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Sample records for chronically inflamed bladder

  1. Molecular Drivers of the Non-T-cell-Inflamed Tumor Microenvironment in Urothelial Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sweis, Randy F; Spranger, Stefani; Bao, Riyue; Paner, Gladell P; Stadler, Walter M; Steinberg, Gary; Gajewski, Thomas F

    2016-07-01

    Muscle-invasive urothelial bladder cancer is a common malignancy with poor outcomes for which immune checkpoint blockade is now showing promise. Despite clinical activity of PD-1/PD-L1-targeted therapy in this disease, most patients do not benefit and resistance mechanisms remain unknown. The non-T-cell-inflamed tumor microenvironment correlates with poor prognosis and resistance to immunotherapies. In this study, we determined tumor-oncogenic pathways correlating with T-cell exclusion. We first establish in this report that T-cell-inflamed bladder tumors can be identified by immune gene expression profiling with concordance with CD8(+) T-cell infiltration. Upregulation of genes encoding immune checkpoint proteins PD-L1, IDO, FOXP3, TIM3, and LAG3 was associated with T-cell-inflamed tumors, suggesting potential for sensitivity to checkpoint blockade. β-Catenin, PPAR-γ, and FGFR3 pathways were activated in non-T-cell-inflamed tumors. No difference was seen in overall somatic mutational density between groups. The three pathways identified represent targetable potential pathways of tumor-intrinsic immunotherapy resistance. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(7); 563-8. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197067

  2. Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Chronically Inflamed Periapical Granulomas

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Kosuke; Takeichi, Osamu; Hatori, Keisuke; Imai, Kenichi; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Ogiso, Bunnai

    2015-01-01

    Periapical granulomas are lesions around the apex of a tooth caused by a polymicrobial infection. Treatment with antibacterial agents is normally performed to eliminate bacteria from root canals; however, loss of the supporting alveolar bone is typically observed, and tooth extraction is often selected if root canal treatment does not work well. Therefore, bacteria and other microorganisms could be involved in this disease. To understand the pathogenesis of periapical granulomas more precisely, we focused on the association with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) using surgically removed periapical granulomas (n = 32). EBV DNA was detected in 25 of 32 periapical granulomas (78.1%) by real-time PCR, and the median number of EBV DNA copies was approximately 8,688.01/μg total DNA. In contrast, EBV DNA was not detected in healthy gingival tissues (n = 10); the difference was statistically significant according to the Mann-Whitney U test (p = 0.0001). Paraffin sections were also analyzed by in situ hybridization to detect EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER)-expressing cells. EBER was detected in the cytoplasm and nuclei of B cells and plasma cells in six of nine periapical granulomas, but not in healthy gingival tissues. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis for latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1) of EBV using serial tissue sections showed that LMP-1-expressing cells were localized to the same areas as EBER-expressing cells. These data suggest that B cells and plasma cells in inflamed granulomas are a major source of EBV infection, and that EBV could play a pivotal role in controlling immune cell responses in periapical granulomas. PMID:25884725

  3. VEGF-A produced by chronically inflamed tissue induces lymphangiogenesis in draining lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Halin, Cornelia; Tobler, Nadja E.; Vigl, Benjamin; Brown, Lawrence F.

    2007-01-01

    Lymphangiogenesis is involved in tumor cell metastasis and plays a major role in chronic inflammatory disorders. To investigate the role of lymphangiogenesis in inflammation, we induced and maintained delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions in the ears of mice and then analyzed the resulting lymphangiogenesis in the inflamed tissue and draining lymph nodes (LNs) by quantitative fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and by immunofluorescence. Long-lasting inflammation induced a significant increase in the number of lymphatic endothelial cells, not only in the inflamed ears but also in the ear-draining auricular LNs. Inflammation-induced lymphangiogenesis was potently blocked by systemic administration of a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A neutralizing antibody. Surprisingly, tissue inflammation specifically induced LN lymphangiogenesis but not LN angiogenesis. These findings were explained by analysis of both VEGF-A protein and mRNA levels, which revealed that VEGF-A was expressed at high mRNA and protein levels in inflamed ears but that expression was increased only at the protein level in activated LNs. Inflammation-induced lymphangiogenesis in LNs was independent of the presence of nodal B lymphocytes, as shown in B cell-deficient mice. Our data reveal that chronic inflammation actively induces lymphangiogenesis in LNs, which is controlled remotely, by lymphangiogenic factors produced at the site of inflammation. PMID:17625067

  4. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, acting at the spinal cord level, participates in bladder hyperactivity and referred pain during chronic bladder inflammation.

    PubMed

    Frias, B; Allen, S; Dawbarn, D; Charrua, A; Cruz, F; Cruz, C D

    2013-03-27

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin (NT) known to participate in chronic somatic pain. A recent study has indicated that BDNF may participate in chronic cystitis at the peripheral level. However, the principal site of action for this NT is the central nervous system, most notably the spinal cord. The effects of centrally-acting BDNF on bladder function in normal animals and its central role during chronic cystitis are presently unknown. The present study was undertaken to clarify this issue. For that purpose, control non-inflamed animals were intrathecally injected with BDNF, after which bladder function was evaluated. This treatment caused short-lasting bladder hyperactivity; whereas chronic intrathecal administration of BDNF did not elicit this effect. Cutaneous sensitivity was assessed by mechanical allodynia as an internal control of BDNF action. To ascertain the role of BDNF in bladder inflammation, animals with cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis received intrathecal injections of either a general Trk receptor antagonist or a BDNF scavenger. Blockade of Trk receptors or BDNF sequestration notably improved bladder function. In addition, these treatments also reduced referred pain, typically observed in rats with chronic cystitis. Reduction of referred pain was accompanied by a decrease in the spinal levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, a marker of increased sensory barrage in the lumbosacral spinal cord, and spinal BDNF expression. Results obtained here indicate that BDNF, acting at the spinal cord level, contributes to bladder hyperactivity and referred pain, important hallmarks of chronic cystitis. In addition, these data also support the development of BDNF modulators as putative therapeutic options for the treatment of chronic bladder inflammation. PMID:23313710

  5. Glucocorticoids differentially regulate Na-bile acid cotransport in normal and chronically inflamed rabbit ileal villus cells.

    PubMed

    Coon, Steven; Kekuda, Ramesh; Saha, Prosenjit; Sundaram, Uma

    2010-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that apical Na-bile acid cotransport (ASBT) is inhibited during chronic ileitis by both a decrease in the affinity as well as a decrease in the number of cotransporters. Methylprednisolone (MP), a commonly used treatment for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, e.g., Crohn's disease), has been shown to reverse the inhibition of several other Na-solute cotransporters during chronic enteritis. However, the effect of MP on ASBT in the chronically inflamed ileum is not known. MP stimulated ASBT in villus cells from the normal rabbit ileum by increasing the cotransporter expression without a change in the affinity of the cotransporter for bile acid. Western blot studies demonstrated an increase in cotransporter expression. MP reversed the inhibition of ASBT in villus cells from the chronically inflamed ileum. Kinetic studies demonstrated that the mechanism of MP-mediated reversal of ASBT inhibition was secondary to a restoration of both affinity as well as cotransporter numbers. Western blot analysis demonstrated restoration of cotransporter numbers after MP treatment of rabbits with chronic ileitis. Thus MP stimulates ASBT in the normal ileum by increasing cotransporter numbers. MP reverses the inhibition of ASBT during chronic ileitis. However, MP restores the diminished affinity as well as cotransporter expression levels during chronic ileitis. Thus MP differentially regulates ASBT in the normal and in the chronically inflamed ileum. PMID:20075140

  6. Glucocorticoids differentially regulate Na-bile acid cotransport in normal and chronically inflamed rabbit ileal villus cells

    PubMed Central

    Coon, Steven; Kekuda, Ramesh; Saha, Prosenjit

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that apical Na-bile acid cotransport (ASBT) is inhibited during chronic ileitis by both a decrease in the affinity as well as a decrease in the number of cotransporters. Methylprednisolone (MP), a commonly used treatment for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, e.g., Crohn's disease), has been shown to reverse the inhibition of several other Na-solute cotransporters during chronic enteritis. However, the effect of MP on ASBT in the chronically inflamed ileum is not known. MP stimulated ASBT in villus cells from the normal rabbit ileum by increasing the cotransporter expression without a change in the affinity of the cotransporter for bile acid. Western blot studies demonstrated an increase in cotransporter expression. MP reversed the inhibition of ASBT in villus cells from the chronically inflamed ileum. Kinetic studies demonstrated that the mechanism of MP-mediated reversal of ASBT inhibition was secondary to a restoration of both affinity as well as cotransporter numbers. Western blot analysis demonstrated restoration of cotransporter numbers after MP treatment of rabbits with chronic ileitis. Thus MP stimulates ASBT in the normal ileum by increasing cotransporter numbers. MP reverses the inhibition of ASBT during chronic ileitis. However, MP restores the diminished affinity as well as cotransporter expression levels during chronic ileitis. Thus MP differentially regulates ASBT in the normal and in the chronically inflamed ileum. PMID:20075140

  7. Antinociceptive effects induced through the stimulation of spinal cannabinoid type 2 receptors in chronically inflamed mice.

    PubMed

    Curto-Reyes, Verdad; Boto, Tamara; Hidalgo, Agustín; Menéndez, Luis; Baamonde, Ana

    2011-10-01

    The stimulation of spinal cannabinoid type 2 (CB(2)) receptors is a suitable strategy for the alleviation of experimental pain symptoms. Several reports have described the up-regulation of spinal cannabinoid CB(2) receptors in neuropathic settings together with the analgesic effects derived from their activation. Besides, we have recently reported in two murine bone cancer models that the intrathecal administration of cannabinoid CB(2) receptor agonists completely abolishes hyperalgesia and allodynia, whereas spinal cannabinoid CB(2) receptor expression remains unaltered. The present experiments were designed to measure the expression of spinal cannabinoid CB(2) receptors as well as the analgesic efficacy derived from their stimulation in mice chronically inflamed by the intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant 1 week before. Both spinal cannabinoid CB(2) receptors mRNA measured by real-time PCR and cannabinoid CB(2) receptor protein levels measured by western blot remained unaltered in inflamed mice. Besides, the intrathecal (i.t.) administration of the cannabinoid CB(2) receptor agonists AM1241, (R,S)-3-(2-Iodo-5-nitrobenzoyl)-1-(1-methyl-2-piperidinylmethyl)-1H-indole, (0.03-1 μg) and JWH 133, (6aR,10aR)-3-(1,1-Dimethylbutyl)-6a,7,10,10a-tetrahydro-6,6,9-trimethyl-6H-dibenzo[b,d]pyran, (3-30 μg) dose-dependently blocked inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. The analgesic effects induced by both agonists were counteracted by the coadministration of the selective cannabinoid CB(2) receptor antagonist SR144528, 5-(4-chloro-3-methylphenyl)-1-[(4-methylphenyl)methyl]-N-[(1S,2S,4R)-1,3,3-trimethylbicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-yl]-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide, (5 μg) but not by the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist AM251, N-(Piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide, (10 μg). The effects induced by AM1241 were also inhibited by the coadministration of the opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone

  8. High endothelial-like venules in chronically inflamed periodontal tissues exchange polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Zoellner, H F; Hunter, N

    1989-12-01

    A survey of 58 gingival biopsies revealed the presence of periodontal high endothelial-like venules (PHELVs) in chronically inflamed gingival tissues. PHELVs were found to exchange polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) almost exclusively in advanced periodontitis, with PMNs greatly exceeding the number of mononuclear cells found in PHELVs (P less than 0.001). Electron microscopy confirmed the emigration of PMNs from these vessels. The enzyme histochemical and ultrastructural features as well as the 35SO4 uptake properties of PHELVs were similar to those of the well-characterized high endothelial venules (HEVs) of rat lymph nodes. It is generally accepted that HEVs in lymphoid tissues and inflammatory sites are specially adapted to assist in the emigration of lymphocytes. However, the observation of preferential PMN emigration in the apparent absence of lymphocyte exchange from PHELVs compels further investigation of other possible functions for HEVs. In relation to this, endothelial cells are capable of producing potent cytokines and inflammatory mediators which may contribute to the development of lesions, and the possibility is discussed that high endothelial cells are functionally adapted to enhance the production of such factors. PMID:2614574

  9. Is chronic urinary infection a cause of overactive bladder?

    PubMed

    Balachandran, Aswini A; Wildman, Scott S; Strutt, Matthew; Duckett, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a diagnosis resulting from a combination of multiple underlying factors. Current traditional treatments are based on anticholinergic blockade which have marginal benefits and are associated with poor tolerability and continuation rates. There is mounting evidence that chronic low grade bacterial bladder colonisation may exacerbate OAB symptoms and may explain why the current treatment strategies are not always successful. However, standard diagnostic laboratory tests to identify the presence of such bacterial infection are unreliable. Newer technologies such as RNA sequencing and extended culture techniques, show that urine is not sterile and organisms that are found in urine may be responsible for OAB symptoms. This article aims to review the current evidence suggesting that micro-organisms in urine may be important in the aetiology of OAB or may exacerbate OAB symptoms. PMID:27088624

  10. Chronic bladder ischemia and oxidative stress: new pharmacotherapeutic targets for lower urinary tract symptoms.

    PubMed

    Nomiya, Masanori; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Yamaguchi, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Chronic bladder ischemia is potentially a common cause of lower urinary tract symptoms in the elderly. Epidemiological studies have shown a close association between lower urinary tract symptoms and vascular risk factors for atherosclerosis, and investigations using transrectal color Doppler ultrasonography have shown a negative correlation between decreased lower urinary tract perfusion and International Prostate Symptom Score in elderly patients with lower urinary tract symptoms. Bladder blood flow is also known to decrease in men with bladder outlet obstruction as a result of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Studies in animal models suggest that chronic bladder ischemia and repeated ischemia/reperfusion during a micturition cycle might produce oxidative stress, leading to denervation of the bladder and the expression of tissue-damaging molecules in the bladder wall, which could be responsible for the development of bladder hyperactivity progressing to bladder underactivity. The effects of drugs with different mechanisms of action; for example, α1-adrenoceptor antagonists, phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, free radical scavengers and β3-adrenoceptor agonist, have been studied in animal models of chronic bladder ischemia. The drugs, representing different treatment principles for increasing blood flow and decreasing oxidative stress, showed protective effects not only on urodynamic parameters, but also on negative effects on muscle contractility and on detrimental structural bladder wall changes. Improvement of lower urinary tract perfusion and control of oxidative stress can be considered new therapeutic strategies for treatment of bladder dysfunction induced by chronic ischemia. PMID:25339506

  11. Triple cancer: chronic lymphocytic leukemia with bladder and prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gajendra, Smeeta; Sharma, Rashi; Sahoo, Manas Kumar

    2015-08-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL) is a common lymphoproliferative disorder with an increased risk of developing subsequent neoplasms of epithelial and mesenchymal origin. The decreased immunity and B-cell dysfunction in CLL probably accounts for this emergence of second malignancies. We report a case of synchronous bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) and prostatic carcinoma with CLL. A 74-year-old male who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) for benign prostatic hyperplasia 2 years before, presented with recurrent urinary tract infection. Peripheral blood smear revealed leukocytosis with absolute lymphocytosis (absolute lymphocyte count: 37870 cells/mm³). Flow cytometric immunophenotyping revealed 75% abnormal lymphoid cells which were positive for CD 19, CD5, CD23, CD22, CD200, CD20 (moderate) with lambda light chain restriction and negative for CD3, CD10, FMC7, CD38, CD138, IgM, CD103, CD123. F Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) showed increased metabolic activity of the left lateral wall of the urinary bladder extending to the left UV junction, adjacent part of trigone and bladder neck region along with multiple heterogeneous enhancing areas with increased FDG avidity within the prostate. Transurethral resection of the bladder tumour by cystoscopy was performed. Histopathology showed high grade, muscle invasive urothelial carcinoma. Due to presence of uptake in the prostate, transurethral resection of the prostate was done and histopathology revealed adenocarcinoma of prostate (prostate specific antigen- positive), Gleason grade III+III and Gleason score 6. A high index of suspicion is required to detect synchronous and metachronous malignancies. Ancillary studies such as immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry and PET/CT are often essential for detection and an accurate diagnosis. PMID:26277675

  12. Detection of a fluorescent-labeled avidin-nucleic acid nanoassembly by confocal laser endomicroscopy in the microvasculature of chronically inflamed intestinal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Buda, Andrea; Facchin, Sonia; Dassie, Elisa; Casarin, Elisabetta; Jepson, Mark A; Neumann, Helmut; Hatem, Giorgia; Realdon, Stefano; D’Incà, Renata; Sturniolo, Giacomo Carlo; Morpurgo, Margherita

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are chronic gastrointestinal pathologies causing great discomfort in both children and adults. The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases is not yet fully understood and their diagnosis and treatment are often challenging. Nanoparticle-based strategies have been tested in local drug delivery to the inflamed colon. Here, we have investigated the use of the novel avidin-nucleic acid nanoassembly (ANANAS) platform as a potential diagnostic carrier in an experimental model of inflammatory bowel diseases. Fluorescent- labeled ANANAS nanoparticles were administered to mice with chemically induced chronic inflammation of the large intestine. Localization of mucosal nanoparticles was assessed in vivo by dual-band confocal laser endomicroscopy. This technique enables characterization of the mucosal microvasculature and crypt architecture at subcellular resolution. Intravascular nanoparticle distribution was observed in the inflamed mucosa but not in healthy controls, demonstrating the utility of the combination of ANANAS and confocal laser endomicroscopy for highlighting intestinal inflammatory conditions. The specific localization of ANANAS in inflamed tissues supports the potential of this platform as a targeted carrier for bioactive moieties in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25609952

  13. Implantable wireless battery recharging system for bladder pressure chronic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Young, Darrin J; Cong, Peng; Suster, Michael A; Damaser, Margot

    2015-11-21

    This paper presents an implantable wireless battery recharging system design for bladder pressure chronic monitoring. The wireless recharging system consists of an external 15 cm-diameter 6-turn powering coil and a silicone-encapsulated implantable rectangular coil with a dimension of 7 mm × 17 mm × 2.5 mm and 18 turns, which further encloses a 3 mm-diameter and 12 mm-long rechargeable battery, two ferrite rods, an ASIC, and a tuning capacitor. For a constant recharging current of 100 μA, an RF power of 700 μW needs to be coupled into the implantable module through the tuned coils. Analyses and experiments confirm that with the two coils aligned coaxially or with a 6 cm axial offset and a tilting angle of 30°, an external power of 3.5 W or 10 W is required, respectively, at an optimal frequency of 3 MHz to cover a large implant depth of 20 cm. PMID:26419677

  14. [The theorotical basis for chronic fatigue syndrome from bladder meridian of foot-taiyang].

    PubMed

    Yao, Fei; Zhao, Yi; Jiang, Shichao; Fang, Min

    2015-03-01

    The bladder meridian of foot-taiyang is considered as key of six meridians and the yang of the yang, which is the pivot of transportation for qi and blood in the meridians and zang-fu. The running route and treatment characteristic of bladder meridian is closely related with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). The bladder meridian belongs to brain and connects with governor vessel, which has a close relationship with zang-fu function, quality of sleep and fatigue. Besides, the running route of bladder meridian is highly consistent with the surface projections of important anatomical structures such as muscle, nerve and sympathetic trunk, etc. Therefore, regulating the meridian-qi of bladder meridian can harmonize five-zang and calm the mind, but also effectively relieve physical and mental fatigue in CFS. PMID:26062210

  15. Role of the chronic bacterial infection in urinary bladder carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Higgy, N.A.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to determine whether or not bacterial infection of the urinary bladder had a role in urinary bladder carcinogenesis. To investigate this proposition, four separate studies were conducted. The first study developed an experimental animal model where bacterial infection of the urinary bladder could be introduced and maintained for a period in excess of one year. The method of infection, inoculation of bacteria (Escherichia coli type 04) subserosally into the vesical wall, successfully caused persistent infection in the majority of animals. In the second study the temporal effects of bacterial infection on the induction of urothelial ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake and DNA synthesis were examined. Bacterial infection of the urinary bladder induced urothelial ODC with a peak in enzyme activity 6 hr after infection./sup 3/H-Thymidine uptake and DNA synthesis peaked 48 hr after infection and coincided with the urothelial hyperplasia that occurred in response to the infection. In the third study the specific bladder carcinogen N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) was given to rats concurrent with the urinary bacterial infection. In the fourth study rats were administered sodium nitrate and either dibutylamine or piperazine in the drinking water. The infected group developed bladder tumors while none were detected in the non-infected rats. From these studies it may be concluded that bacterial infection may have a significant role in the process of urinary bladder carcinogenesis.

  16. A Case of Isolated Coronary Artery Ectasia in the Setting of Chronic Inflamation From human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Heckle, Mark R; Askari, Raza; Morsy, Mohamed; Ibebuogu, Uzoma N

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery ectasia also known as dilated coronopathy is a relatively rare finding that is most commonly associated with atherosclerosis. Several alternative reasons including congenital malformations and chronic inflammation have been identified as a cause of CAE. In this case, we discuss a 61-year-old male with postoperative chest pain who was found to have localized CAE in the absence of significant atherosclerosis. We also elucidate the recently proposed markers of chronic inflammation that might be associated with coronary artery ectasia. PMID:27598894

  17. Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 Restores Gut Barrier Permeability in Chronically Low-Grade Inflamed Mice.

    PubMed

    Martín, Rebeca; Laval, Laure; Chain, Florian; Miquel, Sylvie; Natividad, Jane; Cherbuy, Claire; Sokol, Harry; Verdu, Elena F; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan; Bermudez-Humaran, Luis G; Smokvina, Tamara; Langella, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence supports the efficacy of many probiotic strains in the management of gastrointestinal disorders associated with deregulated intestinal barrier function and/or structure. In particular, bifidobacteria have been studied for their efficacy to both prevent and treat a broad spectrum of animal and/or human gut disorders. The aim of the current work was thus to evaluate effects on intestinal barrier function of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494, a strain used in fermented dairy products. A chronic dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS)-induced low-grade inflammation model causing gut dysfunction in mice was used in order to study markers of inflammation, intestinal permeability, and immune function in the presence of the bacterial strain. In this chronic low-grade inflammation mice model several parameters pointed out the absence of an over active inflammation process. However, gut permeability, lymphocyte populations, and colonic cytokines were found to be altered. B. animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 was able to protect barrier functions by restoring intestinal permeability, colonic goblet cell populations, and cytokine levels. Furthermore, tight junction (TJ) proteins levels were also measured by qRT-PCR showing the ability of this strain to specifically normalize the level of several TJ proteins, in particular for claudin-4. Finally, B. lactis strain counterbalanced CD4(+) lymphocyte alterations in both spleen and mesenteric lymphoid nodes. It restores the Th1/Th2 ratio altered by the DNBS challenge (which locally augments CD4(+) Th1 cells) by increasing the Th2 response as measured by the increase in the production of major representative Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10). Altogether, these data suggest that B. animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 may efficiently prevent disorders associated with increased barrier permeability. PMID:27199937

  18. Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 Restores Gut Barrier Permeability in Chronically Low-Grade Inflamed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Rebeca; Laval, Laure; Chain, Florian; Miquel, Sylvie; Natividad, Jane; Cherbuy, Claire; Sokol, Harry; Verdu, Elena F.; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan; Bermudez-Humaran, Luis G.; Smokvina, Tamara; Langella, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence supports the efficacy of many probiotic strains in the management of gastrointestinal disorders associated with deregulated intestinal barrier function and/or structure. In particular, bifidobacteria have been studied for their efficacy to both prevent and treat a broad spectrum of animal and/or human gut disorders. The aim of the current work was thus to evaluate effects on intestinal barrier function of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494, a strain used in fermented dairy products. A chronic dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS)-induced low-grade inflammation model causing gut dysfunction in mice was used in order to study markers of inflammation, intestinal permeability, and immune function in the presence of the bacterial strain. In this chronic low-grade inflammation mice model several parameters pointed out the absence of an over active inflammation process. However, gut permeability, lymphocyte populations, and colonic cytokines were found to be altered. B. animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 was able to protect barrier functions by restoring intestinal permeability, colonic goblet cell populations, and cytokine levels. Furthermore, tight junction (TJ) proteins levels were also measured by qRT-PCR showing the ability of this strain to specifically normalize the level of several TJ proteins, in particular for claudin-4. Finally, B. lactis strain counterbalanced CD4+ lymphocyte alterations in both spleen and mesenteric lymphoid nodes. It restores the Th1/Th2 ratio altered by the DNBS challenge (which locally augments CD4+ Th1 cells) by increasing the Th2 response as measured by the increase in the production of major representative Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10). Altogether, these data suggest that B. animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 may efficiently prevent disorders associated with increased barrier permeability. PMID:27199937

  19. Micturition in rats: a chronic model for study of bladder function and effect of anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Yaksh, T L; Durant, P A; Brent, C R

    1986-12-01

    The volume-evoked micturition reflex (VEMR) and the effects of anesthetics on the VEMR were studied in a chronic unanesthetized rat model. The bladder catheter was implanted chronically through a laparotomy and externalized percutaneously. An intrathecal (IT) catheter was implanted chronically in animals scheduled for an IT injection. By 2 days after implantation, infusion of saline (200 microliter/min) in the bladder reliably resulted in a low base-line pressure (BP) followed by a transient increase in bladder pressure, an opening of the sphincter (bladder opening pressure, BOP) corresponding to expression of urine (volume of urination, V), then a further rise in pressure (peak pressure, PP) and a subsequent return to base line. Seven days after implantation, values (means +/- SE) for BP, BOP, PP, and V were 10 +/- 0.3, 30 +/- 2, 67 +/- 6 cmH2O, and 1.0 +/- 0.1 ml, respectively. Residual volumes were reliably less than 2-4% of the expressed volume. The VEMR was reliably evoked up to 28 days after implantation. V values in unimplanted and implanted animals were not different. In implanted animals, VEMR parameters were not different during infusion or during spontaneous urination after oral fluid load. Administration of pentobarbital sodium (50 mg/kg ip), alpha-chloralose (130 mg/kg ip), ketamine (100 mg/kg im), halothane (in air 2%), and local anesthetics (2-chloroprocaine 3% or bupivacaine 0.75%, 10 microliter IT) produced a complete blockade of the VEMR and overflow incontinence at pressures significantly higher than BOP values. To compare overflow pressures and passive compliance of the bladder, unanesthetized animals were decapitated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3789199

  20. Sympathetic nervous system and chronic bladder pain: a new tune for an old song

    PubMed Central

    Charrua, Ana; Pinto, Rui; Birder, Lori Ann

    2015-01-01

    Chronic bladder pain (CBP) patients present with pelvic pain or discomfort during bladder filling, for at least a period of 6 months, which may be accompanied by lower urinary tract symptoms such as frequency, nocturia, and urgency. However, both the etiology of CBP and pathophysiological mechanisms are not well described. A number of clinical and basic animal model findings support involvement of sympathetic nervous system in chronic pain syndromes such as CBP. Examples include sympathetic overactivity and high plasma or urinary catecholamine levels that have a high correlation with nociceptive symptoms. In this review, we explored the current evidence in support of the involvement of sympathetic overactivity in CBP. As bladder inflammation often occurs among subgroups of CBP patients, we discuss the possible role of sympathetic nervous system in mastocytosis as well examples examples of animal models that further support the involvement of sympathetic dysfunction in CBP. As there is substantive evidence for cross-organ sensitization in the pelvis can lead to co-morbidity of genitourinary and gastrointestinal dysfunctions, we also include how sympathetic dysfunction may play a role in a number of co-morbid chronic pain syndromes. PMID:26816852

  1. Managing chronic bladder diseases with the administration of exogenous glycosaminoglycans: an update on the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Massimo; Hurle, Rodolfo; Casale, Paolo; Buffi, NicolòMaria; Lughezzani, Giovanni; Fiorini, Girolamo; Peschechera, Roberto; Pasini, Luisa; Zandegiacomo, Silvia; Benetti, Alessio; Taverna, Gianluigi; Guazzoni, Giorgio; Barbagli, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Although the pathophysiology of acute chronic cystitis and other ‘sensory’ disorders, i.e. painful bladder syndrome (PBS) or interstitial cystitis (IC), often remains multifactorial, there is a wide consensus that such clinical conditions may arise from a primary defective urothelium lining or from damaged glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). A ‘cascade’ of events starting from GAG injury, which fails to heal, may lead to chronic bladder epithelial damage and neurogenic inflammation. To restore the GAG layer is becoming the main aim of new therapies for the treatment of chronic cystitis and PBS/IC. Preliminary experiences with GAG replenishment for different pathological conditions involving the lower urinary tract have been reported. There is a range of commercially available intravesical formulations of these components, alone or in combination. Literature evidence shows that exogenous intravesical hyaluronic acid markedly reduces recurrences of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Patients treated with exogenous GAGs have fewer UTI recurrences, a longer time to recurrence and a greater improvement in quality of life. Exogenous intravesical GAGs have been used for the treatment of PBS/IC. Despite the limitations of most of the studies, findings confirmed the role of combination therapy with hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate as a safe and effective option for the treatment of PBS/IC. To prevent and/or treat radiotherapy and chemotherapy induced cystitis, GAG replenishment therapy has been used showing preliminary encouraging results. The safety profile of exogenous GAGs has been reported to be very favourable, without adverse events of particular significance. PMID:27034722

  2. Treating Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome as a Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Philip C; Bosch, David C

    2014-01-01

    The management of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is both frustrating and difficult. The etiology is uncertain and there is no definitive treatment. Consequently, both patients and doctors tend to be unhappy and unsatisfied with the quality of care. The American Urological Association (AUA) provides a guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of IC/BPS. Recommended first-line treatments include patient education, self-care practices, behavior modifications, and stress management. Management of IC/BPS may be also improved if both patients and doctors treat this condition as a chronic disease. This article reviews the AUA first-line treatments for IC/BPS and considers the benefits of treating this condition as a chronic disease. PMID:25009448

  3. Patients With Chronic Pelvic Pain: Endometriosis or Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis and interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome share similar symptoms. Interstitial cystitis was once considered rare, but it is now recognized as more common than previously thought. This review examines evidence that patients presenting with symptoms typically attributed to endometriosis or with unresolved pelvic pain after treatment for endometriosis may, in fact, have interstitial cystitis, and suggests approaches for appropriate diagnosis. Methods: A MedLine search using “chronic pelvic pain,” “endometriosis,” “interstitial cystitis,” and “bladder origin pain” as key words was performed for the most recent English-language articles. Additional references were obtained through cross-referencing the bibliography cited in each publication. Discussion: The symptoms of endometriosis and inter-stitial cystitis frequently overlap, and these 2 conditions may even coexist in the same patient. In cases of unresolved endometriosis and persistent pelvic pain, patients may have interstitial cystitis. A variety of tools are available to aid in identifying interstitial cystitis. Conclusion: Gynecologists should be alert to the possible presence of interstitial cystitis in patients who present with chronic pelvic pain typical of endometriosis. PMID:17761077

  4. Novel Treatment of Chronic Bladder Pain Syndrome and Other Pelvic Pain Disorders by OnabotulinumtoxinA Injection

    PubMed Central

    Jhang, Jia-Fong; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) is defined as pain in the pelvic organs and related structures of at least 6 months’ duration. The pathophysiology of CPP is uncertain, and its treatment presents challenges. Botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A), known for its antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, and muscle relaxant activity, has been used recently to treat refractory CPP with promising results. In patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, most studies suggest intravesical BoNT-A injection reduces bladder pain and increases bladder capacity. Repeated BoNT-A injection is also effective and reduces inflammation in the bladder. Intraprostatic BoNT-A injection could significantly improve prostate pain and urinary frequency in the patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Animal studies also suggest BoNT-A injection in the prostate decreases inflammation in the prostate. Patients with CPP due to pelvic muscle pain and spasm also benefit from localized BoNT-A injections. BoNT-A injection in the pelvic floor muscle improves dyspareunia and decreases pelvic floor pressure. Preliminary studies show intravesical BoNT-A injection is useful in inflammatory bladder diseases such as chemical cystitis, radiation cystitis, and ketamine related cystitis. Dysuria is the most common adverse effect after BoNT-A injection. Very few patients develop acute urinary retention after treatment. PMID:26094697

  5. Biospectral analysis of the bladder channel point in chronic low back pain patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Alberto Espinosa; Nava, Juan José Godina; Segura, Miguel Ángel Rodriguez; Bastida, Albino Villegas

    2012-10-01

    Chronic pain is the main cause of disability in the productive age people and is a public health problem that affects both the patient and society. On the other hand, there isn't any instrument to measure it; this is only estimated using subjective variables. The healthy cells generate a known membrane potential which is part of a network of biologically closed electric circuits still unstudied. It is proposed a biospectral analysis of a bladder channel point as a diagnosis method for chronic low back pain patients. Materials and methods: We employed a study group with chronic low back pain patients and a control group without low back pain patients. The visual analog scale (VAS) to determine the level of pain was applied. Bioelectric variables were measured for 10 seconds and the respective biostatistical analyses were made. Results: Biospectral analysis on frequency domain shows a depression in the 60-300 Hz frequency range proportional to the chronicity of low back pain compared against healthy patients.

