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Sample records for circadian protein bmal1

  1. Insulin post-transcriptionally modulates Bmal1 protein to affect the hepatic circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Dang, Fabin; Sun, Xiujie; Ma, Xiang; Wu, Rong; Zhang, Deyi; Chen, Yaqiong; Xu, Qian; Wu, Yuting; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Although food availability is a potent synchronizer of the peripheral circadian clock in mammals, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, we show that hepatic Bmal1, a core transcription activator of the molecular clock, is post-transcriptionally regulated by signals from insulin, an important hormone that is temporally controlled by feeding. Insulin promotes postprandial Akt-mediated Ser42-phosphorylation of Bmal1 to induce its dissociation from DNA, interaction with 14-3-3 protein and subsequently nuclear exclusion, which results in the suppression of Bmal1 transcriptional activity. Inverted feeding cycles not only shift the phase of daily insulin oscillation, but also elevate the amplitude due to food overconsumption. This enhanced and reversed insulin signalling initiates the reset of clock gene rhythms by altering Bmal1 nuclear accumulation in mouse liver. These results reveal the molecular mechanism of insulin signalling in regulating peripheral circadian rhythms. PMID:27576939

  2. A meeting of two chronobiological systems: circadian proteins Period1 and BMAL1 modulate the human hair cycle clock.

    PubMed

    Al-Nuaimi, Yusur; Hardman, Jonathan A; Bíró, Tamás; Haslam, Iain S; Philpott, Michael P; Tóth, Balázs I; Farjo, Nilofer; Farjo, Bessam; Baier, Gerold; Watson, Rachel E B; Grimaldi, Benedetto; Kloepper, Jennifer E; Paus, Ralf

    2014-03-01

    The hair follicle (HF) is a continuously remodeled mini organ that cycles between growth (anagen), regression (catagen), and relative quiescence (telogen). As the anagen-to-catagen transformation of microdissected human scalp HFs can be observed in organ culture, it permits the study of the unknown controls of autonomous, rhythmic tissue remodeling of the HF, which intersects developmental, chronobiological, and growth-regulatory mechanisms. The hypothesis that the peripheral clock system is involved in hair cycle control, i.e., the anagen-to-catagen transformation, was tested. Here we show that in the absence of central clock influences, isolated, organ-cultured human HFs show circadian changes in the gene and protein expression of core clock genes (CLOCK, BMAL1, and Period1) and clock-controlled genes (c-Myc, NR1D1, and CDKN1A), with Period1 expression being hair cycle dependent. Knockdown of either BMAL1 or Period1 in human anagen HFs significantly prolonged anagen. This provides evidence that peripheral core clock genes modulate human HF cycling and are an integral component of the human hair cycle clock. Specifically, our study identifies BMAL1 and Period1 as potential therapeutic targets for modulating human hair growth. PMID:24005054

  3. A Novel Bmal1 Mutant Mouse Reveals Essential Roles of the C-Terminal Domain on Circadian Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Solmi; Row, Hansang; Lee, Jiyeon; Han, Dong-Hee; Cho, Sehyung; Kim, Kyungjin

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian circadian clock is an endogenous biological timer comprised of transcriptional/translational feedback loops of clock genes. Bmal1 encodes an indispensable transcription factor for the generation of circadian rhythms. Here, we report a new circadian mutant mouse from gene-trapped embryonic stem cells harboring a C-terminus truncated Bmal1 (Bmal1GTΔC) allele. The homozygous mutant (Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC) mice immediately lost circadian behavioral rhythms under constant darkness. The heterozygous (Bmal1+/GTΔC) mice displayed a gradual loss of rhythms, in contrast to Bmal1+/- mice where rhythms were sustained. Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice also showed arrhythmic mRNA and protein expression in the SCN and liver. Lack of circadian reporter oscillation was also observed in cultured fibroblast cells, indicating that the arrhythmicity of Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice resulted from impaired molecular clock machinery. Expression of clock genes exhibited distinct responses to the mutant allele in Bmal1+/GTΔC and Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice. Despite normal cellular localization and heterodimerization with CLOCK, overexpressed BMAL1GTΔC was unable to activate transcription of Per1 promoter and BMAL1-dependent CLOCK degradation. These results indicate that the C-terminal region of Bmal1 has pivotal roles in the regulation of circadian rhythms and the Bmal1GTΔC mice constitute a novel model system to evaluate circadian functional mechanism of BMAL1. PMID:26394143

  4. CRY Drives Cyclic CK2-Mediated BMAL1 Phosphorylation to Control the Mammalian Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Tamaru, Teruya; Hattori, Mitsuru; Honda, Kousuke; Nakahata, Yasukazu; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Ozawa, Takeaki; Takamatsu, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular circadian clocks, composed of clock genes that act in transcription-translation feedback loops, drive global rhythmic expression of the mammalian transcriptome and allow an organism to anticipate to the momentum of the day. Using a novel clock-perturbing peptide, we established a pivotal role for casein kinase (CK)-2-mediated circadian BMAL1-Ser90 phosphorylation (BMAL1-P) in regulating central and peripheral core clocks. Subsequent analysis of the underlying mechanism showed a novel role of CRY as a repressor for protein kinase. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments and real-time monitoring of protein–protein interactions revealed that CRY-mediated periodic binding of CK2β to BMAL1 inhibits BMAL1-Ser90 phosphorylation by CK2α. The FAD binding domain of CRY1, two C-terminal BMAL1 domains, and particularly BMAL1-Lys537 acetylation/deacetylation by CLOCK/SIRT1, were shown to be critical for CRY-mediated BMAL1–CK2β binding. Reciprocally, BMAL1-Ser90 phosphorylation is prerequisite for BMAL1-Lys537 acetylation. We propose a dual negative-feedback model in which a CRY-dependent CK2-driven posttranslational BMAL1–P-BMAL1 loop is an integral part of the core clock oscillator. PMID:26562092

  5. Bmal1 is an essential regulator for circadian cytosolic Ca²⁺ rhythms in suprachiasmatic nucleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Masayuki; Ikeda, Masaaki

    2014-09-01

    The hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) plays a pivotal role in the mammalian circadian clock system. Bmal1 is a clock gene that drives transcriptional-translational feedback loops (TTFLs) for itself and other genes, and is expressed in nearly all SCN neurons. Despite strong evidence that Bmal1-null mutant mice display arrhythmic behavior under constant darkness, the function of Bmal1 in neuronal activity is unknown. Recently, periodic changes in the levels of intracellular signaling messengers, such as cytosolic Ca(2+) and cAMP, were suggested to regulate TTFLs. However, the opposite aspect of how clock gene TTFLs regulate cytosolic signaling remains unclear. To investigate intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics under Bmal1 perturbations, we cotransfected some SCN neurons with yellow cameleon together with wild-type or dominant-negative Bmal1 using a gene-gun applied for mouse organotypic cultures. Immunofluorescence staining for a tag protein linked to BMAL1 showed nuclear expression of wild-type BMAL1 and its degradation within 1 week after transfection in SCN neurons. However, dominant-negative BMAL1 did not translocate into the nucleus and the cytosolic signals persisted beyond 1 week. Consistently, circadian Ca(2+) rhythms in SCN neurons were inhibited for longer periods by dominant-negative Bmal1 overexpression. Furthermore, SCN neurons transfected with a Bmal1 shRNA lengthened, whereas those overexpressing wild-type Bmal1 shortened, the periods of Ca(2+) rhythms, with a significant reduction in their amplitude. BMAL1 expression was intact in the majority of neighboring neurons in organotypic cultures. Therefore, we conclude that proper intrinsic Bmal1 expression, but not passive signaling via cell-to-cell interactions, is the determinant of circadian Ca(2+) rhythms in SCN neurons. PMID:25186748

  6. Circadian Factor BMAL1 in Histaminergic Neurons Regulates Sleep Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiao; Zecharia, Anna; Zhang, Zhe; Yang, Qianzi; Yustos, Raquel; Jager, Polona; Vyssotski, Alexei L.; Maywood, Elizabeth S.; Chesham, Johanna E.; Ma, Ying; Brickley, Stephen G.; Hastings, Michael H.; Franks, Nicholas P.; Wisden, William

    2014-01-01

    Summary Circadian clocks allow anticipation of daily environmental changes [1]. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) houses the master clock, but clocks are also widely expressed elsewhere in the body [1]. Although some peripheral clocks have established roles [1], it is unclear what local brain clocks do [2, 3]. We tested the contribution of one putative local clock in mouse histaminergic neurons in the tuberomamillary nucleus to the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle. Histaminergic neurons are silent during sleep, and start firing after wake onset [4–6]; the released histamine, made by the enzyme histidine decarboxylase (HDC), enhances wakefulness [7–11]. We found that hdc gene expression varies with time of day. Selectively deleting the Bmal1 (also known as Arntl or Mop3 [12]) clock gene from histaminergic cells removes this variation, producing higher HDC expression and brain histamine levels during the day. The consequences include more fragmented sleep, prolonged wake at night, shallower sleep depth (lower nonrapid eye movement [NREM] δ power), increased NREM-to-REM transitions, hindered recovery sleep after sleep deprivation, and impaired memory. Removing BMAL1 from histaminergic neurons does not, however, affect circadian rhythms. We propose that for mammals with polyphasic/nonwake consolidating sleep, the local BMAL1-dependent clock directs appropriately timed declines and increases in histamine biosynthesis to produce an appropriate balance of wake and sleep within the overall daily cycle of rest and activity specified by the SCN. PMID:25454592

  7. Circadian factor BMAL1 in histaminergic neurons regulates sleep architecture.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao; Zecharia, Anna; Zhang, Zhe; Yang, Qianzi; Yustos, Raquel; Jager, Polona; Vyssotski, Alexei L; Maywood, Elizabeth S; Chesham, Johanna E; Ma, Ying; Brickley, Stephen G; Hastings, Michael H; Franks, Nicholas P; Wisden, William

    2014-12-01

    Circadian clocks allow anticipation of daily environmental changes. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) houses the master clock, but clocks are also widely expressed elsewhere in the body. Although some peripheral clocks have established roles, it is unclear what local brain clocks do. We tested the contribution of one putative local clock in mouse histaminergic neurons in the tuberomamillary nucleus to the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle. Histaminergic neurons are silent during sleep, and start firing after wake onset; the released histamine, made by the enzyme histidine decarboxylase (HDC), enhances wakefulness. We found that hdc gene expression varies with time of day. Selectively deleting the Bmal1 (also known as Arntl or Mop3) clock gene from histaminergic cells removes this variation, producing higher HDC expression and brain histamine levels during the day. The consequences include more fragmented sleep, prolonged wake at night, shallower sleep depth (lower nonrapid eye movement [NREM] δ power), increased NREM-to-REM transitions, hindered recovery sleep after sleep deprivation, and impaired memory. Removing BMAL1 from histaminergic neurons does not, however, affect circadian rhythms. We propose that for mammals with polyphasic/nonwake consolidating sleep, the local BMAL1-dependent clock directs appropriately timed declines and increases in histamine biosynthesis to produce an appropriate balance of wake and sleep within the overall daily cycle of rest and activity specified by the SCN. PMID:25454592

  8. Cryptochrome 1 regulates the circadian clock through dynamic interactions with the BMAL1 C terminus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haiyan; Gustafson, Chelsea L; Sammons, Patrick J; Khan, Sanjoy K; Parsley, Nicole C; Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Liu, Andrew C; Partch, Carrie L

    2015-06-01

    The molecular circadian clock in mammals is generated from transcriptional activation by the bHLH-PAS transcription factor CLOCK-BMAL1 and subsequent repression by PERIOD and CRYPTOCHROME (CRY). The mechanism by which CRYs repress CLOCK-BMAL1 to close the negative feedback loop and generate 24-h timing is not known. Here we show that, in mouse fibroblasts, CRY1 competes for binding with coactivators to the intrinsically unstructured C-terminal transactivation domain (TAD) of BMAL1 to establish a functional switch between activation and repression of CLOCK-BMAL1. TAD mutations that alter affinities for co-regulators affect the balance of repression and activation to consequently change the intrinsic circadian period or eliminate cycling altogether. Our results suggest that CRY1 fulfills its role as an essential circadian repressor by sequestering the TAD from coactivators, and they highlight regulation of the BMAL1 TAD as a critical mechanism for establishing circadian timing. PMID:25961797

  9. Investigations of the CLOCK and BMAL1 Proteins Binding to DNA: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Tuo; Song, Chunnian; Wang, Qing; Wang, Yan; Chen, Guangju

    2016-01-01

    The circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK), and brain and muscle ARNT-like 1 (BMAL1) proteins are important transcriptional factors of the endogenous circadian clock. The CLOCK and BMAL1 proteins can regulate the transcription-translation activities of the clock-related genes through the DNA binding. The hetero-/homo-dimerization and DNA combination of the CLOCK and BMAL1 proteins play a key role in the positive and negative transcriptional feedback processes. In the present work, we constructed a series of binary and ternary models for the bHLH/bHLH-PAS domains of the CLOCK and BMAL1 proteins, and the DNA molecule, and carried out molecular dynamics simulations, free energy calculations and conformational analysis to explore the interaction properties of the CLOCK and BMAL1 proteins with DNA. The results show that the bHLH domains of CLOCK and BMAL1 can favorably form the heterodimer of the bHLH domains of CLOCK and BMAL1 and the homodimer of the bHLH domains of BMAL1. And both dimers could respectively bind to DNA at its H1-H1 interface. The DNA bindings of the H1 helices in the hetero- and homo-bHLH dimers present the rectangular and diagonal binding modes, respectively. Due to the function of the α-helical forceps in these dimers, the tight gripping of the H1 helices to the major groove of DNA would cause the decrease of interactions at the H1-H2 interfaces in the CLOCK and BMAL1 proteins. The additional PAS domains in the CLOCK and BMAL1 proteins affect insignificantly the interactions of the CLOCK and BMAL1 proteins with the DNA molecule due to the flexible and long loop linkers located at the middle of the PAS and bHLH domains. The present work theoretically explains the interaction mechanisms of the bHLH domains of the CLOCK and BMAL1 proteins with DNA. PMID:27153104

  10. Palmitate Inhibits SIRT1-Dependent BMAL1/CLOCK Interaction and Disrupts Circadian Gene Oscillations in Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xin; Zhang, Deqiang; Arthurs, Blake; Li, Pei; Durudogan, Leigh; Gupta, Neil; Yin, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of serum saturated fatty acid palmitate have been shown to promote insulin resistance, increase cellular ROS production, and trigger cell apoptosis in hepatocytes during the development of obesity. However, it remains unclear whether palmitate directly impacts the circadian clock in hepatocytes, which coordinates nutritional inputs and hormonal signaling with downstream metabolic outputs. Here we presented evidence that the molecular clock is a novel target of palmitate in hepatocytes. Palmitate exposure at low dose inhibits the molecular clock activity and suppresses the cyclic expression of circadian targets including Dbp, Nr1d1 and Per2 in hepatocytes. Palmitate treatment does not seem to alter localization or reduce protein expression of BMAL1 and CLOCK, the two core components of the molecular clock in hepatocytes. Instead, palmitate destabilizes the protein-protein interaction between BMAL1-CLOCK in a dose and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, we showed that SIRT1 activators could reverse the inhibitory action of palmitate on BMAL1-CLOCK interaction and the clock gene expression, whereas inhibitors of NAD synthesis mimic the palmitate effects on the clock function. In summary, our findings demonstrated that palmitate inhibits the clock function by suppressing SIRT1 function in hepatocytes. PMID:26075729

  11. BMAL1-dependent circadian oscillation of nuclear CLOCK: posttranslational events induced by dimerization of transcriptional activators of the mammalian clock system

    PubMed Central

    Kondratov, Roman V.; Chernov, Mikhail V.; Kondratova, Anna A.; Gorbacheva, Victoria Y.; Gudkov, Andrei V.; Antoch, Marina P.

    2003-01-01

    Mammalian CLOCK and BMAL1 are two members of bHLH-PAS-containing family of transcription factors that represent the positive elements of circadian autoregulatory feedback loop. In the form of a heterodimer, they drive transcription from E-box enhancer elements in the promoters of responsive genes. We have examined abundance, posttranslational modifications, cellular localization of endogenous and ectopically expressed CLOCK and BMAL1 proteins. Nuclear/cytoplasm distribution of CLOCK was found to be under circadian regulation. Analysis of subcellular localization of CLOCK in embryo fibroblasts of mice carrying different germ-line circadian mutations showed that circadian regulation of nuclear accumulation of CLOCK is BMAL1-dependent. Formation of CLOCK/BMAL1 complex following ectopic coexpression of both proteins is followed by their codependent phosphorylation, which is tightly coupled to CLOCK nuclear translocation and degradation. This binding-dependent coregulation is specific for CLOCK/BMAL1 interaction, as no other PAS domain protein that can form a complex with either CLOCK or BMAL1 was able to induce similar effects. Importantly, all posttranslational events described in our study are coupled with active transactivation complex formation, which argues for their significant functional role. Altogether, these results provide evidence for an additional level of circadian system control, which is based on regulation of transcriptional activity or/and availability of CLOCK/BMAL1 complex. PMID:12897057

  12. Interactive Organization of the Circadian Core Regulators PER2, BMAL1, CLOCK and PML

    PubMed Central

    Miki, Takao; Zhao, Zhaoyang; Lee, Cheng Chi

    2016-01-01

    The BMAL1 and CLOCK heterodimer in the mammalian circadian transcriptional complex is thought to be repressed by PER2 and CRY1 via direct interactions. We recently reported that PER2 is largely cytosolic in Pml−/− cells and did not co-immunoprecipitate (co-IP) with BMAL1 or CLOCK. Here, using multi-color immunofluorescence (IF) staining and co-IP, we observed a nuclear distribution of BMAL1 and a predominately cytosolic distribution of CLOCK in Pml−/− MEF. In the presence of WT PML, PER2 co-localized with BMAL1 in the nucleus. In Pml−/− MEF transfected with mutant K487R PML, we observed that BMAL1 and PER2 co-localized with K487R PML in the cytosol. Furthermore, cytosolic CLOCK and PER2 displayed a significant non-overlapping IF staining pattern. In Bmal1−/− MEF, CLOCK was primarily cytosolic while PML and PER2 were nuclear. Together, our studies suggest that PML mediates the binding of PER2 to BMAL1 in the BMAL1/CLOCK heterodimer and is an important component in the organization of a functional clock complex in the nucleus. Our studies also support that BMAL1 is important for CLOCK nuclear localization. PMID:27383066

  13. Interactive Organization of the Circadian Core Regulators PER2, BMAL1, CLOCK and PML.

    PubMed

    Miki, Takao; Zhao, Zhaoyang; Lee, Cheng Chi

    2016-01-01

    The BMAL1 and CLOCK heterodimer in the mammalian circadian transcriptional complex is thought to be repressed by PER2 and CRY1 via direct interactions. We recently reported that PER2 is largely cytosolic in Pml(-/-) cells and did not co-immunoprecipitate (co-IP) with BMAL1 or CLOCK. Here, using multi-color immunofluorescence (IF) staining and co-IP, we observed a nuclear distribution of BMAL1 and a predominately cytosolic distribution of CLOCK in Pml(-/-) MEF. In the presence of WT PML, PER2 co-localized with BMAL1 in the nucleus. In Pml(-/-) MEF transfected with mutant K487R PML, we observed that BMAL1 and PER2 co-localized with K487R PML in the cytosol. Furthermore, cytosolic CLOCK and PER2 displayed a significant non-overlapping IF staining pattern. In Bmal1(-/-) MEF, CLOCK was primarily cytosolic while PML and PER2 were nuclear. Together, our studies suggest that PML mediates the binding of PER2 to BMAL1 in the BMAL1/CLOCK heterodimer and is an important component in the organization of a functional clock complex in the nucleus. Our studies also support that BMAL1 is important for CLOCK nuclear localization. PMID:27383066

  14. Calorie restriction regulates circadian clock gene expression through BMAL1 dependent and independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sonal A.; Velingkaar, Nikkhil; Makwana, Kuldeep; Chaudhari, Amol; Kondratov, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Feeding behavior, metabolism and circadian clocks are interlinked. Calorie restriction (CR) is a feeding paradigm known to extend longevity. We found that CR significantly affected the rhythms in the expression of circadian clock genes in mice on the mRNA and protein levels, suggesting that CR reprograms the clocks both transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally. The effect of CR on gene expression was distinct from the effects of time-restricted feeding or fasting. Furthermore, CR affected the circadian output through up- or down-regulation of the expression of several clock-controlled transcriptional factors and the longevity candidate genes. CR-dependent effects on some clock gene expression were impaired in the liver of mice deficient for BMAL1, suggesting importance of this transcriptional factor for the transcriptional reprogramming of the clock, however, BMAL1- independent mechanisms also exist. We propose that CR recruits biological clocks as a natural mechanism of metabolic optimization under conditions of limited energy resources. PMID:27170536

  15. Calorie restriction regulates circadian clock gene expression through BMAL1 dependent and independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sonal A; Velingkaar, Nikkhil; Makwana, Kuldeep; Chaudhari, Amol; Kondratov, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Feeding behavior, metabolism and circadian clocks are interlinked. Calorie restriction (CR) is a feeding paradigm known to extend longevity. We found that CR significantly affected the rhythms in the expression of circadian clock genes in mice on the mRNA and protein levels, suggesting that CR reprograms the clocks both transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally. The effect of CR on gene expression was distinct from the effects of time-restricted feeding or fasting. Furthermore, CR affected the circadian output through up- or down-regulation of the expression of several clock-controlled transcriptional factors and the longevity candidate genes. CR-dependent effects on some clock gene expression were impaired in the liver of mice deficient for BMAL1, suggesting importance of this transcriptional factor for the transcriptional reprogramming of the clock, however, BMAL1- independent mechanisms also exist. We propose that CR recruits biological clocks as a natural mechanism of metabolic optimization under conditions of limited energy resources. PMID:27170536

  16. Circadian adaptation to cell injury stresses: a crucial interplay of BMAL1 and HSF1.

    PubMed

    Tamaru, Teruya; Ikeda, Masaaki

    2016-07-01

    The circadian clock system confers daily anticipatory physiological processes with the ability to be reset by environmental cues. This "circadian adaptation system" (CAS), driven by cell-autonomous molecular clocks, orchestrates various rhythmic physiological processes in the entire body. Hence, the dysfunction of these clocks exacerbates various diseases, which may partially be due to the impairment of protective pathways. If this is the case, how does the CAS respond to cell injury stresses that are critical in maintaining health and life by evoking protective pathways? To address this question, here we review and discuss recent evidence revealing life-protective (pro-survival) molecular networks between clock (e.g., BMAL1, CLOCK, and PER2) and adaptation (e.g., HSF1, Nrf2, NF-κB, and p53) pathways, which are evoked by various cell injury stresses (e.g., heat, reactive oxygen species, and UV). The CK2 protein kinase-integrated interplay of the BMAL1 (clock) and HSF1 (heat-shock response) pathways is one of the crucial events in CAS. PMID:26910317

  17. Dynamical mechanism of Bmal 1 / Rev- erbα loop in circadian clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Liu, Zengrong

    2015-07-01

    In mammals, the circadian clock is driven by multiple integrated transcriptional feedback loops involving three kinds of central clock-controlled elements (CCEs): E-boxes, D-boxes and ROR-elements. With the aid of CCEs, the concentrations of the active proteins are approximated by the delayed concentrations of mRNAs, which simplifies the circadian system drastically. The regulatory loop composed by BMAL1 and REV-ERB- α plays important roles in circadian clock. With delay differential equations, we gave a mathematical model of this loop and investigated its dynamical mechanisms. Specially, we theoretically provided the sufficient conditions for sustained oscillation of the loop with Hopf bifurcation theory. The total of delays determines the emergence of oscillators, which explains the crucial roles of delays in circadian clock revealed by biological experiments. Numerically, we studied the amplitude and period against the variations of delays and the degradation rates. The different sensitivities of amplitude and period on these factors provide ideas to adjust the amplitude or period of circadian oscillators.

  18. Histone mono-ubiquitination by a Clock–Bmal1 complex marks Per1 and Per2 genes for circadian feedback

    PubMed Central

    Tamayo, Alfred G.; Duong, Hao A.; Robles, Maria S.; Mann, Matthias; Weitz, Charles J.

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in mammals are driven by a feedback loop in which the transcription factor Clock–Bmal1 activates expression of Per and Cry proteins, which together form a large nuclear complex (Per complex) that represses Clock–Bmal1 activity. We found that mouse Clock–Bmal1 recruits the Ddb1–Cullin-4 ubiquitin ligase to Per, Cry, and other circadian target genes. Histone 2B mono-ubiquitination at Per genes was rhythmic and depended on Bmal1, Ddb1, and Cullin-4a. Depletion of Ddb1–Cullin-4a or independent reduction of Histone 2B mono-ubiquitination caused defective circadian feedback and reduced the association of the Per complex with DNA-bound Clock–Bmal1. Clock–Bmal1 thus covalently marks Per genes for subsequent recruitment of the Per complex. Our results reveal a chromatin-mediated signal from the positive to the negative limb of the clock that provides a licensing mechanism for circadian feedback. PMID:26323038

  19. The harmala alkaloid harmine is a modulator of circadian Bmal1 transcription.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Yoshiaki; Oishi, Katsutaka; Kawano, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Yoshimitsu

    2012-02-01

    Biological rhythms are orchestrated by a cell-autonomous clock system that drives the rhythmic cascade of clock genes. We established an assay system using NIH 3T3 cells stably expressing the Bmal1 promoter-driven luciferase reporter gene and used it to analyse circadian oscillation of the gene. Modulators of PKC (protein kinase C) revealed that an activator and an inhibitor represented short- and long-period phenotypes respectively which were consistent with reported effects of PKC on the circadian clock and validated the assay system. We examined the effects of the alkaloid harmine, contained in Hoasca, which has a wide spectrum of pharmacological actions, on circadian rhythms using the validated assay system. Harmine dose dependently elongated the period. Furthermore, EMSA (electrophoretic mobility-shift assay) and Western-blot analysis showed that harmine enhanced the transactivating function of RORα (retinoid-related orphan receptor α), probably by increasing its nuclear translocation. Exogenous expression of RORα also caused a long period, confirming the phenotype indicated by harmine. These results suggest that harmine extends the circadian period by enhancing RORα function and that harmine is a new candidate that contributes to the control of period length in mammalian cells. PMID:21401525

  20. PI3K regulates BMAL1/CLOCK-mediated circadian transcription from the Dbp promoter.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Yoshikazu; Miura, Daiki; Kida, Satoshi

    2016-06-01

    The circadian rhythm generated by circadian clock underlies a molecular mechanism of rhythmic transcriptional regulation by transcription factor BMAL1/CLOCK. Importantly, the circadian clock is coordinated by exogenous cues to accommodate to changes in the external environment. However, the molecular mechanisms by which intracellular-signaling pathways mediate the adjustments of the circadian transcriptional rhythms remain unclear. In this study, we found that pharmacological inhibition or shRNA-mediated knockdown of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) blocked upregulation of Dbp mRNA induced by serum shock in NIH 3T3 cells. Moreover, the inhibition of PI3K significantly reduced the promoter activity of the Dbp gene, as well as decreased the recruitment of BMAL1/CLOCK to the E-box in the Dbp promoter. Interestingly, the inhibition of PI3K blocked heterodimerization of BMAL1 and CLOCK. Our findings suggest that PI3K signaling plays a modulatory role in the regulation of the transcriptional rhythm of the Dbp gene by targeting BMAL1 and CLOCK. PMID:27022680

  1. Smooth-muscle BMAL1 participates in blood pressure circadian rhythm regulation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhongwen; Su, Wen; Liu, Shu; Zhao, Guogang; Esser, Karyn; Schroder, Elizabeth A.; Lefta, Mellani; Stauss, Harald M.; Guo, Zhenheng; Gong, Ming Cui

    2014-01-01

    As the central pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) has long been considered the primary regulator of blood pressure circadian rhythm; however, this dogma has been challenged by the discovery that each of the clock genes present in the SCN is also expressed and functions in peripheral tissues. The involvement and contribution of these peripheral clock genes in the circadian rhythm of blood pressure remains uncertain. Here, we demonstrate that selective deletion of the circadian clock transcriptional activator aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator–like (Bmal1) from smooth muscle, but not from cardiomyocytes, compromised blood pressure circadian rhythm and decreased blood pressure without affecting SCN-controlled locomotor activity in murine models. In mesenteric arteries, BMAL1 bound to the promoter of and activated the transcription of Rho-kinase 2 (Rock2), and Bmal1 deletion abolished the time-of-day variations in response to agonist-induced vasoconstriction, myosin phosphorylation, and ROCK2 activation. Together, these data indicate that peripheral inputs contribute to the daily control of vasoconstriction and blood pressure and suggest that clock gene expression outside of the SCN should be further evaluated to elucidate pathogenic mechanisms of diseases involving blood pressure circadian rhythm disruption. PMID:25485682

  2. Smooth-muscle BMAL1 participates in blood pressure circadian rhythm regulation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhongwen; Su, Wen; Liu, Shu; Zhao, Guogang; Esser, Karyn; Schroder, Elizabeth A; Lefta, Mellani; Stauss, Harald M; Guo, Zhenheng; Gong, Ming Cui

    2015-01-01

    As the central pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) has long been considered the primary regulator of blood pressure circadian rhythm; however, this dogma has been challenged by the discovery that each of the clock genes present in the SCN is also expressed and functions in peripheral tissues. The involvement and contribution of these peripheral clock genes in the circadian rhythm of blood pressure remains uncertain. Here, we demonstrate that selective deletion of the circadian clock transcriptional activator aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like (Bmal1) from smooth muscle, but not from cardiomyocytes, compromised blood pressure circadian rhythm and decreased blood pressure without affecting SCN-controlled locomotor activity in murine models. In mesenteric arteries, BMAL1 bound to the promoter of and activated the transcription of Rho-kinase 2 (Rock2), and Bmal1 deletion abolished the time-of-day variations in response to agonist-induced vasoconstriction, myosin phosphorylation, and ROCK2 activation. Together, these data indicate that peripheral inputs contribute to the daily control of vasoconstriction and blood pressure and suggest that clock gene expression outside of the SCN should be further evaluated to elucidate pathogenic mechanisms of diseases involving blood pressure circadian rhythm disruption. PMID:25485682

  3. Bidirectional CLOCK/BMAL1-dependent circadian gene regulation by retinoic acid in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Shirai, Hidenori; Oishi, Katsutaka; Ishida, Norio . E-mail: n.ishida@aist.go.jp

    2006-12-15

    A central circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the mammalian hypothalamus entrains peripheral clocks through both neural and humoral factors. Although candidates for entrainment factors have been described, their details remain obscure. Here, we screened ligands for nuclear receptors that affect CLOCK/BMAL1-dependent transactivation of the mouse Period1 (mPer1) gene in NIH3T3 cells. We found that retinoic acids (RAs) significantly up-regulate mPer1 expression in an E-box-dependent manner. We also found that RAs up-regulate the expression of other E-box-dependent circadian genes such as mPer2, arginine vasopressin (mAVP), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (mPPAR{alpha}). Surprisingly, the effect of RAs on CLOCK/BMAL1 (E-box)-dependent mRNA expression was bidirectional and depended on the presence of exogenous retinoic acid receptor {alpha} (RAR{alpha}). These results suggest that RAs regulate the CLOCK/BMAL1-dependent transcription of circadian genes in a complex manner.

  4. DNA binding, but not interaction with Bmal1, is responsible for DEC1-mediated transcription regulation of the circadian gene mPer1

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    DEC1 (differentially expressed in chondrocytes 1) and DEC2 are E-box-binding transcription factors and exhibit a circadian expression pattern. Recently, both proteins were found to repress the Clock/Bmal1-activated E-box promoters (e.g. mPer1). Yeast two-hybrid assay detected interactions between Bmal1 and DECs. It was hypothesized that DEC-mediated repression on the mPer1 promoter is achieved by binding to E-box elements and interacting with Bmal1. In the present study, we report that E-box binding rather than Bmal1 interaction is responsible for the observed repression. In the absence of Clock/Bmal1, both DEC1 and DEC2 markedly repressed the mPer1 promoter reporter; however, DNA-binding mutants showed no repressive activity. Similarly, DEC1, but not its DNA-binding mutants, repressed the Clock/Bmal1-induced activation. In addition, DEC1R58P, a DNA-binding mutant with Bmal1 interactivity, repressed neither the mPer1 reporter directly nor the Clock/Bmal1-induced activation, providing direct evidence that DNA binding, rather than Bmal1 interactions, is responsible for the repression on the mPer1 promoter. Furthermore, disruption of the Sp1 site in the proximal promoter of mPer1 increased the repression of DEC1 proteins. Previous studies with mouse DEC2 showed that this factor interacts with Sp1. These findings suggest that DEC proteins regulate the expression of mPer1 through E-box binding and Sp1 interaction. Alterations on circadian systems are increasingly recognized as important risk factors for disease initiation and progression, and the expression of Dec genes is rapidly induced by environmental stimuli and is highly increased in tumour tissues. Therefore de-regulated expression of DEC genes probably alters normal circadian rhythms and contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of many diseases including cancer. PMID:15193144

  5. Differential effects of light and feeding on circadian organization of peripheral clocks in a forebrain Bmal1 mutant

    PubMed Central

    Izumo, Mariko; Pejchal, Martina; Schook, Andrew C; Lange, Ryan P; Walisser, Jacqueline A; Sato, Takashi R; Wang, Xiaozhong; Bradfield, Christopher A; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2014-01-01

    In order to assess the contribution of a central clock in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) to circadian behavior and the organization of peripheral clocks, we generated forebrain/SCN-specific Bmal1 knockout mice by using floxed Bmal1 and pan-neuronal Cre lines. The forebrain knockout mice showed >90% deletion of BMAL1 in the SCN and exhibited an immediate and complete loss of circadian behavior in constant conditions. Circadian rhythms in peripheral tissues persisted but became desynchronized and damped in constant darkness. The loss of synchrony was rescued by light/dark cycles and partially by restricted feeding (only in the liver and kidney but not in the other tissues) in a distinct manner. These results suggest that the forebrain/SCN is essential for internal temporal order of robust circadian programs in peripheral clocks, and that individual peripheral clocks are affected differently by light and feeding in the absence of a functional oscillator in the forebrain. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04617.001 PMID:25525750

  6. Modulation of learning and memory by the targeted deletion of the circadian clock gene Bmal1 in forebrain circuits.

    PubMed

    Snider, Kaitlin H; Dziema, Heather; Aten, Sydney; Loeser, Jacob; Norona, Frances E; Hoyt, Kari; Obrietan, Karl

    2016-07-15

    A large body of literature has shown that the disruption of circadian clock timing has profound effects on mood, memory and complex thinking. Central to this time keeping process is the master circadian pacemaker located within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Of note, within the central nervous system, clock timing is not exclusive to the SCN, but rather, ancillary oscillatory capacity has been detected in a wide range of cell types and brain regions, including forebrain circuits that underlie complex cognitive processes. These observations raise questions about the hierarchical and functional relationship between the SCN and forebrain oscillators, and, relatedly, about the underlying clock-gated synaptic circuitry that modulates cognition. Here, we utilized a clock knockout strategy in which the essential circadian timing gene Bmal1 was selectively deleted from excitatory forebrain neurons, whilst the SCN clock remained intact, to test the role of forebrain clock timing in learning, memory, anxiety, and behavioral despair. With this model system, we observed numerous effects on hippocampus-dependent measures of cognition. Mice lacking forebrain Bmal1 exhibited deficits in both acquisition and recall on the Barnes maze. Notably, loss of forebrain Bmal1 abrogated time-of-day dependent novel object location memory. However, the loss of Bmal1 did not alter performance on the elevated plus maze, open field assay, and tail suspension test, indicating that this phenotype specifically impairs cognition but not affect. Together, these data suggest that forebrain clock timing plays a critical role in shaping the efficiency of learning and memory retrieval over the circadian day. PMID:27091299

  7. The circadian clock gene Bmal1 acts as a potential anti-oncogene in pancreatic cancer by activating the p53 tumor suppressor pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weiliang; Zhao, Senlin; Jiang, Xiaohua; Zhang, Erquan; Hu, Guoyong; Hu, Bin; Zheng, Ping; Xiao, Junhua; Lu, Zhanjun; Lu, Yingying; Ni, Jianbo; Chen, Congying; Wang, Xingpeng; Yang, Lijuan; Wan, Rong

    2016-02-28

    Disruption of the circadian clock has been shown to be associated with tumor development. This study aimed to investigate the role of the core circadian gene Bmal1 in pancreatic cancer (PC). We first found that the levels of Bmal1 were downregulated in PC samples and were closely correlated with the clinicopathological features of patients. To dissect the underlying mechanism, we performed a RNA-seq assay followed by systematic gene function and pathway enrichment analyses. We detected an anti-apoptotic and pro-proliferative transcriptome profile after Bmal1 knockdown in PC cells. Further in vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that Bmal1 overexpression significantly inhibited cell proliferation and invasion and induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, whereas Bmal1 knockdown promoted PC growth, as demonstrated in Bmal1-manipulated AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cell lines. Our mechanistic studies indicated that Bmal1 could directly bind to the p53 gene promoter and thereby transcriptionally activate the downstream tumor suppressor pathway in a p53-dependent manner. In sum, our findings suggest that Bmal1 acts as an anti-oncogene in PC and represents a potential biomarker for its diagnosis. PMID:26683776

  8. Bmal1 and Beta cell clock are required for adaptation to circadian disruption, and their loss of function leads to oxidative stress-induced Beta cell failure in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Circadian disruption has deleterious effects on metabolism. Global deletion of Bmal1, a core clock gene, results in Beta cell dysfunction and diabetes. However, it is unknown if this is due to loss of cell-autonomous function of Bmal1 in Beta cells. To address this, we generated mice with Beta cell ...

  9. Methylation on the Circadian Gene BMAL1 Is Associated with the Effects of a Weight Loss Intervention on Serum Lipid Levels.

    PubMed

    Samblas, Mirian; Milagro, Fermin I; Gómez-Abellán, Purificación; Martínez, J Alfredo; Garaulet, Marta

    2016-06-01

    The circadian clock system has been linked to the onset and development of obesity and some accompanying comorbidities. Epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation, are putatively involved in the regulation of the circadian clock system. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of a weight loss intervention based on an energy-controlled Mediterranean dietary pattern in the methylation levels of 3 clock genes, BMAL1, CLOCK, and NR1D1, and the association between the methylation levels and changes induced in the serum lipid profile with the weight loss treatment. The study sample enrolled 61 women (body mass index = 28.6 ± 3.4 kg/m(2); age: 42.2 ± 11.4 years), who followed a nutritional program based on a Mediterranean dietary pattern. DNA was isolated from whole blood obtained at the beginning and end point. Methylation levels at different CpG sites of BMAL1, CLOCK, and NR1D1 were analyzed by Sequenom's MassArray. The energy-restricted intervention modified the methylation levels of different CpG sites in BMAL1 (CpGs 5, 6, 7, 9, 11, and 18) and NR1D1 (CpGs 1, 10, 17, 18, 19, and 22). Changes in cytosine methylation in the CpG 5 to 9 region of BMAL1 with the intervention positively correlated with the eveningness profile (p = 0.019). The baseline methylation of the CpG 5 to 9 region in BMAL1 positively correlated with energy (p = 0.047) and carbohydrate (p = 0.017) intake and negatively correlated with the effect of the weight loss intervention on total cholesterol (p = 0.032) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p = 0.005). Similar significant and positive correlations were found between changes in methylation levels in the CpG 5 to 9 region of BMAL1 due to the intervention and changes in serum lipids (p < 0.05). This research describes apparently for the first time an association between changes in the methylation of the BMAL1 gene with the intervention and the effects of a weight loss intervention on blood lipids levels. PMID:26873744

  10. Effects of BMAL1-SIRT1-positive cycle on estrogen synthesis in human ovarian granulosa cells: an implicative role of BMAL1 in PCOS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiaou; Liu, Jiansheng; Zhu, Kai; Hong, Yan; Sun, Yun; Zhao, Xiaoming; Du, Yanzhi; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2016-08-01

    Brain and muscle ARNT-like protein 1 (BMAL1) is necessary for fertility and has been found to be essential to follicle growth and steroidogenesis. Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) has been reported to interact with BMAL1 and function in a circadian manner. Evidence has shown that SIRT1 regulates aromatase expression in estrogen-producing cells. We aimed to ascertain if there is a relationship between polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and BMAL1, and whether and how BMAL1 takes part in estrogen synthesis in human granulosa cells (hGCs). Twenty-four women diagnosed with PCOS and 24 healthy individuals undergoing assisted reproduction were studied. BMAL1 expression in their granulosa cells (GCs) was observed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The level of expression in the PCOS group was lower than that of the group without PCOS (p < 0.05). We also analyzed estrogen synthesis and aromatase expression in KGN cell lines. Both were downregulated after BMAL1 and SIRT1 knock-down and, conversely, upregulated after overexpression treatments of these two genes in KGN cells. Both BMAL1 and SIRT1 had a mutually positive regulation, as did the phosphorylation of JNK. Furthermore, JNK overexpression increased estrogen synthesis activity and the expression levels of aromatase, BMAL1, and SIRT1. In KGN and hGCs, estrogen synthesis and aromatase expression were downregulated after treatment with JNK and SIRT1 inhibitors. In addition, BMAL1, SIRT1, and JNK expression levels were all downregulated. Our results demonstrate the effects of BMAL1 on estrogen synthesis in hGCs and suggest a BMAL1-SIRT1-JNK positive feedback cycle in this process, which points out an important role of BMAL1 in the development of PCOS. PMID:27117143

  11. Timing of expression of the core clock gene Bmal1 influences its effects on aging and survival

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guangrui; Chen, Lihong; Grant, Gregory R.; Paschos, Georgios; Song, Wen-Liang; Musiek, Erik S.; Lee, Vivian; McLoughlin, Sarah C.; Grosser, Tilo; Cotsarelis, George; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2016-01-01

    The absence of Bmal1, a core clock gene, results in a loss of circadian rhythms, an acceleration of aging, and a shortened life span in mice. To address the importance of circadian rhythms in the aging process, we generated conditional Bmal1 knockout mice that lacked the BMAL1 protein during adult life and found that wild-type circadian variations in wheel-running activity, heart rate, and blood pressure were abolished. Ocular abnormalities and brain astrogliosis were conserved irrespective of the timing of Bmal1 deletion. However, life span, fertility, body weight, blood glucose levels, and age-dependent arthropathy - which are altered in standard Bmal1 knockout mice - remained unaltered, while atherosclerosis and hair growth improved, in the conditional adult-life Bmal1 knockout mice, despite abolition of clock function. Hepatic RNA-Seq revealed that expression of oscillatory genes was dampened in the adult-life Bmal1 knockout mice, while overall gene expression was largely unchanged. Thus, many phenotypes in conventional Bmal1 knockout mice, hitherto attributed to disruption of circadian rhythms, reflect the loss of properties of BMAL1 that are independent of its role in the clock. These findings prompt re-evaluation of the systemic consequences of disruption of the molecular clock. PMID:26843191

  12. Generation of myometrium-specific Bmal1 knockout mice for parturition analysis.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, Christine K; Asada, Minoru; Allen, Gregg C; McMahon, Douglas G; Muglia, Lisa M; Smith, Donté; Bhattacharyya, Sandip; Muglia, Louis J

    2012-01-01

    Human and rodent studies indicate a role for circadian rhythmicity and associated clock gene expression in supporting normal parturition. The importance of clock gene expression in tissues besides the suprachiasmatic nucleus is emerging. Here, a Bmal1 conditional knockout mouse line and a novel Cre transgenic mouse line were used to examine the role of myometrial Bmal1 in parturition. Ninety-two percent (22/24) of control females but only 64% (14/22) of females with disrupted myometrial Bmal1 completed parturition during the expected time window of 5p.m. on Day 19 through to 9a.m. on Day 19.5 of gestation. However, neither serum progesterone levels nor uterine transcript expression of the contractile-associated proteins Connexin43 and Oxytocin receptor differed between females with disrupted myometrial Bmal1 and controls during late gestation. The data indicate a role for myometrial Bmal1 in maintaining normal time of day of parturition. PMID:22697126

  13. CLOCK and BMAL1 Regulate Muscle Insulin Sensitivity via SIRT1 in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Zhou, Ben; Yan, Menghong; Huang, Rui; Wang, Yuangao; He, Zhishui; Yang, Yonggang; Dai, Changgui; Wang, Yiqian; Zhang, Fang; Zhai, Qiwei

    2016-06-01

    Circadian misalignment induces insulin resistance in both human and animal models, and skeletal muscle is the largest organ response to insulin. However, how circadian clock regulates muscle insulin sensitivity and the underlying molecular mechanisms are still largely unknown. Here we show circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK) and brain and muscle aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like protein (BMAL)-1, two core circadian transcription factors, are down-regulated in insulin-resistant C2C12 myotubes and mouse skeletal muscle. Furthermore, insulin signaling is attenuated in the skeletal muscle of Clock(Δ19/Δ19) mice, and knockdown of CLOCK or BMAL1 by small interfering RNAs induces insulin resistance in C2C12 myotubes. Consistently, ectopic expression of CLOCK and BMAL1 improves insulin sensitivity in C2C12 myotubes. Moreover, CLOCK and BMAL1 regulate the expression of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), an important regulator of insulin sensitivity, in C2C12 myotubes and mouse skeletal muscle, and two E-box elements in Sirt1 promoter are responsible for its CLOCK- and BMAL1-dependent transcription in muscle cells. Further studies show that CLOCK and BMAL1 regulate muscle insulin sensitivity through SIRT1. In addition, we find that BMAL1 and SIRT1 are decreased in the muscle of mice maintained in constant darkness, and resveratrol supplementation activates SIRT1 and improves insulin sensitivity. All these data demonstrate that CLOCK and BMAL1 regulate muscle insulin sensitivity via SIRT1, and activation of SIRT1 might be a potential valuable strategy to attenuate muscle insulin resistance related to circadian misalignment. PMID:27035655

  14. Quantitative Analyses of Cryptochrome-mBMAL1 Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Czarna, Anna; Breitkreuz, Helena; Mahrenholz, Carsten C.; Arens, Julia; Strauss, Holger M.; Wolf, Eva

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian cryptochromes mCRY1 and mCRY2 act as transcriptional repressors within the 24-h transcription-translational feedback loop of the circadian clock. The C-terminal tail and a preceding predicted coiled coil (CC) of the mCRYs as well as the C-terminal region of the transcription factor mBMAL1 are involved in transcriptional feedback repression. Here we show by fluorescence polarization and isothermal titration calorimetry that purified mCRY1/2CCtail proteins form stable heterodimeric complexes with two C-terminal mBMAL1 fragments. The longer mBMAL1 fragment (BMAL490) includes Lys-537, which is rhythmically acetylated by mCLOCK in vivo. mCRY1 (but not mCRY2) has a lower affinity to BMAL490 than to the shorter mBMAL1 fragment (BMAL577) and a K537Q mutant version of BMAL490. Using peptide scan analysis we identify two mBMAL1 binding epitopes within the coiled coil and tail regions of mCRY1/2 and document the importance of positively charged mCRY1 residues for mBMAL1 binding. A synthetic mCRY coiled coil peptide binds equally well to the short and to the long (wild-type and K537Q mutant) mBMAL1 fragments. In contrast, a peptide including the mCRY1 tail epitope shows a lower affinity to BMAL490 compared with BMAL577 and BMAL490(K537Q). We propose that Lys-537mBMAL1 acetylation enhances mCRY1 binding by affecting electrostatic interactions predominantly with the mCRY1 tail. Our data reveal different molecular interactions of the mCRY1/2 tails with mBMAL1, which may contribute to the non-redundant clock functions of mCRY1 and mCRY2. Moreover, our study suggests the design of peptidic inhibitors targeting the interaction of the mCRY1 tail with mBMAL1. PMID:21521686

  15. The effect of new monochromatic light regimes on egg production and expression of the circadian gene BMAL1 in pigeons1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Ding, J T; Yang, H M; Cao, W; Li, Y B

    2015-05-01

    We examined the effect of monochromatic light supplementation on pigeon reproductive performance and on the expression of the brain and muscle aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like (BMAL1) protein in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. White King pigeons were selected randomly from 4 lofts (510 pairs/loft) with 3 subgroups/loft. The lofts were exposed to one of 4 light treatments for 3 months administered in the morning and evening as follows: blue light (480 nm), green light (540 nm), red light (660 nm), and control white light. The laying rate, fertility rate, and birth rate were recorded. After 3 months, 48 birds were selected randomly from the 4 lofts (6 females and 6 males from each loft), sacrificed, and the HPG axis was isolated. Following exposure to red light, laying rate was greater than the control group (P = 0.013), but there were no significant differences in the fertility rate (P = 0.41) or birth rate (P = 0.66). Expression of BMAL1 in the hypothalamus was unaffected by the light regime but was greater in the pituitary of females exposed to red light (P = 0.046) and in the pituitary of males exposed to the control white light (P = 0.059). The change in BMAL1 expression in the pituitary of females was negatively correlated with birth rate in monochromatic light (P = 0.021). We suggest that reproductive performance of pigeons is improved by light supplementation in the morning and evening. According to these data, 100 pigeons exposed to red light could lay 26.68 more eggs per month than the control group. Additionally, BMAL1 expression in the HPG axis of pigeons exposed to monochromatic light correlated with birth rate. PMID:25701204

  16. Clock Gene Bmal1 Modulates Human Cartilage Gene Expression by Crosstalk With Sirt1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Kang, Xiaomin; Liu, Jiali; Li, Huixia; Ma, Zhengmin; Jin, Xinxin; Qian, Zhuang; Xie, Tianping; Qin, Na; Feng, Dongxu; Pan, Wenjie; Chen, Qian; Sun, Hongzhi; Wu, Shufang

    2016-08-01

    The critical regulation of the peripheral circadian gene implicated in osteoarthritis (OA) has been recently recognized; however, the causative role and clinical potential of the peripheral circadian rhythm attributable to such effects remain elusive. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the role of a circadian gene Bmal1 in human cartilage and pathophysiology of osteoarthritis. In our present study, the mRNA and protein levels of circadian rhythm genes, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidase (NAD(+)) and sirtuin 1 (Sirt1), in human knee articular cartilage were determined. In OA cartilage, the levels of both Bmal1 and NAD(+) decreased significantly, which resulted in the inhibition of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase activity and Sirt1 expression. Furthermore, the knockdown of Bmal1 was sufficient to decrease the level of NAD(+) and aggravate OA-like gene expression changes under the stimulation of IL-1β. The overexpression of Bmal1 relieved the alteration induced by IL-1β, which was consistent with the effect of the inhibition of Rev-Erbα (known as NR1D1, nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group D). On the other hand, the transfection of Sirt1 small interfering RNA not only resulted in a reduction of the protein expression of Bmal1 and a moderate increase of period 2 (per2) and Rev-Erbα but also further exacerbated the survival of cells and the expression of cartilage matrix-degrading enzymes induced by IL-1β. Overexpression of Sirt1 restored the metabolic imbalance of chondrocytes caused by IL-1β. These observations suggest that Bmal1 is a key clock gene to involve in cartilage homeostasis mediated through sirt1 and that manipulating circadian rhythm gene expression implicates an innovative strategy to develop novel therapeutic agents against cartilage diseases. PMID:27253997

  17. Synergistic regulation of the mouse orphan nuclear receptor SHP gene promoter by CLOCK-BMAL1 and LRH-1

    SciTech Connect

    Oiwa, Ako; Kakizawa, Tomoko . E-mail: tkaki@hsp.md.shinshu-u.ac.jp; Miyamoto, Takahide; Yamashita, Koh; Jiang, Wei; Takeda, Teiji; Suzuki, Satoru; Hashizume, Kiyoshi

    2007-02-23

    Small heterodimer partner (SHP; NR0B2) is an orphan nuclear receptor and acts as a repressor for wide variety of nuclear hormone receptors. We demonstrated here that mouse SHP mRNA showed a circadian expression pattern in the liver. Transient transfection of the mSHP promoter demonstrated that CLOCK-BMAL1, core circadian clock components, bound to E-box (CACGTG), and stimulated the promoter activity by 4-fold. Liver receptor homologue-1 (LRH-1; NR5A2) stimulated the mSHP promoter, and CLOCK-BMAL1 synergistically enhanced the LRH-1-mediated transactivation. Interestingly, SHP did not affect the CLOCK-BMAL1-mediated promoter activity, but strongly repressed the synergistic activation of CLOCK-BMAL1 and LRH-1. Furthermore, in vitro pull-down assays revealed the existence of direct protein-protein interaction between LRH-1 and CLOCK. In summary, this study shows that CLOCK-BMAL1, LRH-1 and SHP coordinately regulate the mSHP gene to generate the circadian oscillation. The cyclic expression of mSHP may affect daily activity of other nuclear receptors and contribute to circadian liver functions.

  18. CLOCK-BMAL1 regulate the cardiac L-type calcium channel subunit CACNA1C through PI3K-Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanhong; Zhu, Didi; Yuan, Jiamin; Han, Zhonglin; Wang, Yao; Qian, Zhiyong; Hou, Xiaofeng; Wu, Tingting; Zou, Jiangang

    2016-09-01

    The heterodimerized transcription factors CLOCK-BMAL1 regulate the cardiomyocyte circadian rhythms. The L-type calcium currents play important role in the cardiac electrogenesis and arrhythmogenesis. Whether and how the CLOCK-BMAL1 regulate the cardiac L-type calcium channels are yet to be determined. The functions of the L-type calcium channels were evaluated with patch clamping techniques. Recombinant adenoviruses of CLOCK and BMAL1 were used in the expression experiments. We reported that the expressions and functions of CACNA1C (the α-subunit of the L-type calcium channels) showed circadian rhythms, with the peak at zeitgeber time 3 (ZT3). The endocardial action potential durations 90 (APD90) were correspondingly longer at ZT3. The protein levels of the phosphorylated Akt at threonine 308 (pAkt T308) also showed circadian rhythms. Overexpressions of CLOCK-BMAL1 significantly reduced the levels of CACNA1C while increasing the levels of pAkt T308 and pik3r1. Furthermore, the inhibitory effects of CLOCK-BMAL1 on CACNA1C could be abolished by the Akt inhibitor MK2206 or the PDK1 inhibitor GSK2334470. Collectively, our findings suggested that the expressions of the cardiac CACNA1C were under the CLOCK-BMAL1 regulation, probably through the PI3K-Akt signal pathway. PMID:27376484

  19. The Transcriptional Repressor ID2 Can Interact with the Canonical Clock Components CLOCK and BMAL1 and Mediate Inhibitory Effects on mPer1 Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Sarah M.; Fernando, Shanik J.; Hou, Tim Y.; Duffield, Giles E.

    2010-01-01

    ID2 is a rhythmically expressed HLH transcriptional repressor. Deletion of Id2 in mice results in circadian phenotypes, highlighted by disrupted locomotor activity rhythms and an enhanced photoentrainment response. ID2 can suppress the transactivation potential of the positive elements of the clock, CLOCK-BMAL1, on mPer1 and clock-controlled gene (CCG) activity. Misregulation of CCGs is observed in Id2−/− liver, and mutant mice exhibit associated alterations in lipid homeostasis. These data suggest that ID2 contributes to both input and output components of the clock and that this may be via interaction with the bHLH clock proteins CLOCK and BMAL1. The aim of the present study was to explore this potential interaction. Coimmunoprecipitation analysis revealed the capability of ID2 to complex with both CLOCK and BMAL1, and mammalian two-hybrid analysis revealed direct interactions of ID2, ID1 and ID3 with CLOCK and BMAL1. Deletion of the ID2 HLH domain rendered ID2 ineffective at inhibiting CLOCK-BMAL1 transactivation, suggesting that interaction between the proteins is via the HLH region. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed overlapping localization of ID2 with CLOCK and BMAL1 in the cytoplasm. Overexpression of CLOCK and BMAL1 in the presence of ID2 resulted in a significant reduction in their nuclear localization, revealing that ID2 can sequester CLOCK and BMAL1 to the cytoplasm. Serum stimulation of Id2−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts resulted in an enhanced induction of mPer1 expression. These data provide the basis for a molecular mechanism through which ID2 could regulate aspects of both clock input and output through a time-of-day specific interaction with CLOCK and BMAL1. PMID:20861012

  20. Rhythmic expression of miR-27b-3p targets the clock gene Bmal1 at the posttranscriptional level in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenxiang; Wang, Peng; Chen, Siyu; Zhang, Zhao; Liang, Tingming; Liu, Chang

    2016-06-01

    Circadian clocks orchestrate daily oscillations in mammalian behaviors, physiology, and gene expression. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a crucial role in fine-tuning of the circadian system. However, little is known about the direct regulation of the clock genes by specific miRNAs. In this study, we found that miR-27b-3p exhibits rhythmic expression in the metabolic tissues of the mice subjected to constant darkness. MiR-27b-3p's expression is induced in livers of unfed and ob/ob mice. In addition, the oscillation phases of miR-27b-3p can be reversed by restricted feeding, suggesting a role of peripheral clock in regulating its rhythmicity. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like (also known as Bmal1) may be a direct target of miR-27b-3p. Luciferase reporter assay showed that miR-27b-3p suppressed Bmal1 3' UTR activity in a dose-dependent manner, and mutagenesis of their binding site abolished this suppression. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-27b-3p dose-dependently reduced the protein expression levels of BMAL1 and impaired the endogenous BMAL1 and gluconeogenic protein rhythmicity. Collectively, our results suggest that miR-27b-3p plays an important role in the posttranscriptional regulation of BMAL1 protein in the liver. MiR-27b-3p may serve as a novel node to integrate the circadian clock and energy metabolism.-Zhang, W., Wang, P., Chen, S., Zhang, Z., Liang, T., Liu, C. Rhythmic expression of miR-27b-3p targets the clock gene Bmal1 at the posttranscriptional level in the mouse liver. PMID:26919869

  1. Dual attenuation of proteasomal and autophagic BMAL1 degradation in ClockΔ19/+ mice contributes to improved glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Kwon; He, Baokun; Nohara, Kazunari; Park, Noheon; Shin, Youngmin; Kim, Seonghwa; Shimomura, Kazuhiro; Koike, Nobuya; Yoo, Seung-Hee; Chen, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Circadian clocks orchestrate essential physiology in response to various cues, yet their mechanistic and functional plasticity remains unclear. Here, we investigated ClockΔ19/+ heterozygous (Clk/+) mice, known to display lengthened periodicity and dampened amplitude, as a model of partially perturbed clocks. Interestingly, Clk/+ mice exhibited improved glycemic control and resistance to circadian period lengthening under high-fat diet (HFD). Furthermore, BMAL1 protein levels in Clk/+ mouse liver were upregulated compared with wild-type (WT) mice under HFD. Pharmacological and molecular studies showed that BMAL1 turnover entailed proteasomal and autophagic activities, and CLOCKΔ19 attenuated both processes. Consistent with an important role of BMAL1 in glycemic control, enhanced activation of insulin signaling was observed in Clk/+ mice relative to WT in HFD. Finally, transcriptome analysis revealed reprogramming of clock-controlled metabolic genes in Clk/+ mice. Our results demonstrate a novel role of autophagy in circadian regulation and reveal an unforeseen plasticity of circadian and metabolic networks. PMID:26228022

  2. Impact of clock gene Bmal1 deficiency on nutritionally induced obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Hemmeryckx, Bianca; Himmelreich, Uwe; Hoylaerts, Marc F; Lijnen, Henri R

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate the hypothesis that the clock gene Bmal1 (brain and muscle arnt like protein-1) plays a role in the development of obesity, 5-week-old male Bmal1-deficient (Bmal1(-/-)) mice and wild-type littermates (Bmal1(+/+)) were kept on a high-fat diet (HFD) for 15 weeks. Despite an initial accelerated weight gain of Bmal1(-/-) mice, body weight and subcutaneous (SC) and gonadal (GON) adipose tissue mass were comparable to Bmal1(+/+) mice at the end of the diet period. Noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging scanning revealed a modest increase in fat content in Bmal1(-/-) mice after 10 weeks of HFD, whereas at the start and the end of the HFD feeding no differences were observed between both genotypes. After 15 weeks of HFD, adipocyte and blood vessel size and density were similar for Bmal1(+/+) and Bmal1(-/-) mice. However, the weight of major organs was significantly reduced in Bmal1(-/-) mice, confirming the premature ageing phenotype. Thus, we hypothesize that an initial accelerated increase in body weight and fat mass of Bmal1(-/-) mice on HFD may have been offset by the effect of premature ageing on organ weight, resulting in comparable weights after 15 weeks of HFD. PMID:21030946

  3. [Molecular oscillatory machinery of circadian rhythms].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshiaki; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2012-07-01

    Many metabolic and physiological processes display daily rhythms oscillated by the internal circadian clock system. This rhythm is generated by interlocked transcription-(post) translation feedback loops of clock genes: the core oscillatory loop, being composed of CLOCK/BMAL1 heterodimer activating the expressions of PER and CRY that directly repress CLOCK/BMAL1, is accompanied by accessory loops consisted with REV-ERB nuclear receptor repressing Bmal1 or with DBP competing with E4BP4 on D-box site. These clock proteins are regulated by phosphorylation and ubiquitination (PER/CRY), and acetylation (CLOCK/BMAL1). Recently, a deacetylating protein SIRT1 mediated metabolic pathway is discovered to be interlocked with core oscillatory loop via Nampt expression, a late-limiting enzyme in NAD+ salvage pathway. Since many key-step enzymes of metabolisms are regulated by the circadian clock, circadian clock system may intimately link to cellular metabolism. PMID:22844791

  4. Loss of BMAL1 in ovarian steroidogenic cells results in implantation failure in female mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Johnson, Brian P; Shen, Anna L; Wallisser, Jacqueline A; Krentz, Kathy J; Moran, Susan M; Sullivan, Ruth; Glover, Edward; Parlow, Albert F; Drinkwater, Norman R; Schuler, Linda A; Bradfield, Christopher A

    2014-09-30

    The circadian clock plays a significant role in many aspects of female reproductive biology, including estrous cycling, ovulation, embryonic implantation, onset of puberty, and parturition. In an effort to link cell-specific circadian clocks to their specific roles in female reproduction, we used the promoter that controls expression of Steroidogenic Factor-1 (SF1) to drive Cre-recombinase-mediated deletion of the brain muscle arnt-like 1 (Bmal1) gene, known to encode an essential component of the circadian clock (SF1-Bmal1(-/-)). The resultant SF1-Bmal1(-/-) females display embryonic implantation failure, which is rescued by progesterone supplementation, or bilateral or unilateral transplantation of wild-type ovaries into SF1-Bmal1(-/-) dams. The observation that the central clock, and many other peripheral clocks, are fully functional in this model allows the assignment of the implantation phenotype to the clock in ovarian steroidogenic cells and distinguishes it from more general circadian related systemic pathology (e.g., early onset arthropathy, premature aging, ovulation, late onset of puberty, and abnormal estrous cycle). Our ovarian transcriptome analysis reveals that deletion of ovarian Bmal1 disrupts expression of transcripts associated with the circadian machinery and also genes critical for regulation of progesterone production, such as steroidogenic acute regulatory factor (Star). Overall, these data provide a powerful model to probe the interlocking and synergistic network of the circadian clock and reproductive systems. PMID:25225411

  5. The chondrocyte clock gene Bmal1 controls cartilage homeostasis and integrity

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Michal; Gossan, Nicole; Yang, Nan; Im, Hee-Jeong; Ruckshanthi, Jayalath P.D.; Yoshitane, Hikari; Li, Xin; Jin, Ding; Wang, Ping; Boudiffa, Maya; Bellantuono, Ilaria; Fukada, Yoshitaka; Boot-Handford, Ray P.; Meng, Qing-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most prevalent and debilitating joint disease, and there are currently no effective disease-modifying treatments available. Multiple risk factors for OA, such as aging, result in progressive damage and loss of articular cartilage. Autonomous circadian clocks have been identified in mouse cartilage, and environmental disruption of circadian rhythms in mice predisposes animals to OA-like damage. However, the contribution of the cartilage clock mechanisms to the maintenance of tissue homeostasis is still unclear. Here, we have shown that expression of the core clock transcription factor BMAL1 is disrupted in human OA cartilage and in aged mouse cartilage. Furthermore, targeted Bmal1 ablation in mouse chondrocytes abolished their circadian rhythm and caused progressive degeneration of articular cartilage. We determined that BMAL1 directs the circadian expression of many genes implicated in cartilage homeostasis, including those involved in catabolic, anabolic, and apoptotic pathways. Loss of BMAL1 reduced the levels of phosphorylated SMAD2/3 (p-SMAD2/3) and NFATC2 and decreased expression of the major matrix-related genes Sox9, Acan, and Col2a1, but increased p-SMAD1/5 levels. Together, these results define a regulatory mechanism that links chondrocyte BMAL1 to the maintenance and repair of cartilage and suggest that circadian rhythm disruption is a risk factor for joint diseases such as OA. PMID:26657859

  6. The PXDLS linear motif regulates circadian rhythmicity through protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Shalev, Moran; Aviram, Rona; Adamovich, Yaarit; Kraut-Cohen, Judith; Shamia, Tal; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Golik, Marina; Asher, Gad

    2014-01-01

    The circadian core clock circuitry relies on interlocked transcription-translation feedback loops that largely count on multiple protein interactions. The molecular mechanisms implicated in the assembly of these protein complexes are relatively unknown. Our bioinformatics analysis of short linear motifs, implicated in protein interactions, reveals an enrichment of the Pro-X-Asp-Leu-Ser (PXDLS) motif within circadian transcripts. We show that the PXDLS motif can bind to BMAL1/CLOCK and disrupt circadian oscillations in a cell-autonomous manner. Remarkably, the motif is evolutionary conserved in the core clock protein REV-ERBα, and additional proteins implicated in the clock's function (NRIP1, CBP). In this conjuncture, we uncover a novel cross talk between the two principal core clock feedback loops and show that BMAL/CLOCK and REV-ERBα interact and that the PXDLS motif of REV-ERBα participates in their binding. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the PXDLS motifs of NRIP1 and CBP are involved in circadian rhythmicity. Our findings suggest that the PXDLS motif plays an important role in circadian rhythmicity through regulation of protein interactions within the clock circuitry and that short linear motifs can be employed to modulate circadian oscillations. PMID:25260595

  7. Cardiomyocyte-specific Bmal1 deletion in mice triggers diastolic dysfunction, extracellular matrix response, and impaired resolution of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ingle, Kevin A; Kain, Vasundhara; Goel, Mehak; Prabhu, Sumanth D; Young, Martin E; Halade, Ganesh V

    2015-12-01

    The mammalian circadian clock consists of multiple transcriptional regulators that coordinate biological processes in a time-of-day-dependent manner. Cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of the circadian clock component, Bmal1 (aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like protein 1), leads to age-dependent dilated cardiomyopathy and decreased lifespan in mice. We investigated whether cardiomyocyte-specific Bmal1 knockout (CBK) mice display early alterations in cardiac diastolic function, extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling, and inflammation modulators by investigating CBK mice and littermate controls at 8 and 28 wk of age (i.e., prior to overt systolic dysfunction). Left ventricles of CBK mice exhibited (P < 0.05): 1) progressive abnormal diastolic septal annular wall motion and reduced pulmonary venous flow only at 28 wk of age; 2) progressive worsening of fibrosis in the interstitial and endocardial regions from 8 to 28 wk of age; 3) increased (>1.5 fold) expression of collagen I and III, as well as the matrix metalloproteinases MMP-9, MMP-13, and MMP-14 at 28 wk of age; 4) increased transcript levels of neutrophil chemotaxis and leukocyte migration genes (Ccl2, Ccl8, Cxcl2, Cxcl1, Cxcr2, Il1β) with no change in Il-10 and Il-13 genes expression; and 5) decreased levels of 5-LOX, HO-1 and COX-2, enzymes indicating impaired resolution of inflammation. In conclusion, genetic disruption of the cardiomyocyte circadian clock results in diastolic dysfunction, adverse ECM remodeling, and proinflammatory gene expression profiles in the mouse heart, indicating signs of early cardiac aging in CBK mice. PMID:26432841

  8. Molecular components of the circadian clock in mammals.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, J S

    2015-09-01

    The circadian clock mechanism in animals involves a transcriptional feedback loop in which the bHLH-PAS proteins CLOCK and BMAL1 form a transcriptional activator complex to activate the transcription of the Period and Cryptochrome genes, which in turn feed back to repress their own transcription. In the mouse liver, CLOCK and BMAL1 interact with the regulatory regions of thousands of genes, which are both cyclically and constitutively expressed. The circadian transcription in the liver is clustered in phase and this is accompanied by circadian occupancy of RNA polymerase II recruitment and initiation. These changes also lead to circadian fluctuations in histone H3 lysine4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) as well as H3 lysine9 acetylation (H3K9ac) and H3 lysine27 acetylation (H3K27ac). Thus, the circadian clock regulates global transcriptional poise and chromatin state by regulation of RNA polymerase II. PMID:26332962

  9. Heterogeneous Expression of the Core Circadian Clock Proteins among Neuronal Cell Types in Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Zhijing; Ribelayga, Christophe P.

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in metabolism, physiology, and behavior originate from cell-autonomous circadian clocks located in many organs and structures throughout the body and that share a common molecular mechanism based on the clock genes and their protein products. In the mammalian neural retina, despite evidence supporting the presence of several circadian clocks regulating many facets of retinal physiology and function, the exact cellular location and genetic signature of the retinal clock cells remain largely unknown. Here we examined the expression of the core circadian clock proteins CLOCK, BMAL1, NPAS2, PERIOD 1(PER1), PERIOD 2 (PER2), and CRYPTOCHROME2 (CRY2) in identified neurons of the mouse retina during daily and circadian cycles. We found concurrent clock protein expression in most retinal neurons, including cone photoreceptors, dopaminergic amacrine cells, and melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive ganglion cells. Remarkably, diurnal and circadian rhythms of expression of all clock proteins were observed in the cones whereas only CRY2 expression was found to be rhythmic in the dopaminergic amacrine cells. Only a low level of expression of the clock proteins was detected in the rods at any time of the daily or circadian cycle. Our observations provide evidence that cones and not rods are cell-autonomous circadian clocks and reveal an important disparity in the expression of the core clock components among neuronal cell types. We propose that the overall temporal architecture of the mammalian retina does not result from the synchronous activity of pervasive identical clocks but rather reflects the cellular and regional heterogeneity in clock function within retinal tissue. PMID:23189207

  10. Lipoic acid entrains the hepatic circadian clock and lipid metabolic proteins that have been desynchronized with advanced age.

