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Sample records for circular hospital wards

  1. Dealing with Scabies in a Hospital Ward.

    PubMed

    Clavagnier, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    A case of scabies has been diagnosed in the Medical Ward where Sophie works, and the hospital is having to take appropriate measures. Scabies mites can spread quickly, and staff who are in contact with the infected patient risk catching the parasites and contaminating their own family in turn. One of the night nurses is probably infected. PMID:26365648

  2. Exploring positive hospital ward soundscape interventions.

    PubMed

    Mackrill, J; Jennings, P; Cain, R

    2014-11-01

    Sound is often considered as a negative aspect of an environment that needs mitigating, particularly in hospitals. It is worthwhile however, to consider how subjective responses to hospital sounds can be made more positive. The authors identified natural sound, steady state sound and written sound source information as having the potential to do this. Listening evaluations were conducted with 24 participants who rated their emotional (Relaxation) and cognitive (Interest and Understanding) response to a variety of hospital ward soundscape clips across these three interventions. A repeated measures ANOVA revealed that the 'Relaxation' response was significantly affected (n(2) = 0.05, p = 0.001) by the interventions with natural sound producing a 10.1% more positive response. Most interestingly, written sound source information produced a 4.7% positive change in response. The authors conclude that exploring different ways to improve the sounds of a hospital offers subjective benefits that move beyond sound level reduction. This is an area for future work to focus upon in an effort to achieve more positively experienced hospital soundscapes and environments. PMID:24768090

  3. [Nursing Education Utilizing Experiences in a Virtual Hospital Ward].

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Keiko; Matsumoto, Maki; Takai, Kiyako; Kodama, Hiromi; Hagiwara, Tomoko; Iwata, Naomi

    2015-06-01

    Environmental design should be required at medical facilities for conducting medical practice safely and for making hospitalization comfortable. Many medical nursing students cannot imagine medical facilities, especially hospital wards, when they study medical environments in a basic nursing lecture. As a result, they cannot connect well with patient assistance. We employed a computer assisted designing software, "3D My Home Designer" (Mega Soft Company) that runs on Windows 8, and considered the usefulness of it for lectures on environmental design showing how to design a hospital ward for patients' optimal hospital stay. We drew a medical facility in 2-D first, transformed it into 3D images, and then created movies of a virtual hospital ward in which a patient walked around. These movies consisted of 3 kinds: a) hospital room with changeable wall color, b) different allocations of hospital room and nurse station, and c) a blurred ward which corresponded to how a patient with poor eyesight (cataract) would see a ward. We prepared as controls: a') still images of a hospital room, b') still images of ward, and c') a documentation on how a ward is seen by a patient with a cataract. We gave a questionnaire to students and nurses about these movies and still images (controls). In a) and b), there were no differences between the movies and still images in both students and nurses. In c), both students and nurses had a viewpoint from the patient with poor eyesight. From these results, we consider that the students, who have fewer experiences in a hospital, may understand the environments well by movies and the application of a virtual movie ward to nursing education may be useful in a lecture, depending on the readiness of the students. PMID:26073505

  4. 20. West Elevation and Section, Ward 'K', Letterman General Hospital, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. West Elevation and Section, Ward 'K', Letterman General Hospital, Presidio of San Francisco, Cal. Sheet No. 2. May 1917. BUILDING 1049. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 12, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  5. 19. First and Second Floors. Ward 'K', Letterman General Hospital, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. First and Second Floors. Ward 'K', Letterman General Hospital, Presidio of San Francisco, Cal. Sheet No. 1. May 1917. BUILDING 1049. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 12, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  6. Control of infection in hospital wards

    PubMed Central

    Blowers, Robert

    1961-01-01

    Some of the problems of ward management are reviewed. Methods suggested for dealing with them are probably not the ideals that should ultimately be attained but minimum standards to serve as immediate objectives. They concern indications for and methods of isolation, control of infection from staff, environmental contamination, and a few technical procedures. A new type of dressing towel for wounds is described. Images PMID:16810967

  7. Hospital admission avoidance through the introduction of a virtual ward.

    PubMed

    Jones, Joanne; Carroll, Andrea

    2014-07-01

    The ageing British population is placing increased demands on the delivery of care in mainstream health-care institutions. While people are living longer, a significant percentage is also living with one or more long-term conditions. These issues, alongside continuing financial austerity measures, require a radical improvement in the care of patients away from hospitals. The Wyre Forest Clinical Commissioning Group introduced a virtual ward model for two main purposes: to save on spiralling costs of hospital admissions, and, secondly, to ensure the preferred wishes of most patients to be cared for and even die at home were achieved. This commentary describes how the virtual ward model was implemented and the impact of preventing unplanned emergency admissions to hospitals. The setting up of enhanced care services and virtual wards in one county is discussed, aiming to highlight success points and potential pitfalls to avoid. The results from the implementation of the virtual ward model show a significant reduction in emergency and avoidable patient admissions to hospital. The success of virtual wards is dependent on integrated working between different health-care disciplines. PMID:25039341

  8. V-TECS Guide for Hospital Ward Clerk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Ellen T.; Benson, Robert T.

    This curriculum guide consists of materials for use in teaching a course in job skills for hospital ward clerks. Included in the front matter of the guide are an introduction, guidelines for using the guide, and a course outline. The second section contains a job description, seven categories of job duties and tasks, a final examination, sample…

  9. Thermal comfort of patients in hospital ward areas.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R. M.; Rae, A.

    1977-01-01

    The patient is identified as being of prime importance for comfort standards in hospital ward areas, other ward users being expected to adjust their dress to suit the conditions necessary for patients comfort. A study to identify the optimum steady state conditions for patients comfort is then described. Although this study raises some doubts as to the applicability of the standard thermal comfort assessment techniques to ward areas, it is felt that its results give a good indication of the steady-state conditions preferred by the patients. These were an air temperature of between 21-5 degrees and 22 degrees C and a relative humidity of between 30% and 70%, where the air velocity was less than 0-1 m/s and the mean radiant temperature was close to air temperature. PMID:264497

  10. Should we use automated external defibrillators in hospital wards?

    PubMed

    De Regge, M; Monsieurs, K G; Vandewoude, K; Calle, P A

    2012-01-01

    Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) have shown to improve survival after cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) in many, but not all clinical settings. A recent study reported that the use of AEDs in-hospital did not improve survival. The current retrospective study reports the results of an in-hospital AED programme in a university hospital, and focuses on the quality of AED use. At Ghent University Hospital 30 AEDs were placed in non-monitored hospital wards and outpatient clinics treating patients with non-cardiac problems. Nurses were trained to use these devices. From November 2006 until March 2011, the AEDs were used in 23 of 39 CPA cases, in only one patient the presenting heart rhythm was ventricular fibrillation and this patient survived. Pulseless electrical activity was present in 14 patients (four survived) and asystole in eight patients (one survived). AEDs were attached to eight patients without CPA, and in 16 patients with CPA AED was not used. The quality of AED use was often suboptimal as illustrated by external artifacts during the first rhythm analysis by the AED in 30% (7/23) and more than 20 seconds delay before restart of chest compressions after the AED rhythm analysis in 50% (9/18). The literature data, supported by our results, indicate that in-hospital AED programmes are unlikely to improve survival after CPA. Moreover, their use is often suboptimal. Therefore, if AEDs are introduced in a hospital, initial training, frequent retraining and close follow-up are essential. PMID:23019797

  11. Sexual dysfunctions in the patients hospitalized in psychiatric wards compared to other specialized wards in Isfahan, Iran, in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadzadeh, Gholamhossain; Shahin, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Having pleasurable sexual intercourses plays a major role in marital life satisfaction. Many of the medical and psychiatric disorders may affect the sexual function of the patients. The present study aims to investigate the relative frequency of sexual dysfunctions in the patients hospitalized in psychiatric wards and that of the patients in other specialized wards. Materials and Methods: This study is a descriptive-analytical, cross-sectional one, carried out on 900 patients hospitalized in psychiatric, cardiac, orthopedic, ophthalmology, and dermatology and plastic surgery wards of 5 hospitals in Isfahan. Data collection tools included demographic questionnaire and Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale (ASEX). Results: Sexual dysfunction in the patients hospitalized in psychiatric wards (38%) was significantly higher than in the patients in other wards (27%), (P = 0.00). Among the patients hospitalized in psychiatric wards, those with bipolar disorder (37.3%) had the highest prevalence rate of sexual dysfunction. The patients with schizophrenia, major depression, substance abuse, and anxiety disorders had the following rates respectively. Among the patients in non-psychiatric wards, those in cardiac wards (37.1%) had the highest prevalence rate of sexual dysfunction. There was a significant relationship between the drug uses, mostly psychiatric drugs especially anti-psychotics, and the occurrence of sexual dysfunction. Conclusion: Considering the significant relative frequency of sexual dysfunction in psychiatric patients and undesired effects of simultaneous occurrence of both of these disorders in the patients, more emphasis is recommended to be placed on the prevention and proper treatment of these disorders in the patients. PMID:26623400

