP) and force-time integral (FTI) were determined for seven foot areas. The effects of shoes on the different outcome variables were statistically analyzed using a linear mixed model. Running with the rocker shoes caused a significant reduction (p<0.001) in all pressure parameters in the central and lateral forefoot. FTI and MMP were also reduced by 11% and 12% in the medial forefoot while running with rocker shoes. Running with rocker shoes resulted in a significant increase in all pressure parameters at the heel region (p<0.001). Running with rocker shoes received a significant (p<0.01) lower comfort rate than running with standard running shoes. Rocker shoes might be beneficial for runners who are recovering from metatarsalgia or stress fractures of the forefoot region, as it reduces plantar pressure in the forefoot region. PMID:24370440

  7. The Use of Dry Needling and Myofascial Meridians in a Case of Plantar Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Behnam, Akhbari; Mahyar, Salavati; Ezzati, Kamran; Rad, Shahrzad Mohammadi

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe the use of dry needling based on myofascial meridians for management of plantar fasciitis. Clinical features A 53-year-old man presented with bilateral chronic foot pain for more than 2 years. After 2 months of conventional treatment (ultrasound, plantar fascia and Achilles tendon stretching, and intrinsic foot strengthening), symptoms eventually improved; however, symptoms returned after prolonged standing or walking. Almost all previous treatment methods were localized in the site of pain that targeted only the plantar fascia. Initial examination of this individual revealed that multiple tender points were found along the insertion of Achilles tendon, medial gastrocnemius, biceps femoris, semimembranosus, and ischial tuberosity. Intervention and outcome Dry needling of the trigger points was applied. After 4 treatments over 2 weeks, the patient felt a 60% to 70% reduction in pain. His pressure pain threshold was increased, and pain was alleviated. The patient returned to full daily activities. The rapid relief of this patient’s pain after 2 weeks of dry needling to additional locations along the superficial back line suggests that a more global view on management was beneficial to this patient. Conclusion Dry needling based on myofascial meridians improved the symptoms for a patient with recurrent plantar fasciitis. PMID:24711784

  8. The effects of orthotic intervention on multisegment foot kinematics and plantar fascia strain in recreational runners.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Jonathan; Isherwood, Josh; Taylor, Paul J

    2015-02-01

    Chronic injuries are a common complaint in recreational runners. Foot orthoses have been shown to be effective for the treatment of running injuries but their mechanical effects are still not well understood. This study aims to examine the influence of orthotic intervention on multisegment foot kinematics and plantar fascia strain during running. Fifteen male participants ran at 4.0 m · s(-1) with and without orthotics. Multisegment foot kinematics and plantar fascia strain were obtained during the stance phase and contrasted using paired t tests. Relative coronal plane range of motion of the midfoot relative to the rearfoot was significantly reduced with orthotics (1.0°) compared to without (2.2°). Similarly, relative transverse plane range of motion was significantly lower with orthotics (1.1°) compared to without (1.8°). Plantar fascia strain did not differ significantly between orthotic (7.1) and nonorthotic (7.1) conditions. This study shows that although orthotics did not serve to reduce plantar fascia strain, they are able to mediate reductions in coronal and transverse plane rotations of the midfoot. PMID:25268399

  9. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy for plantar fasciitis: randomised controlled multicentre trial

    PubMed Central

    Haake, Michael; Buch, Mathias; Schoellner, Carsten; Goebel, Felix; Vogel, Martin; Mueller, Ingo; Hausdorf, Jörg; Zamzow, Karin; Schade-Brittinger, Carmen; Mueller, Hans-Helge

    2003-01-01

    Objective To determine the effectiveness of extracorporeal shock wave therapy compared with placebo in the treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis. Design Randomised, blinded, multicentre trial with parallel group design. Setting Nine hospitals and one outpatient clinic in Germany. Participants 272 patients with chronic plantar fasciitis recalcitrant to conservative therapy for at least six months: 135 patients were allocated extracorporeal shock wave therapy and 137 were allocated placebo. Main outcome measures Primary end point was the success rate 12 weeks after intervention based on the Roles and Maudsley score. Secondary end points encompassed subjective pain ratings and walking ability up to a year after the last intervention. Results The primary end point could be assessed in 94% (n=256) of patients. The success rate 12 weeks after intervention was 34% (n=43) in the extracorporeal shock wave therapy group and 30% (n=39) in the placebo group (95% confidence interval - 8.0% to 15.1%). No difference was found in the secondary end points. Few side effects were reported. Conclusions Extracorporeal shock wave therapy is ineffective in the treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis. PMID:12855524

  10. Plantar force distribution in Parkinsonian gait: a comparison between patients and age-matched control subjects.

    PubMed

    Nieuwboer, A; De Weerdt, W; Dom, R; Peeraer, L; Lesaffre, E; Hilde, F; Baunach, B

    1999-09-01

    This study aimed to ascertain whether roll-off of the feet during gait was essentially different in patients with Parkinson's disease from that of elderly control subjects. Twenty-two patients, belonging mainly to Hoehn & Yahr grades III and IV, and 30 elderly people participated in the study. Plantar force distribution data were collected of two consecutive strides using pressure-sensitive insoles as part of the pododynograph system. Results showed that when correcting for gait speed and sex differences, patients with Parkinson's disease walked with significantly lower relative peak forces at the forefoot and heel and increased load at the midfoot. The onset of peak forces indicated slower load acceptance on the heel and early forefoot loading which was confirmed by a reduced amplitude of the centre of force along the length of the foot compared with healthy controls. Roll-off was significantly reduced in patients with Parkinson, a feature which was specific for the disease rather than a result of reduced gait speed alone. PMID:10458317

  11. Could Insoles Offload Pressure? An Evaluation of the Effects of Arch-supported Functional Insoles on Plantar Pressure Distribution during Race Walking.

    PubMed

    Song, Qipeng; Xu, Kaisheng; Yu, Bing; Zhang, Cui; Sun, Wei; Mao, Dewei

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of functional insoles on plantar pressure distribution during race walking so as to reduce the high plantar pressure and force on race walkers, who tend to suffer from overuse injury. A total of 20 male race walkers aged 21.19 ± 3.66 years and with a mean height of 178.85 ± 14.07 cm were recruited as participants. Each participant completed a race walking with functional or normal insoles. Plantar pressure insoles were used to collect vertical plantar pressure data. A two-way analysis of variance with a mixed design was used to determine the difference between the two conditions. Results showed that the use of functional insoles reduces the peak pressure and the impulse in the metatarsophalangeal joints and heels and thus suggest that functional insoles reduce the overuse injury risks of these parts. The first ground reaction force peak also decreased. This result suggested that functional insoles reduce the risks of foot and leg injuries. PMID:26061909

  12. Plantar fascia coronal length: a new parameter for plantar fascia assessment.

    PubMed

    Sari, Ahmet Sinan; Demircay, Emre; Cakmak, Gokhan; Sahin, M Sukru; Tuncay, I Cengiz; Altun, Suleyman

    2015-01-01

    The effects of gender and various anthropometric variables were previously reported as significant predictors of plantar fascia thickness. Although a strong correlation between either the body weight or body mass index (BMI) and plantar fascia thickness were not demonstrated, a moderate relation was stated. We retrospectively investigated the role of gender, height, weight, and body mass index on plantar fascia thickness at the calcaneal origin (PFCO) and 1 cm distal from the calcaneal origin (PF1cm) and the coronal length of the plantar fascia at the calcaneal origin (CLPF) in healthy subjects. The PFCO, PF1cm, and CLPF were retrospectively measured from magnetic resonance images of 100 healthy subjects. The gender, height, weight, and body mass index of the participants were also noted. Gender was a predictive factor for the length of the CLPF. The subjects with a BMI >25 kg/m(2) had a significantly greater PFCO, PF1cm, and CLPF. Height was mildly and BMI and weight were moderately related to the PFCO. However the CLPF showed a better correlation with height, BMI, and weight than that of plantar fascia thickness. CLPF better reflected the role of weight, BMI, and height than its thickness. It is a new parameter that could be valuable in the evaluation of plantar fascia disorders. PMID:25488598

  13. Extraskeletal Osteochondroma Arising on the Plantar Region

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Takashi; Ansai, Shin-ichi; Omi, Tokuya; Kawana, Seiji

    2011-01-01

    Extraskeletal osteochondroma is a variant of extraskeletal chondromas that are uncommon soft-tissue cartilaginous tumors. These tumors may undergo extensive enchondral ossification to form an extraskeletal osteochondroma. This report describes the case of a 39-year-old Japanese man with an extraskeletal osteochondroma arising on the plantar aspect of the foot. PMID:21829399

  14. Effects of Combined Foot/Ankle Electromyostimulation and Resistance Training on the In-Shoe Plantar Pressure Patterns during Sprint in Young Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Fourchet, François; Kuitunen, Sami; Girard, Olivier; Beard, Adam J.; Millet, Grégoire P.

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have already reported that specific foot/ankle muscle reinforcement strategies induced strength and joint position sense performance enhancement. Nevertheless the effects of such protocols on sprint performance and plantar loading distribution have not been addressed yet. The objective of the study is to investigate the influence of a 5-wk foot/ankle strength training program on plantar loading characteristics during sprinting in adolescent males. Sixteen adolescent male athletes of a national training academy were randomly assigned to either a combined foot/ankle electromyostimulation and resistance training (FAST) or a control (C) group. FAST consisted of foot medial arch and extrinsic ankle muscles reinforcement exercises, whereas C maintained their usual training routine. Before and after training, in-shoe loading patterns were measured during 30-m running sprints using pressure sensitive insoles (right foot) and divided into nine regions for analysis. Although sprint times remained unchanged in both groups from pre- to post- training (3.90 ± 0.32 vs. 3.98 ± 0.46 s in FAST and 3.83 ± 0.42 vs. 3.81 ± 0.44 s in C), changes in force and pressure appeared from heel to forefoot between FAST and C. In FAST, mean pressure and force increased in the lateral heel area from pre- to post- training (67.1 ± 44.1 vs. 82.9 ± 28.6 kPa [p = 0.06]; 25.5 ± 17.8 vs. 34.1 ± 14.3 N [p = 0.05]) and did not change in the medial forefoot (151.0 ± 23.2 vs. 146.1 ± 30.0 kPa; 142.1 ± 29.4 vs. 136.0 ± 33.8; NS). Mean area increased in FAST under the lateral heel from pre- to post- (4.5 ± 1.3 vs. 5.7 ± 1.6 cm2 [p < 0.05]) and remained unchanged in C (5.5 ± 2.8 vs. 5.0 ± 3.0 cm2). FAST program induced significant promising lateral and unwanted posterior transfer of the plantar loads without affecting significantly sprinting performance. Key points We have evaluated the effects of a foot/ankle strength training program on sprint performance and on related plantar loading characteristics in teenage athletes, and this have not been examined previously. Our results showed no significant pre- to post- changes in sprint performance. This study revealed initially a lateral transfer and secondly a posterior transfer of the plantar loads after the foot/ankle strength training program. PMID:24149874

  15. Dose-response effects of customised foot orthoses on lower limb muscle activity and plantar pressures in pronated foot type.

    PubMed

    Telfer, Scott; Abbott, Mandy; Steultjens, Martijn; Rafferty, Daniel; Woodburn, James

    2013-07-01

    Customised foot orthoses (FOs) featuring extrinsic rearfoot posting are commonly prescribed for individuals with a symptomatic pronated foot type. By altering the angle of the posting it is purported that a controlled dose-response effect during the stance phase of gait can be achieved, however these biomechanical changes have yet to be characterised. Customised FOs were administered to participant groups with symptomatic pronated foot types and asymptomatic normal foot types. The electromyographic (EMG) and plantar pressure effects of varying the dose were measured. Dose was varied by changing the angle of posting from 6° lateral to 10° medial in 2° steps on customised devices produced using computer aided orthoses design software. No effects due to posting level were found for EMG variables. Significant group effects were seen with customised FOs reducing above knee muscle activity in pronated foot types compared to normal foot types (biceps femoris p=0.022; vastus lateralis p<0.001; vastus medialis p=0.001). Interaction effects were seen for gastrocnemius medialis and soleus. Significant linear effects of posting level were seen for plantar pressure at the lateral rearfoot (p=0.001), midfoot (p<0.001) and lateral forefoot (p=0.002). A group effect was also seen for plantar pressure at the medial heel (p=0.009). This study provides evidence that a customised FOs can provide a dose response effect for selected plantar pressure variables, but no such effect could be identified for muscle activity. Foot type may play an important role in the effect of customised orthoses on activity of muscles above the knee. PMID:23391752

  16. Efficacy of EZStep in the management of plantar fasciitis: a prospective, randomized study.

    PubMed

    Al-Bluwi, Mohammed T; Sadat-Ali, Mir; Al-Habdan, Ibrahim M; Azam, Mohammed Q

    2011-08-01

    Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. Despite extensive efforts foot surgeons continue to debate the best modality of treatment. Analgesics, shoe inserts, stretching exercises, steroid injection, night splints, and extracorporeal shock wave therapy have proved effective in one group but fail in others. This study evaluated the efficacy of EZStep, a new foot brace for the management of plantar fasciitis. A total of 198 patients were randomized in 2 groups; group 1 (study group) received nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs; 4-6 weeks) and EZStep whereas group 2 (control group) received either NSAID and physiotherapy alone (2A) or NSAID, physiotherapy, and local steroid injection (2B). None of the patients received over-the-counter insoles or strapping of plantar arch to avoid any bias in randomization. Evaluations included measurement of weight and height, visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, and Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SFMPQ). After 8 weeks, patients were reevaluated, and assessment for the VAS and SFMPQ with treatment outcome was performed. Patients with VAS scores ?3 were considered as excellent, ?4 as good, and ?7 as poor. The posttreatment evaluation showed that VAS scores were in the range from 2.97 ± 1.06 to 7.64 ± 2.9 (2A), P = .001, 95% confidence interval (CI) <-4.104; for 2B P = .001, CI <-2.44, and SFMPQ was 21.7 ± 4.5 and 69.2 ± 5.8 (group 2A; P = .001, 95% CI <-46.44). Compared with group 2B the SFMPQ was 66.5 ± 4.3 (P = .001, 95% CI <-30.720). In group 1 as per VAS, 86 (73.5%) were evaluated as excellent, 15 (12.8%) as good, and 16 (13.6%) as poor. Our study shows that the regular use of EZStep with short course of NSAIDs (4-6 weeks) was effective in ameliorating symptoms in more than 85% of patients suffering from plantar fasciitis. PMID:21868794

  17. Screening Method Based on Walking Plantar Impulse for Detecting Musculoskeletal Senescence and Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yifang; Fan, Yubo; Li, Zhiyu; Newman, Tony; Lv, Changsheng; Zhou, Yi

    2013-01-01

    No consensus has been reached on how musculoskeletal system injuries or aging can be explained by a walking plantar impulse. We standardize the plantar impulse by defining a principal axis of plantar impulse. Based upon this standardized plantar impulse, two indexes are presented: plantar pressure record time series and plantar-impulse distribution along the principal axis of plantar impulse. These indexes are applied to analyze the plantar impulse collected by plantar pressure plates from three sources: Achilles tendon ruptures; elderly people (ages 62–71); and young people (ages 19–23). Our findings reveal that plantar impulse distribution curves for Achilles tendon ruptures change irregularly with subjects’ walking speed changes. When comparing distribution curves of the young, we see a significant difference in the elderly subjects’ phalanges plantar pressure record time series. This verifies our hypothesis that a plantar impulse can function as a means to assess and evaluate musculoskeletal system injuries and aging. PMID:24386288

  18. The effect of the gastrocnemius on the plantar fascia.

    PubMed

    Pascual Huerta, Javier

    2014-12-01

    Although anatomic and functional relationship has been established between the gastrocnemius muscle, via the Achilles tendon, and the plantar fascia, the exact role of gastrocnemius tightness in foot and plantar fascia problems is not completely understood. This article summarizes past and current literature linking these 2 structures and gives a mechanical explanation based on functional models of the relationship between gastrocnemius tightness and plantar fascia. The effect of gastrocnemius tightness on the sagittal behavior of the foot is also discussed. PMID:25456717

  19. Waste Tank Heel Chemical Cleaning Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.J.

    2003-12-02

    At the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, there are approximately 40 million gallons of legacy High Level Waste stored in large capacity sub-surface tanks. Twelve of these tanks are single-containment, non-conforming tanks with leaks. These tanks were built in the 1950s. Some of these tanks contain sludge heels and are being considered for near-term removal efforts and vitrification. Currently, only mechanical methods (i.e., pumps) are used to remove the sludge waste with varying degrees of success. To provide for additional levels of removal, chemically-aided techniques are being considered. The objective of the was to collect and evaluate information available on chemical-based methods for removing residual solids from the Site's waste tanks. As part of this study, the team was requested to develop recommendations for chemical treatments to remove residual heels (primarily sludge). Ideally, one agent alone would be efficient at dissolving all residual tank heels and yet satisfy all safety and process concerns. No such chemical cleaning agent was found. The cleaning agents identified from the literature, included oxalic acid, a mixture of oxalic acid and citric acid, a combination of oxalic acid with hydrogen peroxide, nitric acid, formic acid, and organics. A criteria matrix for evaluating the various cleaning agents was developed. The results of the evaluation conclusively support oxalic acid as the cleaning agent of choice for the immediate future. Oxalic acid scored nearly double the next closest cleaning agent. Nitric acid, formic acid, and oxalic acid with hydrogen peroxide were all closely grouped for the next best choice. The mixture of oxalic acid and citric acid rated poorly. Organics rated even more poorly due to large uncertainties in performance and downstream impacts.

  20. Dynamic Patterns of Forces and Loading Rate in Runners with Unilateral Plantar Fasciitis: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Ana Paula; João, Silvia Maria Amado; Dinato, Roberto Casanova; Tessutti, Vitor Daniel; Sacco, Isabel Camargo Neves

    2015-01-01

    Aim/Hypothesis The etiology of plantar fasciitis (PF) has been related to several risk factors, but the magnitude of the plantar load is the most commonly described factor. Although PF is the third most-common injury in runners, only two studies have investigated this factor in runners, and their results are still inconclusive regarding the injury stage. Objective Analyze and compare the plantar loads and vertical loading rate during running of runners in the acute stage of PF to those in the chronic stage of the injury in relation to healthy runners. Methods Forty-five runners with unilateral PF (30 acute and 15 chronic) and 30 healthy control runners were evaluated while running at 12 km/h for 40 meters wearing standardized running shoes and Pedar-X insoles. The contact area and time, maximum force, and force-time integral over the rearfoot, midfoot, and forefoot were recorded and the loading rate (20–80% of the first vertical peak) was calculated. Groups were compared by ANOVAs (p<0.05). Results Maximum force and force-time integral over the rearfoot and the loading rate was higher in runners with PF (acute and chronic) compared with controls (p<0.01). Runners with PF in the acute stage showed lower loading rate and maximum force over the rearfoot compared to runners in the chronic stage (p<0.01). Conclusion Runners with PF showed different dynamic patterns of plantar loads during running over the rearfoot area depending on the injury stage (acute or chronic). In the acute stage of PF, runners presented lower loading rate and forces over the rearfoot, possibly due to dynamic mechanisms related to pain protection of the calcaneal area. PMID:26375815

  1. Plantar fasciitis (fasciosis) treatment outcome study: plantar fascia thickness measured by ultrasound and correlated with patient self-reported improvement.

    PubMed

    Fabrikant, Jerry M; Park, Tae Soon

    2011-06-01

    Ultrasound, well recognized as an effective diagnostic tool, reveals a thickening of the plantar fascia in patients with plantar fasciitis/fasciosis disease. The authors hypothesized that ultrasound would also reveal a decrease in the plantar fascia thickness for patients undergoing treatment for the disease, a hypothesis that, heretofore, had been only tested on a limited number of subjects. They conducted a more statistically significant study that found that clinical treatment with injection and biomechanical correction does indeed diminish plantar fascia thickness as shown on ultrasound. The study also revealed that patients experience the most heightened plantar fascia tenderness toward the end of the day, and improvement in their symptomatic complaints were associated with a reduction in plantar fascia thickness. As a result, the authors conclude that office-based ultrasound can help diagnose and confirm plantar fasciitis/fasciosis through the measurement of the plantar fascia thickness. Because of the advantages of ultrasound--that it is non-invasive with greater patient acceptance, cost effective and radiation-free--the imaging tool should be considered and implemented early in the diagnosis and treatment of plantar fasciitis/fasciosis. PMID:21398108

  2. In-shoe plantar tri-axial stress profiles during maximum-effort cutting maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yan; Lam, Wing Kai; Cheung, Jason Tak-Man; Zhang, Ming

    2014-12-18

    Soft tissue injuries, such as anterior cruciate ligament rupture, ankle sprain and foot skin problems, frequently occur during cutting maneuvers. These injuries are often regarded as associated with abnormal joint torque and interfacial friction caused by excessive external and in-shoe shear forces. This study simultaneously investigated the dynamic in-shoe localized plantar pressure and shear stress during lateral shuffling and 45° sidestep cutting maneuvers. Tri-axial force transducers were affixed at the first and second metatarsal heads, lateral forefoot, and heel regions in the midsole of a basketball shoe. Seventeen basketball players executed both cutting maneuvers with maximum efforts. Lateral shuffling cutting had a larger mediolateral braking force than 45° sidestep cutting. This large braking force was concentrated at the first metatarsal head, as indicated by its maximum medial shear stress (312.2 ± 157.0 kPa). During propulsion phase, peak shear stress occurred at the second metatarsal head (271.3 ± 124.3 kPa). Compared with lateral shuffling cutting, 45° sidestep cutting produced larger peak propulsion shear stress (463.0 ± 272.6 kPa) but smaller peak braking shear stress (184.8 ± 181.7 kPa), of which both were found at the first metatarsal head. During both cutting maneuvers, maximum medial and posterior shear stress occurred at the first metatarsal head, whereas maximum pressure occurred at the second metatarsal head. The first and second metatarsal heads sustained relatively high pressure and shear stress and were expected to be susceptible to plantar tissue discomfort or injury. Due to different stress distribution, distinct pressure and shear cushioning mechanisms in basketball footwear might be considered over different foot regions. PMID:25468303

  3. Unilobed Rotational Flap for Plantar Hallux Interphalangeal Joint Ulceration Complicated by Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Boffeli, Troy J; Hyllengren, Shelby B

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes-related neuropathic ulcers located at the plantar aspect of the hallux interphalangeal joint are often chronic or recurrent and frequently become complicated by osteomyelitis. Once infected, treatment will typically involve hallux amputation. Although intended as a definitive procedure, amputation of the first toe is not desirable from a cosmetic or functional standpoint and often leads to transfer ulcers at adjacent locations of the foot. Reconstructive wound surgery, combined with limited bone resection, is possible if the infection is caught early before the local tissue and bone have become necrotic. In addition to neuropathy, biomechanical issues, including ankle equinus, hallux limitus, hallux extensus, and hallux valgus, predispose patients with diabetes mellitus to developing plantar hallux ulcers. We commonly employ a proximal based unilobed plantar rotational flap combined with hallux interphalangeal joint arthroplasty as an alternative to hallux amputation. We present a typical case with long-term follow-up to highlight our flap protocol, including patient selection criteria, flap design, surgical technique, bone resection and biopsy pearls, staging timeline, and a typical postoperative course. Periodic follow-up during the next 72 months for unrelated conditions allowed long-term monitoring with no recurrence of osteomyelitis or subsequent amputation. The foot remained ulcer free 6 years later. The benefits of this surgical approach include complete excision of the ulcer, adequate exposure for bone resection, early bone biopsy before the spread of infection or necrosis of local tissue, flap coverage with viable soft tissue, and partial offloading of mechanical pressure at the plantar interphalangeal joint. PMID:25681281

  4. Use of platelet rich plasma to treat plantar fasciitis: design of a multi centre randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background If conservative treatment for chronic plantar fasciitis fails, often a corticosteroid injection is given. Corticosteroid injection gives temporarily pain reduction, but no healing. Blood platelets initiate the natural healing rate. GPS® gives an eightfold concentrate platelets of patients own blood. Injection of these platelets in the attachment of the fascia to the os calcis might induce a healing rate. Methods and design A randomized controlled multi centre trial will be performed. The study population consists of 120 patients of 18 years and older. Patients with chronic plantar fasciitis will be allocated randomly to have a steroid injection or an autologous platelet concentrate injections. Data will be collected before the procedure, 4,8,12,26 weeks and 1 year after the procedure. The main outcome measures of this study are pain and function measured with questionnaires. Conclusion Recent literature show positive effects for the treatment of tendinosis with autologous platelet injections. The forthcoming trial will compare treatment for chronic plantar fasciitis with a steroid injection versus an autologous platelet injection. Our results will be published as soon as they become available. Trial Registration Trial registration number: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00758641. PMID:20398269

  5. MR elastographic methods for the evaluation of plantar fat pads: preliminary comparison of the shear modulus for shearing deformation and compressive deformation in normal subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, John B.; Miller, Timothy B.; Perrinez, Philip R.; Doyley, Marvin M.; Wang, Huifang; Cheung, Yvonne Y.; Wrobel, James S.; Comi, Richard J.; Kennedy, Francis E.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2006-03-01

    MR elastography (MRE) images the intrinsic mechanical properties of soft tissues; e.g., the shear modulus, ?. The ? of the plantar soft tissues is important in understanding the mechanisms whereby the forces induced during normal motion produce ulcers that lead to amputation in diabetic feet. We compared the compliance of the heel fat pad to compressive forces and to shearing forces. The design of prosthetics to protect the foot depends on the proper understanding of the mechanisms inducing damage. In the heel fat pads of six normal subjects, between 25 and 65 years of age, the ? for deformation perpendicular to the direction of weight bearing is similar but not identical to that determined for deformation along the weight bearing axis. The average difference between ? along the weight bearing axis and ? perpendicular to the weight bearing axis, is well correlated with age (Correlation Coefficient = 0.789). The p-value for the data being random was 0.0347 indicating that the observed difference is not likely to be random. The p-value for control points is 0.8989, indicating a random process. The results are suggestive that the high compressive forces imposed during walking damage the heel fat pads over time resulting in softening to compression preferentially over shearing. It is important to validate the observed effect with larger numbers of subjects, and better controls including measures of activity, and to understand if diseases like diabetes increase the observed damage.

  6. Plantar fascia anatomy and its relationship with Achilles tendon and paratenon

    PubMed Central

    Stecco, Carla; Corradin, Marco; Macchi, Veronica; Morra, Aldo; Porzionato, Andrea; Biz, Carlo; De Caro, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    Although the plantar fascia (PF) has been studied quite well from a biomechanical viewpoint, its microscopic properties have been overlooked: nothing is known about its content of elastic fibers, the features of the extracellular matrix or the extent of innervation. From a functional and clinical standpoint, the PF is often correlated with the triceps surae muscle, but the anatomical grounds for this link are not clear. The aim of this work was to focus on the PF macroscopic and microscopic properties and study how Achilles tendon diseases might affect it. Twelve feet from unembalmed human cadavers were dissected to isolate the PF. Specimens from each PF were tested with various histological and immunohistochemical stains. In a second stage, 52 magnetic resonance images (MRI) obtained from patients complaining of aspecific ankle or foot pain were analyzed, dividing the cases into two groups based on the presence or absence of signs of degeneration and/or inflammation of the Achilles tendon. The thickness of PF and paratenon was assessed in the two groups and statistical analyses were conducted. The PF is a tissue firmly joined to plantar muscles and skin. Analyzing its possible connections to the sural structures showed that this fascia is more closely connected to the paratenon of Achilles tendon than to the Achilles tendon, through the periosteum of the heel. The PF extended medially and laterally, continuing into the deep fasciae enveloping the abductor hallucis and abductor digiti minimi muscles, respectively. The PF was rich in hyaluronan, probably produced by fibroblastic-like cells described as ‘fasciacytes’. Nerve endings and Pacini and Ruffini corpuscles were present, particularly in the medial and lateral portions, and on the surface of the muscles, suggesting a role for the PF in the proprioception of foot. In the radiological study, 27 of the 52 MRI showed signs of Achilles tendon inflammation and/or degeneration, and the PF was 3.43 ± 0.48 mm thick (99%CI and SD = 0.95), as opposed to 2.09 ± 0.24 mm (99%CI, SD = 0.47) in the patients in which the MRI revealed no Achilles tendon diseases; this difference in thickness of 1.29 ± 0.57 mm (99%CI) was statistically significant (P < 0.001). In the group of 27/52 patients with tendinopathies, the PF was more than 4.5 mm thick in 5, i.e. they exceeded the threshold for a diagnosis of plantar fasciitis. None of the other 25/52 paitents had a PF more than 4 mm thick. There was a statistically significant correlation between the thicknesses of the PF and the paratenon. These findings suggest that the plantar fascia has a role not only in supporting the longitudinal arch of the foot, but also in its proprioception and peripheral motor coordination. Its relationship with the paratenon of the Achilles tendon is consistent with the idea of triceps surae structures being involved in the PF pathology, so their rehabilitation can be considered appropriate. Finally, the high concentration of hyaluronan in the PF points to the feasibility of using hyaluronan injections in the fascia to treat plantar fasciitis. PMID:24028383

  7. An immunohistochemical study of palmar and plantar digital nerves.

    PubMed

    Auplish, S; Hall, S

    1998-02-01

    We present a qualitative and semi-quantitative description of palmar and plantar digital nerves obtained from cadavers prepared for routine class dissection. The fingertips of the three most functionally important and sensitive digits, namely thumb, index and middle fingers, received more myelinated axons than those of the ring and little fingers. In both palmar and plantar nerves the numbers of myelin basic protein (MBP)-positive myelinated axons decreased proximodistally along each digit and also from thumb to little finger and hallux to little toe respectively. Our results suggest that there are up to ten times more myelinated axons in palmar digital nerves than in plantar nerves. PMID:9571470

  8. Plantar fasciitis: a new experimental approach to treatment.

    PubMed

    Dmitri Luke, B S

    2002-07-01

    Plantar fasciitis has been and remains one of the most common pathologic conditions of the lower extremity. Patients diagnosed with plantar fasciitis are treated conservatively with various degrees of success. This article presents a review of the literature pertaining to treatment of plantar fasciitis as well as introduces a modified experimental footplate, which potentially may improve the outcome and shorten the time of therapeutic regimen. A description of the suggested design is also presented. A randomized clinical study will follow this discussion to determine the effectiveness and applicability of the suggested design. PMID:12160690

  9. Don't Ignore Your Kid's Heel Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Text Size Print Bookmark Don’t Ignore Your Kid’s Heel Pain Address Pain Early, Avoid Long Recovery ... and ankle surgeon. The good news is that kids are good healers and treatment may be simple ...

  10. An evaluation of a silicone adhesive shaped heel dressing.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Sylvie

    Tissue breakdown is complex and involves many factors. Pressure ulcer development in the heels is subject to extrinsic factors such as pressure, shear, friction and moisture. The heels are the most common sites for friction and shear damage, which can lead to blistering, skin erosion and tissue breakdown (Grey et al, 2006). To address the issues of wounds that are painful on dressing removal and friable skin, Smith & Nephew has introduced a soft silicone adhesive dressing to its Allevyn dressing range. Silicone does not adhere to wounded areas and can be removed gently without trauma to the periwound area. This paper discusses the findings of a 20-patient multi-site evaluation examining the performance and acceptability of Allevyn Gentle Border Heel dressing in the management of heel wounds. PMID:20335927

  11. Management of subcalcaneal pain and Achilles tendonitis with heel inserts

    PubMed Central

    Maclellan, G. E.; Vyvyan, Barbara

    1981-01-01

    Soft tissue symptoms in the leg due to sporting activity are commonly associated with the force of heel strike. Conventional training shoes compromise between comfort and performance; few models are suitably designed for both considerations. Using a visco-elastic polymer insert the symptoms of heel pain and Achilles tendonitis have been largely or completely abolished in a preliminary study. Imagesp117-ap117-bp117-cp118-a PMID:7272653

  12. Influence of Inflammatory Polyarthritis on Quantitative Heel Ultrasound Measurements

    E-print Network

    Pye, Stephen R; Marshall, Tarnya; Gaffney, Karl; Luben, Robert; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Silman, Alan J; Symmons, Deborah PM; O'Neill, Terence W

    2012-07-26

    the influence of undifferentiated inflam- matory polyarthritis on heel ultrasound parameters. Data concerning the impact of disease related variables on heel ultrasound parameters are somewhat conflicting. Some, though not all, report an association between SOS... JA, Halse JI, et al: Self reported non-vertebral fractures in rheumatoid arthritis and population based controls: incidence and relationship with bone mineral density and clinical variables. Ann Rheum Dis 2004, 63:177–182. 4. Huusko TM, Korpela M...

  13. The effects of the application of low-dye taping on paretic side plantar pressure among patients with plantar fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan; Lee, Sangyong; Kim, Shingyun; Hwangbo, Gak

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of low-dye taping on paretic side plantar pressure in patients with plantar fasciitis. [Subjects] The 30 patients in this study were randomly allocated to a low-dye taping group (n = 15) or a conservative treatment group (n =15). [Methods] Both groups received treatment thrice a week for six weeks. BioRescue was used to measure the weight distribution of the patients’ paretic side. [Results] Within-group comparison showed that the posterior weight distribution significantly increased among patients in both groups. However, comparison between the two groups showed that the low-dye taping group’s posterior weight distribution was significantly higher than that of the conservative treatment group. [Conclusion] These findings show that the application of low-dye taping is an effective intervention for paretic-side plantar pressure among patients with plantar fasciitis. PMID:26696737

  14. Does Plasmodium falciparum have an Achilles' heel?

    E-print Network

    Liao Y Chen

    2013-05-21

    Plasmodium falciparum is the parasite that causes the most severe form of malaria. Currently, science has been established about its cellular structures, its metabolic processes, and even the molecular structures of its intrinsic membrane proteins responsible for transporting water, nutrient, and waste molecules across the parasite plasma membrane (PPM). I hypothesize that Plasmodium falciparum has an Achilles' heel that can be attacked with erythritol, the well-known sweetener that is classified as generally safe. Most organisms have in their cell membrane two types of water-channel proteins: aquaporins to maintain hydro-homeostasis across the membrane and aquaglyceroporins to uptake glycerols etc. In contrast, P. falciparum has only one type of such proteins---the multi-functional aquaglyceroporin (PfAQP) expressed in the PPM---to do both jobs. Moreover, the parasite also uses PfAQP to excrete its metabolic wastes (ammonia included) produced at a very high rate in the blood stage. This extremely high efficiency of the bug using one protein for multiple essential tasks makes the parasite fatally vulnerable. Erythritol in the blood stream can kill the parasite by clogging up its PfAQP channel that needs to be open for maintaining hydro-homeostasis and for excreting toxic wastes across the bug's PPM. In vitro tests are to measure the growth/death rate of P. falciparum in blood with various erythritol concentrations. In vivo experiments are to administer groups of infected mice with various doses of erythritol and monitor the parasite growth levels from blood samples drawn from each group. Clinic trials can be performed to observe the added effects of administering to patients erythritol along with the known drugs because erythritol was classified as a safe food ingredient.

  15. Abductor Hallucis: Anatomical Variation and Its Clinical Implications in the Reconstruction of Chronic Nonhealing Ulcers and Defects of Foot

    PubMed Central

    Chittoria, Ravi Kumar; Pratap, Harsha; Yekappa, Suma Hottigoudar

    2015-01-01

    Abductor hallucis (AH) is an intrinsic muscle of sole of the foot. It is commonly used in the coverage of ankle and heel defects and chronic nonhealing ulcers of the foot; its use is reported to have a favorable long-term outcome. The muscle's apt bulk and size, its simple surgical isolation, absence of donor-site defect, unvaried anatomy, and long neurovascular pedicle are some of the advantages that make it a promising muscle flap. During routine cadaver dissection in the Department of Anatomy of Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Pondicherry, India, we identified an anatomical variation in AH in both feet of a 45-year-old embalmed male Indian cadaver. The variant muscle had innumerable proximal attachments, a majority of them arising atypically in the form of tough tendinous slips from the medial intermuscular septum at the junction of central and tibial components of plantar aponeurosis, the medial surface of first metatarsal and the intermuscular septum separating AH from the flexor hallucis brevis. The tendon: muscle ratio was 1.76, higher than the normal reported ratio of 0.56±0.07. This article highlights the variation noted and its implication for clinicians. On Internet search, we did not come across the variations described in our article. Findings of the anatomical variation reported in this article could benefit surgeons who decide to use AH flaps in the future. PMID:26634184

  16. Validation of Plantar Pressure Measurements for a Novel In-Shoe Plantar Sensory Replacement Unit

    PubMed Central

    Ferber, Reed; Webber, Talia; Kin, B; Everett, Breanne; Groenland, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Background Research concerning prevention of diabetic foot complications is critical. A novel in-shoe plantar sensory replacement unit (PSRU) has been developed that provides alert-based feedback derived from analyzing plantar pressure threshold measurements in real time. The purpose of this study was to compare the PSRU device to a gold standard pressure-sensing device (GS-PSD) to determine the correlation between concurrent measures of plantar pressure during walking. Methods The PSRU had an array of eight sensors with a range of 10–75 mm Hg and collected data at 4 Hz, whereas the GS-PSD had 99 sensors with a range of 1–112 mm Hg and collected data at 100 Hz. Based on an a priori power analysis, data were collected from 10 participants (3 female, 7 male) while walking over ground in both devices. The primary variable of interest was the number of data points recorded that were greater than 32 mm Hg (capillary arterial pressure—the minimum pressure reported to cause pressure ulcers) for each of the eight PSRU sensors and corresponding average recordings from the GS-PSD sensor clusters. Intraclass correlation coefficient (2,1) was used to compare data between the two devices. Results Compared with the GS-PSD, we found good-to-very-good correlations (r-value range 0.67–0.86; p-value range 0.01–0.05) for six of the PSRU’s eight sensors and poor correlation for only two sensors (r = 0.41, p = .15; r = 0.38, p = .18) when measuring the number of data points recorded that were greater than 32 mm Hg. Conclusions Based on the results of the present study, we conclude the PSRU provides analogous data when compared with a GS-PSD. PMID:24124942

  17. Muscle activation of paraspinal muscles in different types of high heels during standing.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongwook

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study researched the effects of different types of high heels on the muscles surrounding the cervical spine, the thoracic spine, and the lumbar spine by analyzing muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles during standing while wearing high heels. The high heels were all of the same height: 8?cm. [Subjects and Methods] The 28 subjects in this experiment were females in their 20s with a foot size of 225-230?mm and a normal gait pattern. To measure the muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles, EMG electrodes were attached on the paraspinal muscles around C6, T7, and L5. The muscle activation during standing while wearing 8-cm-high wedge heels, setback heels, and French heels was then measured. The measurements were performed 3 times each, and the mean value was used for analysis. [Results] The levels of muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles induced by standing on wedge heels, setback heels, and French heels in the cervical and lumbar areas were significantly higher than those induced by standing on bare feet. But there was no significant difference according to the heel types. [Conclusion] The height of the heels presented a greater variable than the width of the heels on the muscle activation of paraspinal muscles. Therefore, wearing high heels is not recommended for those who have pain or functional problems in the cervical and/or lumbar spine. PMID:25642040

  18. Muscle activation of paraspinal muscles in different types of high heels during standing

    PubMed Central

    Han, Dongwook

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study researched the effects of different types of high heels on the muscles surrounding the cervical spine, the thoracic spine, and the lumbar spine by analyzing muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles during standing while wearing high heels. The high heels were all of the same height: 8?cm. [Subjects and Methods] The 28 subjects in this experiment were females in their 20s with a foot size of 225–230?mm and a normal gait pattern. To measure the muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles, EMG electrodes were attached on the paraspinal muscles around C6, T7, and L5. The muscle activation during standing while wearing 8-cm-high wedge heels, setback heels, and French heels was then measured. The measurements were performed 3 times each, and the mean value was used for analysis. [Results] The levels of muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles induced by standing on wedge heels, setback heels, and French heels in the cervical and lumbar areas were significantly higher than those induced by standing on bare feet. But there was no significant difference according to the heel types. [Conclusion] The height of the heels presented a greater variable than the width of the heels on the muscle activation of paraspinal muscles. Therefore, wearing high heels is not recommended for those who have pain or functional problems in the cervical and/or lumbar spine. PMID:25642040

  19. Is heel prick as safe as we think?

    PubMed

    Onesimo, Roberta; Fioretti, Maria; Pili, Stefania; Monaco, Serena; Romagnoli, Costantino; Fundarò, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Purulent lymphadenitis is rare in newborn and is associated with prematurity and invasive procedure. Neonatal staphylococcal infections due to skin interruption during intramuscular vitamin K administration and national metabolic screening programme (heel prick or Guthrie card test) have been already previously described. This is a report of a premature infant who developed an inguinal adenitis as a result of late complications from heel pricks. The diagnosis was made on clinical grounds and confirmed by ultrasound scans. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated. Bacteremia did not occur and the lymphadenitis had a complete resolution with antimicrobial therapy. The heel prick is a well-established procedure in neonatal practice, nevertheless it is not risk-free. The attention to signs of infections is important to avoid complications such as purulent lymphadenitis, abscess formation and septicemia. Best practice prevention and control in minimising the risk of infections are the most important intervention to prevent this complication. PMID:22675035

  20. Proportional EMG Control of Ankle Plantar Flexion in a Powered Transtibial Prosthesis

    E-print Network

    Wang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    The human calf muscle generates 80% of the mechanical work to walk throughout stance-phase, powered plantar flexion. Powered plantar flexion is not only important for walking energetics, but also to minimize the impact on ...

  1. Effect of revised high-heeled shoes on foot pressure and static balance during standing.

    PubMed

    Bae, Young-Hyeon; Ko, Mansoo; Park, Young-Soul; Lee, Suk-Min

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of revised high-heeled shoes on the foot pressure ratio and static balance during standing. [Subjects and Methods] A single-subject design was used, 15 healthy women wearing revised high-heeled shoes and general high-heeled shoes in a random order. The foot pressure ratio and static balance scores during standing were measured using a SpaceBalance 3D system. [Results] Forefoot and rearfoot pressures were significantly different between the 2 types of high-heeled shoes. Under the 3 conditions tested, the static balance score was higher for the revised high-heeled shoes than for the general high-heeled shoes, but this difference was not statistically significant. [Conclusion] Revised high-heeled shoes are preferable to general high-heeled shoes, as they result in normalization of normalized foot pressure and a positive effect on static balance. PMID:25995572

  2. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section... Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in a given normal operating condition or severe storm condition is the sum of the individual wind...

  3. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section... Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in a given normal operating condition or severe storm condition is the sum of the individual wind...

  4. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section... Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in a given normal operating condition or severe storm condition is the sum of the individual wind...

  5. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section... Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in a given normal operating condition or severe storm condition is the sum of the individual wind...

  6. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section... Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in a given normal operating condition or severe storm condition is the sum of the individual wind...

  7. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section...Drilling Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in a given...

  8. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section...Drilling Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in a given...

  9. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section...Drilling Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in a given...

  10. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section...Drilling Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in a given...

  11. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section...Drilling Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in a given...

  12. Endoscopic Plantar Fasciotomy Improves Early Postoperative Results: A Retrospective Comparison of Outcomes After Endoscopic Versus Open Plantar Fasciotomy.

    PubMed

    Chou, Andrew Chia Chen; Ng, Sean Yung Chuan; Koo, Kevin Oon Thien

    2016-01-01

    Plantar fasciotomy is offered to patients with recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. Few studies have characterized the functional outcomes over time for the endoscopic approach compared with the open approach. We hypothesized that patients undergoing endoscopic surgery will have better postoperative functional outcomes early in the postoperative period but equivalent long-term outcomes compared with patients undergoing open surgery. We analyzed the prospectively collected data of all patients undergoing plantar fasciotomy at our institution from December 2007 to August 2014. A total of 42 feet of 38 patients were included in the analysis. The clinical data were collected preoperatively and at 3 and 6 months and 1 year. The functional outcomes analyzed included the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Ankle-Hindfoot scale, the Medical Outcomes Study, Short-Form, 36-item Health Survey, and patient satisfaction and expectations. Patients undergoing endoscopic surgery had significantly greater American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Ankle-Hindfoot and SF-36 Health Survey scores and lower pain scores at the 3-month period. They were also significantly more likely to be satisfied with and have had their expectations met by surgery. Compared with the open approach, the patients who had undergone endoscopic plantar fasciotomy experienced significantly greater improvements in the subjective and objective functional outcomes, with less pain and greater satisfaction, and had had their expectations met earlier in the recovery period, with equivalent long-term outcomes, compared with the patients who had undergone open plantar fasciotomy. PMID:26007627

  13. A Case of Recalcitrant Plantar Warts Associated with Statin Use

    PubMed Central

    Wernham, Aaron G.; Velangi, Shireen S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Plantar warts are a common presenting skin complaint caused by the human papillomavirus. 1st line therapies include cryotherapy and topical salicylic acid. Where there is resistance to these treatments, consideration is made for 2nd line therapies, including intralesional bleomycin, imiquimod, 5-fluorouracil, and photodynamic therapy. We present a case of bilateral persistent plantar warts, resistant to treatment with repeated cryotherapy and topical salicylic acid over a 6-year period. Following a patient initiated decision to discontinue their statin medication, we observed rapid clearance of plantar warts without change to standard therapy or their environment. This case correlates with emerging literature demonstrating a link between statin medication and proliferation of HPV through increased levels of FOXP3+ regulatory T cells. PMID:25789179

  14. Muscle fatigue in a standing heel-rise test.

    PubMed

    Svantesson, U; Osterberg, U; Thomeé, R; Grimby, G

    1998-06-01

    The fatigue process of the triceps surae was evaluated during a standing heel-rise test, comprising of eccentric and concentric muscle actions. Ten healthy women with a mean age of 24 years participated. The heel-rise test was performed until exhaustion. Work and electromyographic activity expressed as root mean square and mean power frequency of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were calculated. The average number of heel-rises performed was 25 +/- 1. Work decreased significantly during the test. Mean power frequency decreased significantly in both phases. During the eccentric phase the decrease was significantly larger in the gastrocnemius than in the soleus muscle. There were no significant changes in root mean square except for a decrease in the soleus muscle during the eccentric phase. The present results, showing different fatigue patterns in the two muscles, could be used as reference when testing the fatigue process in different clinical conditions. Recommendations for standardization of a heel-rise test are given. PMID:9606767

  15. Plantar melanoma: a case-control study in Paraguay.

    PubMed

    Rolón, P A; Kramárová, E; Rolón, H I; Khlat, M; Parkin, D M

    1997-11-01

    In Paraguay, the plantar surface of the foot is the most common site for malignant melanoma, as it is in several other populations worldwide, most notably in those of African descent. Here, we report the results of the first case-control study of plantar melanoma, carried out in Paraguay. Sixty incident, histologically confirmed cases of plantar melanoma and 256 hospital controls were recruited in 11 hospitals throughout the country during 1988-93. Information was collected on general demographic, social, and lifestyle variables, on external exposures of feet (shoewear, work activities, injuries), and on some constitutional factors (skin, eye and hair color, and pigmented lesions of the feet). Few of the factors examined appeared to be associated with the risk of plantar melanoma. Adjusted for possible confounders, the strongest association was found for reported injuries (odds ratio [OR] = 40.9, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] = 14.8-112.7) and for occurrence of naevi on the soles (OR = 5.9, CI = 2.5-14.3). Walking barefoot did not seem to contribute to the risk although an outdoor workplace was associated with an increased melanoma occurrence (OR = 2.3, CI = 1.1-4.8). Future studies should be aware of problems of recall bias with respect to previous injuries, and ensure that evaluation of pigmentation of the sole is carried out blind to case/control status. PMID:9427427

  16. Nordic Walking Practice Might Improve Plantar Pressure Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Soriano, Pedro; Llana-Belloch, Salvador; Martinez-Nova, Alfonso; Morey-Klapsing, G.; Encarnacion-Martinez, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Nordic walking (NW), characterized by the use of two walking poles, is becoming increasingly popular (Morgulec-Adamowicz, Marszalek, & Jagustyn, 2011). We studied walking pressure patterns of 20 experienced and 30 beginner Nordic walkers. Plantar pressures from nine foot zones were measured during trials performed at two walking speeds (preferred…

  17. Dielectric Elastomer Generators for Foot Plantar Pressure Based Energy Scavenging

    E-print Network

    Potkonjak, Miodrag

    Dielectric Elastomer Generators for Foot Plantar Pressure Based Energy Scavenging Vishwa Goudar Abstract-- Parasitic energy scavenging from human-generated vibrations with piezoelectric materials has. Dielectric Elastomers (DEs) are now gaining notice as low-cost electrostatic transducers with high energy

  18. The relationship between plantar pressure and footprint shape.

    PubMed

    Hatala, Kevin G; Dingwall, Heather L; Wunderlich, Roshna E; Richmond, Brian G

    2013-07-01

    Fossil footprints preserve the only direct evidence of the external foot morphologies and gaits of extinct hominin taxa. However, their interpretation requires an understanding of the complex interaction among foot anatomy, foot function, and soft sediment mechanics. We applied an experimental approach aimed at understanding how one measure of foot function, the distribution of plantar pressure, influences footprint topography. Thirty-eight habitually unshod and minimally shod Daasanach individuals (19 male, 19 female) walked across a pressure pad and produced footprints in sediment directly excavated from the geological layer that preserves 1.5 Ma fossil footprints at Ileret, Kenya. Calibrated pressure data were collected and three-dimensional models of all footprints were produced using photogrammetry. We found significant correlations (Spearman's rank, p < 0.0001) between measurements of plantar pressure distribution and relative footprint depths at ten anatomical regions across the foot. Furthermore, plantar pressure distributions followed a pattern similar to footprint topography, with areas of higher pressure tending to leave deeper impressions. This differs from the results of experimental studies performed in different types of sediment, supporting the hypothesis that sediment type influences the relationship between plantar pressure and footprint topography. Our results also lend support to previous interpretations that the shapes of the Ileret footprints preserve evidence of a medial transfer of plantar pressure during late stance phase, as seen in modern humans. However, the weakness of the correlations indicates that much of the variation in relative depths within footprints is not explained by pressure distributions under the foot when walking on firm ground, using the methods applied here. This warrants caution when interpreting the unique foot anatomies and foot functions of extinct hominins evidenced by their footprint structures. Further research is necessary to clarify how anatomical, functional, and sedimentary variables influence footprint formation and how each can be inferred from footprint morphology. PMID:23725794

  19. Heel and toe driving on fuel cell vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Tayoung; Chen, Dongmei

    2012-12-11

    A system and method for providing nearly instantaneous power in a fuel cell vehicle. The method includes monitoring the brake pedal angle and the accelerator pedal angle of the vehicle, and if the vehicle driver is pressing both the brake pedal and the accelerator pedal at the same time and the vehicle is in a drive gear, activating a heel and toe mode. When the heel and toe mode is activated, the speed of a cathode compressor is increased to a predetermined speed set-point, which is higher than the normal compressor speed for the pedal position. Thus, when the vehicle brake is removed, the compressor speed is high enough to provide enough air to the cathode, so that the stack can generate nearly immediate power.