    PubMed

    Keith, Dove; Finlay, Liam; Butler, Judy; Gómez, Luis; Smith, Eric; Moreau, Régis; Hagen, Tory

    2014-07-18

    It is well established that lipid metabolism is controlled, in part, by circadian clocks. However, circadian clocks lose temporal precision with age and correlates with elevated incidence in dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome in older adults. Because our lab has shown that lipoic acid (LA) improves lipid homeostasis in aged animals, we hypothesized that LA affects the circadian clock to achieve these results. We fed 24 month old male F344 rats a diet supplemented with 0.2% (w/w) LA for 2 weeks prior to sacrifice and quantified hepatic circadian clock protein levels and clock-controlled lipid metabolic enzymes. LA treatment caused a significant phase-shift in the expression patterns of the circadian clock proteins Period (Per) 2, Brain and Muscle Arnt-Like1 (BMAL1), and Reverse Erythroblastosis virus (Rev-erb) β without altering the amplitude of protein levels during the light phase of the day. LA also significantly altered the oscillatory patterns of clock-controlled proteins associated with lipid metabolism. The level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α was significantly increased and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were both significantly reduced, suggesting that the LA-supplemented aged animals are in a catabolic state. We conclude that LA remediates some of the dyslipidemic processes associated with advanced age, and this mechanism may be at least partially through entrainment of circadian clocks. PMID:24944020

  11. Chronotype and stability of spontaneous locomotor activity rhythm in BMAL1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Martina; Korf, Horst-Werner; von Gall, Charlotte

    2015-02-01

    Behavior, physiological functions and cognitive performance change over the time of the day. These daily rhythms are either externally driven by rhythmic environmental cues such as the light/dark cycle (masking) or controlled by an internal circadian clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which can be entrained to the light/dark cycle. Within a given species, there is genetically determined variability in the temporal preference for the onset of the active phase, the chronotype. The chronotype is the phase of entrainment between external and internal time and is largely regulated by the circadian clock. Genetic variations in clock genes and environmental influences contribute to the distribution of chronotypes in a given population. However, little is known about the determination of the chronotype, the stability of the locomotor rhythm and the re-synchronization capacity to jet lag in an animal without a functional endogenous clock. Therefore, we analyzed the chronotype of BMAL1-deficient mice (BMAL1-/-) as well as the effects of repeated experimental jet lag on locomotor activity rhythms. Moreover, light-induced period expression in the retina was analyzed to assess the responsiveness of the circadian light input system. In contrast to wild-type mice, BMAL1-/- showed a significantly later chronotype, adapted more rapidly to both phase advance and delay but showed reduced robustness of rhythmic locomotor activity after repeated phase shifts. However, photic induction of Period in the retina was not different between the two genotypes. Our findings suggest that a disturbed clockwork is associated with a late chronotype, reduced rhythm stability and higher vulnerability to repeated external desynchronization. PMID:25216070

  12. Facilitated physiological adaptation to prolonged circadian disruption through dietary supplementation with essence of chicken.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Yao, Cencen; Tsang, Fai; Huang, Liangfeng; Zhang, Wanjing; Jiang, Jianguo; Mao, Youxiang; Shao, Yujian; Kong, Boda; Singh, Paramjeet; Fu, Zhengwei

    2015-01-01

    Synchrony between circadian and metabolic processes is critical to the maintenance of energy homeostasis. Studies on essence of chicken (EC), a chicken meat extract rich in proteins, amino acids and peptides, showed its effectiveness in alleviating fatigue and promoting metabolism. A recent study revealed that it facilitated the re-entrainment of clock genes (Bmal1, Cry1, Dec1, Per1 and Per2) in the pineal gland and liver in a rat model of circadian disruption. Here, we investigated the role of EC-facilitated circadian synchrony in the maintenance of the energy homeostasis using a mouse model of prolonged circadian disruption. Prolonged circadian disruption (12 weeks) resulted in hepatic maladaptation, manifested by a mild but significant (p < 0.05) hepatomegaly, accompanied by disturbed hepatic lipid metabolism and liver injury (indicated by increased circulating hepatic enzymes). Evidently, there was marked elevations of hepatic inflammatory mediators (interleukin-1beta and interleukin-6), suggesting an underlying inflammation leading to the hepatic injury and functional impairment. Importantly, the disruption paradigm caused the decoupling between key metabolic regulators (e.g. mTOR and AMPK) and hepatic clock genes (Per1, Cry1, Dec1, Bmal1). Further, we showed that the loss of circadian synchrony between the master and hepatic clock genes (Per1, Cry1, Dec1, Bmal1) could be the underlying cause of the maladaptation. When supplemented with EC, the functional impairment and inflammation were abolished. The protective effects could be linked to its effectiveness in maintaining the synchrony between the master and hepatic clocks, and the resultant improved coupling of the circadian oscillators (Per1, Cry1, Dec1, Bmal1) and metabolic regulators (mTOR, AMPK). Overall, EC supplementation promoted the physiological adaptation to the prolonged circadian disruption through facilitation of endogenous circadian synchrony and the coupling of circadian oscillators and

  13. Emerging Models for the Molecular Basis of Mammalian Circadian Timing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian circadian timekeeping arises from a transcription-based feedback loop driven by a set of dedicated clock proteins. At its core, the heterodimeric transcription factor CLOCK:BMAL1 activates expression of Period, Cryptochrome, and Rev-Erb genes, which feed back to repress transcription and create oscillations in gene expression that confer circadian timing cues to cellular processes. The formation of different clock protein complexes throughout this transcriptional cycle helps to establish the intrinsic ∼24 h periodicity of the clock; however, current models of circadian timekeeping lack the explanatory power to fully describe this process. Recent studies confirm the presence of at least three distinct regulatory complexes: a transcriptionally active state comprising the CLOCK:BMAL1 heterodimer with its coactivator CBP/p300, an early repressive state containing PER:CRY complexes, and a late repressive state marked by a poised but inactive, DNA-bound CLOCK:BMAL1:CRY1 complex. In this review, we analyze high-resolution structures of core circadian transcriptional regulators and integrate biochemical data to suggest how remodeling of clock protein complexes may be achieved throughout the 24 h cycle. Defining these detailed mechanisms will provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis of circadian timing and help to establish new platforms for the discovery of therapeutics to manipulate the clock. PMID:25303119

  14. Genomic Convergence among ERRα, PROX1, and BMAL1 in the Control of Metabolic Clock Outputs

    PubMed Central

    Dufour, Catherine R.; Levasseur, Marie-Pier; Pham, Nguyen Hoai Huong; Eichner, Lillian J.; Wilson, Brian J.; Charest-Marcotte, Alexis; Duguay, David; Poirier-Héon, Jean-François; Cermakian, Nicolas; Giguère, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis and circadian rhythms are closely intertwined biological processes. Nuclear receptors, as sensors of hormonal and nutrient status, are actively implicated in maintaining this physiological relationship. Although the orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα, NR3B1) plays a central role in the control of energy metabolism and its expression is known to be cyclic in the liver, its role in temporal control of metabolic networks is unknown. Here we report that ERRα directly regulates all major components of the molecular clock. ERRα-null mice also display deregulated locomotor activity rhythms and circadian period lengths under free-running conditions, as well as altered circulating diurnal bile acid and lipid profiles. In addition, the ERRα-null mice exhibit time-dependent hypoglycemia and hypoinsulinemia, suggesting a role for ERRα in modulating insulin sensitivity and glucose handling during the 24-hour light/dark cycle. We also provide evidence that the newly identified ERRα corepressor PROX1 is implicated in rhythmic control of metabolic outputs. To help uncover the molecular basis of these phenotypes, we performed genome-wide location analyses of binding events by ERRα, PROX1, and BMAL1, an integral component of the molecular clock. These studies revealed the existence of transcriptional regulatory loops among ERRα, PROX1, and BMAL1, as well as extensive overlaps in their target genes, implicating these three factors in the control of clock and metabolic gene networks in the liver. Genomic convergence of ERRα, PROX1, and BMAL1 transcriptional activity thus identified a novel node in the molecular circuitry controlling the daily timing of metabolic processes. PMID:21731503

  15. Lipoic acid entrains the hepatic circadian clock and lipid metabolic proteins that have been desynchronized with advanced age

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, Dove; Finlay, Liam; Butler, Judy; Gómez, Luis; Smith, Eric; Moreau, Régis; Hagen, Tory

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • 24 month old rats were supplemented with 0.2% lipoic acid in the diet for 2 weeks. • Lipoic acid shifts phase of core circadian clock proteins. • Lipoic acid corrects age-induced desynchronized lipid metabolism rhythms. - Abstract: It is well established that lipid metabolism is controlled, in part, by circadian clocks. However, circadian clocks lose temporal precision with age and correlates with elevated incidence in dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome in older adults. Because our lab has shown that lipoic acid (LA) improves lipid homeostasis in aged animals, we hypothesized that LA affects the circadian clock to achieve these results. We fed 24 month old male F344 rats a diet supplemented with 0.2% (w/w) LA for 2 weeks prior to sacrifice and quantified hepatic circadian clock protein levels and clock-controlled lipid metabolic enzymes. LA treatment caused a significant phase-shift in the expression patterns of the circadian clock proteins Period (Per) 2, Brain and Muscle Arnt-Like1 (BMAL1), and Reverse Erythroblastosis virus (Rev-erb) β without altering the amplitude of protein levels during the light phase of the day. LA also significantly altered the oscillatory patterns of clock-controlled proteins associated with lipid metabolism. The level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α was significantly increased and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were both significantly reduced, suggesting that the LA-supplemented aged animals are in a catabolic state. We conclude that LA remediates some of the dyslipidemic processes associated with advanced age, and this mechanism may be at least partially through entrainment of circadian clocks.

  16. Glucocorticoid-mediated Period2 induction delays the phase of circadian rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Solmi; Park, Noheon; Cho, Sehyung; Kim, Kyungjin

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) signaling synchronizes the circadian rhythm of individual peripheral cells and induces the expression of circadian genes, including Period1 (Per1) and Period2 (Per2). However, no GC response element (GRE) has been reported in the Per2 promoter region. Here we report the molecular mechanisms of Per2 induction by GC signaling and its relevance to the regulation of circadian timing. We found that GC prominently induced Per2 expression and delayed the circadian phase. The overlapping GRE and E-box (GE2) region in the proximal Per2 promoter was responsible for GC-mediated Per2 induction. The GRE in the Per2 promoter was unique in that brain and muscle ARNT-like protein-1 (BMAL1) was essential for GC-induced Per2 expression, whereas other GRE-containing promoters, such as Per1 and mouse mammary tumor virus, responded to dexamethasone in the absence of BMAL1. This specialized regulatory mechanism was mediated by BMAL1-dependent binding of the GC receptor to GRE in Per2 promoter. When Per2 induction was abrogated by the mutation of the GRE or E-box, the circadian oscillation phase failed to be delayed compared with that of the wild-type. Therefore, the current study demonstrates that the rapid Per2 induction mediated by GC is crucial for delaying the circadian rhythm. PMID:23620290

  17. Differential maturation of circadian rhythms in clock gene proteins in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the pars tuberalis during mouse ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Nariman; Agathagelidis, Manuel; Lee, Choogon; Korf, Horst-Werner; von Gall, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    Circadian rhythms of many body functions in mammals are controlled by a master pacemaker residing in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) that synchronises peripheral oscillators. The SCN and peripheral oscillators share several components of the molecular clockwork and comprise transcriptional activators (BMAL1 and CLOCK/NPAS2) and inhibitors (mPER1/2 and mCRY1/2). Here we compared the ontogenetic maturation of the clockwork in the SCN and pars tuberalis (PT). The PT is a peripheral oscillator that strongly depends on rhythmic melatonin signals. Immunoreactions for clock gene proteins were determined in the SCN and PT at four different timepoints during four differential stages of mouse ontogeny: foetal (embryonic day 18), newborn (2-day-old), infantile (10-day-old), and adult. In the foetal SCN levels of immunoreactions of all clock proteins were significantly lower as compared to adult levels except for BMAL1. In the newborn SCN the clock protein immunoreactions had not yet reached adult levels, but the infantile SCN showed similar levels of immunreactions as the adult. In contrast, immunoreactions for all clock gene proteins in the foetal PT were as intense as in newborn, infantile, and adult and showed the same phase. As the foetal pineal gland is not yet capable of rhythmic melatonin production, the rhythms in clock gene proteins in the foetal PT are presumably dependent on the maternal melatonin signal. Thus, our data provide the first evidence that maternal melatonin is important for establishing and maintaining circadian rhythms in a foetal peripheral oscillator. PMID:19222558

  18. Differential maturation of circadian rhythms in clock gene proteins in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the pars tuberalis during mouse ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Nariman; Agathagelidis, Manuel; Lee, Choogon; Korf, Horst-Werner; von Gall, Charlotte

    2009-02-01

    Circadian rhythms of many body functions in mammals are controlled by a master pacemaker, residing in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which synchronises peripheral oscillators. The SCN and peripheral oscillators share several components of the molecular clockwork and comprise transcriptional activators (BMAL1 and CLOCK/NPAS2) and inhibitors (mPER1/2 and mCRY1/2). Here we compared the ontogenetic maturation of the clockwork in the SCN and pars tuberalis (PT). The PT is a peripheral oscillator that strongly depends on rhythmic melatonin signals. Immunoreactions for clock gene proteins were determined in the SCN and PT at four different timepoints during four differential stages of mouse ontogeny: foetal (embryonic day 18), newborn (2-day-old), infantile (10-day-old), and adult. In the foetal SCN, levels of immunoreactions of all clock proteins were significantly lower than adult levels except for BMAL1. In the newborn SCN the clock protein immunoreactions had not yet reached adult levels, but the infantile SCN showed similar levels of immunoreactions as the adult. In contrast, immunoreactions for all clock gene proteins in the foetal PT were as intense as in newborn, infantile and adult, and showed the same phase. As the foetal pineal gland is not yet capable of rhythmic melatonin production, the rhythms in clock gene proteins in the foetal PT are presumably dependent on the maternal melatonin signal. Thus, our data provide the first evidence that maternal melatonin is important for establishing and maintaining circadian rhythms in a foetal peripheral oscillator. PMID:19222558

  19. Circadian Clock Regulates Bone Resorption in Mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Cheng; Ochi, Hiroki; Fukuda, Toru; Sato, Shingo; Sunamura, Satoko; Takarada, Takeshi; Hinoi, Eiichi; Okawa, Atsushi; Takeda, Shu

    2016-07-01

    The circadian clock controls many behavioral and physiological processes beyond daily rhythms. Circadian dysfunction increases the risk of cancer, obesity, and cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Although clinical studies have shown that bone resorption is controlled by circadian rhythm, as indicated by diurnal variations in bone resorption, the molecular mechanism of circadian clock-dependent bone resorption remains unknown. To clarify the role of circadian rhythm in bone resorption, aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like (Bmal1), a prototype circadian gene, was knocked out specifically in osteoclasts. Osteoclast-specific Bmal1-knockout mice showed a high bone mass phenotype due to reduced osteoclast differentiation. A cell-based assay revealed that BMAL1 upregulated nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (Nfatc1) transcription through its binding to an E-box element located on the Nfatc1 promoter in cooperation with circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK), a heterodimer partner of BMAL1. Moreover, steroid receptor coactivator (SRC) family members were shown to interact with and upregulate BMAL1:CLOCK transcriptional activity. Collectively, these data suggest that bone resorption is controlled by osteoclastic BMAL1 through interactions with the SRC family and binding to the Nfatc1 promoter. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26841172

  20. SRC-2 is an essential coactivator for orchastrating metabolism and circadian rhythm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synchrony of the mammalian circadian clock is achieved by complex transcriptional and translational feedback loops centered on the BMAL1:CLOCK heterodimer. Modulation of circadian feedback loops is essential for maintaining rhythmicity, yet the role of transcriptional coactivators in driving BMAL1:C...

  1. The Zebrafish Period2 Protein Positively Regulates the Circadian Clock through Mediation of Retinoic Acid Receptor (RAR)-related Orphan Receptor α (Rorα)*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingyong; Zhong, Zhaomin; Zhong, Yingbin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Han

    2015-01-01

    We report the characterization of a null mutant for zebrafish circadian clock gene period2 (per2) generated by transcription activator-like effector nuclease and a positive role of PER2 in vertebrate circadian regulation. Locomotor experiments showed that per2 mutant zebrafish display reduced activities under light-dark and 2-h phase delay under constant darkness, and quantitative real time PCR analyses showed up-regulation of cry1aa, cry1ba, cry1bb, and aanat2 but down-regulation of per1b, per3, and bmal1b in per2 mutant zebrafish, suggesting that Per2 is essential for the zebrafish circadian clock. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that Per2 represses aanat2 expression through E-box and enhances bmal1b expression through the Ror/Rev-erb response element, implicating that Per2 plays dual roles in the zebrafish circadian clock. Cell transfection and co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed that Per2 enhances bmal1b expression through binding to orphan nuclear receptor Rorα. The enhancing effect of mouse PER2 on Bmal1 transcription is also mediated by RORα even though it binds to REV-ERBα. Moreover, zebrafish Per2 also appears to have tissue-specific regulatory roles in numerous peripheral organs. These findings help define the essential functions of Per2 in the zebrafish circadian clock and in particular provide strong evidence for a positive role of PER2 in the vertebrate circadian system. PMID:25544291

  2. A baculovirus photolyase with DNA repair activity and circadian clock regulatory function.

    PubMed

    Biernat, Magdalena A; Eker, André P M; van Oers, Monique M; Vlak, Just M; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J; Chaves, Inês

    2012-02-01

    Cryptochromes and photolyases belong to the same family of flavoproteins but, despite being structurally conserved, display distinct functions. Photolyases use visible light to repair ultraviolet-induced DNA damage. Cryptochromes, however, function as blue-light receptors, circadian photoreceptors, or repressors of the CLOCK/BMAL1 heterodimer, the transcription activator controlling the molecular circadian clock. Here, we present evidence that the functional divergence between cryptochromes and photolyases is not so univocal. Chrysodeixis chalcites nucleopolyhedrovirus possesses 2 photolyase-like genes: phr1 and phr2. We show that PHR1 and PHR2 are able to bind the CLOCK protein. Only for PHR2, however, the physical interaction with CLOCK represses CLOCK/BMAL1-driven transcription. This result shows that binding of photolyase per se is not sufficient to inhibit the CLOCK/BMAL1 heterodimer. PHR2, furthermore, affects the oscillation of immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts, suggesting that PHR2 can regulate the molecular circadian clock. These findings are relevant for further understanding the evolution of cryptochromes and photolyases as well as behavioral changes induced in insects by baculoviruses. PMID:22306969

  3. The De-Ubiquitinylating Enzyme, USP2, Is Associated with the Circadian Clockwork and Regulates Its Sensitivity to Light

    PubMed Central

    Scoma, Heather Dehlin; Humby, Monica; Yadav, Geetha; Zhang, Qingjiong; Fogerty, Joseph; Besharse, Joseph C.

    2011-01-01

    We have identified a novel component of the circadian clock that regulates its sensitivity to light at the evening light to dark transition. USP2 (Ubiquitin Specific Protease 2), which de-ubiquitinylates and stabilizes target proteins, is rhythmically expressed in multiple tissues including the SCN. We have developed a knockout model of USP2 and found that exposure to low irradiance light at ZT12 increases phase delays of USP2−/− mice compared to wildtype. We additionally show that USP2b is in a complex with several clock components and regulates the stability and turnover of BMAL1, which in turn alters the expression of several CLOCK/BMAL1 controlled genes. Rhythmic expression of USP2 in the SCN and other tissues offers a new level of control of the clock machinery through de-ubiqutinylation and suggests a role for USP2 during circadian adaptation to environmental day length changes. PMID:21966515

  4. Astakine 2--the dark knight linking melatonin to circadian regulation in crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Watthanasurorot, Apiruck; Saelee, Netnapa; Phongdara, Amornrat; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Jiravanichpaisal, Pikul; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Söderhäll, Irene

    2013-03-01

    Daily, circadian rhythms influence essentially all living organisms and affect many physiological processes from sleep and nutrition to immunity. This ability to respond to environmental daily rhythms has been conserved along evolution, and it is found among species from bacteria to mammals. The hematopoietic process of the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus is under circadian control and is tightly regulated by astakines, a new family of cytokines sharing a prokineticin (PROK) domain. The expression of AST1 and AST2 are light-dependent, and this suggests an evolutionarily conserved function for PROK domain proteins in mediating circadian rhythms. Vertebrate PROKs are transmitters of circadian rhythms of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the brain of mammals, but the mechanism by which they function is unknown. Here we demonstrate that high AST2 expression is induced by melatonin in the brain. We identify RACK1 as a binding protein of AST2 and further provide evidence that a complex between AST2 and RACK1 functions as a negative-feedback regulator of the circadian clock. By DNA mobility shift assay, we showed that the AST2-RACK1 complex will interfere with the binding between BMAL1 and CLK and inhibit the E-box binding activity of the complex BMAL1-CLK. Finally, we demonstrate by gene knockdown that AST2 is necessary for melatonin-induced inhibition of the complex formation between BMAL1 and CLK during the dark period. In summary, we provide evidence that melatonin regulates AST2 expression and thereby affects the core clock of the crustacean brain. This process may be very important in all animals that have AST2 molecules, i.e. spiders, ticks, crustaceans, scorpions, several insect groups such as Hymenoptera, Hemiptera, and Blattodea, but not Diptera and Coleoptera. Our findings further reveal an ancient evolutionary role for the prokineticin superfamily protein that links melatonin to direct regulation of the core clock gene feedback loops. PMID:23555281

  5. Circadian Rhythmicity of Active GSK3 Isoforms Modulates Molecular Clock Gene Rhythms in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Besing, R.C.; Paul, J.R.; Hablitz, L.M.; Rogers, C.O.; Johnson, R.L.; Young, M.E.; Gamble, K.L.

    2015-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) drives and synchronizes daily rhythms at the cellular level via transcriptional-translational feedback loops comprised of clock genes such as Bmal1 and Period (Per). Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), a serine/threonine kinase, phosphorylates at least five core clock proteins and shows diurnal variation in phosphorylation state (inactivation) of the GSK3β isoform. Whether phosphorylation of the other primary isoform (GSK3α) varies across the subjective day-night cycle is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if the endogenous rhythm of GSK3 (α and β) phosphorylation is critical for rhythmic BMAL1 expression and normal amplitude and periodicity of the molecular clock in the SCN. Significant circadian rhythmicity of phosphorylated GSK3 (α and β) was observed in the SCN from wild-type mice housed in constant darkness for two weeks. Importantly, chronic activation of both GSK3 isoforms impaired rhythmicity of the GSK3 target BMAL1. Furthermore, chronic pharmacological inhibition of GSK3 with 20 μM CHIR-99021 enhanced the amplitude and shortened the period of PER2::luciferase rhythms in organotypic SCN slice cultures. These results support the model that GSK3 activity status is regulated by the circadian clock and that GSK3 feeds back to regulate the molecular clock amplitude in the SCN. PMID:25724980

  6. Evidence for a Circadian Effect on the Reduction of Human Growth Hormone Gene Expression in Response to Excess Caloric Intake.

    PubMed

    Vakili, Hana; Jin, Yan; Cattini, Peter A

    2016-06-24

    Rhythmicity of biological functions is fundamental for optimal adaptations to environmental cues. Growth hormone (GH) is a major metabolic homeostatic factor that is secreted with a circadian pattern, but whether it is synthesized rhythmically is unknown. We used transgenic mice containing the human (h) GH gene (hGH1) locus to investigate the rhythmicity of hGH synthesis and secretion and to show that RNA and secreted protein levels oscillate over a 24-h cycle. Analysis of hGH1 promoter sequences revealed an enhancer motif (E-box) element that binds the circadian transcriptional machinery (Bmal1 and Clock). Furthermore, Bmal1/Clock were able to transactivate the hGH1 promoter, and mutation of this E-box element adversely affected basal activity after gene transfer. The ability of Bmal1 to bind the hGH1 promoter region containing the E-box element was confirmed in the hGH1 transgenic mouse pituitary in situ Occupancy was reduced in mice fed a high fat diet during the light (inactive) stage of the daily cycle in mice and corresponded to a decrease in hGH1 RNA levels. The decreases in occupancy and RNA levels were not seen, however, during the dark (active) stage. A chromatin loop required for efficient postnatal hGH1 expression was negatively affected by the high fat diet in the light but not dark stage similar to the pattern observed with Bmal1 association with the promoter region. This is the first evidence that hGH synthesis follows a diurnal rhythm and of dynamic associations of the circadian machinery with a component of a chromosomal structure of the hGH1 locus that is essential for efficient expression. PMID:27151213

  7. Sleep Loss Reduces the DNA-Binding of BMAL1, CLOCK, and NPAS2 to Specific Clock Genes in the Mouse Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Curie, Thomas; Franken, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that clock genes contribute to the homeostatic aspect of sleep regulation. Indeed, mutations in some clock genes modify the markers of sleep homeostasis and an increase in homeostatic sleep drive alters clock gene expression in the forebrain. Here, we investigate a possible mechanism by which sleep deprivation (SD) could alter clock gene expression by quantifying DNA-binding of the core-clock transcription factors CLOCK, NPAS2, and BMAL1 to the cis-regulatory sequences of target clock genes in mice. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we first showed that, as reported for the liver, DNA-binding of CLOCK and BMAL1 to target clock genes changes in function of time-of-day in the cerebral cortex. Tissue extracts were collected at ZT0 (light onset), −6, −12, and −18, and DNA enrichment of E-box or E'-box containing sequences was measured by qPCR. CLOCK and BMAL1 binding to Cry1, Dbp, Per1, and Per2 depended on time-of-day, with maximum values reached at around ZT6. We then observed that SD, performed between ZT0 and −6, significantly decreased DNA-binding of CLOCK and BMAL1 to Dbp, consistent with the observed decrease in Dbp mRNA levels after SD. The DNA-binding of NPAS2 and BMAL1 to Per2 was also decreased by SD, although SD is known to increase Per2 expression in the cortex. DNA-binding to Per1 and Cry1 was not affected by SD. Our results show that the sleep-wake history can affect the clock molecular machinery directly at the level of chromatin binding thereby altering the cortical expression of Dbp and Per2 and likely other targets. Although the precise dynamics of the relationship between DNA-binding and mRNA expression, especially for Per2, remains elusive, the results also suggest that part of the reported circadian changes in DNA-binding of core clock components in tissues peripheral to the suprachiasmatic nuclei could, in fact, be sleep-wake driven. PMID:22039518

  8. Sleep loss reduces the DNA-binding of BMAL1, CLOCK, and NPAS2 to specific clock genes in the mouse cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Mongrain, Valérie; La Spada, Francesco; Curie, Thomas; Franken, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that clock genes contribute to the homeostatic aspect of sleep regulation. Indeed, mutations in some clock genes modify the markers of sleep homeostasis and an increase in homeostatic sleep drive alters clock gene expression in the forebrain. Here, we investigate a possible mechanism by which sleep deprivation (SD) could alter clock gene expression by quantifying DNA-binding of the core-clock transcription factors CLOCK, NPAS2, and BMAL1 to the cis-regulatory sequences of target clock genes in mice. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we first showed that, as reported for the liver, DNA-binding of CLOCK and BMAL1 to target clock genes changes in function of time-of-day in the cerebral cortex. Tissue extracts were collected at ZT0 (light onset), -6, -12, and -18, and DNA enrichment of E-box or E'-box containing sequences was measured by qPCR. CLOCK and BMAL1 binding to Cry1, Dbp, Per1, and Per2 depended on time-of-day, with maximum values reached at around ZT6. We then observed that SD, performed between ZT0 and -6, significantly decreased DNA-binding of CLOCK and BMAL1 to Dbp, consistent with the observed decrease in Dbp mRNA levels after SD. The DNA-binding of NPAS2 and BMAL1 to Per2 was also decreased by SD, although SD is known to increase Per2 expression in the cortex. DNA-binding to Per1 and Cry1 was not affected by SD. Our results show that the sleep-wake history can affect the clock molecular machinery directly at the level of chromatin binding thereby altering the cortical expression of Dbp and Per2 and likely other targets. Although the precise dynamics of the relationship between DNA-binding and mRNA expression, especially for Per2, remains elusive, the results also suggest that part of the reported circadian changes in DNA-binding of core clock components in tissues peripheral to the suprachiasmatic nuclei could, in fact, be sleep-wake driven. PMID:22039518

  9. Mop3 Is an Essential Component of the Master Circadian Pacemaker in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Bunger, Maureen K.; Wilsbacher, Lisa D.; Moran, Susan M.; Clendenin, Cynthia; Radcliffe, Laurel A.; Hogenesch, John B.; Simon, M. Celeste; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Bradfield, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Circadian oscillations in mammalian physiology and behavior are regulated by an endogenous biological clock. Here we show that loss of the PAS protein MOP3 (also known as BMAL1) in mice results in immediate and complete loss of circadian rhythmicity in constant darkness. Additionally, locomotor activity in light–dark (LD) cycles is impaired and activity levels are reduced in Mop3−/− mice. Analysis of Period gene expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) indicates that these behavioral phenotypes arise from loss of circadian function at the molecular level. These results provide genetic evidence that MOP3 is the bona fide heterodimeric partner of mCLOCK. Furthermore, these data demonstrate that MOP3 is a non-redundant and essential component of the circadian pacemaker in mammals. PMID:11163178

  10. The Cardiomyocyte Molecular Clock Regulates the Circadian Expression of Kcnh2 and Contributes to Ventricular Repolarization

    PubMed Central

    Schroder, Elizabeth A.; Burgess, Don E.; Zhang, Xiping; Lefta, Mellani; Smith, Jennifer L.; Patwardhan, Abhijit; Bartos, Daniel C.; Elayi, Claude S.; Esser, Karyn A.; Delisle, Brian P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD) follows a diurnal variation. Data suggest the timing of SCD is influenced by circadian (~24 hour) changes in neurohumoral and cardiomyocyte-specific regulation of the heart’s electrical properties. Objective The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors BMAL1 and CLOCK coordinate the circadian expression of select genes. We tested whether Bmal1 expression in cardiomyocytes contributes to K+ channel expression and diurnal changes in ventricular repolarization. Methods We utilized transgenic mice that allow for the inducible cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of Bmal1 (iCSΔBmal1−/−). We used quantitative PCR, voltage-clamping, promoter-reporter bioluminescence assays, and electrocardiographic (ECG) telemetry. Results Although several K+ channel gene transcripts were downregulated in iCSΔBmal1−/− mouse hearts, only Kcnh2 exhibited a robust circadian pattern of expression that was disrupted in iCSΔBmal1−/− hearts. Kcnh2 underlies the rapidly activating delayed-rectifier K+ current (IKr), and IKr recorded from iCSΔBmal1−/− ventricular cardiomyocytes was ~50% compared to control myocytes. Promoter-reporter assays demonstrated that the human Kcnh2 promoter is transactivated by the co-expression of BMAL1 and CLOCK. ECG analysis showed iCSΔBmal1−/− mice developed a prolongation in the heart rate corrected QT (QTc) interval during the light (resting)-phase. This was secondary to an augmented circadian rhythm in the uncorrected QT interval without a corresponding change in the RR interval. Conclusion The molecular clock in the heart regulates the circadian expression of Kcnh2, modifies K+ channel gene expression and is important for normal ventricular repolarization. Disruption of the cardiomyocyte circadian clock mechanism likely unmasks diurnal changes in ventricular repolarization that could contribute to an increased risk of cardiac arrhythmias/SCD. PMID:25701773

  11. Long-Range Chromosome Interactions Mediated by Cohesin Shape Circadian Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yichi; Guo, Weimin; Li, Ping; Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Meng; Fan, Zenghua; Zhao, Zhihu; Yan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian circadian rhythm is established by the negative feedback loops consisting of a set of clock genes, which lead to the circadian expression of thousands of downstream genes in vivo. As genome-wide transcription is organized under the high-order chromosome structure, it is largely uncharted how circadian gene expression is influenced by chromosome architecture. We focus on the function of chromatin structure proteins cohesin as well as CTCF (CCCTC-binding factor) in circadian rhythm. Using circular chromosome conformation capture sequencing, we systematically examined the interacting loci of a Bmal1-bound super-enhancer upstream of a clock gene Nr1d1 in mouse liver. These interactions are largely stable in the circadian cycle and cohesin binding sites are enriched in the interactome. Global analysis showed that cohesin-CTCF co-binding sites tend to insulate the phases of circadian oscillating genes while cohesin-non-CTCF sites are associated with high circadian rhythmicity of transcription. A model integrating the effects of cohesin and CTCF markedly improved the mechanistic understanding of circadian gene expression. Further experiments in cohesin knockout cells demonstrated that cohesin is required at least in part for driving the circadian gene expression by facilitating the enhancer-promoter looping. This study provided a novel insight into the relationship between circadian transcriptome and the high-order chromosome structure. PMID:27135601

  12. When the circadian clock meets the melanin pigmentary system.

    PubMed

    Slominski, Andrzej T; Hardeland, Rüdiger; Reiter, Russel J

    2015-04-01

    Silencing of BMAL1 and PER1 stimulates melanogenic activity of follicular and epidermal melanocytes, indicating a novel role for peripheral circadian clock processes in the regulation of melanin pigmentation. Linking the expression levels of BMAL1/PER1 with changes in melanogenesis opens exciting opportunities to study the role of the local molecular clock in modulation of melanocyte functions in the hair follicle and the epidermis with attendant effects on epidermal barrier functions in general. PMID:25785947

  13. Traumatic Brain Injury-Induced Dysregulation of the Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Deborah R.; Sell, Stacy L.; Micci, Maria-Adelaide; Crookshanks, Jeanna M.; Parsley, Margaret; Uchida, Tatsuo; Prough, Donald S.; DeWitt, Douglas S.; Hellmich, Helen L.

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythm disturbances are frequently reported in patients recovering from traumatic brain injury (TBI). Since circadian clock output is mediated by some of the same molecular signaling cascades that regulate memory formation (cAMP/MAPK/CREB), cognitive problems reported by TBI survivors may be related to injury-induced dysregulation of the circadian clock. In laboratory animals, aberrant circadian rhythms in the hippocampus have been linked to cognitive and memory dysfunction. Here, we addressed the hypothesis that circadian rhythm disruption after TBI is mediated by changes in expression of clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) and hippocampus. After fluid-percussion TBI or sham surgery, male Sprague-Dawley rats were euthanized at 4 h intervals, over a 48 h period for tissue collection. Expression of circadian clock genes was measured using quantitative real-time PCR in the SCN and hippocampus obtained by laser capture and manual microdissection respectively. Immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis were used to correlate TBI-induced changes in circadian gene expression with changes in protein expression. In separate groups of rats, locomotor activity was monitored for 48 h. TBI altered circadian gene expression patterns in both the SCN and the hippocampus. Dysregulated expression of key circadian clock genes, such as Bmal1 and Cry1, was detected, suggesting perturbation of transcriptional-translational feedback loops that are central to circadian timing. In fact, disruption of circadian locomotor activity rhythms in injured animals occurred concurrently. These results provide an explanation for how TBI causes disruption of circadian rhythms as well as a rationale for the consideration of drugs with chronobiotic properties as part of a treatment strategy for TBI. PMID:23056261

  14. O-GlcNAcylation, Novel Post-Translational Modification Linking Myocardial Metabolism and Cardiomyocyte Circadian Clock*

    PubMed Central

    Durgan, David J.; Pat, Betty M.; Laczy, Boglarka; Bradley, Jerry A.; Tsai, Ju-Yun; Grenett, Maximiliano H.; Ratcliffe, William F.; Brewer, Rachel A.; Nagendran, Jeevan; Villegas-Montoya, Carolina; Zou, Chenhang; Zou, Luyun; Johnson, Russell L.; Dyck, Jason R. B.; Bray, Molly S.; Gamble, Karen L.; Chatham, John C.; Young, Martin E.

    2011-01-01

    The cardiomyocyte circadian clock directly regulates multiple myocardial functions in a time-of-day-dependent manner, including gene expression, metabolism, contractility, and ischemic tolerance. These same biological processes are also directly influenced by modification of proteins by monosaccharides of O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc). Because the circadian clock and protein O-GlcNAcylation have common regulatory roles in the heart, we hypothesized that a relationship exists between the two. We report that total cardiac protein O-GlcNAc levels exhibit a diurnal variation in mouse hearts, peaking during the active/awake phase. Genetic ablation of the circadian clock specifically in cardiomyocytes in vivo abolishes diurnal variations in cardiac O-GlcNAc levels. These time-of-day-dependent variations appear to be mediated by clock-dependent regulation of O-GlcNAc transferase and O-GlcNAcase protein levels, glucose metabolism/uptake, and glutamine synthesis in an NAD-independent manner. We also identify the clock component Bmal1 as an O-GlcNAc-modified protein. Increasing protein O-GlcNAcylation (through pharmacological inhibition of O-GlcNAcase) results in diminished Per2 protein levels, time-of-day-dependent induction of bmal1 gene expression, and phase advances in the suprachiasmatic nucleus clock. Collectively, these data suggest that the cardiomyocyte circadian clock increases protein O-GlcNAcylation in the heart during the active/awake phase through coordinated regulation of the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway and that protein O-GlcNAcylation in turn influences the timing of the circadian clock. PMID:22069332

  15. A Role for Id2 in Regulating Photic Entrainment of the Mammalian Circadian System

    PubMed Central

    Duffield, Giles E.; Watson, Nathan P.; Mantani, Akio; Peirson, Stuart N.; Robles-Murguia, Maricela; Loros, Jennifer J.; Israel, Mark A.; Dunlap, Jay C.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Inhibitor of DNA binding genes (Id1–Id4) encode helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcriptional repressors associated with development and tumorigenesis [1, 2], but little is known concerning the function(s) of these genes in normal adult animals. Id2 was identified in DNA microarray screens for rhythmically expressed genes [3–5], and further analysis revealed a circadian pattern of expression of all four Id genes in multiple tissues including the suprachiasmatic nucleus. To explore an in vivo function, we generated and characterized deletion mutations of Id2 and of Id4. Id2−/− mice exhibit abnormally rapid entrainment and an increase in the magnitude of the phase shift of the pacemaker. A significant proportion of mice also exhibit disrupted rhythms when maintained under constant darkness. Conversely, Id4−/− mice did not exhibit a noticeable circadian phenotype. In vitro studies using an mPer1 and an AVP promoter reporter revealed the potential for ID1, ID2, and ID3 proteins to interact with the canonical basic HLH clock proteins BMAL1 and CLOCK. These data suggest that the Id genes may be important for entrainment and operation of the mammalian circadian system, potentially acting through BMAL1 and CLOCK targets. PMID:19217292

  16. SRC-2 Is an Essential Coactivator for Orchestrating Metabolism and Circadian Rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Stashi, Erin; Lanz, Rainer B.; Mao, Jianqiang; Michailidis, George; Zhu, Bokai; Kettner, Nicole M.; Putluri, Nagireddy; Reineke, Erin L.; Reineke, Lucas C.; Dasgupta, Subhamoy; Dean, Adam; Stevenson, Connor R.; Sivasubramanian, Natarajan; Sreekumar, Arun; DeMayo, Francesco; York, Brian; Fu, Loning; O'Malley, Bert W.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Synchrony of the mammalian circadian clock is achieved by complex transcriptional and translational feedback loops centered on the BMAL1: CLOCK heterodimer. Modulation of circadian feedback loops is essential for maintaining rhythmicity, yet the role of transcriptional coactivators in driving BMAL1:CLOCK transcriptional networks is largely unexplored. Here, we show diurnal hepatic steroid receptor coactivator 2 (SRC-2) recruitment to the genome that extensively overlaps with the BMAL1 cistrome during the light phase, targeting genes that enrich for circadian and metabolic processes. Notably, SRC-2 ablation impairs wheel-running behavior, alters circadian gene expression in several peripheral tissues, alters the rhythmicity of the hepatic metabolome, and deregulates the synchronization of cell-autonomous metabolites. We identify SRC-2 as a potent coregulator of BMAL1:CLOCK and find that SRC-2 targets itself with BMAL1:CLOCK in a feedforward loop. Collectively, our data suggest that SRC-2 is a transcriptional coactivator of the BMAL1:CLOCK oscillators and establish SRC-2 as a critical positive regulator of the mammalian circa-dian clock. PMID:24529706

  17. HIV Tat protein affects circadian rhythmicity by interfering with the circadian system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, T; Jiang, Z; Hou, W; Li, Z; Cheng, S; Green, LA; Wang, Y; Wen, X; Cai, L; Clauss, M; Wang, Z

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Sleep disorders are common in patients with HIV/AIDS, and can lead to poor quality of life. Although many studies have investigated the aetiology of these disorders, it is still unclear whether impaired sleep quality is associated with HIV itself, social problems, or side effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Moreover, despite its known neurological associations, little is known about the role of the trans-activator of transcription (Tat) protein in sleep disorders in patients with HIV/AIDS. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the sleep quality of patients with HIV/AIDS affected by an altered circadian rhythm correlates with cerebrospinal HIV Tat protein concentration. Methods Ninety-six patients with HIV/AIDS between 20 and 69 years old completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Their circadian rhythm parameters of blood pressure, Tat concentration in cerebrospinal fluid, melatonin concentration, CD4 cell count and HIV RNA viral load in serum were measured. Results The circadian amplitude of systolic blood pressure and the score for sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) were negatively correlated with HIV Tat protein concentration, while the melatonin value was positively correlated with Tat protein concentration. Conclusions The HIV Tat protein affects circadian rhythmicity by interfering with the circadian system in patients with HIV/AIDS and further increases the melatonin excretion value. A Tat protein-related high melatonin value may counteract HIV-related poor sleep quality during the progression of HIV infection. This study provides the first clinical evidence offering an explanation for why sleep quality did not show an association with progression of HIV infection in previous studies. PMID:24750691

  18. Circadian Mechanisms in Murine and Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Following Dexamethasone Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiying; Yu, Gang; Parks, Helen; Hebert, Teddi; Goh, Brian C.; Dietrich, Marilyn A.; Pelled, Gadi; Izadpanah, Reza; Gazit, Dan; Bunnell, Bruce A.; Gimble, Jeffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    A core group of transcriptional regulatory factors regulate circadian rhythms in mammalian cells. While the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the brain serves as the central core circadian oscillator, circadian clocks also exist within peripheral tissues and cells. A growing body of evidence has demonstrated that >20% of expressed mRNAs in bone and adipose tissues oscillate in a circadian manner. The current manuscript reports evidence of the core circadian transcriptional apparatus within primary cultures of murine and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). Exposure of confluent, quiescent BMSCs to dexamethasone synchronized the oscillating expression of the mRNAs encoding the albumin D binding protein (dbp), brain-muscle arnt-like 1 (bmal1), period 3 (per3), rev-erb α, and rev-erb β. The genes displayed a mean oscillatory period of 22.2 to 24.3 hours. The acrophase or peak expression of mRNAs encoding “positive” (bmal1) and “negative” (per3) transcriptional regulatory factors were out of phase with each other by ∼8-12 hours, consistent with in vivo observations. In vivo, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) mediated phosphorylation regulates the turnover of per3 and core circadian transcriptional apparatus. In vitro addition of lithium chloride, a GSK3β inhibitor, significantly shifted the acrophase of all genes by 4.2-4.7 hours oscillation in BMSCs; however, only the male murine BMSCs displayed a significant increase in the length of the period of oscillation. We conclude that human and murine BMSCs represent a valid in vitro model for the analysis of circadian mechanisms in bone metabolism and stem cell biology. PMID:18302991

  19. Circadian rhythms. A protein fold switch joins the circadian oscillator to clock output in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yong-Gang; Cohen, Susan E; Phong, Connie; Myers, William K; Kim, Yong-Ick; Tseng, Roger; Lin, Jenny; Zhang, Li; Boyd, Joseph S; Lee, Yvonne; Kang, Shannon; Lee, David; Li, Sheng; Britt, R David; Rust, Michael J; Golden, Susan S; LiWang, Andy

    2015-07-17

    Organisms are adapted to the relentless cycles of day and night, because they evolved timekeeping systems called circadian clocks, which regulate biological activities with ~24-hour rhythms. The clock of cyanobacteria is driven by a three-protein oscillator composed of KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC, which together generate a circadian rhythm of KaiC phosphorylation. We show that KaiB flips between two distinct three-dimensional folds, and its rare transition to an active state provides a time delay that is required to match the timing of the oscillator to that of Earth's rotation. Once KaiB switches folds, it binds phosphorylated KaiC and captures KaiA, which initiates a phase transition of the circadian cycle, and it regulates components of the clock-output pathway, which provides the link that joins the timekeeping and signaling functions of the oscillator. PMID:26113641

  20. Circadian regulation of ATP release in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Marpegan, Luciano; Swanstrom, Adrienne E; Chung, Kevin; Simon, Tatiana; Haydon, Philip G; Khan, Sanjoy K; Liu, Andrew C; Herzog, Erik D; Beaulé, Christian

    2011-06-01

    Circadian clocks sustain daily oscillations in gene expression, physiology, and behavior, relying on transcription-translation feedback loops of clock genes for rhythm generation. Cultured astrocytes display daily oscillations of extracellular ATP, suggesting that ATP release is a circadian output. We hypothesized that the circadian clock modulates ATP release via mechanisms that regulate acute ATP release from glia. To test the molecular basis for circadian ATP release, we developed methods to measure in real-time ATP release and Bmal1::dLuc circadian reporter expression in cortical astrocyte cultures from mice of different genotypes. Daily rhythms of gene expression required functional Clock and Bmal1, both Per1 and Per2, and both Cry1 and Cry2 genes. Similarly, high-level, circadian ATP release also required a functional clock mechanism. Whereas blocking IP(3) signaling significantly disrupted ATP rhythms with no effect on Bmal1::dLuc cycling, blocking vesicular release did not alter circadian ATP release or gene expression. We conclude that astrocytes depend on circadian clock genes and IP(3) signaling to express daily rhythms in ATP release. PMID:21653839

  1. Circadian regulation of ATP release in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Marpegan, Luciano; Swanstrom, Adrienne E.; Chung, Kevin; Simon, Tatiana; Haydon, Philip G.; Khan, Sanjoy K.; Liu, Andrew C.; Herzog, Erik D.; Beaulé, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Circadian clocks sustain daily oscillations in gene expression, physiology and behavior, relying on transcription-translation feedback loops of clock genes for rhythm generation. Cultured astrocytes display daily oscillations of extracellular ATP, suggesting that ATP release is a circadian output. We hypothesized that the circadian clock modulates ATP release via mechanisms that regulate acute ATP release from glia. To test the molecular basis for circadian ATP release, we developed methods to measure in real-time ATP release and Bmal1::dLuc circadian reporter expression in cortical astrocyte cultures from mice of different genotypes. Daily rhythms of gene expression required functional Clock and Bmal1, both Per1 and Per2, and both Cry1 and Cry2 genes. Similarly, high level, circadian ATP release also required a functional clock mechanism. Whereas blocking IP3 signaling significantly disrupted ATP rhythms with no effect on Bmal1::dLuc cycling, blocking vesicular release did not alter circadian ATP release or gene expression. We conclude that astrocytes depend on circadian clock genes and IP3 signaling to express daily rhythms in ATP release. PMID:21653839

  2. [BMAL1 gene regulates the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells].

    PubMed

    Xiaoguang, Li; Xiao-long, Guo; Bin, Guo

    2016-06-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic infective disease characterized as the destruction of the supporting tissues of the teeth. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, which are ideal adult stem cells for the regeneration of supporting tissues, may play important roles in restoring the structure and function of the periodontium and in promoting the treatment of periodontal disease. As a consequence, the characteristics, especially osteogenic differentiation mechanism, of these stem cells have been extensively investigated. The regulation of the physiological behavior of these stem cells is associated with BMAL1 gene. This gene is a potential treatment target for periodontal disease, although the specific mechanism remains inconclusive. This study aimed to describe the characteristics of BMAL1 gene and its ability to regulate the osteogenic differentiation of stem cells. PMID:27526460

  3. Different Roles of Negative and Positive Components of the Circadian Clock in Oncogene-induced Neoplastic Transformation.

    PubMed

    Katamune, Chiharu; Koyanagi, Satoru; Shiromizu, Shoya; Matsunaga, Naoya; Shimba, Shigeki; Shibata, Shigenobu; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2016-05-13

    In mammals, circadian rhythms in physiological function are generated by a molecular oscillator driven by transcriptional-translational feedback loop consisting of negative and positive regulators. Disruption of this circadian clock machinery is thought to increase the risk of cancer development, but the potential contributions of each component of circadian clock to oncogenesis have been little explored. Here we reported that negative and positive transcriptional regulators of circadian feedback loop had different roles in oncogene-induced neoplastic transformation. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts prepared from animals deficient in negative circadian clock regulators, Period2 (Per2) or Cryptochrome1/2 (Cry1/2), were prone to transformation induced by co-expression of H-ras(V12) and SV40 large T antigen (SV40LT). In contrast, mouse embryonic fibroblasts prepared from mice deficient in positive circadian clock regulators, Bmal1 or Clock, showed resistance to oncogene-induced transformation. In Per2 mutant and Cry1/2-null cells, the introduction of oncogenes induced expression of ATF4, a potent repressor of cell senescence-associated proteins p16INK4a and p19ARF. Elevated levels of ATF4 were sufficient to suppress expression of these proteins and drive oncogenic transformation. Conversely, in Bmal1-null and Clock mutant cells, the expression of ATF4 was not induced by oncogene introduction, which allowed constitutive expression of p16INK4a and p19ARF triggering cellular senescence. Although genetic ablation of either negative or positive transcriptional regulators of the circadian clock leads to disrupted rhythms in physiological functions, our findings define their different contributions to neoplastic cellular transformation. PMID:26961881

  4. Intricate protein-protein interactions in the cyanobacterial circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Egli, Martin

    2014-08-01

    The cyanobacterial circadian clock consists of a post-translational oscillator (PTO) and a PTO-dependent transcription-translation feedback loop (TTFL). The PTO can be reconstituted in vitro with the KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC proteins, enabling detailed biochemical and biophysical investigations. Both the CI and the CII halves of the KaiC hexamer harbor ATPases, but only the C-terminal CII ring exhibits kinase and phospho-transferase activities. KaiA stimulates the kinase and KaiB associates with KaiC during the dephosphorylation phase and sequesters KaiA. Recent research has led to conflicting models of the KaiB-KaiC interaction, precluding a clear understanding of KaiB function and KaiABC clock mechanism. PMID:24936066

  5. Intricate Protein-Protein Interactions in the Cyanobacterial Circadian Clock*

    PubMed Central

    Egli, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The cyanobacterial circadian clock consists of a post-translational oscillator (PTO) and a PTO-dependent transcription-translation feedback loop (TTFL). The PTO can be reconstituted in vitro with the KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC proteins, enabling detailed biochemical and biophysical investigations. Both the CI and the CII halves of the KaiC hexamer harbor ATPases, but only the C-terminal CII ring exhibits kinase and phospho-transferase activities. KaiA stimulates the kinase and KaiB associates with KaiC during the dephosphorylation phase and sequesters KaiA. Recent research has led to conflicting models of the KaiB-KaiC interaction, precluding a clear understanding of KaiB function and KaiABC clock mechanism. PMID:24936066

  6. Circadian Clock Genes Are Essential for Normal Adult Neurogenesis, Differentiation, and Fate Determination.

    PubMed

    Malik, Astha; Kondratov, Roman V; Jamasbi, Roudabeh J; Geusz, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis creates new neurons and glia from stem cells in the human brain throughout life. It is best understood in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ). Circadian rhythms have been identified in the hippocampus, but the role of any endogenous circadian oscillator cells in hippocampal neurogenesis and their importance in learning or memory remains unclear. Any study of stem cell regulation by intrinsic circadian timing within the DG is complicated by modulation from circadian clocks elsewhere in the brain. To examine circadian oscillators in greater isolation, neurosphere cultures were prepared from the DG of two knockout mouse lines that lack a functional circadian clock and from mPer1::luc mice to identify circadian oscillations in gene expression. Circadian mPer1 gene activity rhythms were recorded in neurospheres maintained in a culture medium that induces neurogenesis but not in one that maintains the stem cell state. Although the differentiating neural stem progenitor cells of spheres were rhythmic, evidence of any mature neurons was extremely sparse. The circadian timing signal originated in undifferentiated cells within the neurosphere. This conclusion was supported by immunocytochemistry for mPER1 protein that was localized to the inner, more stem cell-like neurosphere core. To test for effects of the circadian clock on neurogenesis, media conditions were altered to induce neurospheres from BMAL1 knockout mice to differentiate. These cultures displayed unusually high differentiation into glia rather than neurons according to GFAP and NeuN expression, respectively, and very few BetaIII tubulin-positive, immature neurons were observed. The knockout neurospheres also displayed areas visibly devoid of cells and had overall higher cell death. Neurospheres from arrhythmic mice lacking two other core clock genes, Cry1 and Cry2, showed significantly reduced growth and increased astrocyte proliferation during

  7. Circadian Clock Genes Are Essential for Normal Adult Neurogenesis, Differentiation, and Fate Determination

    PubMed Central

    Kondratov, Roman V.; Jamasbi, Roudabeh J.

    2015-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis creates new neurons and glia from stem cells in the human brain throughout life. It is best understood in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ). Circadian rhythms have been identified in the hippocampus, but the role of any endogenous circadian oscillator cells in hippocampal neurogenesis and their importance in learning or memory remains unclear. Any study of stem cell regulation by intrinsic circadian timing within the DG is complicated by modulation from circadian clocks elsewhere in the brain. To examine circadian oscillators in greater isolation, neurosphere cultures were prepared from the DG of two knockout mouse lines that lack a functional circadian clock and from mPer1::luc mice to identify circadian oscillations in gene expression. Circadian mPer1 gene activity rhythms were recorded in neurospheres maintained in a culture medium that induces neurogenesis but not in one that maintains the stem cell state. Although the differentiating neural stem progenitor cells of spheres were rhythmic, evidence of any mature neurons was extremely sparse. The circadian timing signal originated in undifferentiated cells within the neurosphere. This conclusion was supported by immunocytochemistry for mPER1 protein that was localized to the inner, more stem cell-like neurosphere core. To test for effects of the circadian clock on neurogenesis, media conditions were altered to induce neurospheres from BMAL1 knockout mice to differentiate. These cultures displayed unusually high differentiation into glia rather than neurons according to GFAP and NeuN expression, respectively, and very few BetaIII tubulin-positive, immature neurons were observed. The knockout neurospheres also displayed areas visibly devoid of cells and had overall higher cell death. Neurospheres from arrhythmic mice lacking two other core clock genes, Cry1 and Cry2, showed significantly reduced growth and increased astrocyte proliferation during

  8. Cloning of circadian rhythmic pathway genes and perturbation of oscillation patterns in endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs)-exposed mangrove killifish Kryptolebias marmoratus.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Jae-Sung; Kim, Bo-Mi; Lee, Bo-Young; Hwang, Un-Ki; Lee, Yong Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the effect of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on the circadian rhythm pathway, we cloned clock and circadian rhythmic pathway-associated genes (e.g. Per2, Cry1, Cry2, and BMAL1) in the self-fertilizing mangrove killifish Kryptolebias marmoratus. The promoter region of Km-clock had 1 aryl hydrocarbon receptor element (AhRE, GTGCGTGACA) and 8 estrogen receptor (ER) half-sites, indicating that the AhRE and ER half sites would likely be associated with regulation of clock protein activity during EDCs-induced cellular stress. The Km-clock protein domains (bHLH, PAS1, PAS2) were highly conserved in five additional fish species (zebrafish, Japanese medaka, Southern platyfish, Nile tilapia, and spotted green pufferfish), suggesting that the fish clock protein may play an important role in controlling endogenous circadian rhythms. The promoter regions of Km-BMAL1, -Cry1, -Cry2, and -Per2 were found to contain several xenobiotic response elements (XREs), indicating that EDCs may be able to alter the expression of these genes. To analyze the endogenous circadian rhythm in K. marmoratus, we measured expression of Km-clock and other circadian rhythmic genes (e.g. Per2, Cry1, Cry2, and BMAL1) in different tissues, and found ubiquitous expression, although there were different patterns of transcript amplification during different developmental stages. In an estrogen (E2)-exposed group, Km-clock expression was down-regulated, however, a hydroxytamoxifen (TMX, nonsteroid estrogen antagonist)-exposed group showed an upregulated pattern of Km-clock expression, suggesting that the expression of Km-clock is closely associated with exposure to EDCs. In response to the exposure of bisphenol A (BPA) and 4-tert-octyphenol (OP), Km-clock expression was down-regulated in the pituitary/brain, muscle, and skin in both gender types (hermaphrodite and secondary male). In juvenile K. marmoratus liver tissue, expression of Km-clock and other circadian rhythmic pathway

  9. Genetic Disruption of the Core Circadian Clock Impairs Hippocampus-Dependent Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wardlaw, Sarah M.; Phan, Trongha X.; Saraf, Amit; Chen, Xuanmao; Storm, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    Perturbing the circadian system by electrolytically lesioning the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) or varying the environmental light:dark schedule impairs memory, suggesting that memory depends on the circadian system. We used a genetic approach to evaluate the role of the molecular clock in memory. Bmal1[superscript -/-] mice, which are arrhythmic…

  10. Dynamic Localization of the Cyanobacterial Circadian Clock Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Susan E.; Erb, Marcella L.; Selimkhanov, Jangir; Dong, Guogang; Hasty, Jeff; Pogliano, Joe; Golden, Susan S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Background The cyanobacterial circadian clock system has been extensively studied and the structures, interactions and biochemical activities of the central oscillator proteins (KaiA, KaiB and KaiC) have been well elucidated. Despite this rich repository of information, little is known about the distribution of these proteins within the cell. Results Here we report that KaiA and KaiC localize as discrete foci near a single pole of cells in a clock-dependent fashion, with enhanced polar localization observed at night. KaiA localization is dependent on KaiC; consistent with this notion, KaiA and KaiC co-localize with each other as well as with CikA, a key input/output factor previously reported to display unipolar localization. The molecular mechanism that localizes KaiC to the poles is conserved in Escherichia coli, another Gram-negative rod shaped bacterium, suggesting that KaiC localization is not dependent on other clock- or cyanobacterial-specific factors. Moreover, expression of CikA mutant variants that distribute diffusely results in the striking de-localization of KaiC. Conclusions This work shows that the cyanobacterial circadian system undergoes a circadian orchestration of subcellular organization. We propose that the observed spatiotemporal localization pattern represents a novel layer of regulation that contributes to the robustness of the clock by facilitating protein complex formation and synchronizing the clock with environmental stimuli. PMID:25127213

  11. A Long Noncoding RNA Perturbs the Circadian Rhythm of Hepatoma Cells to Facilitate Hepatocarcinogenesis12

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ming; Zheng, Minying; Sun, Baodi; Wang, Yue; Ye, Lihong; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Clock circadian regulator (CLOCK)/brain and muscle arnt-like protein-1 (BMAL1) complex governs the regulation of circadian rhythm through triggering periodic alterations of gene expression. However, the underlying mechanism of circadian clock disruption in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unclear. Here, we report that a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), highly upregulated in liver cancer (HULC), contributes to the perturbations in circadian rhythm of hepatoma cells. Our observations showed that HULC was able to heighten the expression levels of CLOCK and its downstream circadian oscillators, such as period circadian clock 1 and cryptochrome circadian clock 1, in hepatoma cells. Strikingly, HULC altered the expression pattern and prolonged the periodic expression of CLOCK in hepatoma cells. Mechanistically, the complementary base pairing between HULC and the 5' untranslated region of CLOCK mRNA underlay the HULC-modulated expression of CLOCK, and the mutants in the complementary region failed to achieve the event. Moreover, immunohistochemistry staining and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction validated that the levels of CLOCK were elevated in HCC tissues, and the expression levels of HULC were positively associated with those of CLOCK in clinical HCC samples. In functional experiments, our data exhibited that CLOCK was implicated in the HULC-accelerated proliferation of hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our data show that an lncRNA, HULC, is responsible for the perturbations in circadian rhythm through upregulating circadian oscillator CLOCK in hepatoma cells, resulting in the promotion of hepatocarcinogenesis. Thus, our finding provides new insights into the mechanism by which lncRNA accelerates hepatocarcinogenesis through disturbing circadian rhythm of HCC. PMID:25622901

  12. A long noncoding RNA perturbs the circadian rhythm of hepatoma cells to facilitate hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ming; Zheng, Minying; Sun, Baodi; Wang, Yue; Ye, Lihong; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Clock circadian regulator (CLOCK)/brain and muscle arnt-like protein-1 (BMAL1) complex governs the regulation of circadian rhythm through triggering periodic alterations of gene expression. However, the underlying mechanism of circadian clock disruption in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unclear. Here, we report that a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), highly upregulated in liver cancer (HULC), contributes to the perturbations in circadian rhythm of hepatoma cells. Our observations showed that HULC was able to heighten the expression levels of CLOCK and its downstream circadian oscillators, such as period circadian clock 1 and cryptochrome circadian clock 1, in hepatoma cells. Strikingly, HULC altered the expression pattern and prolonged the periodic expression of CLOCK in hepatoma cells. Mechanistically, the complementary base pairing between HULC and the 5' untranslated region of CLOCK mRNA underlay the HULC-modulated expression of CLOCK, and the mutants in the complementary region failed to achieve the event. Moreover, immunohistochemistry staining and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction validated that the levels of CLOCK were elevated in HCC tissues, and the expression levels of HULC were positively associated with those of CLOCK in clinical HCC samples. In functional experiments, our data exhibited that CLOCK was implicated in the HULC-accelerated proliferation of hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our data show that an lncRNA, HULC, is responsible for the perturbations in circadian rhythm through upregulating circadian oscillator CLOCK in hepatoma cells, resulting in the promotion of hepatocarcinogenesis. Thus, our finding provides new insights into the mechanism by which lncRNA accelerates hepatocarcinogenesis through disturbing circadian rhythm of HCC. PMID:25622901

  13. Circadian timing in central and peripheral tissues in a migratory songbird: dependence on annual life-history states.

    PubMed

    Singh, Devraj; Trivedi, Amit Kumar; Rani, Sangeeta; Panda, Satchidananda; Kumar, Vinod

    2015-10-01

    Predictable seasonal change in photoperiod triggers a sequential change in the daily activity-rest pattern, adaptive for migration in several bird species. The night-migratory black-headed bunting (Emberiza melanocephala) is day active under short photoperiods (8 h light:16 h dark, short day sensitive). Under long photoperiods (16 h light:8 h dark), the buntings are initially day active (long day premigratory) but subsequently become intensely night active (long day migratory) and after few weeks again return to a day active pattern (long day refractory). However, it is unclear how the daily expression of circadian genes changes during photoperiod-induced seasonal life-history states (LHSs). We measured period 2 (Per2), cryptochrome 1 (Cry1), brain and muscle arnt-like protein 1 (Bmal1), and circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (Clock) mRNA expressions in various neural and peripheral tissues of buntings in different LHSs and discovered differences of ∼2 to 6 h in the phase and 2- to 4-fold in amplitude of circadian oscillations of Per2, Cry1, and Bmal1 between photoperiod-induced LHSs. Phase relationship in mRNA oscillations was altered between oscillator components in the circadian pacemaker system (retina, pineal, hypothalamus) as well as in the peripheral (liver, muscle) tissues. These results show for the first time altered waveforms of clock gene expressions in all tissues in parallel with behavioral shifts and suggest the involvement of circadian system in photoperiod induction of seasonal LHSs in a migratory species. PMID:26103987

  14. α1B-Adrenergic receptor signaling controls circadian expression of Tnfrsf11b by regulating clock genes in osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Takao; Tanaka, Kenjiro; Togari, Akifumi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Circadian clocks are endogenous and biological oscillations that occur with a period of <24 h. In mammals, the central circadian pacemaker is localized in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and is linked to peripheral tissues through neural and hormonal signals. In the present study, we investigated the physiological function of the molecular clock on bone remodeling. The results of loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments both indicated that the rhythmic expression of Tnfrsf11b, which encodes osteoprotegerin (OPG), was regulated by Bmal1 in MC3T3-E1 cells. We also showed that REV-ERBα negatively regulated Tnfrsf11b as well as Bmal1 in MC3T3-E1 cells. We systematically investigated the relationship between the sympathetic nervous system and the circadian clock in osteoblasts. The administration of phenylephrine, a nonspecific α1-adrenergic receptor (AR) agonist, stimulated the expression of Tnfrsf11b, whereas the genetic ablation of α1B-AR signaling led to the alteration of Tnfrsf11b expression concomitant with Bmal1 and Per2 in bone. Thus, this study demonstrated that the circadian regulation of Tnfrsf11b was regulated by the clock genes encoding REV-ERBα (Nr1d1) and Bmal1 (Bmal1, also known as Arntl), which are components of the core loop of the circadian clock in osteoblasts. PMID:26453621

  15. Circadian phenotyping of obese and diabetic db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Grosbellet, Edith; Dumont, Stephanie; Schuster-Klein, Carole; Guardiola-Lemaitre, Beatrice; Pevet, Paul; Criscuolo, François; Challet, Etienne

    2016-05-01

    Growing evidence links metabolic disorders to circadian alterations. Genetically obese db/db mice, lacking the long isoform of leptin receptor, are a recognized model of type 2 diabetes. In this study, we aimed at characterizing the potential circadian alterations of db/db mice in comparison to db/+ control mice. By using telemetry devices, we first reported arrhythmicity in general activity of most db/db mice under both light-dark cycle and constant darkness, while their rhythm of body temperature is less dramatically disrupted. Water access restricted to nighttime restores significant rhythmicity in behaviorally arrhythmic db/db mice, indicating a masking effect of polydipsia when water is available ad libitum. Endogenous period of temperature rhythm under constant dark conditions is significantly increased (+30 min) in db/db compared with db/+ mice. Next, we studied the oscillations of clock proteins (PER1, PER2 and BMAL1) in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), the site of the master clock, and detected no difference according to the genotype. Furthermore, c-FOS and P-ERK1/2 expression in response to a light pulse in late night was significantly increased (+80 and +55%, respectively) in the SCN of these diabetic mice. We previously showed that, in addition to altered activity rhythms, db/db mice exhibit altered feeding rhythm. Therefore, we investigated daily patterns of clock protein expression in medial hypothalamic oscillators involved in feeding behavior (arcuate nucleus, ventro- and dorso-medial hypothalamic nuclei). Compared with db/+ mice, very subtle or no difference in oscillations of PER1 and BMAL1 is found in the medial hypothalamus. Although we did not find a clear link between altered hypothalamic clockwork and behavioral rhythms in db/db mice, our results highlight a lengthened endogenous period and altered photic integration in these genetically obese and diabetic mice. PMID:26144489

  16. Potential Conservation of Circadian Clock Proteins in the phylum Nematoda as Revealed by Bioinformatic Searches

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, Andrés; Garavaglia, Matías Javier; Goya, María Eugenia; Ghiringhelli, Pablo Daniel; Golombek, Diego Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Although several circadian rhythms have been described in C. elegans, its molecular clock remains elusive. In this work we employed a novel bioinformatic approach, applying probabilistic methodologies, to search for circadian clock proteins of several of the best studied circadian model organisms of different taxa (Mus musculus, Drosophila melanogaster, Neurospora crassa, Arabidopsis thaliana and Synechoccocus elongatus) in the proteomes of C. elegans and other members of the phylum Nematoda. With this approach we found that the Nematoda contain proteins most related to the core and accessory proteins of the insect and mammalian clocks, which provide new insights into the nematode clock and the evolution of the circadian system. PMID:25396739

  17. Circadian Rhythm Disruption Promotes Lung Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Bauer, Matthew R; Davidson, Shawn M; Heimann, Megan; Subbaraj, Lakshmipriya; Bhutkar, Arjun; Bartlebaugh, Jordan; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Jacks, Tyler

    2016-08-01

    Circadian rhythms are 24-hr oscillations that control a variety of biological processes in living systems, including two hallmarks of cancer, cell division and metabolism. Circadian rhythm disruption by shift work is associated with greater risk for cancer development and poor prognosis, suggesting a putative tumor-suppressive role for circadian rhythm homeostasis. Using a genetically engineered mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma, we have characterized the effects of circadian rhythm disruption on lung tumorigenesis. We demonstrate that both physiologic perturbation (jet lag) and genetic mutation of the central circadian clock components decreased survival and promoted lung tumor growth and progression. The core circadian genes Per2 and Bmal1 were shown to have cell-autonomous tumor-suppressive roles in transformation and lung tumor progression. Loss of the central clock components led to increased c-Myc expression, enhanced proliferation, and metabolic dysregulation. Our findings demonstrate that both systemic and somatic disruption of circadian rhythms contribute to cancer progression. PMID:27476975

  18. Heme-based Sensing by the Mammalian Circadian Protein, CLOCK

    PubMed Central

    Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun S.; Correia, Cristina; Botuyan, Maria Victoria; Mer, Georges; Rodgers, Kenton R.