  12. Observations of mealtimes in hospital aged care rehabilitation wards.

    PubMed

    Walton, Karen; Williams, Peter; Tapsell, Linda; Hoyle, Matthew; Shen, Zhi Wei; Gladman, Lauren; Nurka, Martin

    2013-08-01

    Malnutrition is common in long-stay elderly hospitalized patients and their dietary intakes are often poor, despite the provision of adequate quantities of food to meet patient needs. The aim of this study was to identify environmental factors that were associated with achieving adequate food consumption in a hospital context. This study observed the daily routines of 30 elderly patients over 2days in rehabilitation wards in three Australian hospitals. All activities associated with mealtimes were recorded, from the commencement of breakfast to the conclusion of supper at the end of the day. Four key themes emerged: the eating location; assistance given at meals; negative and positive interruptions. The time taken to eat meals averaged 22min, ranging from 3 to 55min. Food intakes appeared to be better when meals were consumed communally in a dining room. There were many occasions when patients needed more assistance to eat than was available. The most common factors negatively affecting meal consumption were medication rounds, inappropriate placement of trays, packaging being hard to open, and patient showering. The presence of visitors, dietitians and nutrition assistants appeared to improve dietary intakes. Trials of protected mealtimes in Australian hospitals are certainly important and timely. PMID:23523667

  13. Job enrichment, work motivation, and job satisfaction in hospital wards: testing the job characteristics model.

    PubMed

    Kivimäki, M; Voutilainen, P; Koskinen, P

    1995-03-01

    This study investigated work motivation and job satisfaction at hospital wards with high and low levels of job enrichment. Primary nursing was assumed to represent a highly enriched job, whereas functional nursing represented a job with a low level of enrichment. Five surgical wards were divided into these two categories based on the structured interviews with head nurses. Work motivation and job satisfaction among ward personnel were assessed by a questionnaire. The ward personnel occupying highly enriched jobs reported significantly higher work motivation and satisfaction with the management than the personnel occupying jobs with a low level of enrichment. PMID:7735655

  14. Delivery of pharmaceutical services at ward level in a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Schellack, N; Martins, V; Botha, N; Meyer, J C

    2009-03-01

    Poor management of pharmaceuticals could lead to wastage of financial resources and poor services in the public sector. The main aim of the study was to investigate the quality of pharmaceutical services at ward level in a teaching hospital. The design of the study was descriptive. Three data collection instruments were designed and pilot-tested prior to the actual data collection. Two structured questionnaires were used to interview the sister-in-charge of each ward and the stock and drug controller at the pharmacy. A checklist for the management of pharmaceuticals was completed for each ward. Descriptive statistics were used to describe and summarise the data. Sisters-in-charge of 30 wards and the stock and drug controller at the pharmacy participated in the study. The relationship with the pharmacy was perceived to be average by 54% (n = 30) of the sisters-in-charge of the wards. Communication with the pharmacy was mainly by telephone and 57% of the sisters-in-charge mentioned that they experienced difficulties in conveying messages to the pharmacy. Ten of the wards received regular ward visits by a pharmacist. Expiry dates were checked by all wards but at different intervals. The majority of the wards (90%) used patient cards, which refer to prescription charts, for stock control and ordering from the pharmacy. Fridge temperatures were checked and charted on a daily basis by 30% of the wards. Written standard operating procedures (SOPs) were used by the pharmacy for issuing ward stock. Although 83% of the wards indicated that they used SOPs, evidence of written SOPs was not available. The results indicated that the management of pharmaceutical services at ward level could be improved. Implementation of appropriate communication systems will enhance cooperation between the pharmacy and the wards. A uniform ward stock control system, either by computer or stock cards, should be introduced. Regular ward visits by a pharmacist to oversee ward stock management are

  15. Ward managers' attitudes towards external consultants in Ashworth, a special hospital, 1992-1994.

    PubMed

    Richman, J; Mercer, D

    2001-08-01

    This case study elaborates the aftermath of the Blom-Cooper Inquiry (1992), which forced the special hospital, Ashworth, into a radical 'culture change'. To this end, two groups of external consultants--a management consultancy and a professional task force--were introduced into the hospital. Newly established ward managers were to spearhead the organizational change by bringing social and clinical order to the wards over which the higher management had lost control. Few studies have mapped out the interaction between segments of an organization and expert outsiders. In this study, the interaction of the ward manager to the newly appointed external management consultancy and task force was analysed. It was clear that ward managers rated poorly the efforts of the management consultancy and task force--it was considered that they were not giving value for money. The task force rated slightly more favourably than the management consultancy. The fact that the management consultancy did not have ward credibility in this closed forensic setting was attributed to low prestige. The management consultancy also failed to fulfill the organizational ambitions of ward managers, who wished to be central to the hospital's major decision-making process. PMID:11507808

  16. Classifying nursing organization in wards in Norwegian hospitals: self-identification versus observation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The organization of nursing services could be important to the quality of patient care and staff satisfaction. However, there is no universally accepted nomenclature for this organization. The objective of the current study was to classify general hospital wards based on data describing organizational practice reported by the ward nurse managers, and then to compare this classification with the name used in the wards to identify the organizational model (self-identification). Methods In a cross-sectional postal survey, 93 ward nurse managers in Norwegian hospitals responded to questions about nursing organization in their wards, and what they called their organizational models. K-means cluster analysis was used to classify the wards according to the pattern of activities attributed to the different nursing roles and discriminant analysis was used to interpret the solutions. Cross-tabulation was used to validate the solutions and to compare the classification obtained from the cluster analysis with that obtained by self-identification. The bootstrapping technique was used to assess the generalizability of the cluster solution. Results The cluster analyses produced two alternative solutions using two and three clusters, respectively. The three-cluster solution was considered to be the best representation of the organizational models: 32 team leader-dominated wards, 23 primary nurse-dominated wards and 38 wards with a hybrid or mixed organization. There was moderate correspondence between the three-cluster solution and the models obtained by self-identification. Cross-tabulation supported the empirical classification as being representative for variations in nursing service organization. Ninety-four per cent of the bootstrap replications showed the same pattern as the cluster solution in the study sample. Conclusions A meaningful classification of wards was achieved through an empirical cluster solution; this was, however, only moderately consistent with

  17. Sexual activity among patients in psychiatric hospital wards.

    PubMed

    Warner, James; Pitts, Nicola; Crawford, Mike J; Serfaty, Marc; Prabhakaran, Pramod; Amin, Rizkar

    2004-10-01

    In psychiatric hospitals, sexual activity between patients raises special difficulties regarding consent. We undertook a questionnaire survey of inpatients in the mental health units of three hospitals to identify the nature and frequency of sexual activity. A contemporaneous staff questionnaire was used in an attempt to validate the patient reports. Of the 100 patients who participated (response rate 60%), 30 reported engaging in some form of sexual activity including 10 who had sexual intercourse. All sexual intercourse was consensual, but only 2 respondents used condoms. Staff questionnaires suggested levels of sexual activity congruent with patient reports. This survey underlines the conflict between an individual's right to sexual expression and the need to protect vulnerable patients. PMID:15459258

  18. Comparison Patients and Staffs Satisfaction in General Versus Special Wards of Hospitals of Jahrom

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Leila; Jahromi, Marzieh Kargar; Hojat, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Aims: Patient satisfaction is the most important indicator of high-quality health care and is used for the assessment and planning of health care. Also, Job satisfaction is an important factor on prediction and perception of organizational manner. The aim of this study is to identify and compare patient and staff satisfaction in general versus special wards. Material and Method: In order to identify the various indicators of satisfaction and dissatisfaction, a descriptive study (cross sectional) was done to assess patients’ satisfaction with in-patient care at Jahrom University of Medical Science hospitals. The sample size was 600 patients that selected by sequential random sampling technique and are close to their discharge from the hospital. Patients were asked to indicate the scale point which best reflected their level of satisfaction with the treatment or service. Also we assess the staff satisfaction (sample size was 408 staffs) in general ward using a researcher made questionnaire. It should be noted that the participants were anonymous and there was no obligation to participation. We tried to set a secure and comfortable environment for filling out the questionnaire. Results: Among 600 patients, 239 (n = 38.67%) were men and 368 (61.33%) were female. Number of nurses was 408, of which 135 (33.08%) were men and 273 (66.92%) female. There was a significant correlation between working experience and professional factors of personnel. The mean total patient satisfaction in general and special wards is (2.75 ± .35, 3.03 ± .53) respectively. Differences of patient satisfaction in domains such respect, care and confidence in general wards versus special ward were statistically significant, but there was no difference in expect time of patients in these wards. Differences Between the mean patient and staff satisfaction in the general wards versus special wards were statistically significant using independent t-tests (p = .018, p = .029

  19. An unusual outbreak of nontuberculous mycobacteria in hospital respiratory wards: Association with nontuberculous mycobacterial colonization of hospital water supply network.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, Salvatore; Rogliani, Paola; Paone, Gregorino; Altieri, Alfonso; Alma, Mario Giuseppe; Cazzola, Mario; Puxeddu, Ermanno