  20. Intravascular Myopericytoma in the Heel: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Valero, José; Salcini, José L.; Gordillo, Luis; Gallart, José; González, David; Deus, Javier; Lahoz, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Intravascular myopericytoma (IVMP), regarded as a variant of myopericytoma, is a rare tumor. Very few cases have been described, none in the foot. The first case of IVMP located in the heel of the foot is described in this article. A literature review is reported of all cases of IVMP published in the English literature. A 48-year-old man possessed an IVMP on the heel of the right foot. The physical examination and histopathological and ultrasound studies are described. The literature review yielded 5 cases of IVMP, 2 of which were in the thigh and 1 each in the oral mucosa, the periorbital region, and the leg. The possibility that these lesions may be malignant suggests that the histopathological study of vascular tumors should include immunohistochemical tests. PMID:25789958

  1. Intravascular myopericytoma in the heel: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Valero, José; Salcini, José L; Gordillo, Luis; Gallart, José; González, David; Deus, Javier; Lahoz, Manuel

    2015-03-01

    Intravascular myopericytoma (IVMP), regarded as a variant of myopericytoma, is a rare tumor. Very few cases have been described, none in the foot.The first case of IVMP located in the heel of the foot is described in this article. A literature review is reported of all cases of IVMP published in the English literature.A 48-year-old man possessed an IVMP on the heel of the right foot. The physical examination and histopathological and ultrasound studies are described. The literature review yielded 5 cases of IVMP, 2 of which were in the thigh and 1 each in the oral mucosa, the periorbital region, and the leg.The possibility that these lesions may be malignant suggests that the histopathological study of vascular tumors should include immunohistochemical tests. PMID:25789958

  2. Effects of high heel wear and increased weight on the knee during walking.

    PubMed

    Titchenal, Matthew R; Asay, Jessica L; Favre, Julien; Andriacchi, Thomas P; Chu, Constance R

    2015-03-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA), a leading cause of disability, is more prevalent in women than men. Wearing high heeled shoes has been implicated as a potential contributing factor for the higher lifetime risk of osteoarthritis in women. This study tests the hypotheses that changes to knee kinematics and kinetics observed during high heeled walking increase in magnitude with increasing heel height and are accentuated by a 20% increase in weight. Fourteen healthy females were tested using marker-based gait analysis in combinations of footwear (flat athletic shoe, 3.8?cm and 8.3?cm heeled shoes) and weight (with and without 20% bodyweight vest). At preferred walking speed, knee flexion angle at heel-strike and midstance increased with increasing heel height and weight. Maximum knee extension moment during loading response decreased with added weight; maximum knee extension moment during terminal stance decreased with heel height; maximum adduction moments increased with heel height. Many of the changes observed with increasing heel height and weight were similar to those seen with aging and OA progression. This suggests that high heel use, especially in combination with additional weight, may contribute to increased OA risk in women. PMID:25532875

  3. A biomechanical approach to the prevention, treatment and rehabilitation of plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Chandler, T J; Kibler, W B

    1993-05-01

    Plantar fasciitis is a repetitive microtrauma overload injury of the attachment of the plantar fascia at the inferior aspect of the calcaneus. The diagnosis of plantar fasciitis is common among athletes in many sports, primarily those sports that involve running. Common treatments for plantar fasciitis, including ice, stretching, ultrasound, and shoe inserts are helpful in reducing the symptoms. However, recurrence of the problem is common. By understanding the potential biomechanical causes of this disorder it may be possible to correct the anatomical and biomechanical variables that cause plantar fasciitis and reduce the rate of recurrence as well as speed the rehabilitation process. It may also be possible to identify predisposing maladaptations that can be corrected, therefore, preventing the initial occurrence of plantar fasciitis. PMID:8100639

  4. Nordic walking practice might improve plantar pressure distribution.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Soriano, Pedro; Llana-Belloch, Salvador; Martínez-Nova, Alfonso; Morey-Klapsing, G; Encarnación-Martínez, Alberto

    2011-12-01

    Nordic walking (NW), characterized by the use of two walking poles, is becoming increasingly popular (Morgulec-Adamowicz, Marszalek, & Jagustyn, 2011). We studied walking pressure patterns of 20 experienced and 30 beginner Nordic walkers. Plantar pressures from nine foot zones were measured during trials performed at two walking speeds (preferred and 20% faster), and under two walking conditions (NW vs. normal walking). In comparison to normal walking, NW experience led to a significant (p < .05) pressure reduction of about 50% on the central metatarsals. No significant increases were detected in other foot regions. The differences between experienced and beginners during normal walking including a 40% pressure reduction on the metatarsal area, suggests that regular NW practice might also have a beneficial effect on plantar pressure when walking without poles. PMID:22276400

  5. Isolated plantar dislocation of the 1st metatarsophalangeal joint.

    PubMed

    Lomax, A; Miller, R J; Kumar, C S

    2013-12-01

    Plantar dislocation of the 1st metatarsophalangeal joint is an extremely rare injury. To the best of our knowledge, there are no previous reports in the literature of an isolated dislocation of this type requiring open reduction and surgical repair. In this case report, we describe the clinical and operative findings and discuss in detail our surgical technique for the successful management of this unusual injury. PMID:24075504

  6. Two emerging technologies for Achilles tendinopathy and plantar fasciopathy.

    PubMed

    Langer, Paul R

    2015-04-01

    Some common overuse injuries, such as Achilles tendinopathy and plantar fasciitis (or fasciopathy), can be refractory to treatment. When standard treatment options fail, operative intervention often becomes the treatment of last resort. Recently, newer technologies have been developed and refined, and can provide potential benefits for these conditions using noninvasive and minimally invasive approaches. Two technologies, extracorporeal shock wave therapy and ultrasound-guided percutaneous tenotomy/fasciotomy are discussed. PMID:25804709

  7. Successful replantation of the heel pad: a seven-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Sanger, J R; Matloub, H S

    1989-04-01

    The authors present a case of successful replantation of the soft tissue of the heel. Circulation was restored by the use of a vein graft from the posterior tibial artery to an arterial branch of the subcutaneous plexus found on the medial aspect of the heel. Two small veins were anastomosed at the edge of the defect. The heel lacks sensation, but the patient has been able to return to work as a heavy laborer in a steel foundry and is walking without the use of orthotics or modified shoes seven years later. This is the first reported case of successful replantation of only the soft tissue of the heel. PMID:2705713

  8. Heel raises versus prefabricated orthoses in the treatment of posterior heel pain associated with calcaneal apophysitis (Sever's Disease): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Posterior Heel pain can present in children of 8 to 14 years, associated with or clinically diagnosed as Sever's disease, or calcaneal apophysitis. Presently, there are no comparative randomised studies evaluating treatment options for posterior heel pain in children with the clinical diagnosis of calcaneal apophysitis or Sever's disease. This study seeks to compare the clinical efficacy of some currently employed treatment options for the relief of disability and pain associated with posterior heel pain in children. Method Design: Factorial 2 × 2 randomised controlled trial with monthly follow-up for 3 months. Participants: Children with clinically diagnosed posterior heel pain possibly associated with calcaneal apophysitis/Sever's disease (n = 124). Interventions: Treatment factor 1 will be two types of shoe orthoses: a heel raise or prefabricated orthoses. Both of these interventions are widely available, mutually exclusive treatment approaches that are relatively low in cost. Treatment factor 2 will be a footwear prescription/replacement intervention involving a shoe with a firm heel counter, dual density EVA midsole and rear foot control. The alternate condition in this factor is no footwear prescription/replacement, with the participant wearing their current footwear. Outcomes: Oxford Foot and Ankle Questionnaire and the Faces pain scale. Discussion This will be a randomised trial to compare the efficacy of various treatment options for posterior heel pain in children that may be associated with calcaneal apophysitis also known as Sever's disease. Trial Registration Trial Number: ACTRN12609000696291 Ethics Approval Southern Health: HREC Ref: 09271B PMID:20196866

  9. The Achilles Heel of the GSR-Shuffle A Note on New Age Solitaire

    E-print Network

    Schalekamp, Frans

    The Achilles Heel of the GSR-Shuffle A Note on New Age Solitaire Anke van Zuylen Frans Schalekamp that is shuffled using the GSR-shuffle (and two variants) are studied. We show that this game pinpoints the Achilles heel of the GSR-shuffle as is demonstrated using the variation distance. 1 Introduction Since

  10. Reliability of the Kinetic Measures under Different Heel Conditions during Normal Walking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yuanlong; Wang, Yong Tai

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the reliability of 3 dimension reaction forces and impulses in walking with 3 different heel shoe conditions. These results suggest that changing the height of the heels affects mainly the reliability of the ground reaction force and impulse measures on the medial and lateral dimension and not…

  11. Efficacy of a single-formula acupuncture treatment for horses with palmar heel pain.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Katherine A; Manning, Stephen T

    2015-12-01

    Acupuncture is used without strong scientific evidence to treat many diseases of the horse, including palmar heel pain. Research is needed to provide evidence for the application of these treatments. Within the confines of our study, acupuncture did not reliably modulate palmar heel pain in horses. PMID:26663921

  12. Heel Removal Analysis for Mixing Pumps of Tank 8

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.

    2003-05-21

    Computational fluid dynamics methods were used to recommend a slurry pump operational strategy for sludge heel removal in Tank 8. Flow patterns calculated by the model were used to evaluate the performance of various combinations of operating pumps and their orientation. The models focused on removal of the sludge heel located at the east side of Tank 8 using the four existing slurry pumps. The models and calculations were based on prototypic tank geometry and expected normal operating conditions as defined by Waste Removal Closure (WRC) Engineering. The calculated results demonstrated that for pump speeds higher than 1800 rpm and at a 130 inch liquid level, a recommended orientation of the slurry pumps could be provided, based on a minimum sludge suspension velocity of 2.27 ft per sec. Further results showed that the time to reach a steady-state flow pattern was affected by both the tank level and the pump speed. Sensitivity studies showed that for a given pump speed, a higher tank level and a lower pump nozzle elevation would result in better performance in suspending and removing the sludge. The results also showed that the presence of flow obstructions were advantageous for certain pump orientations.

  13. Foot deformities, function in the lower extremities, and plantar pressure in patients with diabetes at high risk to develop foot ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ulla Hellstrand; Zügner, Roland; Lisovskaja, Vera; Karlsson, Jon; Hagberg, Kerstin; Tranberg, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Objective Foot deformities, neuropathy, and dysfunction in the lower extremities are known risk factors that increase plantar peak pressure (PP) and, as a result, the risk of developing foot ulcers in patients with diabetes. However, knowledge about the prevalence of these factors is still limited. The aim of the present study was to describe the prevalence of risk factors observed in patients with diabetes without foot ulcers and to explore possible connections between the risk factors and high plantar pressure. Patients and methods Patients diagnosed with type 1 (n=27) or type 2 (n=47) diabetes (mean age 60.0±15.0 years) were included in this cross-sectional study. Assessments included the registration of foot deformities; test of gross function at the hip, knee, and ankle joints; a stratification of the risk of developing foot ulcers according to the Swedish National Diabetes Register; a walking test; and self-reported questionnaires including the SF-36 health survey. In-shoe PP was measured in seven regions of interests on the sole of the foot using F-Scan®. An exploratory analysis of the association of risk factors with PP was performed. Results Neuropathy was present in 28 (38%), and 39 (53%) had callosities in the heel region. Low forefoot arch was present in 57 (77%). Gait-related parameters, such as the ability to walk on the forefoot or heel, were normal in all patients. Eighty percent had normal function at the hip and ankle joints. Gait velocity was 1.2±0.2 m/s. All patients were stratified to risk group 3. Hallux valgus and hallux rigidus were associated with an increase in the PP in the medial forefoot. A higher body mass index (BMI) was found to increase the PP at metatarsal heads 4 and 5. Pes planus was associated with a decrease in PP at metatarsal head 1. Neuropathy did not have a high association with PP. Conclusions This study identified several potential risk factors for the onset of diabetic foot ulcers (DFU). Hallux valgus and hallux rigidus appeared to increase the PP under the medial forefoot and a high BMI appeared to increase the PP under the lateral forefoot. There is a need to construct a simple, valid, and reliable assessment routine to detect potential risk factors for the onset of DFU. PMID:26087865

  14. Flat Feet and a Diagnosis of Plantar Fasciitis in a Marine Corps Recruit.

    PubMed

    Lurati, Ann R

    2015-04-01

    A 22-year-old man sought care at an orthopedic clinic for acute plantar fasciitis. He reported that he had begun an intensive exercise program to prepare himself for Marine Corps Officer Candidate School. Pes Planus, or flat feet, was noted on physical examination. This article reviews the diagnoses of pes planus and plantar fasciitis as well as current intervention strategies. PMID:26081472

  15. Reliability of in-Shoe Plantar Pressure Measurements in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidmar, Gaj; Novak, Primoz

    2009-01-01

    Plantar pressures measurement is a frequently used method in rehabilitation and related research. Metric characteristics of the F-Scan system have been assessed from different standpoints and in different patients, but not its reliability in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Therefore, our objective was to assess reliability of the F-Scan plantar

  16. Design and test of a soft plantar force measurement system for gait detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Zhao, Yulong; Duan, Zhengyong; Liu, Yan

    2012-01-01

    This work describes a plantar force measurement system. The MEMS pressure sensor, as the key sensing element, is designed, fabricated and embedded into a flexible silicon oil-filled bladder made of silicon rubber to constitute a single sensing unit. A conditioning circuit is designed for signal processing and data acquisition. The characteristics of the plantar force sensing unit are investigated by both static and dynamic tests. A comparison of characteristics between the proposed plantar force sensing unit and a commercial flexible force sensor is presented. A practical experiment of plantar force measurement has been carried out to validate the system. The results demonstrate that the proposed measurement system has a potential for success in the application of plantar force measurement during normal gait. PMID:23208558

  17. Design and Test of a Soft Plantar Force Measurement System for Gait Detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Zhao, Yulong; Duan, Zhengyong; Liu, Yan

    2012-01-01

    This work describes a plantar force measurement system. The MEMS pressure sensor, as the key sensing element, is designed, fabricated and embedded into a flexible silicon oil-filled bladder made of silicon rubber to constitute a single sensing unit. A conditioning circuit is designed for signal processing and data acquisition. The characteristics of the plantar force sensing unit are investigated by both static and dynamic tests. A comparison of characteristics between the proposed plantar force sensing unit and a commercial flexible force sensor is presented. A practical experiment of plantar force measurement has been carried out to validate the system. The results demonstrate that the proposed measurement system has a potential for success in the application of plantar force measurement during normal gait. PMID:23208558

  18. Epidemiology of High-Heel Shoe Injuries in U.S. Women: 2002 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Moore, Justin Xavier; Lambert, Brice; Jenkins, Gabrielle P; McGwin, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the epidemiology of high-heel-related injuries among a nationally representative population of women in the United States and to analyze the demographic differences within this group. The data used in the present study were collected from the Consumer Product Safety Commission's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System. A total of 3294 injuries, representing an estimated 123,355 high-heel-related injuries, were treated in emergency departments within the United States from 2002 to 2012. The overall rate of high-heel-related injuries for the study was 7.32 per 100,000 females (95% confidence interval 7.08 to 7.56). The injury rate was greatest for young adult females, with the greatest rates observed for those aged 20 to 29 years (18.38 per 100,000 females) and those aged 30 to 39 years (11.07 per 100,000 females). The results from the present study suggest that high-heel-related injuries have nearly doubled during the 11-year period from 2002 to 2012. Injuries from high heels are differential by body region, with most injuries occurring as sprains and strains to the foot and ankle. Although high heels might be stylish, from a health standpoint, it could be worthwhile for females and those interested in wearing high heels to understand the risks of wearing high-heeled shoes and the potential harm that precarious activities in high-heeled shoes can cause. The results of the present study can be used in the development of a prospective cohort study to investigate the risk of injury from high-heeled shoes, accounting for the exposure time and studying differences in demographics (e.g., age and race). PMID:25977152

  19. Conservative treatment of plantar fasciitis. A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Lynch, D M; Goforth, W P; Martin, J E; Odom, R D; Preece, C K; Kotter, M W

    1998-08-01

    A randomized, prospective study was conducted to compare the individual effectiveness of three types of conservative therapy in the treatment of plantar fasciitis. One hundred three subjects were randomly assigned to one of three treatment categories: anti-inflammatory, accommodative, or mechanical. Subjects were treated for 3 months, with follow-up visits at 2, 4, 6, and 12 weeks. For the 85 patients who completed the study, a statistically significant difference was noted between groups, with mechanical treatment with taping and orthoses proving to be more effective than either anti-inflammatory or accommodative modalities. PMID:9735623

  20. Expanded butterfly plots: A new method to analyze simultaneous pressure and shear on the plantar skin surface during gait.

    PubMed

    Berki, Visar; Boswell, Melissa A; Ciltea, Daniela; Guseila, Loredana M; Goss, Larry; Barnes, Scott; Berme, Necip; McMillan, Grant R; Davis, Brian L

    2015-07-16

    The current method of visualizing pressure and shear data under a subject's foot during gait is the Pedotti, or "butterfly" diagram. This method of force platform data visualization was introduced in the 1970s to display the projection of the ground reaction force vector in the sagittal plane. The purpose of the current study was to examine individual sub-components of the vectors displayed in Pedotti diagrams, in order to better understand the relationship between one foot region and another. For this, new instrumentation was used that allows multiple Pedotti diagrams to be constructed at any instant during the gait cycle. The custom built shear-and-pressure-evaluating camera system (SPECS) allows for simultaneous recordings of pressure and both components of the horizontal force vector (medio-lateral and antero-posterior) at distinctive regions under one's foot during gait. Data analysis of such recordings affirms three conclusions: (i) pressure and shear values on individual sites on the plantar surface of the foot are not associated in a linear manner, (ii) force vectors in the heel and forefoot regions exhibit horizontal force components that oppose one another, and similarly, (iii) force vectors in the frontal plane transecting the forefoot region also exhibit medial-lateral shear components that counteract one another. This approach sheds light on individual vectors that collectively sum to each vector displayed in a Pedotti diagram. The results indicate that shearing between the foot and the ground is not simply a passive event. The structures of the arches and/or muscular activities are major contributors to the observed interfacial stresses. PMID:25895644

  1. Trypanosome resistance to human innate immunity: targeting Achilles’ heel

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Natalie A.; Kieft, Rudo; MacLeod, Annette; Hajduk, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosome lytic factors (TLFs) are powerful, naturally-occurring toxins in humans that provide sterile protection against infection by several African trypanosomes. These trypanocidal complexes predominantly enter the parasite by binding to the trypanosome haptoglobin/hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR), trafficking to the lysosome, causing membrane damage and ultimately, cell lysis. Despite TLF-mediated immunity, the parasites that cause human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, have developed independent mechanisms of resistance to TLF killing. Here we describe the parasite defenses that allow trypanosome infections of humans and discuss how targeting these apparent strengths of the parasite may reveal their Achilles’ heel, leading to new approaches in the treatment of HAT. PMID:23059119

  2. Radiation levels on empty cylinders containing heel material

    SciTech Connect

    Shockley, C.W.

    1991-12-31

    Empty UF{sub 6} cylinders containing heel material were found to emit radiation levels in excess of 200 mr/hr, the maximum amount stated in ORO-651. The radiation levels were as high as 335 mr/hr for thick wall (48X and 48Y) cylinders and 1050 mr/hr for thin wall (48G and 48H) cylinders. The high readings were found only on the bottom of the cylinders. These radiation levels exceeded the maximum levels established in DOT 49 CFR, Part 173.441 for shipment of cylinders. Holding periods of four weeks for thick-wall cylinders and ten weeks for thin-wall cylinders were established to allow the radiation levels to decay prior to shipment.

  3. Walking on high heels changes muscle activity and the dynamics of human walking significantly.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Erik B; Svendsen, Morten B; Nørreslet, Andreas; Baldvinsson, Henrik K; Heilskov-Hansen, Thomas; Larsen, Peter K; Alkjær, Tine; Henriksen, Marius

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the distribution of net joint moments in the lower extremities during walking on high-heeled shoes compared with barefooted walking at identical speed. Fourteen female subjects walked at 4 km/h across three force platforms while they were filmed by five digital video cameras operating at 50 frames/second. Both barefooted walking and walking on high-heeled shoes (heel height: 9 cm) were recorded. Net joint moments were calculated by 3D inverse dynamics. EMG was recorded from eight leg muscles. The knee extensor moment peak in the first half of the stance phase was doubled when walking on high heels. The knee joint angle showed that high-heeled walking caused the subjects to flex the knee joint significantly more in the first half of the stance phase. In the frontal plane a significant increase was observed in the knee joint abductor moment and the hip joint abductor moment. Several EMG parameters increased significantly when walking on high-heels. The results indicate a large increase in bone-on-bone forces in the knee joint directly caused by the increased knee joint extensor moment during high-heeled walking, which may explain the observed higher incidence of osteoarthritis in the knee joint in women as compared with men. PMID:22431211

  4. The plantar fat pad and the diabetic foot - a review.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Sunit; Widgerow, Alan D; Evans, Gregory Rd

    2015-12-01

    There has been much debate concerning the pathologic consequences of diabetes on the plantar fat pad and its subsequent association with the development of a foot ulcer. This review article documents two theories regarding pathophysiology in diabetic foot ulcer formation as they are related to the plantar fat pad and discusses current treatment options for this pathophysiological phenomenon. Traditionally, fat pad atrophy in diabetic patients was thought to result as an irregular arrangement of collagen fibrils within the septal walls as a result of glycation as well as diminishing adipocyte size due to thickened septal walls. Contrary to this traditional theory, a model depicting distal fat pad migration from under the metatarsal heads has been described in the diabetic patient. Such pad migration renders the metatarsal heads vulnerable to increased pressure, which, in turn, predisposes to foot ulceration. This migratory fat pad theory plays a significant role in approaches to the prevention of diabetic foot ulceration and subsequent amputation. Various methods of fat pad supplementation and claw toe management are impacted by the pathophysiological changes described and new avenues of therapy may be based on these changes. PMID:24131727

  5. Effect of shockwave therapy on plantar fasciopathy. A biomechanical prospective.

    PubMed

    Hsu, W-H; Lai, L-J; Chang, H-Y; Hsu, R W-W

    2013-08-01

    It has been suggested that extracorporeal shockwave therapy is a safe and effective treatment for pain relief from recalcitrant plantar fasciopathy (PF). However, the changes in gait and associated biomechanical parameters have not been well characterised. We recruited 12 female patients with recalcitrant PF who had a mean age of 59 years (50 to 70) and mean body mass index of 25 kg/m(2) (22 to 30). The patients reported a mean duration of symptoms of 9.3 months (6 to 15). Shockwave therapy consisting of 1500 impulses (energy flux density 0.26 mJ/mm(2)) was applied for three sessions, each three weeks apart. A pain visual analogue scale (VAS) rating, plantar pressure assessment and motion analysis were carried out before and nine weeks after first shock wave therapy. It was demonstrated that patients increased their walking velocity and cadence as well indicating a decrease in pain after shockwave therapy. In the symptomatic foot, the peak contact pressure over the forefoot increased and the contact area over the digits decreased. The total foot impulse also decreased as did stance duration. The duration the centre of pressure remained in the hindfoot increased in the symptomatic foot after shockwave therapy. The differences in centre of pressure trajectory at baseline decreased at final follow-up. In conclusion, shockwave therapy not only decreased the pain VAS rating but also improved the gait parameters of the symptomatic foot in PF patients. PMID:23908425

  6. The Artificial Gravity Bed Rest Pilot Project: Effects on Knee Extensor and Plantar Flexor Muscle Groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiozzo, V. J.; Haddad, F.; Lee, S.; Baker, M.; Baldwin, K. M.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this project was to examine the effects of artificial gravity (2.5 g) on skeletal muscle strength and key anabolic/catabolic markers known to regulate muscle mass. Two groups of subjects were selected for study: 1) a 21 day-bed rest (BR) control (C) group (N=7); and 2) an AG group (N=8), which was exposed to 21 days of bed-rest plus daily 1 hr exposures to AG (2.5 g). This particular experiment was part of an integrated AG Pilot Project sponsored by NASA/Johnson Space Center. The in vivo torque-velocity relationships of the knee extensors and plantar flexors of the ankle were determined pre and post treatment. Also, pre- and post treatment biopsy samples were obtained from both the vastus lateralis and soleus muscles and were used, in part, for a series of analyses on gene expression (mRNA abundance) of key factors implicated in the anabolic versus catabolic state of the muscle. Post/Pre toque-velocity determinations revealed greater decrements in knee extensor performance in the C versus AG group (P less than 0.04). The plantar flexor muscle group of the AG subjects actually demonstrated a net gain in torque-velocity relationship; whereas, in the C group the overall post/pre responses declined (AG vs C; P less than 0.001). Measurements of muscle fiber cross-sectional area (for both muscles) demonstrated a loss of approx. 20% in the C group while no losses were evident in the AG group. RT-PCR analyses of muscle biopsy specimens demonstrated that markers of growth and cytoskeletal integrity (IGF-1, IGF-1 BP4, mechano growth factor, total RNA, and pro-collagen 3a) were higher in the AG group, whereas catabolic markers (myostatin and atrogen) were elevated in the C group. Importantly, these patterns were seen in both muscles. Based on these observations we conclude that paradigms of AG have the potential to maintain the functional, biochemical, and structural homeostasis of skeletal muscle in the face of chronic unloading states. These findings also warrant further studies since it is likely that other robust paradigms of AG that employ various exercise strategies may be more effective in counteracting long duration unloading states as anticipated on the platforms of the Moon and Mars.

  7. Heel pain due to psoriatic arthritis in a 50 year old recreational male athlete: case report

    PubMed Central

    Yedon, Dominique Forand; Howitt, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Heel pain is a common presentation in a sports injury practice, with a list of common differentials including achilles tendinopathy and retrocalcaneal bursitis. However, seronegative arthritis can also cause enthesopathies that produce heel pain and should be considered in a differential diagnosis list. In this case, a 50 year old recreationally active male presented with non-traumatic insidious heel pain and without history of any skin conditions or any other symptoms of seronegative spondyloarthritis. Clinical suspicion led to laboratory testing and radiographs/bone scan which yielded the diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. PMID:22131565

  8. Analysis of Factors Affecting Stress Solution at Concrete Gravity Dam Heel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Vu Hoang; Quoc Cong, Trinh; Tongchun, Li

    2010-05-01

    Along with Vietnam's development, various hydraulic constructions including concrete gravity dams have been being built. In some of these dams, the fractures occurred at the heel of the dams are even in small and media dams. There are various reasons cause the factures at dam heel but the main reason is the stress states at dam heel are not determined correctly while designing dam. In this paper, several factors affecting stress solution at concrete gravity dam heel such as element mesh size, crack joints of upstream foundation, execution process are investigated by using finite element model of Banve concrete gravity dam. This work is very significant when the more high concrete gravity dams will be constructed in Vietnam year after year.

  9. Bilateral Heel Numbness due to External Compression during Obstetric Epidural Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Kamphuis, Vivian P.; Zegers, Marie P.A.; Koppen, Hille

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 32-year-old woman who developed bilateral heel numbness after obstetric epidural analgesia. We diagnosed her with bilateral neuropathy of the medial calcaneal nerve, most likely due to longstanding pressure on both heels. Risk factors for the development of this neuropathy were prolonged labour with spinal analgesia and a continuation of analgesia during episiotomy. Padded footrests decrease pressure and can possibly prevent this neuropathy. PMID:25802500

  10. Sludge Heel Removal Analysis for Slurry Pumps of Tank 11

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.

    2003-09-30

    Computational fluid dynamics methods were used to develop and recommend a slurry pump operational strategy for sludge heel removal in Tank 11. Flow patterns calculated by the model were used to evaluate the performance of various combinations of operating pumps and their orientation. The models focused on removal of the sludge heel located at the edge of Tank 11 using the four existing slurry pumps. The models and calculations were based on prototypic tank geometry and expected normal operating conditions as defined by Tank Closure Project (TCP) Engineering. Computational fluid dynamics models of Tank 11 with different operating conditions were developed using the FLUENT(tm) code. The modeling results were used to assess the efficiency of sludge suspension and removal operations in the 75-ft tank. The models employed a three-dimensional approach, a two-equation turbulence model, and an approximate representation of flow obstructions. The calculated local velocity was used as a measure of sludge removal and mixing capability. For the simulations, a series of the modeling calculations was performed with indexed pump orientations until an efficient flow pattern near the potential location of the sludge mound was established for sludge removal. The calculated results demonstrated that the existing slurry pumps running at 1600 rpm could remove the sludge mound from the tank with a 103 in. liquid level, based on a minimum sludge suspension velocity of 2.27 ft/sec. In this case, the only exception is the region within about 2 ft. from the tank wall. Further results showed that the capabilities of sludge removal were affected by the indexed pump orientation, the number of operating pumps, and the pump speed. A recommended operational strategy for an efficient flow pattern was developed to remove the sludge mound assuming that local fluid velocity can be used as a measure of sludge suspension and removal. Sensitivity results showed that for a given pump speed, a higher tank level and a lower pump nozzle elevation would result in better performance in suspending and removing the sludge. The results also showed that the presence of flow obstructions such as valve housing structure were advantageous for certain pump orientations.

  11. Clinical significance of plantar grasp response in infants.

    PubMed

    Futagi, Y; Suzuki, Y; Goto, M

    1999-02-01

    The present study was undertaken to delineate the clinical significance of the plantar grasp response in infants. All 834 normal control infants had a positive response within the first 6 months of age, and most of them had a marked response at 1-4 months of age. The authors attempted to evaluate the neurologic outcomes of infants who had negative or diminished responses in these respective periods. Ninety-three infants examined from 1982 to 1992 fulfilled these criteria, and their prognoses were reviewed. The outcomes consisted of cerebral palsy in 75 (69 spastic, four athetoid with spasticity, one athetoid, and one ataxic); mental retardation in seven; borderline intelligence in two; motor delay in one; and eight were considered normal. These outcomes indicate that the negative or diminished response of this primitive reflex during early infancy is highly suggestive of neurologic abnormalities, especially for spasticity. Infants with such findings should be carefully observed for possible development of neurologic abnormalities. PMID:10082338

  12. Mechanical treatment of plantar fasciitis. A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Martin, J E; Hosch, J C; Goforth, W P; Murff, R T; Lynch, D M; Odom, R D

    2001-02-01

    A randomized, prospective study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of three individual mechanical modalities in the treatment of plantar fasciitis. Two hundred fifty-five subjects were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups: custom-made orthoses, over-the-counter arch supports, or tension night splints. Subjects were treated for 3 months, with follow-up visits at 2, 6, and 12 weeks. No statistically significant difference was noted among treatment groups with respect to final outcomes based on first-step pain or pain felt during the day. However, there was a statistically significant difference among the three groups with respect to early patient withdrawal from the study due to continued severe pain, noncompliance, or inability to tolerate the device. Patient compliance was greatest with the use of custom-made orthoses. PMID:11266478

  13. Benign dermoscopic parallel ridge pattern in plantar hyperpigmentation due to capecitabine

    PubMed Central

    Tognetti, Linda; Fimiani, Michele; Rubegni, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 37-year-old woman (phototype II) who presented at our outpatient clinic with a two-month history of hyperpigmented plantar macules. Medical history revealed that the patient had taken capecitabine in the past three months as adjuvant chemotherapy for recurrent breast cancer. Dermoscopic examination of the plantar macules showed parallel ridge pattern with pigmentation in the furrows without obliteration of eccrine gland apertures. Besides in acral melanoma, parallel ridge pattern can also be observed in benign plantar lesions, such as congenital or acquired acral nevi, subcorneal hemorrhage, dye-related pigmentation and drug-induced hyperpigmentation, especially in patients with phototypes III–VI. The few reported cases of capecitabine-induced hyperpigmentation have been associated with hand and foot syndrome in patients with phototypes IV–V and palmar as well as plantar involvement. PMID:26114058

  14. Do Mantle Cell Lymphomas have an “Achilles Heel”?

    PubMed Central

    Saba, Nakhle; Wiestner, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a mature B-cell malignancy that continues to have a high mortality rate. In this manuscript we discuss key pathogenic pathways in MCL biology and their possible therapeutic targeting. Recent findings In addition to Cyclin-D1 the transcription factor SOX-11 emerged as a common characteristic of MCL. Genomic studies have identified a number of recurrently mutated genes; in order of descending frequency these include ATM, CCND1, UBR5, TP53, BIRC3, NOTCH1/2 and TRAF2. However, no clear oncogenic driver has been identified. In contrast, several observations indicate that MCL cells are antigen-experienced cells and that the tumor microenvironment and B-cell receptor engagement are important. This is underscored by the impressive clinical responses achieved with the BTK inhibitor ibrutinib. Recently identified activating mutations in the non-canonical NF-?B pathway could give rise to ibrutinib resistance. PARP and aurora kinase inhibitors may be synthetic lethal with the common aberrations in DNA damage pathways found in MCL. Also, ABT-199, a potent and selective inhibitor of BCL-2 has promising activity in early studies. Summary MCL is a heterogeneous disease and no single Achilles heel has been identified. Nevertheless, genomic, molecular, and clinical studies have revealed vulnerabilities that can be exploited for effective therapy. PMID:24857884

  15. The effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on stroke patients with plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Gon; Bae, Sea Hyun; Kim, Gye Yeop; Kim, Kyung Yoon

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this research was to analyze the efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave therapy for the treatment of stroke patients with plantar fasciitis. [Subjects and Methods] This study included 10 stroke patients diagnosed with plantar fasciitis who were administered 3 sessions of extracorporeal shock wave therapy per week. After the last session, they performed stretching exercises for their Achilles tendon and plantar fascia for 30?min/day, 5 times a week for 6 months. The following parameters were measured and compared prior to therapy, 6 weeks after therapy, and 6 months after therapy: thickness of the plantar fascia, using an ultrasonic imaging system; degree of spasticity, using a muscle tension measuring instrument; degree of pain, using the visual analogue scale; and gait ability, using the Functional Gait Assessment. [Results] Decreased plantar fascia thickness, spasticity, and pain and increased gait ability were noted after therapy. These changes were significantly greater at 6 months after therapy than at 6 weeks after therapy. [Conclusion] These results indicated that extracorporeal shock wave therapy reduced tension in the plantar fascia, relieving pain and improving gait ability in stroke patients. PMID:25729207

  16. The effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on stroke patients with plantar fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Gon; Bae, Sea Hyun; Kim, Gye Yeop; Kim, Kyung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this research was to analyze the efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave therapy for the treatment of stroke patients with plantar fasciitis. [Subjects and Methods] This study included 10 stroke patients diagnosed with plantar fasciitis who were administered 3 sessions of extracorporeal shock wave therapy per week. After the last session, they performed stretching exercises for their Achilles tendon and plantar fascia for 30?min/day, 5 times a week for 6 months. The following parameters were measured and compared prior to therapy, 6 weeks after therapy, and 6 months after therapy: thickness of the plantar fascia, using an ultrasonic imaging system; degree of spasticity, using a muscle tension measuring instrument; degree of pain, using the visual analogue scale; and gait ability, using the Functional Gait Assessment. [Results] Decreased plantar fascia thickness, spasticity, and pain and increased gait ability were noted after therapy. These changes were significantly greater at 6 months after therapy than at 6 weeks after therapy. [Conclusion] These results indicated that extracorporeal shock wave therapy reduced tension in the plantar fascia, relieving pain and improving gait ability in stroke patients. PMID:25729207

  17. Heel effect adaptive flat field correction of digital x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yongjian; Wang, Jue

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Anode heel effect renders large-scale background nonuniformities in digital radiographs. Conventional offset/gain calibration is performed at mono source-to-image distance (SID), and disregards the SID-dependent characteristic of heel effect. It results in a residual nonuniform background in the corrected radiographs when the SID settings for calibration and correction differ. In this work, the authors develop a robust and efficient computational method for digital x-ray detector gain correction adapted to SID-variant heel effect, without resorting to physical filters, phantoms, complicated heel effect models, or multiple-SID calibration and interpolation.Methods: The authors present the Duo-SID projection correction method. In our approach, conventional offset/gain calibrations are performed only twice, at the minimum and maximum SIDs of the system in typical clinical use. A fast iterative separation algorithm is devised to extract the detector gain and basis heel patterns from the min/max SID calibrations. The resultant detector gain is independent of SID, while the basis heel patterns are parameterized by the min- and max-SID. The heel pattern at any SID is obtained from the min-SID basis heel pattern via projection imaging principles. The system gain desired at a specific acquisition SID is then constructed using the projected heel pattern and detector gain map.Results: The method was evaluated for flat field and anatomical phantom image corrections. It demonstrated promising improvements over interpolation and conventional gain calibration/correction methods, lowering their correction errors by approximately 70% and 80%, respectively. The separation algorithm was able to extract the detector gain and heel patterns with less than 2% error, and the Duo-SID corrected images showed perceptually appealing uniform background across the detector.Conclusions: The Duo-SID correction method has substantially improved on conventional offset/gain corrections for digital x-ray imaging in an SID-variant environment. The technique is relatively simple, and can be easily incorporated into multiple-point gain calibration/correction techniques. It offers a potentially valuable tool for preprocessing digital x-ray images to boost image quality of mammography, chest and cardiac radiography, as well as automated computer aided diagnostic radiology.

  18. Anode heel affect in thoracic radiology: a visual grading analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mearon, T.; Brennan, P. C.

    2006-03-01

    For decades, the antero-posterior (AP) projection of the thoracic spine has represented a substantial challenge. Patient thickness varies substantially along the cranio-caudal axis resulting in images that are too dark for the upper vertebrae and too light, or with excessive quantum mottle, towards the 9th to 12th thoracic vertebra. The anode heel affect is a well known phenomenon, however there is a paucity of reports demonstrating its exploitation in clinical departments for optimising images. The current work, using an adult, tissue-equivalent anthropomorphic phantom, explores if appropriate positioning ofthe anode can improve image quality for thoracic spine radiology. At each of 5 kVps (70, 81, 90, 102, 109) thirty AP thoracic spine images were produced, 15 with the anode end of the tube towards the cranial part of the phantom and 15 with the anode end of the tube facing caudally. Visual grading analysis of the resultant images demonstrated significant improvements in overall image quality and visualisation of specific anatomical features for the cranially facing anode compared with the alternative position, which were most pronounced for the 1st to 4th and 9th to 12th vertebrae. These improvements were evident at 70, 81 and 90 kVp, but not for the higher beam energies. The results demonstrate that correct positioning of the X-ray tube can improve image quality for thoracic radiology at specific tube potentials. Further work is ongoing to investigate whether this easy to implement and cost-free technique can be employed for other examinations.

  19. An Achilles' Heel in an Amyloidogenic Protein and Its Repair

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanwu; Petkova, Aneta; Huang, Kun; Xu, Bin; Hua, Qing-xin; Ye, I-Ju; Chu, Ying-Chi; Hu, Shi-Quan; Phillips, Nelson B.; Whittaker, Jonathan; Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz; Mackin, Robert B.; Katsoyannis, Panayotis G.; Tycko, Robert; Weiss, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Insulin fibrillation provides a model for a broad class of amyloidogenic diseases. Conformational distortion of the native monomer leads to aggregation-coupled misfolding. Whereas ?-cells are protected from proteotoxicity by hexamer assembly, fibrillation limits the storage and use of insulin at elevated temperatures. Here, we have investigated conformational distortions of an engineered insulin monomer in relation to the structure of an insulin fibril. Anomalous 13C NMR chemical shifts and rapid 15N-detected 1H-2H amide-proton exchange were observed in one of the three classical ?-helices (residues A1–A8) of the hormone, suggesting a conformational equilibrium between locally folded and unfolded A-chain segments. Whereas hexamer assembly resolves these anomalies in accordance with its protective role, solid-state 13C NMR studies suggest that the A-chain segment participates in a fibril-specific ?-sheet. Accordingly, we investigated whether helicogenic substitutions in the A1–A8 segment might delay fibrillation. Simultaneous substitution of three ?-branched residues (IleA2 ? Leu, ValA3 ? Leu, and ThrA8 ? His) yielded an analog with reduced thermodynamic stability but marked resistance to fibrillation. Whereas amide-proton exchange in the A1–A8 segment remained rapid, 13C? chemical shifts exhibited a more helical pattern. This analog is essentially without activity, however, as IleA2 and ValA3 define conserved receptor contacts. To obtain active analogs, substitutions were restricted to A8. These analogs exhibit high receptor-binding affinity; representative potency in a rodent model of diabetes mellitus was similar to wild-type insulin. Although 13C? chemical shifts remain anomalous, significant protection from fibrillation is retained. Together, our studies define an “Achilles' heel” in a globular protein whose repair may enhance the stability of pharmaceutical formulations and broaden their therapeutic deployment in the developing world. PMID:20106984

  20. Plantar fasciitis – to jab or to support? A systematic review of the current best evidence

    PubMed Central

    Uden, Hayley; Boesch, Eva; Kumar, Saravana

    2011-01-01

    Background: Plantar fasciitis is a common condition routinely managed by podiatrists in the community and is widely treated conservatively. Two commonly used treatments for plantar fasciitis are customized functional foot orthoses and corticosteroid injections. While common to clinical practice, the evidence base underpinning these treatment strategies is unknown. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review was to assess the effectiveness and safety of customized functional foot orthoses and corticosteroid injections in the treatment of plantar fasciitis. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted. Experimental studies, in English, from 1998 to 2010 were accepted for inclusion in this review. The PEDro quality assessment tool and the National Health and Medical Research Council’s hierarchy of evidence were used to assess the quality of the included studies. Results: Six randomized controlled trials which met the selection criteria were included in this review. Four reported on customized functional foot orthoses and 2 on corticosteroid injections. Current best available evidence highlights that both customized functional foot orthoses and corticosteroid injections can lead to a decrease in pain associated with plantar fasciitis. Additionally, customized functional foot orthoses may also provide an additional benefit in terms of increased functional ability in patients with plantar fasciitis. Corticosteroid injections may have side effects, especially pain (from the injection). Conclusion: Both customized functional foot orthoses and corticosteroid injections can lead to reduction in pain associated with plantar fasciitis. While customized functional foot orthoses may increase the functional outcomes in patients with plantar fasciitis, corticosteroid injections may have side effects (especially pain as a result of the injection), which may limit its acceptability. PMID:21655342

  1. The influence of a yacht's heeling stability on optimum sail design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneyd, A. D.; Sugimoto, T.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents fundamental results concerning the optimum design of yacht sails and masts. The aerodynamics of a high aspect ratio sail in uniform flow is analysed using lifting line theory to maximise thrust for a given sail area. The novel feature of this work is that thrust is optimised subject to the constraint that the aerodynamic heeling moment generated by the sail is balanced by the righting moment due to hull buoyancy (and the weight of the keel). Initially, the heel angle is therefore unknown, and determined as part of the solution process. Under the assumption of small heel angle, the problem reduces to minimising a quadratic form in the Fourier coefficients for the circulation distribution along the mast, and a simple analytic solution can be derived. It is found that if the mast is too high, the upper section is unused, and as a consequence there is a theoretically ideal mast height for a yacht of given heeling stability. Under the constraints of given sail area and heeling equilibrium it is found that no advantage is to be gained by allowing reverse circulation near the top of the mast. Various implications for yacht performance are discussed.

  2. Quantification of tritium ``heels`` and isotope exchange mechanisms in La-Ni-Al tritides

    SciTech Connect

    Wermer, J.R.

    1992-07-27

    Formation of tritium heels in LANA (LaNi{sub 5-x}Al{sub x}) 0.30 (x=0.30) and 0.75 tritides was quantified; size of the heel is dependent on storage and processing conditions. Absorption-desorption cycling of the tritide beds mitigates formation of the tritium heel and can reduce its size. The higher pressure material LANA 0.30 showed slower heel formation than LANA 0.75; this allows more tritium to be removed at the maximum processing temperature. In plant application, LANA 0.30 beds are used as compressors; except during compressor operation, their aging will be very slow. Tritium heel removal by D exchange was demonstrated. Absorption-desorption cycling during an exchange cycle does not improve the exchange efficiency. Residual tritium can be removed to very low levels. For a tritide bed scheduled for removal from the process, a final tritium level can be estimated based on the number of D exchange cycles. 13 refs, 8 figs, 6 tabs.

  3. The use of a heel-mounted accelerometer as an adjunct measure of slip distance.

    PubMed

    McGorry, Raymond W; DiDomenico, Angela; Chang, Chien-Chi

    2007-05-01

    A human-centered measure of floor slipperiness could be useful as an adjunct to conventional tribologic measures. This paper reports on the development and evaluation of a measure of slip distance based on variables derived from the signal of a heel-mounted accelerometer. Twenty-one participants walked on a laboratory runway under several surface slipperiness conditions at three walking speeds during a protocol designed to produce a wide range of slip distances at heel strike. Analysis of variance showed significant effects of slip distance (no-slip, micro-slip and slide), walking speed (1.52, 1.78 and 2.13 m/s) and their interactions on peak forward acceleration, peak vertical acceleration and deceleration time of the heel following heel strike in 704 trials. Regression analysis of slip distance and deceleration time showed the strongest relationship with R2=0.511. Large individual variation in the strength of this relationship was observed. The heel-mounted accelerometer may have utility as an adjunct measure in the evaluation of floor slipperiness, particularly for field applications where direct measurement may not be feasible. PMID:16806040

  4. Biomechanics of longitudinal arch support mechanisms in foot orthoses and their effect on plantar aponeurosis strain.

    PubMed

    Kogler, G F; Solomonidis, S E; Paul, J P

    1996-07-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this investigation was to quantify the longitudinal arch support properties of several types of foot orthosis. DESIGN: An in vitro method that simulated 'static stance' was used to determine arch support capabilities, with plantar aponeurosis strain implemented as the performance measure. BACKGROUND: A longitudinal arch support mechanism of an orthosis resists depression of the foot's arches by transferring a portion of the load to the medial structures of the foot. Since the plantar aponeurosis is in tension when the foot is loaded, a quantifiable decrease in strain should occur with an adequate orthotic arch control mechanism. METHODS: A differential variable reluctance transducer was surgically implanted in the plantar aponeurosis of cadaveric donor limb feet (n = 7). Each specimen was mounted in an electromechanical test machine which applied a load of up to 900 N axially to the tibia. The test schedule was divided into seven test conditions: specimen barefoot; specimen with shoe and specimen with shoe and five different orthoses. RESULTS: The University of California Biomechanics Laboratory Shoe Insert and two other foot orthoses significantly decreased the strain in the plantar aponeurosis compared to the barefoot control and were considered effective arch supports (P < 0.05). The functional foot orthosis, stock orthosis, and test shoe did not effectively reduce plantar aponeurosis strain. Significant variations of time required to achieve the specified load levels were recorded among the test conditions, indicating the relative cushioning properties of the shoe/orthosis systems. CONCLUSIONS: The patterns of plantar aponeurosis strain observed in cadaveric tests suggest that certain types of orthoses are more effective than others in the support of the foot's longitudinal arches. It is suggested that to support the longitudinal arches of the foot effectively the medial surface contours of the orthosis must stabilize the apical bony structure of the foot's arch. RELEVANCE: Reducing tension in the plantar aponeurosis is an important treatment objective for orthotic management of plantar fasciitis. Therefore it is of great clinical interest to know whether the longitudinal arch support mechanism of specific foot orthoses have benefits with respect to the loading of the plantar aponeurosis. PMID:11415628

  5. Effect of Different Forefoot and Heel Support Surfaces on the Activities of the RF and HAM Muscles during the Sit-to-stand Task while Wearing High-heel Shoes.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2014-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to show the effect of different forefoot and heel support surfaces on the activities of the rectus femoris and medial hamstring muscles during the sit-to-stand task while wearing high-heel shoes. [Subjects] Fifteen female subjects were recruited. [Methods] The muscle activities of the rectus femoris and hamstring muscles were recorded using an MP150 system during the sit-to-stand task while wearing various high-heeled shoes. [Results] The activities of the rectus femoris and medial hamstring muscles significantly decreased when subjects wore condition 1 shoes compared with when they wore condition 2, 3 or 4 high-heeled shoes. The activities of the rectus femoris and medial hamstring muscles significantly decreased when subjects wore condition 2 high-heeled shoes compared with condition 3 or 4 high-heeled shoes. [Conclusion] The results can be interpreted as indicating that the size of the forefoot supporting surface can influence the lower extremity muscles of women wearing high-heeled shoes more than the size of the heel supporting surface. PMID:25364105

  6. Foot posture, range of motion and plantar pressure characteristics in obese and non-obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Paul A; Urquhart, Donna M; Landorf, Karl B; Wluka, Anita E; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Menz, Hylton B

    2015-02-01

    Obesity is a world-wide health problem and is strongly associated with musculoskeletal disorders of the lower limb. The aim of this study was to evaluate plantar loading patterns in obese and non-obese individuals, while accounting for the contribution of foot structure, range of motion and walking speed. Sixty-eight participants (mean±SD age, 52.6±8.0 years), including 47 females (69%), underwent assessments of body mass index, foot pain and foot structure. Plantar pressures were also obtained, using a floor-mounted resistive sensor mat system. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine which variables were most strongly associated with plantar loading patterns. Obese individuals exhibited flatter feet, reduced inversion-eversion range of motion, and higher peak plantar pressures when walking. After accounting for foot structure and walking speed, bodyweight was found to be significantly associated with elevated loading of the foot, particularly the forefoot and midfoot. These findings suggest that obesity increases the stresses applied to the foot directly, via increased bodyweight, and indirectly, via alterations to foot structure, which may partly explain the link between obesity and the development of foot pain. Clinicians dealing with foot problems should consider the effect of increased bodyweight on plantar loading in obese patients. PMID:25482032

  7. Reconstruction of Ankle and Heel Defects with Peroneal Artery Perforator-Based Pedicled Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Deok Ki; Lew, Dae Hyun; Roh, Tai Suk

    2015-01-01

    Background The reconstruction of ankle and heel defects remains a significant problem for plastic surgeons. The following options exist for reconstructing such defects: local random flaps, reverse flow island flaps, and free flaps. However, each of these methods has certain drawbacks. Peroneal artery perforators have many advantages; in particular, they are predictable and reliable for ankle and heel reconstructions. In this study, we report our clinical experience with peroneal artery perforator-based pedicled flaps in ankle and heel reconstructions. Methods From July 2005 to October 2012, 12 patients underwent the reconstruction of soft tissue defects in the ankle and heel using a peroneal artery perforator-based pedicled flap. These 12 cases were classified according to the anatomical area involved. The cause of the wound, comorbidities, flap size, operative results, and complications were analyzed through retrospective chart review. Results The mean age of the patients was 52.4 years. The size of the flaps ranged from 5×4 to 20×8 cm2. The defects were classified into two groups based on whether they occurred in the Achilles tendon (n=9) or heel pad (n=3). In all 12 patients, complete flap survival was achieved without significant complications; however, two patients experienced minor wound dehiscence. Nevertheless, these wounds healed in response to subsequent debridement and conservative management. No patient had any functional deficits of the lower extremities. Conclusions Peroneal artery perforator-based pedicled flaps were found to be a useful option for the reconstruction of soft tissue defects of the ankle and heel. PMID:26430635

  8. The Effects of Wearing High Heels while Pressing a Car Accelerator Pedal on Lower Extremity Muscle Activation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jaemin; Lee, Sang-yeol

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of wearing high heels while driving on lower extremity muscle activation. [Subjects] The subjects of this experimental study were 14 healthy women in their 20s who normally wear shoes with high heels. [Methods] The subjects were asked to place their shoes on an accelerator pedal with the heel touching the floor and then asked to press the pedal with as much pressure as possible for 3 seconds before removing their feet from the pedal. A total of 3 measurements were taken for each heel height (flat, 5?cm, 7?cm), and the heel height was randomly selected. [Results] The levels of muscle activity, indicated as the percentage of reference voluntary contraction, for gastrocnemius muscle in the flat, 5?cm, and 7?cm shoes were 180.8±61.8%, 285.4±122.3%, and 366.2±193.7%, respectively, and there were significant differences between groups. Those for the soleus muscle were 477.3±209.2%, 718.8±380.5%, and 882.4±509.9%, and there were significant differences between groups. [Conclusion] To summarize the results of this study, it was found that female drivers require greater lower extremity muscle activation when wearing high heels than when wearing low heels. Furthermore, instability and muscle fatigue of the ankle joint, which results from wearing high heels on a daily basis, could also occur while driving. PMID:25435684

  9. The Effects of Wearing High Heels while Pressing a Car Accelerator Pedal on Lower Extremity Muscle Activation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaemin; Lee, Sang-Yeol

    2014-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of wearing high heels while driving on lower extremity muscle activation. [Subjects] The subjects of this experimental study were 14 healthy women in their 20s who normally wear shoes with high heels. [Methods] The subjects were asked to place their shoes on an accelerator pedal with the heel touching the floor and then asked to press the pedal with as much pressure as possible for 3 seconds before removing their feet from the pedal. A total of 3 measurements were taken for each heel height (flat, 5?cm, 7?cm), and the heel height was randomly selected. [Results] The levels of muscle activity, indicated as the percentage of reference voluntary contraction, for gastrocnemius muscle in the flat, 5?cm, and 7?cm shoes were 180.8±61.8%, 285.4±122.3%, and 366.2±193.7%, respectively, and there were significant differences between groups. Those for the soleus muscle were 477.3±209.2%, 718.8±380.5%, and 882.4±509.9%, and there were significant differences between groups. [Conclusion] To summarize the results of this study, it was found that female drivers require greater lower extremity muscle activation when wearing high heels than when wearing low heels. Furthermore, instability and muscle fatigue of the ankle joint, which results from wearing high heels on a daily basis, could also occur while driving. PMID:25435684

  10. Occurrence, Characterization and Synthesis of Hanford and SRS Tank Heel Materials

    SciTech Connect

    KRUMHANSL, JAMES L.