  6. Neurogenic Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Dorsher, Peter T.; McIntosh, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Congenital anomalies such as meningomyelocele and diseases/damage of the central, peripheral, or autonomic nervous systems may produce neurogenic bladder dysfunction, which untreated can result in progressive renal damage, adverse physical effects including decubiti and urinary tract infections, and psychological and social sequelae related to urinary incontinence. A comprehensive bladder-retraining program that incorporates appropriate education, training, medication, and surgical interventions can mitigate the adverse consequences of neurogenic bladder dysfunction and improve both quantity and quality of life. The goals of bladder retraining for neurogenic bladder dysfunction are prevention of urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections, detrusor overdistension, and progressive upper urinary tract damage due to chronic, excessive detrusor pressures. Understanding the physiology and pathophysiology of micturition is essential to select appropriate pharmacologic and surgical interventions to achieve these goals. Future perspectives on potential pharmacological, surgical, and regenerative medicine options for treating neurogenic bladder dysfunction are also presented. PMID:22400020

  7. New pharmacological approaches against chronic bowel and bladder problems in paralytics.

    PubMed

    Guertin, Pierre A

    2016-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) leads generally to an irreversible loss of sensory functions and voluntary motor control below injury level. Cures that could repair SCI and/or restore voluntary walking have not been yet developed nor commercialized. Beyond the well-known loss of walking capabilities, most SCI patients experience also a plethora of motor problems and health concerns including specific bladder and bowel dysfunctions. Indeed, chronic constipation and urinary retention, two significant life-threatening complications, are typically found in patients suffering of traumatic (e.g., falls or car accidents) or non-traumatic SCI (e.g., multiple sclerosis, spinal tumors). Secondary health concerns associated with these dysfunctions include hemorrhoids, abdominal distention, altered visceral sensitivity, hydronephrosis, kidney failure, urinary tract infections, sepsis and, in some cases, cardiac arrest. Consequently, individuals with chronic SCI are forced to regularly seek emergency and critical care treatments when some of these conditions occur or become intolerable. Increasing evidence supports the existence of a novel experimental approach that may be capable of preventing the occurrence or severity of bladder and bowel problems. Indeed, recent findings in animal models of SCI have revealed that, despite paraplegia or tetraplegia, it remains possible to elicit episodes of micturition and defecation by acting pharmacologically or electrically upon specialized lumbosacral neuronal networks, namely the spinal or sacral micturition center (SMC) and lumbosacral defecation center (LDC). Daily activation of SMC and LDC neurons could potentially become, new classes of minimally invasive treatments (i.e., if orally active) against these dysfunctions and their many life-threatening complications. PMID:26855887

  8. New pharmacological approaches against chronic bowel and bladder problems in paralytics

    PubMed Central

    Guertin, Pierre A

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) leads generally to an irreversible loss of sensory functions and voluntary motor control below injury level. Cures that could repair SCI and/or restore voluntary walking have not been yet developed nor commercialized. Beyond the well-known loss of walking capabilities, most SCI patients experience also a plethora of motor problems and health concerns including specific bladder and bowel dysfunctions. Indeed, chronic constipation and urinary retention, two significant life-threatening complications, are typically found in patients suffering of traumatic (e.g., falls or car accidents) or non-traumatic SCI (e.g., multiple sclerosis, spinal tumors). Secondary health concerns associated with these dysfunctions include hemorrhoids, abdominal distention, altered visceral sensitivity, hydronephrosis, kidney failure, urinary tract infections, sepsis and, in some cases, cardiac arrest. Consequently, individuals with chronic SCI are forced to regularly seek emergency and critical care treatments when some of these conditions occur or become intolerable. Increasing evidence supports the existence of a novel experimental approach that may be capable of preventing the occurrence or severity of bladder and bowel problems. Indeed, recent findings in animal models of SCI have revealed that, despite paraplegia or tetraplegia, it remains possible to elicit episodes of micturition and defecation by acting pharmacologically or electrically upon specialized lumbosacral neuronal networks, namely the spinal or sacral micturition center (SMC) and lumbosacral defecation center (LDC). Daily activation of SMC and LDC neurons could potentially become, new classes of minimally invasive treatments (i.e., if orally active) against these dysfunctions and their many life-threatening complications. PMID:26855887

  9. Treatment for chronic ischaemia-induced bladder detrusor dysfunction using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Song; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Ning; Li, Wei-Hong; Shan, Hui; Liu, Ke; Yang, Yong

    2012-03-01

    The mechanism of ischaemia-induced bladder dysfunction is not entirely clear, but is thought to be a result of the ischaemia-related M-receptor hypersensitivity to acetylcholine. In addition to nerve injury, ischaemia may cause bladder detrusor fibrosis and urethra de-epithelialization. Bladder dysfunctions caused by bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) and aging detrusor were considered to be associated with chronic ischaemia. To date, there has been no effective treatment for the histological and functional changes of the bladder caused by bladder ischaemia. The present study evaluated the feasibility and effectiveness of using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of chronic ischaemia-induced bladder detrusor dysfunction in an experimental model. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were injected into the common iliac artery of experimental animals, then bilateral iliac arteries were ligated and doxazosin mesylate was intragastrically administered. Eight weeks later, urodynamic examination and intravesical pressure measurements were performed on experimental animals. Histological changes of the taken bladder from sacrificed SD rats were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and trichrome staining and the images captured were analyzed by a software program. The average intravesical pressure and detrusor contraction power of the ischaemia group was 16.21±5.26 and 17.26±5.72; those of the experimental group were 24.02±10.06 and 25.84±11.99; the average intravesical pressure and detrusor contraction power of the control group was 28.56±4.48 and 29.57±5.01. The average intravesical pressure and detrusor contraction power of the ischaemia group were significantly lower than those of the experimental and control group, while no significant difference was shown between the experimental and control groups. 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) staining for the experimental group was positive. The percentage of the smooth muscle content in

  10. Effects of Chronic Hyperlipidemia on Lower Urinary Tract Function-Bladder Dysfunction in Myocardial Infarction-Prone Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masaki; Kudoh, Junzo; Masunaga, Koichi; Nagata, Takashi; Shiomi, Masashi

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of chronic hyperlipidemia on bladder function, we examined the functional and histological changes of the bladder in myocardial infarction-prone Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL-MI) rabbits. Two age groups of WHHL-MI rabbits (6-12 months old, young WHHL-MI rabbits; and 20-24 months old, old WHHL-MI rabbits group) and the sex- and age-matched control rabbits were prepared. Bladder functions were evaluated using frequency volume charts and cystometrograms, and functional experiments using isolated bladder specimens. Histological studies of bladder were performed with HE staining and immunohistochemical staining with mouse monoclonal S-100 protein antibodies and sheep polyclonal calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) antibodies. In cystometrograms, it has been demonstrated that WHHL-MI rabbits showed significantly shorter micturition interval, smaller voided volume with non-voiding contractions compared to control. There was no significant difference in voiding pressure between young WHHL-MI and control rabbits. However, old WHHL-MI rabbits showed a lower voiding pressure than control rabbits. The functional experiments revealed that carbachol- and electrical field stimulation (EFS)-induced contractile responses of isolated bladder strips were significantly increased in young WHHL-MI rabbits than in control rabbits. However, in the bladder strips of old WHHL-MI rabbits, decreased responses to carbachol and EFS were observed. In WHHL-MI rabbits, bladder urothelium became thinner, smooth muscle area decreased and connective tissue area increased gradually with aging. A significant decrease in S-100 protein-positive neurons, and an increased number of CGRP-positive neurons were observed in both young and old WHHL-MI rabbits. The data demonstrated that there were differences in bladder dysfunction between young and old WHHL-MI rabbits. Old WHHL-MI rabbits showed detrusor hyperactivity with impaired contraction. This study may demonstrate the

  11. A lympho-follicular microenvironment is required for pathological prion protein deposition in chronically inflamed tissues from scrapie-affected sheep.

    PubMed

    Maestrale, Caterina; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Cancedda, Maria Giovanna; Marruchella, Giuseppe; Masia, Mariangela; Sechi, Stefania; Macciocu, Simonetta; Santucciu, Cinzia; Petruzzi, Mara; Ligios, Ciriaco

    2013-01-01

    In sheep scrapie, pathological prion protein (PrP(Sc)) deposition occurs in the lymphoreticular and central nervous systems. We investigated PrP(Sc) distribution in scrapie-affected sheep showing simultaneous evidence of chronic lymphofollicular, lymphoproliferative/non-lymphofollicular, and/or granulomatous inflammations in their mammary gland, lung, and ileum. To do this, PrP(Sc) detection was carried out via immunohistochemistry and Western Blotting techniques, as well as through inflammatory cell immunophenotyping. Expression studies of gene coding for biological factors modulating the host's inflammatory response were also carried out. We demonstrated that ectopic PrP(Sc) deposition occurs exclusively in the context of lymphofollicular inflammatory sites, inside newly formed and well-organized lymphoid follicles harboring follicular dendritic cells. On the contrary, no PrP(Sc) deposition was detected in granulomas, even when they were closely located to newly formed lymphoid follicles. A significantly more consistent expression of lymphotoxin α and β mRNA was detected in lymphofollicular inflammation compared to the other two types, with lymphotoxin α and β signaling new lymphoid follicles' formation and, likely, the occurrence of ectopic PrP(Sc) deposition inside them. Our findings suggest that, in sheep co-affected by scrapie and chronic inflammatory conditions, only newly formed lymphoid follicles provide a suitable micro-environment that supports the scrapie agent's replication in inflammatory sites, with an increased risk of prion shedding through body secretions/excretions. PMID:23658779

  12. A Lympho-Follicular Microenvironment Is Required for Pathological Prion Protein Deposition in Chronically Inflamed Tissues from Scrapie-Affected Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Maestrale, Caterina; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Cancedda, Maria Giovanna; Marruchella, Giuseppe; Masia, Mariangela; Sechi, Stefania; Macciocu, Simonetta; Santucciu, Cinzia; Petruzzi, Mara; Ligios, Ciriaco

    2013-01-01

    In sheep scrapie, pathological prion protein (PrPSc) deposition occurs in the lymphoreticular and central nervous systems. We investigated PrPSc distribution in scrapie-affected sheep showing simultaneous evidence of chronic lymphofollicular, lymphoproliferative/non-lymphofollicular, and/or granulomatous inflammations in their mammary gland, lung, and ileum. To do this, PrPSc detection was carried out via immunohistochemistry and Western Blotting techniques, as well as through inflammatory cell immunophenotyping. Expression studies of gene coding for biological factors modulating the host’s inflammatory response were also carried out. We demonstrated that ectopic PrPSc deposition occurs exclusively in the context of lymphofollicular inflammatory sites, inside newly formed and well-organized lymphoid follicles harboring follicular dendritic cells. On the contrary, no PrPSc deposition was detected in granulomas, even when they were closely located to newly formed lymphoid follicles. A significantly more consistent expression of lymphotoxin α and β mRNA was detected in lymphofollicular inflammation compared to the other two types, with lymphotoxin α and β signaling new lymphoid follicles’ formation and, likely, the occurrence of ectopic PrPSc deposition inside them. Our findings suggest that, in sheep co-affected by scrapie and chronic inflammatory conditions, only newly formed lymphoid follicles provide a suitable micro-environment that supports the scrapie agent’s replication in inflammatory sites, with an increased risk of prion shedding through body secretions/excretions. PMID:23658779

  13. Chronic and acute infection of the gall bladder by Salmonella Typhi: understanding the carrier state

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Escobedo, Geoffrey; Marshall, Joanna M.; Gunn, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Despite major treatment and prevention efforts, millions of new typhoid infections occur worldwide each year. For a subset of infected individuals, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhi colonizes the gall bladder and remains there long after symptoms subside, serving as a reservoir for the further spread of the disease. In this Progress article, we explore recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which Salmonella spp. — predominantly S. Typhi — colonize and persist in the human gall bladder. PMID:21113180

  14. Intraspinal stimulation for bladder voiding in cats before and after chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Pikov, Victor; Bullara, Leo; McCreery, Douglas B

    2007-12-01

    The long-term objective of this study is to develop neural prostheses for people with spinal cord injuries who are unable to voluntarily control their bladder. This feasibility study was performed in 22 adult cats. We implanted an array of microelectrodes into locations in the sacral spinal cord that are involved in the control of micturition reflexes. The effect of microelectrode stimulation was studied under light Propofol anesthesia at monthly intervals for up to 14 months. We found that electrical stimulation in the sacral parasympathetic nucleus at S(2) level or in adjacent ventrolateral white matter produced bladder contractions insufficient for inducing voiding, while stimulation at or immediately dorsal to the dorsal gray commissure at S(1) level produced strong (at least 20 mmHg) bladder contractions as well as strong (at least 40 mm Hg) external urethral sphincter relaxation, resulting in bladder voiding in 14 animals. In a subset of three animals, spinal cord transection was performed. For several months after the transection, intraspinal stimulation continued to be similarly or even more effective in inducing the bladder voiding as before the transection. We speculate that in the absence of the supraspinal connections, the plasticity in the local spinal circuitry played a role in the improved responsiveness to intraspinal stimulation. PMID:18057503

  15. Intraspinal stimulation for bladder voiding in cats before and after chronic spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikov, Victor; Bullara, Leo; McCreery, Douglas B.

    2007-12-01

    The long-term objective of this study is to develop neural prostheses for people with spinal cord injuries who are unable to voluntarily control their bladder. This feasibility study was performed in 22 adult cats. We implanted an array of microelectrodes into locations in the sacral spinal cord that are involved in the control of micturition reflexes. The effect of microelectrode stimulation was studied under light Propofol anesthesia at monthly intervals for up to 14 months. We found that electrical stimulation in the sacral parasympathetic nucleus at S2 level or in adjacent ventrolateral white matter produced bladder contractions insufficient for inducing voiding, while stimulation at or immediately dorsal to the dorsal gray commissure at S1 level produced strong (at least 20 mmHg) bladder contractions as well as strong (at least 40 mm Hg) external urethral sphincter relaxation, resulting in bladder voiding in 14 animals. In a subset of three animals, spinal cord transection was performed. For several months after the transection, intraspinal stimulation continued to be similarly or even more effective in inducing the bladder voiding as before the transection. We speculate that in the absence of the supraspinal connections, the plasticity in the local spinal circuitry played a role in the improved responsiveness to intraspinal stimulation.

  16. Behaviour of the urethral striated sphincter and of the bladder in the chronic spinal cat. Implications at the Central Nervous System Level.

    PubMed

    Rampal, G; Mignard, P

    1975-01-01

    Nine cats were spinalized at the thoraco-lumbar junction (T12-L7) and the subsequent behaviour of the bladder and urethral striated sphincter was observed during periods of up to 27 days after spinalization by means of bladder manometry and of urethral electromyography. On the day following operation, the urethral sphincter responds to stimulation of its intact motor nerve, the pudic nerve by reflex (R) and direct (M) responses analogous to those of the intact animal anaesthetized with chloralose. The ratio R/M lies between 1 and 0.6 in the chronic spinal cat whereas it is generally less than 0.5 in the intact chloralose-anaesthetized cat. The tonic activity of the sphincter is weak or not present. The continence, however, is well maintained. The bladder activity appears only 4 to 8 days after spinalization. The bladder can thus void urine during brief contractions. These micturitions are always incomplete. The urethral reflex activity, either spontaneous or triggered by stimulation of the pudic nerve, may be inhibited, i: to a moderate degree by passive bladder distension; ii: almost completely by activation of vesicomotor neurones which provoke the bladder contraction. The first inhibition is seen the day after spinalization and is probably a protective reflex against vesical hypertension. The second inhibition develops progressively and in parallel to the functional recovery of vesical preganglionic neurones. It takes place on a background of antagnostic equilibrium of bladder and of urethral sphincter activities during micturition. PMID:1168331

  17. Bladder stones

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as: Bladder diverticulum Enlarged prostate Neurogenic bladder Urinary tract infection Almost all bladder stones occur in men. Bladder ... stream Pain, discomfort in the penis Signs of urinary tract infection (such as fever, pain when urinating, and need ...

  18. Painful Bladder Filling and Painful Urgency Are Distinct Characteristics in Men and Women with Urologic Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndromes – A MAPP Research Network Study

    PubMed Central

    Lai, H. Henry; Krieger, John N.; Pontari, Michel A.; Buchwald, Dedra; Hou, Xiaoling; Landis, J. Richard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe bladder-associated symptoms in patients with urologic chronic pelvic pain syndromes (UCPPS) and to correlate these symptoms with urologic, non-urologic, psychosocial, and quality of life measures. Methods Participants were 233 women and 191 men with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome or chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome in a multi-center study. They completed a battery of measures, including items asking if their pain worsened with bladder filling (“painful filling”) or if their urge to urinate was due to pain, pressure, or discomfort (“painful urgency”). Participants were categorized into 3 groups: 1) “both” painful filling and painful urgency, 2) “either” painful filling or painful urgency, or 3) “neither.” Results Seventy-five percent of men and 88% of women were categorized as “both” or “either.” These bladder characteristics were associated with more severe urologic symptoms (increased pain, frequency, urgency), higher somatic symptom burden, depression, and worse quality of life (all p<0.01, 3-group trend test). A gradient effect was observed across groups (both > either > neither). Compared to those in the “neither” group, men categorized as “both” or “either” reported more frequent UCPPS symptom flares, catastrophizing, and irritable bowel syndrome, and women categorized as “both” or “either” were more likely to have negative affect and chronic fatigue syndrome. Conclusions Men and women with bladder symptoms characterized as painful filling or painful urgency had more severe urologic symptoms, more generalized symptoms, and worse quality of life than participants who reported neither characteristic, suggesting that these symptom characteristics might represent important subsets of UCPPS patients. PMID:26192257

  19. Bladder cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder; Urothelial cancer ... In the United States, bladder cancer usually starts from the cells lining the bladder. These cells are called transitional cells. These tumors are classified by the way ...

  20. Bladder Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... frequent, urgent urination Bladder cancer Doctors diagnose bladder diseases using different tests. These include urine tests, x- ... National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  1. Caudal clonidine-bupivicaine block with bladder hydrodistension: a novel combined treatment for the painful bladder.

    PubMed

    Tempest, Heidi; Stoneham, Mark; Frampton, Claire; Noble, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a new combination procedure consisting of bladder hydrodistension with clonidine-bupivicaine caudal block for the symptomatic relief of bladder pain. They report this new technique whereby patients who had tried multiple forms of therapy with little response, including bladder hydrodistension under general anaesthesia for their chronic pelvic bladder pain, responded to this novel combination therapy. PMID:22696635

  2. Persistence of DNA damage following exposure of human bladder cells to chronic monomethylarsonous acid

    SciTech Connect

    Wnek, S.M.; Medeiros, M.K.; Eblin, K.E.; Gandolfi, A.J.

    2009-12-01

    Malignant transformation was demonstrated in UROtsa cells following 52-weeks of exposure to 50 nM monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}); the result was the malignantly transformed cell line, URO-MSC. URO-MSC cells were used to study the induction of DNA damage and the alteration of DNA repair enzymes in both the presence of MMA{sup III} [URO-MSC(+)] and after subsequent removal of MMA{sup III} [URO-MSC(-)] following chronic, low-level exposure. In the presence of MMA{sup III}, URO-MSC(+) cells demonstrated a sustained increase in DNA damage following 12-weeks of exposure; in particular, a significant increase in DNA single-strand breaks at 12-weeks of exposure consistently elevated through 52 weeks. The persistence of DNA damage in URO-MSC cells was assessed after a 2-week removal of MMA{sup III}. URO-MSC(-) cells demonstrated a decrease in DNA damage compared to URO-MSC(+); however, DNA damage in URO-MSC(-) remained significantly elevated when compared to untreated UROtsa and increased in a time-dependent manner. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were demonstrated to be a critical component in the generation of DNA damage determined through the incubation of ROS scavengers with URO-MSC cells. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is a key repair enzyme in DNA single-strand break repair. URO-MSC(+) resulted in a slight increase in PARP activity after 36-weeks of MMA{sup III} exposure, suggesting the presence of MMA{sup III} is inhibiting the increase in PARP activity. In support, PARP activity in URO-MSC(-) increased significantly, coinciding with a subsequent decrease in DNA damage demonstrated in URO-MSC(-) compared to URO-MSC(+). These data demonstrate that chronic, low-level exposure of UROtsa cells to 50 nM MMA{sup III} results in: the induction of DNA damage that remains elevated upon removal of MMA{sup III}; increased levels of ROS that play a role in MMA{sup III} induced-DNA damage; and decreased PARP activity in the presence of MMA{sup III}.

  3. Archaea prevalence in inflamed pulp tissues

    PubMed Central

    Efenberger, Magdalena; Agier, Justyna; Pawłowska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Archaea have been detected in several ecological niches of the human body such as the large intestine, skin, vagina as well as the oral cavity. At present, archaea are recognized as nonpathogenic microorganisms. However, some data indicate that they may be involved in the etiopathogenesis of several diseases, including intestinal diseases as well as oral diseases: periodontitis, peri-implantitis and endodontitis. In this study, on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, we examined whether archaea might be present in inflamed pulp tissues and contribute to the development of endodontic infection. In comparison, we also determined selected bacterial species associated with endodontitis. We detected archaea in 85% of infected endodontic samples. In addition, Prevotella intermedia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola were present in inflamed pulp tissue samples and Treponema denticola occurred with the highest frequency (70%). Further analysis revealed the presence of methanogenic archaea in analyzed samples. Direct sequencing of archaeal 16S rRNA gene PCR products indicated the occurrence of methanogenic archaea in inflamed pulp tissues; phylogenetically most similar were Methanobrevibacter oralis and Methanobrevibacter smithii. Therefore, our results show that methanogenic archaea are present in inflamed pulp tissues and may participate in the development of endodontic infection. PMID:26557034

  4. MORTALITY OF GASWORKERS WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO CANCERS OF THE LUNG AND BLADDER, CHRONIC BRONCHITIS, AND PNEUMOCONIOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Doll, R.; Fisher, R. E. W.; Gammon, E. J.; Gunn, W.; Hughes, G. O.; Tyrer, F. H.; Wilson, W.

    1965-01-01

    were very small. The death rate from cancer of the bladder in class A was four times that in class C, but the total number of deaths was only 14. Five deaths were attributed to pneumoconiosis, four of which occurred in bricklayers (class B). One death from cancer of the scrotum occurred in a retort house worker. For other causes of death the mortality rates were similar to or lower than the corresponding national rates. Examination of the data separately for each area Board showed that the excess mortality from lung cancer and chronic bronchitis in retort house workers persisted in each area. For two Boards the mortality from other causes was close to that recorded for other men living in the same region; in the other two Boards it was substantially lower. A comparison between the mortality of men who worked in horizontal retort houses and of those who worked in vertical houses suggested that the risk of lung cancer was greater in the horizontal houses and the risk of bronchitis was greater in the vertical houses, the differences being, however, not statistically significant. In the light of these and other data, it is concluded that exposure to products of coal carbonization can give rise to cancer of the lung and to bronchitis, and probably also to cancer of the bladder. A risk of pneumoconiosis from work on the repair and setting of retorts is confirmed. PMID:14261702

  5. Bladder stones

    MedlinePlus

    Stones - bladder; Urinary tract stones; Bladder calculi ... Benway BM, Bhayani SM. Lower urinary tract calculi. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 89. Sharma R, Dill CE, Gelman DY. Urinary ...

  6. Bladder Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... life (the person’s level of health, comfort, and happiness). In fact, people with bladder problems may have a lower quality of life than people with diabetes, heart disease, or high blood pressure. Bladder problems ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: bladder cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... chemicals. Studies suggest that chronic bladder inflammation, a parasitic infection called schistosomiasis, and some medications used to treat ... Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (2 links) American Cancer ...

  8. Biomimetic proteolipid vesicles for targeting inflamed tissues.

    PubMed

    Molinaro, R; Corbo, C; Martinez, J O; Taraballi, F; Evangelopoulos, M; Minardi, S; Yazdi, I K; Zhao, P; De Rosa, E; Sherman, M B; De Vita, A; Toledano Furman, N E; Wang, X; Parodi, A; Tasciotti, E

    2016-09-01

    A multitude of micro- and nanoparticles have been developed to improve the delivery of systemically administered pharmaceuticals, which are subject to a number of biological barriers that limit their optimal biodistribution. Bioinspired drug-delivery carriers formulated by bottom-up or top-down strategies have emerged as an alternative approach to evade the mononuclear phagocytic system and facilitate transport across the endothelial vessel wall. Here, we describe a method that leverages the advantages of bottom-up and top-down strategies to incorporate proteins derived from the leukocyte plasma membrane into lipid nanoparticles. The resulting proteolipid vesicles-which we refer to as leukosomes-retained the versatility and physicochemical properties typical of liposomal formulations, preferentially targeted inflamed vasculature, enabled the selective and effective delivery of dexamethasone to inflamed tissues, and reduced phlogosis in a localized model of inflammation. PMID:27213956

  9. Clinical Efficacy and Changes of Urothelial Dysfunction after Repeated Detrusor Botulinum Toxin A Injections in Chronic Spinal Cord-Injured Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng-Fu; Chang, Chia-Hwei; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2016-01-01

    Chornic spinal cord injury (SCI) will induce bladder urothelium dysfunction. This study investigated the therapeutic effects on urothelial dysfunction after repeated detrusor injections of onabotulinumtoxinA (BoNT-A) in SCI patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). Twenty chronic suprasacral SCI patients with NDO were enrolled. The patients received 300 U BoNT-A injection into the detrusor every six months. The urothelium was assessed by cystoscopic biopsy at baseline and six months after each BoNT-A treatment. Immunofluorescence staining for urothelial dysfunction, including E-cadherin, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), tryptase for mast cell activity, and urothelial apoptosis were investigated. The outcome of urothelial dysfunction parameters after BoNT-A injection were compared between baseline and six months after each treatment. Repeated 300 U BoNT-A injections showed a sustained decrease of detrusor pressure compared with baseline. After three repeated BoNT-A detrusor injections, significantly greater distributions of E-cadherin (p = 0.042) and ZO-1 (p = 0.003) expressions, but no significant changes, of urothelial apoptosis and mast cell activation were found after repeated BoNT-A therapy. Urothelial dysfunction, such as adhesive and junction protein concentrations in SCI patients’ bladders, recovered after three repeated cycles of BoNT-A treatment. The therapeutic effects sustained. However, urothelial inflammation and apoptosis after SCI were not significantly improved after three repeated BoNT-A injections. PMID:27249005

  10. Autofluorescence of healthy and inflamed pulpal tissues: photodynamic diagnosis of pulpal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebihara, Arata; Kawashima, Nobuyuki; Saegusa, Hidetoshi; Anjo, Tomoo; Suda, Hideaki

    2005-03-01

    Autofluorescence of healthy and inflamed human pulpal tissues was observed by confocal laser microscopy. In this preliminary study, photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) was applied to diagnose pulpal disease. The ability to accurately diagnose pulpal pathology prior to pulpectomy would be very beneficial. Clinically, however, we are unable to perform biopsy to detect pathological changes. Therefore, this study was performed using healthy, acutely and chronically inflamed human pulpal tissues to detect pathological changes in pulpal tissues. Following excision, pulpal tissues were rapidly frozen and standard cryosections were prepared. Autofluorescence of pulpal tissues was observed using a confocal laser microscope to examine whether there were any differences in autofluorescence intensities between healthy and inflamed pulpal tissues. Several combinations of excitation and detection wavelengths were tested to observe autofluorescence from pulpal tissues; the excitation wavelengths ranged from 488nm to 633nm, and the detection wavelengths were longer than 505 nm. Autofluorescence was detected in both healthy and inflamed groups. With this technique, it may be possible to diagnose pulpal pathology without biopsy, and might be applicable to photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) in root canal treatment.

  11. Bladder Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Diagnostic Ultrasound Corporation's Bladder Scan Monitor continuously records and monitors bladder fullness and alerts the wearer or caretaker when voiding is required. The sensor is held against the lower abdomen by a belt and connected to the monitor by a cable. The sensor obtains bladder volume data from sound waves reflecting off the bladder wall. The device was developed by Langley Research Center, the Ames Research Center and the NASA Technology Applications Team. It utilizes Langley's advanced ultrasound technology. It is licensed to the ARC for medical applications, and sublicensed to Diagnostics Ultrasound. Central monitoring systems are planned for the future.

  12. Mesenchymal stem cells induce epithelial proliferation within the inflamed stomach.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Jessica M; Engevik, Amy; Feng, Rui; Xiao, Chang; Boivin, Gregory P; Li, Jing; Houghton, JeanMarie; Zavros, Yana

    2014-06-15

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) sustain cancer cells by creating a microenvironment favorable for tumor growth. In particular, MSCs have been implicated in gastric cancer development. There is extensive evidence suggesting that Hedgehog signaling regulates tumor growth. However, very little is known regarding the precise roles of Hedgehog signaling and MSCs in tumor development within the stomach. The current study tests that hypothesis that Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), secreted from MSCs, provides a proliferative stimulus for the gastric epithelium in the presence of inflammation. Red fluorescent protein-expressing MSCs transformed in vitro (stMSCs) were transduced with lentiviral constructs containing a vector control (stMSC(vect)) or short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting the Shh gene (stMSC(ShhKO)). Gastric submucosal transplantation of wild-type MSCs (wtMSCs), wild-type MSCs overexpressing Shh (wtMSC(Shh)), stMSC(vect), or stMSC(ShhKO) cells in C57BL/6 control (BL/6) or gastrin-deficient (GKO) mice was performed and mice analyzed 30 and 60 days posttransplantation. Compared with BL/6 mice transplanted with wtMSC(Shh) and stMSC(vect) cells, inflamed GKO mice developed aggressive gastric tumors. Tumor development was not observed in mouse stomachs transplanted with wtMSC or stMSC(ShhKO) cells. Compared with stMSC(ShhKO)-transplanted mice, within the inflamed GKO mouse stomach, Shh-expressing stMSC(vect)- and wtMSC(Shh)-induced proliferation of CD44-positive cells. CD44-positive cells clustered in gland-like structures within the tumor stroma and were positive for Patched (Ptch) expression. We conclude that Shh, secreted from MSCs, provides a proliferative stimulus for the gastric epithelium that is associated with tumor development, a response that is sustained by chronic inflammation. PMID:24789207

  13. Chronic arsenic exposure increases TGFalpha concentration in bladder urothelial cells of Mexican populations environmentally exposed to inorganic arsenic☆

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Olga L.; Germolec, Dori R.; Borja-Aburto, Víctor H.; Contreras-Ruiz, José; García-Vargas, Gonzalo G.; Del Razo, Luz M.

    2009-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is a well-established carcinogen and human exposure has been associated with a variety of cancers including those of skin, lung, and bladder. High expression of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-α) has associated with local relapses in early stages of urinary bladder cancer. iAs exposures are at least in part determined by the rate of formation and composition of iAs metabolites (MAsIII, MAsV, DMAsIII, DMAsV). This study examines the relationship between TGF-α concentration in exfoliated bladder urothelial cells (BUC) separated from urine and urinary arsenic species in 72 resident women (18-51 years old) from areas exposed to different concentrations of iAs in drinking water (2-378 ppb) in central Mexico. Urinary arsenic species, including trivalent methylated metabolites were measured by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry method. The concentration of TGF-α in BUC was measured using an ELISA assay. Results show a statistically significant positive correlation between TGF-α concentration in BUC and each of the six arsenic species present in urine. The multivariate linear regression analyses show that the increment of TGF-α levels in BUC was importantly associated with the presence of arsenic species after adjusting by age, and presence of urinary infection. People from areas with high arsenic exposure had a significantly higher TGF-α concentration in BUC than people from areas of low arsenic exposure (128.8 vs. 64.4 pg/mg protein; p<0.05). Notably, exfoliated cells isolated from individuals with skin lesions contained significantly greater amount of TGF-α than cells from individuals without skin lesions: 157.7 vs. 64.9 pg/mg protein (p=0.003). These results suggest that TGF-α in exfoliated BUC may serve as a susceptibility marker of adverse health effects on epithelial tissue in arsenic-endemic areas. PMID:17267001

  14. [Spinal lipoma with a dural closure defect as a cause of neurogenic bladder and chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Eichler, I; Ungersböck, K; Waldhauser, F; Balzar, E; Nürnberger, N; Pflüger, H; Frisch, H

    1986-04-01

    It is reported on a 6-year-old boy, in whom 3 years after the appearance of a neurogenic disturbance of the urinary bladder a lipoma in the spinal canal of the inferior thoracic region was diagnosed myelographically. The operative removal of the growing and displacing fatty tissue which by a (congenital?) dural gap continued in epidural direction indeed resulted in a far-reaching regression of the paresis of the lower extremities, not, however, in an improvement of the urological picture of the disease. The renal insufficiency caused by the hydronephrosis was no more reversible, which emphasizes the importance of the early diagnosis of this relatively infrequent malformation. PMID:3727820

  15. Differences in cellular glycoconjugates of quiescent, inflamed, and neoplastic colonic epithelium in colitis and cancer-prone tamarins.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R.; King, N.; Alroy, J.

    1988-01-01

    In the preceding paper the authors demonstrated that the lectin staining patterns of normal colonic epithelium obtained from colitis and carcinoma-prone cotton top tamarins (CTTs), Saguinus oedipus, a New World primate, differs from colitis- and carcinoma-resistant primate species. In this study they determined the usefulness of cytochemical features in inflamed epithelium as indicators for malignant change. They compared the lectin staining pattern in inflamed mucosa and adjacent mucosa with colonic carcinoma from 8 CTTs with that of 9 clinically healthy CTTs with no histologic evidence of colitis. Deparaffinized sections were labeled with ten biotinylated lectins and stained by the avidin-biotin peroxidase complex method. Numerous significant differences were demonstrated in the lectin staining pattern between normal epithelium and colonic carcinoma; fewer between normal and chronic inflamed epithelium. However, between chronic inflamed epithelium and colonic carcinoma significant staining differences were observed with only two lectins, peanut agglutinin (PNA) and Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I). These findings suggest that there is a progression in alteration of lectin staining pattern from normal epithelium, via chronic colitis, to colonic carcinoma. Furthermore, the differences between chronic colitis and colonic carcinoma are expressed only with those lectins that are associated with malignant transformation of human colonic epithelium. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:3132858

  16. Differences in cellular glycoconjugates of quiescent, inflamed, and neoplastic colonic epithelium in colitis and cancer-prone tamarins.

