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Sample records for chui flow coast

  1. Properties of oil and char derived from slow pyrolysis of Tetraselmis chui.

    PubMed

    Grierson, Scott; Strezov, Vladimir; Shah, Pushan

    2011-09-01

    Pyrolysis of biomass is a means to industrially manufacture renewable oil and gas, in addition to biochar for soil amendment and long-term carbon fixation. In this work, oil and char derived from the slow pyrolysis of the unicellular marine diatom Tetraselmis chui are analysed using a variety of techniques. The pyrolytic oil fraction exhibits a wide variety of fatty acids, alkanes, alkenes, amides, aldehydes, terpenes, pyrrolidinines, phytol and phenols, with a high heating value (HHV) of 28 MJ/kg. The biochar produced has a HHV of 14.5 MJ/kg and reveals a number of properties that are potentially valuable from an agronomic point of view, including high cation exchange capacity (CEC), large concentration of N, and a low C:N ratio. The quantity of C in T. chui biochar that can be expected to stabilise in soil amounts to approximately 9%/wt of the original feedstock, leading to a potential net reduction in atmospheric CO(2). PMID:21704515

  2. Gulf Coast, Arkoma gas increasing flow through Lebanon hub

    SciTech Connect

    True, W.R.

    1992-03-09

    Construction projects will hit stride this year for moving more U.S.-produced gas into the Northeast. Combined with projects recently completed, under way, or planned for Canadian gas at least 3 bcfd more gas will flow into New York, New Jersey, and the New England states within the next 3 years. This article looks at two major clusters of projectors to move U.S. Gulf Coast and Arkoma gas through the expanding Lebanon, Ohio, hub.

  3. Heat flow measurements on the southeast coast of Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hyndman, R.D.; Jaeger, J.C.; Sass, J.H.

    1969-01-01

    Three boreholes have been drilled for the Australian National University near the southeast coast of New South Wales, Australia. The heat flows found are 1.1, 1.0, and 1.3 ??cal/cm2sec. The errors resulting from the proximity of the sea and a lake, surface temperature change, conductivity structure and water flow have been examined. The radioactive heat production in some of the intrusive rocks of the area have also been measured. The heat flows are much lower than the values of about 2.0 found elsewhere in south eastern Australia. The lower values appear to be part of a distinct heat flow province in eastern Australia. ?? 1969.

  4. Water Flows and Nutrient Loads to the Southwest Coast of Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levesque, Victor A.

    1996-01-01

    The embayments and estuaries of Florida's southwest coast are an integral part of the south Florida ecosystem. Nutrients and other constituents are transported to these coastal waters by surface water and ground-water flow from the Everglades National Park (ENP) and the Big Cypress Preserve and by longshore and offshore tidal currents. The coastal area is an essential breeding ground for many estuarine and marine species and is a popular location for wilderness recreational pursuits as well as sport fishing. The volume of flow and the loads of nutrients being discharged from the streams draining the upland areas of ENP and Big Cypress Preserve currently are unknown.

  5. Debris flows on Belding Creek, Salmonberry River basin, northern Oregon Coast Range

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, L.M. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Belding Creek, a tributary of the Salmonberry River, has experienced repeated debris flow episodes. The Salmonberry River flows through Paleocene Tillamook Basalt and is located at longitude 45[degree]43 minutes in the Northern Oregon Coast Range. On January 9, 1990, a debris flow initiated on a first order tributary of Belding Creek during a heavy precipitation event. A month later another debris flow initiated on a different first order stream under similar conditions. Both debris flows traveled for a distance of approximately 2.1 km and poured into the main Belding Creek channel washing out Belding Road which crosses the stream. Numerical data was obtained from the youngest flow deposit. The debris flow material density is 2.5 g/cm[sup 3]. It traveled at an average velocity of 2.9 m/s with a shear strength of 2.5 [times] 10[sup 4] dn/cm[sup 2], a friction angle of 4[degree], and a cohesion value of 1.4 [times] 10[sup 4] dn/cm[sup 3]. Less than 3% of the fine sediments deposited are clay and silt. Deposits from previous, older debris flow events are in and adjacent to the Belding Creek stream channel. Similar processes are evident in other major tributaries of the Salmonberry River, although these other stream channels have not shown recent activity. Each stream in the area that has experienced past debris flows similar to Belding Creek has a landslide feature at the top and follows regional lineation patterns.

  6. Evidence for an eastward flow along the Central and South American Caribbean Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Carlos Alberto; Barton, Eric Desmond; Mooers, Christopher N. K.

    2003-06-01

    Hydrographic transects suggest an eastward flow with a subsurface core along the entire southern boundary of the Caribbean Sea. The transport of the coastal limb of the Panama-Colombia Gyre (PCG), known as the Panama-Colombia Countercurrent, decreases toward the east (from ˜6 Sv off Panama), as water is lost into the recirculation of the PCG. Off Panama, the flow is strongest at the surface, but, off Colombia, it is strongest at around 100 m. A portion of the counterflow (˜1 Sv) continues eastward along the Colombian coast as far as the Guajira region (12°N, 72°W), where it submerges to become an undercurrent beneath the coastal upwelling center there. The eastward flow also occurs in the Venezuela Basin, beneath the coastal upwelling region off Cariaco Basin and exits the Caribbean through the Grenada Channel at around 200 m depth. Numerical simulations suggest that this flow, counter to the Caribbean Current, is a semi-continuous feature along the entire southern boundary of the Caribbean, and that it is associated with offshore cyclonic eddies. It probably constitutes part of the Sverdrup circulation of the Tropical North Atlantic cyclonic cell.

  7. Observing Poleward Relaxation Flows Along the Central California Coast Using Gliders as Virtual Moorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washburn, L.; Aragon, D.; Haldeman, C.; Ohlmann, C.; Gotschalk, C.; Couto, N.; Miles, T. N.; Robbins, I.; Schofield, O.; Moline, M.; Kerfoot, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Gliders and moorings were used in 2011 to observe warm propagating currents that follow relaxations of prevailing upwelling-favorable winds along the central CA coast. Additional measurements will occur in August and September 2012. We are experimenting with various sampling patterns to determine which best allow the gliders to maintain their horizontal positions in the presence of ambient coastal currents. The gliders, manufactured by Teledyne Webb, measure CTD variables and current velocity using externally mounted acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs). ADCP data are processed following the method described by Todd et al. 2011. In September, 2011 two gliders were deployed offshore of Port San Luis, CA, first in 55 m water depth and then in 95 m. During their deployments within a 3-week period, the gliders observed the passage of a strong poleward relaxation flow. The flow followed a rapid decrease in equatorward wind stress from ~0.4 Pa to zero over 24 hr. Sequential warming at three moorings along the coast on the 15 m isobath revealed propagation of about 25 km/day. As the flow passed the gliders, alongshore currents reversed from ~0.15 m/s equatorward to ~0.3 m/s poleward over about 12 hours. ADCP-measured near-surface currents were consistent with simultaneous currents measured in the region by high frequency radar (~1 m depth). Near-surface temperatures at the gliders increased by 3 °C and near-surface salinity decreased by 0.25, consistent with source waters in the Southern California Bight. As of this writing two gliders are being prepared for deployment offshore of Pt. Sal, CA where two moorings have been deployed on the 15 m and 26 m isobaths. Soon after deployment, the gliders will profile around the mooring on the 26 m isobath to provide a validation data set for currents measured by the glider-mounted ADCPs. The gliders will then move offshore to measure poleward flow characteristics on the mid-shelf in water depths of 55m and 100 m. We also

  8. Relation Between Fog & Summer Stream Flow on the North Coast of California in Redwood National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavery, K.

    2012-12-01

    There are three common definitions of fog; visibility less than 800 meters (Dawson 1998), ceiling height less than 400 meters (Liepper 1995, Johnstone & Dawson 2010) or low level stratus that touches the ground. Regardless of the definition used the ecological importance of fog is evidenced by the commonly used term occult precipitation i.e. water that is not accounted for. Fog is most common on the coast of Northern California during summer, the time of least precipitation. The diurnal flux in stream flows is also most evident in the summer. Diurnal flux and seasonal trends in stream flow are thought to be controlled by precipitation and evapotranspiration. Fog impacts both precipitation and evapotranspiration. While changes in fog regimes are expected to occur as a result of climate change, the ability to measure fog and anticipate the implications are in nascent stages. Although, methods for detecting fog using satellite imagery have been developed they have not been perfected and they generally only give height info for the cloud deck (top of clouds). Although deck height is important for aviation and enables some inference of what is occurring on the ground the thickness and base height are important variables for developing a greater understanding of the impacts of fog. Fog harps will be used to detect fog on the ground. Fog harp data will be compared with the results of satellite imagery analysis for presence or absence of fog. After detrending, stream flow data will be divided into categories of fog and no fog. The two categories will be tested for a statistically significant difference. The results have the potential to help solve a piece of the climate change puzzle. The data will help with the anticipation of change in stream flows in areas with high levels of summer fog and Mediterranean climates as well as refine techniques for analyzing satellite imagery for presence or absence of fog.

  9. Radiosonde and satellite observations of topographic flow off the Norwegian coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugaard Furevik, Birgitte; Dagestad, Knut-Frode; Olafsson, Haraldur

    2015-04-01

    Winds in Norway are strongly affected by the complex topography and in some areas the average wind speed in the fjords may exceed those on the coast. Such effects are revealed through a statistical analysis derived wind speed from ~8500 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) scenes covering the Norwegian coast. We have compared the results with modelled winds from the operational atmosphere model at MET (horizontal grid spacing of 2.5km) and 3 years of measurements from "M/S Trollfjord", a ferry traversing a 2400km coastal route between the cities Bergen and Kirkenes. The analysis reveals many coastal details of the wind field not observed from the meteorological station network of Norway. The data set proves useful for verification of offshore winds in the model. High temporal resolution radiosonde winds from two locations are used to analyse the topographic effects.

  10. Map of debris flows caused by rainfall during 1996 in parts of the Reedsport and Deer Head Point quadrangles, Douglas County, southern Coast Range, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coe, Jeffrey A.; Michael, John A.; Burgos, Marianela Mercado

    2011-01-01

    This 1:12,000-scale map shows an inventory of debris flows caused by rainfall during 1996 in a 94.4 km2 area in the southern Coast Range of Oregon. This map and associated digital data are part of a larger U.S. Geological Survey study of debris flows in the southern Coast Range. Available evidence indicates that the flows were triggered by a rain storm that occurred between November 17 and 19. The closest rain gage in the Coast Range (Goodwin Peak) recorded 245 mm during the storm. Maximum rainfall intensity during the storm was 13.2 mm/hr on November 18. Debris flows were photogrammetrically mapped from 1:12,000-scale aerial photographs flown in May, 1997. The inventory is presented on imagery derived from LiDAR data acquired in 2008. We classified mapped debris flows into four categories based on the type of debris-flow activity: (1) discrete slide source areas, (2) predominantly erosion, (3) predominantly transport or mixed erosion and deposition, and (4) predominantly deposition. Locations of woody-debris jams are also shown on the map. The area encompassed by debris flows is 2.1 percent of the 94.4 km2 map area.

  11. Nonlinear-regression flow model of the Gulf Coast aquifer systems in the south-central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuiper, L.K.

    1994-01-01

    A multiple-regression methodology was used to help answer questions concerning model reliability, and to calibrate a time-dependent variable-density ground-water flow model of the gulf coast aquifer systems in the south-central United States. More than 40 regression models with 2 to 31 regressions parameters are used and detailed results are presented for 12 of the models. More than 3,000 values for grid-element volume-averaged head and hydraulic conductivity are used for the regression model observations. Calculated prediction interval half widths, though perhaps inaccurate due to a lack of normality of the residuals, are the smallest for models with only four regression parameters. In addition, the root-mean weighted residual decreases very little with an increase in the number of regression parameters. The various models showed considerable overlap between the prediction inter- vals for shallow head and hydraulic conductivity. Approximate 95-percent prediction interval half widths for volume-averaged freshwater head exceed 108 feet; for volume-averaged base 10 logarithm hydraulic conductivity, they exceed 0.89. All of the models are unreliable for the prediction of head and ground-water flow in the deeper parts of the aquifer systems, including the amount of flow coming from the underlying geopressured zone. Truncating the domain of solution of one model to exclude that part of the system having a ground-water density greater than 1.005 grams per cubic centimeter or to exclude that part of the systems below a depth of 3,000 feet, and setting the density to that of freshwater does not appreciably change the results for head and ground-water flow, except for locations close to the truncation surface.

  12. Trophic structure and flows of energy in the Huizache-Caimanero lagoon complex on the Pacific coast of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zetina-Rejón, Manuel J.; Arreguín-Sánchez, Francisco; Chávez, Ernesto A.

    2003-08-01

    The Huizache-Caimanero coastal lagoon complex on the Pacific coast of Mexico supports an important shrimp fishery and is one of the most productive systems in catch per unit area of this resource. Four other less important fish groups are also exploited. In this study, we integrated the available information of the system into a mass-balance trophic model to describe the ecosystem structure and flows of energy using the E COPATH approach. The model includes 26 functional groups consisting of 15 fish groups, seven invertebrate groups, macrophytes, phytoplankton, and a detritus group. The resulting model was consistent as indicated by the output parameters. According to the overall pedigree index (0.75), which measures the quality of the input data on a scale from 0 to 1, it is a high quality model. Results indicate that zooplankton, microcrustaceans, and polychaetes are the principal link between trophic level (TL) one (primary producers and detritus) and consumers of higher TLs. Most production from macrophytes flows to detritus, and phytoplankton production is incorporated into the food web by zooplankton. Half of the flow from TL one to the next level come from detritus, which is an important energy source not only for several groups in the ecosystem but also for fisheries, as shown by mixed trophic impacts. The Huizache-Caimanero complex has the typical structure of tropical coastal lagoons and estuaries. The TL of consumers ranges from 2.0 to 3.6 because most groups are composed of juveniles, which use the lagoons as a nursery or protection area. Most energy flows were found in the lower part of the trophic web.

  13. Flow cytometric detection of DNA cell cycle alterations in hemocytes of mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) off the Adriatic coast, Croatia.

    PubMed

    Bihari, Nevenka; Micić, Milena; Batel, Renato; Zahn, Rudolf K

    2003-07-16

    Studies were carried out to determine the alteration in DNA cell cycle characteristics of hemocytes of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis collected at 17 different locations (146 individuals) along the Adriatic coast, Croatia. In order to connect possible genomic manifestation to urban and/or industrial waste flow cytometry was used. We studied incidence of altered DNA profile reflective of chromosomal fragmentation phenomena or aneuploid mosaicism, coefficient of variation (CV) in DNA fluorescence as a measure of intraindividual genome size variability and DNA index (DI) as a measure of ploidy. The different classes of DNA cell cycle alterations found in this study mirror either acute or cumulative genotoxic effects of the surrounding environment on mussel hemocyte DNA. These are intraindividual genome size variability (CV>8, seven individuals from four sites), aneuploidy (altered DNA profile and DI<0.9, 45 individuals from 14 sites) and accidental apoptotic processes (altered DNA profile and presence of apoptotic cells, two individuals from two sites). Normal cell cycle DNA profiles were obtained for 89 (60.9%) individuals from all 17 sites and for 146 examined samples polyploids were absent. Flow cytometry proved to be a powerful technique for the determination of alterations in cell cycle characteristics in mussel hemocyte DNA. Therefore, it may be used in pollution control measurements to distinguish affected or vulnerable populations from healthy populations living in the presence of a wide variety of marine environmental contaminants. PMID:12799105

  14. Mathematical simulation of boulder dislodgement by high-energy marine flows in the western coast of Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canelas, Ricardo; Oliveira, Maria; Crespo, Alejandro; Neves, Ramiro; Costa, Pedro; Freitas, Conceição; Andrade, César; Ferreira, Rui

    2014-05-01

    The study of coastal boulder deposits related with marine abrupt inundation events has been addressed by several authors using conventional numerical solutions that simulate particle transport by storm and tsunami, sometimes with contradictory results (Nandasena et al. 2011, Kain et al. 2012). The biggest challenge has been the differentiation of the events (storm or tsunami), and the reconstruction of wave parameters (e.g. wave height, length, direction) responsible for the entrainment and transport of these megaclasts. In this study we employ an inverse-problem strategy to determine the cause of dislodgement of megaclasts and to explain the pattern of deposition found in some locations of the Portuguese western coast, well above maximum records of sea level. It is envisaged that the causes are either flows originated by wave breaking, typically associated to storms, which would impart large momentum in a short time interval (herein impulsive motion), or long waves such as a tsunamis, that would transport the clasts in a mode analogous to bedload (herein sustained motion). The geometry of the problem is idealized but represents the key features of overhanging layers related with fractures, bedding and differential erosion of sub-horizontal layers. In plan view, concave and convex coastline shapes are testes to assess the influence of flow concentration. These geometrical features are representative of the western Portuguese coast. The fluid-solid model solves numerically the Navier-Stokes equations for the liquid phase and Newton's motion equations for solid bodies. The discretization of both fluid and solids is performed with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). The model is based DualSPHyics code (www.dual.sphysics.org) and represents an effort to avoid different discretization techniques for different phases in motion. This approach to boulder transport demonstrates that the ability of high-energy flow events to entrain and transport large particles largely

  15. Subsurface Observations in a Wind-Driven Flow in Littoral Waters off the East Coast of Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernys, M.; Dhanak, M.

    2001-12-01

    Observations of distribution of currents, temperature, salinity and density over a 1km by 0.5km spatial region in littoral waters (~20m deep) off the east coast of Florida during a passage of a low-pressure atmospheric front will be described. Meteorological and ocean surface current radar (OSCR) observations clearly show the passage of a low pressure front, during April 8-9, 2000, involving a period of warm onshore winds (~10m/s) followed by one of cold offshore winds (~14m/s) over a period of around 40 hours. Subsurface current observations from a bottom-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) and from an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) over an 18-hour period show almost co-incident shift in current direction with the corresponding shift in the wind direction, suggesting that the currents were dominantly wind driven. Dominant currents were approximately 30 degrees to the right of the wind direction, consistent with Ekman flow. The associated magnitude of the depth of the Ekman layer and supporting temperature, salinity and water density observations from the AUV and ship-based casts will be presented. Acknowledgements: The work is part of an on-going effort, supported by ONR (Program Manager: Dr Thomas Curtin), involving AUV-based subsurface observations during adverse atmospheric conditions. Other observation elements (OSCR, bottom-mounted ADCP, moored buoys) are supported by University of Miami, NSWC, Nova Southeastern University, University of South Florida and other partners of the South Florida Ocean Measurement Center.

  16. Assessing morphological, climatic and structural factors controlling water discharge and sediment load of rivers flowing from the Sierra Madre de Chiapas to the Pacific Coast (Southern Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz-Salinas, E.; Castillo, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Sierra Madre de Chiapas (SMC) is a steep mountain range located in the south-western part of Mexico with elevations higher than 2000 m. The SMC is ~30 km off the Pacific Coast and it is oriented parallel to the coast. The annual rainfall exceeds 6 m and most of this takes place during summer season when low-pressure systems and cyclones are frequent. The rivers in SMC incise into the granite and transport large volumes of sediment. Even though rivers can be regarded as bedrock bedrock channels these suddenly change to alluvial-type rivers when these flow in the coastal plain which is ~10 km from the headwater of rivers. There are not data available of the sediment yield of rivers, however, the well-broad coastal plain and the wide continental shelf suggest that the sediment transport from the mountain area to the lowlands is significantly high. Here we assess the main morphological, climatic and structural factors controlling water discharge and sediment load of the rivers flowing from the SMC to the Pacific Coast by means of (1) topographical analysis on a high-resolution DEM, (2) grain-size and OSL analysis on sediment extracted from the riverbed of the main rivers and (3) time-series analysis from the available data of sediment discharge and sediment load. Our results indicate that the river incision and sediment transport is particularly high at the southern sector of the SMC where the topographic and climatic factors promote higher erosion rates.

  17. Assessment of topographic and drainage network controls on debris-flow travel distance along the west coast of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coe, Jeffrey A.; Reid, Mark E.; Brien, Dainne L.; Michael, John A.

    2011-01-01

    To better understand controls on debris-flow entrainment and travel distance, we examined topographic and drainage network characteristics of initiation locations in two separate debris-flow prone areas located 700 km apart along the west coast of the U.S. One area was located in northern California, the other in southern Oregon. In both areas, debris flows mobilized from slides during large storms, but, when stratified by number of contributing initiation locations, median debris-flow travel distances in Oregon were 5 to 8 times longer than median distances in California. Debris flows in Oregon readily entrained channel material; entrainment in California was minimal. To elucidate this difference, we registered initiation locations to high-resolution airborne LiDAR, and then examined travel distances with respect to values of slope, upslope contributing area, planform curvature, distance from initiation locations to the drainage network, and number of initiation areas that contributed to flows. Results show distinct differences in the topographic and drainage network characteristics of debris-flow initiation locations between the two study areas. Slope and planform curvature of initiation locations (landslide headscarps), commonly used to predict landslide-prone areas, were not useful for predicting debris-flow travel distances. However, a positive, power-law relation exists between median debris-flow travel distance and the number of contributing debris-flow initiation locations. Moreover, contributing area and the proximity of the initiation locations to the drainage network both influenced travel distances, but proximity to the drainage network was the better predictor of travel distance. In both study areas, flows that interacted with the drainage network flowed significantly farther than those that did not. In California, initiation sites within 60 m of the network were likely to reach the network and generate longtraveled flows; in Oregon, the threshold was

  18. Simulation of flow in the upper North Coast Limestone Aquifer, Manati-Vega Baja area, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cherry, Gregory S.

    2001-01-01

    A two-dimensional computer ground-water model was constructed of the Manati-Vega Baja area to improve the understanding of the unconfined upper aquifer within the North Coast Province of Puerto Rico. The modeled area covers approximately 79 square miles within the municipios of Manati and Vega Baja and small portions of Vega Alta and Barceloneta. Steady-state two-dimensional ground-water simulations were correlated to conditions prior to construction of the Laguna Tortuguero outlet channel in 1940 and calibrated to the observed potentiometric surface in March 1995. At the regional scale, the unconfined Upper North Coast Limestone aquifer is a diffuse ground-water flow system through the Aguada and Aymamon limestone units. The calibrated model input parameters for aquifer recharge varied from 2 inches per year in coastal areas to 18 inches per year in the upland areas south of Manati and Vega Baja. The calibrated transmissivity values ranged from less than 500 feet squared per day in the upland areas near the southern boundary to 70,000 feet squared per day in the areas west of Vega Baja. Increased ground-water withdrawals from 1.0 cubic foot per second for 1940 conditions to 26.3 cubic feet per second in 1995, has reduced the natural ground-water discharge to springs and wetland areas, and induced additional recharge from the rivers. The most important regional drainage feature is Laguna Tortuguero, which is the major ground-water discharge body for the upper aquifer, and has a drainage area of approximately 17 square miles. The discharge to the sea from Laguna Tortuguero through the outlet channel has been measured on a bi-monthly basis since 1974. The outflow represents a combination of ground- and surface-water discharge over the drainage area. Hydrologic conditions, prior to construction of the Laguna Tortuguero outlet channel in 1943, can be considered natural conditions with minimal ground-water pumpage (1.0 cubic foot per second), and heads in the lagoon

  19. California Coast

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... of the cloud bank is San Nicolas Island, and further up the coast are the Channel Islands. The Los Angeles basin is just south of center; ... Mar 14, 2000 Images:  California Coast location:  United States region:  ...

  20. Coast Guard

    SciTech Connect

    Meed, R.M.

    1991-10-01

    This paper testifies that water pollution by oil remains significant, and noncompliance with federal regulations to prevent oil pollution continues to be great in the four ports GAO visited. Additionally, the impact of the Coast Guard's efforts to reduce oil spill in unknown because the agency does not compile and analyze inspection and spill data needed to make this determination. Further, the Coast Guard has not been inspecting portions of pipes that transport oil between docks and storage tanks. Coast Guard officials now acknowledge this responsibility.

  1. Reactivation of Kamb Ice Stream tributaries triggers century-scale reorganization of Siple Coast ice flow in West Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Bougamont, M.; Christoffersen, P.; Price, S. F.; Fricker, H. A.; Tulaczyk, S.; Carter, S. P.

    2015-10-21

    Ongoing, centennial-scale flow variability within the Ross ice streams of West Antarctica suggests that the present-day positive mass balance in this region may reverse in the future. Here we use a three-dimensional ice sheet model to simulate ice flow in this region over 250 years. The flow responds to changing basal properties, as a subglacial till layer interacts with water transported in an active subglacial hydrological system. We show that a persistent weak bed beneath the tributaries of the dormant Kamb Ice Stream is a source of internal ice flow instability, which reorganizes all ice streams in this region, leading to a reduced (positive) mass balance within decades and a net loss of ice within two centuries. This hitherto unaccounted for flow variability could raise sea level by 5 mm this century. Furthermore, better constraints on future sea level change from this region will require improved estimates of geothermal heat flux and subglacial water transport.

  2. Review: Groundwater flow and transport modeling of karst aquifers, with particular reference to the North Coast Limestone aquifer system of Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemizadeh, Reza; Hellweger, Ferdinand; Butscher, Christoph; Padilla, Ingrid; Vesper, Dorothy; Field, Malcolm; Alshawabkeh, Akram

    2013-01-01

    Karst systems have a high degree of heterogeneity and anisotropy, which makes them behave very differently from other aquifers. Slow seepage through the rock matrix and fast flow through conduits and fractures result in a high variation in spring response to precipitation events. Contaminant storage occurs in the rock matrix and epikarst, but contaminant transport occurs mostly along preferential pathways that are typically inaccessible locations, which makes modeling of karst systems challenging. Computer models for understanding and predicting hydraulics and contaminant transport in aquifers make assumptions about the distribution and hydraulic properties of geologic features that may not always apply to karst aquifers. This paper reviews the basic concepts, mathematical descriptions, and modeling approaches for karst systems. The North Coast Limestone aquifer system of Puerto Rico (USA) is introduced as a case study to illustrate and discuss the application of groundwater models in karst aquifer systems to evaluate aquifer contamination. PMID:23645996

  3. Reactivation of Kamb Ice Stream tributaries triggers century-scale reorganization of Siple Coast ice flow in West Antarctica

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bougamont, M.; Christoffersen, P.; Price, S. F.; Fricker, H. A.; Tulaczyk, S.; Carter, S. P.

    2015-10-21

    Ongoing, centennial-scale flow variability within the Ross ice streams of West Antarctica suggests that the present-day positive mass balance in this region may reverse in the future. Here we use a three-dimensional ice sheet model to simulate ice flow in this region over 250 years. The flow responds to changing basal properties, as a subglacial till layer interacts with water transported in an active subglacial hydrological system. We show that a persistent weak bed beneath the tributaries of the dormant Kamb Ice Stream is a source of internal ice flow instability, which reorganizes all ice streams in this region, leadingmore » to a reduced (positive) mass balance within decades and a net loss of ice within two centuries. This hitherto unaccounted for flow variability could raise sea level by 5 mm this century. Furthermore, better constraints on future sea level change from this region will require improved estimates of geothermal heat flux and subglacial water transport.« less

  4. Coast Guard

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The 11-million gallon Exxon Valdez oil spill highlighted deficiencies in the nation's ability to contain and recover spilled oil. The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 represents a major effort by Congress to address these deficiencies and to clarify the roles and responsibilities of the private sector and the federal government in preventing, preparing for, and responding to oil spills. This report examines the Coast Guard's efforts to avoid unnecessary and wasteful duplication by coordinating with the private sector and others, including federal and state agencies, its plans to buy oil spill response equipment and the new responsibilities the act places on the private sector and the Coast Guard and if these responsibilities call for a shift in emphasis in Coast Guard oil spill response activities.

  5. Coast Guard

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-01

    GAO found the situation in the Philadelphia and New York ports similar to that in Prince William Sound-neither industry nor the Coast Guard are prepared to respond to major oil spills. This report discusses how this unpreparedness is due to a lack of specificity in the industry and Coast Guard's plan on how to deal with spills of various sizes and Coast Guard authority to require ship owners and operators to have contingency plans or to require changes in existing plans. On the basic of recent experiences, GAO believes that prevention of oil spills rather than responding to them should be the main priority. Experiences in Price William Sound and in Philadelphia, however, show that much needs to be done to improve prevention measures like monitoring and guiding ship movements and using harbor pilots or vessel escorts.

  6. Coast Guard

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports that about 16,000 oil spills involving the release of more than 46 million gallons of oil took place in U.S. navigable waters in 1988; spills at water-front facilities, where vessels load and unload oil, accounted for about half of the oil spilled. While the Coast Guard acknowledges its responsibility for regulating and inspecting waterfront facilities, it efforts in this area have fallen short because it has not been inspecting portions of intrafacility pipes that transport oil between docks and storage tanks. Water pollution and noncompliance with federal oil pollution prevention regulations continue to be high at waterfront facilities. Yet the Coast Guard cannot determine how effective its inspection program has been in reducing the risk of oil spills because information on program results, such as the types, severity, and frequency of deficiencies found by inspectors, is not compiled an linked with information on the causes of oil spills found by investigators. Until the Coast Guard collects this type of information, it will not be in a position to establish measurable goals.

  7. The mass mortality of blue mussels (Mytilus spp.) from the Atlantic coast of France is associated with heavy genomic abnormalities as evidenced by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Benabdelmouna, Abdellah; Ledu, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    Since 2014, France's blue mussel industry has been facing heavy mortality outbreaks (90-100%) affecting both juveniles and adults. This report presents evidence of heavy genomic abnormalities associated with mortality outbreaks in blue mussels, Mytilus edulis-galloprovincialis, from the Atlantic coast of France. In this study, ploidy characteristics of hemic cells were investigated using Flow CytoMetry (FCM), revealing an unusual, broad continuum of ploidy distribution from hypodiploidy to tetraploidy. FCM was additionally used to evaluate, at individual and populations levels, different thresholds of genomic abnormality (GA%) using the percentage of non-diploid nuclei. Individual mussels were considered to be abnormal when more than 10% of hemocytes in S-G2/M phase were present. At the population level, a threshold of 6% for the mean intensity of the abnormality is proposed, which means in the population, more than 6% of individual mussels have to present with more than 10% of their hemocytes in S-G2/M phase. GA% was found to be significantly predictive of the final mortality. Based on the established thresholds, only two mussel stocks analyzed in this study were considered to have good cytogenetic quality, while all other stocks appeared to be affected. FCM offers a very powerful tool to help manage current blue mussel mortality in France. We also believe that annual and extensive determination of cytogenetic quality of wild and cultivated mussel beds along with exclusive use of FCM-qualified mussel seeds should be a priority. PMID:27264803

  8. Geochemical evolution of waters within the north coast limestone aquifers of Puerto Rico; a conceptualization based on a flow path in the Barceloneta area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roman-Mas, A. J.; Lee, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Water samples along a groundwater flow path in the Barceloneta area, Puerto Rico, were collected from wells screened in the Montebello Limestone Member of the Cibao Formation (artesian aquifer) and in the overlying Aguada and Aymamon Limestones (water table aquifer). The groundwater chemistry changes as water migrates from recharge areas to downgradient zones in the aquifers. Dissolved magnesium, dissolved sulfate, pH, and carbon-13 isotope generally increase down-gradient. Total inorganic carbon and calcium decrease within the freshwater parts of the aquifer. Mass transfer calculations show that the likely reaction model is carbon dioxide incorporation as water infiltrates through the soil zone, followed by calcite dissolution as water recharges the aquifer. As water moves downgradient within the artesian aquifer, carbon dioxide may degas as a result of calcite precipitation while gypsum and dolomite are dissolved. Within the water table aquifer, continuous recharge of waters rich in carbonic acid maintains the dissolution of the carbonate minerals. Near the coast the mixing of fresh groundwater with saltwater is the primary process affecting water chemistry within the water table aquifer. (Author 's abstract)

  9. Gas hydrate as a proxy for contemporary climate change and shallow heat flow on the US east coast and north slope of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phrampus, Benjamin J.