    2002-07-01

    The long-range objective of this study was to develop chemically assisted technologies for removing heels from tanks. In FY 01, the first two steps toward this objective were taken: (1) catalogue the occurrence and nature of tank heels and assess which materials are available for study and (2) develop methods for synthesizing non-radioactive surrogate heel materials for use in testing potential removal technologies. The chief finding of Task 1 was the existence of ''heels'', depending on the definition used. Hard materials that would be almost impossible to remove by sluicing are all but absent from the records of both Savannah River and Hanford. Historical usage suggests that the term ''heel'' may also apply to chunky, granular, or semi-solid pasty accumulations. These materials are documented and may also be difficult to remove by conventional sluicing technologies. Such heels may be comprised of normal sludge components, dominantly iron and aluminum hydroxides, or they may result from added materials which were not part of the normal fuel reprocessing operations: Portland cement, diatomaceous earth, sand and soil and spent zeolite ion exchange ''resins''. The occurrence and chemistry of the most notable ''heel'', that of the zeolite mass in Tank 19F at Savannah River, is reviewed in some detail. Secondly, no clear correlation was found between high tank temperatures and difficulties encountered in removing materials from a tank at a later date; nor did the sludges from these tanks give any indication of being particularly solid. Experimental studies to develop synthetic heel materials were caned out using a number of different approaches. For normal sludge materials settling, even when assisted by a centrifuge, it proved ineffective. The same result was obtained from drying sludge samples. Even exposing sludges to a molten salt melt at 233 C, only produced a fine powder, rather than a resilient ceramic which resisted disaggregation. A cohesive material, however, was produced by wicking the pore fluid out of a sludge gel (into packed diatomaceous earth), while simultaneously applying pressure to compact the sludge as it dehydrated. Osmotic gradients could provide the same function as the capillary forces provided by the diatomaceous earth sorbant placed in contact with the sludge. Tests on the anomalous materials added to the tanks all indicated potential problems. Hard granules, and maybe chunks, may be encountered where Portland cement was added to a tank. Sand, spent zeolite resin, and diatomaceous earth, will all react with the tank fluids to produce a sodalite/cancrinite material. The degree of reaction determines whether the grains become cemented together. SRS activities showed that heels formed when spent zeolites were added to tanks can be readily dislodged and it is expected that heels from sand would possess equal or less cohesion. Diatomaceous earth may form more resilient crusts or masses. To summarize, the existence of ''hard'' heels has yet to be documented. A broader definition suggests inclusion of poorly cohesive cancrinite-cemented masses and dense past-like accumulations of abnormally compacted ''normal'' sludges. Chemical treatments to remove these materials must focus on agents that are active against aluminosilicates and hydrous oxides of iron and aluminum. Exploiting the high pore-water content of these materials may provide a second avenue for dislodging such accumulations. Techniques were developed to produce synthetic sludges on which various removal technologies could be tried.

  11. [Mobile phone platform for wireless monitoring of human dynamic plantar pressure].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Han, Meng; Liu, Jing

    2010-11-01

    This paper constructed a plantar pressure sensing system based on Bluetooth communication of mobile phone with embedded Windows Mobile system. With the MCU (Microprocessor Control Unit) and Bluetooth module, the pressure sensor and the data acquisition circuit was designed and integrated, with software developed under Visual Studio 2008 environment. The real-time monitoring of human dynamic plantar pressure signal, and transferring, displaying and storing the recorded data on a mobile phone were achieved. This method offers an important measure to acquire human gait information via a pervasive and low cost way. PMID:21360974

  12. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ISOTONIC PLANTAR FLEXOR ENDURANCE, NAVICULAR DROP, AND EXERCISE-RELATED LEG PAIN IN A COHORT OF COLLEGIATE CROSS-COUNTRY RUNNERS

    PubMed Central

    Reinking, Mark F.; Rauh, Mitchell J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between isotonic ankle plantar flexor endurance (PFE), foot pronation as measured by navicular drop, and exercise-related leg pain (ERLP). Background: Exercise-related leg pain is a common occurrence in competitive and recreational runners. The identification of factors contributing to the development of ERLP may help guide methods for the prevention and management of overuse injuries. Methods: Seventy-seven (44 males, 33 females) competitive runners from five collegiate cross-country (XC) teams consented to participate in the study. Isotonic ankle PFE and foot pronation were measured using the standing heel-rise and navicular drop (ND) tests, respectively. Demographic information, anthropometric measurements, and ERLP history were also recorded. Subjects were then prospectively tracked for occurrence of ERLP during the 2009 intercollegiate cross-country season. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to examine the relationships between isotonic ankle joint PFE and ND and the occurrence of ERLP. Results: While no significant differences were identified for isotonic ankle PFE between groups of collegiate XC runners with and without ERLP, runners with a ND >10 mm were almost 7 times (OR=6.6, 95% CI=1.2–38.0) more likely to incur medial ERLP than runners with ND <10 mm. Runners with a history of ERLP in the month previous to the start of the XC season were 12 times (OR=12.3, 95% CI=3.1–48.9) more likely to develop an in-season occurrence of ERLP. Conclusion: While PFE did not appear to be a risk factor in the development of ERLP in this group of collegiate XC runners, those with a ND greater than 10 mm may be at greater odds of incurring medial ERLP. Level of Evidence: 2b. PMID:22666641

  13. Biochemical response to chronic shortening in unloaded soleus muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaspers, S. R.; Fagan, J. M.; Tischler, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    One leg of tail-casted suspended rats was immobilized in a plantar-flexed position to test whether chronic shortening of posterior leg muscles affected the metabolic response to unloading. The immobilized plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles of these animals showed approximately 20 percent loss of muscle mass in contrast to simply a slower growth rate with unloading. Loss of mass of the soleus muscle during suspension was not accentuated by chronic shortening. Although protein degradation in the isolated soleus muscle of the plantar-flexed limb was slightly faster than in the contralateral free limb, this difference was offset by faster synthesis of the myofibrillar protein fraction of the chronically shortened muscle. Total adenine nucleotides were 17 percent lower (P less than 0.005) in the chronically shortened soleus muscle following incubation. Glutamate, glutamine, and alanine metabolism showed little response to chronic shortening. These results suggest that, in the soleus muscle, chronic shortening did not alter significantly the metabolic responses to unloading and reduced activity.

  14. Bilateral heel pain in a patient with Diamond-Blackfan anaemia.

    PubMed

    Charles, Loren T R; Mehdi, Adil M S; Baker, Dennis; Edwards, Max R

    2015-06-01

    A rare case of bilateral calcaneal stress fractures in a patient with Diamond-Blackfan anaemia is described. This has not been previously reported in the literature. A calcaneal stress fracture is an important differential diagnosis in a patient presenting with heel pain. Bilaterality of symptoms should not exclude this diagnosis and clinicians should be especially vigilant with predisposed patients. PMID:26004126

  15. Feasibility of Quantitative Ultrasound Measurement of the Heel Bone in People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mergler, S.; Lobker, B.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Penning, C.

    2010-01-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) and fractures are common in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Reduced mobility in case of motor impairment and the use of anti-epileptic drugs contribute to the development of low BMD. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measurement of the heel bone is a non-invasive and radiation-free method for measuring bone…

  16. 200 Years of History 1815-2015 On the heels of the Revolutionary War our fledgling

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    1 #12;2 200 Years of History 1815-2015 On the heels of the Revolutionary War our fledgling nation would find itself again at war in 1812 with the superpower of that time, Great Britain. As in our first war with Great Britain, the outcome was uncertain and potential costs were great. In our lifetime we

  17. The mechanical characteristics of the human heel pad during foot strike in running: an in vivo cineradiographic study.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, D; Aerts, P; Kunnen, M

    1994-10-01

    The compressive properties of the heel pad during the heel strike when running (barefoot and shod, two subjects, 4.5 m s-1) were studied by means of a high-speed two-dimensional cineradiographic registration (150 frames s-1) of an actual running step. Vertical ground reaction forces were measured with a force platform. In barefoot running the heel pad deforms to a maximal percentage deformation of 60.5 +/- 5.5%. In shod running the heel pad deforms only 35.5 +/- 2.5% and the nonlinear force-deformation relationship reflects an increasing stiffness when deformation rises. Although the amplitudes of the vertical ground reaction forces do not differ notably in both conditions, barefoot running implies a maximal deformation to the fatty heel tissue, reducing its functional role from shock reduction towards local protection of the heel bone. It is argued that embedding the foot in a well-fitting shoe increases the effective stiffness of the heel pad. PMID:7962009

  18. Rearfoot alignment and medial longitudinal arch configurations of runners with symptoms and histories of plantar fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Ana Paula; Trombini-Souza, Francis; Tessutti, Vitor; Lima, Fernanda Rodrigues; de Camargo Neves Sacco, Isabel; João, Sílvia Maria Amado

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate and compare rearfoot alignment and medial longitudinal arch index during static postures in runners, with and without symptoms and histories of plantar fasciitis (PF). INTRODUCTION: PF is the third most common injury in runners but, so far, its etiology remains unclear. In the literature, rearfoot misalignment and conformations of the longitudinal plantar arch have been described as risk factors for the development of PF. However, in most of the investigated literature, the results are still controversial, mainly regarding athletic individuals and the effects of pain associated with these injuries. METHODS: Forty-five runners with plantar fasciitis (30 symptomatic and 15 with previous histories of injuries) and 60 controls were evaluated. Pain was assessed by a visual analogue scale. The assessment of rearfoot alignment and the calculations of the arch index were performed by digital photographic images. RESULTS: There were observed similarities between the three groups regarding the misalignments of the rearfoot valgus. The medial longitudinal arches were more elevated in the group with symptoms and histories of PF, compared to the control runners. CONCLUSIONS: Runners with symptoms or histories of PF did not differ in rearfoot valgus misalignments, but showed increases in the longitudinal plantar arch during bipedal static stance, regardless of the presence of pain symptoms. PMID:21808870

  19. In-Shoe Plantar Pressures and Ground Reaction Forces during Overweight Adults' Overground Walking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Castro, Marcelo P.; Abreu, Sofia C.; Sousa, Helena; Machado, Leandro; Santos, Rubim; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Because walking is highly recommended for prevention and treatment of obesity and some of its biomechanical aspects are not clearly understood for overweight people, we compared the absolute and normalized ground reaction forces (GRF), plantar pressures, and temporal parameters of normal-weight and overweight participants during…

  20. Light-Emitting Diode Versus Sham in the Treatment of Plantar Fasciitis: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Paul E.; Hews, Katherine; Windon, Lowell; Chasse, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this preliminary study was to compare the application of the light emitting diode (LED) to sham LED in the treatment of plantar fasciitis. Methods Eighteen subjects met the inclusion criteria and were randomly assigned into 2 groups: light emitting diode or sham LED. The subjects received either the LED at 12 J/cm2 or sham LED along 2 points of the plantar fascia. Subjects in both groups received a 10 minute transverse friction massage and participated in 4 plantar fascia stretching exercises. All subjects received a total of 6 treatments over 3 weeks. Progress was assessed using the lower extremity functional and analog pain scale. Results No significant difference was found between treatment groups (P = .845). There was a significant difference in pain and outcome scores over time within both groups (P < .35). Conclusion Among patients with plantar fasciitis, the use of LED did not result in greater improvement in function or pain compared with sham treatment. The findings suggest that manual intervention and passive stretching activities may have provided significant pain relief and improvement in functional outcome scores. PMID:26644784

  1. Stresses in the plantar region for long- and short-range throws in women basketball players.

    PubMed

    Pau, Massimiliano; Ciuti, Carla

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess plantar pressure pattern modifications caused by short- and long-distance shots in women basketball players. To this end, 24 experienced national- and regional-level basketball players performed 3 trials of 4 technical gestures (free throw, jump stop shot, three-point shot and lay-up) barefoot on a pressure platform placed in fixed positions on the court. Raw data were processed to calculate location and magnitude of pressure peaks in three sub-regions (forefoot, midfoot and rearfoot), and the increase ratio was calculated relative to plantar pressure measured during a static bipedal and unipedal upright stance. The results showed significant increases (p<0.001) in plantar pressure peaks in forefoot (but not midfoot and rearfoot) for all the gestures that involved the use of both legs. Particularly large increases were detected for the three-point shot. All three sub-regions underwent significant changes of the pressure peak in the case of lay-up (forefoot and rearfoot: p<0.001, midfoot: p=0.002). The high levels of contact stress detected for routinely performed technical gestures suggest that a detailed knowledge of changes in the physiological patterns of plantar stresses that take place during play is crucial in reducing the risk of foot injuries and establishing proper training and rehabilitation protocols. PMID:24050476

  2. ABSTRACTS 219 analysis of plantar pressure data (pSPM). Using

    E-print Network

    Muehlenbein, Michael

    ABSTRACTS 219 analysis of plantar pressure data (pSPM). Using a Holocene footprint site from to variability in footprint morphology within and between trails, especially when interpreting sites water. Comparing these two sites is critical to understanding the transition in foot anatomy and gait

  3. Use of the inverted “T” incision to approach a plantar nodular lesion*

    PubMed Central

    Sampaio, Felipe Maurício Soeiro; Gualberto, Gustavo Vieira; de Souza, Paulo Roberto Cotrim; Lourenço, Fabrício Tinoco; de Cerqueira, Fernando Gustavo Mósca

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the inverted "T" incision - used in plastic, oncologic and orthopedic surgery - has allowed its adaptation for the diagnostic assessment and therapeutical approach of acral, nodular lesions. The authors describe the use of this technique for the surgical approach of a patient with a plantar nodular lesion, further diagnosed as a calcified angioleiomyoma. PMID:25672316

  4. Proportional EMG Control of Ankle Plantar Flexion in a Powered Transtibial Prosthesis

    E-print Network

    Herr, Hugh

    Proportional EMG Control of Ankle Plantar Flexion in a Powered Transtibial Prosthesis Jing Wang amputees, it has recently been shown that knee load on the leading, intact limb decreases as powered on the leading, intact knee are believed to be causative of knee osteoarthritis, a leading secondary impairment

  5. Dynamic plantar loading index: understanding the benefit of custom foot orthoses for painful pes cavus.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Bijan; Barnica, Elizabeth; Wrobel, James S; Burns, Joshua

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a new method showing how custom foot orthoses (CFO) improve dynamics of plantar loading. The method is based on the probability distribution of peak pressure time series and is quantified using the Regression Factor (RF). RF is a least square regression slope between the experimentally observed plantar pressure magnitude probability distribution and a modeled Gaussian shape. Plantar pressure data from a randomized controlled trial of 154 participants with painful Pes Cavus were retrospectively re-analyzed. The participants were randomized to an active treatment group given CFO or a control group given sham orthoses. The location of 2(nd) Peak pressure as a percentage of stance time (P(Loc2)) and its magnitude (P(M2)) was also calculated. In addition, plantar pressure data were collected on 23 healthy volunteers with normal foot alignment and no foot pain. Results demonstrated Pes Cavus had a significantly lower RF than healthy participants (0.30 v. 0.51; p<10(-7)). P(M2) was reduced in both active and control groups. However, RF and the P(Loc2) were only changed in the active group (p<0.005) without any significant change in the control group (p>0.5). This study suggests that painful Pes Cavus alters the shape of probability distribution of plantar loading during walking and CFO are an effective therapeutic solution that can significantly improve it. Further use of the RF index and 2(nd) peak pressure location as an outcome measure for treatment of foot and ankle deformities is suggested. PMID:22516856

  6. EM-31 RETRIEVAL KNOWLEDGE CENTER MEETING REPORT: MOBILIZE AND DISLODGE TANK WASTE HEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Fellinger, A.

    2010-02-16

    The Retrieval Knowledge Center sponsored a meeting in June 2009 to review challenges and gaps to retrieval of tank waste heels. The facilitated meeting was held at the Savannah River Research Campus with personnel broadly representing tank waste retrieval knowledge at Hanford, Savannah River, Idaho, and Oak Ridge. This document captures the results of this meeting. In summary, it was agreed that the challenges to retrieval of tank waste heels fell into two broad categories: (1) mechanical heel waste retrieval methodologies and equipment and (2) understanding and manipulating the heel waste (physical, radiological, and chemical characteristics) to support retrieval options and subsequent processing. Recent successes and lessons from deployments of the Sand and Salt Mantis vehicles as well as retrieval of C-Area tanks at Hanford were reviewed. Suggestions to address existing retrieval approaches that utilize a limited set of tools and techniques are included in this report. The meeting found that there had been very little effort to improve or integrate the multiple proven or new techniques and tools available into a menu of available methods for rapid insertion into baselines. It is recommended that focused developmental efforts continue in the two areas underway (low-level mixing evaluation and pumping slurries with large solid materials) and that projects to demonstrate new/improved tools be launched to outfit tank farm operators with the needed tools to complete tank heel retrievals effectively and efficiently. This document describes the results of a meeting held on June 3, 2009 at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina to identify technology gaps and potential technology solutions to retrieving high-level waste (HLW) heels from waste tanks within the complex of sites run by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). The meeting brought together personnel with extensive tank waste retrieval knowledge from DOE's four major waste sites - Hanford, Savannah River, Idaho, and Oak Ridge. The meeting was arranged by the Retrieval Knowledge Center (RKC), which is a technology development project sponsored by the Office of Technology Innovation & Development - formerly the Office of Engineering and Technology - within the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM).

  7. Impact of heel effect and ROI size on the determination of contrast-to-noise ratio for digital mammography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsager, Abdulaziz; Young, Kenneth C.; Oduko, Jennifer M.

    2008-03-01

    The European Guidelines for quality control in digital mammography specify a procedure for measuring contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) using a 0.2mm thickness of aluminium with different thicknesses of Plexiglas. The relationship between ROI size and heel effect and how this affects CNR measurement is investigated in this work for DR and CR systems. The measured relative noise for the CR images was found to be strongly dependant on the ROI size due to the heel effect. After applying heel effect correction there was very little dependence on ROI size. The relative noise in the images from the DR system showed very little dependence on ROI size. The heel effect also distorted the CNR measurement on CR images when larger ROI is used. However the use of multiple small ROIs led to a result that was essentially the same as if a heel effect correction had been applied. The appropriate ROI size which should be used for CNR measurement was found to be 0.25 × 0.25 cm. Using this size the heel effect had an insignificant impact on the measurement of relative noise and CNR. This approach has the advantage that only a single image is required for each measurement. The application of heel effect correction with CR systems requires two images and complex image processing. The current suggestion in the European guidelines to use a 2 × 2cm ROI is inappropriate for CR systems and leads to an error of 8% to 18% in CNR determination due to the heel effect.

  8. Management of pain from heel stick in neonates: an analysis of research conducted in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Prasopkittikun, Tassanee; Tilokskulchai, Fongcum

    2003-01-01

    The heel stick procedure is the most common painful procedure performed in preterm and full-term neonates. Various nonpharmacologic interventions have been used for pain relief. However, the magnitude of the effect of different interventions has received little attention. In this study, 4 eligible studies conducted in Thailand, focusing on the effects of interventions on pain responses to heel stick procedure in neonates, were obtained for analysis. Swaddling in full-term newborns was found to have the largest mean effect size (dmn = 0.79). However, the moderate-to-large effect sizes (dmn = 0.5-0.75) of positioning in preterm newborns tended to exist throughout the poststick period while the effect sizes of other interventions decreased over time. The effect sizes of these interventions for physiological responses varied. PMID:14655790

  9. Testing the proficiency to distinguish locations with elevated plantar pressure within and between professional groups of foot therapists

    PubMed Central

    Guldemond, Nick A; Leffers, Pieter; Nieman, Fred HM; Sanders, Antal P; Schaper, Nicolaas C; Walenkamp, Geert HIM

    2006-01-01

    Background Identification of locations with elevated plantar pressures is important in daily foot care for patients with rheumatoid arthritis, metatarsalgia and diabetes. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the proficiency of podiatrists, pedorthists and orthotists, to distinguish locations with elevated plantar pressure in patients with metatarsalgia. Methods Ten podiatrists, ten pedorthists and ten orthotists working in The Netherlands were asked to identify locations with excessively high plantar pressure in three patients with forefoot complaints. Therapists were instructed to examine the patients according to the methods used in their everyday clinical practice. Regions could be marked through hatching an illustration of a plantar aspect. A pressure sensitive platform was used to quantify the dynamic bare foot plantar pressures and was considered as 'Gold Standard' (GS). A pressure higher than 700 kPa was used as cut-off criterion for categorizing peak pressure into elevated or non-elevated pressure. This was done for both patient's feet and six separate forefoot regions: big toe and metatarsal one to five. Data were analysed by a mixed-model ANOVA and Generalizability Theory. Results The proportions elevated/non-elevated pressure regions, based on clinical ratings of the therapists, show important discrepancies with the criterion values obtained through quantitative plantar pressure measurement. In general, plantar pressures in the big toe region were underrated and those in the metatarsal regions were overrated. The estimated method agreement on clinical judgement of plantar pressures with the GS was below an acceptable level: i.e. all intraclass correlation coefficient's equal or smaller than .60. The inter-observer agreement for each discipline demonstrated worrisome results: all below .18. The estimated mutual agreements showed that there was virtually no mutual agreement between the professional groups studied. Conclusion Identification of elevated plantar pressure through clinical evaluation is difficult, insufficient and may be potentially harmful. The process of clinical plantar pressure screening has to be re-evaluated. The results of this study point towards the merit of quantitative plantar pressure measurement for clinical practice. PMID:17140435

  10. The Effects of Lower Extremity Angle According to Heel-height Changes in Young Ladies in Their 20s during Gait.

    PubMed

    Lee, ChangRyeol

    2014-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of heel-height changes on the low joint angles of the lower extremities of women in their 20s during gait. [Subjects and Methods] Qualisys Track Manager Software ver. 2.8 (Qualisys, Sweden) was used to perform measurements on 14 female university students in their 20s. To measure movements, the subjects were asked to walk while wearing high-heeled shoes and reflective stickers on their hip joints, knee joints, and ankle joints, the changes in joint angles were measured at heel strike, foot flat, and toe off. [Results] Analysis of the amount of change according to heel height changes during gait showed that the angle of the hip joints was reduced with an increase in heel-height. Although the changes were not significant, the angle of the knee joints was reduced during heel strike, foot flat, and midstance, and it was increased during toe off. In contrast, the angle of the ankle joints was increased by a significant amount during heel strike, foot flat, midstance, and toe off. [Conclusions] During gait with high heels, the movements of the lower extremities of women in their 20s were reduced significantly with an increase in heel height. Therefore, it is concluded that the restrictions on gait can only be reduced by wearing low-heeled shoes. PMID:25140096

  11. Ability to perform a single heel-rise is significantly related to patient-reported outcome after Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Olsson, N; Karlsson, J; Eriksson, B I; Brorsson, A; Lundberg, M; Silbernagel, K G

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluated the short-term recovery of function after an acute Achilles tendon rupture, measured by a single-legged heel-rise test, with main emphasis on the relation to the patient-reported outcomes and fear of physical activity and movement (kinesiophobia). Eighty-one patients treated surgically or non-surgically with early active rehabilitation after Achilles tendon rupture were included in the study. Patient's ability to perform a single-legged heel-rise, physical activity level, patient-reported symptoms, general health, and kinesiophobia was evaluated 12 weeks after the injury. The heel-rise test showed that 40 out of 81 (49%) patients were unable to perform a single heel-rise 12 weeks after the injury. We found that patients who were able to perform a heel-rise were significantly younger, more often of male gender, reported a lesser degree of symptoms, and also had a higher degree of physical activity at 12 weeks. There was also a significant negative correlation between kinesiophobia and all the patient-reported outcomes and the physical activity level. The heel-rise ability appears to be an important early achievement and reflects the general level of healing, which influences patient-reported outcome and physical activity. Future treatment protocols focusing on regaining strength early after the injury therefore seem to be of great importance. Kinesiophobia needs to be addressed early during the rehabilitation process. PMID:22716232

  12. Effects of low-dye taping on plantar pressure pre and post exercise: an exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Damien; Kennedy, Norelee

    2009-01-01

    Background Low-Dye taping is used for excessive pronation at the subtalar joint of the foot. Previous research has focused on the tape's immediate effect on plantar pressure. Its effectiveness following exercise has not been investigated. Peak plantar pressure distribution provides an indirect representation of subtalar joint kinematics. The objectives of the study were 1) To determine the effects of Low-Dye taping on peak plantar pressure immediately post-application. 2) To determine whether any initial effects are maintained following exercise. Methods 12 asymptomatic subjects participated; each being screened for excessive pronation (navicular drop > 10 mm). Plantar pressure data was recorded, using the F-scan, at four intervals during the testing session: un-taped, baseline-taped, post-exercise session 1, and post-exercise session 2. Each exercise session consisted of a 10-minute walk at a normal pace. The foot was divided into 6 regions during data analysis. Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to assess regional pressure variations across the four testing conditions. Results Reduced lateral forefoot peak plantar pressure was the only significant difference immediately post tape application (p = 0.039). This effect was lost after 10 minutes of exercise (p = 0.036). Each exercise session resulted in significantly higher medial forefoot peak pressure compared to un-taped; (p = 0.015) and (p = 0.014) respectively, and baseline-taped; (p = 0.036) and (p = 0.015) respectively. Medial and lateral rearfoot values had also increased after the second session (p = 0.004), following their non-significant reduction at baseline-taped. A trend towards a medial-to-lateral shift in pressure present in the midfoot immediately following tape application was still present after 20 minutes of exercise. Conclusion Low-Dye tape's initial effect of reduced lateral forefoot peak plantar pressure was lost after a 10-minute walk. However, the tape continued to have an effect on the medial forefoot after 20 minutes of exercise. Further studies with larger sample sizes are required to examine the important finding of the anti-pronatory trend present in the midfoot. PMID:19383160

  13. The standing heel-rise test in patients with upper motor neuron lesion due to stroke.

    PubMed

    Svantesson, U; Osterberg, U; Grimby, G; Sunnerhagen, K S

    1998-06-01

    The objective was to investigate the fatigue process in the triceps surae during the heel-rise test (eccentric and concentric phases) in comparison with a walking test and muscle strength. Eight men with prior stroke and 8 age-matched healthy men participated. The electromyographic activity in form of root mean square and mean power frequency of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were measured and work estimated. Walking speed and maximal peak torque were measured and differed significantly between the patient and reference groups. There were no significant differences between the groups nor legs concerning the number of heel-rises or work performed. In the eccentric phase, mean power frequency decreased significantly more in the gastrocnemius than in the soleus muscle in the reference group, while mean power frequency in the soleus muscle tended to decrease more, though non-significantly, in the affected leg. The conclusion is that the capacity to perform the heel-rise test in patients with prior stroke is better than plantarflexor peak torque and walking speed. PMID:9606768

  14. NOTE: Prototype heel effect compensation filter for cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Shinichiro; Endo, Masahiro; Nishizawa, Kanae; Ohno, Mari; Miyazaki, Hiroaki; Tsujita, Kazuhiko; Saito, Yasuo

    2005-11-01

    The prototype cone-beam CT (CBCT) has a larger beam width than the conventional multi-detector row CT (MDCT). This causes a non-uniform angular distribution of the x-ray beam intensity known as the heel effect. Scan conditions for CBCT tube current are adjusted on the anode side to obtain an acceptable clinical image quality. However, as the dose is greater on the cathode side than on the anode side, the signal-to-noise ratio on the cathode side is excessively high, resulting in an unnecessary dose amount. To compensate for the heel effect, we developed a heel effect compensation (HEC) filter. The HEC filter rendered the dose distribution uniform and reduced the dose by an average of 25% for free air and by 20% for CTDI phantoms compared to doses with the conventional filter. In addition, its effect in rendering the effective energy uniform resulted in an improvement in image quality. This new HEC filter may be useful in cone-beam CT studies.

  15. Plantar grasp reflex in high-risk infants during the first year of life.

    PubMed

    Zafeiriou, D I

    2000-01-01

    For most primitive reflexes, retention of the reflex beyond the period when it should no longer be elicited suggests a pathologic process within the central nervous system. However, for certain primitive reflexes, such as the plantar grasp reflex, a negative response within the first months of life is suggestive of a neurologic abnormality. From the results of one prospective and one retrospective study, it is clearly indicated that the absence of the plantar grasp reflex from 3 months of age and on correlates with the development of spastic cerebral palsy. The specific combination of presence or absence of specific primitive reflexes, postural reactions, or both may accurately predict a specific type of cerebral palsy or neurodevelopmental abnormality. PMID:10669212

  16. The reliability of medial and lateral plantar nerve recordings in healthy elderly individuals.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Gokce; Kahraman Koytak, Pinar; Bastan, Birgul; Tanridag, Tulin; Us, Onder; Uluc, Kayihan

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability of medial plantar (MP) and lateral plantar (LP) nerve conduction studies (NCS) in healthy individuals aged >65 years, and to obtain reference values for this age group. The study included 81 healthy subjects. MP response was absent in only 2 subjects, but LP response could not be obtained bilaterally in 43 of the 81 subjects. Regression analysis showed that MP NCS could be reliably performed in those aged ? 72 years and normal values for MP nerve in individuals aged 66-72 years would be strongly against a large-fiber neuropathy. However, LP response was absent in 53.1 % of the healthy elderly subjects; therefore, we think it is unreliable to study the LP nerve in this age group. PMID:25557236

  17. Plantar Loading During Cutting While Wearing a Rigid Carbon Fiber Insert.

    PubMed

    Queen, Robin M; Abbey, Alicia N; Verma, Ravi; Butler, Robert J; Nunley, James A

    2014-02-12

    Context : Stress fractures are one of the most common injuries in sports, accounting for approximately 10% of all overuse injuries. Treatment of fifth metatarsal stress fractures involves both surgical and nonsurgical interventions. Fifth metatarsal stress fractures are difficult to treat because of the risks of delayed union, nonunion, and recurrent injuries. Most of these injuries occur during agility tasks, such as those performed in soccer, basketball, and lacrosse. Objective : To examine the effect of a rigid carbon graphite footplate on plantar loading during 2 agility tasks. Design : ?Crossover study. Setting : Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants : A total of 19 recreational male athletes with no history of lower extremity injury in the past 6 months and no previous metatarsal stress fractures were tested. Main Outcome Measure(s) : ?Seven 45° side-cut and crossover-cut tasks were completed in a shoe with or without a full-length rigid carbon plate. Testing order between the shoe conditions and the 2 cutting tasks was randomized. Plantar-loading data were recorded using instrumented insoles. Peak pressure, maximum force, force-time integral, and contact area beneath the total foot, the medial and lateral midfoot, and the medial, middle, and lateral forefoot were analyzed. A series of paired t tests was used to examine differences between the footwear conditions (carbon graphite footplate, shod) for both cutting tasks independently (? = .05). Results : During the side-cut task, the footplate increased total foot and lateral midfoot peak pressures while decreasing contact area and lateral midfoot force-time integral. During the crossover-cut task, the footplate increased total foot and lateral midfoot peak pressure and lateral forefoot force-time integral while decreasing total and lateral forefoot contact area. Conclusions : Although a rigid carbon graphite footplate altered some aspects of the plantar- pressure profile during cutting in uninjured participants, it was ineffective in reducing plantar loading beneath the fifth metatarsal. PMID:24520831

  18. Case study: Epidermoid cyst following percutaneous Topaz coblation for plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Kim; Thomson, Allan George; Moir, John Stuart

    2012-03-01

    An epidermoid cyst is formed when there is proliferation of epidermal cells within an area of the dermis. They may be formed by the traumatic implantation of epidermal cells within the dermis as well as many other mechanisms. We present a case of epidermoid cyst formation following Topaz coblation for plantar fasciitis; a complication we believe is yet to be reported in the literature. PMID:22265448

  19. Plantar Loading During Cutting While Wearing a Rigid Carbon Fiber Insert

    PubMed Central

    Queen, Robin M.; Abbey, Alicia N.; Verma, Ravi; Butler, Robert J.; Nunley, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Context Stress fractures are one of the most common injuries in sports, accounting for approximately 10% of all overuse injuries. Treatment of fifth metatarsal stress fractures involves both surgical and nonsurgical interventions. Fifth metatarsal stress fractures are difficult to treat because of the risks of delayed union, nonunion, and recurrent injuries. Most of these injuries occur during agility tasks, such as those performed in soccer, basketball, and lacrosse. Objective: To examine the effect of a rigid carbon graphite footplate on plantar loading during 2 agility tasks. Design: ?Crossover study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 19 recreational male athletes with no history of lower extremity injury in the past 6 months and no previous metatarsal stress fractures were tested. Main Outcome Measure(s): ?Seven 45° side-cut and crossover-cut tasks were completed in a shoe with or without a full-length rigid carbon plate. Testing order between the shoe conditions and the 2 cutting tasks was randomized. Plantar-loading data were recorded using instrumented insoles. Peak pressure, maximum force, force-time integral, and contact area beneath the total foot, the medial and lateral midfoot, and the medial, middle, and lateral forefoot were analyzed. A series of paired t tests was used to examine differences between the footwear conditions (carbon graphite footplate, shod) for both cutting tasks independently (? = .05). Results: During the side-cut task, the footplate increased total foot and lateral midfoot peak pressures while decreasing contact area and lateral midfoot force-time integral. During the crossover-cut task, the footplate increased total foot and lateral midfoot peak pressure and lateral forefoot force-time integral while decreasing total and lateral forefoot contact area. Conclusions: Although a rigid carbon graphite footplate altered some aspects of the plantar-pressure profile during cutting in uninjured participants, it was ineffective in reducing plantar loading beneath the fifth metatarsal. PMID:24955620

  20. Enhanced spatio-temporal alignment of plantar pressure image sequences using B-splines.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Francisco P M; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2013-03-01

    This article presents an enhanced methodology to align plantar pressure image sequences simultaneously in time and space. The temporal alignment of the sequences is accomplished using B-splines in the time modeling, and the spatial alignment can be attained using several geometric transformation models. The methodology was tested on a dataset of 156 real plantar pressure image sequences (3 sequences for each foot of the 26 subjects) that was acquired using a common commercial plate during barefoot walking. In the alignment of image sequences that were synthetically deformed both in time and space, an outstanding accuracy was achieved with the cubic B-splines. This accuracy was significantly better (p < 0.001) than the one obtained using the best solution proposed in our previous work. When applied to align real image sequences with unknown transformation involved, the alignment based on cubic B-splines also achieved superior results than our previous methodology (p < 0.001). The consequences of the temporal alignment on the dynamic center of pressure (COP) displacement was also assessed by computing the intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) before and after the temporal alignment of the three image sequence trials of each foot of the associated subject at six time instants. The results showed that, generally, the ICCs related to the medio-lateral COP displacement were greater when the sequences were temporally aligned than the ICCs of the original sequences. Based on the experimental findings, one can conclude that the cubic B-splines are a remarkable solution for the temporal alignment of plantar pressure image sequences. These findings also show that the temporal alignment can increase the consistency of the COP displacement on related acquired plantar pressure image sequences. PMID:23135784

  1. [Realization of a compact mobile phone based wireless plantar pressure monitoring system and application].

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Liu, Jing

    2012-05-01

    An improved compact mobile phone based wireless plantar pressure monitoring system and software are proposed based on former progress, which can collect pressure data by sensors and circuit board, transmit data through Bluetooth wirelessly, and display and calculate the data on the mobile terminal. Conceptual experiments carried out demonstrate the feasibility and accuracy of the new system The system is expected to be widely used in the future owing to its portability, ease of use, and cost-effectiveness PMID:22916468

  2. Controlling Posture and Vergence Eye Movements in Quiet Stance: Effects of Thin Plantar Inserts

    PubMed Central

    Foisy, A.; Gaertner, C.; Matheron, E.; Kapoula, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess properties of vergence and saccade eye movements as well as posture in quiet stance, and the effects of thin plantar inserts upon postural and oculomotor control. The performances of 36 young healthy subjects were recorded by a force platform and an eye tracker in three testing conditions: without plantar stimulation, with a 3 millimetre-thick plantar insert, either a Medial or a Lateral Arch Support (MAS / LAS). The results showed a decrease of the Surface and Variance of Speed and a more posterior position of the CoP with either stimulation compared with the control condition. The fractal analysis showed a decrease with MAS. Wavelet analysis in the time-frequency domain revealed an increase in the Cancelling Time of the low frequency band with MAS. These results suggest a better stability for a lower energy cost. Concerning eye movements, the inserts influenced only vergence (not saccades): MAS caused an increase of the phasic amplitude of divergence, and conversely a decrease of the tonic amplitude. In contrast, LAS caused an increase of the tonic amplitude of convergence. Thus, MAS renders divergence less visually driven, while LAS renders convergence more visually driven. We conclude that the CNS uses the podal signal for both postural and vergence control via specific mechanisms. Plantar inserts have an influence upon posture and vergence movements in a different way according to the part of the foot sole being stimulated. These results can be useful to clinicians interested in foot or eye. PMID:26637132

  3. Characteristics of Plantar Loads in Maximum Forward Lunge Tasks in Badminton

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoyue; Li, Jing Xian; Hong, Youlian; Wang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background Badminton players often perform powerful and long-distance lunges during such competitive matches. The objective of this study is to compare the plantar loads of three one-step maximum forward lunges in badminton. Methods Fifteen right-handed male badminton players participated in the study. Each participant performed five successful maximum lunges at three directions. For each direction, the participant wore three different shoe brands. Plantar loading, including peak pressure, maximum force, and contact area, was measured by using an insole pressure measurement system. Two-way ANOVA with repeated measures was employed to determine the effects of the different lunge directions and different shoes, as well as the interaction of these two variables, on the measurements. Results The maximum force (MF) on the lateral midfoot was lower when performing left-forward lunges than when performing front-forward lunges (p = 0.006, 95% CI = ?2.88 to ?0.04%BW). The MF and peak pressures (PP) on the great toe region were lower for the front-forward lunge than for the right-forward lunge (MF, p = 0.047, 95% CI = ?3.62 to ?0.02%BW; PP, p = 0.048, 95% CI = ?37.63 to ?0.16 KPa) and left-forward lunge (MF, p = 0.015, 95% CI = ?4.39 to ?0.38%BW; PP, p = 0.008, 95% CI = ?47.76 to ?5.91 KPa). Conclusions These findings indicate that compared with the front-forward lunge, left and right maximum forward lunges induce greater plantar loads on the great toe region of the dominant leg of badminton players. The differences in the plantar loads of the different lunge directions may be potential risks for injuries to the lower extremities of badminton players. PMID:26367741

  4. Recalibration of somesthetic plantar information in the control of undisturbed upright stance maintenance.

    PubMed

    Bernard-Demanze, L; Burdet, C; Berger, L; Rougier, P

    2004-12-01

    To assess the effects of changes in somesthetic plantar information on upright quiet stance, a rotary plantar massage was applied under the feet of healthy subjects for ten minutes. The controlling variable, the centre of pressure (CP) displacements, were recorded, before and after massage, through a force platform and decomposed into two elementary motions: the vertical projection of the centre of gravity (CG(v)) and the difference between the latter and the CP (CP-CG(v)) along medio-lateral ML and antero-posterior AP directions. These motions were processed through frequency analysis and modelled as fractional Brownian motion. For CP-CG(v) motions, the frequency analysis shows that massage under the plantar soles induces a decrease of the amplitudes along the ML direction suggesting reduced overall muscular activity (abductor-adductor muscles of the hip according to Winter et al.). A general trend is that the CG(v) amplitudes are also diminished after massage especially in the ML direction, indicating a better distribution of the body weight on the two supports. On the other hand, the effects tend to vanish after about 8 minutes. Conversely, when the massage was given under the toes, no particular effect on any elementary motion was observed, suggesting that the plantar mechanoreceptors under the toes necessitate stronger stimulation to respond significantly and/or that the greater sensitivity obtained was not used by the CNS. Overall, this data emphasises the fact that a recalibration of somesthetic cues may occur when enhanced afferent information is fed to the postural system. PMID:15657978

  5. The Effect of Landing Surface on the Plantar Kinetics of Chinese Paratroopers Using Half-Squat Landing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Wu, Ji; Zheng, Chao; Huang, Rong Rong; Na, Yuhong; Yang, Fan; Wang, Zengshun; Wu, Di

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of landing surface on plantar kinetics during a half-squat landing. Twenty male elite paratroopers with formal parachute landing training and over 2 years of parachute jumping experience were recruited. The subjects wore parachuting boots in which pressure sensing insoles were placed. Each subject was instructed to jump off a platform with a height of 60 cm, and land on either a hard or soft surface in a half-squat posture. Outcome measures were maximal plantar pressure, time to maximal plantar pressure (T-MPP), and pressure-time integral (PTI) upon landing on 10 plantar regions. Compared to a soft surface, hard surface produced higher maximal plantar pressure in the 1st to 4th metatarsal and mid-foot regions, but lower maximal plantar pressure in the 5th metatarsal region. Shorter T- MPP was found during hard surface landing in the 1st and 2nd metatarsal and medial rear foot. Landing on a hard surface landing resulted in a lower PTI than a soft surface in the 1stphalangeal region. For Chinese paratroopers, specific foot prosthesis should be designed to protect the1st to 4thmetatarsal region for hard surface landing, and the 1stphalangeal and 5thmetatarsal region for soft surface landing. Key Points Understanding plantar kinetics during the half-squat landing used by Chinese paratroopers can assist in the design of protective footwear. Compared to landing on a soft surface, a hard surface produced higher maximal plantar pressure in the 1st to 4th metatarsal and mid-foot regions, but lower maximal plantar pressure in the 5th metatarsal region. A shorter time to maximal plantar pressure was found during a hard surface landing in the 1st and 2nd metatarsals and medial rear foot. Landing on a hard surface resulted in a lower pressure-time integral than landing on a soft surface in the 1st phalangeal region. For Chinese paratroopers, specific foot prosthesis should be designed to protect the 1st to 4th metatarsal region for a hard surface landing, and the 1st phalangeal and 5th metatarsal region for a soft surface landing. PMID:24149145

  6. A device for characterising the mechanical properties of the plantar soft tissue of the foot.

    PubMed

    Parker, D; Cooper, G; Pearson, S; Crofts, G; Howard, D; Busby, P; Nester, C

    2015-11-01

    The plantar soft tissue is a highly functional viscoelastic structure involved in transferring load to the human body during walking. A Soft Tissue Response Imaging Device was developed to apply a vertical compression to the plantar soft tissue whilst measuring the mechanical response via a combined load cell and ultrasound imaging arrangement. Accuracy of motion compared to input profiles; validation of the response measured for standard materials in compression; variability of force and displacement measures for consecutive compressive cycles; and implementation in vivo with five healthy participants. Static displacement displayed average error of 0.04 mm (range of 15 mm), and static load displayed average error of 0.15 N (range of 250 N). Validation tests showed acceptable agreement compared to a Houndsfield tensometer for both displacement (CMC > 0.99 RMSE > 0.18 mm) and load (CMC > 0.95 RMSE < 4.86 N). Device motion was highly repeatable for bench-top tests (ICC = 0.99) and participant trials (CMC = 1.00). Soft tissue response was found repeatable for intra (CMC > 0.98) and inter trials (CMC > 0.70). The device has been shown to be capable of implementing complex loading patterns similar to gait, and of capturing the compressive response of the plantar soft tissue for a range of loading conditions in vivo. PMID:26343227

  7. Effectiveness of local tenoxicam versus corticosteroid injection for plantar fasciitis treatment.

    PubMed

    Guner, Savas; Onder, Haci; Guner, Sukriye Ilkay; Ceylan, Mehmet Fethi; Gökalp, Mehmet Ata; Keskin, Siddik

    2013-10-01

    Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of foot pain in adults. In this prospective study, the outcomes of local tenoxicam injection and corticosteroid therapy for the treatment of plantar fasciitis were compared. Patients were randomly assigned to either the tenoxicam or corticosteroid group. The tenoxicam group (n=31) was treated using a local injection of 1 mL of tenoxicam (20 mg/2 mL) and 1 mL of 2% lidocaine, whereas the steroid group (n=30) was treated with a local 1-mL injection containing 40 mg of methylprednisolone acetate and 1 mL of 2% lidocaine. Clinical evaluations, which were performed before the injection and 6 and 12 months after the injection, consisted of patient-assessed pain using a visual analog scale. In addition, patient satisfaction was measured using the Roles and Maudsley score. Comparison of pre- and posttreatment visual analog scale scores demonstrated a statistically significant difference in both groups (P<.05). Furthermore, no significant difference was found between the steroid and tenoxicam groups in terms of visual analog scale scores measured 12 months after injection (P>.05). The tenoxicam injection was not significantly more effective than the corticosteroid injection. However, both methods were effective and successful in treating patients with plantar fasciitis. Tenoxicam therapy appears to provide pain relief, but its effectiveness in the long term should be explored in additional studies. PMID:24093711

  8. Comparison of Radial Shockwaves and Conventional Physiotherapy for Treating Plantar Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Greve, Júlia Maria D’Andréa; Grecco, Marcus Vinicius; Santos-Silva, Paulo Roberto

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare radial shockwave treatment and conventional physiotherapy for plantar fasciitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-two patients with plantar fasciitis were included in this study. They were randomly divided into two groups. Group 1 was composed of 16 patients who underwent 10 physiotherapy sessions each, consisting of ultrasound, kinesiotherapy and instruction for stretching exercises at home. Group 2 was composed of 16 patients who underwent three applications of radial shockwaves (once a week) and received instruction for stretching exercises at home. Pain and ability to function were evaluated before treatment, immediately afterwards, and three months later. The mean age of the patients was 47.3 ± 10.3 years (range 25–68); 81% were female, 87% were overweight, 56% had bilateral impairment, and 75% used analgesics regularly. RESULTS: Both treatments were effective for pain reduction and for improving the functional abilities of patients with plantar fasciitis. The effect of the shockwaves was apparent sooner than physiotherapy after the onset of treatment. CONCLUSION: Shockwave treatment was no more effective than conventional physiotherapy treatment when evaluated three months after the end of treatment. PMID:19219314

  9. Effects of Wearing Different Personal Equipment on Force Distribution at the Plantar Surface of the Foot

    PubMed Central

    Woitge, Sandra; Finze, Susanne; Mittelmeier, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Background. The wearing of personal equipment can cause specific changes in muscle activity and posture. In the present study, we investigated the influence of differences in equipment related weight loading and load distribution on plantar pressure. In addition, we studied functional effects of wearing different equipment with a particular focus on relevant changes in foot shape. Methods. Static and dynamic pedobarography were performed on 31 male soldiers carrying increasing weights consisting of different items of equipment. Results. The pressure acting on the plantar surface of the foot increased with higher loading, both under static and dynamic conditions (p < 0.05). We observed an increase in the contact area (p < 0.05) and an influence of load distribution through different ways to carry the rifle. Conclusions. The wearing of heavier weights leads to an increase in plantar pressure and contact area. This may be caused by flattening of the transverse and longitudinal arches. The effects are more evident in subjects with flat feet deformities which seem to flatten at an earlier load condition with a greater amount compared to subjects with normal arches. Improving load distribution should be a main goal in the development of military equipment in order to prevent injuries or functional disorders of the lower extremity. PMID:23766714

  10. Effectiveness of adjustable dorsiflexion night splint in combination with accommodative foot orthosis on plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Winson C C; Wong, W Y; Kung, Eddy; Leung, Aaron K L

    2012-01-01

    Foot orthoses and night splints have been used separately to treat patients with plantar fasciitis, but were not always successful. Combined use of both orthoses might give better outcomes. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a soft and self-adjustable dorsiflexion night splint in combination with an accommodative foot orthosis for patients with plantar fasciitis. Twenty-eight patients were assigned to group A (foot orthosis only) and group B (combination of foot orthosis and dorsiflexion night splints). A foot function index (FFI) questionnaire was used to evaluate the pain and functions of feet just before, 2 weeks after, and 8 weeks after the treatments. Results showed that subjects in group B had significantly reduced pain scores at week 2 (p < 0.001) and week 8 (p < 0.001). In group A, no statistical differences were noted in the pain (p = 0.15), disability (p = 0.56), activity limitation (p = 0.75), and total FFI (p = 0.35) scores for the three time periods. The application of foot orthoses with adjustable dorsiflexion night splints was found to be more effective than the application of foot orthoses alone in relieving foot pain in patients with plantar fasciitis. PMID:23516059

  11. Conservative therapy for plantar fasciitis: a narrative review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Stuber, Kent; Kristmanson, Kevyn

    2006-01-01

    A narrative literature review of RCTs only, was conducted to ascertain which conservative treatments provide the best results for plantar fasciitis patients. Stretching, prefabricated and custom-made orthotics and night splints have all been scrutinized in numerous studies with mixed results. Chiropractic manipulative therapy has been examined in one study, with favorable results. Therapeutic ultrasound and low intensity laser therapy have been examined in one study apiece with unsatisfactory results. Based on the trials reviewed a trial of therapy beginning with low-cost, patient-centered treatments is recommended, particularly stretching, over-the-counter orthotics, and patient education. Several (but not all) of the reviewed articles indicated that custom-made orthoses are more beneficial for plantar fasciitis than over-the-counter orthotics. In the event these treatments do not provide satisfactory results, use of night splints should be considered. Based on this review, there is no support for the use of magnetic insoles for plantar fasciitis. Most of the studies were found to have at least one methodological flaw, including inadequate sample sizes, high drop-out rates, comparing multiple interventions to multiple interventions (thus making it difficult to determine the effect of each individual intervention) and lack of long-term follow-up. Outcome measure use between studies was inconsistent. PMID:17549177

  12. Sonoelastography of Plantar Fascia: Reproducibility and Pattern Description in Healthy Subjects and Symptomatic Subjects.