    PubMed

    Moore, R; King, N; Alroy, J

    1988-06-01

    In the preceding paper the authors demonstrated that the lectin staining patterns of normal colonic epithelium obtained from colitis and carcinoma-prone cotton top tamarins (CTTs), Saguinus oedipus, a New World primate, differs from colitis- and carcinoma-resistant primate species. In this study they determined the usefulness of cytochemical features in inflamed epithelium as indicators for malignant change. They compared the lectin staining pattern in inflamed mucosa and adjacent mucosa with colonic carcinoma from 8 CTTs with that of 9 clinically healthy CTTs with no histologic evidence of colitis. Deparaffinized sections were labeled with ten biotinylated lectins and stained by the avidin-biotin peroxidase complex method. Numerous significant differences were demonstrated in the lectin staining pattern between normal epithelium and colonic carcinoma; fewer between normal and chronic inflamed epithelium. However, between chronic inflamed epithelium and colonic carcinoma significant staining differences were observed with only two lectins, peanut agglutinin (PNA) and Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I). These findings suggest that there is a progression in alteration of lectin staining pattern from normal epithelium, via chronic colitis, to colonic carcinoma. Furthermore, the differences between chronic colitis and colonic carcinoma are expressed only with those lectins that are associated with malignant transformation of human colonic epithelium. PMID:3132858

  17. Chronic arsenic exposure increases TGFalpha concentration in bladder urothelial cells of Mexican populations environmentally exposed to inorganic arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Valenzuela, Olga L.; Germolec, Dori R.; Borja-Aburto, Victor H.; Contreras-Ruiz, Jose; Garcia-Vargas, Gonzalo G.; Razo, Luz M. del

    2007-08-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is a well-established carcinogen and human exposure has been associated with a variety of cancers including those of skin, lung, and bladder. High expression of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-{alpha}) has associated with local relapses in early stages of urinary bladder cancer. iAs exposures are at least in part determined by the rate of formation and composition of iAs metabolites (MAs{sup III}, MAs{sup V}, DMAs{sup III}, DMAs{sup V}). This study examines the relationship between TGF-{alpha} concentration in exfoliated bladder urothelial cells (BUC) separated from urine and urinary arsenic species in 72 resident women (18-51 years old) from areas exposed to different concentrations of iAs in drinking water (2-378 ppb) in central Mexico. Urinary arsenic species, including trivalent methylated metabolites were measured by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry method. The concentration of TGF-{alpha} in BUC was measured using an ELISA assay. Results show a statistically significant positive correlation between TGF-{alpha} concentration in BUC and each of the six arsenic species present in urine. The multivariate linear regression analyses show that the increment of TGF-{alpha} levels in BUC was importantly associated with the presence of arsenic species after adjusting by age, and presence of urinary infection. People from areas with high arsenic exposure had a significantly higher TGF-{alpha} concentration in BUC than people from areas of low arsenic exposure (128.8 vs. 64.4 pg/mg protein; p < 0.05). Notably, exfoliated cells isolated from individuals with skin lesions contained significantly greater amount of TGF-{alpha} than cells from individuals without skin lesions: 157.7 vs. 64.9 pg/mg protein (p = 0.003). These results suggest that TGF-{alpha} in exfoliated BUC may serve as a susceptibility marker of adverse health effects on epithelial tissue in arsenic-endemic areas.

  18. Fournier's gangrene secondary to an acutely inflamed appendix herniating into the deep inguinal ring

    PubMed Central

    Sarmah, Piyush B.; Khan, Mashuk; Zilvetti, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Fournier's gangrene (FG) requires prompt recognition and management. We report the case of a 68-year-old man who presented with extensive pain and purple discolouration from the right iliac fossa to perineum. Computed tomography demonstrated gas within the right hemiscrotum extending into the inguinal canal and right buttock, with a right pelvic fluid and air collection. At debridement necrotic fluid was arising from the superficial inguinal ring so laparotomy was performed, revealing a grossly inflamed appendix herniating into the inguinal canal; a right hemicolectomy was performed. Unfortunately, the patient went into cardiac arrest and passed away on the operating table. Histological analysis demonstrated acute-on-chronic inflammation involving the appendix. The condition where appendicitis is implicated in FG is usually due to retroperitoneal rupture and tracking into the perineal spaces. This is the first case reported of an inflamed appendix herniating into the inguinal canal and thus causing FG. PMID:25829533

  19. Neurogenic bladder

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the cause. They often include symptoms of urinary incontinence . Symptoms of overactive bladder: Having to urinate too ... If you are having urinary incontinence, organizations are available for further information and support.

  20. Bladder exstrophy repair

    MedlinePlus

    Bladder birth defect repair; Everted bladder repair; Exposed bladder repair; Repair of bladder exstrophy ... in boys and is often linked to other birth defects. Surgery is necessary to: Allow the child to ...

  1. Overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Karen M.; Drake, Marcus J.

    2015-01-01

    Overactive bladder syndrome is highly prevalent, and increasingly so with aging. It is characterized by the presence of urinary urgency, and can be associated with incontinence, increased voiding frequency, and nocturia. Assessment needs to exclude serious medical disorders that might present with similar symptoms, and a bladder diary is an invaluable part of understanding the presentation. Initial management is conservative, comprising education, bladder training, and advice on fluid intake. Drug therapy options include antimuscarinic medications and beta-3 adrenergic receptor agonists. Persistent overactive bladder syndrome, despite initial therapy, requires a review of the patient’s understanding of conservative management and compliance, and adjustment of medications. For refractory cases, specialist review and urodynamic testing should be considered; this may identify detrusor overactivity or increased filling sensation, and needs to exclude additional factors, such as stress incontinence and voiding dysfunction. Botulinum neurotoxin-A bladder injections can be used in severe overactivity, provided the patient is able and willing to do intermittent self-catheterisation, which is necessary in about 5% of treated patients. Sacral nerve stimulation and tibial nerve stimulation are other approaches. Major reconstructive surgery, such as augmentation cystoplasty, is rarely undertaken in modern practice but remains a possibility in extreme cases. PMID:26918151

  2. Effective anaesthesia of the acutely inflamed pulp: part 1. The acutely inflamed pulp.

    PubMed

    Virdee, S S; Seymour, D; Bhakta, S

    2015-10-23

    Achieving profound pulpal anaesthesia in a mandibular molar diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis can be argued to be the most testing of dental anaesthetic challenges. This can be attributed to the technical complexities of conventional techniques and the presence of pulp pathosis. Reasons for why the latter influences the ability to attain pulpal anaesthesia is not yet fully understood, but its frequent occurrence is well documented. In light of overcoming this it has become common practice to prescribe antibiotics, refer onto secondary care or to even commence treatment without appropriately anaesthetising the tooth. Therefore, this two part series aims to help practitioners attain clinically acceptable pulpal anaesthesia in the most testing of scenarios; the acutely inflamed mandibular molar. They should then be able to apply these same principles to other teeth presenting with similar symptoms. This section outlines the clinical presentation and pathophysiology associated with an acutely inflamed pulp, defines what it is to attain pulpal anaesthesia and critically analyses theories as to why these teeth are up to eight times more difficult to anaesthetise than their healthy counterparts. PMID:26494344

  3. MicroRNA expression in inflamed and noninflamed gingival tissues from Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yorimasa; Matsui, Sari; Kato, Ayako; Zhou, Liming; Nakayama, Yohei; Takai, Hideki

    2014-12-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by specific bacteria and viruses. Local, systemic, and environmental factors affect the rate of disease progression. Immune responses to bacterial products, and the subsequent production of inflammatory cytokines, are crucial in the destruction of periodontal tissue. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small RNAs that control various cell processes by negatively regulating protein-coding genes. In this study, we compared miRNA expression in inflamed and noninflamed gingival tissues from Japanese dental patients. Total RNAs were isolated from inflamed and noninflamed gingival tissues. miRNA expression profiles were examined by an miRNA microarray, and the data were analyzed by GeneSpring GX, Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, and the TargetScan databases. Observed miRNA expression levels in inflamed gingiva were confirmed by real-time PCR. The three most overexpressed (by >2.72-fold) miRNAs were hsa-miR-150, hsa-miR-223, and hsa-miR-200b, and the three most underexpressed (by <0.39-fold) miRNAs were hsa-miR-379, hsa-miR-199a-5p, and hsa-miR-214. In IPA analysis, hsa-miR-150, hsa-miR-223, and hsa-miR-200b were associated with inflammatory disease, organismal injury, abnormalities, urological disease, and cancer. The present findings suggest that miRNAs are associated with chronic periodontitis lesions in Japanese. PMID:25500922

  4. Bax is downregulated in inflamed colonic mucosa of ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Iimura, M; Nakamura, T; Shinozaki, S; Iizuka, B; Inoue, Y; Suzuki, S; Hayashi, N

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—One form of epithelial cell injury in inflamed colonic mucosa in ulcerative colitis (UC) is reported to involve apoptosis of these cells. Bcl-2 family proteins Bax and Bcl-2 are the major regulators of apoptosis. The aim of this study was to elucidate the involvement of the Bax/Bcl-2 system in induction of apoptosis of the inflamed colonic epithelium in UC.
METHODS—Colonic epithelium was isolated from colonic biopsy specimens. Expression of CD95, Bax, Bcl-xL, and Bcl-2 proteins was determined by western blotting. Bax gene expression was assessed by both reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) followed by Southern hybridisation and a real time PCR assay.
RESULTS—Equal levels of expression of CD95, Bcl-xL, and Bcl-2 proteins were noted in normal and UC colonic epithelia. Equal levels of expression of Bax protein and mRNA were noted in epithelia of normal colon and inactive UC. Levels of expression of Bax protein and mRNA were markedly reduced in inflamed UC colonic epithelium.
CONCLUSIONS—Our study showed for the first time downregulation of Bax in inflamed colonic epithelium of UC. The Bax/Bcl-2 system did not seem to be involved in induction of apoptosis of epithelial cells in the inflamed colonic mucosa of UC.


Keywords: ulcerative colitis; apoptosis; Bax; Bcl-2; Bcl-xL; CD95 PMID:10896914

  5. Bladder Retraining

    MedlinePlus

    ... IC in Other Languages Associated Conditions Allergies and Sensitivities Celiac Disease Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Chronic Prostatitis Constipation ... check out the information about IC and food sensitivities . There are also over-the-counter products and ...

  6. Photodynamic management of bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, A.; Stepp, H.; Beyer, W.; Pongratz, T.; Sroka, R.; Bader, M.; Kriegmair, M.; Zaak, D.; Waidelich, R.; Karl, A.; Hofstetter, A.; Stief, C.; Baumgartner, R.

    2009-06-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is among the most expensive oncological diseases. Any improvement in diagnosis or therapy carries a high potential for reducing costs. Fluorescence cystoscopy relies on a selective formation of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) or more general photoactive porphyrins (PAP) in malignant urothelium upon instillation of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) or its hexyl-derivative h-ALA. Fluorescence cystoscopy equipment has been developed with the aim to compensate for the undesired distortion caused by the tissue optical properties by displaying the red fluorescence simultaneously with the backscattered blue light. Many clinical studies proved a high sensitivity in detecting flat carcinoma in situ and small papillary malignant tumours. As a result, recurrence rates were significantly decreased in most studies. The limitation lies in a low specificity, caused by false positive findings at inflamed bladder wall. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is currently being investigated as a promising tool to overcome this limitation. H-ALA-PDT (8 or 16 mM h-ALA in 50 ml instillation for 1-2 h, white light source, catheter applicator) has recently been investigated in a phase I study. 17 patients were applied 100 J/cm2 (3 patients received incrementing doses of 25 - 50 - 100 J/cm2) during approx. 1 hour irradiation time in 3 sessions, 6 weeks apart. PDT was performed without any technical complications. Complete photobleaching of the PpIX-fluorescence, as intended, could be achieved in 43 of 45 PDT-sessions receiving 100 J/cm2. The most prominent side effects were postoperative urgency and bladder pain, all symptoms being more severe after 16 mM h-ALA. Preliminary evaluation shows complete response assessed at 3 months after the third PDT-session (i.e. 6 months after first treatment) in 9 of 12 patients. 2 of these patients were free of recurrence until final follow-up at 84 weeks.

  7. The fire within: microbes inflame tumors.

    PubMed

    Gagliani, Nicola; Hu, Bo; Huber, Samuel; Elinav, Eran; Flavell, Richard A

    2014-05-01

    The immune system and the microbiota mutually interact to maintain homeostasis in the intestine. However, components of the microbiota can alter this balance and promote chronic inflammation, promoting intestinal tumor development. We review recent advances in understanding the complex interactions between the microbiota and the innate and adaptive immune systems and discuss their potential to lead us in new directions for understanding cancer biology and treatment. PMID:24813605

  8. Conjugation to polyethylene glycol polymer promotes aptamer biodistribution to healthy and inflamed tissues.

    PubMed

    Boomer, Ryan M; Lewis, Scott D; Healy, Judith M; Kurz, Markus; Wilson, Charles; McCauley, Thomas G

    2005-01-01

    Here, we examine biodistribution of radiolabeled aptamers and assess the relative ability of different stabilized aptamer compositions (mixed 2'-F/2'-O-Me; fully 2'-O-Me modified) to access inflamed tissues in a murine inflammation model. Biodistribution of 3H-labeled aptamers, including pegylated and unpegylated compositions, was assessed 3 hours postadministration using quantitative whole body autoradiography (QWBA). Aptamer penetration of cells in kidney and liver was also examined at a qualitative level by microautoradiography. To evaluate aptamer distribution to diseased tissues, inflammation was induced locally in animal hind limbs by treatment with carrageenan just prior to aptamer dosing. Aptamer compositions examined exhibited significant variation in distribution levels among organs and tissues. Highest concentrations of radioactivity in whole body tissues for all animals were observed in the kidney and urinary bladder contents. Relatively little radioactivity was associated with brain, spinal cord, and adipose tissue. Overall, the total level of radioactivity in whole body tissues was significantly higher for a 20-kDa PEG conjugate than for other aptamers. Comparatively high levels of the 20-kDa conjugate were seen in well-perfused organs and tissues, including liver, lungs, spleen, bone marrow, and myocardium. A fully 2'-O-Me composition aptamer had the lowest level of radioactivity in whole body tissues but distributed to higher concentrations in the gastrointestinal tract contents relative to other aptamers. Interestingly, the 20-kDa PEG-conjugated aptamer showed significantly higher levels of distribution to inflamed paw tissues than did either unconjugated or fully 2'-O-Me-modified aptamers. PMID:16201906

  9. Plasticity of enteric nerve functions in the inflamed and post-inflamed gut

    PubMed Central

    Mawe, Gary M.; Strong, Derek S.; Sharkey, Keith A.

    2009-01-01

    Inflammation of the gut alters the properties of the intrinsic and extrinsic neurons that innervate it. While the mechanisms of neuroplasticity differ amongst the inflammatory models that have been used, amongst various regions of the gut, and between intrinsic versus extrinsic neurons, a number of consistent features have been observed. For example, intrinsic and extrinsic primary afferent neurons become hyperexcitable in response to inflammation, and interneuronal synaptic transmission is facilitated in the enteric circuitry. These changes contribute to alterations in gut function and sensation in the inflamed bowel as well as functional disorders, and these changes persist for weeks beyond the point at which detectable inflammation has subsided. Thus, gaining a more thorough understanding of the mechanisms responsible for inflammation-induced neuroplasticity, and strategies to reverse these changes are clinically relevant goals. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current knowledge regarding neurophysiological changes that occur during and following intestinal inflammation, and to identify and address gaps in our knowledge regarding the role of enteric neuroplasticity in inflammatory and functional gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:19368664

  10. Expression of the Somatostatin Receptor Subtype 4 in Intact and Inflamed Pulmonary Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Varecza, Zoltán; Elekes, Krisztián; László, Terézia; Perkecz, Anikó; Pintér, Erika; Sándor, Zoltán; Szolcsányi, János; Keszthelyi, Dániel; Szabó, Árpád; Sándor, Katalin; Molnár, Tamás F.; Szántó, Zalán; Pongrácz, Judit E.; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2009-01-01

    Somatostatin released from capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves of the lung during endotoxin-induced murine pneumonitis inhibits inflammation and hyperresponsiveness, presumably via somatostatin receptor subtype 4 (sst4). The goal of the present study was to identify sst4 receptors in mouse and human lungs and to reveal its inflammation-induced alterations with real-time quantitative PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. In non-inflamed mouse and human lungs, mRNA expression and immunolocalization of sst4 are very similar. They are present on bronchial epithelial, vascular endothelial, and smooth-muscle cells. The sst4 receptor protein in the mouse lung significantly increases 24 hr after intranasal endotoxin administration as well as in response to 3 months of whole-body cigarette smoke exposure, owing to the infiltrating sst4-positivite mononuclear cells and neutrophils. In the chronically inflamed human lung, the large number of activated macrophages markedly elevate sst4 mRNA levels, although there is no change in acute purulent pneumonia, in which granulocytes accumulate. Despite mouse granulocytes, human neutrophils do not show sst4 immunopositivity. We provide the first evidence for the expression, localization, and inflammation-induced alterations of sst4 receptors in murine and human lungs. Inasmuch as tissue distribution of this receptor is highly similar, extrapolation of murine experimental results to human conditions might be possible. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:1127–1137, 2009) PMID:19687471

  11. Enhanced visualization of oral cavity for early inflamed tissue detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiang-Chen; Chen, Yung-Tsan; Lin, Jui-Teng; Chiang, Chun-Ping; Cheng, Fang-Hsuan

    2010-05-24

    We describe a color image reconstruction method that enables both direct visualization and direct digital image acquisition from one oral tissue by using various light sources and color compensating filters. In this method, the image of the oral tissue with white light emitting diodes (LEDs) with blue color compensating filter has a larger color difference between the normal and inflamed tissues. The enhanced visualization comes from the white light color mixing between the red normal tissue and bluish white light from the LEDs. With our method, we evaluate the perceived tissue reflectance in each pixel of the image and color reproduction with different illuminated spectra. Our approach to enhancement of visually perceived color difference between normal and inflamed oral tissue involves optimization of illumination and observation conditions by allowing a significant optical contrast of illuminated spectrum to reach the observer's eyes. In comparison with a conventional daylight LED flashlight, a LED with blue filter as the illuminant for oral cavity detection enhances the color difference between normal and inflamed tissues by 32%. PMID:20589041

  12. MX-INDUCED URINARY BLADDER EPITHELIAL HYPERPLASIA IN EKER RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    MX-INDUCED URINARY BLADDER EPITHELIAL HYPERPLASIA IN EKER RATS

    Epidemiological studies have shown a positive association between chronic exposure to chlorinated drinking water and human cancer, particularly of the urinary bladder. MX (3- chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydrox...

  13. Bladder Preservation for Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Arafat; Choudhury, Ananya

    2016-01-01

    The standard treatment for muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) has been considered to be radical cystectomy (RC) with pelvic lymphadenectomy. However morbidity and impact on quality of life is significant. Radiotherapy has been used in MIBC patients who choose bladder preservation or who are unfit for RC with comparable outcomes. Evidence from some prospective and large retrospective series supports the use of radiotherapy as an attractive alternative option. In this paper we review the evidence and practice of bladder preservation strategies with radiotherapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer. PMID:27376137

  14. Bladder function - neurological control

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... with urine, sensory nerves send impulses to the brain indicating that the bladder is full. The sensory ... cord to relay this information. In turn, the brain sends impulses back to the bladder instructing the ...

  15. Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... future bladder cancer research through the Patient Survey Network. Read More... Don’t Miss the 2016 BCAN ... Click here for more details Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network 4915 St. Elmo Avenue, Suite 202 Bethesda, Maryland ...

  16. Gall bladder rupture associated with cholecystitis in a domestic ferret (Mustela putorius).

    PubMed

    Huynh, M; Guillaumot, P; Hernandez, J; Ragetly, G

    2014-09-01

    A six-year-old neutered female albino ferret was presented with an acute episode of lethargy and anorexia. Clinical examination revealed marked cranial abdominal pain. A severe neutrophilic leukocytosis was present. Abdominal ultrasound was consistent with a diffuse peritonitis and severe bile duct inflammation. Cytology of the abdominal effusion revealed bile peritonitis. An exploratory laparotomy was performed and the gall bladder appeared inflamed with multiple perforations. A cholecystectomy was performed. The ferret recovered without complication. Bacteriological culture of the bile and gall bladder yielded a pure growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Histopathological analysis of the gall bladder and liver was consistent with a marked cholecystitis and cholangiohepatitis. On the basis of sensitivity testing, the ferret was treated with marbofloxacin for one month. No complications or reoccurrence were seen up to 1 year after the diagnosis. To the author's knowledge, this is the first report of bile peritonitis secondary to gall bladder rupture in a ferret. PMID:25168742

  17. Bone single photon emission computed tomography with computed tomography disclosing chronic uterine perforation with intrauterine device migration into the anterior wall of the bladder: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Extraosseous uptake of 99mTc-hydroxymethylene diphosphonate is a common situation of variable clinical relevance. Case presentation A 52-year-old Caucasian woman presented to our department for breast cancer staging. A 99mTc-hydroxymethylene diphosphonate bone scan was performed and showed focal pelvic hyperfixation that disclosed intrauterine device migration into the anterior wall of the bladder on single photon emission computed tomography with computed tomography. Conclusion This observation confirms the major role of single photon emission computed tomography with computed tomography in achieving an exact diagnosis. PMID:23759143

  18. Evidence of hydrogen ion secretion from the human gall bladder in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Plevris, J N; Hayes, P C; Harrison, D J; Bouchier, I A

    1992-01-01

    Gall bladder bile is more acid that hepatic bile and this has been attributed to bicarbonate absorption by the gall bladder epithelium. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the acid base changes that occur across the human gall bladder mucosa. Fresh gall bladder tissue was obtained at cholecystectomy and placed in an Ussing Chamber and perfused with Ringer-Krebs glucose bicarbonate solution. The viability of the gall bladder was assessed by measuring the potential differences across the epithelium and by the morphology of the epithelial cells at the end of the experiments. Aliquots from the solutions were taken at two, 45 and 70 minutes and pCO2, hydrogen ion and bicarbonate concentrations were measured. In the mucosal side of the chamber a consistent and significant decrease was observed from two minutes to 70 minutes in bicarbonate concentration while pCO2 and hydrogen ion concentrations significantly increased. The degree of inflammation correlated well with the ability for acidification, the more inflamed the tissue the less its ability to acidify. When the gall bladder was exposed to amiloride or sodium free solution acidification was abolished in the mucosal side. When tissue metabolism was irreversibly inhibited by exposure to formaldehyde, hydrogen ion concentration and pCO2 were significantly decreased in the mucosal side of the chamber compared with the viable gall bladder. The human gall bladder is capable of secreting acid and this may be an important mechanism for preventing calcium precipitation and gall stone formation. PMID:1582602

  19. Analgesic effects evoked by a CCR2 antagonist or an anti-CCL2 antibody in inflamed mice.

    PubMed

    Llorián-Salvador, María; Pevida, Marta; González-Rodríguez, Sara; Lastra, Ana; Fernández-García, María-Teresa; Hidalgo, Agustín; Baamonde, Ana; Menéndez, Luis

    2016-06-01

    Chemokine CCL2, also known as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), is a molecule that in addition to its well-established role in chemotaxis can also act as nociceptor sensitizer. The upregulation of this chemokine in inflamed tissues could suggest its involvement in inflammatory hypernociception. Thus, we have measured CCL2 levels in mice with acute or chronic inflammation due to the intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of carrageenan or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), respectively, and we have studied whether inflammatory hyperalgesia or allodynia could be attenuated by blocking CCR2 receptors or neutralizing CCL2 with an anti-CCL2 antibody. A remarkable increase in CCL2 concentration was detected by ELISA in paw homogenates coming from carrageenan- or CFA-inflamed mice, being its expression mainly localized in macrophages, as shown by immunohistochemical assays. The s.c. (0.3-3 mg/kg) or i.pl. (0.3-3 μg) administration of the CCR2 antagonist, RS 504393, dose dependently inhibited thermal hyperalgesia measured in acutely or chronically inflamed mice, whereas s.c. administration of this drug did not reduce inflammatory mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, the inhibition of inflammatory hyperalgesia after the administration of an anti-CCL2 antibody (0.1-1 μg; i.pl.) suggests that CCL2 could be the endogenous chemokine responsible for CCR2-mediated hyperalgesic effects. Besides, the acute administration of the highest antihyperalgesic dose of RS 504393 assayed did not reduce paw tumefaction or modify the presence of inflammatory cells. These results indicate that the blockade of the CCL2/CCR2 system can counteract inflammatory hyperalgesia, being this antinociceptive effect unrelated to a decrease in the inflammatory reaction. PMID:26820818

  20. A case–control study on the association between bladder cancer and prior bladder calculus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bladder calculus is associated with chronic irritation and inflammation. As there is substantial documentation that inflammation can play a direct role in carcinogenesis, to date the relationship between stone formation and bladder cancer (BC) remains unclear. This study aimed to examine the association between BC and prior bladder calculus using a population-based dataset. Methods This case–control study included 2,086 cases who had received their first-time diagnosis of BC between 2001 and 2009 and 10,430 randomly selected controls without BC. Conditional logistic regressions were employed to explore the association between BC and having been previously diagnosed with bladder calculus. Results Of the sampled subjects, bladder calculus was found in 71 (3.4%) cases and 105 (1.1%) controls. Conditional logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds ratio (OR) of having been diagnosed with bladder calculus before the index date for cases was 3.42 (95% CI = 2.48-4.72) when compared with controls after adjusting for monthly income, geographic region, hypertension, diabetes, coronary heart disease, and renal disease, tobacco use disorder, obesity, alcohol abuse, and schistosomiasis, bladder outlet obstruction, and urinary tract infection. We further analyzed according to sex and found that among males, the OR of having been previously diagnosed with bladder calculus for cases was 3.45 (95% CI = 2.39-4.99) that of controls. Among females, the OR was 3.05 (95% CI = 1.53-6.08) that of controls. Conclusions These results add to the evidence surrounding the conflicting reports regarding the association between BC and prior bladder calculus and highlight a potential target population for bladder cancer screening. PMID:23497224

  1. Neoadjuvant Intravesical Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Bladder Carcinoma Who Are Undergoing Cystectomy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-22

    Bladder Adenocarcinoma; Bladder Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer; Stage II Bladder Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer

  2. Calcifying nanoparticles associated encrusted urinary bladder cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Jelic, Tomislav M; Roque, Rod; Yasar, Uzay; Tomchin, Shayna B; Serrato, Jose M; Deem, Samuel G; Tierney, James P; Chang, Ho-Huang

    2008-01-01

    Encrusted cystitis is a subtype of chronic cystitis characterized by multiple calcifications in the form of plaques located in the interstitium of the urinary bladder mucosa and frequently associated with mucosal ulcers. It is a very rare disease of controversial etiology. Our transmission electron microscopy of the calcified plaques of encrusted cystitis has revealed that the smallest formed particles (elementary units) of these calcifications are electron-dense shells surrounding an electron lucent core, diagnostic of calcifying nanoparticles (previously called nanobacteria). We pioneer the notion that calcifying nanoparticles are the causative agents of encrusted urinary bladder cystitis. PMID:18990947

  3. Calcifying nanoparticles associated encrusted urinary bladder cystitis.

    PubMed

    Jelic, Tomislav M; Roque, Rod; Yasar, Uzay; Tomchin, Shayna B; Serrato, Jose M; Deem, Samuel G; Tierney, James P; Chang, Ho-Huang

    2008-01-01

    Encrusted cystitis is a subtype of chronic cystitis characterized by multiple calcifications in the form of plaques located in the interstitium of the urinary bladder mucosa and frequently associated with mucosal ulcers. It is a very rare disease of controversial etiology. Our transmission electron microscopy of the calcified plaques of encrusted cystitis has revealed that the smallest formed particles (elementary units) of these calcifications are electron-dense shells surrounding an electron lucent core, diagnostic of calcifying nanoparticles (previously called nanobacteria). We pioneer the notion that calcifying nanoparticles are the causative agents of encrusted urinary bladder cystitis. PMID:18990947

  4. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer This page lists cancer ... in bladder cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer Atezolizumab Cisplatin Doxorubicin Hydrochloride ...

  5. Scientific Results from the FIRST Instrument Deployment to Cerro Toco, Chile and from the Flight of the INFLAME Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Cageao, Richard P.; Johnson, David G.

    2011-01-01

    Results from the FIRST and INFLAME infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometers are presented. These are comprehensive measurements of the far-IR spectrum (FIRST) and the net infrared fluxes within the atmosphere (INFLAME).

  6. Bladder exstrophy repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... this case, the newborn is sent home on antibiotics. The bladder, which is outside the abdomen, must be kept moist. It can take months for the bladder to grow to the right size. The infant will be followed closely by a medical team ...

  7. Daily Bladder Diary

    MedlinePlus

    ... page you would like to print out: View page 1 of the Bladder Diary View page 2 of the Bladder Diary This content is ... Information Center Phone: 1-800-860-8747 | TTY: 1-866-569-1162 | Email: healthinfo@niddk.nih.gov | Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern time, M-F

  8. Laparoscopy as a Diagnostic and Definitive Therapeutic Tool in Cases of Inflamed Simple Lymphatic Cysts of the Mesentery

    PubMed Central

    Abdelaal, Abdelrahman; Sulieman, Ibnouf; Aftab, Zia; Ahmed, Ayman; Al-Mudares, Saif; Al Tarakji, Mohannad; Almuzrakchi, Ahmad; Di Carlo, Isidoro

    2015-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are rare benign abdominal tumors. These cysts, especially those of lymphatic origin, very rarely become inflamed. The diagnosis of inflamed lymphatic cysts of the mesentery may be difficult. We herein report two cases of inflamed simple lymphatic cysts of the mesentery definitively diagnosed and excised by laparoscopy. PMID:26064760

  9. The inflammatory and normal transcriptome of mouse bladder detrusor and mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Saban, Marcia R; Hellmich, Helen L; Turner, Mary; Nguyen, Ngoc-Bich; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth; Dyer, David W; Hurst, Robert E; Centola, Michael; Saban, Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    Background An organ such as the bladder consists of complex, interacting set of tissues and cells. Inflammation has been implicated in every major disease of the bladder, including cancer, interstitial cystitis, and infection. However, scanty is the information about individual detrusor and urothelium transcriptomes in response to inflammation. Here, we used suppression subtractive hybridizations (SSH) to determine bladder tissue- and disease-specific genes and transcriptional regulatory elements (TRE)s. Unique TREs and genes were assembled into putative networks. Results It was found that the control bladder mucosa presented regulatory elements driving genes such as myosin light chain phosphatase and calponin 1 that influence the smooth muscle phenotype. In the control detrusor network the Pax-3 TRE was significantly over-represented. During development, the Pax-3 transcription factor (TF) maintains progenitor cells in an undifferentiated state whereas, during inflammation, Pax-3 was suppressed and genes involved in neuronal development (synapsin I) were up-regulated. Therefore, during inflammation, an increased maturation of neural progenitor cells in the muscle may underlie detrusor instability. NF-κB was specifically over-represented in the inflamed mucosa regulatory network. When the inflamed detrusor was compared to control, two major pathways were found, one encoding synapsin I, a neuron-specific phosphoprotein, and the other an important apoptotic protein, siva. In response to LPS-induced inflammation, the liver X receptor was over-represented in both mucosa and detrusor regulatory networks confirming a role for this nuclear receptor in LPS-induced gene expression. Conclusion A new approach for understanding bladder muscle-urothelium interaction was developed by assembling SSH, real time PCR, and TRE analysis results into regulatory networks. Interestingly, some of the TREs and their downstream transcripts originally involved in organogenesis and

  10. Overactive bladder: strategies to ensure treatment compliance and adherence

    PubMed Central

    Dhaliwal, Prabhpreet; Wagg, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Overactive bladder is a common, debilitating condition for many patients who may benefit from pharmacological management of their condition. However, adherence to medication in this condition is markedly worse than other chronic medical conditions. This review explores what is known about persistence and the factors which influence medication adherence for overactive bladder, those factors that might be modifiable to improve adherence, and the measures the health care provider can take to optimize adherence to therapy and thereby improve treatment outcomes. PMID:27350744

  11. Origins of Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Czerniak, Bogdan; Dinney, Colin; McConkey, David

    2016-05-23

    Bladder cancer, one of the most frequently occurring human cancers, develops via two tracks referred to as papillary and nonpapillary that correspond to clinically different forms of the disease. Most bladder cancers are chemically induced, with tobacco smoking being the leading risk factor. Recent advances in bladder cancer research have enhanced our understanding of the origin of this disease from urothelial progenitor cells via field effects along papillary/luminal and nonpapillary/basal pathways. Evident from the outset of the disease, the diversity of the luminal and basal pathways, together with cell lineage tracing studies, postulates the origin of molecularly distinct subtypes from different uroprogenitor cells. The molecular mechanisms initiating field effects involve a new class of genes referred to as forerunner (FR) genes that generally map around major tumor suppressors such as RB1. These genes are silenced, predominantly by hypermethylation and less frequently by mutations, and drive the expansion of intraurothelial preneoplastic cells. Different FR genes are involved in various molecular subtypes of bladder cancer and they sensitize the uroprogenitor cells to the development of luminal and basal bladder cancers in animal models. In human bladder cancer, luminal and basal forms have dissimilar clinical behavior and response to conventional and targeted chemotherapeutic manipulations. These new research developments hold the promise of expanding our armamentarium of diagnostic and treatment options for patients with bladder cancer and improving our ability to select patients most likely to respond to a specific therapy. PMID:26907529

  12. Botulinum Toxin A for Bladder Pain Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Bin; Tai, Huai-Ching; Chung, Shiu-Dong; Birder, Lori A.

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT-A), derived from Clostridium botulinum, has been used clinically for several diseases or syndrome including chronic migraine, spasticity, focal dystonia and other neuropathic pain. Chronic pelvic or bladder pain is the one of the core symptoms of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC). However, in the field of urology, chronic bladder or pelvic pain is often difficult to eradicate by oral medications or bladder instillation therapy. We are looking for new treatment modality to improve bladder pain or associated urinary symptoms such as frequency and urgency for patients with BPS/IC. Recent studies investigating the mechanism of the antinociceptive effects of BoNT A suggest that it can inhibit the release of peripheral neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators from sensory nerves. In this review, we will examine the evidence supporting the use of BoNTs in bladder pain from basic science models and review the clinical studies on therapeutic applications of BoNT for BPS/IC. PMID:27376330

  13. Bladder operated robotic joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    This invention is a robotic joint which is operated by inflatable bladders and which can be used in applications where it is desired to move or hold an object. A support block supports an elongated plate to which is pivotally attached a finger. A tension strip passes over a lever attached to the finger and is attached at its ends to the support block on opposite sides of the plate. Bladders positioned between the plate and the tension strip on opposite sides of the plate can be inflated by pumps to pivot the finger, with one of the bladders being inflated while the other is being deflated.

  14. Modulation of Leukocyte Behavior by an Inflamed Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Schor, Hagai; Vaday, Gayle G.

    2000-01-01

    Inflammation is a response of the immune system to foreign insult or physical damage. Various cellular and humoral components of the immune system are recruited from the vascular system and are translocated through endothelium, and into extracellular matrix (ECM) compartments of inflamed tissues. This translocation is orchestrated by various types of accessory signals, in the form of soluble or complexed molecules, which evoke remarkable transitions in leukocyte activities. Recruited inflammatory cells give rise to mechanisms of migration, including the secretion of enzymes and other pro-inflammatory mediators and the alteration of their adhesive contacts with the ECM. Hence, migrating cells secrete enzymes, chemokines, and cytokines which interact with the ECM, and thereby, provide the cells with intrinsic signals for coordinating their responses. Resultant products of enzymatic modifications to the ECM microenvironment, such as cytokine- and ECM-derived molecules, may be also part of a cell-signaling mechanism that provides leukocytes with information about the nature of their inflammatory activity; such a mechanism may give the immune system data that can be cognitively interpreted for consequential activities. This article reviews the findings that support this notion and describe the dynamic interactions between participants of the inflammatory processes. PMID:11097214

  15. CRK proteins selectively regulate T cell migration into inflamed tissues

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanping; Clarke, Fiona; Karimi, Mobin; Roy, Nathan H.; Williamson, Edward K.; Okumura, Mariko; Mochizuki, Kazuhiro; Chen, Emily J.H.; Park, Tae-Ju; Debes, Gudrun F.; Zhang, Yi; Curran, Tom; Kambayashi, Taku; Burkhardt, Janis K.