    Methane hydrates, ice-like solids that sequester large quantities of methane in their crystal structure, are stable at moderate pressures and low temperature. The methane contained within these naturally occurring deposits is typically derived from organic matter that is broken down by thermogenic or biogenic activity. Methane hydrate is found world-wide on nearly every continental margin on Earth where the thermodynamic conditions and methane gas permit the formation of hydrate. Hydrate potentially represents the largest reservoir of hydrocarbon on the planet, yet their response to evolving thermodynamic conditions are poorly understood. This dissertation is a summary of several projects that investigate the unique properties of gas hydrate, and the information we can gain from detailed analysis of these natural deposits. Gas hydrate response to contemporary warming is currently poorly understood. Determining if current or past warming trends are having direct effects on the hydrate stability regime is a region of active interest. The observed zone of hydrate stability is deduced from the current distribution of hydrate. Using current geologic and hydrologic conditions, we can compare the model-predicted zone of hydrate stability and directly compare the data with the observed stability regime. Due to the low thermal diffusivity of sediments, heat conduction is slow, thus if the thermodynamic conditions changed recently, the observed zone of stability will not have time to reach equilibrium and will appear anomalous compared with the predicted stability zone. Using this technique, combined with observations of recent changes in ocean temperatures, I identify two regions currently experiencing ocean warming induced hydrate dissociation: The U.S. East Coast (N. Atlantic) and the North Slope of Alaska (Beaufort Sea). These regions are currently experiencing hydrate dissociation due to contemporary climate forcing. Hydrates also offer unique insights into the

  10. The use of wavelet transformations in the solution of two-phase flow problems

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, G.J.; Nikolaou, M.; You, Y.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper the authors present the use of wavelets to solve the non-linear Partial Differential Equation (PDE) of two-phase flow in one dimension. The wavelet transforms allow a drastically different approach in the discretization of space. In contrast to the traditional trigonometric basis functions, wavelets approximate a function not by cancellation but by placement of wavelets at appropriate locations. When an abrupt change, such as a shock wave or a spike, occurs in a function, only local coefficients in a wavelet approximation will be affected. The unique feature of wavelets is their Multi-Resolution Analysis (MRA) property, which allows seamless investigation at nay spatial resolution. The use of wavelets is tested in the solution of the one-dimensional Buckley-Leverett problem against analytical solutions and solutions obtained from standard numerical models. Two classes of wavelet bases (Daubechies and Chui-Wang) and two methods (Galerkin and collocation) are investigated. The authors determine that the Chui-Wang wavelets and a collection method provide the optimum wavelet solution for this type of problem. Increasing the resolution level improves the accuracy of the solution, but the order of the basis function seems to be far less important. The results indicate that wavelet transforms are an effective and accurate method which does not suffer from oscillations or numerical smearing in the presence of steep fronts.

  11. The use of wavelet transforms in the solution of two-phase flow problems

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, G.J.; Nikolaou, M.; You, Yong

    1994-10-01

    In this paper we present the use of wavelets to solve the nonlinear Partial Differential.Equation (PDE) of two-phase flow in one dimension. The wavelet transforms allow a drastically different approach in the discretization of space. In contrast to the traditional trigonometric basis functions, wavelets approximate a function not by cancellation but by placement of wavelets at appropriate locations. When an abrupt chance, such as a shock wave or a spike, occurs in a function, only local coefficients in a wavelet approximation will be affected. The unique feature of wavelets is their Multi-Resolution Analysis (MRA) property, which allows seamless investigational any spatial resolution. The use of wavelets is tested in the solution of the one-dimensional Buckley-Leverett problem against analytical solutions and solutions obtained from standard numerical models. Two classes of wavelet bases (Daubechies and Chui-Wang) and two methods (Galerkin and collocation) are investigated. We determine that the Chui-Wang, wavelets and a collocation method provide the optimum wavelet solution for this type of problem. Increasing the resolution level improves the accuracy of the solution, but the order of the basis function seems to be far less important. Our results indicate that wavelet transforms are an effective and accurate method which does not suffer from oscillations or numerical smearing in the presence of steep fronts.

  12. Southwest coast of Greenland and Davis Strait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image was taken by MODIS as it passed over the southwest coast of Greenland (right) and the Davis Strait (center and left). The Davis Strait connects Baffin Bay to the north and the Labrador Sea to the south, and separates Greenland from Baffin Island, Canada. The Davis Strait is part of the Northwest Passage, a navigable seaway connecting the Atlantic Ocean and the Pacific Ocean. The image shows the prevailing currents in the area, with the warm water of a branch of the North Atlantic Drift flowing northward along the Greenland coast, and the cold, iceberg-filled Labrador Current flowing southward along the Baffin Island coast.

  13. Ground-water discharge and base-flow nitrate loads of nontidal streams, and their relation to a hydrogeomorphic classification of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, middle Atlantic Coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bachman, L. Joseph; Lindsey, Bruce D.; Brakebill, John W.; Powars, David S.

    1998-01-01

    Existing data on base-flow and groundwater nitrate loads were compiled and analyzed to assess the significance of groundwater discharge as a source of the nitrate load to nontidal streams of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. These estimates were then related to hydrogeomorphic settings based on lithology and physiographic province to provide insight on the areal distribution of ground-water discharge. Base-flow nitrate load accounted for 26 to about 100 percent of total-flow nitrate load, with a median value of 56 percent, and it accounted for 17 to 80 percent of total-flow total-nitrogen load, with a median value of 48 percent. Hydrograph separations were conducted on continuous streamflow records from 276 gaging stations within the watershed. The values for base flow thus calculated were considered an estimate of ground-water discharge. The ratio of base flow to total flow provided an estimate of the relative importance of ground-water discharge within a basin. Base-flow nitrate loads, total-flow nitrate loads, and total-flow total-nitrogen loads were previously computed from water-quality and discharge measurements by use of a regression model. Base-flow nitrate loads were available from 78 stations, total-flow nitrate loads were available from 86 stations, and total-flow total-nitrogen loads were available for 48 stations. The percentage of base-flow nitrate load to total-flow nitrate load could be computed for 57 stations, whereas the percentage of base-flow nitrate load to totalflow total-nitrogen load could be computed for 36 stations. These loads were divided by the basin area to obtain yields, which were used to compare the nitrate discharge from basins of different sizes. The results indicate that ground-water discharge is a significant source of water and nitrate to the total streamflow and nitrate load. Base flow accounted for 16 to 92 percent of total streamflow at the 276 sampling sites, with a median value of 54 percent. It is estimated that of the 50

  14. Year of the Coast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobik, Gray; Lux, Gretchen

    1980-01-01

    President Carter has designated 1980 as the "Year of the Coast" through the efforts of a coalition known as the Coast Alliance. The Coast Alliance will alert people to changes along the coastline, and the need for public participation in the decisions which govern the use and abuse of the coastline. (DS)

  15. Princess Astrid Coast, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The continent of Antarctica is almost completely covered by a thick blanket of ice, punctuated only by steep mountain peaks and a handful of dry valleys. Antarctica is also ringed by a permanent ice shelf, and that is surrounded by seasonal sea ice. The image above, acquired by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on September 26, 2001, shows many of the types of ice found in Antarctica. At the bottom of the image is the ice of the continental glacier, which is up to 4,000 meters thick in the interior. These thick glaciers are held in place by coastal mountain ranges. Some ice does flow through the mountains, spilling onto the relatively flat land of the Princess Astrid Coast. Cold air also spills over the mountains, creating very strong and persistent 'katabatic' winds. These scour the snow off the tops of the glaciers, leaving pale blue patches of bare ice. Above the coastline is the ice shelf, which is much smoother. There, glacial ice actually floats on the sea surface. Beyond that is the chaotic surface of the sea ice, which has been solidifying all winter long. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  16. Gulf Coast Wetlands

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Wetlands of the Gulf Coast     View Larger ... highlights coastal areas of four states along the Gulf of Mexico: Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and part of the Florida panhandle. The ... date:  Oct 15, 2001 Images:  Gulf Coast location:  United States Gulf of ...

  17. The 6 August 2010 Mount Meager rock slide-debris flow, Coast Mountains, British Columbia: characteristics, dynamics, and implications for hazard and risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthrie, R. H.; Friele, P.; Allstadt, K.; Roberts, N.; Evans, S. G.; Delaney, K. B.; Roche, D.; Clague, J. J.; Jakob, M.

    2012-05-01

    A large rock avalanche occurred at 03:27:30 PDT, 6 August 2010, in the Mount Meager Volcanic Complex southwest British Columbia. The landslide initiated as a rock slide in Pleistocene rhyodacitic volcanic rock with the collapse of the secondary peak of Mount Meager. The detached rock mass impacted the volcano's weathered and saturated flanks, creating a visible seismic signature on nearby seismographs. Undrained loading of the sloping flank caused the immediate and extremely rapid evacuation of the entire flank with a strong horizontal force, as the rock slide transformed into a debris flow. The disintegrating mass travelled down Capricorn Creek at an average velocity of 64 m s-1, exhibiting dramatic super-elevation in bends to the intersection of Meager Creek, 7.8 km from the source. At Meager Creek the debris impacted the south side of Meager valley, causing a runup of 270 m above the valley floor and the deflection of the landslide debris both upstream (for 3.7 km) and downstream into the Lillooet River valley (for 4.9 km), where it blocked the Lillooet River river for a couple of hours, approximately 10 km from the landslide source. Deposition at the Capricorn-Meager confluence also dammed Meager Creek for about 19 h creating a lake 1.5 km long. The overtopping of the dam and the predicted outburst flood was the basis for a night time evacuation of 1500 residents in the town of Pemberton, 65 km downstream. High-resolution GeoEye satellite imagery obtained on 16 October 2010 was used to create a post-event digital elevation model. Comparing pre- and post-event topography we estimate the volume of the initial displaced mass from the flank of Mount Meager to be 48.5 × 106 m3, the height of the path (H) to be 2183 m and the total length of the path (L) to be 12.7 km. This yields H/L = 0.172 and a fahrböschung (travel angle) of 9.75°. The movement was recorded on seismographs in British Columbia and Washington State with the initial impact, the debris flow

  18. Coasts under pressure.

    PubMed

    Hinrichsen, D

    1994-01-01

    In most areas of the world, too many people live or play along the coast. Municipal and industrial wastes pollute coastal waters. Rivers spew erosion sediment and pollutants into these waters. Economic development is often the only management strategy for coastal zones, and economic development has little concern for resource degradation and watershed management. 53 countries have coastal management plans, but few have adequately implemented them. Almost 66% of the world's population lives within 150 km of the coast; by 2025, 75% will live as close to the coast. In the US, the coastal population has grown faster than that of the entire US, so that the population density is now almost 400 persons/sq m compared to 275 persons/sq m in 1960. Urbanization continues in the US coastal zones, where 7 of the 10 US largest cities exist. 94% of China's population lives in the eastern 3rd of the country. The population density along China's coast is more than 600/sq km. In Shanghai, it is more than 2000/sq km. Many people are moving from poorer provinces in the central and western regions to the economic free zones and special economic zones along the coast. At any moment, 30-60 million Chinese are moving. Most everyone in southeastern Asia, the Caribbean, and Latin America live in coastal areas. By 2025, the coastal zone between Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo will be all urbanized This is also occurring on Chile's coast between Valparaiso and Concepcion. The Mediterranean has the most overcrowded coastline in the developed world. Unchecked development could lead to continuous urban sprawl between Spain and Greece. Development pressures have caused a sizable decline in or a collapse of coastal fisheries. In Asia, all waters within 15 km of the coastline have been overfished. Coral reefs and mangrove forests are being destroyed with inadequate resources targeted for their protection. PMID:12287493

  19. Coast Guard Firefighting Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    NASA and the U.S. Coast Guard are jointly developing a lightweight, helicopter-transportable, completely self-contained firefighting module for combating shipboard and dockside fires. The project draws upon NASA technology in high-capacity rocket engine pumps, lightweight materials and compact packaging.

  20. Maine coast winds

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, Richard

    2000-01-28

    The Maine Coast Winds Project was proposed for four possible turbine locations. Significant progress has been made at the prime location, with a lease-power purchase contract for ten years for the installation of turbine equipment having been obtained. Most of the site planning and permitting have been completed. It is expect that the turbine will be installed in early May. The other three locations are less suitable for the project, and new locations are being considered.

  1. Canada's east coast play

    SciTech Connect

    Doig, I.M.

    1984-02-01

    The intent of this paper is to give a basic overview presentation on Canada's east coast play - most likely the number one offshore play in the free world - and possibly the world. The play stretches 2,500 miles north and south, as it follows the Labrador Coast, past the Strait of Belle Isle and onto the Grand Banks of Newfoundland and as it makes a 90 degree turn, 1,000 miles east to west along the coast of Nova Scotia to the Georges Bank. 3,500 miles in all - which if placed in western Canada, would stretch from northern Alberta to southern Mexico. It's geologic potential is immense - 15-20 billion barrels of oil and 80-90 Tcf of natural gas. And so far only approximately 2 billion barrels of oil and 5 Tcf of natural gas have been found. There is more out there. And less than 200 wells have been drilled - still very virgin territory. Two world size discoveries have been made in the area. Hibernia, on the Grand Banks, is estimated to contain 1.8 billion barrels. Venture, on the Scotian Shelf, has a natural gas reserve of 2.5 Tcf - big by Canadian standards and significant in that Mobil Oil has also made some other interesting discoveries on the same Sable Island block which have not been delineated.

  2. Greenland's Coast in Holiday Colors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Vibrant reds, emerald greens, brilliant whites, and pastel blues adorn this view of the area surrounding the Jakobshavn Glacier on the western coast of Greenland. The image is a false-color (near-infrared, green, blue) view acquired by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer's nadir camera. The brightness of vegetation in the near-infrared contributes to the reddish hues; glacial silt gives rise to the green color of the water; and blue-colored melt ponds are visible in the bright white ice. A scattering of small icebergs in Disco Bay adds a touch of glittery sparkle to the scene.

    The large island in the upper left is called Qeqertarsuaq. To the east of this island, and just above image center, is the outlet of the fast-flowing Jakobshavn (or Ilulissat) glacier. Jakobshavn is considered to have the highest iceberg production of all Greenland glaciers and is a major drainage outlet for a large portion of the western side of the ice sheet. Icebergs released from the glacier drift slowly with the ocean currents and pose hazards for shipping along the coast.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer views the daylit Earth continuously and the entire globe between 82 degrees north and 82 degrees south latitude is observed every 9 days. These data products were generated from a portion of the imagery acquired on June 18, 2003 during Terra orbit 18615. The image cover an area of about 254 kilometers x 210 kilometers, and use data from blocks 34 to 35 within World Reference System-2 path 10.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  3. Genetically distinct coelacanth population off the northern Tanzanian coast

    PubMed Central

    Nikaido, Masato; Sasaki, Takeshi; Emerson, J. J.; Aibara, Mitsuto; Mzighani, Semvua I.; Budeba, Yohana L.; Ngatunga, Benjamin P.; Iwata, Masamitsu; Abe, Yoshitaka; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Okada, Norihiro

    2011-01-01

    Since the sensational discovery of a living coelacanth off the east coast of South Africa, the geographic distribution of viable coelacanth populations has been a subject of debate. In the past, the coelacanths off the African mainland were thought to be strays from the Comoros because most coelacanths captured were caught in the waters surrounding the Comoros archipelagos. However, in recent years, a large number of coelacanths were captured off the coast of Tanzania, including nine living specimens observed in a remotely operated vehicles survey. Thus, it is possible that there is a reproducing population inhabiting waters off the Tanzania coast. We have sequenced the complete mitochondrial genomes of 21 Tanzanian and 2 Comoran coelacanths and analyzed these sequences together with two additional full mitochondrial genomes and 47 d-loop sequences from the literature. We found that the coelacanth population off the northern Tanzanian coast is genetically differentiated from those of the southern Tanzania coast and the Comoros, whereas no significant genetic differentiation occurs between the latter two localities. The differentiation between the northern and southern Tanzanian coast populations is consistent with the hypothesis that the existence of northward-flowing ocean current along the Tanzanian coast may reduce or prevent gene flow from the northern to the southern population. Finally, we estimated that the population localized to the southern Tanzanian coast and the Comoros diverged from other coelacanths at least 200,000 y ago. These results indicate that the coelacanths off the northern Tanzania coast are not strays but a genetically distinct group. Our study provides important information for the conservation of this threatened “living fossil.” PMID:22025696

  4. Coasts in Crisis

    SciTech Connect

    Hinrichsen, D.

    1996-11-01

    Coastal areas are staggering under an onslaught of human activity. We are presently in the process of destroying 70 percent of the world`s 600,000 square kilometers of coral reefs, an ecosystem containing some 200,000 different species and rivaling tropical rain forests in biodiversity. A combination of pollution, habitat destruction, and gross overfishing has led to the collapse of major fisheries and paved the way for malnutrition and disease in regions where people fish for subsistence. Globally, little is being done to manage the crisis of our coasts. Management strategies, if they exist at all, often deal with economic development along a wafer-thin strip of coastal land. Resource degradation is ignored, and watershed management is mostly rhetoric. Although some 55 countries have drawn up coastal management plans, only a handful have been properly implemented. Coasts must be managed in an integrated manner that takes into account the full range of human activities. Initiating this process is costly, time-consuming, and difficult. Yet we have more than three decades of accumulated experience to draw on.

  5. Central Texas coast gas search bears fruit

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-03

    A group led by American Exploration Co., Houston, plans to drill 40 wells this year on its Yoakum Gorge property in Lavaca County, Tex., where it is completing acquisition of a 152 sq mile 3D seismic survey. The companies planned to spud the first wildcat to Eocene Lower Wilcox on the Central Texas Gulf Coast property in late February. They completed eight exploratory wells as commercial gas discoveries in late 1996 in Oligocene Frio, Miocene, and Eocene Yegua. The eight Frio and Yegua wells drilled during October--December 1996 had combined initial flow rates of 3.730 MMcfd of gas.

  6. View of eastern coast of Sicily area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A vertical view of the eastern coast of Sicily area is seen in this Skylab 3 Earth Resources Experiments Package S190-B (five-inch earth terrain camera) infrared photograph taken from the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. Mount Etna, the highest volcano in Europe (10,958 feet), is still active as evidenced by the thin plume of smoke emaneting from its crest. On the flanks of Etna recent lava flows appear black in contrast to the older flows and volcanic debris that are red. Numerous small, circular cinder cones on the flanks represent sites of previous eruptions. Catania, on the Mediterranean coast south of Etna, is the largest of several cities and villages which appear as light-gray patches on the lower slopes of the volcano. Plano de Catania, south of the city of Catania, is outlined by polygonal light and dark agricultural tracts. Several lakes, the largest of which is Lake Pozzillo, show up as dark blue in the photograph. The unusual colors in the picture are due to the use of

  7. Geographic signatures of North American West Coast estuaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmett, Robert; Llansó, Roberto; Newton, Jan; Thom, Ron; Hornberger, Michelle; Morgan, Cheryl; Levings, Colin; Copping, Andrea; Fishman, Paul

    2000-01-01

    West Coast estuaries are geologically young and composed of a variety of geomorphological types. These estuaries range from large fjords to shallow lagoons; from large to low freshwater flows. Natural hazards include E1 Niños, strong Pacific storms, and active tectonic activity. West Coast estuaries support a wide range of living resources: five salmon species, harvestable shellfish, waterfowl and marine birds, marine mammals, and a variety of algae and plants. Although populations of many of these living resources have declined (salmonids), others have increased (marine mammals). West Coast estuaries are also centers of commerce and increasingly large shipping traffic. The West Coast human population is rising faster than most other areas of the U.S. and Canada, and is distributed heavily in southern California, the San Francisco Bay area, around Puget Sound, and the Fraser River estuary. While water pollution is a problem in many of the urbanized estuaries, most estuaries do not suffer from poor water quality. Primary estuarine problems include habitat alterations, degradation, and loss; diverted freshwater flows; marine sediment contamination; and exotic species introductions. The growing West Coast economy and population are in part related to the quality of life, which is dependent on the use and enjoyment of abundant coastal natural resources.

  8. Honduras: Caribbean Coast.

    PubMed

    Harborne, A R; Afzal, D C; Andrews, M J

    2001-12-01

    The coast of Honduras, Central America, represents the southern end of the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System, although its marine resources are less extensive and studied than nearby Belize and Mexico. However, the coastal zone contains mainland reef formations, mangroves, wetlands, seagrass beds and extensive fringing reefs around its offshore islands, and has a key role in the economy of the country. Like most tropical areas, this complex of benthic habitats experiences limited annual variation in climatic and oceanographic conditions but seasonal and occasional conditions, particularly coral bleaching and hurricanes, are important influences. The effects of stochastic factors on the country's coral reefs were clearly demonstrated during 1998 when Honduras experienced a major hurricane and bleaching event. Any natural or anthropogenic impacts on reef health will inevitably affect other countries in Latin America, and vice versa, since the marine resources are linked via currents and the functioning of the system transcends political boundaries. Much further work on, for example, movement of larvae and transfer of pollutants is required to delineate the full extent of these links. Anthropogenic impacts, largely driven by the increasing population and proportion of people living in coastal areas, are numerous and include key factors such as agricultural run-off, over-fishing, urban and industrial pollution (particularly sewage) and infrastructure development. Many of these threats act synergistically and, for example, poor watershed management via shifting cultivation, increases sedimentation and pesticide run-off onto coral reefs, which increases stress to corals already affected by decreasing water quality and coral bleaching. Threats from agriculture and fishing are particularly significant because of the size of both industries. The desire to generate urgently required revenue within Honduras has also led to increased tourism which provides an overarching stress

  9. 27 CFR 9.30 - North Coast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false North Coast. 9.30 Section... Coast. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “North Coast.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the North Coast viticultural area...

  10. 27 CFR 9.30 - North Coast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false North Coast. 9.30 Section... Coast. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “North Coast.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the North Coast viticultural area...

  11. 27 CFR 9.104 - South Coast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false South Coast. 9.104 Section... Coast. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “South Coast.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of South Coast viticultural area...

  12. 27 CFR 9.104 - South Coast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false South Coast. 9.104 Section... Coast. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “South Coast.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of South Coast viticultural area...

  13. 27 CFR 9.30 - North Coast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false North Coast. 9.30 Section... Coast. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “North Coast.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the North Coast viticultural area...

  14. 27 CFR 9.104 - South Coast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false South Coast. 9.104 Section... Coast. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “South Coast.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of South Coast viticultural area...

  15. 27 CFR 9.104 - South Coast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false South Coast. 9.104 Section... Coast. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “South Coast.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of South Coast viticultural area...

  16. 27 CFR 9.30 - North Coast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false North Coast. 9.30 Section... Coast. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “North Coast.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the North Coast viticultural area...

  17. 27 CFR 9.104 - South Coast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false South Coast. 9.104 Section... Coast. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “South Coast.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of South Coast viticultural area...

  18. 27 CFR 9.30 - North Coast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false North Coast. 9.30 Section... Coast. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “North Coast.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the North Coast viticultural area...

  19. Coastal Fog, South Peruvian Coast at Pisco

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Coastal fog commonly drapes the Peruvian coast. This image captures complex interactions between land, sea, and atmosphere along the southern Peruvian coast. When Shuttle astronauts took the image in February of 2002, the layers of coastal fog and stratus were being progressively scoured away by brisk south to southeast winds. Remnants of the cloud deck banked against the larger, obstructing headlands like Peninsula Paracas and Isla Sangayan, giving the prominent 'white comma' effect. Southerlies also produced ripples of internal gravity waves in the clouds offshore where warm, dry air aloft interacts with a thinning layer of cool, moist air near the sea surface on the outer edge of the remaining cloud bank. South of Peninsula Baracas, the small headlands channeled the clouds into streaks-local horizontal vortices caused by the headlands provided enough lift to give points of origin of the clouds in some bays. Besides the shelter of the peninsula, the Bahia de Pisco appears to be cloud-free due to a dry, offshore flow down the valley of the Rio Ica. The STS-109 crew took image STS109-730-80 in February 2002. The image is provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  20. Bryan Coast, English Coast, Alexander Island, Fallieres Coast, and Bellingshausen Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image of Antarctica shows the Bryan Coast (lower left), the English Coast (lower central), Alexander Island (middle right), the Fallieres Coast (top right), and the Bellingshausen Sea. The entire continent has been dedicated to peaceful scientific investigation since 1961, with the signing of the Antarctic Treaty.The waters surrounding Antarctica are intensely cold. Salt water freezes at -2C, allowing sea ice to form. The middle left portion of the image shows quite a lot of sea ice in the Bellingshausen Sea. During the Antarctic winter, when data for this image was acquired, Antarctica doubles in size to about 28.5 million square km (or about 11 million square miles), and temperatures in the -60C range are common.This true-color image was compiled from MODIS data gathered March 29, 2002. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  1. 27 CFR 9.116 - Sonoma Coast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sonoma Coast. 9.116... Sonoma Coast. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Sonoma Coast”. (b) Approved map. The approved maps for determining the boundary of the Sonoma Coast viticultural area are...

  2. 27 CFR 9.116 - Sonoma Coast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sonoma Coast. 9.116... Sonoma Coast. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Sonoma Coast”. (b) Approved map. The approved maps for determining the boundary of the Sonoma Coast viticultural area are...

  3. 27 CFR 9.116 - Sonoma Coast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sonoma Coast. 9.116... Sonoma Coast. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Sonoma Coast”. (b) Approved map. The approved maps for determining the boundary of the Sonoma Coast viticultural area are...

  4. 27 CFR 9.116 - Sonoma Coast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sonoma Coast. 9.116... Sonoma Coast. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Sonoma Coast”. (b) Approved map. The approved maps for determining the boundary of the Sonoma Coast viticultural area are...

  5. 27 CFR 9.116 - Sonoma Coast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sonoma Coast. 9.116... Sonoma Coast. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Sonoma Coast”. (b) Approved map. The approved maps for determining the boundary of the Sonoma Coast viticultural area are...

  6. Red Tide off Texas Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Red tides (algae) bloomed late this summer along a 300-mile stretch of Texas' Gulf Coast, killing millions of fish and shellfish as well as making some people sick. State officials are calling this the worst red tide bloom in 14 years. The algae produces a poison that paralyzes fish and prevents them from breathing. There is concern that the deadly algae could impact or even wipe out this year's oyster harvest in Texas, which usually peaks during the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays. The red tides were first observed off the Texas coast in mid-August and have been growing steadily in size ever since. Red tides tend to bloom and subside rapidly, depending upon changes in wind speed and direction, water temperature, salinity, and rainfall patterns (as the algae doesn't do as well in fresher water). This true-color image of the Texas Gulf Coast was acquired on September 29, 2000, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The red tide can be seen as the dark reddish discoloration in the ocean running southwest to northeast along the coast. In this scene, the bloom appears to be concentrated north and east of Corpus Christi, just off Matagorda Island. The image was made at 500-meter resolution using a combination of MODIS' visible bands 1 (red), 4 (green), and 3 (blue). The city of Houston can be seen clearly as the large, greyish cluster of pixels to the north and west of Galveston Bay, which is about mid-way up the coastline in this image. Also visible in this image are plumes of smoke, perhaps wildfires, both to the north and northeast of Houston. For more information about red tides, refer to the Texas Red Tide Web site. Image courtesy Andrey Savtchenko, MODIS Data Support Team, and the MODIS Ocean Team, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

  7. California coast nearshore processes study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirie, D. M.; Steller, D. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. During the period 1 May to 30 June 1973 material was processed and interpreted for use in analyzing the three ocean seasons along the California coast. ERTS imagery from the first season of the year, called the Davidson Current period, was mosaiced and analyzed. The second season of the year, the Upwelling period, was mosaiced and interpretation was initiated. Imagery for the third ocean season, the Oceanic period, is being collected for future study.

  8. Coasts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Edward K.; Cliff, Ursula

    1974-01-01

    This article compares two approaches to regional planning. In San Francisco, a citizen-initiated supra-agency was organized to prevent overdevelop ment of the coastline. The New York coastline, developed by one man, Robert Moses, is now victim of an inadequate and inefficient system of development that ecologically threatens the area. (MA)

  9. 47 CFR 80.1119 - Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by coast stations and coast earth stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... by coast stations and coast earth stations. 80.1119 Section 80.1119 Telecommunication FEDERAL... § 80.1119 Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by coast stations and coast earth stations. (a... for coast stations.) (b) Coast earth stations in receipt of distress alerts must ensure that they...

  10. 47 CFR 80.1119 - Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by coast stations and coast earth stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... by coast stations and coast earth stations. 80.1119 Section 80.1119 Telecommunication FEDERAL... § 80.1119 Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by coast stations and coast earth stations. (a... for coast stations.) (b) Coast earth stations in receipt of distress alerts must ensure that they...

  11. 47 CFR 80.1119 - Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by coast stations and coast earth stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... by coast stations and coast earth stations. 80.1119 Section 80.1119 Telecommunication FEDERAL... § 80.1119 Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by coast stations and coast earth stations. (a... for coast stations.) (b) Coast earth stations in receipt of distress alerts must ensure that they...

  12. 47 CFR 80.1119 - Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by coast stations and coast earth stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... by coast stations and coast earth stations. 80.1119 Section 80.1119 Telecommunication FEDERAL... § 80.1119 Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by coast stations and coast earth stations. (a... for coast stations.) (b) Coast earth stations in receipt of distress alerts must ensure that they...

  13. 47 CFR 80.1119 - Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by coast stations and coast earth stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... by coast stations and coast earth stations. 80.1119 Section 80.1119 Telecommunication FEDERAL... § 80.1119 Receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts by coast stations and coast earth stations. (a... for coast stations.) (b) Coast earth stations in receipt of distress alerts must ensure that they...

  14. Phytoplankton bloom along the coast of Namibia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This MODIS true-color image, acquired March 4, 2002, shows a phytoplankton bloom along the coast of Namibia. Phytoplankton is a microscopic organism that utilizes chlorophyll, which sunlight reflects off of to create this intense blue-green color in the water. Also prominent in this image is the Skeleton Coast Game Park, which runs along Namibia's northern coast and here glows a beautiful coral-orange color.

  15. West Coast Tsunami: Cascadia's Fault?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y.; Bernard, E. N.; Titov, V.

    2013-12-01

    The tragedies of 2004 Sumatra and 2011 Japan tsunamis exposed the limits of our knowledge in preparing for devastating tsunamis. The 1,100-km coastline of the Pacific coast of North America has tectonic and geological settings similar to Sumatra and Japan. The geological records unambiguously show that the Cascadia fault had caused devastating tsunamis in the past and this geological process will cause tsunamis in the future. Hypotheses of the rupture process of Cascadia fault include a long rupture (M9.1) along the entire fault line, short ruptures (M8.8 - M9.1) nucleating only a segment of the coastline, or a series of lesser events of M8+. Recent studies also indicate an increasing probability of small rupture occurring at the south end of the Cascadia fault. Some of these hypotheses were implemented in the development of tsunami evacuation maps in Washington and Oregon. However, the developed maps do not reflect the tsunami impact caused by the most recent updates regarding the Cascadia fault rupture process. The most recent study by Wang et al. (2013) suggests a rupture pattern of high- slip patches separated by low-slip areas constrained by estimates of coseismic subsidence based on microfossil analyses. Since this study infers that a Tokohu-type of earthquake could strike in the Cascadia subduction zone, how would such an tsunami affect the tsunami hazard assessment and planning along the Pacific Coast of North America? The rapid development of computing technology allowed us to look into the tsunami impact caused by above hypotheses using high-resolution models with large coverage of Pacific Northwest. With the slab model of MaCrory et al. (2012) (as part of the USGS slab 1.0 model) for the Cascadia earthquake, we tested the above hypotheses to assess the tsunami hazards along the entire U.S. West Coast. The modeled results indicate these hypothetical scenarios may cause runup heights very similar to those observed along Japan's coastline during the 2011

  16. Systems Engineering of Coast Guard Aviator Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Eugene R.; Caro, Paul W.