    2010-01-01

    Heme is emerging as a key player in the synchrony of circadian-coupled transcriptional regulation. Current evidence suggests that levels of circadian-linked transcription are regulated in response to both the availability of intracellular heme and by heme-based sensing of carbon monoxide and possibly nitric oxide. The protein CLOCK is central to the regulation and maintenance of circadian rhythms in mammals. CLOCK comprises two PAS domains, each with a heme binding site. Our studies focus on the functionality of the Murine CLOCK PAS–A domain (residues 103-265). We show that CLOCK PAS–A binds Fe(III) protoporhyrin IX to form a complex with 1:1 stoichiometry. Optical absorbance and resonance Raman studies reveal that the heme of ferric CLOCK PAS–A is a six-coordinate, low spin complex whose resonance Raman signature is insensitive to pH over the range of protein stability. Ferrous CLOCK PAS–A is a mixture of five-coordinate, high spin and six-coordinate, low spin complexes. Ferrous CLOCK PAS–A forms complexes with CO and NO. Ferric CLOCK PAS–A undergoes reductive nitrosylation in the presence of NO to generate a CLOCK PAS–A–NO, which is a pentacoordinate {FeNO}7 complex. Formation of the highly stable {FeNO}7 heme complex from either ferrous or ferric heme makes possible the binding of NO at very low concentration, a characteristic of NO sensors. Comparison of the spectroscopic properties and CO binding kinetics of CLOCK PAS–A with other CO sensor proteins reveals that CLOCK PAS–A exhibits chemical properties consistent with a heme-based gas sensor protein. PMID:20666392

  19. Rhythmicity of the intestinal microbiota is regulated by gender and the host circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xue; Bushman, Frederic D.; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, multiple physiological, metabolic, and behavioral processes are subject to circadian rhythms, adapting to changing light in the environment. Here we analyzed circadian rhythms in the fecal microbiota of mice using deep sequencing, and found that the absolute amount of fecal bacteria and the abundance of Bacteroidetes exhibited circadian rhythmicity, which was more pronounced in female mice. Disruption of the host circadian clock by deletion of Bmal1, a gene encoding a core molecular clock component, abolished rhythmicity in the fecal microbiota composition in both genders. Bmal1 deletion also induced alterations in bacterial abundances in feces, with differential effects based on sex. Thus, although host behavior, such as time of feeding, is of recognized importance, here we show that sex interacts with the host circadian clock, and they collectively shape the circadian rhythmicity and composition of the fecal microbiota in mice. PMID:26240359

  20. Assembly of a Comprehensive Regulatory Network for the Mammalian Circadian Clock: A Bioinformatics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Robert; Abreu, Monica; Fuhr, Luise; Herzel, Hanspeter; Leser, Ulf; Relógio, Angela

    2015-01-01

    By regulating the timing of cellular processes, the circadian clock provides a way to adapt physiology and behaviour to the geophysical time. In mammals, a light-entrainable master clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) controls peripheral clocks that are present in virtually every body cell. Defective circadian timing is associated with several pathologies such as cancer and metabolic and sleep disorders. To better understand the circadian regulation of cellular processes, we developed a bioinformatics pipeline encompassing the analysis of high-throughput data sets and the exploitation of published knowledge by text-mining. We identified 118 novel potential clock-regulated genes and integrated them into an existing high-quality circadian network, generating the to-date most comprehensive network of circadian regulated genes (NCRG). To validate particular elements in our network, we assessed publicly available ChIP-seq data for BMAL1, REV-ERBα/β and RORα/γ proteins and found strong evidence for circadian regulation of Elavl1, Nme1, Dhx6, Med1 and Rbbp7 all of which are involved in the regulation of tumourigenesis. Furthermore, we identified Ncl and Ddx6, as targets of RORγ and REV-ERBα, β, respectively. Most interestingly, these genes were also reported to be involved in miRNA regulation; in particular, NCL regulates several miRNAs, all involved in cancer aggressiveness. Thus, NCL represents a novel potential link via which the circadian clock, and specifically RORγ, regulates the expression of miRNAs, with particular consequences in breast cancer progression. Our findings bring us one step forward towards a mechanistic understanding of mammalian circadian regulation, and provide further evidence of the influence of circadian deregulation in cancer. PMID:25945798

  1. Assembly of a comprehensive regulatory network for the mammalian circadian clock: a bioinformatics approach.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Robert; Childs, Liam; Thomas, Philippe; Abreu, Monica; Fuhr, Luise; Herzel, Hanspeter; Leser, Ulf; Relógio, Angela

    2015-01-01

    By regulating the timing of cellular processes, the circadian clock provides a way to adapt physiology and behaviour to the geophysical time. In mammals, a light-entrainable master clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) controls peripheral clocks that are present in virtually every body cell. Defective circadian timing is associated with several pathologies such as cancer and metabolic and sleep disorders. To better understand the circadian regulation of cellular processes, we developed a bioinformatics pipeline encompassing the analysis of high-throughput data sets and the exploitation of published knowledge by text-mining. We identified 118 novel potential clock-regulated genes and integrated them into an existing high-quality circadian network, generating the to-date most comprehensive network of circadian regulated genes (NCRG). To validate particular elements in our network, we assessed publicly available ChIP-seq data for BMAL1, REV-ERBα/β and RORα/γ proteins and found strong evidence for circadian regulation of Elavl1, Nme1, Dhx6, Med1 and Rbbp7 all of which are involved in the regulation of tumourigenesis. Furthermore, we identified Ncl and Ddx6, as targets of RORγ and REV-ERBα, β, respectively. Most interestingly, these genes were also reported to be involved in miRNA regulation; in particular, NCL regulates several miRNAs, all involved in cancer aggressiveness. Thus, NCL represents a novel potential link via which the circadian clock, and specifically RORγ, regulates the expression of miRNAs, with particular consequences in breast cancer progression. Our findings bring us one step forward towards a mechanistic understanding of mammalian circadian regulation, and provide further evidence of the influence of circadian deregulation in cancer. PMID:25945798

  2. Microgravity influences circadian clock oscillation in human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ranieri, Danilo; Cucina, Alessandra; Bizzarri, Mariano; Alimandi, Maurizio; Torrisi, Maria Rosaria

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity and sudden changes of gravitational forces exert numerous effects on tissues, organs and apparatus. Responses to these forces variably applied to cells indicate the existence of mechanotransduction pathways able to modulate transcription. Oscillation of circadian clocks similarly influences many cellular and metabolic processes. Here we hypothesized that signals derived from changes of gravitational forces applied to epidermal cells might influence their physiology in harmony with the oscillation of the molecular clock. In this study, we describe amplified oscillations of Bmal1 circadian clock gene in human keratinocytes exposed to short simulated microgravity and to rapid variation of gravitational forces. We found that exposure to microgravity enhances the amplitude of the Bmal1 feedback loop sustained by an apparently lower variability of Rev-erbα transcription, while recovery from microgravity is characterized by increased amplitude of Bmal1 expression and elongation of the oscillatory periods of Bmal1 and Rev-erbα. These data highlight the existence of integrated signaling network connecting mechanosensitive pathways to circadian gene regulation. PMID:26448904

  3. CIRCADIAN RHYTHM REPROGRAMMING DURING LUNG INFLAMMATION

    PubMed Central

    Haspel, Jeffrey A.; Chettimada, Sukrutha; Shaik, Rahamthulla S.; Chu, Jen-Hwa; Raby, Benjamin A.; Cernadas, Manuela; Carey, Vincent; Process, Vanessa; Hunninghake, G. Matthew; Ifedigbo, Emeka; Lederer, James A.; Englert, Joshua; Pelton, Ashley; Coronata, Anna; Fredenburgh, Laura E.; Choi, Augustine M. K.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are known to regulate immune responses in healthy animals, but it is unclear whether they persist during acute illnesses where clock gene expression is disrupted by systemic inflammation. Here, we use a genome-wide approach to investigate circadian gene and metabolite expression in the lungs of endotoxemic mice and find that novel cellular and molecular circadian rhythms are elicited in this setting. The endotoxin-specific circadian program exhibits unique features, including a divergent group of rhythmic genes and metabolites compared to the basal state and a distinct periodicity and phase distribution. At the cellular level endotoxin treatment also alters circadian rhythms of leukocyte counts within the lung in a bmal1-dependent manner, such that granulocytes rather than lymphocytes become the dominant oscillating cell type. Our results show that inflammation produces a complex reorganization of cellular and molecular circadian rhythms that are relevant to early events in lung injury. PMID:25208554

  4. Involvement of Wee1 in the circadian rhythm-dependent intestinal damage induced by docetaxel.

    PubMed

    Obi-Ioka, Yuri; Ushijima, Kentaro; Kusama, Mikio; Ishikawa-Kobayashi, Eiko; Fujimura, Akio

    2013-10-01

    Docetaxel, a semisynthetic taxane, is effective for the treatment of some solid cancers; however, docetaxel-induced intestinal damage leads to poor prognosis in some patients. Although such adverse effects have been reported to depend on the dosing-time of docetaxel, the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Wee1 expression is controlled by the clock gene complex, clock/bmal1, and contributes to cell-cycle progression. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the potential role of Wee1 in the circadian rhythm-dependent profile of docetaxel. Male mice were maintained under a 12-hour light/dark cycle. Intestinal damage after repeated dosing of docetaxel (20 mg/kg) for 3 weeks was more severe at 14 hours after light on (HALO) than at 2 HALO. The intestinal protein expressions of Wee1, phosphorylated CDK1, and cleaved Caspase-3 were higher in the 14-HALO group than in the 2-HALO group, whereas that of survivin was lower in the 14-HALO group. Thus, it is speculated that elevated Wee1 expression inhibited CDK1 activity more by phosphorylation, which in turn caused the lower expression of survivin and consequently more activated Caspase-3 in the 14-HALO group. There were no significant differences in plasma docetaxel concentrations between the 2- and 14-HALO groups. Bindings of CLOCK and BMAL1 to the E-box regions at the wee1 gene promoter were not altered by docetaxel treatment at 2 and 14 HALO. These findings suggest that Wee1 is directly or indirectly involved in the mechanism of the circadian rhythm-dependent changes in docetaxel-induced intestinal damage. However, the mechanism for a circadian rhythm-dependent change in intestinal Wee1 expression by docetaxel remains to be determined. PMID:23892568

  5. Molecular assembly of the period-cryptochrome circadian transcriptional repressor complex

    PubMed Central

    Nangle, Shannon N; Rosensweig, Clark; Koike, Nobuya; Tei, Hajime; Takahashi, Joseph S; Green, Carla B; Zheng, Ning

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian circadian clock is driven by a transcriptional–translational feedback loop, which produces robust 24-hr rhythms. Proper oscillation of the clock depends on the complex formation and periodic turnover of the Period and Cryptochrome proteins, which together inhibit their own transcriptional activator complex, CLOCK-BMAL1. We determined the crystal structure of the CRY-binding domain (CBD) of PER2 in complex with CRY2 at 2.8 Å resolution. PER2-CBD adopts a highly extended conformation, embracing CRY2 with a sinuous binding mode. Its N-terminal end tucks into CRY adjacent to a large pocket critical for CLOCK-BMAL1 binding, while its C-terminal half flanks the CRY2 C-terminal helix and sterically hinders the recognition of CRY2 by the FBXL3 ubiquitin ligase. Unexpectedly, a strictly conserved intermolecular zinc finger, whose integrity is important for clock rhythmicity, further stabilizes the complex. Our structure-guided analyses show that these interspersed CRY-interacting regions represent multiple functional modules of PERs at the CRY-binding interface. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03674.001 PMID:25127877

  6. Hepatic circadian-clock system altered by insulin resistance, diabetes and insulin sensitizer in mice.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Huey-Ling; Yang, Shu-Chuan; Yang, Shih-Hsien; Shieh, Kun-Ruey

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are intrinsic rhythms that are coordinated with the rotation of the Earth and are also generated by a set of circadian-clock genes at the intracellular level. Growing evidence suggests a strong link between circadian rhythms and energy metabolism; however, the fundamental mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, neonatal streptozotocin (STZ)-treated mice were used to model the molecular and physiological progress from insulin resistance to diabetes. Two-day-old male C57BL/6 mice received a single injection of STZ and were tested for non-obese, hyperglycemic and hyperinsulinemic conditions in the early stage, insulin resistance in the middle stage, and diabetes in the late stage. Gene expression levels of the hepatic circadian-clock system were examined by real-time quantitative PCR. Most of the components of the hepatic circadian-clock gene expression system, such as the mRNAs of Bmal1 (brain and muscle Arnt-like protein-1), Per2 (period 2) and Cry1 (cryptochrome 1), were elevated, and circadian patterns were retained in the early and middle stages of insulin-resistant conditions. The insulin sensitizer, rosiglitazone, returns the physiological and molecular changes associated with the diabetic phenotype to normal levels through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) rather than PPARα. Early and chronic treatment with rosiglitazone has been shown to be effective to counter the diabetic condition. Over time, this effect acts to attenuate the increased gene expression levels of the hepatic circadian-clock system and delay the severity of diabetic conditions. Together, these results support an essential role for the hepatic circadian-clock system in the coordinated regulation and/or response of metabolic pathways. PMID:25799429

  7. Hepatic Circadian-Clock System Altered by Insulin Resistance, Diabetes and Insulin Sensitizer in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shih-Hsien; Shieh, Kun-Ruey

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are intrinsic rhythms that are coordinated with the rotation of the Earth and are also generated by a set of circadian-clock genes at the intracellular level. Growing evidence suggests a strong link between circadian rhythms and energy metabolism; however, the fundamental mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, neonatal streptozotocin (STZ)-treated mice were used to model the molecular and physiological progress from insulin resistance to diabetes. Two-day-old male C57BL/6 mice received a single injection of STZ and were tested for non-obese, hyperglycemic and hyperinsulinemic conditions in the early stage, insulin resistance in the middle stage, and diabetes in the late stage. Gene expression levels of the hepatic circadian-clock system were examined by real-time quantitative PCR. Most of the components of the hepatic circadian-clock gene expression system, such as the mRNAs of Bmal1 (brain and muscle Arnt-like protein-1), Per2 (period 2) and Cry1 (cryptochrome 1), were elevated, and circadian patterns were retained in the early and middle stages of insulin-resistant conditions. The insulin sensitizer, rosiglitazone, returns the physiological and molecular changes associated with the diabetic phenotype to normal levels through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) rather than PPARα. Early and chronic treatment with rosiglitazone has been shown to be effective to counter the diabetic condition. Over time, this effect acts to attenuate the increased gene expression levels of the hepatic circadian-clock system and delay the severity of diabetic conditions. Together, these results support an essential role for the hepatic circadian-clock system in the coordinated regulation and/or response of metabolic pathways. PMID:25799429

  8. Mass spectrometry-based absolute quantification reveals rhythmic variation of mouse circadian clock proteins.

    PubMed

    Narumi, Ryohei; Shimizu, Yoshihiro; Ukai-Tadenuma, Maki; Ode, Koji L; Kanda, Genki N; Shinohara, Yuta; Sato, Aya; Matsumoto, Katsuhiko; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2016-06-14

    Absolute values of protein expression levels in cells are crucial information for understanding cellular biological systems. Precise quantification of proteins can be achieved by liquid chromatography (LC)-mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of enzymatic digests of proteins in the presence of isotope-labeled internal standards. Thus, development of a simple and easy way for the preparation of internal standards is advantageous for the analyses of multiple target proteins, which will allow systems-level studies. Here we describe a method, termed MS-based Quantification By isotope-labeled Cell-free products (MS-QBiC), which provides the simple and high-throughput preparation of internal standards by using a reconstituted cell-free protein synthesis system, and thereby facilitates both multiplexed and sensitive quantification of absolute amounts of target proteins. This method was applied to a systems-level dynamic analysis of mammalian circadian clock proteins, which consist of transcription factors and protein kinases that govern central and peripheral circadian clocks in mammals. Sixteen proteins from 20 selected circadian clock proteins were successfully quantified from mouse liver over a 24-h time series, and 14 proteins had circadian variations. Quantified values were applied to detect internal body time using a previously developed molecular timetable method. The analyses showed that single time-point data from wild-type mice can predict the endogenous state of the circadian clock, whereas data from clock mutant mice are not applicable because of the disappearance of circadian variation. PMID:27247408

  9. Genetic disruption of the core circadian clock impairs hippocampus-dependent memory

    PubMed Central

    Wardlaw, Sarah M.; Phan, Trongha X.; Saraf, Amit; Chen, Xuanmao

    2014-01-01

    Perturbing the circadian system by electrolytically lesioning the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) or varying the environmental light:dark schedule impairs memory, suggesting that memory depends on the circadian system. We used a genetic approach to evaluate the role of the molecular clock in memory. Bmal1−/− mice, which are arrhythmic under constant conditions, were examined for hippocampus-dependent memory, LTP at the Schaffer-collateral synapse, and signal transduction activity in the hippocampus. Bmal1−/− mice exhibit impaired contextual fear and spatial memory. Furthermore, LTP in hippocampal slices from Bmal1−/− mice is also significantly decreased relative to that from wild-type mice. Activation of Erk1,2 MAP kinase (MAPK) during training for contextual fear memory and diurnal oscillation of MAPK activity and cAMP in the hippocampus is also lost in Bmal1−/− mice, suggesting that the memory defects are due to reduction of the memory consolidation pathway in the hippocampus. We conclude that critical signaling events in the hippocampus required for memory depend on BMAL1. PMID:25034823

  10. Common Genetic Variation in Circadian Rhythm Genes and Risk of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC)

    PubMed Central

    Jim, Heather S.L.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Lawrenson, Kate; Dennis, Joe; Chornokur, Ganna; Chen, Zhihua; Chen, Ann Y.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Aben, Katja KH.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bruinsma, Fiona; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bean, Yukie T.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bunker, Clareann H.; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G.; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; du Bois, Andreas; Despierre, Evelyn; Sieh, Weiva; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana M.; Edwards, Robert P.; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goodman, Marc T.; Gronwald, Jacek; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis N.; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Claus K.; Hogdall, Estrid; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kellar, Melissa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Vierkant, Robert A.; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Alice W.; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Liang, Dong; Lim, Boon Kiong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R.; McNeish, Ian; Menon, Usha; Milne, Roger L.; Modugno, Francesmary; Thomsen, Lotte; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Ness, Roberta B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Eilber, Ursula; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Palmieri Weber, Rachel; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Schernhammer, Eva; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; van Altena, Anne M.; Vergote, Ignace; Walsh, Christine S.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Wu, Anna H.; Wu, Xifeng; Woo, Yin-Ling; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Amankwah, Ernest; Berchuck, Andrew; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Ramus, Susan J.; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Goode, Ellen L.; Narod, Steven A.; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Phelan, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption in circadian gene expression, whether due to genetic variation or environmental factors (e.g., light at night, shiftwork), is associated with increased incidence of breast, prostate, gastrointestinal and hematologic cancers and gliomas. Circadian genes are highly expressed in the ovaries where they regulate ovulation; circadian disruption is associated with several ovarian cancer risk factors (e.g., endometriosis). However, no studies have examined variation in germline circadian genes as predictors of ovarian cancer risk and invasiveness. The goal of the current study was to examine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in circadian genes BMAL1, CRY2, CSNK1E, NPAS2, PER3, REV1 and TIMELESS and downstream transcription factors KLF10 and SENP3 as predictors of risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and histopathologic subtypes. The study included a test set of 3,761 EOC cases and 2,722 controls and a validation set of 44,308 samples including 18,174 (10,316 serous) cases and 26,134 controls from 43 studies participating in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). Analysis of genotype data from 36 genotyped SNPs and 4600 imputed SNPs indicated that the most significant association was rs117104877 in BMAL1 (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.68–0.90, p = 5.59 × 10−4]. Functional analysis revealed a significant down regulation of BMAL1 expression following cMYC overexpression and increasing transformation in ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells as well as alternative splicing of BMAL1 exons in ovarian and granulosa cells. These results suggest that variation in circadian genes, and specifically BMAL1, may be associated with risk of ovarian cancer, likely through disruption of hormonal pathways. PMID:26807442

  11. Circadian Rhythms, the Molecular Clock, and Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lefta, Mellani; Wolff, Gretchen; Esser, Karyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Almost all organisms ranging from single cell bacteria to humans exhibit a variety of behavioral, physiological, and biochemical rhythms. In mammals, circadian rhythms control the timing of many physiological processes over a 24-h period, including sleep-wake cycles, body temperature, feeding, and hormone production. This body of research has led to defined characteristics of circadian rhythms based on period length, phase, and amplitude. Underlying circadian behaviors is a molecular clock mechanism found in most, if not all, cell types including skeletal muscle. The mammalian molecular clock is a complex of multiple oscillating networks that are regulated through transcriptional mechanisms, timed protein turnover, and input from small molecules. At this time, very little is known about circadian aspects of skeletal muscle function/metabolism but some progress has been made on understanding the molecular clock in skeletal muscle. The goal of this chapter is to provide the basic terminology and concepts of circadian rhythms with a more detailed review of the current state of knowledge of the molecular clock, with reference to what is known in skeletal muscle. Research has demonstrated that the molecular clock is active in skeletal muscles and that the muscle-specific transcription factor, MyoD, is a direct target of the molecular clock. Skeletal muscle of clock-compromised mice, Bmal1−/− and ClockΔ19 mice, are weak and exhibit significant disruptions in expression of many genes required for adult muscle structure and metabolism. We suggest that the interaction between the molecular clock, MyoD, and metabolic factors, such as PGC-1, provide a potential system of feedback loops that may be critical for both maintenance and adaptation of skeletal muscle. PMID:21621073

  12. Circadian and ultradian rhythms of clock gene expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of freely moving mice

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Daisuke; Honma, Ken-ichi; Honma, Sato

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, the temporal order of physiology and behavior is primarily regulated by the circadian pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Rhythms are generated in cells by an auto-regulatory transcription/translation feedback loop, composed of several clock genes and their protein products. Taking advantage of bioluminescence reporters, we have succeeded in continuously monitoring the expression of clock gene reporters Per1-luc, PER2::LUC and Bmal1-ELuc in the SCN of freely moving mice for up to 3 weeks in constant darkness. Bioluminescence emitted from the SCN was collected with an implanted plastic optical fiber which was connected to a cooled photomultiplier tube. We found robust circadian rhythms in the clock gene expression, the phase-relation of which were the same as those observed ex vivo. The circadian rhythms were superimposed by episodic bursts which had ultradian periods of approximately 3.0 h. Episodic bursts often accompanied activity bouts, but stoichiometric as well as temporal analyses revealed no causality between them. Clock gene expression in the SCN in vivo is regulated by the circadian pacemaker and ultradian rhythms of unknown origin. PMID:26194231

  13. Visualizing and Quantifying Intracellular Behavior and Abundance of the Core Circadian Clock Protein PERIOD2.

    PubMed

    Smyllie, Nicola J; Pilorz, Violetta; Boyd, James; Meng, Qing-Jun; Saer, Ben; Chesham, Johanna E; Maywood, Elizabeth S; Krogager, Toke P; Spiller, David G; Boot-Handford, Raymond; White, Michael R H; Hastings, Michael H; Loudon, Andrew S I

    2016-07-25

    Transcriptional-translational feedback loops (TTFLs) are a conserved molecular motif of circadian clocks. The principal clock in mammals is the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. In SCN neurons, auto-regulatory feedback on core clock genes Period (Per) and Cryptochrome (Cry) following nuclear entry of their protein products is the basis of circadian oscillation [1, 2]. In Drosophila clock neurons, the movement of dPer into the nucleus is subject to a circadian gate that generates a delay in the TTFL, and this delay is thought to be critical for oscillation [3, 4]. Analysis of the Drosophila clock has strongly influenced models of the mammalian clock, and such models typically infer complex spatiotemporal, intracellular behaviors of mammalian clock proteins. There are, however, no direct measures of the intracellular behavior of endogenous circadian proteins to support this: dynamic analyses have been limited and often have no circadian dimension [5-7]. We therefore generated a knockin mouse expressing a fluorescent fusion of native PER2 protein (PER2::VENUS) for live imaging. PER2::VENUS recapitulates the circadian functions of wild-type PER2 and, importantly, the behavior of PER2::VENUS runs counter to the Drosophila model: it does not exhibit circadian gating of nuclear entry. Using fluorescent imaging of PER2::VENUS, we acquired the first measures of mobility, molecular concentration, and localization of an endogenous circadian protein in individual mammalian cells, and we showed how the mobility and nuclear translocation of PER2 are regulated by casein kinase. These results provide new qualitative and quantitative insights into the cellular mechanism of the mammalian circadian clock. PMID:27374340

  14. Protein phosphatase PHLPP1 controls the light-induced resetting of the circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Masubuchi, Satoru; Gao, Tianyan; O'Neill, Audrey; Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Newton, Alexandra C.; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The pleckstrin homology domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1) differentially attenuates Akt, PKC, and ERK1/2 signaling, thereby controlling the duration and amplitude of responses evoked by these kinases. PHLPP1 is expressed in the mammalian central clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus, where it oscillates in a circadian fashion. To explore the role of PHLPP1 in vivo, we have generated mice with a targeted deletion of the PHLPP1 gene. Here we show that PHLPP1-null mice, although displaying normal circadian rhythmicity, have a drastically impaired capacity to stabilize the circadian period after light-induced resetting, producing a large phase shift after light resetting. Our findings reveal that PHLPP1 exerts a previously unappreciated role in circadian control, governing the consolidation of circadian periodicity after resetting. PMID:20080691

  15. Circadian rhythms, Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and PPAR alpha/gamma profiles in diseases with primary or secondary cardiac dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lecarpentier, Yves; Claes, Victor; Duthoit, Guillaume; Hébert, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clock mechanisms are far-from-equilibrium dissipative structures. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR alpha, beta/delta, and gamma) play a key role in metabolic regulatory processes, particularly in heart muscle. Links between circadian rhythms (CRs) and PPARs have been established. Mammalian CRs involve at least two critical transcription factors, CLOCK and BMAL1 (Gekakis et al., 1998; Hogenesch et al., 1998). PPAR gamma plays a major role in both glucose and lipid metabolisms and presents circadian properties which coordinate the interplay between metabolism and CRs. PPAR gamma is a major component of the vascular clock. Vascular PPAR gamma is a peripheral regulator of cardiovascular rhythms controlling circadian variations in blood pressure and heart rate through BMAL1. We focused our review on diseases with abnormalities of CRs and with primary or secondary cardiac dysfunction. Moreover, these diseases presented changes in the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and PPARs, according to two opposed profiles. Profile 1 was defined as follows: inactivation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway with increased expression of PPAR gamma. Profile 2 was defined as follows: activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway with decreased expression of PPAR gamma. A typical profile 1 disease is arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, a genetic cardiac disease which presents mutations of the desmosomal proteins and is mainly characterized by fatty acid accumulation in adult cardiomyocytes mainly in the right ventricle. The link between PPAR gamma dysfunction and desmosomal genetic mutations occurs via inactivation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway presenting oscillatory properties. A typical profile 2 disease is type 2 diabetes, with activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and decreased expression of PPAR gamma. CRs abnormalities are present in numerous pathologies such as cardiovascular diseases, sympathetic/parasympathetic dysfunction, hypertension, diabetes

  16. Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) Is a Post-Translational Regulator of the Mammalian Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Schmutz, Isabelle; Wendt, Sabrina; Schnell, Anna; Kramer, Achim; Mansuy, Isabelle M.; Albrecht, Urs

    2011-01-01

    Circadian clocks coordinate the timing of important biological processes. Interconnected transcriptional and post-translational feedback loops based on a set of clock genes generate and maintain these rhythms with a period of about 24 hours. Many clock proteins undergo circadian cycles of post-translational modifications. Among these modifications, protein phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating activity, stability and intracellular localization of clock components. Several protein kinases were characterized as regulators of the circadian clock. However, the function of protein phosphatases, which balance phosphorylation events, in the mammalian clock mechanism is less well understood. Here, we identify protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) as regulator of period and light-induced resetting of the mammalian circadian clock. Down-regulation of PP1 activity in cells by RNA interference and in vivo by expression of a specific inhibitor in the brain of mice tended to lengthen circadian period. Moreover, reduction of PP1 activity in the brain altered light-mediated clock resetting behavior in mice, enhancing the phase shifts in either direction. At the molecular level, diminished PP1 activity increased nuclear accumulation of the clock component PER2 in neurons. Hence, PP1, may reduce PER2 phosphorylation thereby influencing nuclear localization of this protein. This may at least partially influence period and phase shifting properties of the mammalian circadian clock. PMID:21712997

  17. Clock Genes Show Circadian Rhythms in Salivary Glands

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, L.; Seon, Y.J.; McHugh, J.; Papagerakis, S.; Papagerakis, P.

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are endogenous self-sustained oscillations with 24-hour periods that regulate diverse physiological and metabolic processes through complex gene regulation by “clock” transcription factors. The oral cavity is bathed by saliva, and its amount and content are modified within regular daily intervals. The clock mechanisms that control salivary production remain unclear. Our objective was to evaluate the expression and periodicity of clock genes in salivary glands. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry were performed to show circadian mRNA and protein expression and localization of key clock genes (Bmal1, Clock, Per1, and Per2), ion and aqua channel genes (Ae2a, Car2, and Aqp5), and salivary gland markers. Clock gene mRNAs and clock proteins were found differentially expressed in the serous acini and duct cells of all major salivary glands. The expression levels of clock genes and Aqp5 showed regular oscillatory patterns under both light/dark and complete-dark conditions. Bmla1 overexpression resulted in increased Aqp5 expression levels. Analysis of our data suggests that salivary glands have a peripheral clock mechanism that functions both in normal light/dark conditions and in the absence of light. This finding may increase our understanding of the control mechanisms of salivary content and flow. PMID:22699207

  18. Early doors (Edo) mutant mouse reveals the importance of period 2 (PER2) PAS domain structure for circadian pacemaking

    PubMed Central

    Militi, Stefania; Maywood, Elizabeth S.; Sandate, Colby R.; Chesham, Johanna E.; Parsons, Michael J.; Vibert, Jennifer L.; Joynson, Greg M.; Partch, Carrie L.; Hastings, Michael H.; Nolan, Patrick M.

    2016-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) defines 24 h of time via a transcriptional/posttranslational feedback loop in which transactivation of Per (period) and Cry (cryptochrome) genes by BMAL1–CLOCK complexes is suppressed by PER–CRY complexes. The molecular/structural basis of how circadian protein complexes function is poorly understood. We describe a novel N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced mutation, early doors (Edo), in the PER-ARNT-SIM (PAS) domain dimerization region of period 2 (PER2) (I324N) that accelerates the circadian clock of Per2Edo/Edo mice by 1.5 h. Structural and biophysical analyses revealed that Edo alters the packing of the highly conserved interdomain linker of the PER2 PAS core such that, although PER2Edo complexes with clock proteins, its vulnerability to degradation mediated by casein kinase 1ε (CSNK1E) is increased. The functional relevance of this mutation is revealed by the ultrashort (<19 h) but robust circadian rhythms in Per2Edo/Edo; Csnk1eTau/Tau mice and the SCN. These periods are unprecedented in mice. Thus, Per2Edo reveals a direct causal link between the molecular structure of the PER2 PAS core and the pace of SCN circadian timekeeping. PMID:26903623

  19. ARNTL (BMAL1) and NPAS2 Gene Variants Contribute to Fertility and Seasonality

    PubMed Central

    Kovanen, Leena; Saarikoski, Sirkku T.; Aromaa, Arpo; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Partonen, Timo

    2010-01-01

    Background Circadian clocks guide the metabolic, cell-division, sleep-wake, circadian and seasonal cycles. Abnormalities in these clocks may be a health hazard. Circadian clock gene polymorphisms have been linked to sleep, mood and metabolic disorders. Our study aimed to examine polymorphisms in four key circadian clock genes in relation to seasonal variation, reproduction and well-being in a sample that was representative of the general population, aged 30 and over, living in Finland. Methodology/Principal Findings Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the ARNTL, ARNTL2, CLOCK and NPAS2 genes were genotyped in 511 individuals. 19 variants were analyzed in relation to 31 phenotypes that were assessed in a health interview and examination study. With respect to reproduction, women with ARNTL rs2278749 TT genotype had more miscarriages and pregnancies, while NPAS2 rs11673746 T carriers had fewer miscarriages. NPAS2 rs2305160 A allele carriers had lower Global Seasonality Scores, a sum score of six items i.e. seasonal variation of sleep length, social activity, mood, weight, appetite and energy level. Furthermore, carriers of A allele at NPAS2 rs6725296 had greater loadings on the metabolic factor (weight and appetite) of the global seasonality score, whereas individuals with ARNTL rs6290035 TT genotype experienced less seasonal variation of energy level. Conclusions/Significance ARNTL and NPAS2 gene variants were associated with reproduction and with seasonal variation. Earlier findings have linked ARNTL to infertility in mice, but this is the first time when any polymorphism of these genes is linked to fertility in humans. PMID:20368993

  20. Circadian and feeding rhythms differentially affect rhythmic mRNA transcription and translation in mouse liver

    PubMed Central

    Atger, Florian; Gobet, Cédric; Marquis, Julien; Martin, Eva; Wang, Jingkui; Weger, Benjamin; Lefebvre, Grégory; Descombes, Patrick; Naef, Felix; Gachon, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Diurnal oscillations of gene expression are a hallmark of rhythmic physiology across most living organisms. Such oscillations are controlled by the interplay between the circadian clock and feeding rhythms. Although rhythmic mRNA accumulation has been extensively studied, comparatively less is known about their transcription and translation. Here, we quantified simultaneously temporal transcription, accumulation, and translation of mouse liver mRNAs under physiological light–dark conditions and ad libitum or night-restricted feeding in WT and brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 (Bmal1)-deficient animals. We found that rhythmic transcription predominantly drives rhythmic mRNA accumulation and translation for a majority of genes. Comparison of wild-type and Bmal1 KO mice shows that circadian clock and feeding rhythms have broad impact on rhythmic gene expression, Bmal1 deletion affecting surprisingly both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Translation efficiency is differentially regulated during the diurnal cycle for genes with 5′-Terminal Oligo Pyrimidine tract (5′-TOP) sequences and for genes involved in mitochondrial activity, many harboring a Translation Initiator of Short 5′-UTR (TISU) motif. The increased translation efficiency of 5′-TOP and TISU genes is mainly driven by feeding rhythms but Bmal1 deletion also affects amplitude and phase of translation, including TISU genes. Together this study emphasizes the complex interconnections between circadian and feeding rhythms at several steps ultimately determining rhythmic gene expression and translation. PMID:26554015

  1. Altered Stra13 and Dec2 circadian gene expression in hypoxic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guillaumond, Fabienne; Lacoche, Samuel; Dulong, Sandrine; Grechez-Cassiau, Aline; Filipski, Elisabeth; Li, Xiao-Mei; Levi, Francis; Berra, Edurne; Delaunay, Franck; Teboul, Michele

    2008-05-16

    The circadian system regulates rhythmically most of the mammalian physiology in synchrony with the environmental light/dark cycle. Alteration of circadian clock gene expression has been associated with tumour progression but the molecular links between the two mechanisms remain poorly defined. Here we show that Stra13 and Dec2, two circadian transcriptional regulators which play a crucial role in cell proliferation and apoptosis are overexpressed and no longer rhythmic in serum shocked fibroblasts treated with CoCl{sub 2,} a substitute of hypoxia. This effect is associated with a loss of circadian expression of the clock genes Rev-erb{alpha} and Bmal1, and the clock-controlled gene Dbp. Consistently, cotransfection assays demonstrate that STRA13 and DEC2 both antagonize CLOCK:BMAL1 dependent transactivation of the Rev-erb{alpha} and Dbp promoters. Using a transplantable osteosarcoma tumour model, we show that hypoxia is associated with altered circadian expression of Stra13, Dec2, Rev-erb{alpha}, Bmal1 and Dbp in vivo. These observations collectively support the notion that overexpression of Stra13 and Dec2 links hypoxia signalling to altered circadian clock gene expression.

  2. CUL1 regulates TOC1 protein stability in the Arabidopsis circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Harmon, Frank; Imaizumi, Takato; Gray, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The circadian clock is the endogenous timer that coordinates physiological processes with daily and seasonal environmental changes. In Arabidopsis thaliana, establishment of the circadian period relies on targeted degradation of TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION 1 (TOC1) by the 26S proteasome. ZEITLUPE (ZTL) is the F-box protein that associates with the SCF (Skp/Cullin/F-box) E3 ubiquitin ligase that is responsible for marking TOC1 for turnover. CULLIN1 (CUL1) is a core component of SCF complexes and is involved in multiple signaling pathways. To assess the contribution of CUL1-containing SCF complexes to signaling within the plant oscillator, circadian rhythms were examined in the recessive, temperature-sensitive CUL1 allele axr6-3. The activity of CUL1 in this mutant declines progressively with increasing ambient temperature, resulting in more severe defects in CUL1-dependent activities at elevated temperature. Examination of circadian rhythms in axr6-3 revealed circadian phenotypes comparable to those observed in ztl null mutants; namely, lengthened circadian period, altered expression of core oscillator genes, and limited degradation of TOC1. In addition, treatment of seedlings with exogenous auxin did not alter TOC1 stability. These results demonstrate that CUL1 is required for TOC1 degradation and further suggest that this protein is the functional cullin for the SCFZTL complex. PMID:18433436

  3. Biotinylation: a novel posttranslational modification linking cell autonomous circadian clocks with metabolism.

    PubMed

    He, Lan; Hamm, J Austin; Reddy, Alex; Sams, David; Peliciari-Garcia, Rodrigo A; McGinnis, Graham R; Bailey, Shannon M; Chow, Chi-Wing; Rowe, Glenn C; Chatham, John C; Young, Martin E

    2016-06-01

    Circadian clocks are critical modulators of metabolism. However, mechanistic links between cell autonomous clocks and metabolic processes remain largely unknown. Here, we report that expression of the biotin transporter slc5a6 gene is decreased in hearts of two distinct genetic mouse models of cardiomyocyte-specific circadian clock disruption [i.e., cardiomyocyte-specific CLOCK mutant (CCM) and cardiomyocyte-specific BMAL1 knockout (CBK) mice]. Biotinylation is an obligate posttranslational modification for five mammalian carboxylases: acetyl-CoA carboxylase α (ACCα), ACCβ, pyruvate carboxylase (PC), methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (MCC), and propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC). We therefore hypothesized that the cardiomyocyte circadian clock impacts metabolism through biotinylation. Consistent with decreased slc5a6 expression, biotinylation of all carboxylases is significantly decreased (10-46%) in CCM and CBK hearts. In association with decreased biotinylated ACC, oleate oxidation rates are increased in both CCM and CBK hearts. Consistent with decreased biotinylated MCC, leucine oxidation rates are significantly decreased in both CCM and CBK hearts, whereas rates of protein synthesis are increased. Importantly, feeding CBK mice with a biotin-enriched diet for 6 wk normalized myocardial 1) ACC biotinylation and oleate oxidation rates; 2) PCC/MCC biotinylation (and partially restored leucine oxidation rates); and 3) net protein synthesis rates. Furthermore, data suggest that the RRAGD/mTOR/4E-BP1 signaling axis is chronically activated in CBK and CCM hearts. Finally we report that the hepatocyte circadian clock also regulates both slc5a6 expression and protein biotinylation in the liver. Collectively, these findings suggest that biotinylation is a novel mechanism by which cell autonomous circadian clocks influence metabolic pathways. PMID:27084392

  4. The orphan receptor Rev-erbα gene is a target of the circadian clock pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Triqueneaux, Gérard; Thenot, Sandrine; Kakizawa, Tomoko; Antoch, Marina P; Safi, Rachid; Takahashi, Joseph S; Delaunay, Franck; Laudet, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Rev-erbα is a ubiquitously expressed orphan nuclear receptor which functions as a constitutive transcriptional repressor and is expressed in vertebrates according to a robust circadian rhythm. We report here that two Rev-erbα mRNA isoforms, namely Rev-erbα1 and Rev-erbα2, are generated through alternative promoter usage and that both show a circadian expression pattern in an in vitro system using serum-shocked fibroblasts. Both promoter regions P1 (Rev-erbα1) and P2 (Rev-erbα2) contain several E-box DNA sequences, which function as response elements for the core circadian-clock components: CLOCK and BMAL1. The CLOCK–BMAL1 heterodimer stimulates the activity of both P1 and P2 promoters in transient transfection assay by 3–6-fold. This activation was inhibited by the overexpression of CRY1, a component of the negative limb of the circadian transcriptional loop. Critical E-box elements were mapped within both promoters. This regulation is conserved in vertebrates since we found that the CLOCK–BMAL1 heterodimer also regulates the zebrafish Rev-erbα gene. In line with these data Rev-erbα circadian expression was strongly impaired in the livers of Clock mutant mice and in the pineal glands of zebrafish embryos treated with Clock and Bmal1 antisense oligonucleotides. Together these data demonstrate that CLOCK is a critical regulator of Rev-erbα circadian gene expression in evolutionarily distant vertebrates and suggest a role for Rev-erbα in the circadian clock output. PMID:15591021

  5. Toward a detailed computational model for the mammalian circadian clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leloup, Jean-Christophe; Goldbeter, Albert

    2003-06-01

    We present a computational model for the mammalian circadian clock based on the intertwined positive and negative regulatory loops involving the Per, Cry, Bmal1, Clock, and Rev-Erb genes. In agreement with experimental observations, the model can give rise to sustained circadian oscillations in continuous darkness, characterized by an antiphase relationship between Per/Cry/Rev-Erb and Bmal1 mRNAs. Sustained oscillations correspond to the rhythms autonomously generated by suprachiasmatic nuclei. For other parameter values, damped oscillations can also be obtained in the model. These oscillations, which transform into sustained oscillations when coupled to a periodic signal, correspond to rhythms produced by peripheral tissues. When incorporating the light-induced expression of the Per gene, the model accounts for entrainment of the oscillations by light-dark cycles. Simulations show that the phase of the oscillations can then vary by several hours with relatively minor changes in parameter values. Such a lability of the phase could account for physiological disorders related to circadian rhythms in humans, such as advanced or delayed sleep phase syndrome, whereas the lack of entrainment by light-dark cycles can be related to the non-24h sleep-wake syndrome. The model uncovers the possible existence of multiple sources of oscillatory behavior. Thus, in conditions where the indirect negative autoregulation of Per and Cry expression is inoperative, the model indicates the possibility that sustained oscillations might still arise from the negative autoregulation of Bmal1 expression.

  6. Circadian Regulation of Sucrose Phosphate Synthase Activity in Tomato by Protein Phosphatase Activity.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, T. L.; Ort, D. R.

    1997-01-01

    Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS), a key enzyme in sucrose biosynthesis, is regulated by protein phosphorylation and shows a circadian pattern of activity in tomato. SPS is most active in its dephosphorylated state, which normally coincides with daytime. Applying okadaic acid, a potent protein phosphatase inhibitor, prevents SPS activation. More interesting is that a brief treatment with cycloheximide, a cytoplasmic translation inhibitor, also prevents the light activation of SPS without any effect on the amount of SPS protein. Cordycepin, an inhibitor of transcript synthesis and processing, has the same effect. Both of these inhibitors also prevent the activation phase of the circadian rhythm in SPS activity. Conversely, cycloheximide and cordycepin do not prevent the decline in circadian SPS activity that normally occurs at night. These observations indicate that SPS phosphatase activity but not SPS kinase activity is controlled, directly or indirectly, at the level of gene expression. Taken together, these data imply that there is a circadian rhythm controlling the transcription of a protein phosphatase that subsequently dictates the circadian rhythm in SPS activity via effects on this enzyme's phosphorylation state. PMID:12223667

  7. Manipulations of amyloid precursor protein cleavage disrupt the circadian clock in aging Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Blake, Matthew R; Holbrook, Scott D; Kotwica-Rolinska, Joanna; Chow, Eileen S; Kretzschmar, Doris; Giebultowicz, Jadwiga M

    2015-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by severe cognitive deterioration. While causes of AD pathology are debated, a large body of evidence suggests that increased cleavage of Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) producing the neurotoxic Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide plays a fundamental role in AD pathogenesis. One of the detrimental behavioral symptoms commonly associated with AD is the fragmentation of sleep-activity cycles with increased nighttime activity and daytime naps in humans. Sleep-activity cycles, as well as physiological and cellular rhythms, which may be important for neuronal homeostasis, are generated by a molecular system known as the circadian clock. Links between AD and the circadian system are increasingly evident but not well understood. Here we examined whether genetic manipulations of APP-like (APPL) protein cleavage in Drosophila melanogaster affect rest-activity rhythms and core circadian clock function in this model organism. We show that the increased β-cleavage of endogenous APPL by the β-secretase (dBACE) severely disrupts circadian behavior and leads to reduced expression of clock protein PER in central clock neurons of aging flies. Our data suggest that behavioral rhythm disruption is not a product of APPL-derived Aβ production but rather may be caused by a mechanism common to both α and β-cleavage pathways. Specifically, we show that increased production of the endogenous Drosophila Amyloid Intracellular Domain (dAICD) caused disruption of circadian rest-activity rhythms, while flies overexpressing endogenous APPL maintained stronger circadian rhythms during aging. In summary, our study offers a novel entry point toward understanding the mechanism of circadian rhythm disruption in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25766673

  8. Codon usage affects the structure and function of the Drosophila circadian clock protein PERIOD.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jingjing; Murphy, Katherine A; Zhou, Mian; Li, Ying H; Lam, Vu H; Tabuloc, Christine A; Chiu, Joanna C; Liu, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Codon usage bias is a universal feature of all genomes, but its in vivo biological functions in animal systems are not clear. To investigate the in vivo role of codon usage in animals, we took advantage of the sensitivity and robustness of the Drosophila circadian system. By codon-optimizing parts of Drosophila period (dper), a core clock gene that encodes a critical component of the circadian oscillator, we showed that dper codon usage is important for circadian clock function. Codon optimization of dper resulted in conformational changes of the dPER protein, altered dPER phosphorylation profile and stability, and impaired dPER function in the circadian negative feedback loop, which manifests into changes in molecular rhythmicity and abnormal circadian behavioral output. This study provides an in vivo example that demonstrates the role of codon usage in determining protein structure and function in an animal system. These results suggest a universal mechanism in eukaryotes that uses a codon usage "code" within genetic codons to regulate cotranslational protein folding. PMID:27542830

  9. Small Heterodimer Partner (NR0B2) Coordinates Nutrient Signaling and the Circadian Clock in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Nan; Kim, Kang Ho; Zhou, Ying; Lee, Jae Man; Kettner, Nicole M; Mamrosh, Jennifer L; Choi, Sungwoo; Fu, Loning; Moore, David D

    2016-09-01

    Circadian rhythm regulates multiple metabolic processes and in turn is readily entrained by feeding-fasting cycles. However, the molecular mechanisms by which the peripheral clock senses nutrition availability remain largely unknown. Bile acids are under circadian control and also increase postprandially, serving as regulators of the fed state in the liver. Here, we show that nuclear receptor Small Heterodimer Partner (SHP), a regulator of bile acid metabolism, impacts the endogenous peripheral clock by directly regulating Bmal1. Bmal1-dependent gene expression is altered in Shp knockout mice, and liver clock adaptation is delayed in Shp knockout mice upon restricted feeding. These results identify SHP as a potential mediator connecting nutrient signaling with the circadian clock. PMID:27427832

  10. Coactivator-Dependent Oscillation of Chromatin Accessibility Dictates Circadian Gene Amplitude via REV-ERB Loading.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bokai; Gates, Leah A; Stashi, Erin; Dasgupta, Subhamoy; Gonzales, Naomi; Dean, Adam; Dacso, Clifford C; York, Brian; O'Malley, Bert W

    2015-12-01

    A central mechanism for controlling circadian gene amplitude remains elusive. We present evidence for a "facilitated repression (FR)" model that functions as an amplitude rheostat for circadian gene oscillation. We demonstrate that ROR and/or BMAL1 promote global chromatin decondensation during the activation phase of the circadian cycle to actively facilitate REV-ERB loading for repression of circadian gene expression. Mechanistically, we found that SRC-2 dictates global circadian chromatin remodeling through spatial and temporal recruitment of PBAF members of the SWI/SNF complex to facilitate loading of REV-ERB in the hepatic genome. Mathematical modeling highlights how the FR model sustains proper circadian rhythm despite fluctuations of REV-ERB levels. Our study not only reveals a mechanism for active communication between the positive and negative limbs of the circadian transcriptional loop but also establishes the concept that clock transcription factor binding dynamics is perhaps a central tenet for fine-tuning circadian rhythm. PMID:26611104

  11. An epithelial circadian clock controls pulmonary inflammation and glucocorticoid action

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Julie; Ince, Louise; Matthews, Laura; Mei, Junjie; Bell, Thomas; Yang, Nan; Saer, Ben; Begley, Nicola; Poolman, Toryn; Pariollaud, Marie; Farrow, Stuart; Demayo, Francesco; Hussell, Tracy; Worthen, G Scott; Ray, David; Loudon, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The circadian system is as an important regulator of immune function. Human inflammatory lung diseases frequently show time-of-day variation in symptom severity and lung function, but the mechanisms and cell types that are underlying these effects remain unclear. We show that pulmonary antibacterial responses are modulated by a circadian clock within epithelial club (Clara) cells. These drive circadian neutrophil recruitment to the lung via the chemokine CXCL5. Genetic ablation of the clock gene Bmal1 (also called Arntl or MOP3) in bronchiolar cells disrupts rhythmic Cxcl5 expression, resulting in exaggerated inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide and bacterial infection. Adrenalectomy blocks rhythmic inflammatory responses and the circadian regulation of CXCL5, suggesting a key role for the adrenal axis in driving CXCL5 expression and pulmonary neutrophil recruitment. Glucocorticoid receptor occupancy at the Cxcl5 locus shows circadian oscillations, but this is disrupted in mice with bronchiole-specific ablation of Bmal1, leading to enhanced CXCL5 expression despite normal corticosteroid secretion. In clock-gene disrupted mice the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone loses anti-inflammatory efficacy. We now define a regulatory mechanism that links the circadian clock and glucocorticoid hormones to control both time-of-day variation and also the magnitude of pulmonary inflammation and responses to bacterial infection. PMID:25064128

  12. Protein sequestration versus Hill-type repression in circadian clock models.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Kyoung

    2016-08-01

    Circadian (∼24 h) clocks are self-sustained endogenous oscillators with which organisms keep track of daily and seasonal time. Circadian clocks frequently rely on interlocked transcriptional-translational feedback loops to generate rhythms that are robust against intrinsic and extrinsic perturbations. To investigate the dynamics and mechanisms of the intracellular feedback loops in circadian clocks, a number of mathematical models have been developed. The majority of the models use Hill functions to describe transcriptional repression in a way that is similar to the Goodwin model. Recently, a new class of models with protein sequestration-based repression has been introduced. Here, the author discusses how this new class of models differs dramatically from those based on Hill-type repression in several fundamental aspects: conditions for rhythm generation, robust network designs and the periods of coupled oscillators. Consistently, these fundamental properties of circadian clocks also differ among Neurospora, Drosophila, and mammals depending on their key transcriptional repression mechanisms (Hill-type repression or protein sequestration). Based on both theoretical and experimental studies, this review highlights the importance of careful modelling of transcriptional repression mechanisms in molecular circadian clocks. PMID:27444022

  13. Circadian molecular clock in lung pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Isaac K; Yao, Hongwei; Sellix, Michael T; Rahman, Irfan

    2015-11-15

    Disrupted daily or circadian rhythms of lung function and inflammatory responses are common features of chronic airway diseases. At the molecular level these circadian rhythms depend on the activity of an autoregulatory feedback loop oscillator of clock gene transcription factors, including the BMAL1:CLOCK activator complex and the repressors PERIOD and CRYPTOCHROME. The key nuclear receptors and transcription factors REV-ERBα and RORα regulate Bmal1 expression and provide stability to the oscillator. Circadian clock dysfunction is implicated in both immune and inflammatory responses to environmental, inflammatory, and infectious agents. Molecular clock function is altered by exposomes, tobacco smoke, lipopolysaccharide, hyperoxia, allergens, bleomycin, as well as bacterial and viral infections. The deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) regulates the timing of the clock through acetylation of BMAL1 and PER2 and controls the clock-dependent functions, which can also be affected by environmental stressors. Environmental agents and redox modulation may alter the levels of REV-ERBα and RORα in lung tissue in association with a heightened DNA damage response, cellular senescence, and inflammation. A reciprocal relationship exists between the molecular clock and immune/inflammatory responses in the lungs. Molecular clock function in lung cells may be used as a biomarker of disease severity and exacerbations or for assessing the efficacy of chronotherapy for disease management. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of clock-controlled cellular and molecular functions in the lungs and highlight the repercussions of clock disruption on the pathophysiology of chronic airway diseases and their exacerbations. Furthermore, we highlight the potential for the molecular clock as a novel chronopharmacological target for the management of lung pathophysiology. PMID:26361874

  14. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy to Monitor Kai Protein-based Circadian Oscillations in Real Time*

    PubMed Central

    Goda, Kazuhito; Ito, Hiroshi; Kondo, Takao; Oyama, Tokitaka

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic protein-protein interactions play an essential role in cellular regulatory systems. The cyanobacterial circadian clock is an oscillatory system that can be reconstituted in vitro by mixing ATP and three clock proteins: KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC. Association and dissociation of KaiB from KaiC-containing complexes are critical to circadian phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of KaiC. We developed an automated and noninvasive method to monitor dynamic complex formation in real time using confocal fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and uniformly labeled KaiB as a probe. A nanomolar concentration of the labeled KaiB for FCS measurement did not interfere with the oscillatory system but behaved similarly to the wild-type one during the measurement period (>5 days). The fluorescent probe was stable against repeated laser exposure. As an application, we show that this detection system allowed analysis of the dynamics of both long term circadian oscillations and short term responses to temperature changes (∼10 min) in the same sample. This suggested that a phase shift of the clock with a high temperature pulse occurred just after the stimulus through dissociation of KaiB from the KaiC complex. This monitoring method should improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying this cellular circadian oscillator and provide a means to assess dynamic protein interactions in biological systems characterized by rates similar to those observed with the Kai proteins. PMID:22157012

  15. The Transcription Factor Runx2 Is under Circadian Control in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus and Functions in the Control of Rhythmic Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Reale, Meghan E.; Webb, Ian C.; Wang, Xu; Baltazar, Ricardo M.; Coolen, Lique M.; Lehman, Michael N.

    2013-01-01

    Runx2, a member of the family of runt-related transcription factors, is rhythmically expressed in bone and may be involved in circadian rhythms in bone homeostasis and osteogenesis. Runx2 is also expressed in the brain, but its function is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that in the brain, Runx2 may interact with clock-controlled genes to regulate circadian rhythms in behavior. First, we demonstrated diurnal and circadian rhythms in the expression of Runx2 in the mouse brain. Expression of Runx2 mRNA and protein mirrored that of the core clock genes, Period1 and Period2, in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the paraventricular nucleus and the olfactory bulb. The rhythm of Runx2 expression was eliminated in the SCN of Bmal1−/− mice. Moreover, by crossbreeding mPer2Luc mice with Runx2+/− mice and recording bioluminescence rhythms, a significant lengthening of the period of rhythms was detected in cultured SCN of Runx2−/− animals compared to either Runx2+/− or Runx2+/+ mice. Behavioral analyses of Runx2 mutant mice revealed that Runx2+/− animals displayed a significantly lengthened free-running period of running wheel activity compared to Runx2+/+ littermates. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for clock gene-mediated rhythmic expression of Runx2, and its functional role in regulating circadian period at the level of the SCN and behavior. PMID:23372705

  16. Circadian rhythms, oxidative stress, and antioxidative defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hardeland, Rüdiger; Coto-Montes, Ana; Poeggeler, Burkhard

    2003-11-01

    the per2 gene homolog are reported to be cancer-prone, a finding which might also relate to oxidative stress. In the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum [Gonyaulax polyedra], various treatments that cause oxidative stress result in strong suppressions of melatonin and its metabolite 5-methoxytryptamine (5-MT) and to secondary effects on overt rhythmicity. The glow maximum, depending on the presence of elevated 5-MT at the end of subjective night, decreases in a dose-dependent manner already under moderate, non-lethal oxidative stress, but is restored by replenishing melatonin. Therefore, a general effect of oxidative stress may consist in declines of easily oxidizable signaling molecules such as melatonin, and this can have consequences on the circadian intraorganismal organization and expression of overt rhythms. Recent findings on a redox-sensitive input into the core oscillator via modulation of NPAS2/BMAL1 or CLK/BMAL1 heterodimer binding to DNA indicate a direct influence of cellular redox balance, including oxidative stress, on the circadian clock. PMID:14680136

  17. A Protein Fold Switch Joins the Circadian Oscillator to Clock Output in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yong-Gang; Cohen, Susan E.; Phong, Connie; Myers, William K.; Kim, Yong-Ick; Tseng, Roger; Lin, Jenny; Zhang, Li; Boyd, Joseph S.; Lee, Yvonne; Kang, Shannon; Lee, David; Li, Sheng; Britt, R. David; Rust, Michael J.; Golden, Susan S.; LiWang, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Organisms are adapted to the relentless cycles of day and night, because they evolved timekeeping systems called circadian clocks, which regulate biological activities with ~24-h rhythms. The clock of cyanobacteria is driven by a three-protein oscillator comprised of KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC, which together generate a circadian rhythm of KaiC phosphorylation. We show that KaiB flips between two distinct three-dimensional folds, and its rare transition to an active state provides a time delay that is required to match the timing of the oscillator to that of earth’s rotation. Once KaiB switches folds, it binds phosphorylated KaiC and captures KaiA, initiating a phase transition of the circadian cycle, and regulates components of the clock-output pathway, providing the link that joins the timekeeping and signaling functions of the oscillator. PMID:26113641

  18. Circadian Clock-Specific Roles for the Light Response Protein WHITE COLLAR-2

    PubMed Central

    Collett, Michael A.; Dunlap, Jay C.; Loros, Jennifer J.

    2001-01-01

    To understand the role of white collar-2 in the Neurospora circadian clock, we examined alleles of wc-2 thought to encode partially functional proteins. We found that wc-2 allele ER24 contained a conservative mutation in the zinc finger. This mutation results in reduced levels of circadian rhythm-critical clock gene products, frq mRNA and FRQ protein, and in a lengthened period of the circadian clock. In addition, this mutation altered a second canonical property of the clock, temperature compensation: as temperature increased, period length decreased substantially. This temperature compensation defect correlated with a temperature-dependent increase in overall FRQ protein levels, with the relative increase being greater in wc-2 (ER24) than in wild type, while overall frq mRNA levels were largely unaltered by temperature. We suggest that this temperature-dependent increase in FRQ levels partially rescues the lowered levels of FRQ resulting from the wc-2 (ER24) defect, yielding a shorter period at higher temperatures. Thus, normal activity of the essential clock component WC-2, a positive regulator of frq, is critical for establishing period length and temperature compensation in this circadian system. PMID:11283242

  19. Dynamics of the circadian clock protein PERIOD2 in living cells.

    PubMed

    Öllinger, Rupert; Korge, Sandra; Korte, Thomas; Koller, Barbara; Herrmann, Andreas; Kramer, Achim

    2014-10-01

    In mammals, circadian rhythms are generated by delayed negative feedback, in which period (PER1-PER3) and cryptochrome (CRY1, CRY2) proteins gradually accumulate in the nucleus to suppress the transcription of their own genes. Although the importance of nuclear import and export signals for the subcellular localization of clock proteins is well established, little is known about the dynamics of these processes as well as their importance for the generation of circadian rhythms. We show by pharmacological perturbations of oscillating cells that nuclear import and export are of crucial importance for the circadian period. Live-cell fluorescence microscopy revealed that nuclear import of the key circadian protein PER2 is fast and further accelerated by CRY1. Moreover, PER2 nuclear import is crucially dependent on a specific nuclear-receptor-binding motif in PER2 that also mediates nuclear immobility. Nuclear export, however, is relatively slow, supporting a model of PER2 nuclear accumulation by rapid import, slow export and substantial nuclear degradation. PMID:25074809

  20. Tracking and visualizing the circadian ticking of the cyanobacterial clock protein KaiC in solution.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Yoriko; Mukaiyama, Atsushi; Imai, Keiko; Onoue, Yasuhiro; Tsunoda, Akina; Nohara, Atsushi; Ishida, Tatsuro; Maéda, Yuichiro; Terauchi, Kazuki; Kondo, Takao; Akiyama, Shuji

    2011-01-01

    The circadian clock in cyanobacteria persists even without the transcription/translation feedbacks proposed for eukaryotic systems. The period of the cyanobacterial clock is tuned to the circadian range by the ATPase activity of a clock protein known as KaiC. Here, we provide structural evidence on how KaiC ticks away 24 h while coupling the ATPase activity in its N-terminal ring to the phosphorylation state in its C-terminal ring. During the phosphorylation cycle, the C-terminal domains of KaiC are repositioned in a stepwise manner to affect global expansion and contraction motions of the C-terminal ring. Arg393 of KaiC has a critical function in expanding the C-terminal ring and its replacement with Cys affects the temperature compensation of the period--a fundamental property of circadian clocks. The conformational ticking of KaiC observed here in solution serves as a timing cue for assembly/disassembly of other clock proteins (KaiA and KaiB), and is interlocked with its auto-inhibitory ATPase underlying circadian periodicity of cyanobacteria. PMID:21113137

  1. MYC/MIZ1-dependent gene repression inversely coordinates the circadian clock with cell cycle and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Shostak, Anton; Ruppert, Bianca; Ha, Nati; Bruns, Philipp; Toprak, Umut H; Eils, Roland; Schlesner, Matthias; Diernfellner, Axel; Brunner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock and the cell cycle are major cellular systems that organize global physiology in temporal fashion. It seems conceivable that the potentially conflicting programs are coordinated. We show here that overexpression of MYC in U2OS cells attenuates the clock and conversely promotes cell proliferation while downregulation of MYC strengthens the clock and reduces proliferation. Inhibition of the circadian clock is crucially dependent on the formation of repressive complexes of MYC with MIZ1 and subsequent downregulation of the core clock genes BMAL1 (ARNTL), CLOCK and NPAS2. We show furthermore that BMAL1 expression levels correlate inversely with MYC levels in 102 human lymphomas. Our data suggest that MYC acts as a master coordinator that inversely modulates the impact of cell cycle and circadian clock on gene expression. PMID:27339797

  2. MYC/MIZ1-dependent gene repression inversely coordinates the circadian clock with cell cycle and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Shostak, Anton; Ruppert, Bianca; Ha, Nati; Bruns, Philipp; Toprak, Umut H.; Lawerenz, Chris; Lichter, Peter; Radlwimmer, Bernhard; Eils, Jürgen; Brors, Benedikt; Radomski, Sylwester; Scholz, Ingrid; Richter, Gesine; Siebert, Reiner; Wagner, Susanne; Haake, Andrea; Richter, Julia; Aukema, Sietse; Ammerpohl, Ole; Lopez, Christina; Nagel, Inga; Vater, Inga; Wagner, Rabea; Borst, Christoph; Haas, Siegfried; Rohde, Marius; Burkhardt, Birgit; Lisfeld, Jasmin; Claviez, Alexander; Dreyling, Martin; Eberth, Sonja; Trümper, Lorenz; Kube, Dieter; Stadler, Christina; Einsele, Hermann; Frickhofen, Norbert; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Karsch, Dennis; Kneba, Michael; Mantovani-Löffler, Luisa; Staib, Peter; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Ott, German; Küppers, Ralf; Weniger, Marc; Hummel, Michael; Lenze, Dido; Szczepanowski, Monika; Klapper, Wolfram; Kostezka, Ulrike; Möller, Peter; Rosenwald, Andreas; Leich, Ellen; Pischimariov, Jordan; Binder, Vera; Borkhardt, Arndt; Hezaveh, Kebria; Hoell, Jessica; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schilhabel, Markus; Schreiber, Stefan; Bernhart, Stephan H.; Doose, Gero; Hoffmann, Steve; Kretzmer, Helene; Langenberger, David; Binder, Hans; Hopp, Lydia; Kreuz, Markus; Loeffler, Markus; Rosolowski, Maciej; Korbel, Jan; Sungalee, Stefanie; Stadler, Peter F.; Zenz, Thorsten; Eils, Roland; Schlesner, Matthias; Diernfellner, Axel; Brunner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock and the cell cycle are major cellular systems that organize global physiology in temporal fashion. It seems conceivable that the potentially conflicting programs are coordinated. We show here that overexpression of MYC in U2OS cells attenuates the clock and conversely promotes cell proliferation while downregulation of MYC strengthens the clock and reduces proliferation. Inhibition of the circadian clock is crucially dependent on the formation of repressive complexes of MYC with MIZ1 and subsequent downregulation of the core clock genes BMAL1 (ARNTL), CLOCK and NPAS2. We show furthermore that BMAL1 expression levels correlate inversely with MYC levels in 102 human lymphomas. Our data suggest that MYC acts as a master coordinator that inversely modulates the impact of cell cycle and circadian clock on gene expression. PMID:27339797

  3. Ube3a Imprinting Impairs Circadian Robustness in Angelman Syndrome Models

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shu-qun; Bichell, Terry Jo; Ihrie, Rebecca A.; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The paternal allele of Ube3a is silenced by imprinting in neurons, and Angelman Syndrome (AS) is a disorder arising from a deletion or mutation of the maternal Ube3a allele, which thereby eliminates Ube3a neuronal expression. Sleep disorders such as short sleep duration and increased sleep onset latency are very common in AS. Results We found an unique link between neuronal imprinting of Ube3a and circadian rhythms in two mouse models of AS, including enfeebled circadian activity behavior and slowed molecular rhythms in ex vivo brain tissues. As a consequence of compromised circadian behavior, metabolic homeostasis is also disrupted in AS mice. Unsilencing the paternal Ube3a allele restores functional circadian periodicity in neurons deficient in maternal Ube3a, but does not affect periodicity in peripheral tissues that are not imprinted for uniparental Ube3a expression. The ubiquitin ligase encoded by Ube3a interacts with the central clock components BMAL1 and BMAL2. Moreover, inactivation of Ube3a expression elevates BMAL1 levels in brain regions that control circadian behavior of AS model mice, indicating an important role for Ube3a in modulating BMAL1 turnover. Conclusions Ube3a expression constitutes a direct mechanistic connection between symptoms of a human neurological disorder and the central circadian clock mechanism. The lengthened circadian period leads to delayed phase, which could explain the short sleep duration and increased sleep onset latency of AS subjects. Moreover, we report the pharmacological rescue of an AS phenotype, in this case, altered circadian period. These findings reveal potential treatments for sleep disorders in AS patients. PMID:25660546

  4. USP7 and TDP-43: Pleiotropic Regulation of Cryptochrome Protein Stability Paces the Oscillation of the Mammalian Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Yoshitane, Hikari; Oyama, Masaaki; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Lanjakornsiripan, Darin; Fukada, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian Cryptochromes, CRY1 and CRY2, function as principal regulators of a transcription-translation-based negative feedback loop underlying the mammalian circadian clockwork. An F-box protein, FBXL3, promotes ubiquitination and degradation of CRYs, while FBXL21, the closest paralog of FBXL3, ubiquitinates CRYs but leads to stabilization of CRYs. Fbxl3 knockout extremely lengthened the circadian period, and deletion of Fbxl21 gene in Fbxl3-deficient mice partially rescued the period-lengthening phenotype, suggesting a key role of CRY protein stability for maintenance of the circadian periodicity. Here, we employed a proteomics strategy to explore regulators for the protein stability of CRYs. We found that ubiquitin-specific protease 7 (USP7 also known as HAUSP) associates with CRY1 and CRY2 and stabilizes CRYs through deubiquitination. Treatment with USP7-specific inhibitor or Usp7 knockdown shortened the circadian period of the cellular rhythm. We identified another CRYs-interacting protein, TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43), an RNA-binding protein. TDP-43 stabilized CRY1 and CRY2, and its knockdown also shortened the circadian period in cultured cells. The present study identified USP7 and TDP-43 as the regulators of CRY1 and CRY2, underscoring the significance of the stability control process of CRY proteins for period determination in the mammalian circadian clockwork. PMID:27123980

  5. Cold-induced RNA-binding proteins regulate circadian gene expression by controlling alternative polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuting; Hu, Wenchao; Murakawa, Yasuhiro; Yin, Jingwen; Wang, Gang; Landthaler, Markus; Yan, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The body temperature is considered a universal cue by which the master clock synchronizes the peripheral clocks in mammals, but the mechanism is not fully understood. Here we identified two cold-induced RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), Cirbp and Rbm3, as important regulators for the temperature entrained circadian gene expression. The depletion of Cirbp or Rbm3 significantly reduced the amplitudes of core circadian genes. PAR-CLIP analyses showed that the 3′UTR binding sites of Cirbp and Rbm3 were significantly enriched near the polyadenylation sites (PASs). Furthermore, the depletion of Cirbp or Rbm3 shortened 3′UTR, whereas low temperature (upregulating Cirbp and Rbm3) lengthened 3′UTR. Remarkably, we found that they repressed the usage of proximal PASs by binding to the common 3′UTR, and many cases of proximal/distal PAS selection regulated by them showed strong circadian oscillations. Our results suggested that Cirbp and Rbm3 regulated the circadian gene expression by controlling alternative polyadenylation (APA). PMID:23792593

  6. Setting the PAS, the role of circadian PAS domain proteins during environmental adaptation in plants

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Julia H. M.; Schippers, Jos H. M.

    2015-01-01

    The per-ARNT-sim (PAS) domain represents an ancient protein module that can be found across all kingdoms of life. The domain functions as a sensing unit for a diverse array of signals, including molecular oxygen, small metabolites, and light. In plants, several PAS domain-containing proteins form an integral part of the circadian clock and regulate responses to environmental change. Moreover, these proteins function in pathways that control development and plant stress adaptation responses. Here, we discuss the role of PAS domain-containing proteins in anticipation, and adaptation to environmental changes in plants. PMID:26217364

  7. Endotoxin Disrupts Circadian Rhythms in Macrophages via Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yusi; Pati, Paramita; Xu, Yiming; Chen, Feng; Stepp, David W.; Huo, Yuqing; Rudic, R. Daniel; Fulton, David J. R.

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock is a transcriptional network that functions to regulate the expression of genes important in the anticipation of changes in cellular and organ function. Recent studies have revealed that the recognition of pathogens and subsequent initiation of inflammatory responses are strongly regulated by a macrophage-intrinsic circadian clock. We hypothesized that the circadian pattern of gene expression might be influenced by inflammatory stimuli and that loss of circadian function in immune cells can promote pro-inflammatory behavior. To investigate circadian rhythms in inflammatory cells, peritoneal macrophages were isolated from mPer2luciferase transgenic mice and circadian oscillations were studied in response to stimuli. Using Cosinor analysis, we found that LPS significantly altered the circadian period in peritoneal macrophages from mPer2luciferase mice while qPCR data suggested that the pattern of expression of the core circadian gene (Bmal1) was disrupted. Inhibition of TLR4 offered protection from the LPS-induced impairment in rhythm, suggesting a role for toll-like receptor signaling. To explore the mechanisms involved, we inhibited LPS-stimulated NO and superoxide. Inhibition of NO synthesis with L-NAME had no effect on circadian rhythms. In contrast, inhibition of superoxide with Tempol or PEG-SOD ameliorated the LPS-induced changes in circadian periodicity. In gain of function experiments, we found that overexpression of NOX5, a source of ROS, could significantly disrupt circadian function in a circadian reporter cell line (U2OS) whereas iNOS overexpression, a source of NO, was ineffective. To assess whether alteration of circadian rhythms influences macrophage function, peritoneal macrophages were isolated from Bmal1-KO and Per-TKO mice. Compared to WT macrophages, macrophages from circadian knockout mice exhibited altered balance between NO and ROS release, increased uptake of oxLDL and increased adhesion and migration. These results

  8. Oscillating primary transcripts harbor miRNAs with circadian functions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haifang; Fan, Zenghua; Zhao, Meng; Li, Juan; Lu, Minghua; Liu, Wei; Ying, Hao; Liu, Mofang; Yan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The roles of miRNAs as important post-transcriptional regulators in the circadian clock have been suggested in several studies. But the search for circadian miRNAs has led to disparate results. Here we demonstrated that at least 57 miRNA primary transcripts are rhythmically transcribed in mouse liver. Most of these transcripts are under the regulation of circadian transcription factors such as BMAL1/CLOCK and REV-ERBα/β. However, the mature miRNAs derived from these transcripts are either not oscillating or oscillating at low amplitudes, which could explain the inconsistency of different circadian miRNA studies. In order to show that these circadian primary transcripts can give rise to miRNAs with circadian functions, we over-expressed one of them, miR-378, in mouse by adenovirus injection. We found a significant over-representation of circadian oscillating genes under-expressed by miR-378 over-expression in liver. In particular, we observed that miR-378 modulates the oscillation amplitudes of Cdkn1a in the control of cell cycle and Por in the regulation of oxidation reduction by forming partnership with different circadian transcription factors. Our study suggests that circadian transcription of miRNA at primary transcript level can be a good indicator for circadian miRNA functions. PMID:26898952

  9. ELF3 Encodes a Circadian Clock–Regulated Nuclear Protein That Functions in an Arabidopsis PHYB Signal Transduction Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xing Liang; Covington, Michael F.; Fankhauser, Christian; Chory, Joanne; Wagner, D. Ry

    2001-01-01

    Many aspects of plant development are regulated by photoreceptor function and the circadian clock. Loss-of-function mutations in the Arabidopsis EARLY FLOWERING 3 (ELF3) and PHYTOCHROME B (PHYB) genes cause early flowering and influence the activity of circadian clock–regulated processes. We demonstrate here that the relative abundance of the ELF3 protein, which is a novel nucleus-localized protein, displays circadian regulation that follows the pattern of circadian accumulation of ELF3 transcript. Furthermore, the ELF3 protein interacts with PHYB in the yeast two-hybrid assay and in vitro. Genetic analyses show that ELF3 requires PHYB function in early morphogenesis but not for the regulation of flowering time. This suggests that ELF3 is a component of a PHYB signaling complex that controls early events in plant development but that ELF3 and PHYB control flowering via independent signal transduction pathways. PMID:11402161

  10. p53 Regulates Period2 Expression and the Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Miki, Takao; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Zhao, Zhaoyang; Lee, Cheng Chi

    2013-01-01

    The mechanistic interconnectivity between circadian regulation and the genotoxic stress response remains poorly understood. Here we show that the expression of Period 2 (Per2), a circadian regulator, is directly regulated by p53 binding to a response element in the Per2 promoter. This p53 response element is evolutionarily conserved and overlaps with the E-Box element critical for BMAL1/CLOCK binding and its transcriptional activation of Per2 expression. Our studies reveal that p53 blocks BMAL1/CLOCK binding to the Per2 promoter leading to repression of Per2 expression. In the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), p53 expression and its binding to the Per2 promoter are under circadian control. Per2 expression in the SCN is altered by p53 deficiency or stabilization of p53 by Nutlin-3. Behaviorally, p53−/− mice have a shorter period length that lacks stability and they exhibit impaired photo-entrainment to a light pulse under a free-running state. Our studies demonstrate that p53 modulates mouse circadian behavior. PMID:24051492

  11. Effect of peripheral circadian dysfunction on metabolic disease in response to a diabetogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Pijut, Sonja S; Corbett, Danielle E; Wang, Yuhuan; Li, Jianing; Charnigo, Richard J; Graf, Gregory A

    2016-06-01

    BMAL1 is a core component of the transcription/translation machinery that regulates central and peripheral circadian rhythms that coordinate behavior and metabolism, respectively. Our objective was to determine the impact of BMAL1 in adipose alone or in combination with liver on metabolic phenotypes. Control, adipose-Bmal1 knockout (ABKO), and liver- and adipose-Bmal1 knockout (LABKO) female mice were placed in TSE System metabolic chambers for metabolic phenotyping. A second cohort of male mice was fed a control or diabetogenic diet, and body weight and composition, glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and serum and hepatic lipids were measured. Both female ABKO and LABKO mice exhibited increased food consumption compared with control mice. ABKO mice also exhibited increased overall activity predominantly during the light phase compared with both control and LABKO mice and were protected from increased weight gain. When the male cohort was challenged with a diabetogenic diet, LABKO mice had increased body weight due to increased fat mass compared with control and ABKO mice. However, these mice did not present further impairments in glycemic control, adipose inflammation, or liver injury. LABKO mice had increased hepatic cholesterol and elevated expression of cholesterol synthesis and uptake genes. Our data indicate that deletion of this allele in adipose or in combination with liver alters feeding behavior and locomotor activity. However, obesity is exacerbated only with the combination of liver and adipose deletion. PMID:27048996

  12. Gpr176 is a Gz-linked orphan G-protein-coupled receptor that sets the pace of circadian behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Masao; Murai, Iori; Kunisue, Sumihiro; Setsu, Genzui; Uchio, Naohiro; Tanaka, Rina; Kobayashi, Sakurako; Shimatani, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Hida; Chao, Hsu-Wen; Nakagawa, Yuuki; Takahashi, Yukari; Hotta, Yunhong; Yasunaga, Jun-ichirou; Matsuoka, Masao; Hastings, Michael H.; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) participate in a broad range of physiological functions. A priority for fundamental and clinical research, therefore, is to decipher the function of over 140 remaining orphan GPCRs. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the brain's circadian pacemaker, governs daily rhythms in behaviour and physiology. Here we launch the SCN orphan GPCR project to (i) search for murine orphan GPCRs with enriched expression in the SCN, (ii) generate mutant animals deficient in candidate GPCRs, and (iii) analyse the impact on circadian rhythms. We thereby identify Gpr176 as an SCN-enriched orphan GPCR that sets the pace of circadian behaviour. Gpr176 is expressed in a circadian manner by SCN neurons, and molecular characterization reveals that it represses cAMP signalling in an agonist-independent manner. Gpr176 acts independently of, and in parallel to, the Vipr2 GPCR, not through the canonical Gi, but via the unique G-protein subclass Gz. PMID:26882873

  13. Role of sympathetic nervous system in the entrainment of circadian natural killer cell function

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Ryan; Arjona, Alvaro; Sarkar, Dipak K.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research in our laboratory has demonstrated robust circadian variations of cytokines and cytolytic factors in enriched NK cells from rat spleen, strongly suggesting these functions may be subject to circadian regulation. The SCN mediates timing information to peripheral tissues by both humoral and neural inputs. In particular, noradrenergic (NE) sympathetic nervous system (SNS) terminals innervate the spleen tissue communicating information between central and peripheral systems. However, whether these immune factors are subject to timing information conveyed through neural NE innervation to the spleen remained unknown. Indeed, we were able to characterize a circadian rhythm of NE content in the spleen, supporting the role of the SNS as a conveyor of timing information to splenocytes. By chemically producing a local splenic sympathectomy through guanethidine treatment, the splenic NE rhythm was abolished or shifted as indicated by a blunting of the expected peak at ZT7. Consequently, the daily variations of cytokine, TNF-α, and cytolytic factors, granzyme-B and perforin, in NK cells and splenocytes were altered. Only time-dependent mRNA expression of IFN-γ was altered in splenocytes, but not protein levels in NK cells, suggesting non-neural entrainment cues may be necessary to regulate specific immune factors. In addition, the rhythms of clock genes and proteins, Bmal1 and Per2, in these tissues also displayed significantly altered daily variations. Collectively, these results demonstrate rhythmic NE input to the spleen acts as an entrainment cue to modulate the molecular clock in NK cells and other spleen cells possibly playing a role in regulating the cytokine and cytolytic function of these cells. PMID:20816749

  14. Temporal Requirements of the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein in Modulating Circadian Clock Circuit Synaptic Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Gatto, Cheryl L.; Broadie, Kendal

    2009-01-01

    Loss of fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene function is the most common cause of inherited mental retardation and autism spectrum disorders, characterized by attention disorder, hyperactivity and disruption of circadian activity cycles. Pursuit of effective intervention strategies requires determining when the FMR1 product (FMRP) is required in the regulation of neuronal circuitry controlling these behaviors. In the well-characterized Drosophila disease model, loss of the highly conserved dFMRP causes circadian arrhythmicity and conspicuous abnormalities in the circadian clock circuitry. Here, a novel Sholl Analysis was used to quantify over-elaborated synaptic architecture in dfmr1-null small ventrolateral neurons (sLNvs), a key subset of clock neurons. The transgenic Gene-Switch system was employed to drive conditional neuronal dFMRP expression in the dfmr1-null mutant background in order to dissect temporal requirements within the clock circuit. Introduction of dFMRP during early brain development, including the stages of neurogenesis, neuronal fate specification and early pathfinding, provided no rescue of dfmr1 mutant phenotypes. Similarly, restoring normal dFMRP expression in the adult failed to restore circadian circuit architecture. In sharp contrast, supplying dFMRP during a transient window of very late brain development, wherein synaptogenesis and substantial subsequent synaptic reorganization (e.g. use-dependent pruning) occur, provided strong morphological rescue to reestablish normal sLNvs synaptic arbors. We conclude that dFMRP plays a developmentally restricted role in sculpting synaptic architecture in these neurons that cannot be compensated for by later reintroduction of the protein at maturity. PMID:19738924

  15. Intramolecular Regulation of Phosphorylation Status of the Circadian Clock Protein KaiC

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yao; Mori, Tetsuya; Qin, Ximing; Yan, Heping; Egli, Martin; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2009-01-01

    Background KaiC, a central clock protein in cyanobacteria, undergoes circadian oscillations between hypophosphorylated and hyperphosphorylated forms in vivo and in vitro. Structural analyses of KaiC crystals have identified threonine and serine residues in KaiC at three residues (T426, S431, and T432) as potential sites at which KaiC is phosphorylated; mutation of any of these three sites to alanine abolishes rhythmicity, revealing an essential clock role for each residue separately and for KaiC phosphorylation in general. Mass spectrometry studies confirmed that the S431 and T432 residues are key phosphorylation sites, however, the role of the threonine residue at position 426 was not clear from the mass spectrometry measurements. Methodology and Principal Findings Mutational approaches and biochemical analyses of KaiC support a key role for T426 in control of the KaiC phosphorylation status in vivo and in vitro and demonstrates that alternative amino acids at residue 426 dramatically affect KaiC's properties in vivo and in vitro, especially genetic dominance/recessive relationships, KaiC dephosphorylation, and the formation of complexes of KaiC with KaiA and KaiB. These mutations alter key circadian properties, including period, amplitude, robustness, and temperature compensation. Crystallographic analyses indicate that the T426 site is phosphorylatible under some conditions, and in vitro phosphorylation assays of KaiC demonstrate labile phosphorylation of KaiC when the primary S431 and T432 sites are blocked. Conclusions and Significance T426 is a crucial site that regulates KaiC phosphorylation status in vivo and in vitro and these studies underscore the importance of KaiC phosphorylation status in the essential cyanobacterial circadian functions. The regulatory roles of these phosphorylation sites–including T426–within KaiC enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying circadian rhythm generation in cyanobacteria. PMID:19946629

  16. Chamber-dependent circadian expression of cardiac natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Goetze, Jens Peter; Georg, Birgitte; Jørgensen, Henrik L; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2010-02-25

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) have important local functions within the myocardium, where they protect against accelerated fibrosis. As circadian expression of cardiac natriuretic peptides could be of importance in local cardiac protection against disease, we examined the diurnal changes of the mRNAs encoding ANP, BNP, and their common receptor NPR-A in atrial and ventricular myocardium. Forty eight mice were killed at the following ZT times: 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24, where ZT designates Zeitgeber; ZT 0 corresponds to lights ON and ZT 12 corresponds to lights OFF. Eight animals (4 males and 4 females) were included at each time point. Another 48 animals were killed during the second cycle of dark/dark (designated Circadian Time or CT: CT 4, CT 8, CT 12, CT 16, CT 20, and CT 24). The cellular contents of the clock genes Per1 and Bmal1 as well as ANP, BNP, and their common receptor (NPR-A) were determined using RT-PCR. Per1 and Bmal1 mRNA contents oscillated in antiphase in both atrial and ventricular regions, where Bmal1 mRNA peaked 12h out of phase relative to Per1 mRNA. ANP and NPR-A atrial mRNA contents revealed borderline significant diurnal changes, whereas ventricular BNP mRNA contents exhibited pronounced oscillation during constant darkness with nadir at CT 12 (P<0.0001). In conclusion, we report a chamber-dependent circadian profile of cardiac BNP mRNA contents, which is not paralleled by the related ANP gene. Our findings suggest that the BNP mRNA pattern could be associated with increased cardiac susceptibility and response to disease. PMID:20035806

  17. Machine Learning Helps Identify CHRONO as a Circadian Clock Component

    PubMed Central

    Venkataraman, Anand; Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Kavakli, Ibrahim H.; Hughes, Michael E.; Baggs, Julie E.; Growe, Jacqueline; Liu, Andrew C.; Kim, Junhyong; Hogenesch, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades, researchers have characterized a set of “clock genes” that drive daily rhythms in physiology and behavior. This arduous work has yielded results with far-reaching consequences in metabolic, psychiatric, and neoplastic disorders. Recent attempts to expand our understanding of circadian regulation have moved beyond the mutagenesis screens that identified the first clock components, employing higher throughput genomic and proteomic techniques. In order to further accelerate clock gene discovery, we utilized a computer-assisted approach to identify and prioritize candidate clock components. We used a simple form of probabilistic machine learning to integrate biologically relevant, genome-scale data and ranked genes on their similarity to known clock components. We then used a secondary experimental screen to characterize the top candidates. We found that several physically interact with known clock components in a mammalian two-hybrid screen and modulate in vitro cellular rhythms in an immortalized mouse fibroblast line (NIH 3T3). One candidate, Gene Model 129, interacts with BMAL1 and functionally represses the key driver of molecular rhythms, the BMAL1/CLOCK transcriptional complex. Given these results, we have renamed the gene CHRONO (computationally highlighted repressor of the network oscillator). Bi-molecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation demonstrate that CHRONO represses by abrogating the binding of BMAL1 to its transcriptional co-activator CBP. Most importantly, CHRONO knockout mice display a prolonged free-running circadian period similar to, or more drastic than, six other clock components. We conclude that CHRONO is a functional clock component providing a new layer of control on circadian molecular dynamics. PMID:24737000

  18. Machine learning helps identify CHRONO as a circadian clock component.

    PubMed

    Anafi, Ron C; Lee, Yool; Sato, Trey K; Venkataraman, Anand; Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Kavakli, Ibrahim H; Hughes, Michael E; Baggs, Julie E; Growe, Jacqueline; Liu, Andrew C; Kim, Junhyong; Hogenesch, John B

    2014-04-01

    Over the last decades, researchers have characterized a set of "clock genes" that drive daily rhythms in physiology and behavior. This arduous work has yielded results with far-reaching consequences in metabolic, psychiatric, and neoplastic disorders. Recent attempts to expand our understanding of circadian regulation have moved beyond the mutagenesis screens that identified the first clock components, employing higher throughput genomic and proteomic techniques. In order to further accelerate clock gene discovery, we utilized a computer-assisted approach to identify and prioritize candidate clock components. We used a simple form of probabilistic machine learning to integrate biologically relevant, genome-scale data and ranked genes on their similarity to known clock components. We then used a secondary experimental screen to characterize the top candidates. We found that several physically interact with known clock components in a mammalian two-hybrid screen and modulate in vitro cellular rhythms in an immortalized mouse fibroblast line (NIH 3T3). One candidate, Gene Model 129, interacts with BMAL1 and functionally represses the key driver of molecular rhythms, the BMAL1/CLOCK transcriptional complex. Given these results, we have renamed the gene CHRONO (computationally highlighted repressor of the network oscillator). Bi-molecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation demonstrate that CHRONO represses by abrogating the binding of BMAL1 to its transcriptional co-activator CBP. Most importantly, CHRONO knockout mice display a prolonged free-running circadian period similar to, or more drastic than, six other clock components. We conclude that CHRONO is a functional clock component providing a new layer of control on circadian molecular dynamics. PMID:24737000

  19. Circadian control of mRNA polyadenylation dynamics regulates rhythmic protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Shihoko; Sher-Chen, Elaine L.; Green, Carla B.