    2015-01-01

    Effector T cell migration into inflamed sites greatly exacerbates tissue destruction and disease severity in inflammatory diseases, including graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). T cell migration into such sites depends heavily on regulated adhesion and migration, but the signaling pathways that coordinate these functions downstream of chemokine receptors are largely unknown. Using conditional knockout mice, we found that T cells lacking the adaptor proteins CRK and CRK-like (CRKL) exhibit reduced integrin-dependent adhesion, chemotaxis, and diapedesis. Moreover, these two closely related proteins exhibited substantial functional redundancy, as ectopic expression of either protein rescued defects in T cells lacking both CRK and CRKL. We determined that CRK proteins coordinate with the RAP guanine nucleotide exchange factor C3G and the adhesion docking molecule CASL to activate the integrin regulatory GTPase RAP1. CRK proteins were required for effector T cell trafficking into sites of inflammation, but not for migration to lymphoid organs. In a murine bone marrow transplantation model, the differential migration of CRK/CRKL-deficient T cells resulted in efficient graft-versus-leukemia responses with minimal GVHD. Together, the results from our studies show that CRK family proteins selectively regulate T cell adhesion and migration at effector sites and suggest that these proteins have potential as therapeutic targets for preventing GVHD. PMID:25621495

  16. Modulation of adult-born neurons in the inflamed hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Belarbi, Karim; Rosi, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    Throughout life new neurons are continuously added to the hippocampal circuitry involved with spatial learning and memory. These new cells originate from neural precursors in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus, migrate into the granule cell layer, and integrate into neural networks encoding spatial and contextual information. This process can be influenced by several environmental and endogenous factors and is modified in different animal models of neurological disorders. Neuroinflammation, as defined by the presence of activated microglia, is a common key factor to the progression of neurological disorders. Analysis of the literature shows that microglial activation impacts not only the production, but also the migration and the recruitment of new neurons. The impact of microglia on adult-born neurons appears much more multifaceted than ever envisioned before, combining both supportive and detrimental effects that are dependent upon the activation phenotype and the factors being released. The development of strategies aimed to change microglia toward states that promote functional neurogenesis could therefore offer novel therapeutic opportunities against neurological disorders associated with cognitive deficits and neuroinflammation. The present review summarizes the current knowledge on how production, distribution, and recruitment of new neurons into behaviorally relevant neural networks are modified in the inflamed hippocampus. PMID:24046730

  17. Microcirculation and micromorphology of healthy and inflamed gingivae.

    PubMed

    Kerdvongbundit, Varunee; Vongsavan, Noppakun; Soo-Ampon, Surin; Hasegawa, Akira

    2003-09-01

    Inflammation changes the microcirculatory and micromorphological dynamics of human gingiva. Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and a replica technique for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to examine the facial soft tissues of six maxillary anterior teeth, before and after treatment, in 12 patients exhibiting clinically healthy tissues and in 12 others with moderate gingivitis. All patients received oral hygiene instructions and scaling. The gingiva in the gingivitis group became healthy within 3 months after treatment. LDF results were recorded at the free gingivae, interdental gingivae, attached gingivae, and alveolar mucosae of the six maxillary anterior teeth. The gingival blood flows in the gingivitis group before treatment were significantly different from those in the healthy gingiva group. Flows were restored to the same level as the healthy gingiva, with no significant difference, at P > 0.01, 3 months after treatment. However, there were significant differences among sites during the same period. In addition, blood flow was reduced to a normal level after the inflammation subsided. Initially, the gingival morphology of the inflamed sites exhibited irregular free gingival margins, in contrast to that of healthy gingivae, which were characterized by rounded margins closely adapted to the tooth. One month post-treatment, the gingivae exhibited a wrinkled appearance, but they had reverted to normal micromorphology by 3 months post-treatment. The replica impression technique can be used to record gingival micromorphology both before and after reduction of inflammation. PMID:14505185

  18. Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome.

    PubMed

    Panzera, Alis Kolter

    2007-02-01

    Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a chronic, painful bladder syndrome primarily found in women. Although the direct cause(s) of IC are unknown, several theories exist. Common symptoms include urinary urgency, frequency, and pain. Treatment options include behavioral therapies, use of pharmacologic agents, and surgery. Patients benefit from prompt diagnosis and initiation of treatments. Important clinical features of IC in women including the pathology, common symptoms, and recommended evaluation and management strategies are reviewed. PMID:17390922

  19. Mechanisms of tumor escape in the context of the T-cell-inflamed and the non-T-cell-inflamed tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Spranger, Stefani

    2016-08-01

    Checkpoint blockade therapy has been proven to be highly active across many cancer types but emerging evidence indicates that the therapeutic benefit is limited to a subset of patients in each cancer entity. The presence of CD8(+) T cells within the tumor microenvironment or the invasive margin of the tumor, as well as the up-regulation of PD-L1, have emerged to be the most predictive biomarkers for clinical benefit in response to checkpoint inhibition. Although the up-regulation of immune inhibitory mechanisms is one mechanism of immune escape, commonly used by T-cell-inflamed tumors, exclusion of an anti-tumor specific T-cell infiltrate displays another even more potent mechanism of immune escape. This review will contrast the mechanisms of immunogenic, T-cell-inflamed, and the novel concept of non-immunogenic, non-T-cell-inflamed, adaptive immune escape. PMID:26989092

  20. Gene expression profiling of inflammatory bladder disorders.

    PubMed

    Saban, Marcia R; Nguyen, Ngoc-Bich; Hurst, Robert E; Saban, Ricardo

    2003-03-01

    Inflammation underlies all major bladder pathologies including malignancy and represents a defense reaction to injury caused by physical damage, chemical substances, micro-organisms or other agents. During acute inflammation, activation of specific molecular pathways leads to an increased expression of selected genes whose products attack the insult, but ultimately should protect the tissue from the noxious stimulus. However, once the stimulus ceases, gene-expression should return to basal levels to avoid tissue damage, fibrosis, loss of function, and chronic inflammation. If this down-regulation does not occur, tissue fibrosis occurs as a serious complication of chronic inflammation. Although sensory nerve and most cells products are known to be key parts of the inflammatory puzzle, other key molecules are constantly being described that have a role in bladder inflammation. Therefore, as the database describing the repertoire of inflammatory mediators implicated in bladder inflammation increases, the central mechanisms by which injury can induce inflammation, cell damage, and repair often becomes less rather than more clear. To make sense of the vast knowledge of the genes involved in the inflammatory response may require analysis of the patterns of change and the elucidation of gene networks far more than definition of additional members of inflammatory cascades. This review discuss the appropriate use of microarray technology, which promises to solve both of these problems as well as identifying key molecules and mechanisms involved in the transition between acute and chronic inflammation. PMID:12647997

  1. Giant bladder diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Tortorelli, Antonio Pio; Rosa, Fausto; Papa, Valerio; Alfieri, Sergio; Doglietto, Giovanni Battista

    2011-03-01

    We present the case of a 73-year-old man affected by progressive and painful abdominal distension and paresthesia/hypoesthesia at the left leg. US and CT-scan revealed the presence in the left retroperitoneum of a large cystic mass without parietal thickening or enhancement after contrast injection. This mass disappeared after positioning a vesical Foley's catheter and a retrograde cystography confirmed the suspected diagnosis of a large bladder diverticulum due to a severe prostatic hypertrophy; the patient underwent an open diverticulectomy and endoscopic prostatic resection. Bladder diverticula can occasionally appear as complex pelvic masses not obviously connected to the bladder, eventually leading to diagnostic confusion; while small size diverticulum resolves with relief of bladder outlet obstruction, open or laparoscopic diverticulectomy is needed in large size diverticulum if symptomatic, even considering the possible tumor harboring. PMID:21229344

  2. Ultrasound: Bladder (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bladder area and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  3. Cystocele (Fallen Bladder)

    MedlinePlus

    ... interprets the images. A woman does not need anesthesia. A health care provider can also use a ... completely emptying her bladder. A woman receives local anesthesia. A health care provider may use a voiding ...

  4. Urinary Incontinence: Bladder Training

    MedlinePlus

    ... following ways: Lengthen the amount of time between bathroom trips. Increase the amount of urine your bladder ... Kegel exercises may also help control urges. Scheduled bathroom trips: Some people control their incontinence by going ...

  5. Daily Bladder Diary

    MedlinePlus

    ... bladder diary. If you have Adobe's® Acrobat® Reader Software , you might prefer looking at the Print PDF Version (80 KB) of the diary as the print quality will be much enhanced. Please select which page ...

  6. Diagnosis of urinary bladder diseases in dogs by using two-dimensional and three-dimensional ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Dinesh, Dehmiwal; Behl, S.M.; Singh, Prem; Tayal, Rishi; Pal, Madan; Chandolia, R.K.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this study was to obtain and compare two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) ultrasonographic images of the urinary bladder in different disease conditions. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducting on total 10clinical cases of the urinary bladder in dogs. The ultrasound (US) machine used for this study was 3D US machine (Nemio-XG: Toshiba, Japan) having a four-dimensional volumetric probe. Results: In the present study, the inflamed thickened wall was clearly visible with the distinction of different layers of the urinary bladder wall in some of the cases of cystitis using 2D ultrasonography. In 3D sonogram, the urinary bladder was visualized as a large anechoic structure with no distinction of different layers of the bladder wall. The cystoliths were clearly visible as hyperechoic structures with distal acoustic shadow in 2D sonogram and appeared as a bright echogenic area in 3D sonogram. In case of urinary bladder neoplasia in 2D ultrasonogram, the bladder lumen was found to be occluded with a large growth imaged as focal anechoic areas in the tissue of mixed echogenicity with small hyperechoic dots in this tissue parenchyma. In 3D ultrasonogram, a tissue of mixed echogenicity of pus was also observed. Conclusion: From the present study it was concluded that 2D and 3D ultrasonography is very helpful for diagnosis of different clinical conditions of the urinary bladder such as cystitis, cystoliths, and urinary bladder neoplasia. The cavity of urinary bladder was more clearly visualized in 3D ultrasonography, but the distinction of different layers of the bladder wall was visualized only in 2D ultrasonography. The distinct shadow of pus and cystoliths were visible in 2D ultrasonogram. The visualization of pus in 3D ultrasonography was done for the first time in present study. PMID:27047159

  7. Neuromodulation in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, Melissa T.

    2016-01-01

    While neuromodulation is a well-established treatment option for patients with non-neurogenic overactive bladder and urinary retention, its applicability to the neurogenic bladder population has only recently been examined more in depth. In this article we will discuss the outcomes, contraindications, and special considerations of sacral and percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:26904417

  8. Salmonella Transiently Reside in Luminal Neutrophils in the Inflamed Gut

    PubMed Central

    Loetscher, Yvonne; Wieser, Andreas; Lengefeld, Jette; Kaiser, Patrick; Schubert, Sören; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich; Stecher, Bärbel

    2012-01-01

    Background Enteric pathogens need to grow efficiently in the gut lumen in order to cause disease and ensure transmission. The interior of the gut forms a complex environment comprising the mucosal surface area and the inner gut lumen with epithelial cell debris and food particles. Recruitment of neutrophils to the intestinal lumen is a hallmark of non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica infections in humans. Here, we analyzed the interaction of gut luminal neutrophils with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Tm) in a mouse colitis model. Results Upon S. Tmwt infection, neutrophils transmigrate across the mucosa into the intestinal lumen. We detected a majority of pathogens associated with luminal neutrophils 20 hours after infection. Neutrophils are viable and actively engulf S. Tm, as demonstrated by live microscopy. Using S. Tm mutant strains defective in tissue invasion we show that pathogens are mostly taken up in the gut lumen at the epithelial barrier by luminal neutrophils. In these luminal neutrophils, S. Tm induces expression of genes typically required for its intracellular lifestyle such as siderophore production iroBCDE and the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 encoded type three secretion system (TTSS-2). This shows that S. Tm at least transiently survives and responds to engulfment by gut luminal neutrophils. Gentamicin protection experiments suggest that the life-span of luminal neutrophils is limited and that S. Tm is subsequently released into the gut lumen. This “fast cycling” through the intracellular compartment of gut luminal neutrophils would explain the high fraction of TTSS-2 and iroBCDE expressing intra- and extracellular bacteria in the lumen of the infected gut. Conclusion In conclusion, live neutrophils recruited during acute S. Tm colitis engulf pathogens in the gut lumen and may thus actively engage in shaping the environment of pathogens and commensals in the inflamed gut. PMID:22493718

  9. Traumatic injury of the bladder and urethra

    MedlinePlus

    Injury - bladder and urethra; Bruised bladder; Urethral injury; Bladder injury; Pelvic fracture; Urethral disruption ... Types of bladder injuries include: Blunt trauma (such as a blow to the body) Penetrating wounds (such as bullet or stab wounds) The ...

  10. Renal Function Outcomes and Risk Factors for Risk Factors for Stage 3B Chronic Kidney Disease after Urinary Diversion in Patients with Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hatakeyama, Shingo; Koie, Takuya; Narita, Takuma; Hosogoe, Shogo; Yamamoto, Hayato; Tobisawa, Yuki; Yoneyama, Tohru; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Ohyama, Chikara

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the effects of urinary diversion on renal function, we retrospectively investigated renal function over 5 years after urinary diversion using a propensity score matching strategy. Methods Between May 1996 and November 2013, 345 consecutive adult patients underwent radical cystectomy and urinary diversion in our hospital; one hundred and fifteen patients with more than a 5-year follow-up were enrolled. Propensity scores were calculated using logistic analysis, and the data used in the analyses included age, gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status (ECOG-PS), clinical tumor stage, presence of cardiovascular disease; hypertension; and type 2 diabetes and preoperative eGFR at the initial visit. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess the risk factors for stage 3B chronic kidney disease (CKD) after the different types of urinary diversion. Results Continent and incontinent diversion were performed in 68 and 47 patients, respectively. The mean preoperative eGFR was significantly lower in the incontinent than in the continent group (P < 0.001). In propensity score-matched patients (n = 34 each), no significant differences were observed in pre- and postoperative eGFR and 5-year eGFR decrease rates between the groups. In the incontinent group, the number of postoperative stage 3B CKD patients was significantly increased than the continent group. Using multivariate analysis, independent risk factors significantly associated with stage 3B CKD at 5 years after surgery were older age, eGFR before surgery, incontinent diversion (cutaneous ureterostomy), and postoperative hydronephrosis. Conclusions The types of urinary diversion had no significant impact on renal function decline, whereas older age, preexisting impaired renal function, postoperative hydronephrosis, and cutaneous ureterostomy were independent risk factors for stage 3B CKD at 5 years after radical cystectomy. PMID:26901860

  11. Real-time bladder volume monitoring by the application of a new implantable bladder volume sensor for a small animal model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Sup; Kim, Su Jin; Sohn, Dong Wan; Choi, Bumkyoo; Lee, Moon Kyu; Lee, Seung Joon; Kim, Sae Woong

    2011-04-01

    Although real-time monitoring of bladder volume together with intravesical pressure can provide more information for understanding the functional changes of the urinary bladder, it still entails difficulties in the accurate prediction of real-time bladder volume in urodynamic studies with small animal models. We studied a new implantable bladder volume monitoring device with eight rats. During cystometry, microelectrodes prepared by the microelectromechanical systems process were placed symmetrically on both lateral walls of the bladder, and the expanded bladder volume was calculated. Immunohistological study was done after 1 week and after 4 weeks to evaluate the biocompatibility of the microelectrode. From the point that infused saline volume into the bladder was higher than 0.6 mL, estimated bladder volume was statistically correlated with the volume of saline injected (p<0.01). Additionally, the microelectromechanical system microelectrodes used in this study showed reliable biocompatibility. Therefore, the device can be used to evaluate changes in bladder volume in studies with small animals, and it may help to provide more information about functional changes in the bladder in laboratory studies. Furthermore, owing to its biocompatibility, the device could be chronically implanted in conscious ambulating animals, thus allowing a novel longitudinal study to be performed for a specific purpose. PMID:21463835

  12. Chronic prostatitis: management strategies.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Adam B; Macejko, Amanda; Taylor, Aisha; Nadler, Robert B

    2009-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has redefined prostatitis into four distinct entities. Category I is acute bacterial prostatitis. It is an acute prostatic infection with a uropathogen, often with systemic symptoms of fever, chills and hypotension. The treatment hinges on antimicrobials and drainage of the bladder because the inflamed prostate may block urinary flow. Category II prostatitis is called chronic bacterial prostatitis. It is characterized by recurrent episodes of documented urinary tract infections with the same uropathogen and causes pelvic pain, urinary symptoms and ejaculatory pain. It is diagnosed by means of localization cultures that are 90% accurate in localizing the source of recurrent infections within the lower urinary tract. Asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis comprises NIH category IV. This entity is, by definition, asymptomatic and is often diagnosed incidentally during the evaluation of infertility or prostate cancer. The clinical significance of category IV prostatitis is unknown and it is often left untreated. Category III prostatitis is called chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). It is characterized by pelvic pain for more than 3 of the previous 6 months, urinary symptoms and painful ejaculation, without documented urinary tract infections from uropathogens. The syndrome can be devastating, affecting 10-15% of the male population, and results in nearly 2 million outpatient visits each year. The aetiology of CP/CPPS is poorly understood, but may be the result of an infectious or inflammatory initiator that results in neurological injury and eventually results in pelvic floor dysfunction in the form of increased pelvic muscle tone. The diagnosis relies on separating this entity from chronic bacterial prostatitis. If there is no history of documented urinary tract infections with a urinary tract pathogen, then cultures should be taken when patients are symptomatic. Prostatic localization cultures, called the

  13. Nerve Disease and Bladder Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Training & Career Development Grant programs for students, postdocs, and faculty Research at NIDDK Labs, faculty, and ... KB) Alternate Language URL Nerve Disease and Bladder Control Page Content On this page: What bladder control ...

  14. Arteriovenous malformations of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Grunberger, I; DeAsis, A; Torno, R; Godec, C J

    1989-01-01

    We report a rare case of a localized arteriovenous malformation of the bladder mimicking a bladder tumor and presenting with gross hematuria. The mass was successfully resected transurethrally. PMID:2908934

  15. General Information about Bladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Bladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Bladder Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  16. Superficial bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Hall, R R

    1994-04-01

    Bladder cancer is almost certainly a product of the industrial revolution and the cigarette smoking that has accompanied it. Exposure to a chemical bladder carcinogen such as beta naphthylamine, benzidine, or 4-diphenylaniline can be proved in only a small proportion of patients and only a handful obtain industrial diseases benefit after developing "Prescribed Industrial Disease C23." None the less, the continued use of known carcinogenic substances in British industry for many years after their identification, the wide range of industries with a known or suspected increased risk of bladder cancer, and our ignorance of the carcinogenic potential of many materials used in current manufacturing should be a cause for continuing concern. PMID:8173377

  17. Similarities between interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and vulvodynia: implications for patient management

    PubMed Central

    Moldwin, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) and vulvodynia are chronic pain syndromes that appear to be intertwined from the perspectives of embryology, pathology and epidemiology. These associations may account for similar responses to various therapies. PMID:26816866

  18. GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN MOUSE BLADDER TISSUE IN RESPONSE TO INORGANIC ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic human exposures to high arsenic concentrations are associated with lung, skin, and bladder cancer. Considerable controversy exists concerning arsenic mode of action and low dose extrapolation. This investigation was designed to identify dose-response changes in gene expre...

  19. Bladder afferent hyperexcitability in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Naoki; Oguchi, Tomohiko; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Funahashi, Yasuhito; Yoshikawa, Satoru; Sugino, Yoshio; Kawamorita, Naoki; Kashyap, Mahendra P; Chancellor, Michael B; Tyagi, Pradeep; Ogawa, Teruyuki

    2014-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is a disease with lower urinary tract symptoms, such as bladder pain and urinary frequency, which results in seriously impaired quality of life of patients. The extreme pain and urinary frequency are often difficult to treat. Although the etiology of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is still not known, there is increasing evidence showing that afferent hyperexcitability as a result of neurogenic bladder inflammation and urothelial dysfunction is important to the pathophysiological basis of symptom development. Further investigation of the pathophysiology will lead to the effective treatment of patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. PMID:24807488

  20. INFLAME: In-situ net flux within the atmosphere of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, M. G.; Johnson, D. G.

    2006-12-01

    The In-situ Net FLux within the AtMosphere of the Earth (INFLAME) instrument is designed to make direct measurements of the net radiative flux within the Earth's atmosphere. Deployed on an uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) the INFLAME instruments will record vertical profiles of net radiative flux separately for the visible and infrared streams of radiation within the atmosphere. Upon differentiation of these vertical profiles the divergence of the net flux is obtained, which combined with the atmospheric density yields the rate of radiative heating (Kelvin per day) within the atmosphere. INFLAME offers the advantage of using a Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) to directly measure the net flux, thereby avoiding potentially large errors in the derived heating rate associated with differencing separate measurements of the upwelling and downwelling fluxes of radiation. INFLAME is a new project in NASA's Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). We will describe the science motivating the measurements, the historical background to the measurements, and the INFLAME instrument now under development at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  1. Prostatic inflammation induces fibrosis in a mouse model of chronic bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Wong, Letitia; Hutson, Paul R; Bushman, Wade

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation of the prostate is strongly correlated with development of lower urinary tract symptoms and several studies have implicated prostatic fibrosis in the pathogenesis of bladder outlet obstruction. It has been postulated that inflammation induces prostatic fibrosis but this relationship has never been tested. Here, we characterized the fibrotic response to inflammation in a mouse model of chronic bacterial-induced prostatic inflammation. Transurethral instillation of the uropathogenic E. coli into C3H/HeOuJ male mice induced persistent prostatic inflammation followed by a significant increase in collagen deposition and hydroxyproline content. This fibrotic response to inflammation was accompanied with an increase in collagen synthesis determined by the incorporation of 3H-hydroxyproline and mRNA expression of several collagen remodeling-associated genes, including Col1a1, Col1a2, Col3a1, Mmp2, Mmp9, and Lox. Correlation analysis revealed a positive correlation of inflammation severity with collagen deposition and immunohistochemical staining revealed that CD45+VIM+ fibrocytes were abundant in inflamed prostates at the time point coinciding with increased collagen synthesis. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis demonstrated an increased percentage of these CD45+VIM+ fibrocytes among collagen type I expressing cells. These data show-for the first time-that chronic prostatic inflammation induces collagen deposition and implicates fibrocytes in the fibrotic process. PMID:24950301

  2. Postmenopausal overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bladder storage symptoms have a severe impact on many areas as regards the quality of life including health-related, social, psychological and working functions. Pharmacotherapy of lower urinary tract stores (LUTS) has been developed to optimize neural control of the lower urinary tract in pathologic states. The bladder can be overactive or underactive. Overactive bladder (OAB) is highly prevalent and is associated with considerable morbidity, especially in aging population. Therefore, an effective treatment of OAB must result in a meaningful reduction in urinary symptoms. Pharmacotherapy for the OAB must be individualized based on the degree of bother, medication side-effect profile, concomitant comorbidities and current medication regimen. Antimuscarinic agents will continue to represent the current gold standard for the first-line pharmacological management of OAB. Alternatively to antimuscarinic therapy, β3-adrenergic receptor agonists, due to their efficacy and favorable adverse event profile, are a novel and attractive option of pharmacological treatment of overactive bladder symptoms. A combination of selective antimuscarinic and β3-adrenergic receptor agonists, agents with the different mechanism of action, gives a new treatment option for the patient with OAB according to its harms profile. A number of putative novel therapeutic agents is under clinical evaluations that may ultimately provide alternative or combination treatment options for OAB in the nearest future. PMID:26327873

  3. Expression of epithelial adhesion proteins and integrins in chronic inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Haapasalmi, K.; Mäkelä, M.; Oksala, O.; Heino, J.; Yamada, K. M.; Uitto, V. J.; Larjava, H.

    1995-01-01

    Epithelial cell behavior in chronic inflammation is poorly characterized. During inflammation of tooth-supporting structures (periodontal disease), increased proliferation of epithelial cells into the inflamed connective tissue stroma is commonly seen. In some areas ulceration and degeneration take place. We studied alterations in the expression of adhesion molecules and integrins during chronic periodontal inflammation. In inflamed tissue, laminin-1 and type IV collagen were still present in the basement membrane and surrounding blood vessels, but they were also found extravascularly in inflamed connective tissue stroma. Type VII collagen and laminin-5 (also known as kalinin, epiligrin, or nicein) were poorly preserved in the basement membrane zone, but both were found in unusual streak-like distributions in the subepithelial connective tissue stroma in inflamed tissue. Both fibronectin and tenascin were substantially decreased in chronically inflamed connective tissue, showing only punctate staining at the basement membrane zone. Integrins of the beta 1 family showed two distinct staining patterns in epithelial cells during chronic inflammation; focal losses of beta 1 integrins (alpha 2 beta 1 and alpha 3 beta 1) were found in most areas, while in other areas the entire pocket epithelium was found to be strongly positive for beta 1 integrins. No members of the alpha v integrin family were found in any epithelia studied. Expression of the alpha 6 beta 4 integrin was high in basal cells of healthy tissue, but weak in epithelium associated with chronic inflammation. Chronic inflammation therefore involves alterations in both adhesion proteins and integrins expressed by epithelial cells. Basement membrane components found at abnormal sites in stroma in chronic inflammation might serve as new adhesive ligands for various cell types in inflamed stroma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:7541610

  4. Bladder leiomyoma presenting as dyspareunia

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Jun; Lai, Hai-ping; Lin, Shao-kun; Zhang, Qing-quan; Shao, Chu-xiao; Jin, Lie; Lei, Wen-hui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Leiomyoma of the bladder is a rare tumor arising from the submucosa. Most patients with bladder leiomyoma may present with urinary frequency or obstructive urinary symptoms. However, there are a few cases of bladder leiomyoma coexisting with uterine leiomyoma presenting as dyspareunia. We herein report an unusual case of coexisting bladder leiomyoma and uterine leiomyoma presenting as dyspareunia. Case presentation: A 44-year-old Asian female presented to urologist and complained that she had experienced dyspareunia over the preceding several months. A pelvic ultrasonography revealed a mass lesion located in the trigone of urinary bladder. The mass lesion was confirmed on contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT). The CT scan also revealed a lobulated and enlarged uterus consistent with uterine leiomyoma. Then, the biopsies were then taken with a transurethral resection (TUR) loop and these biopsies showed a benign proliferation of smooth muscle in a connective tissue stroma suggestive of bladder leiomyoma. An open local excision of bladder leiomyoma and hysteromyomectomy were performed successfully. Histological examination confirmed bladder leiomyoma coexisting with uterine leiomyoma. Conclusion: This case highlights a rare presentation of bladder leiomyoma, dyspareunia, as the chief symptom in a patient who had coexisting uterine leiomyoma. Bladder leiomyomas coexisting with uterine leiomyomas are rare and can present with a wide spectrum of complaints including without symptoms, irritative symptoms, obstructive symptoms, or even dyspareunia. PMID:27428187

  5. Inflaming the brain: CRPS a model disease to understand neuroimmune interactions in chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Linnman, C; Becerra, L; Borsook, D

    2013-06-01

    We review current concepts in CRPS from a neuroimaging perspective and point out topics and potential mechanisms that are suitable to be investigated in the next step towards understanding the pathophysiology of CRPS. We have outlined functional aspects of the syndrome, from initiating lesion via inflammatory mechanisms to CNS change and associated sickness behavior, with current evidence for up-regulation of immunological factors in CRPS, neuroimaging of systemic inflammation, and neuroimaging findings in CRPS. The initiation, maintenances and CNS targets implicated in CRPS and in the neuro-inflammatory reflex are discussed in terms of CRPS symptoms and recent preclinical studies. Potential avenues for investigating CRPS with PET and fMRI are described, along with roles of inflammation, treatment and behavior in CRPS. It is our hope that this outline will provoke discussion and promote further empirical studies on the interactions between central and peripheral inflammatory pathways manifest in CRPS. PMID:23188523

  6. Inflaming the Brain: CRPS a model disease to understand Neuroimmune interactions in Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Linnman, C; Becerra, L; Borsook, D

    2012-01-01

    We review current concepts in CRPS from a neuroimaging perspective and point out topics and potential mechanisms that are suitable to be investigated in the next step towards understanding the pathophysiology of CRPS. We have outlined functional aspects of the syndrome, from initiating lesion via inflammatory mechanisms to CNS change and associated sickness behavior, with current evidence for up-regulation of immunological factors in CRPS, neuroimaging of systemic inflammation, and neuroimaging findings in CRPS. The initiation, maintenances and CNS targets implicated in CRPS and in the neuro-inflammatory reflex are discussed in terms of CRPS symptoms and recent preclinical studies. Potential avenues for investigating CRPS with PET and fMRI are described, along with roles of inflammation, treatment and behavior in CRPS. It is our hope that this outline will provoke discussion and promote further empirical studies on the interactions between central and peripheral inflammatory pathways manifest in CRPS. PMID:23188523

  7. Potential therapeutic effect of intravesical botulinum toxin type A on bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Jhang, Jia-Fong; Jiang, Yuan-Hong; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2014-04-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is characterized by bladder pain associated with urgency, frequency, nocturia, dysuria and sterile urine. Recent studies have shown that these bladder dysfunctions could originate from chronic inflammation or urothelial insult and proceed to a cascade of tissue reactions, which finally ascends to the central nervous system. Pilot studies of intravesical injection of botulinum toxin type A for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis had been introduced since 2005 with a promising result. Recent evidence suggests that botulinum toxin type A could significantly improve symptoms such as daytime frequency, nocturia, pain, quality of life and bladder capacity in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis patients. Single injection of botulinum toxin could not achieve long-term successful therapeutic result, and repeat injections could provide a better long-term success rate. However, patients with ulcer type bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis might not gain a benefit from botulinum toxin type A injection. Laboratory evidence showed that botulinum toxin type A for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis injection could induce peripheral desensitization, reduces bladder chronic inflammation and decreases apoptotic signal molecules in the urothelium. The present article reviewed the recent advances of botulinum toxin type A on bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. PMID:24807497

  8. Female Bladder Outlet Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Daniel S; Nitti, Victor W

    2016-04-01

    The non-specific symptoms the patients express upon the presentation of female bladder outlet obstruction make it a challenge to diagnose. There are subtle differences between the obstructed patient and those whose bladders are underactive and/or fail to mount a detrusor contraction. These disparities can be extracted through a thorough history and examination. At times, the clinician may utilize nomograms, non-invasive uroflow, and urodynamics with the addition of fluoroscopy to establish the diagnosis of obstruction. Management of the obstruction depends on the nature of the condition, whether functional or anatomical. The increase in the number of sling procedures performed to treat stress urinary incontinence has resulted in a rise in the number of iatrogenic obstructions. The temporal relationship between surgery and obstruction is the key to identifying the problem. PMID:26902625

  9. Overactive bladder in males

    PubMed Central

    Dmochowski, Roger R.; Gomelsky, Alex

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms is considerable in both men and women and the impact on quality of life (QOL) is equally substantial. Ironically, despite nearly equal prevalence, OAB symptoms in men are infrequently treated, and often with medical therapies aimed at bladder outlet obstruction (BOO). In this review, we examine the pathophysiology of OAB and its evaluation in the context of benign prostatic hypertrophy and concomitant BOO. We then consider the efficacy and safety of individual therapeutic options for lower urinary tract symptoms in men, focusing on the mainstays of medical therapy: α-adrenergic blockers, 5-α reductase inhibitors, and antimuscarinic agents. Finally, we aim to comment on new therapeutic strategies and targets that may one day be available for the treatment of male OAB. PMID:21789068

  10. Endoscopic Management of Bladder Diverticula.

    PubMed

    Pham, Khanh N; Jeldres, Claudio; Hefty, Thomas; Corman, John M

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with benign prostatic hyperplasia and urinary retention had a very large diverticulum on the posterior wall of the bladder. The patient was managed with transurethral resection of the prostate and endoscopic fulguration of the bladder diverticulum mucosa using the Orandi technique. There was near-complete resolution of the bladder diverticulum following endoscopic management, obviating the need for bladder diverticulectomy. The patient now empties his bladder, with a postvoid residual < 50 mL and the absence of urinary tract infection after 6-month follow-up. We report the successful treatment of a large bladder diverticulum with endoscopic fulguration to near-complete resolution. This minimally invasive technique is a useful alternative in patients unfit for a more extensive surgical approach. PMID:27601971

  11. Endoscopic Management of Bladder Diverticula

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Khanh N.; Jeldres, Claudio; Hefty, Thomas; Corman, John M.