    2016-06-01

    The incidence and prevalence of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection is increasing worldwide arousing concerns that NTM infection may become a serious health challenge. We recently observed a significant increase of NTM-positive sputa samples from patients referred to respiratory disease wards of a large tertiary hospital in Rome. A survey to identify possible NTM contamination revealed a massive presence of NTM in the hospital water supply network. After decontamination procedures, NTM presence dropped both in water pipelines and sputa samples. We believe that this observation should encourage water network surveys for NTM contamination and prompt decontamination procedures should be considered to reduce this potential source of infection. PMID:27242241

  20. The outbreak of Serratia marcescens bacteremia in a pediatric ward, Siriraj Hospital 1997.

    PubMed

    Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Danchaivijitr, Somwang; Boonpragaigaew, Gorapin; Dhiraputra, Chertsak; Vanprapa, Nirun; Visitsunthorn, Nuananong; Trakulsomboon, Suwanna

    2002-08-01

    Between October 20 and November 11, 1997, Serratia marcescens bacteremia was identified in 8 patients in a pediatric ward at Siriraj Hospital. The organism was isolated from 17 blood and 3 bone marrow specimens. The only common associated factor in these patients was that they all had received an intravenous fluid infusion. In the attempt to investigate the source of S. marcescens implicated in the outbreak, 108 specimens of intravenous fluid, 3 intravenous fluid bottle caps, 4 specimens from intravenous fluid tubing sets, 21 specimens of antiseptics used on the ward, 28 specimens of rectal swabs from patients on the ward, 1 sample of blood culture media prepared by the hospital for routine use, and 62 environmental specimens including hand swabs of the medical personnel, refrigerator, air conditioning, milk samples, room air, water sink, wooden splint and adhesive tape used to immobilize the intravenous access. Of 227 specimens sent for culture, S. marcescens was isolated from only one specimen collected from the in-use intravenous fluid given to a patient with Serratia bacteremia. S. marcescens was not found in any other surveillance culture. The 8 patients were placed under quarantine in the same room with an exclusive nursing team. With the investigation and intervention including monitoring for meticulous hand washing of the ward staff, the outbreak was stopped within 7 days. Although the investigation failed to discover the environmental reservoir of S. marcescens in this outbreak, the data suggested that intravenous fluid was probably the route of transmission and the medical personnel played an important role in spreading the infection. PMID:12403246

  1. Effectiveness of Hospital-Wide Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Infection Control Policies Differs by Ward Specialty

    PubMed Central

    Sadsad, Rosemarie; Sintchenko, Vitali; McDonnell, Geoff D.; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L.

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of preventable nosocomial infections and is endemic in hospitals worldwide. The effectiveness of infection control policies varies significantly across hospital settings. The impact of the hospital context towards the rate of nosocomial MRSA infections and the success of infection control is understudied. We conducted a modelling study to evaluate several infection control policies in surgical, intensive care, and medical ward specialties, each with distinct ward conditions and policies, of a tertiary public hospital in Sydney, Australia. We reconfirm hand hygiene as the most successful policy and find it to be necessary for the success of other policies. Active screening for MRSA, patient isolation in single-bed rooms, and additional staffing were found to be less effective. Across these ward specialties, MRSA transmission risk varied by 13% and reductions in the prevalence and nosocomial incidence rate of MRSA due to infection control policies varied by up to 45%. Different levels of infection control were required to reduce and control nosocomial MRSA infections for each ward specialty. Infection control policies and policy targets should be specific for the ward and context of the hospital. The model we developed is generic and can be calibrated to represent different ward settings and pathogens transmitted between patients indirectly through health care workers. This can aid the timely and cost effective design of synergistic and context specific infection control policies. PMID:24340085

  2. Medication prescribing errors and associated factors at the pediatric wards of Dessie Referral Hospital, Northeast Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Medication error is common and preventable cause of medical errors and occurs as a result of either human error or a system flaw. The consequences of such errors are more harmful and frequent among pediatric patients. Objective To assess medication prescribing errors and associated factors in the pediatric wards of Dessie Referral Hospital, Northeast Ethiopia. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in the pediatric wards of Dessie Referral Hospital from February 17 to March 17, 2012. Data on the prescribed drugs were collected from patient charts and prescription papers among all patients who were admitted during the study period. Descriptive statistics was used to determine frequency, prevalence, means, and standard deviations. The relationship between dependent and independent variables were computed using logistic regression (with significance declared at p-value of 0.05 and 95% confidence interval). Results Out of the 384 Medication order s identified during the study, a total of 223 prescribing errors were identified. This corresponds to an overall medication prescribing error rate of 58.07%. Incomplete prescriptions and dosing errors were the two most common types of prescribing errors. Antibiotics (54.26%) were the most common classes of drugs subjected to prescribing error. Day of the week and route of administration were factors significantly associated with increased prescribing error. Conclusions Medication prescribing errors are common in the pediatric wards of Dessie Referral Hospital. Improving quick access to up to date reference materials, providing regular refresher trainings and possibly including a clinical pharmacist in the healthcare team are recommended. PMID:24826198

  3. Blood infections in patients treated at transplantation wards of a clinical hospital in Warsaw.

    PubMed

    Kierzkowska, M; Majewska, A; Dobrzaniecka, K; Sawicka-Grzelak, A; Mlynarczyk, A; Chmura, A; Durlik, M; Deborska-Materkowska, D; Paczek, L; Mlynarczyk, G

    2014-10-01

    Establishment of the etiology in blood infection is always advisable. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the proportion of different bacterial species, including aerobic and anaerobic bacteria in blood cultures of patients hospitalized in transplantation wards of a large clinical hospital between 2010 and 2012. A total of 1994 blood samples from patients who were treated at one of two transplantation wards of a large hospital in Warsaw were analyzed using an automated blood culture system, BacT/ALERT (bioMerieux, France). The 306 bacterial strains were obtained from the examined samples. The highest proportion were bacteria from the family Enterobacteriaceae (112 strains; 36.6%) with Escherichia coli (61 strains), Klebsiella pneumoniae (30 strains), and Enterobacter cloacae (10 strains) most commonly isolated. The non-fermenting bacilli constituted 21.6% (66 strains), with most common Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (31 strains), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (14 strains), Achromobacter spp. (12 strains), and Acinetobacter baumannii (3 strains). Most frequent Gram-positive bacteria were staphylococci (25.2%). Of 77 staphylococcal strains, 56 were coagulase-negative staphylococci and 21 Staphylococcus aureus. Other Gram-positive bacteria included enterococci (14 strains) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (1 strain). Obligatory anaerobic bacteria were represented by 19 strains (6.2% of total isolates). Among all Enterobacteriaceae, 49 isolates (43.7%) produced extended-spectrum ß-lactamases (ESBLs). Resistance to methicillin was detected in 62% of S aureus isolates and in 46% of coagulase-negative staphylococci. Of 14 enterococci cultured from blood samples, 2 strains (14.3%) were resistant to vancomycin. Both were Enterococcus faecium. Resistant strains of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria are significant problems for patients in the transplantation ward. PMID:25380873

  4. Drug-related problems among medical ward patients in Jimma university specialized hospital, Southwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Tigabu, Bereket Molla; Daba, Daniel; Habte, Belete

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The increasing number of available drugs and drug users, as well as more complex drug regimens led to more side effects and drug interactions and complicates follow-up. The objective of this study was to assess drug-related problems (DRPs) and associated factors in hospitalized patients. Methods: A hospital-based cross-sectional study design was employed. The study was conducted in Jimma University Specialized Hospital, Jimma, located in the south west of Addis Ababa. All patients who were admitted to the medical ward from February 2011 to March 2011 were included in the study. Data on sociodemographic variables, past medical history, drug history, current diagnosis, current medications, vital signs, and relevant laboratory data were collected using semi-structured questionnaire and data collection forms which were filling through patient interview and card review. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16 for windows. Descriptive statistics, cross-tabs, Chi-square, and logistic regression were utilized. Findings: Out of 257 study participants, 189 (73.5%) had DRPs and a total of 316 DRPs were identified. From the six classes of DRPs studied, 103 (32.6%) cases related to untreated indication or need additional drug therapy, and 49 (15.5%) cases related to high medication dosage. Unnecessary drug therapy in 49 (15.5%) cases, low medication dosage in 44 (13.9%) cases, and ineffective drug therapy in 42 (13.3%) cases were the other classes of problems identified. Noncompliance in 31 (9.8%) cases was the least prevalent DRP. Independent factors which predicted the occurrence of DRPs in the study population were sex, age, polypharmacy, and clinically significant potential drug-drug interactions. The prevalence of DRPs was substantially high (73.5%). Conclusion: Drug-related problems are common among medical ward patients. Indication-related problems, untreated indication and unnecessary drug therapy were the most common types of DRPs among patients of our