    PubMed

    Ríos-Díaz, José; Martínez-Payá, Jacinto J; del Baño-Aledo, María Elena; de Groot-Ferrando, Ana; Botía-Castillo, Paloma; Fernández-Rodríguez, David

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of the work reported here was to describe the sonoelastographic appearance of the plantar fascia of healthy volunteers and patients with fasciitis. Twenty-three healthy subjects and 21 patients with plantar fasciitis were examined using B-mode and real-time sonoelastography (RTSR) scanning. B-Mode examination included fascia thickness and echotexture. Echogenicity and echovariation of the color histogram were analyzed. Fasciae were classified into type 1, blue (more elastic); type 2, blue/green (intermediate); or type 3, green (less elastic). RTSE revealed 72.7% of fasciae as type 2, with no significant association with fasciitis (?(2) = 3.6, df = 2, p = 0.17). Quantitative analysis of the color histogram revealed a significantly greater intensity of green (mean = 77.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 71.9-83.6) and blue (mean = 74.2, 95% CI = 69.7-78.8) in healthy subjects. Echovariation of the color red was 33.4% higher in the fasciitis group than in the healthy group (95% CI = 16.7-50.1). Sonoelastography with quantitative analysis of echovariation can be a useful tool for evaluation of plantar fascia pathology. PMID:26164287

  13. Relationship between hamstring activation rate and heel contact velocity: Factors influencing age-related slip-induced falls

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, Thurmon E.; Kim, Sukwon

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine whether a decreased hamstring activation rate among the elderly is responsible for a higher horizontal heel contact velocity and increased likelihood of slip-induced falls compared to their younger counterparts. Twenty-eight subjects from two age groups (14 young and 14 old) walked across a linear walking track with embedded force platforms while wearing a fall arresting harness attached to an overhead arresting rig for safety. In order to obtain realistic unexpected slip-induced fall data, a soapy vinyl floor surface was hidden from the subjects and unexpectedly introduced. Synchronized kinematics, kinetic and electromyography (EMG) analyses during the heel contact phase of the gait cycle while walking over slippery and non-slippery floor surfaces were examined in the study. Normalized EMG data were examined in terms of hamstring activation rate and evaluated with heel contact velocity and friction demand characteristic (as measured by peak required coefficient of friction (RCOF)) on the dry vinyl floor surface. Furthermore, slip parameters (i.e. slip distances and slipping velocity) were assessed on the soapy vinyl floor surface. The results indicated that younger adults’ hamstring activation rate was higher than older adults, whereas younger adults’ heel contact velocity was not different from older adults. These results suggested that heel contact velocity in younger adults was sufficiently reduced before the heel contact phase of the gait cycle. This could be due to the outcome of higher hamstring activation rate in younger adults in comparison to older adults. However, lower friction demand (peak RCOF), shorter slip distances, slower peak sliding heel velocity and more falls among older adults suggested that the slip initiation characteristics were not the only factors contributing to slip-induced falls among the elderly. PMID:16112575

  14. Methods for Heel Retrieval for Tanks C-101, C-102, and C-111 at the Hanford Site - 13064

    SciTech Connect

    Sams, T.L.; Kirch, N.W.; Reynolds, J.H.

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the prospects of using bulk waste characteristics to determine the most appropriate heel retrieval technology. If the properties of hard to remove heels can be determined before bulk retrieval, then a heel retrieval technology can be selected before bulk retrieval is complete. This would save substantially on sampling costs and would allow the deployment of the heel retrieval technology immediately after bulk retrieval. The latter would also accelerate the heel removal schedule. A number of C-farm retrievals have been fully or partially completed at the time of this writing. Thus, there is already substantial information on the success of different technologies and the composition of the heels. There is also substantial information on the waste types in each tank based on historical records. Therefore, this study will correlate the performance of technologies used so far and compare them to the known waste types in the tanks. This will be used to estimate the performance of future C Farm heel retrievals. An initial decision tree is developed and employed on tanks C-101, C-102, and C 111. An assumption of this study is that no additional characterization information would be available, before or after retrieval. Note that collecting additional information would substantially increase the probability of success. Deploying some in-situ testing technologies, such as a water lance or an in-situ Raman probe, might substantially increase the probability of successfully selecting the process conditions without having to take samples from the tanks for laboratory analysis. (authors)

  15. Methods for heel retrieval for tanks C-101, C-102, and C-111 at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Sams, Terry L.; Kirch, N. W.; Reynolds, Jacob G.

    2013-01-11

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the prospects of using bulk waste characteristics to determine the most appropriate heel retrieval technology. If the properties of hard to remove heels can be determined before bulk retrieval, then a heel retrieval technology can be selected before bulk retrieval is complete. This would save substantially on sampling costs and would allow the deployment of the heel retrieval technology immediately after bulk retrieval. The latter would also accelerate the heel removal schedule. A number of C-farm retrievals have been fully or partially completed at the time of this writing. Thus, there is already substantial information on the success of different technologies and the composition of the heels. There is also substantial information on the waste types in each tank based on historical records. Therefore, this study will correlate the performance of technologies used so far and compare them to the known waste types in the tanks. This will be used to estimate the performance of future C Farm heel retrievals. An initial decision tree is developed and employed on tanks C-101, C-102, and C 111. An assumption of this study is that no additional characterization information would be available, before or after retrieval. Note that collecting additional information would substantially increase the probability of success. Deploying some in-situ testing technologies, such as a water lance or an in-situ Raman probe, might substantially increase the probability of successfully selecting the process conditions without having to take samples from the tanks for laboratory analysis.

  16. The relationship of heel contact in ascent and descent from jumps to the incidence of shin splints in ballet dancers.

    PubMed

    Gans, A

    1985-08-01

    I conducted a study to determine whether ballet dancers with a history of shin splints make heel contact on ascent and descent from jumps less often than dancers without this history. Sixteen dancers were filmed as they executed a sequence of jumps at two different speeds. Eight of the subjects had a history of shin-splint pain; eight had no such history. The film was viewed on a Super 8 movie projector. Heel contacts on ascent and descent from jumps were counted. Double heel strikes (heel rise between landing and pushing off) were also counted. A nonparametric t test showed no differences between the two groups in the number of contacts on ascent or descent. The dancers with a history of shin splints, however, demonstrated more double heel strikes (p = .02) than the other group. Clinically, this finding may represent a lack of control or a tight Achilles tendon or both. Further study is necessary to confirm these theories. For treatment and prevention of shin splints, a clinician must evaluate a dancer's jumping technique and then provide systematic training to develop the skin strength, flexibility, and coordination that make up control. PMID:4023066

  17. The damping properties of the venous plexus of the heel region of the foot during simulated heelstrike.

    PubMed

    Weijers, René E; Kessels, Alphons G H; Kemerink, Gerrit J

    2005-12-01

    The damping mechanisms that are operational in the heel pad during the impact phase of locomotion have the important function to protect the musculo-skeletal system from injuries. How this is achieved is still not fully understood, as is for instance illustrated by the 'heel pad paradox', the observation that in vivo and in vitro experiments yielded widely different results. This paradox could so far only partially be explained. In the light of this paradox, and a previous study by our group, we conjectured that the venous plexus might contribute as a hydraulic shock absorber to the damping properties of the heel pad. To investigate this hypothesis in vivo, heel pads of 11 volunteers were subjected to pendulum impact tests, using velocities of 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 m/s, and three physiologically different, consecutive conditions: (i) a relatively empty venous plexus, (ii) a congested venous plexus, and (iii) a decongested venous plexus. At congestion, the maximum impact force decreased slightly but significantly by 2.6% at 0.2 m/s and 1.8% at 0.4 m/s. This effect was no longer found at 0.6 m/s. Although these effects are rather small, they confirm the fundamental hypothesis that the venous plexus contributes to the damping properties of the heel pad during walking. It is likely that some underestimation of the effect has occurred. PMID:16214490

  18. SLUDGE HEEL REMOVAL BY ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE 12390

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, M.

    2012-01-12

    High Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently stored in aging underground storage tanks. This waste is a complex mixture of insoluble solids, referred to as sludge, and soluble salts. Continued long-term storage of these radioactive wastes poses an environmental risk. Operations are underway to remove and disposition the waste, clean the tanks and fill with grout for permanent closure. Heel removal is the intermediate phase of the waste retrieval and tank cleaning process at SRS, which is intended to reduce the volume of waste prior to treatment with oxalic acid. The goal of heel removal is to reduce the residual amount of radioactive sludge wastes to less than 37,900 liters (10,000 gallons) of wet solids. Reducing the quantity of residual waste solids in the tank prior to acid cleaning reduces the amount of acid required and reduces the amount of excess acid that could impact ongoing waste management processes. Mechanical heel removal campaigns in Tank 12 have relied solely on the use of mixing pumps that have not been effective at reducing the volume of remaining solids. The remaining waste in Tank 12 is known to have a high aluminum concentration. Aluminum dissolution by caustic leaching was identified as a treatment step to reduce the volume of remaining solids and prepare the tank for acid cleaning. Dissolution was performed in Tank 12 over a two month period in July and August, 2011. Sample results indicated that 16,440 kg of aluminum oxide (boehmite) had been dissolved representing 60% of the starting inventory. The evolution resulted in reducing the sludge solids volume by 22,300 liters (5900 gallons), preparing the tank for chemical cleaning with oxalic acid.

  19. The effect of melody on the physiological responses of heel sticks pain in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Marofi, Maryam; Nikobakht, Farzaneh; Badiee, Zohreh; Golchin, Mehri

    2015-01-01

    Background: During health care in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), infants undergo extremely painful procedures, which may cause problems, if not controlled, such as changes in the pattern of respiratory rate, heart rate, and blood oxygen saturation. The present study aimed to find the effect of melody on the physiological responses of neonates’ heel stick pain. Materials and Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted in Alzahra Hospital (Isfahan, Iran) for 5 months. Fifty infants were selected through convenient sampling method and were randomly assigned in equal numbers to two groups (n = 25). In the melody group (intervention), a selected melody was played for the infants at a distance of 1 m from them, with a sound intensity of 65 dB, from 3 minutes before, during, and after the heel stick procedure, respectively, and their physiological responses were observed with a monitoring system and recorded at the afore-mentioned time periods. Physiological responses were also recorded in the control group (no intervention) 3 min before, during, and after the heel stick procedure, respectively. Results: Means of respiratory and pulse rates in the melody and control groups showed a significant difference at different time points. But the mean blood oxygen saturation in the melody group showed no significant difference at different time points, although the difference was significant in the control group. Conclusions: The results showed that melody could maintain more balance in some physiological responses of infants, such as the respiratory rate and pulse rate during the Guthrie test. Therefore, melody is recommended to be used to prevent the destructive effects of pain in infants during painful procedures. PMID:26120343

  20. Low heel ultrasound parameters predict mortality in men: results from the European Male Ageing Study (EMAS)

    PubMed Central

    Pye, Stephen R.; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Boonen, Steven; Gielen, Evelien; Adams, Judith E.; Ward, Kate A.; Lee, David M.; Bartfai, György; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Finn, Joseph D.; Forti, Gianni; Giwercman, Aleksander; Han, Thang S.; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T.; Kula, Krzysztof; Lean, Michael E.; Pendleton, Neil; Punab, Margus; Wu, Frederick C.; O'Neill, Terence W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: low bone mineral density measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry is associated with increased mortality. The relationship between other skeletal phenotypes and mortality is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between quantitative heel ultrasound parameters and mortality in a cohort of European men. Methods: men aged 40–79 years were recruited for participation in a prospective study of male ageing: the European Male Ageing Study (EMAS). At baseline, subjects attended for quantitative ultrasound (QUS) of the heel (Hologic—SAHARA) and completed questionnaires on lifestyle factors and co-morbidities. Height and weight were measured. After a median of 4.3 years, subjects were invited to attend a follow-up assessment, and reasons for non-participation, including death, were recorded. The relationship between QUS parameters (broadband ultrasound attenuation [BUA] and speed of sound [SOS]) and mortality was assessed using Cox proportional hazards model. Results: from a total of 3,244 men (mean age 59.8, standard deviation [SD] 10.8 years), 185 (5.7%) died during the follow-up period. After adjusting for age, centre, body mass index, physical activity, current smoking, number of co-morbidities and general health, each SD decrease in BUA was associated with a 20% higher risk of mortality (hazard ratio [HR] per SD = 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0–1.4). Compared with those in higher quintiles (2nd–5th), those in the lowest quintile of BUA and SOS had a greater mortality risk (BUA: HR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.1–2.3 and SOS: HR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.2–2.2). Conclusion: lower heel ultrasound parameters are associated with increased mortality in European men. PMID:26162912

  1. A Rare Case of Plantar Epithelioma Cuniculatum Arising from a Wart

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Rahul; Bhagat, Aditi; Vasudevan, Biju; Sridhar, Jandhyala; Madan, Renu; Ray, Manjusha

    2015-01-01

    A 68-year-old man, a known case of hypertension, coronary artery disease and old cardiovascular accident with right-sided hemiplegia, came with the chief complaints of a large cauliflower like growth with pus discharge on the left heel since 15 years. The patient had sustained a penetrating injury by a thorn on the left heel region few days before the lesion appeared. Dermatological examination revealed a single verrucous lesion measuring 7 × 7 cm on the left heel region associated with discharge of foul smelling cheesy material. There was also a enlarged right inguinal lymph node which was non-tender, firm, measuring 2 cm in diameter with normal overlying skin. X-ray left ankle was done which showed some soft tissue swelling. A skin biopsy showed hyperkeratosis, acanthosis and parakeratosis. Elongated rete ridges with keratinocyte hyperplasia, forming a large mass pressing on the underlying dermis were seen. There was formation of multiple large keratin filled invaginations and crypts. No atypical cells were seen. Based on history, clinical examination and investigations, a diagnosis of epithelium cuniculatum type of verrucous squamous cell carcinoma was made. A wide excision with a flap cover was performed in consultation with the oncosurgeon and the excision sample was sent for histopathological re-examination, which confirmed the diagnosis of epithelioma cuniculatum. PMID:26538697

  2. A Rare Case of Plantar Epithelioma Cuniculatum Arising from a Wart.

    PubMed

    Ray, Rahul; Bhagat, Aditi; Vasudevan, Biju; Sridhar, Jandhyala; Madan, Renu; Ray, Manjusha

    2015-01-01

    A 68-year-old man, a known case of hypertension, coronary artery disease and old cardiovascular accident with right-sided hemiplegia, came with the chief complaints of a large cauliflower like growth with pus discharge on the left heel since 15 years. The patient had sustained a penetrating injury by a thorn on the left heel region few days before the lesion appeared. Dermatological examination revealed a single verrucous lesion measuring 7 × 7 cm on the left heel region associated with discharge of foul smelling cheesy material. There was also a enlarged right inguinal lymph node which was non-tender, firm, measuring 2 cm in diameter with normal overlying skin. X-ray left ankle was done which showed some soft tissue swelling. A skin biopsy showed hyperkeratosis, acanthosis and parakeratosis. Elongated rete ridges with keratinocyte hyperplasia, forming a large mass pressing on the underlying dermis were seen. There was formation of multiple large keratin filled invaginations and crypts. No atypical cells were seen. Based on history, clinical examination and investigations, a diagnosis of epithelium cuniculatum type of verrucous squamous cell carcinoma was made. A wide excision with a flap cover was performed in consultation with the oncosurgeon and the excision sample was sent for histopathological re-examination, which confirmed the diagnosis of epithelioma cuniculatum. PMID:26538697

  3. Results of Characterization and Retrieval Testing on Tank 241-C-110 Heel Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Callaway, William S.

    2013-09-30

    Nine samples of heel solids from tank 241-C-110 were delivered to the 222-S Laboratory for characterization and dissolution testing. After being drained thoroughly, the sample solids were primarily white to light-brown with minor dark-colored inclusions. The maximum dimension of the majority of the solids was <2 mm; however, numerous pieces of aggregate, microcrystalline, and crystalline solids with maximum dimensions ranging from 5-70 mm were observed. In general, the larger pieces of aggregate solids were strongly cemented. Natrophosphate [Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}?19H{sub 2}O] was the dominant solid phase identified in the heel solids. Results of chemical analyses suggested that 85-87 wt% of the heel solids were the fluoridephosphate double salt. The average bulk density measured for the heel solids was 1.689 g/mL; the reference density of natrophosphate is 1.71 g/mL. Dissolution tests on composite samples indicate that 94 to 97 wt% of the tank 241-C-110 heel solids can be retrieved by dissolution in water. Dissolution and recovery of the soluble components in 1 kg (0.59 L) of the heel solids required the addition of ≈9.5 kg (9.5 L) of water at 15 ?C and ≈4.4 kg (4.45 L) of water at 45 ?C. Calculations performed using the Environmental Simulation Program indicate that dissolution of the ≈0.86 kg of natrophosphate in each kilogram of the tank 241-C-110 heel solids would require ≈9.45 kg of water at 15 ?C and ≈4.25 kg of water at 45 ?C. The slightly larger quantities of water determined to be required to retrieve the soluble components in 1 kg of the heel solids are consistent with that required for the dissolution of solids composed mainly of natrophosphate with a major portion of the balance consisting of highly soluble sodium salts. At least 98% of the structural water, soluble phosphate, sodium, fluoride, nitrate, carbonate, nitrite, sulfate, oxalate, and chloride in the test composites was dissolved and recovered in the dissolution tests. Most of the {sup 99}Tc and {sup 137}Cs present in the initial heel solids composites was removed in the water dissolution tests. The estimated activities/weights of {sup 129}I, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 236}U, and {sup 238}U in the dry residual solids were <25% of the weights/activities in the initial composite solids. Gibbsite and nordstrandite [both Al(OH){sub 3}] were the major solid phases identified in the solids remaining after completion of the dissolution tests. Chemical analysis indicated that the residual solids may have contained up to 62 wt% Al(OH){sub 3}. Significant quantities of unidentified phosphate-, iron-, bismuth-, silicon-, and strontium- bearing species were also present in the residual solids. The reference density of gibbsite (and nordstrandite) is 2.42 g/mL. The measured density of the residual solids, 2.65 g/mL, would be a reasonable value for solids containing gibbsite as the major component with minor quantities of other, higher density solids. Sieve analysis indicated that 22.2 wt% of the residual solids were discrete particles >710 μm in size, and 77.8 wt% were particulates <710 μm in size. Light-scattering measurements suggested that nearly all of the <710-μm particulates with diameters >12 μm were weakly bound aggregates of particles with diameters <2 μm. The <710-μm residual solids settled very slowly when dispersed in reagent water. The physical appearance of a suspension containing ≈0.4 vol% of the solids in pure water changed very little over a period of 46.5 hours. It should be noted that the distribution of particle sizes in the residual solids and the observed settling behavior were both strongly influenced by the procedures followed in the dissolution tests.

  4. A Vibrotactile and Plantar Force Measurement-Based Biofeedback System: Paving the Way towards Wearable Balance-Improving Devices.

    PubMed

    Ma, Christina Zong-Hao; Wan, Anson Hong-Ping; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Lee, Winson Chiu-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Although biofeedback systems have been used to improve balance with success, they were confined to hospital training applications. Little attempt has been made to investigate the use of in-shoe plantar force measurement and wireless technology to turn hospital training biofeedback systems into wearable devices. This research developed a wearable biofeedback system which detects body sway by analyzing the plantar force and provides users with the corresponding haptic cues. The effects of this system were evaluated in thirty young and elderly subjects with simulated reduced foot sensation. Subjects performed a Romberg test under three conditions: (1) no socks, system turned-off; (2) wearing five layers of socks, system turned-off; (3) wearing five layers of socks, and system turned-on. Degree of body sway was investigated by computing the center of pressure (COP) movement measured by a floor-mounted force platform. Plantar tactile sensation was evaluated using a monofilament test. Wearing multiple socks significantly decreased the plantar tactile sensory input (p < 0.05), and increased the COP parameters (p < 0.017), indicating increased postural sway. After turning on the biofeedback system, the COP parameters decreased significantly (p < 0.017). The positive results of this study should inspire future development of wearable plantar force-based biofeedback systems for improving balance in people with sensory deficits. PMID:26694399

  5. Programmed death 1 blockade, an Achilles heel for MMR-deficient tumors?

    PubMed

    Lin, Andy Yingjie; Lin, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Program death receptor-1 (PD-1) is upregulated in many tumors and in tumor microenvironment, and PD-1 blockade has led to remarkable immune-based anti-tumor responses in across many tumor types. Pembrolizumab, an anti-programmed death 1 checkpoint inhibitor, resulted in a high rate of immune response in 41 patients with previously treated mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient tumor including colorectal cancer but not in MMR-stable tumor with expectant toxicities. Both immune-based progression-free and overall survival are quite promising and correlate with high mutation loads in the tumor. MMR-deficient tumors made up not an insignificant proportion of GI and GU cancers and are found mostly in younger patients who had better prognosis than MMR-stable tumors. However, MMR-deficient tumors do not respond to cytotoxic chemotherapy as these agents may require intact DNA mismatch repair to be effective. MMR deficiency occurred as a result of mutations in defined DNA repair complex mutations or epigenetics modifications and gene upstream of DNA repair complex. PD-1 blockade represents our first successful shot at one of the Achilles heels of this MMR-deficient tumor Goliath. Only coordinated attack on all of its Achilles heels and healing mechanisms can this tumor Goliath be brought down to its knees. PMID:26542241

  6. CHEMICAL SLUDGE HEEL REMOVAL AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE F TANK FARM CLOSURE PROJECT 8183

    SciTech Connect

    Thaxton, D; Timothy Baughman, T

    2008-01-16

    Chemical Sludge Removal (CSR) is the final waste removal activity planned for some of the oldest nuclear waste tanks located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, SC. In 2008, CSR will be used to empty two of these waste tanks in preparation for final closure. The two waste tanks chosen to undergo this process have previously leaked small amounts of nuclear waste from the primary tank into an underground secondary containment pan. CSR involves adding aqueous oxalic acid to the waste tank in order to dissolve the remaining sludge heel. The resultant acidic waste solution is then pumped to another waste tank where it will be neutralized and then stored awaiting further processing. The waste tanks to be cleaned have a storage capacity of 2.84E+06 liters (750,000 gallons) and a target sludge heel volume of 1.89E+04 liters (5,000 gallons) or less for the initiation of CSR. The purpose of this paper is to describe the CSR process and to discuss the most significant technical issues associated with the development of CSR.

  7. Plantar aponeurosis and internal architecture of the ball of the foot.

    PubMed

    Bojsen-Moller, F; Flagstad, K E

    1976-07-01

    On the basis of its internal structure, the ball of the foot can be divided into three transverse areas, each with a different mechanical function: (1) an area proximal to the heads of the metatarsals in which the retinacula cutis are developed into a series of transverse bands, and in which the deep fibres of the plantar aponeurosis form ten sagittal septa connected to the deep transverse metatarsal ligament and through this the proximal phalanges of the toes, (2) an area below the heads of the metatarsals in which vertical fibres from the joint capsules and the sides of the fibrous flexor sheaths form a cushion below each metatarsal head, and in which fat bodies cover the digital nerves and vessels in their passage between the cushions, and (3) a distal area which comprises the interdigital web. The superficial fibres of the plantar aponeurosis are inserted into the skin of this distal area, and deep to them the plantar interdigital ligament forms a series of transverse lamellae connected to the proximal phalanges by a mooring ligament which arches from one fibrous flexor sheath to the next. When the metatarsophalangeal joints are extended, the fibres of the three areas are tensed and the skin is anchored firmly to the skeleton. The direction of the fibres in the distal and proximal area promotes the transfer of forces exerted on the skin during push-off and braking respectively, while the intermediate area is adapted to bear the weight of the body. A concentration of Pacinian corpuscles is found along the digital nerves in the weight-bearing area below the transverse metatarsal ligament. The nerves for the second, and especially for the third, interstice are close to or in contact with the sharp proximal edges of the sagittal septa. PMID:1018010

  8. Neuromuscular function and fatigue resistance of the plantar flexors following short-term cycling endurance training

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Martin; Weippert, Matthias; Wassermann, Franziska; Bader, Rainer; Bruhn, Sven; Mau-Moeller, Anett

    2015-01-01

    Previously published studies on the effect of short-term endurance training on neuromuscular function of the plantar flexors have shown that the H-reflex elicited at rest and during weak voluntary contractions was increased following the training regime. However, these studies did not test H-reflex modulation during isometric maximum voluntary contraction (iMVC) and did not incorporate a control group in their study design to compare the results of the endurance training group to individuals without the endurance training stimulus. Therefore, this randomized controlled study was directed to investigate the neuromuscular function of the plantar flexors at rest and during iMVC before and after 8 weeks of cycling endurance training. Twenty-two young adults were randomly assigned to an intervention group and a control group. During neuromuscular testing, rate of torque development, isometric maximum voluntary torque and muscle activation were measured. Triceps surae muscle activation and tibialis anterior muscle co-activation were assessed by normalized root mean square of the EMG signal during the initial phase of contraction (0–100, 100–200 ms) and iMVC of the plantar flexors. Furthermore, evoked spinal reflex responses of the soleus muscle (H-reflex evoked at rest and during iMVC, V-wave), peak twitch torques induced by electrical stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve at rest and fatigue resistance were evaluated. The results indicate that cycling endurance training did not lead to a significant change in any variable of interest. Data of the present study conflict with the outcome of previously published studies that have found an increase in H-reflex excitability after endurance training. However, these studies had not included a control group in their study design as was the case here. It is concluded that short-term cycling endurance training does not necessarily enhance H-reflex responses and fatigue resistance. PMID:26029114

  9. Effect of Orthotics on Postural Sway After Fatigue of the Plantar Flexors and Dorsiflexors

    PubMed Central

    Ochsendorf, David T.; Mattacola, Carl G.; Arnold, Brent L.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of orthotic intervention on unilateral postural sway after fatigue of the plantar flexor and dorsiflexor muscle groups. Design and Setting: Subjects were assigned to both orthotic and nonorthotic testing conditions in a counterbalanced order, then assessed for postural sway before and after isokinetic fatiguing contractions of the plantar flexors and dorsiflexors. Postural stability was measured on the motor-dominant extremity. (Motor dominance was assessed as the foot the subject used to kick a ball.) Subjects: Eleven active, healthy male subjects (mean age = 24 ± 2.0 years, wt = 74.5 ± 8.8 kg, ht = 180.3 ± 8.4 cm) volunteered to participate in the study. Measurements: Center-of-pressure postural sway was assessed via the force platforms of a Chattecx Dynamic Balance System and transformed via 4 transducers as values indicative of sway in the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions. The dependent measure was postural sway in centimeters. Fatigue was induced by consecutive concentric plantar flexiondorsiflexion contractions on a Kin-Com II isokinetic dynamometer. Results: A repeated-measures analysis of variance revealed a significant orthotic-by-test interaction. Post hoc analysis with the Tukey honestly significant difference method revealed that postural sway values of the postfatigue nonorthotic condition were significantly greater when compared with the prefatigue orthotic, prefatigue nonorthotic, and postfatigue orthotic conditions. Conclusions: Our results suggest that molded orthotics may be an effective means of decreasing postural sway after an isokinetic fatigue protocol. Further research is needed to determine the exact mechanism of this improvement and whether orthotics are an effective means of preventing ankle injury. PMID:16558604

  10. Plantar thermography is useful in the early diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Balbinot, Luciane Fachin; Canani, Luis Henrique; Robinson, Caroline Cabral; Achaval, Matilde; Zaro, Milton Antônio

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated plantar thermography sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing diabetic polyneuropathy using cardiac tests (heart rate variability) as a reference standard because autonomic small fibers are affected first by this disease. METHODS: Seventy-nine individuals between the ages of 19 and 79 years old (28 males) were evaluated and divided into three groups: control (n?=?37), pre-diabetics (n?=?13) and type 2 diabetics (n?=?29). The plantar images were recorded at baseline and then minutes after a provocative maneuver (Cold Stress Test) using an infrared camera that is appropriate for clinical use. Two thermographic variables were studied: the thermal recovery index and the interdigital anisothermal technique. Heart rate variability was measured in a seven-test battery that included three spectral indexes (in the frequency domain) and four Ewing tests (the Valsalva maneuver, the orthostatic test, a deep breathing test, and the orthostatic hypotension test). Other classically recommended tests were applied, including electromyography (EMG), Michigan inventory, and a clinical interview that included a neurological physical examination. RESULTS: Among the diabetic patients, the interdigital anisothermal technique alone performed better than the thermal recovery index alone, with a better sensitivity (81.3%) and specificity (46.2%). For the pre-diabetic patients, the three tests performed equally well. None of the control subjects displayed abnormal interdigital anisothermal readouts or thermal recovery indices, which precluded the sensitivity estimation in this sample of subjects. However, the specificity (70.6%) was higher in this group. CONCLUSION: In this study, plantar thermography, which predominately considers the small and autonomic fibers that are commonly associated with a sub-clinical condition, proved useful in diagnosing diabetic neuropathy early. The interdigital anisothermal test, when used alone, performed best. PMID:23295596

  11. Plantar loading during jumping while wearing a rigid carbon graphite footplate.

    PubMed

    Queen, Robin M; Verma, Ravi; Abbey, Alicia N; Nunley, James A; Butler, Robert J

    2014-02-01

    Fifth metatarsal stress fractures are common in sports and often result in delayed and non-union. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a rigid carbon graphite footplate (CGF) on plantar loading during take-off and landing from a jump. Nineteen recreational male athletes with no history of lower extremity injury in the past 6 months and no foot or ankle surgery in the past 3 years participated in this study. Subjects completed 7 jumping tasks while wearing a standard running shoe and then the shoe plus the CGF while plantar loading data was recorded. A series of paired t-tests were used to examine differences between the two footwear conditions independently for both takeoff and landing (a = 0.05). The contact area in the medial midfoot (p < .001) and forefoot (p = .010) statistically decreased when wearing the CGFP. The force–time integral was significantly greater when wearing the CGFP in the middle (p < .001) and lateral forefoot (p = .019). Maximum force was significantly greater beneath the middle (p < .001) and lateral forefoot (p < .001) when wearing the CGFP, while it was decreased beneath the medial midfoot (p < .001). During landing, the contact area beneath the medial (p = .017) and lateral midfoot (p = .004) were significantly decreased when wearing the CGFP. The force– time integral was significantly decrease beneath the medial midfoot (p < .001) when wearing the CGFP. The maximum force was significantly greater beneath the medial (p = .047) and middle forefoot (p = .001) when the subject was wearing the CGFP. The maximum force beneath the medial midfoot (p < .001) was significantly reduced when wearing the carbon graphite footplate. The results of the study indicate that the CGF is ineffective at reducing plantar loading during jumping and landing. PMID:24611163

  12. Corticosteroid versus placebo injection for plantar fasciitis: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    LI, ZONGHUAN; YU, AIXI; QI, BAIWEN; ZHAO, YONG; WANG, WEIYANG; LI, PING; DING, JUNHUI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine the efficacy of corticosteroid versus placebo injection for the treatment of plantar fasciitis. Databases (Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library and Google Scholar) and study references were searched for randomized controlled trials comparing corticosteroid with placebo injection for plantar fasciitis. Studies that met the inclusion criteria were selected for the analysis. The risk of bias tool was used for the methodological assessment. Outcomes including visual analogue score (VAS) and plantar fascia thickness (PFT) were extracted and pooled. Egger's test was used to detect publication bias. The evidence quality was assessed by the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Statistical analysis was performed using RevMan 5.2. A total of four studies with 289 patients were included in the analysis. Compared with the placebo, corticosteroid injection provided better pain relief after one month [standardized mean difference (SMD), ?0.32; 95% confidence interval (CI), ?0.59--0.06); P=0.02). No difference was detected with respect to the VAS after two months (SMD, ?0.04; 95% CI, ?0.35–0.27; P=0.79) or three months (SMD, ?0.42; 95% CI, ?1.00–0.16; P=0.15) or to the PFT (MD, 0.70; 95% CI, ?1.77–0.38; P=0.20), although a tendency of favoring corticosteroid injection was observed. No obvious publication bias was detected. In conclusion, corticosteroid injection may provide pain relief for a short period of time, but the efficacy may disappear with the progression of time. PMID:26136971

  13. Intermediate-term results of partial plantar fascia release with microtenotomy using bipolar radiofrequency microtenotomy.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Douglas E; Ekroth, Scott R; Hyer, Christopher F

    2015-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is a common condition, with most patients treated successfully with nonoperative management. Recalcitrant disease has been managed with surgical procedures that vary in design and associated morbidity. The present study sought to determine the intermediate-term results of percutaneous bipolar radiofrequency microtenotomy in recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. The patient medical records were reviewed, and data were gathered for all the patients who met the inclusion criteria. The foot function index and visual analog scale (VAS) pain scale questionnaires were mailed to the 111 patients. Of the 111 patients, 61 (55.0%) returned their questionnaires and were ultimately included in the present analysis. Of the 61 patients, 44 (72.1%) were female and 17 were (27.9%) male, with an average reported follow-up of 33.3 ± 8.6 (range 16.1 to 46.6) months. The median postoperative VAS score was 0.0 (range 0.0 to 10.0), and the median foot function index score was 3.1 (range 0.0 to 97.1). The patients were subdivided into success and failure groups according to their satisfaction. Of the 61 patients, 51 (83.6%) were satisfied and would recommend the procedure to a friend. The median VAS score in the success group was 0.0 (range 0.0 to 5.0), and the median VAS score in the failure group was 6.0 (range 0.0 to 10.0), a significant difference (p < .001). A significant difference was also seen in the foot function index score between the success (median 2.4, range 0.0 to 25.7) and failure (median 37.4, range 0.0 to 97.1) groups (p < .001). Bipolar radiofrequency microtenotomy appears to be a safe procedure that can provide outcomes equivalent to those with open surgery, with less morbidity, for recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. PMID:25617155

  14. Treatment of plantar fasciitis with a night splint and shoe modification consisting of a steel shank and anterior rocker bottom.

    PubMed

    Mizel, M S; Marymont, J V; Trepman, E

    1996-12-01

    Seventy-one feet in 57 patients with plantar fasciitis were treated with the combination of a night splint and a shoe modification consisting of a steel shank and anterior rocker bottom. At average follow-up of 16 months, symptoms were resolved in 42 (59%), improved in 13 (18%), not changed in 11 (15%), and worse in 5 (7%) of the feet. No relation was found between outcome and age, gender, duration of symptoms, and bilateral involvement. The method is effective for the treatment of plantar fasciitis. PMID:8973894

  15. Chronic Bronchitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Calendar Read the News View Daily Pollen Count COPD Program This program offers comprehensive, individualized care for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) including emphysema and chronic bronchitis. Learn more. Doctors ...

  16. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    Chronic pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas that does not heal or improve, gets worse over time, and leads ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  17. Results of Characterization and Retrieval Testing on Tank 241-C-109 Heel Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Callaway, William S.

    2013-09-26

    Eight samples of heel solids from tank 241-C-109 were delivered to the 222-S Laboratory for characterization and dissolution testing. After being drained thoroughly, one-half to two-thirds of the solids were off-white to tan solids that, visually, were fairly evenly graded in size from coarse silt (30-60 μm) to medium pebbles (8-16 mm). The remaining solids were mostly strongly cemented aggregates ranging from coarse pebbles (16-32 mm) to fine cobbles (6-15 cm) in size. Solid phase characterization and chemical analysis indicated that the air-dry heel solids contained ≈58 wt% gibbsite [Al(OH){sub 3}] and ≈37 wt% natrophosphate [Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}?19H{sub 2}O]. The strongly cemented aggregates were mostly fine-grained gibbsite cemented with additional gibbsite. Dissolution testing was performed on two test samples. One set of tests was performed on large pieces of aggregate solids removed from the heel solids samples. The other set of dissolution tests was performed on a composite sample prepared from well-drained, air-dry heel solids that were crushed to pass a ?-in. sieve. The bulk density of the composite sample was 2.04 g/mL. The dissolution tests included water dissolution followed by caustic dissolution testing. In each step of the three-step water dissolution tests, a volume of water approximately equal to 3 times the initial volume of the test solids was added. In each step, the test samples were gently but thoroughly mixed for approximately 2 days at an average ambient temperature of 25 ?C. The caustic dissolution tests began with the addition of sufficient 49.6 wt% NaOH to the water dissolution residues to provide ≈3.1 moles of OH for each mole of Al estimated to have been present in the starting composite sample and ≈2.6 moles of OH for each mole of Al potentially present in the starting aggregate sample. Metathesis of gibbsite to sodium aluminate was then allowed to proceed over 10 days of gentle mixing of the test samples at temperatures ranging from 26-30 ?C. The metathesized sodium aluminate was then dissolved by addition of volumes of water approximately equal to 1.3 times the volumes of caustic added to the test slurries. Aluminate dissolution was allowed to proceed for 2 days at ambient temperatures of ≈29 ?C. Overall, the sequential water and caustic dissolution tests dissolved and removed 80.0 wt% of the tank 241-C-109 crushed heel solids composite test sample. The 20 wt% of solids remaining after the dissolution tests were 85-88 wt% gibbsite. If the density of the residual solids was approximately equal to that of gibbsite, they represented ≈17 vol% of the initial crushed solids composite test sample. In the water dissolution tests, addition of a volume of water ≈6.9 times the initial volume of the crushed solids composite was sufficient to dissolve and recover essentially all of the natrophosphate present. The ratio of the weight of water required to dissolve the natrophosphate solids to the estimated weight of natrophosphate present was 8.51. The Environmental Simulation Program (OLI Systems, Inc., Morris Plains, New Jersey) predicts that an 8.36 w/w ratio would be required to dissolve the estimated weight of natrophosphate present in the absence of other components of the heel solids. Only minor amounts of Al-bearing solids were removed from the composite solids in the water dissolution tests. The caustic metathesis/aluminate dissolution test sequence, executed at temperatures ranging from 27-30 ?C, dissolved and recovered ≈69 wt% of the gibbsite estimated to have been present in the initial crushed heel solids composite. This level of gibbsite recovery is consistent with that measured in previous scoping tests on the dissolution of gibbsite in strong caustic solutions. Overall, the sequential water and caustic dissolution tests dissolved and removed 80.3 wt% of the tank 241-C-109 aggregate solids test sample. The residual solids were 92-95 wt% gibbsite. Only a minor portion (≈4.

  18. Influence of the calcaneus shape on the risk of posterior heel ulcer using 3D patient-specific biomechanical modeling.

    PubMed

    Luboz, V; Perrier, A; Bucki, M; Diot, B; Cannard, F; Vuillerme, N; Payan, Y

    2015-02-01

    Most posterior heel ulcers are the consequence of inactivity and prolonged time lying down on the back. They appear when pressures applied on the heel create high internal strains and the soft tissues are compressed by the calcaneus. It is therefore important to monitor those strains to prevent heel pressure ulcers. Using a biomechanical lower leg model, we propose to estimate the influence of the patient-specific calcaneus shape on the strains within the foot and to determine if the risk of pressure ulceration is related to the variability of this shape. The biomechanical model is discretized using a 3D Finite Element mesh representing the soft tissues, separated into four domains implementing Neo Hookean materials with different elasticities: skin, fat, Achilles' tendon, and muscles. Bones are modelled as rigid bodies attached to the tissues. Simulations show that the shape of the calcaneus has an influence on the formation of pressure ulcers with a mean variation of the maximum strain over 6.0 percentage points over 18 distinct morphologies. Furthermore, the models confirm the influence of the cushion on which the leg is resting: a softer cushion leading to lower strains, it has less chances of creating a pressure ulcer. The methodology used for patient-specific strain estimation could be used for the prevention of heel ulcer when coupled with a pressure sensor. PMID:25384835

  19. Effect of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching on the plantar flexor muscle-tendon tissue properties.

    PubMed

    Mahieu, N N; Cools, A; De Wilde, B; Boon, M; Witvrouw, E

    2009-08-01

    Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching programs have been shown to be the most effective stretching technique to increase the range of motion (ROM). The objective of this study was to examine the mechanism of effect of PNF stretching on changes in the ROM. Sixty-two healthy subjects were randomized into two groups: a PNF stretching group and a control group. The PNF group performed a 6-week stretching program for the calf muscles. Before and after this period, all subjects were evaluated for dorsiflexion ROM, passive resistive torque (PRT) of the plantar flexors and stiffness of the Achilles tendon. The results of the study revealed that the dorsiflexion ROM was significantly increased in the PNF group (DeltaROMext: 5.97+/-0.671 degrees ; DeltaROMflex: 5.697+/-0.788 degrees ). The PRT of the plantar flexors and the stiffness of the Achilles tendon did not change significantly after 6 weeks of PNF stretching. These findings provide evidence that PNF stretching results in an increased ankle dorsiflexion. However, this increase in ROM could not be explained by a decrease of the PRT or by a change in stiffness of the Achilles tendon, and therefore can be explained by an increase in stretch tolerance. PMID:18627559

  20. Increased plantar force and impulse in American football players with high arch compared to normal arch

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Daniel W.; Myer, Gregory D.; Hewett, Timothy E.; Heidt, Robert S.; Ford, Kevin R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Risk of overuse injury among athletes is high due in part to repeated loading of the lower extremities. Compared to individuals with normal arch (NA) structure, those with high (HA) or low arch (LA) may be at increased risk of specific overuse injuries, including stress fractures. A high medial longitudinal arch may result in decreased shock absorbing properties due to increased rigidity in foot mechanics. While the effect of arch structure on dynamic function has been examined in straight line walking and running, the relationship between the two during multi-directional movements remains unstudied. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine if differences in plantar loading in football players occur during both walking and pivoting movements. Method Plantar loading was examined in 9 regions of the foot for 26 participants (16 NA, 10 HA). Results High arch athletes demonstrated increased maximum force in the lateral rear foot and medial forefoot, and force time integral in the medial forefoot while walking. HA athletes also demonstrated increased maximum force in the medial rear foot and medial and central forefoot during rapid pivoting. Conclusions The current findings demonstrate that loading patterns differ between football players with high and normal arch structure, which could possibly influence injury risk in this population. PMID:23141809

  1. Effectiveness of different types of foot orthoses for the treatment of plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Landorf, Karl B; Keenan, Anne-Maree; Herbert, Robert D

    2004-01-01

    Clinicians often use foot orthoses to manage the symptoms of plantar fasciitis. Although there has been considerable research evaluating the effectiveness of orthoses for this condition, there is still a lack of scientific evidence that is of suitable quality to fully inform clinical practice. Randomized controlled trials are recognized as the "gold standard" when evaluating the effectiveness of treatments. We discuss why randomized controlled trials are so important, the features of a well-conducted randomized controlled trial, and some of the problems that arise when trial design is not sound. We then evaluate the available evidence for the use of foot orthoses, with particular focus on published randomized controlled trials. From the evidence to date, it seems that foot orthoses do have a role in the management of plantar fasciitis and that prefabricated orthoses are a worthwhile initial management strategy. At this time, however, it is not possible to recommend either prefabricated or customized orthoses as being better, and it cannot be inferred that customized orthoses are more effective over time and therefore have a cost advantage. Additional good-quality randomized controlled trials are needed to answer these questions. PMID:15547121

  2. Foot claudication with plantar flexion as a result of dorsalis pedis artery impingement in an Irish dancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brigitte K; Engelbert, Travis; Turnipseed, William D

    2013-07-01

    Dorsalis pedis artery impingement is an extremely rare cause of foot claudication, with a single case reported in the literature. In this report, we describe the case of a 17-year-old female Irish dancer who presented with intermittent bilateral foot pain and discoloration during active plantar flexion. PMID:23352357

  3. Effects of the application of Low-Dye taping on the pain and stability of patients with plantar fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan; Lee, Sangyong; Lim, Dong-young; Yi, Char-Woo; Kim, Jang Hwan; Jeon, Chunbae

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined how the application of Low-Dye (LD) taping affected the pain and stability of patients with plantar fasciitis. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 patients with plantar fasciitis who were divided into two groups: a Low-Dye taping group (LTG, n=15) and a conservative treatment group (CTG, n=15). [Methods] The treatments were performed three times a week for six weeks in both groups. A visual analog scale (VAS) was used to evaluate the pain and stability of patients with plantar fasciitis, and the transfer area of the center of gravity (TAOCOG) was measured to evaluate stability using a BioRescue device. [Results] In the within-group comparison of the VAS, the LTG and CTG values significantly decreased. In the post-test between-group comparison, the VAS pain decreased more significantly in LTG than in CTG. In the within-group comparison of the TAOCOG, the LTG value significantly increased. In the post-test between-group comparison, the TAOCOG value increased more significantly than in LTG than in CTG. [Conclusion] Utilizing Low-Dye taping for patients with plantar fasciitis appears to be an effective intervention method for reducing pain and enhancing stability. PMID:26355306

  4. Effects of the application of Low-Dye taping on the pain and stability of patients with plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan; Lee, Sangyong; Lim, Dong-Young; Yi, Char-Woo; Kim, Jang Hwan; Jeon, Chunbae

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] This study examined how the application of Low-Dye (LD) taping affected the pain and stability of patients with plantar fasciitis. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 patients with plantar fasciitis who were divided into two groups: a Low-Dye taping group (LTG, n=15) and a conservative treatment group (CTG, n=15). [Methods] The treatments were performed three times a week for six weeks in both groups. A visual analog scale (VAS) was used to evaluate the pain and stability of patients with plantar fasciitis, and the transfer area of the center of gravity (TAOCOG) was measured to evaluate stability using a BioRescue device. [Results] In the within-group comparison of the VAS, the LTG and CTG values significantly decreased. In the post-test between-group comparison, the VAS pain decreased more significantly in LTG than in CTG. In the within-group comparison of the TAOCOG, the LTG value significantly increased. In the post-test between-group comparison, the TAOCOG value increased more significantly than in LTG than in CTG. [Conclusion] Utilizing Low-Dye taping for patients with plantar fasciitis appears to be an effective intervention method for reducing pain and enhancing stability. PMID:26355306

  5. The influence of gait cadence on the ground reaction forces and plantar pressures during load carriage of young adults.

    PubMed

    Castro, Marcelo P; Figueiredo, Maria Cristina; Abreu, Sofia; Sousa, Helena; Machado, Leandro; Santos, Rubim; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo

    2015-07-01

    Biomechanical gait parameters--ground reaction forces (GRFs) and plantar pressures--during load carriage of young adults were compared at a low gait cadence and a high gait cadence. Differences between load carriage and normal walking during both gait cadences were also assessed. A force plate and an in-shoe plantar pressure system were used to assess 60 adults while they were walking either normally (unloaded condition) or wearing a backpack (loaded condition) at low (70 steps per minute) and high gait cadences (120 steps per minute). GRF and plantar pressure peaks were scaled to body weight (or body weight plus backpack weight). With medium to high effect sizes we found greater anterior-posterior and vertical GRFs and greater plantar pressure peaks in the rearfoot, forefoot and hallux when the participants walked carrying a backpack at high gait cadences compared to walking at low gait cadences. Differences between loaded and unloaded conditions in both gait cadences were also observed. PMID:25766421

  6. Quantitative heel ultrasound in assessment of bone structure in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Mondry, A; Hetzel, G R; Willers, R; Feldkamp, J; Grabensee, B

    2001-05-01

    Many patients with advanced renal disease have osteopenia or even osteoporosis by the definition of the World Health Organization based on bone mineral density (BMD). Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), the standard method to assess BMD, is not always available. Quantitative heel ultrasound (QUS) is an inexpensive, mobile, and radiation-free diagnostic alternative, yet few data address this method's usefulness in patients with renal disease. The present study assessed the value of QUS in detecting changes in bone structure in renal transplant recipients compared with DXA. In a cross-sectional analysis, 50 patients (29 women) with a mean age of 50 +/- 13 years, mean time since transplantation of 60 months (range, 1 to 205 months), and stable renal allograft function were studied. BMD was quantified by DXA of the hip and spine. QUS of the left heel measured broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) and speed of sound (SOS). Stiffness index (SI) was calculated as SI = (0.67 * BUA + 0.28 * SOS) - 420. DXA measurements established the diagnoses of osteopenia and osteoporosis in 49% and 22% of the patients, respectively. Femoral neck BMD and QUS parameters showed good correlation (r = 0.638; P < 0.001). Sensitivities of BUA, SOS, and SI for diagnosing osteoporosis were 100%, and specificities were 73%, 76%, and 78%, respectively. Positive predictive values were 50%, 53%, and 56%, and negative predictive values were 100%. QUS can be recommended for screening patients who do not have osteoporosis. Those suspected of osteopenic bone structure should be examined by additional DXA measurement for quantification before initiation of therapy. PMID:11325674

  7. Heel bone strength is related to lifestyle factors in Okinawan men with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Gushiken, Michiko; Komiya, Ichiro; Ueda, Shinichiro; Kobayashi, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction Although male diabetic patients have an increased risk of fracture, there is little information about this in the literature. The association between heel bone stiffness and the lifestyle of male patients with diabetes was evaluated. Materials and Methods The study included 108 participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and 168 age-adjusted, healthy male volunteers. None of the participants had a history of osteoporosis or other severe diseases. Heel bone stiffness was examined by quantitative ultrasound, and each participant completed a health interview survey questionnaire. Bone stiffness was taken as an indicator of bone strength. Stepwise regression analysis was used to investigate associations between bone stiffness and lifestyle-related factors, such as sunlight exposure, intake of milk or small fish, regular exercise, cigarette smoking, consumption of alcohol, and number of remaining teeth. Results Bone stiffness showed a significant negative association with cigarette smoking [standardized coefficient (SC) = ?0.297, F-value (F) = 10.059] and age (SC = ?0.207, F = 7.565) in diabetic patients. Bone stiffness showed a significant negative association with age (SC = ?0.371, F = 12.076) and height (SC = ?0.193, F = 7.898), as well as a significant positive association with sunlight exposure (SC = 0.182, F = 9.589) and intake of small fish (SC = 0.170, F = 7.393) in controls. Conclusions These findings suggest that cigarette smoking and age are negatively associated with bone stiffness in Okinawan male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:25802722

  8. Difference in plantar pressure between the preferred and non?preferred feet in four soccer?related movements

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Pui?lam; Chamari, Karim; Chaouachi, Anis; De Wei Mao; Wisløff, Ulrik; Hong, Youlian

    2007-01-01

    Objective and participants The present study measured the difference in plantar pressure between the preferred and non?preferred foot in four soccer?related movements in 15 male university soccer players (mean (SD) age 20.9 (1.3)?years, mean (SD) height 173 (4)?cm and mean (SD) weight 61.7 (3.6)?kg). Design To record plantar pressure distribution, players randomly wore three types of soccer shoes (classical 6?stud and 12?stud, and specially designed 12?stud) embedded with an insole pressure recorder device with 99 sensors, divided into 10 areas for analysis. Plantar pressure was recorded in five successful trials in each of the four soccer?related movements: running (at 3.3?m/s), sideward cutting, 45° cutting and landing from a vertical jump. Results Plantar pressures of the preferred and non?preferred foot were different in 115 of 120 comparisons. The overall plantar pressure of the preferred foot was higher than that of the non?preferred foot. Specifically, in each of the four movements, higher pressure was found in the preferred foot during the take?off phase, whereas this was found in the non?preferred foot during the landing phase. This would suggest a tendency of the preferred foot for higher motion force and of the non?preferred foot for a greater role in body stabilisation. Conclusions The data indicate that the preferred and non?preferred foot should be treated independently with regard to strength/power training to avoid unnecessary injuries. Different shoes/insoles and different muscular strengthening programmes are thus suggested for each of the soccer player's feet. PMID:17138639

  9. Chronic kidney disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Kidney failure - chronic; Renal failure - chronic; Chronic renal insufficiency; Chronic kidney failure; Chronic renal failure ... Chronic kidney disease (CKD) slowly gets worse over months or years. you may not notice any symptoms for some ...