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with benign prostatic hyperplasia and urinary retention had a very large diverticulum on the posterior wall of the bladder. The patient was managed with transurethral resection of the prostate and endoscopic fulguration of the bladder diverticulum mucosa using the Orandi technique. There was near-complete resolution of the bladder diverticulum following endoscopic management, obviating the need for bladder diverticulectomy. The patient now empties his bladder, with a postvoid residual < 50 mL and the absence of urinary tract infection after 6-month follow-up. We report the successful treatment of a large bladder diverticulum with endoscopic fulguration to near-complete resolution. This minimally invasive technique is a useful alternative in patients unfit for a more extensive surgical approach. PMID:27601971

  12. Self assembled hyaluronic acid nanoparticles as a potential carrier for targeting the inflamed intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Vafaei, Seyed Yaser; Esmaeili, Motahareh; Amini, Mohsen; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Ostad, Seyed Naser; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2016-06-25

    To develop a nanoparticulate drug carrier for targeting of the inflamed intestinal mucosa, amphiphilic hyaluronic acid (HA) conjugates were synthesized, which could form self-assembled nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous solution and budesonide (BDS) was loaded into the HANPs. Their particle sizes were in the range of 177 to 293nm with negative surface charge. The model of inflammatory CACO-2 cells was utilized to investigate the therapeutic potential of budesonide loaded HA nanocarriers. The highest expression of CD44 receptors was found on inflamed Caco-2 cells, as determined by flow cytometry. FITC-labeled HANPs revealed greater uptake in inflamed CACO-2 cells compared to untreated CACO-2 and CD44-negative cell lines, NIH3T3. BDS loaded HANPs displayed almost no toxicity indicating HANPs are excellent biocompatible nano-carriers. BDS loaded HANPs demonstrated higher anti-inflammatory effect on IL-8 and TNF-α secretion in inflamed cell model compared to the same dose of free drug. These results revealed the promising potential of HA nanoparticles as a targeted drug delivery system for IBD treatment. PMID:27083829

  13. Matrix metalloproteinase levels and gelatinolytic activity in clinically healthy and inflamed human dental pulps.

    PubMed

    Gusman, Heloisa; Santana, Ronaldo B; Zehnder, Matthias

    2002-10-01

    The role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the breakdown of pulp tissue of teeth with severe caries has not yet been directly elucidated. This study was to determine the levels of selected MMPs and the overall gelatinolytic activity in clinically healthy and inflamed human dental pulps of 29 healthy subjects, aged 10-19 yr. Seventeen pulps were collected from subjects diagnosed with symptomatic pulpitis, and 18 control pulps were obtained from 12 subjects following premolar extraction for orthodontic reasons. The levels of MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9 were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Densitometric analysis of gelatin zymograms was used to assay gelatinolytic activity in pulp supernatants. The MMP-1 levels were below the detection limit for both groups. Levels of MMP-2 and MMP-3 were significantly lower in symptomatic vs. clinically healthy pulps. In contrast, levels of MMP-9 in inflamed pulps were significantly higher than those recorded in clinically normal pulps. The overall gelatinolytic activity was elevated in inflamed pulps compared with healthy counterparts. Further, the gelatinolytic activity was positively correlated with MMP-9 levels. The data obtained suggest a key role of MMP-9 in the breakdown of inflamed human dental pulp tissue. PMID:12664465

  14. Expression of corticotropin-releasing factor in inflamed tissue is required for intrinsic peripheral opioid analgesia.

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, M; Mousa, S A; Zhang, Q; Carter, L; Stein, C

    1996-01-01

    Immune cell-derived opioid peptides can activate opioid receptors on peripheral sensory nerves to inhibit inflammatory pain. The intrinsic mechanisms triggering this neuroimmune interaction are unknown. This study investigates the involvement of endogenous corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1). A specific stress paradigm, cold water swim (CWS), produces potent opioid receptor-specific antinociception in inflamed paws of rats. This effect is dose-dependently attenuated by intraplantar but not by intravenous alpha-helical CRF. IL-1 receptor antagonist is ineffective. Similarly, local injection of antiserum against CRF, but not to IL-1, dose-dependently reverses this effect. Intravenous anti-CRF is only inhibitory at 10(4)-fold higher concentrations and intravenous CRF does not produce analgesia. Pretreatment of inflamed paws with an 18-mer 3'-3'-end inverted CRF-antisense oligodeoxynucleotide abolishes CWS-induced antinociception. The same treatment significantly reduces the amount of CRF extracted from inflamed paws and the number of CRF-immunostained cells without affecting gross inflammatory signs. A mismatch oligodeoxynucleotide alters neither the CWS effect nor CRF immunoreactivity. These findings identify locally expressed CRF as the predominant agent to trigger opioid release within inflamed tissue. Endogenous IL-1, circulating CRF or antiinflammatory effects, are not involved. Thus, an intact immune system plays an essential role in pain control, which is important for the understanding of pain in immunosuppressed patients with cancer or AIDS. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8650225

  15. Tumor markers of bladder cancer: the schistosomal bladder tumors versus non-schistosomal bladder tumors

    PubMed Central

    Abdulamir, Ahmed S; Hafidh, Rand R; Kadhim, Haider S; Abubakar, Fatimah

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to comparatively elucidate the underlying molecular pathways and clinicopathological criteria in schistosomal bladder tumor (SBT) versus non-schistosomal bladder tumor (NSBT). Methods This study explored the role of p53, p16, bcl-2, ki-67, c-myc, Rb and EGFR, by using Immunohistochemistry assay, in 45 SBT and 39 NSBT patients in comparison with 16 schistosomal chronic cystitis (SC), 28 non-schistosomal chronic cystitis (NSC), and 20 normal control (CTL) subjects. The studied markers in SBT and NSBT were correlated with different clinicopathological criteria namely, tumor histopathology, grading, invasiveness, stage, and presentation of the disease. Results SBT was associated with high grade invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) while NSBT was associated with lower grade less invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). The expression of p53, bcl-2, c-myc, and EGFR was higher in SBT than in NSBT while Rb was higher in NSBT than in SBT. However, p16 and ki-67 were not different between SBT and NSBT. The profile of molecular markers in SC was similar to NSC except for EGFR which was higher in SC than in NSC. Both SC and NSC showed higher level of p53, bcl-2, ki-67, and EGFR than in CTL group while p16, Rb, and c-myc were not different. p53 was associated with high grade SCC in both SBT and NSBT. Bcl-2 was associated with high grade invasive tumors in SBT and NSBT. P16 was associated with low grade, late stage, and recurrent SBT and high grade, invasive, late stage, and recurrent NSBT. Rb was associated with SCC in SBT, invasive tumors in NSBT, and late stage and recurrent presentation in both SBT and NSBT. C-myc was associated with high grade, invasive, and late stage SBT and SCC, high grade, invasive, and late stage NSBT. EGFR was associated with invasive SCC in SBT and invasive, high grade, and late stage TCC in NSBT. ki-67 was associated with invasive SBT and high grade late stage NSBT. Conclusion SBT and NSBT showed distinct

  16. Pharmacogenomics in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dancik, Garrett M.; Theodorescu, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a common cancer worldwide. For patients presenting with muscle-invasive disease, the five year survival rate is approximately 50%. Cisplatinum-based combination chemotherapy is recommended in the neoadjuvant setting prior to cystectomy and is also the first line in the metastatic setting. However, the survival benefit of such therapy is modest. The identification of pharmacogenomic biomarkers would enable the rational and personalized treatment of patients by selecting those patients that would benefit most from such therapies sparing others the unnecessary toxicity. Conventional therapies would be recommended for an expected responder while a non-responder would be considered for alternative therapies selected on the basis of the individual’s molecular profile. Although few effective bladder cancer therapies have been introduced in the past 30 years, several targeted therapies against the molecular drivers of bladder cancer appear promising. This review summarizes pharmacogenomic biomarkers that require further investigation and/or prospective evaluation, publicly available tools for drug discovery and biomarker identification from in vitro data, and targeted agents that have been evaluated in preclinical models. PMID:24360659

  17. Contemporary Management of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bell, David; Fradet, Yves

    1991-01-01

    Bladder cancer is currently the fifth most common cancer in Western society, and its incidence appears to be increasing. Important advances have recently occurred in both diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to bladder neoplasms. Presentation is not unique, and physician awareness is important to identify patients who are at risk for bladder neoplasia and consequently require further investigation. A diagnostic approach and contemporary management are discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 4 PMID:21229043

  18. Urinary Bladder Adenocarcinoma Metastatic to the Abdominal Wall: Report of a Case with Cytohistologic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Baliga, Mithra

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of adenocarcinoma metastatic to the abdominal wall in a 71-year-old man with a history of primary bladder adenocarcinoma. CT-guided core biopsy was performed; imprints and histologic sections showed malignant glands lined by tumor cells with hyperchromatic nuclei and prominent nucleoli, infiltrating through skeletal muscle. Immunohistochemistry revealed positivity for CK7, membranous/cytoplasmic β-catenin, caudal-type homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2), and α-methylacyl coenzyme A racemase and negativity for CK20, p63, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and prostate-specific acid phosphatase (PSAP). These findings were interpreted as metastatic adenocarcinoma, consistent with bladder primary. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma is a rare malignancy arising within glandular metaplasia and is associated with cystitis cystica and cystitis glandularis. Predisposing factors include bladder exstrophy, schistosomiasis, and other causes of chronic bladder irritation. This tumor is divided into intestinal, clear cell, and signet ring cell subtypes. Treatment involves radical cystectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection, and prognosis is unfavorable. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma should be differentiated from urachal adenocarcinoma, which arises from urachal remnants near the bladder dome, and secondary adenocarcinoma, or vesical involvement by adenocarcinoma from a different primary. CK7, CK20, CDX2, thrombomodulin, and β-catenin can help distinguish primary bladder adenocarcinoma from colonic adenocarcinoma; PSA and PSAP can help distinguish primary bladder adenocarcinoma from prostate adenocarcinoma. PMID:27006847

  19. Urinary Bladder Adenocarcinoma Metastatic to the Abdominal Wall: Report of a Case with Cytohistologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Nath, Vikas; Baliga, Mithra

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of adenocarcinoma metastatic to the abdominal wall in a 71-year-old man with a history of primary bladder adenocarcinoma. CT-guided core biopsy was performed; imprints and histologic sections showed malignant glands lined by tumor cells with hyperchromatic nuclei and prominent nucleoli, infiltrating through skeletal muscle. Immunohistochemistry revealed positivity for CK7, membranous/cytoplasmic β-catenin, caudal-type homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2), and α-methylacyl coenzyme A racemase and negativity for CK20, p63, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and prostate-specific acid phosphatase (PSAP). These findings were interpreted as metastatic adenocarcinoma, consistent with bladder primary. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma is a rare malignancy arising within glandular metaplasia and is associated with cystitis cystica and cystitis glandularis. Predisposing factors include bladder exstrophy, schistosomiasis, and other causes of chronic bladder irritation. This tumor is divided into intestinal, clear cell, and signet ring cell subtypes. Treatment involves radical cystectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection, and prognosis is unfavorable. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma should be differentiated from urachal adenocarcinoma, which arises from urachal remnants near the bladder dome, and secondary adenocarcinoma, or vesical involvement by adenocarcinoma from a different primary. CK7, CK20, CDX2, thrombomodulin, and β-catenin can help distinguish primary bladder adenocarcinoma from colonic adenocarcinoma; PSA and PSAP can help distinguish primary bladder adenocarcinoma from prostate adenocarcinoma. PMID:27006847

  20. [Diet in bladder cancer ethiopathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Radosavljević, V; Ilić, M; Janković, S; Djokić, M

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show influence of different foods on bladder cancer appearance, as well as possible consequent ways of prevention. Consuption of food rich in animal fat and cholesterol, fried foods, especially several times used cookin oil for frying, processed meat with additives (nitrates, nitrites, azo-colourrs) can influence bladder cancer occurrence. Regularly, continous consumption of fermented milk products, which contains come types of milky--acids bacterias, is considered as protective factor in developing bladder cancer. Reports that fruit and vegetable are protective food items are pretty consistent. Data about mineral intake and bladder cancer are obscure. PMID:16812999

  1. Bladder Cancer and Genetic Mutations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Yangde

    2015-09-01

    The most common type of urinary bladder cancer is called as transitional cell carcinoma. The major risk factors for bladder cancer are environmental, tobacco smoking, exposure to toxic industrial chemicals and gases, bladder inflammation due to microbial and parasitic infections, as well as some adverse side-effects of medications. The genetic mutations in some chromosomal genes, such as FGFR3, RB1, HRAS, TP53, TSC1, and others, occur which form tumors in the urinary bladder. These genes play an important role in the regulation of cell division which prevents cells from dividing too quickly. The changes in the genes of human chromosome 9 are usually responsible for tumor in bladder cancer, but the genetic mutation of chromosome 22 can also result in bladder cancer. The identification of p53 gene mutation has been studied at NIH, Washington, DC, USA, in urine samples of bladder cancer patients. The invasive bladder cancers were determined for the presence of gene mutations on p53 suppressor gene. The 18 different bladder tumors were evaluated, and 11 (61 %) had genetic mutations of p53 gene. The bladder cancer studies have suggested that 70 % of bladder cancers involve a specific mutation in a particular gene, namely telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene. The TERT gene is involved in DNA protection, cellular aging processes, and cancer. The Urothelial carcinomas of the bladder have been described in Atlas of genetics and cytogenetics in oncology and hematology. HRAS is a proto-oncogene and has potential to cause cancer in several organs including the bladder. The TSC1 c. 1907 1908 del (E636fs) mutation in bladder cancer suggests that the location of the mutation is Exon 15 with frequency of TSC1 mutation of 11.7 %. The recent findings of BAP1 mutations have shown that it contributes to BRCA pathway alterations in bladder cancer. The discoveries of more gene mutations and new biomarkers and polymerase chain reaction bioassays for gene mutations in bladder

  2. Gene Expression Pattern of Cells From Inflamed and Normal Areas of Osteoarthritis Synovial Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Cécile; Dubuc, Jean-Emile; Montell, Eulàlia; Vergés, Josep; Munaut, Carine; Noël, Agnès; Henrotin, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the gene expression patterns of synovial cells from inflamed or normal/reactive areas of synovial membrane obtained from the same patient with osteoarthritis (OA). Methods At the time of total knee replacement, synovial tissues were obtained from 12 patients with knee OA. The inflammation status of the synovial membrane was characterized according to macroscopic criteria and classified as normal/reactive or inflamed. Biopsy samples were cultured separately for 7 days. Microarray gene expression profiling was performed on normal/reactive and inflamed areas. Western blot and immunohistochemistry were used to confirm the identified genes that were differentially expressed. Results We identified 896 genes that were differentially expressed between normal/reactive and inflamed areas. The key pathways were related to inflammation, cartilage metabolism, Wnt signaling, and angiogenesis. In the inflammation network, the genes TREM1 and S100A9 were strongly up-regulated. The genes MMP3, MMP9, CTSH (cathepsin H), and CTSS (cathepsin S) were significantly up-regulated in the cartilage catabolism pathway, while the most up-regulated anabolism enzyme gene was HAS1. In the Wnt signaling pathway, the genes for Wnt-5a and low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 5 were up-regulated, while the gene FZD2 and the gene for Dkk-3 were down-regulated. Finally, STC1, which codes for a protein involved in angiogenesis, was identified as the most up-regulated gene in inflamed compared with normal/reactive areas. Conclusion This study is the first to identify different expression patterns between 2 areas of the synovial membrane from the same patient. These differences concern several key pathways involved in OA pathogenesis. This analysis also provides information regarding new genes and proteins as potential targets of treatment. PMID:24757147

  3. Altered asymmetric dimethyl arginine metabolism in allergically inflamed mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Tanveer; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Ghosh, Balaram; Agrawal, Anurag

    2010-01-01

    Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), causes uncoupling of NOS leading to generation of reactive nitrogen species, such as peroxynitrite. The lung generates a significant amount of ADMA, potentially contributing to plasma ADMA levels that have been related to endothelial dysfunction. ADMA infusion causes increased collagen deposition in lungs, suggesting that it could influence the development of chronic lung diseases such as fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and asthma. To explore the link between endogenous ADMA and asthma, we determined the levels of ADMA, enzymes implicated in its metabolism, and peroxynitrite in murine models of allergic airway inflammation (AAI) resembling asthma. ADMA levels and nitrosative stress were found to be positively correlated in cytosol and mitochondria during AAI. This was associated with increased expression of protein-arginine methyltransferase-2, an ADMA-synthesizing enzyme, and reduced expression of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase-2, an ADMA-degrading enzyme, in bronchial epithelia. Increased nitrotyrosine similarly localized to the bronchial epithelium, as well as in infiltrated inflammatory cells. Administration of L-arginine, which was expected to compete with ADMA and reverse the uncoupling/inhibition of NOS, restored normal ADMA metabolism, along with the expected reduction of nitrosative stress in lung. Because dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase-2 function is known to be negatively related to oxidative stress, this may represent a feed-forward loop effect. We conclude that a delicate balance between ADMA-metabolizing enzymes is disturbed in bronchial epithelium during AAI, potentially causing increased nitrosative stress in a self-propagating cycle. This represents a potential therapeutic target in asthma. PMID:19648472

  4. Long-term complications following bladder augmentations in patients with spina bifida: bladder calculi, perforation of the augmented bladder and upper tract deterioration

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background We desire to review our experience with bladder augmentation in spina bifida patients followed in a transitional and adult urologic practice. This paper will specifically focus on three major complications: bladder calculi, the most frequent complication found following bladder augmentation, perforation of the augmentation, its most lethal complication and finally we will address loss of renal function as a direct result of our surgical reconstructive procedures. Methods We reviewed a prospective data base maintained on patients with spina bifida followed in our transitional and adult urology clinic from 1986 to date. Specific attention was given to patients who had developed bladder calculi, sustained a spontaneous perforation of the augmented bladder or had developed new onset of renal scarring or renal insufficiency (≥ stage 3 renal failure) during prolonged follow-up. Results The development of renal stones (P<0.05) and symptomatic urinary tract infections (P<0.0001) were found to be significantly reduced by the use of high volume (≥240 mL) daily bladder wash outs. Individuals who still developed bladder calculi recalcitrant to high volume wash outs were not benefited by the correction of underlying metabolic abnormalities or mucolytic agents. Spontaneous bladder perforations in the adult patient population with spina bifida were found to be directly correlated to substance abuse and noncompliance with intermittent catheterization, P<0.005. Deterioration of the upper tracts as defined by the new onset of renal scars occurred in 40% (32/80) of the patients managed by a ileocystoplasty and simultaneous bladder neck outlet procedure during a median follow-up interval 14 years (range, 8–45 years). Development of ≥ stage 3 chronic renal failure occurred within 38% (12/32) of the patients with scarring i.e., 15% (12/80) of the total patient population. Prior to the development of the renal scarring, 69% (22/32) of the patients had been noncompliant

  5. Immunological Basis in the Pathogenesis and Treatment of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, David B.; Siref, Larry E.; Feloney, Michael P.; Hauke, Ralph J.; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis and transition of normal urothelium into bladder carcinoma are multifactorial processes. Chronic inflammation causes initiation and progression of the underlying pathophysiology of invasive and metastatic cancer. A dichotomy is observed in the role of immune cells in bladder cancer. While the immune response defends the host by suppressing neoplastic growth, several immune cells, including neutrophils, macrophages, and T-lymphocytes, promote tumor development and progression. The levels of human neutrophil peptide-1, -2, and -3, produced by neutrophils, increase in bladder cancer and might promote tumor angiogenesis and growth. The effect of macrophages is primarily mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-α. Additionally, the underlying immunological mechanisms of two treatments, BCG and cytokine gene-modified tumor vaccines, and future directions are critically discussed. PMID:25391391

  6. Ba-Wei-Di-Huang-Wan through its active ingredient loganin counteracts substance P-enhanced NF-κB/ICAM-1 signaling in rats with bladder hyperactivity.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Hsin; Wu, Chung-Hsin; Cheng, Chen-Hung; Chien, Chiang-Ting

    2016-09-01

    Overt bladder afferent activation may exacerbate endogenous substance P (SP) release to induce intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1)-mediated inflammation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production leading to hyperactive bladder. Ba-Wei-Die-Huang-Wan (BWDHW), a traditional Chinese medicine, has been used to treat lower urinary tract symptoms in patients by undefined mechanisms. We explored the possible mechanisms and the active components of BWDHW on exogenous SP-induced bladder hyperactivity. BWDHW contained six major components: loganin, paeoniflorin, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, cinnamic acid, cinnamaldehyde, and paeonol by high-performance liquid chromatography. In urethane-anesthetized female Wistar rats, we evaluated transcystometrogram, pelvic afferent nerve activity by electrophysiologic recording techniques, ICAM-1 expression by Western blot and immunohistochemistry, ROS amount by an ultrasensitive chemiluminescence method and possible ROS sources from the different leukocytes by specific stains in SP-treated bladder. BWDHW and its major component loganin dose-dependently inhibited H2 O2 and HOCl activity in vitro. Intragastrical BWDHW (250 mg/kg) and loganin (5 mg/kg) twice daily for 2 weeks did not affect the baseline micturition parameters. Intra-arterial SP (20 µg/rat) through neurokinin-1 receptor activation increased voiding frequency (shortened intercontraction intervals), pelvic afferent nerve activity, bladder NF-κB/ICAM-1 expression, bladder ROS amount, neutrophils adhesion to venous endothelium, CD68 (monocyte/macrophage), and mast cell infiltration in the inflamed bladder. BWDHW and loganin pretreatment significantly depressed SP-enhanced pelvic afferent nerve activity, bladder NF-κB/ICAM-1 expression, leukocyte infiltration, and ROS amount, and subsequently improved bladder hyperactivity. In conclusion, our results suggest that BWDHW and its active component loganin improves bladder hyperactivity via inhibiting SP/neurokinin-1

  7. Impact of diabetes mellitus on bladder uroepithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hanna-Mitchell, Ann T; Ruiz, Giovanni W; Daneshgari, Firouz; Liu, Guiming; Apodaca, Gerard; Birder, Lori A

    2013-01-15

    Diabetic bladder dysfunction (DBD), a prevalent complication of diabetes mellitus (DM), is characterized by a broad spectrum of symptoms including urinary urgency, frequency, and incontinence. As DBD is commonly diagnosed late, it is important to understand the chronic impact of DM on bladder tissues. While changes in bladder smooth muscle and innervation have been reported in diabetic patients, the impact of DM on the specialized epithelial lining of the urinary bladder, the urothelium (UT), is largely unknown. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis and electron microscopy were used to evaluate UT gene expression and cell morphology 3, 9, and 20 wk following streptozotocin (STZ) induction of DM in female Sprague-Dawley rats compared with age-matched control tissue. Desquamation of superficial (umbrella) cells was noted at 9 wk DM, indicating a possible breach in barrier function. One causative factor may be metabolic burden due to chronic hyperglycemia, suggested by upregulation of the polyol pathway and glucose transport genes in DM UT. While superficial UT repopulation occurred by 20 wk DM, the phenotype was different, with significant upregulation of receptors associated with UT mechanosensation (transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1; TRPV1) and UT autocrine/paracrine signaling (acetylcholine receptors AChR-M2 and -M3, purinergic receptors P2X(2) and P2X(3)). Compromised barrier function and alterations in UT mechanosensitivity and cell signaling could contribute to bladder instability, hyperactivity, and altered bladder sensation by modulating activity of afferent nerve endings, which appose the urothelium. Our results show that DM impacts urothelial homeostasis and may contribute to the underlying mechanisms of DBD. PMID:23174855

  8. Impact of diabetes mellitus on bladder uroepithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Giovanni W.; Daneshgari, Firouz; Liu, Guiming; Apodaca, Gerard; Birder, Lori A.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic bladder dysfunction (DBD), a prevalent complication of diabetes mellitus (DM), is characterized by a broad spectrum of symptoms including urinary urgency, frequency, and incontinence. As DBD is commonly diagnosed late, it is important to understand the chronic impact of DM on bladder tissues. While changes in bladder smooth muscle and innervation have been reported in diabetic patients, the impact of DM on the specialized epithelial lining of the urinary bladder, the urothelium (UT), is largely unknown. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis and electron microscopy were used to evaluate UT gene expression and cell morphology 3, 9, and 20 wk following streptozotocin (STZ) induction of DM in female Sprague-Dawley rats compared with age-matched control tissue. Desquamation of superficial (umbrella) cells was noted at 9 wk DM, indicating a possible breach in barrier function. One causative factor may be metabolic burden due to chronic hyperglycemia, suggested by upregulation of the polyol pathway and glucose transport genes in DM UT. While superficial UT repopulation occurred by 20 wk DM, the phenotype was different, with significant upregulation of receptors associated with UT mechanosensation (transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1; TRPV1) and UT autocrine/paracrine signaling (acetylcholine receptors AChR-M2 and -M3, purinergic receptors P2X2 and P2X3). Compromised barrier function and alterations in UT mechanosensitivity and cell signaling could contribute to bladder instability, hyperactivity, and altered bladder sensation by modulating activity of afferent nerve endings, which appose the urothelium. Our results show that DM impacts urothelial homeostasis and may contribute to the underlying mechanisms of DBD. PMID:23174855

  9. Immunotherapy for bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fuge, Oliver; Vasdev, Nikhil; Allchorne, Paula; Green, James SA

    2015-01-01

    It is nearly 40 years since Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) was first used as an immunotherapy to treat superficial bladder cancer. Despite its limitations, to date it has not been surpassed by any other treatment. As a better understanding of its mechanism of action and the clinical response to it have evolved, some of the questions around optimal dosing and treatment protocols have been answered. However, its potential for toxicity and failure to produce the desired clinical effect in a significant cohort of patients presents an ongoing challenge to clinicians and researchers alike. This review summarizes the evidence behind the established mechanism of action of BCG in bladder cancer, highlighting the extensive array of immune molecules that have been implicated in its action. The clinical aspects of BCG are discussed, including its role in reducing recurrence and progression, the optimal treatment regime, toxicity and, in light of new evidence, whether or not there is a superior BCG strain. The problems of toxicity and non-responders to BCG have led to development of new techniques aimed at addressing these pitfalls. The progress made in the laboratory has led to the identification of novel targets for the development of new immunotherapies. This includes the potential augmentation of BCG with various immune factors through to techniques avoiding the use of BCG altogether; for example, using interferon-activated mononuclear cells, BCG cell wall, or BCG cell wall skeleton. The potential role of gene, virus, or photodynamic therapy as an alternative to BCG is also reviewed. Recent interest in the immune check point system has led to the development of monoclonal antibodies against proteins involved in this pathway. Early findings suggest benefit in metastatic disease, although the role in superficial bladder cancer remains unclear. PMID:26000263

  10. Immunotherapy for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Fuge, Oliver; Vasdev, Nikhil; Allchorne, Paula; Green, James Sa

    2015-01-01

    It is nearly 40 years since Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) was first used as an immunotherapy to treat superficial bladder cancer. Despite its limitations, to date it has not been surpassed by any other treatment. As a better understanding of its mechanism of action and the clinical response to it have evolved, some of the questions around optimal dosing and treatment protocols have been answered. However, its potential for toxicity and failure to produce the desired clinical effect in a significant cohort of patients presents an ongoing challenge to clinicians and researchers alike. This review summarizes the evidence behind the established mechanism of action of BCG in bladder cancer, highlighting the extensive array of immune molecules that have been implicated in its action. The clinical aspects of BCG are discussed, including its role in reducing recurrence and progression, the optimal treatment regime, toxicity and, in light of new evidence, whether or not there is a superior BCG strain. The problems of toxicity and non-responders to BCG have led to development of new techniques aimed at addressing these pitfalls. The progress made in the laboratory has led to the identification of novel targets for the development of new immunotherapies. This includes the potential augmentation of BCG with various immune factors through to techniques avoiding the use of BCG altogether; for example, using interferon-activated mononuclear cells, BCG cell wall, or BCG cell wall skeleton. The potential role of gene, virus, or photodynamic therapy as an alternative to BCG is also reviewed. Recent interest in the immune check point system has led to the development of monoclonal antibodies against proteins involved in this pathway. Early findings suggest benefit in metastatic disease, although the role in superficial bladder cancer remains unclear. PMID:26000263

  11. Antispasmodic effects of myrrh due to calcium antagonistic effects in inflamed rat small intestinal preparations.

    PubMed

    Vissiennon, Cica; Goos, Karl-Heinz; Goos, Ole; Nieber, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Myrrh is the oleo-gum resin of mainly Commiphora molmol and as a powdered substance, one compound in the traditional medicinal product Myrrhinil-Intest®, which has been used for the treatment of unspecific, inflammatory intestinal disorders. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antispasmodic effect of myrrh under healthy and inflamed conditions, and to evaluate a calcium-antagonistic effect as a possible mode of action. Therefore, an ethanolic myrrh extract was tested for its effects on muscle tone and acetylcholine-induced contractions in untreated and inflamed rat ileum/jejunum preparations. Inflammation was experimentally induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (10 mM, 30 min). Additionally, the effect of the calcium channel agonist Bay K8644 in the presence of varying myrrh extract concentrations was examined. Myrrh extract (0.99 mg/mL) suppressed the acetylcholine-induced contraction down to 25.8 % in untreated and 15.2 % in inflamed preparations. Myrrh extract (0.15; 0.25 and 0.35 mg/mL) induced a concentration-dependent rightward shift of the Bay K8644 concentration-response curve in untreated and inflamed preparations with a significant EC50 shift. Schild analysis resulted in a pA2 value of 0.93 for untreated preparations. Increasing myrrh extract concentrations induced a concentration-dependent decrease of the agonistic maximum effect in untreated and inflamed preparations down to 15.8 % and 25.8 %, respectively, for the highest concentration leading to a pD2 value of 0.58. Myrrh extract reduced intestinal muscle tone and acetylcholine-induced contraction of untreated and inflamed ileum/jejunum preparations based on dual calcium antagonism characterized by a right shift of the agonistic dose-response curve and a depression of the maximum effect. The resulting reduction of intestinal motility and spasmolytic effects provide a rationale for the symptom treatment of intestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome

  12. Tissue performance of bladder following stretched electrospun silk fibroin matrix and bladder acellular matrix implantation in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian-Wen; Xu, Yue-Min; Li, Zhao-Bo; Murphy, Sean V; Zhao, Weixin; Liu, Qiang-Qiang; Zhu, Wei-Dong; Fu, Qiang; Zhang, Yao-Peng; Song, Lu-Jie

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the tissue performance of bladder following stretched electrospun silk fibroin matrix (SESFM) implantation compared with bladder acellular matrix (BAM). We compared SESFM with BAM based on porosity and pore size. Scaffolds were separately transplanted into opposite walls of the bladder of 30 rabbits after stripping the bladder mucosa and smooth muscle (1.5 × 2.0 cm(2)). Gross anatomical observation, histological analysis and muscle contractility studies were performed at 2, 4, and 8 weeks post-op. SESFM has higher porosity and larger pore size compared with BAM (p < 0.05). At 2 weeks, the presence of vesical calculus was evident in 7/10 rabbits. Histological analysis showed that SESFM and BAM promoted similar degree of urothelium regeneration (p > 0.05). However, SESFM promoted a higher degree of smooth muscle and vessel regeneration compared to BAM (p < 0.05). In addition, muscle strips supported by SESFM displayed higher contractile responses to carbachol, KCl, and phenylephrine compared with BAM. At 8 weeks, both matrices elicited similar mild acute and chronic inflammatory reactions. Our results demonstrated that SESFM has greater ability to promote bladder tissue regeneration with structural and functional properties compared to BAM, and with similar biocompatibility. PMID:26148477

  13. Chemoprevention of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Ashish M; Lamm, Donald L

    2002-02-01

    The data presented herein, although highly supportive for a protective role of various nutrients against bladder cancer, are far from definitive. Many authorities question the validity of current recommendations for nutritional chemoprevention against bladder cancer. The reason for the wide variations reported in epidemiologic studies lies in the nature of observational studies. Dietary studies are limited in their conclusions because the protection afforded by the consumption of a particular nutrient may be multifactorial, with different components of the food exerting potential chemopreventive effects. Furthermore, measuring levels of nutrients in the food intake of populations is confounded by factors that might affect these levels and also the incidence of cancer. For example, vitamin A can come from animal or vegetarian sources. Because animal fat has been identified as a potential carcinogen in man, depending on the source of the vitamin, varying levels of protection might be deduced. In addition, chemoprevention studies using dietary supplements are expected to have mild effects, and large studies would be required to confirm statistical significance. Even with agents such as intravesical chemotherapy, only half the studies achieve statistical significance [29]. Prospective randomized trials with a large sample size, longer follow-up, and an extended duration of treatment are needed to clarify the association between micronutrients and cancer protection. With these caveats in mind, several recommendations can be made. Simple measures, such as drinking more fluids (especially water), can have a profound impact on the incidence of bladder cancer. Vitamins are being extensively studied in chemopreventive trials for different cancers. There is strong evidence for a chemoprotective effect of vitamin A in bladder cancer. The authors recommend 32,000 IU/day of vitamin A initially, with lower doses (24,000 IU) for persons less than 50 kg. Because liver toxicity is a

  14. Ureteral bladder augmentation.

    PubMed

    Churchill, B M; Aliabadi, H; Landau, E H; McLorie, G A; Steckler, R E; McKenna, P H; Khoury, A E

    1993-08-01

    Virtually all segments of the gastrointestinal tract have been used successfully in augmentation cystoplasty. The complications inherent in enterocystoplasty are well described. Megaureters subtending effete kidneys (poorly or nonfunctioning) provide a novel and excellent source of augmentation material with urothelium and muscular backing, free of the electrolyte and acid base disturbances, and mucus production that plague enterocystoplasty. Augmentation cystoplasty using detubularized, reconfigured, otherwise disposable megaureter, with or without ipsilateral total or partial nephrectomy, was performed in 16 patients (mean age 8.8 years, range 1 to 25) with inadequate and dysfunctional bladders. Postoperative followup varied between 8 and 38 months (mean 22). The overall renal function and radiographic appearance of the remaining upper tracts have remained stable or improved in all patients. Of the 16 patients 15 require intermittent catheterization and 1 voids spontaneously. Ten patients are continent day and night, 5 have improved continence (4 damp at night and 1 stress incontinence) and 1 has failed to gain continence despite good capacity and compliance. Complete postoperative urodynamic evaluations in 12 of 13 patients show good capacity, low pressure bladders with no instability. Complications occurred in 5 patients, including transient urine extravasation in 2, contralateral ureterovesical obstruction in 2 and Mitrofanoff stomal stenosis in 1. Augmentation ureterocystoplasty combines the benefits common to all enterocystoplasties without adding any of the untoward complications or risks associated with nonurothelial augmentations. PMID:8326632

  15. Increased Apoptosis of Inflamed Odontoblasts Is Associated with CD47 Loss.

    PubMed

    Wang, H S; Pei, F; Chen, Z; Zhang, L

    2016-06-01

    Survival of odontoblasts during infection and inflammation determines prognosis of the dental pulp. CD47 is a "self"-label surface marker on viable cells. The aim of the present study is to investigate the interaction between CD47, autophagy, and apoptosis in inflamed human dental pulp and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated mDPC6T cells. We identified activation of autophagy and apoptosis in the odontoblasts due to inflammation of the human dental pulp. Furthermore, downregulation of CD47 correlated with increased autophagy and apoptosis in dental pulp of the patients afflicted with either caries and/or pulpitis. We also detected colocalization of CD47 and LC3 in the inflamed odontoblasts. In addition, functional study indicated that loss of CD47 activates autophagy and increases apoptosis, indicating that CD47 plays a key role in the LPS-induced autophagy and apoptosis of odontoblasts. PMID:26912219