  5. Neuroinfection survey at a neurological ward in a Brazilian tertiary teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Marchiori, Paulo E; Lino, Angelina M M; Machado, Luis R; Pedalini, Livia M; Boulos, Marcos; Scaff, Milberto

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was undertaken to characterize the neuroinfection profile in a tertiary neurological ward. INTRODUCTION: Neuroinfection is a worldwide concern and bacterial meningitis, tetanus and cerebral malaria have been reported as the commonest causes in developing countries. METHODS: From 1999 to 2007, all patients admitted to the Neurology Ward of Hospital das Clínicas, S�o Paulo University School of Medicine because of neuroinfection had their medical records reviewed. Age, gender, immunological status, neurological syndrome at presentation, infectious agent and clinical outcome were recorded. RESULTS: Three hundred and seventy four cases of neuroinfectious diseases accounted for 4.2% of ward admissions and the identification of infectious agent was successful in 81% of cases. Mean age was 40.5±13.4 years, 63.8% were male, 19.7% were immunocompromised patients and meningoencephalitis was the most common clinical presentation despite infectious agent. Viruses and bacteria were equally responsible for 29.4% of neuroinfectious diseases; parasitic, fungal and prion infections accounted for 28%, 9.6% and 3.5% respectively. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Treponema pallidum, Taenia solium, Schistosoma mansoni, Cryptococcus neoformans and Histoplasma capsulatum were the more common infectious pathogens in the patients. Infection mortality rate was 14.2%, of which 62.3% occurred in immunocompetent patients. CONCLUSION: Our institution appeared to share some results with developed and developing countries. Comparison with literature may be considered as quality control to health assistance. PMID:21808869

  6. Prevalence of ESBLs-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from different wards in a Chinese teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhilong; Niu, Hui; Chen, Guangyu; Li, Mingcheng; Li, Ming; Zhou, Yuqing

    2015-01-01

    This study was to explore the molecular dissemination of P. aeruginosa producing extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBLs) recovered from the different wards in a teaching hospital, Jilin. Among 240 isolates, 91 strains were isolated from burn wards and 149 strains from surgical wards. A total of 210 strains (87.5%) produced ESBLs, 30 strains (12.5%) didn’t produce ESBLs. All ESBLs isolates showed identical antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. The genotypic prevalence of ESBLs for bla SHV-12, bla TEM-24, bla CTX-M-1, bla CTX-M-2, bla CTX-M-3, bla PER and bla VEB genes was 17.6%, 20.5%, 14.3%, 9.6%, 12.9%, 13.8% and 11.4% respectively. All P. aeruginosa strains producing ESBLs had three to six plasmids and contained class 1 integrons, which transferred resistance to E. coli C 600 by conjuation. The data indicated a high prevalence of ESBL among P. aeruginosa isolates in this region and their enzyme types were diverse. PMID:26770582

  7. Quality of bedside teaching in internal wards of Qaem and Imam Reza hospitals in Mashhad

    PubMed Central

    Jamaazghandi, Alireza; Emadzadeh, Ali; Vakili, Vida; Bazaz, Seyed Mojtaba Mousavi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bedside teaching is a patient-based teaching method in medical education. The present study has been conducted with the aim of investigating the quality of bedside teaching in the internal wards of Qaem and Imam Reza Educational Hospitals. Methods: This study follows a mixed qualitative-quantitative approach using checklists on educational clinical rounds in Imam Reza and Qaem Hospitals in Mashhad. In the first stage consisting of qualitative study, the parts related to the quality of bedside teaching were recognized and a checklist was designed in three domains of patient comfort (8 questions), targeted teaching (14 questions) and group dynamics (8 questions), and its reliability and validity were verified. In the next step, data were collected and then analyzed using SPSS 16 software through statistical techniques of independent t-test, one-way ANOVA and variance analysis. Results: In total, 113 educational rounds were investigated in this study. Among them, 59 (52.2%) and 54 (47.8%) educational rounds have been investigated in Imam Reza and Qaem Hospitals, respectively. The average total score of bedside teaching was 180.8 out of 300 in the internal wards of both Imam Reza and Qaem Hospitals. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that generally the quality of bedside teaching in Imam Reza and Qaem Hospitals of Mashhad is low according to the qualitative standards considered in this study. Holding educational workshops along with more familiarity of the professors with effective bedside teaching strategies could be effective in improving the quality of educational rounds. PMID:26396735

  8. A practical guide to the implementation of an effective incident reporting scheme to reduce medication error on the hospital ward.

    PubMed

    Webster, Craig S; Anderson, David J

    2002-08-01

    This paper discusses an anonymous incident reporting scheme to reduce drug administration error on the hospital ward, as part of an effective, non-punitive, systems-focused approach to safety. Drug error is costly in terms of increased hospital stay, resources consumed, patient harm, lives lost and careers ruined. Safety initiatives that focus, not on blaming individuals, but on improving the wider system in which personnel work have been adopted in a number of branches of health care. However, in nursing, blame remains the predominant approach for dealing with error, and the ward has seen little application of the systems approach to safety. Safety interventions founded on an effective incident scheme typically pay for themselves in terms of dollar savings arising from averted harm. Recent calls for greater health-care safety require finding new ways to make drug administration safer throughout the hospital, and the scope for such safety gains on the hospital ward remains considerable. PMID:12100674

  9. [Medium-term strategy for the specific management of pneumology hospitals and wards after the decentralization of the sanitary system].

    PubMed

    Muşat, Simona Nicoleta; Ioniţa, Diana; Paceonea, Mirela; Chiriac, Nona Delia; Stoicescu, Ileana Paula; Mihălţan, F D

    2011-01-01

    Identifying and promoting new management techniques for the descentralized pneumology hospitals or wards was one of the most ambitious objectives of the project "Quality in the pneumology medical services through continuous medical education and organizational flexibility", financed by the Human Resourses Development Sectorial Operational Programme 2007-2013 (ID 58451). The "Medium term Strategy on the specific management of the pneumology hospitals or wards after the descentralization of the sanitary system" presented in the article was written by the project's experts and discussed with pneumology managers and local authorities representatives. This Strategy application depends on the colaboration of the pneumology hospitals with professional associations, and local and central authorities. PMID:22097433

  10. Large-eddy simulation of airflow and heat transfer in a general ward of hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Md. Farhad; Himika, Taasnim Ahmed; Molla, Md. Mamun

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a very popular alternative computational technique, the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) has been used for Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) of airflow and heat transfer in general ward of hospital. Different Reynolds numbers have been used to study the airflow pattern. In LES, Smagorinsky turbulence model has been considered and a discussion has been conducted in brief. A code validation has been performed comparing the present results with benchmark results for lid-driven cavity problem and the results are found to agree very well. LBM is demonstrated through simulation in forced convection inside hospital ward with six beds with a partition in the middle, which acted like a wall. Changes in average rate of heat transfer in terms of average Nusselt numbers have also been recorded in tabular format and necessary comparison has been showed. It was found that partition narrowed the path for airflow and once the air overcame this barrier, it got free space and turbulence appeared. For higher turbulence, the average rate of heat transfer increased and patients near the turbulence zone released maximum heat and felt more comfortable.

  11. Factors associated with readmission of patients at a university hospital psychiatric ward in iran.

    PubMed

    Barekatain, Majid; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Hassannejad, Razeyeh; Hosseini, Reihane

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Readmission has a major role in the reduction of the quality of life and the increase in the years of lost life. The main objectives of this study were to answer to the following research questions. (a) What was the readmission rate? (b) What were the social, demographic, and clinical characteristics of patients admitted to the Psychiatric Emergency Service at Nour University Hospital, affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran? (c) What were the effective factors on readmission? Method. This cross-sectional study was conducted on a total number of 3935 patients who were admitted to Isfahan University Hospital Psychiatric Ward in Isfahan, Iran, from 2004 to 2010. Gender, age, marital status, education, self-report history of previous admission, type of psychiatric disorder, substance misuse, suicide, and the length of the current psychiatric disorder were collected from the registered medical files of patients. The data were analysed using the negative binomial regression model. Results. We found that factors such as psychiatric anxiety disorder, bipolar I, bipolar II, psychotic disorder, depression, and self report history of previous admission were statistically significant in the number of readmissions using the negative binomial model. Conclusion. Readmission to the psychiatric ward is mainly predictable by the type of diagnosis and psychosocial supports. PMID:24236285

  12. Evaluation of Nosocomial Infection in Patients at hematology-oncology ward of Dr. Sheikh children’s hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ghassemi, A; Farhangi, H; Badiee, Z; Banihashem, A; Mosaddegh, MR