    This paper describes a total-program application of the systems engineering concept of the U.S. Coast Guard aviation training programs. The systems approach used treats all aspects of the training to produce the most cost-effective integration of academic, synthetic, and flight training for the production of graduate Coast Guard aviators. The…

  17. Gulf Coast Community College's Memory Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrell, Matthew D.

    2005-01-01

    Gulf Coast Community College in Panama City, Florida, is celebrating a fifty-year anniversary in 2007. Maintained by the library, the school's archives represent the historical contributions on a local and national level. Gulf Coast Community College library is ensuring the school's historical significance through the digitization of its…

  18. Discovering the "-Ologies" on the Jurassic Coast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peacock, Alan

    2007-01-01

    The Jurassic Coast is Britain's only natural World Heritage site, a tangible time-line that takes one through 185 million years of history in 95 miles of coast. It provides individuals with a world-famous educational resource and an unrivalled outdoor classroom that has played a key role in the study of earth sciences. The author is keen to ignite…

  19. 33 CFR 23.15 - Coast Guard ensign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coast Guard ensign. 23.15 Section 23.15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.15 Coast Guard ensign. The Coast Guard...

  20. 33 CFR 23.15 - Coast Guard ensign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coast Guard ensign. 23.15 Section 23.15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.15 Coast Guard ensign. The Coast Guard...

  1. 33 CFR 23.15 - Coast Guard ensign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coast Guard ensign. 23.15 Section 23.15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.15 Coast Guard ensign. The Coast Guard...

  2. 76 FR 30575 - Eleventh Coast Guard District Annual Marine Events

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Eleventh Coast Guard District Annual Marine Events AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard... regulated area. DATES: Comments and related material must be received by the Coast Guard on or before...

  3. 76 FR 7123 - Eleventh Coast Guard District Annual Marine Events

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Eleventh Coast Guard District Annual Marine Events AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard proposes to update and consolidate the list of marine events occurring annually within the Eleventh Coast...

  4. 75 FR 79956 - Protection for Whistleblowers in the Coast Guard

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-21

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 53 RIN 1625-AB33 Protection for Whistleblowers in the Coast Guard AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Direct final rule; request for comments. SUMMARY: By this direct final rule, the Coast Guard is amending its ``Coast Guard Whistleblower Protection'' regulations to conform...

  5. 33 CFR 23.15 - Coast Guard ensign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coast Guard ensign. 23.15 Section 23.15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.15 Coast Guard ensign. The Coast Guard...

  6. 33 CFR 23.15 - Coast Guard ensign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coast Guard ensign. 23.15 Section 23.15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.15 Coast Guard ensign. The Coast Guard...

  7. 76 FR 53329 - Eleventh Coast Guard District Annual Marine Events

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Eleventh Coast Guard District Annual Marine Events AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is updating and consolidating the list of marine events occurring annually within the Eleventh Coast Guard District. These...

  8. Historical Tsunami Deposits on the Sanriku Coast, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, T.; Satake, K.; Sugai, T.; Ishibe, T.; Harada, T.; Murotani, S.

    2013-12-01

    At least six layers of tsunami deposit during the recent 500 years were found in a small valley on the Sanriku coast, just north of Taro (Miyako city, Iwate prefecture), where the 2011 tsunami heights from the Tohoku earthquake ranged from 17 to 34 m. The Sanriku coast is a Ria coast characterized by sawtooth-shaped coastline. Because of the steep-sloped valleys, alluvial deposits are very limited and tsunami traces are difficult to be preserved. Around the survey site, however, a marsh is separated from open sea by a beach ridge with the maximum altitude of about 4.5 m above mean sea level. In the marsh, well-decomposed peat has been developed. The sand deposits were brought by large tsunamis over the beach ridge and preserved in the marsh peat. We conducted drilling survey using the 3-m long Geo-slicer, trench survey, and outcrop observations. We sketch the sedimentary structure, conduct grain size analysis, reconstruct paleo-environment from microfossils, estimate the deposition age on the basis of radiocarbon dating and 210Pb/137Cs analysis, and correlate them with historical tsunamis. The uppermost sand layer which covers the ground surface is probably due to the 2011 tsunami. At least six event deposit layers can be identified in Geo-slicer's sample. Some sandy layers show normal or inverse grading structures and/or lamination, indicating a strong water flow. Some sand layers can be traced up to 400 m inland from the coast, while others can be identified only near the coast. The sandy layers well correlate with abrupt increases in marine microfossils floating near the sea surface. We use it as indicators of inflow of sea water into the marsh. The bottom peat layer of Geo-slicer's sample shows the AD 15th century, indicating that all the sand layers are from tsunamis in historical age during the recent 500 years. These tsunami deposits can be correlated with local tsunamis or distant tsunamis on the basis of radiocarbon dating and 210Pb/137Cs analysis

  9. Differential stream incision in the Oregon Coast Range

    SciTech Connect

    Personius, S.F. )

    1993-04-01

    Stream incision rates are used to determine rates and styles of late quaternary deformation of the Oregon Coast Range, in the forearc of the Cascadia subduction zone. Bedrock incision rates were obtained along westward-flowing streams, from the Umpqua river in a central western Oregon to the North Fork Nehalem River in northwestern Oregon. Incision measurements were restricted mostly to nontidal reaches that are more than 20--40 km inland from the coast, to exclude areas affected by eustatic changes in sea level. Most strath ages were determined indirectly by radiocarbon dating of detrital charcoal sampled from alluvium that overlies the straths. A few incision measurements were made on straths that underlie higher, less well preserved terrace remnants. The ages of some of these higher straths were determined by thermoluminescence (TL) dating. These ages are less constrained than those established with radiocarbon dating, but they appear to yield similar rates of incision. The difference in age between the overlying sediments and the age of strath abandonment is unknown, but several lines of evidence indicate that sediment mobilization and deposition most likely were concurrent with cutting of the strath. Numerous strath height measurements indicate that rates of incision are fairly uniform along many kilometers of individual Coast Range streams, regardless of the type of bedrock traversed. Such uniform incision rates do not support the landward tilting of the Coast Range as postulated by other studies. However, regional differences in incision apparent in northern Oregon may be explained by differential uplift caused by north-south compression in the overriding North American plate, or by changes in the geometry of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate.

  10. Controlling Transport Processes in Groundwater Contamination in the North Coast Karst Aquifer of Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, I. Y.; Steele, K.

    2008-05-01

    The karst aquifer of the North Coast of Puerto Rico represents a significant source of water for drinking purposes, as well as ecosystem sustainability. The same characteristics making this aquifer the most productive in the island, fast infiltration and rapid flow in karst conduits, make the aquifers vulnerable highly vulnerable to contamination. Once in the ground water, organic contaminants move through the karst aquifers by complex pathways dictated by system characteristics and flow regimes. Ground water flow in karst aquifers is subscribed to two types of flow systems: conduit flow and diffuse flow. Transport in conduit-flow dominated systems tends to convey solutes rapidly through the system to a discharge or point without much attenuation. Transport in diffuse- flow systems, on the other hand, causes significant solute retardation and serves as a long-term source of contamination. Although it is common to attribute one type of predominant flow regime, most carbonate aquifers are characterized by a mixture of both flow systems. The north coast aquifer of Puerto Rico has been impacted by a large number of contaminates sites. During the last 25 years, 10 Superfund sites have been declared in the zone and others are being evaluated for inclusion in the National Priority List. The work presented herein addresses the potential impact of these sites on the extent of contamination and discusses the transport mechanisms affecting the transport and persistence of organic contaminants in the north coast aquifer of Puerto Rico. Preliminary evaluation indicates that fate and transport of these contaminants is controlled by a combinations of conduit- and diffuse-flow mechanisms, where conduits tend to concentrate water and contaminants and convey it rapidly or to "trapping" diffusive-flow zones of smaller pore-size zones.

  11. Causes and systematics of inundations of the Krasnodar territory on the Russian Black Sea coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeevsky, Nikolay; Magritsky, Dmitry V.; Koltermann, Klaus Peter; Krylenko, Inna; Toropov, Pavel

    2016-06-01

    The inundation situations on the Black Sea coast of the Krasnodar territory for the period from 1945 until 2013 were analysed and the main types of inundations at the coast are described. Synoptic factors of the formation of extreme precipitation and rainfall floods, features and regularities of the downstream flood wave transformation in the rivers are also studied. Therefore, assessments of seasonal and maximum flow of the Black Sea coast rivers for the period of hydrometric measurements were done. Regularities of change of the occurrence of inundations and their characteristics on the coastal terrain were analysed, for a year and on a perennial timescale. Most catastrophic and exceptional inundations arise in the summer and in early autumn. Small inundations during the remaining year reflect the seasonal distribution of river flow and floods in the Black Sea rivers. Extensive and sometimes extreme precipitation dominates the river flow regimes. The seasonal distribution of small and moderately dangerous inundations reflects, on average, a water regime of two groups of rivers of the coast - to the north and to the south of the Tuapse River. To the north of the Tuapse River, floods prevail from November until March (up to 70 % of observed floods took place in this period) as a result of precipitation and winter snowmelt during frequent thaw periods. In winter, high waters often overlap to form a multi-peak high water of 2-3 weeks' duration. In the summer and in early autumn we observe a steady low flow. The total amount of runoff increases both in a southeast direction, and with the altitude of the river basins. Interannual variability of mean annual runoff, as well as maximum runoff, on the contrary decreases in the southern direction and with an increasing area of the river basins. The coastal high waters of the rivers of the Sochi part of the coast are typical at any time of the year, but more often floods in the cold season result from incessant rain, and

  12. Thermal frontal zone along the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kok, Poh Heng; Akhir, Mohd F.; Tangang, Fredolin T.

    2015-11-01

    Monthly satellite-derived sea surface temperature (SST) climatology was used to investigate the thermal frontal zone along the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia (ECPM) during both northeast and southwest monsoons. In addition, in situ hydrographic observations were conducted to investigate the vertical structure of thermohaline fronts during the southwest monsoon and inter-monsoon period. During the northeast monsoon, the locations of the front is determined by the speed of the southward flowing western boundary current, located near South Vietnam, which causes the tongue of cooler water, flooding into the ECPM. As the speed of southward flowing western boundary current increases, the cooler water tongue moves closer to the ECPM. On the other hand, as current speed decreases, the distinctive cooler water tongue recedes from the ECPM. During the southwest monsoon, the presence of a cooler water patch is observed in the SST climatology data and limited field data exhibit upwelling features (i.e. the presence of isotherm and isohaline shoaling towards the coast and surface). Analysis of European Centre for Medium-range Forecast (ECMWF) wind data show the presence of positive wind stress curl in the region, indicating a driving mechanism for upwelling. Additionally, analyses of onshore and offshore SST differences suggest that significant atmospheric forcing during different monsoon periods are responsible for the seasonal evolution of SST patterns.

  13. The Coast Guard Comes to Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fawcett, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on Sea Partners, by the United States Coast Guard, that enables students to understand how pollution affects the marine environment. Correlates the activities with the National Science Education Standards. (DDR)

  14. Education by Television in the Ivory Coast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valerien, Jean

    1981-01-01

    The management, administration, production, and broadcasting of educational television are discussed and evaluated with respect to its use in elementary education, training of teachers, and out-of-school education in the Ivory Coast during the 1970s. (CHC)

  15. Eighteenth annual West Coast theoretical chemistry conference

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    Abstracts are presented from the eighteenth annual west coast theoretical chemistry conference. Topics include molecular simulations; quasiclassical simulations of reactions; photodissociation reactions; molecular dynamics;interface studies; electronic structure; and semiclassical methods of reactive systems.

  16. Relative importance of estuarine flatfish nurseries along the Portuguese coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Henrique N.; Vasconcelos, Rita; Vinagre, Catarina; França, Susana; Fonseca, Vanessa; Maia, Anabela; Reis-Santos, Patrick; Lopes, Marta; Ruano, Miguel; Campos, Joana; Freitas, Vânia; Santos, Paulo T.; Costa, Maria José

    2007-02-01

    The relative importance of nursery areas and their relationships with several environmental variables were evaluated in nine estuarine systems along the Portuguese coast based on trawl surveys. Historical data were used to outline changes and trends in the nursery function of some of these estuaries over the past decades. The dominant flatfish species in Portuguese estuaries were Platichthys flesus (Linnaeus, 1758), Solea solea (Linnaeus, 1758), Solea senegalensis Kaup, 1858 and Monochirus hispidus Rafinesque, 1814, but their occurrence differed among the estuaries. P. flesus only occurred in estuaries north of the Tejo estuary (39°N), S. solea was quite rare along the southern Portuguese coast (south of 37°30'N), S. senegalensis occurred in estuaries throughout the coast, but its abundance varied considerably, and the occurrence of M. hispidus was limited to the Sado estuary and Ria Formosa. A Correspondence Analysis was performed to evaluate the relationships between flatfish species abundance and geomorphologic and hydrologic characteristics of estuaries (latitude, freshwater flow, estuarine area, intertidal area, mean depth and residence time). Abiotic characteristics (depth, temperature, salinity, sediment type) of nursery grounds of each flatfish species were also evaluated. Results showed that some estuaries along the Portuguese coast have nursery grounds used by several flatfish species (e.g. Ria de Aveiro, Sado estuary), while in other systems a segregation was noticed, with juveniles of different species occurring in distinct estuarine areas (e.g. Minho and Mondego estuaries). This emphasizes the relevance of niche overlap, but the potential for competition may be considerably minimized by differences in resource use patterns and by an extremely high abundance of resources. Peak densities of flatfishes recorded in nurseries areas along the Portuguese coast were within the range of values reported for other geographical areas. Inter-annual abundance

  17. 76 FR 17782 - Protection for Whistleblowers in the Coast Guard

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ... the Coast Guard'' in the Federal Register. (75 FR 79956). That rule broadens the whistleblower... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 53 RIN 1625-AB33 Protection for Whistleblowers in the Coast Guard AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Direct final rule; confirmation of effective date. SUMMARY: On December...

  18. 33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coast Guard emblem. 23.10 Section 23.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.10 Coast Guard emblem. (a) The...

  19. 33 CFR 52.42 - Views of the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Views of the Coast Guard. 52.42 Section 52.42 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PERSONNEL BOARD FOR CORRECTION OF MILITARY RECORDS OF THE COAST GUARD Submissions by the Coast Guard and Other...

  20. 46 CFR 50.10-30 - Coast Guard number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coast Guard number. 50.10-30 Section 50.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-30 Coast Guard number. (a) The Coast Guard number...

  1. 33 CFR 52.42 - Views of the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Views of the Coast Guard. 52.42 Section 52.42 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PERSONNEL BOARD FOR CORRECTION OF MILITARY RECORDS OF THE COAST GUARD Submissions by the Coast Guard and Other...

  2. 33 CFR 173.83 - Availability of Coast Guard forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Availability of Coast Guard forms. 173.83 Section 173.83 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Number § 173.83 Availability of Coast Guard forms. In a State where the Coast Guard is the...

  3. 46 CFR 50.10-30 - Coast Guard number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard number. 50.10-30 Section 50.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-30 Coast Guard number. (a) The Coast Guard number means that number assigned to boilers and...

  4. 46 CFR 167.05-15 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 167.05-15 Section 167.05-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Definitions § 167.05-15 Coast Guard District Commander. This term means an officer of the Coast Guard designated as such by...

  5. 33 CFR 23.12 - Coast Guard identifying insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coast Guard identifying insignia. 23.12 Section 23.12 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.12 Coast Guard identifying...

  6. 46 CFR 4.03-20 - Coast Guard district.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard district. 4.03-20 Section 4.03-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-20 Coast Guard district. A Coast Guard district is one of the...

  7. 46 CFR 4.03-20 - Coast Guard district.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coast Guard district. 4.03-20 Section 4.03-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-20 Coast Guard district. A Coast Guard district is one of the...

  8. 46 CFR 50.10-30 - Coast Guard number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coast Guard number. 50.10-30 Section 50.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-30 Coast Guard number. (a) The Coast Guard number...

  9. 33 CFR 173.83 - Availability of Coast Guard forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Availability of Coast Guard forms. 173.83 Section 173.83 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Number § 173.83 Availability of Coast Guard forms. In a State where the Coast Guard is the...

  10. 46 CFR 50.10-25 - Coast Guard Symbol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard Symbol. 50.10-25 Section 50.10-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-25 Coast Guard Symbol. (a) The term Coast Guard Symbol means that impression stamped on the...

  11. 46 CFR 50.10-25 - Coast Guard Symbol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coast Guard Symbol. 50.10-25 Section 50.10-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-25 Coast Guard Symbol. (a) The term Coast Guard...

  12. 33 CFR 173.83 - Availability of Coast Guard forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Availability of Coast Guard forms. 173.83 Section 173.83 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Number § 173.83 Availability of Coast Guard forms. In a State where the Coast Guard is the...

  13. 49 CFR 850.30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. 850.30... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.30 Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. (a) The Coast Guard conducts an investigation...

  14. 33 CFR 23.12 - Coast Guard identifying insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coast Guard identifying insignia. 23.12 Section 23.12 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.12 Coast Guard identifying...

  15. 46 CFR 167.05-15 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 167.05-15 Section 167.05-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Definitions § 167.05-15 Coast Guard District Commander. This term means an officer of the Coast Guard designated as such by...

  16. The U.S. Coast Guard Academy Curricula; An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Theodore R.; And Others

    This report presents the results of research that had as its objective the evaluation of the curricula of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy. Over 125 Coast Guard officers and men were interviewed to gather detailed background information about the Coast Guard, the Coast Guard Academy, and job requirements of Academy graduates. These data were developed…

  17. 46 CFR 4.03-20 - Coast Guard district.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coast Guard district. 4.03-20 Section 4.03-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-20 Coast Guard district. A Coast Guard district is one of the geographical areas whose boundaries are described...

  18. 33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coast Guard emblem. 23.10 Section 23.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.10 Coast Guard emblem. (a) The...

  19. 33 CFR 23.12 - Coast Guard identifying insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coast Guard identifying insignia. 23.12 Section 23.12 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.12 Coast Guard identifying...

  20. 33 CFR 23.20 - Coast Guard commission pennant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coast Guard commission pennant. 23.20 Section 23.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.20 Coast Guard commission...

  1. 46 CFR 50.10-25 - Coast Guard Symbol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coast Guard Symbol. 50.10-25 Section 50.10-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-25 Coast Guard Symbol. (a) The term Coast Guard...

  2. 33 CFR 173.83 - Availability of Coast Guard forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Availability of Coast Guard forms. 173.83 Section 173.83 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Number § 173.83 Availability of Coast Guard forms. In a State where the Coast Guard is the...

  3. 46 CFR 4.03-20 - Coast Guard district.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard district. 4.03-20 Section 4.03-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-20 Coast Guard district. A Coast Guard district is one of the geographical areas whose boundaries are described...

  4. 33 CFR 23.20 - Coast Guard commission pennant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coast Guard commission pennant. 23.20 Section 23.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.20 Coast Guard commission...

  5. 46 CFR 50.10-30 - Coast Guard number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard number. 50.10-30 Section 50.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-30 Coast Guard number. (a) The Coast Guard number means that number assigned to boilers and...

  6. 46 CFR 4.03-20 - Coast Guard district.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coast Guard district. 4.03-20 Section 4.03-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-20 Coast Guard district. A Coast Guard district is one of the...

  7. 33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coast Guard emblem. 23.10 Section 23.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.10 Coast Guard emblem. (a) The...

  8. 33 CFR 23.20 - Coast Guard commission pennant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coast Guard commission pennant. 23.20 Section 23.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.20 Coast Guard commission...

  9. 33 CFR 52.42 - Views of the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Views of the Coast Guard. 52.42 Section 52.42 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PERSONNEL BOARD FOR CORRECTION OF MILITARY RECORDS OF THE COAST GUARD Submissions by the Coast Guard and Other...

  10. 49 CFR 850.30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. 850.30... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.30 Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. (a) The Coast Guard conducts an investigation...

  11. 33 CFR 173.83 - Availability of Coast Guard forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Availability of Coast Guard forms. 173.83 Section 173.83 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Number § 173.83 Availability of Coast Guard forms. In a State where the Coast Guard is the...

  12. 46 CFR 50.10-25 - Coast Guard Symbol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard Symbol. 50.10-25 Section 50.10-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-25 Coast Guard Symbol. (a) The term Coast Guard Symbol means that impression stamped on the...

  13. 33 CFR 23.12 - Coast Guard identifying insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coast Guard identifying insignia. 23.12 Section 23.12 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.12 Coast Guard identifying...

  14. 5. AERIAL VIEW TO NORTHEAST OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. AERIAL VIEW TO NORTHEAST OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR STATION SAN FRANCISCO. 8X10 black and white silver gelatin print. United States Coast Guard Official Photograph, 12th Coast Guard District, San Francisco. 1960. - U.S. Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco, 1020 North Access Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  15. 46 CFR 50.10-30 - Coast Guard number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coast Guard number. 50.10-30 Section 50.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-30 Coast Guard number. (a) The Coast Guard number...

  16. 33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coast Guard emblem. 23.10 Section 23.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.10 Coast Guard emblem. (a) The...

  17. 33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coast Guard emblem. 23.10 Section 23.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.10 Coast Guard emblem. (a) The...

  18. 33 CFR 52.42 - Views of the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Views of the Coast Guard. 52.42 Section 52.42 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PERSONNEL BOARD FOR CORRECTION OF MILITARY RECORDS OF THE COAST GUARD Submissions by the Coast Guard and Other...

  19. 33 CFR 52.42 - Views of the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Views of the Coast Guard. 52.42 Section 52.42 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PERSONNEL BOARD FOR CORRECTION OF MILITARY RECORDS OF THE COAST GUARD Submissions by the Coast Guard and Other...

  20. 33 CFR 23.20 - Coast Guard commission pennant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coast Guard commission pennant. 23.20 Section 23.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.20 Coast Guard commission...

  1. 49 CFR 850.30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. 850.30... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.30 Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. (a) The Coast Guard conducts an investigation...

  2. 49 CFR 850.30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. 850.30... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.30 Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. (a) The Coast Guard conducts an investigation...

  3. 46 CFR 50.10-25 - Coast Guard Symbol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coast Guard Symbol. 50.10-25 Section 50.10-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-25 Coast Guard Symbol. (a) The term Coast Guard...

  4. 33 CFR 23.20 - Coast Guard commission pennant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coast Guard commission pennant. 23.20 Section 23.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.20 Coast Guard commission...

  5. 33 CFR 23.12 - Coast Guard identifying insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coast Guard identifying insignia. 23.12 Section 23.12 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.12 Coast Guard identifying...

  6. 47 CFR 80.121 - Public coast stations using telegraphy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Public coast stations using telegraphy. 80.121... Coast Stations § 80.121 Public coast stations using telegraphy. (a) Narrow-band direct-printing (NB-DP... transmission of the signature the coast station must, following the signal “COL”, routinely repeat all...

  7. 50 CFR 660.518 - Pacific Coast Treaty Indian Rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pacific Coast Treaty Indian Rights. 660... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES Coastal Pelagics Fisheries § 660.518 Pacific Coast Treaty Indian Rights. (a) Pacific Coast treaty Indian...

  8. 47 CFR 80.105 - General obligations of coast stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false General obligations of coast stations. 80.105... Stations § 80.105 General obligations of coast stations. Each coast station or marine-utility station must...) public coast stations may provide fixed or hybrid services on a co-primary basis with mobile operations....

  9. 47 CFR 80.121 - Public coast stations using telegraphy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Public coast stations using telegraphy. 80.121... Coast Stations § 80.121 Public coast stations using telegraphy. (a) Narrow-band direct-printing (NB-DP... transmission of the signature the coast station must, following the signal “COL”, routinely repeat all...

  10. 47 CFR 80.121 - Public coast stations using telegraphy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Public coast stations using telegraphy. 80.121... Coast Stations § 80.121 Public coast stations using telegraphy. (a) Narrow-band direct-printing (NB-DP... transmission of the signature the coast station must, following the signal “COL”, routinely repeat all...

  11. 47 CFR 80.105 - General obligations of coast stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false General obligations of coast stations. 80.105... Stations § 80.105 General obligations of coast stations. Each coast station or marine-utility station must...) public coast stations may provide fixed or hybrid services on a co-primary basis with mobile operations....

  12. 50 CFR 660.518 - Pacific Coast Treaty Indian Rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pacific Coast Treaty Indian Rights. 660... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES Coastal Pelagics Fisheries § 660.518 Pacific Coast Treaty Indian Rights. (a) Pacific Coast treaty Indian...

  13. 47 CFR 80.121 - Public coast stations using telegraphy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Public coast stations using telegraphy. 80.121... Coast Stations § 80.121 Public coast stations using telegraphy. (a) Narrow-band direct-printing (NB-DP... transmission of the signature the coast station must, following the signal “COL”, routinely repeat all...

  14. 47 CFR 80.105 - General obligations of coast stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false General obligations of coast stations. 80.105... Stations § 80.105 General obligations of coast stations. Each coast station or marine-utility station must...) public coast stations may provide fixed or hybrid services on a co-primary basis with mobile operations....

  15. 47 CFR 80.121 - Public coast stations using telegraphy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Public coast stations using telegraphy. 80.121... Coast Stations § 80.121 Public coast stations using telegraphy. (a) Narrow-band direct-printing (NB-DP... transmission of the signature the coast station must, following the signal “COL”, routinely repeat all...

  16. 47 CFR 80.105 - General obligations of coast stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false General obligations of coast stations. 80.105... Stations § 80.105 General obligations of coast stations. Each coast station or marine-utility station must...) public coast stations may provide fixed or hybrid services on a co-primary basis with mobile operations....

  17. 47 CFR 80.105 - General obligations of coast stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General obligations of coast stations. 80.105... Stations § 80.105 General obligations of coast stations. Each coast station or marine-utility station must...) public coast stations may provide fixed or hybrid services on a co-primary basis with mobile operations....

  18. 50 CFR 660.518 - Pacific Coast Treaty Indian Rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pacific Coast Treaty Indian Rights. 660... Pelagics Fisheries § 660.518 Pacific Coast Treaty Indian Rights. (a) Pacific Coast treaty Indian tribes... the purposes of this section, “Pacific Coast treaty Indian tribes” and their “usual and...

  19. 50 CFR 660.518 - Pacific Coast Treaty Indian Rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pacific Coast Treaty Indian Rights. 660... Pelagics Fisheries § 660.518 Pacific Coast Treaty Indian Rights. (a) Pacific Coast treaty Indian tribes... the purposes of this section, “Pacific Coast treaty Indian tribes” and their “usual and...

  20. 50 CFR 660.518 - Pacific Coast Treaty Indian Rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pacific Coast Treaty Indian Rights. 660... Pelagics Fisheries § 660.518 Pacific Coast Treaty Indian Rights. (a) Pacific Coast treaty Indian tribes... the purposes of this section, “Pacific Coast treaty Indian tribes” and their “usual and...

  1. FutureCoast: "Listen to your futures"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfirman, S. L.; Eklund, K.; Thacher, S.; Orlove, B. S.; Diane Stovall-Soto, G.; Brunacini, J.; Hernandez, T.

    2014-12-01

    Two science-arts approaches are emerging as effective means to convey "futurethinking" to learners: systems gaming and experiential futures. FutureCoast exemplifies the latter: by engaging participants with voicemails supposedly leaking from the cloud of possible futures, the storymaking game frames the complexities of climate science in relatable contexts. Because participants make the voicemails themselves, FutureCoast opens up creative ways for people to think about possibly climate-changed futures and personal ways to talk about them. FutureCoast is a project of the PoLAR Partnership with a target audience of informal adult learners primarily reached via mobile devices and online platforms. Scientists increasingly use scenarios and storylines as ways to explore the implications of environmental change and societal choices. Stories help people make connections across experiences and disciplines and link large-scale events to personal consequences. By making the future seem real today, FutureCoast's framework helps people visualize and plan for future climate changes. The voicemails contributed to FutureCoast are spread through the game's intended timeframe (2020 through 2065). Based on initial content analysis of voicemail text, common themes include ecosystems and landscapes, weather, technology, societal issues, governance and policy. Other issues somewhat less frequently discussed include security, food, industry and business, health, energy, infrastructure, water, economy, and migration. Further voicemail analysis is examining: temporal dimensions (salient time frames, short vs. long term issues, intergenerational, etc.), content (adaptation vs. mitigation, challenges vs. opportunities, etc.), and emotion (hopeful, resigned, etc. and overall emotional context). FutureCoast also engaged audiences through facilitated in-person experiences, geocaching events, and social media (Tumblr, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube). Analysis of the project suggests story

  2. 75 FR 32993 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Amendments 20...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-10

    ...NMFS proposes measures to initiate implementation of Amendments 20 and 21 to the Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan (FMP). Amendment 20 would establish a trawl rationalization program for the Pacific Coast groundfish fishery. Amendment 20's trawl rationalization program would consist of: An individual fishing quota (IFQ) program for the shore-based trawl fleet (including whiting......

  3. 75 FR 75449 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-03

    ...: The proposed rule that published on November 3, 2010 (75 FR 67810), establishes the 2011-2012 harvest... National Standard 1 Guidelines (74 FR 3178, January 16, 2009). The proposed rule published in the Federal... Provisions; Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery; Comment Period...

  4. 75 FR 13081 - Fisheries off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery; Trawl Rationalization Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-18

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XRO1 Fisheries off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery; Trawl Rationalization Program AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... trawl rationalization program that would affect the limited entry trawl fishery of the Pacific...

  5. 76 FR 68658 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Harvest Specifications and Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... measures for most species (75 FR 27508, May 11, 2011), in part pursuant to NMFS' emergency authority under... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 660 RIN 0648-BA01 Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Harvest Specifications and Management Measures for the Remainder of...

  6. 76 FR 28897 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ...This final rule establishes the 2011 fishery harvest specifications for Pacific whiting in the U.S. exclusive economic zone (EEZ) and state waters off the coasts of Washington, Oregon, and California, as authorized by the Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan (FMP). These specifications include the overfishing level (OFL), catch limits, and allocations for the non-tribal commercial......

  7. 33 CFR 334.783 - Arlington Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast Guard restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast Guard restricted area. 334.783 Section 334.783 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.783 Arlington Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast.... Government vessels include U.S. Coast Guard vessels, Department of Defense vessels, state and local...

  8. 33 CFR 334.783 - Arlington Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast Guard restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast Guard restricted area. 334.783 Section 334.783 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.783 Arlington Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast.... Government vessels include U.S. Coast Guard vessels, Department of Defense vessels, state and local...

  9. 33 CFR 334.783 - Arlington Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast Guard restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast Guard restricted area. 334.783 Section 334.783 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.783 Arlington Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast.... Government vessels include U.S. Coast Guard vessels, Department of Defense vessels, state and local...

  10. 33 CFR 334.783 - Arlington Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast Guard restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast Guard restricted area. 334.783 Section 334.783 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.783 Arlington Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast.... Government vessels include U.S. Coast Guard vessels, Department of Defense vessels, state and local...

  11. 77 FR 65639 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Fisheries Off the West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-30

    ... Provisions; Fisheries Off the West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery; Pacific Whiting and Non... October 4, 2012. This action is authorized by regulations implementing the Pacific Coast Groundfish... available for harvest to other sectors of the trawl fishery. For 2012 the Washington Coast treaty...

  12. COAST: Cascadia Open-Access Seismic Transects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrook, W.; Johnson, H. P.; Kent, G.; Keranen, K. M.; Tobin, H. J.; Trehu, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Cascadia margin is the site of active subduction, where the Juan de Fuca plate subducts under the North American plate at a rate of ~35 mm/yr. This system is of great scientific and societal interest, as it is capable of very large (Mw~9) earthquakes, creates volcanic hazards in the Cascades, and hosts periodic episodic tremor and slip (ETS) episodes. Despite evidence that the system has generated large megathrust earthquakes, limited seismicity creates large uncertainties in the position, structure, and physical state of the plate boundary. The COAST (Cascadia Open-Access Seismic Transects) project conducted an open-access, open-participation 2D seismic survey of the Cascadia subduction margin off Grays Harbor, WA, that will provide benchmark seismic images to address key scientific issues regarding the location, physical state, fluid budget, and associated methane systems of the subducting plate boundary and overlying crust. We collected seismic reflection, multibeam bathymetric, sidescan sonar, gravity, and magnetic data on the Cascadia subduction margin from the R/V Langseth in July 2012 in a high-priority GeoPRISMS corridor off Grays Harbor, Washington. The cruise was open-participation, with an organized shipboard education and training program, and the data are open-access, with immediate, full release to the community of all geophysical data. Project goals include (1) determining the location of the offshore plate boundary, (2) constraining sediment subduction and plate boundary roughness, (3) estimating pore fluid pathways, (4) determining controls on methane distribution, and (5) imaging compressional and extensional structures that may pose geohazards on the Cascadia margin. Initial observations include the following: (1) The Pleistocene accretionary wedge is well imaged and shows landward-vergent thrust faulting throughout our survey area. An outboard series of ramp-and-thrust structures gives way to a region characterized by folds that separate

  13. Hydrocarbon frontier on the East Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, H.E.; Sheppard, R.C.; Ziegler, D.G.