    2012-01-01

    Poly(A) tails are 3′ modifications of eukaryotic mRNAs that are important in the control of translation and mRNA stability. We identified hundreds of mouse liver mRNAs that exhibit robust circadian rhythms in the length of their poly(A) tails. Approximately 80% of these are primarily the result of nuclear adenylation coupled with rhythmic transcription. However, unique decay kinetics distinguish these mRNAs from other mRNAs that are transcribed rhythmically but do not exhibit poly(A) tail rhythms. The remaining 20% are uncoupled from transcription and exhibit poly(A) tail rhythms even though the steady-state mRNA levels are not rhythmic. These are under the control of rhythmic cytoplasmic polyadenylation, regulated at least in some cases by cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding proteins (CPEBs). Importantly, we found that the rhythmicity in poly(A) tail length is closely correlated with rhythmic protein expression, with a several-hour delay between the time of longest tail and the time of highest protein level. Our study demonstrates that the circadian clock regulates the dynamic polyadenylation status of mRNAs, which can result in rhythmic protein expression independent of the steady-state levels of the message. PMID:23249735

  20. Class IIa Histone Deacetylases Are Conserved Regulators of Circadian Function*

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, Paul C. M.; O'Neill, John S.; Dobrzycki, Tomasz; Calvert, Shaun; Lord, Emma C.; McIntosh, Rebecca L. L.; Elliott, Christopher J. H.; Sweeney, Sean T.; Hastings, Michael H.; Chawla, Sangeeta

    2014-01-01

    Class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs) regulate the activity of many transcription factors to influence liver gluconeogenesis and the development of specialized cells, including muscle, neurons, and lymphocytes. Here, we describe a conserved role for class IIa HDACs in sustaining robust circadian behavioral rhythms in Drosophila and cellular rhythms in mammalian cells. In mouse fibroblasts, overexpression of HDAC5 severely disrupts transcriptional rhythms of core clock genes. HDAC5 overexpression decreases BMAL1 acetylation on Lys-537 and pharmacological inhibition of class IIa HDACs increases BMAL1 acetylation. Furthermore, we observe cyclical nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HDAC5 in mouse fibroblasts that is characteristically circadian. Mutation of the Drosophila homolog HDAC4 impairs locomotor activity rhythms of flies and decreases period mRNA levels. RNAi-mediated knockdown of HDAC4 in Drosophila clock cells also dampens circadian function. Given that the localization of class IIa HDACs is signal-regulated and influenced by Ca2+ and cAMP signals, our findings offer a mechanism by which extracellular stimuli that generate these signals can feed into the molecular clock machinery. PMID:25271152

  1. Characterization of peripheral circadian clocks in adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Zvonic, Sanjin; Ptitsyn, Andrey A; Conrad, Steven A; Scott, L Keith; Floyd, Z Elizabeth; Kilroy, Gail; Wu, Xiying; Goh, Brian C; Mynatt, Randall L; Gimble, Jeffrey M

    2006-04-01

    First described in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, circadian clocks have since been found in several peripheral tissues. Although obesity has been associated with dysregulated circadian expression profiles of leptin, adiponectin, and other fat-derived cytokines, there have been no comprehensive analyses of the circadian clock machinery in adipose depots. In this study, we show robust and coordinated expression of circadian oscillator genes (Npas2, Bmal1, Per1-3, and Cry1-2) and clock-controlled downstream genes (Rev-erb alpha, Rev-erb beta, Dbp, E4bp4, Stra13, and Id2) in murine brown, inguinal, and epididymal (BAT, iWAT, and eWAT) adipose tissues. These results correlated with respective gene expression in liver and the serum markers of circadian function. Through Affymetrix microarray analysis, we identified 650 genes that shared circadian expression profiles in BAT, iWAT, and liver. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that temporally restricted feeding causes a coordinated phase-shift in circadian expression of the major oscillator genes and their downstream targets in adipose tissues. The presence of circadian oscillator genes in fat has significant metabolic implications, and their characterization may have potential therapeutic relevance with respect to the pathogenesis and treatment of diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:16567517

  2. Regulation of behavioral circadian rhythms and clock protein PER1 by the deubiquitinating enzyme USP2

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yaoming; Duguay, David; Bédard, Nathalie; Rachalski, Adeline; Baquiran, Gerardo; Na, Chan Hyun; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Storch, Kai-Florian; Peng, Junmin; Wing, Simon S.; Cermakian, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Summary Endogenous 24-hour rhythms are generated by circadian clocks located in most tissues. The molecular clock mechanism is based on feedback loops involving clock genes and their protein products. Post-translational modifications, including ubiquitination, are important for regulating the clock feedback mechanism. Previous work has focused on the role of ubiquitin ligases in the clock mechanism. Here we show a role for the rhythmically-expressed deubiquitinating enzyme ubiquitin specific peptidase 2 (USP2) in clock function. Mice with a deletion of the Usp2 gene (Usp2 KO) display a longer free-running period of locomotor activity rhythms and altered responses of the clock to light. This was associated with altered expression of clock genes in synchronized Usp2 KO mouse embryonic fibroblasts and increased levels of clock protein PERIOD1 (PER1). USP2 can be coimmunoprecipitated with several clock proteins but directly interacts specifically with PER1 and deubiquitinates it. Interestingly, this deubiquitination does not alter PER1 stability. Taken together, our results identify USP2 as a new core component of the clock machinery and demonstrate a role for deubiquitination in the regulation of the circadian clock, both at the level of the core pacemaker and its response to external cues. PMID:23213472

  3. Altered dynamics in the circadian oscillation of clock genes in dermal fibroblasts of patients suffering from idiopathic hypersomnia.

    PubMed

    Lippert, Julian; Halfter, Hartmut; Heidbreder, Anna; Röhr, Dominik; Gess, Burkhard; Boentert, Mathias; Osada, Nani; Young, Peter

    2014-01-01

    From single cell organisms to the most complex life forms, the 24-hour circadian rhythm is important for numerous aspects of physiology and behavior such as daily periodic fluctuations in body temperature and sleep-wake cycles. Influenced by environmental cues - mainly by light input -, the central pacemaker in the thalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) controls and regulates the internal clock mechanisms which are present in peripheral tissues. In order to correlate modifications in the molecular mechanisms of circadian rhythm with the pathophysiology of idiopathic hypersomnia, this study aimed to investigate the dynamics of the expression of circadian clock genes in dermal fibroblasts of idiopathic hypersomniacs (IH) in comparison to those of healthy controls (HC). Ten clinically and polysomnographically proven IH patients were recruited from the department of sleep medicine of the University Hospital of Muenster. Clinical diagnosis was done by two consecutive polysomnographies (PSG) and Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT). Fourteen clinical healthy volunteers served as control group. Dermal fibroblasts were obtained via punch biopsy and grown in cell culture. The expression of circadian clock genes was investigated by semiquantitative Reverse Transcriptase-PCR qRT-PCR analysis, confirming periodical oscillation of expression of the core circadian clock genes BMAL1, PER1/2 and CRY1/2. The amplitude of the rhythmically expressed BMAL1, PER1 and PER2 was significantly dampened in dermal fibroblasts of IH compared to HC over two circadian periods whereas the overall expression of only the key transcriptional factor BMAL1 was significantly reduced in IH. Our study suggests for the first time an aberrant dynamics in the circadian clock in IH. These findings may serve to better understand some clinical features of the pathophysiology in sleep - wake rhythms in IH. PMID:24454829

  4. USP2 regulates the intracellular localization of PER1 and circadian gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yaoming; Duguay, David; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Cermakian, Nicolas; Wing, Simon S

    2014-08-01

    Endogenous 24-h rhythms in physiology are driven by a network of circadian clocks located in most tissues. The molecular clock mechanism is based on feedback loops involving clock genes and their protein products. Posttranslational modifications, including ubiquitination, are important for regulating the clock feedback mechanism. Recently, we showed that the deubiquitinating enzyme ubiquitin-specific peptidase 2 (USP2) associates with clock proteins and deubiquitinates PERIOD1 (PER1) but does not affect its overall stability. Mice devoid of USP2 display defects in clock function. Here, we show that USP2 regulates nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and nuclear retention of PER1 and its repressive role on the clock transcription factors CLOCK and BMAL1. The rhythm of nuclear entry of PER1 in Usp2 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) was advanced but with reduced nuclear accumulation of PER1. Although Per1 mRNA expression rhythm remained intact in the Usp2 KO MEFs, the expression profiles of other core clock genes were altered. This was also true for the expression of clock-controlled genes (e.g., Dbp, Tef, Hlf, E4bp4). A similar phase advance of PER1 nuclear localization rhythm and alteration of clock gene expression profiles were also observed in livers of Usp2 KO mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate a novel function of USP2 in the molecular clock in which it regulates PER1 function by gating its nuclear entry and accumulation. PMID:25238854

  5. Timing Matters: Circadian Rhythm in Sepsis, Obstructive Lung Disease, Obstructive Sleep Apnea, and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Truong, Kimberly K; Lam, Michael T; Grandner, Michael A; Sassoon, Catherine S; Malhotra, Atul

    2016-07-01

    Physiological and cellular functions operate in a 24-hour cyclical pattern orchestrated by an endogenous process known as the circadian rhythm. Circadian rhythms represent intrinsic oscillations of biological functions that allow for adaptation to cyclic environmental changes. Key clock genes that affect the persistence and periodicity of circadian rhythms include BMAL1/CLOCK, Period 1, Period 2, and Cryptochrome. Remarkable progress has been made in our understanding of circadian rhythms and their role in common medical conditions. A critical review of the literature supports the association between circadian misalignment and adverse health consequences in sepsis, obstructive lung disease, obstructive sleep apnea, and malignancy. Circadian misalignment plays an important role in these disease processes and can affect disease severity, treatment response, and survivorship. Normal inflammatory response to acute infections, airway resistance, upper airway collapsibility, and mitosis regulation follows a robust circadian pattern. Disruption of normal circadian rhythm at the molecular level affects severity of inflammation in sepsis, contributes to inflammatory responses in obstructive lung diseases, affects apnea length in obstructive sleep apnea, and increases risk for cancer. Chronotherapy is an underused practice of delivering therapy at optimal times to maximize efficacy and minimize toxicity. This approach has been shown to be advantageous in asthma and cancer management. In asthma, appropriate timing of medication administration improves treatment effectiveness. Properly timed chemotherapy may reduce treatment toxicities and maximize efficacy. Future research should focus on circadian rhythm disorders, role of circadian rhythm in other diseases, and modalities to restore and prevent circadian disruption. PMID:27104378

  6. Establishment of human cell lines showing circadian rhythms of bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Aki; Shimada, Hiroko; Numazawa, Kahori; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Ikeda, Masaaki; Kawashima, Minae; Kato, Nobumasa; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Ebisawa, Takashi

    2008-11-28

    We have established human retinal pigment epithelial cell lines stably expressing the luciferase gene, driven by the human Bmal1 promoter, to obtain human-derived cells that show circadian rhythms of bioluminescence after dexamethasone treatment. The average circadian period of bioluminescence for the obtained clones was 24.07+/-0.48 h. Lithium (10 mM) in the medium significantly lengthened the circadian period of bioluminescence, which is consistent with previous reports, while 2 mM or 5 mM lithium had no effect. This is the first report on the establishment of human-derived cell lines that proliferate infinitely and show circadian rhythms of bioluminescence, and also the first to investigate the effects of low-dose lithium on the circadian rhythms of human-derived cells in vitro. The established cells will be useful for various in vitro studies of human circadian rhythms and for the development of new therapies for human disorders related to circadian rhythm disturbances. PMID:18809466

  7. Altered feeding differentially regulates circadian rhythms and energy metabolism in liver and muscle of rats.

    PubMed

    Reznick, Jane; Preston, Elaine; Wilks, Donna L; Beale, Susan M; Turner, Nigel; Cooney, Gregory J

    2013-01-01

    Energy metabolism follows a diurnal pattern responding to the light/dark cycle and food availability. This study investigated the impact of restricting feeding to the daylight hours and feeding a high fat diet on circadian clock (bmal1, dbp, tef and e4bp4) and metabolic (pepck, fas, ucp3, pdk4) gene expression and markers of energy metabolism in muscle and liver of rats. The results show that in chow-fed rats switched to daylight feeding, the peak diurnal expression of genes in liver was shifted by 6-12h while expression of these genes in muscle remained in a similar phase to rats feeding ad libitum. High fat feeding during the daylight hours had limited effect on clock gene expression in liver or muscle but shifted the peak expression of metabolic genes (pepck, fas) in liver by 6-12h. The differential effects of daylight feeding on gene and protein expression in muscle and liver were accompanied by an 8% reduction in whole body energy expenditure, a 20-30% increased glycogen content during the light phase in muscle of day-fed rats and increased adipose tissue deposition per gram food consumed. These data demonstrate that a mismatch of feeding and light/dark cycle disrupts tissue metabolism in muscle with significant consequences for whole body energy homeostasis. PMID:22952003

  8. Circadian Rhythms

    MedlinePlus

    ... chronobiology. Are circadian rhythms the same thing as biological clocks? No, but they are related. Our biological clocks drive our circadian rhythms. What are biological clocks? The biological clocks that control circadian rhythms ...

  9. Identification and validation of cryptochrome inhibitors that modulate the molecular circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Chun, Sung Kook; Jang, Jaebong; Chung, Sooyoung; Yun, Hwayoung; Kim, Nam-Jung; Jung, Jong-Wha; Son, Gi Hoon; Suh, Young-Ger; Kim, Kyungjin

    2014-03-21

    Circadian rhythms, biological oscillations with a period of about 24 h, are maintained by a genetically determined innate time-keeping system called the molecular circadian clockwork. Despite the physiological and clinical importance of the circadian clock, the development of small molecule modulators that directly target the core clock machinery has only been recently initiated. In the present study, we aimed to identify novel small molecule modulators influencing the molecular feedback loop of the circadian clock by applying our two-step cell-based screening strategy based on E-box-mediated transcriptional activity to test more than 1000 drug-like compounds. A derivative of 2-ethoxypropanoic acid designated as compound 15 was selected as the most promising candidate in terms of both efficacy and potency. We then performed pull-down assays with the biotinylated compound and find out that both cryptochrome (CRY)1 and 2 (CRY1/2), key negative components of the mammalian circadian clock, as molecular targets of compound 15. In accordance with the binding property, compound 15 enhanced E-box-mediated transcription in a CRY1/2-dependent manner, and more importantly, it attenuated the circadian oscillation of Per2-Luc and Bmal1-dLuc activities in cultured fibroblasts, indicating that compound 15 can functionally inhibit the effects of CRY1/2 in the molecular circadian clockwork. In conclusion, the present study describes the first novel chemical inhibitor of CRY1/2 that inhibits the repressive function of CRY1/2, thereby activating CLOCK-BMAL1-evoked E-box-mediated transcription. Further optimizations and subsequent functional studies of this compound may lead to development of efficient therapeutic strategies for a variety of physiological and metabolic disorders with circadian natures. PMID:24387302

  10. Circadian variation in gastric vagal afferent mechanosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kentish, Stephen J; Frisby, Claudine L; Kennaway, David J; Wittert, Gary A; Page, Amanda J

    2013-12-01

    Food intake is coordinated to cellular metabolism by clock gene expression with a master clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus synchronized by light exposure. Gastric vagal afferents play a role in regulating food intake, but it is unknown whether they exhibit circadian variation in their mechanosensitivity. We aimed to determine whether gastric vagal afferents express clock genes and whether their response to mechanical stimuli oscillates throughout the light/dark cycle. Nodose ganglia were collected from 8-week-old female C57BL/6 mice every 3 h starting at lights off (1800 h) to quantify Bmal1, Per1, Per2, and Nr1d1 mRNA by qRT-PCR. Additionally in vitro single-fiber recordings of gastric vagal mechanoreceptors were taken at all time points. Per1, Per2, Bmal1, and Nr1d1 mRNA is expressed in the nodose ganglia and levels oscillated over a 24 h period. In mice fed ad libitum, gastric content was 3 times higher at 0000 h and 0300 h than 1200 h. The response of tension receptors to 3 g stretch was reduced by up to 70% at 2100 h, 0000 h, and 0300 h compared with 1200 h. Gastric mucosal receptor response to stroking with a 50 mg von Frey hair was 3 times greater at 1200 h and 1500 h than the response at 0000 h. Similar findings were obtained in mice fasted for 6 h or maintained in darkness for 3 d before study. Therefore, these changes do not result from food intake or the light/dark cycle. Thus, gastric vagal mechanoreceptors display circadian rhythm, which may act to control food intake differentially at different times of the day. PMID:24305819

  11. Rev-erbalpha2 mRNA encodes a stable protein with a potential role in circadian clock regulation.

    PubMed

    Rambaud, Juliette; Triqueneaux, Gérard; Masse, Ingrid; Staels, Bart; Laudet, Vincent; Benoit, Gérard

    2009-05-01

    Circadian rhythms are observed in nearly all aspects of physiology and behavior. In mammals, such biological rhythms are supported by a complex network of self-sustained transcriptional loops and posttranslational modifications, which regulate timely controlled production and degradation of critical factors on a 24-h basis. Among these factors, the orphan nuclear receptor rev-erbalpha plays an essential role by linking together positive and negative regulatory loops. As an essential part of the circadian core clock mechanism, REV-ERBalpha expression shows a precisely scheduled oscillation reflecting the tight control of its production and degradation. In previous studies, we identified two alternative transcripts encoding two protein variants referred to as REV-ERBalpha1 and -alpha2. Interestingly, recent work identified structural elements present only in REV-ERBalpha1 that controls its turnover and thereby influences circadian oscillations. In the present work, we comparatively analyze the two variants and show that REV-ERBalpha2 exhibits a half-life incompatible with a circadian function, suggesting that this variant exerts different biological functions. However, our comparative study clearly indicates undistinguishable DNA-binding properties and transcriptional repression activity as well as a similar regulation mechanism. The only consistent difference appears to be the relative expression level of the two transcripts, rev-erbalpha1 being one to 100 times more expressed than alpha2 depending on tissue and circadian time. Taking this finding into consideration, we reassessed REV-ERBalpha2 turnover and were able to show that this variant exhibits a reduced half-life when coexpressed with REV-ERBalpha1. We propose that the relative expression levels of the two REV-ERBalpha variants fine-tune the circadian period length by regulating REV-ERBalpha half-life. PMID:19228794

  12. Effects of adenylates on the circadian interaction of KaiB with the KaiC complex in the reconstituted cyanobacterial Kai protein oscillator.

    PubMed

    Goda, Kazuhito; Kondo, Takao; Oyama, Tokitaka

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes that possess circadian oscillators. Clock proteins, KaiA, KaiB, KaiC compose the central circadian oscillator, which can be reconstituted in vitro in the presence of ATP. KaiC has ATPase, autokinase, and autophosphatase enzymatic activities. These activities are modulated by protein-protein interactions among the Kai proteins. The interaction of KaiB with the KaiC complex shows a circadian rhythm in the reconstituted system. We previously developed a quantitative, real-time monitoring system for the dynamic behavior of the complex using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Here, we examined the effects of ATP and ADP on the rhythmic interaction of KaiB. We show that increased concentration of ATP or ADP shortened period length. Adding ADP to the Kai protein oscillation shifted its phase in a phase-dependent manner. These results provide insight into how circadian oscillation entrainment mechanism is linked to cellular metabolism. PMID:25105527

  13. Genome-wide analysis of SREBP1 activity around the clock reveals its combined dependency on nutrient and circadian signals.

    PubMed

    Gilardi, Federica; Migliavacca, Eugenia; Naldi, Aurélien; Baruchet, Michaël; Canella, Donatella; Le Martelot, Gwendal; Guex, Nicolas; Desvergne, Béatrice

    2014-03-01

    In mammals, the circadian clock allows them to anticipate and adapt physiology around the 24 hours. Conversely, metabolism and food consumption regulate the internal clock, pointing the existence of an intricate relationship between nutrient state and circadian homeostasis that is far from being understood. The Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1 (SREBP1) is a key regulator of lipid homeostasis. Hepatic SREBP1 function is influenced by the nutrient-response cycle, but also by the circadian machinery. To systematically understand how the interplay of circadian clock and nutrient-driven rhythm regulates SREBP1 activity, we evaluated the genome-wide binding of SREBP1 to its targets throughout the day in C57BL/6 mice. The recruitment of SREBP1 to the DNA showed a highly circadian behaviour, with a maximum during the fed status. However, the temporal expression of SREBP1 targets was not always synchronized with its binding pattern. In particular, different expression phases were observed for SREBP1 target genes depending on their function, suggesting the involvement of other transcription factors in their regulation. Binding sites for Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 (HNF4) were specifically enriched in the close proximity of SREBP1 peaks of genes, whose expression was shifted by about 8 hours with respect to SREBP1 binding. Thus, the cross-talk between hepatic HNF4 and SREBP1 may underlie the expression timing of this subgroup of SREBP1 targets. Interestingly, the proper temporal expression profile of these genes was dramatically changed in Bmal1-/- mice upon time-restricted feeding, for which a rhythmic, but slightly delayed, binding of SREBP1 was maintained. Collectively, our results show that besides the nutrient-driven regulation of SREBP1 nuclear translocation, a second layer of modulation of SREBP1 transcriptional activity, strongly dependent from the circadian clock, exists. This system allows us to fine tune the expression timing of SREBP1 target genes, thus

  14. HSP90 functions in the circadian clock through stabilization of the client F-box protein ZEITLUPE

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-sung; Kim, Woe Yeon; Fujiwara, Sumire; Kim, Jeongsik; Cha, Joon-Yung; Park, Jin Ho; Lee, Sang Yeol; Somers, David E.

    2011-01-01

    The autoregulatory loops of the circadian clock consist of feedback regulation of transcription/translation circuits but also require finely coordinated cytoplasmic and nuclear proteostasis. Although protein degradation is important to establish steady-state levels, maturation into their active conformation also factors into protein homeostasis. HSP90 facilitates the maturation of a wide range of client proteins, and studies in metazoan clocks implicate HSP90 as an integrator of input or output. Here we show that the Arabidopsis circadian clock-associated F-box protein ZEITLUPE (ZTL) is a unique client for cytoplasmic HSP90. The HSP90-specific inhibitor geldanamycin and RNAi-mediated depletion of cytoplasmic HSP90 reduces levels of ZTL and lengthens circadian period, consistent with ztl loss-of-function alleles. Transient transfection of artificial microRNA targeting cytoplasmic HSP90 genes similarly lengthens period. Proteolytic targets of SCFZTL, TOC1 and PRR5, are stabilized in geldanamycin-treated seedlings, whereas the levels of closely related clock proteins, PRR3 and PRR7, are unchanged. An in vitro holdase assay, typically used to demonstrate chaperone activity, shows that ZTL can be effectively bound, and aggregation prevented, by HSP90. GIGANTEA, a unique stabilizer of ZTL, may act in the same pathway as HSP90, possibly linking these two proteins to a similar mechanism. Our findings establish maturation of ZTL by HSP90 as essential for proper function of the Arabidopsis circadian clock. Unlike metazoan systems, HSP90 functions here within the core oscillator. Additionally, F-box proteins as clients may place HSP90 in a unique and more central role in proteostasis. PMID:21949396

  15. CUL1 Regulates TOC1 Protein Stability in the Arabidopsis Circadian Clock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The circadian clock is the endogenous timer that coordinates physiological processes with daily and seasonal environmental changes. In Arabidopsis thaliana, establishment of the circadian period relies on targeted degradation of TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION 1 (TOC1) by the 26S proteasome. ZEITLUPE (ZTL)...

  16. Transcriptional regulation of NHE3 and SGLT1 by the circadian clock protein Per1 in proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Solocinski, Kristen; Richards, Jacob; All, Sean; Cheng, Kit-Yan; Khundmiri, Syed J; Gumz, Michelle L

    2015-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the circadian clock protein period (Per)1 coordinately regulates multiple genes involved in Na(+) reabsorption in renal collecting duct cells. Consistent with these results, Per1 knockout mice exhibit dramatically lower blood pressure than wild-type mice. The proximal tubule is responsible for a majority of Na(+) reabsorption. Previous work has demonstrated that expression of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3 (NHE3) oscillates with a circadian pattern and Na(+)-glucose cotransporter (SGLT)1 has been demonstrated to be a circadian target in the colon, but whether these target genes are regulated by Per1 has not been investigated in the kidney. The goal of the present study was to determine if Per1 regulates the expression of NHE3, SGLT1, and SGLT2 in the kidney. Pharmacological blockade of nuclear Per1 entry resulted in decreased mRNA expression of SGLT1 and NHE3 but not SGLT2 in the renal cortex of mice. Per1 small interfering RNA and pharmacological blockade of Per1 nuclear entry in human proximal tubule HK-2 cells yielded the same results. Examination of heterogeneous nuclear RNA suggested that the effects of Per1 on NHE3 and SGLT1 expression occurred at the level of transcription. Per1 and the circadian protein CLOCK were detected at promoters of NHE3 and SGLT1. Importantly, both membrane and intracellular protein levels of NHE3 and SGLT1 were decreased after blockade of nuclear Per1 entry. This effect was associated with reduced activity of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase. These data demonstrate a role for Per1 in the transcriptional regulation of NHE3 and SGLT1 in the kidney. PMID:26377793

  17. Transcriptional Regulation via Nuclear Receptor Crosstalk Required for the Drosophila Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Jaumouillé, Edouard; Machado Almeida, Pedro; Stähli, Patrick; Koch, Rafael; Nagoshi, Emi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Circadian clocks in large part rely on transcriptional feedback loops. At the core of the clock machinery, the transcriptional activators CLOCK/BMAL1 (in mammals) and CLOCK/CYCLE (CLK/CYC) (in Drosophila) drive the expression of the period (per) family genes. The PER-containing complexes inhibit the activity of CLOCK/BMAL1 or CLK/CYC, thereby forming a negative feedback loop [1]. In mammals, the ROR and REV-ERB family nuclear receptors add positive and negative transcriptional regulation to this core negative feedback loop to ensure the generation of robust circadian molecular oscillation [2]. Despite the overall similarities between mammalian and Drosophila clocks, whether comparable mechanisms via nuclear receptors are required for the Drosophila clock remains unknown. We show here that the nuclear receptor E75, the fly homolog of REV-ERB α and REV-ERB β, and the NR2E3 subfamily nuclear receptor UNF are components of the molecular clocks in the Drosophila pacemaker neurons. In vivo assays in conjunction with the in vitro experiments demonstrate that E75 and UNF bind to per regulatory sequences and act together to enhance the CLK/CYC-mediated transcription of the per gene, thereby completing the core transcriptional feedback loop necessary for the free-running clockwork. Our results identify a missing link in the Drosophila clock and highlight the significance of the transcriptional regulation via nuclear receptors in metazoan circadian clocks. PMID:26004759

  18. Transcriptional regulation via nuclear receptor crosstalk required for the Drosophila circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Jaumouillé, Edouard; Machado Almeida, Pedro; Stähli, Patrick; Koch, Rafael; Nagoshi, Emi

    2015-06-01

    Circadian clocks in large part rely on transcriptional feedback loops. At the core of the clock machinery, the transcriptional activators CLOCK/BMAL1 (in mammals) and CLOCK/CYCLE (CLK/CYC) (in Drosophila) drive the expression of the period (per) family genes. The PER-containing complexes inhibit the activity of CLOCK/BMAL1 or CLK/CYC, thereby forming a negative feedback loop [1]. In mammals, the ROR and REV-ERB family nuclear receptors add positive and negative transcriptional regulation to this core negative feedback loop to ensure the generation of robust circadian molecular oscillation [2]. Despite the overall similarities between mammalian and Drosophila clocks, whether comparable mechanisms via nuclear receptors are required for the Drosophila clock remains unknown. We show here that the nuclear receptor E75, the fly homolog of REV-ERB α and REV-ERB β, and the NR2E3 subfamily nuclear receptor UNF are components of the molecular clocks in the Drosophila pacemaker neurons. In vivo assays in conjunction with the in vitro experiments demonstrate that E75 and UNF bind to per regulatory sequences and act together to enhance the CLK/CYC-mediated transcription of the per gene, thereby completing the core transcriptional feedback loop necessary for the free-running clockwork. Our results identify a missing link in the Drosophila clock and highlight the significance of the transcriptional regulation via nuclear receptors in metazoan circadian clocks. PMID:26004759

  19. Analysis and synthesis of high-amplitude Cis-elements in the mammalian circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Kumaki, Yuichi; Ukai-Tadenuma, Maki; Uno, Ken-ichiro D; Nishio, Junko; Masumoto, Koh-hei; Nagano, Mamoru; Komori, Takashi; Shigeyoshi, Yasufumi; Hogenesch, John B; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2008-09-30

    Mammalian circadian clocks consist of regulatory loops mediated by Clock/Bmal1-binding elements, DBP/E4BP4 binding elements, and RevErbA/ROR binding elements. As a step toward system-level understanding of the dynamic transcriptional regulation of the oscillator, we constructed and used a mammalian promoter/enhancer database (http://promoter.cdb.riken.jp/) with computational models of the Clock/Bmal1-binding elements, DBP/E4BP4 binding elements, and RevErbA/ROR binding elements to predict new targets of the clock and subsequently validated these targets at the level of the cell and organism. We further demonstrated the predictive nature of these models by generating and testing synthetic regulatory elements that do not occur in nature and showed that these elements produced high-amplitude circadian gene regulation. Biochemical experiments to characterize these synthetic elements revealed the importance of the affinity balance between transactivators and transrepressors in generating high-amplitude circadian transcriptional output. These results highlight the power of comparative genomics approaches for system-level identification and knowledge-based design of dynamic regulatory circuits. PMID:18815372

  20. Interaction of MAGED1 with nuclear receptors affects circadian clock function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohan; Tang, Jing; Xing, Lijuan; Shi, Guangsen; Ruan, Haibin; Gu, Xiwen; Liu, Zhiwei; Wu, Xi; Gao, Xiang; Xu, Ying

    2010-04-21

    The circadian clock has a central role in physiological adaption and anticipation of day/night changes. In a genetic screen for novel regulators of circadian rhythms, we found that mice lacking MAGED1 (Melanoma Antigen Family D1) exhibit a shortened period and altered rest-activity bouts. These circadian phenotypes are proposed to be caused by a direct effect on the core molecular clock network that reduces the robustness of the circadian clock. We provide in vitro and in vivo evidence indicating that MAGED1 binds to RORalpha to bring about positive and negative effects on core clock genes of Bmal1, Rev-erbalpha and E4bp4 expression through the Rev-Erbalpha/ROR responsive elements (RORE). Maged1 is a non-rhythmic gene that, by binding RORalpha in non-circadian way, enhances rhythmic input and buffers the circadian system from irrelevant, perturbing stimuli or noise. We have thus identified and defined a novel circadian regulator, Maged1, which is indispensable for the robustness of the circadian clock to better serve the organism. PMID:20300063

  1. Interaction of MAGED1 with nuclear receptors affects circadian clock function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohan; Tang, Jing; Xing, Lijuan; Shi, Guangsen; Ruan, Haibin; Gu, Xiwen; Liu, Zhiwei; Wu, Xi; Gao, Xiang; Xu, Ying

    2010-01-01

    The circadian clock has a central role in physiological adaption and anticipation of day/night changes. In a genetic screen for novel regulators of circadian rhythms, we found that mice lacking MAGED1 (Melanoma Antigen Family D1) exhibit a shortened period and altered rest–activity bouts. These circadian phenotypes are proposed to be caused by a direct effect on the core molecular clock network that reduces the robustness of the circadian clock. We provide in vitro and in vivo evidence indicating that MAGED1 binds to RORα to bring about positive and negative effects on core clock genes of Bmal1, Rev-erbα and E4bp4 expression through the Rev-Erbα/ROR responsive elements (RORE). Maged1 is a non-rhythmic gene that, by binding RORα in non-circadian way, enhances rhythmic input and buffers the circadian system from irrelevant, perturbing stimuli or noise. We have thus identified and defined a novel circadian regulator, Maged1, which is indispensable for the robustness of the circadian clock to better serve the organism. PMID:20300063

  2. Circadian autodephosphorylation of cyanobacterial clock protein KaiC occurs via formation of ATP as intermediate.

    PubMed

    Nishiwaki, Taeko; Kondo, Takao

    2012-05-25

    The cyanobacterial circadian oscillator can be reconstituted in vitro; mixing three clock proteins (KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC) with ATP results in an oscillation of KaiC phosphorylation with a periodicity of ~24 h. The hexameric ATPase KaiC hydrolyzes ATP bound at subunit interfaces. KaiC also exhibits autokinase and autophosphatase activities, the latter of which is particularly noteworthy because KaiC is phylogenetically distinct from typical protein phosphatases. To examine this activity, we performed autodephosphorylation assays using (32)P-labeled KaiC. The residual radioactive ATP bound to subunit interfaces was removed using a newly established method, which included the dissociation of KaiC hexamers into monomers and the reconstitution of KaiC hexamers with nonradioactive ATP. This approach ensured that only the signals derived from (32)P-labeled KaiC were examined. We detected the transient formation of [(32)P]ATP preceding the accumulation of (32)P(i). Together with kinetic analyses, our data demonstrate that KaiC undergoes dephosphorylation via a mechanism that differs from those of conventional protein phosphatases. A phosphate group at a phosphorylation site is first transferred to KaiC-bound ADP to form ATP as an intermediate, which can be regarded as a reversal of the autophosphorylation reaction. Subsequently, the ATP molecule is hydrolyzed to form P(i). We propose that the ATPase active site mediates not only ATP hydrolysis but also the bidirectional transfer of the phosphate between phosphorylation sites and the KaiC-bound nucleotide. On the basis of these findings, we can now dissect the dynamics of the KaiC phosphorylation cycle relative to ATPase activity. PMID:22493509

  3. Circadian Autodephosphorylation of Cyanobacterial Clock Protein KaiC Occurs via Formation of ATP as Intermediate*

    PubMed Central

    Nishiwaki, Taeko; Kondo, Takao

    2012-01-01

    The cyanobacterial circadian oscillator can be reconstituted in vitro; mixing three clock proteins (KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC) with ATP results in an oscillation of KaiC phosphorylation with a periodicity of ∼24 h. The hexameric ATPase KaiC hydrolyzes ATP bound at subunit interfaces. KaiC also exhibits autokinase and autophosphatase activities, the latter of which is particularly noteworthy because KaiC is phylogenetically distinct from typical protein phosphatases. To examine this activity, we performed autodephosphorylation assays using 32P-labeled KaiC. The residual radioactive ATP bound to subunit interfaces was removed using a newly established method, which included the dissociation of KaiC hexamers into monomers and the reconstitution of KaiC hexamers with nonradioactive ATP. This approach ensured that only the signals derived from 32P-labeled KaiC were examined. We detected the transient formation of [32P]ATP preceding the accumulation of 32Pi. Together with kinetic analyses, our data demonstrate that KaiC undergoes dephosphorylation via a mechanism that differs from those of conventional protein phosphatases. A phosphate group at a phosphorylation site is first transferred to KaiC-bound ADP to form ATP as an intermediate, which can be regarded as a reversal of the autophosphorylation reaction. Subsequently, the ATP molecule is hydrolyzed to form Pi. We propose that the ATPase active site mediates not only ATP hydrolysis but also the bidirectional transfer of the phosphate between phosphorylation sites and the KaiC-bound nucleotide. On the basis of these findings, we can now dissect the dynamics of the KaiC phosphorylation cycle relative to ATPase activity. PMID:22493509

  4. Analysis of core circadian feedback loop in suprachiasmatic nucleus of mCry1-luc transgenic reporter mouse

    PubMed Central

    Maywood, Elizabeth S.; Drynan, Lesley; Chesham, Johanna E.; Edwards, Mathew D.; Dardente, Hugues; Fustin, Jean-Michel; Hazlerigg, David G.; O’Neill, John S.; Codner, Gemma F.; Smyllie, Nicola J.; Brancaccio, Marco; Hastings, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) coordinates circadian rhythms that adapt the individual to solar time. SCN pacemaking revolves around feedback loops in which expression of Period (Per) and Cryptochrome (Cry) genes is periodically suppressed by their protein products. Specifically, PER/CRY complexes act at E-box sequences in Per and Cry to inhibit their transactivation by CLOCK/BMAL1 heterodimers. To function effectively, these closed intracellular loops need to be synchronized between SCN cells and to the light/dark cycle. For Per expression, this is mediated by neuropeptidergic and glutamatergic extracellular cues acting via cAMP/calcium-responsive elements (CREs) in Per genes. Cry genes, however, carry no CREs, and how CRY-dependent SCN pacemaking is synchronized remains unclear. Furthermore, whereas reporter lines are available to explore Per circadian expression in real time, no Cry equivalent exists. We therefore created a mouse, B6.Cg-Tg(Cry1-luc)01Ld, carrying a transgene (mCry1-luc) consisting of mCry1 elements containing an E-box and E′-box driving firefly luciferase. mCry1-luc organotypic SCN slices exhibited stable circadian bioluminescence rhythms with appropriate phase, period, profile, and spatial organization. In SCN lacking vasoactive intestinal peptide or its receptor, mCry1 expression was damped and desynchronized between cells. Despite the absence of CREs, mCry1-luc expression was nevertheless (indirectly) sensitive to manipulation of cAMP-dependent signaling. In mPer1/2-null SCN, mCry1-luc bioluminescence was arrhythmic and no longer suppressed by elevation of cAMP. Finally, an SCN graft procedure showed that PER-independent as well as PER-dependent mechanisms could sustain circadian expression of mCry1. The mCry1-luc mouse therefore reports circadian mCry1 expression and its interactions with vasoactive intestinal peptide, cAMP, and PER at the heart of the SCN pacemaker. PMID:23690615

  5. Roles of two ATPase-motif-containing domains in cyanobacterial circadian clock protein KaiC.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Fumio; Itoh, Noriyo; Uzumaki, Tatsuya; Iwase, Ryo; Tsuchiya, Yuka; Yamakawa, Hisanori; Morishita, Megumi; Onai, Kiyoshi; Itoh, Shigeru; Ishiura, Masahiro

    2004-12-10

    Cyanobacterial clock protein KaiC has a hexagonal, pot-shaped structure composed of six identical dumbbell-shaped subunits. Each subunit has duplicated domains, and each domain has a set of ATPase motifs. The two spherical regions of the dumbbell are likely to correspond to two domains. We examined the role of the two sets of ATPase motifs by analyzing the in vitro activity of ATPgammaS binding, AMPPNP-induced hexamerization, thermostability, and phosphorylation of KaiC and by in vivo rhythm assays both in wild type KaiC (KaiCWT) and KaiCs carrying mutations in either Walker motif A or deduced catalytic Glu residues. We demonstrated that 1) the KaiC subunit had two types of ATP-binding sites, a high affinity site in N-terminal ATPase motifs and a low affinity site in C-terminal ATPase motifs, 2) the N-terminal motifs were responsible for hexamerization, and 3) the C-terminal motifs were responsible for both stabilization and phosphorylation of the KaiC hexamer. We proposed the following reaction mechanism. ATP preferentially binds to the N-terminal high affinity site, inducing the hexamerization of KaiC. Additional ATP then binds to the C-terminal low affinity site, stabilizing and phosphorylating the hexamer. We discussed the effect of these KaiC mutations on circadian bioluminescence rhythm in cells of cyanobacteria. PMID:15377674

  6. Circadian expression of clock and putative clock-controlled genes in skeletal muscle of the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Ian P G; Johnston, Ian A

    2012-01-01

    To identify circadian patterns of gene expression in skeletal muscle, adult male zebrafish were acclimated for 2 wk to a 12:12-h light-dark photoperiod and then exposed to continuous darkness for 86 h with ad libitum feeding. The increase in gut food content associated with the subjective light period was much diminished by the third cycle, enabling feeding and circadian rhythms to be distinguished. Expression of zebrafish paralogs of mammalian transcriptional activators of the circadian mechanism (bmal1, clock1, and rora) followed a rhythmic pattern with a ∼24-h periodicity. Peak expression of rora paralogs occurred at the beginning of the subjective light period [Zeitgeber time (ZT)07 and ZT02 for roraa and rorab], whereas the highest expression of bmal1 and clock paralogs occurred 12 h later (ZT13-15 and ZT16 for bmal and clock paralogs). Expression of the transcriptional repressors cry1a, per1a/1b, per2, per3, nr1d2a/2b, and nr1d1 also followed a circadian pattern with peak expression at ZT0-02. Expression of the two paralogs of cry2 occurred in phase with clock1a/1b. Duplicated genes had a high correlation of expression except for paralogs of clock1, nr1d2, and per1, with cry1b showing no circadian pattern. The highest expression difference was 9.2-fold for the activator bmal1b and 51.7-fold for the repressor per1a. Out of 32 candidate clock-controlled genes, only myf6, igfbp3, igfbp5b, and hsf2 showed circadian expression patterns. Igfbp3, igfbp5b, and myf6 were expressed in phase with clock1a/1b and had an average of twofold change in expression from peak to trough, whereas hsf2 transcripts were expressed in phase with cry1a and had a 7.2-fold-change in expression. The changes in expression of clock and clock-controlled genes observed during continuous darkness were also observed at similar ZTs in fish exposed to a normal photoperiod in a separate control experiment. The role of circadian clocks in regulating muscle maintenance and growth are discussed

  7. Suprachiasmatic nucleus function and circadian entrainment are modulated by G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying (GIRK) channels

    PubMed Central

    Hablitz, L M; Molzof, H E; Paul, J R; Johnson, R L; Gamble, K L

    2014-01-01

    Abstract G protein signalling within the central circadian oscillator, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), is essential for conveying time-of-day information. We sought to determine whether G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels (GIRKs) modulate SCN physiology and circadian behaviour. We show that GIRK current and GIRK2 protein expression are greater during the day. Pharmacological inhibition of GIRKs and genetic loss of GIRK2 depolarized the day-time resting membrane potential of SCN neurons compared to controls. Behaviourally, GIRK2 knockout (KO) mice failed to shorten free running period in response to wheel access in constant darkness and entrained more rapidly to a 6 h advance of a 12 h:12 h light–dark (LD) cycle than wild-type (WT) littermate controls. We next examined whether these effects were due to disrupted signalling of neuropeptide Y (NPY), which is known to mediate non-photic phase shifts, attenuate photic phase shifts and activate GIRKs. Indeed, GIRK2 KO SCN slices had significantly fewer silent cells in response to NPY, likely contributing to the absence of NPY-induced phase advances of PER2::LUC rhythms in organotypic SCN cultures from GIRK2 KO mice. Finally, GIRK channel activation is sufficient to cause a non-photic-like phase advance of PER2::LUC rhythms on a Per2Luc+/− background. These results suggest that rhythmic regulation of GIRK2 protein and channel function in the SCN contributes to day-time resting membrane potential, providing a mechanism for the fine tuning responses to non-photic and photic stimuli. Further investigation could provide insight into disorders with circadian disruption comorbidities such as epilepsy and addiction, in which GIRK channels have been implicated. PMID:25217379

  8. NPAS2 Compensates for Loss of CLOCK in Peripheral Circadian Oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Landgraf, Dominic; Wang, Lexie L.; Diemer, Tanja; Welsh, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Heterodimers of CLOCK and BMAL1 are the major transcriptional activators of the mammalian circadian clock. Because the paralog NPAS2 can substitute for CLOCK in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian pacemaker, CLOCK-deficient mice maintain circadian rhythms in behavior and in tissues in vivo. However, when isolated from the SCN, CLOCK-deficient peripheral tissues are reportedly arrhythmic, suggesting a fundamental difference in circadian clock function between SCN and peripheral tissues. Surprisingly, however, using luminometry and single-cell bioluminescence imaging of PER2 expression, we now find that CLOCK-deficient dispersed SCN neurons and peripheral cells exhibit similarly stable, autonomous circadian rhythms in vitro. In CLOCK-deficient fibroblasts, knockdown of Npas2 leads to arrhythmicity, suggesting that NPAS2 can compensate for loss of CLOCK in peripheral cells as well as in SCN. Our data overturn the notion of an SCN-specific role for NPAS2 in the molecular circadian clock, and instead indicate that, at the cellular level, the core loops of SCN neuron and peripheral cell circadian clocks are fundamentally similar. PMID:26895328

  9. Human skeletal myotubes display a cell-autonomous circadian clock implicated in basal myokine secretion

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, Laurent; Loizides-Mangold, Ursula; Skarupelova, Svetlana; Pulimeno, Pamela; Chanon, Stephanie; Robert, Maud; Bouzakri, Karim; Modoux, Christine; Roux-Lombard, Pascale; Vidal, Hubert; Lefai, Etienne; Dibner, Charna

    2015-01-01

    Objective Circadian clocks are functional in all light-sensitive organisms, allowing an adaptation to the external world in anticipation of daily environmental changes. In view of the potential role of the skeletal muscle clock in the regulation of glucose metabolism, we aimed to characterize circadian rhythms in primary human skeletal myotubes and investigate their roles in myokine secretion. Methods We established a system for long-term bioluminescence recording in differentiated human myotubes, employing lentivector gene delivery of the Bmal1-luciferase and Per2-luciferase core clock reporters. Furthermore, we disrupted the circadian clock in skeletal muscle cells by transfecting siRNA targeting CLOCK. Next, we assessed the basal secretion of a large panel of myokines in a circadian manner in the presence or absence of a functional clock. Results Bioluminescence reporter assays revealed that human skeletal myotubes, synchronized in vitro, exhibit a self-sustained circadian rhythm, which was further confirmed by endogenous core clock transcript expression. Moreover, we demonstrate that the basal secretion of IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 by synchronized skeletal myotubes has a circadian profile. Importantly, the secretion of IL-6 and several additional myokines was strongly downregulated upon siClock-mediated clock disruption. Conclusions Our study provides for the first time evidence that primary human skeletal myotubes possess a high-amplitude cell-autonomous circadian clock, which could be attenuated. Furthermore, this oscillator plays an important role in the regulation of basal myokine secretion by skeletal myotubes. PMID:26629407

  10. Circadian Modulation of 8-Oxoguanine DNA Damage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Manzella, Nicola; Bracci, Massimo; Strafella, Elisabetta; Staffolani, Sara; Ciarapica, Veronica; Copertaro, Alfredo; Rapisarda, Venerando; Ledda, Caterina; Amati, Monica; Valentino, Matteo; Tomasetti, Marco; Stevens, Richard G.; Santarelli, Lory

    2015-01-01

    The DNA base excision repair pathway is the main system involved in the removal of oxidative damage to DNA such as 8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG) primarily via the 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1). Our goal was to investigate whether the repair of 8-oxoG DNA damage follow a circadian rhythm. In a group of 15 healthy volunteers, we found a daily variation of Ogg1 expression and activity with higher levels in the morning compared to the evening hours. Consistent with this, we also found lower levels of 8-oxoG in morning hours compared to those in the evening hours. Lymphocytes exposed to oxidative damage to DNA at 8:00 AM display lower accumulation of 8-oxoG than lymphocytes exposed at 8:00 PM. Furthermore, altered levels of Ogg1 expression were also observed in a group of shift workers experiencing a deregulation of circadian clock genes compared to a control group. Moreover, BMAL1 knockdown fibroblasts with a deregulated molecular clock showed an abolishment of circadian variation of Ogg1 expression and an increase of OGG1 activity. Our results suggest that the circadian modulation of 8-oxoG DNA damage repair, according to a variation of Ogg1 expression, could render humans less susceptible to accumulate 8-oxoG DNA damage in the morning hours. PMID:26337123

  11. Circadian Modulation of 8-Oxoguanine DNA Damage Repair.

    PubMed

    Manzella, Nicola; Bracci, Massimo; Strafella, Elisabetta; Staffolani, Sara; Ciarapica, Veronica; Copertaro, Alfredo; Rapisarda, Venerando; Ledda, Caterina; Amati, Monica; Valentino, Matteo; Tomasetti, Marco; Stevens, Richard G; Santarelli, Lory

    2015-01-01

    The DNA base excision repair pathway is the main system involved in the removal of oxidative damage to DNA such as 8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG) primarily via the 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1). Our goal was to investigate whether the repair of 8-oxoG DNA damage follow a circadian rhythm. In a group of 15 healthy volunteers, we found a daily variation of Ogg1 expression and activity with higher levels in the morning compared to the evening hours. Consistent with this, we also found lower levels of 8-oxoG in morning hours compared to those in the evening hours. Lymphocytes exposed to oxidative damage to DNA at 8:00 AM display lower accumulation of 8-oxoG than lymphocytes exposed at 8:00 PM. Furthermore, altered levels of Ogg1 expression were also observed in a group of shift workers experiencing a deregulation of circadian clock genes compared to a control group. Moreover, BMAL1 knockdown fibroblasts with a deregulated molecular clock showed an abolishment of circadian variation of Ogg1 expression and an increase of OGG1 activity. Our results suggest that the circadian modulation of 8-oxoG DNA damage repair, according to a variation of Ogg1 expression, could render humans less susceptible to accumulate 8-oxoG DNA damage in the morning hours. PMID:26337123

  12. Ras-Mediated Deregulation of the Circadian Clock in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Relógio, Angela; Thomas, Philippe; Medina-Pérez, Paula; Reischl, Silke; Bervoets, Sander; Gloc, Ewa; Riemer, Pamela; Mang-Fatehi, Shila; Maier, Bert; Schäfer, Reinhold; Leser, Ulf; Herzel, Hanspeter; Kramer, Achim; Sers, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are essential to the temporal regulation of molecular processes in living systems and as such to life itself. Deregulation of these rhythms leads to failures in biological processes and eventually to the manifestation of pathological phenotypes including cancer. To address the questions as to what are the elicitors of a disrupted clock in cancer, we applied a systems biology approach to correlate experimental, bioinformatics and modelling data from several cell line models for colorectal and skin cancer. We found strong and weak circadian oscillators within the same type of cancer and identified a set of genes, which allows the discrimination between the two oscillator-types. Among those genes are IFNGR2, PITX2, RFWD2, PPARγ, LOXL2, Rab6 and SPARC, all involved in cancer-related pathways. Using a bioinformatics approach, we extended the core-clock network and present its interconnection to the discriminative set of genes. Interestingly, such gene signatures link the clock to oncogenic pathways like the RAS/MAPK pathway. To investigate the potential impact of the RAS/MAPK pathway - a major driver of colorectal carcinogenesis - on the circadian clock, we used a computational model which predicted that perturbation of BMAL1-mediated transcription can generate the circadian phenotypes similar to those observed in metastatic cell lines. Using an inducible RAS expression system, we show that overexpression of RAS disrupts the circadian clock and leads to an increase of the circadian period while RAS inhibition causes a shortening of period length, as predicted by our mathematical simulations. Together, our data demonstrate that perturbations induced by a single oncogene are sufficient to deregulate the mammalian circadian clock. PMID:24875049

  13. Ras-mediated deregulation of the circadian clock in cancer.

    PubMed

    Relógio, Angela; Thomas, Philippe; Medina-Pérez, Paula; Reischl, Silke; Bervoets, Sander; Gloc, Ewa; Riemer, Pamela; Mang-Fatehi, Shila; Maier, Bert; Schäfer, Reinhold; Leser, Ulf; Herzel, Hanspeter; Kramer, Achim; Sers, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are essential to the temporal regulation of molecular processes in living systems and as such to life itself. Deregulation of these rhythms leads to failures in biological processes and eventually to the manifestation of pathological phenotypes including cancer. To address the questions as to what are the elicitors of a disrupted clock in cancer, we applied a systems biology approach to correlate experimental, bioinformatics and modelling data from several cell line models for colorectal and skin cancer. We found strong and weak circadian oscillators within the same type of cancer and identified a set of genes, which allows the discrimination between the two oscillator-types. Among those genes are IFNGR2, PITX2, RFWD2, PPARγ, LOXL2, Rab6 and SPARC, all involved in cancer-related pathways. Using a bioinformatics approach, we extended the core-clock network and present its interconnection to the discriminative set of genes. Interestingly, such gene signatures link the clock to oncogenic pathways like the RAS/MAPK pathway. To investigate the potential impact of the RAS/MAPK pathway - a major driver of colorectal carcinogenesis - on the circadian clock, we used a computational model which predicted that perturbation of BMAL1-mediated transcription can generate the circadian phenotypes similar to those observed in metastatic cell lines. Using an inducible RAS expression system, we show that overexpression of RAS disrupts the circadian clock and leads to an increase of the circadian period while RAS inhibition causes a shortening of period length, as predicted by our mathematical simulations. Together, our data demonstrate that perturbations induced by a single oncogene are sufficient to deregulate the mammalian circadian clock. PMID:24875049

  14. Rats with minimal hepatic encephalopathy show reduced cGMP-dependent protein kinase activity in hypothalamus correlating with circadian rhythms alterations.

    PubMed

    Felipo, Vicente; Piedrafita, Blanca; Barios, Juan A; Agustí, Ana; Ahabrach, Hanan; Romero-Vives, María; Barrio, Luis C; Rey, Beatriz; Gaztelu, Jose M; Llansola, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Patients with liver cirrhosis show disturbances in sleep and in its circadian rhythms which are an early sign of minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE). The mechanisms of these disturbances are poorly understood. Rats with porta-caval shunt (PCS), a model of MHE, show sleep disturbances reproducing those of cirrhotic patients. The aims of this work were to characterize the alterations in circadian rhythms in PCS rats and analyze the underlying mechanisms. To reach these aims, we analyzed in control and PCS rats: (a) daily rhythms of spontaneous and rewarding activity and of temperature, (b) timing of the onset of activity following turning-off the light, (c) synchronization to light after a phase advance and (d) the molecular mechanisms contributing to these alterations in circadian rhythms. PCS rats show altered circadian rhythms of spontaneous and rewarding activities (wheel running). PCS rats show more rest bouts during the active phase, more errors in the onset of motor activity and need less time to re-synchronize after a phase advance than control rats. Circadian rhythm of body temperature is also slightly altered in PCS rats. The internal period length (tau) of circadian rhythm of motor activity is longer in PCS rats. We analyzed some mechanisms by which hypothalamus modulate circadian rhythms. PCS rats show increased content of cGMP in hypothalamus while the activity of cGMP-dependent protein kinase was reduced by 41% compared to control rats. Altered cGMP-PKG pathway in hypothalamus would contribute to altered circadian rhythms and synchronization to light. PMID:26203935

  15. Circadian oscillations of protein-coding and regulatory RNAs in a highly dynamic mammalian liver epigenome

    PubMed Central

    Vollmers, Christopher; Schmitz, Robert J.; Nathanson, Jason; Yeo, Gene; Ecker, Joseph R.; Panda, Satchidananda

    2012-01-01

    In the mouse liver, circadian transcriptional rhythms are necessary for metabolic homeostasis. Whether dynamic epigenomic modifications are associated with transcript oscillations has not been systematically investigated. We found in addition to mRNAs, several antisense-, linc- and micro-RNA transcripts showed circadian oscillations in adult mouse livers. Robust transcript oscillations were often accompanied by temporally correlated rhythmic histone modifications in promoters, gene bodies or enhancers, although promoter DNA methylation levels were relatively stable. Such integrative analyses identified oscillating expression of a previously undetected antisense transcript (asPer2) to the gene encoding the circadian oscillator component Per2. Robustness of transcript oscillations often accompanied rhythms in multiple histone modifications and recruitment of multiple chromatin-associated clock components. In summary, coupling of the locations of cycling histone modifications with one or more oscillating transcripts within their proximity enabled establishment of a temporal relationship between enhancers, genes and transcripts on a genome-wide, base-resolution scale in a mammalian liver. The results offer a framework to understand intricate dynamic regulation among metabolism, circadian clock, and chromatin modifications to maintain metabolic homeostasis. PMID:23217262

  16. The negative transcription factor E4BP4 is associated with circadian clock protein PERIOD2.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Tomoya; Onishi, Yoshiaki; Ishida, Norio

    2007-03-23

    The bZIP transcription factor E4BP4, is a mammalian homologue of vrille that functions as a key negative component of the circadian clock. We have shown that the E4BP4-binding site (B-site) is required in addition to a non-canonical E-box (E2 enhancer) for robust circadian Period2 (Per2) expression in the cell-autonomous clock. While the E2 enhancer and the B-site are closely situated, correlations between each component bound to the E2 enhancer and the B-site remain obscure. Here, we show that E4BP4 interacts with PER2, which represses transcriptional activity via the E-box enhancer. Interaction with PER2 required the carboxyl-terminal region that contains the repression domain of E4BP4. We also found that E4BP4 interacts with CRYPTOCHROME2 (CRY2), a key negative regulator in the mammalian circadian clock. These results suggest that E4BP4 is a component of the negative regulator complex of mammalian circadian clocks. PMID:17274955

  17. Noncanonical FK506-binding Protein BDBT Binds DBT to Enhance its Circadian Function and Forms Foci at Night

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jin-Yuan; Agyekum, Boadi; Venkatesan, Anandakrishnan; Hall, David R.; Keightley, Andrew; Bjes, Edward S.; Bouyain, Samuel; Price, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The kinase DOUBLETIME is a master regulator of the Drosophila circadian clock, yet the mechanisms regulating its activity remain unclear. A proteomic analysis of DOUBLETIME interactors led to the identification of an unstudied protein designated CG17282. RNAi-mediated knock-down of CG17282 produced behavioral arrhythmicity and long periods, high levels of hypophosphorylated nuclear PERIOD and phosphorylated DOUBLETIME. Overexpression of DOUBLETIME in flies suppresses these phenotypes and overexpression of CG17282 in S2 cells enhances DOUBLETIME-dependent PERIOD degradation, indicating that CG17282 stimulates DOUBLETIME’s circadian function. In photoreceptors, CG17282 accumulates rhythmically in PERIOD- and DOUBLETIME-dependent cytosolic foci. Finally, structural analyses demonstrated CG17282 is a noncanonical FK506-binding protein with an inactive peptide prolyl-isomerase domain that binds DOUBLETIME and tetratricopeptide repeats that may promote assembly of larger protein complexes. We have named CG17282 Bride of Doubletime and established it as a mediator of DOUBLETIME’s effects on PERIOD, most likely in cytosolic foci that regulate PERIOD nuclear accumulation. PMID:24210908

  18. Daily expression of six clock genes in central and peripheral tissues of a night-migratory songbird: evidence for tissue-specific circadian timing.

    PubMed

    Singh, Devraj; Rani, Sangeeta; Kumar, Vinod

    2013-12-01

    In birds, independent circadian clocks reside in the retina, pineal, and hypothalamus, which interact with each other and produce circadian time at the functional level. However, less is known of the molecular clockwork, and of the integration between central and peripheral clocks in birds. The present study investigated this, by monitoring the timed expression of five core clock genes (Per2. Cry1. Cry2. Bmal1, and Clock) and one clock-controlled gene (E4bp4) in a night-migratory songbird, the redheaded bunting (rb; Emberiza bruniceps). The authors first partially cloned these six genes, and then measured their 24-h profiles in central (retina, hypothalamus) and peripheral (liver, heart, stomach, gut, testes) tissues, collected at six times (zeitgeber time 2 [ZT2], ZT6, ZT11, ZT13, ZT18, and ZT23; ZT0 = lights on) from birds (n = 5 per ZT) on 12 h:12 h light-dark cycle. rbPer2. rbCry1. rbBmal1, and rbClock were expressed with a significant rhythm in all the tissues, except in the retina (only rbClock) and testes. rbCry2, however, had tissue-specific expression pattern: a significant rhythm in the hypothalamus, heart, and gut, but not in the retina, liver, stomach, and testes. rbE4bp4 had a significant mRNA rhythm in all the tissues, except retina. Further, rbPer2 mRNA peak was phase aligned with lights on, whereas rbCry1. rbBmal1, and rbE4bp4 mRNA peaks were phase aligned with lights off. rbCry2 and rbClock had tissue-specific scattered peaks. For example, both rbCry2 and rbClock peaks were close to rbCry1 and rbBmal1 peaks, respectively, in the hypothalamus, but not in other tissues. The results are consistent with the autoregulatory circadian feedback loop, and indicate a conserved tissue-level circadian time generation in buntings. Variable phase relationships between gene pairs forming positive and negative limbs of the feedback loop may suggest the tissue-specific contribution of individual core circadian genes in the circadian time generation. PMID:23971885

  19. The C-terminal Kinase and ERK-binding Domains of Drosophila S6KII (RSK) Are Required for Phosphorylation of the Protein and Modulation of Circadian Behavior*

    PubMed Central

    Tangredi, Michelle M.; Ng, Fanny S.; Jackson, F. Rob

    2012-01-01

    A detailed structure/function analysis of Drosophila p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (S6KII) or its mammalian homolog RSK has not been performed in the context of neuronal plasticity or behavior. We previously reported that S6KII is required for normal circadian periodicity. Here we report a site-directed mutagenesis of S6KII and analysis of mutants, in vivo, that identifies functional domains and phosphorylation sites critical for the regulation of circadian period. We demonstrate, for the first time, a role for the S6KII C-terminal kinase that is independent of its known role in activation of the N-terminal kinase. Both S6KII C-terminal kinase activity and its ERK-binding domain are required for wild-type circadian period and normal phosphorylation status of the protein. In contrast, the N-terminal kinase of S6KII is dispensable for modulation of circadian period and normal phosphorylation of the protein. We also show that particular sites of S6KII phosphorylation, Ser-515 and Thr-732, are essential for normal circadian behavior. Surprisingly, the phosphorylation of S6KII residues, in vivo, does not follow a strict sequential pattern, as implied by certain cell-based studies of mammalian RSK protein. PMID:22447936

  20. Peripheral circadian clocks--a conserved phenotype?

    PubMed

    Weigl, Yuval; Harbour, Valerie L; Robinson, Barry; Dufresne, Line; Amir, Shimon

    2013-05-01

    The circadian system of mammals regulates the timing of occurrence of behavioral and physiological events, thereby optimizing adaptation to their surroundings. This system is composed of a single master pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and a population of peripheral clocks. The SCN integrates time information from exogenous sources and, in turn, synchronizes the downstream peripheral clocks. It is assumed that under normal conditions, the circadian phenotype of different peripheral clocks would be conserved with respect to its period and robustness. To study this idea, we measured the daily wheel-running activity (WRA; a marker of the SCN output) in 84 male inbred LEW/Crl rats housed under a 12 h:12 h light-dark cycle. In addition, we assessed the mRNA expression of two clock genes, rPer2 and rBmal1, and one clock-controlled gene, rDbp, in four tissues that have the access to time cues other than those emanating from the SCN: olfactory bulbs (OBs), liver, tail skin, and white blood cells (WBCs). In contrast with the assumption stated above, we found that circadian clocks in peripheral tissues differ in the temporal pattern of the expression of circadian clock genes, in the robustness of the rhythms, and possibly in the number of functional ~24-h-clock cells. Based on the tissue diversity in the robustness of the clock output, the hepatic clock is likely to house the highest number of functional ~24-h-clock cells, and the OBs, the fewest number. Thus, the phenotype of the circadian clock in the periphery is tissue specific and may depend not only on the SCN but also on the sensitivity of the tissue to non-SCN-derived time cues. In the OBs and liver, the circadian clock phenotypes seem to be dominantly shaped by the SCN output. However, in the tail skin and WBC, other time cues participate in the phenotype design. Finally, our study suggests that the basic phenotype of the circadian clock is constructed at the transcript level of the core clock

  1. Shifting the feeding of mice to the rest phase creates metabolic alterations, which, on their own, shift the peripheral circadian clocks by 12 hours

    PubMed Central

    Mukherji, Atish; Kobiita, Ahmad; Chambon, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the events through which alterations in diurnal activities impinge on peripheral circadian clocks (PCCs), and reciprocally how the PCCs affect metabolism, thereby generating pathologies, are still poorly understood. Here, we deciphered how switching the diurnal feeding from the active to the rest phase, i.e., restricted feeding (RF), immediately creates a hypoinsulinemia during the active phase, which initiates a metabolic reprogramming by increasing FFA and glucagon levels. In turn, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) activation by free fatty acid (FFA), and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) activation by glucagon, lead to further metabolic alterations during the circadian active phase, as well as to aberrant activation of expression of the PCC components nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group D, member 1 (Nr1d1/RevErbα), Period (Per1 and Per2). Moreover, hypoinsulinemia leads to an increase in glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) activity that, through phosphorylation, stabilizes and increases the level of the RevErbα protein during the active phase. This increase then leads to an untimely repression of expression of the genes containing a RORE DNA binding sequence (DBS), including the Bmal1 gene, thereby initiating in RF mice a 12-h PCC shift to which the CREB-mediated activation of Per1, Per2 by glucagon modestly contributes. We also show that the reported corticosterone extraproduction during the RF active phase reflects an adrenal aberrant activation of CREB signaling, which selectively delays the activation of the PPARα–RevErbα axis in muscle and heart and accounts for the retarded shift of their PCCs. PMID:26627259

  2. Genome-wide expression analysis reveals 100 adrenal gland-dependent circadian genes in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Amagai, Noriko; Shirai, Hidenori; Kadota, Koji; Ohkura, Naoki; Ishida, Norio

    2005-01-01

    Recent progress in genome-wide expression analysis has identified hundreds of circadian genes not only in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (the mammalian master clock) but also in peripheral tissues, such as heart, liver and kidney of mammals. Glucocorticoid is thought to be a circadian time cue for mammalian peripheral clocks. To identify the genes of which the circadian expression is regulated by endogenous glucocorticoids, we performed DNA microarray analysis using hepatic RNA from adrenalectomized (ADX) and sham-operated mice. We identified 169 genes that fluctuated between day and night in the livers of the sham-operated mice. Among these, 100 lost circadian rhythmicity in ADX mice. These included the genes for key enzymes of liver metabolic functions, such as glucokinase, HMG-CoA reductase and glucose-6-phosphatase. The circadian expression of Lpin1, FKBP51 and S-adenosyl methionine decarboxylase was also abolished in the ADX mice. On the other hand, although the circadian expression of clock or clock-related genes, such as mPer2, DBP, E4BP4, mDec1, Usp2 and Wee1 remained almost totally intact in the liver of ADX mice, it was extremely damped in homozygous Clock mutant mice. The present findings suggested that one type of hepatic circadian genes in mice is transcriptionally regulated by core components of the circadian clock, such as CLOCK and BMAL1, and that the other depends on the adrenal gland. PMID:16303750

  3. Natural variation reveals that intracellular distribution of ELF3 protein is associated with function in the circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Anwer, Muhammad Usman; Boikoglou, Eleni; Herrero, Eva; Hallstein, Marc; Davis, Amanda Melaragno; Velikkakam James, Geo; Nagy, Ferenc; Davis, Seth Jon

    2014-01-01

    Natural selection of variants within the Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock can be attributed to adaptation to varying environments. To define a basis for such variation, we examined clock speed in a reporter-modified Bay-0 x Shakdara recombinant inbred line and localized heritable variation. Extensive variation led us to identify EARLY FLOWERING3 (ELF3) as a major quantitative trait locus (QTL). The causal nucleotide polymorphism caused a short-period phenotype under light and severely dampened rhythm generation in darkness, and entrainment alterations resulted. We found that ELF3-Sha protein failed to properly localize to the nucleus, and its ability to accumulate in darkness was compromised. Evidence was provided that the ELF3-Sha allele originated in Central Asia. Collectively, we showed that ELF3 protein plays a vital role in defining its light-repressor action in the circadian clock and that its functional abilities are largely dependent on its cellular localization. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02206.001 PMID:24867215

  4. Mitogen and stress-activated protein kinase 1 (MSK1) modulates photic entrainment of the suprachiasmatic circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ruifeng; Butcher, Greg Q.; Karelina, Kate; Arthur, J. Simon C.; Obrietan, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The master circadian clock in mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), is under the entraining influence of the external light cycle. At a mechanistic level, intracellular signaling via the p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway appears to play a central role in light-evoked clock entrainment; however, the precise downstream mechanisms by which this pathway influences clock timing are not known. Within this context, we have previously reported that light stimulates activation of the MAPK effector mitogen stress activated kinase 1 (MSK1) in the SCN. In this study we utilized MSK1-/- mice to further investigate the potential role of MSK1 in circadian clock timing and entrainment. Locomotor activity analysis revealed that MSK1 null mice entrained to a 12h light/dark cycle and exhibited circadian free-running rhythms in constant darkness. Interestingly, the free running period in MSK1 null mice was significantly longer than WT control animals, and MSK1 null mice exhibited a significantly greater variance in activity onset. Further, MSK1 null mice exhibited a significant reduction in the phase delaying response to an early night light pulse (100 lux, 15 min), and, using an 8-hr phase-advancing “jet-lag” experimental paradigm MSK1 knockout animals exhibited a significantly delayed rate of re-entrainment. At the molecular level, early night light-evoked CREB phosphorylation, histone phosphorylation and Period1 gene expression were markedly attenuated in MSK1-/- animals relative to WT mice. Together, these data provide key new insights into the molecular mechanisms by which MSK1 affects the SCN clock. PMID:23127194

  5. A PTH-responsive circadian clock operates in ex vivo mouse femur fracture healing site.

    PubMed

    Kunimoto, Tatsuya; Okubo, Naoki; Minami, Yoichi; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Hosokawa, Toshihiro; Asada, Maki; Oda, Ryo; Kubo, Toshikazu; Yagita, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock contains clock genes including Bmal1 and Period2, and it maintains an interval rhythm of approximately 24 hours (the circadian rhythm) in various organs including growth plate and articular cartilage. As endochondral ossification is involved not only in growth plate but also in fracture healing, we investigated the circadian clock functions in fracture sites undergoing healing. Our fracture models using external fixation involved femurs of Period2::Luciferase knock-in mice which enables the monitoring of endogenous circadian clock state via bioluminescence. Organ culture was performed by collecting femurs, and fracture sites were observed using bioluminescence imaging systems. Clear bioluminescence rhythms of 24-hour intervals were revealed in fracture healing sites. When parathyroid hormone (PTH) was administered to fractured femurs in organ culture, peak time of Period2::Luciferase activity in fracture sites and growth plates changed, indicating that PTH-responsive circadian clock functions in the mouse femur fracture healing site. While PTH is widely used in treating osteoporosis, many studies have reported that it contributes to improvement of fracture healing. Future studies of the role of this local clock in wound healing may reveal a novel function of the circadian timing mechanism in skeletal cells. PMID:26926165

  6. PPAR{alpha} is a potential therapeutic target of drugs to treat circadian rhythm sleep disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Shirai, Hidenori; Oishi, Katsutaka; Kudo, Takashi; Shibata, Shigenobu; Ishida, Norio . E-mail: n.ishida@aist.go.jp

    2007-06-08

    Recent progress at the molecular level has revealed that nuclear receptors play an important role in the generation of mammalian circadian rhythms. To examine whether peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}) is involved in the regulation of circadian behavioral rhythms in mammals, we evaluated the locomotor activity of mice administered with the hypolipidemic PPAR{alpha} ligand, bezafibrate. Circadian locomotor activity was phase-advanced about 3 h in mice given bezafibrate under light-dark (LD) conditions. Transfer from LD to constant darkness did not change the onset of activity in these mice, suggesting that bezafibrate advanced the phase of the endogenous clock. Surprisingly, bezafibrate also advanced the phase in mice with lesions of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN; the central clock in mammals). The circadian expression of clock genes such as period2, BMAL1, and Rev-erb{alpha} was also phase-advanced in various tissues (cortex, liver, and fat) without affecting the SCN. Bezafibrate also phase-advanced the activity phase that is delayed in model mice with delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS) due to a Clock gene mutation. Our results indicated that PPAR{alpha} is involved in circadian clock control independently of the SCN and that PPAR{alpha} could be a potent target of drugs to treat circadian rhythm sleep disorders including DSPS.