  10. Palmar and plantar pads and flexion creases of genetic polydactyly mice (Pdn).

    PubMed

    Kimura, S; Naruse, I; Schaumann, B A; Plato, C C; Shimada, M; Shiota, K

    1999-01-01

    Attempts to gain a better understanding of the relationship between the epidermal ridge patterns (dermatoglyphics) and flexion creases on the volar aspects of human hands and feet and specific medical disorders led to a search for a suitable animal model, allowing studies of the fetal development of the pertinent structures. A common experimental animal, the rat (Rattus norvegicus), was found to be an excellent candidate, owing to the strong resemblance of the volar pads and flexion creases on its palmar and plantar surfaces to those of human subjects. A hereditary preaxial polydactyly mouse (Pdn) provides an opportunity to study the effects of this malformation on the surrounding morphological structures and, specifically, on the volar pads, i.e., the sites over which the dermatoglyphic patterns develop. The hands and feet of the wild-type (+/+) mice show no anomalies, and their major pad and flexion crease configurations correspond to those of normal rats. The heterozygous (Pdn/+) mice, in spite of having a thumb/big toe with a duplicated distal phalanx on their hands/feet, did not display any alterations in palmar/plantar pads. The homozygous (Pdn/Pdn) mice have a protrusion in the thenar area and one to three supernumerary digits on the preaxial portion of both the hands and feet. The effect of these anomalies was found to be limited to the pad and flexion crease configurations in the preaxial areas; the postaxial sites were not affected. The original number of pads on the thenar/first interdigital areas of Pdn/Pdn mice was apparently identical to that of the +/+ and Pdn/+mice. The preaxial protrusion, however, affected the number, size, and location of the pads observed in the newborn mice, resulting in varying pad configurations, such as fused and scattered pads or a pad cluster formed by gathering the neighboring pads. These pad modifications were induced by the preaxial plantar/palmar protrusion only and were not affected by the presence of supernumerary preaxial digits. In view of the similarities in the morphology and fetal development of human and mouse distal limbs, the present study is relevant to human subjects, particularly to the understanding of the significance of dermatoglyphic variations in individuals with specific medical disorders. Future studies of naturally occurring or experimentally induced limb malformations in mice or rats should provide valuable insights into the development of human hands and feet and into factors contributing to their congenital anomalies. PMID:9918099

  11. Plantar Wart

    MedlinePLUS

    ... counter wart removers have a high percentage of salicylic acid and work by dissolving away the layer of ... if it touches unaffected skin around it; 40% salicylic acid self-stick pads appear to be one of ...

  12. Palmar and plantar lichen planus: a case report and review of the literature*

    PubMed Central

    Velez, Ana Maria Abreu; Howard, Michael S; Pereyo, Neville

    2015-01-01

    Palmoplantar lichen planus is an uncommon dermatosis. We present a case of 38-year-old Caucasian male with a history of pruritic, scaly lesions on the right plantar foot. Physical examination revealed whitish plaques and numerous spiny hyperkeratotic papules and focal scaling. A biopsy demonstrated orthohyperkeratosis and acanthosis of the epidermis. Immunohistochemical staining revealed positivity within the epidermis and/or lichenoid infiltrate with CD3, CD8, CD45, CD68, myeloid histiod antigen, BCL2, p27, p53, HLA-DPDQDR, metallothionein and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1. The diagnosis of PPLP was thus confirmed; this case illustrates that PPLP should be considered in the differential diagnosis of uncommon foot dermatoses with a significant junctional inflammatory component. PMID:26312708

  13. [Experimental gait study based on the plantar pressure test for the young people].

    PubMed

    Fang, Zheng; Zhang, Xingliang; Wang, Chao; Gu, Xin; Ma, Shenglin; Wang, Lei; Chen, Siyuan

    2014-12-01

    Based on force sensing resistor (FSR) sensor, we designed insoles for pressure measurement, which were stable and reliable with a simple structure, and easy to wear and to do outdoor experiments with. So the insoles could be used for gait detection system. The hardware includes plantar pressure sensor array, signal conditioning unit and main circuit unit. The software has the function of data acquisition, signal processing, feature extraction and classification function. We collected 27 groups of gait data of a healthy person based on this system to analyze the data and study pressure distribution under various gait features, i.e., walking on the flat ground, uphill, downhill, up the stairs, and down the stairs. These five gait patterns for pattern recognition and classification by K-nearest neighbors (KNN) recognition algorithm reached up to 90% accuracy. This preliminarily verified the usefulness of the system. PMID:25868244

  14. REMOVING SLUDGE HEELS FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE WASTE TANKS BY OXALIC ACID DISSOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M; David Herman, D; Fernando Fondeur, F; John Pareizs, J; Michael Hay, M; Bruce Wiersma, B; Kim Crapse, K; Thomas Peters, T; Samuel Fink, S; Donald Thaxton, D

    2009-03-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will remove sludge as part of waste tank closure operations. Typically the bulk sludge is removed by mixing it with supernate to produce a slurry, and transporting the slurry to a downstream tank for processing. Experience shows that a residual heel may remain in the tank that cannot be removed by this conventional technique. In the past, SRS used oxalic acid solutions to disperse or dissolve the sludge heel to complete the waste removal. To better understand the actual conditions of oxalic acid cleaning of waste from carbon steel tanks, the authors developed and conducted an experimental program to determine its effectiveness in dissolving sludge, the hydrogen generation rate, the generation rate of other gases, the carbon steel corrosion rate, the impact of mixing on chemical cleaning, the impact of temperature, and the types of precipitates formed during the neutralization process. The test samples included actual SRS sludge and simulated SRS sludge. The authors performed the simulated waste tests at 25, 50, and 75 C by adding 8 wt % oxalic acid to the sludge over seven days. They conducted the actual waste tests at 50 and 75 C by adding 8 wt % oxalic acid to the sludge as a single batch. Following the testing, SRS conducted chemical cleaning with oxalic acid in two waste tanks. In Tank 5F, the oxalic acid (8 wt %) addition occurred over seven days, followed by inhibited water to ensure the tank contained enough liquid to operate the mixer pumps. The tank temperature during oxalic acid addition and dissolution was approximately 45 C. The authors analyzed samples from the chemical cleaning process and compared it with test data. The conclusions from the work are: (1) Oxalic acid addition proved effective in dissolving sludge heels in the simulant demonstration, the actual waste demonstration, and in SRS Tank 5F. (2) The oxalic acid dissolved {approx} 100% of the uranium, {approx} 100% of the iron, and {approx} 40% of the manganese during a single contact in the simulant demonstration. (The iron dissolution may be high due to corrosion of carbon steel coupons.) (3) The oxalic acid dissolved {approx} 80% of the uranium, {approx} 70% of the iron, {approx} 50% of the manganese, and {approx} 90% of the aluminum in the actual waste demonstration for a single contact. (4) The oxalic acid dissolved {approx} 100% of the uranium, {approx} 15% of the iron, {approx} 40% of the manganese, and {approx} 80% of the aluminum in Tank 5F during the first contact cycle. Except for the iron, these results agree well with the demonstrations. The data suggest that a much larger fraction of the iron in the sludge dissolved, but it re-precipitated with the oxalate added to Tank 5F. (5) The demonstrations produced large volumes (i.e., 2-14 gallons of gas/gallon of oxalic acid) of gas (primarily carbon dioxide) by the reaction of oxalic acid with sludge and carbon steel. (6) The reaction of oxalic acid with carbon steel produced hydrogen in the simulant and actual waste demonstrations. The volume produced varied from 0.00002-0.00100 ft{sup 3} hydrogen/ft{sup 2} carbon steel. The hydrogen production proved higher in unmixed tanks than in mixed tanks.

  15. Plantar Pressure in Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Patients with Active Foot Ulceration, Previous Ulceration and No History of Ulceration: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Malindu Eranga; Crowther, Robert George; Pappas, Elise; Lazzarini, Peter Anthony; Cunningham, Margaret; Sangla, Kunwarjit Singh; Buttner, Petra; Golledge, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Aims Elevated dynamic plantar pressures are a consistent finding in diabetes patients with peripheral neuropathy with implications for plantar foot ulceration. This meta-analysis aimed to compare the plantar pressures of diabetes patients that had peripheral neuropathy and those with neuropathy with active or previous foot ulcers. Methods Published articles were identified from Medline via OVID, CINAHL, SCOPUS, INFORMIT, Cochrane Central EMBASE via OVID and Web of Science via ISI Web of Knowledge bibliographic databases. Observational studies reporting barefoot dynamic plantar pressure in adults with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, where at least one group had a history of plantar foot ulcers were included. Interventional studies, shod plantar pressure studies and studies not published in English were excluded. Overall mean peak plantar pressure (MPP) and pressure time integral (PTI) were primary outcomes. The six secondary outcomes were MPP and PTI at the rear foot, mid foot and fore foot. The protocol of the meta-analysis was published with PROPSERO, (registration number CRD42013004310). Results Eight observational studies were included. Overall MPP and PTI were greater in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients with foot ulceration compared to those without ulceration (standardised mean difference 0.551, 95% CI 0.290–0.811, p<0.001; and 0.762, 95% CI 0.303–1.221, p?=?0.001, respectively). Sub-group analyses demonstrated no significant difference in MPP for those with neuropathy with active ulceration compared to those without ulcers. A significant difference in MPP was found for those with neuropathy with a past history of ulceration compared to those without ulcers; (0.467, 95% CI 0.181– 0.753, p?=?0.001). Statistical heterogeneity between studies was moderate. Conclusions Plantar pressures appear to be significantly higher in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy with a history of foot ulceration compared to those with diabetic neuropathy without a history of ulceration. More homogenous data is needed to confirm these findings. PMID:24915443

  16. Mixing of process heels, process solutions, and recycle streams: Results of the small-scale radioactive tests

    SciTech Connect

    GJ Lumetta; JP Bramson; OT Farmer III; LR Greenwood; FV Hoopes; MA Mann; MJ Steele; RT Steele; RG Swoboda; MW Urie

    2000-05-17

    Various recycle streams will be combined with the low-activity waste (LAW) or the high-level waste (HLW) feed solutions during the processing of the Hanford tank wastes by BNFL, Inc. In addition, the LAW and HLW feed solutions will also be mixed with heels present in the processing equipment. This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of mixing specific process streams. Observations were made regarding adverse reactions (mainly precipitation) and effects on the Tc oxidation state (as indicated by K{sub d} measurements with SuperLig{reg_sign} 639). The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-023, Rev. 0, Small Scale Mixing of Process Heels, Solutions, and Recycle Streams. The test went according to plan, with only minor deviations from the test plan. The deviations from the test plan are discussed in the experimental section.

  17. Clarification of functional differences between the hallux and lesser toes during the single leg stance: immediate effects of conditioning contraction of the toe plantar flexion muscles

    PubMed Central

    Saeki, Junya; Tojima, Michio; Torii, Suguru

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the functional differences of the plantar flexion muscles of the hallux and lesser toes during the single leg stance by comparing postural sway in different conditioning contraction interventions. [Subjects] Thirty-four healthy, young males and females participated in this study. [Methods] The front-back and right-left direction components of maximal displacement and postural sway velocity during the single leg stance were measured in various conditioning contraction interventions for the plantar flexion muscles of the hallux or lessor toes. [Results] The main findings of this study were as follows: 1) the front-back direction component of maximal displacement was reduced by conditioning contraction of the plantar flexion muscles of the hallux, and 2) the front-back direction component of the postural sway velocity was reduced by conditioning contraction of the plantar flexion muscles of the lesser toes during the single leg stance. [Conclusion] The plantar flexion muscles of the lesser toes control the postural sway velocity. Furthermore, the plantar flexion muscles of the hallux appear to control the amplitude of postural sway. PMID:26504272

  18. A novel approach to mapping load transfer from the plantar surface of the foot to the walls of the total contact cast: a proof of concept study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Total contact casting is regarded as the gold standard treatment for plantar foot ulcers. Load transfer from the plantar surface of the foot to the walls of the total contact cast has previously been assessed indirectly. The aim of this proof of concept study was to determine the feasibility of a new method to directly measure the load between the cast wall and the lower leg interface using capacitance sensors. Methods Plantar load was measured with pedar® sensor insoles and cast wall load with pliance® sensor strips as participants (n=2) walked along a 9 m walkway at 0.4±0.04 m/sec. The relative force (%) on the cast wall was calculated by dividing the mean cast wall force (N) per step by the mean plantar force (N) per step in the shoe-cast condition. Results The combined average measured load per step upon the walls of the TCC equated to 23-34% of the average plantar load on the opposite foot. The highest areas of load on the lower leg were located at the posterior margin of the lateral malleolus and at the anterior ankle/extensor retinaculum. Conclusions These direct measurements of cast wall load are similar to previous indirect assessment of load transfer (30-36%) to the cast walls. This new methodology may provide a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of load transfer from the plantar surface of the foot to the cast walls of the total contact cast. PMID:23237261

  19. A comparison of the effectiveness of extracorporeal shock wave and ultrasound therapy in the management of heel pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheing, G. L. Y.; Chang, H.; Lo, S. K.

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) and ultrasound therapy (US) for managing heel pain. Thirty-seven subjects received either: ESWT (once a week), US (three times a week), or CONTROL (no treatment) for 3 consecutive weeks and were followed-up for 3 more weeks. A visual analogue scale (VAS), the maximum tolerable duration for prolonged walking or standing, and the Mayo clinical scoring system (MCSS) were evaluated. Mixed models treating baseline measures as covariates were adopted for statistical analysis. By week 3, intensity of heel pain on palpation was reduced by 37% (VAS score from 7.5 to 4.6) in the ESWT group, 24% (from 5.3 to 4.2) in the US group, and increased by 3% (5.6-5.7) in the control group; this difference was significant after adjusting for baseline VAS scores ( p = 0.022). The improvements in the maximum tolerable duration of prolonged walking or standing was only significant in the ESWT group (157% increase, p = 0.043) but not the other two groups. Both active treatment groups maintained the treatment effect at the three-week follow-up. We conclude that ESWT is potentially more effective in reducing heel pain than ultrasound therapy but additional evidence is needed due to the various limitations of the study.

  20. Citral: a monoterpene with prophylactic and therapeutic anti-nociceptive effects in experimental models of acute and chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Catarine M; Ganev, Ellen G; Mazzardo-Martins, Leidiane; Martins, Daniel F; Rocha, Lúcia R M; Santos, Adair R S; Hiruma-Lima, Clelia A

    2014-08-01

    Citral (3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadienal) is an open-chain monoterpenoid present in the essential oils of several medicinal plants. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of orally administered citral in experimental models of acute and chronic nociception, inflammation, and gastric ulcers caused by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Oral treatment with citral significantly inhibited the neurogenic and inflammatory pain responses induced by intra-plantar injection of formalin. Citral also had prophylactic and therapeutic anti-nociceptive effects against mechanical hyperalgesia in plantar incision surgery, chronic regional pain syndrome, and partial ligation of sciatic nerve models, without producing any significant motor dysfunction. In addition, citral markedly attenuated the pain response induced by intra-plantar injection of glutamate and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, a protein kinase C activator), as well as by intrathecal (i.t.) injection of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists (N-methyl-D-aspartic acid [NMDA] and 1-amino-1,3-dicarboxycyclopentane [trans-ACPD], respectively), substance P, and cytokine tumour necrosis factor-?. However, citral potentiated behaviours indicative of pain caused by i.t., but not intra-plantar, injection of a transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor type 1 (TRPV1) agonist. Finally, the anti-nociceptive action of citral was found to involve significant activation of the 5-HT2A serotonin receptor. The effect of citral was accompanied by a gastro-protective effect against NSAID-induced ulcers. Together, these results show the potential of citral as a new drug for the treatment of pain. PMID:24792822

  1. [Chronic cough].

    PubMed

    Yernault, J C

    1999-09-01

    Cough becomes chronic after three weeks of evolution. Chronic cough is due to four syndromes in 90% of cases: postnasal drip syndrome, asthma, gastroesophageal reflux and chronic bronchitis. Each syndrome needs a specific therapeutic approach. Antitussive drugs like dextromethorphan are prescribed in cases of complicated cough. Cough secondary to angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors must not be neglected. In case of failure of initial check up or lack of response to specific therapy, a more thorough examination must be conducted in a specialized centre. PMID:10523911

  2. EM-31 ALTERNATIVE AND ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING PROGRAM FOR SLUDGE HEEL REMOVAL - 11220

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.; Hay, M.; Wiersma, B.; Pennebaker, F.

    2010-12-10

    Mixtures of oxalic acid with nitric acid have been shown to be superior to oxalic acid alone for the dissolution of iron-rich High Level Waste sludge heels. Optimized conditions resulting in minimal oxalate usage and stoichiometric iron dissolution (based on added oxalate ion) have been determined for hematite (a primary sludge iron phase) in oxalic/nitric acid mixtures. The acid mixtures performed better than expected based on the solubility of hematite in the individual acids through a synergistic effect in which the preferred 1:1 Fe:oxalate complex is formed. This allows for the minimization of oxalate additions to the waste stream. Carbon steel corrosion rates were measured in oxalic/nitric acid mixtures to evaluate the impacts of chemical cleaning with these solutions on waste tank integrity. Manageable corrosion rates were observed in the concentration ranges of interest for an acid contact timescale of 1 month. Kinetics tests involving hematite and gibbsite (a primary sludge aluminum phase) have confirmed that {ge}90% solids dissolution occurs within 3 weeks. Based on these results, the chemical cleaning conditions recommended to promote minimal oxalate usage and manageable corrosion include: 0.5 wt. % oxalic acid/0.175 M nitric acid mixture, 50 C, 2-3 week contact time with agitation.

  3. Dendritic cells as Achilles' heel and Trojan horse during varicella zoster virus infection.

    PubMed

    Schönrich, Günther; Raftery, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV), a human alphaherpesvirus, causes varicella and subsequently establishes latency within sensory nerve ganglia. Later in life VZV can reactivate to cause herpes zoster. A reduced frequency of VZV-specific T cells is strongly associated with herpes zoster illustrating that these immune cells are central to control latency. Dendritic cells (DCs) are required for the generation of VZV-specific T cells. However, DCs can also be infected in vitro and in vivo allowing VZV to evade the antiviral immune response. Thus, DCs represent the immune systems' Achilles heel. Uniquely among the human herpesviruses, VZV infects both DCs and T cells, and exploits both as Trojan horses. During primary infection VZV-infected DCs traffic to the draining lymph nodes and tonsils, where the virus is transferred to T cells. VZV-infected T cells subsequently spread infection throughout the body to give the typical varicella skin rash. The delicate interplay between VZV and DCs and its consequences for viral immune evasion and viral dissemination will be discussed in this article. PMID:26005438

  4. EM-21 ALTERNATIVE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING PROGRAM FOR SLUDGE HEEL REMOVAL

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M.; King, W.; Martino, C.

    2009-12-18

    Preliminary studies in the EM-21 Alternative Chemical Cleaning Program have focused on understanding the dissolution of Hematite (a primary sludge heel phase) in oxalic acid, with a focus on minimizing oxalic acid usage. Literature reviews, thermodynamic modeling, and experimental results have all confirmed that pH control, preferably using a supplemental proton source, is critical to oxalate minimization. With pH control, iron concentrations as high as 0.103 M have been obtained in 0.11 M oxalic acid. This is consistent with the formation of a 1:1 (iron:oxalate) complex. The solubility of Hematite in oxalic acid has been confirmed to increase by a factor of 3 when the final solution pH decreases from 5 to below 1. This is consistent with literature predictions of a shift in speciation from a 1:3 to 1:1 as the pH is lowered. Above a solution pH of 6, little Hematite dissolves. These results emphasize the importance of pH control in optimizing Hematite dissolution in oxalic acid.

  5. Ear infection - chronic

    MedlinePLUS

    Middle ear infection - chronic; Otitis media - chronic; Chronic otitis media; Chronic ear infection ... Chole RA. Chronic otitis media, mastoiditis, and petrositis. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. ...

  6. [Chronic migraine].

    PubMed

    Diener, H C; Holle, D; Müller, D; Nägel, S; Rabe, K

    2013-12-01

    The classification of the International Headache Society (IHS) generally differentiates episodic from chronic headache. Chronic migraine is defined as headache on 15 and more days a month over more than 3 months and headache on 8 days or more fulfils the criteria for migraine or were triptan/ergot-responsive when thought to be migrainous in early stages of the attack. The prevalence of chronic migraine is estimated at 2-4?%. The quality of life is highly compromised in this condition and comorbidities are much more frequent compared to episodic migraine. Data from prospective randomized studies are scarce as most patients with chronic migraine were excluded from previous trials and only few studies were conducted for this condition. The efficacy for prophylactic treatment compared with placebo is proven for topiramate and onabotulinum toxin A. PMID:24337617

  7. Chronic Meningitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... not infections can cause chronic meningitis. They include sarcoidosis and certain disorders that cause inflammation, such as ... For disorders that are not infections, such as sarcoidosis and Behçet syndrome: Corticosteroids or other drugs that ...

  8. Assessment of Diabetic Polyneuropathy and Plantar Pressure in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus in Prevention of Diabetic Foot

    PubMed Central

    Skopljak, Amira; Sukalo, Aziz; Batic-Mujanovic, Olivera; Muftic, Mirsad; Tiric-Campara, Merita; Zunic, Lejla

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Risk assessment for development foot ulcer in diabetics is a key aspect in any plan and program for prevention of non-traumatic amputation of lower extremities. Material and methods: In the prospective research to assessed diabetic neuropathy in diabetic patients, to determined the dynamic function of the foot (plantar pressure), by using pedobarography (Group I), and after the use of orthopedic insoles with help of pedobarography, to determined the connection between the risk factors: deformity of the foot, limited joint movements, diabetic polyneuropathy, plantar pressure in effort preventing changes in the diabetic foot. Results: Out of 1806 patients, who are registered in one Team of family medicine examined 100 patients with diabetes mellitus Type 2. The average age of subjects was 59.4, SD11.38. The average HbA1c was 7.78% SD1.58. Combining monofilament and tuning fork tests, the diagnosis of polyneuropathy have 65% of patients. Comparing Test Symptom Score individual parameters between the first and second measurement, using pedobarography, in Group I, statistically significant difference was found for all of the assessed parameters: pain, burning sensation, paresthesia and insensitivity (p<0,05). The measurements of peak pressure, both first and the second measurement, for all of the subjects in Group I(45) show values above 200kPa. That’s a level of pressure that needs to be corrected. The study finds correlation between the foot deformation, diabetic polyneuropathy and plantar pressure (p>0,05). Conclusion: A detail clinical exam of diabetic food in a family doctor office equipped with pedobarography (plantar pressure measurements), use of orthopedic insoles, significantly reduces clinical symptoms of diabetic polyneuropathy in patients with diabetes. PMID:25650237

  9. The effect of low-dye taping on rearfoot motion and plantar pressure during the stance phase of gait

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, Kieran; Kennedy, Norelee; O'Neill, Emer; Ni Mhainin, Una

    2008-01-01

    Background Low-dye (LD) taping is commonly used to reduce rearfoot pronation. No studies have previously investigated the effectiveness of LD taping using both plantar pressure distribution (F-Scan) and 3-D (CODA) analysis of rearfoot motion. Methods 20 healthy subjects with a navicular drop test exceeding 10 mm participated in the study. T tests were used to determine whether significant (p < 0.05) differences in plantar pressure and rearfoot motion occurred with LD taping. Results LD taping resulted in statistically significant increases in peak plantar pressure in the lateral midfoot (p = 0.000), along with significant decreases in pressure in the medial forefoot (p = 0.014), and the medial (p = 0.000) and lateral hindfoot (p = 0.007). No significant changes occurred in the medial midfoot (p = 0.794) or lateral forefoot (p = 0.654). When assessed using motion analysis, taping resulted in a statistically significant decrease in rearfoot pronation (p = 0.006), supination (p = 0.025) and total rearfoot range of motion (p = 0.000). The mean rearfoot position during stance was not significantly different however (p = 0.188). Conclusion LD taping is associated with alterations in peak plantar pressure in the midfoot and forefoot that indicate reduced pronation with LD taping. However, LD taping appears to reduce both pronation and supination in the rearfoot, rather than simply reducing pronation, when assessed using 3D motion analysis. Therefore, it would appear that LD taping does indeed reduce pronation, by restricting rearfoot motion in general, rather than pronation specifically. The degree of change observed with LD taping was however very small, and further research is needed to clarify the clinical significance of these initial findings. PMID:18710520

  10. Characterization of postural stability in a simulated environment of an earthquake using in-shoe plantar pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Abu-Faraj, Ziad O; Abou-Assi, Fadi A; Jaber, Rawad K; Khalifeh, Hassan A

    2009-01-01

    An abled individual is believed to be capable of withstanding and overcoming the severe tremors of an earthquake as has been ascertained in a previous study. However, the event-related physiological mechanisms of human postural stability during an earthquake are subject to further investigation. Accordingly, the objective of this study is to further characterize postural stability in a simulated environment of an earthquake using a pedar-x (novel gmbh, Munich, Germany) in-shoe dynamic plantar pressure measurement system. A foot mask, dividing each of the insoles into seven plantar loading regions, was employed in this study. This paper reports preliminary results obtained from a normal adult female test subject with right side dominance and a normal foot arch. The test trial was comprised of 12 stages, ranging from quiet standing to simulated earthquake magnitude of 6.7 degrees on the Richter's scale, which is considered to be violent. The study metrics included: mean plantar pressure, foot-to-ground contact duration, insole loading area, and the position, displacement, and instantaneous velocity of the center of pressure. The study showed bilateral quantifiable changes in these metrics by foot-mask-region as a result of increasing magnitudes of simulated tremors. The subject was able to defy the overwhelming perturbations and maintain her balance and postural stability throughout the test period. The significance of this study lies in its ability to determine the threshold of falling within different subject populations in the event of an earthquake. PMID:19964865

  11. Effect of plantar subcutaneous administration of bergamot essential oil and linalool on formalin-induced nociceptive behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Soh; Otowa, Akira; Kamio, Satomi; Sato, Kazuma; Yagi, Tomomi; Kishikawa, Yukinaga; Komatsu, Takaaki; Bagetta, Giacinto; Sakurada, Tsukasa; Nakamura, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of bergamot essential oil (BEO) or linalool, a major volatile component of BEO, on the nociceptive response to formalin. Plantar subcutaneous injection of BEO or linalool into the ipsilateral hindpaw reduced both the first and late phases of the formalin-induced licking and biting responses in mice. Plantar subcutaneous injection of BEO or linalool into the contralateral hindpaw did not yield an antinociceptive effect, suggesting that the antinociceptive effect of BEO or linalool in the formalin test occurred peripherally. Intraperitoneal and plantar subcutaneous injection pretreatment with naloxone hydrochloride, an opioid receptor antagonist, significantly attenuated both BEO- and linalool-induced antinociception. Pretreatment with naloxone methiodide, a peripherally acting opioid receptor antagonists, also significantly antagonized the antinociceptive effects of BEO and linalool. Our results provide evidence for the involvement of peripheral opioids in antinociception induced by BEO and linalool. These results suggest that activation of peripheral opioid receptors may play an important role in reducing formalin-induced nociception. PMID:25749150

  12. Experience with extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furia, John P.

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to summarize the literature and to report on single treatment, high-energy ESWT for the treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis and lateral epicondylitis. Fifty-three patients (60 heels) were treated with 3800 shock waves. Sixteen patients (19 heels) were active, 21 (22 heels), were moderately active, and 16 (19 heels) were sedentary. Twelve weeks post treatment, mean visual analog scores (VAS) for the entire group improved from 9.2 to 2.4 (p<0.05), RAND-Physical Functioning score improved from 40.4 to 91.5 (p<0.05), and RAND-Pain score improved from 33.3 to 90 (p<0.05). Fifty heels (83.3%) were assigned an excellent or good result. Thirty-six patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis were treated with 3200 shock waves. There were 9 workers compensation and 27 non-workers compensation patients. Twelve weeks post treatment, the mean VAS for the entire group improved from 8.0 to 2.5 (p<0.05), and the mean RAND-Physical Functioning score improved from 65.6 to 88.0 (p<0.05). Twenty-eight elbows (77.8%) were assigned an excellent or good result. In both trials, outcome was similar for each subgroup. There were no significant complications in either trial. Using the therapeutic parameters applied, ESWT is a safe and effective treatment for chronic plantar fasciitis and lateral epicondylitis.

  13. Pads and flexion creases on the plantar surface of hammertoe mutant mouse (Hm).

    PubMed

    Kimura, S; Terashima, T; Schaumann, B A; Shimada, M; Shiota, K

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of the present work was to determine the effects of the hereditary malformation of Hammertoe mutant mice (gene symbol Hm) on the surrounding morphological structures and, specifically, on the volar pads, i.e., the sites of the epidermal ridge patterns (dermatoglyphics). The hindlimbs of the wild-type (+/+) Hammertoe mice show no anomalies and their major pad and flexion crease configurations correspond to those of normal mice. The heterozygous (Hm/+) and homozygous (Hm/Hm) mice display a fusion of the interdigital tissues involving all digits with the exception of digit I. In Hm/Hm mice, this webbing extends to the distal phalanx and the markedly flexed digits form a shape resembling a hammer. In Hm/+ mice, the interdigital webbing does not extend as far and the digits show moderate flexion compared to those of Hm/Hm mice. Both Hm/Hm and Hm/+ have a rudimentary extra digit in the postaxial area of the hindlimbs. The ventral volar skin of the flexed digits is incompletely developed. The more posterior digits show the more severe camptodactyly. These aberrant configurations are related to the abnormal occurrence of the programmed cell death (PCD) in the interdigital zones II-IV and the proximal part of the postaxial margin during hindlimb development. They are limited to the pads on the plantar surface of the postaxial area; the preaxial area is not affected. As a result of a severe camptodactyly of digit V, its volar skin is shifted into the distal portion of the hypothenar area. This shifting affects the number, size, and location of the pads, especially of the hypothenar pad, resulting in varying pad configurations, such as a displacement of the distal and proximal components of the hypothenar pad, or a fusion of the two components of the hypothenar pad, leading to a reduced final pad number. These pad modifications are induced by the postaxial plantar surface shifting proximally and are not affected by the presence of an extra rudimentary digit. The pad modifications in Hammertoe mice with webbed digits and postaxial polydactyly resemble closely those of the previously studied mice with genetic preaxial polydactyly. PMID:10967533

  14. Unilateral Plantar Flexors Static-Stretching Effects on Ipsilateral and Contralateral Jump Measures

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Josinaldo Jarbas; Behm, David George; Gomes, Willy Andrade; Silva, Fernando Henrique Domingues de Oliveira; Soares, Enrico Gori; Serpa, Érica Paes; Vilela Junior, Guanis de Barros; Lopes, Charles Ricardo; Marchetti, Paulo Henrique

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute effects of unilateral ankle plantar flexors static-stretching (SS) on the passive range of movement (ROM) of the stretched limb, surface electromyography (sEMG) and single-leg bounce drop jump (SBDJ) performance measures of the ipsilateral stretched and contralateral non-stretched lower limbs. Seventeen young men (24 ± 5 years) performed SBDJ before and after (stretched limb: immediately post-stretch, 10 and 20 minutes and non-stretched limb: immediately post-stretch) unilateral ankle plantar flexor SS (6 sets of 45s/15s, 70-90% point of discomfort). SBDJ performance measures included jump height, impulse, time to reach peak force, contact time as well as the sEMG integral (IEMG) and pre-activation (IEMGpre-activation) of the gastrocnemius lateralis. Ankle dorsiflexion passive ROM increased in the stretched limb after the SS (pre-test: 21 ± 4° and post-test: 26.5 ± 5°, p < 0.001). Post-stretching decreases were observed with peak force (p = 0.029), IEMG (P<0.001), and IEMGpre-activation (p = 0.015) in the stretched limb; as well as impulse (p = 0.03), and jump height (p = 0.032) in the non-stretched limb. In conclusion, SS effectively increased passive ankle ROM of the stretched limb, and transiently (less than 10 minutes) decreased muscle peak force and pre-activation. The decrease of jump height and impulse for the non-stretched limb suggests a SS-induced central nervous system inhibitory effect. Key points When considering whether or not to SS prior to athletic activities, one must consider the potential positive effects of increased ankle dorsiflexion motion with the potential deleterious effects of power and muscle activity during a simple jumping task or as part of the rehabilitation process. Since decreased jump performance measures can persist for 10 minutes in the stretched leg, the timing of SS prior to performance must be taken into consideration. Athletes, fitness enthusiasts and therapists should also keep in mind that SS one limb has generalized effects upon contralateral limbs as well. PMID:25983580

  15. Prevention of Recurrent Foot Ulcers With Plantar Pressure–Based In-Shoe Orthoses: The CareFUL Prevention Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ulbrecht, Jan S.; Hurley, Timothy; Mauger, David T.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the efficacy of in-shoe orthoses that were designed based on shape and barefoot plantar pressure in reducing the incidence of submetatarsal head plantar ulcers in people with diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, and a history of similar prior ulceration. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Single-blinded multicenter randomized controlled trial with subjects randomized to wear shape- and pressure-based orthoses (experimental, n = 66) or standard-of-care A5513 orthoses (control, n = 64). Patients were followed for 15 months, until a study end point (forefoot plantar ulcer or nonulcerative plantar forefoot lesion) or to study termination. Proportional hazards regression was used for analysis. RESULTS There was a trend in the composite primary end point (both ulcers and nonulcerative lesions) across the full follow-up period (P = 0.13) in favor of the experimental orthoses. This trend was due to a marked difference in ulcer occurrence (P = 0.007) but no difference in the rate of nonulcerative lesions (P = 0.76). At 180 days, the ulcer prevention effect of the experimental orthoses was already significant (P = 0.003) when compared with control, and the benefit of the experimental orthoses with respect to the composite end point was also significant (P = 0.042). The hazard ratio was 3.4 (95% CI 1.3–8.7) for the occurrence of a submetatarsal head plantar ulcer in the control compared with experimental arm over the duration of the study. CONCLUSIONS We conclude that shape- and barefoot plantar pressure–based orthoses were more effective in reducing submetatarsal head plantar ulcer recurrence than current standard-of-care orthoses, but they did not significantly reduce nonulcerative lesions. PMID:24760263

  16. On Heels and Toes: How Ants Climb with Adhesive Pads and Tarsal Friction Hair Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Endlein, Thomas; Federle, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Ants are able to climb effortlessly on vertical and inverted smooth surfaces. When climbing, their feet touch the substrate not only with their pretarsal adhesive pads but also with dense arrays of fine hairs on the ventral side of the 3rd and 4th tarsal segments. To understand what role these different attachment structures play during locomotion, we analysed leg kinematics and recorded single-leg ground reaction forces in Weaver ants (Oecophylla smaragdina) climbing vertically on a smooth glass substrate. We found that the ants engaged different attachment structures depending on whether their feet were above or below their Centre of Mass (CoM). Legs above the CoM pulled and engaged the arolia (‘toes’), whereas legs below the CoM pushed with the 3rd and 4th tarsomeres (‘heels’) in surface contact. Legs above the CoM carried a significantly larger proportion of the body weight than legs below the CoM. Force measurements on individual ant tarsi showed that friction increased with normal load as a result of the bending and increasing side contact of the tarsal hairs. On a rough sandpaper substrate, the tarsal hairs generated higher friction forces in the pushing than in the pulling direction, whereas the reverse effect was found on the smooth substrate. When the tarsal hairs were pushed, buckling was observed for forces exceeding the shear forces found in climbing ants. Adhesion forces were small but not negligible, and higher on the smooth substrate. Our results indicate that the dense tarsal hair arrays produce friction forces when pressed against the substrate, and help the ants to push outwards during horizontal and vertical walking. PMID:26559941

  17. Chronic urticaria.

    PubMed Central

    Leznoff, A.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the pathophysiology of chronic urticaria in light of recent evidence for it being an autoimmune disease, and to recommend appropriate management. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: An extensive literature review was supplemented with a MEDLINE search. Articles from easily available journals were preferred. These consisted of the most recent basic articles on autoimmunity in relation to chronic urticaria and a selection of previous articles on pathophysiology, which illustrate consistencies with recent evidence. The investigation and management protocol is supported by original and relevant literature. MAIN FINDINGS: The histopathology and immunohistology of chronic urticaria and certain clinical studies were a prelude to definitive evidence that most instances of chronic urticaria are autoimmune. Although allergic and other causes are uncommon, these must be sought because identification can lead to cure or specific treatment. Management of the much more common autoimmune urticaria is based on principles derived from the demonstrated pathogenesis and on results of published clinical trials. CONCLUSIONS: In most instances, chronic urticaria is an autoimmune disease, but uncommon allergic or other causes must be considered. PMID:9805172

  18. Correlation between maximum in-shoe plantar pressures and clubhead speed in amateur golfers.

    PubMed

    Pataky, Todd Colin

    2015-01-01

    Disagreements exist in the literature regarding the manner in which weight should be dynamically shared during the golf swing, both within-feet and between the back- and target-foot, to generate maximal clubhead speed. The purpose of this study was to determine whether preferential foot-loading locations underlie weight sharing by examining the correlation between clubhead speed and maximum plantar pressure (PP) distributions. Thirty-two amateur golfers with handicap indexes ranging from 2.7 to 25 performed 10 driver swings on artificial turf following a warm-up. PP distributions were recorded at 100 Hz, and clubhead speed was recorded using a ball-tracking Doppler radar system. Maximum PPs were extracted from a 2-s window approximately centred on ball contact and were regressed against clubhead speed. Significance was assessed over the entire foot surface using statistical parametric mapping (SPM), a spatially continuous technique. SPM revealed, at relatively high anatomical resolution, significant positive correlations between clubhead speed and PPs in the lateral target-foot (P < 0.05). This suggests that not only weight transfer but also weight-transfer location may be an important determinant of clubhead speed in amateur golfers. PMID:25010946

  19. Manipulation in the Treatment of Plantar Digital Neuralgia: A Retrospective Study of 38 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Cashley, David G.; Cochrane, Lynda

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this retrospective case series is to describe treatment outcomes for patients with plantar digital neuralgia (PDN) (Morton’s neuroma) who were treated using foot manipulation. Methods Charts were reviewed retrospectively for patients with a diagnosis of PDN and who received a minimum of 6 treatments consisting of manipulation alone. Visual analogue pain scales (VAS) and pressure threshold meter readings (PTM) were extracted as outcome measures. Results Thirty-eight cases met inclusion criteria. Mean pretreatment duration of pain was 28 months. Mean pretreatment VAS was 69.5/100 mm. Mean pretreatment PTM was 2.54 Kp. By the sixth treatment, 30 (79%) of the 38 patients scored a VAS of 0 mm and a further 4 (10%) were below 10 mm. Contralateral limb PTM showed a mean pre-treatment score of 5.5 Kp, which rose slightly to 5.85 Kp. This compared to a pre-treatment score of 2.54 Kp rising to 5.86 Kp in the affected limb. This represents a 126% increase in the affected side compared to 6.5% in the unaffected limb. Statistical analysis demonstrated a significant linear trend between decreasing VAS and manipulation (P < .001). Conclusion The patients with PDN who were included in this case series improved with conservative care that included only foot manipulation. PMID:26257593

  20. A two-phase model of plantar tissue: a step toward prediction of diabetic foot ulceration.

    PubMed

    Sciumè, G; Boso, D P; Gray, W G; Cobelli, C; Schrefler, B A

    2014-11-01

    A new computational model, based on the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory, has been recently proposed to predict tumor initiation and proliferation. A similar mathematical approach is proposed here as an aid in diabetic ulcer prevention. The common aspects at the continuum level are the macroscopic balance equations governing the flow of the fluid phase, diffusion of chemical species, tissue mechanics, and some of the constitutive equations. The soft plantar tissue is modeled as a two-phase system: a solid phase consisting of the tissue cells and their extracellular matrix, and a fluid one (interstitial fluid and dissolved chemical species). The solid phase may become necrotic depending on the stress level and on the oxygen availability in the tissue. Actually, in diabetic patients, peripheral vascular disease impacts tissue necrosis; this is considered in the model via the introduction of an effective diffusion coefficient that governs transport of nutrients within the microvasculature. The governing equations of the mathematical model are discretized in space by the finite element method and in time domain using the ?-Wilson Method. While the full mathematical model is developed in this paper, the example is limited to the simulation of several gait cycles of a healthy foot. PMID:24841993

  1. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    MedlinePLUS

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... nuclear disaster. It takes many years to develop leukemia from radiation exposure. Most people treated for cancer ...

  2. A pilot study of a plantar sensory evaluation system for early screening of diabetic neuropathy in a weight-bearing position.

    PubMed

    Ino, Shuichi; Chikai, Manabu; Takahashi, Noriyo; Ohnishi, Tadasuke; Doi, Kohki; Nunokawa, Kiyohiko

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop smart equipment to quantify plantar tactile sensibility for the early diagnosis and tracking of peripheral neuropathy caused by diabetes mellitus. In this paper, we offer a new testing system that is composed of a plantar tactile stimulation platform with a small moving contactor to stretch the skin tangentially, a response switch for each tactile stimulus, a motor control box, and a personal computer (PC) for psychophysical data processing. This quantitative sensory testing system has detailed measurements available and is easy to use compared with the conventional testing devices, such as von Frey monofilaments, pin-prick testing devices, and current perception threshold testers. When using our testing system in a weight-bearing position, we observed that the plantar tactile thresholds for the tangential stretching stimulus on the plantar surface of the foot ranged from approximately 10 um to 30 um for healthy subjects. However, the threshold for a subject with diabetes was nearly three times higher than that for healthy subjects. The significant difference between these values suggests that the plantar sensory evaluation system using the lateral skin stretch stimulation can be used for early diagnosis, for the accurate staging of diabetic neuropathy, and for evaluating its progression noninvasively in a clinic and at home. PMID:25570747

  3. Chronic gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Sipponen, Pentti; Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Prevalence of chronic gastritis has markedly declined in developed populations during the past decades. However, chronic gastritis is still one of the most common serious pandemic infections with such severe killing sequelae as peptic ulcer or gastric cancer. Globally, on average, even more than half of people may have a chronic gastritis at present. Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood is the main cause of chronic gastritis, which microbial origin is the key for the understanding of the bizarre epidemiology and course of the disease. A life-long and aggressive inflammation in gastritis results in destruction (atrophic gastritis) of stomach mucosa with time (years and decades). The progressive worsening of atrophic gastritis results subsequently in dysfunctions of stomach mucosa. Atrophic gastritis will finally end up in a permanently acid-free stomach in the most extreme cases. Severe atrophic gastritis and acid-free stomach are the highest independent risk conditions for gastric cancer known so far. In addition to the risks of malignancy and peptic ulcer, acid-free stomach and severe forms of atrophic gastritis may associate with failures in absorption of essential vitamins, like vitamin B12, micronutrients (like iron, calcium, magnesium and zinc), diet and medicines. PMID:25901896

  4. [Preliminary report on a method for establishing the relation between the surface of a plantar load and the total projective surface of the foot: index of plantar load (IPL)].

    PubMed

    Della Capanna, G P

    1983-07-30

    The creation of a Plantar Load Index (PLI) is proposed, with a view to studying the plantar surface of the foot from a morphofunctional standpoint. This Index would provide information on the centesimal relationship between the surface load values and the total projective values of the foot, expressed in cm2. The measurements in question are homogeneous in nature and may, therefore, be easily related to one another. To obtain these values, the two surfaces are visualized, photographed together in a single photogram and analyzed by means of the computerized visual system (Zeiss Videoplan). Visualization is obtained by means of a thermochromatic variation plate which is placed on the stand of a reflexion podoscope and which is sensitive to the heat of the plantar skin and the suitably emitted infra-red rays. The heat of the skin in contact with the plate shows the load surface. The intra-red rays suitably emitted from above onto the plate and onto the back of the foot produce the general chromatic variation of the plate, also showing the perimetrical outline of the foot. The picture to be photographed will, then, be as follows: a continuous black edge formed from the outside by the colouring of the plate produced by the infra-red rays (the perimeter of the foot); more black, extending inwards, in varying degrees, when the skin is not touching the plate (the archer and furrows in the skin); coloured areas inside of the perimeter, showing the load surface.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6626330

  5. Chronic motor tic disorder

    MedlinePLUS

    Chronic vocal tic disorder; Tic - chronic motor tic disorder ... Chronic motor tic disorder is more common than Tourette syndrome . Chronic tics may be forms of Tourette syndrome. Tics usually start ...

  6. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    MedlinePLUS

    COPD; Chronic obstructive airways disease; Chronic obstructive lung disease; Chronic bronchitis; Emphysema; Bronchitis - chronic ... Smoking is the main cause of COPD. The more a person smokes, the ... develop COPD. But some people smoke for years and never get ...

  7. Chronic pain - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain - resources; Resources - chronic pain ... The following organizations are good resources for information on chronic pain: American Chronic Pain Association -- www.theacpa.org National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Association -- www.fmcpaware.org ...

  8. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Children/Pediatric > Chronic Pancreatitis in Children test Chronic Pancreatitis in Children What symptoms would my child have? ... will develop diabetes in adolescence. Who gets chronic pancreatitis? Those at risk for chronic pancreatitis are children ...

  9. Subclinical hypothyroidism is related to lower heel QUS in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Mutsuko; Suzuki, Atsushi; Sekiguchi, Sahoko; Ono, Yasunaga; Nishiwaki-Yasuda, Keiko; Itoi, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Sakura; Imamura, Shigeo; Katoh, Taiya; Hayakawa, Nobuki; Oda, Naohisa; Hashimoto, Shuji; Itoh, Mitsuyasu

    2007-08-01

    Recent findings suggest that thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) is a negative regulator of skeletal remodeling by reducing both differentiation of osteoblasts and formation of osteoclasts. In addition, increased fracture risk in untreated hypothyroid patients has been reported to begin up to 8 years before diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of subclinical hypothyroidism on bone structure by using the heel QUS. Subjects were outpatients without any past or present history of thyroid disease. Among 210 postmenopausal women, 22 of 33 patients (Hypo), who had elevated serum TSH concentration (TSH>or=4 microU/ml) with normal serum free thyroxine (FT4) concentration, agreed to join to this study. We also randomly selected 24 control subjects (Cont) from 176 postmenopausal women with normal thyroid status. Calcaneus osteo sono assessment indices (OSI) of right feet were measured using the ultrasound bone densitometry AOS-100. Serum TSH concentrations in Hypo patients (5.31 +/- 1.3 microU/ml) were higher than those in Cont patients (2.05 +/- 1.1 microU/ml), and there was significant difference of FT(4) concentrations (Cont 1.33 +/- 0.15 ng/dl; Hypo 1.19 +/- 0.17 ng/dl). OSI and its Z-score in Hypo subjects (OSI, 2.138 +/- 0.152; Z-Score -0.322 +/- 0.504 SD, Mean SD) were significantly lower than those in Cont subjects (OSI, 2.347 +/- 0.243; Z-Score 0.322 +/- 0.91 SD, Mean +/- SD). Simple regression statistical analysis showed that OSI decreased according to the increase of serum TSH concentration (n = 47, P<0.037). In addition, multiple regression analysis showed that the elevation of serum TSH concentration was associated with the decrease of OSI. These results suggest that the elevation of serum TSH concentration in subclinical hypothyroidism affects not bone turnover but bone structure as assessed by QUS. PMID:17641439

  10. SOLID PHASE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEEL SAMPLES FROM TANK 241-C-110

    SciTech Connect

    PAGE JS; COOKE GA; PESTOVICH JA; HUBER HJ

    2011-12-01

    During sluicing operations of tank 241-C-110, a significant amount of solids were unable to be retrieved. These solids (often referred to as the tank 'heel') were sampled in 2010 and chemically and mineralogically analyzed in the 222-S Laboratory. Additionally, dissolution tests were performed to identify the amount of undissolvable material after using multiple water contacts. This report covers the solid phase characterization of six samples from these tests using scanning electron microscopy, polarized light microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The chemical analyses, particle size distribution analysis, and dissolution test results are reported separately. Two of the samples were from composites created from as-received material - Composite A and Composite B. The main phase in these samples was sodium-fluoride-phosphate hydrate (natrophosphate) - in the X-ray diffraction spectra, this phase was the only phase identifiable. Polarized light microscopy showed the presence of minor amounts of gibbsite and other phases. These phases were identified by scanning electron microscopy - energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy as sodium aluminosilicates, sodium diuranate, and sodium strontium phosphate hydrate (nastrophite) crystals. The natrophosphate crystals in the scanning electron microscopy analysis showed a variety of erosive and dissolution features from perfectly shaped octahedral to well-rounded appearance. Two samples were from water-washed Composites A and B, with no change in mineralogy compared to the as-received samples. This is not surprising, since the water wash had only a short period of water contact with the material as opposed to the water dissolution tests. The last two samples were residual solids from the water dissolution tests. These tests included multiple additions of water at 15 C and 45 C. The samples were sieved to separate a coarser fraction of > 710 {mu}m and a finer fraction of < 710 {mu}m. These two fractions were analyzed separately. The coarser fraction contained mostly gibbsite with minor amounts of sodium aluminosilicates (cancrinite) and bismuth aluminum-rich phases. The finer fraction was mostly composed of gibbsite, the sodium alumino silicate phase, cancrinite, and a poorly crystalline to non-crystalline phase containing varying amounts of iron, bismuth, aluminum, and phosphorus.

  11. Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®) General Information About Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms ...

  12. Comparison of the analgesic effect of ultrasound and low-level laser therapy in patients suffering from plantar fasciitis (calcar calcanei)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navratil, Leos; Skopek, Jiri; Hronkova, Hana; Kymplova, Jaroslava; Knizek, Jiri

    2001-10-01

    To compare the effectiveness of the two therapeutic approaches, ultrasound and low level laser (LLLT) used in 181 patients suffering from calcar calcanei-plantar fasciitis. The effectiveness of the treatment was determined according to the evaluation of the patient using certain criteria described in the table. The complete disappearance of pain was seen in 50% of 60 patients treated with US and partial improvement in 16.6% and 69 patients were treated with LLLT from which 67% described complete pain relief, and 20% partial improvement. The results show that the LLLT is a good therapeutic approach in the treatment of pain in patients suffering from calcar calcanei-plantar fasciitis. The treatment with laser was significantly more successful then the ultrasound therapy, which is currently the most common therapy used for plantar fasciitis.