    1987-10-12

    This article states that numerous buried Mesozoic basins can be found beneath the Atlantic Coastal Plain sediments. A data acquisition program is being done by Teledyne Exploration Company to provide stratigraphically placed seismic reflection profiles across some of the basins. This article describes what Teledyne is doing. The early Mesozoic rift system, a hydrocarbon frontier on the East Coast, provides promise of a major oil and gas producing province stretching 900 miles along the East Coast. Data at hand now give support to the key elements required, namely, source, reservoir, traps, and seal. Technology has improved to where seismic data resolution now distinctly maps attitudes of beds within these basins in spite of the drastic velocity change at the postrift unconformity of the buried basins and man-made noise and population density. With the continuing risk of energy shortfalls either by reserve, supply, or transportation deficiencies, the authors believe the East Coast is a good place to be.

  14. Gulf Coast Clean Energy Application Center

    SciTech Connect

    Dillingham, Gavin

    2013-09-30

    The Gulf Coast Clean Energy Application Center was initiated to significantly improve market and regulatory conditions for the implementation of combined heat and power technologies. The GC CEAC was responsible for the development of CHP in Texas, Louisiana and Oklahoma. Through this program we employed a variety of outreach and education techniques, developed and deployed assessment tools and conducted market assessments. These efforts resulted in the growth of the combined heat and power market in the Gulf Coast region with a realization of more efficient energy generation, reduced emissions and a more resilient infrastructure. Specific t research, we did not formally investigate any techniques with any formal research design or methodology.

  15. Chalk play tops Gulf Coast horizontal scene

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-18

    This paper reports on horizontal drilling in the Cretaceous Austin chalk of Texas which dominates news of U.S. Gulf Coast horizontal action. In spite of a significant decline in horizontal drilling in Texas-the Texas Railroad Commission reported a 15 unit decline in the number of permits to drill horizontal wells during the third quarter-operators in East and South Texas continue to expand plays and develop new ones. The Cretaceous Bruda may be gaining some respect as a horizontal target in Texas. Elsewhere on the Gulf Coast, Mississippi soon will see more action on the horizontal drilling front.

  16. US Coast Guard lightweight fire-fighting module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The U.S. Coast Guard Fire-fighting Module developed for the purpose of fighting fires in harbors and on ships is described. The module can be lifted by a dockside crane or helicopter and placed on the deck of a patrol boat or cutter for transportation to the scene of the fire. At the fire the module can be set up and put in operation by a crew of two in approximately fifteen minutes. Once in operation the module will deliver water to two fire nozzles at a pressure of 150 psi and a flow rate of 2000 gpm. Sufficient fuel is carried in the module for three hours of continuous operation. A record of the development of the fire fighting module is also presented.

  17. US Coast Guard lightweight fire-fighting module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-05-01

    The U.S. Coast Guard Fire-fighting Module developed for the purpose of fighting fires in harbors and on ships is described. The module can be lifted by a dockside crane or helicopter and placed on the deck of a patrol boat or cutter for transportation to the scene of the fire. At the fire the module can be set up and put in operation by a crew of two in approximately fifteen minutes. Once in operation the module will deliver water to two fire nozzles at a pressure of 150 psi and a flow rate of 2000 gpm. Sufficient fuel is carried in the module for three hours of continuous operation. A record of the development of the fire fighting module is also presented.

  18. Variations in surface current off the coasts of Canada as inferred from infrared satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, W. J.; Ikeda, M.; Mysak, L. A.; Leblond, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    Infrared satellite images of sea surface temperature are used to infer changes in the surface currents off both the east and west coasts of Canada. Off the east coast, summer infrared temperature patterns suggest a close connection between the location of the continental slope and the path of the Labrador Current as marked by a strong change in the shape of the continental slope. In winter both infrared and visible imagery reveal the southward propagation of wavelike features in the ice patterns along the Labrador coast. A large number of images from the Canadian west coast were used to depict the evolution of surface temperature features. In winter and spring 150 km current meanders are fed energy by the baroclinic instability of the uniformly directed current which flows northwest in winter and southeast in spring. In summer the surface current is directed southeastward while below it an undercurrent flows to the northeast. Initiated by an interaction with the irregularities of the local continental slope 75 km current meanders begin to form. Energy is then fed non-linearly by baroclinic instability into longer scale 150 km meander which eventually shed to form separate eddies.

  19. General Education at the Coast Guard Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, William A.

    In seeking the most effective presentation of the liberal arts in curricula such as the heavily technical and professional curricula at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, which leave little room for general education, general education course design must capture the imagination of students and motivate them for continuing self-education. Development of…

  20. Coast Guard's Response to Spilled Oil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ard, R. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The Coast Guard utilizes a number of monitoring detectors, sensors, and techniques to find, recover and identify oil spills. Discussed in this article are in-situ and airborne sensors, systems developed to provide clean-up capability such as air deployable anti-pollution transfer system (ADAPTS), and techniques which will determine the source of a…

  1. Tsunami Risk for the Caribbean Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozelkov, A. S.; Kurkin, A. A.; Pelinovsky, E. N.; Zahibo, N.

    2004-12-01

    The tsunami problem for the coast of the Caribbean basin is discussed. Briefly the historical data of tsunami in the Caribbean Sea are presented. Numerical simulation of potential tsunamis in the Caribbean Sea is performed in the framework of the nonlinear-shallow theory. The tsunami wave height distribution along the Caribbean Coast is computed. These results are used to estimate the far-field tsunami potential of various coastal locations in the Caribbean Sea. In fact, five zones with tsunami low risk are selected basing on prognostic computations, they are: the bay "Golfo de Batabano" and the coast of province "Ciego de Avila" in Cuba, the Nicaraguan Coast (between Bluefields and Puerto Cabezas), the border between Mexico and Belize, the bay "Golfo de Venezuela" in Venezuela. The analysis of historical data confirms that there was no tsunami in the selected zones. Also, the wave attenuation in the Caribbean Sea is investigated; in fact, wave amplitude decreases in an order if the tsunami source is located on the distance up to 1000 km from the coastal location. Both factors wave attenuation and wave height distribution should be taken into account in the planned warning system for the Caribbean Sea.

  2. SOUTH COAST SCHOOL BUS IDLING STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and Coalition for Clean Air (CCA) conducted this study to provide information useful for estimating exposure of children in the South coast air basin to diesel exhaust while buses are loading and unloading at shcool sites. It was foun...

  3. GULF COAST REGIONAL ASSESSMENT: PROJECT DESCRIPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the USGCRP's First National Assessment effort, EPA is sponsoring the Gulf Coast Regional Assessment. Southern University and A&M College and its collaborators are analyzing and evaluating the potential consequences of climate variability and change for the region in th...

  4. Diseases of Pacific Coast conifers. Agriculture handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Scharpf, R.F.

    1993-06-01

    The handbook provides basic information needed to identify the common diseases of Pacific Coast conifers. Hosts, distribution, disease cycles, and identifying characteristics are described for more than 150 diseases, including cankers, diebacks, galls, rusts, needle diseases, root diseases, mistletoes, and rots. Diseases in which abiotic factors are involved are also described. For some groups of diseases, a descriptive key to field identification is included.

  5. Human Dimensions of our Estuaries and Coasts

    EPA Science Inventory

    The connection between humans and the sea via the coastal margin is well understood. Many of our major cities are built in the coastal zone, and 44 % of the world’s population lives within 150 km of the coast (United Nations 2014a). This tight connection is driven by the benefits...

  6. Dynamics of circulation off the west coast of Vancouver Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, B. K.; Holloway, G.

    1996-10-01

    The Princeton Ocean Model (Blumberg and Mellor,1987) is used to examine dynamical balances in the summer and winter three-dimensional circulation along the west coast of Vancouver Island. The model is initialized with horizontally averaged temperature and salinity over a domain 445 km alongshore by 145 km cross-shore. Forcing is by uniform summer and winter winds and by discharge from Juan de Fuca Strait. A topographic stress parameterization (Eby and Holloway, 1994) is included. In the absence of topographic stress and Juan de Fuca discharge, wind-forced summer circulation is dominated by equatorward flow over the shelf and slope. With topographic stress included, poleward coastal flow develops over the shelf and shelfbreak with a transition zone between poleward and equatorward flow over the slope. When the buoyancy forcing is introduced, an eddy is developed off the mouth of the Juan de Fuca Strait. Winter circulation tends to be poleward for all combinations of wind, buoyancy and topographic stress forcings. These results agree qualitatively with observations.

  7. Abandoned oil fields of Texas Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, S.P.

    1984-04-01

    One nonconventional oil target in Texas is the oil that remains in abandoned fields, defined as those fields that had no oil or gas production in 1977 and 1982. This target includes oil that has not been tapped by conventional field development because of reservoir heterogeneity and oil in reservoirs that have not been subjected to any secondary or tertiary recovery efforts. A total of 138 abandoned oil fields having individual cumulative production greater than 500,000 bbl are located in the Texas Gulf Coast (railroad Commission of Texas Districts 2, 3, and 4). These 138 onshore fields produced 276 million barrels of oil before being abandoned. Nongiant fields in the Texas Gulf Coast average about 40% ultimate recovery, so these fields probably originally contained about 700 million bbl of oil in place. Therefore, about 424 million bbl of oil remain unrecovered. Reservoirs in these abandoned fields are Tertiary sandstones. The 44 abandoned fields in the upper Texas Gulf Coast (District 3) produced from a wide range of plays; those plays with the largest number of abandoned fields are Yegua and Frio deep-seated domes, Eocene deltaic sandstone, and Frio barrier/strand-plain sandstone. The 19 abandoned fields in the middle Texas Gulf Coast (District 2) produced mainly from Wilcox and Frio fluvial/deltaic sandstones and from Frio and Jackson-Yegua barrier/strand-plain sandstones. The lower Texas Gulf Coast (District 4) contains 75 abandoned fields that produced from Frio fluvial/deltaic and barrier/strand-plain sandstones and from Jackson-Yegua barrier/strand-plain sandstones.

  8. Population genetic structure of annual and perennial populations of Zostera marina L. along the Pacific coast of Baja California and the Gulf of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munoz-Salazar, R.; Talbot, S.L.; Sage, G.K.; Ward, D.H.; Cabello-Pasini, Alejandro

    2005-01-01

    The Baja California peninsula represents a biogeographical boundary contributing to regional differentiation among populations of marine animals. We investigated the genetic characteristics of perennial and annual populations of the marine angiosperm, Zostera marina, along the Pacific coast of Baja California and in the Gulf of California, respectively. Populations of Z. marina from five coastal lagoons along the Pacific coast and four sites in the Gulf of California were studied using nine microsatellite loci. Analyses of variance revealed significant interregional differentiation, but no subregional differentiation. Significant spatial differentiation, assessed using θ values, was observed among all populations within the two regions. Z. marina populations along the Pacific coast are separated by more than 220 km and had the greatest θ (0.13-0.28) values, suggesting restricted gene flow. In contrast, lower but still significant genetic differentiation was observed among populations within the Gulf of California (θ = 0.04-0.18), even though populations are separated by more than 250 km. This suggests higher levels of gene flow among Gulf of California populations relative to Pacific coast populations. Direction of gene flow was predominantly southward among Pacific coast populations, whereas no dominant polarity in the Gulf of California populations was observed. The test for isolation by distance (IBD) showed a significant correlation between genetic and geographical distances in Gulf of California populations, but not in Pacific coast populations, perhaps because of shifts in currents during El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events along the Pacific coast.

  9. Microwave radiometer measurement of tidally induced salinity changes off the Georgia coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, B. M.; Blanton, J. O.

    1981-01-01

    A quasi-synoptic survey of tidally induced salinity changes off the Georgia coast was performed by using a L band microwave radiomater onboard a NASA aircraft. Salinity maps were obtained for ebb and flood conditions in order to define the salinity distributions near rivers and sounds and major changes that occur from ebb flow to flood flow. The Savannah River plume dominated the salinity regime and extended out from the Savannah River mouth about 12 km during ebb tidal conditions. The plume merged into a band of low salinity water extending along the Georgia-South Carolina coast which was produced by the many river sources of freshwater entering the coastal waters. The changes in salinity observed offshore of the river plume area were consistent with estimates of the changes that would occur over a typical tidal excursion perpendicular to the observed gradient.

  10. 1. General view of guard house and entrance to Coast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. General view of guard house and entrance to Coast Guard Base from La Putilla Street, looking southwest - U.S. Coast Guard Base, San Juan, Guard House, La Puntilla Finalle, San Juan, San Juan Municipio, PR

  11. 29. COAST LANDSCAPE VIEW FROM HIGHWAY 101, 10 MILES SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. COAST LANDSCAPE VIEW FROM HIGHWAY 101, 10 MILES SOUTH OF CRESCENT CITY. DEL NORTE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING S. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  12. 46 CFR 14.103 - Addresses of Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Addresses of Coast Guard. 14.103 Section 14.103 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN SHIPMENT AND DISCHARGE OF MERCHANT MARINERS General § 14.103 Addresses of Coast Guard. (a) U.S. postal mail: U.S. Coast Guard National Maritime Center (NMC-42),...

  13. 46 CFR 14.103 - Addresses of Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Addresses of Coast Guard. 14.103 Section 14.103 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN SHIPMENT AND DISCHARGE OF MERCHANT MARINERS General § 14.103 Addresses of Coast Guard. (a) U.S. postal mail: U.S. Coast Guard National Maritime Center (NMC-42),...

  14. 33 CFR 64.33 - Marking by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Marking by the Coast Guard. 64.33 Section 64.33 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO... Marking by the Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander may mark for the protection of maritime...

  15. 33 CFR 100.10 - Coast Guard-State agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coast Guard-State agreements. 100.10 Section 100.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.10 Coast Guard-State agreements....

  16. 46 CFR 90.10-9 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 90.10-9 Section 90.10-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 90.10-9 Coast Guard District Commander. This...

  17. 33 CFR 174.125 - Coast Guard address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coast Guard address. 174.125 Section 174.125 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY STATE NUMBERING AND CASUALTY REPORTING SYSTEMS State Reports § 174.125 Coast Guard...

  18. 1. AERIAL VIEW TO WEST OF COAST GUARD AIR STATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. AERIAL VIEW TO WEST OF COAST GUARD AIR STATION SAN FRANCISCO, SHOWING ALL MAJOR BUILDINGS. 8X10 black and white silver gelatin print. United States Coast Guard, February 1962. - U.S. Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco, 1020 North Access Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  19. 46 CFR 14.103 - Addresses of Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Addresses of Coast Guard. 14.103 Section 14.103 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN SHIPMENT AND DISCHARGE OF MERCHANT MARINERS General § 14.103 Addresses of Coast Guard. (a) U.S. postal mail: U.S....

  20. 33 CFR 67.50-35 - Eleventh Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Eleventh Coast Guard District. 67.50-35 Section 67.50-35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 67.50-35 Eleventh Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.55-1 of this chapter. (b) Line...

  1. 46 CFR 167.05-15 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 167.05-15 Section 167.05-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Definitions § 167.05-15 Coast Guard District Commander. This term means an officer of...

  2. 33 CFR 67.50-45 - Thirteenth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Thirteenth Coast Guard District. 67.50-45 Section 67.50-45 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Regulations § 67.50-45 Thirteenth Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.65-1 of this chapter....

  3. 33 CFR 67.50-25 - Eighth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Eighth Coast Guard District. 67.50-25 Section 67.50-25 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 67.50-25 Eighth Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.40-1 of this chapter. (b) Lines...

  4. 33 CFR 66.01-15 - Action by Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Action by Coast Guard. 66.01-15 Section 66.01-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO... Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander receiving the application will review it for completeness...

  5. 33 CFR 174.125 - Coast Guard address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coast Guard address. 174.125 Section 174.125 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY STATE NUMBERING AND CASUALTY REPORTING SYSTEMS State Reports § 174.125 Coast Guard...

  6. 33 CFR 66.01-15 - Action by Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Action by Coast Guard. 66.01-15 Section 66.01-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO... Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander receiving the application will review it for completeness...

  7. 33 CFR 67.50-15 - Fifth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fifth Coast Guard District. 67.50-15 Section 67.50-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS....50-15 Fifth Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.25-1 of this chapter. (b) Line...

  8. 46 CFR 188.10-13 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 188.10-13 Section 188.10-13 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-13 Coast Guard District...

  9. 33 CFR 67.50-15 - Fifth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fifth Coast Guard District. 67.50-15 Section 67.50-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS....50-15 Fifth Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.25-1 of this chapter. (b) Line...

  10. 33 CFR 64.33 - Marking by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Marking by the Coast Guard. 64.33 Section 64.33 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO... Marking by the Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander may mark for the protection of maritime...

  11. 33 CFR 100.10 - Coast Guard-State agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coast Guard-State agreements. 100.10 Section 100.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.10 Coast Guard-State agreements....

  12. 33 CFR 67.50-50 - Seventeenth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Seventeenth Coast Guard District. 67.50-50 Section 67.50-50 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Regulations § 67.50-50 Seventeenth Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.85-1 of this chapter....

  13. 33 CFR 100.10 - Coast Guard-State agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coast Guard-State agreements. 100.10 Section 100.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.10 Coast Guard-State agreements....

  14. 46 CFR 14.103 - Addresses of Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Addresses of Coast Guard. 14.103 Section 14.103 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN SHIPMENT AND DISCHARGE OF MERCHANT MARINERS General § 14.103 Addresses of Coast Guard. (a) U.S. postal mail: U.S....

  15. 33 CFR 66.01-15 - Action by Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Action by Coast Guard. 66.01-15 Section 66.01-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO... Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander receiving the application will review it for completeness...

  16. 33 CFR 118.30 - Action by Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Action by Coast Guard. 118.30 Section 118.30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.30 Action by Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander receiving...

  17. 33 CFR 67.50-15 - Fifth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fifth Coast Guard District. 67.50-15 Section 67.50-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS....50-15 Fifth Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.25-1 of this chapter. (b) Line...

  18. 33 CFR 67.50-30 - Ninth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ninth Coast Guard District. 67.50-30 Section 67.50-30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS....50-30 Ninth Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.45-1 of this chapter. (b) Line...

  19. 46 CFR 188.10-13 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 188.10-13 Section 188.10-13 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-13 Coast Guard District...

  20. 33 CFR 67.50-50 - Seventeenth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Seventeenth Coast Guard District. 67.50-50 Section 67.50-50 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Regulations § 67.50-50 Seventeenth Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.85-1 of this chapter....

  1. 46 CFR 90.10-9 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 90.10-9 Section 90.10-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 90.10-9 Coast Guard District Commander. This...

  2. 33 CFR 67.50-5 - First Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false First Coast Guard District. 67.50-5 Section 67.50-5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS....50-5 First Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.05-1 of this chapter. (b) Line...

  3. 33 CFR 67.50-25 - Eighth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Eighth Coast Guard District. 67.50-25 Section 67.50-25 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 67.50-25 Eighth Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.40-1 of this chapter. (b) Lines...

  4. 33 CFR 67.50-45 - Thirteenth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Thirteenth Coast Guard District. 67.50-45 Section 67.50-45 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Regulations § 67.50-45 Thirteenth Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.65-1 of this chapter....

  5. 33 CFR 67.50-30 - Ninth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ninth Coast Guard District. 67.50-30 Section 67.50-30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS....50-30 Ninth Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.45-1 of this chapter. (b) Line...

  6. 33 CFR 118.30 - Action by Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Action by Coast Guard. 118.30 Section 118.30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.30 Action by Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander receiving...

  7. 33 CFR 100.10 - Coast Guard-State agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coast Guard-State agreements. 100.10 Section 100.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.10 Coast Guard-State agreements....

  8. 33 CFR 67.50-45 - Thirteenth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Thirteenth Coast Guard District. 67.50-45 Section 67.50-45 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Regulations § 67.50-45 Thirteenth Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.65-1 of this chapter....

  9. 33 CFR 118.30 - Action by Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Action by Coast Guard. 118.30 Section 118.30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.30 Action by Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander receiving...

  10. 49 CFR 850.30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. 850.30 Section 850.30 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.30 Procedures for Coast...

  11. 46 CFR 188.10-13 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 188.10-13 Section 188.10-13 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-13 Coast Guard District Commander. This term means an officer of the...

  12. 33 CFR 67.50-15 - Fifth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fifth Coast Guard District. 67.50-15 Section 67.50-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS....50-15 Fifth Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.25-1 of this chapter. (b) Line...

  13. 33 CFR 173.35 - Coast Guard validation sticker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coast Guard validation sticker. 173.35 Section 173.35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... number issued by the Coast Guard unless it has the validation sticker issued with the certificate...

  14. 46 CFR 107.117 - Coast Guard addresses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard addresses. 107.117 Section 107.117 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION General § 107.117 Coast Guard addresses. When approval of the Commandant is required under...

  15. 33 CFR 118.30 - Action by Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Action by Coast Guard. 118.30 Section 118.30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.30 Action by Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander receiving...

  16. 46 CFR 90.10-9 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 90.10-9 Section 90.10-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 90.10-9 Coast Guard District Commander. This...

  17. 33 CFR 174.125 - Coast Guard address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coast Guard address. 174.125 Section 174.125 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY STATE NUMBERING AND CASUALTY REPORTING SYSTEMS State Reports § 174.125 Coast Guard...

  18. 2. AERIAL VIEW TO SOUTHEAST OF COAST GUARD AIR STATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. AERIAL VIEW TO SOUTHEAST OF COAST GUARD AIR STATION SAN FRANCISCO, SHOWING ALL MAJOR BUILDINGS. 8X10 black and white silver gelatin print. United States Coast Guard, February 1962. - U.S. Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco, 1020 North Access Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  19. 33 CFR 67.50-35 - Eleventh Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Eleventh Coast Guard District. 67.50-35 Section 67.50-35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 67.50-35 Eleventh Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.55-1 of this chapter. (b) Line...

  20. 33 CFR 67.50-20 - Seventh Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Seventh Coast Guard District. 67.50-20 Section 67.50-20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 67.50-20 Seventh Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.35-1 of this chapter. (b) Line...

  1. 33 CFR 173.35 - Coast Guard validation sticker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coast Guard validation sticker. 173.35 Section 173.35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... number issued by the Coast Guard unless it has the validation sticker issued with the certificate...

  2. 33 CFR 67.50-15 - Fifth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fifth Coast Guard District. 67.50-15 Section 67.50-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS....50-15 Fifth Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.25-1 of this chapter. (b) Line...

  3. 33 CFR 174.125 - Coast Guard address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coast Guard address. 174.125 Section 174.125 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY STATE NUMBERING AND CASUALTY REPORTING SYSTEMS State Reports § 174.125 Coast Guard...

  4. 46 CFR 107.117 - Coast Guard addresses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard addresses. 107.117 Section 107.117 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION General § 107.117 Coast Guard addresses. When approval of the Commandant is required under...

  5. 46 CFR 90.10-9 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 90.10-9 Section 90.10-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 90.10-9 Coast Guard District Commander. This...

  6. 33 CFR 67.50-35 - Eleventh Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Eleventh Coast Guard District. 67.50-35 Section 67.50-35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 67.50-35 Eleventh Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.55-1 of this chapter. (b) Line...

  7. 33 CFR 67.50-20 - Seventh Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Seventh Coast Guard District. 67.50-20 Section 67.50-20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 67.50-20 Seventh Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.35-1 of this chapter. (b) Line...

  8. 46 CFR 107.117 - Coast Guard addresses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coast Guard addresses. 107.117 Section 107.117 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION General § 107.117 Coast Guard addresses. When approval of the Commandant is required under...

  9. 33 CFR 67.50-5 - First Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false First Coast Guard District. 67.50-5 Section 67.50-5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS....50-5 First Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.05-1 of this chapter. (b) Line...

  10. 33 CFR 67.50-20 - Seventh Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Seventh Coast Guard District. 67.50-20 Section 67.50-20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 67.50-20 Seventh Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.35-1 of this chapter. (b) Line...

  11. 33 CFR 64.33 - Marking by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Marking by the Coast Guard. 64.33 Section 64.33 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO... Marking by the Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander may mark for the protection of maritime...

  12. 46 CFR 188.10-13 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 188.10-13 Section 188.10-13 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-13 Coast Guard District Commander. This term means an officer of the...

  13. 33 CFR 67.50-30 - Ninth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ninth Coast Guard District. 67.50-30 Section 67.50-30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS....50-30 Ninth Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.45-1 of this chapter. (b) Line...

  14. 46 CFR 107.117 - Coast Guard addresses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coast Guard addresses. 107.117 Section 107.117 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION General § 107.117 Coast Guard addresses. When approval of the Commandant is required under...

  15. 33 CFR 67.50-25 - Eighth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Eighth Coast Guard District. 67.50-25 Section 67.50-25 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 67.50-25 Eighth Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.40-1 of this chapter. (b) Lines...

  16. 33 CFR 67.50-35 - Eleventh Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eleventh Coast Guard District. 67.50-35 Section 67.50-35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 67.50-35 Eleventh Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.55-1 of this chapter. (b) Line...

  17. 50. Elevation view underway, showing "new" coast guard paint scheme ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. Elevation view underway, showing "new" coast guard paint scheme and A-frame crane. Note crews quarters expanded over turtle deck at stern. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE SUMAC, U.S. Coast Guard 8th District Base, 4640 Urquhart Street, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, LA

  18. 33 CFR 67.50-50 - Seventeenth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Seventeenth Coast Guard District. 67.50-50 Section 67.50-50 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Regulations § 67.50-50 Seventeenth Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.85-1 of this chapter....

  19. 33 CFR 64.33 - Marking by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Marking by the Coast Guard. 64.33 Section 64.33 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO... Marking by the Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander may mark for the protection of maritime...

  20. 33 CFR 67.50-25 - Eighth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eighth Coast Guard District. 67.50-25 Section 67.50-25 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 67.50-25 Eighth Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.40-1 of this chapter. (b) Lines...

  1. 46 CFR 107.117 - Coast Guard addresses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coast Guard addresses. 107.117 Section 107.117 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION General § 107.117 Coast Guard addresses. When approval of the Commandant is required under...

  2. 33 CFR 67.50-50 - Seventeenth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Seventeenth Coast Guard District. 67.50-50 Section 67.50-50 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Regulations § 67.50-50 Seventeenth Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.85-1 of this chapter....

  3. 33 CFR 66.01-15 - Action by Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Action by Coast Guard. 66.01-15 Section 66.01-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO... Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander receiving the application will review it for completeness...

  4. 33 CFR 67.50-5 - First Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false First Coast Guard District. 67.50-5 Section 67.50-5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS....50-5 First Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.05-1 of this chapter. (b) Line...

  5. 33 CFR 173.35 - Coast Guard validation sticker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coast Guard validation sticker. 173.35 Section 173.35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... number issued by the Coast Guard unless it has the validation sticker issued with the certificate...

  6. 33 CFR 67.50-20 - Seventh Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Seventh Coast Guard District. 67.50-20 Section 67.50-20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 67.50-20 Seventh Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.35-1 of this chapter. (b) Line...

  7. 33 CFR 173.35 - Coast Guard validation sticker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coast Guard validation sticker. 173.35 Section 173.35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... number issued by the Coast Guard unless it has the validation sticker issued with the certificate...

  8. 46 CFR 90.10-9 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 90.10-9 Section 90.10-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 90.10-9 Coast Guard District Commander. This...

  9. 46 CFR 167.05-15 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 167.05-15 Section 167.05-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Definitions § 167.05-15 Coast Guard District Commander. This term means an officer of...

  10. 33 CFR 67.50-35 - Eleventh Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Eleventh Coast Guard District. 67.50-35 Section 67.50-35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 67.50-35 Eleventh Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.55-1 of this chapter. (b) Line...

  11. 4. AERIAL VIEW TO SOUTHEAST OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. AERIAL VIEW TO SOUTHEAST OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR STATION SAN FRANCISCO. 8X10 black and white silver gelatin print. United States Coast Guard Official Photograph, 12th District, File No. 62751-22 A.S. Date unknown. - U.S. Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco, 1020 North Access Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  12. 33 CFR 67.50-20 - Seventh Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Seventh Coast Guard District. 67.50-20 Section 67.50-20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 67.50-20 Seventh Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.35-1 of this chapter. (b) Line...

  13. 33 CFR 67.50-45 - Thirteenth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Thirteenth Coast Guard District. 67.50-45 Section 67.50-45 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Regulations § 67.50-45 Thirteenth Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.65-1 of this chapter....

  14. 33 CFR 174.125 - Coast Guard address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coast Guard address. 174.125 Section 174.125 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY STATE NUMBERING AND CASUALTY REPORTING SYSTEMS State Reports § 174.125 Coast Guard...

  15. 33 CFR 67.50-50 - Seventeenth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Seventeenth Coast Guard District. 67.50-50 Section 67.50-50 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Regulations § 67.50-50 Seventeenth Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.85-1 of this chapter....

  16. 33 CFR 118.30 - Action by Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Action by Coast Guard. 118.30 Section 118.30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.30 Action by Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander receiving...

  17. 33 CFR 67.50-30 - Ninth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ninth Coast Guard District. 67.50-30 Section 67.50-30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS....50-30 Ninth Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.45-1 of this chapter. (b) Line...

  18. 33 CFR 100.10 - Coast Guard-State agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coast Guard-State agreements. 100.10 Section 100.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.10 Coast Guard-State agreements....

  19. 28. VIEW OF WHITE SAGE PRIOR TO BEING PAINTED COAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. VIEW OF WHITE SAGE PRIOR TO BEING PAINTED COAST GUARD COLORS OF BLACK AND WHITE. NOTE ALSO THE PHOTOGRAPH WAS TAKEN PRIOR TO THE INSTALLATION OF A-FRAME MAST AND BOOM AND TO THE CONSTRUCTION OF TURTLE DECK. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE SAGE, U.S. Coast Guard 1st District Base, 1 Thames Street, Bristol, Bristol County, RI

  20. 33 CFR 66.01-15 - Action by Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Action by Coast Guard. 66.01-15 Section 66.01-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO... Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander receiving the application will review it for completeness...

  1. 33 CFR 67.50-45 - Thirteenth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Thirteenth Coast Guard District. 67.50-45 Section 67.50-45 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Regulations § 67.50-45 Thirteenth Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.65-1 of this chapter....

  2. 33 CFR 67.50-5 - First Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false First Coast Guard District. 67.50-5 Section 67.50-5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS....50-5 First Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.05-1 of this chapter. (b) Line...

  3. 46 CFR 188.10-13 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 188.10-13 Section 188.10-13 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-13 Coast Guard District...

  4. 33 CFR 67.50-5 - First Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false First Coast Guard District. 67.50-5 Section 67.50-5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS....50-5 First Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.05-1 of this chapter. (b) Line...

  5. 46 CFR 14.103 - Addresses of Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Addresses of Coast Guard. 14.103 Section 14.103 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN SHIPMENT AND DISCHARGE OF MERCHANT MARINERS General § 14.103 Addresses of Coast Guard. (a) U.S. postal mail: U.S....

  6. 33 CFR 173.35 - Coast Guard validation sticker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coast Guard validation sticker. 173.35 Section 173.35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... number issued by the Coast Guard unless it has the validation sticker issued with the certificate...

  7. 33 CFR 64.33 - Marking by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Marking by the Coast Guard. 64.33 Section 64.33 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO... Marking by the Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander may mark for the protection of maritime...

  8. 33 CFR 67.50-30 - Ninth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ninth Coast Guard District. 67.50-30 Section 67.50-30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS....50-30 Ninth Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.45-1 of this chapter. (b) Line...

  9. 46 CFR 167.05-15 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 167.05-15 Section 167.05-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Definitions § 167.05-15 Coast Guard District Commander. This term means an officer of...

  10. 33 CFR 67.50-25 - Eighth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Eighth Coast Guard District. 67.50-25 Section 67.50-25 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 67.50-25 Eighth Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.40-1 of this chapter. (b) Lines...