  7. A PTH-responsive circadian clock operates in ex vivo mouse femur fracture healing site

    PubMed Central

    Kunimoto, Tatsuya; Okubo, Naoki; Minami, Yoichi; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Hosokawa, Toshihiro; Asada, Maki; Oda, Ryo; Kubo, Toshikazu; Yagita, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock contains clock genes including Bmal1 and Period2, and it maintains an interval rhythm of approximately 24 hours (the circadian rhythm) in various organs including growth plate and articular cartilage. As endochondral ossification is involved not only in growth plate but also in fracture healing, we investigated the circadian clock functions in fracture sites undergoing healing. Our fracture models using external fixation involved femurs of Period2::Luciferase knock-in mice which enables the monitoring of endogenous circadian clock state via bioluminescence. Organ culture was performed by collecting femurs, and fracture sites were observed using bioluminescence imaging systems. Clear bioluminescence rhythms of 24-hour intervals were revealed in fracture healing sites. When parathyroid hormone (PTH) was administered to fractured femurs in organ culture, peak time of Period2::Luciferase activity in fracture sites and growth plates changed, indicating that PTH-responsive circadian clock functions in the mouse femur fracture healing site. While PTH is widely used in treating osteoporosis, many studies have reported that it contributes to improvement of fracture healing. Future studies of the role of this local clock in wound healing may reveal a novel function of the circadian timing mechanism in skeletal cells. PMID:26926165

  8. Circadian rhythms, the molecular clock, and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Harfmann, Brianna D; Schroder, Elizabeth A; Esser, Karyn A

    2015-04-01

    Circadian rhythms are the approximate 24-h biological cycles that function to prepare an organism for daily environmental changes. They are driven by the molecular clock, a transcriptional:translational feedback mechanism that in mammals involves the core clock genes Bmal1, Clock, Per1/2, and Cry1/2. The molecular clock is present in virtually all cells of an organism. The central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) has been well studied, but the clocks in the peripheral tissues, such as heart and skeletal muscle, have just begun to be investigated. Skeletal muscle is one of the largest organs in the body, comprising approximately 45% of total body mass. More than 2300 genes in skeletal muscle are expressed in a circadian pattern, and these genes participate in a wide range of functions, including myogenesis, transcription, and metabolism. The circadian rhythms of skeletal muscle can be entrained both indirectly through light input to the SCN and directly through time of feeding and activity. It is critical for the skeletal muscle molecular clock not only to be entrained to the environment but also to be in synchrony with rhythms of other tissues. When circadian rhythms are disrupted, the observed effects on skeletal muscle include fiber-type shifts, altered sarcomeric structure, reduced mitochondrial respiration, and impaired muscle function. Furthermore, there are detrimental effects on metabolic health, including impaired glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, which skeletal muscle likely contributes to considering it is a key metabolic tissue. These data indicate a critical role for skeletal muscle circadian rhythms for both muscle and systems health. Future research is needed to determine the mechanisms of molecular clock function in skeletal muscle, identify the means by which skeletal muscle entrainment occurs, and provide a stringent comparison of circadian gene expression across the diverse tissue system of skeletal muscle. PMID:25512305

  9. Profiling of circadian genes expressed in the uterus endometrial stromal cells of pregnant rats as revealed by DNA microarray coupled with RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Tasaki, Hirotaka; Zhao, Lijia; Isayama, Keishiro; Chen, Huatao; Nobuhiko Yamauchi; Yasufumi Shigeyoshi; Hashimoto, Seiichi; Hattori, Masa-Aki

    2013-01-01

    The peripheral circadian oscillator plays an essential role in synchronizing local physiology to operate in a circadian manner via regulation of the expression of clock-controlled genes. The present study aimed to evaluate the circadian rhythms of clock genes and clock-controlled genes expressed in the rat uterus endometrial stromal cells (UESCs) during the stage of implantation by a DNA microarray. Of 12,252 genes showing significantly expression, 7,235 genes displayed significant alterations. As revealed by the biological pathway analysis using the database for annotation, visualization, and integrated discovery online annotation software, genes were involved in cell cycle, glutathione metabolism, MAPK signaling pathway, fatty acid metabolism, ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, focal adhesion, and PPAR signaling pathway. The clustering of clock genes were mainly divided into four groups: the first group was Rorα, Timeless, Npas2, Bmal1, Id2, and Cry2; the second group Per1, Per2, Per3, Dec1, Tef, and Dbp; the third group Bmal2, Cry1, E4bp4, Rorβ, and Clock; the fourth group Rev-erbα. Eleven implantation-related genes and 24 placenta formation-related genes displayed significant alterations, suggesting that these genes involved in implantation and placenta formation are controlled under circadian clock. Some candidates as clock-controlled genes were evaluated by using RNA interference to Bmal1 mRNA. Down-regulation of Igf1 gene expression was observed by Bmal1 silencing, whereas the expression of Inhβa was significantly increased. During active oscillation of circadian clock, the apoptosis-related genes Fas and Caspase3 remained no significant changes, but they were significantly increased by knockdown of Bmal1 mRNA. These results indicate that clock-controlled genes are up- or down-regulated in rat UESCs during the stage of decidualization. DNA microarray analysis coupled with RNA interference will be helpful to understand the physiological roles of some

  10. Structure of the frequency-interacting RNA helicase: a protein interaction hub for the circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Karen S; Hurley, Jennifer M; Widom, Joanne; Ringelberg, Carol S; Loros, Jennifer J; Dunlap, Jay C; Crane, Brian R

    2016-08-01

    In the Neurospora crassa circadian clock, a protein complex of frequency (FRQ), casein kinase 1a (CK1a), and the FRQ-interacting RNA Helicase (FRH) rhythmically represses gene expression by the white-collar complex (WCC). FRH crystal structures in several conformations and bound to ADP/RNA reveal differences between FRH and the yeast homolog Mtr4 that clarify the distinct role of FRH in the clock. The FRQ-interacting region at the FRH N-terminus has variable structure in the absence of FRQ A known mutation that disrupts circadian rhythms (R806H) resides in a positively charged surface of the KOW domain, far removed from the helicase core. We show that changes to other similarly located residues modulate interactions with the WCC and FRQ A V142G substitution near the N-terminus also alters FRQ and WCC binding to FRH, but produces an unusual short clock period. These data support the assertion that FRH helicase activity does not play an essential role in the clock, but rather FRH acts to mediate contacts among FRQ, CK1a and the WCC through interactions involving its N-terminus and KOW module. PMID:27340124

  11. Moderate Changes in the Circadian System of Alzheimer's Disease Patients Detected in Their Home Environment

    PubMed Central

    Weissová, Kamila; Bartoš, Aleš; Sládek, Martin; Nováková, Marta; Sumová, Alena

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease often accompanied with disruption of sleep-wake cycle. The sleep-wake cycle is controlled by mechanisms involving internal timekeeping (circadian) regulation. The aim of our present pilot study was to assess the circadian system in patients with mild form of AD in their home environment. In the study, 13 elderly AD patients and 13 age-matched healthy control subjects (the patient's spouses) were enrolled. Sleep was recorded for 21 days by sleep diaries in all participants and checked by actigraphy in 4 of the AD patient/control couples. The samples of saliva and buccal mucosa were collected every 4 hours during the same 24 h-interval to detect melatonin and clock gene (PER1 and BMAL1) mRNA levels, respectively. The AD patients exhibited significantly longer inactivity interval during the 24 h and significantly higher number of daytime naps than controls. Daily profiles of melatonin levels exhibited circadian rhythms in both groups. Compared with controls, decline in amplitude of the melatonin rhythm in AD patients was not significant, however, in AD patients more melatonin profiles were dampened or had atypical waveforms. The clock genes PER1 and BMAL1 were expressed rhythmically with high amplitudes in both groups and no significant differences in phases between both groups were detected. Our results suggest moderate differences in functional state of the circadian system in patients with mild form of AD compared with healthy controls which are present in conditions of their home dwelling. PMID:26727258

  12. Moderate Changes in the Circadian System of Alzheimer's Disease Patients Detected in Their Home Environment.

    PubMed

    Weissová, Kamila; Bartoš, Aleš; Sládek, Martin; Nováková, Marta; Sumová, Alena

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease often accompanied with disruption of sleep-wake cycle. The sleep-wake cycle is controlled by mechanisms involving internal timekeeping (circadian) regulation. The aim of our present pilot study was to assess the circadian system in patients with mild form of AD in their home environment. In the study, 13 elderly AD patients and 13 age-matched healthy control subjects (the patient's spouses) were enrolled. Sleep was recorded for 21 days by sleep diaries in all participants and checked by actigraphy in 4 of the AD patient/control couples. The samples of saliva and buccal mucosa were collected every 4 hours during the same 24 h-interval to detect melatonin and clock gene (PER1 and BMAL1) mRNA levels, respectively. The AD patients exhibited significantly longer inactivity interval during the 24 h and significantly higher number of daytime naps than controls. Daily profiles of melatonin levels exhibited circadian rhythms in both groups. Compared with controls, decline in amplitude of the melatonin rhythm in AD patients was not significant, however, in AD patients more melatonin profiles were dampened or had atypical waveforms. The clock genes PER1 and BMAL1 were expressed rhythmically with high amplitudes in both groups and no significant differences in phases between both groups were detected. Our results suggest moderate differences in functional state of the circadian system in patients with mild form of AD compared with healthy controls which are present in conditions of their home dwelling. PMID:26727258

  13. Regulation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) binding in the mammalian clock pacemaker by light but not a circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Kako, K; Banasik, M; Lee, K; Ishida, N

    1997-02-01

    Mammalian circadian rhythms are considered to be regulated by a clock pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus. The molecular mechanism of entrainment and oscillation of circadian rhythm are not well understood but photic induction of immediate-early gene (IEG) expression in the SCN is thought to play a role. Here we show that under 12 h light:12 h dark (LD) condition, the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) binding to cAMP responsive promoter element (CRE) of NMDAR1/zeta1 promoter region in the SCN is higher during the light than the dark by electro-mobility shift assay (EMSA). When animals are placed in constant dark, CREB DNA binding activity in the SCN is low and does not vary with circadian time when compared with cortex nuclear extract as a control. Most significantly, photic induction of CREB binding activity in the SCN occurs at all circadian times tested, indicating that CREB DNA binding in the SCN is not gated by the endogenous clock. These results implicate the role of CREB in photic neuronal signaling in the SCN and suggest that CREB DNA binding activities may not be regulated by a circadian clock. PMID:9030696

  14. Sleep Deprivation Influences Circadian Gene Expression in the Lateral Habenula

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yanxia

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is governed by homeostasis and the circadian clock. Clock genes play an important role in the generation and maintenance of circadian rhythms but are also involved in regulating sleep homeostasis. The lateral habenular nucleus (LHb) has been implicated in sleep-wake regulation, since LHb gene expression demonstrates circadian oscillation characteristics. This study focuses on the participation of LHb clock genes in regulating sleep homeostasis, as the nature of their involvement is unclear. In this study, we observed changes in sleep pattern following sleep deprivation in LHb-lesioned rats using EEG recording techniques. And then the changes of clock gene expression (Per1, Per2, and Bmal1) in the LHb after 6 hours of sleep deprivation were detected by using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). We found that sleep deprivation increased the length of Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep (NREMS) and decreased wakefulness. LHb-lesioning decreased the amplitude of reduced wake time and increased NREMS following sleep deprivation in rats. qPCR results demonstrated that Per2 expression was elevated after sleep deprivation, while the other two genes were unaffected. Following sleep recovery, Per2 expression was comparable to the control group. This study provides the basis for further research on the role of LHb Per2 gene in the regulation of sleep homeostasis. PMID:27413249

  15. microRNA modulation of circadian clock period and entrainment

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hai-Ying M.; Papp, Joseph W.; Varlamova, Olga; Dziema, Heather; Russell, Brandon; Curfman, John P.; Nakazawa, Takanobu; Shimizu, Kimiko; Okamura, Hitoshi; Impey, Soren; Obrietan, Karl

    2007-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, non-coding, RNAs that regulate the stability or translation of mRNA transcripts. Although recent work has implicated miRNAs in development and in disease, the expression and function of miRNAs in the adult mammalian nervous system has not been extensively characterized. Here, we examine the role of two brain-specific miRNAs, miR-219 and miR-132, in modulating the circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. miR-219 is a target of the CLOCK/BMAL1 complex, exhibits robust circadian rhythms of expression and the in vivo knockdown of miR-219 lengthens the circadian period. miR-132 is induced by photic entrainment cues via a MAPK/CREB-dependent mechanism, modulates clock gene expression, and attenuates the entraining effects of light. Collectively, these data reveal miRNAs as clock- and light-regulated genes and provide a mechanistic examination of their roles as effectors of pacemaker activity and entrainment. PMID:17553428

  16. Sleep Deprivation Influences Circadian Gene Expression in the Lateral Habenula.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Beilin; Gao, Yanxia; Li, Yang; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is governed by homeostasis and the circadian clock. Clock genes play an important role in the generation and maintenance of circadian rhythms but are also involved in regulating sleep homeostasis. The lateral habenular nucleus (LHb) has been implicated in sleep-wake regulation, since LHb gene expression demonstrates circadian oscillation characteristics. This study focuses on the participation of LHb clock genes in regulating sleep homeostasis, as the nature of their involvement is unclear. In this study, we observed changes in sleep pattern following sleep deprivation in LHb-lesioned rats using EEG recording techniques. And then the changes of clock gene expression (Per1, Per2, and Bmal1) in the LHb after 6 hours of sleep deprivation were detected by using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). We found that sleep deprivation increased the length of Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep (NREMS) and decreased wakefulness. LHb-lesioning decreased the amplitude of reduced wake time and increased NREMS following sleep deprivation in rats. qPCR results demonstrated that Per2 expression was elevated after sleep deprivation, while the other two genes were unaffected. Following sleep recovery, Per2 expression was comparable to the control group. This study provides the basis for further research on the role of LHb Per2 gene in the regulation of sleep homeostasis. PMID:27413249

  17. Early Chronotype and Tissue-Specific Alterations of Circadian Clock Function in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sládek, Martin; Polidarová, Lenka; Nováková, Marta; Parkanová, Daniela; Sumová, Alena

    2012-01-01

    Malfunction of the circadian timing system may result in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, and conversely, these diseases can impair the circadian system. The aim of this study was to reveal whether the functional state of the circadian system of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) differs from that of control Wistar rat. This study is the first to analyze the function of the circadian system of SHR in its complexity, i.e., of the central clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) as well as of the peripheral clocks. The functional properties of the SCN clock were estimated by behavioral output rhythm in locomotor activity and daily profiles of clock gene expression in the SCN determined by in situ hybridization. The function of the peripheral clocks was assessed by daily profiles of clock gene expression in the liver and colon by RT-PCR and in vitro using real time recording of Bmal1-dLuc reporter. The potential impact of the SHR phenotype on circadian control of the metabolic pathways was estimated by daily profiles of metabolism-relevant gene expression in the liver and colon. The results revealed that SHR exhibited an early chronotype, because the central SCN clock was phase advanced relative to light/dark cycle and the SCN driven output rhythm ran faster compared to Wistar rats. Moreover, the output rhythm was dampened. The SHR peripheral clock reacted to the dampened SCN output with tissue-specific consequences. In the colon of SHR the clock function was severely altered, whereas the differences are only marginal in the liver. These changes may likely result in a mutual desynchrony of circadian oscillators within the circadian system of SHR, thereby potentially contributing to metabolic pathology of the strain. The SHR may thus serve as a valuable model of human circadian disorders originating in poor synchrony of the circadian system with external light/dark regime. PMID:23056539

  18. Insulin effects on glucose tolerance, hypermetabolic response, and circadian-metabolic protein expression in a rat burn and disuse model.

    PubMed

    Pidcoke, Heather F; Baer, Lisa A; Wu, Xiaowu; Wolf, Steven E; Aden, James K; Wade, Charles E

    2014-07-01

    Insulin controls hyperglycemia after severe burns, and its use opposes the hypermetabolic response. The underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood, and previous research in this area has been limited because of the inadequacy of animal models to mimic the physiological effects seen in humans with burns. Using a recently published rat model that combines both burn and disuse components, we compare the effects of insulin treatment vs. vehicle on glucose tolerance, hypermetabolic response, muscle loss, and circadian-metabolic protein expression after burns. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to three groups: cage controls (n = 6); vehicle-treated burn and hindlimb unloading (VBH; n = 11), and insulin-treated burn and hindlimb unloading (IBH; n = 9). With the exception of cage controls, rats underwent a 40% total body surface area burn with hindlimb unloading, then IBH rats received 12 days of subcutaneous insulin injections (5 units·kg(-1)·day(-1)), and VBH rats received an equivalent dose of vehicle. Glucose tolerance testing was performed on day 14, after which blood and tissues were collected for analysis. Body mass loss was attenuated by insulin treatment (VBH = 265 ± 17 g vs. IBH = 283 ± 14 g, P = 0.016), and glucose clearance capacity was increased. Soleus and gastrocnemius muscle loss was decreased in the IBH group. Insulin receptor substrate-1, AKT, FOXO-1, caspase-3, and PER1 phosphorylation was altered by injury and disuse, with levels restored by insulin treatment in almost all cases. Insulin treatment after burn and during disuse attenuated the hypermetabolic response, increased glucose clearance, and normalized circadian-metabolic protein expression patterns. Therapies aimed at targeting downstream effectors may provide the beneficial effects of insulin without hypoglycemic risk. PMID:24760998

  19. Insulin effects on glucose tolerance, hypermetabolic response, and circadian-metabolic protein expression in a rat burn and disuse model

    PubMed Central

    Pidcoke, Heather F.; Baer, Lisa A.; Wu, Xiaowu; Wolf, Steven E.; Aden, James K.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin controls hyperglycemia after severe burns, and its use opposes the hypermetabolic response. The underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood, and previous research in this area has been limited because of the inadequacy of animal models to mimic the physiological effects seen in humans with burns. Using a recently published rat model that combines both burn and disuse components, we compare the effects of insulin treatment vs. vehicle on glucose tolerance, hypermetabolic response, muscle loss, and circadian-metabolic protein expression after burns. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to three groups: cage controls (n = 6); vehicle-treated burn and hindlimb unloading (VBH; n = 11), and insulin-treated burn and hindlimb unloading (IBH; n = 9). With the exception of cage controls, rats underwent a 40% total body surface area burn with hindlimb unloading, then IBH rats received 12 days of subcutaneous insulin injections (5 units·kg−1·day−1), and VBH rats received an equivalent dose of vehicle. Glucose tolerance testing was performed on day 14, after which blood and tissues were collected for analysis. Body mass loss was attenuated by insulin treatment (VBH = 265 ± 17 g vs. IBH = 283 ± 14 g, P = 0.016), and glucose clearance capacity was increased. Soleus and gastrocnemius muscle loss was decreased in the IBH group. Insulin receptor substrate-1, AKT, FOXO-1, caspase-3, and PER1 phosphorylation was altered by injury and disuse, with levels restored by insulin treatment in almost all cases. Insulin treatment after burn and during disuse attenuated the hypermetabolic response, increased glucose clearance, and normalized circadian-metabolic protein expression patterns. Therapies aimed at targeting downstream effectors may provide the beneficial effects of insulin without hypoglycemic risk. PMID:24760998

  20. Regulation of MAPK/ERK Signaling and Photic Entrainment of the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Circadian Clock by Raf Kinase Inhibitor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Antoun, Ghadi; Cannon, Pascale Bouchard; Cheng, Hai-Ying Mary

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the MAPK/ERK signaling cascade in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is a key event that couples light to circadian clock entrainment. However, we do not fully understand the mechanisms that shape the properties of MAPK/ERK signaling in the SCN, and how these mechanisms may influence overt circadian rhythms. Here we show that Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) controls the kinetics of light-induced MAPK/ERK activity in the SCN and photic entrainment of behavioral rhythms. Light triggers robust phosphorylation of RKIP in the murine SCN and dissociation of RKIP and c-Raf. Overexpression of a nonphosphorylatable form of RKIP in the SCN of transgenic mice blocks light-induced ERK1/2 activation in the SCN and severely dampens light-induced phase delays in behavioral rhythms. Conversely, in RKIP knock-out (RKIP−/−) mice, light-induced ERK1/2 activity in the SCN is prolonged in the early and late subjective night, resulting in augmentation of the phase-delaying and -advancing effects of light. Reentrainment to an advancing light cycle was also accelerated in RKIP−/− mice. In relation to the molecular clockwork, genetic deletion of RKIP potentiated light-evoked PER1 and PER2 protein expression in the SCN in the early night. Additionally, RKIP−/− mice displayed enhanced transcriptional activation of mPeriod1 and the immediate early gene c-Fos in the SCN in response to a phase-delaying light pulse. Collectively, our data reveal an important role of RKIP in the regulation of MAPK/ERK signaling in the SCN and photic entrainment of the SCN clock. PMID:22492043

  1. Negative reciprocal regulation between Sirt1 and Per2 modulates the circadian clock and aging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui-Hong; Zhao, Tingrui; Cui, Kairong; Hu, Gangqing; Chen, Qiang; Chen, Weiping; Wang, Xin-Wei; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Zhao, Keji; Deng, Chu-Xia

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is involved in both aging and circadian-clock regulation, yet the link between the two processes in relation to SIRT1 function is not clear. Using Sirt1-deficient mice, we found that Sirt1 and Period 2 (Per2) constitute a reciprocal negative regulation loop that plays important roles in modulating hepatic circadian rhythmicity and aging. Sirt1-deficient mice exhibited profound premature aging and enhanced acetylation of histone H4 on lysine16 (H4K16) in the promoter of Per2, the latter of which leads to its overexpression; in turn, Per2 suppresses Sirt1 transcription through binding to the Sirt1 promoter at the Clock/Bmal1 site. This negative reciprocal relationship between SIRT1 and PER2 was also observed in human hepatocytes. We further demonstrated that the absence of Sirt1 or the ectopic overexpression of Per2 in the liver resulted in a dysregulated pace of the circadian rhythm. The similar circadian rhythm was also observed in aged wild type mice. The interplay between Sirt1 and Per2 modulates aging gene expression and circadian-clock maintenance. PMID:27346580

  2. Negative reciprocal regulation between Sirt1 and Per2 modulates the circadian clock and aging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Hong; Zhao, Tingrui; Cui, Kairong; Hu, Gangqing; Chen, Qiang; Chen, Weiping; Wang, Xin-Wei; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Zhao, Keji; Deng, Chu-Xia

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is involved in both aging and circadian-clock regulation, yet the link between the two processes in relation to SIRT1 function is not clear. Using Sirt1-deficient mice, we found that Sirt1 and Period 2 (Per2) constitute a reciprocal negative regulation loop that plays important roles in modulating hepatic circadian rhythmicity and aging. Sirt1-deficient mice exhibited profound premature aging and enhanced acetylation of histone H4 on lysine16 (H4K16) in the promoter of Per2, the latter of which leads to its overexpression; in turn, Per2 suppresses Sirt1 transcription through binding to the Sirt1 promoter at the Clock/Bmal1 site. This negative reciprocal relationship between SIRT1 and PER2 was also observed in human hepatocytes. We further demonstrated that the absence of Sirt1 or the ectopic overexpression of Per2 in the liver resulted in a dysregulated pace of the circadian rhythm. The similar circadian rhythm was also observed in aged wild type mice. The interplay between Sirt1 and Per2 modulates aging gene expression and circadian-clock maintenance. PMID:27346580

  3. Smith-Magenis Syndrome Results in Disruption of CLOCK Gene Transcription and Reveals an Integral Role for RAI1 in the Maintenance of Circadian Rhythmicity

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Stephen R.; Zies, Deborah; Mullegama, Sureni V.; Grotewiel, Michael S.; Elsea, Sarah H.

    2012-01-01

    Haploinsufficiency of RAI1 results in Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS), a disorder characterized by intellectual disability, multiple congenital anomalies, obesity, neurobehavioral abnormalities, and a disrupted circadian sleep-wake pattern. An inverted melatonin rhythm (i.e., melatonin peaks during the day instead of at night) and associated sleep-phase disturbances in individuals with SMS, as well as a short-period circadian rhythm in mice with a chromosomal deletion of Rai1, support SMS as a circadian-rhythm-dysfunction disorder. However, the molecular cause of the circadian defect in SMS has not been described. The circadian oscillator temporally orchestrates metabolism, physiology, and behavior largely through transcriptional modulation. Data support RAI1 as a transcriptional regulator, but the genes it might regulate are largely unknown. Investigation into the role that RAI1 plays in the regulation of gene transcription and circadian maintenance revealed that RAI1 regulates the transcription of circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK), a key component of the mammalian circadian oscillator that transcriptionally regulates many critical circadian genes. Data further show that haploinsufficiency of RAI1 and Rai1 in SMS fibroblasts and the mouse hypothalamus, respectively, results in the transcriptional dysregulation of the circadian clock and causes altered expression and regulation of multiple circadian genes, including PER2, PER3, CRY1, BMAL1, and others. These data suggest that heterozygous mutation of RAI1 and Rai1 leads to a disrupted circadian rhythm and thus results in an abnormal sleep-wake cycle, which can contribute to an abnormal feeding pattern and dependent cognitive performance. Finally, we conclude that RAI1 is a positive transcriptional regulator of CLOCK, pinpointing a novel and important role for this gene in the circadian oscillator. PMID:22578325

  4. Prokineticin 2 and circadian clock output

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qun-Yong; Cheng, Michelle Y.

    2009-01-01

    Circadian timing from the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is a critical component of sleep regulation. Animal lesion and genetic studies have indicated an essential interaction between the circadian signals and the homeostatic processes that regulate sleep. Here we summarize the biological functions of prokineticins, a pair of newly discovered regulatory proteins, with focus on the circadian function of prokineticin 2 (PK2) and its potential role in sleep-wake regulation. PK2 has been shown as a candidate SCN output molecule that regulates circadian locomotor behavior. The PK2 molecular rhythm in the SCN is predominantly controlled by the circadian transcriptional/translational loops, but also regulated directly by light. The receptor for PK2 is expressed in the primary SCN output targets that regulate circadian behavior including sleep-wake. The depolarizing effect of PK2 on neurons that express PK2 receptor may represent a possible mechanism for the regulatory role of PK2 in circadian rhythms. PMID:16279936

  5. On the Role of Histamine Receptors in the Regulation of Circadian Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Rozov, Stanislav V.; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Panula, Pertti

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest a regulatory role of histamine in circadian rhythms, but little is known about signaling pathways that would be involved in such a putative role. The aim of this study was to examine whether histamine mediates its effects on the circadian system through Hrh1 or Hrh3 receptors. We assessed both diurnal and free-running locomotor activity rhythms of Hrh1-/- and Hrh3-/- mice. We also determined the expression of Per1, Per2 and Bmal1 genes in the suprachiasmatic nuclei, several areas of the cerebral cortex and striatum under symmetric 24 h light-dark cycle at zeitgeber times 14 and 6 by using radioactive in situ hybridization. We found no differences between Hrh1-/- and wild type mice in the length, amplitude and mesor of diurnal and free-running activity rhythms as well as in expression of Per1, Per2 and Bmal1 genes in any of the examined brain structures. The amplitude of free-running activity rhythm of the Hrh3-/- mice was significantly flattened, whereas the expression of the clock genes in Hrh3-/- mice was similar to the wild type animals in all of the assessed brain structures. Therefore, the knockout of Hrh1 receptor had no effects on the circadian rhythm of spontaneous locomotion, and a knockout of Hrh3 receptor caused a substantial reduction of free-running activity rhythm amplitude, but none of these knockout models affected the expression patterns of the core clock genes in any of the studied brain structures. PMID:26660098

  6. Circadian CLOCK Mediates Activation of Transforming Growth Factor-β Signaling and Renal Fibrosis through Cyclooxygenase 2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Dar; Yeh, Jih-Kai; Peng, Meng-Ting; Shie, Shian-Sen; Lin, Shuei-Liong; Yang, Chia-Hung; Chen, Tien-Hsing; Hung, Kuo-Chun; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Hsieh, I-Chang; Wen, Ming-Shien; Wang, Chao-Yung

    2015-12-01

    The circadian rhythm regulates blood pressure and maintains fluid and electrolyte homeostasis with central and peripheral clock. However, the role of circadian rhythm in the pathogenesis of tubulointerstitial fibrosis remains unclear. Here, we found that the amplitudes of circadian rhythm oscillation in kidneys significantly increased after unilateral ureteral obstruction. In mice that are deficient in the circadian gene Clock, renal fibrosis and renal parenchymal damage were significantly worse after ureteral obstruction. CLOCK-deficient mice showed increased synthesis of collagen, increased oxidative stress, and greater transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) expression. TGF-β mRNA expression oscillated with the circadian rhythms under the control of CLOCK-BMAL1 heterodimers. The expression of cyclooxygenase 2 was significantly higher in kidneys from CLOCK-deficient mice with ureteral obstruction. Treatment with a cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor celecoxib significantly improved renal fibrosis in CLOCK-deficient mice. Taken together, these data establish the importance of the circadian rhythm in tubulointerstitial fibrosis and suggest CLOCK/TGF-β signaling as a novel therapeutic target of cyclooxygenase inhibition. PMID:26458764

  7. Pinealectomy abolishes circadian behavior and interferes with circadian clock gene oscillations in brain and liver but not retina in a migratory songbird.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Amit Kumar; Malik, Shalie; Rani, Sangeeta; Kumar, Vinod

    2016-03-15

    In songbirds, the pineal gland is part of the multi-oscillatory circadian timing system, with participating component oscillators in the eyes and hypothalamus. This study investigated the role of the pineal gland in development of the nighttime migratory restlessness (Zugunruhe) and generation of circadian gene oscillations in the retina, brain and liver tissues in migratory redheaded buntings (Emberiza bruniceps). Pinealectomized (pinx) and sham-operated buntings entrained to short days (8h light: 16h darkness, 8L:16D) were sequentially exposed for 10days each to stimulatory long days (13L: 11D) and constant dim light (LLdim; a condition that tested circadian rhythm persistence). Whereas activity-rest pattern was monitored continuously, the mRNA expressions of clock genes (bmal1, clock, npas2, per2, cry1, rorα, reverα) were measured in the retina, hypothalamus, telencephalon, optic tectum and liver tissues at circadian times, CT, 1, 6, 13, 17 and 21 (CT 0, activity onset) on day 11 of the LLdim. The absence of the pineal gland did not affect the development of long-day induced Zugunruhe but caused decay of the circadian rhythm in Zugunruhe as well as the clock gene oscillations in the hypothalamus, but not in the retina. Further, there were variable effects of pinealectomy in the peripheral brain and liver tissue circadian gene oscillations, notably the persistence of per 2 and cry1 (optic tectum), rorα (telencephalon) and npas2 (liver) mRNA oscillations in pinx birds. We suggest the pineal gland dependence of the generation of circadian gene oscillations in the hypothalamus, not retina, and peripheral brain and liver tissues in migratory redheaded buntings. PMID:26801391

  8. Circadian rhythm and its role in malignancy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are daily oscillations of multiple biological processes directed by endogenous clocks. The circadian timing system comprises peripheral oscillators located in most tissues of the body and a central pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Circadian genes and the proteins produced by these genes constitute the molecular components of the circadian oscillator which form positive/negative feedback loops and generate circadian rhythms. The circadian regulation extends beyond clock genes to involve various clock-controlled genes (CCGs) including various cell cycle genes. Aberrant expression of circadian clock genes could have important consequences on the transactivation of downstream targets that control the cell cycle and on the ability of cells to undergo apoptosis. This may lead to genomic instability and accelerated cellular proliferation potentially promoting carcinogenesis. Different lines of evidence in mice and humans suggest that cancer may be a circadian-related disorder. The genetic or functional disruption of the molecular circadian clock has been found in various cancers including breast, ovarian, endometrial, prostate and hematological cancers. The acquisition of current data in circadian clock mechanism may help chronotherapy, which takes into consideration the biological time to improve treatments by devising new therapeutic approaches for treating circadian-related disorders, especially cancer. PMID:20353609

  9. Phosphorylation of the D1 Photosystem II Reaction Center Protein Is Controlled by an Endogenous Circadian Rhythm1

    PubMed Central

    Booij-James, Isabelle S.; Swegle, W. Mark; Edelman, Marvin; Mattoo, Autar K.

    2002-01-01

    The light dependence of D1 phosphorylation is unique to higher plants, being constitutive in cyanobacteria and algae. In a photoautotrophic higher plant, Spirodela oligorrhiza, grown in greenhouse conditions under natural diurnal cycles of solar irradiation, the ratio of phosphorylated versus total D1 protein (D1-P index: [D1-P]/[D1] + [D1-P]) of photosystem II is shown to undergo reproducible diurnal oscillation. These oscillations were clearly out of phase with the period of maximum in light intensity. The timing of the D1-P index maximum was not affected by changes in temperature, the amount of D1 kinase activity present in the thylakoid membranes, the rate of D1 protein synthesis, or photoinhibition. However, when the dark period in a normal diurnal cycle was cut short artificially by transferring plants to continuous light conditions, the D1-P index timing shifted and reached a maximum within 4 to 5 h of light illumination. The resultant diurnal oscillation persisted for at least two cycles in continuous light, suggesting that the rhythm is endogenous (circadian) and is entrained by an external signal. PMID:12481090

  10. Peripheral circadian clocks are diversely affected by adrenalectomy.

    PubMed

    Soták, M; Bryndová, J; Ergang, P; Vagnerová, K; Kvapilová, P; Vodička, M; Pácha, J; Sumová, A

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are considered to synchronize the rhythmicity of clock genes in peripheral tissues; however, the role of circadian variations of endogenous glucocorticoids is not well defined. In the present study, we examined whether peripheral circadian clocks were impaired by adrenalectomy. To achieve this, we tested the circadian rhythmicity of core clock genes (Bmal1, Per1-3, Cry1, RevErbα, Rora), clock-output genes (Dbp, E4bp4) and a glucocorticoid- and clock-controlled gene (Gilz) in liver, jejunum, kidney cortex, splenocytes and visceral adipose tissue (VAT). Adrenalectomy did not affect the phase of clock gene rhythms but distinctly modulated clock gene mRNA levels, and this effect was partially tissue-dependent. Adrenalectomy had a significant inhibitory effect on the level of Per1 mRNA in VAT, liver and jejunum, but not in kidney and splenocytes. Similarly, adrenalectomy down-regulated mRNA levels of Per2 in splenocytes and VAT, Per3 in jejunum, RevErbα in VAT and Dbp in VAT, kidney and splenocytes, whereas the mRNA amounts of Per1 and Per2 in kidney and Per3 in VAT and splenocytes were up-regulated. On the other hand, adrenalectomy had minimal effects on Rora and E4bp4 mRNAs. Adrenalectomy also resulted in decreased level of Gilz mRNA but did not alter the phase of its diurnal rhythm. Collectively, these findings suggest that adrenalectomy alters the mRNA levels of core clock genes and clock-output genes in peripheral organs and may cause tissue-specific modulations of their circadian profiles, which are reflected in changes of the amplitudes but not phases. Thus, the circulating corticosteroids are necessary for maintaining the high-amplitude rhythmicity of the peripheral clocks in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:27031999

  11. Altered circadian clock gene expression in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anne-Sofie; Owe-Larsson, Björn; Hetta, Jerker; Lundkvist, Gabriella B

    2016-07-01

    Impaired circadian rhythmicity has been reported in several psychiatric disorders. Schizophrenia is commonly associated with aberrant sleep-wake cycles and insomnia. It is not known if schizophrenia is associated with disturbances in molecular rhythmicity. We cultured fibroblasts from skin samples obtained from patients with chronic schizophrenia and from healthy controls, respectively, and analyzed the circadian expression during 48h of the clock genes CLOCK, BMAL1, PER1, PER2, CRY1, CRY2, REV-ERBα and DBP. In fibroblasts obtained from patients with chronic schizophrenia, we found a loss of rhythmic expression of CRY1 and PER2 compared to cells from healthy controls. We also estimated the sleep quality in these patients and found that most of them suffered from poor sleep in comparison with the healthy controls. In another patient sample, we analyzed mononuclear blood cells from patients with schizophrenia experiencing their first episode of psychosis, and found decreased expression of CLOCK, PER2 and CRY1 compared to blood cells from healthy controls. These novel findings show disturbances in the molecular clock in schizophrenia and have important implications in our understanding of the aberrant rhythms reported in this disease. PMID:27132483

  12. The Roles of the Dimeric and Tetrameric Structures of the Clock Protein KaiB in the Generation of Circadian Oscillations in Cyanobacteria*

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Reiko; Mutoh, Risa; Iwase, Ryo; Furukawa, Yukio; Imada, Katsumi; Onai, Kiyoshi; Morishita, Megumi; Yasui, So; Ishii, Kentaro; Valencia Swain, Jonathan Orville; Uzumaki, Tatsuya; Namba, Keiichi; Ishiura, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    The molecular machinery of the cyanobacterial circadian clock consists of three proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC. The three Kai proteins interact with each other and generate circadian oscillations in vitro in the presence of ATP (an in vitro KaiABC clock system). KaiB consists of four subunits organized as a dimer of dimers, and its overall shape is that of an elongated hexagonal plate with a positively charged cleft flanked by two negatively charged ridges. We found that a mutant KaiB with a C-terminal deletion (KaiB1–94), which lacks the negatively charged ridges, was a dimer. Despite its dimeric structure, KaiB1–94 interacted with KaiC and generated normal circadian oscillations in the in vitro KaiABC clock system. KaiB1–94 also generated circadian oscillations in cyanobacterial cells, but they were weak, indicating that the C-terminal region and tetrameric structure of KaiB are necessary for the generation of normal gene expression rhythms in vivo. KaiB1–94 showed the highest affinity for KaiC among the KaiC-binding proteins we examined and inhibited KaiC from forming a complex with SasA, which is involved in the main output pathway from the KaiABC clock oscillator in transcription regulation. This defect explains the mechanism underlying the lack of normal gene expression rhythms in cells expressing KaiB1–94. PMID:22722936

  13. A blue-violet laser irradiation stimulates bone nodule formation of mesenchymal stromal cells by the control of the circadian clock protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Awazu, Kunio

    2007-02-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells, which are present in adult bone marrow, that can replicate as undifferentiated cells and that have the potential to differentiate to lineages of mesenchymal tissues, including bone, cartilage, fat, tendon, and muscle. Their rapid and selective differentiation should provide the potential of new therapeutic approaches for the restoration of damaged or diseased tissue. However, several fundamental questions must be answered before it will be feasible to usefully predict and control MSCs responses to exogenous cytokines or genes. In particular, a better understanding of how specific factor may alter the fate of differentiation of MSCs is needed. In recent reports, circadian clock protein controls osteogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Here we show that a stimulation of a blue-violet laser irradiation regulates the differentiation of mouse MSCs to osteoblasts by change of the localization of a circadian rhythm protein, mouse Cryptochrome 1 (mCRY1). We found that a blue laser irradiation accelerated osteogenesis of MSCs. After laser irradiation, mCRY1 protein was translocated from cytoplasm to nucleus and mCRY1 mRNA level was downregulated thereafter. These results indicate that mCRY1, a blue-violet-light receptor and a master regulator of circadian rhythm, plays important roles in the regulation of the differentiation of MSCs. Since the differentiation of MSCs was easily regulated only by a laser irradiation, the potential of new therapeutic approaches for the restoration of damaged or diseased tissue is anticipated. Furthermore, our results obtained in this study may prove an excellent opportunity to gain insights into cross-talk between circadian rhythms and bone formation.

  14. Circadian System and Melatonin Hormone: Risk Factors for Complications during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, F. J.; Vera, J.; Venegas, C.; Pino, F.; Lagunas, C.

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy is a complex and well-regulated temporal event in which several steps are finely orchestrated including implantation, decidualization, placentation, and partum and any temporary alteration has serious effects on fetal and maternal health. Interestingly, alterations of circadian rhythms (i.e., shiftwork) have been correlated with increased risk of preterm delivery, intrauterine growth restriction, and preeclampsia. In the last few years evidence is accumulating that the placenta may have a functional circadian system and express the clock genes Bmal1, Per1-2, and Clock. On the other hand, there is evidence that the human placenta synthesizes melatonin, hormone involved in the regulation of the circadian system in other tissues. Moreover, is unknown the role of this local production of melatonin and whether this production have a circadian pattern. Available information indicates that melatonin induces in placenta the expression of antioxidant enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase, prevents the injury produced by oxidative stress, and inhibits the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) a gene that in other tissues is controlled by clock genes. In this review we aim to analyze available information regarding clock genes and clock genes controlled genes such as VEGF and the possible role of melatonin synthesis in the placenta. PMID:25821470

  15. Sympathetic Activation Induces Skeletal Fgf23 Expression in a Circadian Rhythm-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Masanobu; Kinoshita, Saori; Shimba, Shigeki; Ozono, Keiichi; Michigami, Toshimi

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock network is well known to link food intake and metabolic outputs. Phosphorus is a pivotal nutritional factor involved in energy and skeletal metabolisms and possesses a circadian profile in the circulation; however, the precise mechanisms whereby phosphate metabolism is regulated by the circadian clock network remain largely unknown. Because sympathetic tone, which displays a circadian profile, is activated by food intake, we tested the hypothesis that phosphate metabolism was regulated by the circadian clock network through the modification of food intake-associated sympathetic activation. Skeletal Fgf23 expression showed higher expression during the dark phase (DP) associated with elevated circulating FGF23 levels and enhanced phosphate excretion in the urine. The peaks in skeletal Fgf23 expression and urine epinephrine levels, a marker for sympathetic tone, shifted from DP to the light phase (LP) when mice were fed during LP. Interestingly, β-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol (ISO), induced skeletal Fgf23 expression when administered at ZT12, but this was not observed in Bmal1-deficient mice. In vitro reporter assays revealed that ISO trans-activated Fgf23 promoter through a cAMP responsive element in osteoblastic UMR-106 cells. The mechanism of circadian regulation of Fgf23 induction by ISO in vivo was partly explained by the suppressive effect of Cryptochrome1 (Cry1) on ISO signaling. These results indicate that the regulation of skeletal Fgf23 expression by sympathetic activity is dependent on the circadian clock system and may shed light on new regulatory networks of FGF23 that could be important for understanding the physiology of phosphate metabolism. PMID:24302726

  16. Catabolic cytokines disrupt the circadian clock and the expression of clock-controlled genes in cartilage via an NFкB-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Guo, B.; Yang, N.; Borysiewicz, E.; Dudek, M.; Williams, J.L.; Li, J.; Maywood, E.S.; Adamson, A.; Hastings, M.H.; Bateman, J.F.; White, M.R.H.; Boot-Handford, R.P.; Meng, Q.J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective To define how the catabolic cytokines (Interleukin 1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)) affect the circadian clock mechanism and the expression of clock-controlled catabolic genes within cartilage, and to identify the downstream pathways linking the cytokines to the molecular clock within chondrocytes. Methods Ex vivo cartilage explants were isolated from the Cry1-luc or PER2::LUC clock reporter mice. Clock gene dynamics were monitored in real-time by bioluminescence photon counting. Gene expression changes were studied by qRT-PCR. Functional luc assays were used to study the function of the core Clock/BMAL1 complex in SW-1353 cells. NFкB pathway inhibitor and fluorescence live-imaging of cartilage were performed to study the underlying mechanisms. Results Exposure to IL-1β severely disrupted circadian gene expression rhythms in cartilage. This effect was reversed by an anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone, but not by other clock synchronizing agents. Circadian disruption mediated by IL-1β was accompanied by disregulated expression of endogenous clock genes and clock-controlled catabolic pathways. Mechanistically, NFкB signalling was involved in the effect of IL-1β on the cartilage clock in part through functional interference with the core Clock/BMAL1 complex. In contrast, TNFα had little impact on the circadian rhythm and clock gene expression in cartilage. Conclusion In our experimental system (young healthy mouse cartilage), we demonstrate that IL-1β (but not TNFα) abolishes circadian rhythms in Cry1-luc and PER2::LUC gene expression. These data implicate disruption of the chondrocyte clock as a novel aspect of the catabolic responses of cartilage to pro-inflammatory cytokines, and provide an additional mechanism for how chronic joint inflammation may contribute to osteoarthritis (OA). PMID:26521744

  17. Gene profiling the response to repeated cocaine self-administration in dorsal striatum: a focus on circadian genes.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Wendy J; Girgenti, Matthew J; Breslin, Florence J; Newton, Samuel S; Taylor, Jane R

    2008-06-01

    Alterations in gene expression in the dorsal striatum caused by chronic cocaine exposure have been implicated in the long-term behavioral changes associated with cocaine addiction. To gain further insight into the molecular alterations that occur as a result of cocaine self-administration, we conducted a microarray analysis of gene expression followed by bioinformatic gene network analysis that allowed us to identify adaptations at the level of gene expression as well as into interconnected networks. Changes in gene expression were examined in the dorsal striatum of rats 1 day after they had self-administered cocaine for 7 days under a 24-h access, discrete trial paradigm (averaging 98 mg/kg/day). Here we report the regulation of the circadian genes Clock, Bmal1, Cryptochrome1, Period2, as well as several genes that are regulated by/associated with the circadian system (i.e., early growth response 1, dynorphin). We also observed regulation of other relevant genes (i.e., Nur77, beta catenin). These changes were then linked to curated pathways and formulated networks which identified circadian rhythm processes as affected by cocaine self-administration. These data strongly suggest involvement of circadian-associated genes in the brain's response to cocaine and may contribute to an understanding of addictive behavior including disruptions in sleep and circadian rhythmicity. PMID:18452895

  18. NAD+-SIRT1 control of H3K4 trimethylation through circadian deacetylation of MLL1

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Arnal, Lorena; Katada, Sayako; Orozco-Solis, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock controls the transcription of hundred genes through specific chromatin remodeling events. The histone methyltransferase Mixed-Lineage Leukemia 1 (MLL1) coordinates recruitment of CLOCK–BMAL1 activator complexes to chromatin, an event associated to cyclic H3K4 tri-methylation at circadian promoters. Remarkably, in mouse liver circadian H3K4me3 is modulated by SIRT1, a NAD+ dependent deacetylase involved in clock control. We show that mammalian MLL1 is acetylated at two conserved residues, K1130 and K1133. Notably, MLL1 acetylation is cyclic, controlled by the clock and by SIRT1, and impacts the methyltransferase activity of MLL1. Moreover, H3K4 methylation at clock-controlled gene promoters is influenced by pharmacological or genetic inactivation of SIRT1. Finally, MLL1 acetylation and H3K4me3 levels at circadian gene promoters depend on NAD+ circadian levels. These findings reveal a previously unappreciated regulatory pathway between energy metabolism and histone methylation. PMID:25751424

  19. Mechanism of the circadian clock in physiology

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    It has been well established that the circadian clock plays a crucial role in the regulation of almost every physiological process. It also plays a critical role in pathophysiological states including those of obesity and diabetes. Recent evidence has highlighted the potential for targeting the circadian clock as a potential drug target. New studies have also demonstrated the existence of “clock-independent effects” of the circadian proteins, leading to exciting new avenues of research in the circadian clock field in physiology. The goal of this review is to provide an introduction to and overview of the circadian clock in physiology, including mechanisms, targets, and role in disease states. The role of the circadian clocks in the regulation of the cardiovascular system, renal function, metabolism, the endocrine system, immune, and reproductive systems will be discussed. PMID:23576606

  20. Metabolic and Nontranscriptional Circadian Clocks: Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Akhilesh B.; Rey, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks are cellular timekeeping mechanisms that coordinate behavior and physiology around the 24-h day in most living organisms. Misalignment of an organism’s clock with its environment is associated with long-term adverse fitness consequences, as exemplified by the link between circadian disruption and various age-related diseases in humans. Current eukaryotic models of the circadian oscillator rely on transcription/translation feedback loop mechanisms, supplemented with accessory cytosolic loops that connect them to cellular physiology. However, there is mounting evidence questioning the absolute necessity of transcription-based oscillators for circadian rhythmicity, supported by the recent discovery of oxidation-reduction cycles of peroxiredoxin proteins, which persist even in the absence of transcription. A more fundamental mechanism based on metabolic cycles could thus underlie circadian transcriptional and cytosolic rhythms, thereby promoting circadian oscillations to integral properties of cellular metabolism. PMID:24606143

  1. Transcriptional repressor E4-binding protein 4 (E4BP4) regulates metabolic hormone fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) during circadian cycles and feeding.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xin; Muchnik, Marina; Chen, Zheng; Patel, Manish; Wu, Nan; Joshi, Shree; Rui, Liangyou; Lazar, Mitchell A; Yin, Lei

    2010-11-19

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a potent antidiabetic and triglyceride-lowering hormone whose hepatic expression is highly responsive to food intake. FGF21 induction in the adaptive response to fasting has been well studied, but the molecular mechanism responsible for feeding-induced repression remains unknown. In this study, we demonstrate a novel link between FGF21 and a key circadian output protein, E4BP4. Expression of Fgf21 displays a circadian rhythm, which peaks during the fasting phase and is anti-phase to E4bp4, which is elevated during feeding periods. E4BP4 strongly suppresses Fgf21 transcription by binding to a D-box element in the distal promoter region. Depletion of E4BP4 in synchronized Hepa1c1c-7 liver cells augments the amplitude of Fgf21 expression, and overexpression of E4BP4 represses FGF21 secretion from primary mouse hepatocytes. Mimicking feeding effects, insulin significantly increases E4BP4 expression and binding to the Fgf21 promoter through AKT activation. Thus, E4BP4 is a novel insulin-responsive repressor of FGF21 expression during circadian cycles and feeding. PMID:20851878

  2. INTRINSIC CIRCADIAN RHYTHMS IN THE CARDIOMYOCYTE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cardiomyocyte possesses a fully functional circadian clock. Circadian clocks are a set of proteins that generate self-sustained transcriptional positive and negative feedback loops with a free-running period of 24 hours. These intracellular molecular mechanisms confer the selective advantage of ...

  3. Aberrant Development of the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus and Circadian Rhythms in Mice Lacking the Homeodomain Protein Six6

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Daniel D.; Gorman, Michael R.; Hatori, Megumi; Meadows, Jason D.; Panda, Satchidananda; Mellon, Pamela L.

    2013-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the mammalian hypothalamus is the central pacemaker for peripheral and organismal circadian rhythms. The development of this hypothalamic structure depends on genetic programs throughout embryogenesis. We have investigated the role of the homeodomain transcription factor Six6 in the development of the SCN. We first showed that Six6 mRNA has circadian regulation in the mouse SCN. We then characterized the behavioral activity patterns of Six6-null mice under various photoperiod manipulations and stained their hypothalami using SCN-specific markers. Six6-null mice display abnormal patterns of circadian behavior indicative of SCN abnormalities. The ability of light exposure to reset rhythms correlates with the presence or absence of optic nerves, but all Six6-null mice show irregular rhythms. In contrast, wild-type mice with crushed optic nerves maintain regular rhythms regardless of light exposure. Using immunohistochemistry for arginine vasopressin (AVP), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), and β-galactosidase, we demonstrated the lack of these SCN markers in all Six6- null mice regardless of the presence of optic nerve or partial circadian rhythms. Therefore, Six6 is required for the normal development of the SCN, and the Six6-null mouse can mount independent, although irregular, circadian rhythms despite the apparent absence of a histochemically defined SCN. PMID:23382588

  4. The Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein in Circadian Rhythmicity and Memory Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Gatto, Cheryl L.; Broadie, Kendal

    2013-01-01

    The control of new protein synthesis provides a means to locally regulate the availability of synaptic components necessary for dynamic neuronal processes. The Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP), an RNA-binding translational regulator, is a key player mediating appropriate synaptic protein synthesis in response to neuronal activity levels. Loss of FMRP causes Fragile X Syndrome (FraX), the most commonly inherited form of mental retardation and autism spectrum disorders. FraX-associated translational dysregulation causes wide-ranging neurological deficits including severe impairments of biological rhythms, learning processes and memory consolidation. Dysfunction in cytoskeletal regulation and synaptic scaffolding disrupts neuronal architecture and functional synaptic connectivity. The understanding of this devastating disease and the implementation of meaningful treatment strategies require a thorough exploration of the temporal and spatial requirements for FMRP in establishing and maintaining neural circuit function. PMID:19214804

  5. Insulin Restores an Altered Corneal Epithelium Circadian Rhythm in Mice with Streptozotocin-induced Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Song, Fang; Xue, Yunxia; Dong, Dong; Liu, Jun; Fu, Ting; Xiao, Chengju; Wang, Hanqing; Lin, Cuipei; Liu, Peng; Zhong, Jiajun; Yang, Yabing; Wang, Zhaorui; Pan, Hongwei; Chen, Jiansu; Li, Yangqiu; Cai, Dongqing; Li, Zhijie

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms of corneal epithelial lesions and delayed wound repair, as well as their association with diabetes mellitus, are critical issues for clinical ophthalmologists. To test whether the diabetic condition alters the circadian rhythm in a mouse cornea and whether insulin can synchronise the corneal clock, we studied the effects of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on the mitosis of epithelial cells, the recruitment of leukocytes to the cornea, and the expression of main core clock genes (Clock, Bmal1, Per2, Cry1, and Rev-erbα) in the corneal epithelium. We also assessed the possible effect of insulin on these modifications. Diabetes downregulated Clock, Bmal1, and Per2 expression, upregulated Cry1 and Rev-erbα expression, reduced corneal epithelial mitosis, and increased leukocyte (neutrophils and γδ T-cells) recruitment to the cornea. Early treatments with insulin partially restored the altered rhythmicity in the diabetic cornea. In conclusion, insulin-dependent diabetes altered the normal rhythmicity of the cornea, and insulin administration had a beneficial effect on restoring normal rhythmicity in the diabetic cornea. PMID:27611469

  6. Insulin Restores an Altered Corneal Epithelium Circadian Rhythm in Mice with Streptozotocin-induced Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Song, Fang; Xue, Yunxia; Dong, Dong; Liu, Jun; Fu, Ting; Xiao, Chengju; Wang, Hanqing; Lin, Cuipei; Liu, Peng; Zhong, Jiajun; Yang, Yabing; Wang, Zhaorui; Pan, Hongwei; Chen, Jiansu; Li, Yangqiu; Cai, Dongqing; Li, Zhijie

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms of corneal epithelial lesions and delayed wound repair, as well as their association with diabetes mellitus, are critical issues for clinical ophthalmologists. To test whether the diabetic condition alters the circadian rhythm in a mouse cornea and whether insulin can synchronise the corneal clock, we studied the effects of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on the mitosis of epithelial cells, the recruitment of leukocytes to the cornea, and the expression of main core clock genes (Clock, Bmal1, Per2, Cry1, and Rev-erbα) in the corneal epithelium. We also assessed the possible effect of insulin on these modifications. Diabetes downregulated Clock, Bmal1, and Per2 expression, upregulated Cry1 and Rev-erbα expression, reduced corneal epithelial mitosis, and increased leukocyte (neutrophils and γδ T-cells) recruitment to the cornea. Early treatments with insulin partially restored the altered rhythmicity in the diabetic cornea. In conclusion, insulin-dependent diabetes altered the normal rhythmicity of the cornea, and insulin administration had a beneficial effect on restoring normal rhythmicity in the diabetic cornea. PMID:27611469

  7. Circadian control of oscillations in mitochondrial rate-limiting enzymes and nutrient utilization by PERIOD proteins.

    PubMed

    Neufeld-Cohen, Adi; Robles, Maria S; Aviram, Rona; Manella, Gal; Adamovich, Yaarit; Ladeuix, Benjamin; Nir, Dana; Rousso-Noori, Liat; Kuperman, Yael; Golik, Marina; Mann, Matthias; Asher, Gad

    2016-03-22

    Mitochondria are major suppliers of cellular energy through nutrients oxidation. Little is known about the mechanisms that enable mitochondria to cope with changes in nutrient supply and energy demand that naturally occur throughout the day. To address this question, we applied MS-based quantitative proteomics on isolated mitochondria from mice killed throughout the day and identified extensive oscillations in the mitochondrial proteome. Remarkably, the majority of cycling mitochondrial proteins peaked during the early light phase. We found that rate-limiting mitochondrial enzymes that process lipids and carbohydrates accumulate in a diurnal manner and are dependent on the clock proteins PER1/2. In this conjuncture, we uncovered daily oscillations in mitochondrial respiration that peak during different times of the day in response to different nutrients. Notably, the diurnal regulation of mitochondrial respiration was blunted in mice lacking PER1/2 or on a high-fat diet. We propose that PERIOD proteins optimize mitochondrial metabolism to daily changes in energy supply/demand and thereby, serve as a rheostat for mitochondrial nutrient utilization. PMID:26862173

  8. Circadian light-input pathways in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Taishi; Hermann-Luibl, Christiane; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Light is the most important environmental cue to entrain the circadian clock in most animals. In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, the light entrainment mechanisms of the clock have been well-studied. The Drosophila brain contains approximately 150 neurons that rhythmically express circadian clock genes. These neurons are called "clock neurons" and control behavioral activity rhythms. Many clock neurons express the Cryptochrome (CRY) protein, which is sensitive to UV and blue light, and thus enables clock neurons deep in the brain to directly perceive light. In addition to the CRY protein, external photoreceptors in the Drosophila eyes play an important role in circadian light-input pathways. Recent studies have provided new insights into the mechanisms that integrate these light inputs into the circadian network of the brain. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge on the light entrainment pathways in the Drosophila circadian clock. PMID:27066180

  9. CLOCK-Controlled Polyphonic Regulation of Circadian Rhythms through Canonical and Noncanonical E-Boxes

    PubMed Central

    Yoshitane, Hikari; Ozaki, Haruka; Terajima, Hideki; Du, Ngoc-Hien; Suzuki, Yutaka; Fujimori, Taihei; Kosaka, Naoki; Shimba, Shigeki; Sugano, Sumio; Takagi, Toshihisa

    2014-01-01

    In mammalian circadian clockwork, the CLOCK-BMAL1 complex binds to DNA enhancers of target genes and drives circadian oscillation of transcription. Here we identified 7,978 CLOCK-binding sites in mouse liver by chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-Seq), and a newly developed bioinformatics method, motif centrality analysis of ChIP-Seq (MOCCS), revealed a genome-wide distribution of previously unappreciated noncanonical E-boxes targeted by CLOCK. In vitro promoter assays showed that CACGNG, CACGTT, and CATG(T/C)G are functional CLOCK-binding motifs. Furthermore, we extensively revealed rhythmically expressed genes by poly(A)-tailed RNA-Seq and identified 1,629 CLOCK target genes within 11,926 genes expressed in the liver. Our analysis also revealed rhythmically expressed genes that have no apparent CLOCK-binding site, indicating the importance of indirect transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations. Indirect transcriptional regulation is represented by rhythmic expression of CLOCK-regulated transcription factors, such as Krüppel-like factors (KLFs). Indirect posttranscriptional regulation involves rhythmic microRNAs that were identified by small-RNA-Seq. Collectively, CLOCK-dependent direct transactivation through multiple E-boxes and indirect regulations polyphonically orchestrate dynamic circadian outputs. PMID:24591654

  10. Altered Circadian Rhythm and Metabolic Gene Profile in Rats Subjected to Advanced Light Phase Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Laura; Valcarcel, Lorea; da Silva, Crhistiane Andressa; Albert, Nerea; Diez-Noguera, Antoni; Cambras, Trinitat; Serra, Dolors

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock regulates metabolic homeostasis and its disruption predisposes to obesity and other metabolic diseases. However, the effect of phase shifts on metabolism is not completely understood. We examined whether alterations in the circadian rhythm caused by phase shifts induce metabolic changes in crucial genes that would predispose to obesity. Three-month-old rats were maintained on a standard diet under lighting conditions with chronic phase shifts consisting of advances, delays or advances plus delays. Serum leptin, insulin and glucose levels decreased only in rats subjected to advances. The expression of the clock gene Bmal 1 increased in the hypothalamus, white adipose tissue (WAT), brown adipose tissue (BAT) and liver of the advanced group compared to control rats. The advanced group showed an increase in hypothalamic AgRP and NPY mRNA, and their lipid metabolism gene profile was altered in liver, WAT and BAT. WAT showed an increase in inflammation and ER stress and brown adipocytes suffered a brown-to-white transformation and decreased UCP-1 expression. Our results indicate that chronic phase advances lead to significant changes in neuropeptides, lipid metabolism, inflammation and ER stress gene profile in metabolically relevant tissues such as the hypothalamus, liver, WAT and BAT. This highlights a link between alteration of the circadian rhythm and metabolism at the transcriptional level. PMID:25837425

  11. Early Appearance of Nonvisual and Circadian Markers in the Developing Inner Retinal Cells of Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Nicolás M.; Morera, Luis P.; Verra, Daniela M.; Contin, María A.; Guido, Mario E.

    2014-01-01

    The retina is a key component of the vertebrate circadian system; it is responsible for detecting and transmitting the environmental illumination conditions (day/night cycles) to the brain that synchronize the circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). For this, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) project to the SCN and other nonvisual areas. In the chicken, intrinsically photosensitive RGCs (ipRGCs) expressing the photopigment melanopsin (Opn4) transmit photic information and regulate diverse nonvisual tasks. In nonmammalian vertebrates, two genes encode Opn4: the Xenopus (Opn4x) and the mammalian (Opn4m) orthologs. RGCs express both Opn4 genes but are not the only inner retinal cells expressing Opn4x: horizontal cells (HCs) also do so. Here, we further characterize primary cultures of both populations of inner retinal cells (RGCs and HCs) expressing Opn4x. The expression of this nonvisual photopigment, as well as that for different circadian markers such as the clock genes Bmal1, Clock, Per2, and Cry1, and the key melatonin synthesizing enzyme, arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT), appears very early in development in both cell populations. The results clearly suggest that nonvisual Opn4 photoreceptors and endogenous clocks converge all together in these inner retinal cells at early developmental stages. PMID:24977155

  12. Cold-Induced Cysts of the Photosynthetic Dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum Have an Arrested Circadian Bioluminescence Rhythm and Lower Levels of Protein Phosphorylation1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sougata; Letourneau, Louis; Morse, David

    2014-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are microscopic, eukaryotic, and primarily marine plankton. Temporary cyst formation is a well-known physiological response of dinoflagellate cells to environmental stresses. However, the molecular underpinnings of cold-induced cyst physiology have never been described. Cultures of the photosynthetic dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum readily form temporary cysts when placed at low (8°C ± 1°C) temperature and excyst to form normal motile cells following a return to normal temperature (18°C ± 1°C). The normal circadian bioluminescence rhythm and the expected changes in Luciferin Binding Protein abundance were arrested in L. polyedrum cysts. Furthermore, after excystment, the bioluminescence rhythm initiates at a time corresponding to zeitgeber 12, independent of the time when the cells encysted. Phosphoprotein staining after two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, as well as column-based phosphoprotein enrichment followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, showed cyst proteins are hypophosphorylated when compared with those from motile cells, with the most marked decreases found for predicted Casein Kinase2 target sites. In contrast to the phosphoproteome, the cyst proteome is not markedly different from motile cells, as assessed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In addition to changes in the phosphoproteome, RNA sequencing revealed that cysts show a significant decrease in the levels of 132 RNAs. Of the 42 RNAs that were identified by sequence analysis, 21 correspond to plastid-encoded gene products and 11 to nuclear-encoded cell wall/plasma membrane components. Our data are consistent with a model in which the highly reduced metabolism in cysts is achieved primarily by alterations in the phosphoproteome. The stalling of the circadian rhythm suggests temporary cysts may provide an interesting model to address the circadian system of dinoflagellates. PMID:24335505

  13. Disruption of the circadian clock due to the Clock mutation has discrete effects on aging and carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Antoch, Marina P.; Gorbacheva, Victoria Y.; Vykhovanets, Olena; Toshkov, Illia A.; Kondratov, Roman V.; Kondratova, Anna A.; Lee, Choogon; Nikitin, Alexander Yu.

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian circadian system has been implicated in the regulation of various biological processes including those involved in genotoxic stress responses and tumor suppression. Here we report that mice with the functional deficiency in circadian transcription factor CLOCK (Clock/Clock mutant mice) do not display predisposition to tumor formation both during their normal lifespan or when challenged by γ-radiation. This phenotype is consistent with high apoptotic and low proliferation rate in lymphoid tissues of Clock mutant mice and is supported by the gene expression profiling of a number of apoptosis and cell cycle-related genes, as well as by growth inhibition of cells with CLOCK downregulation. At the same time, Clock mutant mice respond to low-dose irradiation by accelerating their aging program, and develop phenotypes that are reminiscent of those in Bmal1-deficient mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate the dichotomy in biological consequences of the disruption of the circadian clock with respect to ageing and cancer. They also highlight the existence of a complex interconnection between ageing, carcinogenesis and individual components of the circadian clock machinery. PMID:18418054

  14. Circadian oscillations of cytosolic and chloroplastic free calcium in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. H.; Knight, M. R.; Kondo, T.; Masson, P.; Sedbrook, J.; Haley, A.; Trewavas, A.

    1995-01-01

    Tobacco and Arabidopsis plants, expressing a transgene for the calcium-sensitive luminescent protein apoaequorin, revealed circadian oscillations in free cytosolic calcium that can be phase-shifted by light-dark signals. When apoaequorin was targeted to the chloroplast, circadian chloroplast calcium rhythms were likewise observed after transfer of the seedlings to constant darkness. Circadian oscillations in free calcium concentrations can be expected to control many calcium-dependent enzymes and processes accounting for circadian outputs. Regulation of calcium flux is therefore fundamental to the organization of circadian systems.

  15. Light-dependent and circadian clock-regulated activation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein, X-box-binding protein 1, and heat shock factor pathways.

    PubMed

    Hatori, Megumi; Hirota, Tsuyoshi; Iitsuka, Michiko; Kurabayashi, Nobuhiro; Haraguchi, Shogo; Kokame, Koichi; Sato, Ryuichiro; Nakai, Akira; Miyata, Toshiyuki; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Fukada, Yoshitaka

    2011-03-22

    The circadian clock is phase-delayed or -advanced by light when given at early or late subjective night, respectively. Despite the importance of the time-of-day-dependent phase responses to light, the underlying molecular mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we performed a comprehensive analysis of light-inducible genes in the chicken pineal gland, which consists of light-sensitive clock cells representing a prototype of the clock system. Light stimulated expression of 62 genes and 40 ESTs by >2.5-fold, among which genes responsive to the heat shock and endoplasmic reticulum stress as well as their regulatory transcription factors heat shock factor (HSF)1, HSF2, and X-box-binding protein 1 (XBP1) were strongly activated when a light pulse was given at late subjective night. In contrast, the light pulse at early subjective night caused prominent induction of E4bp4, a key regulator in the phase-delaying mechanism of the pineal clock, along with activation of a large group of cholesterol biosynthetic genes that are targets of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factor. We found that the light pulse stimulated proteolytic formation of active SREBP-1 that, in turn, transactivated E4bp4 expression, linking SREBP with the light-input pathway of the pineal clock. As an output of light activation of cholesterol biosynthetic genes, we found light-stimulated pineal production of a neurosteroid, 7α-hydroxypregnenolone, demonstrating a unique endocrine function of the pineal gland. Intracerebroventricular injection of 7α-hydroxypregnenolone activated locomotor activities of chicks. Our study on the genome-wide gene expression analysis revealed time-of-day-dependent light activation of signaling pathways and provided molecular connection between gene expression and behavior through neurosteroid release from the pineal gland. PMID:21383147

  16. The circadian system: plasticity at many levels.

    PubMed

    Muraro, N I; Pírez, N; Ceriani, M F

    2013-09-01

    Over the years it has become crystal clear that a variety of processes encode time-of-day information, ranging from gene expression, protein stability, or subcellular localization of key proteins, to the fine tuning of network properties and modulation of input signals, ultimately ensuring that physiology and behavior are properly synchronized to a changing environment. The purpose of this review is to put forward examples (as opposed to generate a comprehensive revision of all the available literature) in which the circadian system displays a remarkable degree of plasticity, from cell autonomous to circuit-based levels. In the literature, the term circadian plasticity has been used to refer to different concepts. The obvious one, more literally, refers to any change that follows a circadian (circa=around, diem=day) pattern, i.e. a daily change of a given parameter. The discovery of daily remodeling of neuronal structures will be referred herein as structural circadian plasticity, and represents an additional and novel phenomenon modified daily. Finally, any plasticity that has to do with a circadian parameter would represent a type of circadian plasticity; as an example, adjustments that allow organisms to adapt their daily behavior to the annual changes in photoperiod is a form of circadian plasticity at a higher organizational level, which is an emergent property of the whole circadian system. Throughout this work we will revisit these types of changes by reviewing recent literature delving around circadian control of clock outputs, from the most immediate ones within pacemaker neurons to the circadian modulation of rest-activity cycles. PMID:23727010

  17. Circadian rhythms, alcohol and gut interactions

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Christopher B.; Voigt, Rbin M.; Burgess, Helen J.; Swanson, Garth R.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock establishes rhythms throughout the body with an approximately 24 hour period that affect expression of hundreds of genes. Epidemiological data reveal chronic circadian misalignment, common in our society, significantly increases the risk for a myriad of diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, infertility and gastrointestinal disease. Disruption of intestinal barrier function, also known as gut leakiness, is especially important in alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Several studies have shown that alcohol causes ALD in only a 20–30% subset of alcoholics. Thus, a better understanding is needed of why only a subset of alcoholics develops ALD. Compelling evidence shows that increased gut leakiness to microbial products and especially LPS play a critical role in the pathogenesis of ALD. Clock and other circadian clock genes have been shown to regulate lipid transport, motility and other gut functions. We hypothesized that one possible mechanism for alcohol-induced intestinal hyper-permeability is through disruption of central or peripheral (intestinal) circadian regulation. In support of this hypothesis, our recent data shows that disruption of circadian rhythms makes the gut more susceptible to injury. Our in vitro data show that alcohol stimulates increased Clock and Per2 circadian clock proteins and that siRNA knockdown of these proteins prevents alcohol-induced permeability. We also show that intestinal Cyp2e1-mediated oxidative stress is required for alcohol-induced upregulation of Clock and Per2 and intestinal hyperpermeability. Our mouse model of chronic alcohol feeding shows that circadian disruption through genetics (in ClockΔ19 mice) or environmental disruption by weekly 12h phase shifting results in gut leakiness alone and exacerbates alcohol-induced gut leakiness and liver pathology. Our data in human alcoholics show they exhibit abnormal melatonin profiles characteristic of circadian disruption. Taken together our

  18. Daily Fasting Blood Glucose Rhythm in Male Mice: A Role of the Circadian Clock in the Liver.

    PubMed

    Ando, Hitoshi; Ushijima, Kentaro; Shimba, Shigeki; Fujimura, Akio

    2016-02-01

    Fasting blood glucose (FBG) and hepatic glucose production are regulated according to a circadian rhythm. An early morning increase in FBG levels, which is pronounced among diabetic patients, is known as the dawn phenomenon. Although the intracellular circadian clock generates various molecular rhythms, whether the hepatic clock is involved in FBG rhythm remains unclear. To address this issue, we investigated the effects of phase shift and disruption of the hepatic clock on the FBG rhythm. In both C57BL/6J and diabetic ob/ob mice, FBG exhibited significant daily rhythms with a peak at the beginning of the dark phase. Light-phase restricted feeding altered the phase of FBG rhythm mildly in C57BL/6J mice and greatly in ob/ob mice, in concert with the phase shifts of mRNA expression rhythms of the clock and glucose production-related genes in the liver. Moreover, the rhythmicity of FBG and Glut2 expression was not detected in liver-specific Bmal1-deficient mice. Furthermore, treatment with octreotide suppressed the plasma growth hormone concentration but did not affect the hepatic mRNA expression of the clock genes or the rise in FBG during the latter half of the resting phase in C57BL/6J mice. These results suggest that the hepatic circadian clock plays a critical role in regulating the daily FBG rhythm, including the dawn phenomenon. PMID:26653333

  19. The molecular mechanism regulating the autonomous circadian expression of Topoisomerase I in NIH3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fang; Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Kumagai, Megumi; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Ikeda, Masaaki

    2009-02-27

    To identify whether Topoisomerase I (TopoI) has autonomous circadian rhythms regulated by clock genes, we tested mouse TopoI (mTopoI) promoter oscillation in NIH3T3 cells using a real-time monitoring assay and TopoI mRNA oscillations using real-time RT-PCR. Analysis of the mTopoI promoter region with Matlnspector software revealed two putative E-box (E1 and E2) and one DBP/E4BP4-binding element (D-box). Luciferase assays indicated that mTopoI gene expression was directly regulated by clock genes. The real-time monitoring assay showed that E-box and D-box response elements participate in the regulation of the circadian expression of mTopoI. Furthermore, a gel-shift assay showed that E2 is a direct target of the BMAL1/CLOCK heterodimer and DBP binds to the putative D-site. These results indicate that TopoI is expressed in an autonomous circadian rhythm in NIH3T3 cells. PMID:19138663

  20. Circadian clock genes are rhythmically expressed in specific segments of the hen oviduct.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z C; Wang, Y G; Li, L; Yin, H D; Li, D Y; Wang, Y; Zhao, X L; Liu, Y P; Zhu, Q

    2016-07-01

    In animals, core clock genes are expressed in many peripheral tissues throughout the body that contribute to tissue specific temporal regulation including those that comprise the reproductive system. The chicken ovulatory cycle seems to provide an example of a system in which circadian and interval timing mechanisms operate during ovulation-oviposition. However, little is known about the possible role of circadian regulation during egg formation and laying. To this end, we determined the rhythmic expression of several known canonical clock genes and clock controlled genes in the 4 segments of the chicken oviduct (infundibulum, magnum, isthmus, and uterus) taken from the same biological state (laying sequence and oviposition time) using real time RT-PCR. Except for Cry1, the other genes we analyzed were expressed in all 4 segments of the oviduct. Intriguingly, in a daily light-dark cycle, Bmal1, Clock, Per2, Per3, Cry2, and Rev-erbβ have highly significant rhythmic expression in the infundibulum and uterus but not in the magnum and isthmus. These results show that there is spatial specificity in the localization of clock cells in the hen reproductive tract and that peripheral clocks might have a direct role in the infundibulum and uterus where yolk is captured and the eggshell is formed, respectively. PMID:26944979

  1. Evidences of Polymorphism Associated with Circadian System and Risk of Pathologies: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, F. J.; Vera, J.; Venegas, C.; Muñoz, S.; Oyarce, S.; Muñoz, K.; Lagunas, C.