  16. Fructose-Asparagine Is a Primary Nutrient during Growth of Salmonella in the Inflamed Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Mohamed M.; Newsom, David L.; González, Juan F.; Sabag-Daigle, Anice; Stahl, Christopher; Steidley, Brandi; Dubena, Judith; Dyszel, Jessica L.; Smith, Jenee N.; Dieye, Yakhya; Arsenescu, Razvan; Boyaka, Prosper N.; Krakowka, Steven; Romeo, Tony; Behrman, Edward J.; White, Peter; Ahmer, Brian M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (Salmonella) is one of the most significant food-borne pathogens affecting both humans and agriculture. We have determined that Salmonella encodes an uptake and utilization pathway specific for a novel nutrient, fructose-asparagine (F-Asn), which is essential for Salmonella fitness in the inflamed intestine (modeled using germ-free, streptomycin-treated, ex-germ-free with human microbiota, and IL10−/− mice). The locus encoding F-Asn utilization, fra, provides an advantage only if Salmonella can initiate inflammation and use tetrathionate as a terminal electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration (the fra phenotype is lost in Salmonella SPI1− SPI2− or ttrA mutants, respectively). The severe fitness defect of a Salmonella fra mutant suggests that F-Asn is the primary nutrient utilized by Salmonella in the inflamed intestine and that this system provides a valuable target for novel therapies. PMID:24967579

  17. Effective anaesthesia of the acutely inflamed pulp: part 2. Clinical strategies.

    PubMed

    Virdee, S S; Bhakta, S; Seymour, D

    2015-11-13

    Achieving profound pulpal anaesthesia in a mandibular molar diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis can be argued to be the most testing of dental anaesthetic challenges. Following discussion on the possible reasons for this occurrence in part 1, part 2 outlines the various local anaesthetic techniques that practitioners can use to overcome the acutely inflamed mandibular molar. They should then be able to apply these same principles to help anaesthetise any other tooth presenting with an acutely inflamed pulp. Techniques are discussed in detail along with key variables that have been associated with having an impact on the anaesthetic efficacy. This is to bring to light factors that can aid anaesthetic success as well as dispel common misnomers. PMID:26564355

  18. A time-dependent degeneration manner of condyle in rat CFA-induced inflamed TMJ.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liqin; Guo, Huilin; Li, Cheng; Xu, Jie; Fang, Wei; Long, Xing

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation is a potential risk factor of osteoarthritis (OA) but the detailed degenerative changes in the inflamed TMJ remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated the changes of condylar cartilage and subchondral bone in rat inflamed TMJ induced by Freund's complete adjuvant (CFA). Articular cavity was injected with CFA and the TMJ samples were collected 1, 2, 3, and 4-week post-injection. Hematoxylin & Eosin (H&E) staining, toluidine blue (TB) staining, Safranin O (S.O) staining, Masson trichrome staining and micro-CT were used to assess TMJ degeneration during inflammation. Osteoclast and osteoblast activities were analyzed by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining and osteocalcin (OCN) immunohistochemistry staining respectively. The expression of receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in condylar cartilage and subchondral bone was also evaluated through immunohistochemistry and RANKL/OPG ratio was evaluated. Reduced cartilage thickness, decreased number of chondrocytes, and down-regulated proteoglycan expression were observed in the condylar cartilage in the inflamed TMJ. Enhanced osteoclast activity, and expanded bone marrow cavity were reached the peak in the 2-week after CFA-injection. Meanwhile the RANKL/OPG ratio in the cartilage and subchondral bone also increased in the 2-week CFA-injection. Immature, unmineralized new bones with irregular trabecular bone structure, atypical condylar shape, up-regulated OCN expression, and decreased bone mineral density (BMD) were found in the inflamed TMJ. The time-dependent degeneration manner of TMJ cartilage and subchondral bone was found in CFA-induced arthritis rat model. The degeneration in the TMJ with inflammation might be a risk factor and should be concerned. PMID:27158347

  19. The Next Hurdle in Cancer Immunotherapy: Overcoming the Non-T-Cell-Inflamed Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Gajewski, Thomas F

    2015-08-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that a major subset of patients with advanced solid tumors shows evidence for a T-cell-inflamed tumor microenvironment. This phenotype has positive prognostic value for several types of early stage cancer, suggesting that the attempt by the host to generate an anti-tumor immune response reflects a biologic process associated with improved patient outcomes. In metastatic disease, the presence of this phenotype appears to be associated with clinical response to several immunotherapies, including cancer vaccines, checkpoint blockade, and adoptive T-cell transfer. With the high rate of clinical response to several of these therapies, along with early data indicating that combination immunotherapies may be even more potent, it seems likely that effective immune-based therapies will become a reality for patients with a range of different cancers that physiologically support the T-cell-inflamed tumor microenvironment in a subset of individuals. Therefore, one of the next significant hurdles will be to develop new therapeutic interventions that will enable these immunotherapies to be effective in patients with the non-T-cell-inflamed phenotype. Rational development of such interventions will benefit from a detailed molecular understanding of the mechanisms that explain the presence or absence of the T-cell-inflamed tumor microenvironment, which in turn will benefit from focused interrogation of patient samples. This iterative "reverse-translational" research strategy has already identified new candidate therapeutic targets and approaches. It is envisioned that the end result of these investigations will be an expanded array of interventions that will broaden the fraction of patients benefitting from immunotherapies in the clinic. PMID:26320069

  20. Imidazolium Salts as Small-Molecule Urinary Bladder Exfoliants in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Wagers, Patrick O.; Tiemann, Kristin M.; Shelton, Kerri L.; Kofron, William G.; Panzner, Matthew J.; Wooley, Karen L.; Youngs, Wiley J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel family of small-molecule urinary bladder exfoliants that are expected to be of great value in preclinical studies of urologic conditions and have improved potential for translation compared with prior agents. There is broad urologic interest in the therapeutic potential of such exfoliating agents. The primary agent used in preclinical models, the cationic peptide protamine sulfate (PS), has limited translational potential due to concerns including systemic adverse reactions and bladder tissue injury. Intravesical application of a safe, systemically nontoxic exfoliant would have potential utility in the eradication of Escherichia coli and other uropathogens that reside in the bladder epithelium following cystitis, as well as in chronic bladder pain and bladder cancer. Here, we introduce a family of imidazolium salts with potent and focused exfoliating activity on the bladder epithelium. Synthesis and purification were straightforward and scalable, and the compounds exhibited prolonged stability in lyophilized form. Most members of the compound family were cytotoxic to cultured uroepithelial cells, with >10-fold differences in potency across the series. Upon topical (intravesical) administration of selected compounds to the murine bladder, complete epithelial exfoliation was achieved with physiologically relevant imidazolium concentrations and brief contact times. The exfoliative activity of these compounds was markedly improved in comparison to PS, as assessed by microscopy, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting for uroplakins. Bladder uroepithelium regenerated within days to yield a histologically normal appearance, and no toxicity was observed. Finally, the chemical scaffold offers an opportunity for inclusion of antimicrobials or conjugation with chemotherapeutic or other moieties. PMID:26124168

  1. Imidazolium salts as small-molecule urinary bladder exfoliants in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Wagers, Patrick O; Tiemann, Kristin M; Shelton, Kerri L; Kofron, William G; Panzner, Matthew J; Wooley, Karen L; Youngs, Wiley J; Hunstad, David A

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel family of small-molecule urinary bladder exfoliants that are expected to be of great value in preclinical studies of urologic conditions and have improved potential for translation compared with prior agents. There is broad urologic interest in the therapeutic potential of such exfoliating agents. The primary agent used in preclinical models, the cationic peptide protamine sulfate (PS), has limited translational potential due to concerns including systemic adverse reactions and bladder tissue injury. Intravesical application of a safe, systemically nontoxic exfoliant would have potential utility in the eradication of Escherichia coli and other uropathogens that reside in the bladder epithelium following cystitis, as well as in chronic bladder pain and bladder cancer. Here, we introduce a family of imidazolium salts with potent and focused exfoliating activity on the bladder epithelium. Synthesis and purification were straightforward and scalable, and the compounds exhibited prolonged stability in lyophilized form. Most members of the compound family were cytotoxic to cultured uroepithelial cells, with >10-fold differences in potency across the series. Upon topical (intravesical) administration of selected compounds to the murine bladder, complete epithelial exfoliation was achieved with physiologically relevant imidazolium concentrations and brief contact times. The exfoliative activity of these compounds was markedly improved in comparison to PS, as assessed by microscopy, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting for uroplakins. Bladder uroepithelium regenerated within days to yield a histologically normal appearance, and no toxicity was observed. Finally, the chemical scaffold offers an opportunity for inclusion of antimicrobials or conjugation with chemotherapeutic or other moieties. PMID:26124168

  2. Matrix metalloproteinases modulate ameboid-like migration of neutrophils through inflamed interstitial tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lerchenberger, Max; Uhl, Bernd; Stark, Konstantin; Zuchtriegel, Gabriele; Eckart, Annekathrin; Miller, Meike; Puhr-Westerheide, Daniel; Praetner, Marc; Rehberg, Markus; Khandoga, Alexander G.; Lauber, Kirsten; Massberg, Steffen; Krombach, Fritz

    2013-01-01

    In vitro studies suggest that leukocytes locomote in an ameboid fashion independently of pericellular proteolysis. Whether this motility pattern applies for leukocyte migration in inflamed tissue is still unknown. In vivo microscopy on the inflamed mouse cremaster muscle revealed that blockade of serine proteases or of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) significantly reduces intravascular accumulation and transmigration of neutrophils. Using a novel in vivo chemotaxis assay, perivenular microinjection of inflammatory mediators induced directional interstitial migration of neutrophils. Blockade of actin polymerization, but not of actomyosin contraction abolished neutrophil interstitial locomotion. Multiphoton laser scanning in vivo microscopy showed that the density of the interstitial collagen network increases in inflamed tissue, thereby providing physical guidance to infiltrating neutrophils. Although neutrophils locomote through the interstitium without pericellular collagen degradation, inhibition of MMPs, but not of serine proteases, diminished their polarization and interstitial locomotion. In this context, blockade of MMPs was found to modulate expression of adhesion/signaling molecules on neutrophils. Collectively, our data indicate that serine proteases are critical for neutrophil extravasation, whereas these enzymes are dispensable for neutrophil extravascular locomotion. By contrast, neutrophil interstitial migration strictly relies on actin polymerization and does not require the pericellular degradation of collagen fibers but is modulated by MMPs. PMID:23757732

  3. Expression of the duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines (DARC) by the inflamed synovial endothelium.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Angela M; Siddall, Hilary; Chamberlain, Giselle; Gardner, Lucy; Middleton, Jim

    2002-05-01

    The expression of chemokine binding sites on the endothelial cells of venules in inflamed synovia was examined and whether the Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines (DARC) was involved. In situ binding assays were performed to determine the expression of chemokine binding sites from rheumatoid (n = 10) and non-rheumatoid (n = 10) synovia. The expression of DARC protein and mRNA was examined by immunohistochemistry and northern blotting. The involvement of DARC in chemokine binding was studied by incubating sections with blocking antibodies to DARC (Fy3 and 6), to find out if these reduced 125I-IL-8 binding. Binding of radiolabelled chemokines IL-8, RANTES, MCP-1, but not MIP-1alpha, was found on venular endothelial cells in inflamed synovia from both rheumatoid and non-rheumatoid patients. Excess homologous unlabelled chemokine displaced binding and excess unlabelled RANTES could displace radiolabelled IL-8 binding. DARC protein expression was demonstrated on venular endothelial cells in all samples and DARC mRNA could be detected in extracts from synovia. There was downregulation of DARC protein and mRNA in rheumatoid samples. Binding of IL-8 to both rheumatoid and non-rheumatoid synovia was significantly reduced in the presence of anti-DARC Fy3 and Fy6 monoclonal antibodies. These findings show the expression of a multispecific chemokine binding site on the inflamed synovial endothelium, with evidence for involvement of DARC. This suggests a potential role for DARC in the inflammatory processes involved in synovitis. PMID:12081195

  4. Bladder Injury During Cesarean Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tarney, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean section is the most common surgery performed in the United States with over 30% of deliveries occurring via this route. This number is likely to increase given decreasing rates of vaginal birth after cesarean section (VBAC) and primary cesarean delivery on maternal request, which carries the inherent risk for intraoperative complications. Urologic injury is the most common injury at the time of either obstetric or gynecologic surgery, with the bladder being the most frequent organ damaged. Risk factors for bladder injury during cesarean section include previous cesarean delivery, adhesions, emergent cesarean delivery, and cesarean section performed at the time of the second stage of labor. Fortunately, most bladder injuries are recognized at the time of surgery, which is important, as quick recognition and repair are associated with a significant reduction in patient mortality. Although cesarean delivery is a cornerstone of obstetrics, there is a paucity of data in the literature either supporting or refuting specific techniques that are performed today. There is evidence to support double-layer closure of the hysterotomy, the routine use of adhesive barriers, and performing a Pfannenstiel skin incision versus a vertical midline subumbilical incision to decrease the risk for bladder injury during cesarean section. There is also no evidence that supports the creation of a bladder flap, although routinely performed during cesarean section, as a method to reduce the risk of bladder injury. Finally, more research is needed to determine if indwelling catheterization, exteriorization of the uterus, and methods to extend hysterotomy incision lead to bladder injury. PMID:24876830

  5. Host-Pathogen Checkpoints and Population Bottlenecks in Persistent and Intracellular Uropathogenic E. coli Bladder Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Thomas J.; Totsika, Makrina; Mansfield, Kylie J.; Moore, Kate H.; Schembri, Mark A.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2013-01-01

    Bladder infections affect millions of people yearly, and recurrent symptomatic infections (cystitis) are very common. The rapid increase in infections caused by multi-drug resistant uropathogens threatens to make recurrent cystitis an increasingly troubling public health concern. Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) cause the vast majority of bladder infections. Upon entry into the lower urinary tract, UPEC face obstacles to colonization that constitute population bottlenecks, reducing diversity and selecting for fit clones. A critical mucosal barrier to bladder infection is the epithelium (urothelium). UPEC bypass this barrier when they invade urothelial cells and form intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs), a process which requires type 1 pili. IBCs are transient in nature, occurring primarily during acute infection. Chronic bladder infection is common and can be either latent, in the form of the Quiescent Intracellular Reservoir (QIR), or active, in the form of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB/ABU) or chronic cystitis. In mice, the fate of bladder infection: QIR, ASB, or chronic cystitis, is determined within the first 24 hours of infection and constitutes a putative host-pathogen mucosal checkpoint that contributes to susceptibility to recurrent cystitis. Knowledge of these checkpoints and bottlenecks is critical for our understanding of bladder infection and efforts to devise novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:22404313

  6. Adenomyomatosis of the gall bladder: the NUH experience.

    PubMed

    Chan-Wilde, C; Chew, R; Foong, W C; Wee, A

    1990-05-01

    Adenomyomatosis (AD) is a degenerative disorder of the gall bladder wall which can be complicated by chronic inflammation and calculi. The true incidence of this disorder in South East Asians is not known. Nine Chinese patients with AD were discovered amongst 200 consecutive right upper quadrant ultrasound examinations. Four of them had cholecystectomy and were diagnosed as cholecystitis by the pathologist. Adenomyomatosis can be suspected on ultrasonography, but should be confirmed by oral cholecystography (OCG). There is great disparity in the ultrasound, OCG, surgical and histopathological diagnosis of this condition. This may be due to the fact that only complicated cases of AD come to surgery, where the presence of chronic cholecystitis or calculi detracts from recognising or overshadows the presence of AD. It is not known whether uncomplicated AD has any clinical significance and whether it, if given sufficient time, will lead to inflammation of the gall bladder. PMID:2203297

  7. A rare urinary bladder tumour

    PubMed Central

    Haddad-Lacle, Judella Edwina Maria; Haddad, Charles Joseph; Villas, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes a 54-year-old man who presented to his primary care physician with low back pain. During his workup, an incidental finding of a bladder mass was diagnosed. He underwent transurethral resection of the bladder tumour and the resulting pathology was consistent with extra nodal marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma). Presentation of MALT lymphoma in the urinary bladder is rare. This malignancy is more commonly found in the stomach. The prognosis for this rare tumour is excellent. Our patient showed no sign of recurrence with transurethral excision and radiation alone. PMID:24835803

  8. Underactive Bladder in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yao-Chi; Plata, Mauricio; Lamb, Laura E; Chancellor, Michael B

    2015-11-01

    Overactive bladder is one of the most common bladder problems, but an estimated 20 million Americans have underactive bladder (UAB), which makes going to the bathroom difficult, increases the risk of urinary tract infections, and even leads to institutionalization. This article provides an overview of UAB in older adults, and discusses the prevalence, predisposing factors, cause, clinical investigations, and treatments. At present, there is no effective therapy for UAB. A great deal of work still needs to be done on understanding the pathogenesis and the development of effective therapies. PMID:26476113

  9. Increased bladder permeability in interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Wisniewski, Amy B.; VanGordon, Samuel; Lin, HsuehKung; Kropp, Bradley P.; Towner, Rheal A.

    2015-01-01

    The definition of interstitial cystitis (IC) has evolved over the years from being a well-defined entity characterized by diagnostic lesion (Hunner’s ulcer) in the urothelium to a clinical diagnosis by exclusion [painful bladder syndrome (PBS)]. Although the etiology is unknown, a central theme has been an association with increased permeability of the bladder. This article reviews the evidence for increased permeability being important to the symptoms of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) and in treating the disorder. Recent work showing cross-communication among visceral organs is also reviewed to provide a basis for understanding IC/PBS as a systemic disorder of a complex, interconnected system consisting of the bladder, bowel and other organs, nerves, cytokine-responding cells and the nervous system. PMID:26751576

  10. Bladder neck contracture

    PubMed Central

    Simhan, Jay; Ramirez, Daniel; Morey, Allen F.

    2014-01-01

    Bladder neck contracture (BNC) is a well-described complication of the surgical treatment of benign and malignant prostate conditions. Nevertheless, etiologies of BNC development are highly dependent on the primary treatment modality undertaken with BNC also occurring after pelvic radiation. The treatment options for BNC can range from simple, office-based dilation procedures to more invasive, complex abdomino-perineal reconstructive surgery. Although numerous strategies have been described, a patient-specific approach is usually necessary in the management of these complex patients. In this review, we highlight various therapeutic maneuvers described for the management of BNC and further delineate a tailored approach utilized at our institution in these complicated patients. PMID:26816768

  11. Ct2 Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Soloway, Mark S

    2016-09-01

    The patient is an 80-year-old man who presented with gross hematuria. His past medical history indicates he was a cigarette smoker with 50 pack/years. He was successfully treated for carcinoma of the lung 7 years ago. He received chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. He has mild COPD but has a good performance status. His laboratory studies do not indicate any abnormalities in terms of renal function. He does not have any significant cardiac disease. He has a medium build. He had prostate cancer and underwent a successful radical prostatectomy 10 years ago. His PSA is undetectable. He has some urinary incontinence and wears two pads/day. He underwent the appropriate investigations for gross hematuria. A CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis was normal with the exception of a 4-cm posterior mass in the bladder. There was no hydronephrosis and no enlarged lymph nodes. He underwent a transurethral resection of a solitary bladder tumor performed by another urologist. The tumor was described as large and sessile. It was located on the posterior wall and was approximately 4 cm. The bimanual examination did not reveal a mass. The pathology report stated that the tumor was a high-grade urothelial carcinoma with invasion into the muscularis propria. There was no lymphovascular invasion. I performed a reTURBT, and at that procedure, I did not identify any obvious tumor but the prior resection site was evident. I resected the prior tumor site quite extensively both in depth and width. The pathology revealed only focal carcinoma in situ. There was ample muscle in the specimen and there was some fat as well. As stated, they were free of any cancer. The patient is receptive to any treatment approach. PMID:27457483

  12. Clinical study of bladder diseases using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagainova, Elena; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Strelzova, O.; Sumin, A.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Iksanov, Rashid R.

    2000-11-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), a new optical bioimaging technique was used to evaluate the state of mucosa in the urinary bladder. The state of mucosa of the bladder was evaluated in patients with prostatic adenoma (11 male patients) during the course of prostatectomy operation via a resection cytoscope. An OCT probe was inserted into the biopsy channel of a cystoscope. The sites to be imaged by OCT were determined visually and, after OCT study, underwent excisional biopsy and subsequent histological examination. Children (9 girls) were examined during diagnostic cystoscopy. Our analysis of diagnostic capabilities of OCT in urology relies on the comparison of OCT information on normal and morphologically altered tissues. OCT is able to provide objective data concerning the structure of mucosa of the bladder due to the difference in optical properties of different layers in tissue. The epithelium and the layers of connective tissue, both in norm and pathology, are clearly visualized in the tomograms. Our OCT study of healthy mucosa of the urinary bladder has demonstrated that the epithelium appears in the tomograms as an upper highly backscattering layer. An underlying optically less transparent layer, much greater in size than the previous one, corresponds to the connective tissue of the mucosa. Inside this layer, elongated poorly backscattering formations with clear contours are seen; they do not alter the longitudinal structure of the submucosal layer. These formations are blood vessels. Optical patterns characteristic of chronic inflammation are obtained. They correspond, as confirmed histologically, to liquid accumulation, cellular infiltration of mucosal layers, hypervascularization, and fibrosis. OCT information on proliferative processes, such as papillomatosis of the urinary bladder and squamous cell carcinoma, is analyzed. It is shown that OCT can reliably reveal edema of the mucous membrane of the bladder and identify the character of appearing

  13. [Delayed spontaneous rupture of the bladder following augmentation enterocystoplasty].

    PubMed

    Leibovitch, I; Ramon, J; Ben Chaim, J; Goldwasser, B

    1990-08-01

    Delayed spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder following augmentation enterocystoplasty is a serious life-threatening complication of uncertain etiology. Multiple factors are believed to contribute to the mechanism of bladder perforation. Ruptured augmented bladders share a common urodynamic pattern of high leak point pressure of the urethra, with sensory and mechanical tolerance of high filling pressure. This combination seems to be the main predisposing factor for spontaneous perforation. Other risk factors, including catheter trauma during intermittent self-catheterization, urinary retention due to mucus retention or noncompliance with the catheterization protocol, chronic infection, and decreased sensation of bladder filling, may play roles in the mechanism of rupture. Clinically, patients present with sepsis, abdominal pain and distension, ileus, fever, oliguria and peritoneal irritation. The diagnosis is made on low pressure cystography, although failure of cystography to demonstrate extravasation is not unusual. Aggressive surgical treatment consists of immediate exploration, primary repair of the perforation, drainage of the perivesical space, suprapubic cystostomy and broad-spectrum antibiotics. Longterm management includes a strict intermittent catheterization schedule, anticholinergic therapy and urodynamic evaluation. Failure to achieve a low pressure storage reservoir by conservative means entails an increased risk of recurrent perforation. In such cases further surgical intervention should be considered. We present a 21-year-old paraplegic man 5 months after augmentation enterocystoplasty who required operation because of spontaneous rupture of the augmented bladder. Spontaneous delayed rupture of the bladder should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen in patients after augmentation enterocystoplasty. Early surgical treatment and subsequent monitoring of the low pressure reservoir are recommended. PMID:2227670

  14. Augmentation cystoplasty in neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Çetinel, Bülent; Kocjancic, Ervin; Demirdağ, Çetin

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this review is to update the indications, contraindications, technique, complications, and the tissue engineering approaches of augmentation cystoplasty (AC) in patients with neurogenic bladder. PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for the keywords "augmentation cystoplasty," "neurogenic bladder," and "bladder augmentation." Additional relevant literature was determined by examining the reference lists of articles identified through the search. The update review of of the indications, contraindications, technique, outcome, complications, and tissue engineering approaches of AC in patients with neurogenic bladder is presented. Although some important progress has been made in tissue engineering AC, conventional AC still has an important role in the surgical treatment of refractory neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:27617312

  15. Augmentation cystoplasty in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Kocjancic, Ervin; Demirdağ, Çetin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to update the indications, contraindications, technique, complications, and the tissue engineering approaches of augmentation cystoplasty (AC) in patients with neurogenic bladder. PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for the keywords "augmentation cystoplasty," "neurogenic bladder," and "bladder augmentation." Additional relevant literature was determined by examining the reference lists of articles identified through the search. The update review of of the indications, contraindications, technique, outcome, complications, and tissue engineering approaches of AC in patients with neurogenic bladder is presented. Although some important progress has been made in tissue engineering AC, conventional AC still has an important role in the surgical treatment of refractory neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:27617312

  16. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bladder cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  17. [Melanosis of the urinary bladder].

    PubMed

    Wöllner, J; Janzen, J; Pannek, J

    2016-01-01

    Melanosis of the bladder is rare. Only 10 cases have been described in the literature. We present the case of an 80-year-old woman with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction due to spinal paralysis. During the diagnostic work-up which included cystoscopy, black spots in the bladder wall were observed. Histopathological evaluation revealed a benign suburothelial melanosis. Thus, with cystoscopic suspicion of a malignancy (melanoma), a biopsy is mandatory and regular cystoscopic follow-up is recommended. PMID:26358438

  18. Cloacal anomaly with bladder tumor

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Amlesh; Ram, Ishwar

    2013-01-01

    A rare case of squamous cell carcinoma of bladder occurring in a 36-year-old female with persistent cloacal anomaly who presented with frequency, urgency, dysuria, and recurrent urinary tract infection is reported. Contrast Enhanced Computed Tomography with three dimensional reconstruction showed presence of bladder tumor and persistent cloaca. She underwent pelvic exenteration and wet colostomy. Histopathologic findings revealed locally advanced moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:23956519

  19. Novel research approaches for interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome: thinking beyond the bladder

    PubMed Central

    Bavendam, Tamara; Kirkali, Ziya; Kusek, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Despite years of basic and clinical research focused on interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS), including clinical trials of candidate therapies, there remains an insufficient understanding of underlying cause(s), important clinical features and a lack of effective treatments for this syndrome. Progress has been limited and is likely due to many factors, including a primary focus on the bladder and lower urinary tract as origin of symptoms without adequately considering the potential influence of other local (pelvic) or systemic factors. Traditionally, there has been a lack of sufficiently diverse expertise and application of novel, integrated methods to study this syndrome. However, some important insights have been gained. For example, epidemiological studies have revealed that IC/BPS is commonly associated with other chronic pain conditions, including fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and chronic fatigue syndrome. These observations suggest that IC/BPS may involve systemic pathophysiology, including alterations of the central nervous system in some patients. Furthermore, there may be multiple causes and contributing factors that manifest in the symptoms of IC/BPS leading to multiple patient sub-groups or phenotypes. Innovative research is necessary to allow for a more complete description of the relationship between this syndrome and other disorders with overlapping symptoms. This report provides examples of such innovative research studies and their findings which have the potential to provide fresh insights into IC/BPS and disorders associated with chronic pain through characterization of broad physiologic systems, as well as assessment of the contribution of the bladder and lower urinary tract. They may also serve as models for future investigation of symptom-based urologic and non-urologic disorders that may remain incompletely characterized by previous, more traditional research approaches. Furthermore, it is anticipated a more holistic

  20. Novel research approaches for interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome: thinking beyond the bladder.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Chris; Bavendam, Tamara; Kirkali, Ziya; Kusek, John W

    2015-10-01

    Despite years of basic and clinical research focused on interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS), including clinical trials of candidate therapies, there remains an insufficient understanding of underlying cause(s), important clinical features and a lack of effective treatments for this syndrome. Progress has been limited and is likely due to many factors, including a primary focus on the bladder and lower urinary tract as origin of symptoms without adequately considering the potential influence of other local (pelvic) or systemic factors. Traditionally, there has been a lack of sufficiently diverse expertise and application of novel, integrated methods to study this syndrome. However, some important insights have been gained. For example, epidemiological studies have revealed that IC/BPS is commonly associated with other chronic pain conditions, including fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and chronic fatigue syndrome. These observations suggest that IC/BPS may involve systemic pathophysiology, including alterations of the central nervous system in some patients. Furthermore, there may be multiple causes and contributing factors that manifest in the symptoms of IC/BPS leading to multiple patient sub-groups or phenotypes. Innovative research is necessary to allow for a more complete description of the relationship between this syndrome and other disorders with overlapping symptoms. This report provides examples of such innovative research studies and their findings which have the potential to provide fresh insights into IC/BPS and disorders associated with chronic pain through characterization of broad physiologic systems, as well as assessment of the contribution of the bladder and lower urinary tract. They may also serve as models for future investigation of symptom-based urologic and non-urologic disorders that may remain incompletely characterized by previous, more traditional research approaches. Furthermore, it is anticipated a more holistic

  1. In GERD patients, mucosal repair associated genes are upregulated in non-inflamed oesophageal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    De Vries, D R; Ter Linde, J J M; Van Herwaarden, M A; Schwartz, M P; Shephard, P; Geng, M M; Smout, A J P M; Samsom, M

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies addressing the effects of acid reflux and PPI therapy on gene expression in oesophageal epithelium concentrated on inflamed tissue. We aimed to determine changes in gene expression in non-inflamed oesophageal epithelium of GERD patients. Therefore, we included 20 GERD patients with pathological total 24-hr acid exposure of 6–12% and SAP ≥ 95%. Ten patients discontinued PPI treatment (PPI-), 10 took pantoprazole 40 mg bid (PPI+). Ten age/sex-matched healthy controls were recruited. Biopsies were taken from non-inflamed mucosa 6 cm and 16 cm proximal to the squamocolumnar junction (SCJ). Gene expression profiling of biopsies from 6 cm was performed on Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 arrays (Affymetrix). Genes exhibiting a fold change >1.4 (t-test P-value < 1E– 4) were considered differentially expressed. Results were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR. In PPI- patients, 92 microarray probesets were deregulated. The majority of the corresponding genes were associated with cell–cell contacts, cytoskeletal reorganization and cellular motility, suggesting facilitation of a migratory phenotype. Genes encoding proteins with anti-apoptotic or anti-proliferative functions or stress-protective functions were also deregulated. No probesets were deregulated in PPI+ patients. QPCR analysis of 20 selected genes confirmed most of the deregulations in PPI- patients, and showed several deregulated genes in PPI+ patients as well. In the biopsies taken at 16 cm QPCR revealed no deregulations of the selected genes. We conclude that upon acid exposure, oesophageal epithelial cells activate a process globally known as epithelial restitution: up-regulation of anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidant and migration associated genes. Possibly this process helps maintaining barrier function. PMID:19413890

  2. Detection of Helicobacter pylori DNA in inflamed dental pulp specimens from Japanese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ogaya, Yuko; Nomura, Ryota; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Nakano, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity has been implicated as a source of Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood. Various PCR methods have been used to detect H. pylori DNA in oral specimens with various detection rates reported. Such disparity in detection rates complicates the estimation of the true infection rate of H. pylori in the oral cavity. In the present study, we constructed a novel PCR system for H. pylori detection and used it to analyse oral specimens. Firstly, the nucleotide alignments of genes commonly used for H. pylori detection were compared using the complete genome information for 48 strains registered in the GenBank database. Candidate primer sets with an estimated amplification size of approximately 300-400 bp were selected, and the specificity and sensitivity of the detection system using each primer set were evaluated. Five sets of primers targeting ureA were considered appropriate, of which a single primer set was chosen for inclusion in the PCR system. The sensitivity of the system was considered appropriate and its detection limit established as one to ten cells per reaction. The novel PCR system was used to examine H. pylori distribution in oral specimens (40 inflamed pulp tissues, 40 saliva samples) collected from Japanese children, adolescents and young adults. PCR analysis revealed that the detection rate of H. pylori in inflamed pulp was 15 %, whereas no positive reaction was found in any of the saliva specimens. Taken together, our novel PCR system was found to be reliable for detecting H. pylori. The results obtained showed that H. pylori was detected in inflamed pulp but not saliva specimens, indicating that an infected root canal may be a reservoir for H. pylori. PMID:25332373

  3. [Multiple bladder diverticula caused by occipital horn syndrome].

    PubMed

    Legros, L; Revencu, N; Nassogne, M-C; Wese, F-X; Feyaerts, A

    2015-11-01

    We report on the case of a child who presented with recurrent, multiple, and voluminous bladder diverticula. Bladder diverticula are defined as a herniation of the mucosa through the bladder muscle or the detrusor. Causes are numerous and diverticula can be classified into primary congenital diverticula (para-ureteral - or Hutch diverticula - and posterolateral diverticula); secondary diverticula (resulting from chronic mechanical obstruction or from neurological disease; and diverticula secondary to connective tissue or muscle fragility. The latter is seen in disease entities such as prune belly syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, cutis laxa syndrome, OHS (occipital horn syndrome), Menkes disease, and Williams-Beuren syndrome. In this patient, the cause of these diverticula was OHS, a genetic, recessive X-chromosome-linked syndrome, responsible for abnormal tissue caused by a disorder in copper metabolism. This case reminds us of the importance of pushing the diagnostic workup when presented with multiple and/or large bladder diverticula, and in particular to search for rare malformation syndromes after exclusion of an obstacle. PMID:26386812

  4. Transcriptomic dose-and-time-course indicators of early key events in a cytotoxicity-mediated mode of action for rodent urinary bladder tumorigenesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRANSCRIPTOMIC DOSE- AND TIME-COURSE INDICATORS OF EARLY KEY EVENTS IN A CYTOTOXICITY-MEDIATED MODE OF ACTION FOR RODENT URINARY BLADDER TUMORIGENESISDiuron is a substituted urea compound used globally as an herbicide. Urinary bladder tumors were induced in rats after chronic die...

  5. Overactive bladder in children.

    PubMed

    Franco, Israel

    2016-09-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a ubiquitous syndrome that is defined by urinary urgency with, or without urinary incontinence. OAB is observed in all parts of the world, with a prevalence of 5-12% in children (5-10 years of age) and a prevalence of 0.5% in older adolescents (16-18 years of age). Published data indicate that around a third of children with OAB are likely to become adults with similar complaints. Studies in children and in adults with OAB indicate that these individuals are more likely to also have anxiety, depression and attention deficit problems, and that appropriate treatment of these comorbidities can often improve the patient's OAB symptoms. Furthermore, data from twin studies and familial surveys seem to indicate a genetic component of OAB. Pharmacological treatments of OAB in children have improved in the past 5 years, moving beyond anticholinergic agents and including the off-label use of α-blockers, β3-agonists and intravesical botulinum toxin. Use of several different electrical stimulation techniques is also effective, both as first-line treatments, and for patients with treatment-refractory symptoms. Overall the outlook of children with OAB seems to be improving, with a greater understanding of the pathophysiology of this syndrome. Treatment modalities that target the source of the underlying problem, especially in children, are likely to provide the best patient outcomes. PMID:27530266

  6. Bladder Cancer in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Milowsky, Matthew; Droller, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Age is now widely accepted as the greatest single risk factor for developing bladder cancer, and bladder cancer is considered as primarily a disease of the elderly. Because of the close link between age and incidence of bladder cancer, it can be expected that this disease will become an enormous challenge with the growth of an aging population in the years ahead. Methods Using MEDLINE, a search of the literature between January 1966 and July 2007 was performed to describe normative physiologic changes associated with aging, elucidate genetic and epigenetic alterations that associate aging with bladder cancer and its phenotypes; and to characterize how aging influences efficacies, risks, side effects and potential complications of the treatments needed for the various stages of bladder cancer.. Results We discuss influence of aging on host physiology, genetic and epigenetic changes, environmental influences, and host factors in the development and treatment of bladder cancer. Treatments with intravesical Bacille Calmette Guerin, radical cystectomy, and perioperative chemotherapy are less well tolerated and have poorer response in elderly patients compared to their younger counterparts. Elderly patients face both clinical and broader institutional barriers to appropriate treatment and may receive less aggressive treatment and sub-therapeutic dosing. However, when appropriately selected, elderly patients tolerate and respond well to cancer treatments. Conclusions The decision to undergo treatment for cancer is a tradeoff between loss of function and/or independence and extension of life which is complicated by a host of concomitant issues such as co-morbid medical conditions, functional declines and “frailty”, family dynamics, and social and psychological issues. Chronological age should not preclude definitive surgical therapy. It is imperative that healthcare practitioners and researchers from disparate disciplines collectively focus efforts towards

  7. Age-Related Alterations in Regeneration of the Urinary Bladder after Subtotal Cystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Burmeister, David M.; AbouShwareb, Tamer; Bergman, Christopher R.; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Christ, George J.