  13. Impact reduction through long-term intervention in recreational runners: midfoot strike pattern versus low-drop/low-heel height footwear.

    PubMed

    Giandolini, Marlène; Horvais, Nicolas; Farges, Yohann; Samozino, Pierre; Morin, Jean-Benoît

    2013-08-01

    Impact reduction has become a factor of interest in the prevention of running-related injuries such as stress fractures. Currently, the midfoot strike pattern (MFS) is thought as a potential way to decrease impact. The purpose was to test the effects of two long-term interventions aiming to reduce impact during running via a transition to an MFS: a foot strike retraining versus a low-drop/low-heel height footwear. Thirty rearfoot strikers were randomly assigned to two experimental groups (SHOES and TRAIN). SHOES progressively wore low-drop/low-heel height shoes and TRAIN progressively adopted an MFS, over a 3-month period with three 30-min running sessions per week. Measurement sessions (pre-training, 1, 2 and 3 months) were performed during which subjects were equipped with three accelerometers on the shin, heel and metatarsals, and ran for 15 min on an instrumented treadmill. Synchronized acceleration and vertical ground reaction force signals were recorded. Peak heel acceleration was significantly lower as compared to pre-training for SHOES (-33.5 ± 12.8 % at 2 months and -25.3 ± 18.8 % at 3 months, p < 0.001), and so was shock propagation velocity (-12.1 ± 9.3 %, p < 0.001 at 2 months and -11.3 ± 4.6 %, p < 0.05 at 3 months). No change was observed for TRAIN. Important inter-individual variations were noted in both groups and reported pains were mainly located at the shin and calf. Although it induced reversible pains, low-drop/low-heel height footwear seemed to be more effective than foot strike retraining to attenuate heel impact in the long term. PMID:23584279

  14. Plantar pressure relief under the metatarsal heads: therapeutic insole design using three-dimensional finite element model of the foot.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ming; Lee, Sung-Jae; Lee, Peter Vee Sin

    2015-02-26

    Therapeutic footwear with specially-made insoles is often used in people with diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis to relieve ulcer risks and pain due to high pressures from areas beneath bony prominences of the foot, in particular to the metatarsal heads (MTHs). In a three-dimensional finite element study of the foot and footwear with sensitivity analysis, effects of geometrical variations of a therapeutic insole, in terms of insole thicknesses and metatarsal pad (MP) placements, on local peak plantar pressure under MTHs and stress/strain states within various forefoot tissues, were determined. A validated musculoskeletal finite element model of the human foot was employed. Analyses were performed in a simulated muscle-demanding instant in gait. For many design combinations, increasing insole thicknesses consistently reduce peak pressures and internal tissue strain under MTHs, but the effects reach a plateau when insole becomes very thick (e.g., a value of 12.7mm or greater). Altering MP placements, however, showed a proximally- and a distally-placed MP could result in reverse effects on MTH pressure-relief. The unsuccessful outcome due to a distally-placed MP may attribute to the way it interacts with plantar tissue (e.g., plantar fascia) adjacent to the MTH. A uniform pattern of tissue compression under metatarsal shaft is necessary for a most favorable pressure-relief under MTHs. The designated functions of an insole design can best be achieved when the insole is very thick, and when the MP can achieve a uniform tissue compression pattern adjacent to the MTH. PMID:25620685

  15. Comparison of foot orthoses made by podiatrists, pedorthists and orthotists regarding plantar pressure reduction in The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Guldemond, Nick A; Leffers, Pieter; Schaper, Nicolaas C; Sanders, Antal P; Nieman, Fred HM; Walenkamp, Geert HIM

    2005-01-01

    Background There is a need for evidence of clinical effectiveness of foot orthosis therapy. This study evaluated the effect of foot orthoses made by ten podiatrists, ten pedorthists and eleven orthotists on plantar pressure and walking convenience for three patients with metatarsalgia. Aims were to assess differences and variability between and within the disciplines. The relationship between the importance of pressure reduction and the effect on peak pressure was also evaluated. Methods Each therapist examined all three patients and was asked to rate the 'importance of pressure reduction' through a visual analogue scale. The orthoses were evaluated twice in two sessions while the patient walked on a treadmill. Plantar pressures were recorded with an in-sole measuring system. Patients scored walking convenience per orthosis. The effects of the orthoses on peak pressure reduction were calculated for the whole plantar surface of the forefoot and six regions: big toe and metatarsal one to five. Results Within each discipline there was an extensive variation in construction of the orthoses and achieved peak pressure reductions. Pedorthists and orthotists achieved greater maximal peak pressure reductions calculated over the whole forefoot than podiatrists: 960, 1020 and 750 kPa, respectively (p < .001). This was also true for the effect in the regions with the highest baseline peak pressures and walking convenience rated by patients A and B. There was a weak relationship between the 'importance of pressure reduction' and the achieved pressure reduction for orthotists, but no relationship for podiatrists and pedorthotists. Conclusion The large variation for various aspects of foot orthoses therapy raises questions about a consistent use of concepts for pressures management within the professional groups. PMID:16368005

  16. Static progressive stretch brace as a treatment of pain and functional limitations associated with plantar fasciitis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neena K; Loudon, Janice K

    2010-06-01

    Plantar fasciitis is a common and hard-to-treat disorder of the foot. Numerous studies have compared various stretching exercises, but the use of a day-wear static progressive stretch brace has not been studied. A randomized, single-blinded trial was conducted to compare the effectiveness of a static progressive stretch brace to standard care of active stretching exercises. Thirteen subjects (12 women and 1 man; mean age, 42 +/- 9.0 years) with plantar fasciitis participated in this study between January 2004 and March 2007. Subjects were randomized to either an exercise group (static stretch group, n = 8) or a brace group (static progressive stretch group, n = 9) for an 8-week treatment period and 1-month follow up. Both groups received basic off-the-shelf foot orthoses. Data were available for 7 subjects in the exercise group and 6 in the brace group. Pain and functional limitations were evaluated with the Foot Functional Index pain subscale, the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Ankle-Hindfoot Scale, and great toe extension motion. Overall pain and morning pain improved in both groups as compared with baseline measures (repeated-measures analysis of variance, P = .04 and P = .02, respectively). Functional rating also improved in both groups (repeated-measures analysis of variance, P = .005). No changes were found in either group with great toe extension range of motion. In addition, there was no significant group difference or interaction with time and group with any measures. Both interventions (static, exercise, and brace stretching) were beneficial for treating pain and functional limitations, suggesting that static progressive stretch brace is an effective alternative option to static stretching exercises for people with plantar fasciitis. PMID:20508011

  17. Effects of a 5-h hilly running on ankle plantar and dorsal flexor force and fatigability.

    PubMed

    Fourchet, François; Millet, Grégoire P; Tomazin, Katja; Guex, Kenny; Nosaka, Ken; Edouard, Pascal; Degache, Francis; Millet, Guillaume Y

    2012-07-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of a 5-h hilly run on ankle plantar (PF) and dorsal flexor (DF) force and fatigability. It was hypothesised that DF fatigue/fatigability would be greater than PF fatigue/fatigability. Eight male trail long distance runners (42.5 ± 5.9 years) were tested for ankle PF and DF maximal voluntary isokinetic contraction strength and fatigue resistance tests (percent decrement score), maximal voluntary and electrically evoked isometric contraction strength before and after the run. Maximal EMG root mean square (RMS(max)) and mean power frequency (MPF) values of the tibialis anterior (TA), gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) and soleus (SOL) EMG activity were calculated. The peak torque of the potentiated high- and low-frequency doublets and the ratio of paired stimulation peak torques at 10 Hz over 100 Hz (Db10:100) were analysed for PF. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction strength of PF decreased from pre- to post-run (-17.0 ± 6.2%; P < 0.05), but no significant decrease was evident for DF (-7.9 ± 6.2%). Maximal voluntary isokinetic contraction strength and fatigue resistance remained unchanged for both PF and DF. RMS(max) SOL during maximal voluntary isometric contraction and RMS(max) TA during maximal voluntary isokinetic contraction were decreased (P < 0.05) after the run. For MPF, a significant decrease for TA (P < 0.05) was found and the ratio Db10:100 decreased for PF (-6.5 ± 6.0%; P < 0.05). In conclusion, significant isometric strength loss was only detected for PF after a 5-h hilly run and was partly due to low-frequency fatigue. This study contradicted the hypothesis that neuromuscular alterations due to prolonged hilly running are predominant for DF. PMID:22085978

  18. Spinal plasticity in stroke patients after botulinum neurotoxin A injection in ankle plantar flexors

    PubMed Central

    Aymard, Claire; Giboin, Louis-Solal; Lackmy-Vallée, Alexandra; Marchand-Pauvert, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    The effect of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT-A) in stroke patients' upper limbs has been attributed to its peripheral action only. However, BoNT-A depressed recurrent inhibition of lumbar motoneurons, likely due to its retrograde transportation along motor axons affecting synapses to Renshaw cells. Because Renshaw cells control group Ia interneurons mediating reciprocal inhibition between antagonists, we tested whether this inhibition, particularly affected after stroke, could recover after BoNT-A. The effect of posterior tibial nerve (PTN) stimulation on tibialis anterior (TA) electromyogram (EMG) was investigated in 13 stroke patients during treadmill walking before and 1 month after BoNT-A injection in ankle plantar flexors. Before BoNT-A, PTN stimuli enhanced TA EMG all during the swing phase. After BoNT-A, the PTN-induced reciprocal facilitation in TA motoneurons was depressed at the beginning of swing and reversed into inhibition in midswing, but at the end of swing, the reciprocal facilitation was enhanced. This suggests that BoNT-A induced spinal plasticity leading to the recovery of reciprocal inhibition likely due to the withdrawal of inhibitory control from Renshaw cells directly blocked by the toxin. At the end of swing, the enhanced reciprocal facilitation might be due to BoNT-induced modification of peripheral afferent inputs. Therefore, both central and peripheral actions of BoNT-A can modify muscle synergies during walking: (1) limiting ankle muscle co-contraction in the transition phase from stance to swing, to assist dorsiflexion, and (2) favoring it from swing to stance, which blocks the ankle joint and thus assists the balance during the single support phase on the paretic limb. PMID:24400171

  19. Impact of age on exercise-induced ATP supply during supramaximal plantar flexion in humans.

    PubMed

    Layec, Gwenael; Trinity, Joel D; Hart, Corey R; Kim, Seong-Eun; Groot, H Jonathan; Le Fur, Yann; Sorensen, Jacob R; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Richardson, Russell S

    2015-08-15

    Currently, the physiological factors responsible for exercise intolerance and bioenergetic alterations with age are poorly understood due, at least in art, to the confounding effect of reduced physical activity in the elderly. Thus, in 40 healthy young (22 ± 2 yr) and old (74 ± 8 yr) activity-matched subjects, we assessed the impact of age on: 1) the relative contribution of the three major pathways of ATP synthesis (oxidative ATP synthesis, glycolysis, and the creatine kinase reaction) and 2) the ATP cost of contraction during high-intensity exercise. Specifically, during supramaximal plantar flexion (120% of maximal aerobic power), to stress the functional limits of the skeletal muscle energy systems, we used (31)P-labeled magnetic resonance spectroscopy to assess metabolism. Although glycolytic activation was delayed in the old, ATP synthesis from the main energy pathways was not significantly different between groups. Similarly, the inferred peak rate of mitochondrial ATP synthesis was not significantly different between the young (25 ± 8 mM/min) and old (24 ± 6 mM/min). In contrast, the ATP cost of contraction was significantly elevated in the old compared with the young (5.1 ± 2.0 and 3.7 ± 1.7 mM·min(-1)·W(-1), respectively; P < 0.05). Overall, these findings suggest that, when young and old subjects are activity matched, there is no evidence of age-related mitochondrial and glycolytic dysfunction. However, this study does confirm an abnormal elevation in exercise-induced skeletal muscle metabolic demand in the old that may contribute to the decline in exercise capacity with advancing age. PMID:26041112

  20. Plantar Pressure Distribution During Robotic-Assisted Gait in Post-stroke Hemiplegic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin Kyu; Ahn, Na El; Kim, Dae Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the plantar pressure distribution during the robotic-assisted walking, guided through normal symmetrical hip and knee physiological kinematic trajectories, with unassisted walking in post-stroke hemiplegic patients. Methods Fifteen hemiplegic stroke patients, who were able to walk a minimum of ten meters independently but with asymmetric gait patterns, were enrolled in this study. All the patients performed both the robotic-assisted walking (Lokomat) and the unassisted walking on the treadmill with the same body support in random order. The contact area, contact pressure, trajectory length of center of pressure (COP), temporal data on both limbs and asymmetric index of both limbs were obtained during both walking conditions, using the F-Scan in-shoe pressure measurement system. Results The contact area of midfoot and total foot on the affected side were significantly increased in robotic-assisted walking as compared to unassisted walking (p<0.01). The contact pressure of midfoot and total foot on affected limbs were also significantly increased in robotic-assisted walking (p<0.05). The anteroposterior and mediolateral trajectory length of COP were not significantly different between the two walking conditions, but their trajectory variability of COP was significantly improved (p<0.05). The asymmetric index of area, stance time, and swing time during robotic-assisted walking were statistically improved as compared with unassisted walking (p<0.05). Conclusion The robotic-assisted walking may be helpful in improving the gait stability and symmetry, but not the physiologic ankle rocker function. PMID:24855607

  1. Plantar tactile perturbations enhance transfer of split-belt locomotor adaptation.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Mukul; Eikema, Diderik Jan A; Chien, Jung Hung; Myers, Sara A; Scott-Pandorf, Melissa; Bloomberg, Jacob J; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2015-10-01

    Patterns of human locomotion are highly adaptive and flexible and depend on the environmental context. Locomotor adaptation requires the use of multisensory information to perceive altered environmental dynamics and generate an appropriate movement pattern. In this study, we investigated the use of multisensory information during locomotor learning. Proprioceptive perturbations were induced by vibrating tactors, placed bilaterally over the plantar surfaces. Under these altered sensory conditions, participants were asked to perform a split-belt locomotor task representative of motor learning. Twenty healthy young participants were separated into two groups: no-tactors (NT) and tactors (TC). All participants performed an overground walking trial, followed by treadmill walking including 18 min of split-belt adaptation and an overground trial to determine transfer effects. Interlimb coordination was quantified by symmetry indices and analyzed using mixed repeated-measures ANOVAs. Both groups adapted to the locomotor task, indicated by significant reductions in gait symmetry during the split-belt task. No significant group differences in spatiotemporal and kinetic parameters were observed on the treadmill. However, significant group differences were observed overground. Step and swing time asymmetries learned on the split-belt treadmill were retained and decayed more slowly overground in the TC group whereas in NT, asymmetries were rapidly lost. These results suggest that tactile stimulation contributed to increased lower limb proprioceptive gain. High proprioceptive gain allows for more persistent overground after effects, at the cost of reduced adaptability. Such persistence may be utilized in populations displaying pathologic asymmetric gait by retraining a more symmetric pattern. PMID:26169104

  2. Three-dimensional morphology and strain of the human Achilles free tendon immediately following eccentric heel drop exercise.

    PubMed

    Obst, Steven J; Newsham-West, Richard; Barrett, Rod S

    2015-12-01

    Our understanding of the immediate effects of exercise on Achilles free tendon transverse morphology is limited to single site measurements acquired at rest using 2D ultrasound. The purpose of this study was to provide a detailed 3D description of changes in Achilles free tendon morphology immediately following a single clinical bout of exercise. Freehand 3D ultrasound was used to measure Achilles free tendon length, and regional cross-sectional area (CSA), medio-lateral (ML) diameter and antero-posterior (AP) diameter in healthy young adults (N=14) at rest and during isometric muscle contraction, immediately before and after 3×15 eccentric heel drops. Post-exercise reductions in transverse strain were limited to CSA and AP diameter in the mid-proximal region of the Achilles free tendon during muscle contraction. The change in CSA strain during muscle contraction was significantly correlated to the change in longitudinal strain (r=-0.72) and the change in AP diameter strain (r=0.64). Overall findings suggest the Achilles free tendon experiences a complex change in 3D morphology following eccentric heel drop exercise that manifests under contractile but not rest conditions, is most pronounced in the mid-proximal tendon and is primarily driven by changes in AP diameter strain and not ML diameter strain. PMID:26519510

  3. Evaluation of clinical examination for differential diagnosis of lameness by navicular apparatus or heel pain in horses.

    PubMed

    Sardari, Kamran; Kazemi, Hossain

    2008-07-01

    To evaluation of clinical examination for differential diagnosis of navicular region pain from other forms of palmar heel pain in the forelimb in horses the present study was undertaken. Thirty four horses with lameness referable to the palmar aspect of the hoof based on their response to the palmar digital nerves analgesia were divided into 2 groups based on their response to both distal interphalangeal joint and navicular bursa analgesia. Horses that were profoundly improved by both analgesic blocks (distal interphalangeal joint and navicular bursa) were considered to have navicular region pain whereas, all other horses were considered to have other cause of palmar heel pain. The responses to various diagnostic tests such as hoof tester, distal limb flexion and toe wedge tests were compared between the groups. For all diagnostic tests, sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive values for navicular pain were calculated. According to the present study the single most accurate diagnostic test was analgesia of the distal interphalangeal joint for navicular region pain. PMID:18819633

  4. Photoletter to the editor: Exogenous pigmentation after Diplopoda exposure leading to a dermatoscopic parallel ridge pattern on the plantar region.

    PubMed

    Fracaroli, Tainá Scalfoni; Miranda, Ludmilla Queirós; Maceira, Juan Piñeiro; Barcaui, Carlos Baptista

    2015-09-30

    The millipedes (also known as "gongolos") are arthropods characterized by a cylindrical body consisting of rings. When threatened, they release chemicals that can cause erythema and hyperpigmentation. We report the case of a patient who developed a darkened macule on the plantar region after stepping on a millipede. Dermatoscopic examination showed a parallel-ridge pattern, which is considered typical for acral melanoma. A detailed history was essential for the diagnosis, as the clinical and dermatoscopic features suggested a malignant melanocytic lesion. PMID:26512306

  5. Chronic urticaria.

    PubMed Central

    Burrall, B. A.; Halpern, G. M.; Huntley, A. C.

    1990-01-01

    Urticaria affects 15% to 20% of the population once or more during a lifetime. Chronic urticaria is a frequent recurrent eruption over a period greater than 6 weeks; the cause remains a mystery in more than 75% of cases. Urticaria and angioedema may be produced by immunologic or nonimmunologic means. Urticarial vasculitis, contact urticaria, mastocytosis, physical urticarias, dermatographism, cholinergic urticaria, localized heat urticaria, cold urticaria, aquagenic urticaria, and vibratory angioedema all require specific evaluation and treatment. Chronic idiopathic urticaria is usually controlled by antihistamines; depending on the circadian rhythm of the eruption, sedative or nonsedative antihistamines are prescribed. Some patients will require a combination of H1 and H2 antagonists, or even parenteral corticosteroids. PMID:1970697

  6. Differences in plantar loading between training shoes and racing flats at a self-selected running speed.

    PubMed

    Wiegerinck, Johannes I; Boyd, Jennifer; Yoder, Jordan C; Abbey, Alicia N; Nunley, James A; Queen, Robin M

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the difference in plantar loading between two different running shoe types. We hypothesized that a higher maximum force, peak pressure, and contact area would exist beneath the entire foot while running in a racing flat when compared to a training shoe. 37 athletes (17 male and 20 female) were recruited for this study. Subjects had no history of lower extremity injuries in the past six months, no history of foot or ankle surgery within the past 3 years, and no history of metatarsal stress fractures. Subjects had to be physically active and run at least 10 miles per week. Each subject ran on a 10m runway 7 times wearing two different running shoe types, the Nike Air Pegasus (training shoe) and the Nike Air Zoom Katana IV (racing flat). A Pedar-X in-shoe pressure measurement system sampling at 50Hz was used to collect plantar pressure data. Peak pressure, maximum force, and contact area beneath eight different anatomical regions of the foot as well as beneath the total foot were obtained. The results of this study demonstrated a significant difference between training shoes and racing flats in terms of peak pressure, maximum force, and contact area. The significant differences measured between the two shoes can be of importance when examining the influence of shoe type on the occurrence of stress fractures in runners. PMID:19147359

  7. Pressure distribution between the deep digital flexor tendon and the navicular bone, and the effect of raising the heels in vitro.

    PubMed

    Weaver, M P; Shaw, D J; Munaiwa, G; Fitzpatrick, D P; Bellenger, C R

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to topographically map pressure distribution across the palmar surface of the navicular bone in response to forces applied by the deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT), and evaluate the effect of raising the heels in vitro . A rig was constructed to hold an equine cadaver limb and apply controlled pressure to the navicular bone from the DDFT. Pressure-sensitive paper was used to quantify and map the resultant pressure. Changes in response to heel wedges (5 degrees and 10 degrees ) were recorded. The areas subject to maximum pressure from the DDFT were: the central ridge, the paired symmetrical areas adjacent to the ridge and the distal edge of the palmar bone surface. These regions correspond to the known sites of navicular pathology. Heel wedges redistributed the pressure exerted on the palmar surface of the navicular bone, with measurements varying depending on fetlock angle and wedge angle. These in vitro results support the hypothesis that inappropriate forces exerted via the DDFT on the bone cause navicular disease. However, they throw doubt on the practice of shoeing such horses with heel wedges as the redistribution of pressure may increase the force exerted on regions predisposed to disease. PMID:19597630

  8. A Novel and Alternative Treatment Method for Diabetic Heel Ulceration Exposing the Calcaneus Which Is Not Suitable for Flap Surgery: Vacuum Assisted Sandwich Dermal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Bingol, Ugur A.; Cinar, Can; Arslan, Hakan; Alt?ndas, Muzaffer

    2015-01-01

    Background. Currently, free flaps and pedicled flaps are the first treatment choices for large heel ulcer reconstruction. However, flap reconstruction of heel ulcerations cannot be performed in all diabetics especially with concurrent severe peripheral vascular disease because of higher flap failure rate. In recent years, the use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) has emerged as an alternative treatment option for extremity ulcers. Methods. We present 13 diabetic patients with a large heel ulceration exposing the calcaneus, who were not eligible for flap surgery due to the presence of only one patent artery of trifurcation. These cases were treated with the vacuum assisted sandwich dermal matrix (VASDEM) method. Results. None of the patients required amputation. Skin grafting was successful in ten patients. Although partial losses were observed in three patients, they were healed spontaneously without surgical interventions. During the follow-up period none of the patients developed ulceration on the treatment area. All patients maintained their preoperative ambulatory ability. Conclusion. VASDEM is a novel method offering opportunity for treatment before proceeding to amputation in diabetic heel ulceration exposing the calcaneus which is not suitable for flap surgery. It also has the potential to close wounds of all sizes independent of the vessel status and wound size in selected diabetic patients. PMID:26516626

  9. Intra-rater reliability of the modified Tardieu scale to quantify spasticity in elbow flexors and ankle plantar flexors in adult stroke subjects

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Priyanka; Joshua, Abraham M.; Ganeshan, Sailakshmi; Suresh, Sucharitha

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate Iintra-rater reliability of the Modified Tardieu Scale (MTS) in elbow flexors and ankle plantar flexors in adult subjects with stroke. Materials and Methods: A total of 91 subjects with stroke participated in this test-retest study. Intra-rater reliability of the MTS was investigated by a qualified and trained physiotherapist for elbow flexors and ankle plantar flexors in two sessions. A rater was one who performed the procedure and an observer only records the angles so that the rater was blinded to findings. Outcome measures in this study were measurable components of MTS, which are angle of muscle reaction (R1), passive range of motion (R2), dynamic component (R2-R1), and quality of muscle reaction (grade 0 – 4) termed as MTS score. Results: Intra-rater reliability of MTS was very good for R1, R2, R2-R1, and MTS score (ICC > 0.85, P<0.0001) across two sessions in elbow flexors and ankle plantar flexors. Conclusion: MTS is a reliable clinical tool for measurement of spasticity in the elbow flexors and ankle plantar flexors in adult subjects with stroke. PMID:21633610

  10. Low-pressure, single-point grout injection for tank heel sludge mixing and in-situ immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Whyatt, G.A.; Hymas, C.R.

    1998-09-01

    This report describes tests conducted in an approximately 9-ft diameter test tank situated outside the 336 building in Hanford`s 300 area. The tests were performed to measure the ability of jets of grout slurry to mobilize and mix simulated tank sludge. The technique is intended for in situ immobilization of tank waste heels. The current approach uses a single, rotated, larger-diameter nozzle driven at lower pressure. Due to the larger diameter, the potential for plugging is reduced and the effective radius around an injection point over which the jet is effective in mobilizing sludge from the tank bottom can be made larger. A total of three grout injection tests were conducted in a 9-ft diameter tank. In each case, a 2-in. layer of kaolin clay paste was placed on a dry tank floor to simulate a sludge heel. The clay was covered with 4 inches of water. The grout slurry, consisting of Portland cement, class F fly ash, and eater, was prepared and delivered by an offsite vendor. In the third test, the sludge in half of the tank was replaced by a layer of 20x50 mesh zeolite, and bentonite clay was added to the grout formulation. After injection, the grout was allowed to set and then the entire grout monolith was manually broken up and excavated using a jack hammer. Intact pieces of clay were visually apparent due to a sharp color contrast between the grout and clay. Remaining clay deposits were collected and weighed and suspended clay pieces within the monolith were photographed. The mobilization performance of the grout jets exceeded expectations.

  11. The design and validation of a magnetic resonance imaging-compatible device for obtaining mechanical properties of plantar soft tissue via gated acquisition.

    PubMed

    Williams, Evan D; Stebbins, Michael J; Cavanagh, Peter R; Haynor, David R; Chu, Baocheng; Fassbind, Michael J; Isvilanonda, Vara; Ledoux, William R

    2015-10-01

    Changes in the mechanical properties of the plantar soft tissue in people with diabetes may contribute to the formation of plantar ulcers. Such ulcers have been shown to be in the causal pathway for lower extremity amputation. The hydraulic plantar soft tissue reducer (HyPSTER) was designed to measure in vivo, rate-dependent plantar soft tissue compressive force and three-dimensional deformations to help understand, predict, and prevent ulcer formation. These patient-specific values can then be used in an inverse finite element analysis to determine tissue moduli, and subsequently used in a foot model to show regions of high stress under a wide variety of loading conditions. The HyPSTER uses an actuator to drive a magnetic resonance imaging-compatible hydraulic loading platform. Pressure and actuator position were synchronized with gated magnetic resonance imaging acquisition. Achievable loading rates were slower than those found in normal walking because of a water-hammer effect (pressure wave ringing) in the hydraulic system when the actuator direction was changed rapidly. The subsequent verification tests were, therefore, performed at 0.2 Hz. The unloaded displacement accuracy of the system was within 0.31%. Compliance, presumably in the system's plastic components, caused a displacement loss of 5.7 mm during a 20-mm actuator test at 1354 N. This was accounted for with a target to actual calibration curve. The positional accuracy of the HyPSTER during loaded displacement verification tests from 3 to 9 mm against a silicone backstop was 95.9% with a precision of 98.7%. The HyPSTER generated minimal artifact in the magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Careful analysis of the synchronization of the HyPSTER and the magnetic resonance imaging scanner was performed. With some limitations, the HyPSTER provided key functionality in measuring dynamic, patient-specific plantar soft tissue mechanical properties. PMID:26405098

  12. Correlation between computerised findings and Newman's scaling on vascularity using power Doppler ultrasonography imaging and its predictive value in patients with plantar fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H; Ho, H M; Ying, M; Fu, S N

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to correlate findings on small vessel vascularity between computerised findings and Newman's scaling using power Doppler ultrasonography (PDU) imaging and its predictive value in patients with plantar fasciitis. Methods PDU was performed on 44 patients (age range 30–66 years; mean age 48 years) with plantar fasciitis and 46 healthy subjects (age range 18–61 years; mean age 36 years). The vascularity was quantified using ultrasound images by a customised software program and graded by Newman's grading scale. Vascular index (VI) was calculated from the software program as the ratio of the number of colour pixels to the total number of pixels within a standardised selected area of proximal plantar fascia. The 46 healthy subjects were examined on 2 occasions 7–10 days apart, and 18 of them were assessed by 2 examiners. Statistical analyses were performed using intraclass correlation coefficient and linear regression analysis. Results Good correlation was found between the averaged VI ratios and Newman's qualitative scale (? = 0.70; p<0.001). Intratester and intertester reliability were 0.89 and 0.61, respectively. Furthermore, higher VI was correlated with less reduction in pain after physiotherapeutic intervention. Conclusions The computerised VI not only has a high level of concordance with the Newman grading scale but is also reliable in reflecting the vascularity of proximal plantar fascia, and can predict pain reduction after intervention. This index can be used to characterise the changes in vascularity of patients with plantar fasciitis, and it may also be helpful for evaluating treatment and monitoring the progress after intervention in future studies. PMID:22167513

  13. Left Ventricular Assist Device Driveline Infections: The Achilles' Heel of Destination Therapy.

    PubMed

    Angud, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is a chronic progressive disease that affects millions of people in the United States. Although medical management of heart failure has helped improve quality of life and survival, end-stage heart failure ultimately requires a heart transplant or long-term left ventricular assist device (LVAD) support. With more patients awaiting transplant, the demand for hearts outweighs the supply of donor hearts. The use of LVADs is increasing in patients with advanced heart failure as a treatment option for those awaiting a heart transplant or as a long-term solution if they are ineligible for a transplant. Although the LVAD is a marvel of modern medicine, infection is a cause of concern because today's LVADs are powered externally through a percutaneous driveline that can be a major source of infection. PMID:26484989

  14. Assessment of the efficacy of a new formulation for plantar wart mummification: new experimental design and human papillomavirus identification.

    PubMed

    Viennet, C; Gheit, T; Muret, P; Aubin, F; Cabou, J; Marchal, A; Tommasino, M; Humbert, P

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous warts are caused by infection of the epidermis with human papillomavirus (HPV). Cryotherapy using liquid nitrogen is one of the most common local treatments. In this study, we used a novel ex vivo approach to compare the efficacy of a new product with conventional liquid-nitrogen cryotherapy by studying epidermal histology and assessing the presence of HPV types 1 and 2 DNA in plantar warts. The studied formulation, which acts by tissues mummification, is a combination of nitric acid, organic acids and metallic salts. We found that, similar to liquid nitrogen, the studied product induced alterations in the wart structure. In addition, unlike liquid nitrogen, this product also reduced the amount of HPV DNA. The results suggest that there is a poor correlation between the histological response and the antiviral efficacy of standard wart treatment. PMID:23252755

  15. Genetic determinants of heel bone properties: genome-wide association meta-analysis and replication in the GEFOS/GENOMOS consortium

    PubMed Central

    Moayyeri, Alireza; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Karasik, David; Estrada, Karol; Xiao, Su-Mei; Nielson, Carrie; Srikanth, Priya; Giroux, Sylvie; Wilson, Scott G.; Zheng, Hou-Feng; Smith, Albert V.; Pye, Stephen R.; Leo, Paul J.; Teumer, Alexander; Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Ohlsson, Claes; McGuigan, Fiona; Minster, Ryan L.; Hayward, Caroline; Olmos, José M.; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Lewis, Joshua R.; Swart, Karin M.A.; Masi, Laura; Oldmeadow, Chris; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Cheng, Sulin; van Schoor, Natasja M.; Harvey, Nicholas C.; Kruk, Marcin; del Greco M, Fabiola; Igl, Wilmar; Trummer, Olivia; Grigoriou, Efi; Luben, Robert; Liu, Ching-Ti; Zhou, Yanhua; Oei, Ling; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Zmuda, Joseph; Tranah, Greg; Brown, Suzanne J.; Williams, Frances M.; Soranzo, Nicole; Jakobsdottir, Johanna; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Holliday, Kate L.; Hannemann, Anke; Go, Min Jin; Garcia, Melissa; Polasek, Ozren; Laaksonen, Marika; Zhu, Kun; Enneman, Anke W.; McEvoy, Mark; Peel, Roseanne; Sham, Pak Chung; Jaworski, Maciej; Johansson, Åsa; Hicks, Andrew A.; Pludowski, Pawel; Scott, Rodney; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A.M.; van der Velde, Nathalie; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma S.; Sievänen, Harri; Raitakari, Olli T.; González-Macías, Jesús; Hernández, Jose L.; Mellström, Dan; Ljunggren, Östen; Cho, Yoon Shin; Völker, Uwe; Nauck, Matthias; Homuth, Georg; Völzke, Henry; Haring, Robin; Brown, Matthew A.; McCloskey, Eugene; Nicholson, Geoffrey C.; Eastell, Richard; Eisman, John A.; Jones, Graeme; Reid, Ian R.; Dennison, Elaine M.; Wark, John; Boonen, Steven; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Wu, Frederick C.W.; Aspelund, Thor; Richards, J. Brent; Bauer, Doug; Hofman, Albert; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Dedoussis, George; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Gyllensten, Ulf; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Lorenc, Roman S.; Cooper, Cyrus; Kung, Annie Wai Chee; Lips, Paul; Alen, Markku; Attia, John; Brandi, Maria Luisa; de Groot, Lisette C.P.G.M.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Riancho, José A.; Campbell, Harry; Liu, Yongmei; Harris, Tamara B.; Akesson, Kristina; Karlsson, Magnus; Lee, Jong-Young; Wallaschofski, Henri; Duncan, Emma L.; O'Neill, Terence W.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Spector, Timothy D.; Rousseau, François; Orwoll, Eric; Cummings, Steven R.; Wareham, Nick J.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Prince, Richard L.; Kiel, Douglas P.; Reeve, Jonathan; Kaptoge, Stephen K.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative ultrasound of the heel captures heel bone properties that independently predict fracture risk and, with bone mineral density (BMD) assessed by X-ray (DXA), may be convenient alternatives for evaluating osteoporosis and fracture risk. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) studies to assess the genetic determinants of heel broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA; n = 14 260), velocity of sound (VOS; n = 15 514) and BMD (n = 4566) in 13 discovery cohorts. Independent replication involved seven cohorts with GWA data (in silico n = 11 452) and new genotyping in 15 cohorts (de novo n = 24 902). In combined random effects, meta-analysis of the discovery and replication cohorts, nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) had genome-wide significant (P < 5 × 10?8) associations with heel bone properties. Alongside SNPs within or near previously identified osteoporosis susceptibility genes including ESR1 (6q25.1: rs4869739, rs3020331, rs2982552), SPTBN1 (2p16.2: rs11898505), RSPO3 (6q22.33: rs7741021), WNT16 (7q31.31: rs2908007), DKK1 (10q21.1: rs7902708) and GPATCH1 (19q13.11: rs10416265), we identified a new locus on chromosome 11q14.2 (rs597319 close to TMEM135, a gene recently linked to osteoblastogenesis and longevity) significantly associated with both BUA and VOS (P < 8.23 × 10?14). In meta-analyses involving 25 cohorts with up to 14 985 fracture cases, six of 10 SNPs associated with heel bone properties at P < 5 × 10?6 also had the expected direction of association with any fracture (P < 0.05), including three SNPs with P < 0.005: 6q22.33 (rs7741021), 7q31.31 (rs2908007) and 10q21.1 (rs7902708). In conclusion, this GWA study reveals the effect of several genes common to central DXA-derived BMD and heel ultrasound/DXA measures and points to a new genetic locus with potential implications for better understanding of osteoporosis pathophysiology. PMID:24430505

  16. Plantar Temperature Response to Walking in Diabetes with and without Acute Charcot: The Charcot Activity Response Test.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Bijan; Wrobel, James S; Grewal, Gurtej; Menzies, Robert A; Talal, Talal K; Zirie, Mahmoud; Armstrong, David G

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Asymmetric plantar temperature differences secondary to inflammation is a hallmark for the diagnosis and treatment response of Charcot foot syndrome. However, little attention has been given to temperature response to activity. We examined dynamic changes in plantar temperature (PT) as a function of graduated walking activity to quantify thermal responses during the first 200 steps. Methods. Fifteen individuals with Acute Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN) and 17 non-CN participants with type 2 diabetes and peripheral neuropathy were recruited. All participants walked for two predefined paths of 50 and 150 steps. A thermal image was acquired at baseline after acclimatization and immediately after each walking trial. The PT response as a function of number of steps was examined using a validated wearable sensor technology. The hot spot temperature was identified by the 95th percentile of measured temperature at each anatomical region (hind/mid/forefoot). Results. During initial activity, the PT was reduced in all participants, but the temperature drop for the nonaffected foot was 1.9 times greater than the affected side in CN group (P = 0.04). Interestingly, the PT in CN was sharply increased after 50 steps for both feet, while no difference was observed in non-CN between 50 and 200 steps. Conclusions. The variability in thermal response to the graduated walking activity between Charcot and non-Charcot feet warrants future investigation to provide further insight into the correlation between thermal response and ulcer/Charcot development. This stress test may be helpful to differentiate CN and its response to treatment earlier in its course. PMID:22900177

  17. How a plantar pressure-based, tongue-placed tactile biofeedback modifies postural control mechanisms during quiet standing.

    PubMed

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; Pinsault, Nicolas; Chenu, Olivier; Boisgontier, Matthieu; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of a plantar pressure-based, tongue-placed tactile biofeedback on postural control mechanisms during quiet standing. To this aim, 16 young healthy adults were asked to stand as immobile as possible with their eyes closed in two conditions of No-biofeedback and Biofeedback. Centre of foot pressure (CoP) displacements, recorded using a force platform, were used to compute the horizontal displacements of the vertical projection of the centre of gravity (CoG( v )) and those of the difference between the CoP and the vertical projection of the CoG (CoP-CoG( v )). Analysis of the CoP-CoG( v ) displacements showed larger root mean square (RMS) and mean power frequencies (MPF) in the Biofeedback than in the No-biofeedback condition. Stabilogram-diffusion analysis further showed a concomitant increased spatial and reduced temporal transition point co-ordinates at which the corrective processes were initiated and an increased persistent behaviour of the CoP-CoG( v ) displacements over the short-term region. Analysis of the CoG( v ) displacements showed decreased RMS and increased MPF in the Biofeedback relative to the No-biofeedback condition. Stabilogram-diffusion analysis further indicated that these effects mainly stem from reduced spatio-temporal transition point co-ordinates at which the corrective process involving CoG( v ) displacements is initiated and an increased anti-persistent behaviour of the CoG( v ) displacements over the long-term region. Altogether, the present findings suggest that the main way the plantar pressure-based, tongue-placed tactile biofeedback improves postural control during quiet standing is via both a reduction of the correction thresholds and an increased efficiency of the corrective mechanism involving the CoG( v ) displacements. PMID:17476487

  18. Specific modulation of spinal and cortical excitabilities during lengthening and shortening submaximal and maximal contractions in plantar flexor muscles.

    PubMed

    Duclay, Julien; Pasquet, Benjamin; Martin, Alain; Duchateau, Jacques

    2014-12-15

    This study investigated the influence of the torque produced by plantar flexor muscles on cortical and spinal excitability during lengthening and shortening voluntary contractions. To that purpose, modulations of motor-evoked potential (MEP) and Hoffmann (H) reflex were compared in the soleus (SOL) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) during anisometric submaximal and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the plantar flexor muscles. For the submaximal shortening and lengthening contractions, the target torque was set at 50% of their respective MVC force. The results indicate that the amplitudes of both MEP and H-reflex responses, normalized to the maximal M wave, were significantly (P < 0.05) lower during lengthening compared with shortening submaximal contraction. For these two parameters, the reduction reached, respectively, 22.1 and 31.9% for the SOL and 34.5 and 29.3% for the MG. During MVC, normalized MEP and H reflex of the SOL were both reduced significantly by 19.9% (P < 0.05) and 29.9% (P < 0.001) during lengthening and shortening contraction, respectively, whereas no significant change (P > 0.05) was observed for MG. In addition, the silent period in the ongoing electromyogram (EMG) activity following the MEP was significantly (P < 0.01) briefer during lengthening than shortening contractions but did not differ (P > 0.05) between contraction intensities and muscles. Together, these results indicate that cortical and spinal mechanisms involved in the modulation of muscle activation during shortening and lengthening contractions differ between synergistic muscles according to the torque produced. Data further document previous studies reporting that the specific modulation of muscle activation during lengthening contraction is not torque dependent. PMID:25324516

  19. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) made in the past year. Recent findings Tropical pancreatitis associates with SPINK1 and/or CFTR gene mutations in approximately 50% of patients, similar to the frequency in idiopathic CP. Corticosteroids increase secretin-stimulated pancreatic bicarbonate concentrations in AIP by restoring mislocalized CFTR protein to the apical ductal membrane. Most patients with asymptomatic hyperenzymemia have pancreatic lesions of unclear significance or no pancreatic lesions. Common pitfalls in the use of diagnostic tests for EPI confound interpretation of findings in IBS and severe renal insufficiency. Further study is needed to improve the accuracy of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) to diagnose CP. Celiac plexus block provides short term pain relief in a subset of patients. Summary Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the genetic associations of tropical pancreatitis, a reversible mislocalization of ductal CFTR in AIP, the association of asymptomatic pancreatic hyperenzymemia with pancreatic disorders, limitations of diagnostic tests for EPI, diagnosis of CP by EUS and endoscopic pancreatic function testing and treatment of pain. PMID:21844753

  20. Tradeoffs between impact loading rate, vertical impulse and effective mass for walkers and heel strike runners wearing footwear of varying stiffness.

    PubMed

    Addison, Brian J; Lieberman, Daniel E

    2015-05-01

    Humans experience repetitive impact forces beneath the heel during walking and heel strike running that cause impact peaks characterized by high rates and magnitudes of loading. Impact peaks are caused by the exchange of momentum between the ground and a portion of the body that comes to a full stop (the effective mass) during the period of the impact peak. A number of factors can influence this exchange of momentum, including footwear stiffness. This study presents and tests an impulse-momentum model of impact mechanics which predicts that effective mass and vertical impulse is greater in walkers and heel strike runners wearing less stiff footwear. The model also predicts a tradeoff between impact loading rate and effective mass, and between impact loading rate and vertical impulse among individuals wearing footwear of varying stiffness. We tested this model using 19 human subjects walking and running in minimal footwear and in two experimental footpads. Subjects walked and ran on an instrumented treadmill and 3D kinematic data were collected. As predicted, both vertical impulse (walking: F(2,54)=52.0, p=2.6E-13; running: F(2,54)=25.2, p=1.8E-8) and effective mass (walking: F(2,54)=12.1, p=4.6E-5; running: F(2,54)=15.5, p=4.7E-6) increase in less stiff footwear. In addition, there is a significant inverse relationship between impact loading rate and vertical impulse (walking: r=-0.88, p<0.0001; running: r=-0.78, p<0.0001) and between impact loading rate and effective mass (walking: r=-0.88, p<0.0001; running: r=-0.82, p<0.0001). The tradeoff relationships documented here raise questions about how and in what ways the stiffness of footwear heels influence injury risk during human walking and running. PMID:25814181

  1. The Achilles’ heel of senescent cells: from transcriptome to senolytic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yi; Tchkonia, Tamara; Pirtskhalava, Tamar; Gower, Adam C; Ding, Husheng; Giorgadze, Nino; Palmer, Allyson K; Ikeno, Yuji; Hubbard, Gene B; Lenburg, Marc; O’Hara, Steven P; LaRusso, Nicholas F; Miller, Jordan D; Roos, Carolyn M; Verzosa, Grace C; LeBrasseur, Nathan K; Wren, Jonathan D; Farr, Joshua N; Khosla, Sundeep; Stout, Michael B; McGowan, Sara J; Fuhrmann-Stroissnigg, Heike; Gurkar, Aditi U; Zhao, Jing; Colangelo, Debora; Dorronsoro, Akaitz; Ling, Yuan Yuan; Barghouthy, Amira S; Navarro, Diana C; Sano, Tokio; Robbins, Paul D; Niedernhofer, Laura J; Kirkland, James L

    2015-01-01

    The healthspan of mice is enhanced by killing senescent cells using a transgenic suicide gene. Achieving the same using small molecules would have a tremendous impact on quality of life and the burden of age-related chronic diseases. Here, we describe the rationale for identification and validation of a new class of drugs termed senolytics, which selectively kill senescent cells. By transcript analysis, we discovered increased expression of pro-survival networks in senescent cells, consistent with their established resistance to apoptosis. Using siRNA to silence expression of key nodes of this network, including ephrins (EFNB1 or 3), PI3K?, p21, BCL-xL, or plasminogen-activated inhibitor-2, killed senescent cells, but not proliferating or quiescent, differentiated cells. Drugs targeting these same factors selectively killed senescent cells. Dasatinib eliminated senescent human fat cell progenitors, while quercetin was more effective against senescent human endothelial cells and mouse BM-MSCs. The combination of dasatinib and quercetin was effective in eliminating senescent MEFs. In vivo, this combination reduced senescent cell burden in chronologically aged, radiation-exposed, and progeroid Ercc1?/? mice. In old mice, cardiac function and carotid vascular reactivity were improved 5 days after a single dose. Following irradiation of one limb in mice, a single dose led to improved exercise capacity for at least 7 months following drug treatment. Periodic drug administration extended healthspan in Ercc1?/? mice, delaying age-related symptoms and pathology, osteoporosis, and loss of intervertebral disk proteoglycans. These results demonstrate the feasibility of selectively ablating senescent cells and the efficacy of senolytics for alleviating symptoms of frailty and extending healthspan. PMID:25754370

  2. The Achilles' heel of senescent cells: from transcriptome to senolytic drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yi; Tchkonia, Tamara; Pirtskhalava, Tamar; Gower, Adam C; Ding, Husheng; Giorgadze, Nino; Palmer, Allyson K; Ikeno, Yuji; Hubbard, Gene B; Lenburg, Marc; O'Hara, Steven P; LaRusso, Nicholas F; Miller, Jordan D; Roos, Carolyn M; Verzosa, Grace C; LeBrasseur, Nathan K; Wren, Jonathan D; Farr, Joshua N; Khosla, Sundeep; Stout, Michael B; McGowan, Sara J; Fuhrmann-Stroissnigg, Heike; Gurkar, Aditi U; Zhao, Jing; Colangelo, Debora; Dorronsoro, Akaitz; Ling, Yuan Yuan; Barghouthy, Amira S; Navarro, Diana C; Sano, Tokio; Robbins, Paul D; Niedernhofer, Laura J; Kirkland, James L

    2015-08-01

    The healthspan of mice is enhanced by killing senescent cells using a transgenic suicide gene. Achieving the same using small molecules would have a tremendous impact on quality of life and the burden of age-related chronic diseases. Here, we describe the rationale for identification and validation of a new class of drugs termed senolytics, which selectively kill senescent cells. By transcript analysis, we discovered increased expression of pro-survival networks in senescent cells, consistent with their established resistance to apoptosis. Using siRNA to silence expression of key nodes of this network, including ephrins (EFNB1 or 3), PI3K?, p21, BCL-xL, or plasminogen-activated inhibitor-2, killed senescent cells, but not proliferating or quiescent, differentiated cells. Drugs targeting these same factors selectively killed senescent cells. Dasatinib eliminated senescent human fat cell progenitors, while quercetin was more effective against senescent human endothelial cells and mouse BM-MSCs. The combination of dasatinib and quercetin was effective in eliminating senescent MEFs. In vivo, this combination reduced senescent cell burden in chronologically aged, radiation-exposed, and progeroid Ercc1(-/?) mice. In old mice, cardiac function and carotid vascular reactivity were improved 5 days after a single dose. Following irradiation of one limb in mice, a single dose led to improved exercise capacity for at least 7 months following drug treatment. Periodic drug administration extended healthspan in Ercc1(-/?) mice, delaying age-related symptoms and pathology, osteoporosis, and loss of intervertebral disk proteoglycans. These results demonstrate the feasibility of selectively ablating senescent cells and the efficacy of senolytics for alleviating symptoms of frailty and extending healthspan. PMID:25754370

  3. The effect of lateral heel studs on the kinematics of the equine digit while cantering on grass.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Alison M; Williams, Sarah B; Singer, Ellen R

    2012-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of lateral heel studs on foot-ground interaction in the horse by quantifying foot slip during stance whilst cantering on a grass surface. It was hypothesised that using studs would decrease foot slip distance on the ground conditions tested. Nine horses were ridden with and without a stud placed laterally in the shoe of each of the 4 feet. High speed video-analysis was used to track hoof markers and to provide data quantifying foot slip distance, slip duration and stance duration. Using studs resulted in a significant decrease in foot slip distance in all four limbs (all P values<0.004). The magnitude of the difference in slip distance with and without studs was greatest in the trailing limbs. The results supported the hypothesis that using studs will decrease foot slip distance in horses cantering on a grass surface, and additionally, highlights that stud efficacy may vary between limbs. The decrease in slip distance with studs demonstrated increased traction and a more stable foot-ground interaction, although this may cause a concomitant increase in the required energy dissipation, either within the limb or via surface deformation. The effect of repetitive usage of studs in the aetiology of musculoskeletal conditions should therefore be investigated further. PMID:21752677

  4. Topical pyruvic acid (70%) versus topical salicylic acid (16.7%) compound in treatment of plantar warts: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Shahmoradi, Zabihollah; Assaf, Fatima; Al Said, Hassan; Khosravani, Parastoo; Hosseini, Sayyed Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recurrence rate is considerable with current topical treatments of plantar warts. We compared the efficacy of topical pyruvic acid (70%) with salicylic acid (16.7%) compound in treating multiple plantar warts. Materials and Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 60 patients with multiple plantar warts were equally randomized to receive either pyruvic acid 70% or compound salicylic acid solution (salicylic acid 16.7%, lactic acid 16.7%, and collodion 100%) that was topically applied twice a day for 4 weeks. Patients were visited every 2 weeks for 1 month after starting treatment and then every 1 month for another 2 months. The number and size of warts, treatment complications (pain, burning, scar, pigmentation, and crust), and recurrence were evaluated. Results: Warts’ number was decreased by ?13.12 ± 25.6% with pyruvic acid and by ?23.0 ± 28.0% with compound salicylic acid (P = 0.159) after treatment. Warts’ size was decreased by ?43.47 ± 57.0% with pyruvic acid and by ?37.40 ± 32.76% with compound salicylic acid (P = 0.615) after treatment. There was no difference between the two groups in cumulative incidence of treatment complications (P > 0.05). Also, there was no difference between the two groups in recurrence rate at 2 months (10 vs. 16.7%, P = 0.500) or at 3 months after treatment (3.3 vs. 6.7%, P = 0.335). Conclusion: Topical pyruvic acid and compound salicylic acid had the same efficacy and complications in treating plantar warts. Decision for choosing the treatment can be made based on the costs and individual factors as well as patients preferences. PMID:26261815

  5. Evaluation of skin surface hydration state and barrier function of stratum corneum of dorsa of hands and heels treated with PROTECT X2 skin protective cream.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Takahiro

    2012-06-01

    Skin roughness is a term commonly used in Japan to describe a poor skin condition related to a rough and dry skin surface that develops as a result of various damaging effects from the environment or skin inflammation. Recovery from skin roughness requires skin care for a long period, thus it is important to prevent development of such skin changes. PROTECT X2 contains agents used for a protective covering of the skin from frequent hand washing or use of alcohol-based disinfectants. These unique components are also thought to be effective to treat skin roughness of the dorsa of the hands and heels. In the present study, we evaluated the effectiveness of PROTECT X2 to increase skin surface hydration state, as well as enhance the barrier function of the stratum corneum of the dorsa of the hands and heels in elderly individuals. A total of 8 elderly subjects and their caretakers without any skin diseases participated in the study. They applied PROTECT X2 by themselves to the dorsum area of 1 hand and heel 3 to 5 times daily for 1 month, while the opposite sides were left untreated. We measured stratum corneum (SC) hydration and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) before beginning treatment, then 1 week and 1 month after the start of treatment to compare between the treated and untreated skin. SC hydration state after applications of PROTECT X2 was 1.5- to 3.0-fold higher than that of the untreated skin in the dorsa of both hands and heels, indicating that the moisturizing ingredients accompanied by water were replenished in those areas where the cream was applied. Also, TEWL in the dorsum of the hands was 17.0-27.9% lower on the treated side, indicating improvement in SC barrier function. On the basis of these findings, we concluded that PROTECT X2 enhances water-holding in the SC and aids the barrier function of the skin in the dorsum of the hands. In addition, we consider that this formulation is useful for not only protecting the hands from the effects of such agents as detergents and alcohol-based disinfectants, but also for protecting heel skin covered by a thick SC from dry and cold conditions such as those encountered in winter. However, since the SC in that area is much thicker than that of the hands, the barrier function was not significantly improved within 1 month of daily treatments. PMID:22890206

  6. Anemia of chronic disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... There are many types of anemia. Anemia of chronic disease is anemia that is found in people with ... blood. Some conditions can lead to anemia of chronic disease include: Autoimmune disorders , such as Crohn disease , systemic ...