  11. Family moves and depression among Coast Guard wives.

    PubMed

    McGarigal, Alyssa; Jablonski, Jessica; Ferri, Christine; Lester, David

    2009-12-01

    A comparison of 78 Coast Guard wives' and 30 firefighters' wives' scores on Zung's self-rating scale for depression showed no differences, but the Coast Guard wives had more often been prescribed antidepressants. Scores on a scale to assess the negative effects of moving were positively associated with current depression for the Coast Guard wives. PMID:20099556

  12. 33 CFR 166.500 - Areas along the Atlantic Coast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Areas along the Atlantic Coast. 166.500 Section 166.500 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Anchorages § 166.500 Areas along the Atlantic Coast. (a) Purpose. Fairways, as described in this section...

  13. 33 CFR 166.500 - Areas along the Atlantic Coast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Areas along the Atlantic Coast. 166.500 Section 166.500 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Anchorages § 166.500 Areas along the Atlantic Coast. (a) Purpose. Fairways, as described in this section...

  14. 47 CFR 80.153 - Coast station operator requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coast station operator requirements. 80.153... SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Operator Requirements Coast Station Operator Requirements § 80.153 Coast station operator requirements. (a) Except as provided in § 80.179, operation of a...

  15. 33 CFR 166.500 - Areas along the Atlantic Coast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Areas along the Atlantic Coast. 166.500 Section 166.500 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Anchorages § 166.500 Areas along the Atlantic Coast. (a) Purpose. Fairways, as described in this section...

  16. 47 CFR 80.153 - Coast station operator requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coast station operator requirements. 80.153... SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Operator Requirements Coast Station Operator Requirements § 80.153 Coast station operator requirements. (a) Except as provided in § 80.179, operation of a...

  17. 47 CFR 80.153 - Coast station operator requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast station operator requirements. 80.153... SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Operator Requirements Coast Station Operator Requirements § 80.153 Coast station operator requirements. (a) Except as provided in § 80.179, operation of a...

  18. 47 CFR 80.153 - Coast station operator requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coast station operator requirements. 80.153... SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Operator Requirements Coast Station Operator Requirements § 80.153 Coast station operator requirements. (a) Except as provided in § 80.179, operation of a...

  19. 50 CFR 600.1102 - Pacific Coast groundfish fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pacific Coast groundfish fee. 600.1102... Fishing Capacity Reduction Regulations § 600.1102 Pacific Coast groundfish fee. (a) Purpose. This section implements the fee for repaying the reduction loan financing the Pacific Coast Groundfish Program...

  20. 47 CFR 80.153 - Coast station operator requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast station operator requirements. 80.153... SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Operator Requirements Coast Station Operator Requirements § 80.153 Coast station operator requirements. (a) Except as provided in § 80.179, operation of a...

  1. 33 CFR 166.500 - Areas along the Atlantic Coast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Areas along the Atlantic Coast. 166.500 Section 166.500 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Anchorages § 166.500 Areas along the Atlantic Coast. (a) Purpose. Fairways, as described in this section...

  2. 3 CFR - Long-Term Gulf Coast Restoration Support Plan

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Long-Term Gulf Coast Restoration Support Plan Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of June 30, 2010 Long-Term Gulf Coast... help the Gulf Coast and its people recover from this tragedy. A long-term plan to restore the...

  3. 50 CFR 600.1102 - Pacific Coast groundfish fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pacific Coast groundfish fee. 600.1102... Fishing Capacity Reduction Regulations § 600.1102 Pacific Coast groundfish fee. (a) Purpose. This section implements the fee for repaying the reduction loan financing the Pacific Coast Groundfish Program...

  4. 33 CFR 166.500 - Areas along the Atlantic Coast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Areas along the Atlantic Coast. 166.500 Section 166.500 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Anchorages § 166.500 Areas along the Atlantic Coast. (a) Purpose. Fairways, as described in this section...

  5. 50 CFR 660.50 - Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... issued pursuant to 25 CFR part 249, subpart A, is prima facie evidence that the holder is a member of the... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries... Groundfish Fisheries § 660.50 Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries. (a) Pacific Coast treaty Indian...

  6. 50 CFR 660.50 - Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... issued pursuant to 25 CFR part 249, subpart A, is prima facie evidence that the holder is a member of the... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries. 660... Groundfish Fisheries § 660.50 Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries. (a) Pacific Coast treaty Indian...

  7. 50 CFR 600.1102 - Pacific Coast groundfish fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pacific Coast groundfish fee. 600.1102... Fishing Capacity Reduction Regulations § 600.1102 Pacific Coast groundfish fee. (a) Purpose. This section implements the fee for repaying the reduction loan financing the Pacific Coast Groundfish Program...

  8. 50 CFR 660.50 - Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... issued pursuant to 25 CFR part 249, subpart A, is prima facie evidence that the holder is a member of the... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries... Groundfish Fisheries § 660.50 Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries. (a) Pacific Coast treaty Indian...

  9. 50 CFR 600.1102 - Pacific Coast groundfish fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pacific Coast groundfish fee. 600.1102... Fishing Capacity Reduction Regulations § 600.1102 Pacific Coast groundfish fee. (a) Purpose. This section implements the fee for repaying the reduction loan financing the Pacific Coast Groundfish Program...

  10. 50 CFR 660.324 - Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... tribal consensus. (e) Identification. A valid treaty Indian identification card issued pursuant to 25 CFR... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries. 660... Groundfish Fisheries § 660.324 Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries. (a) Pacific Coast treaty Indian...

  11. 50 CFR 600.1102 - Pacific Coast groundfish fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pacific Coast groundfish fee. 600.1102... Fishing Capacity Reduction Regulations § 600.1102 Pacific Coast groundfish fee. (a) Purpose. This section implements the fee for repaying the reduction loan financing the Pacific Coast Groundfish Program...

  12. 47 CFR 80.72 - Antenna requirements for coast stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna requirements for coast stations. 80.72 Section 80.72 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... Stations § 80.72 Antenna requirements for coast stations. All emissions of a coast station a...

  13. 47 CFR 80.72 - Antenna requirements for coast stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna requirements for coast stations. 80.72 Section 80.72 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... Stations § 80.72 Antenna requirements for coast stations. All emissions of a coast station a...

  14. 47 CFR 80.72 - Antenna requirements for coast stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna requirements for coast stations. 80.72 Section 80.72 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... Stations § 80.72 Antenna requirements for coast stations. All emissions of a coast station a...

  15. 47 CFR 80.72 - Antenna requirements for coast stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna requirements for coast stations. 80.72 Section 80.72 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... Stations § 80.72 Antenna requirements for coast stations. All emissions of a coast station a...

  16. 47 CFR 80.72 - Antenna requirements for coast stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna requirements for coast stations. 80.72 Section 80.72 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... Stations § 80.72 Antenna requirements for coast stations. All emissions of a coast station a...

  17. Flow separation of currents in shallow water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Signell, Richard P.

    1989-01-01

    Flow separation of currents in shallow coastal areas is investigated using a boundary layer model for two-dimensional (depth-averaged) tidal flow past an elliptic headland. If the shoaling region near the coast is narrow compared to the scale of the headland, bottom friction causes the flow to separate just downstream of the point where the pressure gradient switches from favoring to adverse. As long as the shoaling region at the coast is well resolved, the inclusion of eddy viscosity and a no-slip boundary condition have no effect on this result. An approximate analytic solution for the pressure gradient along the boundary is obtained by assuming the flow away from the immediate vicinity of the boundary is irrotational. On the basis of the pressure gradient obtained from the irrotational flow solution, flow separation is a strong function of the headland aspect ratio, an equivalent Reynolds number, and a Keulegan-Carpenter number.

  18. South coast air quality management district

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    The first of several state-of-the-art sampling instruments to monitor acid fog in the South Coast Air Basin on an on-going basis has been in stalled in Rubidoux by the South Coast Air Quality Management District. The automated equipment, called the Caltech Active Strand Collector (CASC), is part of a long-term acid fog monitoring program developed by AQMD. The collecting process involves drawing a fog-laden air sample into the collector where fog droplets strike a series of teflon strands and run down to a collection trough. The sample is then sent to AQMD's laboratory to determine acidity and chemical composition. The monitoring equipment will be moved to Pomona later this winter, and to Crestline in the spring. Following this initial evaluation period, additional CASC units will be sited in the region.

  19. 46 CFR 153.358 - Venting system flow capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Venting system flow capacity. 153.358 Section 153.358 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS... Venting Systems § 153.358 Venting system flow capacity. (a) The cross-sectional flow area of any...

  20. 46 CFR 154.550 - Excess flow valve: Bypass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excess flow valve: Bypass. 154.550 Section 154.550 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... and Process Piping Systems § 154.550 Excess flow valve: Bypass. If the excess flow valve allowed...

  1. 46 CFR 154.550 - Excess flow valve: Bypass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Excess flow valve: Bypass. 154.550 Section 154.550 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... and Process Piping Systems § 154.550 Excess flow valve: Bypass. If the excess flow valve allowed...

  2. 46 CFR 154.550 - Excess flow valve: Bypass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Excess flow valve: Bypass. 154.550 Section 154.550 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... and Process Piping Systems § 154.550 Excess flow valve: Bypass. If the excess flow valve allowed...

  3. 46 CFR 154.550 - Excess flow valve: Bypass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Excess flow valve: Bypass. 154.550 Section 154.550 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... and Process Piping Systems § 154.550 Excess flow valve: Bypass. If the excess flow valve allowed...

  4. 46 CFR 154.550 - Excess flow valve: Bypass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Excess flow valve: Bypass. 154.550 Section 154.550 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... and Process Piping Systems § 154.550 Excess flow valve: Bypass. If the excess flow valve allowed...

  5. 46 CFR 154.548 - Cargo piping: Flow capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo piping: Flow capacity. 154.548 Section 154.548 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... and Process Piping Systems § 154.548 Cargo piping: Flow capacity. Piping with an excess flow...

  6. WEST COAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Myer; Terry Surles; Kelly Birkinshaw

    2004-01-01

    The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership is one of seven partnerships which have been established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate carbon dioxide capture, transport and sequestration (CT&S) technologies best suited for different regions of the country. The West Coast Region comprises Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, and the North Slope of Alaska. Led by the California Energy Commission, the West Coast Partnership is a consortium of over thirty five organizations, including state natural resource and environmental protection agencies; national labs and universities; private companies working on CO{sub 2} capture, transportation, and storage technologies; utilities; oil and gas companies; nonprofit organizations; and policy/governance coordinating organizations. In an eighteen month Phase I project, the Partnership will evaluate both terrestrial and geologic sequestration options. Work will focus on five major objectives: (1) Collect data to characterize major CO{sub 2} point sources, the transportation options, and the terrestrial and geologic sinks in the region, and compile and organize this data via a geographic information system (GIS) database; (2) Address key issues affecting deployment of CT&S technologies, including storage site permitting and monitoring, injection regulations, and health and environmental risks (3) Conduct public outreach and maintain an open dialogue with stakeholders in CT&S technologies through public meetings, joint research, and education work (4) Integrate and analyze data and information from the above tasks in order to develop supply curves and cost effective, environmentally acceptable sequestration options, both near- and long-term (5) Identify appropriate terrestrial and geologic demonstration projects consistent with the options defined above, and create action plans for their safe and effective implementation A kickoff meeting for the West Coast Partnership was held on Sept 30-Oct

  7. Phillips goes subsea trees in Ivory Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Bryngelson, R.H.

    1982-11-15

    Describes installation of 3 wet, diver-assist trees, in the Espoir field offshore Ivory Coast, as part of Phillips Petroleum's plans to use 5 satellite wells with downhole completion equipment and subsea production trees. Simplicity in design and attention to training has resulted in an installation time of about 3 weeks for one of the largest subsea trees in the industry. Presents diagram showing the converted jackup, Dan Duke drilling unit, which supports equipment to handle production from subsea wells.

  8. Open ocean Internal Waves, Namibia Coast, Africa.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    These open ocean Internal Waves were seen off the Namibia Coast, Africa (23.0S, 14.0E). The periodic and regularly spaced sets of internal waves most likely coincide with tidal periods about 12 hours apart. The wave length (distance from crest to crest) varies between 1.5 and 5.0 miles and the crest lengths stretch across and beyond the distance of the photo. The waves are intersecting the Namibia coastline at about a 30 degree angle.

  9. Open ocean Internal Waves, Namibia Coast, Africa.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    These open ocean Internal Waves were seen off the Namibia Coast, Africa (19.5S, 11.5E). The periodic and regularly spaced sets of incoming internal appear to be diffracting against the coastline and recombining to form a network of interference patterns. They seem to coincide with tidal periods about 12 hours apart and wave length (distance from crest to crest) varies between 1.5 and 5.0 miles and the crest lengths stretch beyond the image.

  10. Phytoplankton off the Coast of Portugal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A large phytoplankton bloom off of the coast of Portugal can be seen in this true-color image taken on April 23, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA's Terra satellite. The bloom is roughly half the size of Portugal and forms a bluish-green cloud in the water. The red spots in northwest Spain denote what are likely small agricultural fires. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  11. Tritium level along Romanian Black Sea Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Varlam, C.; Stefanescu, I.; Popescu, I.; Faurescu, I.

    2008-07-15

    Establishing the tritium level along the Romanian Black Sea Coast, after 10 years of exploitation of the nuclear power plant from Cernavoda, is a first step in evaluating its impact on the Black Sea ecosystem. The monitoring program consists of tritium activity concentration measurement in sea water and precipitation from Black Sea Coast between April 2005 and April 2006. The sampling points were spread over the Danube-Black Sea Canal - before the locks Agigea and Navodari, and Black Sea along the coast to the Bulgarian border. The average tritium concentration in sea water collected from the sampling locations had the value of 11.1 {+-} 2.1 TU, close to tritium concentration in precipitation. Although an operating nuclear power plant exists in the monitored area, the values of tritium concentration in two locations are slightly higher than those recorded elsewhere. To conclude, it could be emphasized that until now, Cernavoda NPP did not had any influence on the tritium concentration of the Black Sea Shore. (authors)

  12. [Implementation of palliative care in Ivory Coast].

    PubMed

    Coulibaly, J Didi-Kouko; Datie, A-M; Binlin-Dadie, R; Kouame, I; N'guessan, Zc; Barouan, M-C; Koffi, E; Coulibaly, I; Mensah, J; Yenou, H Memain; Dedomey, E; Echimane, Ka; Plo, Kj; Kouassi, B

    2009-05-01

    Ivory Coast adhered to the strategy of the primary cares of health whose leading principles served basis to the definition of the National politics of sanitary development, exposed in the National plan of sanitary development 1996-2005. The improvement of the quality of the cares is the main objective of this plan. The attack of this objective cannot make itself without the hold in account of the palliative cares that are a component of the cares for the patients affected by chronic and incurable affections, since the diagnosis until the death and even after the death. Conscious of the necessity to develop the palliative cares to improve the quality of life of the patients and their families, the ministry in charge of health, in collaboration with the partners to the development, initiated a project of development of the palliative care in Ivory Coast. It is about an innovating gait in Ivory Coast concerning politics of health. This work has for goal to present the big lines and the setting in which this politics has been put in place. PMID:19423486

  13. A new infrared camera for COAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neill, Richard J.; Young, John S.

    2004-09-01

    We describe the design of a new IR camera for the Cambridge Optical Aperture Synthesis Telescope that has been designed both to increase our science productivity at COAST and to prototype novel hardware architectures for the Magdalena Ridge Observatory Interferometer IR detector systems. The new camera uses a Rockwell HAWAII sensor in place of the NICMOS device from our previous camera and will be able to sample the temporal fringe patterns from the four outputs of the COAST infrared beam-combiner at frame rates up to 10 kHz. The use of non-destructive multiple reads should allow an effective read noise of 3 electrons to be attained with this chip. The camera controller uses a PulseBlaster FPGA card to generate the timing signals: the advantages of this are flexibility, ease of use, and rapid reconfiguration of the clocking scheme. The new system should improve the IR sensitivity of COAST by around 2 magnitudes. We detail the design of the hardware and the associated software.

  14. Holocene Glacial Retreat at Walgreen Coast, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindow, J.; Johnson, J.; Castex, M.; Wittmann, H.; Smith, J.; Lisker, F.; Gohl, K.; Spiegel, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Walgreen Coast of West Antarctica represents one of the most rapidly changing sectors of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS). With the fastest ice streams in the whole Antarctic, the WAIS is characterised by rapid thinning and grounding line retreat. Airborne and satellite-based short-term observations show a doubling of the negative net mass balance between 1996-2006 (Rignot et al., 2008). Furthermore, because the WAIS is largely grounded below sea level, continued inland thinning and grounding line retreat could result in rapid ice sheet collapse, which would raise global sea level by between 3-5 m. However, due to remoteness and challenging accessibility, onshore data is limited to a few isolated nunataks making it difficult to assess the long-term evolution of the glacial dynamics along Walgreen Coast. To address this we present new data from two key areas of the Walgreen Coast; the Kohler Range and the Pine Island Bay. Our 10Be surface exposure ages from erratic boulders in the Kohler Range are the first and reveal that this area became ice-free between 8.3 and 12.3 ka. This implies a long-term thinning rate of 3.3 cm/yr and agrees with similar data published from glaciers eastward. Our ages are also consistent with recent deglaciation models which suggest strong thinning after 15 ka and off-shore sediments shows a concurrent lateral ice-shelf front retreat. Our results suggest an ice-cover at least 300 m thicker in the Kohler Range during the early Holocene and that subsequent average thinning occurred on rates one order of magnitude slower than recent satellite measurements show. This implies that the recent trend in ice-sheet thinning results from a recent dynamic changes rather than a response to long-term thinning. To further constrain the lateral deglaciation history along the eastern Walgreen Coast, namely the Pine Island Glacier, we collected additional samples from a chain of islands, located flow-parallel and downstream of the ice-shelf front. We

  15. 75 FR 11515 - Fisheries Off West Coast States and in the Western Pacific; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-11

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XU32 Fisheries Off West Coast States and in the Western Pacific; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery; Application for an Exempted Fishing Permit AGENCY... implementing the provisions of Amendment 10 to the Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan...

  16. 78 FR 2254 - Fisheries Off West Coast States and in the Western Pacific; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-10

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC397 Fisheries Off West Coast States and in the Western Pacific; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery; Application for an Exempted Fishing Permit AGENCY... INFORMATION: This action is authorized by the Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan (FMP) and...

  17. PHYSICAL MODELING OF CONTRACTED FLOW.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Jonathan K.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments on steady flow over uniform grass roughness through centered single-opening contractions were conducted in the Flood Plain Simulation Facility at the U. S. Geological Survey's Gulf Coast Hydroscience Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. The experimental series was designed to provide data for calibrating and verifying two-dimensional, vertically averaged surface-water flow models used to simulate flow through openings in highway embankments across inundated flood plains. Water-surface elevations, point velocities, and vertical velocity profiles were obtained at selected locations for design discharges ranging from 50 to 210 cfs. Examples of observed water-surface elevations and velocity magnitudes at basin cross-sections are presented.

  18. On the summer coast parallel winds off the west coast of Iberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijo, Nádia; Lima, Daniela C. A.; Semedo, Alvaro; Soares, Pedro M. M.; Cardoso, Rita M.; Miranda, Pedro M. A.

    2016-04-01

    During summer the west coast of the Iberian Peninsula is under the effect of persistent coast parallel northerly winds, called Nortada (northerly wind in Portuguese). The synoptic forcing behind the Nortada is caused by the semi-permanent Azores High and the thermal low pressure system in-land central Iberia. The associated pressure gradient gives rise to coastal parallel winds as the result of the geostrophically adjusted response to this synoptic pattern. In turn the persistence of the Nortada induces the development of upwelling systems from the Galicia to Algarve, off the west coast of Iberia, bringing deep cold nutrient-rich water to the shelf and to the surface. This cold water sharpens the temperature and pressure gradients at the coast, leading to a further increase of the wind speed at the coast. The summer regional climate of the coastal western Iberian area is modulated by the Nortada. The structure and climatology characterization of the summer Nortada is investigated through analyses of close to surface wind data produced by a regional 9km horizontal resolution atmospheric hindcast. This regional data was produced using the WRF model, forced by the ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) ERA-Interim reanalysis, and covers the period 1989-2007. The link between the Nortada and the Iberian coastal low level jet is also studied.

  19. Impacts of the 2004 Indian ocean tsunami on the southwest coasts of Sri Lanka

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Robert A.; Goff, John A.; Nichol, Scott L.

    2007-01-01

    The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami caused major landscape changes along the southwest coasts of Sri Lanka that were controlled by the flow, natural topography and bathymetry, and anthropogenic modifications of the terrain. Landscape changes included substantial beach erosion and scouring of return-flow channels near the beach, and deposition of sand sheets across the narrow coastal plain. In many areas tsunami deposits also included abundant building rubble due to the extensive destruction of homes and businesses in areas of dense development. Trim lines and flow directions confirmed that shoreline orientation and wave refraction from embayments and rock-anchored headlands locally focused the flow and amplified the inundation. Tsunami deposits were 1 to 36 cm thick but most were less than 25 cm thick. Deposit thickness depended partly on antecedent topography. The deposits were composed of coarse to medium sand organized into a few sets of plane parallel laminae that exhibited overall upward fining and landward thinning trends.

  20. 33 CFR 334.1480 - Vieques Passage and Atlantic Ocean, off east coast of Puerto Rico and coast of Vieques Island...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Ocean, off east coast of Puerto Rico and coast of Vieques Island; naval restricted areas. 334.1480... east coast of Puerto Rico and coast of Vieques Island; naval restricted areas. (a) The restricted areas. (1) A strip, 1,500 yards wide, off the naval reservation shoreline along the east coast of...

  1. 33 CFR 334.1480 - Vieques Passage and Atlantic Ocean, off east coast of Puerto Rico and coast of Vieques Island...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Ocean, off east coast of Puerto Rico and coast of Vieques Island; naval restricted areas. 334.1480... east coast of Puerto Rico and coast of Vieques Island; naval restricted areas. (a) The restricted areas. (1) A strip, 1,500 yards wide, off the naval reservation shoreline along the east coast of...

  2. 33 CFR 334.1480 - Vieques Passage and Atlantic Ocean, off east coast of Puerto Rico and coast of Vieques Island...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Ocean, off east coast of Puerto Rico and coast of Vieques Island; naval restricted areas. 334.1480... east coast of Puerto Rico and coast of Vieques Island; naval restricted areas. (a) The restricted areas. (1) A strip, 1,500 yards wide, off the naval reservation shoreline along the east coast of...

  3. Flood risk on the Black sea coast of Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseevsky, Nikolay; Magritsky, Dmitry; Koltermann, Peter; Krylenko, Inna; Umina, Natalya; Aybulatov, Denis; Efremova, Natalya; Lebedeva, Seraphima

    2013-04-01

    The data of unique database "Floods in the coastal zones of Europeans part of Russia", developed by authors, are shown, that frequency of floods and damage in the coastal zones are growing. There is most dangerous situation on the Black sea coast of Russia. Here the main part of settlements, resorts and industry is situated in the river valleys and mouths. All main roads and pipelines cross the river channels. The Black sea rivers have flood regime with high intensity of flood formations and huge destructive flood power. Despite prevalence of floods during the cold period of year the most part of high floods in 100 years of supervision was noted here in the summer-fall (65% in July-October). Usually they were induced by the showers connected with passing of powerful cyclones, atmospheric fronts, and water tornadoes. The insignificant part of floods was connected with snow melting, backwater phenomena, showers in the cities and dam breaks. Thus shower induced floods here are the most widespread and destructive. Usually they arise within two-three watersheds simultaneously. Formation catastrophic heavy rain flood is possible on any site of a river valley of the Black Sea coast. The wave of a high water moves with very high speed, carrying a large number of deposits and garbage. To the mouth the flood can be transformed into debris flow. The water levels during a high water period rise on 3-6 m in the channels, and up to 11-12 m in the river canyons; the maximum depths of flow on the floodplains are 3 m and more. Flooding depths, induced by slope streams, can be to 0,5 m and higher. Flooding proceeds only some hours. After that water rather quickly flows down from a floodplains to the bed of the rivers and into the sea, leaving traces of destructions, a powerful layer of deposits (to 10-20 cm and more) and garbage. In the mouth river deposits quite often form the river mouth bar which is washed away during next storms. The damage from river floods on the Black Sea

  4. Geological effects and implications of the 2010 tsunami along the central coast of Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, R.A.; Gelfenbaum, G.; Buckley, M.L.; Richmond, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    Geological effects of the 2010 Chilean tsunami were quantified at five near-field sites along a 200. km segment of coast located between the two zones of predominant fault slip. Field measurements, including topography, flow depths, flow directions, scour depths, and deposit thicknesses, provide insights into the processes and morphological changes associated with tsunami inundation and return flow. The superposition of downed trees recorded multiple strong onshore and alongshore flows that arrived at different times and from different directions. The most likely explanation for the diverse directions and timing of coastal inundation combines (1) variable fault rupture and asymmetrical slip displacement of the seafloor away from the epicenter with (2) resonant amplification of coastal edge waves. Other possible contributing factors include local interaction of incoming flow and return flow and delayed wave reflection by the southern coast of Peru. Coastal embayments amplified the maximum inundation distances at two sites (2.4 and 2.6. km, respectively). Tsunami vertical erosion included scour and planation of the land surface, inundation scour around the bases of trees, and channel incision from return flow. Sheets and wedges of sand and gravel were deposited at all of the sites. Locally derived boulders up to 1. m in diameter were transported as much as 400. m inland and deposited as fields of dispersed clasts. The presence of lobate bedforms at one site indicates that at least some of the late-stage sediment transport was as bed load and not as suspended load. Most of the tsunami deposits were less than 25. cm thick. Exceptions were thick deposits near open-ocean river mouths where sediment supply was abundant. Human alterations of the land surface at most of the sites provided opportunities to examine some tsunami effects that otherwise would not have been possible, including flow histories, boulder dispersion, and vegetation controls on deposit thickness

  5. Geological impacts and implications of the 2010 tsunami along the central coast of Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Robert A.; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Buckley, Mark L.; Richmond, Bruce M.

    2011-01-01

    Geological effects of the 2010 Chilean tsunami were quantified at five near-field sites along a 200 km segment of coast located between the two zones of predominant fault slip. Field measurements, including topography, flow depths, flow directions, scour depths, and deposit thicknesses, provide insights into the processes and morphological changes associated with tsunami inundation and return flow. The superposition of downed trees recorded multiple strong onshore and alongshore flows that arrived at different times and from different directions. The most likely explanation for the diverse directions and timing of coastal inundation combines (1) variable fault rupture and asymmetrical slip displacement of the seafloor away from the epicenter with (2) resonant amplification of coastal edge waves. Other possible contributing factors include local interaction of incoming flow and return flow and delayed wave reflection by the southern coast of Peru. Coastal embayments amplified the maximum inundation distances at two sites (2.4 and 2.6 km, respectively). Tsunami vertical erosion included scour and planation of the land surface, inundation scour around the bases of trees, and channel incision from return flow. Sheets and wedges of sand and gravel were deposited at all of the sites. Locally derived boulders up to 1 m in diameter were transported as much as 400 m inland and deposited as fields of dispersed clasts. The presence of lobate bedforms at one site indicates that at least some of the late-stage sediment transport was as bed load and not as suspended load. Most of the tsunami deposits were less than 25 cm thick. Exceptions were thick deposits near open-ocean river mouths where sediment supply was abundant. Human alterations of the land surface at most of the sites provided opportunities to examine some tsunami effects that otherwise would not have been possible, including flow histories, boulder dispersion, and vegetation controls on deposit thickness.

  6. Shoreface morphodynamics along the Danube Delta coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatui, Florin; Vespremeanu-Stroe, Alfred

    2015-04-01

    The shoreface has an important long-term contribution to the coastal sediment budget as it behaves as either a sink or source of sediment from/to the active zone (Hinton and Nicholls, 2007). Hence, it modulates the long-term shoreline movement. However, the shoreface behaviour remains poorly understood and such studies are scarce especially because of the lack of extensive long-term good-quality data. The objective of this study is to examine and explain the shoreface morphodynamics along the Danube Delta coast. The shoreface morphodynamics has been investigated over the medium- and large-scales (decades to centuries). This is a wave-dominated, low-lying coastline interrupted by river mouths and, sometimes, by engineering structures (jetties). This work uses historical and modern maps (since 1856) and bathymetrical measurements (2008 and 2014) extending along the whole Danube Delta coast (both Romanian and Ukrainian sectors) to water depths of approximately 20 m; sectorial seasonal and annual bathymetries of the upper shoreface (2003 - 2014); LIDAR data (2011), recent high resolution satellite images, ortophotos and GPS surveys for shoreline extraction, which were comparatively analysed (volume changes, profile to profile evolution) by means of GIS techniques in order to explain the morphological and volumetric evolution of the shoreface. The large scale coastal behaviour of Danube Delta coast (expressed in terms of shoreface sediment volume and spatial distribution pattern of cells) is linked to climatic forcings (storminess), Danube river sediment supply changes, longshore sediment transport distribution and impact of hard coastal engineering structures. Significant increase of shoreface volume in the last century is related to active deltaic lobes (Chilia) or developing barrier islands (Sacalin), while decreasing shoreface volumes are related to the presence of Sulina jetties which blocked the longshore sediment transport and induced severe erosion downdrift. In

  7. Cross-frontal transport along the Keweenaw coast in Lake Superior: a Lagrangian model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changsheng; Zhu, Jianrong; Kang, KiRyong; Liu, Hedong; Ralph, Elise; Green, Sarah A.; Budd, Judith Wells

    2002-11-01

    Offshore transport across the thermal front along the Keweenaw coast in Lake Superior was examined by tracking the trajectories of water particles in the model-simulated three-dimensional (3D) flow field of July 1973. Particles were released at different depths and horizontal locations within the Keweenaw Current during various wind events and were tracked until the end of the month. The trajectories of water particles showed a remarkable offshore cross-frontal water transport at the topographic-splitting point on the eastern side of the Keweenaw Waterway and near Eagle Harbor. This transport was driven dominantly by wind-induced Ekman flow near the surface but was controlled by local bottom topography in the deep region. A northeastward wind prevailed over the lake during July 1973. This wind tended to produce onshore water transports near the surface and hence caused downwelling against the coast. An offshore current was expected in the deep region based on the conservation of water mass. The vortex shedding off coastal bathymetry abutments plus baroclinic instability of the thermal front also led to offshore meandering of the temperature field in the deep region over local varying bottom topography. This meandering tended to produce a cyclonic vorticity and drove particles offshore across the thermal front along the northern coast of the Keweenaw Peninsula.

  8. 75 FR 41383 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Fisheries off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ....gpoaccess.gov/fr/index.html . Background information and documents are available at the Pacific Fishery... for the Pacific Coast groundfish fishery (73 FR 80516). The final rule to implement the 2009-2010... (74 FR 9874). This final rule was subsequently amended by inseason actions on April 27, 2009 (74...

  9. 75 FR 33196 - Fisheries off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery; Suspension of the Primary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery; Suspension of the Primary Pacific Whiting Season for the Shore... announces the suspension of the Pacific whiting (whiting) fishery primary season for the shore-based sector... reinstated until 0001 hours June 15, 2010, at which time the primary season for the shore-based sector...

  10. 75 FR 38030 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ....gpoaccess.gov/fr/index.html . Background information and documents are available at the Pacific Fishery... for the Pacific Coast groundfish fishery (73 FR 80516). A final rule was published on March 6, 2009 (74 FR 9874), which codified the specifications and management measures in the CFR (50 CFR part...

  11. 75 FR 39178 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ....gpoaccess.gov/fr/index.html . Background information and documents are available at the Pacific Fishery... Council. Copies of the Record of Decision (ROD), final regulatory flexibility analysis (FRFA), and the... for the Pacific Coast groundfish fishery (73 FR 80516), including, among other species,...