    2014-01-01

    Prior work documented that surgical removal of approximately 70% of the bladder (subtotal cystectomy) in 12-week-old female rats induced complete functional regeneration of the bladder within 8 weeks. To determine whether animal age affects bladder regeneration, female F344 rats aged 12 weeks (young) and 12 months (old) underwent subtotal cystectomy, and then were evaluated from 1 to 26 weeks after subtotal cystectomy. At 26 weeks after subtotal cystectomy, bladder capacity in young animals was indistinguishable from that in age-matched controls, but bladder capacity in old animals was only approximately 56% of that in age-matched controls. There was no detectable difference in residual volume among treatment groups, but the diminished regeneration in old animals was associated with a corresponding increase in the ratio of residual volume to micturition volume. The majority of old animals exhibited evidence of chronic kidney damage after subtotal cystectomy. Maximal contraction of bladder strips to electrical field stimulation, as well as activation with carbachol, phenylephrine, and KCl, were lower in old than in young animals at 26 weeks after subtotal cystectomy. Immunostaining with proliferating cell nuclear antigen and Von Willebrand factor revealed delayed and/or diminished proliferative and angiogenic responses, respectively, in old animals. These results confirm prior work and suggest that multiple mechanisms may contribute to an age-related decline in the regenerative capacity of the bladder. PMID:24012523

  8. Are you experienced? Understanding bladder innate immunity in the context of recurrent urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Valerie P.; Hannan, Thomas J.; Schaeffer, Anthony J.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Recurrent urinary tract infection (rUTI) is a serious clinical problem, yet effective therapeutic options are limited, especially against multidrug-resistant uropathogens. In this review, we explore the development of a clinically relevant model of rUTI in previously infected mice and review recent developments in bladder innate immunity that may affect susceptibility to rUTI. Recent findings Chronic bladder inflammation during prolonged bacterial cystitis in mice causes bladder mucosal remodelling that sensitizes the host to rUTI. Although constitutive defenses help prevent bacterial colonization of the urinary bladder, once infection occurs, induced cytokine and myeloid cell responses predominate and the balance of immune cell defense and bladder immunopathology is critical for determining disease outcome, in both naïve and experienced mice. In particular, the maintenance of the epithelial barrier appears to be essential for preventing severe infection. Summary The innate immune response plays a key role in determining susceptibility to rUTI. Future studies should be directed towards understanding how the innate immune response changes as a result of bladder mucosal remodelling in previously infected mice, and validating these findings in human clinical specimens. New therapeutics targeting the immune response should selectively target the induced innate responses that cause bladder immunopathology, while leaving protective defenses intact. PMID:25517222

  9. Spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder (SRUB); A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Sawalmeh, Haitham; Al-Ozaibi, Labib; Hussein, Ahmed; Al-Badri, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Spontaneous urinary bladder rupture is a rare urological emergency. It is usually secondary to an underlying pathology and it is an uncommon complication of urosepsis. We report a case of spontaneous urinary bladder rupture as a complication of urosepsis in a 67 year old male patient, who was admitted as a case of left diabetic foot and urinary tract infection. Case presentation A 67 year old male patient with a long standing indwelling urinary catheter and chronic cystitis developed acute peritonitis. Intraoperative finding was ruptured urinary bladder. Discussion A few cases of spontaneous urinary bladder rupture due to infection were found in literature. The majority of the patients present with diffuse abdominal pain, and tenderness due to chemical peritonitis. In the majority of cases the bladder perforation was diagnosed intra-operative. Conclusion A diagnosis of spontaneous perforation of the bladder should be considered in patients presenting with an acute abdomen. The general surgeon is more likely than the urologist to encounter such patients in the first instance. There should be a high index of suspicion in patients with an acute abdomen and have associated urinary bladder condition. PMID:26451645

  10. Mucosal Muscarinic Receptors Enhance Bladder Activity in Cats With Feline Interstitial Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Y.; Birder, L.; Buffington, C.; Roppolo, J.; Kanai, A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Interstitial cystitis is a chronic pelvic pain syndrome of which the origin and mechanisms involved remain unclear. In this study Ca2+ transients in the bladder wall of domestic cats diagnosed with naturally occurring feline interstitial cystitis were examined. Materials and Methods Cross-sections of full-thickness bladder strips from normal cats and cats with feline interstitial cystitis were examined by optically mapping Ca2+ transients and recording tension. Responses of Ca2+ activity and detrusor contractions to pharmacological interventions were compared. In addition, pharmacological responses were compared in mucosa denuded preparations. Results Optical mapping showed that feline interstitial cystitis bladders had significantly more spontaneous Ca2+ transients in the mucosal layer than control bladders. Optical mapping also demonstrated that feline interstitial cystitis bladders were hypersensitive to a low dose (50 nM) of the muscarinic receptor agonist arecaidine when the mucosal layer was intact. This hypersensitivity was markedly decreased in mucosa denuded bladder strips. Conclusions In feline interstitial cystitis cat bladders there is increased Ca2+ activity and sensitivity of muscarinic receptors in the mucosal layer, which can enhance smooth muscle spontaneous contractions. PMID:19157447

  11. A healthy bladder: a consensus statement

    PubMed Central

    Lukacz, E S; Sampselle, C; Gray, M; MacDiarmid, S; Rosenberg, M; Ellsworth, P; Palmer, M H

    2011-01-01

    A panel of experts in urology, urogynecology, nursing, and behavioral therapy convened in 2010 to discuss the importance of a healthy bladder on overall health. They determined that a consensus statement was necessary to raise awareness among the general public, healthcare providers, payors, and policymakers, with the goals of minimizing the impact of poor bladder health and stimulating primary prevention of bladder conditions. In this statement, ‘healthy’ bladder function is described, as well as internal and external factors that influence bladder health. It is suggested that primary prevention strategies should be aimed at providing education regarding normal lower urinary tract structures and functioning to the public, including patients and healthcare providers. This education may promote the achievement of optimal bladder health by increasing healthy bladder habits and behaviors, awareness of risk factors, healthcare seeking, and clinician engagement and reducing stigma and other barriers to treatment. Promoting optimal bladder health may reduce the personal, societal and economic impact of bladder conditions, including anxiety and depression and costs associated with conditions or diseases and their treatment. While adopting healthy bladder habits and behaviors and behaviors may improve or maintain bladder health, it is important to recognize that certain symptoms may indicate the presence of conditions that require medical attention; many bladder conditions are treatable with a range of options for most bladder conditions. Lastly, the authors propose clinical directives based on persuasive and convergent research to improve and maintain bladder health. The authors hope that this statement will lead to promotion and achievement of optimal bladder health, which may improve overall health and help minimize the effects of bladder conditions on the public, healthcare professionals, educators, employers, and payors. The advisors are in consensus regarding the

  12. Clinical experience with the use of 5-ALA for the detection of superficial bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepp, Herbert G.; Baumgartner, Reinhold; Knuechel, Ruth; Kriegmair, M.; Stepp, H. G.; Zaak, D.; Hofstetter, Alfons G.

    2000-06-01

    We report about the experience obtained in the fluorescence cystoscopic evaluation of 647 patients investigated since 1993. Of all histologically confirmed tumors, 32 percent would have been missed with conventional cystoscopy. Only 16 of 38 CIS were also detected under white light. In patients with entirely normal or unspecifically inflamed appearing mucosa, 44 otherwise invisible malignant lesions could be localized by fluorescence, 16 of them being present in patients with negative bladder washing cytology. The specificity of fluorescence cystoscopy is comparable to white light cystoscopy. A prospective multi-center study was conducted to show, whether a fluorescence controlled transurethral two weeks revealed residual tumor in 53 percent in the white light arm compared to 33 percent in the fluorescence arm. This difference was statistically significant. Of the 33 percent tumor in the fluorescence arm, most was gathered within the resection margins of the first resection, indicating an insufficiently deep resection rather than a failure in detecting the lesion.

  13. Brain-bladder control network: the unsolved 21st century urological mystery.

    PubMed

    Kitta, Takeya; Mitsui, Takahiko; Kanno, Yukiko; Chiba, Hiroki; Moriya, Kimihiko; Shinohara, Nobuo

    2015-04-01

    A review of functional brain imaging studies of bladder control in participants with normal control and pathological conditions. In the normal condition, bladder and urethral afferents received in the periaqueductal gray relay the information to the insula, the anterior cingulate cortex and the prefrontal cortex. During the storage phase, these superior regions control the pontine micturition center to inhibit voiding. In overactive bladder patients, brain responses are different. Cortical responses become exaggerated, especially in the anterior cingulate cortex and the supplementary motor area. That is what presumably evokes the "urgency". The supplementary motor area is activated during contraction of the pelvic floor muscles, and provides protection against incontinence. We believe that functional brain imaging studies are promising not only for the understanding of bladder dysfunction, but also as an aid to the development of therapeutic options for chronic disorders. PMID:25693685

  14. Intraperitoneally placed Foley catheter via verumontanum initially presenting as a bladder rupture.

    PubMed

    Raheem, Omer A; Jeong, Young Beom

    2011-09-01

    Since urethral Foley catheterization is usually easy and safe, serious complications related to this procedure have been rarely reported. Herein, we describe a case of intraperitoneally placed urethral catheter via verumontanum presenting as intraperitoneal bladder perforation in a chronically debilitated elderly patient. A 82-yr-old male patient was admitted with symptoms of hematuria, lower abdominal pain after traumatic Foley catheterization. The retrograde cystography showed findings of intraperitoneal bladder perforation, but emergency laparotomy with intraoperative urethrocystoscopy revealed a tunnel-like false passage extending from the verumontanum into the rectovesical pouch between the posterior wall of the bladder and the anterior wall of the rectum with no bladder injury. The patient was treated with simple closure of the perforated rectovesical pouch and a placement of suprapubic cystostomy tube. PMID:21935283

  15. Monocyte-mediated delivery of polymeric backpacks to inflamed tissues: a generalized strategy to deliver drugs to treat inflammation.

    PubMed

    Anselmo, Aaron C; Gilbert, Jonathan B; Kumar, Sunny; Gupta, Vivek; Cohen, Robert E; Rubner, Michael F; Mitragotri, Samir

    2015-02-10

    Targeted delivery of drugs and imaging agents to inflamed tissues, as in the cases of cancer, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and arthritis, represents one of the major challenges in drug delivery. Monocytes possess a unique ability to target and penetrate into sites of inflammation. Here, we describe a broad approach to take advantage of the natural ability of monocytes to target and deliver flat polymeric particles ("Cellular Backpacks") to inflamed tissues. Cellular backpacks attach strongly to the surface of monocytes but do not undergo phagocytosis due to backpack's size, disk-like shape and flexibility. Following attachment of backpacks, monocytes retain important cellular functions including transmigration through an endothelial monolayer and differentiation into macrophages. In two separate in vivo inflammation models, backpack-laden monocytes exhibit increased targeting to inflamed tissues. Cellular backpacks, and their abilities to attach to monocytes without impairing monocyte functions and 'hitchhike' to a variety of inflamed tissues, offer a new platform for both cell-mediated therapies and broad targeting of inflamed tissues. PMID:25481443

  16. Bladder cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lamm, D L; Thor, D E; Stogdill, V D; Radwin, H M

    1982-11-01

    A randomized controlled prospective evaluation of intravesical and percutaneous bacillus Calmette-Guerin immunotherapy was done in 57 patients with transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. In addition, 9 patients at high risk for tumor recurrence were treated with bacillus Calmette-Guerin produced a self-limited cystitis and 1 complication (hydronephrosis) of immunotherapy was observed. Of the 57 randomized patients 54 were followed for 3 to 30 months. Tumor recurrence was documented in 13 of 26 controls (50 per cent) and only 6 of 28 patients (21 per cent) treated with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (p equals 0.027, chi-square). The interval free of disease was prolonged significantly with bacillus Calmette-Guerin treatment (p equals 0.014, generalized Wilcoxon test). Importantly, a simple purified protein derivative skin test distinguished those patients who responded to bacillus Calmette-Guerin immunotherapy from those who did not. Only 1 of 17 treated patients (6 per cent) whose purified protein derivative test converted from negative to positive had tumor recurrence compared to 5 recurrences (38 per cent) among the 13 patients whose test remained negative or had been positive before treatment (p equals 0.022, chi-square). Bacillus Calmette-Guerin was given to 10 patients with stage B transitional cell carcinoma who were not candidates for cystectomy and 7 are free of disease. Of 5 patients with carcinoma in situ 3 remain free of tumor after bacillus Calmette-Guerin treatment and 5 of 6 who had multiple recurrences after intravesical chemotherapy responded favorably to bacillus Calmette-Guerin immunotherapy. PMID:6757467

  17. Treatment of non-inflamed obstructive meibomian gland dysfunction by an infrared warm compression device

    PubMed Central

    Goto, E; Monden, Y; Takano, Y; Mori, A; Shimmura, S; Shimazaki, J; Tsubota, K

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To test the short term efficacy and safety of an infrared warm compression device (IWCD, Eye Hot, Cept Co, Tokyo, Japan) as treatment for non-inflamed meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD). Methods: 37 subjects with non-inflamed obstructive MGD, with and without aqueous tear deficiency (ATD) dry eye, participated in a prospective non-comparative interventional case series. Symptom scores, face scores, tear evaporation rates, fluorescein and rose bengal vital staining, tear break up time (BUT), Schirmer test, meibomian gland obstruction, and meibography were compared before and after 2 weeks of therapy. Results: In a total of 37 cases, total subjective symptom scores and subjective face scores improved significantly, from 12.3 (SD 5.9) to 8.4 (6.1), and from 7.0 (1.7) to 5.3 (2.0) (both p <0.0001). The results for tear evaporation rates during forced blinking (p = 0.002), fluorescein staining (p = 0.03), rose bengal staining (p = 0.03), BUT (p <0.0001), and meibomian gland orifice obstruction score (p <0.0001) had also improved significantly at the end of the 2 week period of infrared thermotherapy. No complaints and/or complications of the IWCD were reported. Conclusion: The IWCD was effective and safe for the treatment of MGD. Improved tear stability associated with release of meibum is a possible mechanism of this treatment. PMID:12446375

  18. [Inhibition of prostaglandins synthesis in the inflamed site results in opioid-mediated hypoalgesia in rats].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian; Wu, Jian; Yang, Huai-Zu; Hong, Yanguo

    2016-06-25

    This study was designed to investigate the contribution of prostaglandins to the maintenance of inflammatory pain. Inflammation was induced by intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of carrageenan in right hindpaw in rats. Indomethacin (non-selective COX inhibitor) was administered i.pl. 1 h after the carrageenan injection, and paw withdrawal latency (PWL) responding to noxious heat was measured. β-endorphin (β-END) and μ-opioid receptor (MOR) expressed in the inflamed site were examined by using immunocytochemistry, ELISA and RT-PCR techniques. The results showed that indomethacin dose-dependently increased PWL to the levels that were above the baseline on the day 2 and 3, referred to as hypoalgesia. The hypoalgesia was abolished by a local injection of the non-selective opioid receptor inhibitor naloxone methiodide. The number of β-END-positive cells, the content of β-END and the expression of MOR mRNA in the inflammatory site of inflammation model rats were all significantly increased by indomethacin. These results reveal a novel mechanism of prostaglandins for the inhibition of inflammation-induced endogenous opioid activity. This study provides further evidence that inhibition of prostaglandins in inflamed site could be a promising therapy for inflammatory pain. PMID:27350196

  19. Transcriptional Modulation of the ERK1/2 MAPK and NF-kB pathways in Human Urothelial cells after trivalent arsenical exposure: Implications for urinary bladder cancer

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic exposure to drinking water contaminated with inorganic arsenic (iAs) is associated with an increased risk ofurinary bladder (DB) cancers in humans. Rodent models administered particular arsenicals have indicated urothelial necrosis followed by regenerative proliferation i...

  20. Implantable Bladder Sensors: A Methodological Review

    PubMed Central

    Dakurah, Mathias Naangmenkpeong; Koo, Chiwan; Choi, Wonseok; Joung, Yeun-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The loss of urinary bladder control/sensation, also known as urinary incontinence (UI), is a common clinical problem in autistic children, diabetics, and the elderly. UI not only causes discomfort for patients but may also lead to kidney failure, infections, and even death. The increase of bladder urine volume/pressure above normal ranges without sensation of UI patients necessitates the need for bladder sensors. Currently, a catheter-based sensor is introduced directly through the urethra into the bladder to measure pressure variations. Unfortunately, this method is inaccurate because measurement is affected by disturbances in catheter lines as well as delays in response time owing to the inertia of urine inside the bladder. Moreover, this technique can cause infection during prolonged use; hence, it is only suitable for short-term measurement. Development of discrete wireless implantable sensors to measure bladder volume/pressure would allow for long-term monitoring within the bladder, while maintaining the patient’s quality of life. With the recent advances in microfabrication, the size of implantable bladder sensors has been significantly reduced. However, microfabricated sensors face hostility from the bladder environment and require surgical intervention for implantation inside the bladder. Here, we explore the various types of implantable bladder sensors and current efforts to solve issues like hermeticity, biocompatibility, drift, telemetry, power, and compatibility issues with popular imaging tools such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. We also discuss some possible improvements/emerging trends in the design of an implantable bladder sensor. PMID:26620894

  1. Implantable Bladder Sensors: A Methodological Review.

    PubMed

    Dakurah, Mathias Naangmenkpeong; Koo, Chiwan; Choi, Wonseok; Joung, Yeun-Ho

    2015-09-01

    The loss of urinary bladder control/sensation, also known as urinary incontinence (UI), is a common clinical problem in autistic children, diabetics, and the elderly. UI not only causes discomfort for patients but may also lead to kidney failure, infections, and even death. The increase of bladder urine volume/pressure above normal ranges without sensation of UI patients necessitates the need for bladder sensors. Currently, a catheter-based sensor is introduced directly through the urethra into the bladder to measure pressure variations. Unfortunately, this method is inaccurate because measurement is affected by disturbances in catheter lines as well as delays in response time owing to the inertia of urine inside the bladder. Moreover, this technique can cause infection during prolonged use; hence, it is only suitable for short-term measurement. Development of discrete wireless implantable sensors to measure bladder volume/pressure would allow for long-term monitoring within the bladder, while maintaining the patient's quality of life. With the recent advances in microfabrication, the size of implantable bladder sensors has been significantly reduced. However, microfabricated sensors face hostility from the bladder environment and require surgical intervention for implantation inside the bladder. Here, we explore the various types of implantable bladder sensors and current efforts to solve issues like hermeticity, biocompatibility, drift, telemetry, power, and compatibility issues with popular imaging tools such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. We also discuss some possible improvements/emerging trends in the design of an implantable bladder sensor. PMID:26620894

  2. Transurethral Electrovaporization of Bladder Diverticulum: An Alternative to Open or Laparoscopic Bladder Diverticulectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chandhoke, Ryan A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We used transurethral electrovaporization of the diverticular mucosa as the primary treatment for an acquired bladder diverticulum in a female patient. The bladder diverticulum was secondary to bladder outlet obstruction from a previous pubovaginal sling. In comparison to either open or laparoscopic bladder diverticulectomy, transurethral electrovaporization of the bladder diverticulum was effective in significantly reducing the diverticular size while being less invasive, requiring a short operative time, and a quick patient recovery.

  3. Detecting bladder fullness through the ensemble activity patterns of the spinal cord unit population in a somatovisceral convergence environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Hong; Kim, Chang-Eop; Shin, Jaewoo; Im, Changkyun; Koh, Chin Su; Seo, In Seok; Kim, Sang Jeong; Shin, Hyung-Cheul

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Chronic monitoring of the state of the bladder can be used to notify patients with urinary dysfunction when the bladder should be voided. Given that many spinal neurons respond both to somatic and visceral inputs, it is necessary to extract bladder information selectively from the spinal cord. Here, we hypothesize that sensory information with distinct modalities should be represented by the distinct ensemble activity patterns within the neuronal population and, therefore, analyzing the activity patterns of the neuronal population could distinguish bladder fullness from somatic stimuli. Approach. We simultaneously recorded 26-27 single unit activities in response to bladder distension or tactile stimuli in the dorsal spinal cord of each Sprague-Dawley rat. In order to discriminate between bladder fullness and tactile stimulus inputs, we analyzed the ensemble activity patterns of the entire neuronal population. A support vector machine (SVM) was employed as a classifier, and discrimination performance was measured by k-fold cross-validation tests. Main results. Most of the units responding to bladder fullness also responded to the tactile stimuli (88.9-100%). The SVM classifier precisely distinguished the bladder fullness from the somatic input (100%), indicating that the ensemble activity patterns of the unit population in the spinal cord are distinct enough to identify the current input modality. Moreover, our ensemble activity pattern-based classifier showed high robustness against random losses of signals. Significance. This study is the first to demonstrate that the two main issues of electroneurographic monitoring of bladder fullness, low signals and selectiveness, can be solved by an ensemble activity pattern-based approach, improving the feasibility of chronic monitoring of bladder fullness by neural recording.

  4. Does central sensitization help explain idiopathic overactive bladder?

    PubMed

    Reynolds, W Stuart; Dmochowski, Roger; Wein, Alan; Bruehl, Stephen

    2016-08-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) can include dysfunction of sensory pathways of the peripheral and central nervous systems, resulting in bladder hypersensitivity. Central sensitization describes an induced state of spinal hypersensitivity that is associated with a variety of chronic pain disorders that share many attributes with OAB, albeit without the presence of pain. As such, the concept of central sensitization might be relevant to understanding the mechanisms and clinical manifestations of OAB syndrome. An understanding of the pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of central sensitization, and the evidence that supports a role of central sensitization in OAB, including the potential implications of mechanisms of central sensitization for the treatment of patients with OAB could provide a novel approach to the treatment of patients with this disease. Such an approach would be especially relevant to those patients with central sensitization-related comorbidities, and has the potential to improve the outcomes of these patients in particular. PMID:27245505

  5. Does central sensitization help explain idiopathic overactive bladder?

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, W. Stuart; Dmochowski, Roger; Wein, Alan; Bruehl, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) can include dysfunction of sensory pathways of the peripheral and central nervous systems, resulting in bladder hypersensitivity. Central sensitization describes an induced state of spinal hypersensitivity that is associated with a variety of chronic pain disorders that share many attributes with OAB, albeit without the presence of pain. As such, the concept of central sensitization might be relevant to understanding the mechanisms and clinical manifestations of OAB syndrome. An understanding of the pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of central sensitization, and the evidence that supports a role of central sensitization in OAB, including the potential implications of mechanisms of central sensitization for the treatment of patients with OAB could provide a novel approach to the treatment of patients with this disease. Such an approach would be especially relevant to those patients with central sensitization-related comorbidities, and has the potential to improve the outcomes of these patients in particular. PMID:27245505

  6. Overactive bladder - 18 years - Part II.

    PubMed

    Truzzi, Jose Carlos; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Bezerra, Carlos A; Plata, Ivan Mauricio; Campos, Jose; Garrido, Gustavo Luis; Almeida, Fernando G; Averbeck, Marcio Augusto; Fornari, Alexandre; Salazar, Anibal; Dell'Oro, Arturo; Cintra, Caio; Sacomani, Carlos Alberto Ricetto; Tapia, Juan Pablo; Brambila, Eduardo; Longo, Emilio Miguel; Rocha, Flavio Trigo; Coutinho, Francisco; Favre, Gabriel; Garcia, Jose Antonio; Castano, Juan; Reyes, Miguel; Leyton, Rodrigo Eugenio; Ferreira, Ruiter Silva; Duran, Sergio; Lopez, Vanda; Reges, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome has been based on the use of oral medications with the purpose of reestablishing the detrusor stability. The recent better understanding of the urothelial physiology fostered conceptual changes, and the oral anticholinergics - pillars of the overactive bladder pharmacotherapy - started to be not only recognized for their properties of inhibiting the detrusor contractile activity, but also their action on the bladder afference, and therefore, on the reduction of the symptoms that constitute the syndrome. Beta-adrenergic agonists, which were recently added to the list of drugs for the treatment of overactive bladder, still wait for a definitive positioning - as either a second-line therapy or an adjuvant to oral anticholinergics. Conservative treatment failure, whether due to unsatisfactory results or the presence of adverse side effects, define it as refractory overactive bladder. In this context, the intravesical injection of botulinum toxin type A emerged as an effective option for the existing gap between the primary measures and more complex procedures such as bladder augmentation. Sacral neuromodulation, described three decades ago, had its indication reinforced in this overactive bladder era. Likewise, the electric stimulation of the tibial nerve is now a minimally invasive alternative to treat those with refractory overactive bladder. The results of the systematic literature review on the oral pharmacological treatment and the treatment of refractory overactive bladder gave rise to this second part of the review article Overactive Bladder - 18 years, prepared during the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder. PMID:27176185

  7. Bladder health across the life course.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, P; Marschall-Kehrel, D; King, S; Lukacz, E

    2013-05-01

    Influences on bladder health begin during infancy and continue throughout the lifespan. Bladder anatomy and physiology change as individuals age, and the risk and propensity for bladder conditions, including lower urinary tract symptoms, throughout life are related to factors specific to age, sex, and life events. Bladder habits and dysfunctions at one stage of life may affect bladder health in subsequent stages. However, bladder problems are neither a normal part of aging nor inevitable at any stage of life. Many of the factors that negatively impact bladder health at all ages may be modifiable, and healthy bladder habits may prevent or reverse bladder dysfunctions that can occur naturally or in response to life events. There are opportunities to further define and promote healthy bladder habits through focused research and heightened public awareness of the importance of bladder health, which may lead to improvements in overall health and quality of life. It is our hope that this paper will inform and encourage public health initiatives and research programs aimed at this goal. PMID:23574100

  8. Immunotherapeutic strategies for bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Mathieu F; Nardelli-Haefliger, Denise; Domingos-Pereira, Sonia; Jichlinski, Patrice; Derré, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a common urologic malignancy with rising incidence in the elderly population. In most cases, bladder cancer is non-muscle-invasive at diagnosis and shows dramatically high recurrence rates, although current treatments often reduce the risk of disease progression. Immunotherapy using intravesical instillation of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) remains the most effective therapy for patients with high risk tumors. However, BCG-therapy has important limitations including substantial adverse events and frequent treatment failure. Thus, it appears crucial to either improve or replace current therapy using new immunotherapeutic strategies. Here, we discuss the clinical trials that assessed therapeutic vaccination of bladder cancer patients using tumor associated antigens and we also argue for novel approaches arising from murine models. Vaccination routes to induce appropriate T-cell homing in the tumor site as well as the use of local immunostimulation to enhance recruitment of vaccine-induced T cells are discussed to highlight what we believe is a promising therapeutic vaccination strategy for patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. PMID:24384699

  9. Cancer of the Urinary Bladder

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 76,960 % of All New Cancer Cases 4.6% Estimated Deaths in 2016 16,390 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 587,426 people living with bladder cancer in ...

  10. [Specific types of bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Bertz, S; Hartmann, A; Knüchel-Clarke, R; Gaisa, N T

    2016-02-01

    Bladder cancer shows rare variants and special subtypes with diverse prognostic importance and therefore may necessitate different therapeutic approaches. For pathologists it is important to histologically diagnose and specify such variants. Nested variants of urothelial carcinoma with inconspicuous, well-formed tumor cell nests present with an aggressive course. The plasmacytoid variant, which morphologically resembles plasma cells is associated with a shorter survival time and a high frequency of peritoneal metastasis. Micropapillary urothelial carcinoma with small papillary tumor cell islands within artificial tissue retraction spaces and frequent lymphovascular invasion also has a poor prognosis. Other important rare differential variants listed in the World Health Organization (WHO) classification are microcystic, lymphoepithelioma-like, sarcomatoid, giant cell and undifferentiated urothelial carcinomas. Additionally, there are three special types of bladder cancer: squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the bladder. These tumors are characterized by pure squamous cell or glandular differentiation and are sometimes less responsive to adjuvant (chemo)therapy. Small cell carcinoma of the bladder mimics the neuroendocrine features of its pulmonary counterpart, shows an aggressive course but is sensitive to (neo-)adjuvant chemotherapy. The morphology and histology of the most important variants and special types are discussed in this review. PMID:26782034

  11. Nephrogenic adenoma of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Vorreuther, R; Nayal, W; Hake, R; Engelmann, U

    1994-01-01

    A nephrogenic adenoma of the bladder in a 4-year-old girl with a past history of urologic surgery for vesicorenal reflux is described. The multifocal tumor was treated by transurethral resection. Relapse occurred 15 months later and was again treated by transurethral resection. Pathological aspects, clinical features and therapeutic considerations of this proliferative lesion are reviewed and discussed. PMID:7855943

  12. Immunotherapeutic strategies for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Mathieu F; Nardelli-Haefliger, Denise; Domingos-Pereira, Sonia; Jichlinski, Patrice; Derré, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a common urologic malignancy with rising incidence in the elderly population. In most cases, bladder cancer is non-muscle-invasive at diagnosis and shows dramatically high recurrence rates, although current treatments often reduce the risk of disease progression. Immunotherapy using intravesical instillation of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) remains the most effective therapy for patients with high risk tumors. However, BCG-therapy has important limitations including substantial adverse events and frequent treatment failure. Thus, it appears crucial to either improve or replace current therapy using new immunotherapeutic strategies. Here, we discuss the clinical trials that assessed therapeutic vaccination of bladder cancer patients using tumor associated antigens and we also argue for novel approaches arising from murine models. Vaccination routes to induce appropriate T-cell homing in the tumor site as well as the use of local immunostimulation to enhance recruitment of vaccine-induced T cells are discussed to highlight what we believe is a promising therapeutic vaccination strategy for patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. PMID:24384699

  13. Bladder Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing bladder cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  14. Pathobiology and Chemoprevention of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takuji; Miyazawa, Katsuhito; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Kuno, Toshiya; Suzuki, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathogenesis of bladder cancer has improved considerably over the past decade. Translating these novel pathobiological discoveries into therapies, prevention, or strategies to manage patients who are suspected to have or who have been diagnosed with bladder cancer is the ultimate goal. In particular, the chemoprevention of bladder cancer development is important, since urothelial cancer frequently recurs, even if the primary cancer is completely removed. The numerous alterations of both oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes that have been implicated in bladder carcinogenesis represent novel targets for therapy and prevention. In addition, knowledge about these genetic alterations will help provide a better understanding of the biological significance of preneoplastic lesions of bladder cancer. Animal models for investigating bladder cancer development and prevention can also be developed based on these alterations. This paper summarizes the results of recent preclinical and clinical chemoprevention studies and discusses screening for bladder cancer. PMID:21941546

  15. PROTEOMIC PROFILING OF CULTURED HUMAN BLADDER CELLS AFTER TRIVALENT ARSENICAL EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic exposure to arsenic has been associated with human cancers of the bladder, kidney, lung, liver, and skin. Inorganic arsenic is biotransformed in a stepwise manner via both a reduction and then an oxidative methylation step in which arsenic cycles between +5 and +3 oxidati...

  16. PROTEOMIC PROFILING OF CULTURED HUMAN BLADDER CELLS AFTER TRIVALENT ARSENIC EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic exposure to arsenic has been associated with human cancers of the bladder, kidney, lung, liver, and skin. Inorganic arsenic is biotransformed in a stepwise manner via both a reduction and then an oxidative methylation step in which arsenic cycles between +5 and +3 oxidati...

  17. PROTEOMIC PROFILING OF CULTURED HUMAN BLADDER CELLS AFTER TRIVALENT ARSENICAL EXPOSURES (SOT 2008)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic exposure to arsenic has been associated with human cancers of the bladder, kidney, lung, liver, and skin. Inorganic arsenic is biotransformed in a stepwise manner via both a reduction and then an oxidative methylation step in which arsenic cycles between +5 and +3 oxidati...

  18. DIFFERENTIAL ACTIVATION OF AP-1 IN HUMAN BLADDER EPITHELIAL CELLS BY INORGANIC AND METHYLATED ARSENICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Differential Activation of AP-1 in Human Bladder Epithelial Cells by Inorganic and Methylated Arsenicals

    Zuzana Drobna, Ilona Jaspers, David J. Thomas, and Miroslav Styblo

    ABSTRACT

    Epidemiological studies have linked chronic ingestion of drinking water contai...