  7. Effects of long-term wearing of high-heeled shoes on the control of the body's center of mass motion in relation to the center of pressure during walking.

    PubMed

    Chien, Hui-Lien; Lu, Tung-Wu; Liu, Ming-Wei

    2014-04-01

    High-heeled shoes are associated with instability and falling, leading to injuries such as fracture and ankle sprain. This study investigated the effects of habitual wearing of high-heeled shoes on the body's center of mass (COM) motion relative to the center of pressure (COP) during gait. Fifteen female experienced wearers and 15 matched controls walked with high-heeled shoes (7.3cm) while kinematic and ground reaction force data were measured and used to calculate temporal-distance parameters, joint moments, COM-COP inclination angles (IA) and the rate of IA changes (RCIA). Compared with inexperienced wearers, experienced subjects showed significantly reduced frontal IA with increased ankle pronator moments during single-limb support (p<0.05). During double-limb support (DLS), they showed significantly increased magnitudes of the frontal RCIA at toe-off and contralateral heel-strike, and reduced DLS time (p<0.05) but unaltered mean RCIA over DLS. In the sagittal plane experienced wearers showed significantly increased mean RCIA (p<0.05) and significant differences in the RCIA at toe-off and contralateral heel-strike (p<0.05). Significantly increased hip flexor moments and knee extensor moments at toe-off (p<0.05) were needed for forward motion of the trailing limb. The current results identified the change in the balance control in females after long-term use of high-heeled shoes, providing a basis for future design of strategies to minimize the risk of falling during high-heeled gait. PMID:24508016

  8. Ipsi- and contralateral H-reflexes and V-waves after unilateral chronic Achilles tendon vibration.

    PubMed

    Lapole, Thomas; Canon, Francis; Pérot, Chantal

    2013-09-01

    Chronic Achilles tendon vibration has previously shown its effectiveness in improving plantar flexor's strength and activation capacities. The present study investigated the related neural mechanisms by analyzing H-reflexes and V-waves of the soleus (SOL) and gastrocnemii (GM gastrocnemius medialis; GL gastrocnemius lateralis) muscles under maximal isometric plantar flexion. Moreover, recordings were conducted bilaterally to address potential crossed effects. 11 subjects were engaged in this study. Maximal voluntary contraction and superimposed H-reflexes and V-waves were quantified in both legs at baseline (PRE) and 2 weeks later to verify repeatability of data (CON). Then, subjects were retested after 14 days of daily unilateral Achilles tendon vibration (VIB; 1 h per day; frequency: 50 Hz). No changes were reported between PRE and CON data. In the VIB condition, there was an increase in MVC for both the vibrated (+9.1 %; p = 0.016) and non-vibrated (+10.2 %; p = 0.009) legs. The H-reflex increased by a mean 25 % in the vibrated SOL (p < 0.001), while it remained unchanged for the contralateral side (p = 0.531). The SOL V-wave also increased in the vibrated limb (+43.3 %; p < 0.001), as well as in the non-vibrated one (+41.9 %; p = 0.006). Furthermore, the GM V-wave increased by 37.8 % (p = 0.081) in the vibrated side and by 39.4 % (p = 0.03) in the non-vibrated side. However, no changes were reported for the GL muscles. While the present study confirmed the strength gains induced by chronic Achilles tendon vibration, the results indicated a cross-education phenomenon with differences in neural adaptations between the vibrated leg and non-vibrated leg. PMID:23652708

  9. What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... about chronic myeloid leukemia? What is chronic myeloid leukemia? Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), also known as chronic ... is the same as for adults. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts in the ...

  10. Utilization of the MPI Process for in-tank solidification of heel material in large-diameter cylindrical tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Kauschinger, J.L.; Lewis, B.E.

    2000-01-01

    A major problem faced by the US Department of Energy is remediation of sludge and supernatant waste in underground storage tanks. Exhumation of the waste is currently the preferred remediation method. However, exhumation cannot completely remove all of the contaminated materials from the tanks. For large-diameter tanks, amounts of highly contaminated ``heel'' material approaching 20,000 gal can remain. Often sludge containing zeolite particles leaves ``sand bars'' of locally contaminated material across the floor of the tank. The best management practices for in-tank treatment (stabilization and immobilization) of wastes require an integrated approach to develop appropriate treatment agents that can be safely delivered and mixed uniformly with sludge. Ground Environmental Services has developed and demonstrated a remotely controlled, high-velocity jet delivery system termed, Multi-Point-Injection (MPI). This robust jet delivery system has been field-deployed to create homogeneous monoliths containing shallow buried miscellaneous waste in trenches [fiscal year (FY) 1995] and surrogate sludge in cylindrical (FY 1998) and long, horizontal tanks (FY 1999). During the FY 1998 demonstration, the MPI process successfully formed a 32-ton uniform monolith of grout and waste surrogates in about 8 min. Analytical data indicated that 10 tons of zeolite-type physical surrogate were uniformly mixed within a 40-in.-thick monolith without lifting the MPI jetting tools off the tank floor. Over 1,000 lb of cohesive surrogates, with consistencies similar to Gunite and Associated Tank (GAAT) TH-4 and Hanford tank sludges, were easily intermixed into the monolith without exceeding a core temperature of 100 F during curing.

  11. Native American lithic procurement along the international border in the boot heel region of southwestern New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeigler, K. E.; Hogan, P.; Hughes, C.; Kurota, A.

    2011-06-01

    Multidisciplinary field projects can be very useful to a more fundamental understanding of the world around us, though these projects are not as common as they should be. In particular, the combination of archeology and geology combines our understanding of human behavior and human use of the landscape with an intimate knowledge of geologic processes and the materials available for human use in order to gain a broader understanding of human-Earth interaction. Here we present data from a cross-disciplinary project that uses a common dataset, archeological artifacts, to explore the anthropological and geologic implications of useage patterns. Archeological excavations and surveys conducted by the Office of Contract Archeology in 2007 along the route of the proposed international border fence reveal patterns of use of geologic materials by Archaic, Formative and Protohistoric Native Americans in the Boot Heel of southwestern New Mexico. Thousands of artifacts were recorded in multiple sites from Guadalupe Pass in the southern Peloncillo Mountains to the Carrizalillo Hills west of Columbus. We identified the lithologies of artifacts, ranging from projectile points to groundstones, and then constructed material movement maps based on either known procurement sites ("quarries") or outcrops identified as the closest source to a given site for each lithology. Not unexpectedly, the majority of the rock types utilized by native peoples are local siliceous volcanic materials. However, several artifacts constructed from obsidian were transported into the region from northern Mexico and eastern Arizona, indicating long-distance travel and/or trade routes. We also examine useage pattern difference between Archaic, Formative and Protohistoric sites. Additionally, a dramatic change in distribution of sources for geologic materials occurs between one pre-Spanish site and one post-Spanish site that are adjacent to one another.

  12. Native American lithic procurement along the international border in the boot heel region of southwestern New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeigler, K. E.; Hughes, C.; Kurota, A.; Hogan, P.

    2010-12-01

    Multidisciplinary field projects can be very useful to a more fundamental understanding of the world around us, though these projects are not as common as they should be. In particular, the combination of archeology and geology combines our understanding of human behavior and human use of the landscape with an intimate knowledge of geologic processes and the materials available for human use in order to gain a broader understanding of human-Earth interaction. Here we present data from a cross-disciplinary project that uses a common dataset, archeological artifacts, to explore the anthropological and geologic implications of useage patterns. Archeological excavations and surveys conducted by the Office of Contract Archeology in 2007 along the route of the proposed international border fence reveal patterns of use of geologic materials by Archaic, Formative and Protohistoric Native Americans in the Boot Heel of southwestern New Mexico. Thousands of artifacts were recorded in multiple sites from Guadalupe Pass in the southern Peloncillo Mountains to the Carrizalillo Hills west of Columbus. We identified the lithologies of artifacts, ranging from projectile points to groundstones, and then constructed material movement maps based on either known procurement sites ("quarries") or outcrops identified as the closest source to a given site for each lithology. Not unexpectedly, the majority of the rock types utilized by native peoples are local siliceous volcanic materials. However, several artifacts constructed from obsidian were transported into the region from northern Mexico and eastern Arizona, indicating long-distance travel and/or trade routes. We also examine useage pattern difference between Archaic, Formative and Protohistoric sites. Additionally, a dramatic change in distribution of sources for geologic materials occurs between one pre-Spanish site and one post-Spanish site that are adjacent to one another.

  13. A color-code based method for the interpretation of plantar pressure measurements in clinical gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, Kevin; Staes, Filip; Desmet, Dirk; Roosen, Philip; Matricali, Giovanni Arnoldo; Keijsers, Noel; Nobels, Frank; Tits, Jos; Bruyninckx, Herman

    2015-03-01

    Comparing plantar pressure measurements (PPM) of a patient following an intervention or between a reference group and a patient-group is common practice in clinical gait analysis. However, this process is often time consuming and complex, and commercially available software often lacks powerful visualization and interpretation tools. In this paper, we propose a simple method for displaying pixel-level PPM deviations relative to a so-called reference PPM pattern. The novel method contains 3 distinct stages: (1) a normalization of pedobarographic fields (for foot length and width), (2) a pixel-level z-score based calculation and, (3) color coding of the normalized pedobarographic fields. The methodological steps associated to this novel method are precisely described and clinical output illustrated. We believe that the advantages of the novel method cover several domains. The strongest advantage of the novel method is that it provides a straightforward visual interpretation of PPM without decreasing the resolution perspective. A second advantage is that it may guide the selection of a local mapping technique (data reduction technique). Finally, it may be easily used as education tool during the therapist-patient interaction. PMID:25743774

  14. Circumscribed palmar or plantar hypokeratosis 10 years after the first description: what is known and the issues under discussion.

    PubMed

    Urbina, F; Pérez, A; Requena, L; Rütten, A

    2014-01-01

    This review of the literature on palmoplantar hypokeratosis, a process that was first indentified only 10 years ago, discusses the current state of our understanding, the therapeutic options available, and the debate about etiology. Forty-four publications reporting 69 cases were found. Palmar or plantar hypokeratosis occurs mainly in women (76.8%) and age at the time of a first visit to a physician ranges from 42 to 84 years. Most cases present between the ages of 51 and 70 years. The majority of patients have had solitary lesions usually located on the right palm, particularly in the regions of the thenar (in 44/79 lesions [55.7%]) or hypothenar eminences (in 11/79 lesions [13.9%]). In only 8 cases was there a history of prior trauma at the site. Studies using polymerase chain reaction techniques to identify human papillomavirus involvement were negative in most cases. These hypokeratotic lesions are localized epidermal depressions formed by an abrupt thinning of the stratum corneum, providing a singular histopathologic feature. This condition can currently be considered a localized keratinization disorder affecting zones where there is a thick stratum corneum. The precipitating cause is unknown and a definitive treatment remains to be found. The mechanism would be the localized failure of a clone of keratinocytes during differentiation toward normal palmoplantar hyperkeratinization. PMID:24011977

  15. Preventing chronic postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Reddi, D

    2016-01-01

    Chronic postoperative pain is common. Nerve injury and inflammation promote chronic pain, the risk of which is influenced by patient factors, including psychological characteristics. Interventional trials to prevent chronic postoperative pain have been underpowered with inadequate patient follow-up. Ketamine may reduce chronic postoperative pain, although the optimum treatment duration and dose for different operations have yet to be identified. The evidence for gabapentin and pregabalin is encouraging but weak; further work is needed before these drugs can be recommended for the prevention of chronic pain. Regional techniques reduce the rates of chronic pain after thoracotomy and breast cancer surgery. Nerve-sparing surgical techniques may be of benefit, although nerve injury is not necessary or sufficient for chronic pain to develop. PMID:26620149

  16. 5-HT2 and 5-HT7 receptor agonists facilitate plantar stepping in chronic spinal rats through actions on different populations of spinal neurons

    PubMed Central

    S?awi?ska, Urszula; Miazga, Krzysztof; Jordan, Larry M.

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable evidence from research in neonatal and adult rat and mouse preparations to warrant the conclusion that activation of 5-HT2 and 5-HT1A/7 receptors leads to activation of the spinal cord circuitry for locomotion. These receptors are involved in control of locomotor movements, but it is not clear how they are implicated in the responses to 5-HT agonists observed after spinal cord injury. Here we used agonists that are efficient in promoting locomotor recovery in paraplegic rats, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin (8-OHDPAT) (acting on 5-HT1A/7 receptors) and quipazine (acting on 5-HT2 receptors), to examine this issue. Analysis of intra- and interlimb coordination confirmed that the locomotor performance was significantly improved by either drug, but the data revealed marked differences in their mode of action. Interlimb coordination was significantly better after 8-OHDPAT application, and the activity of the extensor soleus muscle was significantly longer during the stance phase of locomotor movements enhanced by quipazine. Our results show that activation of both receptors facilitates locomotion, but their effects are likely exerted on different populations of spinal neurons. Activation of 5-HT2 receptors facilitates the output stage of the locomotor system, in part by directly activating motoneurons, and also through activation of interneurons of the locomotor central pattern generator (CPG). Activation of 5-HT7/1A receptors facilitates the activity of the locomotor CPG, without direct actions on the output components of the locomotor system, including motoneurons. Although our findings show that the combined use of these two drugs results in production of well-coordinated weight supported locomotion with a reduced need for exteroceptive stimulation, they also indicate that there might be some limitations to the utility of combined treatment. Sensory feedback and some intraspinal circuitry recruited by the drugs can conflict with the locomotor activation. PMID:25191231

  17. Environmental pollution and chronic arsenicosis in south Calcutta.

    PubMed Central

    Mazumder, D. N.; Das Gupta, J.; Chakraborty, A. K.; Chatterjee, A.; Das, D.; Chakraborti, D.

    1992-01-01

    Careless handling of industrial wastes often creates problems for human health and the environment. Chronic arsenic toxicity, resulting from household use of arsenic-contaminated water occurred in 53 out of 79 members (67%) of 17 families residing in South Calcutta close to a factory that manufactured Paris-green (copper acetoarsenite). Clinical investigation of 20 of these affected persons showed typical skin pigmentation as well as palmar and plantar keratosis in all of them, while gastrointestinal symptoms, anaemia and signs of liver disease and peripheral neuropathy were seen in many. The water used by the affected families for drinking and cooking had been taken from shallow tubewells and had arsenic levels from 5.0 to 58 mg/l (WHO permissible limit, 0.05 mg/l). Other residents in the same area whose drinking-water came from deep tubewells or from tap water supplied by the Calcutta Municipal Corporation (arsenic levels, less than 0.05 mg/l) were not affected. The study confirms that arsenic in the shallow tubewells was due to the waste discharged by the factory producing Paris-green. PMID:1394782

  18. Biofilms in chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    James, Garth A; Swogger, Ellen; Wolcott, Randall; Pulcini, Elinor deLancey; Secor, Patrick; Sestrich, Jennifer; Costerton, John W; Stewart, Philip S

    2008-01-01

    Chronic wounds including diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers, and venous leg ulcers are a worldwide health problem. It has been speculated that bacteria colonizing chronic wounds exist as highly persistent biofilm communities. This research examined chronic and acute wounds for biofilms and characterized microorganisms inhabiting these wounds. Chronic wound specimens were obtained from 77 subjects and acute wound specimens were obtained from 16 subjects. Culture data were collected using standard clinical techniques. Light and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to analyze 50 of the chronic wound specimens and the 16 acute wound specimens. Molecular analyses were performed on the remaining 27 chronic wound specimens using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequence analysis. Of the 50 chronic wound specimens evaluated by microscopy, 30 were characterized as containing biofilm (60%), whereas only one of the 16 acute wound specimens was characterized as containing biofilm (6%). This was a statistically significant difference (p<0.001). Molecular analyses of chronic wound specimens revealed diverse polymicrobial communities and the presence of bacteria, including strictly anaerobic bacteria, not revealed by culture. Bacterial biofilm prevalence in specimens from chronic wounds relative to acute wounds observed in this study provides evidence that biofilms may be abundant in chronic wounds. PMID:18086294

  19. Management of Chronic Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) conducted a systematic review on interventions used to treat pressure ulcers in order to answer the following questions: Do currently available interventions for the treatment of pressure ulcers increase the healing rate of pressure ulcers compared with standard care, a placebo, or other similar interventions? Within each category of intervention, which one is most effective in promoting the healing of existing pressure ulcers? Background A pressure ulcer is a localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in conjunction with shear and/or friction. Many areas of the body, especially the sacrum and the heel, are prone to the development of pressure ulcers. People with impaired mobility (e.g., stroke or spinal cord injury patients) are most vulnerable to pressure ulcers. Other factors that predispose people to pressure ulcer formation are poor nutrition, poor sensation, urinary and fecal incontinence, and poor overall physical and mental health. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in Ontario has been estimated to range from a median of 22.1% in community settings to a median of 29.9% in nonacute care facilities. Pressure ulcers have been shown to increase the risk of mortality among geriatric patients by as much as 400%, to increase the frequency and duration of hospitalization, and to decrease the quality of life of affected patients. The cost of treating pressure ulcers has been estimated at approximately $9,000 (Cdn) per patient per month in the community setting. Considering the high prevalence of pressure ulcers in the Ontario health care system, the total cost of treating pressure ulcers is substantial. Technology Wounds normally heal in 3 phases (inflammatory phase, a proliferative phase of new tissue and matrix formation, and a remodelling phase). However, pressure ulcers often fail to progress past the inflammatory stage. Current practice for treating pressure ulcers includes treating the underlying causes, debridement to remove necrotic tissues and contaminated tissues, dressings to provide a moist wound environment and to manage exudates, devices and frequent turning of patients to provide pressure relief, topical applications of biologic agents, and nutritional support to correct nutritional deficiencies. A variety of adjunctive physical therapies are also in use. Method Health technology assessment databases and medical databases were searched from 1996 (Medline), 1980 (EMBASE), and 1982 (CINAHL) systematically up to March 2008 to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the following treatments of pressure ulcers: cleansing, debridement, dressings, biological therapies, pressure-relieving devices, physical therapies, nutritional therapies, and multidisciplinary wound care teams. Full literature search strategies are reported in appendix 1. English-language studies in previous systematic reviews and studies published since the last systematic review were included if they had more than 10 subjects, were randomized, and provided objective outcome measures on the healing of pressure ulcers. In the absence of RCTs, studies of the highest level of evidence available were included. Studies on wounds other than pressure ulcers and on surgical treatment of pressure ulcers were excluded. A total of 18 systematic reviews, 104 RCTs, and 4 observational

  20. Treatment Outcomes of Corticosteroid Injection and Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy as Two Primary Therapeutic Methods for Acute Plantar Fasciitis: A Prospective Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Mardani-Kivi, Mohsen; Karimi Mobarakeh, Mahmoud; Hassanzadeh, Zabihallah; Mirbolook, Ahmadreza; Asadi, Kamran; Ettehad, Hossein; Hashemi-Motlagh, Keyvan; Saheb-Ekhtiari, Khashayar; Fallah-Alipour, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of corticosteroid injection (CSI) and extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) as primary treatment of acute plantar fasciitis has been debated. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate and compare the therapeutic effects of CSI and ESWT in patients with acute (<6-week duration) symptomatic plantar fasciitis. Of the 116 eligible patients, 68 were randomized to 2 equal groups of 34 patients, each undergoing either ESWT or CSI. The ESWT method included 2000 impulses with energy of 0.15 mJ/mm(2) and a total energy flux density of 900 mJ/mm(2) for 3 consecutive sessions at 1-week intervals. In the CSI group, 40 mg of methyl prednisolone acetate plus 1 mL of lidocaine 2% was injected into the maximal tenderness point at the inframedial calcaneal tuberosity. The success and recurrence rates and pain intensity measured using the visual analog scale, were recorded and compared at the 3-month follow-up visit. The pain intensity had reduced significantly in all patients undergoing either technique. However, the value and trend of pain reduction in the CSI group was significantly greater than those in the ESWT group (p < .0001). In the ESWT and CSI groups, 19 (55.9%) and 5 (14.7%) patients experienced treatment failure, respectively. Age, gender, body mass index, and recurrence rate were similar between the 2 groups (p > .05). Both ESWT and CSI can be used as the primary and/or initial treatment option for treating patients with acute plantar fasciitis; however, the CSI technique had better therapeutic outcomes. PMID:26215551

  1. Predicting Complete Ground Reaction Forces and Moments During Gait With Insole Plantar Pressure Information Using a Wavelet Neural Network.

    PubMed

    Sim, Taeyong; Kwon, Hyunbin; Oh, Seung Eel; Joo, Su-Bin; Choi, Ahnryul; Heo, Hyun Mu; Kim, Kisun; Mun, Joung Hwan

    2015-09-01

    In general, three-dimensional ground reaction forces (GRFs) and ground reaction moments (GRMs) that occur during human gait are measured using a force plate, which are expensive and have spatial limitations. Therefore, we proposed a prediction model for GRFs and GRMs, which only uses plantar pressure information measured from insole pressure sensors with a wavelet neural network (WNN) and principal component analysis-mutual information (PCA-MI). For this, the prediction model estimated GRFs and GRMs with three different gait speeds (slow, normal, and fast groups) and healthy/pathological gait patterns (healthy and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) groups). Model performance was validated using correlation coefficients (r) and the normalized root mean square error (NRMSE%) and was compared to the prediction accuracy of the previous methods using the same dataset. As a result, the performance of the GRF and GRM prediction model proposed in this study (slow group: r?=?0.840-0.989 and NRMSE%?=?10.693-15.894%; normal group: r?=?0.847-0.988 and NRMSE% =?10.920-19.216%; fast group: r?=?0.823-0.953 and NRMSE%?=?12.009-20.182%; healthy group: r?=?0.836-0.976 and NRMSE%?=?12.920-18.088%; and AIS group: r?=?0.917-0.993 and NRMSE%?=?7.914-15.671%) was better than that of the prediction models suggested in previous studies for every group and component (p?

  2. Adherence to Wearing Prescription Custom-Made Footwear in Patients With Diabetes at High Risk for Plantar Foot Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Waaijman, Roelof; Keukenkamp, Renske; de Haart, Mirjam; Polomski, Wojtek P.; Nollet, Frans; Bus, Sicco A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Prescription custom-made footwear can only be effective in preventing diabetic foot ulcers if worn by the patient. Particularly, the high prevalence of recurrent foot ulcers focuses the attention on adherence, for which objective data are nonexisting. We objectively assessed adherence in patients with high risk of ulcer recurrence and evaluated what determines adherence. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In 107 patients with diabetes, neuropathy, a recently healed plantar foot ulcer, and custom-made footwear, footwear use was measured during 7 consecutive days using a shoe-worn, temperature-based monitor. Daily step count was measured simultaneously using an ankle-worn activity monitor. Patients logged time away from home. Adherence was calculated as the percentage of steps that prescription footwear was worn. Determinants of adherence were evaluated in multivariate linear regression analysis. RESULTS Mean ± SD adherence was 71 ± 25%. Adherence at home was 61 ± 32%, over 3,959 ± 2,594 steps, and away from home 87 ± 26%, over 2,604 ± 2,507 steps. In 35 patients with low adherence (<60%), adherence at home was 28 ± 24%. Lower BMI, more severe foot deformity, and more appealing footwear were significantly associated with higher adherence. CONCLUSIONS The results show that adherence to wearing custom-made footwear is insufficient, particularly at home where patients exhibit their largest walking activity. This low adherence is a major threat for reulceration. These objective findings provide directions for improvement in adherence, which could include prescribing specific off-loading footwear for indoors, and they set a reference for future comparative research on footwear adherence in diabetes. PMID:23321218

  3. Contoured, prefabricated foot orthoses demonstrate comparable mechanical properties to contoured, customised foot orthoses: a plantar pressure study

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, Anthony C; Landorf, Karl B; Keenan, Anne-Maree

    2009-01-01

    Background Foot orthoses have been demonstrated to be effective in the management of a range of conditions, but there is debate as to the benefits of customised foot orthoses over less expensive, prefabricated devices. Methods In a randomised, cross-over trial, 15 flat-footed participants aged between 18 and 45 years were provided with semi-rigid, customised orthoses and semi-rigid, contoured, prefabricated orthoses. Pressures and forces were measured using an in-shoe system with subjects wearing shoes alone, wearing customised orthoses, and again when wearing contoured prefabricated orthoses. Two weeks acclimatisation was included between cross-over of therapy. Repeated measures ANOVA models with post-hoc, pair-wise comparisons were used to test for differences. Results When compared to wearing shoes alone, wearing either the customised orthoses or the prefabricated orthoses was associated with increases in force and force time integrals in the midfoot region. Peak and maximum mean pressure and pressure-time, and force-time integrals were reduced in both the medial and lateral forefoot. There were, however, no significant differences between the customised orthoses and the prefabricated orthoses at any site. Conclusion There was a similar change in loading with both the semi-rigid customised and the semi-rigid prefabricated orthoses when compared to the shoe alone condition. However, while customised devices offered minor differences over prefabricated orthoses in some variables, these were not statistically significant. The results suggest that there may be only minor differences in the effects on plantar pressures between the customised and the less expensive prefabricated orthoses tested in this study, however further research is warranted. PMID:19531262

  4. Preventing Chronic Disease

    Cancer.gov

    Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD) is a peer-reviewed electronic journal established by the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion to address the interface between applied public health research, practice, and policy. Articles focus on preventing and controlling chronic diseases and conditions, promoting health, and examining the biological, behavioral, physical, and social determinants of health and their impact on quality of life, morbidity, and mortality across the life span.

  5. Leg soft tissue position and velocity data from skin markers can be obtained with good to acceptable reliability following heel impacts.

    PubMed

    Brydges, Evan A; Burkhart, Timothy A; Altenhof, William J; Andrews, David M

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying soft tissue motion following impact is important in human motion analysis as soft tissues attenuate potentially injurious forces resulting from activities such as running and jumping. This study determined the reliability of leg soft tissue position and velocity following heel impacts. A grid of black dots was applied to the skin of the right leg and foot (n = 20). Dots were automatically detected (ProAnalyst(®)) from high-speed records of pendulum and drop impacts. Three trained measurers selected columns of dots on each participant for analysis; one measurer 6 months later. Between- and within-measurer differences in kinematic variables were all relatively small (<0.8 cm for position; <3.7 cm/s for velocity) between-measurers and (<0.5 cm for position; <2.6 cm/s for velocity) within-measurer. Good (coefficients of variation (CV) ? 10%) to acceptable (CV > 10% and ?20%) reliability was shown for 95% of the position measures, with mean CVs of 10% and 11% within-measurers and between-measures, respectively. Velocity measures were less reliable; 40% of the measures showed good to marginal (CV > 20% and ?30%) reliability. This study established that leg soft tissue position data from skin markers could be obtained with good to acceptable reliability following heel impacts. Velocity data were less reliable but still acceptable in many cases. PMID:25626597

  6. Feynman's Achilles' Heel?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Lyndsay G. M.

    2011-12-01

    Feynman1 argued that a ratchet of the type used in heavy machinery could be used, in a scaled-down version, to show that the second law of thermodynamics is not just a statistical law, but has absolute status. Hidden is the assumption that this model represented the completely general example of this device—and that it remained so, across the complete range of magnitudes from macro- to micro-domains. It will be argued here, that Feynman's example is only one construct of a ratchet and cannot represent the general case. A mechanism, with sufficient difference and confined to the micro-domain, is the subject of the present discussion. Its unique feature is the compressible nature of the pawl as it librates in pawl-space. The motions of the gear and the pawl are governed by the energy exchanges between them and with the ambient gas. The average linear pressure on the pawl which varies with the magnitude of pawl-space is associated with the compressibility of the pawl. Feynman's objective was to show that the prototypal ratchet is incapable of converting heat into work in a manner contrary to the second law. The dubious nature of his examination is not due to an incorrect analysis of his thought experiment, but lies within the assumption that his example represented the general case. In contrast, the ratchet analyzed here does not conform to the principle of detailed balance and thereby the absolute status of the law remains an open question.

  7. Calcaneus (Heel Bone) Fractures

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the calcaneus grow together and form one bone. Fusion also means that no more motion can occur ... some or all of the deformity along with fusion of the bones. These surgeries usually require several ...

  8. Chronic gastritis - an update.

    PubMed

    Varbanova, Mariya; Frauenschläger, Katrin; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the main aetiologic factor for chronic gastritis worldwide. The degree of inflammation and the evolution of this form of chronic gastritis can vary largely depending on bacterial virulence factors, host susceptibility factors and environmental conditions. Autoimmune gastritis is another cause of chronic inflammation in the stomach, which can occur in all age groups. This disease presents typically with vitamin B12 deficiency and pernicious anaemia. The presence of anti-parietal cell antibodies is highly specific for the diagnosis. The role of H. pylori as a trigger for autoimmune gastritis remains uncertain. Other rare conditions for chronic gastritis are chronic inflammatory conditions such as Crohn's disease or on the background of lymphocytic or collagenous gastroenteropathies. PMID:25439069

  9. Chronic Diseases and Health Promotion

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of blindness among adults. 6 Top of Page Health Risk Behaviors that Cause Chronic Diseases Health risk behaviors ... of Page The Cost of Chronic Diseases and Health Risk Behaviors In the United States, chronic diseases and ...

  10. Changes of Plantar Pressure and Gait Parameters in Children with Mild Cerebral Palsy Who Used a Customized External Strap Orthosis: A Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wen-Dien; Chang, Nai-Jen; Lin, Hung-Yu; Lai, Ping-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Toe-in gait and crouch gait can make children with mild cerebral palsy fall and suffer improper balance during walking or ambulation training. A customized external strap orthosis for correcting leg alignment was used to resolve this problem. The purpose of this study was to research the immediate effects while wearing the customized external strap orthosis. Pressure platform was used to assess the plantar pressure through static and dynamic assessments and to record the changes in path of pressure trajectory. Motion image analysis system was used to record the gait parameters, which included gait speed, stride length, and cadence. The influence of both wearing and removing the orthosis on the dominant leg of children with mild cerebral palsy was analyzed. Nine children with mild cerebral palsy, who all had a dominant right leg, were recruited. After wearing the orthosis, all gait parameters improved, and foot motion changed in the stance phase of the gait cycle. The path of pressure trajectory closing to the midline was also observed during dynamic assessment. Changes in plantar pressure and path of pressure trajectory were observed and the orthosis device could provide immediate assistance to correct the leg alignment and improve the gait performance in children with mild cerebral palsy. PMID:26640796

  11. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP)

    MedlinePLUS

    NINDS Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP) Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What is Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP)? Is there any treatment? ...

  12. EFFECT OF ATHLETIC TAPING AND KINESIOTAPING® ON MEASUREMENTS OF FUNCTIONAL PERFORMANCE IN BASKETBALL PLAYERS WITH CHRONIC INVERSION ANKLE SPRAINS

    PubMed Central

    Karatas, Nihan; Baltaci, Gul

    2012-01-01

    Background: Chronic inversion ankle sprains are common in basketball players. The effect of taping on functional performance is disputed in the literature. Kinesiotaping® (KT®) is a new method that is being used as both a therapeutic and performance enhancement tool. To date, it appears that no study has investigated the effect of ankle KT® on functional performance. Purpose: To investigate the effects of different types of taping (KT® using Kinesio Tex®, athletic taping) on functional performance in athletes with chronic inversion sprains of the ankle. Study Design: Crossover Study Design Methods: Fifteen male basketball players with chronic inversion ankle sprains between the ages of 18 and 22 participated in this study. Functional performance tests (Hopping test by Amanda et al, Single Limb Hurdle Test, Standing Heel Rise test, Vertical Jump Test, The Star Excursion Balance Test [SEBT] and Kinesthetic Ability Trainer [KAT] Test) were used to quantify agility, endurance, balance, and coordination. These tests were conducted four times at one week intervals using varied conditions: placebo tape, without tape, standard athletic tape, and KT®. One-way ANOVA tests were used to examine difference in measurements between conditions. Bonferroni correction was applied to correct for repeated testing. Results: There were no significant differences among the results obtained using the four conditions for SEBT (anterior p=0.0699; anteromedial p=0.126; medial p=0.550; posteromedial p=0.587; posterior p=0.754; posterolateral p=0.907; lateral p=0.124; anterolateral p=0.963) and the KAT dynamic measurement (p=0.388). Faster performance times were measured with KT® and athletic tape in single limb hurdle test when compared to placebo and non-taped conditions (Athletic taping- placebo taping: p=0.03; athletic taping- non tape p=0.016;KT®- Placebo taping p=0.042; KT®-Non tape p=0.016). In standing heel rise test and vertical jump test, athletic taping led to decreased performance. (Standing heel rise test: Athletic taping- placebo taping p=0.035; athletic taping- non tape p=0.043; athletic tape- KT® p<0.001) (Vertical jump test: Athletic taping- placebo taping p=0.002: athletic taping- non tape p=0.002; KT®- athletic tape p<0.001) Conclusion: Kinesiotaping® had no negative effects on a battery of functional performance tests and improvements were seen in some functional performance tests. Clinical Relevance: Ankle taping using Kinesio Tex® Tape did not inhibit functional performance. PMID:22530190

  13. Patients with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Salama-Hanna, Joseph; Chen, Grace

    2013-11-01

    Preoperative evaluation of patients with chronic pain is important because it may lead to multidisciplinary preoperative treatment of patients' pain and a multimodal analgesia plan for effective pain control. Preoperative multidisciplinary management of chronic pain and comorbid conditions, such as depression, anxiety, deconditioning, and opioid tolerance, can improve patient satisfaction and surgical recovery. Multimodal analgesia using pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic strategies shifts the burden of analgesia away from simply increasing opioid dosing. In more complicated chronic pain patients, multidisciplinary treatment, including pain psychology, physical therapy, judicious medication management, and minimally invasive interventions by pain specialists, can improve patients' satisfaction and surgical outcome. PMID:24182727

  14. [Chronic constrictive pericarditis].

    PubMed

    Seidler, S; Lebowitz, D; Müller, H

    2015-05-27

    Chronic constrictive pericarditis is a rare condition characterized by an impairment of myocardial relaxation due to limitation by a rigid pericardium. It is most often associated with infection, thoracic radiotherapy and heart surgery. Clinical features are that of chronic heart failure, therefore non-specific and resulting in a delay of several years before diagnosis is made. The echocardiogram and heart catheterization are part of the initial work-up. Surgical treatment consisting in pericardiectomy can be curative if the disease is recognised early. This article makes use of a case report and review of the litterature to discuss the physiopathology, clinical features and management of chronic constrictive pericarditis. PMID:26182634

  15. Test-retest reliability of an insole plantar pressure system to assess gait along linear and curved trajectories

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have assessed reliability of insole technology for evaluating foot pressure distribution during linear walking. Since in natural motion straight walking is intermingled with turns, we determined the test-retest reliability of insole assessment for curved as well as linear trajectories, and estimated the minimum number of steps required to obtain excellent reliability for each output variable. Methods Sixteen young healthy participants were recruited. Each performed, two days apart, two sessions of three walking conditions: linear (LIN) and curved, clockwise (CW) and counter-clockwise (CCW). The Pedar-X system was used to collect pressure distribution. Foot print was analyzed both as a whole and as subdivided into eight regions: medial and lateral heel, medial and lateral arch, I metatarsal head, II-V metatarsal heads, hallux, lateral toes. Reliability was assessed by using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for clinically relevant variables from analysis of 50 steps per trajectory: Peak Force (PF); Peak Pressure (PP); Contact Area (CA); Stance Duration (S). Results When considering whole-foot, all variables showed an ICC >0.80, therefore highly reliable. This was true for both LIN and curved trajectories. There was no difference in ICC of the four variables between left and right foot. When collapsing foot and trajectories, S had a lower ICC than PP and CA, and PP lower than CA. Mean percent error between the values of first and second session was <5%. When separately considering the eight foot regions, ICCs of PF, PP and CA for all regions and trajectories were generally >0.90, indicating excellent reliability. In curved trajectories, S showed smaller ICCs. Since the least ICC value for S was 0.60 in LIN trajectory, we estimated that to achieve an ICC ?0.90 more than 200 steps should be collected. Conclusions High reliability of insole dynamic variables (PF, PP, CA) is obtained with 50 steps using the Pedar-X system. On the contrary, high reliability of temporal variable (S) requires a larger step number. The negligible differences in ICC between LIN and curved trajectory allow use of this device for gait assessment along mixed trajectories in both clinical and research setting. PMID:24903003

  16. [Physical-technical principles of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT)].

    PubMed

    Gerdesmeyer, L; Maier, M; Haake, M; Schmitz, C

    2002-07-01

    Extracorporeal shock waves in orthopaedics are currently applied in the treatment of chronic enthesiopathies such as lateral epicondylitis, plantar heel spur, as well as in calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder or in bony nonunions. Detailed knowledge of physical parameters and properties of shock waves appear to be necessary to determine clinically relevant dose-effect relations and to make shock wave devices, clinical results, and basic science in shock wave therapy more comparable. This study gives an overview of physical parameters and properties in shock wave therapy. Measurement technologies, types of shock wave devices, and mechanisms of shock waves are also described. PMID:12219657

  17. Managing Chronic Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... may lead to depression. With the help of occupational therapy, people with chronic pain can learn to manage ... distributed without prior written consent. Occupational therapists and occupational therapy assis- tants are trained in helping both adults ...

  18. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... System How the Body Works Main Page Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth > Kids > Health Problems > Bladder, Kidneys & Urinary ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  19. Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. Their main job is to filter wastes and excess water out of ... help control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged ...

  20. Low back pain - chronic

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for low-back pain with or without sciatica. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2010;(5):CD003010. Henschke N, ... al. Behavioural treatment for chronic low-back pain. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2010;(7):CD002014. Chou R, ...

  1. Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... can also change the way your body uses minerals such as calcium and phosphorus that are used ... certain foods to help your body use these minerals better. If you have chronic kidney disease, you ...

  2. People Experiencing Chronic Homelessness

    MedlinePLUS

    ... people with the highest needs are reached. Lower barriers to entry through Housing First adoption Chronic homelessness ... Issue The Power of Constituent Voice: The Rhode Island Homeless Bill of Rights Starting Is the Starting ...

  3. Chronic Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a specific diagnosis What you should know: The pelvic floor muscles act as a muscular sling that supports ... causes Chronic constipation or diarrhea can lead to pelvic floor dysfunction and pelvic pain can become very debilitating ...

  4. Depression and Chronic Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... pain? For More Information on Depression Citations Reprints Depression and Chronic Pain Order a free hardcopy En ... difficult, so proper treatment is important. What is depression? Major depressive disorder, or depression, is a serious ...

  5. Chronic Beryllium Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... processes at a metal, alloy and oxide production plant. Occup Environ Med 1997; 54:605-612. Mroz ... for chronic beryllium disease in a beryllium machining plant. J Occup Environ Med 2001; 43:231-237. ...

  6. Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Area Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD) Phagocyte (purple) engulfing Staphylococcus aureus bacteria (yellow). Credit: NIAID CGD is a ... types of bacteria and fungi, including the following: Staphylococcus aureus Serratia marcescens Burkholderia cepacia Nocardia species Aspergillus ...

  7. What Is Chronic Pain?

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Chronic Pain Medications & Treatments The Art of Pain Management What We Have Learned Going to the ER Communication Tools Pain Management Programs Videos Resources Glossary FAQs Surveys September is ...

  8. Chronic granulomatous disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... unable to kill some types of bacteria and fungi. This disorder leads to long-term ( chronic ) and ... during a woman's 10th to 12th week of pregnancy) have made early detection of CGD possible. However, ...

  9. Employees with Chronic Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... but seldom develop all of them. Also, the degree of limitation will vary among individuals. Be aware that not all people with chronic pain will need accommodations to perform their jobs and many others may only need a few ...

  10. Chronic Illness & Mental Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information on Depression and Other Medical Illnesses Chronic Illness & Mental Health Order a free hardcopy Depression is ... is clear. Depression is treatable even when other illness is present. Do not dismiss depression as a ...

  11. Linkage and association for bone mineral density and heel ultrasound measurements with a simple tandem repeat polymorphism near the osteocalcin gene in female dizygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Andrew, T; Mak, Y T; Reed, P; MacGregor, A J; Spector, T D

    2002-09-01

    In this confirmatory candidate gene study, we investigated possible linkage and association for bone density, heel ultrasound and bone turnover with the osteocalcin gene using the nearby (50-180kb) microsatellite marker D1S3737. Non-identical twin sisters aged 18-75 years at first interview were recruited for the study from the St Thomas' UK Adult Twin Registry with 1366 women being genotyped for marker D1S3737. Linkage, allelic association and joint linkage and association tests were carried out using quantitative transmission disequilibrium tests (QTDT), along with post-hoc multivariate tests of linkage and association. Phenotypes tested were bone mineral density (BMD) at the spine, left forearm and left total hip; quantitative ultrasound measurements of the heel including velocity of ultrasound (VOS) and broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA); and bone turnover markers, urine deoxypyridinoline (DPD), serum osteocalcin, bone specific and total alkaline phosphatase (ALP). BMD and ultrasound variables showed evidence of pleiotropic linkage ( p = 0.05) and association ( p = 0.02) with the marker in postmenopausal women. Bone markers showed little or no evidence of linkage and association for any age group. Evidence for pleiotropic linkage appeared to be strongest for BUA and spine BMD in postmenopausal women. The univariate test statistic for BUA was chi(2)(1)=12.8 ( p = 0.0003), equivalent to a LOD score of 2.8. DPD showed borderline evidence of linkage to the marker for women of all ages. Multivariate model-fitting showed allele 10 to be negatively associated with BMD, VOS and BUA via a common pathway, suggesting the putative functional polymorphism affects both bone content and structure through shared underlying metabolic pathways. It is likely that the alleles are in linkage disequilibrium with functional polymorphism(s) in or nearby the osteocalcin gene, which may contribute to the onset of osteoporosis. PMID:12195539

  12. Cortical pathophysiology of chronic pain

    E-print Network

    Apkarian, A. Vania

    Cortical pathophysiology of chronic pain A. Vania Apkarian Department of Physiology multiple non-invasive brain imaging techniques to study the characteristics of patients with chronic pain in chronic pain are summarized, emphasizing the unique role of the prefrontal cortex in chronic, especially

  13. 'The apple doesn't fall far from the tree': the role of parents in chronic disease self-management.

    PubMed

    Orrell-Valente, Joan K; Cabana, Michael D

    2008-12-01

    Medical nonadherence has been termed the "Achilles' heel of modern healthcare." In considering the need to improve medical adherence among chronically ill children, it is necessary to understand parent adherence. Parents have long been acknowledged to be the primary socialization agents in children's development across the various domains of functioning. Through communication of their beliefs, the behavior they model, and direct training, parents exert a powerful influence on the development of children's beliefs and behavior. Adherence may be similarly conceptualized as a socialization process, in which parents influence the development of children's beliefs and behavior regarding their eventual disease self-management. Given this perspective, it is important for clinicians to emphasize the need for parental adherence to a child's treatment regimen. An increased focus on parental adherence will require an investment of time and effort that will pay dividends in the long term. PMID:19005339

  14. Targeting the Achilles heel of the hepatitis B virus: a review of current treatments against covalently closed circular DNA.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Marawan; Wang, Feng; Levin, Aviad; Le, Connie; Eltayebi, Yomna; Houghton, Michael; Tyrrell, Lorne; Barakat, Khaled

    2015-05-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) often leads to the development of liver cancer and cirrhosis, creating immense sociological, clinical and economic burdens worldwide. Although current anti-HBV medications manage to control the disease progression and help restore normal liver functions, they often fail to eliminate the virus completely. A major reason for this failure is the presence of a stable viral genome in the hepatocyte nucleus: the covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA). Targeting HBV cccDNA is a promising approach that could lead to a complete cure. Here, we review various research approaches that are directed toward eliminating HBV cccDNA. This is a brief, yet comprehensive, summary of current state-of-the-art developments in this emerging area of interest. PMID:25622780

  15. The Acute Effects of Unilateral Ankle Plantar Flexors Static- Stretching on Postural Sway and Gastrocnemius Muscle Activity During Single-Leg Balance Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Bráulio N.; Lucareli, Paulo R.G.; Gomes, Willy A.; Silva, Josinaldo J.; Bley, Andre S.; Hartigan, Erin H.; Marchetti, Paulo H.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of unilateral ankle plantar flexors static- stretching on surface electromyography (sEMG) and the center of pressure (COP) during a single-leg balance task in both lower limbs. Fourteen young healthy, non-athletic individuals performed unipodal quiet standing for 30s before and after (stretched limb: immediately post-stretch, 10 and 20 minutes and non-stretched limb: immediately post-stretch) a unilateral ankle plantar flexor static- stretching protocol [6 sets of 45s/15s, 70-90% point of discomfort (POD)]. Postural sway was described using the COP area, COP speed (antero-posterior and medio-lateral directions) and COP frequency (antero-posterior and medio-lateral directions). Surface EMG (EMG integral [IEMG] and Median frequency[FM]) was used to describe the muscular activity of gastrocnemius lateralis. Ankle dorsiflexion passive range of motion increased in the stretched limb before and after the static-stretching protocol (mean ± SD: 15.0° ± 6.0 and 21.5° ± 7.0 [p < 0.001]). COP area and IEMG increased in the stretch limb between pre-stretching and immediately post-stretching (p = 0.015 and p = 0.036, respectively). In conclusion, our static- stretching protocol effectively increased passive ankle ROM. The increased ROM appears to increase postural sway and muscle activity; however these finding were only a temporary or transient effect. Key Points The postural control can be affected by static- stretching protocol. The lateral gastrocnemius muscle action was increased after the static- stretching protocol. The static- stretching effects remain for less than 10 minutes. PMID:25177183

  16. Asymmetry of the active nonweightbearing foot and ankle range of motion for dorsiflexion-plantar flexion and its coupled movements in adults.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Virgilio F; Turci, Michela; Lovecchio, Nicola; Shirai, Yuri F; Sforza, Chiarella

    2007-10-01

    Asymmetries in ankle range of motion (ROM) have been reported, but often the uninvolved limb is used as a reference in clinical practice. The study wanted to quantify the intraindividual asymmetries in dorsi-plantar flexion foot and ankle ROM and its coupled foot movements. Active triplanar nonweightbearing ROM of the foot and ankle was recorded in young healthy adults (30 male volunteers, mean age 22.8 years; 35 female volunteers, mean age 23.8 years) using an optoelectronic set-up. The sagittal plane movement (mean ROM female subjects right side 71.3 degrees, left side 71.4 degrees, P > 0.05; mean ROM male subjects right side 69 degrees , left side 68.9 degrees, P > 0.05; sex difference, P < 0.001) was coupled with frontal (mean ROM female subjects right side 16.6 degrees, left side 14.8 degrees, P > 0.05; male subjects right side 17 degrees, left side 15.3 degrees; P > 0.05; no sex difference) and horizontal (mean ROM female subjects right side 19.6 degrees, left side 18.8 degrees, P < 0.001; male subjects right side 17.6 degrees, left side 16.2 degrees, P < 0.001; sex < 0.001) plane motions. Individual fluctuating asymmetries up to 15 degrees (principal movement), and up to 29 degrees (associated movements) were measured. Overall, 20% of female and 34% of male subjects had principal plane asymmetries >5 degrees, and 50% of the subjects had asymmetries >5 degrees in the associated movements. In young adults, individual asymmetries in ankle joint complex dorsi-plantar flexion should be taken into account when using the uninvolved, contralateral limb as a reference for clinical examination. PMID:17584864

  17. The acute effects of unilateral ankle plantar flexors static- stretching on postural sway and gastrocnemius muscle activity during single-leg balance tasks.

    PubMed

    Lima, Bráulio N; Lucareli, Paulo R G; Gomes, Willy A; Silva, Josinaldo J; Bley, Andre S; Hartigan, Erin H; Marchetti, Paulo H

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of unilateral ankle plantar flexors static- stretching on surface electromyography (sEMG) and the center of pressure (COP) during a single-leg balance task in both lower limbs. Fourteen young healthy, non-athletic individuals performed unipodal quiet standing for 30s before and after (stretched limb: immediately post-stretch, 10 and 20 minutes and non-stretched limb: immediately post-stretch) a unilateral ankle plantar flexor static- stretching protocol [6 sets of 45s/15s, 70-90% point of discomfort (POD)]. Postural sway was described using the COP area, COP speed (antero-posterior and medio-lateral directions) and COP frequency (antero-posterior and medio-lateral directions). Surface EMG (EMG integral [IEMG] and Median frequency[FM]) was used to describe the muscular activity of gastrocnemius lateralis. Ankle dorsiflexion passive range of motion increased in the stretched limb before and after the static-stretching protocol (mean ± SD: 15.0° ± 6.0 and 21.5° ± 7.0 [p < 0.001]). COP area and IEMG increased in the stretch limb between pre-stretching and immediately post-stretching (p = 0.015 and p = 0.036, respectively). In conclusion, our static- stretching protocol effectively increased passive ankle ROM. The increased ROM appears to increase postural sway and muscle activity; however these finding were only a temporary or transient effect. Key PointsThe postural control can be affected by static- stretching protocol.The lateral gastrocnemius muscle action was increased after the static- stretching protocol.The static- stretching effects remain for less than 10 minutes. PMID:25177183

  18. Effects of low level laser in the morphology of the skeletal muscle fiber during compensatory hypertrophy in plantar muscle of rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terena, Stella Maris Lins; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Kalil, Sandra; Alves, Agnelo Neves; Mesquita Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli

    2015-06-01

    The hypertrophy is known as an increase the cross-sectional area of the muscle as a result of a muscular work against an overload, and it is compensatory because the overload is induced by functional elimination of synergistic muscles. The importance of study the compensatory hypertrophy is understand how this process can be influenced by the irradiation with regard to the weight and muscle cross-sectional area, to assist in the rehabilitation process and the effectiveness functional return. The aim was evaluate the effects of low-level laser irradiation on morphological aspects of muscle tissue, comparing the weight and cross-sectional area in rat skeletal muscle. Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control, hypertrophy group without irradiation (right plantar muscle) and hypertrophy group and irradiation (left plantar muscle), both analyzed after 7 and 14 days. The irradiation was performed daily immediately after the surgery. The parameters were: ? = 780nm, beam spot of 0.04 cm2, output power of 40mW, power density of 1W/cm2, energy density of 10J / cm2 and 10s exposure time with a total energy of 3.2 J. The results revealed that low level laser irradiation an increase the weight of the plantaris muscle after 7 and 14 days with a difference of 7.06% and 11.51% respectively. In conclusion, low level laser irradiation has an effect on compensatory hypertrophy to produce increased muscle weight and promoted an increase in cross-sectional area of muscle fibers in the compensatory hypertrophy model after 14 days with parameters cited above.