    2016-01-01

    The circadian system is a supraphysiological system that modulates different biological functions such as metabolism, sleep-wake, cellular proliferation, and body temperature. Different chronodisruptors have been identified, such as shift work, feeding time, long days, and stress. The environmental changes and our modern lifestyle can alter the circadian system and increase the risk of developing pathologies such as cancer, preeclampsia, diabetes, and mood disorder. This system is organized by transcriptional/tranductional feedback loops of clock genes Clock, Bmal1, Per1–3, and Cry1-2. How molecular components of the clock are able to influence the development of diseases and their risk relation with genetic components of polymorphism of clock genes is unknown. This research describes different genetic variations in the population and how these are associated with risk of cancer, metabolic diseases such as diabetes, obesity, and dyslipidemias, and also mood disorders such as depression, bipolar disease, excessive alcohol intake, and infertility. Finally, these findings will need to be implemented and evaluated at the level of genetic interaction and how the environment factors trigger the expression of these pathologies will be examined. PMID:27313610

  2. Evidences of Polymorphism Associated with Circadian System and Risk of Pathologies: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, F J; Vera, J; Venegas, C; Muñoz, S; Oyarce, S; Muñoz, K; Lagunas, C

    2016-01-01

    The circadian system is a supraphysiological system that modulates different biological functions such as metabolism, sleep-wake, cellular proliferation, and body temperature. Different chronodisruptors have been identified, such as shift work, feeding time, long days, and stress. The environmental changes and our modern lifestyle can alter the circadian system and increase the risk of developing pathologies such as cancer, preeclampsia, diabetes, and mood disorder. This system is organized by transcriptional/tranductional feedback loops of clock genes Clock, Bmal1, Per1-3, and Cry1-2. How molecular components of the clock are able to influence the development of diseases and their risk relation with genetic components of polymorphism of clock genes is unknown. This research describes different genetic variations in the population and how these are associated with risk of cancer, metabolic diseases such as diabetes, obesity, and dyslipidemias, and also mood disorders such as depression, bipolar disease, excessive alcohol intake, and infertility. Finally, these findings will need to be implemented and evaluated at the level of genetic interaction and how the environment factors trigger the expression of these pathologies will be examined. PMID:27313610

  3. Changes in Gene Expression Patterns of Circadian-Clock, Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 and Nerve Growth Factor in Inflamed Human Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shu-Chuan; Chen, Chien-Lin; Yi, Chih-Hsun; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Shieh, Kun-Ruey

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythm is driven by the molecular circadian-clock system and regulates many physiological functions. Diurnal rhythms in the gastrointestinal tract are known to be related to feeding pattern, but whether these rhythms are also related to the gastrointestinal damage or injuries; for example, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), is unclear. This study was conducted to determine whether expression of circadian-clock genes or factors involved in vagal stimulation or sensitization were altered in the esophagus of GERD patients. Diurnal patterns of PER1, PER2, BMAL1, CRY2, TRPV1, and NGF mRNA expression were found in patient controls, and these patterns were altered and significantly correlated to the GERD severity in GERD patients. Although levels of CRY1, TIM, CB1, NHE3, GDNF, and TAC1 mRNA expression did not show diurnal patterns, they were elevated and also correlated with GERD severity in GERD patients. Finally, strong correlations among PER1, TRPV1, NGF and CRY2 mRNA expression, and among PER2, TRPV1 and CRY2 expression were found. Expression levels of CRY1 mRNA highly correlated with levels of TIM, CB1, NHE3, GDNF and TAC1. This study suggests that the circadian rhythm in the esophagus may be important for the mediation of and/or the response to erosive damage in GERD patients. PMID:26337663

  4. Cellular DBP and E4BP4 proteins are critical for determining the period length of the circadian oscillator.

    PubMed

    Yamajuku, Daisuke; Shibata, Yasutaka; Kitazawa, Masashi; Katakura, Toshie; Urata, Hiromi; Kojima, Tomoko; Takayasu, Satoko; Nakata, Osamu; Hashimoto, Seiichi

    2011-07-21

    The phenotypes of mice carrying clock gene mutations have been critical to understanding the mammalian clock function. However, behavior does not necessarily reflect cell-autonomous clock phenotypes, because of the hierarchical dominance of the central clock. We performed cell-based siRNA knockdown and cDNA overexpression and monitored rhythm using bioluminescent reporters of clock genes. We found that knockdown of DBP, D-box positive regulator, in our model led to a short-period phenotype, whereas overexpressing of DBP produced a long-period rhythm when compared to controls. Furthermore, knockdown and overexpressing of E4BP4, D-box negative regulator, led to an opposite effect of DBP. Our experiments demonstrated that D-box regulators play a crucial role in determining the period length of Per1 and Per2 promoter-driven circadian rhythms in Rat-1 fibroblasts. PMID:21635892

  5. NONO couples the circadian clock to the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kowalska, Elzbieta; Ripperger, Juergen A.; Hoegger, Dominik C.; Bruegger, Pascal; Buch, Thorsten; Birchler, Thomas; Mueller, Anke; Albrecht, Urs; Contaldo, Claudio; Brown, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian circadian clocks restrict cell proliferation to defined time windows, but the mechanism and consequences of this interrelationship are not fully understood. Previously we identified the multifunctional nuclear protein NONO as a partner of circadian PERIOD (PER) proteins. Here we show that it also conveys circadian gating to the cell cycle, a connection surprisingly important for wound healing in mice. Specifically, although fibroblasts from NONO-deficient mice showed approximately normal circadian cycles, they displayed elevated cell doubling and lower cellular senescence. At a molecular level, NONO bound to the p16-Ink4A cell cycle checkpoint gene and potentiated its circadian activation in a PER protein-dependent fashion. Loss of either NONO or PER abolished this activation and circadian expression of p16-Ink4A and eliminated circadian cell cycle gating. In vivo, lack of NONO resulted in defective wound repair. Because wound healing defects were also seen in multiple circadian clock-deficient mouse lines, our results therefore suggest that coupling of the cell cycle to the circadian clock via NONO may be useful to segregate in temporal fashion cell proliferation from tissue organization. PMID:23267082

  6. The role of circadian rhythm in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shujing; Ao, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    The circadian rhythm is an endogenous time keeping system shared by most organisms. The circadian clock is comprised of both peripheral oscillators in most organ tissues of the body and a central pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the central nervous system. The circadian rhythm is crucial in maintaining the normal physiology of the organism including, but not limited to, cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and cellular metabolism; whereas disruption of the circadian rhythm is closely related to multi-tumorigenesis. In the past several years, studies from different fields have revealed that the genetic or functional disruption of the molecular circadian rhythm has been found in various cancers, such as breast, prostate, and ovarian. In this review, we will investigate and present an overview of the current research on the influence of circadian rhythm regulating proteins on breast cancer. PMID:23997531

  7. Circadian Clocks and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Marcheva, Biliana; Ramsey, Kathryn M.; Peek, Clara B.; Affinati, Alison; Maury, Eleonore; Bass, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clocks maintain periodicity in internal cycles of behavior, physiology, and metabolism, enabling organisms to anticipate the 24-h rotation of the Earth. In mammals, circadian integration of metabolic systems optimizes energy harvesting and utilization across the light/dark cycle. Disruption of clock genes has recently been linked to sleep disorders and to the development of cardiometabolic disease. Conversely, aberrant nutrient signaling affects circadian rhythms of behavior. This chapter reviews the emerging relationship between the molecular clock and metabolic systems and examines evidence that circadian disruption exerts deleterious consequences on human health. PMID:23604478

  8. Enhancement of NAD+-dependent SIRT1 deacetylase activity by methylselenocysteine resets the circadian clock in carcinogen-treated mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Mingzhu; Guo, Wei-Ren; Park, Youngil; Kang, Hwan-Goo; Zarbl, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that dietary methylselenocysteine (MSC) inhibits N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (NMU)-induced mammary tumorigenesis by resetting circadian gene expression disrupted by the carcinogen at the early stage of tumorigenesis. To investigate the underlying mechanism, we developed a circadian reporter system comprised of human mammary epithelial cells with a luciferase reporter driven by the promoter of human PERIOD 2 (PER2), a core circadian gene. In this in vitro model, NMU disrupted cellular circadian rhythm in a pattern similar to that observed with SIRT1-specific inhibitors; in contrast, MSC restored the circadian rhythms disrupted by NMU and protected against SIRT1 inhibitors. Moreover, NMU inhibited intracellular NAD+/NADH ratio and reduced NAD+-dependent SIRT1 activity in a dose-dependent manner, while MSC restored NAD+/NADH and SIRT1 activity in the NMU-treated cells, indicating that the NAD+-SIRT1 pathway was targeted by NMU and MSC. In rat mammary tissue, a carcinogenic dose of NMU also disrupted NAD+/NADH oscillations and decreased SIRT1 activity; dietary MSC restored NAD+/NADH oscillations and increased SIRT1 activity in the mammary glands of NMU-treated rats. MSC-induced SIRT1 activity was correlated with decreased acetylation of BMAL1 and increased acetylation of histone 3 lysine 9 at the Per2 promoter E-Box in mammary tissue. Changes in SIRT1 activity were temporally correlated with loss or restoration of rhythmic Per2 mRNA expression in NMU-treated or MSC-rescued rat mammary glands, respectively. Together with our previous findings, these results suggest that enhancement of NAD+-dependent SIRT1 activity contributes to the chemopreventive efficacy of MSC by restoring epigenetic regulation of circadian gene expression at early stages of mammary tumorigenesis. PMID:26544624

  9. GABA-mediated repulsive coupling between circadian clock neurons in the SCN encodes seasonal time

    PubMed Central

    Myung, Jihwan; Hong, Sungho; DeWoskin, Daniel; De Schutter, Erik; Forger, Daniel B.; Takumi, Toru

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) forms not only the master circadian clock but also a seasonal clock. This neural network of ∼10,000 circadian oscillators encodes season-dependent day-length changes through a largely unknown mechanism. We show that region-intrinsic changes in the SCN fine-tune the degree of network synchrony and reorganize the phase relationship among circadian oscillators to represent day length. We measure oscillations of the clock gene Bmal1, at single-cell and regional levels in cultured SCN explanted from animals raised under short or long days. Coupling estimation using the Kuramoto framework reveals that the network has couplings that can be both phase-attractive (synchronizing) and -repulsive (desynchronizing). The phase gap between the dorsal and ventral regions increases and the overall period of the SCN shortens with longer day length. We find that one of the underlying physiological mechanisms is the modulation of the intracellular chloride concentration, which can adjust the strength and polarity of the ionotropic GABAA-mediated synaptic input. We show that increasing day-length changes the pattern of chloride transporter expression, yielding more excitatory GABA synaptic input, and that blocking GABAA signaling or the chloride transporter disrupts the unique phase and period organization induced by the day length. We test the consequences of this tunable GABA coupling in the context of excitation–inhibition balance through detailed realistic modeling. These results indicate that the network encoding of seasonal time is controlled by modulation of intracellular chloride, which determines the phase relationship among and period difference between the dorsal and ventral SCN. PMID:26130804

  10. The Arabidopsis Circadian System

    PubMed Central

    McClung, C. Robertson; Salomé, Patrice A.; Michael, Todd P.

    2002-01-01

    Rhythms with periods of approximately 24 hr are widespread in nature. Those that persist in constant conditions are termed circadian rhythms and reflect the activity of an endogenous biological clock. Plants, including Arabidopsis, are richly rhythmic. Expression analysis, most recently on a genomic scale, indicates that the Arabidopsis circadian clock regulates a number of key metabolic pathways and stress responses. A number of sensitive and high-throughput assays have been developed to monitor the Arabidopsis clock. These assays have facilitated the identification of components of plant circadian systems through genetic and molecular biological studies. Although much remains to be learned, the framework of the Arabidopsis circadian system is coming into focus. Dedication This review is dedicated to the memory of DeLill Nasser, a wonderful mentor and an unwavering advocate of both Arabidopsis and circadian rhythms research. PMID:22303209

  11. Ketogenic diet delays the phase of circadian rhythms and does not affect AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Genzer, Yoni; Dadon, Maayan; Burg, Chen; Chapnik, Nava; Froy, Oren

    2015-12-01

    Ketogenic diet (KD) is used for weight loss or to treat epilepsy. KD leads to liver AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, which would be expected to inhibit gluconeogenesis. However, KD leads to increased hepatic glucose output. As AMPK and its active phosphorylated form (pAMPK) show circadian oscillation, this discrepancy could stem from wrong-time-of-day sampling. The effect of KD was tested on mouse clock gene expression, AMPK, mTOR, SIRT1 and locomotor activity for 2 months and compared to low-fat diet (LFD). KD led to 1.5-fold increased levels of blood glucose and insulin. Brain pAMPK/AMPK ratio was 40% higher under KD, whereas that in liver was not affected. KD led to 40% and 20% down-regulation of the ratio of pP70S6K/P70S6K, the downstream target of mTOR, in the brain and liver, respectively. SIRT1 levels were 40% higher in the brain, but 40% lower in the liver of KD-fed mice. Clock genes showed delayed rhythms under KD. In the brain of KD-fed mice, amplitudes of clock genes were down-regulated, whereas 6-fold up-regulation was found in the liver. The metabolic state under KD indicates reduced satiety in the brain and reduced anabolism alongside increased gluconeogenesis in the liver. PMID:26408964

  12. Chronic exposure to low doses of pharmaceuticals disturbs the hepatic expression of circadian genes in lean and obese mice.

    PubMed

    Anthérieu, Sébastien; Le Guillou, Dounia; Coulouarn, Cédric; Begriche, Karima; Trak-Smayra, Viviane; Martinais, Sophie; Porceddu, Mathieu; Robin, Marie-Anne; Fromenty, Bernard

    2014-04-01

    Drinking water can be contaminated with pharmaceuticals. However, it is uncertain whether this contamination can be harmful for the liver, especially during obesity. Hence, the goal of our study was to determine whether chronic exposure to low doses of pharmaceuticals could have deleterious effects on livers of lean and obese mice. To this end, lean and ob/ob male mice were treated for 4 months with a mixture of 11 drugs provided in drinking water at concentrations ranging from 10 to 10⁶ ng/l. At the end of the treatment, some liver and plasma abnormalities were observed in ob/ob mice treated with the cocktail containing 10⁶ ng/l of each drug. For this dosage, a gene expression analysis by microarray showed altered expression of circadian genes (e.g. Bmal1, Dbp, Cry1) in lean and obese mice. RT-qPCR analyses carried out in all groups of animals confirmed that expression of 8 different circadian genes was modified in a dose-dependent manner. For some genes, a significant modification was observed for dosages as low as 10²-10³ ng/l. Drug mixture and obesity presented an additive effect on circadian gene expression. These data were validated in an independent study performed in female mice. Thus, our study showed that chronic exposure to trace pharmaceuticals disturbed hepatic expression of circadian genes, particularly in obese mice. Because some of the 11 drugs can be found in drinking water at such concentrations (e.g. acetaminophen, carbamazepine, ibuprofen) our data could be relevant in environmental toxicology, especially for obese individuals exposed to these contaminants. PMID:24525044

  13. Involvement of 5-HT₃ and 5-HT₄ receptors in the regulation of circadian clock gene expression in mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Natsumi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Okada, Kazuya; Aoki, Kazuyuki; Imanishi, Takuma; Yoshida, Daisuke; Ishikawa, Ryosuke; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2014-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that 5-HT receptors play a critical role in the expression of clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the main circadian oscillator in hamsters. The contributions of 5-HT-receptor subtypes in the intestine, where they are expressed at high concentrations, are however not yet clarified. The 5-HT synthesis inhibitor, p-chlorophenylalanine, attenuated the daily rhythm of Per1 and Per2 gene expression in the intestine. Injection of 5-HT and agonists of the 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptors increased Per1/Per2 expression and decreased Bmal1 expression in a dose-dependent manner. Although treatment with antagonists of 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 alone did not affect clock gene expression, co-injection of these antagonists with 5-HT blocked the 5-HT-induced changes in clock gene expression. Increased tissue levels of 5-HT due to treatment with the antidepressants clomipramine and fluvoxamine did not affect clock gene expression. The present results suggest that the 5-HT system in the small intestine may play a critical role in regulating circadian rhythms through 5-HT3/5-HT4-receptor activation. PMID:24492464

  14. Calcium and SOL Protease Mediate Temperature Resetting of Circadian Clocks

    PubMed Central

    Tataroglu, Ozgur; Zhao, Xiaohu; Busza, Ania; Ling, Jinli; O’Neill, John S.; Emery, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Summary Circadian clocks integrate light and temperature input to remain synchronized with the day/night cycle. Although light input to the clock is well studied, the molecular mechanisms by which circadian clocks respond to temperature remain poorly understood. We found that temperature phase shifts Drosophila circadian clocks through degradation of the pacemaker protein TIM. This degradation is mechanistically distinct from photic CRY-dependent TIM degradation. Thermal TIM degradation is triggered by cytosolic calcium increase and CALMODULIN binding to TIM and is mediated by the atypical calpain protease SOL. This thermal input pathway and CRY-dependent light input thus converge on TIM, providing a molecular mechanism for the integration of circadian light and temperature inputs. Mammals use body temperature cycles to keep peripheral clocks synchronized with their brain pacemaker. Interestingly, downregulating the mammalian SOL homolog SOLH blocks thermal mPER2 degradation and phase shifts. Thus, we propose that circadian thermosensation in insects and mammals share common principles. PMID:26590423

  15. A circadian clock nanomachine that runs without transcription or translation

    PubMed Central

    Egli, Martin; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2013-01-01

    The biochemical basis of circadian timekeeping is best characterized in cyanobacteria. The structures of its key molecular players, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC are known and these proteins can reconstitute a remarkable circadian oscillation in a test tube. KaiC is rhythmically phosphorylated and its phospho-status is a marker of circadian phase that regulates ATPase activity and the oscillating assembly of a nanomachine. Analyses of the nanomachines have revealed how their timing circuit is ratcheted to be unidirectional and how they stay in synch to ensure a robust oscillator. These insights are likely to elucidate circadian timekeeping in higher organisms, including how transcription and translation could appear to be a core circadian timer when the true pacemaker is an embedded biochemical oscillator. PMID:23571120

  16. A circadian clock nanomachine that runs without transcription or translation.

    PubMed

    Egli, Martin; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2013-10-01

    The biochemical basis of circadian timekeeping is best characterized in cyanobacteria. The structures of its key molecular players, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC are known and these proteins can reconstitute a remarkable circadian oscillation in a test tube. KaiC is rhythmically phosphorylated and its phospho-status is a marker of circadian phase that regulates ATPase activity and the oscillating assembly of a nanomachine. Analyses of the nanomachines have revealed how their timing circuit is ratcheted to be unidirectional and how they stay in synch to ensure a robust oscillator. These insights are likely to elucidate circadian timekeeping in higher organisms, including how transcription and translation could appear to be a core circadian timer when the true pacemaker is an embedded biochemical oscillator. PMID:23571120

  17. An antennal circadian clock and circadian rhythms in peripheral pheromone reception in the moth Spodoptera littoralis.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Christine; Lucas, Philippe; Rochat, Didier; François, Marie-Christine; Maïbèche-Coisne, Martine; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle

    2007-12-01

    Circadian rhythms are observed in mating behaviors in moths: females emit sex pheromones and males are attracted by these pheromones in rhythmic fashions. In the moth Spodoptera littoralis, we demonstrated the occurrence of a circadian oscillator in the antenna, the peripheral olfactory organ. We identified different clock genes, period (per), cryptochrome1 (cry1) and cryptochrome2 (cry2), in this organ. Using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), we found that their corresponding transcripts cycled circadianly in the antenna as well as in the brain. Electroantennogram (EAG) recordings over 24 h demonstrated for the first time a circadian rhythm in antennal responses of a moth to sex pheromone. qPCR showed that out of one pheromone-binding protein (PBP), one olfactory receptor (OR), and one odorant-degrading enzyme (ODE), all putatively involved in the pheromone reception, only the ODE transcript presented a circadian rhythm that may be related to rhythms in olfactory signal resolution. Peripheral or central circadian clock control of olfaction is then discussed in light of recent data. PMID:18057325

  18. Circadian systems biology: When time matters

    PubMed Central

    Fuhr, Luise; Abreu, Mónica; Pett, Patrick; Relógio, Angela

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock is a powerful endogenous timing system, which allows organisms to fine-tune their physiology and behaviour to the geophysical time. The interplay of a distinct set of core-clock genes and proteins generates oscillations in expression of output target genes which temporally regulate numerous molecular and cellular processes. The study of the circadian timing at the organismal as well as at the cellular level outlines the field of chronobiology, which has been highly interdisciplinary ever since its origins. The development of high-throughput approaches enables the study of the clock at a systems level. In addition to experimental approaches, computational clock models exist which allow the analysis of rhythmic properties of the clock network. Such mathematical models aid mechanistic understanding and can be used to predict outcomes of distinct perturbations in clock components, thereby generating new hypotheses regarding the putative function of particular clock genes. Perturbations in the circadian timing system are linked to numerous molecular dysfunctions and may result in severe pathologies including cancer. A comprehensive knowledge regarding the mechanistic of the circadian system is crucial to develop new procedures to investigate pathologies associated with a deregulated clock. In this manuscript we review the combination of experimental methodologies, bioinformatics and theoretical models that have been essential to explore this remarkable timing-system. Such an integrative and interdisciplinary approach may provide new strategies with regard to chronotherapeutic treatment and new insights concerning the restoration of the circadian timing in clock-associated diseases. PMID:26288701

  19. Biophotonics: Circadian photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rea, Mark S.

    2011-05-01

    A growing body of medical evidence suggests that disrupting the body's biological clock can have adverse effects on health. Researchers are now creating the photonic tools to monitor, predict and influence the circadian rhythm.

  20. A circadian rhythm in the expression of PERIOD2 protein reveals a novel SCN-controlled oscillator in the oval nucleus of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis.

    PubMed

    Amir, Shimon; Lamont, Elaine Waddington; Robinson, Barry; Stewart, Jane

    2004-01-28

    Circadian rhythms in mammals are regulated not only globally by the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), but also locally by widely distributed populations of clock cells in the brain and periphery that control tissue-specific rhythmic outputs. Here we show that the oval nucleus of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST-OV) exhibits a robust circadian rhythm in expression of the Period2 (PER2) clock protein. PER2 expression is rhythmic in the BNST-OV in rats housed under a light/dark cycle or in constant darkness, in blind rats, and in mice, and is in perfect synchrony with the PER2 rhythm of the SCN. Constant light or bilateral SCN lesions abolish the rhythm of PER2 in the BNST-OV. Large abrupt shifts in the light schedule transiently uncouple the BNST-OV rhythm from that of the SCN. Re-entrainment of the PER2 rhythm is faster in the SCN than in the BNST-OV, and it is faster after a delay than an advance shift. Bilateral adrenalectomy blunts the PER2 rhythm in the BNST-OV. Thus, the BNST-OV contains circadian clock cells that normally oscillate in synchrony with the SCN, but these cells appear to require both input from the SCN and circulating glucocorticoids to maintain their circadian oscillation. Taken together with what is known about the functional organization of the connections of the BNST-OV with systems of the brain involved in stress and motivational processes, these findings place BNST-OV oscillators in a position to influence specific physiological and behavioral rhythms downstream from the SCN clock. PMID:14749422

  1. Intact Interval Timing in Circadian CLOCK Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Cordes, Sara; Gallistel, C. R.

    2008-01-01

    While progress has been made in determining the molecular basis for the circadian clock, the mechanism by which mammalian brains time intervals measured in seconds to minutes remains a mystery. An obvious question is whether the interval timing mechanism shares molecular machinery with the circadian timing mechanism. In the current study, we trained circadian CLOCK +/− and −/− mutant male mice in a peak-interval procedure with 10 and 20-s criteria. The mutant mice were more active than their wild-type littermates, but there were no reliable deficits in the accuracy or precision of their timing as compared with wild-type littermates. This suggests that expression of the CLOCK protein is not necessary for normal interval timing. PMID:18602902

  2. Circadian Gene Variants and Susceptibility to Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, M. Ann; Rees, Simon D.; Hydrie, M. Zafar I.; Shera, A. Samad; Bellary, Srikanth; O’Hare, J. Paul; Kumar, Sudhesh; Taheri, Shahrad; Basit, Abdul; Barnett, Anthony H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Disruption of endogenous circadian rhythms has been shown to increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, suggesting that circadian genes might play a role in determining disease susceptibility. We present the results of a pilot study investigating the association between type 2 diabetes and selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in/near nine circadian genes. The variants were chosen based on their previously reported association with prostate cancer, a disease that has been suggested to have a genetic link with type 2 diabetes through a number of shared inherited risk determinants. Methodology/Principal Findings The pilot study was performed using two genetically homogeneous Punjabi cohorts, one resident in the United Kingdom and one indigenous to Pakistan. Subjects with (N = 1732) and without (N = 1780) type 2 diabetes were genotyped for thirteen circadian variants using a competitive allele-specific polymerase chain reaction method. Associations between the SNPs and type 2 diabetes were investigated using logistic regression. The results were also combined with in silico data from other South Asian datasets (SAT2D consortium) and white European cohorts (DIAGRAM+) using meta-analysis. The rs7602358G allele near PER2 was negatively associated with type 2 diabetes in our Punjabi cohorts (combined odds ratio [OR] = 0.75 [0.66–0.86], p = 3.18×10−5), while the BMAL1 rs11022775T allele was associated with an increased risk of the disease (combined OR = 1.22 [1.07–1.39], p = 0.003). Neither of these associations was replicated in the SAT2D or DIAGRAM+ datasets, however. Meta-analysis of all the cohorts identified disease associations with two variants, rs2292912 in CRY2 and rs12315175 near CRY1, although statistical significance was nominal (combined OR = 1.05 [1.01–1.08], p = 0.008 and OR = 0.95 [0.91–0.99], p = 0.015 respectively). Conclusions/significance None of the selected circadian gene

  3. Intrinsic, nondeterministic circadian rhythm generation in identified mammalian neurons

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Alexis B.; Angelo, Nikhil; Huettner, James E.; Herzog, Erik D.

    2009-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are modeled as reliable and self-sustained oscillations generated by single cells. The mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) keeps near 24-h time in vivo and in vitro, but the identity of the individual cellular pacemakers is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that circadian cycling is intrinsic to a unique class of SCN neurons by measuring firing rate or Period2 gene expression in single neurons. We found that fully isolated SCN neurons can sustain circadian cycling for at least 1 week. Plating SCN neurons at <100 cells/mm2 eliminated synaptic inputs and revealed circadian neurons that contained arginine vasopressin (AVP) or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) or neither. Surprisingly, arrhythmic neurons (nearly 80% of recorded neurons) also expressed these neuropeptides. Furthermore, neurons were observed to lose or gain circadian rhythmicity in these dispersed cell cultures, both spontaneously and in response to forskolin stimulation. In SCN explants treated with tetrodotoxin to block spike-dependent signaling, neurons gained or lost circadian cycling over many days. The rate of PERIOD2 protein accumulation on the previous cycle reliably predicted the spontaneous onset of arrhythmicity. We conclude that individual SCN neurons can generate circadian oscillations; however, there is no evidence for a specialized or anatomically localized class of cell-autonomous pacemakers. Instead, these results indicate that AVP, VIP, and other SCN neurons are intrinsic but unstable circadian oscillators that rely on network interactions to stabilize their otherwise noisy cycling. PMID:19805326

  4. Intrinsic, nondeterministic circadian rhythm generation in identified mammalian neurons.

    PubMed

    Webb, Alexis B; Angelo, Nikhil; Huettner, James E; Herzog, Erik D

    2009-09-22

    Circadian rhythms are modeled as reliable and self-sustained oscillations generated by single cells. The mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) keeps near 24-h time in vivo and in vitro, but the identity of the individual cellular pacemakers is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that circadian cycling is intrinsic to a unique class of SCN neurons by measuring firing rate or Period2 gene expression in single neurons. We found that fully isolated SCN neurons can sustain circadian cycling for at least 1 week. Plating SCN neurons at <100 cells/mm(2) eliminated synaptic inputs and revealed circadian neurons that contained arginine vasopressin (AVP) or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) or neither. Surprisingly, arrhythmic neurons (nearly 80% of recorded neurons) also expressed these neuropeptides. Furthermore, neurons were observed to lose or gain circadian rhythmicity in these dispersed cell cultures, both spontaneously and in response to forskolin stimulation. In SCN explants treated with tetrodotoxin to block spike-dependent signaling, neurons gained or lost circadian cycling over many days. The rate of PERIOD2 protein accumulation on the previous cycle reliably predicted the spontaneous onset of arrhythmicity. We conclude that individual SCN neurons can generate circadian oscillations; however, there is no evidence for a specialized or anatomically localized class of cell-autonomous pacemakers. Instead, these results indicate that AVP, VIP, and other SCN neurons are intrinsic but unstable circadian oscillators that rely on network interactions to stabilize their otherwise noisy cycling. PMID:19805326

  5. A metabolomic study of adipose tissue in mice with a disruption of the circadian system

    PubMed Central

    Castro, C.; Briggs, W.; Paschos, G. K.; FitzGerald, G. A.; Griffin, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue functions in terms of energy homeostasis as a rheostat for blood triglyceride, regulating its concentration, in response to external stimuli. In addition it acts as a barometer to inform the central nervous system of energy levels which can vary dramatically between meals and according to energy demand. Here a metabolomic approach, combining both Mass Spectrometry and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy, was used to analyse both white and brown adipose tissue in mice with adipocyte-specific deletion of Arntl (also known as Bmal1), a gene encoding a core molecular clock component. The results are consistent with a peripheral circadian clock playing a central role in metabolic regulation of both brown and white adipose tissue in rodents and show that Arntl induced global changes in both tissues which were distinct for the two types. In particular, anterior subcutaneous white adipose tissue (ASWAT) tissue was effected by a reduction in the degree of unsaturation of fatty acids, while brown adipose tissue (BAT) changes were associated with a reduction in chain length. In addition the aqueous fraction of metabolites in BAT were profoundly affected by Arntl disruption, consistent with the dynamic role of this tissue in maintaining body temperature across the day/night cycle and an upregulation in fatty acid oxidation and citric acid cycle activity to generate heat during the day when rats are inactive (increases in 3-hydroxybutyrate and glutamate), and increased synthesis and storage of lipids during the night when rats feed more (increased concentrations of glycerol, choline and glycerophosphocholine). PMID:25907923

  6. Physiology of circadian entrainment.

    PubMed

    Golombek, Diego A; Rosenstein, Ruth E

    2010-07-01

    Mammalian circadian rhythms are controlled by endogenous biological oscillators, including a master clock located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). Since the period of this oscillation is of approximately 24 h, to keep synchrony with the environment, circadian rhythms need to be entrained daily by means of Zeitgeber ("time giver") signals, such as the light-dark cycle. Recent advances in the neurophysiology and molecular biology of circadian rhythmicity allow a better understanding of synchronization. In this review we cover several aspects of the mechanisms for photic entrainment of mammalian circadian rhythms, including retinal sensitivity to light by means of novel photopigments as well as circadian variations in the retina that contribute to the regulation of retinal physiology. Downstream from the retina, we examine retinohypothalamic communication through neurotransmitter (glutamate, aspartate, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide) interaction with SCN receptors and the resulting signal transduction pathways in suprachiasmatic neurons, as well as putative neuron-glia interactions. Finally, we describe and analyze clock gene expression and its importance in entrainment mechanisms, as well as circadian disorders or retinal diseases related to entrainment deficits, including experimental and clinical treatments. PMID:20664079

  7. Circadian clocks and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, Victoria; Williams, Jack L; Meng, Qing-Jun; Streuli, Charles H

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks respond to environmental time cues to coordinate 24-hour oscillations in almost every tissue of the body. In the breast, circadian clocks regulate the rhythmic expression of numerous genes. Disrupted expression of circadian genes can alter breast biology and may promote cancer. Here we overview circadian mechanisms, and the connection between the molecular clock and breast biology. We describe how disruption of circadian genes contributes to cancer via multiple mechanisms, and link this to increased tumour risk in women who work irregular shift patterns. Understanding the influence of circadian rhythms on breast cancer could lead to more efficacious therapies, reformed public health policy and improved patient outcome. PMID:27590298

  8. Molecular Mechanisms of Circadian Regulation During Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanello, Susana; Boyle, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Disruption of the regular environmental circadian cues in addition to stringent and demanding operational schedules are two main factors that undoubtedly impact sleep patterns and vigilant performance in the astronaut crews during spaceflight. Most research is focused on the behavioral aspects of the risk of circadian desynchronization, characterized by fatigue and health and performance decrement. A common countermeasure for circadian re-entrainment utilizes blue-green light to entrain the circadian clock and mitigate this risk. However, an effective countermeasure targeting the photoreceptor system requires that the basic circadian molecular machinery remains intact during spaceflight. The molecular clock consists of sets of proteins that perform different functions within the clock machinery: circadian oscillators (genes whose expression levels cycle during the day, keep the pass of cellular time and regulate downstream effector genes), the effector or output genes (those which impact the physiology of the tissue or organism), and the input genes (responsible for sensing the environmental cues that allow circadian entrainment). The main environmental cue is light. As opposed to the known photoreceptors (rods and cones), the non-visual light stimulus is received by a subset of the population of retinal ganglion cells called intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGC) that express melanopsin (opsin 4 -Opn4-) as the photoreceptor. We hypothesize that spaceflight may affect ipRGC and melanopsin expression, which may be a contributing cause of circadian disruption during spaceflight. To answer this question, eyes from albino Balb/cJ mice aboard STS-133 were collected for histological analysis and gene expression profiling of the retina at 1 and 7 days after landing. Both vivarium and AEM (animal enclosure module) mice were used as ground controls. Opn4 expression was analyzed by real time RT/qPCR and retinal sections were stained for Opn4

  9. Structures of KaiC Circadian Clock Mutant Proteins: A New Phosphorylation Site at T426 and Mechanisms of Kinase, ATPase and Phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Pattanayek, Rekha; Mori, Tetsuya; Xu, Yao; Pattanayek, Sabuj; Johnson, Carl H.; Egli, Martin

    2010-09-02

    The circadian clock of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus can be reconstituted in vitro by three proteins, KaiA, KaiB and KaiC. Homo-hexameric KaiC displays kinase, phosphatase and ATPase activities; KaiA enhances KaiC phosphorylation and KaiB antagonizes KaiA. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the two known sites in the C-terminal half of KaiC subunits, T432 and S431, follow a strict order (TS {yields} pTS {yields} pTpS {yields} TpS {yields} TS) over the daily cycle, the origin of which is not understood. To address this void and to analyze the roles of KaiC active site residues, in particular T426, we determined structures of single and double P-site mutants of S. elongatus KaiC. The conformations of the loop region harboring P-site residues T432 and S431 in the crystal structures of six KaiC mutant proteins exhibit subtle differences that result in various distances between Thr (or Ala/Asn/Glu) and Ser (or Ala/Asp) residues and the ATP {gamma}-phosphate. T432 is phosphorylated first because it lies consistently closer to P{gamma}. The structures of the S431A and T432E/S431A mutants reveal phosphorylation at T426. The environments of the latter residue in the structures and functional data for T426 mutants in vitro and in vivo imply a role in dephosphorylation. We provide evidence for a third phosphorylation site in KaiC at T426. T426 and S431 are closely spaced and a KaiC subunit cannot carry phosphates at both sites simultaneously. Fewer subunits are phosphorylated at T426 in the two KaiC mutants compared to phosphorylated T432 and/or S431 residues in the structures of wt and other mutant KaiCs, suggesting that T426 phosphorylation may be labile. The structures combined with functional data for a host of KaiC mutant proteins help rationalize why S431 trails T432 in the loss of its phosphate and shed light on the mechanisms of the KaiC kinase, ATPase and phosphatase activities.

  10. Circadian Rhythms and Mood Disorders: Are the Phenomena and Mechanisms Causally Related?

    PubMed

    Bechtel, William

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the compelling evidence of disrupted circadian rhythms in individuals with mood disorders (major depressive disorder, seasonal affective disorder, and bipolar disorder) and that treatments such as bright light, designed to alter circadian rhythms, are effective in treating these disorders. Neurotransmitters in brain regions implicated in mood regulation exhibit circadian rhythms. A mouse model originally employed to identify a circadian gene has proven a potent model for mania. While this evidence is suggestive of an etiological role for altered circadian rhythms in mood disorders, it is compatible with other explanations, including that disrupted circadian rhythms and mood disorders are effects of a common cause and that genes and proteins implicated in both simply have pleiotropic effects. In light of this, the paper advances a proposal as to what evidence would be needed to establish a direct causal link between disruption of circadian rhythms and mood disorders. PMID:26379559

  11. A role for Drosophila ATX2 in activation of PER translation and circadian behavior.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Ling, Jinli; Yuan, Chunyan; Dubruille, Raphaëlle; Emery, Patrick

    2013-05-17

    A negative transcriptional feedback loop generates circadian rhythms in Drosophila. PERIOD (PER) is a critical state-variable in this mechanism, and its abundance is tightly regulated. We found that the Drosophila homolog of ATAXIN-2 (ATX2)--an RNA-binding protein implicated in human neurodegenerative diseases--was required for circadian locomotor behavior. ATX2 was necessary for PER accumulation in circadian pacemaker neurons and thus determined period length of circadian behavior. ATX2 was required for the function of TWENTY-FOUR (TYF), a crucial activator of PER translation. ATX2 formed a complex with TYF and promoted its interaction with polyadenylate-binding protein (PABP). Our work uncovers a role for ATX2 in circadian timing and reveals that this protein functions as an activator of PER translation in circadian neurons. PMID:23687048

  12. Circadian Rhythms in Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Susan E; Golden, Susan S

    2015-12-01

    Life on earth is subject to daily and predictable fluctuations in light intensity, temperature, and humidity created by rotation of the earth. Circadian rhythms, generated by a circadian clock, control temporal programs of cellular physiology to facilitate adaptation to daily environmental changes. Circadian rhythms are nearly ubiquitous and are found in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Here we introduce the molecular mechanism of the circadian clock in the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. We review the current understanding of the cyanobacterial clock, emphasizing recent work that has generated a more comprehensive understanding of how the circadian oscillator becomes synchronized with the external environment and how information from the oscillator is transmitted to generate rhythms of biological activity. These results have changed how we think about the clock, shifting away from a linear model to one in which the clock is viewed as an interactive network of multifunctional components that are integrated into the context of the cell in order to pace and reset the oscillator. We conclude with a discussion of how this basic timekeeping mechanism differs in other cyanobacterial species and how information gleaned from work in cyanobacteria can be translated to understanding rhythmic phenomena in other prokaryotic systems. PMID:26335718

  13. Socially synchronized circadian oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, Guy; Herzog, Erik D.; Levine, Joel D.; Schwartz, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Daily rhythms of physiology and behaviour are governed by an endogenous timekeeping mechanism (a circadian ‘clock’). The alternation of environmental light and darkness synchronizes (entrains) these rhythms to the natural day–night cycle, and underlying mechanisms have been investigated using singly housed animals in the laboratory. But, most species ordinarily would not live out their lives in such seclusion; in their natural habitats, they interact with other individuals, and some live in colonies with highly developed social structures requiring temporal synchronization. Social cues may thus be critical to the adaptive function of the circadian system, but elucidating their role and the responsible mechanisms has proven elusive. Here, we highlight three model systems that are now being applied to understanding the biology of socially synchronized circadian oscillators: the fruitfly, with its powerful array of molecular genetic tools; the honeybee, with its complex natural society and clear division of labour; and, at a different level of biological organization, the rodent suprachiasmatic nucleus, site of the brain's circadian clock, with its network of mutually coupled single-cell oscillators. Analyses at the ‘group’ level of circadian organization will likely generate a more complex, but ultimately more comprehensive, view of clocks and rhythms and their contribution to fitness in nature. PMID:23825203

  14. System identification of the Arabidopsis plant circadian system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foo, Mathias; Somers, David E.; Kim, Pan-Jun

    2015-02-01

    The circadian system generates an endogenous oscillatory rhythm that governs the daily activities of organisms in nature. It offers adaptive advantages to organisms through a coordination of their biological functions with the optimal time of day. In this paper, a model of the circadian system in the plant Arabidopsis (species thaliana) is built by using system identification techniques. Prior knowledge about the physical interactions of the genes and the proteins in the plant circadian system is incorporated in the model building exercise. The model is built by using primarily experimentally-verified direct interactions between the genes and the proteins with the available data on mRNA and protein abundances from the circadian system. Our analysis reveals a great performance of the model in predicting the dynamics of the plant circadian system through the effect of diverse internal and external perturbations (gene knockouts and day-length changes). Furthermore, we found that the circadian oscillatory rhythm is robust and does not vary much with the biochemical parameters except those of a light-sensitive protein P and a transcription factor TOC1. In other words, the circadian rhythmic profile is largely a consequence of the network's architecture rather than its particular parameters. Our work suggests that the current experimental knowledge of the gene-to-protein interactions in the plant Arabidopsis, without considering any additional hypothetical interactions, seems to suffice for system-level modeling of the circadian system of this plant and to present an exemplary platform for the control of network dynamics in complex living organisms.

  15. Circadian Clock NAD+ Cycle Drives Mitochondrial Oxidative Metabolism in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Peek, Clara Bien; Affinati, Alison H.; Ramsey, Kathryn Moynihan; Kuo, Hsin-Yu; Yu, Wei; Sena, Laura A.; Ilkayeva, Olga; Marcheva, Biliana; Kobayashi, Yumiko; Omura, Chiaki; Levine, Daniel C.; Bacsik, David J.; Gius, David; Newgard, Christopher B.; Goetzman, Eric; Chandel, Navdeep S.; Denu, John M.; Mrksich, Milan; Bass, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clocks are self-sustained cellular oscillators that synchronize oxidative and reductive cycles in anticipation of the solar cycle. We found that the clock transcription feedback loop produces cycles of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) biosynthesis, adenosine triphosphate production, and mitochondrial respiration through modulation of mitochondrial protein acetylation to synchronize oxidative metabolic pathways with the 24-hour fasting and feeding cycle. Circadian control of the activity of the NAD+-dependent deacetylase sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) generated rhythms in the acetylation and activity of oxidative enzymes and respiration in isolated mitochondria, and NAD+ supplementation restored protein deacetylation and enhanced oxygen consumption in circadian mutant mice. Thus, circadian control of NAD+ bioavailability modulates mitochondrial oxidative function and organismal metabolism across the daily cycles of fasting and feeding. PMID:24051248

  16. RORγ directly regulates the circadian expression of clock genes and downstream targets in vivo.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yukimasa; Jothi, Raja; Birault, Veronique; Jetten, Anton M

    2012-09-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that the lack of retinoic acid-related orphan receptor (ROR) γ or α expression in mice significantly reduced the peak expression level of Cry1, Bmal1, E4bp4, Rev-Erbα and Per2 in an ROR isotype- and tissue-selective manner without affecting the phase of their rhythmic expression. Analysis of RORγ/RORα double knockout mice indicated that in certain tissues RORγ and RORα exhibited a certain degree of redundancy in regulating clock gene expression. Reporter gene analysis showed that RORγ was able to induce reporter gene activity through the RORE-containing regulatory regions of Cry1, Bmal1, Rev-Erbα and E4bp4. Co-expression of Rev-Erbα or addition of a novel ROR antagonist repressed this activation. ChIP-Seq and ChIP-Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) analysis demonstrated that in vivo RORγ regulate these genes directly and in a Zeitgeber time (ZT)-dependent manner through these ROREs. This transcriptional activation by RORs was associated with changes in histone acetylation and chromatin accessibility. The rhythmic expression of RORγ1 by clock proteins may lead to the rhythmic expression of RORγ1 target genes. The presence of RORγ binding sites and its down-regulation in RORγ-/- liver suggest that the rhythmic expression of Avpr1a depends on RORγ consistent with the concept that RORγ1 provides a link between the clock machinery and its regulation of metabolic genes. PMID:22753030

  17. Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Ju; Lee, Jung Hie; Duffy, Jeanne F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review circadian rhythm sleep disorders, including underlying causes, diagnostic considerations, and typical treatments. Methods Literature review and discussion of specific cases. Results Survey studies 1,2 suggest that up to 3% of the adult population suffers from a circadian rhythm sleep disorder (CRSD). However, these sleep disorders are often confused with insomnia, and an estimated 10% of adult and 16% of adolescent sleep disorders patients may have a CRSD 3-6. While some CRSD (such as jet lag) can be self-limiting, others when untreated can lead to adverse medical, psychological, and social consequences. The International Classification of Sleep Disorders classifies CRSD as dyssomnias, with six subtypes: Advanced Sleep Phase Type, Delayed Sleep Phase Type, Irregular Sleep Wake Type, Free Running Type, Jet Lag Type, and Shift Work Type. The primary clinical characteristic of all CRSD is an inability to fall asleep and wake at the desired time. It is believed that CRSD arise from a problem with the internal biological clock (circadian timing system) and/or misalignment between the circadian timing system and the external 24-hour environment. This misalignment can be the result of biological and/or behavioral factors. CRSD can be confused with other sleep or medical disorders. Conclusions Circadian rhythm sleep disorders are a distinct class of sleep disorders characterized by a mismatch between the desired timing of sleep and the ability to fall asleep and remain asleep. If untreated, CRSD can lead to insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness, with negative medical, psychological, and social consequences. It is important for physicians to recognize potential circadian rhythm sleep disorders so that appropriate diagnosis, treatment, and referral can be made. PMID:25368503

  18. Circadian Disruption in Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Jones, Stephanie G; Benca, Ruth M

    2015-12-01

    Evidence suggests that abnormalities in circadian rhythms might prove causally or pathophysiologically significant in psychiatric illness. The circadian regulation of hormonal and behavioral timekeeping processes is often altered in patients with major depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia, and a susceptibility to rhythm instability may contribute to the functional impairment. For some patients, interventions that stabilize or resynchronize circadian rhythms prove therapeutically effective. Circadian disruption in the clinical profiles of most psychiatric illnesses and the treatment efficacy of chronobiological interventions suggest that attention to circadian phenotypes in a range of psychiatric disorders may help to uncover shared pathophysiologic mechanisms. PMID:26568124

  19. Dephosphorylation of the Core Clock Protein KaiC in the Cyanobacterial KaiABC Circadian Oscillator Proceeds via an ATP Synthase Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Egli, Martin; Mori, Tetsuya; Pattanayek, Rekha; Xu, Yao; Qin, Ximing; Johnson, Carl H.

    2014-10-02

    The circadian clock of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus can be reconstituted in vitro from three proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC in the presence of ATP, to tick in a temperature-compensated manner. KaiC, the central cog of this oscillator, forms a homohexamer with 12 ATP molecules bound between its N- and C-terminal domains and exhibits unusual properties. Both the N-terminal (CI) and C-terminal (CII) domains harbor ATPase activity, and the subunit interfaces between CII domains are the sites of autokinase and autophosphatase activities. Hydrolysis of ATP correlates with phosphorylation at threonine and serine sites across subunits in an orchestrated manner, such that first T432 and then S431 are phosphorylated, followed by dephosphorylation of these residues in the same order. Although structural work has provided insight into the mechanisms of ATPase and kinase, the location and mechanism of the phosphatase have remained enigmatic. From the available experimental data based on a range of approaches, including KaiC crystal structures and small-angle X-ray scattering models, metal ion dependence, site-directed mutagenesis (i.e., E318, the general base), and measurements of the associated clock periods, phosphorylation patterns, and dephosphorylation courses as well as a lack of sequence motifs in KaiC that are typically associated with known phosphatases, we hypothesized that KaiCII makes use of the same active site for phosphorylation and dephosphorlyation. We observed that wild-type KaiC (wt-KaiC) exhibits an ATP synthase activity that is significantly reduced in the T432A/S431A mutant. We interpret the first observation as evidence that KaiCII is a phosphotransferase instead of a phosphatase and the second that the enzyme is capable of generating ATP, both from ADP and P{sub i} (in a reversal of the ATPase reaction) and from ADP and P-T432/P-S431 (dephosphorylation). This new concept regarding the mechanism of dephosphorylation is also supported by the

  20. Dephosphorylation of the core clock protein KaiC in the cyanobacterial KaiABC circadian oscillator proceeds via an ATP synthase mechanism.

    PubMed

    Egli, Martin; Mori, Tetsuya; Pattanayek, Rekha; Xu, Yao; Qin, Ximing; Johnson, Carl H

    2012-02-28

    The circadian clock of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus can be reconstituted in vitro from three proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC in the presence of ATP, to tick in a temperature-compensated manner. KaiC, the central cog of this oscillator, forms a homohexamer with 12 ATP molecules bound between its N- and C-terminal domains and exhibits unusual properties. Both the N-terminal (CI) and C-terminal (CII) domains harbor ATPase activity, and the subunit interfaces between CII domains are the sites of autokinase and autophosphatase activities. Hydrolysis of ATP correlates with phosphorylation at threonine and serine sites across subunits in an orchestrated manner, such that first T432 and then S431 are phosphorylated, followed by dephosphorylation of these residues in the same order. Although structural work has provided insight into the mechanisms of ATPase and kinase, the location and mechanism of the phosphatase have remained enigmatic. From the available experimental data based on a range of approaches, including KaiC crystal structures and small-angle X-ray scattering models, metal ion dependence, site-directed mutagenesis (i.e., E318, the general base), and measurements of the associated clock periods, phosphorylation patterns, and dephosphorylation courses as well as a lack of sequence motifs in KaiC that are typically associated with known phosphatases, we hypothesized that KaiCII makes use of the same active site for phosphorylation and dephosphorlyation. We observed that wild-type KaiC (wt-KaiC) exhibits an ATP synthase activity that is significantly reduced in the T432A/S431A mutant. We interpret the first observation as evidence that KaiCII is a phosphotransferase instead of a phosphatase and the second that the enzyme is capable of generating ATP, both from ADP and P(i) (in a reversal of the ATPase reaction) and from ADP and P-T432/P-S431 (dephosphorylation). This new concept regarding the mechanism of dephosphorylation is also supported by the

  1. Dephosphorylation of the Core Clock Protein KaiC in the Cyanobacterial KaiABC Circadian Oscillator Proceeds via an ATP Synthase Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Egli, Martin; Mori, Tetsuya; Pattanayek, Rekha; Xu, Yao; Qin, Ximing; Johnson, Carl H.

    2012-01-01

    The circadian clock of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus can be reconstituted in vitro from three proteins, KaiA, KaiB and KaiC in the presence of ATP, to tick in a temperature-compensated manner. KaiC, the central cog of this oscillator, forms a homo-hexamer with twelve ATP molecules bound between its N- and C-terminal domains and exhibits unusual properties. Both the N-terminal (CI) and C-terminal (CII) domains harbor ATPase activity and the subunit interfaces between CII domains are the sites of auto-kinase and auto-phosphatase activities. Hydrolysis of ATP correlates with phosphorylation at threonine and serine sites across subunits in an orchestrated manner, such that first T432 and then S431 is phosphorylated, followed by dephosphorylation of these residues in the same order. Although structural work has provided insight into the mechanisms of ATPase and kinase, the location and mechanism of the phosphatase have remained enigmatic. From the available experimental data based on a range of approaches, including KaiC crystal structures and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) models, metal ion dependence, site-directed mutagenesis (i.e. E318, the general base) and measurements of the associated clock periods, phosphorylation patterns and dephosphorylation courses as well as a lack of sequence motifs in KaiC that are typically associated with known phosphatases, we hypothesized that KaiCII makes use of the same active site for phosphorylation and dephosphorlyation. We observed that wt-KaiC exhibits an ATP synthase activity that is significantly reduced in the T432A/S431A mutant. We interpret the first observation as evidence that KaiCII is a phospho-transferase instead of a phosphatase and the second that the enzyme is capable of generating ATP, both from ADP + Pi (in a reversal of the ATPase reaction), and ADP + P-T432/P-S431 (dephosphorylation). This new concept regarding the mechanism of dephosphorylation is also supported by strikingly similar make

  2. Circadian Clocks, Stress, and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Dumbell, Rebecca; Matveeva, Olga; Oster, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, molecular circadian clocks are present in most cells of the body, and this circadian network plays an important role in synchronizing physiological processes and behaviors to the appropriate time of day. The hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal endocrine axis regulates the response to acute and chronic stress, acting through its final effectors – glucocorticoids – released from the adrenal cortex. Glucocorticoid secretion, characterized by its circadian rhythm, has an important role in synchronizing peripheral clocks and rhythms downstream of the master circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Finally, glucocorticoids are powerfully anti-inflammatory, and recent work has implicated the circadian clock in various aspects and cells of the immune system, suggesting a tight interplay of stress and circadian systems in the regulation of immunity. This mini-review summarizes our current understanding of the role of the circadian clock network in both the HPA axis and the immune system, and discusses their interactions. PMID:27199894

  3. Circadian Mechanisms Underlying Reward-Related Neurophysiology and Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Puja K.; McClung, Colleen A.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence from clinical and preclinical research provides an undeniable link between disruptions in the circadian clock and the development of psychiatric diseases, including mood and substance abuse disorders. The molecular clock, which controls daily patterns of physiological and behavioral activity in living organisms, when desynchronized, may exacerbate or precipitate symptoms of psychiatric illness. One of the outstanding questions remaining in this field is that of cause and effect in the relationship between circadian rhythm disruption and psychiatric disease. Focus has recently turned to uncovering the role of circadian proteins beyond the maintenance of homeostatic systems and outside of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master pacemaker region of the brain. In this regard, several groups, including our own, have sought to understand how circadian proteins regulate mechanisms of synaptic plasticity and neurotransmitter signaling in mesocorticolimbic brain regions, which are known to be critically involved in reward processing and mood. This regulation can come in the form of direct transcriptional control of genes central to mood and reward, including those associated with dopaminergic activity in the midbrain. It can also be seen at the circuit level through indirect connections of mesocorticolimbic regions with the SCN. Circadian misalignment paradigms as well as genetic models of circadian disruption have helped to elucidate some of the complex interactions between these systems and neural activity influencing behavior. In this review, we explore findings that link circadian protein function with synaptic adaptations underlying plasticity as it may contribute to the development of mood disorders and addiction. In light of recent advances in technology and sophisticated methods for molecular and circuit-level interrogation, we propose future directions aimed at teasing apart mechanisms through which the circadian system modulates mood and reward

  4. Circadian Mechanisms Underlying Reward-Related Neurophysiology and Synaptic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Puja K; McClung, Colleen A

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from clinical and preclinical research provides an undeniable link between disruptions in the circadian clock and the development of psychiatric diseases, including mood and substance abuse disorders. The molecular clock, which controls daily patterns of physiological and behavioral activity in living organisms, when desynchronized, may exacerbate or precipitate symptoms of psychiatric illness. One of the outstanding questions remaining in this field is that of cause and effect in the relationship between circadian rhythm disruption and psychiatric disease. Focus has recently turned to uncovering the role of circadian proteins beyond the maintenance of homeostatic systems and outside of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master pacemaker region of the brain. In this regard, several groups, including our own, have sought to understand how circadian proteins regulate mechanisms of synaptic plasticity and neurotransmitter signaling in mesocorticolimbic brain regions, which are known to be critically involved in reward processing and mood. This regulation can come in the form of direct transcriptional control of genes central to mood and reward, including those associated with dopaminergic activity in the midbrain. It can also be seen at the circuit level through indirect connections of mesocorticolimbic regions with the SCN. Circadian misalignment paradigms as well as genetic models of circadian disruption have helped to elucidate some of the complex interactions between these systems and neural activity influencing behavior. In this review, we explore findings that link circadian protein function with synaptic adaptations underlying plasticity as it may contribute to the development of mood disorders and addiction. In light of recent advances in technology and sophisticated methods for molecular and circuit-level interrogation, we propose future directions aimed at teasing apart mechanisms through which the circadian system modulates mood and reward

  5. Biological Clocks & Circadian Rhythms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Laura; Jones, M. Gail

    2009-01-01

    The study of biological clocks and circadian rhythms is an excellent way to address the inquiry strand in the National Science Education Standards (NSES) (NRC 1996). Students can study these everyday phenomena by designing experiments, gathering and analyzing data, and generating new experiments. As students explore biological clocks and circadian…

  6. A novel circadianly expressed Drosophila melanogaster gene dependent on the period gene for its rhythmic expression.

    PubMed Central

    Van Gelder, R N; Krasnow, M A

    1996-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster period (per) gene is required for expression of endogenous circadian rhythms of locomotion and eclosion. per mRNA is expressed with a circadian rhythm that is dependent on Per protein; this feedback loop has been proposed to be essential to the central circadian pacemaker. This model would suggest the Per protein also controls the circadian expression of other genetic loci to generate circadian behavior and physiology. In this paper we describe Dreg-5, a gene whose mRNA is expressed in fly heads with a circadian rhythm nearly identical to that of the per gene. Dreg-5 mRNA continues to cycle in phase with that of per mRNA in conditions of total darkness and also when the daily feeding time is altered. Like per mRNA, Dreg-5 mRNA is not expressed rhythmically in per null mutant flies. Dreg-5 encodes a novel 298 residue protein and Dreg-5 protein isoforms also oscillate in abundance with a circadian rhythm. The phase of Dreg-5 protein oscillation, however, is different from that of Per protein expression, suggesting that Dreg-5 and per have common translational but different post-translational control mechanisms. These results demonstrate that the per gene is capable of modulating the rhythmic expression of other genes; this activity may form the basis of the output of circadian rhythmicity in Drosophila. Images PMID:8612586

  7. Chronic exposure to low doses of pharmaceuticals disturbs the hepatic expression of circadian genes in lean and obese mice

    SciTech Connect

    Anthérieu, Sébastien; Le Guillou, Dounia; Coulouarn, Cédric; Begriche, Karima; Trak-Smayra, Viviane; Martinais, Sophie; Porceddu, Mathieu; Robin, Marie-Anne; Fromenty, Bernard

    2014-04-01

    Drinking water can be contaminated with pharmaceuticals. However, it is uncertain whether this contamination can be harmful for the liver, especially during obesity. Hence, the goal of our study was to determine whether chronic exposure to low doses of pharmaceuticals could have deleterious effects on livers of lean and obese mice. To this end, lean and ob/ob male mice were treated for 4 months with a mixture of 11 drugs provided in drinking water at concentrations ranging from 10 to 10{sup 6} ng/l. At the end of the treatment, some liver and plasma abnormalities were observed in ob/ob mice treated with the cocktail containing 10{sup 6} ng/l of each drug. For this dosage, a gene expression analysis by microarray showed altered expression of circadian genes (e.g. Bmal1, Dbp, Cry1) in lean and obese mice. RT-qPCR analyses carried out in all groups of animals confirmed that expression of 8 different circadian genes was modified in a dose-dependent manner. For some genes, a significant modification was observed for dosages as low as 10{sup 2}–10{sup 3} ng/l. Drug mixture and obesity presented an additive effect on circadian gene expression. These data were validated in an independent study performed in female mice. Thus, our study showed that chronic exposure to trace pharmaceuticals disturbed hepatic expression of circadian genes, particularly in obese mice. Because some of the 11 drugs can be found in drinking water at such concentrations (e.g. acetaminophen, carbamazepine, ibuprofen) our data could be relevant in environmental toxicology, especially for obese individuals exposed to these contaminants. - Highlights: • The contamination of drinking water with drugs may have harmful effects on health. • Some drugs can be more hepatotoxic in the context of obesity and fatty liver. • Effects of chronic exposure of trace drugs were studied in lean and obese mouse liver. Drugs and obesity present additive effects on circadian gene expression and toxicity. • Trace

  8. Circadian clocks and cell division

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Evolution has selected a system of two intertwined cell cycles: the cell division cycle (CDC) and the daily (circadian) biological clock. The circadian clock keeps track of solar time and programs biological processes to occur at environmentally appropriate times. One of these processes is the CDC, which is often gated by the circadian clock. The intermeshing of these two cell cycles is probably responsible for the observation that disruption of the circadian system enhances susceptibility to some kinds of cancer. The core mechanism underlying the circadian clockwork has been thought to be a transcription and translation feedback loop (TTFL), but recent evidence from studies with cyanobacteria, synthetic oscillators and immortalized cell lines suggests that the core circadian pacemaking mechanism that gates cell division in mammalian cells could be a post-translational oscillator (PTO). PMID:20890114

  9. Best practices for fluorescence microscopy of the cyanobacterial circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Susan E.; Erb, Marcella L.; Pogliano, Joe; Golden, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary This chapter deals with methods of monitoring the subcellular localization of proteins in single cells in the circadian model system Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. While genetic, biochemical and structural insights into the cyanobacterial circadian oscillator have flourished, difficulties in achieving informative subcellular imaging in cyanobacterial cells have delayed progress of the cell biology aspects of the clock. Here, we describe best practices for using fluorescent protein tags to monitor localization. Specifically we address how to vet fusion proteins and overcome challenges in microscopic imaging of very small autofluorescent cells. PMID:25662459

  10. Circadian Timing in the Lung; A Specific Role for Bronchiolar Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, J. E.; Beesley, S.; Plumb, J.; Singh, D.; Farrow, S.; Ray, D. W.; Loudon, A. S. I.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the core circadian oscillator, located within the suprachiasmatic nucleus, numerous peripheral tissues possess self-sustaining circadian timers. In vivo these are entrained and temporally synchronized by signals conveyed from the core oscillator. In the present study, we examine circadian timing in the lung, determine the cellular localization of core clock proteins in both mouse and human lung tissue, and establish the effects of glucocorticoids (widely used in the treatment of asthma) on the pulmonary clock. Using organotypic lung slices prepared from transgenic mPER2::Luc mice, luciferase levels, which report PER2 expression, were measured over a number of days. We demonstrate a robust circadian rhythm in the mouse lung that is responsive to glucocorticoids. Immunohistochemical techniques were used to localize specific expression of core clock proteins, and the glucocorticoid receptor, to the epithelial cells lining the bronchioles in both mouse and human lung. In the mouse, these were established to be Clara cells. Murine Clara cells retained circadian rhythmicity when grown as a pure population in culture. Furthermore, selective ablation of Clara cells resulted in the loss of circadian rhythm in lung slices, demonstrating the importance of this cell type in maintaining overall pulmonary circadian rhythmicity. In summary, we demonstrate that Clara cells are critical for maintaining coherent circadian oscillations in lung tissue. Their coexpression of the glucocorticoid receptor and core clock components establishes them as a likely interface between humoral suprachiasmatic nucleus output and circadian lung physiology. PMID:18787022

  11. Circadian Regulation of Synaptic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Frank, Marcos G

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms refer to oscillations in biological processes with a period of approximately 24 h. In addition to the sleep/wake cycle, there are circadian rhythms in metabolism, body temperature, hormone output, organ function and gene expression. There is also evidence of circadian rhythms in synaptic plasticity, in some cases driven by a master central clock and in other cases by peripheral clocks. In this article, I review the evidence for circadian influences on synaptic plasticity. I also discuss ways to disentangle the effects of brain state and rhythms on synaptic plasticity. PMID:27420105

  12. Postoperative circadian disturbances.

    PubMed

    Gögenur, Ismail

    2010-12-01

    An increasing number of studies have shown that circadian variation in the excretion of hormones, the sleep wake circle, the core body temperature rhythm, the tone of the autonomic nervous system and the activity rhythm are important both in health and in disease processes. An increasing attention has also been directed towards the circadian variation in endogenous rhythms in relation to surgery. The attention has been directed to the question whether the circadian variation in endogenous rhythms can affect postoperative recovery, morbidity and mortality. Based on the lack of studies where these endogenous rhythms have been investigated in relation to surgery we performed a series of studies exploring different endogenous rhythms and factors affecting these rhythms. We also wanted to examine whether the disturbances in the postoperative circadian rhythms could be correlated to postoperative recovery parameters, and if pharmacological administration of chronobiotics could improve postoperative recovery. Circadian rhythm disturbances were found in all the examined endogenous rhythms. A delay was found in the endogenous rhythm of plasma melatonin and excretion of the metabolite of melatonin (AMT6s) in urine the first night after both minor and major surgery. This delay after major surgery was correlated to the duration of surgery. The amplitude in the melatonin rhythm was unchanged the first night but increased in the second night after major surgery. The amplitude in AMT6s was reduced the first night after minimally invasive surgery. The core body temperature rhythm was disturbed after both major and minor surgery. There was a change in the sleep wake cycle with a significantly increased duration of REM-sleep in the day and evening time after major surgery compared with preoperatively. There was also a shift in the autonomic nervous balance after major surgery with a significantly increased number of myocardial ischaemic episodes during the nighttime period. The

  13. Sleep and circadian rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, Timothy H.

    1991-01-01

    Three interacting processes are involved in the preservation of circadian rhythms: (1) endogenous rhythm generation mechanisms, (2) entrainment mechanisms to keep these rhythms 'on track', and (3) exogenous masking processes stemming from changes in environment and bahavior. These processes, particularly the latter two, can be dramatically affected in individuals of advanced age and in space travelers, with a consequent disruption in sleep and daytime functioning. This paper presents results of a phase-shift experiment investigating the age-related effects of the exogeneous component of circadian rhythms in various physiological and psychological functions by comparing these functions in middle aged and old subjects. Dramatic differences were found between the two age groups in measures of sleep, mood, activation, and performance efficiency.

  14. CIRCADIAN REGULATION OF METABOLISM

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Shannon M.; Udoh, Uduak S.; Young, Martin E.

    2014-01-01

    In association with sleep/wake and fasting/feeding cycles, organisms experience dramatic oscillations in energetic demands and nutrient supply. It is therefore not surprising that various metabolic parameters, ranging from the activity status of molecular energy sensors to circulating nutrient levels, oscillate in time-of-day-dependent manners. It has become increasingly clear that rhythms in metabolic processes are not simply in response to daily environmental/behavioral influences, but are driven in part by cell autonomous circadian clocks. By synchronizing the cell with its environment, clocks modulate a host of metabolic processes in a temporally appropriate manner. The purpose of this article is to review current understanding of the interplay between circadian clocks and metabolism, in addition to the pathophysiologic consequences of disruption of this molecular mechanism, in terms of cardiometabolic disease development. PMID:24928941

  15. Temperature compensation and temperature sensation in the circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Philip B.; Young, Michael W.; Siggia, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    All known circadian clocks have an endogenous period that is remarkably insensitive to temperature, a property known as temperature compensation, while at the same time being readily entrained by a diurnal temperature oscillation. Although temperature compensation and entrainment are defining features of circadian clocks, their mechanisms remain poorly understood. Most models presume that multiple steps in the circadian cycle are temperature-dependent, thus facilitating temperature entrainment, but then insist that the effect of changes around the cycle sums to zero to enforce temperature compensation. An alternative theory proposes that the circadian oscillator evolved from an adaptive temperature sensor: a gene circuit that responds only to temperature changes. This theory implies that temperature changes should linearly rescale the amplitudes of clock component oscillations but leave phase relationships and shapes unchanged. We show using timeless luciferase reporter measurements and Western blots against TIMELESS protein that this prediction is satisfied by the Drosophila circadian clock. We also review evidence for pathways that couple temperature to the circadian clock, and show previously unidentified evidence for coupling between the Drosophila clock and the heat-shock pathway. PMID:26578788

  16. Circadian rhythms have broad implications for understanding brain and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Rae; Kriegsfeld, Lance J.

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are generated by an endogenously organized timing system that drives daily rhythms in behavior, physiology and metabolism. In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is the locus of a master circadian clock. The SCN is synchronized to environmental changes in the light:dark cycle by direct, monosynaptic innervation via the retino-hypothalamic tract. In turn, the SCN coordinates the rhythmic activities of innumerable subordinate clocks in virtually all bodily tissues and organs. The core molecular clockwork is composed of a transcriptional/post-translational feedback loop in which clock genes and their protein products periodically suppress their own transcription. This primary loop connects to downstream output genes by additional, interlocked transcriptional feedback loops to create tissue-specific ‘circadian transcriptomes’. Signals from peripheral tissues inform the SCN of the internal state of the organism and the brain’s master clock is modified accordingly. A consequence of this hierarchical, multilevel feedback system is that there are ubiquitous effects of circadian timing on genetic and metabolic responses throughout the body. This overview examines landmark studies in the history of the study of circadian timing system, and highlights our current understanding of the operation of circadian clocks with a focus on topics of interest to the neuroscience community. PMID:24799154

  17. Caenorhabditis elegans opens up new insights into circadian clock mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Kenji; Saigusa, Tetsu; Tamai, Yoichi

    2005-01-01

    The roundworm, Caenorhabditis elegans, is known to carry homologues of clock genes such as per (=period) and tim (=timeless), which constitute the core of the circadian clock in Drosophila and mammals: lin-42 and tim-1. Analyses using WormBase (C. elegans gene database) have identified with relatively high identity analogous of the clock genes recognized in Drosophila and mammals, with the notable exception of cry (=cryptochrome), which is lacking in C. elegans. All of these C. elegans cognates of the clock genes appear to belong to members of the PAS-superfamily and to participate in development or responsiveness to the environment but apparently are not involved in the C. elegans circadian clock. Nevertheless, C. elegans exhibits convincing circadian rhythms in locomotor behavior in the adult stage and in resistance to hyperosmotic stress in starved larvae (L1) after hatching, indicating that it has a circadian clock with a core design entirely different from that of Drosophila and mammals. Here two possibilities are considered. First, the core of the C. elegans circadian clock includes transcriptional/translational feedback loops between genes and their protein products that are entirely different from those of Drosophila and mammals. Second, a more basic principle such as homeostasis governs the circadian cellular physiology, and was established primarily to minimize the accumulation of DNA damage in response to an environment cycling at 24 h intervals. PMID:15865318

  18. Circadian clock system in the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Fukada, Yoshitaka; Okano, Toshiyuki

    2002-02-01

    The pineal gland is a neuroendocrine organ that functions as a central circadian oscillator in a variety of nonmammalian vertebrates. In many cases, the pineal gland retains photic input and endocrinal-output pathways both linked tightly to the oscillator. This contrasts well with the mammalian pineal gland equipped only with the output of melatonin production that is subject to neuronal regulation by central circadian oscillator located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Molecular studies on animal clock genes were performed first in Drosophila and later developed in rodents. More recently, clock genes such as Per, Cry, Clock, and Bmal have been found in a variety of vertebrate clock structures including the avian pineal gland. The profiles of the temporal change of the clock gene expression in the avian pineal gland are more similar to those in the mammalian SCN rather than to those in the mammalian pineal gland. Avian pineal gland and mammalian SCN seem to share a fundamental molecular framework of the clock oscillator composed of a transcription/translation-based autoregulatory feedback loop. The circadian time-keeping mechanism also requires several post-translational events, such as protein translocation and degradation processes, in which protein phosphorylation plays a very important role for the stable 24-h cycling of the oscillator and/or the photic-input pathway for entrainment of the clock. PMID:11890455

  19. Crystal Structure of the Redox-Active Cofactor DBMIB Bound to Circadian Clock Protein KaiA and Structural Basis for DBMIB’s Ability to Prevent Stimulation of KaiC Phosphorylation by KaiA

    PubMed Central

    Pattanayek, Rekha; Sidiqi, Said K.; Egli, Martin

    2012-01-01

    KaiA protein that stimulates KaiC phosphorylation in the cyanobacterial circadian clock was recently shown to be destabilized by dibromothymoquinone (DBMIB), thus revealing KaiA as a sensor of the plastoquinone (PQ) redox state and suggesting an indirect control of the clock by light through PQ redox changes. Here we show using X-ray crystallography that several DBMIBs are bound to KaiA dimer. Some binding modes are consistent with oligomerization of N-terminal KaiA pseudoreceiver domains and/or reduced inter-domain flexibility. DBMIB bound to the C-terminal KaiA (C-KaiA) domain and limited stimulation of KaiC kinase activity by C-KaiA in the presence of DBMIB demonstrate that the cofactor may weakly inhibit KaiA-KaiC binding. PMID:23020633

  20. The Catalytic and Non-catalytic Functions of the Brahma Chromatin-Remodeling Protein Collaborate to Fine-Tune Circadian Transcription in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Rosanna S.; Li, Ying H.; Lei, Anna J.; Edery, Isaac; Chiu, Joanna C.

    2015-01-01

    Daily rhythms in gene expression play a critical role in the progression of circadian clocks, and are under regulation by transcription factor binding, histone modifications, RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) recruitment and elongation, and post-transcriptional mechanisms. Although previous studies have shown that clock-controlled genes exhibit rhythmic chromatin modifications, less is known about the functions performed by chromatin remodelers in animal clockwork. Here we have identified the Brahma (Brm) complex as a regulator of the Drosophila clock. In Drosophila, CLOCK (CLK) is the master transcriptional activator driving cyclical gene expression by participating in an auto-inhibitory feedback loop that involves stimulating the expression of the main negative regulators, period (per) and timeless (tim). BRM functions catalytically to increase nucleosome density at the promoters of per and tim, creating an overall restrictive chromatin landscape to limit transcriptional output during the active phase of cycling gene expression. In addition, the non-catalytic function of BRM regulates the level and binding of CLK to target promoters and maintains transient RNAPII stalling at the per promoter, likely by recruiting repressive and pausing factors. By disentangling its catalytic versus non-catalytic functions at the promoters of CLK target genes, we uncovered a multi-leveled mechanism in which BRM fine-tunes circadian transcription. PMID:26132408

  1. Circadian genes and lithium response in bipolar disorders: associations with PPARGC1A (PGC-1α) and RORA.

    PubMed

    Geoffroy, P A; Etain, B; Lajnef, M; Zerdazi, E-H; Brichant-Petitjean, C; Heilbronner, U; Hou, L; Degenhardt, F; Rietschel, M; McMahon, F J; Schulze, T G; Jamain, S; Marie-Claire, C; Bellivier, F

    2016-09-01

    Preliminary studies suggest that lithium (Li) response might be associated with some circadian gene polymorphisms, we therefore performed a pharmacogenetic study on the core clock genes in two independent samples suffering from bipolar disorder (BD) and thoroughly characterized for their Li response. Two independent Caucasian samples (165 and 58 bipolar patients) treated with Li were selected from samples recruited in a French multicenter study and assessed for their Li response using the Alda scale. The two samples were genotyped using the Human660 (H660) and OmniExpress (OE) BeadChips and gene-based association analyses of 22 core clock genes were conducted. In the first sample (H660 chip), the RAR-related orphan receptor-a gene (RORA) and the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma, Coactivator 1 Alpha gene (PPARGC1A or PGC-1α) were significantly associated with the Li response (empirical P-value = 0.0015 and 0.04, respectively), and remained significant only for RORA after Bonferroni correction. In the second sample (OE chip), PPARGC1A was significantly associated with the Li response (empirical P-value = 0.04), and did not remain significant after Bonferroni correction. PPARGC1A is a master regulator of mitochondrial function and a key component of the endogenous clock that stimulates the expression of Bmal1 and Rev-erb-alpha through coactivation of RORA. Although the observed associations deserve further replication and investigation, our results suggest genetic associations between Li response and these two close biological partners: PPARGC1A and RORA involved in circadian rhythms and bioenergetics processes in Li response. PMID:27324142

  2. Influence of beta-blockers on the myocardial mRNA expressions of circadian clock- and metabolism-related genes.

    PubMed

    Ushijima, Kentarou; Maekawa, Tomohiro; Ishikawa-Kobayashi, Eiko; Ando, Hitoshi; Shiga, Tsuyoshi; Fujimura, Akio

    2013-01-01

    Daily rhythms are regulated by a master clock-system in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and by a peripheral clock-system in each organ. Because norepinephrine is one of the timekeepers for the myocardial circadian clock that influences cardiac metabolism, it is speculated that a beta-blocker may affect the circadian clock and metabolism in heart tissue. In this study, thirty mg/kg/day of propranolol (a lipophilic beta-blocker) or atenolol (a hydrophilic beta-blocker) was given orally to Wistar rats for 4 weeks. The mRNA expressions of Bmal1 and E4BP4 in heart tissue were suppressed by the beta-blockers. However, the mRNA expressions of these clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus were unchanged. Myocardial mRNA expressions of lactate dehydrogenase a and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 were also suppressed by the beta-blockers. In addition, ATP content in heart tissue was significantly elevated by the beta-blockers throughout 24 hours. The effects of propranolol and atenolol did not differ significantly. This study showed for the first time that a beta-blocker affects myocardial clock gene expression. Propranolol and atenolol increased ATP content in heart tissue throughout 24 hours. The influences of beta-blockers may be negligible on the SCN, and may be independent of lipid solubility on heart tissue. It is well known that these drugs exert a protective effect against myocardial ischemia, which may be mediated by an increase in the preservation of myocardial ATP. PMID:23394803

  3. The clock gene cycle plays an important role in the circadian clock of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Uryu, Outa; Karpova, Svetlana G; Tomioka, Kenji

    2013-07-01

    To dissect the molecular oscillatory mechanism of the circadian clock in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, we have cloned a cDNA of the clock gene cycle (Gb'cyc) and analyzed its structure and function. Gb'cyc contains four functional domains, i.e. bHLH, PAS-A, PAS-B and BCTR domains, and is expressed rhythmically in light dark cycles, peaking at mid night. The RNA interference (RNAi) of Clock (Gb'Clk) and period (Gb'per) reduced the Gb'cyc mRNA levels and abolished the rhythmic expression, suggesting that the rhythmic expression of Gb'cyc is regulated by a mechanism including Gb'Clk and Gb'per. These features are more similar to those of mammalian orthologue of cyc (Bmal1) than those of Drosophila cyc. A single treatment with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) of Gb'cyc effectively knocked down the Gb'cyc mRNA level and abolished its rhythmic expression. The cyc RNAi failed to disrupt the locomotor rhythm, but lengthened its free-running period in constant darkness (DD). It is thus likely that Gb'cyc is involved in the circadian clock machinery of the cricket. The cyc RNAi crickets showed a rhythmic expression of Gb'per and timeless (Gb'tim) in the optic lobe in DD, explaining the persistence of the locomotor rhythm. Surprisingly, cyc RNAi revealed a rhythmic expression of Gb'Clk in DD which is otherwise rather constitutively expressed in the optic lobe. These facts suggest that the cricket might have a unique clock oscillatory mechanism in which both Gb'cyc and Gb'Clk are rhythmically controlled and that under abundant expression of Gb'cyc the rhythmic expression of Gb'Clk may be concealed. PMID:23665334

  4. Circadian gene variants in cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Humans as diurnal beings are active during the day and rest at night. This daily oscillation of behavior and physiology is driven by an endogenous circadian clock not environmental cues. In modern societies, changes in lifestyle have led to a frequent disruption of the endogenous circadian homeostas...