  19. X-ray tube with a graphite field emitter inflamed at high temperature

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, Yusuke; Koike, Takayoshi; Hayama, Youhei; Jouzuka, Atsuo; Nakamura, Tomonori; Onizuka, Yoshihiro; Miyoshi, Motosuke; Mimura, Hidenori

    2013-01-01

    The authors developed a class of novel graphite-based field emitters, known as graphite field emitters inflamed at high temperature (GFEIHTs), which includes numerous edges and juts. The GFEIHT field emission characteristics are investigated in a vacuum tube (10−7 Pa), and an anode current exceeding 2 mA is obtained. The authors also fabricated tipped-off x-ray tubes using GFEIHTs. No degradation in the anode current is observed under the operating conditions of 16.6 kV anode voltage and 160 μA anode current. The current dispersion, defined as the standard deviation (σ)/mean over 24 h, is 2.8%. The authors successfully demonstrated radiography and x-ray fluorescence spectrometry using an x-ray tube with GFEIHT. PMID:23847750

  20. Sympathetic activation triggers endogenous opioid release and analgesia within peripheral inflamed tissue.

    PubMed

    Binder, Waltraud; Mousa, Shaaban A; Sitte, Nicolle; Kaiser, Myriam; Stein, Christoph; Schäfer, Michael

    2004-07-01

    Stress induces analgesia by mechanisms within and outside the brain. Here we show that the sympathetic nervous system is an essential trigger of intrinsic opioid analgesia within peripheral injured tissue. Noradrenaline, injected directly into inflamed hind paws of male Wistar rats, produced dose-dependent antinociception, reversible by alpha(1)-, alpha(2)- and beta(2)-antagonists. alpha(1)-, alpha(2)- and beta(2)-adrenergic receptors were demonstrated on beta-endorphin-containing immune cells and noradrenaline induced adrenergic receptor-specific release of beta-endorphin from immune cell suspensions. This antinociceptive effect of noradrenaline was reversed by micro - and delta-opioid antagonists as well as by anti-beta-endorphin. Stress-induced peripheral analgesia was abolished by chemical sympathectomy and by adrenergic antagonists. These findings indicate that sympathetic neuron-derived noradrenaline stimulates adrenergic receptors on inflammatory cells to release beta-endorphin, which induces analgesia via activation of peripheral opioid receptors. PMID:15245482

  1. Activity-dependent hyperpolarization of EGABA is absent in cutaneous DRG neurons from inflamed rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yi; Zhang, Xiu-Lin; Gold, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    A shift in GABAA signaling from inhibition to excitation in primary afferent neurons appears to contribute to the inflammation-induced increase in afferent input to the central nervous system (CNS). An activity-dependent depolarization of the GABA equilibrium potential (EGABA) has been described in CNS neurons which drives a shift in GABAA signaling from inhibition to excitation. The purpose of the present study was to determine if such an activity-dependent depolarization of EGABA occurs in primary afferents and whether the depolarization is amplified with persistent inflammation. Acutely dissociated retrogradely labeled cutaneous DRG neurons from naïve and inflamed rats were studied with gramicidin perforated patch recording. Rather than a depolarization, 200 action potentials delivered at 2 Hz resulted in a ~10 mV hyperpolarization of EGABA in cutaneous neurons from naïve rats. No such hyperpolarization was observed in neurons from inflamed rats. The shift in EGABA was not blocked by 10 µM bumetanide. Furthermore, because activity-dependent hyperpolarization of EGABA was fully manifest in the absence of HCO3− in the bath solution, this shift was not dependent on a change in HCO3−-Cl− exchanger activity, despite evidence of HCO3−-Cl− exchangers in DRG neurons that may contribute to the establishment of EGABA in the presence of HCO3−. While the mechanism underlying the activity-dependent hyperpolarization of EGABA has yet to be identified, because this mechanism appears to function as a form of feedback inhibition, facilitating GABA mediated inhibition of afferent activity, it may serve as a novel target for the treatment of inflammatory pain. PMID:24135545

  2. Expression of high mobility group box 1 in inflamed dental pulp and its chemotactic effect on dental pulp cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xufang; Jiang, Hongwei; Gong, Qimei; Fan, Chen; Huang, Yihua; Ling, Junqi

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • HMGB1 translocated from nucleus to cytoplasm during dental pulp inflammation. • HMGB1and its receptor RAGE were up-regulated in hDPCs under LPS stimulation. • HMGB1 enhanced hDPCs migration and induces cytoskeleton reorganization. • HMGB1 may play a critical role in dental pulp repair during inflamed state. - Abstract: High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a chromatin protein which can be released extracellularly, eliciting a pro-inflammatory response and promoting tissue repair process. This study aimed to examine the expression and distribution of HMGB1 and its receptor RAGE in inflamed dental pulp tissues, and to assess its effects on proliferation, migration and cytoskeleton of cultured human dental pulp cells (DPCs). Our data demonstrated that cytoplasmic expression of HMGB1 was observed in inflamed pulp tissues, while HMGB1 expression was confined in the nuclei in healthy dental pulp. The mRNA expression of HMGB1 and RAGE were significantly increased in inflamed pulps. In in vitro cultured DPCs, expression of HMGB1 in both protein and mRNA level was up-regulated after treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exogenous HMGB1 enhanced DPCs migration in a dose-dependent manner and induced the reorganization of f-actin in DPCs. Our results suggests that HMGB1 are not only involved in the process of dental pulp inflammation, but also play an important role in the recruitment of dental pulp stem cells, promoting pulp repair and regeneration.

  3. Immunopathology of chronic lentivirus-induced arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkerson, M. J.; Davis, W. C.; Baszler, T. V.; Cheevers, W. P.

    1995-01-01

    This study evaluated histopathology and mononuclear cell phenotypes in synovial lesions of chronic arthritis induced by experimental infection of Saanen goats with caprine arthritis-encephalitis lentivirus. Histological examination of carpal joint synovium of three infected goats with clinical arthritis revealed progressive lesions consisting of membrane villus hypertrophy with extensive angiogenesis and mononuclear cell infiltration and degenerative changes of membrane villus necrosis associated with loss of vasculature and infiltrates. Changes in synovial tissue of five age-matched infected goats without clinical arthritis were limited to moderate synovial membrane hyperplasia also noted in an age-matched uninfected goat. Immunohistochemistry identified CD45R+ CD5- B lymphocytes as the principal component of most perivascular infiltrates in arthritic synovium. Other mononuclear cells included perivascular CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes and macrophages with a prominent accumulation of CD8+ T lymphocytes at the lining surface of inflamed villi. T lymphocytes and macrophages as well as synovial lining cells were activated with respect to MHC class II but not for interleukin-2 receptors. Inflamed villi also contained lymphoid aggregates comprised of B cell germinal centers and activated T-cell mantles. B cells expressing immunoglobulin occurred around follicles and throughout inflamed villi. These findings indicate that memory immune responses that favor expansion and maturation of B cells and immunoglobulin production contribute to the immunopathology of chronic arthritis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7778682

  4. Patient reported outcome measures in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Roderick

    2016-01-01

    Many interventions for neurogenic bladder patients are directed towards improving quality of life (QOL). Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are the primary method of evaluating QOL, and they provide an important quantification of symptoms which can’t be measured objectively. Our goal was to review general measurement principles, and identify and discuss PROMs relevant to neurogenic bladder patients. We identify two recent reviews of the state of the literature and updated the results with an additional Medline search up to September 1, 2015. Using the previous identified reviews, and our updated literature review, we identified 16 PROMs which are used for the assessment of QOL and symptoms in neurogenic bladder patients. Several are specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients, such as the Qualiveen (for neurogenic bladder related QOL), and the Neurogenic Bladder Symptom Score (NBSS) (for neurogenic bladder symptoms). We also highlight general QOL measures for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury (SCI) which include questions about bladder symptoms, and incontinence PROMs which are commonly used, but not specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients. It is essential for clinicians and researchers with an interest in neurogenic bladder to be aware of the current PROMs, and to have a basic understanding of the principals of measurement in order to select the most appropriate one for their purpose. PMID:26904409

  5. Assessment of bladder wall thickness in women with overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Üçer, Oktay; Gümüş, Bilal; Albaz, Ali Can; Pekindil, Gökhan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare bladder wall thickness (BWT) between female patients with overactive bladder (OAB) and aged-matched healthy controls. Material and methods Thirty-six female patients with OAB and 31 healthy women were enrolled in the present prospective observational study. Qmax and Qave were measured by using uroflowmetry in all of the women in the patient and control groups, and also maximum bladder capacity (MBC), post- void residual urine (PVRU), prevoiding and postvoiding BWT were measured by using transabdominal ultrasound. Lower urinary tract symptoms of the participants were assessed by using Overactive Bladder Version-8 (OAB-V8) and International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF). All of the data were statistically compared between the patient and control groups. In the patient group, the relationships between parameters were evaluated correlation analysis. Results The mean age of the patients and controls were similar (respectively, 45.58±12.35 and 44.21±11.60 years (p=0.68). The mean pre- and post-voiding BWT, OAB-V8 and ICIQ-SF scores of the patients were significantly higher than the controls. In the patient group, the moderate positive correlations between BWT with Qmax (p=0.02) and Qave (p=0.02) were found. Conclusion This study showed that the BWTs of the female patients with OAB are higher than those of healthy women. Further studies should investigate the changes in BWT of patients with OAB after treatment of OAB. PMID:27274895

  6. Metabolic phenotype of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Santoni, Matteo; Iacovelli, Roberto; Mazzucchelli, Roberta; Piva, Francesco; Scarpelli, Marina; Berardi, Rossana; Tortora, Giampaolo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo

    2016-04-01

    Metabolism of bladder cancer represents a key issue for cancer research. Several metabolic altered pathways are involved in bladder tumorigenesis, representing therefore interesting targets for therapy. Tumor cells, including urothelial cancer cells, rely on a peculiar shift to aerobic glycolysis-dependent metabolism (the Warburg-effect) as the main energy source to sustain their uncontrolled growth and proliferation. Therefore, the high glycolytic flux depends on the overexpression of glycolysis-related genes (SRC-3, glucose transporter type 1 [GLUT1], GLUT3, lactic dehydrogenase A [LDHA], LDHB, hexokinase 1 [HK1], HK2, pyruvate kinase type M [PKM], and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha [HIF-1α]), resulting in an overproduction of pyruvate, alanine and lactate. Concurrently, bladder cancer metabolism displays an increased expression of genes favoring the pentose phosphate pathway (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase [G6PD]) and the fatty-acid synthesis (fatty acid synthase [FASN]), along with a decrease of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Krebs cycle activities. Moreover, the PTEN/PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, hyper-activated in bladder cancer, acts as central regulator of aerobic glycolysis, hence contributing to cancer metabolic switch and tumor cell proliferation. Besides glycolysis, glycogen metabolism pathway plays a robust role in bladder cancer development. In particular, the overexpression of GLUT-1, the loss of the tumor suppressor glycogen debranching enzyme amylo-α-1,6-glucosidase, 4-α-glucanotransferase (AGL), and the increased activity of the tumor promoter enzyme glycogen phosphorylase impair glycogen metabolism. An increase in glucose uptake, decrease in normal cellular glycogen storage, and overproduction of lactate are consequences of decreased oxidative phosphorylation and inability to reuse glucose into the pentose phosphate and de novo fatty acid synthesis pathways. Moreover, AGL loss determines augmented levels of the serine-to-glycine enzyme

  7. Demonstration of Trophozoites of G. Lamblia in Ileal Mucosal Biopsy Specimens May Reveal Giardiasis in Patients With Significantly Inflamed Parasite-free Duodenal Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Oberhuber, Georg; Mesteri, Ildiko; Kopf, Wolfram; Müller, Heiko

    2016-09-01

    In the majority of individuals, infestation with trophozoites of Giardia lamblia (synonymous G. duodenalis or G. intestinalis) leads to a self-limited disease. Whereas most duodenal biopsies with chronic giardiasis show little or no inflammatory reaction, some patients may develop a severe disease with significant mucosal inflammation and various degrees of villous blunting. Occasionally, the histologic changes may resemble those of celiac disease. In this paper, we describe 11 patients, 5 of them female, with chronic giardiasis and demonstrable G. lamblia in ileal biopsies. The median age was 45 years (35 to 62 y), with male patients being at least 10 years younger than female patients. All of the duodenal biopsies showed at least mild villous blunting (grading: mild, marked, or total). In the mucosa an increased number of plasma cells and lymphocytes was observed. Furthermore, varying numbers of granulocytes were found in the lamina propria and in the epithelial layer. In 1 case only, the number of intraepithelial lymphocytes was >40/100 epithelial cells thus mirroring the histologic picture of celiac disease with a flat mucosa (with negative celiac disease-specific serological findings). Interestingly enough, all mucosal biopsy specimens from the duodenum were parasite free. Therefore, giardiasis could only be revealed by the demonstration of trophozoites of G. lamblia in biopsy specimens from the terminal ileum, which had been taken simultaneously or several weeks later. In contrast to duodenal biopsies, the ileal mucosa appeared either normal or only mildly inflamed in this setting. All patients but 1 were symptomatic, with chronic diarrhea being the leading symptom. Symptoms resolved after antibiotic therapy. This study demonstrates that giardiasis may be associated with a significant duodenal pathology in biopsy specimens without discernible parasites. In the cases described here infestation with G. lamblia was only proven histologically by examination of

  8. Vesical nephrogenic adenoma: an unusual presentation of a bladder tumour

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Sanchíz, Carlos; Martínez-Ruiz, Jesús; Anguita-Fernandez, Pedro J.; Giménez-Bachs, José M.; Atiénzar-Tobarra, Manuel; Rodríguez, Julio Antonio Virseda; Salinas-Sánchez, Antonio S.

    2011-01-01

    Vesical nephrogenic adenoma is a rare, benign entity that appears most commonly in middle-aged males. Its etiology is unknown, but it has been linked to chronic irritating factors, such as infection, trauma, urological surgery, kidney stones, foreign bodies and chemical agents, such as Bacille Calmette-Guerin. We report 2 new cases with a history of transurethral resection of the bladder and the prostate and a history of prolonged voiding symptoms. In both cases, the findings of encysted tubular structures lined with flattened cuboidal cells without atypia were consistent with the diagnosis of vesical nephrogenic adenoma. PMID:21989174

  9. Research Findings on Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Phani B.; Patra, Sayani

    2015-01-01

    Several physiopathologic conditions lead to the manifestation of overactive bladder (OAB). These conditions include ageing, diabetes mellitus, bladder outlet obstruction, spinal cord injury, stroke and brain injury, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, interstitial cystitis, stress and depression. This review has discussed research findings in human and animal studies conducted on the above conditions. Several structural and functional changes under these conditions have not only been observed in the lower urinary tract, but also in the brain and spinal cord. Significant changes were observed in the following areas: neurotransmitters, prostaglandins, nerve growth factor, Rho-kinase, interstitial cells of Cajal, and ion and transient receptor potential channels. Interestingly, alterations in these areas showed great variation in each of the conditions of the OAB, suggesting that the pathophysiology of the OAB might be different in each condition of the disease. It is anticipated that this review will be helpful for further research on new and specific drug development against OAB. PMID:26195957

  10. Emulating a Fish Swim Bladder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesenka, James; Meredith, Dawn; Bolker, Jessica; Schubert, Christopher; Kraut, Gertrud

    2009-10-01

    The University of New Hampshire and the University of New England are developing biologically relevant physics laboratories for their predominantly health science audiences. Buoyancy plays an important role in a variety of biological processes. We describe an inexpensive laboratory activity based on the Cartesian Diver that allows students to quantitatively emulate the swim bladder of a fish. Inflation of the ``bladder'' is externally controlled through an external gas syringe or squeezing on the plastic water containment vessel (a 2L soda bottle). The students can accurately determine the volume of a ``fish'' at the point of neutral buoyancy by visual measurement of the trapped air pocket. A simple electronic gas pressure sensor allows the hydrostatic pressure on the fish to be analyzed simultaneously.

  11. Microsatellite instability in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Zulueta, M; Ruppert, J M; Tokino, K; Tsai, Y C; Spruck, C H; Miyao, N; Nichols, P W; Hermann, G G; Horn, T; Steven, K

    1993-12-01

    Somatic instability at microsatellite repeats was detected in 6 of 200 transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder. Instabilities were apparent as changes in (GT)n repeat lengths on human chromosome 9 for four tumors and as alterations in a (CAG)n repeat in the androgen receptor gene on the X chromosome for three tumors. Single locus alterations were detected in three tumors, while three other tumors revealed changes in two or more loci. In one tumor we found microsatellite instability in all five loci analyzed on chromosome 9. The alterations detected were either minor 2-base pair changes or larger (> 2 base pairs) alterations in repeat length. All six tumors were low stage (Ta-T1), suggesting that these alterations can occur early in bladder tumorigenesis. PMID:8242615

  12. UTIs in patients with neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Jahromi, Mona S; Mure, Amanda; Gomez, Christopher S

    2014-09-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) remain one of the most prevalent and frustrating morbidities for neurogenic bladder patients, and death attributed to urosepsis in the spinal cord injury (SCI) patient is higher when compared to the general population. Risk factors include urinary stasis, high bladder pressures, bladder stones, and catheter use. While classic symptoms of UTI include dysuria, increased frequency and urgency, neurogenic bladder patients present differently with increased spasticity, autonomic dysreflexia, urinary incontinence, and vague pains. Multiple modalities have been assessed for prevention including catheter type, oral supplements, bladder irrigation, detrusor injections and prophylactic antimicrobials. Of these, bladder inoculation with E. coli HU2117, irrigation with iAluRil(®), detrusor injections, and weekly prophylaxis with alternating antibiotics appear to have a positive reduction in UTI but require further study. Ultimately, treatment for symptomatic UTI should account for the varied flora and possible antibiotic resistances including relying on urine cultures to guide antibiotic therapy. PMID:25113150

  13. Review of intravesical therapies for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Rosamilia, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is a chronic pain condition characterised by urinary frequency, urgency and pain or discomfort which the patient attributes to the bladder. It is a complex condition to manage and treat and requires a multi-disciplinary and multi-modal approach. As well as lifestyle and behavioural modifications, physical therapy and oral medications, intravesical treatments can be used in the treatment algorithm for BPS/IC. A number of intravesical agents are reviewed in this paper along with the available evidence for their use. PMID:26816864

  14. Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma urinary bladder coexisting with tuberculosis in pelvic lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Vilvapathy Senguttuvan; Manikandan, Ramanitharan; Jacob, Sajini Elizabeth; Murugan, P Puvai

    2013-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the urinary bladder is usually associated with Schistosoma haematobium and chronic bladder irritation. We report a case of coexistent metastatic SCC and tuberculosis in obturator lymph nodes in radical cystoprostatectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy specimens. Though tubercular iliac lymphadenitis and metastatic transitional carcinoma following intravesical BCG has been reported, the concurrent presence of non-transitional cell cancer and primary lymph nodal tuberculosis in regional lymph nodes is rare. This case is reported to highlight the paucity of management guidelines available presently in the treatment of such patients who require systemic chemotherapy and antitubercular therapy. PMID:24296773

  15. Nursing Care of Women With Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome.

    PubMed

    MacMullen, Nancy J; Dulski, Laura A; Martin, Patricia B; Blobaum, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome is a chronic condition affecting approximately 3.3 million women in the United States. It is defined by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases as "urinary pain that can't be attributed to other causes such as infection or urinary stones." Because of the intimate nature of the symptoms, women are often reluctant to seek treatment. When they do, they require a care provider with specialized nursing skills. Nursing practice based on carefully reviewed literature will result in the provision of comprehensive and compassionate nursing care for women with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome. PMID:27067933

  16. Giant Leiomyosarcoma of the Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, José G.A.; Klojda, Carlos A.B.; Araújo, Claudio P. De; Pires, Lucas A.S.

    2016-01-01

    The bladder leiomyosarcoma is a rare and agressive mesenchymal tumour, and adult women of reproductive age have a higher incidence of developing the bladder leiomyosarcoma. The pathophysiology of the disease is not certain, and its main symptoms are hematuria, dysuria and abdominal pain. There are not a considerable amount of cases described in the literature. We report a case of a giant leiomyosarcoma of the urinary bladder in a 31-year-old woman. PMID:27437302

  17. Bladder Tumor Diagnosis—Improved Excretory Cystograms

    PubMed Central

    Amar, Arjan D.

    1967-01-01

    The correct precystoscopic diagnosis of bladder tumor was made in 20 of 23 patients with this disease, among more than 1,000 persons studied by double-dose excretory urography. There was no increase in the incidence of untoward effects. Double-dose excretory urography with delayed bladder films is recommended as the primary urographic procedure in all patients with gross or microscopic hematuria in whom bladder tumor is suspected. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:6044290

  18. Botulinum toxin: An emerging therapy in female bladder outlet obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Aditya A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: We evaluated the utility of botulinum toxin in functional female bladder outlet obstruction. Materials and Methods: A total of 7 consecutive female patients with bladder outlet obstruction were included. Patients with neurogenic bladder were excluded. All were previously treated with periodic dilations. Diagnosis was based on symptomatology, cystometry, and micturating cystograms. A total of 2 patients had been in chronic retention with residual volumes more than 400 ml. All were managed with an injection of botulinum toxin, 100 units in 2 ml of saline injected with a flexible cystoscopic needle. The site of the injection was deep submucosally, 0.5 ml in each quadrant at the level of the most prominent narrowing seen endoscopically. All the procedures were done as day care procedures under local anaesthesia. After the procedure, no catheter was placed. Patients were followed up for changes in IPSS scores and post void residual urine measurements. In all cases, multiple injections were used. Results: The follow-up period ranged from 48–52 weeks. The IPSS reduced by an average of 12 points. Post void residual urine reduced by 62%. Improvements commenced 4.85 days (average) after the procedure and lasted for an average of 16.8 weeks (range: 10.8–28 weeks). Discussion: There is a gradual improvement in symptoms over time and the maximal effect occurred at 10–14 days. The duration of improvement was approximately 16.8 weeks. All patients were satisfied by the degree of improvement felt. Conclusions: Botulinum toxin proved successful in improving the voiding characteristics. It possibly acts at the zone of hypertonicity at the bladder neck or midurethra. The only disadvantage is the high cost of the drug. PMID:19881122

  19. Ultrasound and Biomarker Tests in Predicting Cancer Aggressiveness in Tissue Samples of Patients With Bladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    Bladder Papillary Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0a Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0is Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer With Carcinoma In Situ; Stage I Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage II Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage III Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma

  20. Effect of Dietary Treatment with Dimethylarsinous Acid (DMAIII) on the Urinary Bladder Epithelium of Arsenic (+3 Oxidation State) Methyltransferase (As3mt) Knockout and C57BL/6 Wild Type Female Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) is carcinogenic to the human urinary bladder. It produces urothelial cytotoxicity and proliferation in rats and mice. DMAv, a major methylated urinary metabolite of iAs, is a rat bladder carcinogen, but without effects on the...

  1. AB208. Can bladder irrigation reduce the morbidity of bladder stones in patients with spinal cord injury?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H; Xie, KJ; Jiang, CH; Zeng, JW; Huang, MP; Liu, QL; Huang, JB; Huang, TH; Li, YF

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of bladder irrigation for reducing the morbidity of bladder stones in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. Methods From December 2011 to July 2013, SCI patients were prospectively randomized and assigned to either a bladder irrigation group or a no bladder irrigation group. Bladder irrigations were performed twice a week by urologists. The primary outcomes were incidences of bladder stones and Incontinence-Specific Quality-of-Life Instrument (I-QoL). Secondary outcomes were related adverse events. Results A total of 80 eligible patients participated and 78 (97.5%) patients (bladder irrigation, n=39; no bladder irrigation, n=39) completed 24 weeks of follow-up. Out of the 78 patients, 19 (24.3%) developed bladder stones. All occurred in no bladder irrigation group. In 8 of the 19 patients (42.1%), stones were only detected by cystoscopy .The bladder stones were mostly thin with an eggshell appearance (78.95% for diameter of stone <5 mm, 84.21% for volume of bladder stone<0.2 cm3). Bladder stones were removed by vigorous bladder irrigation guided by ultrasound (73.68%) or endoscopic lithotripsy (26.32%). The I-QOL was significantly better in the bladder irrigation group than in no bladder irrigation group at weeks 6, 12, 18, and 24 of follow-up. Conclusions Bladder irrigation may be more effective and safer than no bladder irrigation for reducing the morbidity of bladder stone in SCI patients.

  2. Effect of endoscopic sphincterotomy on gall bladder bile lithogenicity and motility

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, B; Agarwal, D; Baijal, S; Negi, T; Choudhuri, G; Saraswat, V

    1998-01-01

    Background—Endoscopic sphincterotomy has been shown to inhibit stone formation in the gall bladder of experimental animals. 
Aims—To investigate the alterations in bile composition and gall bladder motility after endoscopic sphincterotomy. 
Patients—A study was performed of gall bladder bile composition and gall bladder motility in patients with gallstone disease ((n = 20; age 40-60 years, median age 55 years: seven men), with gall bladder calculi (n = 12) and with diseased gall bladder (chronic inflammation) without gall bladder calculi (n = 8)), who had received endoscopic sphincterotomy for common bile duct stones. Age and sex matched disease controls comprised 20 patients with gallstone disease but without stones and an intact sphincter of Oddi (with gall bladder calculi (n = 10) and diseased gall bladder without gall bladder calculi (n =10)). 
Methods—Gall bladder motility was assessed by ultrasound. Duodenal bile collected by nasoduodenal tube after stimulation of gall bladder by intravenous ceruletid infusion was analysed for cholesterol, phospholipid, and bile acid concentrations, cholesterol saturation index, and nucleation time. 
Results—There was a significant reduction in mean (SEM) fasting volume (12.5 (1.7) ml v 26.4 (2.5) ml; p<0.001) and mean (SEM) residual volume (4.34 (0.9) ml v 14.7 (0.98) ml; p<0.001), and increase in mean (SEM) ejection fraction (65.7 (4.2)% v 43.6 (5.52)%; p<0.001) and mean (SEM) rate constant of gall bladder emptying (−0.031/min v −0.020/min; p<0.01) in patients who had been subjected to endoscopic sphincterotomy. Median nucleation time was significantly longer (17 days v 6 days; p<0.006) in treated patients. There was a reduction in total mean (SEM) lipid concentrations (6.73(0.32) g/dl v 7.72 (0.84) g/dl; p<0.05), cholesterol (5.6 (1.5) mmol/l v 10.3 (2.23) mmol/l; p<0.001) and CSI (0.72 (0.15) v 1.32(0.31); p<0.001). There was no significant change in mean (SEM) phospholipid (25.6 (3.5) mmol/l v 23

  3. [Treatment of exstrophy of bladder in adults].

    PubMed

    Perlin, D V; Sapozhnikov, A D; Darenkov, S P; Efremov, E A

    2014-01-01

    Exstrophy of bladder in adults is extremely rare, since such anomalies are usually underwent surgery in early childhood. Difficulties in the treatment of adult patients are associated with severe long-term changes of the mucosa and surrounding tissues, chronic urinary infection, as well as a large diastasis between pubic bones and inefficiency of osteotomy. The article describes the methodology and results of the surgery in a patient 33 years old with exstrophy-epispadias after failed previous interventions. During the follow-up period of more than 5 years, there were no complications related to continent reservoir, reconstruction of the anterior abdominal wall, and urinary infection. Decrease in renal function was not observed. Thus, the cystectomy with formation of continent reservoir from the ileum is accompanied by a good functional and cosmetic results. Resection of vesical plate is justified due to severe long-term changes of the mucosa and the surrounding skin, as well as a high risk of malignancy. The use of polypropylene ? allows to reconstruct the anterior abdominal wall without osteotomy and provides a sufficient degree of its strengthening. PMID:25807774

  4. Atezolizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent BCG-Unresponsive Non-muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-22

    Recurrent Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0a Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0is Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer With Carcinoma In Situ; Stage I Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma

  5. The Illness Experiences of Women with Overactive Bladder in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Siu, Judy Yuen-Man

    2014-04-14

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a common chronic bladder dysfunction worldwide. However, the illness experiences of women with OAB in Asian countries have not been well documented. In this article, I investigate the illness experiences of women with OAB in Hong Kong. I adopted a qualitative study design by conducting 30 in-depth, semistructured interviews with women who were diagnosed as having OAB and were aged between 28 and 55 years. Negative illness experiences were noted among the participants, including embarrassment, shame, frustration, helplessness, resignation, uselessness, and self-seclusion. These negative experiences were not only the result of the physical symptoms and limitations brought on by the bladder condition, but were also caused by social difficulties such as the flippant attitudes of primary care providers, the tortuous journey of seeking and receiving treatment, and a lack of understanding from social members such as family members and colleagues in the workplace. PMID:24732998

  6. Comparative Ability of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Different Tissues to Limit Neutrophil Recruitment to Inflamed Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Munir, Hafsa; Luu, Nguyet-Thin; Clarke, Lewis S. C.; Nash, Gerard B.; McGettrick, Helen M.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are tissue-resident stromal cells capable of modulating immune responses, including leukocyte recruitment by endothelial cells (EC). However, the comparative potency of MSC from different sources in suppressing recruitment, and the necessity for close contact with endothelium remain uncertain, although these factors have implications for use of MSC in therapy. We thus compared the effects of MSC isolated from bone marrow, Wharton’s jelly, and trabecular bone on neutrophil recruitment to cytokine-stimulated EC, using co-culture models with different degrees of proximity between MSC and EC. All types of MSC suppressed neutrophil adhesion to inflamed endothelium but not neutrophil transmigration, whether directly incorporated into endothelial monolayers or separated from them by thin micropore filters. Further increase in the separation of the two cell types tended to reduce efficacy, although this diminution was least for the bone marrow MSC. Immuno-protective effects of MSC were also diminished with repeated passage; with BMMSC, but not WJMSC, completing losing their suppressive effect by passage 7. Conditioned media from all co-cultures suppressed neutrophil recruitment, and IL-6 was identified as a common bioactive mediator. These results suggest endogenous MSC have a homeostatic role in limiting inflammatory leukocyte infiltration in a range of tissues. Since released soluble mediators might have effects locally or remotely, infusion of MSC into blood or direct injection into target organs might be efficacious, but in either case, cross-talk between EC and MSC appears necessary. PMID:27171357

  7. Resveratrol suppresses PAI-1 gene expression in a human in vitro model of inflamed adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Zagotta, Ivana; Dimova, Elitsa Y; Funcke, Jan-Bernd; Wabitsch, Martin; Kietzmann, Thomas; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Increased plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels are associated with a number of pathophysiological complications; among them is obesity. Resveratrol was proposed to improve obesity-related health problems, but the effect of resveratrol on PAI-1 gene expression in obesity is not completely understood. In this study, we used SGBS adipocytes and a model of human adipose tissue inflammation to examine the effects of resveratrol on the production of PAI-1. Treatment of SGBS adipocytes with resveratrol reduced PAI-1 mRNA and protein in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Further experiments showed that obesity-associated inflammatory conditions lead to the upregulation of PAI-1 gene expression which was antagonized by resveratrol. Although signaling via PI3K, Sirt1, AMPK, ROS, and Nrf2 appeared to play a significant role in the modulation of PAI-1 gene expression under noninflammatory conditions, those signaling components were not involved in mediating the resveratrol effects on PAI-1 production under inflammatory conditions. Instead, we demonstrate that the resveratrol effects on PAI-1 induction under inflammatory conditions were mediated via inhibition of the NF κ B pathway. Together, resveratrol can act as NF κ B inhibitor in adipocytes and thus the subsequently reduced PAI-1 expression in inflamed adipose tissue might provide a new insight towards novel treatment options of obesity. PMID:23819014

  8. Orf virus IL-10 reduces monocyte, dendritic cell and mast cell recruitment to inflamed skin.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Jared R; Lateef, Zabeen; Fleming, Stephen B; Mercer, Andrew A; Wise, Lyn M

    2016-02-01

    Orf virus (ORFV) is a zoonotic parapoxvirus that causes pustular dermatitis of sheep, and occasionally humans. Despite causing sustained infections, ORFV induces only a transient increase in pro-inflammatory signalling and the trafficking of innate immune cells within the skin seems to be impaired. An explanation for this tempered response to ORFV infection may lie in its expression of a homolog of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin (IL)-10. Using a murine model in which inflammation was induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide, we examined the effects of the ORFV-IL-10 protein on immune cell trafficking to and from the skin. ORFV-IL-10 limited the recruitment of blood-derived Gr-1(int)/CD11b(int) monocytes, CD11c(+ve)/MHC-II(+ve) dendritic cells and c-kit(+ve)/FcεR1(+ve) mature mast cells into inflamed skin. ORFV-IL-10 also suppressed the activation of CD11c(+ve)/MHC-II(+ve) dendritic cells within the skin, reducing their trafficking to the draining lymph node. These findings suggest that expression of IL-10 by ORFV may contribute to the impaired trafficking of innate immune cells within infected skin. PMID:26732486

  9. Population of sensory neurons essential for asthmatic hyperreactivity of inflamed airways

    PubMed Central

    Tränkner, Dimitri; Hahne, Nadeau; Sugino, Ken; Hoon, Mark A.; Zuker, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a common debilitating inflammatory lung disease affecting over 200 million people worldwide. Here, we investigated neurogenic components involved in asthmatic-like attacks using the ovalbumin-sensitized murine model of the disease, and identified a specific population of neurons that are required for airway hyperreactivity. We show that ablating or genetically silencing these neurons abolished the hyperreactive broncho-constrictions, even in the presence of a fully developed lung inflammatory immune response. These neurons are found in the vagal ganglia and are characterized by the expression of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel. However, the TRPV1 channel itself is not required for the asthmatic-like hyperreactive airway response. We also demonstrate that optogenetic stimulation of this population of TRP-expressing cells with channelrhodopsin dramatically exacerbates airway hyperreactivity of inflamed airways. Notably, these cells express the sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 3 (S1PR3), and stimulation with a S1PR3 agonist efficiently induced broncho-constrictions, even in the absence of ovalbumin sensitization and inflammation. Our results show that the airway hyperreactivity phenotype can be physiologically dissociated from the immune component, and provide a platform for devising therapeutic approaches to asthma that target these pathways separately. PMID:25049382

  10. Population of sensory neurons essential for asthmatic hyperreactivity of inflamed airways.

    PubMed

    Tränkner, Dimitri; Hahne, Nadeau; Sugino, Ken; Hoon, Mark A; Zuker, Charles

    2014-08-01

    Asthma is a common debilitating inflammatory lung disease affecting over 200 million people worldwide. Here, we investigated neurogenic components involved in asthmatic-like attacks using the ovalbumin-sensitized murine model of the disease, and identified a specific population of neurons that are required for airway hyperreactivity. We show that ablating or genetically silencing these neurons abolished the hyperreactive broncho-constrictions, even in the presence of a fully developed lung inflammatory immune response. These neurons are found in the vagal ganglia and are characterized by the expression of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel. However, the TRPV1 channel itself is not required for the asthmatic-like hyperreactive airway response. We also demonstrate that optogenetic stimulation of this population of TRP-expressing cells with channelrhodopsin dramatically exacerbates airway hyperreactivity of inflamed airways. Notably, these cells express the sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 3 (S1PR3), and stimulation with a S1PR3 agonist efficiently induced broncho-constrictions, even in the absence of ovalbumin sensitization and inflammation. Our results show that the airway hyperreactivity phenotype can be physiologically dissociated from the immune component, and provide a platform for devising therapeutic approaches to asthma that target these pathways separately. PMID:25049382