  12. 77 FR 55426 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Modifications of the West Coast Commercial and Recreational...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-10

    ... INFORMATION: Background In the 2012 annual management measures for ocean salmon fisheries (77 FR 25915, May 2... the annual management measures for ocean salmon fisheries (77 FR 25915, May 2, 2012), the West Coast... to May 1, 2013 (77 FR 25915, May 2, 2012). The RA determined that the best available...

  13. 75 FR 24482 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; West Coast Salmon Fisheries; 2010 Management Measures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... management process for the 2010 ocean salmon fisheries in the Federal Register on December 30, 2009 (74 FR... as threatened under the ESA (73 FR 7816 February 11, 2008). Regardless of their listing status, the... Chinook salmon catch by 30 percent in Canada's West Coast Vancouver Island (WCVI) troll and sport...

  14. 75 FR 8820 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... December 31, 2008, (73 FR 80516). The final rule to implement the 2009-2010 specifications and management measures for the Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery was published on March 6, 2009 (74 FR 9874). This final... Federal Register's Web site at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/fr/index.html . Background information...

  15. 78 FR 24360 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Modifications of the West Coast Commercial and Recreational...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-25

    ... management measures for ocean salmon fisheries (77 FR 25915, May 2, 2012), the West Coast Salmon Plan, and.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background In the 2012 annual management measures for ocean salmon fisheries (77 FR... the 2012 Ocean Salmon Fisheries and 2012 fisheries opening prior to May 1, 2013 (77 FR 25915, May...

  16. 78 FR 70509 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Modifications of the West Coast Commercial and Recreational...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ... fisheries (78 FR 25865, May 3, 2013), the West Coast Salmon Fishery Management Plan (Salmon FMP), and... the 2013 annual management measures for ocean salmon fisheries (78 FR 25865, May 3, 2013), NMFS... the OR-KMZ and supersedes inseason action 10 (76 FR 50347). This action was taken to allow access...

  17. 76 FR 79122 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... management measures for most species of the Pacific Coast groundfish fishery (75 FR 67810). The final rule to... Groundfish Fishery was published on May 11, 2011 (76 FR 27508). This final rule was subsequently amended by inseason actions on June 30, 2011 (76 FR 38313) and October 31, 2011 (76 FR 67092). Additional changes...

  18. 78 FR 35153 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Modifications of the West Coast Commercial Salmon Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... the annual management measures for ocean salmon fisheries (78 FR 25865, May 3, 2013), the West Coast... ocean salmon fisheries (78 FR 25865, May 3, 2013), NMFS announced the commercial and recreational...,700 Chinook guideline is not exceeded (78 FR 25865, May 3, 2013). NMFS is authorized to...

  19. 75 FR 75638 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Modifications of the West Coast Commercial and Recreational...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-06

    ... fisheries (75 FR 24482, May 5, 2010), the West Coast Salmon Plan, and regulations implementing the West.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In the 2010 annual management measures for ocean salmon fisheries (75 FR 24482, May 5..., inseason action 11 (75 FR 54791, September, 9, 2010) imposed an open period landing and possession limit...

  20. 75 FR 61102 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-04

    ... specifications and management measures for the Pacific Coast groundfish fishery (73 FR 80516). The final rule to... Register's Web site at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/fr/index.html . Background information and documents are... published on March 6, 2009 (74 FR 9874). This final rule was subsequently amended by inseason actions...

  1. 78 FR 50347 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Modifications of the West Coast Commercial Salmon Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... management measures for ocean salmon fisheries (78 FR 25865, May 3, 2013), the West Coast Salmon Fishery... salmon fisheries (78 FR 25865, May 3, 2013), NMFS announced the commercial and recreational fisheries in... the 2013 ocean salmon fisheries and 2014 fisheries opening prior to May 1, 2014 (78 FR 25865, May...

  2. 78 FR 30780 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Modifications of the West Coast Commercial Salmon Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-23

    ... ocean salmon fisheries (78 FR 25865, May 3, 2013), the West Coast Salmon Fishery Management Plan (Salmon... measures for ocean salmon fisheries (78 FR 25865, May 3, 2013), NMFS announced the commercial and... announced for the 2013 Ocean Salmon Fisheries and 2014 fisheries opening prior to May 1, 2014 (78 FR...

  3. 75 FR 75639 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Modifications of the West Coast Commercial and Recreational...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-06

    ... the annual management measures for ocean salmon fisheries (75 FR 24482, May 5, 2010), the West Coast.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In the 2010 annual management measures for ocean salmon fisheries (75 FR 24482, May 5... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 660 RIN 0648-XY83 Fisheries Off West...

  4. 77 FR 61728 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Modifications of the West Coast Commercial and Recreational...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ... the annual management measures for ocean salmon fisheries (77 FR 25915, May 2, 2012), the West Coast...: Background In the 2012 annual management measures for ocean salmon fisheries (77 FR 25915, May 2, 2012), NMFS... Point) to allow retention of unmarked coho, as anticipated in the 2012 annual management measures (77...

  5. 76 FR 38313 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... specifications and management measures for the Pacific Coast groundfish fishery (75 FR 67810). The final rule to... the Office of the Federal Register's Web site at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/fr/index.html . Background... Fishery was published on May 11, 2011 (76 FR 27508). These specifications and management measures...

  6. 77 FR 65329 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Modifications of the West Coast Commercial and Recreational...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... the annual management measures for ocean salmon fisheries (77 FR 25915, May 2, 2012), the West Coast... measures for ocean salmon fisheries (77 FR 25915, May 2, 2012), NMFS announced the commercial and... on September 13, 2012, superseding inseason action 16 (77 FR 61728, October 11, 2012), and...

  7. 75 FR 51684 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... for the Pacific Coast groundfish fishery (73 FR 80516). The final rule to implement the 2009-2010....gpoaccess.gov/fr/index.html . Background information and documents are available at the Pacific Fishery... (74 FR 9874). This final rule was subsequently amended by inseason actions on April 27, 2009 (74...

  8. 78 FR 7371 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery; Trawl Rationalization Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... million loan to the industry that was to be paid by assessing buyback fees on landings (70 FR 40225, July... FR 33980, June 8, 2012) would establish procedures for the National Appeals Office to review, and if... States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery; Trawl Rationalization Program; Cost Recovery AGENCY:...

  9. 76 FR 34910 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... Distinct Population Segment (DPS) of green sturgeon was listed as threatened under the ESA (71 FR 17757... the ESA (75 FR 13012). NMFS has reinitiated consultation on the fishery, including impacts on green... management measures for that fishery off the coasts of Washington, Oregon, and California (76 FR 27508)....

  10. 76 FR 11381 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ... http://www.gpoaccess.gov/fr/index.html . Background information and documents are available at the... management measures for the Pacific Coast groundfish fishery (73 FR 80516). The final rule to implement the... on March 6, 2009 (74 FR 9874). The final rule was subsequently amended by inseason actions on...

  11. 77 FR 45508 - Fisheries off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Trawl...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ...This action delays some and revises other portions of the Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Trawl Rationalization Program (program) regulations. These changes are necessary to enable the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to implement new regulations for the program to comply with a court order requiring NMFS to reconsider the initial allocation of Pacific whiting (whiting) to the......

  12. 78 FR 72 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Trawl...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-02

    ... coast groundfish fishery's trawl fleet (see 75 FR 78344; Dec. 15, 2010). The program was adopted in 2010... follow. NMFS published the ANPR on April 4, 2012 (77 FR 20337), which, among other things, announced the... 21, 2012 (77 FR 29955), with the final rule published on August 1, 2012 (77 FR 45508). RAW 1...

  13. 77 FR 29955 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Trawl...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... rationalization program for the Pacific coast groundfish fishery's trawl fleet (see 75 FR 78344; Dec. 15, 2010... ANPR on April 4, 2012 (77 FR 20337) that, among other things, announced the court's order, the Council...'' is in the Federal Register. 62 FR 44421; August 21, 1997. This guidance defines an emergency as...

  14. 75 FR 23620 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... via the Internet at the Office of the Federal Register's Web site at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/fr/index... Coast groundfish fishery (73 FR 80516). A final rule was published on March 6, 2009 (74 FR 9874), which... allocation and management of the 2010 tribal Pacific whiting fishery (75 FR 11829). The comment period...

  15. 75 FR 75417 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-03

    ... groundfish fishery (73 FR 80516). The final rule to implement the 2009-2010 specifications and management measures for the Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery was published on March 6, 2009 (74 FR 9874). This final... Internet at the Office of the Federal Register's Web site at...

  16. 78 FR 56641 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Commercial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ...This proposed action would implement revisions to the boundaries of the Rockfish Conservation Area (RCA) that is closed to vessels fishing groundfish with bottom trawl gear. This proposed rule would affect the limited entry bottom trawl sector managed under the Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan (FMP) by liberalizing RCA boundaries in order to improve utilization of target......

  17. 76 FR 67092 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ... site at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/fr/index.html . Background information and documents are available at... measures for the Pacific Coast groundfish fishery (75 FR 67810). The final rule to implement the 2011-2012... May 11, 2011 (76 FR 27508). This final rule was subsequently amended by inseason actions on June...

  18. Compared sub-bottom profile interpretation in fjords of King George Island and Danco Coast, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, C.; Vilches, L.; Vallejos, C.; Fernandez, R.; Molares, R.

    2015-12-01

    The fjords of the South Shetland Islands (Antarctica) and Danco Coast (Antarctic Peninsula) represent climatic transitional areas (subpolar to polar). The analysis of the distribution of sub-bottom facies helps to understand the prevailing sedimentary and climatic processes. This work seeks to characterize and compare the fjord seismic facies, of the indicated areas, to determine the main sedimentary processes in these regions. Compressed High-Intensity Radiated Pulse (CHIRP) records from 3.5 kHz sub-bottom profiler were obtained from the cruise: NBP0703 (2007); and pinger 3.5 kHz sub-bottom profiler records from the cruises: ECA-50 INACH (2014), and First Colombian Expedition (2015). Several seismic facies were recognized in all studied areas with some variability on their thickness and extent, and indicate the occurrence of similar sedimentary processes. These are: SSD facies (strong to weak intensity, stratified, draped sheet external shape), is interpreted as sedimentary deposits originated from suspended sediments from glaciar plumes and/or ice-rafting. This facies, in general, is thicker in the fjords of King George Island than in the larger fjords of the Danco Coast; on the other hand, within the Danco Coast area, this facies is thinner and more scarce in the smaller fjords and bays. MCM facies (moderate intensity, chaotic and with mounds) is associated with moraine deposits and/or basement. This is present in all areas, being most abundant in the Danco Coast area. WIC facies (weak intensity and chaotic) is interpreted as debris flows, which are present in both regions, but is most common in small fjords or bays in the Danco Coast, perhaps due to higher slopes of the seabed. In this work we discuss the influence of local climate, sediment plumes from the glaciers and other sedimentary processes on the distribution and geometry of the identified seismic facies.

  19. Assessing hazards along our Nation's coasts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Brenner, Owen; Hehre, Rachel; Reynolds, B.J.

    2013-01-01

    Coastal areas are essential to the economic, cultural, and environmental health of the Nation, yet by nature coastal areas are constantly changing due to a variety of events and processes. Extreme storms can cause dramatic changes to our shorelines in a matter of hours, while sea-level rise can profoundly alter coastal environments over decades. These changes can have a devastating impact on coastal communities, such as the loss of homes built on retreating sea cliffs or protective dunes eroded by storm waves. Sometimes, however, the changes can be positive, such as new habitat created by storm deposits. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is meeting the need for scientific understanding of how our coasts respond to different hazards with continued assessments of current and future changes along U.S. coastlines. Through the National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards (NACCH), the USGS carries out the unique task of quantifying coastal change hazards along open-ocean coasts in the United States and its territories. Residents of coastal communities, emergency managers, and other stakeholders can use science-based data, tools, models, and other products to improve planning and enhance resilience.

  20. Phytoplankton off the West Coast of Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Just off the coast of West Africa, persistent northeasterly trade winds often churn up deep ocean water. When the nutrients in these deep waters reach the ocean's surface, they often give rise to large blooms of phytoplankton. This image of the Mauritanian coast shows swirls of phytoplankton fed by the upwelling of nutrient-rich water. The scene was acquired by the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) aboard the European Space Agency's ENVISAT. MERIS will monitor changes in phytoplankton across Earth's oceans and seas, both for the purpose of managing fisheries and conducting global change research. NASA scientists will use data from this European instrument in the Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) program. The mission of SIMBIOS is to construct a consistent long-term dataset of ocean color (phytoplankton abundance) measurements made by multiple satellite instruments, including the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). For more information about MERIS and ENVISAT, visit the ENVISAT home page. Image copyright European Space Agency

  1. New data on selected Ivory Coast tektites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuttitta, F.; Carron, M. K.; Annell, C. S.

    1972-01-01

    Fourteen Ivory Coast tektites exhibit a range of bulk indices of refraction of 1.5156 to 1.5217 plus or minus 0.0004 and of bulk specific gravities of 2.428 to 2.502 plus or minus 0.005. Seven of these Ivory Coast (IVC) tektites were analyzed for major and minor element content. Compared to tektites from other strewn fields, their SiO2 content is low (67.2-69.1%), Al2O3 relatively high (15.8-16.8%), and total iron relatively high but with a more restricted range (6.3-6.8% as FeO). Their lime content is low (0.71-1.35%) compared to Australasian tektites but their MgO/CaO ratio (about 3.1) is unusually high. All other tektite groups have Na2O/K2O ratios less than unity, but the Na2O/K2O ratio of the IVC tektites is slightly greater than unity. Their K/Rb ratios range from 200 to 256 and average 227.

  2. Red algal exotics on North Sea coasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, Christine A.; Stegenga, Herre

    1998-09-01

    A total of ten red seaweed species are recognized as introduced into the North Sea from other parts of the world. These are Asparagopsis armata and Bonnemaisonia hamifera (Bonnemaisoniales), Grateloupia doryphora (Halymeniales), Antithamnionella spirographidis, Antithamnionella ternifolia, Anotrichium furcellatum, Dasya baillouviana, ?Dasysiphonia sp., Polysiphonia harveyi and Polysiphonia senticulosa (Ceramiales). The oldest of these is B. hamifera, introduced prior to 1890, while the most recent, ?Dasysiphonia sp., was first found in 1994 and still requires taxonomic investigation. A variety of distribution patterns is seen, with geographical ranges varying from general within the North Sea to very restricted. The diversity of introduced red algae on eastern coasts of the North Sea is much greater than in the west. The most likely explanation for this pattern is that French coasts were the initial site of introduction for many of the seaweeds, which were then distributed northwards by the residual surface currents. Their increasing success in the Netherlands has probably been promoted by the drastically changed local hydrodynamic conditions which have also permitted the recent introduction of many native European species. Of the biological features of species that may favour their success as introductions, clonal vegetative propagation, often with specialized propagules or fragmentation mechanisms, is almost ubiquitous. Low-temperature tolerances can be inferred, but data are sparse. Many of the alien red algae in the North Sea contain anti-grazing compounds such as bromophenols, which may contribute to their invasive potential by deterring grazing sufficiently to permit establishment of an inoculum.

  3. [Diabetes in Ivory Coast: special epidemiological features].

    PubMed

    Oga, A S S; Tebi, A; Aka, J; Adouéni, K V; Malan, K A; Kouadio, L P; Lokrou, A

    2006-06-01

    Within less than a quarter century diabetes has become a health problem in developing countries. In Africa this metabolic disorder is found in a wide variety of sometimes atypical forms. The purpose of this study was to highlight the special epidemiological features of medically diagnosed diabetes in Ivory Coast. Data from the files of 10320 African patients who presented at a major national outpatient care centre between January 1, 1991 and December 31, 2000 were compiled and analyzed. Findings showed that morbidity gradually increased from 30 to 49 years then stabilized from 50 to 69 years with a higher rate in males between 30 and 49 years. One of the five national ethnic groups appeared to be most affected and two appeared to be relatively unaffected. On the basis of several criteria, 5968 patients were classified as type 1 in 11.8% of cases, type 2 without excess body weight in 48.7% and type 2 with excess body weight in 39.5%. The second of these identified groups was characterized by intermediate-discovered glycaemia and older age at diagnosis. Epidemiological features included age of occurrence and higher morbidity in young male patients, probable higher premature mortality, likely links with socio-cultural environmental factors and existence of two type 2 subgroups. This profile underlines the challenges of screening, management and prevention of diabetes in Ivory Coast. PMID:16924814

  4. Sulfur Upwelling off the African Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Though these aquamarine clouds in the waters off the coast of northern Namibia may look like algae blooms, they are in fact clouds of sulfur produced by anaerobic bacteria on the ocean's floor. This image of the sulfur-filled water was taken on April 24, 2002, by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS), flying aboard the Orbview-2 satellite. The anaerobic bacteria (bacteria that can live without oxygen) feed upon algae carcasses that exist in abundance on the ocean's floor off of Namibia. As the bacteria ingest the algae husks, they produce hydrogen sulfide, which slowly builds up in the sea-floor sediments. Eventually, the hydrogen sulfide reaches the point where the sediment can no longer contain it, and it bubbles forth. When this poisonous chemical reaches the surface, it combines with the oxygen in the upper layers of the ocean to create clouds of pure sulfur. The sulfur causes the Namibian coast to smell like rotten eggs, and the hydrogen sulfide will often kill fish and drive lobsters away. For more information, read: A Bloom By Any Other Name A high-resolution (250 meters per pixel) image earlier on the 24th taken from the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) shows additional detail in the plumes. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE. MODIS image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  5. Meteotsunami occurrence frequency along the Mediterranean coasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masina, Marinella; Archetti, Renata; Lamberti, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    A number of research studies describe exceptional destructive meteotsunami events since long time whereas no systematic database is available of moderate events because sea level data were recorded with insufficient resolution. Sea level measurements recently collected with high sampling rate, one per minute or less, by tide gauges positioned along the Mediterranean coasts are examined, aiming to analyze the occurrence of oscillation events in the tsunami frequency range. Sea level data from operating tide stations inside the Mediterranean basin are made publicly available through the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission Sea Level Monitoring Facility web site (http://www.ioc-sealevelmonitoring.org/). After the implementation of a rigorous quality check procedure to the raw water level time series, Hilbert transform is applied to two hour high-pass filtered observations to identify tsunami-like oscillation events. Events of seismic origin are identified by consistency between earthquake occurrence and tsunami wave travel time from the earthquake epicenter to the specific tide gauge. Similar analyses are performed to exclude sea waves induced harbor seiches events. A list of probable meteotsunami episodes occurred in the Mediterranean region is so compiled and their occurrence frequency and intensity statistics are evaluated at the different tide gauge sites over the time period of high frequency water level data availability ranging from five to seven years. The effects of atmospheric conditions and seabed topography are discussed. Detection and characterization of meteotsunamis, both of exceptional character and of weak intensity, represent an essential step toward improved assessments of coastal flooding risk along the Mediterranean coasts.

  6. The coast guard's cleanup of hazardous waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Rezendes, V.S.

    1989-11-01

    GAO concluded that the Coast Guard still has most of its major hazardous waste cleanup work to do - an effort that will cost millions and will take decades to complete. Yet the Coast Guard cannot confidently estimate long-term cleanup costs until it assesses and investigates potential hazardous waste locations. While Coast Guard data suggest that it is complying with hazardous waste regulations, this GAO report maintains that the Coast Guard may not be collecting the type of information needed to support long-term budget requests. The Coast Guard is planning to reissue reporting instructions in order to stress the importance of reporting violations and related costs. If successful, this effort could help ensure that the Coast Guard has the information necessary to estimate future funding needs.

  7. 3. AERIAL VIEW TO NORTH OF NORTH PART OF COAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. AERIAL VIEW TO NORTH OF NORTH PART OF COAST GUARD AIR STATION SAN FRANCISCO, SHOWING PAN AMERICAN WORLD AIRWAYS HANGAR IN BACKGROUND. 8X10 black and white silver gelatin print. United States Coast Guard Official Photograph, 12th District, File No. 62751-21 A.S. Date unknown. - U.S. Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco, 1020 North Access Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  8. The Development of Loss of Flow Analysis Method for OPR1000 Using RETRAN

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Hyuk Lee; Yo-Han Kim; Chang-Kyung Sung

    2006-07-01

    A new loss of flow transient analysis method for OPR1000 (Optimized Power Reactor 1000, previously called KSNP: Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant) based on RETRAN code were developed. The reference plant for the analysis is Ulchin Unit 3 and the transient analyzed is 4 pump coast-down. The current analysis for loss of RCS flow transient of OPR1000 uses COAST and CESEC codes. The new method uses RETRAN code to replace COAST and CESEC codes. Since the ability of RETRAN to replace CESEC has been studied in other non-LOCA transients, this paper will focus on COAST code and RCP coast-down flow rates. The results from simplified RETRAN nodalization corresponding to COAST show good agreement with RCS flow results from COAST code. The results are also compared with RETRAN base-deck for safety analysis which is more complex and show similar trends. Therefore, previous analysis method for loss of flow of OPR1000 using COAST code can be replaced with the new analysis method based on RETRAN. (authors)

  9. New data on selected Ivory Coast tektites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cuttitta, F.; Carron, M.K.; Annell, C.S.

    1972-01-01

    Fourteen Ivory Coast tektites exhibit a range of bulk indices of refraction of 1.5156 to 1.5217 ?? 0.0004 and of bulk specific gravities of 2.428 to 2.502 ??0.005. Seven of these Ivory Coast (IVC) tektites were analyzed for major and minor element content. Compared to tektites from other strewn fields, their SiO2 content is low (67.2-69.1 %), A12O3 relatively high (15.8-16.8 %), and total iron relatively high but with a more restricted range (6.3-6.8 % as FeO). Their lime content is low (0.71-1.35%) compared to Australasian tektites but their MgO CaO ratio (about 3.1) is unusually high. All other tektite groups have Na2O K2O ratios less than unity, but the Na2O K2O ratio of the IVC tektites is slightly greater than unity. Their K Rb ratios range from 200 to 256 and average 227, which is higher than those determined for Australasian tektites, but similar to some obtained for moldavites. The Li content (41-48 ppm) is about the same as that of the Australasian tektites, but the Cs and Rb are lower, being 1.9 to 2.9 and 57 to 86 ppm, respectively. The IVC tektites are high in Cr (260-375 ppm), Co (19-25 ppm) and Ni (101-167 ppm), and particularly in Pb (<10-18 ppm), Cu (13-21 ppm) and Ga (14-23 ppm). The high Cr Ni ratios of the IVC tektites (range 2-3.6) are similar to those found for australites, philippinites and thailandites, but not the javanites and indochinites. Evaluation of these and other reported data show that compositional similarities between the IVC tektites and green or black Bosumtwi Crater glasses strongly support the hypothesis of a common impact origin-i.e. the Bosumtwi Crater site. Comparison of the IVC tektite composition with those of returned lunar materials (gabbros, basalts, breccia and soils) do not support a lunar origin for the Ivory Coast tektites. ?? 1972.

  10. Evidence for vertical movement of diagenetic fluids, Texas Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Land, L.S.

    1984-04-01

    Both the study of burial diagenesis and the study of present-day formation waters of Jurassic through Pleistocene formations from the Texas Gulf Coast document local vertical fluid transport of at least several kilometers. Evidence includes the following: (1) discharge at the land surface of Mesozoic-derived brines as bad water; (2) emplacement of Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc mineralization by fluids derived from Mesozoic formations in salt dome cap rocks at or near the land surface; (3) emplacement of uranium in Tertiary aquifers as a result of reduction by ascending reduced sulfur, presumably of Mesozoic origin; (4) emplacement of calcite cement derived from Mesozoic strata Tertiary sandstones; and (5) presence of fluids in Plio-Pleistocene rocks with chemical signatures that could only have been derived from Mesozoic strata. Material-transport calculations indicate that the volumes of fluid involved far exceed the volume of connate water deposited in the basin, strongly suggesting some mechanism of thermally driven convective flow.

  11. Modeling Waves and Coastal Flooding along the Connecticut Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifuentes-Lorenzen, A.; Howard-Strobel, M. M.; Fake, T.; McCardell, G.; O'Donnell, J.; Asthita, M.

    2015-12-01

    We have used a hydrodynamic- wave coupled numerical model (FVCOM-SWAVE) to simulate flooding at the Connecticut coastline during severe storms. The model employed a one-way nesting scheme and an unstructured grid. The parent domain spanned most of the southern New England shelf and the fine resolution grid covered Long Island Sound (LIS) and extended across the Connecticut coast to the 10m elevation contour. The model results for sea level, current and wave statistics from the parent grid have been tested with data from several field campaigns at different locations spanning the western, central and eastern portions of LIS. Waves are fetch limited and improvements to the model-data comparison required modifications to spectral coefficients in the wave model. Finally, the nested results were validated with two field campaigns in shallow water environments (i.e. New Haven and Old Saybrook). To assess the spatial variability of storm wave characteristics the domain was forced with the hindcast winds obtained from meteorological models (NAM and WRF) for 13 severe weather events that affected LIS in the past 15 years. We have also forced the system with a simulation of Superstorm Sandy in a warmer climate to assess the impact a climate change on the character of flooding. The nested grid is currently being used to map flooding risks under severe weather events including the effects of precipitation on river flow and discharge.

  12. Designing and Modelling Coast Management GIS for Bosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumusay, M. U.; Ozdemir, O.; Bakirman, T.

    2016-06-01

    Web based geographic information systems (GIS) has great potential based on developments in internet and web technology. Web based GIS is a network based tool that takes advantage of internet with visualizing, analysing and accessing of distributed data and analysis functions. With the length of 30 kilometres, the Bosphorus provides an essential zone that offers great maritime traffic services. This shipping way which connects The Black Sea and The Mediterranean Sea through The Marmara Sea, has no alternative and it is substantial for economies of Black Sea countries. The Bosphorus is one of most important natural straits in the world handling 150 transit ships, 23 freighters with dangerous cargo and 2500 local transport ships with 2 million passengers on daily basis. In this study, it is aimed to create a web based GIS application for an effective coast management which includes berthing factors (anchorage areas, currents, submerged, etc.), maritime traffic factors (traffic separation schemes, traffic flow directions), closed areas and other factors (lighthouses, buoys, beacons, etc.) by digitizing printed navigation charts produced by Turkish Naval Forces, Office of Navigation, Hydrography and Oceanography.

  13. US Coast Guard differential GPS network

    SciTech Connect

    Alsip, D.H.; Butler, J.M.; Radice, J.T.

    1993-03-01

    In order to aid navigation and to prevent disasters such as oil spills, collisions, and wrecks of vessels and aircraft, the US Coast Guard is charged with establishing, maintaining, and operating electronic aids to navigation. In a technological advance developed and operated by the Department of Defense, the global positioning system (GPS) provides all-weather global coverage, 24 hours/day at unprecedented accuracies. GPS provides standard positioning service (SPS) and precise positioning service (PPS). By applying differential techniques to GPS, navigational accuracies of better than 10 meters can be achieved. For the first time, an all-weather system is possible to meet all the marine navigator's needs including harbor and harbor approach navigation. This should revolutionize navigation safety and efficiency, surveying operations, search and rescue operations, and underwater mine disposal efficiency and safety.

  14. Main Coast Winds - Final Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jason Huckaby; Harley Lee

    2006-03-15

    The Maine Coast Wind Project was developed to investigate the cost-effectiveness of small, distributed wind systems on coastal sites in Maine. The restructuring of Maine's electric grid to support net metering allowed for the installation of small wind installations across the state (up to 100kW). The study performed adds insight to the difficulties of developing cost-effective distributed systems in coastal environments. The technical hurdles encountered with the chosen wind turbine, combined with the lower than expected wind speeds, did not provide a cost-effective return to make a distributed wind program economically feasible. While the turbine was accepted within the community, the low availability has been a negative.

  15. Methylmercury in hair fisherman for Turkish coasts

    SciTech Connect

    Vural, N.; Uenlue, H.

    1996-10-01

    Environmental methylmercury mainly arises from the methylation of inorganic mercury. The change in speciation of mercury from inorganic to methylated forms is the first step in the aquatic bioaccumulation processes. The bioconcentration factor of methylmercury in fish tissue to that in water is usually between 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 5}. Among seafood, fish products are the main source of methylmercury absorbed by men from the environment. Since Minimata epidemic health injuries and deaths in relation to mercury pollution, environmental and biological monitoring of inorganic and organic mercury species has gained importance through out the world and many reports have been published on the health effects and biological monitoring of mercury compounds including some Mediterranean countries. This study focuses on methylmercury in hair of fisherman living in different geographical Turkish coasts and relationship to eating fish habit. 17 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  16. Gastropod fauna of the Cameroonian coasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandel, K.; Kowalke, T.

    1999-11-01

    Eighteen species of gastropods were encountered living near and within the large coastal swamps, mangrove forests, intertidal flats and the rocky shore of the Cameroonian coast of the Atlantic Ocean. These represent members of the subclasses Neritimorpha, Caenogastropoda, and Heterostropha. Within the Neritimorpha, representatives of the genera Nerita, Neritina, and Neritilia could be distinguished by their radula anatomy and ecology. Within the Caenogastropoda, representatives of the families Potamididae with Tympano-tonos and Planaxidae with Angiola are characterized by their early ontogeny and ecology. The Pachymelaniidae are recognized as an independent group and are introduced as a new family within the Cerithioidea. Littorinimorpha with Littorina, Assiminea and Potamopyrgus as well as Neogastropoda (Thais) and Heterostropha (Melampus and Onchidium) are described and compared with representatives of the Caribbean and Indo-Pacific province.

  17. Marine West Coast Forests, Chapter 9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, Steven S.; Geiser, Linda H.; Lilleskov, Erik A.

    2011-01-01

    Human activities have greatly increased nitrogen emissions and deposition across large areas of Earth. Although nitrogen is an essential nutrient for plant growth, too much nitrogen in excess of critical loads leads to losses of biodiversity, soil and stream acidification, nutrient imbalances, and other deleterious effects. In a new report quantifying critical loads of nitrogen deposition across the United States, USGS scientist Steve Perakis and co-authors provided a chapter about responses of marine west coast forests. Much of this region is understudied with respect to nitrogen deposition, and in this chapter the authors identify known adverse effects and estimate critical loads of nitrogen deposition for western Oregon and Washington and southeast Alaska forests. Perakis also contributed to the synthesis chapter, which includes background, objectives, advantages and uncertainties of critical loads, an overview of critical loads across U.S. ecoregions, and other topics.

  18. Infrasound from lightning measured in Ivory Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farges, T.; Matoza, R. S.

    2011-12-01

    It is well established that more than 2,000 thunderstorms occur continuously around the world and that about 45 lightning flashes are produced per second over the globe. More than two thirds (42) of the infrasound stations of the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the CTBTO (Comprehensive nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organisation) are now certified and routinely measure signals due to natural activity (e.g., airflow over mountains, aurora, microbaroms, surf, volcanoes, severe weather including lightning flashes, ...). Some of the IMS stations are located where worldwide lightning detection networks (e.g. WWLLN) have a weak detection capability but lightning activity is high (e.g. Africa, South America). These infrasound stations are well localised to study lightning flash activity and its disparity, which is a good proxy for global warming. Progress in infrasound array data processing over the past ten years makes such lightning studies possible. For example, Farges and Blanc (2010) show clearly that it is possible to measure lightning infrasound from thunderstorms within a range of distances from the infrasound station. Infrasound from lightning can be detected when the thunderstorm is within about 75 km from the station. The motion of the squall zone is very well measured inside this zone. Up to 25% of lightning flashes can be detected with this technique, giving better results locally than worldwide lightning detection networks. An IMS infrasound station has been installed in Ivory Coast for 8 years. The optical space-based instrument OTD measured a rate of 10-20 flashes/km^2/year in that country and showed strong seasonal variations (Christian et al., 2003). Ivory Coast is therefore a good place to study infrasound data associated with lightning activity and its temporal variation. First statistical results will be presented in this paper based on 3 years of data (2005-2008).

  19. Geothermal structure of Australia's east coast basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danis, C. R.; O'Neill, C.