  19. Nutrition and Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Joseph Andrew; Underdown, Mary Jane; Clark, William Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Nutrition is one of the most basic of medical issues and is often ignored as a problem in the management of our chronic wound patients. Unfortunately, malnutrition is widespread in our geriatric patients even in nursing homes in developed countries. Attention to basic nutrition and providing appropriate supplements may assist in the healing of our chronic wounds. Recent Advances: Recent research has revealed the epidemiology of malnutrition in developed countries, the similarities to malnutrition in developing countries, and some of the physiologic and sociologic causes for this problem. More information is now available on the biochemical effects of nutrient deficiency and supplementation with macronutrients and micronutrients. In some cases, administration of isolated nutrients beyond recommended amounts for healthy individuals may have a pharmacologic effect to help wounds heal. Critical Issues: Much of the knowledge of the nutritional support of chronic wounds is based on information that has been obtained from trauma management. Due to the demographic differences of the patients and differences in the physiology of acute and chronic wounds, it is not logical to assume that all aspects of nutritional support are identical in these patient groups. Before providing specific nutritional supplements, appropriate assessments of patient general nutritional status and the reasons for malnutrition must be obtained or specific nutrient supplementation will not be utilized. Future Directions: Future research must concentrate on the biochemical and physiologic differences of the acute and chronic wounds and the interaction with specific supplements, such as antioxidants, vitamin A, and vitamin D. PMID:25371850

  20. [Chronic disease and adolescence].

    PubMed

    Bühlmann, U

    1992-01-25

    Chronic disease is not a strictly defined term and includes a large number of illnesses ranging from physical to mental impairment. It is estimated that between 10% and 20% of adolescents have a chronic disease. Independence and new relations, acceptance of a new body image and sexuality, career plans and cognitive maturation are core topics in development to adulthood. Chronic disease may interfere with these developmental tasks. Most often there is no specific psychopathology, but the type of impairment, its influence on family life and functioning, age at onset, gender, and other factors will interact with psychosocial maturation. Because of the important role of the family, not only the adolescent patient him/herself, but also parents and siblings need to be included in all major decisions. As hospitalizations may be disruptive they must be planned, taking in account the patient's plans and opinions. Chronic disease may lead to death during the period of adolescence. It is believed that the concept of one's own mortality develops at age 14 to 17 years, a fact that will influence care during the terminal stage of a disease. Whatever the problems and questions raised by the family, the developmental stage of the adolescent has always to be considered when dealing with specific issues of chronic disease. Periodic reassessment of psychosocial development is therefore one of the main tasks of the primary care physician. Counselling will address not only the disease but also the developmental tasks of any teenager. PMID:1734506

  1. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Includes: Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Submit Button NCHS Home Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Includes: Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema Recommend on Facebook ... and other residential care Percent of residents with COPD: 10.8% Source: 2010 NSRCF Data Dictionary: Resident ...

  2. Chronic blood pressure control.

    PubMed

    Brands, Michael W

    2012-10-01

    Chronic blood pressure is maintained within very narrow limits around an average value. However, the multitude of physiologic processes that participate in blood pressure control present a bewildering array of possibilities to explain how such tight control of arterial pressure is achieved. Guyton and Coleman and colleagues addressed this challenge by creating a mathematical model that integrated the short- and long-term control systems for overall regulation of the circulation. The hub is the renal-body fluid feedback control system, which links cardiac function and vascular resistance and capacitance with fluid volume homeostasis as the foundation for chronic blood pressure control. The cornerstone of that system is renal sodium excretory capability, which is defined by the direct effect of blood pressure on urinary sodium excretion, that is, "pressure natriuresis." Steady-state blood pressure is the pressure at which pressure natriuresis balances sodium intake over time; therefore, renal sodium excretory capability is the set point for chronic blood pressure. However, this often is misinterpreted as dismissing, or minimizing, the importance of nonrenal mechanisms in chronic blood pressure control. This article explains the renal basis for the blood pressure set point by focusing on the absolute dependence of our survival on the maintenance of sodium balance. Two principal threats to sodium balance are discussed: (1) a change in sodium intake or renal excretory capability and (2) a change in blood pressure. In both instances, circulatory homeostasis is maintained because the sodium balance blood pressure set point is reached. PMID:23720255

  3. Chronic Pain Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to take, ask your doctor or your pharmacist. Acetaminophen Acetaminophen (one brand name: Tylenol) helps many kinds of chronic pain. Remember, many over-the-counter and prescription pain medicines have acetaminophen in them. If you're not careful, you ...

  4. Chronic wasting disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an emerging prion disease of deer, elk, and moose in North America. This fatal neurodegenerative disease was first recognized 50 years ago and its distribution was limited to the Rocky Mountains for several decades. In the past few years, CWD has been found in the ea...

  5. Chronic manganese intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.C.; Chu, N.S.; Lu, C.S.; Wang, J.D.; Tsai, J.L.; Tzeng, J.L.; Wolters, E.C.; Calne, D.B. )

    1989-10-01

    We report six cases of chronic manganese intoxication in workers at a ferromanganese factory in Taiwan. Diagnosis was confirmed by assessing increased manganese concentrations in the blood, scalp, and pubic hair. In addition, increased manganese levels in the environmental air were established. The patients showed a bradykinetic-rigid syndrome indistinguishable from Parkinson's disease that responded to treatment with levodopa.

  6. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Diagnosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... CDC.gov . Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) Share Compartir Diagnosis Diagnostic Challenges For doctors, diagnosing chronic fatigue syndrome ( ... severity. These factors have contributed to a low diagnosis rate. Of the one to four million Americans ...

  7. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... because the symptoms often mimic those of a viral infection, such as chronic infectious mononucleosis. Researchers are hard at work trying ... diarrhea, and fluctuations in appetite and weight. Diagnosis Chronic ... disease , cardiac disease, depression , and neurological illnesses. ...

  8. Diarrheal Diseases - Acute and Chronic

    MedlinePLUS

    ... greasy or very bad smelling stools. Causes – Acute Diarrhea Most cases of acute, watery diarrhea are caused ... a common cause of traveler’s diarrhea. Causes – Chronic Diarrhea Chronic diarrhea is classified as fatty or malabsorption, ...

  9. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) Share Compartir Symptoms On this Page Primary ... Other Symptoms What's the Clinical Course of CFS? Chronic fatigue syndrome can be misdiagnosed or overlooked because its symptoms ...

  10. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, V.K.

    2013-01-01

    The global prevalence of physiologically defined chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adults aged >40 yr is approximately 9-10 per cent. Recently, the Indian Study on Epidemiology of Asthma, Respiratory Symptoms and Chronic Bronchitis in Adults had shown that the overall prevalence of chronic bronchitis in adults >35 yr is 3.49 per cent. The development of COPD is multifactorial and the risk factors of COPD include genetic and environmental factors. Pathological changes in COPD are observed in central airways, small airways and alveolar space. The proposed pathogenesis of COPD includes proteinase-antiproteinase hypothesis, immunological mechanisms, oxidant-antioxidant balance, systemic inflammation, apoptosis and ineffective repair. Airflow limitation in COPD is defined as a postbronchodilator FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 sec) to FVC (forced vital capacity) ratio <0.70. COPD is characterized by an accelerated decline in FEV1. Co morbidities associated with COPD are cardiovascular disorders (coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure), hypertension, metabolic diseases (diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome and obesity), bone disease (osteoporosis and osteopenia), stroke, lung cancer, cachexia, skeletal muscle weakness, anaemia, depression and cognitive decline. The assessment of COPD is required to determine the severity of the disease, its impact on the health status and the risk of future events (e.g., exacerbations, hospital admissions or death) and this is essential to guide therapy. COPD is treated with inhaled bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, oral theophylline and oral phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor. Non pharmacological treatment of COPD includes smoking cessation, pulmonary rehabilitation and nutritional support. Lung volume reduction surgery and lung transplantation are advised in selected severe patients. Global strategy for the diagnosis, management and prevention of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease guidelines recommend influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations. PMID:23563369

  11. Chronic hyperlipasemia caused by sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Duerksen, D R; Tsang, M; Parry, D M

    2000-08-01

    A chronically elevated lipase is a rare biochemical finding and has only previously been described in patients with malignancy and macrolipasemia. We report a case of chronic hyperlipasemia caused by sarcoidosis. The literature on pancreatic sarcoidosis is reviewed and the significance of lipase isoforms is discussed. Sarcoidosis needs to be considered in patients presenting with chronic hyperlipasemia. PMID:11007103

  12. The cost-benefit of using soft silicone multilayered foam dressings to prevent sacral and heel pressure ulcers in trauma and critically ill patients: a within-trial analysis of the Border Trial.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, Nick; Liu, Wei; Gerdtz, Marie; Sage, Sarah; McCann, Jane; Freeman, Amy; Vassiliou, Theresa; DeVincentis, Stephanie; Ng, Ai W; Manias, Elizabeth; Knott, Jonathan; Liew, Danny

    2015-06-01

    Little is known about the cost-benefit of soft silicone foam dressings in pressure ulcer (PU) prevention among critically ill patients in the emergency department (ED) and intensive care unit (ICU). A randomised controlled trial to assess the efficacy of soft silicone foam dressings in preventing sacral and heel PUs was undertaken among 440 critically ill patients in an acute care hospital. Participants were randomly allocated either to an intervention group with prophylactic dressings applied to the sacrum and heels in the ED and changed every 3 days in the ICU or to a control group with standard PU prevention care provided during their ED and ICU stay. The results showed a significant reduction of PU incidence rates in the intervention group (P = 0·001). The intervention cost was estimated to be AU$36·61 per person based on an intention-to-treat analysis, but this was offset by lower downstream costs associated with PU treatment (AU$1103·52). Therefore, the average net cost of the intervention was lower than that of the control (AU$70·82 versus AU$144·56). We conclude that the use of soft silicone multilayered foam dressings to prevent sacral and heel PUs among critically ill patients results in cost savings in the acute care hospital. PMID:24750780

  13. Treatment Options for Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®) General Information About Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms ...

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®) General Information About Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms ...

  15. General Information about Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®) General Information About Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms ...

  16. Improving the spectral resolution of a highly pixelated detector by applying a pixel-by-pixel energy calibration for investigating the spectral properties of the anode heel effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sievers, P.; Klammer, J.; Michel, T.; Hupe, O.; Anton, G.

    2012-07-01

    The energy deposition spectrum measured with highly pixelated photon-counting pixel detectors with a semiconductor sensor layer (e.g. silicon) differs significantly from the impinging X-ray spectrum. This is the main disadvantage compared to commonly known X-ray spectrometers, e.g. high purity Germanium (hpGe) detector. On the other hand, those hpGe-detectors have a lack of spatial resolution and can not be used for energy-resolved imaging. In case of measurements with highly pixelated detectors, a set of monoenergetic detector response functions is needed for the deconvolution of the measured distribution into the impinging spectrum. We have investigated the possibility of applying a pixel-by-pixel calibration on a highly pixelated detector for gaining a higher energy resolution and for lowering the minimal flux needed for the deconvolution. As a result it is now possible to utilize small ROIs of the pixel matrix for the deconvolution. With this analysis method the detector enables spectral X-ray imaging of high photon rates. This is in particular shown for the angular dependency of the anode heel effect on the emitted spectrum.

  17. [Duodenogastric reflux and chronic gastritis].

    PubMed

    Wolff, G

    1988-01-01

    In a review of the literature it is considered a possible relation between duodenogastric reflux and chronic gastritis. Doubtless bile acids are able to break down mucosal barrier in an acute action. But it is not proven, that bile acids cause chronic gastritis in chronic action. Furthermore duodenogastric bile reflux is a frequent and physiological event. Therefore we can not accept the duodenogastric reflux as the cause of simple chronic gastritis. The expression "reflux gastritis" is not correct for each kind of chronic gastritis that is no auto-immune gastritis. PMID:3069454

  18. [Epidemiology of chronic bronchitis].

    PubMed

    Rey, P

    1976-01-01

    In this short paper, the definition of chronic bronchitis, as it is now widely accepted by epidemiologists, is given and a comparison is made with the disease as usually referred to by general practitioners. Risk factors which are related to the development of the disease are then briefly discussed and the importance of internal parameters is underlined. At last, the methodological difficulties which arise in the assessment of the relationship between air pollution and respiratory symptoms are emphasized. PMID:969928

  19. Buprenorphine for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Raul; Copenhaver, David

    2013-12-01

    Questions from patients about pain conditions, analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. The use of transdermal buprenorphine for chronic pain management is discussed. A brief history of the medication is provided. The use of the medication in opioid maintenance, and withdrawal and other concerns are discussed. Possible side effects are described. PMID:24245573

  20. Chronic cough in children.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Johana B Castro; Pine, Harold S

    2013-08-01

    The management of chronic cough, a common complaint in children, is challenging for most health care professionals. Millions of dollars are spent every year on unnecessary testing and treatment. A rational approach based on a detailed interview and a thorough physical examination guides further intervention and management. Inexpensive and simple homemade syrups based on dark honey have proved to be an effective measure when dealing with cough in children. PMID:23905830

  1. Technology for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suyi; Seymour, Ben

    2014-09-22

    Technology developed for chronic pain management has been fast evolving and offers new stand-alone prospects for the diagnosis and treatment of pain, rather than simply addressing the limitations of pharmacology-based approaches. There are two central challenges to be tackled: developing objective measures that capture the subjectivity of pain experience, and providing technology-based interventions that offer new approaches for pain management. Here we highlight recent developments that hold promise in addressing both of these challenges. PMID:25247372

  2. Hemodynamic responses during graded and constant-load plantar flexion exercise in middle-aged men and women with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kiely, Catherine; O'Connor, Eamonn; O'Shea, Donal; Green, Simon; Egaña, Mikel

    2014-10-01

    We tested the hypotheses that type 2 diabetes (T2D) impairs the 1) leg hemodynamic responses to an incremental intermittent plantar-flexion exercise and 2) dynamic responses of leg vascular conductance (LVC) during low-intensity (30% maximal voluntary contraction, MVC) and high-intensity (70% MVC) constant-load plantar-flexion exercise in the supine posture. Forty-four middle-aged individuals with T2D (14 women), and 35 healthy nondiabetic (ND) individuals (18 women) were tested. Leg blood flow (LBF) was measured between each contraction using venous occlusion plethysmography. During the incremental test peak force (Fpeak) relative to MVC was significantly reduced (P < 0.05) in men and women with T2D compared with their respective nondiabetic counterparts. Peak LBF and the slope of LBF relative to percentage Fpeak were also reduced (P < 0.05) in women with T2D compared with healthy women (peak blood flow, 460.6 ± 126.8 vs. 628.3 ± 347.7 ml/min; slope, 3.78 ± 1.74 vs. 5.85 ± 3.14 ml·min(-1)·%Fpeak (-1)) and in men with T2D compared with nondiabetic men (peak blood flow, 621.7 ± 241.3 vs. 721.2 ± 359.7 ml/min; slope, 5.75 ± 2.66 vs. 6.33 ± 3.63 ml·min(-1)·%Fpeak (-1)). During constant-load contractions at 30% MVC T2D did not affect the dynamic responses of LVC (LBF/MAP). However, at 70% MVC [completed by a subgroup of participants (20 with T2D, 6 women; 13 ND, 6 women)] the time constant of the second growth phase of LVC was longer and the amplitude of the first growth phase was lower (P < 0.05 for both) in men and women with T2D. The results suggest that the T2D-induced impairments in performance of the leg muscles are related to reductions in blood flow in both men and women. PMID:25123197

  3. Biomarkers for chronic fatigue.

    PubMed

    Klimas, Nancy G; Broderick, Gordon; Fletcher, Mary Ann

    2012-11-01

    Fatigue that persists for 6 months or more is termed chronic fatigue. Chronic fatigue (CF) in combination with a minimum of 4 of 8 symptoms and the absence of diseases that could explain these symptoms, constitute the case definition for chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME). Inflammation, immune system activation, autonomic dysfunction, impaired functioning in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and neuroendocrine dysregulation have all been suggested as root causes of fatigue. The identification of objective markers consistently associated with CFS/ME is an important goal in relation to diagnosis and treatment, as the current case definitions are based entirely on physical signs and symptoms. This review is focused on the recent literature related to biomarkers for fatigue associated with CFS/ME and, for comparison, those associated with other diseases. These markers are distributed across several of the body's core regulatory systems. A complex construct of symptoms emerges from alterations and/or dysfunctions in the nervous, endocrine and immune systems. We propose that new insight will depend on our ability to develop and deploy an integrative profiling of CFS/ME pathogenesis at the molecular level. Until such a molecular signature is obtained efforts to develop effective treatments will continue to be severely limited. PMID:22732129

  4. Who becomes chronic?

    PubMed

    Wing, J K

    1978-01-01

    Chronic social disablement is caused by three types of factor: impairment, e.g. slowness in schizophrenia; social disadvantage, e.g. lack of opportunity to develop social or vocational skills; and an underconfidence or unduly low self-esteem which is reactive to impairment and disadvantage. The last of these factors is particularly evident in 'institutionalism', a condition in which the individual comes to acquire a contentment with institutional life and wishes to lead no other. Many long-stay patients in large mental hospitals used to be 'well-institutionalized' but it became recognized that retraining and rehabilitation could lead to successful resettlement outside hospital. For a time these striking successes suggested to some theorists that abolishing the hospitals would abolish disablement as well but it is now quite clear that this is not the case. Chronic impairments still occur and create a continuing need for sheltered environments. The frequency and type of problems still arising are discussed in the light of recent surveys in England. One small group requires highly-staffed accommodation, others need less supervised day and residential settings; all need long-term care. It is emphasized that some people living at home with relatives also have chronic mental disabilities as have a high proportion of the destitute. Such problems are less frequent than formerly but they still require detailed medical and social attention. PMID:214808

  5. Antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects of zerumbone on a mouse model of chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Zulazmi, Nurul Atiqah; Gopalsamy, Banulata; Farouk, Ahmad Akira Omar; Sulaiman, Mohd Roslan; Bharatham, B Hemabarathy; Perimal, Enoch Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Neuropathic pain is a chronic condition that is difficult to be treated. Current therapies available are either ineffective or non-specific thus requiring newer treatment approaches. In this study, we investigated the antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects of zerumbone, a bioactive sesquiterpene from Zingiber zerumbet in chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain animal model. Our findings showed that single and repeated dose of intra-peritoneal administration of zerumbone (5, 10, 50, 100 mg/kg) significantly attenuated the CCI-induced neuropathic pain when evaluated using the electronic von Frey anesthesiometer, cold plate, Randall-Selitto analgesiometer and the Hargreaves plantar test. Zerumbone significantly alleviated tactile and cold allodynia as well as mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. Our findings are in comparison to the positive control drugs thatused gabapentin (20 mg/kgi.p.) and morphine (1 mg/kgi.p.). Together, these results showed that the systemic administration of zerumbone produced marked antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects in the CCI-induced neuropathic pain in mice and may serve as a potential lead compound for further analysis. PMID:26205045

  6. Effect of tape on dynamic postural stability in subjects with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    De Ridder, R; Willems, T M; Vanrenterghem, J; Roosen, P

    2015-04-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate the effect of taping on the dynamic postural stability during a jump landing protocol in subjects with chronic ankle instability (CAI). For this purpose, 28 subjects with CAI performed a sagittal and frontal plane landing task in a non-taped and taped condition. As main outcome measure, the dynamic postural stability index (DPSI) was calculated. In addition, subjective feelings of instability and perceived difficulty level were assessed. Furthermore, mechanical effectiveness of the tape on the ankle joint was determined by registering 3D kinematics. 3 subjects were excluded based on discomfort during the landing protocol. Study results indicated that the tape reduced plantar flexion and inversion at the ankle at touchdown and range of motion in the landing phase. There was, however, no effect on the DPSI or on its directional subcomponents. Subjective feelings of stability with tape improved significantly, whereas perceived difficulty did not change. In conclusion, our taping procedure did not improve postural control during a sagittal and frontal plane landing task in subjects with CAI. Perceived instability did improve and is considered an important treatment outcome, which suggests that taping could be considered as a treatment modality by clinicians. PMID:25665000

  7. Interventions for chronic blepharitis

    PubMed Central

    Lindsley, Kristina; Matsumura, Sueko; Hatef, Elham; Akpek, Esen K

    2012-01-01

    Background Blepharitis, an inflammatory condition associated with itchiness, redness, flaking, and crusting of the eyelids, is a common eye condition that affects both children and adults. It is common in all ethnic groups and across all ages. Although infrequent, blepharitis can lead to permanent alterations to the eyelid margin or vision loss from superficial keratopathy (abnormality of the cornea), corneal neovascularization, and ulceration. Most importantly, blepharitis frequently causes significant ocular symptoms such as burning sensation, irritation, tearing, and red eyes as well as visual problems such as photophobia and blurred vision. The exact etiopathogenesis is unknown, but suspected to be multifactorial, including chronic low-grade infections of the ocular surface with bacteria, infestations with certain parasites such as demodex, and inflammatory skin conditions such as atopy and seborrhea. Blepharitis can be categorized in several different ways. First, categorization is based on the length of disease process: acute or chronic blepharitis. Second, categorization is based on the anatomical location of disease: anterior, or front of the eye (e.g. staphylococcal and seborrheic blepharitis), and posterior, or back of the eye (e.g. meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD)). This review focuses on chronic blepharitis and stratifies anterior and posterior blepharitis. Objectives To examine the effectiveness of interventions in the treatment of chronic blepharitis. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 1), MEDLINE (January 1950 to February 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to February 2012), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We searched the reference lists of included studies for any additional studies not identified by the electronic searches. There were no date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. The electronic databases were last searched on 9 February 2012. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomized controlled trials (CCTs) in which participants were adults aged 16 years or older and clinically diagnosed with chronic blepharitis. We also included trials where participants with chronic blepharitis were a subset of the participants included in the study and data were reported separately for these participants. Interventions within the scope of this review included medical treatment and lid hygiene measures. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed search results, reviewed full-text copies for eligibility, examined risk of bias, and extracted data. Data were meta-analyzed for studies comparing similar interventions and reporting comparable outcomes with the same timing. Otherwise, results for included studies were summarized in the text. Main results There were 34 studies (2169 participants with blepharitis) included in this review: 20 studies (14 RCTs and 6 CCTs) included 1661 participants with anterior or mixed blepharitis and 14 studies (12 RCTs and 2 CCTs) included 508 participants with posterior blepharitis (MGD). Due to the heterogeneity of study characteristics among the included studies, with respect to follow-up periods and types of interventions, comparisons, and condition of participants, our ability to perform meta-analyses was limited. Topical antibiotics were shown to provide some symptomatic relief and were effective in eradicating bacteria from the eyelid margin for anterior blepharitis. Lid hygiene may provide symptomatic relief for anterior and posterior blepharitis. The effectiveness of other treatments for blepharitis, such as topical steroids and oral antibiotics, were inconclusive. Authors’ conclusions Despite identifying 34 trials related to treatments for blepharitis, there is no strong evidence for any of the treatments in

  8. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Caroline; Montani, David; Savale, Laurent; Sitbon, Olivier; Parent, Florence; Seferian, Andrei; Bulifon, Sophie; Fadel, Elie; Mercier, Olaf; Mussot, Sacha; Fabre, Dominique; Dartevelle, Philippe; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Jaïs, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a form of pulmonary hypertension (PH) characterized by the persistence of thromboembolic obstructing the pulmonary arteries as an organized tissue and the presence of a variable small vessel arteriopathy. The consequence is an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance resulting in progressive right heart failure. CTEPH is classified as group IV pulmonary hypertension according to the WHO classification of pulmonary hypertension. CTEPH is defined as precapillary pulmonary hypertension (mean pulmonary artery pressure?25mmHg with a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure?15mmHg) associated with mismatched perfusion defects on ventilation-perfusion lung scan and signs of chronic thromboembolic disease on computed tomography pulmonary angiogram and/or conventional pulmonary angiography, in a patient who received at least 3 months of therapeutic anticoagulation. CTEPH as a direct consequence of symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE) is rare, and a significant number of CTEPH cases develop in the absence of history of PE. Thus, CTEPH should be considered in any patient with unexplained PH. Splenectomy, chronic inflammatory conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, indwelling catheters and cardiac pacemakers have been identified as associated conditions increasing the risk of CTEPH. Ventilation-perfusion scan (V/Q) is the best test available for establishing the thromboembolic nature of PH. When CTEPH is suspected, patients should be referred to expert centres where pulmonary angiography, right heart catheterization and high-resolution CT scan will be performed to confirm the diagnosis and to assess the operability. Pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) remains the gold standard treatment for CTEPH when organized thrombi involve the main, lobar or segmental arteries. This operation should only be performed by experienced surgeons in specialized centres. For inoperable patients, current ESC/ERS guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension recommend the use of riociguat and say that off-label use of drugs approved for PAH and pulmonary angioplasty may be considered in expert centres. PMID:26585271

  9. Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-16

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

  10. Chronic Wasting Disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richards, Bryan

    2007-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an always-fatal, neurological illness occurring in North American cervids (members of the deer family), including white-tailed deer, mule deer, elk and moose. Since its discovery in 1967, CWD has spread geographically and increased in prevalence locally. CWD is contagious; it can be transmitted freely within and among free-ranging populations. It is likely that diseased animals can transmit CWD to healthy animals long before they become clinically ill. Managing CWD in free-ranging populations is extremely difficult, therefore preventative measures designed to reduce the chance for disease spread are critically important.

  11. Methamphetamine Induces Chronic Corticostriatal Depression

    E-print Network

    Sulzer, David

    Methamphetamine Induces Chronic Corticostriatal Depression: Too Much of a Bad Thing Jeremy J. Day1-releasing psychostimu- lant methamphetamine alters neurotrans- mission at corticostriatal synapses. Imag- ing

  12. Tropical chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Barman, K; Premalatha, G; Mohan, V

    2003-01-01

    Tropical chronic pancreatitis (TCP) is a juvenile form of chronic calcific non-alcoholic pancreatitis, seen almost exclusively in the developing countries of the tropical world. The classical triad of TCP consists of abdominal pain, steatorrhoea, and diabetes. When diabetes is present, the condition is called fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD) which is thus a later stage of TCP. Some of the distinctive features of TCP are younger age at onset, presence of large intraductal calculi, more aggressive course of the disease, and a high susceptibility to pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic calculi are the hallmark for the diagnosis of TCP and in non-calcific cases ductal dilation on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, computed tomography, or ultrasound helps to identify the disease. Diabetes is usually quite severe and of the insulin requiring type, but ketosis is rare. Microvascular complications of diabetes occur as frequently as in type 2 diabetes but macrovascular complications are uncommon. Pancreatic enzyme supplements are used for relief of abdominal pain and reducing the symptoms related to steatorrhoea. Early diagnosis and better control of the endocrine and exocrine dysfunction could help to ensure better survival and improve the prognosis and quality of life of TCP patients. PMID:14654569

  13. ICON: chronic rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Bachert, Claus; Pawankar, Ruby; Zhang, Luo; Bunnag, Chaweewan; Fokkens, Wytske J; Hamilos, Daniel L; Jirapongsananuruk, Orathai; Kern, Robert; Meltzer, Eli O; Mullol, Joaquim; Naclerio, Robert; Pilan, Renata; Rhee, Chae-Seo; Suzaki, Harumi; Voegels, Richard; Blaiss, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a public health problem that has a significant socio-economic impact. Moreover, the complexity of this disease due to its heterogeneous nature based on the underlying pathophysiology - leading to different disease variants - further complicates our understanding and directions for the most appropriate targeted treatment strategies. Several International/national guidelines/position papers and/or consensus documents are available that present the current knowledge and treatment strategies for CRS. Yet there are many challenges to the management of CRS especially in the case of the more severe and refractory forms of disease. Therefore, the International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology (iCAALL), a collaboration between EAACI, AAAAI, ACAAI, and WAO, has decided to propose an International Consensus (ICON) on Chronic Rhinosinusitis. The purpose of this ICON on CRS is to highlight the key common messages from the existing guidelines, the differences in recommendations as well as the gaps in our current knowledge of CRS, thus providing a concise reference. In this document we discuss the definition of the disease, its relevance, pharmacoeconomics, pathophysiology, phenotypes and endotypes, genetics and risk factors, natural history and co-morbidities as well as clinical manifestations and treatment options in both adults and children comprising pharmacotherapy, surgical interventions and more recent biological approaches. Finally, we have also highlighted the unmet needs that wait to be addressed through future research. PMID:25379119

  14. [Etiology of chronic bronchitis].

    PubMed

    Schlick, W

    1986-12-31

    From a synopsis of the large number of epidemiological studies of the recent 20 years it is know, that inhalation of cigarette smoke is the most important factor that generates chronic bronchitis. Other noxious agents about which there are still controversial opinions, are air pollution and occupational inhalants. Although hypersecretion of mucus is the primary symptom of chronic bronchitis, it seems to have no particular prognostic meaning. Whether severe airflow obstruction develops, apparently depends upon predisposing factors such as disturbances of humoral immunity manifested by marked hypogammaglobulinemia or a defect of mucociliary clearance. In recent time increased serum IgE-levels in mom-atopic smokers with bronchial obstructions were reported. Frequent recurrent bronchial infections alone seem to be no serious risk factor. The molecular mechanisms that lead to structural damage are clarified. Activated alveolar macrophages attract polymorphonuclear leucocytes by chemotaxis. These cells set free proteolytic enzymes such as elastases. In addition certain oxidants inhibit the protection system of proteinase inhibitors. PMID:3645943

  15. INTRODUCTION Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome

    E-print Network

    Apkarian, A. Vania

    INTRODUCTION · Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome affects 5-10% of men pathophysiological correlates of CP/CPPS pain (prostate inflammation, endocrine abnormalities, pelvic floor muscle/CPPS biomarkers can potentially advance diagnosis of mechanistically distinct pain subtypes and direct

  16. Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Undifferentiated Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-04

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase of Disease; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Recurrent Disease

  17. Children Coping with Chronic Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Lissette M.

    Children who live with chronic illness are confronted with challenges that frequently force them to cope in myriad ways. The ways in which children face chronic illness are summarized in this literature review. Also covered, are how the effects of family can influence coping strategies and how family members, especially parents, cope with their…

  18. Program for the Chronically Ill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenherr, Arline; Schnarr, Barbara

    The program for chronically ill students in the Detroit public schools is described. Forms are presented listing needed information and implications for teachers of the following conditions: diabetes, sickle cell anemia, chronic renal failure, congenital heart disease, hemophilia, rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, leukemia, and cystic fibrosis. The…

  19. Understanding anemia of chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Fraenkel, Paula G

    2015-12-01

    The anemia of chronic disease is an old disease concept, but contemporary research in the role of proinflammatory cytokines and iron biology has shed new light on the pathophysiology of the condition. Recent epidemiologic studies have connected the anemia of chronic disease with critical illness, obesity, aging, and kidney failure, as well as with the well-established associations of cancer, chronic infection, and autoimmune disease. Functional iron deficiency, mediated principally by the interaction of interleukin-6, the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin, and the iron exporter ferroportin, is a major contributor to the anemia of chronic disease. Although anemia is associated with adverse outcomes, experimental models suggest that iron sequestration is desirable in the setting of severe infection. Experimental therapeutic approaches targeting interleukin-6 or the ferroportin-hepcidin axis have shown efficacy in reversing anemia in either animal models or human patients, although these agents have not yet been approved for the treatment of the anemia of chronic disease. PMID:26637695

  20. Chronic Cough in Adults (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of Use ©2016 UpToDate, Inc. Patient information: Chronic cough in adults (Beyond the Basics) Authors Ronald C ... and helps to prevent infection. However, sometimes a cough can become a chronic condition. A chronic cough ...

  1. Chronic Liver Disease and Hispanic Americans

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and Hispanic Americans Among the Hispanic/Latino population, chronic liver disease is a leading cause of death. While ...

  2. Chronic wasting disease

    PubMed Central

    Sigurdson, Christina J.; Aguzzi, Adriano

    2009-01-01

    Until recently, chronic wasting disease of cervids, the only wildlife prion disease, was believed to be geographically concentrated to Colorado and Wyoming within the United States. However, increased surveillance has unveiled several additional pockets of CWD-infected deer and elk in 12 additional states and 2 Canadian provinces. Deer and elk with CWD have extensive aggregates of PrPSc not only in the central nervous system, but also in peripheral lymphoid tissues, skeletal muscle, and other organs, perhaps influencing prion shedding. Indeed, CWD is transmitted efficiently among animals by horizontal routes, although the mechanism of spread is unknown. Genetic polymorphisms in the Prnp gene may affect CWD susceptibility, particularly at codon 225 (S/F) in deer and codon 132 (M/L) in elk. Since CWD infects free-ranging animals and is efficiently spread, disease management will be a challenge. PMID:17223321

  3. Chronic otitis media.

    PubMed

    Wallis, Sebastian; Atkinson, Helen; Coatesworth, Andrew P

    2015-05-01

    Chronic otitis media (COM) is a common problem facing general practitioners, pediatricians and otolaryngologists. This article reviews the aetiopathogenesis, epidemiology, presentation, natural history, complications and management of COM. The literature was reviewed by using the PubMed search engine and entering a combination of terms including "COM", "diagnosis", "incidence", "complications" and "management". Relevant articles were identified and examined for content. What is the "take-home" message for the clinician? COM is a common problem with various sub-categories according to the disease state. It most commonly presents with painless otorrhoea and hearing loss. Treatment options vary according to the activity and type of disease encountered. COM carries significant patient morbidity. PMID:25913599

  4. [Chronic hepatitis B therapy].

    PubMed

    Morovi?, Miro; Troselj-Vuki?, Biserka; Klarin, Ivo; Hrsti?, Irena; Ostoji?, Rajko

    2009-12-01

    Chronic hepatitis B is associated with the development of cirrhosis in more than one third of patients and in a large proportion of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Current standard treatment includes pegylated interferon alfa-2a and five oral nucleoside/nucleotide analogues: entecavir, tenofovir, adefovir, telbivudine and lamivudine (listed according to antiviral efficacy). The advantage of interferon treatment is the possibility of long-term remission in one third of carefully selected HbeAg+ patients without development of resistance. However, interferon treatment is not efficient in the majority of patients. The advantage of treatment with nucleoside and nucleotide analogues is the possibility to suppress HBV DNA to undetectable levels in 70%-90% of patients. However, analogue treatment is a long-term treatment (possibly life-long) and is associated with the development of resistance. PMID:20198897

  5. Chronic subdural haematoma.

    PubMed

    Luxon, L M; Harrison, M J

    1979-01-01

    A retrospective case note survey of chronic subdural haematomata was carried out in an attempt to throw some light on the difficulties encountered in clinical diagnosis. The combination of raised intracranial pressure headache, fluctuating drowsiness and mild hemiparesis, although highly suggestive of subdural haematoma, is not always encountered, and epilepsy, aphasia, hemianopia and dense hemiplegia can all occur contrary to 'text book' descriptions. Head injury or other aetiological factors are commonly absent. The presentation may mimic tumour, dementia, cerebrovascular accident or subarachnoid haemorrhage. Non-invasive investigations may yield false negative results, although in the case of radionucleide scanning and computerized axial tomography the reliability is approaching 90 per cent. The diagnosis will, however, remain an unexpected finding at angiography in a percentage of cases. PMID:482590

  6. Chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mawle, A C

    1997-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) has emerged as a public health concern over the past decade. A working case definition was created in 1988 and revised in 1994, and this has been used to establish prevalence estimates using physician-based surveillance and an a random digit dial telephone survey. Although CFS has some characteristics of an infectious disease, so far no infectious agent has been associated with the illness. Studies of immune function in CFS patients failed to detect differences between cases and healthy controls. However, when cases were subgrouped according to whether they had a sudden or gradual onset, differences in immunologic markers were detected between cases and their matched controls. PMID:9037629

  7. Acute vs. chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Auvenshine, R C

    2000-07-01

    The differences between acute and chronic pain are many and varied. They are so different from one another that they must be considered separate entities. The chronic pain patient does not fit the traditional acute illness model as conceptualized by patients and healthcare providers. Because of the complex nature of the pain mechanism as a protective "reflex" and the fact that the pain response gets caught up in emotional expression, pain becomes a learned behavior pattern. When the patient who presents to the dental office suffering from pain is found not to respond to conventional methods of treatment, the dentist should first consider the nature of the pain response and the fact that the patient may not meet all the requirements for the acute illness model. The manner in which the patient describes his or her pain can be a major clue as to the temporal classification of the pain, thus allowing the dentist the advantage of better decision-making. Great discernment on the part of the dental practitioner must be exercised in order to provide the optimum care for the patient. It is important for the dentist to consider the fact that there may be no underlying cause for the pain and it may be necessary to make proper referrals for management of this type of patient. At a more practical and human level, patients want to know if their pain will ever completely go away. Patients are frightened that their pain is attributable to some unrecognized pathology (catastrophic thinking). This drives them to search for the ultimate cure. Going from practitioner to practitioner worsens the confusion as the patient hopes that someone will be able to illuminate the problem. By being able to classify the pain into a recognizable and explainable syndrome, the pain practitioner is often able to offer hope to the patient. Although treatment often does not yield a completely pain-free state, understanding the basis for the pain can provide significant relief through proper management. PMID:11858059

  8. CYBERWAR-2012/13: Siegel 2011 Predicted Cyberwar Via ACHILLES-HEEL DIGITS BEQS BEC ZERO-DIGIT BEC of/in ACHILLES-HEEL DIGITS Log-Law Algebraic-Inversion to ONLY BEQS BEC Digit-Physics U Barabasi Network/Graph-Physics BEQS BEC JAMMING Denial-of-Access(DOA) Attacks 2012-Instantiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffmann, Master; Siegel, Edward Carl-Ludwig

    2013-03-01

    Newcomb-Benford(NeWBe)-Siegel log-law BEC Digit-Physics Network/Graph-Physics Barabasi et.al. evolving-``complex''-networks/graphs BEC JAMMING DOA attacks: Amazon(weekends: Microsoft I.E.-7/8(vs. Firefox): Memorial-day, Labor-day,...), MANY U.S.-Banks:WF,BoA,UB,UBS,...instantiations AGAIN militate for MANDATORY CONVERSION to PARALLEL ANALOG FAULT-TOLERANT but slow(er) SECURITY-ASSURANCE networks/graphs in parallel with faster ``sexy'' DIGITAL-Networks/graphs:``Cloud'', telecomm: n-G,..., because of common ACHILLES-HEEL VULNERABILITY: DIGITS!!! ``In fast-hare versus slow-tortoise race, Slow-But-Steady ALWAYS WINS!!!'' (Zeno). {Euler [#s(1732)] ?- ?()-Riemann[Monats. Akad. Berlin (1859)] ?- ?()- Kummer-Bernoulli (#s)}-Newcomb [Am.J.Math.4(1),39 (81) discovery of the QUANTUM!!!]-{Planck (01)]}-{Einstein (05)]-Poincar e [Calcul Probabilités,313(12)]-Weyl[Goett. Nach.(14); Math.Ann.77,313(16)]-(Bose (24)-Einstein(25)]-VS. -Fermi (27)-Dirac(27))-Menger [Dimensiontheorie(29)]-Benford [J.Am. Phil.Soc.78,115(38)]-Kac[Maths Stats.-Reason. (55)]- Raimi [Sci.Am.221,109(69)]-Jech-Hill [Proc.AMS,123,3,887(95)] log-function

  9. Reductions in heel bone quality across gestation are attenuated in pregnant adolescents with higher prepregnancy weight and greater increases in PTH across gestation.

    PubMed

    Whisner, Corrie M; Young, Bridget E; Witter, Frank R; Harris, Zena Leah; Queenan, Ruth A; Cooper, Elizabeth M; O'Brien, Kimberly O

    2014-09-01

    Few studies have examined the effect of maternal calcium intake and vitamin D status on bone health across gestation in pregnant adolescents. This study aimed to characterize maternal bone quality and determinants of bone-quality change across gestation in pregnant adolescents. Healthy pregnant adolescents (n?=?156; aged 13 to 18 years) with singleton pregnancies and at 12 to 30 weeks gestation at enrollment were recruited from two urban maternity clinics in Baltimore, MD, and Rochester, NY, for this prospective longitudinal study. Maternal serum was collected at midgestation and at delivery for assessment of bone biomarkers and calcitropic hormones. Maternal bone quality (assessed by heel ultrasound) and sonographic fetal biometry were measured up to three times across pregnancy. Racially diverse teens (64.7% African American, 35.3% white) were followed from 21.0 (interquartile range [IQR] 17.3, 27.0) weeks of gestation until delivery at 40.0 (IQR 39.0, 40.7) weeks. Significant decreases in calcaneal speed of sound (SOS), broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA), and quantitative ultrasound index (QUI) (-9.2?±?16.1?m/s, -3.2 (-8.0, 2.1) dB/MHz and -5.3?±?8.8, respectively) were evident across pregnancy. Multivariate analysis controlling for baseline measures and measurement intervals was used to identify independent predictors of normalized (per week) calcaneal bone loss. Weekly decreases in bone quality were not significantly associated with maternal calcium intake or 25(OH)D concentration. Greater weekly reductions in calcaneal bone quality were evident in teens with lower prepregnancy weight (BUA, p?=?0.006 and QUI, p?=?0.012) and among those with lower weekly increase in PTH (SOS, p?=?0.046). Overall, significant decreases in calcaneal bone quality occurred across pregnancy in adolescents, but the magnitude of this loss was attenuated in those with greater prepregnancy weight and weekly increases in PTH. Further studies are needed to understand the role of elevated PTH and greater prepregnancy weight in preserving adolescent bone during pregnancy. PMID:24676885

  10. [Therapy of primary chronic headache: chronic migraine, chronic tension type headache and other forms of daily chronic headache].

    PubMed

    Straube, A; May, A; Kropp, P; Katsarava, Z; Haag, G; Lampl, C; Sándor, P S; Diener, H-C; Evers, S

    2008-10-01

    The criteria of the International Headache Society (IHS) define four different primary headache syndromes with daily chronic headaches: chronic migraine, episodic and chronic tension type headache, hemicrania continua, new daily persisting headache. A further important differential diagnosis is medication overuse headache (previously known as analgesia headache). The German, Austrian, and Swiss headache societies now present the first joint guidelines for therapy of these headache syndromes. The current literature was reviewed and a summary is presented. The therapy recommendations do not only include the scientific evidence but also the practical relevance. PMID:18483751

  11. Laryngeal hypersensitivity in chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Hull, J H; Menon, A

    2015-12-01

    Patients with chronic cough often report symptoms arising in the throat, in response to non-specific stimuli. Accordingly, the concept of a 'hypersensitivity' of the larynx in chronic cough has evolved over the past ten years. Patients with cough and laryngeal hypersensitivity frequently report features that overlap other laryngeal dysfunction syndromes, including a tendency for the vocal cords to inappropriately adduct. The mechanisms underlying laryngeal hypersensitivity in chronic cough are currently unclear, however recent studies provide new clinical and physiological techniques to aid detection and monitoring of laryngeal hypersensitivity. This review provides an overview of the current state of knowledge in this field. PMID:26325433

  12. Multimodal Treatment of Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Dale, Rebecca; Stacey, Brett

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with chronic pain receive multimodal treatment. There is scant literature to guide us, but when approaching combination pharmacotherapy, the practitioner and patient must weigh the benefits with the side effects; many medications have modest effect yet carry significant side effects that can be additive. Chronic pain often leads to depression, anxiety, and deconditioning, which are targets for treatment. Structured interdisciplinary programs are beneficial but costly. Interventions have their place in the treatment of chronic pain and should be a part of a multidisciplinary treatment plan. Further research is needed to validate many common combination treatments. PMID:26614719

  13. A randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of soft silicone multi-layered foam dressings in the prevention of sacral and heel pressure ulcers in trauma and critically ill patients: the border trial.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, Nick; Gerdtz, Marie; Sage, Sarah; McCann, Jane; Freeman, Amy; Vassiliou, Theresa; De Vincentis, Stephanie; Ng, Ai Wei; Manias, Elizabeth; Liu, Wei; Knott, Jonathan

    2015-06-01

    The prevention of hospital acquired pressure ulcers in critically ill patients remains a significant clinical challenge. The aim of this trial was to investigate the effectiveness of multi-layered soft silicone foam dressings in preventing intensive care unit (ICU) pressure ulcers when applied in the emergency department to 440 trauma and critically ill patients. Intervention group patients (n = 219) had Mepilex(®) Border Sacrum and Mepilex(®) Heel dressings applied in the emergency department and maintained throughout their ICU stay. Results revealed that there were significantly fewer patients with pressure ulcers in the intervention group compared to the control group (5 versus 20, P = 0·001). This represented a 10% difference in incidence between the groups (3·1% versus 13·1%) and a number needed to treat of ten patients to prevent one pressure ulcer. Overall there were fewer sacral (2 versus 8, P = 0·05) and heel pressure ulcers (5 versus 19, P = 0·002) and pressure injuries overall (7 versus 27, P = 0·002) in interventions than in controls. The time to injury survival analysis indicated that intervention group patients had a hazard ratio of 0·19 (P = 0·002) compared to control group patients. We conclude that multi-layered soft silicone foam dressings are effective in preventing pressure ulcers in critically ill patients when applied in the emergency department prior to ICU transfer. PMID:23711244

  14. Relationship Between Urinary Cross-Linked N-Telopeptide of Type-I Collagen and Heel Stiffness Index Measured by Quantitative Ultrasound in Middle-Aged and Elderly Men.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takayuki; Arima, Kazuhiko; Abe, Yasuyo; Kanagae, Mitsuo; Mizukami, Satoshi; Okabe, Takuhiro; Tomita, Yoshihito; Goto, Hisashi; Horiguchi, Itsuko; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the age-related patterns and the relationship between levels of urinary cross-linked N-telopeptide of type-I collagen (NTx) and heel stiffness index measured by quantitative ultrasound (QUS) in men with a special reference to age groups of aged 40 to 59 years and ?60 years.A total of 379 men participated in this study. Heel stiffness index (bone mass) was measured by QUS. Spot urine samples were collected, and urinary NTx was measured. The values were corrected for creatinine (Cre) concentration.Stiffness index was significantly lower in men aged ?60 years compared with men aged 40 to 59 years (P?

  15. Functionally Different Pads on the Same Foot Allow Control of Attachment: Stick Insects Have Load-Sensitive “Heel” Pads for Friction and Shear-Sensitive “Toe” Pads for Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Labonte, David; Federle, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Stick insects (Carausius morosus) have two distinct types of attachment pad per leg, tarsal “heel” pads (euplantulae) and a pre-tarsal “toe” pad (arolium). Here we show that these two pad types are specialised for fundamentally different functions. When standing upright, stick insects rested on their proximal euplantulae, while arolia were the only pads in surface contact when hanging upside down. Single-pad force measurements showed that the adhesion of euplantulae was extremely small, but friction forces strongly increased with normal load and coefficients of friction were 1. The pre-tarsal arolium, in contrast, generated adhesion that strongly increased with pulling forces, allowing adhesion to be activated and deactivated by shear forces, which can be produced actively, or passively as a result of the insects' sprawled posture. The shear-sensitivity of the arolium was present even when corrected for contact area, and was independent of normal preloads covering nearly an order of magnitude. Attachment of both heel and toe pads is thus activated partly by the forces that arise passively in the situations in which they are used by the insects, ensuring safe attachment. Our results suggest that stick insect euplantulae are specialised “friction pads” that produce traction when pressed against the substrate, while arolia are “true” adhesive pads that stick to the substrate when activated by pulling forces. PMID:24349156

  16. Palaeoclimate: East Antarctica's Achilles' heel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter

    2013-09-01

    The East Antarctic ice sheet is believed to be Earth's most stable ice sheet. Changes in geochemical composition of offshore sediments suggest that its margin repeatedly retreated by at least 350-550 kilometres inland between 5.3 and 3.3 million years ago.

  17. [Chronic granulomatous disease].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Cardona, Aristóteles; Yamazaki-Nakashimada, Marco Antonio; Espinosa-Padilla, Sara Elva

    2009-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency, a phagocyte defect that appears in 1:200,000 live births and is produced by mutations in the genes that codify for the enzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NADPH oxidase). The inheritance form is X linked (> 60%) or autosomic recesive (30-40%). The NADPH oxidase is responsible for the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the activated phagocyte ("respiratory burst"). When present, mutations on the NAPDH oxidase genes do not allow the ROS production, making the neutrophils of these patients incapable to destroy pathogens. These patients are especially susceptible to infections by staphylococcus, fungi and some gram-negative bacteria. The main clinical manifestations include recurrent life-threatening episodes of lymphadenitis, abscess, pneumonias, osteomyelitis, granuloma formation and sepsis. The diagnosis is suggested by a history of recurrent infections, familiar cases, fail to grow and confirmed with an altered test of ROS production and the specific mutation. Allogenic stem cells transplant is the curative treatment. The early diagnosis and the treatment with prophylactic antibiotics and interferon-gamma have modified favorably the morbidity and mortality of these patients. PMID:19999020

  18. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Kidney Foundation U.S. Food and Drug Administration MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... 345 KB)????? Alternate Language URL Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Page Content On this page: What is ...

  19. Management of Chronic Facial Pain

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Christopher G.; Dellon, A. Lee; Rosson, Gedge D.

    2009-01-01

    Pain persisting for at least 6 months is defined as chronic. Chronic facial pain conditions often take on lives of their own deleteriously changing the lives of the sufferer. Although much is known about facial pain, it is clear that those physicians who treat these conditions should continue elucidating the mechanisms and defining successful treatment strategies for these life-changing conditions. This article will review many of the classic causes of chronic facial pain due to the trigeminal nerve and its branches that are amenable to surgical therapies. Testing of facial sensibility is described and its utility introduced. We will also introduce some of the current hypotheses of atypical facial pain and headaches secondary to chronic nerve compressions and will suggest possible treatment strategies. PMID:22110799

  20. What Is Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is another rare form of chronic leukemia. The cancer cells are large and have features of either T lymphocytes or another type of lymphocyte called natural killer (NK) cells. Most LGL leukemias are slow- ...