  5. Circadian Disorganization Alters Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Robin M.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Green, Stefan J.; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Turek, Fred W.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis and circadian rhythm disruption are associated with similar diseases including obesity, metabolic syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease. Despite the overlap, the potential relationship between circadian disorganization and dysbiosis is unknown; thus, in the present study, a model of chronic circadian disruption was used to determine the impact on the intestinal microbiome. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent once weekly phase reversals of the light:dark cycle (i.e., circadian rhythm disrupted mice) to determine the impact of circadian rhythm disruption on the intestinal microbiome and were fed either standard chow or a high-fat, high-sugar diet to determine how diet influences circadian disruption-induced effects on the microbiome. Weekly phase reversals of the light:dark (LD) cycle did not alter the microbiome in mice fed standard chow; however, mice fed a high-fat, high-sugar diet in conjunction with phase shifts in the light:dark cycle had significantly altered microbiota. While it is yet to be established if some of the adverse effects associated with circadian disorganization in humans (e.g., shift workers, travelers moving across time zones, and in individuals with social jet lag) are mediated by dysbiosis, the current study demonstrates that circadian disorganization can impact the intestinal microbiota which may have implications for inflammatory diseases. PMID:24848969

  6. Circadian rhythms. Atomic-scale origins of slowness in the cyanobacterial circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Abe, Jun; Hiyama, Takuya B; Mukaiyama, Atsushi; Son, Seyoung; Mori, Toshifumi; Saito, Shinji; Osako, Masato; Wolanin, Julie; Yamashita, Eiki; Kondo, Takao; Akiyama, Shuji

    2015-07-17

    Circadian clocks generate slow and ordered cellular dynamics but consist of fast-moving bio-macromolecules; consequently, the origins of the overall slowness remain unclear. We identified the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) catalytic region [adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase)] in the amino-terminal half of the clock protein KaiC as the minimal pacemaker that controls the in vivo frequency of the cyanobacterial clock. Crystal structures of the ATPase revealed that the slowness of this ATPase arises from sequestration of a lytic water molecule in an unfavorable position and coupling of ATP hydrolysis to a peptide isomerization with high activation energy. The slow ATPase is coupled with another ATPase catalyzing autodephosphorylation in the carboxyl-terminal half of KaiC, yielding the circadian response frequency of intermolecular interactions with other clock-related proteins that influences the transcription and translation cycle. PMID:26113637

  7. Adaptive temperature compensation in circadian oscillations.

    PubMed

    François, Paul; Despierre, Nicolas; Siggia, Eric D

    2012-01-01

    A temperature independent period and temperature entrainment are two defining features of circadian oscillators. A default model of distributed temperature compensation satisfies these basic facts yet is not easily reconciled with other properties of circadian clocks, such as many mutants with altered but temperature compensated periods. The default model also suggests that the shape of the circadian limit cycle and the associated phase response curves (PRC) will vary since the average concentrations of clock proteins change with temperature. We propose an alternative class of models where the twin properties of a fixed period and entrainment are structural and arise from an underlying adaptive system that buffers temperature changes. These models are distinguished by a PRC whose shape is temperature independent and orbits whose extrema are temperature independent. They are readily evolved by local, hill climbing, optimization of gene networks for a common quality measure of biological clocks, phase anticipation. Interestingly a standard realization of the Goodwin model for temperature compensation displays properties of adaptive rather than distributed temperature compensation. PMID:22807663

  8. Adaptive Temperature Compensation in Circadian Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    François, Paul; Despierre, Nicolas; Siggia, Eric D.

    2012-01-01

    A temperature independent period and temperature entrainment are two defining features of circadian oscillators. A default model of distributed temperature compensation satisfies these basic facts yet is not easily reconciled with other properties of circadian clocks, such as many mutants with altered but temperature compensated periods. The default model also suggests that the shape of the circadian limit cycle and the associated phase response curves (PRC) will vary since the average concentrations of clock proteins change with temperature. We propose an alternative class of models where the twin properties of a fixed period and entrainment are structural and arise from an underlying adaptive system that buffers temperature changes. These models are distinguished by a PRC whose shape is temperature independent and orbits whose extrema are temperature independent. They are readily evolved by local, hill climbing, optimization of gene networks for a common quality measure of biological clocks, phase anticipation. Interestingly a standard realization of the Goodwin model for temperature compensation displays properties of adaptive rather than distributed temperature compensation. PMID:22807663

  9. The systemic control of circadian gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gerber, A; Saini, C; Curie, T; Emmenegger, Y; Rando, G; Gosselin, P; Gotic, I; Gos, P; Franken, P; Schibler, U

    2015-09-01

    The mammalian circadian timing system consists of a central pacemaker in the brain's suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and subsidiary oscillators in nearly all body cells. The SCN clock, which is adjusted to geophysical time by the photoperiod, synchronizes peripheral clocks through a wide variety of systemic cues. The latter include signals depending on feeding cycles, glucocorticoid hormones, rhythmic blood-borne signals eliciting daily changes in actin dynamics and serum response factor (SRF) activity, and sensors of body temperature rhythms, such as heat shock transcription factors and the cold-inducible RNA-binding protein CIRP. To study these systemic signalling pathways, we designed and engineered a novel, highly photosensitive apparatus, dubbed RT-Biolumicorder. This device enables us to record circadian luciferase reporter gene expression in the liver and other organs of freely moving mice over months in real time. Owing to the multitude of systemic signalling pathway involved in the phase resetting of peripheral clocks the disruption of any particular one has only minor effects on the steady state phase of circadian gene expression in organs such as the liver. Nonetheless, the implication of specific pathways in the synchronization of clock gene expression can readily be assessed by monitoring the phase-shifting kinetics using the RT-Biolumicorder. PMID:26332965

  10. Metabolic Cycles in Yeast Share Features Conserved among Circadian Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Causton, Helen C.; Feeney, Kevin A.; Ziegler, Christine A.; O’Neill, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cell-autonomous circadian rhythms allow organisms to temporally orchestrate their internal state to anticipate and/or resonate with the external environment [1, 2]. Although ∼24-hr periodicity is observed across aerobic eukaryotes, the central mechanism has been hard to dissect because few simple models exist, and known clock proteins are not conserved across phylogenetic kingdoms [1, 3, 4]. In contrast, contributions to circadian rhythmicity made by a handful of post-translational mechanisms, such as phosphorylation of clock proteins by casein kinase 1 (CK1) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), appear conserved among phyla [3, 5]. These kinases have many other essential cellular functions and are better conserved in their contribution to timekeeping than any of the clock proteins they phosphorylate [6]. Rhythmic oscillations in cellular redox state are another universal feature of circadian timekeeping, e.g., over-oxidation cycles of abundant peroxiredoxin proteins [7–9]. Here, we use comparative chronobiology to distinguish fundamental clock mechanisms from species and/or tissue-specific adaptations and thereby identify features shared between circadian rhythms in mammalian cells and non-circadian temperature-compensated respiratory oscillations in budding yeast [10]. We find that both types of oscillations are coupled with the cell division cycle, exhibit period determination by CK1 and GSK3, and have peroxiredoxin over-oxidation cycles. We also explore how peroxiredoxins contribute to YROs. Our data point to common mechanisms underlying both YROs and circadian rhythms and suggest two interpretations: either certain biochemical systems are simply permissive for cellular oscillations (with frequencies from hours to days) or this commonality arose via divergence from an ancestral cellular clock. PMID:25866393

  11. Metabolic Cycles in Yeast Share Features Conserved among Circadian Rhythms.

    PubMed

    Causton, Helen C; Feeney, Kevin A; Ziegler, Christine A; O'Neill, John S

    2015-04-20

    Cell-autonomous circadian rhythms allow organisms to temporally orchestrate their internal state to anticipate and/or resonate with the external environment. Although ∼24-hr periodicity is observed across aerobic eukaryotes, the central mechanism has been hard to dissect because few simple models exist, and known clock proteins are not conserved across phylogenetic kingdoms. In contrast, contributions to circadian rhythmicity made by a handful of post-translational mechanisms, such as phosphorylation of clock proteins by casein kinase 1 (CK1) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), appear conserved among phyla. These kinases have many other essential cellular functions and are better conserved in their contribution to timekeeping than any of the clock proteins they phosphorylate. Rhythmic oscillations in cellular redox state are another universal feature of circadian timekeeping, e.g., over-oxidation cycles of abundant peroxiredoxin proteins. Here, we use comparative chronobiology to distinguish fundamental clock mechanisms from species and/or tissue-specific adaptations and thereby identify features shared between circadian rhythms in mammalian cells and non-circadian temperature-compensated respiratory oscillations in budding yeast. We find that both types of oscillations are coupled with the cell division cycle, exhibit period determination by CK1 and GSK3, and have peroxiredoxin over-oxidation cycles. We also explore how peroxiredoxins contribute to YROs. Our data point to common mechanisms underlying both YROs and circadian rhythms and suggest two interpretations: either certain biochemical systems are simply permissive for cellular oscillations (with frequencies from hours to days) or this commonality arose via divergence from an ancestral cellular clock. PMID:25866393

  12. Circadian gene variants in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kettner, Nicole M.; Katchy, Chinenye A.; Fu, Loning

    2014-01-01

    Humans as diurnal beings are active during the day and rest at night. This daily oscillation of behavior and physiology is driven by an endogenous circadian clock not environmental cues. In modern societies, changes in lifestyle have led to a frequent disruption of the endogenous circadian homeostasis leading to increased risk of various diseases including cancer. The clock is operated by the feedback loops of circadian genes and controls daily physiology by coupling cell proliferation and metabolism, DNA damage repair, and apoptosis in peripheral tissues with physical activity, energy homeostasis, immune and neuroendocrine functions at the organismal level. Recent studies have revealed that defects in circadian genes due to targeted gene ablation in animal models or single nucleotide polymorphism, deletion, deregulation and/or epigenetic silencing in humans are closely associated with increased risk of cancer. In addition, disruption of circadian rhythm can disrupt the molecular clock in peripheral tissues in the absence of circadian gene mutations. Circadian disruption has recently been recognized as an independent cancer risk factor. Further study of the mechanism of clock-controlled tumor suppression will have a significant impact on human health by improving the efficiencies of cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:24901356

  13. Phenotyping Circadian Rhythms in Mice.

    PubMed

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms take place with a periodicity of 24 hr, temporally following the rotation of the earth around its axis. Examples of circadian rhythms are the sleep/wake cycle, feeding, and hormone secretion. Light powerfully entrains the mammalian clock and assists in keeping animals synchronized to the 24-hour cycle of the earth by activating specific neurons in the "central pacemaker" of the brain, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Absolute periodicity of an animal can deviate slightly from 24 hr as manifest when an animal is placed into constant dark or "free-running" conditions. Simple measurements of an organism's activity in free-running conditions reveal its intrinsic circadian period. Mice are a particularly useful model for studying circadian rhythmicity due to the ease of genetic manipulation, thus identifying molecular contributors to rhythmicity. Furthermore, their small size allows for monitoring locomotion or activity in their homecage environment with relative ease. Several tasks commonly used to analyze circadian periodicity and plasticity in mice are presented here including the process of entrainment, determination of tau (period length) in free-running conditions, determination of circadian periodicity in response to light disruption (e.g., jet lag studies), and evaluation of clock plasticity in non-24-hour conditions (T-cycles). Studying the properties of circadian periods such as their phase, amplitude, and length in response to photic perturbation, can be particularly useful in understanding how humans respond to jet lag, night shifts, rotating shifts, or other transient or chronic disruption of environmental surroundings. PMID:26331760

  14. Circadian misalignment increases cardiovascular disease risk factors in humans

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Christopher J.; Purvis, Taylor E.; Hu, Kun; Scheer, Frank A. J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Shift work is a risk factor for hypertension, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease. This increased risk cannot be fully explained by classic risk factors. One of the key features of shift workers is that their behavioral and environmental cycles are typically misaligned relative to their endogenous circadian system. However, there is little information on the impact of acute circadian misalignment on cardiovascular disease risk in humans. Here we show—by using two 8-d laboratory protocols—that short-term circadian misalignment (12-h inverted behavioral and environmental cycles for three days) adversely affects cardiovascular risk factors in healthy adults. Circadian misalignment increased 24-h systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) by 3.0 mmHg and 1.5 mmHg, respectively. These results were primarily explained by an increase in blood pressure during sleep opportunities (SBP, +5.6 mmHg; DBP, +1.9 mmHg) and, to a lesser extent, by raised blood pressure during wake periods (SBP, +1.6 mmHg; DBP, +1.4 mmHg). Circadian misalignment decreased wake cardiac vagal modulation by 8–15%, as determined by heart rate variability analysis, and decreased 24-h urinary epinephrine excretion rate by 7%, without a significant effect on 24-h urinary norepinephrine excretion rate. Circadian misalignment increased 24-h serum interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, resistin, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels by 3–29%. We demonstrate that circadian misalignment per se increases blood pressure and inflammatory markers. Our findings may help explain why shift work increases hypertension, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:26858430

  15. Endocrine Effects of Circadian Disruption.

    PubMed

    Bedrosian, Tracy A; Fonken, Laura K; Nelson, Randy J

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of circadian rhythms, provoked by artificial lighting at night, inconsistent sleep-wake schedules, and transmeridian air travel, is increasingly prevalent in modern society. Desynchrony of biological rhythms from environmental light cycles has dramatic consequences for human health. In particular, disrupting homeostatic oscillations in endocrine tissues and the hormones that these tissues regulate can have cascading effects on physiology and behavior. Accumulating evidence suggests that chronic disruption of circadian organization of endocrine function may lead to metabolic, reproductive, sleep, and mood disorders. This review discusses circadian control of endocrine systems and the consequences of distorting rhythmicity of these systems. PMID:26208951

  16. Nocturia: The circadian voiding disorder

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Young Tae; Kim, Kyung Do

    2016-01-01

    Nocturia is a prevalent condition of waking to void during the night. The concept of nocturia has evolved from being a symptomatic aspect of disease associated with the prostate or bladder to a form of lower urinary tract disorder. However, recent advances in circadian biology and sleep science suggest that it might be important to consider nocturia as a form of circadian dysfunction. In the current review, nocturia is reexamined with an introduction to sleep disorders and recent findings in circadian biology in an attempt to highlight the importance of rediscovering nocturia as a problem of chronobiology. PMID:27195315

  17. Nocturia: The circadian voiding disorder.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Wook; Moon, Young Tae; Kim, Kyung Do

    2016-05-01

    Nocturia is a prevalent condition of waking to void during the night. The concept of nocturia has evolved from being a symptomatic aspect of disease associated with the prostate or bladder to a form of lower urinary tract disorder. However, recent advances in circadian biology and sleep science suggest that it might be important to consider nocturia as a form of circadian dysfunction. In the current review, nocturia is reexamined with an introduction to sleep disorders and recent findings in circadian biology in an attempt to highlight the importance of rediscovering nocturia as a problem of chronobiology. PMID:27195315

  18. Neurobiology of Circadian Rhythm Regulation.

    PubMed

    Rosenwasser, Alan M; Turek, Fred W

    2015-12-01

    Over the past few decades, multilevel research has elucidated the basic neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, and molecular neurobiology of the master circadian pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The circadian timing system is composed of a large number of cellular oscillators located in the SCN, in non-SCN brain structures, and throughout the body. Cellular-level oscillations are generated by a molecular feedback loop in which circadian clock genes rhythmically regulate their own transcription, as well as that of hundreds of clock-controlled genes. The maintenance of proper coordination within this network of cellular- and tissue-level clocks is essential for health and well-being. PMID:26568118

  19. The Circadian Clock in Murine Chondrocytes Regulates Genes Controlling Key Aspects of Cartilage Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Gossan, Nicole; Zeef, Leo; Hensman, James; Hughes, Alun; Bateman, John F; Rowley, Lynn; Little, Christopher B; Piggins, Hugh D; Rattray, Magnus; Boot-Handford, Raymond P; Meng, Qing-Jun

    2013-01-01

    ObjectiveTo characterize the circadian clock in murine cartilage tissue and identify tissue-specific clock target genes, and to investigate whether the circadian clock changes during aging or during cartilage degeneration using an experimental mouse model of osteoarthritis (OA). MethodsCartilage explants were obtained from aged and young adult mice after transduction with the circadian clock fusion protein reporter PER2::luc, and real-time bioluminescence recordings were used to characterize the properties of the clock. Time-series microarrays were performed on mouse cartilage tissue to identify genes expressed in a circadian manner. Rhythmic genes were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction using mouse tissue, primary chondrocytes, and a human chondrocyte cell line. Experimental OA was induced in mice by destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM), and articular cartilage samples were microdissected and subjected to microarray analysis. ResultsMouse cartilage tissue and a human chondrocyte cell line were found to contain intrinsic molecular circadian clocks. The cartilage clock could be reset by temperature signals, while the circadian period was temperature compensated. PER2::luc bioluminescence demonstrated that circadian oscillations were significantly lower in amplitude in cartilage from aged mice. Time-series microarray analyses of the mouse tissue identified the first circadian transcriptome in cartilage, revealing that 615 genes (∼3.9% of the expressed genes) displayed a circadian pattern of expression. This included genes involved in cartilage homeostasis and survival, as well as genes with potential importance in the pathogenesis of OA. Several clock genes were disrupted in the early stages of cartilage degeneration in the DMM mouse model of OA. ConclusionThese results reveal an autonomous circadian clock in chondrocytes that can be implicated in key aspects of cartilage biology and pathology. Consequently

  20. Role of cardiomyocyte circadian clock in myocardial metabolic adaptation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marked circadian rhythmicities in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology exist. The cardiomyocyte circadian clock has recently been linked to circadian rhythms in myocardial gene expression, metabolism, and contractile function. For instance, the cardiomyocyte circadian clock is essential f...

  1. Epigenetic and Posttranslational Modifications in Light Signal Transduction and the Circadian Clock in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Proietto, Marco; Bianchi, Michele Maria; Ballario, Paola; Brenna, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Blue light, a key abiotic signal, regulates a wide variety of physiological processes in many organisms. One of these phenomena is the circadian rhythm presents in organisms sensitive to the phase-setting effects of blue light and under control of the daily alternation of light and dark. Circadian clocks consist of autoregulatory alternating negative and positive feedback loops intimately connected with the cellular metabolism and biochemical processes. Neurospora crassa provides an excellent model for studying the molecular mechanisms involved in these phenomena. The White Collar Complex (WCC), a blue-light receptor and transcription factor of the circadian oscillator, and Frequency (FRQ), the circadian clock pacemaker, are at the core of the Neurospora circadian system. The eukaryotic circadian clock relies on transcriptional/translational feedback loops: some proteins rhythmically repress their own synthesis by inhibiting the activity of their transcriptional factors, generating self-sustained oscillations over a period of about 24 h. One of the basic mechanisms that perpetuate self-sustained oscillations is post translation modification (PTM). The acronym PTM generically indicates the addition of acetyl, methyl, sumoyl, or phosphoric groups to various types of proteins. The protein can be regulatory or enzymatic or a component of the chromatin. PTMs influence protein stability, interaction, localization, activity, and chromatin packaging. Chromatin modification and PTMs have been implicated in regulating circadian clock function in Neurospora. Research into the epigenetic control of transcription factors such as WCC has yielded new insights into the temporal modulation of light-dependent gene transcription. Here we report on epigenetic and protein PTMs in the regulation of the Neurospora crassa circadian clock. We also present a model that illustrates the molecular mechanisms at the basis of the blue light control of the circadian clock. PMID:26198228

  2. PDF receptor signaling in Drosophila contributes to both circadian and geotactic behaviors.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Inge; Vandingenen, Anick; Johnson, Erik C; Shafer, Orie T; Li, W; Trigg, J S; De Loof, Arnold; Schoofs, Liliane; Taghert, Paul H

    2005-10-20

    The neuropeptide Pigment-Dispersing Factor (PDF) is a principle transmitter regulating circadian locomotor rhythms in Drosophila. We have identified a Class II (secretin-related) G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is specifically responsive to PDF and also to calcitonin-like peptides and to PACAP. In response to PDF, the PDF receptor (PDFR) elevates cAMP levels when expressed in HEK293 cells. As predicted by in vivo studies, cotransfection of Neurofibromatosis Factor 1 significantly improves coupling of PDFR to adenylate cyclase. pdfr mutant flies display increased circadian arrhythmicity, and also display altered geotaxis that is epistatic to that of pdf mutants. PDFR immunosignals are expressed by diverse neurons, but only by a small subset of circadian pacemakers. These data establish the first synapse within the Drosophila circadian neural circuit and underscore the importance of Class II peptide GPCR signaling in circadian neural systems. PMID:16242402

  3. Suprachiasmatic astrocytes as an interface for immune-circadian signalling.

    PubMed

    Leone, María Juliana; Marpegan, Luciano; Bekinschtein, Tristán A; Costas, Mónica A; Golombek, Diego A

    2006-11-15

    The hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), the site of a mammalian circadian clock, exhibit a dense immunoreactivity for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a specific marker for astrocytes. Although there is evidence of a circadian variation in GFAP-IR in the hamster SCN and of the participation of glial cells in input and output mechanisms of the clock, the role of these cells within the circadian system is not clearly understood. The fact that astroglia can express and respond to cytokines suggests that they could work as mediators of immune signals to the circadian system. In the present study, we have found a daily variation of GFAP-IR in the mouse SCN, peaking during the light phase. In addition, we have identified GFAP and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) in glial cells within the SCN and in primary cultures of the mouse SCN. Moreover, SCN glia cultures were transfected with an NF-kappaB/luc construct whose transcriptional activity was increased with lipopolysaccharide 2 mug/ml, tumor necrosis factor-alpha 20 ng/ml, or interleukin-1alpha 100 ng/ml, after 12 hr of stimulation. These results suggest that the glial cells of the SCN can mediate input signals to the mouse circadian system coming from the immune system via NF-kappaB signaling. PMID:16955486

  4. Endocrine regulation of circadian physiology.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Anthony H; Astiz, Mariana; Friedrichs, Maureen; Oster, Henrik

    2016-07-01

    Endogenous circadian clocks regulate 24-h rhythms of behavior and physiology to align with external time. The endocrine system serves as a major clock output to regulate various biological processes. Recent findings suggest that some of the rhythmic hormones can also provide feedback to the circadian system at various levels, thus contributing to maintaining the robustness of endogenous rhythmicity. This delicate balance of clock-hormone interaction is vulnerable to modern lifestyle factors such as shiftwork or high-calorie diets, altering physiological set points. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the communication between the circadian timing and endocrine systems, with a focus on adrenal glucocorticoids and metabolic peptide hormones. We explore the potential role of hormones as systemic feedback signals to adjust clock function and their relevance for the maintenance of physiological and metabolic circadian homeostasis. PMID:27106109

  5. Circadian Control of Global Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shujing; Zhang, Luoying

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms exist in most if not all organisms on the Earth and manifest in various aspects of physiology and behavior. These rhythmic processes are believed to be driven by endogenous molecular clocks that regulate rhythmic expression of clock-controlled genes (CCGs). CCGs consist of a significant portion of the genome and are involved in diverse biological pathways. The transcription of CCGs is tuned by rhythmic actions of transcription factors and circadian alterations in chromatin. Here, we review the circadian control of CCG transcription in five model organisms that are widely used, including cyanobacterium, fungus, plant, fruit fly, and mouse. Comparing the similarity and differences in the five organisms could help us better understand the function of the circadian clock, as well as its output mechanisms adapted to meet the demands of diverse environmental conditions. PMID:26682214

  6. Circadian Dysrhythmias, Physiological Aberrations, and the Link to Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Daniel; Arbesman, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are core regulators of a variety of mammalian physiologic processes and oscillate in a 24-h pattern. Many peripheral organs possess endogenous rhythmicity that is then modulated by a master clock; the skin is one of these peripheral organs. The dysregulation of rhythms is associated with decreased ability to ameliorate cellular stressors at a local and global level, which then increases the propensity for the development of neoplastic growths. In this article, we review the implications of altered circadian rhythms on DNA repair as well as modified gene expression of core clock proteins with particular focus on skin models. These findings are then correlated with epidemiologic data regarding skin cancer to showcase the effects of circadian disruption on this phenomenon. PMID:27128901

  7. Dual KaiC-based oscillations constitute the circadian system of cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kitayama, Yohko; Nishiwaki, Taeko; Terauchi, Kazuki; Kondo, Takao

    2008-01-01

    In the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, the KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC proteins are essential for the generation of circadian rhythms. Both in vivo and in vitro, phosphorylation of KaiC is regulated positively by KaiA and negatively by KaiB and shows circadian rhythmicity. The autonomous circadian cycling of KaiC phosphorylation is thought to be the basic pacemaker of the circadian clock and to control genome-wide gene expression in cyanobacteria. In this study, we found that temperature-compensated circadian oscillations of gene expression persisted even when KaiC was arrested in the phosphorylated state due to kaiA overexpression. Moreover, two phosphorylation mutants showed transcriptional oscillation with a long period. In kaiA-overexpressing and phosphorylation-deficient strains, KaiC oscillated and transient overexpression of phosphorylation-deficient kaiC reset the phase of the rhythm. These results suggest that transcription- and translation-based oscillations in KaiC abundance are also important for circadian rhythm generation in cyanobacteria. Furthermore, at low temperature, cyanobacteria can show circadian rhythms only when both the KaiC phosphorylation cycle and the transcription and translation cycle are intact. Our findings indicate that multiple coupled oscillatory systems based on the biochemical properties of KaiC are important to maintain robust and precise circadian rhythms in cyanobacteria. PMID:18477603

  8. Bifurcations in a mathematical model for circadian oscillations of clock genes.

    PubMed

    Tsumoto, Kunichika; Yoshinaga, Tetsuya; Iida, Hitoshi; Kawakami, Hiroshi; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2006-03-01

    Circadian oscillations with a period of about 24h are observed in nearly all living organisms as conspicuous biological rhythms. In this paper, we investigate various kinds of bifurcation phenomena produced in a circadian oscillator model of Drosophila. In Drosophila, it is known that circadian oscillations in the levels of two proteins, PER and TIM, result from the negative feedback exerted by a PER-TIM complex on the expression of the per and tim genes that code for the two proteins. For studying circadian oscillations of proteins in Drosophila, a mathematical model has been proposed. The model cannot only account for regular circadian oscillations in environmental conditions such as constant darkness, but also give rise to more complex oscillatory phenomena including chaos and birhythmicity. By calculating bifurcations using Kawakami's method, we obtain detailed bifurcation diagrams related to stable and unstable invariant sets, and identify parameter regions in which the model generates complex oscillations as well as regular circadian oscillations. Moreover, we study bifurcations observed in the model incorporating the effect on a light-dark (LD) cycle and show that the waveform of the periodic variation in the light-induced parameter has a marked influence on the global bifurcation structure or the type of dynamic behavior resulting from the forcing term of the circadian oscillator by the LD cycles. PMID:16143345

  9. Casein kinase 1 promotes synchrony of the circadian clock network.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiangzhong; Sowcik, Mallory; Chen, Dechun; Sehgal, Amita

    2014-07-01

    Casein kinase 1, known as DOUBLETIME (DBT) in Drosophila melanogaster, is a critical component of the circadian clock that phosphorylates and promotes degradation of the PERIOD (PER) protein. However, other functions of DBT in circadian regulation are not clear, in part because severe reduction of dbt causes preadult lethality. Here we report the molecular and behavioral phenotype of a viable dbt(EY02910) loss-of-function mutant. We found that DBT protein levels are dramatically reduced in adult dbt(EY02910) flies, and the majority of mutant flies display arrhythmic behavior, with a few showing weak, long-period (∼32 h) rhythms. Peak phosphorylation of PER is delayed, and both hyper- and hypophosphorylated forms of the PER and CLOCK proteins are present throughout the day. In addition, molecular oscillations of the circadian clock are dampened. In the central brain, PER and TIM expression is heterogeneous and decoupled in the canonical clock neurons of the dbt(EY02910) mutants. We also report an interaction between dbt and the signaling pathway involving pigment dispersing factor (PDF), a synchronizing peptide in the clock network. These data thus demonstrate that overall reduction of DBT causes long and arrhythmic behavior, and they reveal an unexpected role of DBT in promoting synchrony of the circadian clock network. PMID:24820422

  10. Casein Kinase 1 Promotes Synchrony of the Circadian Clock Network

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiangzhong; Sowcik, Mallory; Chen, Dechun

    2014-01-01

    Casein kinase 1, known as DOUBLETIME (DBT) in Drosophila melanogaster, is a critical component of the circadian clock that phosphorylates and promotes degradation of the PERIOD (PER) protein. However, other functions of DBT in circadian regulation are not clear, in part because severe reduction of dbt causes preadult lethality. Here we report the molecular and behavioral phenotype of a viable dbtEY02910 loss-of-function mutant. We found that DBT protein levels are dramatically reduced in adult dbtEY02910 flies, and the majority of mutant flies display arrhythmic behavior, with a few showing weak, long-period (∼32 h) rhythms. Peak phosphorylation of PER is delayed, and both hyper- and hypophosphorylated forms of the PER and CLOCK proteins are present throughout the day. In addition, molecular oscillations of the circadian clock are dampened. In the central brain, PER and TIM expression is heterogeneous and decoupled in the canonical clock neurons of the dbtEY02910 mutants. We also report an interaction between dbt and the signaling pathway involving pigment dispersing factor (PDF), a synchronizing peptide in the clock network. These data thus demonstrate that overall reduction of DBT causes long and arrhythmic behavior, and they reveal an unexpected role of DBT in promoting synchrony of the circadian clock network. PMID:24820422

  11. Circadian Rhythms of Isoprene Biosynthesis in Grey Poplar Leaves1

    PubMed Central

    Loivamäki, Maaria; Louis, Sandrine; Cinege, Gyöngyi; Zimmer, Ina; Fischbach, Robert J.; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter

    2007-01-01

    Isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) emission varies diurnally in different species. In poplar (Populus spp.), it has recently been shown that the gene encoding the synthesizing enzyme for isoprene, isoprene synthase (ISPS), displays diurnal variation in expression. Working on shoot cultures of Grey poplar (Populus × canescens) placed under a different light regime in phytochambers, we showed that these variations in PcISPS gene expression, measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, are not only due to day-night changes, but also are linked to an internal circadian clock. Measurement of additional selected isoprenoid genes revealed that phytoene synthase (carotenoid pathway) displays similar fluctuations, whereas 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase, possibly the first committed enzyme of the 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate pathway, only shows light regulation. On the protein level, it appeared that PcISPS activity and protein content became reduced under constant darkness, whereas under constant light, activity and protein content of this enzyme were kept high. In contrast, isoprene emission rates under continuous irradiation displayed circadian changes as is the case for gene expression of PcISPS. Furthermore, binding assays with Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) late elongated hypocotyl, a transcription factor of Arabidopsis involved in circadian regulation, clearly revealed the presence of circadian-determining regulatory elements in the promoter region of PcISPS. PMID:17122071

  12. Phenotyping Circadian Rhythms in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms take place with a periodicity of twenty-four hours, temporally following the rotation of the earth around its axis. Examples of circadian rhythms are the sleep/wake cycle, feeding, and hormone secretion. Light powerfully entrains the mammalian clock and assists in keeping animals synchronized to the 24-hour cycle of the earth by activating specific neurons in the “central pacemaker” of the brain, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Absolute periodicity of an animal can deviate slightly from 24 hours as manifest when an animal is placed into constant dark- or “free running”- conditions. Simple measurements of an organism's activity in free running conditions reveal its intrinsic circadian period. Mice are a particularly useful model for studying circadian rhythmicity due to the ease of genetic manipulation, thus identifying molecular contributors to rhythmicity. Furthermore, their small size allows for monitoring locomotion or activity in their home cage environment with relative ease. Several tasks commonly used to analyze circadian periodicity and plasticity in mice are outlined here including the process of entrainment, determination of tau (period length) in free running conditions, determination of circadian periodicity in response to light disruption (i.e. jet lag studies), and evaluation of clock plasticity in non-twenty-four hour conditions (T-cycles). Studying the properties of circadian periods such as their phase, amplitude, and length in response to photic perturbation, can be particularly useful in understanding how humans respond to jet lag, night shifts, rotating shifts, or other transient or chronic disruption of one's environmental surroundings. PMID:26331760

  13. Predicted Role of NAD Utilization in the Control of Circadian Rhythms during DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Luna, Augustin; McFadden, Geoffrey B; Aladjem, Mirit I; Kohn, Kurt W

    2015-05-01

    The circadian clock is a set of regulatory steps that oscillate with a period of approximately 24 hours influencing many biological processes. These oscillations are robust to external stresses, and in the case of genotoxic stress (i.e. DNA damage), the circadian clock responds through phase shifting with primarily phase advancements. The effect of DNA damage on the circadian clock and the mechanism through which this effect operates remains to be thoroughly investigated. Here we build an in silico model to examine damage-induced circadian phase shifts by investigating a possible mechanism linking circadian rhythms to metabolism. The proposed model involves two DNA damage response proteins, SIRT1 and PARP1, that are each consumers of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), a metabolite involved in oxidation-reduction reactions and in ATP synthesis. This model builds on two key findings: 1) that SIRT1 (a protein deacetylase) is involved in both the positive (i.e. transcriptional activation) and negative (i.e. transcriptional repression) arms of the circadian regulation and 2) that PARP1 is a major consumer of NAD during the DNA damage response. In our simulations, we observe that increased PARP1 activity may be able to trigger SIRT1-induced circadian phase advancements by decreasing SIRT1 activity through competition for NAD supplies. We show how this competitive inhibition may operate through protein acetylation in conjunction with phosphorylation, consistent with reported observations. These findings suggest a possible mechanism through which multiple perturbations, each dominant during different points of the circadian cycle, may result in the phase advancement of the circadian clock seen during DNA damage. PMID:26020938

  14. Predicted Role of NAD Utilization in the Control of Circadian Rhythms during DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Augustin; McFadden, Geoffrey B.; Aladjem, Mirit I.; Kohn, Kurt W.

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock is a set of regulatory steps that oscillate with a period of approximately 24 hours influencing many biological processes. These oscillations are robust to external stresses, and in the case of genotoxic stress (i.e. DNA damage), the circadian clock responds through phase shifting with primarily phase advancements. The effect of DNA damage on the circadian clock and the mechanism through which this effect operates remains to be thoroughly investigated. Here we build an in silico model to examine damage-induced circadian phase shifts by investigating a possible mechanism linking circadian rhythms to metabolism. The proposed model involves two DNA damage response proteins, SIRT1 and PARP1, that are each consumers of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), a metabolite involved in oxidation-reduction reactions and in ATP synthesis. This model builds on two key findings: 1) that SIRT1 (a protein deacetylase) is involved in both the positive (i.e. transcriptional activation) and negative (i.e. transcriptional repression) arms of the circadian regulation and 2) that PARP1 is a major consumer of NAD during the DNA damage response. In our simulations, we observe that increased PARP1 activity may be able to trigger SIRT1-induced circadian phase advancements by decreasing SIRT1 activity through competition for NAD supplies. We show how this competitive inhibition may operate through protein acetylation in conjunction with phosphorylation, consistent with reported observations. These findings suggest a possible mechanism through which multiple perturbations, each dominant during different points of the circadian cycle, may result in the phase advancement of the circadian clock seen during DNA damage. PMID:26020938

  15. Circadian Rhythm and Cartilage Extracellular Matrix Genes in Osseointegration: A Genome-Wide Screening of Implant Failure by Vitamin D Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mengatto, Cristiane Machado; Mussano, Federico; Honda, Yoshitomo; Colwell, Christopher S.; Nishimura, Ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Background Successful dental and orthopedic implants require the establishment of an intimate association with bone tissue; however, the mechanistic explanation of how biological systems accomplish osseointegration is still incomplete. We sought to identify critical gene networks involved in osseointegration by exploring the implant failure model under vitamin D deficiency. Methodology Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to control or vitamin D-deficient diet prior to the osteotomy surgery in the femur bone and the placement of T-shaped Ti4Al6V implant. Two weeks after the osteotomy and implant placement, tissue formed at the osteotomy site or in the hollow chamber of T-shaped implant was harvested and total RNA was evaluated by whole genome microarray analyses. Principal Findings Two-way ANOVA of microarray data identified 103 genes that were significantly (>2 fold) modulated by the implant placement and vitamin D deficiency. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analyses assigned the highest z-score to the circadian rhythm pathway including neuronal PAS domain 2 (NPAS2), and period homolog 2 (Per2). NPAS2 and Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like (ARNTL/Bmal 1) were upregulated around implant and diminished by vitamin D deficiency, whereas the expression pattern of Per2 was complementary. Hierarchical cluster analysis further revealed that NPAS2 was in a group predominantly composed of cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) genes. Whereas the expression of bone ECM genes around implant was not significantly affected by vitamin D deficiency, cartilage ECM genes were modulated by the presence of the implant and vitamin D status. In a proof-of-concept in vitro study, the expression of cartilage type II and X collagens was found upregulated when mouse mesenchymal stem cells were cultured on implant disk with 1,25D supplementation. Conclusions This study suggests that the circadian rhythm system and cartilage extracellular matrix may be

  16. Circadian regulation of renal function.

    PubMed

    Firsov, Dmitri; Bonny, Olivier

    2010-10-01

    Urinary excretion of water and all major electrolytes exhibit robust circadian oscillations. The 24-h periodicity has been well documented for several important determinants of urine formation, including renal blood flow, glomerular filtration, tubular reabsorption, and tubular secretion. Disturbance of the renal circadian rhythms is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for hypertension, polyuria, and other diseases and may contribute to renal fibrosis. The origin of these rhythms has been attributed to the reactive response of the kidney to circadian changes in volume and/or in the composition of extracellular fluids that are entrained by rest/activity and feeding/fasting cycles. However, numerous studies have shown that most of the renal excretory rhythms persist for long periods of time, even in the absence of periodic environmental cues. These observations led to the hypothesis of the existence of a self-sustained mechanism, enabling the kidney to anticipate various predictable circadian challenges to homeostasis. The molecular basis of this mechanism remained unknown until the recent discovery of the mammalian circadian clock made of a system of autoregulatory transcriptional/translational feedback loops, which have been found in all tissues studied, including the kidney. Here, we present a review of the growing evidence showing the involvement of the molecular clock in the generation of renal excretory rhythms. PMID:20664559

  17. Nutrition and the Circadian System

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Gregory D M; Cade, Janet E; Grant, Peter J; Hardie, Laura J

    2016-01-01

    The human circadian system anticipates and adapts to daily environmental changes to optimise behaviour according to time of day and temporally partition incompatible physiological processes. At the helm of this system is a master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus. The SCN are primarily synchronised to the 24 hour day by the light/dark cycle; however, feeding/fasting cycles are the primary time cues for clocks in peripheral tissues. Aligning feeding/fasting cycles with clock-regulated metabolic changes optimises metabolism, and studies of other animals suggest that feeding at inappropriate times disrupts circadian system organisation and thereby contributes to adverse metabolic consequences and chronic disease development. ‘High-fat diets’ (HFDs) produce particularly deleterious effects on circadian system organisation in rodents by blunting feeding/fasting cycles. Time-of-day-restricted feeding, where food availability is restricted to a period of several hours, offsets many adverse consequences of HFDs in these animals; however, further evidence is required to assess whether the same is true in humans. Several nutritional compounds have robust effects on the circadian system. Caffeine, for example, can speed synchronisation to new time zones after jetlag. An appreciation of the circadian system has many implications for nutritional science and may ultimately help reduce the burden of chronic diseases. PMID:27221157

  18. Analysis of Circadian Leaf Movements.

    PubMed

    Müller, Niels A; Jiménez-Gómez, José M

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock is a molecular timekeeper that controls a wide variety of biological processes. In plants, clock outputs range from the molecular level, with rhythmic gene expression and metabolite content, to physiological processes such as stomatal conductance or leaf movements. Any of these outputs can be used as markers to monitor the state of the circadian clock. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, much of the current knowledge about the clock has been gained from time course experiments profiling expression of endogenous genes or reporter constructs regulated by the circadian clock. Since these methods require labor-intensive sample preparation or transformation, monitoring leaf movements is an interesting alternative, especially in non-model species and for natural variation studies. Technological improvements both in digital photography and image analysis allow cheap and easy monitoring of circadian leaf movements. In this chapter we present a protocol that uses an autonomous point and shoot camera and free software to monitor circadian leaf movements in tomato. PMID:26867616

  19. Nutrition and the circadian system.

    PubMed

    Potter, Gregory D M; Cade, Janet E; Grant, Peter J; Hardie, Laura J

    2016-08-01

    The human circadian system anticipates and adapts to daily environmental changes to optimise behaviour according to time of day and temporally partitions incompatible physiological processes. At the helm of this system is a master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus. The SCN are primarily synchronised to the 24-h day by the light/dark cycle; however, feeding/fasting cycles are the primary time cues for clocks in peripheral tissues. Aligning feeding/fasting cycles with clock-regulated metabolic changes optimises metabolism, and studies of other animals suggest that feeding at inappropriate times disrupts circadian system organisation, and thereby contributes to adverse metabolic consequences and chronic disease development. 'High-fat diets' (HFD) produce particularly deleterious effects on circadian system organisation in rodents by blunting feeding/fasting cycles. Time-of-day-restricted feeding, where food availability is restricted to a period of several hours, offsets many adverse consequences of HFD in these animals; however, further evidence is required to assess whether the same is true in humans. Several nutritional compounds have robust effects on the circadian system. Caffeine, for example, can speed synchronisation to new time zones after jetlag. An appreciation of the circadian system has many implications for nutritional science and may ultimately help reduce the burden of chronic diseases. PMID:27221157

  20. Analysis of Circadian Regulation of Poly(A) Tail Length

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Shihoko; Green, Carla B.

    2015-01-01

    The poly(A) tail is found on the 3’-end of most eukaryotic mRNAs, and its length significantly contributes to the mRNAs half-life and translational competence. Circadian regulation of poly(A) tail length is a powerful mechanism to confer rhythmicity in gene expression post-transcriptionally, and provides a means to regulate protein levels independent of rhythmic transcription in the nucleus. Therefore, analysis of circadian poly(A) tail length regulation is important for a complete understanding of rhythmic physiology, since rhythmically expressed proteins are the ultimate mediators of rhythmic function. Nevertheless, it has previously been challenging to measure changes in poly(A) tail length, especially at a global level, due to technical constraints. However, new methodology based on differential fractionation of mRNAs based on the length of their tails has recently been developed. In this chapter, we will describe these methods as used for examining the circadian regulation of poly(A) tail length and will provide detailed experimental procedures to measure poly(A) tail length both at a the single mRNA level and the global level. Although this chapter concentrates on methods we used for analyzing poly(A) tail length in the mammalian circadian system, the methods described here can be applicable to any organisms and any biological processes. PMID:25662466

  1. From light to genes: moving the hands of the circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Golombek, Diego A; Ferreyra, Gabriela A; Agostino, Patricia V; Murad, Alejandro D; Rubio, María F; Pizzio, Gastón A; Katz, Marcelo E; Marpegan, Luciano; Bekinschtein, Tristán A

    2003-05-01

    Mammalian circadian rhythms are generated by the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei and finely tuned to environmental periodicities by neurochemical responses to the light-dark cycle. Light reaches the clock through a direct retinohypothalamic tract, primarily through glutamatergic innervation, and its action is probably regulated by a variety of other neurotransmitters. A key second messenger in circadian photic entrainment is calcium, mobilized through membrane channels or intracellular reservoirs, which triggers the activation of several enzymes, including a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase and nitric oxide synthase. Other enzymes activated by light are mitogen-activated- and cGMP-dependent protein kinase; all of the above have been reported to be involved in the circadian responses to nocturnal light pulses. These mechanisms lead to expression of specific clock genes which eventually set the phase of the clock and of clock-controlled circadian rhythms. PMID:12700026

  2. Picrotoxin dramatically speeds the mammalian circadian clock independent of Cys-loop receptors

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, G. Mark; Nakajima, Masato; Ueda, Hiroki R.

    2013-01-01

    Picrotoxin is extensively and specifically used to inhibit GABAA receptors and other members of the Cys-loop receptor superfamily. We find that picrotoxin acts independently of known Cys-loop receptors to shorten the period of the circadian clock markedly by specifically advancing the accumulation of PERIOD2 protein. We show that this mechanism is surprisingly tetrodotoxin-insensitive, and the effect is larger than any known chemical or genetic manipulation. Notably, our results indicate that the circadian target of picrotoxin is common to a variety of human and rodent cell types but not Drosophila, thereby ruling out all conserved Cys-loop receptors and known regulators of mammalian PERIOD protein stability. Given that the circadian clock modulates significant aspects of cell physiology including synaptic plasticity, these results have immediate and broad experimental implications. Furthermore, our data point to the existence of an important and novel target within the mammalian circadian timing system. PMID:23576702

  3. Circadian Clock, Cancer, and Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock is a global regulatory system that interfaces with most other regulatory systems and pathways in mammalian organisms. Investigations of the circadian clock–DNA damage response connections have revealed that nucleotide excision repair, DNA damage checkpoints, and apoptosis are appreciably influenced by the clock. Although several epidemiological studies in humans and a limited number of genetic studies in mouse model systems have indicated that clock disruption may predispose mammals to cancer, well-controlled genetic studies in mice have not supported the commonly held view that circadian clock disruption is a cancer risk factor. In fact, in the appropriate genetic background, clock disruption may instead aid in cancer regression by promoting intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis. Finally, the clock may affect the efficacy of cancer treatment (chronochemotherapy) by modulating the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of chemotherapeutic drugs as well as the activity of the DNA repair enzymes that repair the DNA damage caused by anticancer drugs. PMID:25302769

  4. Circadian Insights into Motivated Behavior.

    PubMed

    Antle, Michael C; Silver, Rae

    2016-01-01

    For an organism to be successful in an evolutionary sense, it and its offspring must survive. Such survival depends on satisfying a number of needs that are driven by motivated behaviors, such as eating, sleeping, and mating. An individual can usually only pursue one motivated behavior at a time. The circadian system provides temporal structure to the organism's 24 hour day, partitioning specific behaviors to particular times of the day. The circadian system also allows anticipation of opportunities to engage in motivated behaviors that occur at predictable times of the day. Such anticipation enhances fitness by ensuring that the organism is physiologically ready to make use of a time-limited resource as soon as it becomes available. This could include activation of the sympathetic nervous system to transition from sleep to wake, or to engage in mating, or to activate of the parasympathetic nervous system to facilitate transitions to sleep, or to prepare the body to digest a meal. In addition to enabling temporal partitioning of motivated behaviors, the circadian system may also regulate the amplitude of the drive state motivating the behavior. For example, the circadian clock modulates not only when it is time to eat, but also how hungry we are. In this chapter we explore the physiology of our circadian clock and its involvement in a number of motivated behaviors such as sleeping, eating, exercise, sexual behavior, and maternal behavior. We also examine ways in which dysfunction of circadian timing can contribute to disease states, particularly in psychiatric conditions that include adherent motivational states. PMID:26419240

  5. Nitrogen regulates CRY1 phosphorylation and circadian clock input pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang-Hong; Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Zheng, Chong; Yuan, Shu; He, Yikun

    2016-09-01

    The delayed flowering phenotype caused by nitrogen (N) fertilizer application has been known for a long time, but we know little about the specific molecular mechanism for this phenomenon before. Our study indicated that low nitrogen increases the NADPH/NADP(+) and ATP/AMP ratios which affect adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and phosphorylation and abundance of nuclear CRY1 protein. Then CRY1 acts in the N signal input pathway to the circadian clock. Here we further discuss: (1) the role of C/N ratio in flowering, (2) circadian oscillation of plant AMPK transcripts and proteins, (3) conservation of nutrition-mediated CRY1 phosphorylation and degradation, and (4) crosstalks between nitrogen signals and nitric oxide (NO) signals in flowering. PMID:27617369

  6. In vitro circadian rhythms: imaging and electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Beaulé, Christian; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; Marpegan, Luciano; Herzog, Erik D

    2011-06-30

    In vitro assays have localized circadian pacemakers to individual cells, revealed genetic determinants of rhythm generation, identified molecular players in cell-cell synchronization and determined physiological events regulated by circadian clocks. Although they allow strict control of experimental conditions and reduce the number of variables compared with in vivo studies, they also lack many of the conditions in which cellular circadian oscillators normally function. The present review highlights methods to study circadian timing in cultured mammalian cells and how they have shaped the hypothesis that all cells are capable of circadian rhythmicity. PMID:21819387

  7. In vitro circadian rhythms: imaging and electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Beaulé, Christian; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; Marpegan, Luciano; Herzog, Erik D.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro assays have localized circadian pacemakers to individual cells, revealed genetic determinants of rhythm generation, identified molecular players in cell-cell synchronization and determined physiological events regulated by circadian clocks. Although they allow strict control of experimental conditions and reduce the number of variables compared with in vivo studies, they also lack many of the conditions in which cellular circadian oscillators normally function. The present review highlights methods to study circadian timing in cultured mammalian cells and how they have shaped the hypothesis that all cells are capable of circadian rhythmicity. PMID:21819387

  8. Rhythmic expression of cryptochrome induces the circadian clock of arrhythmic suprachiasmatic nuclei through arginine vasopressin signaling.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Mathew D; Brancaccio, Marco; Chesham, Johanna E; Maywood, Elizabeth S; Hastings, Michael H

    2016-03-01

    Circadian rhythms in mammals are coordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). SCN neurons define circadian time using transcriptional/posttranslational feedback loops (TTFL) in which expression of Cryptochrome (Cry) and Period (Per) genes is inhibited by their protein products. Loss of Cry1 and Cry2 stops the SCN clock, whereas individual deletions accelerate and decelerate it, respectively. At the circuit level, neuronal interactions synchronize cellular TTFLs, creating a spatiotemporal wave of gene expression across the SCN that is lost in Cry1/2-deficient SCN. To interrogate the properties of CRY proteins required for circadian function, we expressed CRY in SCN of Cry-deficient mice using adeno-associated virus (AAV). Expression of CRY1::EGFP or CRY2::EGFP under a minimal Cry1 promoter was circadian and rapidly induced PER2-dependent bioluminescence rhythms in previously arrhythmic Cry1/2-deficient SCN, with periods appropriate to each isoform. CRY1::EGFP appropriately lengthened the behavioral period in Cry1-deficient mice. Thus, determination of specific circadian periods reflects properties of the respective proteins, independently of their phase of expression. Phase of CRY1::EGFP expression was critical, however, because constitutive or phase-delayed promoters failed to sustain coherent rhythms. At the circuit level, CRY1::EGFP induced the spatiotemporal wave of PER2 expression in Cry1/2-deficient SCN. This was dependent on the neuropeptide arginine vasopressin (AVP) because it was prevented by pharmacological blockade of AVP receptors. Thus, our genetic complementation assay reveals acute, protein-specific induction of cell-autonomous and network-level circadian rhythmicity in SCN never previously exposed to CRY. Specifically, Cry expression must be circadian and appropriately phased to support rhythms, and AVP receptor signaling is required to impose circuit-level circadian function. PMID:26903624

  9. ATPase activity of KaiC determines the basic timing for circadian clock of cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Kazuki; Kitayama, Yohko; Nishiwaki, Taeko; Miwa, Kumiko; Murayama, Yoriko; Oyama, Tokitaka; Kondo, Takao

    2007-10-01

    Self-sustainable oscillation of KaiC phosphorylation has been reconstituted in vitro, demonstrating that this cycle is the basic time generator of the circadian clock of cyanobacteria. Here we show that the ATPase activity of KaiC satisfies the characteristics of the circadian oscillation, the period length, and the temperature compensation. KaiC possesses extremely weak but stable ATPase activity (15 molecules of ATP per day), and the addition of KaiA and KaiB makes the activity oscillate with a circadian period in vitro. The ATPase activity of KaiC is inherently temperature-invariant, suggesting that temperature compensation of the circadian period could be driven by this simple biochemical reaction. Moreover, the activities of wild-type KaiC and five period-mutant proteins are directly proportional to their in vivo circadian frequencies, indicating that the ATPase activity defines the circadian period. Thus, we propose that KaiC ATPase activity constitutes the most fundamental reaction underlying circadian periodicity in cyanobacteria. PMID:17901204

  10. The ancestral circadian clock of monarch butterflies: role in time-compensated sun compass orientation.

    PubMed

    Reppert, S M

    2007-01-01

    The circadian clock has a vital role in monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) migration by providing the timing component of time-compensated sun compass orientation, which contributes to navigation to the overwintering grounds. The location of circadian clock cells in monarch brain has been identified in the dorsolateral protocerebrum (pars lateralis); these cells express PERIOD, TIMELESS, and a Drosophila-like cryptochrome designated CRY1. Monarch butterflies, like all other nondrosophilid insects examined so far, express a second cry gene (designated insect CRY2) that encodes a vertebrate-like CRY that is also expressed in pars lateralis. An ancestral circadian clock mechanism has been defined in monarchs, in which CRY1 functions as a blue light photoreceptor for photic entrainment, whereas CRY2 functionswithin the clockwork as themajor transcriptional repressor of an intracellular negative transcriptional feedback loop. A CRY1-staining neural pathway has been identified that may connect the circadian (navigational) clock to polarized light input important for sun compass navigation, and a CRY2-positive neural pathway has been discovered that may communicate circadian information directly from the circadian clock to the central complex, the likely site of the sun compass. The monarch butterfly may thus use the CRY proteins as components of the circadian mechanism and also as output molecules that connect the clock to various aspects of the sun compass apparatus. PMID:18419268

  11. Human Gut Bacteria Are Sensitive to Melatonin and Express Endogenous Circadian Rhythmicity

    PubMed Central

    Paulose, Jiffin K.; Wright, John M.; Patel, Akruti G; Cassone, Vincent M.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are fundamental properties of most eukaryotes, but evidence of biological clocks that drive these rhythms in prokaryotes has been restricted to Cyanobacteria. In vertebrates, the gastrointestinal system expresses circadian patterns of gene expression, motility and secretion in vivo and in vitro, and recent studies suggest that the enteric microbiome is regulated by the host’s circadian clock. However, it is not clear how the host’s clock regulates the microbiome. Here, we demonstrate at least one species of commensal bacterium from the human gastrointestinal system, Enterobacter aerogenes, is sensitive to the neurohormone melatonin, which is secreted into the gastrointestinal lumen, and expresses circadian patterns of swarming and motility. Melatonin specifically increases the magnitude of swarming in cultures of E. aerogenes, but not in Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae. The swarming appears to occur daily, and transformation of E. aerogenes with a flagellar motor-protein driven lux plasmid confirms a temperature-compensated circadian rhythm of luciferase activity, which is synchronized in the presence of melatonin. Altogether, these data demonstrate a circadian clock in a non-cyanobacterial prokaryote and suggest the human circadian system may regulate its microbiome through the entrainment of bacterial clocks. PMID:26751389

  12. Circadian Rhythms: Hijacking the Cyanobacterial Clock

    PubMed Central

    Hoyle, Nathaniel P.; O’Neill, John S

    2016-01-01

    The production of limitless carbon-free energy is a long-sought dream of scientists and politicians alike. One strategy for achieving this aim is the production of hydrogen by photosynthetic microorganisms – harnessing the effectively limitless power of the sun to power our cars, toasters and PCR machines. It may be tempting to think of host expression systems as miniature factories given over entirely to the production our molecule of interest. However, the biological nature of the host must be taken into account if we are to maximize productivity. The circadian rhythm, an organism’s entrainable oscillation of biological processes with a period of around 24 hours, is one such aspect that has received scant attention but is likely to be of particular importance to photosynthetic host systems. In this issue of current biology Xu et al. describe how our knowledge of the Synechococcus elongatus circadian clock can be leveraged to improve the production of exogeneous proteins, including those involved in the production of hydrogen [1]. PMID:24309283

  13. Circadian rhythms: basic neurobiology and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Moore, R Y

    1997-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are major features of adaptation to our environment. In mammals, circadian rhythms are generated and regulated by a circadian timing system. This system consists of entertainment pathways, pacemakers, and pace-maker output to effector systems that are under circadian control. The primary entertainment pathway is the retinohypothalamic tract, which terminates in the circadian pacemakers, the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus. The output of the suprachiasmatic nuclei is principally to the hypothalamus, the midline thalamus, and the basal forebrain. This provides a temporal organization to the sleep-wake cycle, to many physiological and endocrine functions, and to psychomotor performance functions. Disorders of circadian timing primarily affect entertainment and pacemaker functions. The pineal hormone, melatonin, appears to be promising agent for therapy of some circadian timing disorders. PMID:9046960

  14. Metabolism and the Circadian Clock Converge

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Circadian rhythms occur in almost all species and control vital aspects of our physiology, from sleeping and waking to neurotransmitter secretion and cellular metabolism. Epidemiological studies from recent decades have supported a unique role for circadian rhythm in metabolism. As evidenced by individuals working night or rotating shifts, but also by rodent models of circadian arrhythmia, disruption of the circadian cycle is strongly associated with metabolic imbalance. Some genetically engineered mouse models of circadian rhythmicity are obese and show hallmark signs of the metabolic syndrome. Whether these phenotypes are due to the loss of distinct circadian clock genes within a specific tissue versus the disruption of rhythmic physiological activities (such as eating and sleeping) remains a cynosure within the fields of chronobiology and metabolism. Becoming more apparent is that from metabolites to transcription factors, the circadian clock interfaces with metabolism in numerous ways that are essential for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. PMID:23303907

  15. Circadian Transcription Contributes to Core Period Determination in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kadener, Sebastian; Menet, Jerome S; Schoer, Rebecca; Rosbash, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The Clock–Cycle (CLK–CYC) heterodimer constitutes a key circadian transcription complex in Drosophila. CYC has a DNA-binding domain but lacks an activation domain. Previous experiments also indicate that most of the transcriptional activity of CLK–CYC derives from the glutamine-rich region of its partner CLK. To address the role of transcription in core circadian timekeeping, we have analyzed the effects of a CYC–viral protein 16 (VP16) fusion protein in the Drosophila system. The addition of this potent and well-studied viral transcriptional activator (VP16) to CYC imparts to the CLK–CYC-VP16 complex strongly enhanced transcriptional activity relative to that of CLK–CYC. This increase is manifested in flies expressing CYC-VP16 as well as in S2 cells. These flies also have increased levels of CLK–CYC direct target gene mRNAs as well as a short period, implicating circadian transcription in period determination. A more detailed examination of reporter gene expression in CYC-VP16–expressing flies suggests that the short period is due at least in part to a more rapid transcriptional phase. Importantly, the behavioral effects require a period (per) promoter and are therefore unlikely to be merely a consequence of generally higher PER levels. This indicates that the CLK–CYC-VP16 behavioral effects are a consequence of increased per transcription. All of this also suggests that the timing of transcriptional activation and not the activation itself is the key event responsible for the behavioral effects observed in CYC-VP16-expressing flies. The results taken together indicate that circadian transcription contributes to core circadian function in Drosophila. PMID:18494558

  16. Aging alters circadian regulation of redox in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Klichko, Vladimir I.; Chow, Eileen S.; Kotwica-Rolinska, Joanna; Orr, William C.; Giebultowicz, Jadwiga M.; Radyuk, Svetlana N.

    2015-01-01

    Circadian coordination of metabolism, physiology, and neural functions contributes to healthy aging and disease prevention. Clock genes govern the daily rhythmic expression of target genes whose activities underlie such broad physiological parameters as maintenance of redox homeostasis. Previously, we reported that glutathione (GSH) biosynthesis is controlled by the circadian system via effects of the clock genes on expression of the catalytic (Gclc) and modulatory (Gclm) subunits comprising the glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL) holoenzyme. The objective of this study was to determine whether and how aging, which leads to weakened circadian oscillations, affects the daily profiles of redox-active biomolecules. We found that fly aging is associated with altered profiles of Gclc and Gclm expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Analysis of free aminothiols and GCL activity revealed that aging abolishes daily oscillations in GSH levels and alters the activity of glutathione biosynthetic pathways. Unlike GSH, its precursors and products of catabolism, methionine, cysteine and cysteinyl-glycine, were not rhythmic in young or old flies, while rhythms of the glutathione oxidation product, GSSG, were detectable. We conclude that the temporal regulation of GSH biosynthesis is altered in the aging organism and that age-related loss of circadian modulation of pathways involved in glutathione production is likely to impair temporal redox homeostasis. PMID:25806044

  17. Interdependence of nutrient metabolism and the circadian clock system: Importance for metabolic health

    PubMed Central

    Ribas-Latre, Aleix; Eckel-Mahan, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Background While additional research is needed, a number of large epidemiological studies show an association between circadian disruption and metabolic disorders. Specifically, obesity, insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, and other signs of metabolic syndrome all have been linked to circadian disruption in humans. Studies in other species support this association and generally reveal that feeding that is not in phase with the external light/dark cycle, as often occurs with night or rotating shift workers, is disadvantageous in terms of energy balance. As food is a strong driver of circadian rhythms in the periphery, understanding how nutrient metabolism drives clocks across the body is important for dissecting out why circadian misalignment may produce such metabolic effects. A number of circadian clock proteins as well as their accessory proteins (such as nuclear receptors) are highly sensitive to nutrient metabolism. Macronutrients and micronutrients can function as zeitgebers for the clock in a tissue-specific way and can thus impair synchrony between clocks across the body, or potentially restore synchrony in the case of circadian misalignment. Circadian nuclear receptors are particularly sensitive to nutrient metabolism and can alter tissue-specific rhythms in response to changes in the diet. Finally, SNPs in human clock genes appear to be correlated with diet-specific responses and along with chronotype eventually may provide valuable information from a clinical perspective on how to use diet and nutrition to treat metabolic disorders. Scope of review This article presents a background of the circadian clock components and their interrelated metabolic and transcriptional feedback loops, followed by a review of some recent studies in humans and rodents that address the effects of nutrient metabolism on the circadian clock and vice versa. We focus on studies in which results suggest that nutrients provide an opportunity to restore or, alternatively

  18. Circadian influences on myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Virag, Jitka A I; Lust, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Components of circadian rhythm maintenance, or "clock genes," are endogenous entrainable oscillations of about 24 h that regulate biological processes and are found in the suprachaismatic nucleus (SCN) and many peripheral tissues, including the heart. They are influenced by external cues, or Zeitgebers, such as light and heat, and can influence such diverse phenomena as cytokine expression immune cells, metabolic activity of cardiac myocytes, and vasodilator regulation by vascular endothelial cells. While it is known that the central master clock in the SCN synchronizes peripheral physiologic rhythms, the mechanisms by which the information is transmitted are complex and may include hormonal, metabolic, and neuronal inputs. Whether circadian patterns are causally related to the observed periodicity of events, or whether they are simply epi-phenomena is not well established, but a few studies suggest that the circadian effects likely are real in their impact on myocardial infarct incidence. Cycle disturbances may be harbingers of predisposition and subsequent response to acute and chronic cardiac injury, and identifying the complex interactions of circadian rhythms and myocardial infarction may provide insights into possible preventative and therapeutic strategies for susceptible populations. PMID:25400588

  19. Circadian influences on myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Virag, Jitka A. I.; Lust, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Components of circadian rhythm maintenance, or “clock genes,” are endogenous entrainable oscillations of about 24 h that regulate biological processes and are found in the suprachaismatic nucleus (SCN) and many peripheral tissues, including the heart. They are influenced by external cues, or Zeitgebers, such as light and heat, and can influence such diverse phenomena as cytokine expression immune cells, metabolic activity of cardiac myocytes, and vasodilator regulation by vascular endothelial cells. While it is known that the central master clock in the SCN synchronizes peripheral physiologic rhythms, the mechanisms by which the information is transmitted are complex and may include hormonal, metabolic, and neuronal inputs. Whether circadian patterns are causally related to the observed periodicity of events, or whether they are simply epi-phenomena is not well established, but a few studies suggest that the circadian effects likely are real in their impact on myocardial infarct incidence. Cycle disturbances may be harbingers of predisposition and subsequent response to acute and chronic cardiac injury, and identifying the complex interactions of circadian rhythms and myocardial infarction may provide insights into possible preventative and therapeutic strategies for susceptible populations. PMID:25400588

  20. Thyroxine Differentially Modulates the Peripheral Clock: Lessons from the Human Hair Follicle

    PubMed Central

    Hardman, Jonathan A.; Haslam, Iain S.; Farjo, Nilofer; Farjo, Bessam; Paus, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The human hair follicle (HF) exhibits peripheral clock activity, with knock-down of clock genes (BMAL1 and PER1) prolonging active hair growth (anagen) and increasing pigmentation. Similarly, thyroid hormones prolong anagen and stimulate pigmentation in cultured human HFs. In addition they are recognized as key regulators of the central clock that controls circadian rhythmicity. Therefore, we asked whether thyroxine (T4) also influences peripheral clock activity in the human HF. Over 24 hours we found a significant reduction in protein levels of BMAL1 and PER1, with their transcript levels also decreasing significantly. Furthermore, while all clock genes maintained their rhythmicity in both the control and T4 treated HFs, there was a significant reduction in the amplitude of BMAL1 and PER1 in T4 (100 nM) treated HFs. Accompanying this, cell-cycle progression marker Cyclin D1 was also assessed appearing to show an induced circadian rhythmicity by T4 however, this was not significant. Contrary to short term cultures, after 6 days, transcript and/or protein levels of all core clock genes (BMAL1, PER1, clock, CRY1, CRY2) were up-regulated in T4 treated HFs. BMAL1 and PER1 mRNA was also up-regulated in the HF bulge, the location of HF epithelial stem cells. Together this provides the first direct evidence that T4 modulates the expression of the peripheral molecular clock. Thus, patients with thyroid dysfunction may also show a disordered peripheral clock, which raises the possibility that short term, pulsatile treatment with T4 might permit one to modulate circadian activity in peripheral tissues as a target to treat clock-related disease. PMID:25822259

  1. Thyroxine differentially modulates the peripheral clock: lessons from the human hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Hardman, Jonathan A; Haslam, Iain S; Farjo, Nilofer; Farjo, Bessam; Paus, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The human hair follicle (HF) exhibits peripheral clock activity, with knock-down of clock genes (BMAL1 and PER1) prolonging active hair growth (anagen) and increasing pigmentation. Similarly, thyroid hormones prolong anagen and stimulate pigmentation in cultured human HFs. In addition they are recognized as key regulators of the central clock that controls circadian rhythmicity. Therefore, we asked whether thyroxine (T4) also influences peripheral clock activity in the human HF. Over 24 hours we found a significant reduction in protein levels of BMAL1 and PER1, with their transcript levels also decreasing significantly. Furthermore, while all clock genes maintained their rhythmicity in both the control and T4 treated HFs, there was a significant reduction in the amplitude of BMAL1 and PER1 in T4 (100 nM) treated HFs. Accompanying this, cell-cycle progression marker Cyclin D1 was also assessed appearing to show an induced circadian rhythmicity by T4 however, this was not significant. Contrary to short term cultures, after 6 days, transcript and/or protein levels of all core clock genes (BMAL1, PER1, clock, CRY1, CRY2) were up-regulated in T4 treated HFs. BMAL1 and PER1 mRNA was also up-regulated in the HF bulge, the location of HF epithelial stem cells. Together this provides the first direct evidence that T4 modulates the expression of the peripheral molecular clock. Thus, patients with thyroid dysfunction may also show a disordered peripheral clock, which raises the possibility that short term, pulsatile treatment with T4 might permit one to modulate circadian activity in peripheral tissues as a target to treat clock-related disease. PMID:25822259

  2. Drosophila spaghetti and doubletime link the circadian clock and light to caspases, apoptosis and tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Means, John C; Venkatesan, Anandakrishnan; Gerdes, Bryan; Fan, Jin-Yuan; Bjes, Edward S; Price, Jeffrey L

    2015-05-01

    While circadian dysfunction and neurodegeneration are correlated, the mechanism for this is not understood. It is not known if age-dependent circadian dysfunction leads to neurodegeneration or vice-versa, and the proteins that mediate the effect remain unidentified. Here, we show that the knock-down of a regulator (spag) of the circadian kinase Dbt in circadian cells lowers Dbt levels abnormally, lengthens circadian rhythms and causes expression of activated initiator caspase (Dronc) in the optic lobes during the middle of the day or after light pulses at night. Likewise, reduced Dbt activity lengthens circadian period and causes expression of activated Dronc, and a loss-of-function mutation in Clk also leads to expression of activated Dronc in a light-dependent manner. Genetic epistasis experiments place Dbt downstream of Spag in the pathway, and Spag-dependent reductions of Dbt are shown to require the proteasome. Importantly, activated Dronc expression due to reduced Spag or Dbt activity occurs in cells that do not express the spag RNAi or dominant negative Dbt and requires PDF neuropeptide signaling from the same neurons that support behavioral rhythms. Furthermore, reduction of Dbt or Spag activity leads to Dronc-dependent Drosophila Tau cleavage and enhanced neurodegeneration produced by human Tau in a fly eye model for tauopathy. Aging flies with lowered Dbt or Spag function show markers of cell death as well as behavioral deficits and shortened lifespans, and even old wild type flies exhibit Dbt modification and activated caspase at particular times of day. These results suggest that Dbt suppresses expression of activated Dronc to prevent Tau cleavage, and that the circadian clock defects confer sensitivity to expression of activated Dronc in response to prolonged light. They establish a link between the circadian clock factors, light, cell death pathways and Tau toxicity, potentially via dysregulation of circadian neuronal remodeling in the optic lobes

  3. Modelling and Analysis of the Feeding Regimen Induced Entrainment of Hepatocyte Circadian Oscillators Using Petri Nets

    PubMed Central

    Tareen, Samar Hayat Khan; Ahmad, Jamil

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are certain periodic behaviours exhibited by living organism at different levels, including cellular and system-wide scales. Recent studies have found that the circadian rhythms of several peripheral organs in mammals, such as the liver, are able to entrain their clocks to received signals independent of other system level clocks, in particular when responding to signals generated during feeding. These studies have found SIRT1, PARP1, and HSF1 proteins to be the major influencers of the core CLOCKBMAL1:PER-CRY circadian clock. These entities, along with abstracted feeding induced signals were modelled collectively in this study using Petri Nets. The properties of the model show that the circadian system itself is strongly robust, and is able to continually evolve. The modelled feeding regimens suggest that the usual 3 meals/day and 2 meals/day feeding regimens are beneficial with any more or less meals/day negatively affecting the system. PMID:25789928

  4. Ubiquitin ligase Siah2 regulates RevErbα degradation and the mammalian circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    DeBruyne, Jason P.; Baggs, Julie E.; Sato, Trey K.; Hogenesch, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Regulated degradation of proteins by the proteasome is often critical to their function in dynamic cellular pathways. The molecular clock underlying mammalian circadian rhythms relies on the rhythmic expression and degradation of its core components. However, because the tools available for identifying the mechanisms underlying the degradation of a specific protein are limited, the mechanisms regulating clock protein degradation are only beginning to be elucidated. Here we describe a cell-based functional screening approach designed to quickly identify the ubiquitin E3 ligases that induce the degradation of potentially any protein of interest. We screened the nuclear hormone receptor RevErbα (Nr1d1), a key constituent of the mammalian circadian clock, for E3 ligases that regulate its stability and found Seven in absentia2 (Siah2) to be a key regulator of RevErbα stability. Previously implicated in hypoxia signaling, Siah2 overexpression destabilizes RevErbα/β, and siRNA depletion of Siah2 stabilizes endogenous RevErbα. Moreover, Siah2 depletion delays circadian degradation of RevErbα and lengthens period length. These results demonstrate the utility of functional screening approaches for identifying regulators of protein stability and reveal Siah2 as a previously unidentified circadian clockwork regulator that mediates circadian RevErbα turnover. PMID:26392558

  5. Parathyroid hormone resets the cartilage circadian clock of the organ-cultured murine femur

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, Naoki; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Minami, Yoichi; Kunimoto, Tatsuya; Hosokawa, Toshihiro; Umemura, Yasuhiro; Inokawa, Hitoshi; Asada, Maki; Oda, Ryo; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose The circadian clock governs endogenous day-night variations. In bone, the metabolism and growth show diurnal rhythms. The circadian clock is based on a transcription-translation feedback loop composed of clock genes including Period2 (Per2), which encodes the protein period circadian protein homolog 2. Because plasma parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels show diurnal variation, we hypothesized that PTH could carry the time information to bone and cartilage. In this study, we analyzed the effect of PTH on the circadian clock of the femur. Patients and methods Per2::Luciferase (Per2::Luc) knock-in mice were used and their femurs were organ-cultured. The bioluminescence was measured using photomultiplier tube-based real-time bioluminescence monitoring equipment or real-time bioluminescence microscopic imaging devices. PTH or its vehicle was administered and the phase shifts were calculated. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect PTH type 1 receptor (PTH1R) expression. Results Real-time bioluminescence monitoring revealed that PTH reset the circadian rhythm of the Per2::Luc activity in the femurs in an administration time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. Microscopic bioluminescence imaging revealed that Per2::Luc activity in the growth plate and the articular cartilage showed that the circadian rhythms and their phase shifts were induced by PTH. PTH1R was expressed in the growth plate cartilage. Interpretation In clinical practice, teriparatide (PTH (1-34)) treatment is widely used for osteoporosis. We found that PTH administration regulated the femoral circadian clock oscillation, particularly in the cartilage. Regulation of the local circadian clock by PTH may lead to a more effective treatment for not only osteoporosis but also endochondral ossification in bone growth and fracture repair. PMID:25765847

  6. Melanopsin--shedding light on the elusive circadian photopigment.

    PubMed

    Brown, R Lane; Robinson, Phyllis R

    2004-03-01

    Circadian photoentrainment is the process by which the brain's internal clock becomes synchronized with the daily external cycle of light and dark. In mammals, this process is mediated exclusively by a novel class of retinal ganglion cells that send axonal projections to the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), the region of the brain that houses the circadian pacemaker. In contrast to their counterparts that mediate image-forming vision, SCN-projecting RGCs are intrinsically sensitive to light, independent of synaptic input from rod and cone photoreceptors. The recent discovery of these photosensitive RGCs has challenged the long-standing dogma of retinal physiology that rod and cone photoreceptors are the only retinal cells that respond directly to light and has explained the perplexing finding that mice lacking rod and cone photoreceptors can still reliably entrain their circadian rhythms to light. These SCN-projecting RGCs selectively express melanopsin, a novel opsin-like protein that has been proposed as a likely candidate for the photopigment in these cells. Research in the past three years has revealed that disruption of the melanopsin gene impairs circadian photo- entrainment, as well as other nonvisual responses to light such as the pupillary light reflex. Until recently, however, there was no direct demonstration that melanopsin formed a functional photopigment capable of catalyzing G-protein activation in a light-dependent manner. Our laboratory has recently succeeded in expressing melanopsin in a heterologous tissue culture system and reconstituting a pigment with the 11-cis-retinal chromophore. In a reconstituted biochemical system, the reconstituted melanopsin was capable of activating transducin, the G-protein of rod photoreceptors, in a light-dependent manner. The absorbance spectrum of this heterologously expressed melanopsin, however, does not match that predicted by previous behavioral and electophysiological studies. Although melanopsin is clearly the

  7. Role of Circadian Rhythms in Potassium Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Gumz, Michelle L.; Rabinowitz, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    It has been known for decades that urinary potassium excretion varies with a circadian pattern. In this review, we consider the historical evidence for this phenomenon and present an overview of recent developments in the field. Extensive evidence from the latter part of the last century clearly demonstrates that circadian potassium excretion does not depend on endogenous aldosterone. Of note is the recent discovery that the expression of several renal potassium transporters varies with a circadian pattern that appears to be consistent with substantial clinical data regarding daily fluctuations in urinary potassium levels. We propose the circadian clock mechanism as a key regulator of renal potassium transporters, and consequently renal potassium excretion. Further investigation into the mechanism of regulation of renal potassium transport by the circadian clock is warranted in order to increase our understanding of the clinical relevance of circadian rhythms to potassium homeostasis. PMID:23953800

  8. Circadian clocks: lessons from fish.

    PubMed

    Idda, M Laura; Bertolucci, Cristiano; Vallone, Daniela; Gothilf, Yoav; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Foulkes, Nicholas S

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the molecular and cellular organization of the circadian timing system in vertebrates has increased enormously over the past decade. In large part, progress has been based on genetic studies in the mouse as well as on fundamental similarities between vertebrate and Drosophila clocks. The zebrafish was initially considered as a potentially attractive genetic model for identifying vertebrate clock genes. However, instead, fish have ultimately proven to be valuable complementary models for studying various aspects of clock biology. For example, many fish can shift from diurnal to nocturnal activity implying specific flexibility in their clock function. We have learned much about the function of light input pathways, and the ontogeny and function of the pineal organ, the fish central pacemaker. Finally, blind cavefish have also provided new insight into the evolution of the circadian clock under extreme environmental conditions. PMID:22877658

  9. Circadian Rhythm Control: Neurophysiological Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glotzbach, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) was implicated as a primary component in central nervous system mechanisms governing circadian rhythms. Disruption of the normal synchronization of temperature, activity, and other rhythms is detrimental to health. Sleep wake disorders, decreases in vigilance and performance, and certain affective disorders may result from or be exacerbated by such desynchronization. To study the basic neurophysiological mechanisms involved in entrainment of circadian systems by the environment, Parylene-coated, etched microwire electrode bundles were used to record extracellular action potentials from the small somata of the SCN and neighboring hypothalamic nuclei in unanesthetized, behaving animals. Male Wistar rats were anesthetized and chronically prepared with EEG ane EMG electrodes in addition to a moveable microdrive assembly. The majority of cells had firing rates 10 Hz and distinct populations of cells which had either the highest firing rate or lowest firing rate during sleep were seen.