    2015-01-01

    Background Infections in critical care unit are high, and they are serious hospital problems. Infections acquired during the hospital stay are generally called nosocomial infections, initially known as infections arising after 48 h of hospital admission. The mostfrequent nosocomial infections (urinary, respiratory, gastroenteritis and blood stream infection) were common in patients at hospital.The aim was to study, the current status of nosocomial infection, rate of infection among hospitalized children at hematology-oncology ward of Dr. Sheikh children’s hospital, Mashhad, Iran. Materials and Methods Data were collected from 200 patient's records presented with symptoms of nosocomial infection at hematology-oncology ward of Dr. Sheikh children’s hospital from March 2014 to September 2014. Descriptive statistics using percentage was calculated. Results Incidence of nosocomial infections inpatients athematology-oncology ward was 31% (62/200). Of which 69.35% (43/62) blood stream infection being the most frequent; followed by 30.64% (19/62) was urinary tract infection (UTI), and the most common blood culture isolate was been Staphylococcus epidermidis 18 (41.86%), andour study showed that large numbers ofnosocomial UTIs causing by Gram‑negative bacteria. Conclusion This study showed blood stream infection and UTI are the common nosocomial infections among patients athematology-oncology ward. Early recognition of infections and short term use of invasive devices along with proper infection control procedures can significantly decrease the incidence of nosocomial infections in patients. PMID:26985350

  13. Changing hospital policy from the wards: an introduction to health policy education.

    PubMed

    Jacobsohn, Vanessa; DeArman, Maria; Moran, Patrick; Cross, Jennette; Dietz, Deidre; Allen, Rebekah; Bachofer, Sally; Dow-Velarde, Lily; Kaufman, Arthur

    2008-04-01

    Although the need for physician participation in critiquing and setting health policies is great, physician participation in health policy activities is low. Many barriers hamper physician involvement, from limited time to ignorance of their potential roles, to minimal exposure to the issue during medical education. University of New Mexico School of Medicine family medicine residents and students on ward teams were trained to ask specific questions on rounds that framed individual patient encounters as windows into broader community health and policy issues. Teams selected problems on which to intervene, with the intent of influencing hospital policies to improve health care and outcomes. Ten projects were completed in six months, four of which are presented. Resident and student accomplishments included (1) identifying a free drug formulary at the Health Care for the Homeless pharmacy to reduce readmission rates of discharged homeless patients, (2) expanding hospital outpatient pharmacy hours to reduce preventable emergency room visits for medications, (3) expanding the hospital social service workforce to address the overwhelming need to discharge indigent patients needing extended care, and (4) certifying residents and faculty to provide outpatient buprenorphine treatment as a harm-reduction intervention for opiate-addicted patients, thereby reducing preventable hospitalizations for overdose or for medical complications from illicit opiate use. Hospital health policy is made more accessible to learners if issues that generate policy discussions emerge from their daily learning environment, if learners can intervene to improve those policies within a limited timeframe, and if faculty mentors are available to guide their interventions. PMID:18367894

  14. Non-Invasive Continuous Respiratory Monitoring on General Hospital Wards: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    van Loon, Kim; van Zaane, Bas; Bosch, Els J.; Kalkman, Cor J.; Peelen, Linda M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Failure to recognize acute deterioration in hospitalized patients may contribute to cardiopulmonary arrest, unscheduled intensive care unit admission and increased mortality. Purpose In this systematic review we aimed to determine whether continuous non-invasive respiratory monitoring improves early diagnosis of patient deterioration and reduces critical incidents on hospital wards. Data Sources Studies were retrieved from Medline, Embase, CINAHL, and the Cochrane library, searched from 1970 till October 25, 2014. Study Selection Electronic databases were searched using keywords and corresponding synonyms ‘ward’, ‘continuous’, ‘monitoring’ and ‘respiration’. Pediatric, fetal and animal studies were excluded. Data Extraction Since no validated tool is currently available for diagnostic or intervention studies with continuous monitoring, methodological quality was assessed with a modified tool based on modified STARD, CONSORT, and TREND statements. Data Synthesis Six intervention and five diagnostic studies were included, evaluating the use of eight different devices for continuous respiratory monitoring. Quantitative data synthesis was not possible because intervention, study design and outcomes differed considerably between studies. Outcomes estimates for the intervention studies ranged from RR 0.14 (0.03, 0.64) for cardiopulmonary resuscitation to RR 1.00 (0.41, 2.35) for unplanned ICU admission after introduction of continuous respiratory monitoring, Limitations The methodological quality of most studies was moderate, e.g. ‘before-after’ designs, incomplete reporting of primary outcomes, and incomplete clinical implementation of the monitoring system. Conclusions Based on the findings of this systematic review, implementation of routine continuous non-invasive respiratory monitoring on general hospital wards cannot yet be advocated as results are inconclusive, and methodological quality of the studies needs improvement. Future

  15. [Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa Patients in General Hospitals with Psychiatric Wards Current Situation and Establishment of a Treatment System].

    PubMed

    Wada, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) exhibit physical and psychiatric symptoms, in addition to their behavioral problems, and often require admission to a general hospital with a psychiatric ward. There are only a few general hospitals with psychiatric wards available, and patients with AN tend to be concentrated in a small number of such institutions. Thus, it is difficult to provide adequate support for the treatment of patients with AN. In Kyoto, the number of general hospitals with a psychiatric ward is small. Patients with AN tend to be treated at the two university hospitals. However, our University Hospital cannot accept all patients with AN, especially the emergency admissions. Therefore, with respect to the inpatient treatment of AN, we established a cooperation agreement with other psychiatric hospitals. We are planning to divide the inpatient treatment of AN between our university hospital and other psychiatric hospitals, depending on the stage of AN and the severity of the patients' physical condition. With respect to the treatment of AN, it is necessary to establish a treatment system with each hospital playing a role. PMID:26502711

  16. Pattern and Trend of Morbidity in the Infectious Disease Ward of North Bengal Medical College and Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Basak, Moumita; Chaudhuri, Sudip Banik; Ishore, Kaushik; Das, Dilip Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background In spite of experiencing a large decline in the spread and burden of infectious diseases, the Global Burden of Disease Project suggests that about 30% of the disease burden in India is attributable to infections. The hospital data constitute a basic and primary source of information for continuous follow up of this changing pattern of morbidity and mortality. Aim To identify the pattern and trend of different infectious diseases among admissions in the Infectious Disease ward of North Bengal Medical College and Hospital. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of inpatient hospital database over 5 years period (January 2008 – December 2012) of Infectious Disease ward of North Bengal Medical College & Hospital. Results Among 3277 admissions in the Infectious Disease ward during 2008-12, diarrhoeal diseases (84.3%) were most common. The highest mortality was recorded for rabies cases (83.9%), followed by tetanus (32.6%) and diphtheria (27.3%). The majority cases of diphtheria (78.9%) and measles (53.1%) belonged to below 9 years age. Except the year 2010, there was a gradual rise in admissions from 2008 to 2012. Conclusion Review of hospital records provided information regarding the pattern of diseases but no definite trend among admissions in the infectious diseases ward. PMID:26674374

  17. Activity sampling of nurses of a sub-acute ward of a large hospital.

    PubMed

    Bobdey, C S; Sandhu, M S; Urmil, A C; Dayakar, T

    1992-07-01

    A study was conducted in a 43 bedded subacute family ward of a large hospital to find out the adequacy and efficiency of its nursing service. Activity analysis in respect of nurses was carried out by Activity Sampling Technique. The study revealed that out of 334 activities, observed, 78 (23.3%) were non-productive, whereas 256 (76.7%) were productive. Out of the productive activities, 148 (44.3%) were for direct patient care mainly comprising of 46 (31.1% for carrying out technical procedures, 36 (24.32%) for determining patients' needs, 20 (13.15%) for preparing patients for various procedures and 15 (10.14%) for assisting in technical procedures. Number wise the nurses were found to be adequate. PMID:10130935

  18. Drug-related problems in medical wards of Tikur Anbessa specialized hospital, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Ayalew, Mohammed Biset; Megersa, Teshome Nedi; Mengistu, Yewondwossen Taddese

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study was aimed to determine the prevalence of drug-related problems (DRPs), identify the most common drugs, and drug classes involved in DRPs as well as associated factors with the occurrence of DRPs. Methods: A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted on 225 patients admitted to medical wards of Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital, Addis Ababa from March to June 2014. Data regarding patient characteristics, medications, diagnosis, length of hospitalization, investigation, and laboratory results were collected using data abstraction forms through review of patients’ medical card and medication charts. Identified DRPs were recorded and classified using DRP registration forms. The possible intervention measures for the identified DRPs were proposed and communicated to either the physician or the patient. Data were entered into Epi Info 7 and analyzed using SPSS version 21 (IBM Corp. Released 2012, Armonk, NY: IBM Corp). Findings: DRPs were found in 52% of study subjects. A drug-drug interaction (48% of all DRPs) was the most common DRP followed by adverse drug reaction (23%). Anti-infectives and gastrointestinal medicines were commonly involved in DRPs. Drugs with the highest drug risk ratio were gentamycin, warfarin, nifedipine, and cimetidine. The number of drugs taken by the patient per day is an important risk factor for DRPs. Conclusion: DRPs are common among medical ward patients. Polypharmacy has a significant association with the occurrence of DRP. Drugs such as gentamycin, warfarin, nifedipine, and cimetidine have the highest probability of causing DRP. So, patients who are taking either of these drugs or polypharmacy should be closely assessed for identification and timely correction of DRPs. PMID:26645029