    2010-12-01

    The east coast sedimentary basins of Australia formed on an active margin of eastern Gondwana, and constitute an important hydrocarbon resource. The 1600km long Sydney-Gunnedah-Bowen Basin (SGBB) is largest east coast basin system, with thick Permian to Jurassic sedimentary successions overlying Palaeozoic basement rocks. The SGBB has been the focus of renewed geothermal exploration interest, however, the thermal state and geothermal potential of the system is largely unconstrained. Geothermal exploration programs require an accurate estimate of subsurface temperature information, in addition to favourable geology, to make informed decisions on potential targe developments. Primarily temperature information comes from downhole measurements, generally non-equilibrated, which are traditionally extrapolated to depth, however such extrapolation does not take into account variations in geological structure or thermal conductivity. Here we import deep 3D geological models into finite element conduction simulations, using the code Underworld, to calculate the deep thermal structure of the basin system. Underworld allows us to incorporate complex, detailed geological architecture models, incorporating different material properties for different layers, with variable temperature and depth-dependent properties. We adopt a fixed top boundary temperature on a variable topographic surface, and vary the bottom surface boundary condition, to converge of models which satisfy equilibrated downhole temperature measurement constraints. We find coal plays an important role in insulating sedimentary basins. Heat refracts around the coal interval and produces elevated temperatures beneath thick sediments, especially where thick coal intervals are present. This workflow has been formalized into an Underworld geothermal model library, enabling model centric computational workflows. Using the imported model architecture from the geology, data can be continuously updated and added to the

  20. Some Observational and Modeling Studies of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer at Mississippi Gulf Coast for Air Pollution Dispersion Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Yerramilli, Anjaneyulu; Challa, Venkata Srinivas; Indracanti, Jayakumar; Dasari, Hariprasad; Baham, Julius; Patrick, Chuck; Young, John; Hughes, Robert; White, Lorren D.; Hardy, Mark G.; Swanier, Shelton

    2008-01-01

    Coastal atmospheric conditions widely vary from those over inland due to the land-sea interface, temperature contrast and the consequent development of local circulations. In this study a field meteorological experiment was conducted to measure vertical structure of boundary layer during the period 25–29 June, 2007 at three locations Seabee base, Harrison and Wiggins sites in the Mississippi coast. A GPS Sonde along with slow ascent helium balloon and automated weather stations equipped with slow and fast response sensors were used in the experiment. GPS sonde were launched at three specific times (0700 LT, 1300 LT and 1800 LT) during the experiment days. The observations indicate shallow boundary layer near the coast which gradually develops inland. The weather research and forecasting (WRF) meso-scale atmospheric model and a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (HYSPLIT) are used to simulate the lower atmospheric flow and dispersion in a range of 100 km from the coast for 28–30 June, 2007. The simulated meteorological parameters were compared with the experimental observations. The meso-scale model results show significant temporal and spatial variations in the meteorological fields as a result of development of sea breeze flow, its coupling with the large scale flow field and the ensuing alteration in the mixing depth across the coast. Simulated ground-level concentrations of SO2 from four elevated point sources located along the coast indicate diurnal variation and impact of the local sea-land breeze on the direction of the plume. Model concentration levels were highest during the stable morning condition and during the sea-breeze time in the afternoon. The highest concentrations were found up to 40 km inland during sea breeze time. The study illustrates the application of field meteorological observations for the validation of WRF which is coupled to HYSPLIT for dispersion assessment in the coastal region. PMID:19151446

  1. A numerical study on convergence of alongshore flows over the Texas-Louisiana shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoru; Hetland, Robert

    2012-11-01

    A hydrodynamic model is used to investigate convergent alongshore flows over the Texas-Louisiana shelf, characterized by down-coast flows over the northern shelf encountering up-coast flows over the southern shelf. The model's ability to reproduce realistic current, salinity, and surface elevation fields is demonstrated through positive model skill scores when comparing model simulations to observational data. The convergent flows are explored on both weather band and seasonal time scales. For weather band scales, this study focuses on wintertime convergent events. The model-predicted locations of convergent flows are supported by current measurements. We find that the formation of convergent flows is primarily caused by along-coast variation in the alongshore component of wind forcing, which in turn is due to the curvature of the Texas-Louisiana coastline. In general, the alongshore currents are well correlated with alongshore winds. However, the convergence points of currents and winds are not colocated, but rather, convergence points in ocean currents typically occur down coast of convergence points in the wind. This offset is demonstrated to be mainly caused by buoyancy forcing that can drive the convergence location in the currents farther down coast. No specific temporal pattern is found for the weather band convergence locations, whereas at seasonal time scales, the monthly mean convergence exhibits a prominent seasonal pattern, with up-coast migration of convergence locations in spring and summer and down-coast migration in fall and winter.

  2. 78 FR 74048 - Eleventh Coast Guard District Annual Fireworks Events

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ...The Coast Guard proposes to amend several permanent safety zones located in the Eleventh Coast Guard District that are established to protect public safety during annual firework displays. These amendments will standardize the safety zone language, update listed events, delete events that are no longer occurring, add new annual fireworks events, and establish a standardized format using a......

  3. 2. General view of guard house and entrance to Coast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. General view of guard house and entrance to Coast Guard Base from La Putilla Street, with view of Motor Pool (Building 122) on right side looking west - U.S. Coast Guard Base, San Juan, Guard House, La Puntilla Finalle, San Juan, San Juan Municipio, PR

  4. 31. COAST LANDSCAPE VIEW FROM VISTA POINT AT END OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. COAST LANDSCAPE VIEW FROM VISTA POINT AT END OF ENDERT'S BEACH ROAD (ABANDONED OLD HIGHWAY 101). NOTE CRESCENT CITY AT LEFT REAR. LOOKING NNW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  5. Regional Industry Workforce Development: The Gulf Coast Petrochemical Information Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgin, Johnette; Muha, Susan

    2008-01-01

    The Gulf Coast Petrochemical Information Network (GC-PIN) is a workforce development partnership among industry businesses and area institutions of higher education in the four-county Gulf Coast region. GC-PIN partners develop new industry-specific curricula, foster industry career awareness, and retrain existing employees in new technologies.

  6. 75 FR 13252 - Oregon Coast Provincial Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Oregon Coast Provincial Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Oregon Coast Province Advisory Committee will meet at the Siuslaw National...

  7. Programming Practices of Atlantic Coast Conference Wind Ensembles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiltshire, Eric S.; Paul, Timothy A.; Paul, Phyllis M.; Rudnicki, Erika

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the programming trends of the elite wind bands/ensembles of the Atlantic Coast Conference universities. Using survey techniques previously employed by Powell (2009) and Paul (2010; in press), we contacted the directors of the Atlantic Coast Conference band programs and requested concert programs from their top groups for the…

  8. 75 FR 53667 - Space Coast Regional Innovation Cluster Competition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... Agreements, published in the Federal Register on February 11, 2008 (73 FR 7696), are applicable to this... Economic Development Administration Space Coast Regional Innovation Cluster Competition AGENCY: Economic...: This notice announces the upcoming availability of funding for the Space Coast Regional...

  9. 22. AERIAL VIEW TO NORTH OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. AERIAL VIEW TO NORTH OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR STATION SAN FRANCISCO, SHOWING BUILDING H AT LEFT AND BUILDING F AT UPPER LEFT. 30X24 inch black and white silver gelatin print. Photographers unknown. Date unknown. - U.S. Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco, Warehouse, 1020 North Access Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  10. 20. AERIAL VIEW TO NORTHEAST OF NORTH PART OF COAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. AERIAL VIEW TO NORTHEAST OF NORTH PART OF COAST GUARD AIR STATION SAN FRANCISCO. 30X20 inch black and white silver gelatin print. Photographers unknown. Date unknown. - U.S. Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco, Warehouse, 1020 North Access Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  11. 6. AERIAL VIEW TO NORTHWEST OF NORTH PART OF COAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. AERIAL VIEW TO NORTHWEST OF NORTH PART OF COAST GUARD AIR STATION SAN FRANCISCO. 8X10 black and white silver gelatin print. Photographer unknown. Date unknown. - U.S. Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco, 1020 North Access Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  12. 21. AERIAL VIEW TO SOUTHWEST OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. AERIAL VIEW TO SOUTHWEST OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR STATION SAN FRANCISCO, SHOWING BUILDING F AT RIGHT AND BUILDING H (HAER No. CA-329-B) AT UPPER LEFT. 30X24 inch black and white silver gelatin print. Photographers unknown. Date unknown. - U.S. Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco, Warehouse, 1020 North Access Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  13. Roots and Branches: Contemporary Essays by West Coast Writers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junker, Howard, Ed.

    Celebrating the vitality and diversity of West Coast writing, this book is a collection of 35 essays by writers based in California, Oregon, Washington, and Alaska. Loosely organized around the ideas that West Coast writers often look to their roots elsewhere and that they pursue new directions as varied as their roots, the collection presents a…

  14. 77 FR 59083 - Safety Zone; Coast Guard Exercise, Hood Canal, Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Coast Guard Exercise, Hood Canal, Washington AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone around vessels involved in a Coast Guard Ready for Operations exercise in Hood...

  15. 78 FR 69007 - Special Local Regulations; Eleventh Coast Guard District Annual Marine Events

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Eleventh Coast Guard District Annual Marine Events AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard proposes to update the list of marine events that occur annually within the Eleventh Coast...

  16. 75 FR 53195 - Security Zone; U.S. Coast Guard BSU Seattle, Pier 36, Seattle, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... Zone; U.S. Coast Guard BSU Seattle, Pier 36, Seattle, WA in the Federal Register (75 FR 23212). We... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zone; U.S. Coast Guard BSU Seattle, Pier 36, Seattle, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing...

  17. 76 FR 25548 - Safety Zone; Coast Guard Use of Force Training Exercises, San Pablo Bay, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ...; Coast Guard Use of Force Training Exercises, San Pablo Bay, CA in the Federal Register (74 FR 214). We... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Coast Guard Use of Force Training Exercises, San Pablo Bay, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard...

  18. 77 FR 47519 - Annual Marine Events in the Eighth Coast Guard District, Sabine River; Orange, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 Annual Marine Events in the Eighth Coast Guard District, Sabine River; Orange, TX AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: The Coast..., call or email Mr. Scott Whalen. U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit Port Arthur, TX; telephone...

  19. 32 CFR 700.602 - The Commandant of the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The Commandant of the Coast Guard. 700.602... States Coast Guard (When Operating as a Service in the Navy) § 700.602 The Commandant of the Coast Guard. (a) The Commandant of the Coast Guard is the senior officer of the United States Coast Guard....

  20. 32 CFR 700.602 - The Commandant of the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false The Commandant of the Coast Guard. 700.602... States Coast Guard (When Operating as a Service in the Navy) § 700.602 The Commandant of the Coast Guard. (a) The Commandant of the Coast Guard is the senior officer of the United States Coast Guard....

  1. 32 CFR 700.602 - The Commandant of the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false The Commandant of the Coast Guard. 700.602... States Coast Guard (When Operating as a Service in the Navy) § 700.602 The Commandant of the Coast Guard. (a) The Commandant of the Coast Guard is the senior officer of the United States Coast Guard....

  2. 78 FR 39595 - Safety Zone, Fifth Coast Guard District Firework Display, Pagan River; Smithfield, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Fifth Coast Guard District Firework Display, Pagan River; Smithfield, VA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary Final Rule. SUMMARY: The Coast... the Fifth Coast Guard District. This regulation applies only to one recurring fireworks event, held...

  3. 33 CFR 8.1 - Functions of the Coast Guard Reserve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Functions of the Coast Guard Reserve. 8.1 Section 8.1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL UNITED STATES COAST GUARD RESERVE § 8.1 Functions of the Coast Guard Reserve. (a) The Coast...

  4. 76 FR 7131 - Safety Zones; Eleventh Coast Guard District Annual Fireworks Events

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zones; Eleventh Coast Guard District Annual Fireworks Events AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard... displays at various locations in the Eleventh Coast Guard District. These amendments will standardize...

  5. 33 CFR 8.1 - Functions of the Coast Guard Reserve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Functions of the Coast Guard Reserve. 8.1 Section 8.1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL UNITED STATES COAST GUARD RESERVE § 8.1 Functions of the Coast Guard Reserve. (a) The Coast...

  6. 32 CFR 700.602 - The Commandant of the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false The Commandant of the Coast Guard. 700.602... States Coast Guard (When Operating as a Service in the Navy) § 700.602 The Commandant of the Coast Guard. (a) The Commandant of the Coast Guard is the senior officer of the United States Coast Guard....

  7. 33 CFR 8.1 - Functions of the Coast Guard Reserve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Functions of the Coast Guard Reserve. 8.1 Section 8.1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL UNITED STATES COAST GUARD RESERVE § 8.1 Functions of the Coast Guard Reserve. (a) The Coast...

  8. 77 FR 26699 - Safety Zone; Coast Guard Exercise, Hood Canal, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Coast Guard Exercise, Hood Canal, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary Final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone around vessels involved in a Coast Guard Ready for Operations exercise in Hood Canal, WA...

  9. 76 FR 66239 - Safety Zones; Fireworks Displays Within the Fifth Coast Guard District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zones; Fireworks Displays Within the Fifth Coast Guard District AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard... locations within the geographic boundary of the Fifth Coast Guard District. This action is necessary...

  10. 77 FR 2629 - Special Local Regulations; Recurring Marine Events in the Fifth Coast Guard District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-19

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Recurring Marine Events in the Fifth Coast Guard District AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard... locations within the geographic boundary of the Fifth Coast Guard District. This rule revises 33 CFR...

  11. 33 CFR 8.1 - Functions of the Coast Guard Reserve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Functions of the Coast Guard Reserve. 8.1 Section 8.1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL UNITED STATES COAST GUARD RESERVE § 8.1 Functions of the Coast Guard Reserve. (a) The Coast...

  12. 33 CFR 100.701 - Special Local Regulations; Marine Events in the Seventh Coast Guard District

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Events in the Seventh Coast Guard District 100.701 Section 100.701 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... § 100.701 Special Local Regulations; Marine Events in the Seventh Coast Guard District The following... officer of the Coast Guard who has been designated by the respective Coast Guard Sector Commander...

  13. 32 CFR 700.602 - The Commandant of the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false The Commandant of the Coast Guard. 700.602... States Coast Guard (When Operating as a Service in the Navy) § 700.602 The Commandant of the Coast Guard. (a) The Commandant of the Coast Guard is the senior officer of the United States Coast Guard....

  14. 75 FR 23212 - Security Zone; U.S. Coast Guard BSU Seattle, Pier 36, Seattle, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-03

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zone; U.S. Coast Guard BSU Seattle, Pier 36, Seattle, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard proposes a security zone at U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Base Support Unit Seattle, Pier 36, Elliot Bay,...

  15. 33 CFR 8.1 - Functions of the Coast Guard Reserve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Functions of the Coast Guard Reserve. 8.1 Section 8.1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL UNITED STATES COAST GUARD RESERVE § 8.1 Functions of the Coast Guard Reserve. (a) The Coast...

  16. 78 FR 8027 - Safety Zone, Coast Guard Exercise Area, Hood Canal, Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Coast Guard Exercise Area, Hood Canal, Washington AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The U.S. Coast Guard is establishing a safety zone around vessels involved in Coast Guard training exercises in Hood Canal, WA. This...

  17. Chapter 9: The rock coast of the USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Adams, Peter N.; Allan, Jonathan; Ashton, Andrew; Griggs, Gary B.; Hampton, Monty A.; Kelly, Joseph; Young, Adam P.

    2014-01-01

    The coastline of the USA is vast and comprises a variety of landform types including barrier islands, mainland beaches, soft bluffed coastlines and hard rocky coasts. The majority of the bluffed and rocky coasts are found in the northeastern part of the country (New England) and along the Pacific coast. Rocky and bluffed landform types are commonly interspersed along the coastline and occur as a result of relative lowering of sea level from tectonic or isostatic forcing, which can occur on timescales ranging from instantaneous to millenia. Recent research on sea cliffs in the contiguous USA has focused on a broad range of topics from documenting erosion rates to identifying processes and controls on morphology to prediction modelling. This chapter provides a detailed synthesis of recent and seminal research on rocky coast geomorphology along open-ocean coasts of the continental United States (USA).

  18. 33 CFR 334.783 - Arlington Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast Guard restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Arlington Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast Guard restricted area. 334.783 Section 334.783 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.783...

  19. 75 FR 12729 - Fisheries Off West Coast States and in the Western Pacific; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XU95 Fisheries Off West Coast States and in the Western Pacific; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery; Application for an Exempted Fishing Permit...

  20. Ocean bottom gravimetry near the coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, H.; Kanazawa, T.; Oshida, A.

    2008-12-01

    Inland earthquakes have recently caused damages in the Japanese Islands. Although more than 2,000 active faults have been recognized in and around Japan, the earthquakes had their sources in unexpected faults in the upper crust. Detecting such hidden active faults has become an important subject in the field of earth sciences. Precise gravimetry, a basic geodetic measurement, is now recognized as one of important means for detecting active faults hidden under the ground. Precise and dense gravimetry has covered the Japanese Islands, but not in the offshore area. The most critical point is that there are no gravity data in the offshore area near the coast; the area has not been included in land nor marine gravity mapping. An ocean bottom gravimeter (OBG) was developed in Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, for gravimetry on the deep seafloor (Fujimoto et al., 1998). Free gimbal suspensions with an oil damper keep a sensor package of Scintrex CG-3M/SB gravimeter roughly vertical, typically in a few tens arc-seconds, and the effect of the remaining tilt is numerically corrected by the gravimeter. The gimbals and the sensor are in a pressure-tight spherical housing made of titanium alloy, and the logging unit in a glass sphere. Two trial measurements on the shallow seafloor in Suruga Bay showed that precision of seafloor gravimtery with the OBG is much the same that with field gravimeters on land (Fujimoto et al., 1998). The importance of gravity mapping over the shallow ocean bottom near the coast was recognized and there were requests to use our OBG for such observations. Then we modify the OBG system into a single housing for easy maintenance and measurement. Ocean bottom gravity measurements with the OBG have been carried out around Awaji Island near Kobe, off the northern end of Tohoku, off Niigata, and in the Seto Inland Sea. The OBG was lowered from a boat to each gravity point on the bottom with a rope. Judging from the observed data, precision

  1. Siple Coast ice streams reorganization following the reactivation of Kamb Ice Stream tributaries, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoffersen, P.; Bougamont, M. H.; Price, S. F.; Fricker, H. A.; Tulaczyk, S. M.; Carter, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    Ice streams in Antarctica account for most of the ice volume discharged to the ocean, and their flow variability greatly influences the mass balance of the ice sheet. Today, the Siple Coast region is the only one in West Antarctica to experience a positive mass balance of 36 Gt/yr, as a consequence of the stagnation of Kamb Ice Stream 170 years ago as well as the ongoing slowdown of Whillans Ice Stream. However, this positive trend could be temporary, as reconstructions of past flow show that the Siple Coast ice streams have experienced significant flow variability over the past millennia, with episodes of stagnation typically followed by reactivation on a centennial timescale. The impact that this internally induced variability may have on the future mass balance remains unknown. Here, we use the three-dimensional ice sheet model CISM to study the flow variability of the Ross ice streams over a 250 year period, during which the basal properties controlling ice flow evolve according to the distribution of meltwater in a dynamic, regional hydrological system, coupled to a subglacial till layer. To obtain realistic initial flow conditions, we assimilate the 1997 velocity data available for this region. During the forward simulation, all ice streams undergo dynamic changes, traced to persistently weak bed conditions beneath the tributaries of the currently dormant Kamb Ice Stream. This source of regional instability propagates into the catchments of Whillans as well as Bindschadler ice streams within decades, and re-organizes the flow of all the Ross ice streams within two centuries. Ice piracy from Kamb Ice Stream prolongs the fast flow on Whillans Ice Stream, maintaining its trunk active during the first modeled century. At the same time, ice piracy into the catchment of Bindschadler ice stream reactivates the relict Siple Ice Stream, which significantly reduces the mass balance for this region. The trunk of Kamb Ice Stream reactivates last (during the second half

  2. Adjustment of the marine atmospheric boundary layer to the large-scale bend in the California coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Kathleen A.; Rogers, David P.; Dorman, Clive E.

    2002-12-01

    Observations of the surface wind field off the U.S. West Coast were made from satellite by the Sea Surface Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) during June 1994 and June 1996. The coast bends inward 28° at 40° N latitude. Northerly wind speeds are high within a region that extends far south and offshore of this bend, bounded on the east by the California coast. On average, the high-speed wind zone extends ˜250 km from shore and 800 km alongcoast. Long coast-perpendicular aircraft transects show that moving onshore, the depth of the MABL decreases, the northerly wind speed increases, and the Froude number increases. A network of oceanographic buoys records the surface wind speed, direction, and pressure. From six buoy pressure measurements, the geostrophic wind vector was computed to represent the synoptic flow over the Oregon-northern California coastal waters. The satellite surface wind fields were composited by the direction of the buoy geostrophic background wind. The predominant direction is 210°-180°. A high-speed region extends south of the bend for directions in the 0°-180° range (moving counterclockwise), which corresponds to a downcoast component of the pressure gradient. For directions between 180° and 0°, flow splits at the bend and the region of highest winds is found to its north and offshore. A high-speed region south of the bend was present in 65% of the satellite wind maps as well as in the June averages. The flow's response to coastal promontories such as Point Arena is nested within this broad zone of fast, thin, likely supercritical flow.

  3. Underway in Alaska, U.S. Coast Guard, Seventeenth District (date unknown). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Underway in Alaska, U.S. Coast Guard, Seventeenth District (date unknown). - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HOLLY, U.S. Coast Guard 8th District Base, 4640 Urquhart Street, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, LA

  4. 77 FR 16813 - Availability of Seat for Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Availability of Seat for Olympic Coast National Marine... Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: Coastal Marine Resources Committees. Applicants.... ADDRESSES: Application kits may be obtained from Norma Klein, Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary,...

  5. Tsunami damage along the Andaman Islands coasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Among the first places to be affected by the massive tidal wave that ripped across the Indian Ocean on December 26, 2004, were the Andaman Islands. Located approximately 850 kilometers north of the epicenter of the earthquake that triggered the tsunami, the islands were not only among the first land masses to be swept under the wave, they have also been rattled by a series of aftershocks. Administrated by the Indian government, about 300,000 people live on the remote island chain, including several indigenous tribes. As of January 3, over 6,000 were confirmed dead or missing in the Andaman Islands. This Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image shows the Andaman Islands on January 3, 2005. Compared to previous images of the islands, the beaches along the west side of the islands have been stripped bare, leaving a strip of bright tan land along the coast. The change is most notable on North Sentinel Island, home of the Sentinelese aboriginals, and on Interview Island, where the formerly green coastline has been replaced with an abnormally bright ring of bare sand. The large image reveals additional damage along all the islands of the Andaman chain.

  6. US west coast revisited: An aeromagnetic perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Zietz, I.; Johnson, P.R. ); Bond, K.R. )

    1990-04-01

    A new compilation of magnetic data for the western conterminous United States and offshore areas provides significant information about crustal units and structures in the region. Features shown on the compilation include a magnetic quiet zone along the coast and two lineaments inland. The magnetic quiet zone correlates with the accretionary prism at the western edge of the North American plate and overlies subducted ocean crust; abrupt termination of ocean-floor magnetic anomalies at, or a short distance east of, the toe of the accretionary prism is an inferred effect subduction-induced low-temperature metamorphism of the ocean crust. The Puget Lowlands-San Joaquin lineament is an alignment of high-intensity magnetic anomalies that in the south, and possibly also in the north, are cause by bodies of mafic-ultramafic rocks accreted to North America during the Mesozoic and Tertiary. The lineup of the highs and the inferred lineup of the causative bodies may reflect fundamental structures that control Mesozoic and Tertiary evolution of the continental margin. The Mojave Desert lineament, a distinctive chain of short-wavelength magnetic anomalies in southern California, coincides partly with a zone of Mesozoic intrusions and the Cenozoic San Andreas fault system, but is likely to be older than both in origin and may reflect a Mesozoic or older crustal discontinuity.

  7. Phillips goes subsea trees in Ivory Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Bryngelson, R.H.

    1982-11-15

    Describes installation of 3 satellite subsea trees in 500 ft of water from a semisubmersible drilling rig. These wet, diver-assist trees are part of Phillips Petroleum's early development and production program (EDPP) for the Espoir field offshore Ivory Coast, with plans calling for 5 satellite wells with downhole completion equipment and subsea production trees. Diagram shows how a converted jackup, Dan Duke, supports equipment to handle production from subsea wells. Table gives time breakdown of subsea tree installation. Before mobilizing the subsea trees, control system, and tubulars to the rig, a study of deck layout, payloads, and traffic patterns was performed. Concludes that, based on experience in this project and the cost differences between purchase and installation costs, final success is 90% dependent on informed and trained field personnel after engineering, design, and manufacturing; attention to installation procedures and training of field and operational personnel are as critical or more critical than design changes to equipment; and selection of a supplier for high technology equipment, based on a low bid alone, may not translate into lower installation costs.

  8. The oldest rock of Ivory Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouamelan, Alain Nicaise; Djro, Sagbrou Chérubin; Allialy, Marc Ephrem; Paquette, Jean-Louis; Peucat, Jean-Jacques

    2015-03-01

    The tonalitic gneiss of Balmer (TGB), in the SASCA area of south-western Ivory Coast, previously dated at 3141 ± 2 Ma using the single zircon evaporation method, is regarded as a relic of Archean rock within the Paleoproterozoic (Birimian) formation of the West African Craton (WAC). We present new geochronological data for the TGB using the laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) method. We obtain a U-Pb age of 3207 ± 7 Ma for abundant zircons extracted from the tonalitic gneiss, and interpret this age as that of the magmatic protolith because of the igneous-type homogeneous zircon population. Certain magmatic zircon edges and some round zircons define an upper intercept age of 3155 ± 17 Ma which could represent overgrowths during gneissification. It appears that the TGB was not affected by the events posterior to its genesis, i.e. the Liberian (2.9-2.7 Ga) and Eburnean (2.4-2.0 Ga) events. Additionally, the TGB proves to be a juvenile Leonian rock, as indicated by the Nd model age of 3456 Ma, and could also constitute the protolith of the granulitic grey gneisses and charnockites of the Man area, which are 150-400 Ma younger.

  9. Post Fukushima tsunami simulations for Malaysian coasts

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, Hock Lye; Teh, Su Yean; Abas, Mohd Rosaidi Che

    2014-10-24

    The recent recurrences of mega tsunamis in the Asian region have rekindled concern regarding potential tsunamis that could inflict severe damage to affected coastal facilities and communities. The 11 March 2011 Fukushima tsunami that crippled nuclear power plants in Northern Japan has further raised the level of caution. The recent discovery of petroleum reserves in the coastal water surrounding Malaysia further ignites the concern regarding tsunami hazards to petroleum facilities located along affected coasts. Working in a group, federal government agencies seek to understand the dynamics of tsunami and their impacts under the coordination of the Malaysian National Centre for Tsunami Research, Malaysian Meteorological Department. Knowledge regarding the generation, propagation and runup of tsunami would provide the scientific basis to address safety issues. An in-house tsunami simulation models known as TUNA has been developed by the authors to assess tsunami hazards along affected beaches so that mitigation measures could be put in place. Capacity building on tsunami simulation plays a critical role in the development of tsunami resilience. This paper aims to first provide a simple introduction to tsunami simulation towards the achievement of tsunami simulation capacity building. The paper will also present several scenarios of tsunami dangers along affected Malaysia coastal regions via TUNA simulations to highlight tsunami threats. The choice of tsunami generation parameters reflects the concern following the Fukushima tsunami.

  10. Post Fukushima tsunami simulations for Malaysian coasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Hock Lye; Teh, Su Yean; Abas, Mohd Rosaidi Che

    2014-10-01

    The recent recurrences of mega tsunamis in the Asian region have rekindled concern regarding potential tsunamis that could inflict severe damage to affected coastal facilities and communities. The 11 March 2011 Fukushima tsunami that crippled nuclear power plants in Northern Japan has further raised the level of caution. The recent discovery of petroleum reserves in the coastal water surrounding Malaysia further ignites the concern regarding tsunami hazards to petroleum facilities located along affected coasts. Working in a group, federal government agencies seek to understand the dynamics of tsunami and their impacts under the coordination of the Malaysian National Centre for Tsunami Research, Malaysian Meteorological Department. Knowledge regarding the generation, propagation and runup of tsunami would provide the scientific basis to address safety issues. An in-house tsunami simulation models known as TUNA has been developed by the authors to assess tsunami hazards along affected beaches so that mitigation measures could be put in place. Capacity building on tsunami simulation plays a critical role in the development of tsunami resilience. This paper aims to first provide a simple introduction to tsunami simulation towards the achievement of tsunami simulation capacity building. The paper will also present several scenarios of tsunami dangers along affected Malaysia coastal regions via TUNA simulations to highlight tsunami threats. The choice of tsunami generation parameters reflects the concern following the Fukushima tsunami.

  11. View of the Caribbean coast of Venezuela

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A near vertical view of the Caribbean coast of Venezuela is seen in this Skylab 3 Earth Resources Experiment Package S190-B (five-inch earth terrain camera) photograph taken from the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. The large body of water is the Golfo de Venezuela; and the major land mass is the Peninsula de Paraguana. The view is looking northward from the mouth of the Golfete de Coro and Punta Cardon to Punta Macolia. The peninsula is connected to the Venezuelan mainland by the narrow strip of land in the most easterly corner of the picture. The dry, arid climate of the peninsula is indicated by sparse vegetation and the abundance of sand dunes. The highest point is about 2,700 feet above the sea and is the conspicuous black spot. Old raised shorelines features appear as streaks parallel to the Golfete de Coro. Water of the Golfete de Coro is red from the high sediment content. The streaks in the water off the peninsula is apparently an effect of wind which is blowing sand and w

  12. Provenance of Norphlet sandstone, northern Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, W.P.; Ward, W.C.; Kuglar, R.L.

    1987-09-01

    The Upper Jurassic Norphlet sandstone of the northern Gulf Coast is predominantly subarkose, with some arkose in the eastern area and sublitharenite and quartzarenite in the western area. Despite great depths of burial and despite feldspar and rock-fragment constituents, diagenesis has not appreciably altered the composition of Norphlet sandstone. Therefore, reconstruction of original composition of Norphlet sandstone presented little difficulty. Variation in detrital modes of the Norphlet suggests compositionally distinct source terranes. Samples from Florida, Alabama, and Mississippi reflect the influence of metamorphic and plutonic rocks of the Appalachian Piedmont Province and of Triassic-Jurassic volcanic rocks. Sandstones in east Texas, northern Louisiana, and southern Arkansas were derived from sedimentary and metasedimentary rocks of the Ouachita system. The Arbuckle Mountains and Llano uplift may have supplied trace amounts of quartzo-feldspathic and volcanic-rock fragments to the extreme western part of the study area. Norphlet sandstones represent a mixture of collision-orogen-derived sediment from the Appalachian and/or Ouachita system and continental-block-derived sediment from paleohighs and uplifts within the Gulf basin. However, Norphlet sandstones plot in the craton-interior and transitional-continental fields on Q-F-L and QM-F-Lt tectonic-provenance diagrams, because of mineralogically mature source rocks, elimination of unstable grains by abrasion and sorting during deposition, and/or sediment mixing from different source terranes.

  13. Arctic coastal zone mapping: Evolution of sedimentary coasts in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendixen, M.; Kroon, A.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change threatens many of the coastal areas all over the world. In the Arctic, the warming happens at a rate which is three times faster than the global average increasing the pressure on the coast. Arctic coasts differ from coasts in lower latitude in terms of the natural conditions prevailing, i.e. sea-ice, permafrost, and thermal erosion. These factors are likely to change with an increasing temperature, and thereby the erodibility of the shores and the erosivity of the coastal processes are changing. The majority of studies on arctic coasts focus on tundra coasts. Here, there is a general increase of coastal erosion rates over the last decades. However, the arctic coastal areas of Greenland differ; they are often close to hard rock protrusions and are characterized by large differences in geomorphology, erodibility of sediments, and erosivity by coastal processes. Sedimentary coasts in Greenland are only sporadically investigated, and it is thus difficult to predict the impact of climate changes in these areas. With this work we focus on sedimentary coasts in Greenland and present shoreline analysis of two sedimentary coastal sites. We show how the position of the shoreline has changed since the 1930'ies and we address the responsible factors controlling this evolution. The hotspots of coastal change are all located near delta mouths and the detected changes are coupled to dominating process occurring here.