  10. Circadian rhythmometry of mammalian radiosensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haus, E.; Halberg, F.; Loken, M. K.; Kim, Y. S.

    1974-01-01

    In the case of human bone marrow, the largest number of mitoses is seen in the evening in diurnally active men, mitotic activity being at a minimum in the morning. The opposite pattern is observed for nocturnal animals such as rats and mice on a regimen of light during the daytime alternating with darkness during the night hours. The entirety of these rhythms plays an important role in the organism's responses to environmental stimuli, including its resistance to potentially harmful agents. Conditions under which circadian rhythms can be observed and validated by inferential statistical means are discussed while emphasizing how artifacts of the laboratory environment can be shown to obscure circadian periodic variations in radiosensitivity.

  11. Circadian rhythms: glucocorticoids and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Sulli, Alberto; Pizzorni, Carmen; Secchi, Maria Elena; Soldano, Stefano; Seriolo, Bruno; Straub, Rainer H; Otsa, Kati; Maestroni, Georges J

    2006-06-01

    Circadian rhythms are driven by biological clocks and are endogenous in origin. Therefore, circadian changes in the metabolism or secretion of endogenous glucocorticoids are certainly responsible in part for the time-dependent changes observed in the inflammatory response and arthritis. More recently, melatonin (MLT), another circadian hormone that is the secretory product of the pineal gland, has been found implicated in the time-dependent inflammatory reaction with effects opposite those of cortisol. Interestingly, cortisol and MLT show an opposite response to the light. The light conditions in the early morning have a strong impact on the morning cortisol peak, whereas MLT is synthesized in a strictly nocturnal pattern. Recently, a diurnal rhythmicity in healthy humans between cellular (Th1 type) or humoral (Th2 type) immune responses has been found and related to immunomodulatory actions of cortisol and MLT. The interferon (IFN)-gamma/interleukin (IL)-10 ratio peaked during the early morning and correlated negatively with plasma cortisol and positively with plasma MLT. Accordingly, the intensity of the arthritic pain varies consistently as a function of the hour of the day: pain is greater after waking up in the morning than in the afternoon or evening. The reduced cortisol and adrenal androgen secretion, observed during testing in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients not treated with glucocoticoids, should be clearly considered as a "relative adrenal insufficiency" in the presence of a sustained inflammatory process, and allows Th1 type cytokines to be produced in higher amounts during the late night. In conclusion, the right timing (early morning) for the glucocorticoid therapy in arthritis is fundamental and well justified by the circadian rhythms of the inflammatory mechanisms. PMID:16855156

  12. Circadian rhythms and cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wood, P A; Hrushesky, W J

    1996-01-01

    Temporal coordination of biologic processes with an approximately 24-h cycle (circadian) is common throughout the animal and plant kingdom and even in some prokaryotic organisms. In all organisms studied, the capability to keep biologic time is an inherited characteristic located intracellularly. These biological clocks anticipate and get the organism ready for regular environmental changes. This indicates both the ubiquity and the weight of the selective environmental pressure to keep time accurately. Several molecular strategies for biologic time keeping have apparently arisen independently several times throughout evolution. The anatomic, biochemical, and molecular mechanisms of the clock are in the process of being defined. This temporal organization at the cellular, organ, and organismic levels results in predictable differences in the capacity of plants, animals, and human beings to respond to therapeutic interventions administered at different times throughout important biologic cycles (e.g., circadian timed therapy). In the treatment of the cancer bearing host, circadian timing of surgery, anticancer drugs, radiation therapy, and biologic agents can result in improved toxicity profiles, enhanced tumor control, and improved host survival. The routine clinical application of such principles is facilitated by the availability of programmable drug delivery devices. Rhythm frequency ranges other than 24-h (e.g., low frequency: menstrual; high frequency: 10 to 120 min) may also be important to understanding health and disease and to designing successful therapy in diseases as diverse as cancer, infertility, and diabetes. PMID:8959371

  13. The ROP vesicle release factor is required in adult Drosophila glia for normal circadian behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Fanny S.; Jackson, F. Rob

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that endocytosis and/or vesicle recycling mechanisms are essential in adult Drosophila glial cells for the neuronal control of circadian locomotor activity. In this study, our goal was to identify specific glial vesicle trafficking, recycling, or release factors that are required for rhythmic behavior. From a glia-specific, RNAi-based genetic screen, we identified eight glial factors that are required for normally robust circadian rhythms in either a light-dark cycle or in constant dark conditions. In particular, we show that conditional knockdown of the ROP vesicle release factor in adult glial cells results in arrhythmic behavior. Immunostaining for ROP reveals reduced protein in glial cell processes and an accumulation of the Par Domain Protein 1ε (PDP1ε) clock output protein in the small lateral clock neurons. These results suggest that glia modulate rhythmic circadian behavior by secretion of factors that act on clock neurons to regulate a clock output factor. PMID:26190976

  14. Quantifying the robustness of circadian oscillations at the single-cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Guillaume; Rust, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Cyanobacteria are light-harvesting microorganisms that contribute to 30% of the photosynthetic activity on Earth and contain one of the simplest circadian systems in the animal kingdom. In Synechococcus elongatus , a species of freshwater cyanobacterium, circadian oscillations are regulated by the KaiABC system, a trio of interacting proteins that act as a biomolecular pacemaker of the circadian system. While the core oscillator precisely anticipates Earth's 24h light/dark cycle, it is unclear how much individual cells benefit from the expression and maintenance of a circadian clock. By studying the growth dynamics of individual S . elongatus cells under sudden light variations, we show that several aspects of cellular growth, such as a cell's division probability and its elongation rate, are tightly coupled to the circadian clock. We propose that the evolution and maintenance of a circadian clock increases the fitness of cells by allowing them to take advantage of cyclical light/dark environments by alternating between two phenotypes: expansionary, where cells grow and divide at a fast pace during the first part of the day, and conservative, where cells enter a more quiescent state to better prepare to the stresses associated with the night's prolonged darkness.

  15. Understanding the role of chromatin remodeling in the regulation of circadian transcription in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Rosanna S; Lam, Vu H; Chiu, Joanna C

    2015-10-01

    Circadian clocks enable organisms to anticipate daily changes in the environment and coordinate temporal rhythms in physiology and behavior with the 24-h day-night cycle. The robust cycling of circadian gene expression is critical for proper timekeeping, and is regulated by transcription factor binding, RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) recruitment and elongation, and post-transcriptional mechanisms. Recently, it has become clear that dynamic alterations in chromatin landscape at the level of histone posttranslational modification and nucleosome density facilitate rhythms in transcription factor recruitment and RNAPII activity, and are essential for progression through activating and repressive phases of circadian transcription. Here, we discuss the characterization of the BRAHMA (BRM) chromatin-remodeling protein in Drosophila in the context of circadian clock regulation. By dissecting its catalytic vs. non-catalytic activities, we propose a model in which the non-catalytic activity of BRM functions to recruit repressive factors to limit the transcriptional output of CLOCK (CLK) during the active phase of circadian transcription, while the primary function of the ATP-dependent catalytic activity is to tune and prevent over-recruitment of negative regulators by increasing nucleosome density. Finally, we divulge ongoing efforts and investigative directions toward a deeper mechanistic understanding of transcriptional regulation of circadian gene expression at the chromatin level. PMID:26926115

  16. Understanding the role of chromatin remodeling in the regulation of circadian transcription in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Rosanna S.; Lam, Vu H.; Chiu, Joanna C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Circadian clocks enable organisms to anticipate daily changes in the environment and coordinate temporal rhythms in physiology and behavior with the 24-h day-night cycle. The robust cycling of circadian gene expression is critical for proper timekeeping, and is regulated by transcription factor binding, RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) recruitment and elongation, and post-transcriptional mechanisms. Recently, it has become clear that dynamic alterations in chromatin landscape at the level of histone posttranslational modification and nucleosome density facilitate rhythms in transcription factor recruitment and RNAPII activity, and are essential for progression through activating and repressive phases of circadian transcription. Here, we discuss the characterization of the BRAHMA (BRM) chromatin-remodeling protein in Drosophila in the context of circadian clock regulation. By dissecting its catalytic vs. non-catalytic activities, we propose a model in which the non-catalytic activity of BRM functions to recruit repressive factors to limit the transcriptional output of CLOCK (CLK) during the active phase of circadian transcription, while the primary function of the ATP-dependent catalytic activity is to tune and prevent over-recruitment of negative regulators by increasing nucleosome density. Finally, we divulge ongoing efforts and investigative directions toward a deeper mechanistic understanding of transcriptional regulation of circadian gene expression at the chromatin level. PMID:26926115

  17. Drosophila TRPA1 functions in temperature control of circadian rhythm in pacemaker neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngseok; Montell, Craig

    2013-04-17

    Most animals from flies to humans count on circadian clocks to synchronize their physiology and behaviors. Daily light cycles are well known environmental cues for setting circadian rhythms. Warmer and cooler temperatures that mimic day and night are also effective in entraining circadian activity in most animals. Even vertebrate organisms can be induced to show circadian responses through exposure to temperature cycles. In poikilothermic animals such as Drosophila, temperature differences of only 2-3°C are sufficient to synchronize locomotor rhythms. However, the molecular sensors that participate in temperature regulation of circadian activity in fruit flies or other animals are enigmatic. It is also unclear whether such detectors are limited to the periphery or may be in the central brain. Here, we showed that Drosophila TRPA1 (transient receptor potential cation channel A1) was necessary for normal activity patterns during temperature cycles. The trpA1 gene was expressed in a subset of pacemaker neurons in the central brain. In response to temperature entrainment, loss of trpA1 impaired activity, and altered expression of the circadian clock protein period (Per) in a subset of pacemaker neurons. These findings underscore a role for a thermoTRP in temperature regulation that extends beyond avoidance of noxious or suboptimal temperatures. PMID:23595730

  18. The Cyanobacterial Circadian System: From Biophysics to Bioevolution

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Phoebe L.; Egli, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have unveiled the molecular machinery responsible for the biological clock in cyanobacteria and found that it exerts pervasive control over cellular processes including global gene expression. Indeed, the entire chromosome undergoes daily cycles of topology/compaction! The circadian system comprises both a posttranslational oscillator (PTO) and a transcriptional/translational feedback loop (TTFL). The PTO can be reconstituted in vitro with three purified proteins (KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC) and ATP. These are the only circadian proteins for which high-resolution structures are available. Phase in this nanoclockwork has been associated with key phosphorylations of KaiC. Structural considerations illuminate the mechanism by which the KaiABC oscillator ratchets unidirectionally. Models of the complete in vivo system have important implications for our understanding of circadian clocks in higher organisms, including mammals. The conjunction of structural, biophysical, and biochemical approaches to this system has brought our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of biological timekeeping to an unprecedented level. PMID:21332358

  19. Circadian Profiling of the Arabidopsis Proteome Using 2D-DIGE

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Mani K.; Nomura, Yuko; Shi, Hua; Nakagami, Hirofumi; Somers, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Clock-generated biological rhythms provide an adaptive advantage to an organism, resulting in increased fitness and survival. To better elucidate the plant response to the circadian system, we surveyed protein oscillations in Arabidopsis seedlings under constant light. Using large-scale two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) the abundance of more than 1000 proteins spots was reproducibly resolved quantified and profiled across a circadian time series. A comparison between phenol-extracted samples and RuBisCO-depleted extracts identified 71 and 40 rhythmically-expressed proteins, respectively, and between 30 and 40% of these derive from non-rhythmic transcripts. These included proteins influencing transcriptional regulation, translation, metabolism, photosynthesis, protein chaperones, and stress-mediated responses. The phasing of maximum expression for the cyclic proteins was similar for both datasets, with a nearly even distribution of peak phases across the time series. STRING clustering analysis identified two interaction networks with a notable number of oscillating proteins: plastid-based and cytosolic chaperones and 10 proteins involved in photosynthesis. The oscillation of the ABA receptor, PYR1/RCAR11, with peak expression near dusk adds to a growing body of evidence that intimately ties ABA signaling to the circadian system. Taken together, this study provides new insights into the importance of post-transcriptional circadian control of plant physiology and metabolism. PMID:27462335

  20. Rapid attenuation of circadian clock gene oscillations in the rat heart following ischemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Kung, Theodore A; Egbejimi, Oluwaseun; Cui, Jiajia; Ha, Ngan P; Durgan, David J; Essop, M Faadiel; Bray, Molly S; Shaw, Chad A; Hardin, Paul E; Stanley, William C; Young, Martin E

    2007-12-01

    The intracellular circadian clock consists of a series of transcriptional modulators that together allow the cell to perceive the time of day. Circadian clocks have been identified within various components of the cardiovascular system (e.g. cardiomyocytes, vascular smooth muscle cells) and possess the potential to regulate numerous aspects of cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology. The present study tested the hypothesis that ischemia/reperfusion (I/R; 30 min occlusion of the rat left main coronary artery in vivo) alters the circadian clock within the ischemic, versus non-ischemic, region of the heart. Left ventricular anterior (ischemic) and posterior (non-ischemic) regions were isolated from I/R, sham-operated, and naïve rats over a 24-h period, after which mRNAs encoding for both circadian clock components and known clock-controlled genes were quantified. Circadian clock gene oscillations (i.e. peak-to-trough fold differences) were rapidly attenuated in the I/R, versus the non-ischemic, region. Consistent with decreased circadian clock output, we observe a rapid induction of E4BP4 in the ischemic region of the heart at both the mRNA and protein levels. In contrast with I/R, chronic (1 week) hypobaric chamber-induced hypoxia did not attenuate oscillations in circadian clock genes in either the left or right ventricle of the rat heart. In conclusion, these data show that in a rodent model of myocardial I/R, circadian clocks within the ischemic region become rapidly impaired, through a mechanism that appears to be independent of hypoxia. PMID:17959196

  1. A mechanosensory pathway to the Drosophila circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Simoni, Alekos; Wolfgang, Werner; Topping, Matthew P; Kavlie, Ryan G; Stanewsky, Ralf; Albert, Joerg T

    2014-01-31

    Circadian clocks attune the physiology of virtually all living organisms to the diurnal cycles of their environments. In metazoan animals, multiple sensory input pathways have been linked to clock synchronization with the environmental cycle (entrainment). Extrinsic entrainment cues include light and temperature. We show that (12-hour:12-hour) cycles of vibration and silence (VS) are sufficient to synchronize the daily locomotor activity of wild-type Drosophila melanogaster. Behavioral synchronization to VS cycles required a functional clock and functional chordotonal organs and was accompanied by phase-shifts of the daily oscillations of PERIOD protein concentrations in brain clock neurons. The feedback from mechanosensory-and particularly, proprioceptive-organs may help an animal to keep its circadian clock in sync with its own, stimulus-induced activities. PMID:24482478

  2. Circadian rhythm of lactate dehydrogenase in rat testis.

    PubMed

    Vermouth, N T; Ponce, R H; Carriazo, C S; Blanco, A

    1984-01-01

    Activity of total lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and of the isozyme X (LDH X or C4) have been determined at 2 hr intervals during 24 hr cycles in testis of adult rats maintained since birth in a photoperiod of 14 hr light: 10 hr dark. LDH X activity of epididymal sections (caput, corpus and cauda) from the same animals was also determined. Total LDH and LDH X activities in testis exhibited circadian rhythms with different timing. LDH X in the three portions of epididymis showed diurnal variations similar to those in testis. Rats subjected to constant light or constant dark presented marked modifications of LDH X profiles, indicating that the photoperiod plays a synchronizer role. While total soluble proteins did not show variations in testis of rats exposed to the photoperiod, a circadian rhythm was demonstrated in animals maintained in constant light or dark. PMID:6467917

  3. Circadian regulation of metabolic homeostasis: causes and consequences

    PubMed Central

    McGinnis, Graham R; Young, Martin E

    2016-01-01

    Robust circadian rhythms in metabolic processes have been described in both humans and animal models, at the whole body, individual organ, and even cellular level. Classically, these time-of-day-dependent rhythms have been considered secondary to fluctuations in energy/nutrient supply/demand associated with feeding/fasting and wake/sleep cycles. Renewed interest in this field has been fueled by studies revealing that these rhythms are driven, at least in part, by intrinsic mechanisms and that disruption of metabolic synchrony invariably increases the risk of cardiometabolic disease. The objectives of this paper are to provide a comprehensive review regarding rhythms in glucose, lipid, and protein/amino acid metabolism, the relative influence of extrinsic (eg, neurohumoral factors) versus intrinsic (eg, cell autonomous circadian clocks) mediators, the physiologic roles of these rhythms in terms of daily fluctuations in nutrient availability and activity status, as well as the pathologic consequences of dyssynchrony. PMID:27313482

  4. Molecular Mechanisms of Circadian Regulation During Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanello, S. B.; Boyle, R.

    2012-01-01

    The physiology of both vertebrates and invertebrates follows internal rhythms coordinated in phase with the 24-hour daily light cycle. This circadian clock is governed by a central pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the brain. However, peripheral circadian clocks or oscillators have been identified in most tissues. How the central and peripheral oscillators are synchronized is still being elucidated. Light is the main environmental cue that entrains the circadian clock. Under the absence of a light stimulus, the clock continues its oscillation in a free-running condition. In general, three functional compartments of the circadian clock are defined. The vertebrate retina contains endogenous clocks that control many aspects of retinal physiology, including retinal sensitivity to light, neurohormone synthesis (melatonin and dopamine), rod disk shedding, signalling pathways and gene expression. Neurons with putative local circadian rhythm generation are found among all the major neuron populations in the mammalian retina. In the mouse, clock genes and function are more localized to the inner retinal and ganglion cell layers. The photoreceptor, however, secrete melatonin which may still serve a an important circadian signal. The reception and transmission of the non-visual photic stimulus resides in a small subpopulation (1-3%) or retinal ganglion cells (RGC) that express the pigment melanopsin (Opn4) and are called intrisically photoreceptive RGC (ipRGC). Melanopsin peak absorption is at 420 nm and all the axons of the ipRGC reach the SCN. A common countermeasure for circadian re-entrainment utilizes blue-green light to entrain the circadian clock and mitigate the risk of fatigue and health and performance decrement due to circadian rhythm disruption. However, an effective countermeasure targeting the photoreceptor system requires that the basic circadian molecular machinery remains intact during spaceflight. We hypothesize that spaceflight may affect ip

  5. Circadian RNA expression elicited by 3’-UTR IRAlu-paraspeckle associated elements

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Manon; Becquet, Denis; Blanchard, Marie-Pierre; Guillen, Séverine; Boyer, Bénédicte; Moreno, Mathias; Franc, Jean-Louis; François-Bellan, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Paraspeckles are nuclear bodies form around the long non-coding RNA, Neat1, and RNA-binding proteins. While their role is not fully understood, they are believed to control gene expression at a post-transcriptional level by means of the nuclear retention of mRNA containing in their 3’-UTR inverted repeats of Alu sequences (IRAlu). In this study, we found that, in pituitary cells, all components of paraspeckles including four major proteins and Neat1 displayed a circadian expression pattern. Furthermore the insertion of IRAlu at the 3’-UTR of the EGFP cDNA led to a rhythmic circadian nuclear retention of the egfp mRNA that was lost when paraspeckles were disrupted whereas insertion of a single antisense Alu had only a weak effect. Using real-time video-microscopy, these IRAlu were further shown to drive a circadian expression of EGFP protein. This study shows that paraspeckles, thanks to their circadian expression, control circadian gene expression at a post-transcriptional level. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14837.001 PMID:27441387

  6. Circadian RNA expression elicited by 3'-UTR IRAlu-paraspeckle associated elements.

    PubMed

    Torres, Manon; Becquet, Denis; Blanchard, Marie-Pierre; Guillen, Séverine; Boyer, Bénédicte; Moreno, Mathias; Franc, Jean-Louis; François-Bellan, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Paraspeckles are nuclear bodies form around the long non-coding RNA, Neat1, and RNA-binding proteins. While their role is not fully understood, they are believed to control gene expression at a post-transcriptional level by means of the nuclear retention of mRNA containing in their 3'-UTR inverted repeats of Alu sequences (IRAlu). In this study, we found that, in pituitary cells, all components of paraspeckles including four major proteins and Neat1 displayed a circadian expression pattern. Furthermore the insertion of IRAlu at the 3'-UTR of the EGFP cDNA led to a rhythmic circadian nuclear retention of the egfp mRNA that was lost when paraspeckles were disrupted whereas insertion of a single antisense Alu had only a weak effect. Using real-time video-microscopy, these IRAlu were further shown to drive a circadian expression of EGFP protein. This study shows that paraspeckles, thanks to their circadian expression, control circadian gene expression at a post-transcriptional level. PMID:27441387

  7. Circadian Genomics Reveal a Role for Post-transcriptional Regulation in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To maintain daily cycles, the circadian clock must tightly regulate the rhythms of thousands of mRNAs and proteins with the correct period, phase, and amplitude to ultimately drive the wide range of rhythmic biological processes. Recent genomic approaches have revolutionized our view of circadian gene expression and highlighted the importance of post-transcriptional regulation in driving mRNA rhythmicity. Even after transcripts are made from DNA, subsequent processing and regulatory steps determine when, where, and how much protein will be generated. These post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms can add flexibility to overall gene expression and alter protein levels rapidly without requiring transcript synthesis and are therefore beneficial for cells; however, the extent to which circadian post-transcriptional mechanisms contribute to rhythmic profiles throughout the genome and the mechanisms involved have not been fully elucidated. In this review, we will summarize how circadian genomics have revealed new insights into rhythmic post-transcriptional regulation in mammals and discuss potential implications of such regulation in controlling many circadian-driven physiologies. PMID:25303020

  8. Identifying Novel Transcriptional Regulators with Circadian Expression

    PubMed Central

    Schick, Sandra; Thakurela, Sudhir; Fournier, David; Hampel, Mareike Hildegard

    2015-01-01

    Organisms adapt their physiology and behavior to the 24-h day-night cycle to which they are exposed. On a cellular level, this is regulated by intrinsic transcriptional-translational feedback loops that are important for maintaining the circadian rhythm. These loops are organized by members of the core clock network, which further regulate transcription of downstream genes, resulting in their circadian expression. Despite progress in understanding circadian gene expression, only a few players involved in circadian transcriptional regulation, including transcription factors, epigenetic regulators, and long noncoding RNAs, are known. Aiming to discover such genes, we performed a high-coverage transcriptome analysis of a circadian time course in murine fibroblast cells. In combination with a newly developed algorithm, we identified many transcription factors, epigenetic regulators, and long intergenic noncoding RNAs that are cyclically expressed. In addition, a number of these genes also showed circadian expression in mouse tissues. Furthermore, the knockdown of one such factor, Zfp28, influenced the core clock network. Mathematical modeling was able to predict putative regulator-effector interactions between the identified circadian genes and may help for investigations into the gene regulatory networks underlying circadian rhythms. PMID:26644408

  9. The Circadian Clock and Human Health.

    PubMed

    Roenneberg, Till; Merrow, Martha

    2016-05-23

    Epidemiological studies provided the first evidence suggesting a connection between the circadian clock and human health. Mutant mice convincingly demonstrate the principle that dysregulation of the circadian system leads to a multitude of pathologies. Chrono-medicine is one of the most important upcoming themes in the field of circadian biology. Although treatments counteracting circadian dysregulation are already being applied (e.g., prescribing strong and regular zeitgebers), we need to comprehend entrainment throughout the body's entire circadian network before understanding the mechanisms that tie circadian dysregulation to pathology. Here, we attempt to provide a systematic approach to understanding the connection between the circadian clock and health. This taxonomy of (mis)alignments on one hand exposes how little we know about entrainment within any organism and which 'eigen-zeitgeber' signals are used for entrainment by the different cells and tissues. On the other hand, it provides focus for experimental approaches and tools that will logically map out how circadian systems contribute to disease as well as how we can treat and prevent them. PMID:27218855

  10. Circadian dysregulation disrupts bile acid homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bile acids are potentially toxic compounds and their levels of hepatic production, uptake, and export are tightly regulated by many inputs, including circadian rhythm. We tested the impact of disrupting the peripheral circadian clock on integral steps of bile acid homeostasis. Both restricted feedi...

  11. Circadian dysfunction induces leptin resistance in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Circadian disruption is associated with obesity, implicating the central clock in body weight control. Our comprehensive screen of wild-type and three circadian mutant mouse models, with or without chronic jet lag, shows that distinct genetic and physiologic interventions differentially disrupt over...

  12. [Circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatric diseases].

    PubMed

    Bromundt, Vivien

    2014-11-01

    Circadian rhythm sleep disorders are prevalent among psychiatric patients. This is most probable due to a close relationship between functional disturbances of the internal clock, sleep regulation and mental health. Mechanisms on molecular level of the circadian clock and neurotransmitter signalling are involved in the development of both disorders. Moreover, circadian disorders and psychiatric diseases favour each other by accessory symptoms such as stress or social isolation. Actimetry to objectively quantify the rest-activity cycle and salivary melatonin profiles as marker for the circadian phase help to diagnose circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatric patients. Chronotherapeutics such as bright light therapy, dark therapy, melatonin administration, and wake therapy are used to synchronise and consolidate circadian rhythms and help in the treatment of depression and other psychiatric disorders, but are still neglected in medicine. More molecular to behavioural research is needed for the understanding of the development of circadian disorders and their relationship to psychiatric illnesses. This will help to boost the awareness and treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatry. PMID:25377290

  13. Circadian regulation of insect olfactory learning.

    PubMed

    Decker, Susan; McConnaughey, Shannon; Page, Terry L

    2007-10-01

    Olfactory learning in insects has been used extensively for studies on the neurobiology, genetics, and molecular biology of learning and memory. We show here that the ability of the cockroach Leucophaea maderae to acquire olfactory memories is regulated by the circadian system. We investigated the effect of training and testing at different circadian phases on performance in an odor-discrimination test administered 30 min after training (short-term memory) or 48 h after training (long-term memory). When odor preference was tested by allowing animals to choose between two odors (peppermint and vanilla), untrained cockroaches showed a clear preference for vanilla at all circadian phases, indicating that there was no circadian modulation of initial odor preference or ability to discriminate between odors. After differential conditioning, in which peppermint odor was associated with a positive unconditioned stimulus of sucrose solution and vanilla odor was associated with a negative unconditioned stimulus of saline solution, cockroaches conditioned in the early subjective night showed a strong preference for peppermint and retained the memory for at least 2 days. Animals trained and tested at other circadian phases showed significant deficits in performance for both short- and long-term memory. Performance depended on the circadian time (CT) of training, not the CT of testing, and results indicate that memory acquisition rather than retention or recall is modulated by the circadian system. The data suggest that the circadian system can have profound effects on olfactory learning in insects. PMID:17893338

  14. THE INTRINSIC CIRCADIAN CLOCK WITHIN THE CARDIOMYOCYTE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Circadian clocks are intracellular molecular mechanisms that allow the cell to anticipate the time of day. We have previously reported that the intact rat heart expresses the major components of the circadian clock, of which its rhythmic expression in vivo is consistent with the operation of a fully...

  15. A colorful model of the circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Reppert, Steven M

    2006-01-27

    The migration of the colorful monarch butterfly provides biologists with a unique model system with which to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying a sophisticated circadian clock. The monarch circadian clock is involved in the induction of the migratory state and navigation over long distances, using the sun as a compass. PMID:16439193

  16. Circadian rhythms in myocardial metabolism and function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Circadian rhythms in myocardial function and dysfunction are firmly established in both animal models and humans. For example, the incidence of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death increases when organisms awaken. Such observations have classically been explained by circadian rhythms in neurohumoral...

  17. PDP1ε functions downstream of the circadian oscillator to mediate behavioral rhythms Abbreviated title: PDP1ε function in the circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Benito, Juliana; Zheng, Hao; Hardin, Paul E.

    2007-01-01

    The Drosophila circadian oscillator is comprised of autoregulatory period/timeless (per/tim) and Clock (Clk) feedback loops that control rhythmic transcription. In the Clk loop, CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC) heterodimers activate vrille (vri) and PAR domain protein 1ε (Pdp1ε) transcription, then sequential repression by VRI and activation by PDP1ε mediate rhythms in Clk transcription. Since VRI and PDP1ε bind the same regulatory element, the VRI/PDP1ε ratio is thought to control the level of Clk transcription. Thus, constant high or low PDP1ε levels in clock cells should eliminate Clk mRNA cycling and disrupt circadian oscillator function. Here we show that reducing PDP1ε levels in clock cells by ~70% via RNA interference or increasing PDP1ε levels by ~10-fold in clock cells does not alter Clk mRNA cycling or circadian oscillator function. However, constant low or high PDP1ε levels in clock cells disrupt locomotor activity rhythms despite persistent circadian oscillator function in brain pacemaker neurons that extend morphologically normal projections into the dorsal brain. These results demonstrate that the VRI/PDP1ε ratio neither controls Clk mRNA cycling nor circadian oscillator function, and argue that PDP1ε is not essential for Clk activation. PDP1ε is nevertheless required for behavioral rhythmicity, which suggests that it functions to regulate oscillator output. PMID:17344391

  18. Metabolic consequences of sleep and circadian disorders

    PubMed Central

    Depner, Christopher M.; Stothard, Ellen R.; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2014-01-01

    Sleep and circadian rhythms modulate or control daily physiological patterns with importance for normal metabolic health. Sleep deficiencies associated with insufficient sleep schedules, insomnia with short-sleep duration, sleep apnea, narcolepsy, circadian misalignment, shift work, night eating syndrome and sleep-related eating disorder may all contribute to metabolic dysregulation. Sleep deficiencies and circadian disruption associated with metabolic dysregulation may contribute to weight gain, obesity, and type 2 diabetes potentially by altering timing and amount of food intake, disrupting energy balance, inflammation, impairing glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Given the rapidly increasing prevalence of metabolic diseases, it is important to recognize the role of sleep and circadian disruption in the development, progression, and morbidity of metabolic disease. Some findings indicate sleep treatments and countermeasures improve metabolic health, but future clinical research investigating prevention and treatment of chronic metabolic disorders through treatment of sleep and circadian disruption is needed. PMID:24816752

  19. Circadian regulation of human cortical excitability.

    PubMed

    Ly, Julien Q M; Gaggioni, Giulia; Chellappa, Sarah L; Papachilleos, Soterios; Brzozowski, Alexandre; Borsu, Chloé; Rosanova, Mario; Sarasso, Simone; Middleton, Benita; Luxen, André; Archer, Simon N; Phillips, Christophe; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Maquet, Pierre; Massimini, Marcello; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness alters cortical excitability, which is essential for proper brain function and cognition. However, besides prior wakefulness, brain function and cognition are also affected by circadian rhythmicity. Whether the regulation of cognition involves a circadian impact on cortical excitability is unknown. Here, we assessed cortical excitability from scalp electroencephalography (EEG) responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in 22 participants during 29 h of wakefulness under constant conditions. Data reveal robust circadian dynamics of cortical excitability that are strongest in those individuals with highest endocrine markers of circadian amplitude. In addition, the time course of cortical excitability correlates with changes in EEG synchronization and cognitive performance. These results demonstrate that the crucial factor for cortical excitability, and basic brain function in general, is the balance between circadian rhythmicity and sleep need, rather than sleep homoeostasis alone. These findings have implications for clinical applications such as non-invasive brain stimulation in neurorehabilitation. PMID:27339884

  20. Genetic Basis of Human Circadian Rhythm Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher R.; Huang, Angela L.; Ptáček, Louis J.; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythm disorders constitute a group of phenotypes that usually present as altered sleep-wake schedules. Until a human genetics approach was applied to investigate these traits, the genetic components regulating human circadian rhythm and sleep behaviors remained mysterious. Steady advances in the last decade have dramatically improved our understanding of the genes involved in circadian rhythmicity and sleep regulation. Finding these genes presents new opportunities to use a wide range of approaches, including in vitro molecular studies and in vivo animal modeling, to elevate our understanding of how sleep and circadian rhythms are regulated and maintained. Ultimately, this knowledge will reveal how circadian and sleep disruption contribute to various ailments and shed light on how best to maintain and recover good health. PMID:22849821

  1. Circadian regulation of human cortical excitability

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Julien Q. M.; Gaggioni, Giulia; Chellappa, Sarah L.; Papachilleos, Soterios; Brzozowski, Alexandre; Borsu, Chloé; Rosanova, Mario; Sarasso, Simone; Middleton, Benita; Luxen, André; Archer, Simon N.; Phillips, Christophe; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Maquet, Pierre; Massimini, Marcello; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness alters cortical excitability, which is essential for proper brain function and cognition. However, besides prior wakefulness, brain function and cognition are also affected by circadian rhythmicity. Whether the regulation of cognition involves a circadian impact on cortical excitability is unknown. Here, we assessed cortical excitability from scalp electroencephalography (EEG) responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in 22 participants during 29 h of wakefulness under constant conditions. Data reveal robust circadian dynamics of cortical excitability that are strongest in those individuals with highest endocrine markers of circadian amplitude. In addition, the time course of cortical excitability correlates with changes in EEG synchronization and cognitive performance. These results demonstrate that the crucial factor for cortical excitability, and basic brain function in general, is the balance between circadian rhythmicity and sleep need, rather than sleep homoeostasis alone. These findings have implications for clinical applications such as non-invasive brain stimulation in neurorehabilitation. PMID:27339884

  2. Central and peripheral circadian clocks in mammals.

    PubMed

    Mohawk, Jennifer A; Green, Carla B; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2012-01-01

    The circadian system of mammals is composed of a hierarchy of oscillators that function at the cellular, tissue, and systems levels. A common molecular mechanism underlies the cell-autonomous circadian oscillator throughout the body, yet this clock system is adapted to different functional contexts. In the central suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, a coupled population of neuronal circadian oscillators acts as a master pacemaker for the organism to drive rhythms in activity and rest, feeding, body temperature, and hormones. Coupling within the SCN network confers robustness to the SCN pacemaker, which in turn provides stability to the overall temporal architecture of the organism. Throughout the majority of the cells in the body, cell-autonomous circadian clocks are intimately enmeshed within metabolic pathways. Thus, an emerging view for the adaptive significance of circadian clocks is their fundamental role in orchestrating metabolism. PMID:22483041

  3. Elevated ATPase activity of KaiC applies a circadian checkpoint on cell division in Synechococcus elongatus.

    PubMed

    Dong, Guogang; Yang, Qiong; Wang, Qiang; Kim, Yong-Ick; Wood, Thammajun L; Osteryoung, Katherine W; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Golden, Susan S

    2010-02-19

    A circadian clock coordinates physiology and behavior in diverse groups of living organisms. Another major cyclic cellular event, the cell cycle, is regulated by the circadian clock in the few cases where linkage of these cycles has been studied. In the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus, the circadian clock gates cell division by an unknown mechanism. Using timelapse microscopy, we confirm the gating of cell division in the wild-type and demonstrate the regulation of cytokinesis by key clock components. Specifically, a state of the oscillator protein KaiC that is associated with elevated ATPase activity closes the gate by acting through a known clock output pathway to inhibit FtsZ ring formation at the division site. An activity that stimulates KaiC phosphorylation independently of the KaiA protein was also uncovered. We propose a model that separates the functions of KaiC ATPase and phosphorylation in cell division gating and other circadian behaviors. PMID:20178745

  4. Quantitative Circadian Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Arabidopsis Reveals Extensive Clock Control of Key Components in Physiological, Metabolic, and Signaling Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Mani Kant; Nomura, Yuko; Wang, Lei; Nakagami, Hirofumi; Somers, David E.

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock provides adaptive advantages to an organism, resulting in increased fitness and survival. The phosphorylation events that regulate circadian-dependent signaling and the processes which post-translationally respond to clock-gated signals are largely unknown. To better elucidate post-translational events tied to the circadian system we carried out a survey of circadian-regulated protein phosphorylation events in Arabidopsis seedlings. A large-scale mass spectrometry-based quantitative phosphoproteomics approach employing TiO2-based phosphopeptide enrichment techniques identified and quantified 1586 phosphopeptides on 1080 protein groups. A total of 102 phosphopeptides displayed significant changes in abundance, enabling the identification of specific patterns of response to circadian rhythms. Our approach was sensitive enough to quantitate oscillations in the phosphorylation of low abundance clock proteins (EARLY FLOWERING4; ELF4 and PSEUDORESPONSE REGULATOR3; PRR3) as well as other transcription factors and kinases. During constant light, extensive cyclic changes in phosphorylation status occurred in critical regulators, implicating direct or indirect regulation by the circadian system. These included proteins influencing transcriptional regulation, translation, metabolism, stress and phytohormones-mediated responses. We validated our analysis using the elf4–211 allele, in which an S45L transition removes the phosphorylation herein identified. We show that removal of this phosphorylatable site diminishes interaction with EARLY FLOWERING3 (ELF3), a key partner in a tripartite evening complex required for circadian cycling. elf4–211 lengthens period, which increases with increasing temperature, relative to the wild type, resulting in a more stable temperature compensation of circadian period over a wider temperature range. PMID:26091701

  5. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide entrains circadian rhythms in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Marpegan, Luciano; Krall, Thomas J; Herzog, Erik D

    2009-04-01

    Many mammalian cell types show daily rhythms in gene expression driven by a circadian pacemaker. For example, cultured astrocytes display circadian rhythms in Period1 and Period2 expression. It is not known, however, how or which intercellular factors synchronize and sustain rhythmicity in astrocytes. Because astrocytes are highly sensitive to vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), a neuropeptide released by neurons and important for the coordination of daily cycling, the authors hypothesized that VIP entrains circadian rhythms in astrocytes. They used astrocyte cultures derived from knock-in mice containing a bioluminescent reporter of PERIOD2 (PER2) protein, to assess the effects of VIP on the rhythmic properties of astrocytes. VIP induced a dose-dependent increase in the peak-to-trough amplitude of the ensemble rhythms of PER2 expression with maximal effects near 100 nM VIP and threshold values between 0.1 and 1 nM. VIP also induced dose- and phase-dependent shifts in PER2 rhythms and daily VIP administration entrained bioluminescence rhythms of astrocytes to a predicted phase angle. This is the first demonstration that a neuropeptide can entrain glial cells to a phase predicted by a phase-response curve. The authors conclude that VIP potently entrains astrocytes in vitro and is a candidate for coordinating daily rhythms among glia in the brain. PMID:19346450

  6. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide entrains circadian rhythms in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Marpegan, Luciano; Krall, Thomas J.; Herzog, Erik D.

    2009-01-01

    Many mammalian cell types show daily rhythms in gene expression driven by a circadian pacemaker. For example, cultured astrocytes display circadian rhythms in Period1 and Period2 expression. It is not known, however, how or which intercellular factors synchronize and sustain rhythmicity in astrocytes. Because astrocytes are highly sensitive to vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), a neuropeptide released by neurons and important for the coordination of daily cycling, we hypothesized that VIP entrains circadian rhythms in astrocytes. We used astrocyte cultures derived from knock-in mice containing a bioluminescent reporter of PERIOD2 (PER2) protein, to assess the effects of VIP on the rhythmic properties of astrocytes. VIP induced a dose-dependent increase in the peak-to-trough amplitude of the ensemble rhythms of PER2 expression with maximal effects near 100nM VIP and threshold values between 0.1 and 1 nM. VIP also induced dose- and phase-dependent shifts in PER2 rhythms and daily VIP administration entrained bioluminescence rhythms of astrocytes to a predicted phase angle. This is the first demonstration that a neuropeptide can entrain glial cells to a phase predicted by a phase response curve. We conclude that VIP potently entrains astrocytes in vitro and is a candidate for coordinating daily rhythms among glia in the brain. PMID:19346450

  7. Robust and tunable circadian rhythms from differentially sensitive catalytic domains

    PubMed Central

    Phong, Connie; Markson, Joseph S.; Wilhoite, Crystal M.; Rust, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Circadian clocks are ubiquitous biological oscillators that coordinate an organism’s behavior with the daily cycling of the external environment. To ensure synchronization with the environment, the period of the clock must be maintained near 24 h even as amplitude and phase are altered by input signaling. We show that, in a reconstituted circadian system from cyanobacteria, these conflicting requirements are satisfied by distinct functions for two domains of the central clock protein KaiC: the C-terminal autokinase domain integrates input signals through the ATP/ADP ratio, and the slow N-terminal ATPase acts as an input-independent timer. We find that phosphorylation in the C-terminal domain followed by an ATPase cycle in the N-terminal domain is required to form the inhibitory KaiB•KaiC complexes that drive the dynamics of the clock. We present a mathematical model in which this ATPase-mediated delay in negative feedback gives rise to a compensatory mechanism that allows a tunable phase and amplitude while ensuring a robust circadian period. PMID:23277568

  8. An allele of the crm gene blocks cyanobacterial circadian rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Joseph S.; Bordowitz, Juliana R.; Bree, Anna C.; Golden, Susan S.

    2013-01-01

    The SasA-RpaA two-component system constitutes a key output pathway of the cyanobacterial Kai circadian oscillator. To date, rhythm of phycobilisome associated (rpaA) is the only gene other than kaiA, kaiB, and kaiC, which encode the oscillator itself, whose mutation causes completely arrhythmic gene expression. Here we report a unique transposon insertion allele in a small ORF located immediately upstream of rpaA in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 termed crm (for circadian rhythmicity modulator), which results in arrhythmic promoter activity but does not affect steady-state levels of RpaA. The crm ORF complements the defect when expressed in trans, but only if it can be translated, suggesting that crm encodes a small protein. The crm1 insertion allele phenotypes are distinct from those of an rpaA null; crm1 mutants are able to grow in a light:dark cycle and have no detectable oscillations of KaiC phosphorylation, whereas low-amplitude KaiC phosphorylation rhythms persist in the absence of RpaA. Levels of phosphorylated RpaA in vivo measured over time are significantly altered compared with WT in the crm1 mutant as well as in the absence of KaiC. Taken together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that the Crm polypeptide modulates a circadian-specific activity of RpaA. PMID:23918383

  9. Robust and tunable circadian rhythms from differentially sensitive catalytic domains.

    PubMed

    Phong, Connie; Markson, Joseph S; Wilhoite, Crystal M; Rust, Michael J

    2013-01-15

    Circadian clocks are ubiquitous biological oscillators that coordinate an organism's behavior with the daily cycling of the external environment. To ensure synchronization with the environment, the period of the clock must be maintained near 24 h even as amplitude and phase are altered by input signaling. We show that, in a reconstituted circadian system from cyanobacteria, these conflicting requirements are satisfied by distinct functions for two domains of the central clock protein KaiC: the C-terminal autokinase domain integrates input signals through the ATP/ADP ratio, and the slow N-terminal ATPase acts as an input-independent timer. We find that phosphorylation in the C-terminal domain followed by an ATPase cycle in the N-terminal domain is required to form the inhibitory KaiB•KaiC complexes that drive the dynamics of the clock. We present a mathematical model in which this ATPase-mediated delay in negative feedback gives rise to a compensatory mechanism that allows a tunable phase and amplitude while ensuring a robust circadian period. PMID:23277568

  10. The regulation of central and peripheral circadian clocks in humans.

    PubMed

    Cermakian, N; Boivin, D B

    2009-11-01

    Many circadian rhythms are controlled by the central clock of the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, as well as clocks located in other brain regions and most peripheral tissues. These central and peripheral clocks are based on clock genes and their protein products. In recent years, the expression of clock genes has started to be investigated in human samples, primarily white blood cells, but also skin, oral mucosa, colon cells, adipose tissue as well as post-mortem brain tissue. The expression of clock genes in those peripheral tissues offers a way to monitor human peripheral clocks and to compare their function and regulation with those of the central clock, which is followed by markers such as melatonin, cortisol and core body temperature. We have recently used such an approach to compare central and peripheral rhythms in subjects under different lighting conditions. In particular, we have monitored the entrainment of the clock of blood cells in subjects undergoing a simulated night shift protocol with bright light treatment, known to efficiently reset the central clock. This line of research will be helpful for learning more about the human circadian system and to find ways to alleviate health problems of shift workers, and other populations experiencing altered circadian rhythms. PMID:19849799

  11. Remodeling the clock: coactivators and signal transduction in the circadian clockworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Frank

    2009-03-01

    Most organisms on earth such as cyanobacteria, fungi, plants, insects, animals, and humans synchronize their physiological and behavioral activities with the environmental cycles of day and night. Significant progress has been made in unraveling the genetic components that constitute a molecular circadian clock, which facilitates the temporal control of physiology and behavior. Clock genes assemble interlocked transcriptional/translational feedback loops that underlie the circadian oscillations. Recent investigations revealed that posttranslational regulation of clock proteins is crucial for functioning of the molecular oscillator and for precise temporal control of circadian transcription. This review provides an overview of the homologous clockworks in Drosophila and mammals, with a special focus on recent insights in the posttranslational regulation of clock proteins as well as the role of coactivators, repressors, and signal transduction for circadian controlled genome-wide transcription. The emerging mechanisms of clock gene regulation provide an understanding of the temporal control of transcription in general and the circadian orchestration of physiology and behavior in particular.

  12. Light-regulated translational control of circadian behavior by eIF4E phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ruifeng; Gkogkas, Christos G; de Zavalia, Nuria; Blum, Ian D; Yanagiya, Akiko; Tsukumo, Yoshinori; Xu, Haiyan; Lee, Choogon; Storch, Kai-Florian; Liu, Andrew C; Amir, Shimon; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2015-06-01

    The circadian (∼24 h) clock is continuously entrained (reset) by ambient light so that endogenous rhythms are synchronized with daily changes in the environment. Light-induced gene expression is thought to be the molecular mechanism underlying clock entrainment. mRNA translation is a key step of gene expression, but the manner in which clock entrainment is controlled at the level of mRNA translation is not well understood. We found that a light- and circadian clock-regulated MAPK/MNK pathway led to phosphorylation of the cap-binding protein eIF4E in the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, the locus of the master circadian clock in mammals. Phosphorylation of eIF4E specifically promoted translation of Period 1 (Per1) and Period 2 (Per2) mRNAs and increased the abundance of basal and inducible PER proteins, which facilitated circadian clock resetting and precise timekeeping. Together, these results highlight a critical role for light-regulated translational control in the physiology of the circadian clock. PMID:25915475

  13. SKIP Is a Component of the Spliceosome Linking Alternative Splicing and the Circadian Clock in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Fangming; Xie, Qiguang; Wang, Huamei; Wang, Ying; Yue, Yanling; Gahura, Ondrej; Ma, Shuangshuang; Liu, Lei; Cao, Ying; Jiao, Yuling; Puta, Frantisek; McClung, C. Robertson; Xu, Xiaodong; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-01-01

    Circadian clocks generate endogenous rhythms in most organisms from cyanobacteria to humans and facilitate entrainment to environmental diurnal cycles, thus conferring a fitness advantage. Both transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms are prominent in the basic network architecture of circadian systems. Posttranscriptional regulation, including mRNA processing, is emerging as a critical step for clock function. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms linking RNA metabolism to the circadian clock network. Here, we report that a conserved SNW/Ski-interacting protein (SKIP) domain protein, SKIP, a splicing factor and component of the spliceosome, is involved in posttranscriptional regulation of circadian clock genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutation in SKIP lengthens the circadian period in a temperature-sensitive manner and affects light input and the sensitivity of the clock to light resetting. SKIP physically interacts with the spliceosomal splicing factor Ser/Arg-rich protein45 and associates with the pre-mRNA of clock genes, such as PSEUDORESPONSE REGULATOR7 (PRR7) and PRR9, and is necessary for the regulation of their alternative splicing and mRNA maturation. Genome-wide investigations reveal that SKIP functions in regulating alternative splicing of many genes, presumably through modulating recognition or cleavage of 5′ and 3′ splice donor and acceptor sites. Our study addresses a fundamental question on how the mRNA splicing machinery contributes to circadian clock function at a posttranscriptional level. PMID:22942380

  14. Nonphotic entrainment of the human circadian pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klerman, E. B.; Rimmer, D. W.; Dijk, D. J.; Kronauer, R. E.; Rizzo, J. F. 3rd; Czeisler, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    In organisms as diverse as single-celled algae and humans, light is the primary stimulus mediating entrainment of the circadian biological clock. Reports that some totally blind individuals appear entrained to the 24-h day have suggested that nonphotic stimuli may also be effective circadian synchronizers in humans, although the nonphotic stimuli are probably comparatively weak synchronizers, because the circadian rhythms of many totally blind individuals "free run" even when they maintain a 24-h activity-rest schedule. To investigate entrainment by nonphotic synchronizers, we studied the endogenous circadian melatonin and core body temperature rhythms of 15 totally blind subjects who lacked conscious light perception and exhibited no suppression of plasma melatonin in response to ocular bright-light exposure. Nine of these fifteen blind individuals were able to maintain synchronization to the 24-h day, albeit often at an atypical phase angle of entrainment. Nonphotic stimuli also synchronized the endogenous circadian rhythms of a totally blind individual to a non-24-h schedule while living in constant near darkness. We conclude that nonphotic stimuli can entrain the human circadian pacemaker in some individuals lacking ocular circadian photoreception.

  15. Circadian Rhythms, Sleep Deprivation, and Human Performance

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Namni; Basner, Mathias; Rao, Hengyi; Dinges, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Much of the current science on, and mathematical modeling of, dynamic changes in human performance within and between days is dominated by the two-process model of sleep–wake regulation, which posits a neurobiological drive for sleep that varies homeostatically (increasing as a saturating exponential during wakefulness and decreasing in a like manner during sleep), and a circadian process that neurobiologically modulates both the homeostatic drive for sleep and waking alertness and performance. Endogenous circadian rhythms in neurobehavioral functions, including physiological alertness and cognitive performance, have been demonstrated using special laboratory protocols that reveal the interaction of the biological clock with the sleep homeostatic drive. Individual differences in circadian rhythms and genetic and other components underlying such differences also influence waking neurobehavioral functions. Both acute total sleep deprivation and chronic sleep restriction increase homeostatic sleep drive and degrade waking neurobehavioral functions as reflected in sleepiness, attention, cognitive speed, and memory. Recent evidence indicating a high degree of stability in neurobehavioral responses to sleep loss suggests that these trait-like individual differences are phenotypic and likely involve genetic components, including circadian genes. Recent experiments have revealed both sleep homeostatic and circadian effects on brain metabolism and neural activation. Investigation of the neural and genetic mechanisms underlying the dynamically complex interaction between sleep homeostasis and circadian systems is beginning. A key goal of this work is to identify biomarkers that accurately predict human performance in situations in which the circadian and sleep homeostatic systems are perturbed. PMID:23899598

  16. Design principles underlying circadian clocks.

    PubMed Central

    Rand, D. A.; Shulgin, B. V.; Salazar, D.; Millar, A. J.

    2004-01-01

    A fundamental problem for regulatory networks is to understand the relation between form and function: to uncover the underlying design principles of the network. Circadian clocks present a particularly interesting instance, as recent work has shown that they have complex structures involving multiple interconnected feedback loops with both positive and negative feedback. While several authors have speculated on the reasons for this, a convincing explanation is still lacking.We analyse both the flexibility of clock networks and the relationships between various desirable properties such as robust entrainment, temperature compensation, and stability to environmental variations and parameter fluctuations. We use this to argue that the complexity provides the flexibility necessary to simultaneously attain multiple key properties of circadian clocks. As part of our analysis we show how to quantify the key evolutionary aims using infinitesimal response curves, a tool that we believe will be of general utility in the analysis of regulatory networks. Our results suggest that regulatory and signalling networks might be much less flexible and of lower dimension than their apparent complexity would suggest. PMID:16849158

  17. Association of intrinsic circadian period with morningness-eveningness, usual wake time, and circadian phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, J. F.; Rimmer, D. W.; Czeisler, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    The biological basis of preferences for morning or evening activity patterns ("early birds" and "night owls") has been hypothesized but has remained elusive. The authors reported that, compared with evening types, the circadian pacemaker of morning types was entrained to an earlier hour with respect to both clock time and wake time. The present study explores a chronobiological mechanism by which the biological clock of morning types may be set to an earlier hour. Intrinsic period, a fundamental property of the circadian system, was measured in a month-long inpatient study. A subset of participants also had their circadian phase assessed. Participants completed a morningness-eveningness questionnaire before study. Circadian period was correlated with morningness-eveningness, circadian phase, and wake time, demonstrating that a fundamental property of the circadian pacemaker is correlated with the behavioral trait of morningness-eveningness.

  18. Characterisation of circadian rhythms of various duckweeds.

    PubMed

    Muranaka, T; Okada, M; Yomo, J; Kubota, S; Oyama, T

    2015-01-01

    The plant circadian clock controls various physiological phenomena that are important for adaptation to natural day-night cycles. Many components of the circadian clock have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, the model plant for molecular genetic studies. Recent studies revealed evolutionary conservation of clock components in green plants. Homologues of clock-related genes have been isolated from Lemna gibba and Lemna aequinoctialis, and it has been demonstrated that these homologues function in the clock system in a manner similar to their functioning in Arabidopsis. While clock components are widely conserved, circadian phenomena display diversity even within the Lemna genus. In order to survey the full extent of diversity in circadian rhythms among duckweed plants, we characterised the circadian rhythms of duckweed by employing a semi-transient bioluminescent reporter system. Using a particle bombardment method, circadian bioluminescent reporters were introduced into nine strains representing five duckweed species: Spirodela polyrhiza, Landoltia punctata, Lemna gibba, L. aequinoctialis and Wolffia columbiana. We then monitored luciferase (luc+) reporter activities driven by AtCCA1, ZmUBQ1 or CaMV35S promoters under entrainment and free-running conditions. Under entrainment, AtCCA1::luc+ showed similar diurnal rhythms in all strains. This suggests that the mechanism of biological timing under day-night cycles is conserved throughout the evolution of duckweeds. Under free-running conditions, we observed circadian rhythms of AtCCA1::luc+, ZmUBQ1::luc+ and CaMV35S::luc+. These circadian rhythms showed diversity in period length and sustainability, suggesting that circadian clock mechanisms are somewhat diversified among duckweeds. PMID:24942699

  19. The circadian timing system in clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    Innominato, Pasquale F; Roche, Véronique P; Palesh, Oxana G; Ulusakarya, Ayhan; Spiegel, David; Lévi, Francis A

    2014-06-01

    The circadian timing system (CTS) controls several critical molecular pathways for cancer processes and treatment effects over the 24 hours, including drug metabolism, cell cycle, apoptosis, and DNA damage repair mechanisms. This results in the circadian time dependency of whole-body and cellular pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of anticancer agents. However, CTS robustness and phase varies among cancer patients, based on circadian monitoring of rest- activity, body temperature, sleep, and/or hormonal secretion rhythms. Circadian disruption has been further found in up to 50% of patients with metastatic cancer. Such disruption was associated with poor outcomes, including fatigue, anorexia, sleep disorders, and short progression-free and overall survival. Novel, minimally invasive devices have enabled continuous CTS assessment in non-hospitalized cancer patients. They revealed up to 12-hour differences in individual circadian phase. Taken together, the data support the personalization of chronotherapy. This treatment method aims at the adjustment of cancer treatment delivery according to circadian rhythms, using programmable-in-time pumps or novel release formulations, in order to increase both efficacy and tolerability. A fixed oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin chronotherapy protocol prolonged median overall survival in men with metastatic colorectal cancer by 3.3 months as compared to conventional delivery, according to a meta-analysis (P=0.009). Further analyses revealed the need for the prevention of circadian disruption or the restoration of robust circadian function in patients on chronotherapy, in order to further optimize treatment effects. The strengthening of external synchronizers could meet such a goal, through programmed exercise, meal timing, light exposure, improved social support, sleep scheduling, and the properly timed administration of drugs that target circadian clocks. Chrono-rehabilitation warrants clinical testing for improving

  20. Circadian rhythms of women with fibromyalgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klerman, E. B.; Goldenberg, D. L.; Brown, E. N.; Maliszewski, A. M.; Adler, G. K.

    2001-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic and debilitating disorder characterized by widespread nonarticular musculoskeletal pain whose etiology is unknown. Many of the symptoms of this syndrome, including difficulty sleeping, fatigue, malaise, myalgias, gastrointestinal complaints, and decreased cognitive function, are similar to those observed in individuals whose circadian pacemaker is abnormally aligned with their sleep-wake schedule or with local environmental time. Abnormalities in melatonin and cortisol, two hormones whose secretion is strongly influenced by the circadian pacemaker, have been reported in women with fibromyalgia. We studied the circadian rhythms of 10 women with fibromyalgia and 12 control healthy women. The protocol controlled factors known to affect markers of the circadian system, including light levels, posture, sleep-wake state, meals, and activity. The timing of the events in the protocol were calculated relative to the habitual sleep-wake schedule of each individual subject. Under these conditions, we found no significant difference between the women with fibromyalgia and control women in the circadian amplitude or phase of rhythms of melatonin, cortisol, and core body temperature. The average circadian phases expressed in hours posthabitual bedtime for women with and without fibromyalgia were 3:43 +/- 0:19 and 3:46 +/- 0:13, respectively, for melatonin; 10:13 +/- 0:23 and 10:32 +/- 0:20, respectively for cortisol; and 5:19 +/- 0:19 and 4:57 +/- 0:33, respectively, for core body temperature phases. Both groups of women had similar circadian rhythms in self-reported alertness. Although pain and stiffness were significantly increased in women with fibromyalgia compared with healthy women, there were no circadian rhythms in either parameter. We suggest that abnormalities in circadian rhythmicity are not a primary cause of fibromyalgia or its symptoms.

  1. Methylselenocysteine Resets the Rhythmic Expression of Circadian and Growth Regulatory Genes Disrupted by Nitrosomethylurea in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ming Zhu; Zhang, Xun; Zarbl, Helmut

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological and animal studies indicate that disruption of circadian rhythm increases breast cancer risk. Previously, we demonstrated that methylselenocysteine (MSC) reduced the incidence of N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU)-induced mammary carcinomas in Fischer 344 rats by 63%. MSC also increased the expression of Period 2 (Per2) and D-binding protein (DBP), providing evidence for a link between circadian rhythm and chemoprevention. Here, we report that NMU disrupted the expression of core circadian genes (Per1, Per2, Cry1, Cry2, and RevErbAα) and circadian-controlled genes (CCGs), including melatonin receptor 1α (MTNR1A), estrogen receptors (ER a and β), and growth regulatory genes (Trp53, p21, Gadd45α, and c-Myc) in mammary glands of F344 rats. By contrast, dietary MSC (3 ppm Selenium) given for 30 days, significantly enhanced the circadian expression of these genes (except for Cry1 and Cry2). The largest effect was on the levels of the Per2, MTNR1A, and ERβ mRNAs, which respectively showed 16.5-, 4.7-, and 9.5-fold increases in their rhythm-adjusted means, and 44.5-, 6.5-, and 9.7-fold increases in amplitude as compared to the control diet. MSC also shifted the peak expression times of these genes to Zeitgeber Time 12 (ZT12; light off). MSC also induced rhythmic expression of Trp53, p21, and Gadd45α mRNAs with peak levels at ZT12, when c-Myc expression was at its lowest level. However, MSC had no significant impact on the circadian expression of these genes in liver. These results suggest that dietary MSC counteracted the disruptive effect of NMU on circadian expression of genes essential to the normal mammary cell growth and differentiation. PMID:20424134

  2. Involvement of dopamine signaling in the circadian modulation of interval timing.

    PubMed

    Bussi, Ivana L; Levín, Gloria; Golombek, Diego A; Agostino, Patricia V

    2014-07-01

    Duration discrimination within the seconds-to-minutes range, known as interval timing, involves the interaction of cortico-striatal circuits via dopaminergic-glutamatergic pathways. Besides interval timing, most (if not all) organisms exhibit circadian rhythms in physiological, metabolic and behavioral functions with periods close to 24 h. We have previously reported that both circadian disruption and desynchronization impaired interval timing in mice. In this work we studied the involvement of dopamine (DA) signaling in the interaction between circadian and interval timing. We report that daily injections of levodopa improved timing performance in the peak-interval procedure in C57BL/6 mice with circadian disruptions, suggesting that a daily increase of DA is necessary for an accurate performance in the timing task. Moreover, striatal DA levels measured by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography indicated a daily rhythm under light/dark conditions. This daily variation was affected by inducing circadian disruption under constant light (LL). We also demonstrated a daily oscillation in tyrosine hydroxylase levels, DA turnover (3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid/DA levels), and both mRNA and protein levels of the circadian component Period2 (Per2) in the striatum and substantia nigra, two brain areas relevant for interval timing. None of these oscillations persisted under LL conditions. We suggest that the lack of DA rhythmicity in the striatum under LL - probably regulated by Per2 - could be responsible for impaired performance in the timing task. Our findings add further support to the notion that circadian and interval timing share some common processes, interacting at the level of the dopaminergic system. PMID:24689904

  3. Ribosome profiling reveals the rhythmic liver translatome and circadian clock regulation by upstream open reading frames

    PubMed Central

    Janich, Peggy; Arpat, Alaaddin Bulak; Castelo-Szekely, Violeta; Lopes, Maykel; Gatfield, David

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian gene expression displays widespread circadian oscillations. Rhythmic transcription underlies the core clock mechanism, but it cannot explain numerous observations made at the level of protein rhythmicity. We have used ribosome profiling in mouse liver to measure the translation of mRNAs into protein around the clock and at high temporal and nucleotide resolution. We discovered, transcriptome-wide, extensive rhythms in ribosome occupancy and identified a core set of approximately 150 mRNAs subject to particularly robust daily changes in translation efficiency. Cycling proteins produced from nonoscillating transcripts revealed thus-far-unknown rhythmic regulation associated with specific pathways (notably in iron metabolism, through the rhythmic translation of transcripts containing iron responsive elements), and indicated feedback to the rhythmic transcriptome through novel rhythmic transcription factors. Moreover, estimates of relative levels of core clock protein biosynthesis that we deduced from the data explained known features of the circadian clock better than did mRNA expression alone. Finally, we identified uORF translation as a novel regulatory mechanism within the clock circuitry. Consistent with the occurrence of translated uORFs in several core clock transcripts, loss-of-function of Denr, a known regulator of reinitiation after uORF usage and of ribosome recycling, led to circadian period shortening in cells. In summary, our data offer a framework for understanding the dynamics of translational regulation, circadian gene expression, and metabolic control in a solid mammalian organ. PMID:26486724

  4. CRTC Potentiates Light-independent timeless Transcription to Sustain Circadian Rhythms in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minkyung; Lee, Hoyeon; Hur, Jin-Hoe; Choe, Joonho; Lim, Chunghun

    2016-01-01

    Light is one of the strongest environmental time cues for entraining endogenous circadian rhythms. Emerging evidence indicates that CREB-regulated transcription co-activator 1 (CRTC1) is a key player in this pathway, stimulating light-induced Period1 (Per1) transcription in mammalian clocks. Here, we demonstrate a light-independent role of Drosophila CRTC in sustaining circadian behaviors. Genomic deletion of the crtc locus causes long but poor locomotor rhythms in constant darkness. Overexpression or RNA interference-mediated depletion of CRTC in circadian pacemaker neurons similarly impairs the free-running behavioral rhythms, implying that Drosophila clocks are sensitive to the dosage of CRTC. The crtc null mutation delays the overall phase of circadian gene expression yet it remarkably dampens light-independent oscillations of TIMELESS (TIM) proteins in the clock neurons. In fact, CRTC overexpression enhances CLOCK/CYCLE (CLK/CYC)-activated transcription from tim but not per promoter in clock-less S2 cells whereas CRTC depletion suppresses it. Consistently, TIM overexpression partially but significantly rescues the behavioral rhythms in crtc mutants. Taken together, our data suggest that CRTC is a novel co-activator for the CLK/CYC-activated tim transcription to coordinate molecular rhythms with circadian behaviors over a 24-hour time-scale. We thus propose that CRTC-dependent clock mechanisms have co-evolved with selective clock genes among different species. PMID:27577611

  5. Cross-talk between circadian clocks, sleep-wake cycles, and metabolic networks: Dispelling the darkness.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sandipan; Reddy, Akhilesh B

    2016-04-01

    Integration of knowledge concerning circadian rhythms, metabolic networks, and sleep-wake cycles is imperative for unraveling the mysteries of biological cycles and their underlying mechanisms. During the last decade, enormous progress in circadian biology research has provided a plethora of new insights into the molecular architecture of circadian clocks. However, the recent identification of autonomous redox oscillations in cells has expanded our view of the clockwork beyond conventional transcription/translation feedback loop models, which have been dominant since the first circadian period mutants were identified in fruit fly. Consequently, non-transcriptional timekeeping mechanisms have been proposed, and the antioxidant peroxiredoxin proteins have been identified as conserved markers for 24-hour rhythms. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of interdependencies amongst circadian rhythms, sleep homeostasis, redox cycles, and other cellular metabolic networks. We speculate that systems-level investigations implementing integrated multi-omics approaches could provide novel mechanistic insights into the connectivity between daily cycles and metabolic systems. PMID:26866932

  6. Hippocampal PER1: a circadian sentinel controlling RSKy activity during memory formation.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seung-Hee; Eckel-Mahan, Kristin

    2016-09-01

    Studies have demonstrated a pronounced dependence of memory formation on circadian time; however, the numerous mechanisms underlying this reliance are only beginning to be understood. While the 24-h cellular clock controls various aspects of hippocampal memory formation, its consolidation in particular (i.e., its conversion from short-term to long-term memory), appears to be heavily dependent on circadian activity in hippocampal neurons. Hippocampal memory consolidation requires phosphorylation of the cAMP Response Element-Binding protein, CREB, which upon phosphorylation promotes the transcription of genes necessary for long-term memory formation. Rhythmic cAMP/ERK-MAPK activity upstream of CREB is a necessary component. This Editorial highlights a study by Rawashdeh and coworkers, in which the authors establish the circadian clock gene Period1 (Per1) as a regulator of CREB phosphorylation in the mouse hippocampus, and thus reveal a functional link between circadian rhythms and learning efficiency. Read the highlighted article 'Period1 gates the circadian modulation of memory-relevant signaling in mouse hippocampus by regulating the nuclear shuttling of the CREB kinase pP90RSK' on page 731. PMID:27554418

  7. Ribosome profiling reveals an important role for translational control in circadian gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Christopher; Lahens, Nicholas F.; Hogenesch, John B.; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Physiological and behavioral circadian rhythms are driven by a conserved transcriptional/translational negative feedback loop in mammals. Although most core clock factors are transcription factors, post-transcriptional control introduces delays that are critical for circadian oscillations. Little work has been done on circadian regulation of translation, so to address this deficit we conducted ribosome profiling experiments in a human cell model for an autonomous clock. We found that most rhythmic gene expression occurs with little delay between transcription and translation, suggesting that the lag in the accumulation of some clock proteins relative to their mRNAs does not arise from regulated translation. Nevertheless, we found that translation occurs in a circadian fashion for many genes, sometimes imposing an additional level of control on rhythmically expressed mRNAs and, in other cases, conferring rhythms on noncycling mRNAs. Most cyclically transcribed RNAs are translated at one of two major times in a 24-h day, while rhythmic translation of most noncyclic RNAs is phased to a single time of day. Unexpectedly, we found that the clock also regulates the formation of cytoplasmic processing (P) bodies, which control the fate of mRNAs, suggesting circadian coordination of mRNA metabolism and translation. PMID:26338483

  8. CRTC Potentiates Light-independent timeless Transcription to Sustain Circadian Rhythms in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minkyung; Lee, Hoyeon; Hur, Jin-Hoe; Choe, Joonho; Lim, Chunghun

    2016-01-01

    Light is one of the strongest environmental time cues for entraining endogenous circadian rhythms. Emerging evidence indicates that CREB-regulated transcription co-activator 1 (CRTC1) is a key player in this pathway, stimulating light-induced Period1 (Per1) transcription in mammalian clocks. Here, we demonstrate a light-independent role of Drosophila CRTC in sustaining circadian behaviors. Genomic deletion of the crtc locus causes long but poor locomotor rhythms in constant darkness. Overexpression or RNA interference-mediated depletion of CRTC in circadian pacemaker neurons similarly impairs the free-running behavioral rhythms, implying that Drosophila clocks are sensitive to the dosage of CRTC. The crtc null mutation delays the overall phase of circadian gene expression yet it remarkably dampens light-independent oscillations of TIMELESS (TIM) proteins in the clock neurons. In fact, CRTC overexpression enhances CLOCK/CYCLE (CLK/CYC)-activated transcription from tim but not per promoter in clock-less S2 cells whereas CRTC depletion suppresses it. Consistently, TIM overexpression partially but significantly rescues the behavioral rhythms in crtc mutants. Taken together, our data suggest that CRTC is a novel co-activator for the CLK/CYC-activated tim transcription to coordinate molecular rhythms with circadian behaviors over a 24-hour time-scale. We thus propose that CRTC-dependent clock mechanisms have co-evolved with selective clock genes among different species. PMID:27577611

  9. Cross‐talk between circadian clocks, sleep‐wake cycles, and metabolic networks: Dispelling the darkness

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Sandipan

    2016-01-01

    Integration of knowledge concerning circadian rhythms, metabolic networks, and sleep‐wake cycles is imperative for unraveling the mysteries of biological cycles and their underlying mechanisms. During the last decade, enormous progress in circadian biology research has provided a plethora of new insights into the molecular architecture of circadian clocks. However, the recent identification of autonomous redox oscillations in cells has expanded our view of the clockwork beyond conventional transcription/translation feedback loop models, which have been dominant since the first circadian period mutants were identified in fruit fly. Consequently, non‐transcriptional timekeeping mechanisms have been proposed, and the antioxidant peroxiredoxin