  19. Incidence of nutritional support complications in patient hospitalized in wards. multicentric study

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo, Nubia Amparo; Aguilar, Nora Luz; Restrepo, Beatriz Elena; Vanegas, Marcela; Alzate, Sandra; Martínez, Mónica; Gamboa, Sonia Patricia; Castaño, Eliana; Barbosa, Janeth; Román, Juliana; Serna, Ángela María; Hoyos, Gloria Marcela

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Nutritional support generates complications that must be detected and treated on time. Objective: To estimate the incidence of some complications of nutritional support in patients admitted to general hospital wards who received nutritional support in six high-complexity institutions. Methods: Prospective, descriptive and multicentric study in patients with nutritional support; the variables studied were medical diagnosis, nutritional condition, nutritional support duration, approach, kind of formula, and eight complications. Results: A total of 277 patients were evaluated; 83% received enteral nutrition and 17% received parenteral nutrition. Some 69.3% presented risk of malnourishment or severe malnourishment at admittance. About 35.4% of those receiving enteral nutrition and 39.6% of the ones who received parenteral nutrition had complications; no significant difference per support was found (p= 0.363). For the enteral nutrition, the most significant complication was the removal of the catheter (14%), followed by diarrhea (8.3%); an association between the duration of the enteral support with diarrhea, constipation and removal of the catheter was found (p < 0.05). For parenteral nutrition, hyperglycemia was the complication of highest incidence (22.9%), followed by hypophosphatemia (12.5%); all complications were associated with the duration of the support (p < 0.05). Nutritional support was suspended in 24.2% of the patients. Conclusions: Complications with nutritional support in hospital-ward patients were frequent, with the removal of the catheter and hyperglycemia showing the highest incidence. Duration of the support was the variable that revealed an association with complications. Strict application of protocols could decrease the risk for complications and boost nutritional support benefits. PMID:24893056

  20. The cost of a hospital ward in Europe: is there a methodology available to accurately measure the costs?

    PubMed

    Negrini, D; Kettle, A; Sheppard, L; Mills, G H; Edbrooke, D L

    2004-01-01

    Costing health care services has become a major requirement due to an increase in demand for health care and technological advances. Several studies have been published describing the computation of the costs of hospital wards. The objective of this article is to examine the methodologies utilised to try to describe the basic components of a standardised method, which could be applied throughout Europe. Cost measurement however is a complex matter and a lack of clarity exists in the terminology and the cost concepts utilised. The methods discussed in this review make it evident that there is a lack of standardized methodologies for the determination of accurate costs of hospital wards. A standardized costing methodology would facilitate comparisons, encourage economic evaluation within the ward and hence assist in the decision-making process with regard to the efficient allocation of resources. PMID:15366283

  1. Summative Evaluation on the Hospital Wards. What Do Faculty Say to Learners?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasley, Peggy B.; Arnold, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    No previous studies have described how faculty give summative evaluations to learners on the medical wards. The aim of this study was to describe summative evaluations on the medical wards. Participants were students, house staff and faculty at the University of Pittsburgh. Ward rotation evaluative sessions were tape recorded. Feedback was…

  2. Antibiotic resistance patterns of microorganisms isolated from nephrology and kidney transplant wards of a referral academic hospital

    PubMed Central

    Samanipour, Atieh; Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin; Abbasi, Mohammad-Reza; Abdollahi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Antibiotic use pattern and emergence of resistant bacteria are major concerns in clinical settings. This study aimed to detect common bacteria and their antibiotic sensitivity patterns in nephrology and kidney transplant wards. Methods: This 1-year, observational study was performed in the nephrology and kidney transplant wards of Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex, Tehran, Iran. All patients treated with antimicrobial agents for confirmed or suspected infections were included. Their demographic, clinical, and laboratory data (including biological media used for microbial culture, growth organisms, and antibiograms) were collected. Adherence of antimicrobial regimen to standard guidelines was also assessed. Findings: About half of the patients received antibiotic. The most common infecting bacteria were Escherichia coli followed by Enterococcus sp. and Staphylococcus aureus. E. coli showed high rate of sensitivity to carbapenems and nitrofurantoin and high rate of resistance to co-trimoxazole and ciprofloxacin. Enterococcus sp. in both wards had high rate of resistance to ampicillin and were all sensitive to linezolid. Unlike to the nephrology ward, more than 50% of Enterococcus sp. from kidney transplant ward was resistant to vancomycin. The most common type of S. aureus in this nephrology ward was methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Most commonly-prescribed antibiotics were carbapenems followed by vancomycin, ciprofloxacin, and ceftriaxone. Antibiotic regimens were 75% and 83%, 85% and 91%, and 80% and 87% compatible with international guidelines in antibiotic types, dosages, and treatment durations, respectively, in nephrology and kidney transplant wards, respectively. Conclusion: MRSA, fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli, and vancomycin resistant Enterococcus species are major threats in nephrology and kidney transplant wards. Most commonly-prescribed antibiotics were carbapenems that necessitate providing internal guidelines by the teamwork of

  3. Effects of family-centered care on the satisfaction of parents of children hospitalized in pediatric wards in a pediatric ward in Chaloos in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Forouzan; Hassan, Syed Tajuddin Syed; Yaghmai, Farideh; Ismaeil, Suriani Binti; Suandi, Turiman Bin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Family-centered care (FCC) involves holistic care and requires cooperation with the family in planning, intervention, and the evolution of the care that is being provided. Many previous studies have provided results that indicate the importance of the family’s involvement in pediatric care, but there is still resistance in doing so within the organizational culture of the hospitals in Iran. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of FCC on the satisfaction of parents of children hospitalized in 2012 in the pediatric ward at Razi Hospital in Chaloos, Iran. Methods: This Quasi-experimental study was conducted in 2012 in the pediatric ward at Razi Hospital in Chaloos, Iran. Seventy hospitalized children between the ages of 1 and 3 who suffered from diarrhea, vomiting, or pneumonia were selected through convenience sampling. They were divided randomly into two equal groups, a control group (routine care) and an experimental group (family-centered care). SPSS Statistics 14 software was used to analyze the data, and p<0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: In the FCC group, the mean score of satisfaction among the parents of the children was 20 out of 90 before the intervention, but, after the FCC method was used, it increased to 83.2 out of 90. In addition, a significant difference was found between the scores of satisfaction for the control and experimental groups (p<0.001), and all parents of children in the experimental group expressed high satisfaction. Conclusion: Our findings showed that the practice of FCC in caring for the sick children can increase the satisfaction of their parents significantly. The role of the family’s involvement is critical in every component of the intervention efforts, as shown by the constructs of participatory support, educational support, and psychological support. Thus, a notable implication here is that FCC may lead to increased quality of care and should be included in the educational programs of

  4. Multidisciplinary case management for patients at high risk of hospitalization: comparison of virtual ward models in the United kingdom, United States, and Canada.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Geraint; Wright, Lorraine; Vaithianathan, Rhema

    2012-10-01

    Virtual wards are a model for delivering multidisciplinary case management to people who are at high predicted risk of unplanned acute care hospitalization. First introduced in Croydon, England, in 2006, this concept has since been adopted and adapted by health care organizations in other parts of the United Kingdom and internationally. In this article, the authors review the model of virtual wards as originally described-with its twin pillars of (1) using a predictive model to identify people who are at high risk of future emergency hospitalization, and (2) offering these individuals a period of intensive, multidisciplinary preventive care at home using the systems, staffing, and daily routines of a hospital ward. The authors then describe how virtual wards have been modified and implemented in 6 sites in the United Kingdom, United States, and Canada where they are subject to formal evaluation. Like hospital wards, virtual wards vary in terms of patient selection, ward configuration, staff composition, and ward processes. Policy makers and researchers should be aware of these differences when considering the evaluation results of studies investigating the cost-effectiveness of virtual wards. PMID:22788975

  5. Four Simple Ward Based Initiatives to Reduce Unnecessary In-Hospital Patient Stay: A Quality Improvement Project.

    PubMed

    Shabbir, Asad; Wali, Gorav; Steuer, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged hospital stay not only increases financial stress on the National Health Service but also exposes patients to an unnecessarily high risk of adverse ward events. Each day accumulates approximately £225 in bed costs with additional risks of venousthromboembolism, hospital acquired infections, prescription errors, and falls. Despite being medically fit for discharge (MFFD), patients awaiting care packages with prolonged length of stay (LoS) have poorer outcomes and experience increased rates of mortality as a result. A six cycle prospective audit was carried out to investigate if four simple ward based initiatives could optimise patient flow through a medical ward and reduce LoS of inpatients awaiting social packages and placement. The four daily initiatives were: A morning board round between nurses and doctors to prioritise new or sick patients for early review.A post ward round meeting between the multidisciplinary team to expedite rehabilitation and plan discharges early.An evening board round to highlight which patients needed discharge paperwork for the next day to alleviate the wait for pharmacy.A 'computer on wheels' on ward rounds so investigations could be ordered and reviewed at the bedside allowing more time to address patient concerns. A control month in August 2013 and five intervention cycles were completed between September 2013 and January 2014. Prior to intervention, mean time taken for patients to be discharged with a package of care, once declared MFFD, was 25 days. With intervention this value dropped to 1 day. The total LoS fell from 46 days to 16 days. It was also found that the time taken from admission to MFFD status was reduced from 21 days to 15 days. In conclusion this data shows that with four simple modifications to ward behaviour unnecessary inpatient stay can be significantly reduced. PMID:26734432

  6. [Longer working hours of pharmacists in the ward resulted in lower medication-related errors--survey of national university hospitals in Japan].