  14. Separated flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, W. L., III; Dunham, R. E., Jr.; Goodman, W. L.; Howard, F. G.; Margason, R. J.; Rudy, D. H.; Rumsey, C. L.; Stough, H. P., III; Thomas, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    A brief overview of flow separation phenomena is provided. Langley has many active research programs in flow separation related areas. Three cases are presented which describe specific examples of flow separation research. In each example, a description of the fundamental fluid physics and the complexity of the flow field is presented along with a method of either reducing or controlling the extent of separation. The following examples are discussed: flow over a smooth surface with an adverse pressure gradient; flow over a surface with a geometric discontinuity; and flow with shock-boundary layer interactions. These results will show that improvements are being made in the understanding of flow separation and its control.

  15. Reducing the uncertainty in wind speed estimations near the coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floors, Rogier; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Karagali, Ioanna; Vasiljevic, Nikola; Lea, Guillaume; Simon, Elliot; Courtney, Michael; Ahsbahs, Tobias; Bay Hasager, Charlotte; Badger, Merete; Peña, Alfredo

    2016-04-01

    Many countries plan to meet renewable energy targets by installing near-shore wind farms, because of the high offshore wind speeds and good grid connectivity. Because of the strong relation between mean wind speed and the annual energy production, there is an interest in reducing uncertainty of the estimation of the wind speed in these coastal areas. The RUNE project aims to provide recommendations on the use of lidar systems and mesoscale models results to find the most effective (cost vs. accuracy) solution of estimating near-shore wind resources. Here we show some first results of the RUNE measuring campaign at the west coast of Jutland that started in December 2015. In this campaign, a long-range WindScanner system (a multi-lidar instrumentation) was used simultaneously with measurements from several vertical profiling lidars, a meteorological mast and an offshore buoy. These measurements result in a detailed picture of the flow in a transect across the coastline from approximately 5 km offshore up to 3 km inland. The wind speed obtained from a lidar in a sector-scanning mode and from two time-synchronized lidars that were separated horizontally but focused in the same point, will be compared. Furthermore it will be shown how the resulting horizontal wind speed transects compare with the wind speed measurements from the vertical profiling lidars and the meteorological mast. The behaviour of the coastal gradient in wind speed in this area is discussed. Satellite data for the wind over the RUNE measurement area were also collected. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) winds from Sentinel-1 and TerraSAR-X were retrieved at different spatial resolutions. Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) swath winds were obtained from both METOP-A and B platforms. These were used for direct comparisons with the lidar in sector scanning mode.

  16. What rainfall events trigger landslides on the West Coast US?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasutti, Michela; Seager, Richard; Kirschbaum, Dalia

    2016-04-01

    A dataset of landslide occurrences compiled by collating google news reports covers 9 full years of data. We show that, while this compilation cannot provide consistent and widespread monitoring everywhere, it is adequate to capture the distribution of events in the major urban areas of the West Coast US and it can be used to provide a quantitative relationship between landslides and rainfall events. The case of the Seattle metropolitan area is presented as an example. The landslide dataset shows a clear seasonality in landslide occurrence, corresponding to the seasonality of rainfall, modified by the accumulation of soil moisture as winter progresses. Interannual variability of landslide occurrences is also linked to interannual variability of monthly rainfall. In most instances, landslides are clustered on consecutive days or at least within the same pentad and correspond to days of large rainfall accumulation at the regional scale. A joint analysis of the landslide data and of the high-resolution PRISM daily rainfall accumulation shows that on days when landslides occurred, the distribution of rainfall was shifted, with rainfall accumulation higher than 10mm/day being more common. Accumulations above 50mm/day much increase the probability of landslides, including the possibility of a major landslide event (one with multiple landslides in a day). The synoptic meteorological conditions associated with these major events show a mid-tropospheric ridge to the south of the target area steering a surface low and bringing enhanced precipitable water towards the Pacific North West. The interaction of the low-level flow with the local orography results in instances of a strong Puget Sound Convergence Zone, with widespread rainfall accumulation above 30mm/day and localized maxima as high as 100mm/day or more.

  17. Sequestration Options for the West Coast States

    SciTech Connect

    Myer, Larry

    2006-04-30

    The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) is one of seven partnerships that have been established by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies best suited for different regions of the country. The West Coast Region comprises Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, Alaska, and British Columbia. Led by the California Energy Commission, WESTCARB is a consortium of about 70 organizations, including state natural resource and environmental protection agencies; national laboratories and universities; private companies working on carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture, transportation, and storage technologies; utilities; oil and gas companies; nonprofit organizations; and policy/governance coordinating organizations. Both terrestrial and geologic sequestration options were evaluated in the Region during the 18-month Phase I project. A centralized Geographic Information System (GIS) database of stationary source, geologic and terrestrial sink data was developed. The GIS layer of source locations was attributed with CO{sub 2} emissions and other data and a spreadsheet was developed to estimate capture costs for the sources in the region. Phase I characterization of regional geological sinks shows that geologic storage opportunities exist in the WESTCARB region in each of the major technology areas: saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and coal beds. California offers outstanding sequestration opportunities because of its large capacity and the potential of value-added benefits from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and enhanced gas recovery. The estimate for storage capacity of saline formations in the ten largest basins in California ranges from about 150 to about 500 Gt of CO{sub 2}, the potential CO{sub 2}-EOR storage was estimated to be 3.4 Gt, and the cumulative production from gas reservoirs suggests a CO{sub 2} storage capacity of 1.7 Gt. A GIS-based method for source

  18. Infrasound from lightning measured in Ivory Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farges, T.; Millet, C.; Matoza, R. S.

    2012-04-01

    It is well established that more than 2,000 thunderstorms occur continuously around the world and that about 45 lightning flashes are produced per second over the globe. More than two thirds (42) of the infrasound stations of the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the CTBTO (Comprehensive nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organisation) are now certified and routinely measure signals due to natural activity (e.g., airflow over mountains, aurora, microbaroms, surf, volcanoes, severe weather including lightning flashes, …). Some of the IMS stations are located where worldwide lightning detection networks (e.g. WWLLN) have a weak detection capability but lightning activity is high (e.g. Africa, South America). These infrasound stations are well localised to study lightning flash activity and its disparity, which is a good proxy for global warming. Progress in infrasound array data processing over the past ten years makes such lightning studies possible. For example, Farges and Blanc (2010) show clearly that it is possible to measure lightning infrasound from thunderstorms within a range of distances from the infrasound station. Infrasound from lightning can be detected when the thunderstorm is within about 75 km from the station. The motion of the squall zone is very well measured inside this zone. Up to 25% of lightning flashes can be detected with this technique, giving better results locally than worldwide lightning detection networks. An IMS infrasound station has been installed in Ivory Coast for 9 years. The lightning rate of this region is 10-20 flashes/km2/year from space-based instrument OTD (Christian et al., 2003). Ivory Coast is therefore a good place to study infrasound data associated with lightning activity and its temporal variation. First statistical results will be presented in this paper based on 4 years of data (2005-2009). For short lightning distances (less than 20 km), up to 60 % of lightning detected by WWLLN has been one-to-one correlated

  19. Bats in Agroecosytems around California's Central Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayne, A.

    2014-12-01

    Bats in agroecosystems around California's Central Coast: A full quarter of California's land area is farmland. Crops account for 32.5 billion of California's GDP. Insect control is a big problem for farmers, and California bats eat only insects, saving farmers an estimated 3 to $53 billion a year. As farmers maximize crop yield, they use more pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers, which contaminate runoff streams that bats drink from. Also, pesticide use kills bats' sole food source: insects. My research objective was to find out how farm management practices and landscape complexity affect bat diversity and activity, and to see which one affects bat activity more. We monitored 18 sites, including conventional, organic, and low and high-complexity landscapes. We noted more bat activity at sites with high complexity landscapes and organic practices than at sites with either low-complexity landscapes or conventional farming practices. I captured and processed bats and recorded data. I also classified insects collected from light traps. I learned how to handle bats and measure forearm length and weight, as well as how to indentify their gender. I took hair clippings and fecal samples, which yield data about the bats' diet. Their diet, in turn, gives us data about which pests they eat and therefore help control. I also learned about bats' echolocation: they have a special muscle over their ears that closes when they echolocate so that they don't burst their own eardrum. Also, some insects have evolved a special call that will disrupt bats echolocation so bats can't track it.

  20. Oceanic Loading Eect near the European Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiridonov, E.; Vinogradova, O.; Boyarskiy, E.; Afanasieva, L.

    2012-04-01

    The dissipation, anisotropy, and rotation constraints of the total oceanic gravimetric effect are analysed. The dependence of the results on the selected P- and S-velocity model (i.e., on the structure of the crust and upper mantle of the Earth) is considered. For calculating the effect of oceanic loading, we apply the method of Legendre polynomial expansion of tidal heights. The CSR3 model data are expanded up to the 720th order. The results yielded by this method closely agree with those calculated from the Green's functions by the LOAD07 program of the ETERNA software. Remarkable advantage of our program over other approaches is that it provides high-speed processing and does not require introducing the near-field formalism. Application of the pre-computed expansions reduces the time of calculations by two orders of magnitude, compared to LOAD07. This is particularly important when analyzing the geographical distributions of the loading effect predicted by different models. Taking dissipation into account improves the total gravimetric effect calculated for the M2 wave near the coast of Europe by 0.1-0.2 mcGal in amplitude and by a few hundredths of degree in phase. Transition from the PREM model to the IASP91 model which is better suitable for Europe changes the model predictions by 0.1-0.4 mcGal in amplitude and by 0.1 to 5-7 degrees in phase. Thus, allowance for dissipation together with the use of the refined data on the crustal and upper-mantle structure of the Earth may contribute, at places, over 0.5 mcGal to the amplitude and a few degrees to the phase of the total oceanic gravimetric effect. In this relation, particular attention should be paid to the regions about the Land's End cape (Cape Cornwall) and Cape Saint Mathieu.

  1. Mysterious Black Water off Florida's Gulf Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In mid-December last year, a mysterious black water overtook the normally bluish green waters of Florida Bay. Over the course of the winter, the extent of the water grew to encompass an area as big as Lake Okeechobee, Florida, before subsiding over the last few weeks. These images taken by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS), flying aboard the Orbview-2 satellite, show the progression of the black water over the last three months. The affected water sits along the southeastern coast of Florida about fifty miles north of the Florida Keys. As of now, scientists do not know why the water appears black in satellite and aerial images or whether the water is harming the wildlife. They speculate that it could be due to an exotic algae bloom, an underwater fountain pushing up sediments from the ocean floor, or possibly chemical and sediment run-off from the nearby Shark River. Researchers at the Florida Marine Research Institute in St. Petersburg and the Mote Marine Research Institute in Sarasota are running tests to determine the chemical make-up of the water. No big fish kills have been reported in the area. But fishermen say the catch has been low this winter. In addition, the black water sits just north of the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, which is home to one of the largest coral reef habitats in the United States. Toxic run-off from the Florida coastline and motor boats in the area have already destroyed many of Florida's reefs. Scientists are concerned that if the extent of the black water grows again, it could endanger these reefs. Information provided by the Naples Daily News. For up-to-date images of the area, view these SeaWiFS Images of Florida Bay. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  2. Deep-Seated Landslides Influence Topographic Variability and Salmon Habitat in the Oregon Coast Range, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeson, H. W.; Fonstad, M. A.; Roering, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    A well-accepted idea in geomorphology is that landforms control the type and distribution of biological habitat. However, the linkages between geomorphology and ecology remain poorly understood. In rivers, the geomorphic template controls the hydraulic environment, partly shaping the river ecosystem. But what processes shape the geomorphic template? Here, I examine how two hillslope processes dominant in the Oregon Coast Range, debris flows and deep-seated landslides, affect valley floor width and channel slope, key components of the geomorphic template in riverine ecosystems. I then investigate how patterns in potential salmon habitat differ between eleven streams dominated by deep-seated landslides and eleven streams dominated by debris flows. I show that terrain influenced by deep-seated landslides exhibits (1) valley widths that are more variable throughout the network but less locally variable, (2) more variable channel slopes, and (3) more potential salmon habitat as well as significantly more connectivity between habitat types.

  3. Circulation and meltwater distribution in the Bellingshausen Sea: From shelf break to coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiyue; Thompson, Andrew F.; Flexas, Mar M.; Roquet, Fabien; Bornemann, Horst

    2016-06-01

    West Antarctic ice shelves have thinned dramatically over recent decades. Oceanographic measurements that explore connections between offshore warming and transport across a continental shelf with variable bathymetry toward ice shelves are needed to constrain future changes in melt rates. Six years of seal-acquired observations provide extensive hydrographic coverage in the Bellingshausen Sea, where ship-based measurements are scarce. Warm but modified Circumpolar Deep Water floods the shelf and establishes a cyclonic circulation within the Belgica Trough with flow extending toward the coast along the eastern boundaries and returning to the shelf break along western boundaries. These boundary currents are the primary water mass pathways that carry heat toward the coast and advect ice shelf meltwater offshore. The modified Circumpolar Deep Water and meltwater mixtures shoal and thin as they approach the continental slope before flowing westward at the shelf break, suggesting the presence of the Antarctic Slope Current. Constraining meltwater pathways is a key step in monitoring the stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet.

  4. Evaluating Tsunami Impact on the Gulf of Cadiz Coast (Northeast Atlantic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omira, R.; Baptista, M. A.; Miranda, J. M.

    2011-06-01

    The Gulf of Cadiz coasts are exposed to tsunamis. Emergency planning tools are now taking into account this fact, especially because a series of historical occurrences were strikingly significant, having left strong evidence behind, in the mareographic records, the geological evidence or simply the memory of the populations. The study area is a strip along the Algarve coast, south Portugal, an area known to have been heavily impacted by the 1 November 1755 event. In this study we use two different tsunami scenarios generated by the rupture of two thrust faults identified in the area, corresponding to 8.1-8.3 magnitude earthquakes. Tsunami propagation and inundation computation is performed using a non-linear shallow water code with bottom friction. Numerical modeling results are presented in terms of flow depth and current velocity with maximum values of 7 m and 8 m/s for inundation depth and flow speed, respectively. These results constitute a valuable tool for local authorities, emergency and decision planners to define the priority zones where tsunami mitigation measures must be implemented and to develop tsunami-resilient communities.

  5. Ocean acidification along the Gulf Coast and East Coast of the USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanninkhof, Rik; Barbero, Leticia; Byrne, Robert; Cai, Wei-Jun; Huang, Wei-Jen; Zhang, Jia-Zhong; Baringer, Molly; Langdon, Chris

    2015-04-01

    As part of an effort to monitor changes in inorganic carbon chemistry of the coastal ocean, near-synoptic cruises are being conducted in the Northern Gulf of Mexico and along the East Coast of the United States. Here we describe observations obtained on a cruise in the summer of 2012 and compare them with results from a cruise following a similar track in 2007. The focus is on describing spatial patterns of aragonite saturation state (ΩAr). This parameter is an indicator of ecosystem health, in particular for calcifying organisms. The results show large-scale regional trends from different source waters at the northeastern and southwestern edges of the domain, along with the modulating effects of remineralization/respiration and riverine inputs. The broader patterns and changes over five years along the coast can be well described by the impacts of large-scale circulation, notably changes in source water contributions. Changes in the well-buffered Loop Current and Gulf Stream with high ΩAr impact the waters in the southern part of the study area. The less buffered southward coastal currents with low ΩAr originating from the Labrador Sea and Gulf of St. Lawrence impact the ΩAr patterns in the Northern regions. The expected 2% average decrease in ΩAr in the surface mixed layer due to increasing atmospheric CO2 levels over the 5-year period is largely overshadowed by local and regional variability from changes in hydrography and mixed layer dynamics.

  6. Joint Air Sea Interaction (JASIN) experiment, Northwest coast of Scotland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Businger, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The joint air sea interaction (JASIN) experiment took place off the Northwest coast of Scotland. Sea surface and boundary layer parameters were measured. The JASIN data was used as ground truth for various sensors on the SEASAT satellite.

  7. Pacific Coast Torpedo Station, Keyport Industrial District, Both sides of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Pacific Coast Torpedo Station, Keyport Industrial District, Both sides of Second Street, between Dedrick Drive and Liberty Bay and one building west of Dedrick Drive and south of Second Street, Keyport, Kitsap County, WA

  8. PARTS WASHING ALTERNATIVES STUDY - UNITED STATES COAST GUARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report has been written to assist the United States Coast Guard (USCG) industrial managers in determining the most cost effective and environmentally acceptable parts washing alternatives for their specific applications. An; evaluation was conducted on four different cleane...

  9. Gulf Coast Sea Turtle Hatchlings Released at KSC

    NASA Video Gallery

    The first group of hatchlings from endangered sea turtle eggs brought from beaches along the northern U.S. Gulf Coast was released into the Atlantic Ocean off NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida...

  10. INTERIOR TOWER ROOM LOOKING NORTHEAST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR TOWER ROOM LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  11. A PROBABILISTIC SURVEY OF SEDIMENT TOXICITY IN WEST COAST ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A probabalistic survey of coastal condition assessment was conducted in 1999 by participants in US EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP). The survey targeted estuaries along the outer coasts of Washington, Oregon and California, including the lower Columbi...

  12. Coast Community College: The Learning Society, California Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Real, James

    1978-01-01

    Community colleges in the California Coast Community College district have capitalized on a burgeoning adult education clientele and the public television boom to acquire one of the fasting growing and most venturesome education systems in the world. (Author/LBH)

  13. Genes, Diversity, and Geologic Process on the Pacific Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, David K.

    2004-05-01

    We examine the genetics of marine diversification along the West Coast of North America in relation to the Late Neogene geology and climate of the region. Trophically important components of the diverse West Coast fauna, including kelp, alcid birds (e.g., auks, puffins), salmon, rockfish, abalone, and Cancer crabs, appear to have radiated during peaks of upwelling primarily in the Late Miocene and in some cases secondarily in the Pleistocene. Phylogeographic barriers associated with Mio-Pliocene estuaries of the mid-California coast, the Pliocene opening of the Gulf of California, tectonic and eustatic evolution of the California Bight, as well as the influence of Pleistocene and Holocene climate change on genetic structure are assessed in a geologic context. Comparisons to East Coast and western freshwater systems, as well as upwelling systems around the globe, provide perspective for the survey.

  14. CONTROLS ON WATER CHEMISTRY OF AN OREGON COAST RANGE STREAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous factors may control losses of dissolved nutrients from forested basins in the Oregon Coast Range. Potentially important factors include forest composition, stand age, forest management, grazing, agriculture, sewage inputs and bedrock types, as well as others perhaps not...

  15. 14. Second floor office (coast guard) in area office building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Second floor office (coast guard) in area office building looking southwest - Duluth Ship Canal, Marine Museum-Area Office, North end of Minnesota Point at Canal Park, Duluth, St. Louis County, MN

  16. Intensification of upwelling along Oman coast in a warming scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praveen, V.; Ajayamohan, R. S.; Valsala, V.; Sandeep, S.

    2016-07-01

    The oceanic impact of poleward shift in monsoon low-level jet (MLLJ) is examined using a Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). Two sets of downscaling experiments were conducted using ROMS with boundary and initial conditions from six CMIP5 models. While outputs from the historical run (1981-2000) acts as forcing for the first, the second uses RCP8.5 (2080-2099). By comparing the outputs, it is found that Oman coast will experience an increase in upwelling in tune with MLLJ shift. Consistent with the changes in upwelling and zonal Ekman transport, temperature, salinity, and productivity show significant changes near the Oman coast. The changes in MLLJ causes the coastal wind to angle against the Oman coast in such a fashion that the net upwelling increases in the next century and so does the marine productivity. This study contrasts the general view of weakening of upwelling along the Arabian coasts due to the weakening of monsoon winds.

  17. 1. Environmental view looking from the east past the coast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Environmental view looking from the east past the coast guard station; note, in the background, is the observation tower (HABS No. NH-239-I) - Fort Point, 25 Wentworth Road, New Castle, Rockingham County, NH

  18. Coast and river mouths, Columbia, South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Numerous rivers in Ecuador and Columbia stand out in this South American Pacific coastal scene (1.5N, 79.0W). This region has one of the highest rainfalls in the world with the consequent heavy cloud cover and it is rare to be able to photograph the surface. The Pacific mountain drainage area is small but produces a large volume of runoff and sediment flow into the ocean.

  19. 78 FR 61844 - North Atlantic Coast Comprehensive Study

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-04

    ...The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is requesting peer reviewed information that would be useful in the preparation of the North Atlantic Coast Comprehensive Study (Hurricane Sandy). The USACE is preparing a report that will be submitted to Congress in 2015. The goals of the North Atlantic Coast Comprehensive Study authorized under the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act, Public Law 113-2......

  20. 22. AERIAL VIEW OF SOUTH PART OF THE COAST GUARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. AERIAL VIEW OF SOUTH PART OF THE COAST GUARD AIR STATION SAN FRANCISCO, SHOWING PART OF BUILDING H IN THE LOWER RIGHT CORNER (DOES NOT SHOW BUILDING F). 30X24 inch black and white silver gelatin print. Photographer unknown. Date unknown. 304 - U.S. Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco, Bachelor Officer Quarters, 1020 North Access Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  1. Phytoplankton bloom all along the coast of Southeast United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    All along the eastern and southern coasts of the United States, marine plants seem impervious to the onslaught of winter weather further north. In this true-color image from January 9, 2002, phytoplankton can be seen growing in the nation's coastal waters; their characteristic blue-green swirls are especially visible off the west coast of Florida. Fire locations are marked with red dots. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  2. Geochemistry and age of Ivory Coast tektites and microtektites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeberl, Christian; Bottomley, Richard; Glass, Billy P.; Storzer, Dieter

    1997-04-01

    Ivory Coast tektites were first reported in 1934 from a geographically restricted area at Ivory Coast, West Africa. Although some additional specimens have been found later, the total number remains small (a few hundred). The Bosumtwi impact crater in Ghana is most likely the source crater for the Ivory Coast tektites, based on the finding that the tektites and the crater have the same age as well as similar isotopic and chemical compositions. In addition to tektites on land, microtektites were found in (so far) eleven deep-sea cores off the West African coast, between about 9°N and 11°S and 0° and 23°W, defining the extent of the Ivory Coast tektite strewn field. In this study we analyzed eleven Ivory Coast tektites for their major and trace element composition, studied their petrographical characteristics, provided major element data for 111 microtektites, and major and trace element data for four microtektites. We determined the 40Ar sbnd 39Ar step-heating age of five Ivory Coast tektites and four microtektites and obtained fission-track dates for ten tektites and one Bosumtwi impact glass. The tektites have very small intersample and intrasample variations of their major and trace element composition. 111 Ivory Coast microtektites from eleven cores were analyzed for their major element compositional range. Their compositional range is significantly wider than that of the Ivory Coast tektites, but the majority of all microtektites have compositions very similar to those of the tektites (within a factor of 1.2). Trace element compositions of the tektites also show little variation between samples. The samples do not show any distinct Eu anomaly in the REE patterns. This characteristic, as well as the high absolute REE abundances and La NYb N ratios of about 8, indicate that Archean rocks are plausible source rocks. The major and trace element contents of four individually analyzed Ivory Coast microtektites show compositions that are very similar to those of

  3. Aftermath of Hurricane Ike along Texas Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Three weeks after Hurricane Ike came ashore near Galveston, TX, residents returned to find their houses in ruins. From the coast to over 15 km inland, salt water saturated the soil as a result of the 7m storm surge pushed ashore by the force of the hurricane. The right image was acquired on September 28; the left image was acquired August 15, 2006. Vegetation is displayed in red, and inundated areas are in blue-green. Within the inundated area are several small 'red islands' of high ground where salt domes raised the level of the land, and protected the vegetation.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 37 by 49.5 kilometers (22.8 by 30.6 miles) Location: 29.8 degrees North latitude, 94.4 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top

  4. Gulf Coast, Shaded Relief and Colored Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2

    The topography of the Gulf Coast states is well shown in this color-coded shaded relief map generated with data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. The image on the top (see Figure 1) is a standard view showing southern Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and the panhandle of Florida. Green colors indicate low elevations, rising through yellow and tan, to white at the highest elevations.

    For the view on the bottom (see Figure 2), elevations below 10 meters (33 feet) above sea level have been colored light blue. These low coastal elevations are especially vulnerable to flooding associated with storm surges. Planners can use data like these to predict which areas are in the most danger and help develop mitigation plans in the event of particular flood events.

    Elevation data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter (approximately 200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) of the U.S. Department of Defense and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C.

    Location: 31 degrees north latitude, 88 degrees west longitude Orientation: North toward the top, Mercator projection Size: 702 by 433 kilometers (435 by 268 miles) Image Data: shaded and colored SRTM

  5. Ocean-Ice-Atmosphere Interactions off Sabrina and Adelie Coasts During NBP1402 and AU1402

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsi, A. H.; Zielinski, N. J.; Webb, C.; Huber, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    near-freezing waters drawn from intermediate levels of the adjacent westward flowing ACoC.
Winds, currents and ice interactions observed off Sabrina Coast during NBP1402 and AU1402 are most likely widespread, in view of reported decadal freshening of upper waters over the Antarctic continental shelf and their localized AABW outflows.

  6. USGS "iCoast - Did the Coast Change?" Project: Crowd-Tagging Aerial Photographs to Improve Coastal Change Prediction Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S. B.; Poore, B. S.; Plant, N. G.; Stockdon, H. F.; Morgan, K.; Snell, R.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been acquiring oblique aerial photographs of the coast before and after major storms since 1995 and has amassed a database of over 140,000 photographs of the Gulf, Atlantic, and Pacific coasts. USGS coastal scientists use these photographs to document and characterize coastal change caused by storms. The images can also be used to evaluate the accuracy of predictive models of coastal erosion. However, the USGS does not have the personnel to manually analyze all of the photographs taken after a storm. Also, computers cannot yet automatically identify damages and geomorphic changes to the coast from the oblique aerial photographs. There is a high public interest in accessing the limited number of pre- and post-storm photographic pairs the USGS is currently able to share. Recent federal policies that encourage open data and open innovation initiatives have resulted in many federal agencies developing new ways of using citizen science and crowdsourcing techniques to share data and collaborate with the public to accomplish large tasks. The USGS launched a crowdsourcing application in June 2014 called "iCoast - Did the Coast Change?" (http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/icoast) to allow citizens to help USGS scientists identify changes to the coast by comparing USGS aerial photographs taken before and after storms, and then selecting pre-defined tags like "dune scarp" and "sand on road." The tags are accompanied by text definitions and pictorial examples of these coastal morphology terms and serve to informally and passively educate users about coastal hazards. The iCoast application facilitates greater citizen awareness of coastal change and is an educational resource for teachers and students interested in learning about coastal vulnerability. We expect that the citizen observations from iCoast will assist with probabilistic model development to produce more accurate predictions of coastal vulnerability.

  7. Tsunami characteristics and formation potential of sandy tsunami deposit in Sanriku Coast: implications from numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, D.; Haraguchi, T.; Takahashi, T.

    2013-12-01

    Geological investigation of paleotsunami deposit is crucial for knowing the history and magnitude of tsunami events in the past. Among various kinds of grain sizes, sandy tsunami deposit has been best investigated by previous studies, because of its potential for identification in the sedimentary column. Many sandy tsunami deposits have been found from coastal plains, which have sandy beach and low-lying wetlands. However, sandy tsunami deposits in narrow valleys at rocky ria coast have rarely been found. It may be presumed that formation potential of sandy tsunami layer in the rocky coasts is generally lower than coastal plains, because of the absence of sandy beach, tsunami run-up on steeper slope and stronger return flow. In this presentation, characteristics of the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake tsunami in Sanriku Coast, a continuous rocky ria coast located in the northeast Japan, is investigated based on numerical modeling. In addition, the formation potential of sandy tsunami deposit is also investigated based on numerical modeling of sediment transport. Preliminary result of tsunami hydrodynamics showed that the waveform and amplification of the tsunami are clearly affected by the local bathymetry, which is associated with submerged topography formed during the last glacial stage. Although the tsunami height in the offshore of each bay is around 8.0 m, the tsunami height at the bay head was increased in different way. The amplification factor at the bay head was typically 2.0 among most of V-shaped narrow embayments; meanwhile the amplification factor is much lower than 1.0 at some cases. The preliminary result of the modeling of sediment transport predicted huge amount of sediments may be suspended into the water column, given that sandy deposit is available there. Massive erosion and deposition of sea bottom sediments may commonly take place in the bays. However, formation of onshore tsunami deposit differs from each other. Whether the suspended sediments

  8. 49 CFR 850.10 - Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. 850... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.10 Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. (a) The Coast Guard conducts the...

  9. 77 FR 66856 - Merchant Marine Personnel Advisory Committee: Intercessional Meeting AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Merchant Marine Personnel Advisory Committee: Intercessional Meeting AGENCY: Coast...: The working group will meet in Room 5-1224 of Coast Guard Headquarters, 2100 Second Ave. SW... magnetometer in order to gain admittance to the U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters Building. Visitors should...

  10. 33 CFR 8.5 - Regulations for the Coast Guard Reserve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Regulations for the Coast Guard Reserve. 8.5 Section 8.5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL UNITED STATES COAST GUARD RESERVE § 8.5 Regulations for the Coast Guard Reserve. (a)...

  11. 33 CFR 165.518 - Security Zone; Waters of the Fifth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... waters of the Fifth Coast Guard District as defined in 33 CFR 3.25-1, from surface to bottom. (c... Fifth Coast Guard District. 165.518 Section 165.518 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... ACCESS AREAS Specific Regulated Navigation Areas and Limited Access Areas Fifth Coast Guard...

  12. 33 CFR 1.01-50 - Delegation to District Commander, Seventeenth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Seventeenth Coast Guard District. 1.01-50 Section 1.01-50 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... District Commander, Seventeenth Coast Guard District. The Commandant redelegates to the District Commander, Seventeenth Coast Guard District, the authority in 46 U.S.C. 3302(i)(1) to issue permits to certain...

  13. 33 CFR 100.114 - Fireworks displays within the First Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... First Coast Guard District. 100.114 Section 100.114 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Fireworks displays within the First Coast Guard District. (a) Regulated area. That area of navigable waters... the regulated area during the effective period of regulation unless authorized by the Coast...

  14. 33 CFR 165.506 - Safety Zones; Fireworks Displays in the Fifth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the Port zone, please see 33 CFR 3.25. (1) Coast Guard Sector Delaware Bay—Captain of the Port Zone... in the Fifth Coast Guard District. 165.506 Section 165.506 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Guard District § 165.506 Safety Zones; Fireworks Displays in the Fifth Coast Guard District....

  15. 33 CFR 149.404 - Can I use firefighting equipment that has no Coast Guard standards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... that has no Coast Guard standards? 149.404 Section 149.404 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... firefighting equipment that has no Coast Guard standards? A deepwater port may use firefighting equipment for which there is no Coast Guard standard as supplemental equipment, pursuant to § 149.403, if...

  16. 49 CFR 850.10 - Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. 850... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.10 Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. (a) The Coast Guard conducts the...

  17. 49 CFR 850.35 - Records of the Coast Guard and the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. 850.35... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.35 Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. (a) Records of the Coast Guard made under § 850.30...

  18. 33 CFR 165.1711 - Security Zones; Waters of the Seventeenth Coast Guard District

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Seventeenth Coast Guard District 165.1711 Section 165.1711 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... ACCESS AREAS Specific Regulated Navigation Areas and Limited Access Areas Seventeenth Coast Guard District § 165.1711 Security Zones; Waters of the Seventeenth Coast Guard District (a) Definitions. As...

  19. 33 CFR 165.1711 - Security Zones; Waters of the Seventeenth Coast Guard District

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Seventeenth Coast Guard District 165.1711 Section 165.1711 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... ACCESS AREAS Specific Regulated Navigation Areas and Limited Access Areas Seventeenth Coast Guard District § 165.1711 Security Zones; Waters of the Seventeenth Coast Guard District (a) Definitions. As...

  20. 33 CFR 173.85 - Fees levied by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fees levied by the Coast Guard. 173.85 Section 173.85 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Number § 173.85 Fees levied by the Coast Guard. (a) In a State where the Coast Guard is the...