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Kazuo; Toyama, Akira; Satoh, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Awaya, Toshio; Tasaki, Yoshikazu; Yasuoka, Toshiaki; Horiuchi, Ryuya

    2011-04-01

    It is obvious that pharmacists play a critical role as risk managers in the healthcare system, especially in medication treatment. Hitherto, there is not a single multicenter-survey report describing the effectiveness of clinical pharmacists in preventing medical errors from occurring in the wards in Japan. Thus, we conducted a 1-month survey to elucidate the relationship between the number of errors and working hours of pharmacists in the ward, and verified whether the assignment of clinical pharmacists to the ward would prevent medical errors between October 1-31, 2009. Questionnaire items for the pharmacists at 42 national university hospitals and a medical institute included the total and the respective numbers of medication-related errors, beds and working hours of pharmacist in 2 internal medicine and 2 surgical departments in each hospital. Regardless of severity, errors were consecutively reported to the Medical Security and Safety Management Section in each hospital. The analysis of errors revealed that longer working hours of pharmacists in the ward resulted in less medication-related errors; this was especially significant in the internal medicine ward (where a variety of drugs were used) compared with the surgical ward. However, the nurse assignment mode (nurse/inpatients ratio: 1 : 7-10) did not influence the error frequency. The results of this survey strongly indicate that assignment of clinical pharmacists to the ward is critically essential in promoting medication safety and efficacy. PMID:21467804

  7. Confidential conversations between supervisor and employee as a means for improving leadership: a quasi-experimental study in hospital wards.

    PubMed

    Kivimäki, M

    1996-11-01

    Although yearly confidential conversations between a supervisor and an employee have been recommended as a means for improving leadership, evidence on the actual effects of these conversations has been lacking. The present study therefore investigated whether confidential conversations improve perceptions of goal clarity, sufficiency of feedback and innovativeness, and elicit satisfaction with the supervisor's leadership style within the hospital setting. Nine wards were divided into one experimental group (3 wards) and two control groups (3 + 3 wards). A questionnaire on goal clarity, feedback, innovativeness and satisfaction was administered twice to every group (1st measurement: r = 186, 2nd measurement: n = 163). The experimental group began confidential conversations after the first measurement, control group 1 entered into conversations during both measurements, and control group 2 did not enter into conversations at the time of either measurement. Confidential conversations improved perceived feedback. In both measurements, the sufficiency of feedback was reported to be significantly better in the groups having conversations than in the other groups. In addition, there was a significant positive change in the perceived sufficiency of feedback in the experimental group but not in the other groups. Confidential conversations did not affect the perceptions of goal clarity and innovativeness or elicit satisfaction with the supervisor's management style. PMID:9035634

  8. Ward Climate Within a High Secure Forensic Psychiatric Hospital: Perceptions of Patients and Nursing Staff and the Role of Patient Characteristics.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Meike Godelieve; Brazil, Inti Angelo; Tonkin, Matthew; Bulten, Berend Hendrik

    2016-06-01

    Within this study the relationship between patient characteristics (age, length of stay, risk, psychopathy) and individual perceived ward climate (n=83), and differences between staff's and patient perceptions of climate (n=185) was investigated within a high secure forensic hospital. Results show that therapeutic hold was rated higher among staff compared to patients, while patients held a more favorable view on patient cohesion and experienced safety. Furthermore, patient characteristics (age, risk and psychopathy) were found to be related with individual ratings of ward climate. The findings underline the importance of assessing ward climate among both patients and staff in clinical practice. PMID:27256939

  9. Application of water-soluble nanofilters for collection of airborne Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA in hospital wards.

    PubMed

    Vladimirsky, M A; Shipina, L K; Makeeva, E S; Alyapkina, Y S; Mikheev, A Y; Morozov, V N

    2016-05-01

    A simple inexpensive technique for collection of airborne biomarkers of nosocomial infections is described. Biomarkers were collected on water-soluble electrospun nanofilters attached to a household vacuum cleaner from 6-10m(3) of air in 10-15min within several wards of a tuberculosis clinic. Filters were then dissolved in water and tested for the presence of the IS6110 and regX3 genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) using real-time polymerase chain reaction. It was demonstrated that trace amounts of airborne MTB DNA (>3gene copies/m(3)) were always present in the air and on the surfaces in the wards occupied with tuberculosis patients having positive smear tests. PMID:27021397

  10. Main clinical features in patients at their first psychiatric admission to Italian acute hospital psychiatric wards. The PERSEO study

    PubMed Central

    Ballerini, Andrea; Boccalon, Roberto M; Boncompagni, Giancarlo; Casacchia, Massimo; Margari, Francesco; Minervini, Lina; Righi, Roberto; Russo, Federico; Salteri, Andrea; Frediani, Sonia; Rossi, Andrea; Scatigna, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Background Few data are available on subjects presenting to acute wards for the first time with psychotic symptoms. The aims of this paper are (i) to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients at their first psychiatric admission (FPA), including socio-demographic features, risk factors, life habits, modalities of onset, psychiatric diagnoses and treatments before admission; (ii) to assess the aggressive behavior and the clinical management of FPA patients in Italian acute hospital psychiatric wards, called SPDCs (Servizio Psichiatrico Diagnosi e Cura = psychiatric service for diagnosis and management). Method Cross-sectional observational multi-center study involving 62 Italian SPDCs (PERSEO – Psychiatric EmeRgency Study and EpidemiOlogy). Results 253 FPA aged <= 40 were identified among 2521 patients admitted to Italian SPDCs over the 5-month study period. About half of FPA patients showed an aggressive behavior as defined by a Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS) score greater than 0 Vs 46% of non-FPA patients (p = 0.3651). The most common was verbal aggression, while about 20% of FPA patients actually engaged in physical aggression against other people. 74% of FPA patients had no diagnosis at admission, while 40% had received a previous psychopharmacological treatment, mainly benzodiazepines and antidepressants. During SPDC stay, diagnosis was established in 96% of FPA patients and a pharmacological therapy was prescribed to 95% of them, mainly benzodiazepines, antipsychotics and mood stabilizers. Conclusion Subjects presenting at their first psychiatric ward admission have often not undergone previous adequate psychiatric assessment and diagnostic procedures. The first hospital admission allows diagnosis and psychopharmacological treatment to be established. In our population, aggressive behaviors were rather frequent, although most commonly verbal. Psychiatric symptoms, as evaluated by psychiatrists and patients, improved

  11. A Survey of the quantity and type of biological aerosols in selected wards of a teaching hospital in Ghazvin

    PubMed Central

    Eslami, Akbar; Karimi, Fatemeh; Karimi, Zainab; Rajabi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bioaerosols are agents that can cause infection, allergy or induce other toxic effects in the human body. If the person exposed to such particles is not capable of their destruction or elimination from the body, the established chemical and physiological disorders can result in disease or death. The aim of this study was to assess the concentrations of bioaerosols in several wards of a teaching hospital. Methods Given that gas air-conditioners (split and window types) were used for ventilation in the eye operating room, internal intensive care unit, and the respiratory isolation room, these wards were selected for passive sampling. Sterile plates containing culture medium were exposed for two hours to the wards’ indoor ambient air. After this time, they were transferred to a lab to undergo incubation, colony count, and identification of the microorganisms. The data were analyzed using SPSS software, version 18, and the significance level of less than 0.05 was used. Results Based on our findings, the highest colony-forming bacterial unit was observed 22 cfu/plate/h in the eye operating room and, the highest colony-forming fungal unit was observed 4 cfu/plate/h in the internal intensive care unit. Based on the results of the differential tests, the most prevalent bacteria identified were Staphylococcus epidermidis (75%) in the air of eye operating room and Staphylococcus saprophyticus (52%) in the internal intensive care unit and isolation room. The most prevalent identified fungi in the air of selected wards were related to Alternaria alternata (43%), Aspergillus flavus (24%), Penicillium (36%) and Curvularia (21%) types. Based on Spearman’s correlation test, no significant relationship was observed between the factor of temperature and the number of fungal and bacterial colonies (r = 0.201, p = 0.42; r = −0.197, p = 0.41). Moreover, a meaningful relationship was observed only between the number of individuals and the bacterial colonies present in

  12. An antimicrobial stewardship program reduces antimicrobial therapy duration and hospital stay in surgical wards.

    PubMed

    Güerri-Fernández, R; Villar-García, J; Herrera-Fernández, S; Trenchs-Rodríguez, M; Fernández-Morato, J; Moro, L; Sancho, J; Grande, L; Clará, A; Grau, S; Horcajada, J P

    2016-06-01

    We report a quasi-experimental study of the implementation of an antimicrobial stewardship program in two surgical wards, with a pre-intervention period with just assessment of prescription and an intervention period with a prospective audit on antibiotic prescription model. There was a significant reduction of length of stay and the total days of antimicrobial administration. There were no differences in mortality between groups. The antimicrobial stewardship program led to the early detection of inappropriate empirical antibiotic treatment and was associated with a significant reduction in length of stay and the total duration of antimicrobial therapy. PMID:27167764

  13. An IBCLC in the Maternity Ward of a Mother and Child Hospital: A Pre- and Post-Intervention Study.

    PubMed

    Chiurco, Antonella; Montico, Marcella; Brovedani, Pierpaolo; Monasta, Lorenzo; Davanzo, Riccardo

    2015-08-01

    Published evidence on the impact of the integration of International Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLCs) for breastfeeding promotion is growing, but still relatively limited. Our study aims at evaluating the effects of adding an IBCLC for breastfeeding support in a mother and child hospital environment. We conducted a prospective study in the maternity ward of our maternal and child health Institute, recruiting 402 mothers of healthy term newborns soon after birth. The 18-month intervention of the IBCLC (Phase II) was preceded (Phase I) by data collection on breastfeeding rates and factors related to breastfeeding, both at hospital discharge and two weeks later. Data collection was replicated just before the end of the intervention (Phase III). In Phase III, a significantly higher percentage of mothers: (a) received help to breastfeed, and also received correct information on breastfeeding and community support, (b) started breastfeeding within two hours from delivery, (c) reported a good experience with the hospital staff. Moreover, the frequency of sore and/or cracked nipples was significantly lower in Phase III. However, no difference was found in exclusive breastfeeding rates at hospital discharge or at two weeks after birth. PMID:26308018

  14. An IBCLC in the Maternity Ward of a Mother and Child Hospital: A Pre- and Post-Intervention Study

    PubMed Central

    Chiurco, Antonella; Montico, Marcella; Brovedani, Pierpaolo; Monasta, Lorenzo; Davanzo, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Published evidence on the impact of the integration of International Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLCs) for breastfeeding promotion is growing, but still relatively limited. Our study aims at evaluating the effects of adding an IBCLC for breastfeeding support in a mother and child hospital environment. We conducted a prospective study in the maternity ward of our maternal and child health Institute, recruiting 402 mothers of healthy term newborns soon after birth. The 18-month intervention of the IBCLC (Phase II) was preceded (Phase I) by data collection on breastfeeding rates and factors related to breastfeeding, both at hospital discharge and two weeks later. Data collection was replicated just before the end of the intervention (Phase III). In Phase III, a significantly higher percentage of mothers: (a) received help to breastfeed, and also received correct information on breastfeeding and community support, (b) started breastfeeding within two hours from delivery, (c) reported a good experience with the hospital staff. Moreover, the frequency of sore and/or cracked nipples was significantly lower in Phase III. However, no difference was found in exclusive breastfeeding rates at hospital discharge or at two weeks after birth. PMID:26308018

  15. Bacterial Epidemiology and Antimicrobial Resistance in the Surgery Wards of a Large Teaching Hospital in Southern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Silvano; Gioia, Renato; De Simone, Giuseppe; Noviello, Silvana; Lombardi, Domenico; Di Crescenzo, Vincenzo Giuseppe; Filippelli, Amelia; Rega, Maria Rosaria; Massari, Angelo; Elberti, Maria Giovanna; Grisi, Lucilla; Boccia, Giovanni; De Caro, Francesco; Leone, Sebastiano

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Surgical infections represent an increasingly important problem for the National Health System. In this study we retrospectively evaluated the bacterial epidemiology and antimicrobial susceptibility of the microorganisms concerned as well as the utilization of antibiotics in the General and Emergency Surgery wards of a large teaching hospital in southern Italy in the period 2011–2013. Methods Data concerning non-duplicate bacterial isolates and antimicrobial susceptibility were retrieved from the Vitek 2 database. The pharmacy provided data about the consumption of antibiotics in the above reported wards. Chi-square or Fisher’s exact test were used. Results In all, 94 Gram-negative were isolated in 2011, 77 in 2012, and 125 in 2013, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa always being the most frequently isolated microorganisms. A. baumannii showed high rates of resistance to carbapenems (with values of 100% in 2011 and 2012) and low rates of resistance to tigecycline, colistin and amikacin. In the same years, there were respectively 105, 93, and 165 Gram-positive isolated. The rate of MRSA isolates ranged from 66% to 75% during the study period. Conclusions Our results show no significant increase in antimicrobial resistance over the period in question, and a higher rate of both MRSA isolates and resistance to carbapenems in A. baumannii compared with other European data. PMID:26075047

  16. [Hospital readmission after postpartum discharge of term newborns in two maternity wards in Stockholm and Marseille].

    PubMed

    Boubred, F; Herlenius, E; Andres, V; des Robert, C; Marchini, G

    2016-03-01

    The consequences of early postpartum discharge (EPPD, within 2days after birth) on newborn health remain debated. Early discharge has been associated with increased neonatal morbidity. However, neonatal re-hospitalization can be prevented by careful follow-up during the 1st week after birth. We compared the early neonatal hospitalization of term newborns over 2years in two hospitals: Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm (n=7300births), which allowed early discharge from 6h after birth with specific neonatal follow-up, and Marseille University Hospital (AP-HM) (n=4385) where postpartum discharge was more conventional after 72h. During the study period, the EPPD rate was 41% vs. 2% in Stockholm and Marseille, respectively (P<0.001). Hospital readmission was comparable (5.6‰ vs. 7‰, P=0.2). The leading cause associated with hospitalization was icterus in Stockholm (76% vs. 26%, P<0.001) and feeding difficulties in Marseille (17% vs. 48%, P<0.001). In conclusion, close neonatal follow-up during the 1st week of life associated with restricted maternal and neonatal eligibility criteria for EPPD are required to prevent early neonatal re-hospitalization. PMID:26899902

  17. Predictors of in-hospital mortality in elderly patients with bacteraemia admitted to an Internal Medicine ward

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Infectious diseases are a common cause of increased morbidity and mortality in elderly patients. Bacteraemia in the elderly is a difficult diagnosis and a therapeutic challenge due to age-related vicissitudes and to their comorbidities. The main purpose of the study was to assess independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality among the elderly with bacteraemia admitted to an Internal Medicine Ward. Methods Overall, a cohort of 135 patients, 65 years of age and older, with bacteraemia were retrospectively studied. Data related to demographic information, comorbidities, clinical parameters on admission, source and type of infection, microorganism isolated in the blood culture, laboratory data and empirical antibiotic treatment was recorded from each patient. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify independent predictors of all-cause in-hospital mortality. Results Of these 135 patients, 45.9% were women. The most common infections in this group of patients were urinary tract infections (46.7%). The main microorganisms isolated in the blood cultures were Escherichia coli (14.9%), Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (12.0%), non-MRSA (11.4%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (9.1%) and Enterococcus faecalis (8.0%). The in-hospital mortality was 22.2%. Independent prognostic factors associated with in-hospital mortality were age ≥ 85 years, chronic renal disease, bacteraemia of unknown focus and cognitive impairment at admission (OR, 2.812 [95% CI, 1.039-7.611; p = 0.042]; OR, 6.179 [95% CI, 1.840-20.748; p = 0.003]; OR, 8.673 [95% CI, 1.557-48.311; p = 0.014] and OR, 3.621 [95% CI, 1.226-10.695; p = 0.020], respectively). By multivariate analysis appropriate antibiotic therapy was not associated with lower odds of mortality. Conclusion Bacteraemia in the elderly has a high mortality rate. There are no set of signs or clinical features that can predict bacteraemia in the elderly. However, older age (≥ 85 years), chronic renal

  18. A comparative study of epidural catheter colonization and infection in Intensive Care Unit and wards in a Tertiary Care Public Hospital.

    PubMed

    Harde, Minal; Bhadade, Rakesh; Iyer, Hemlata; Jatale, Amol; Tiwatne, Sagar

    2016-02-01

    Infection is a potentially serious complication of epidural analgesia and with an increase in its use in wards there is a necessity to demonstrate its safety. We aimed to compare the incidence of colonization of epidural catheters retained for short duration (for 48 h) postoperative analgesia in postanesthesia care unit and wards. It was a prospective observational study done in a tertiary care teaching public hospital over a period of 2 years and included 400 patients with 200 each belonged to two groups PACU and ward. We also studied epidural tip culture pattern, skin swab culture at the entry point of the catheter, their relation to each other and whether colonization is equivalent to infection. Data were analyzed using statistical software GraphPad. Overall positive tip culture was 6% (24), of them 7% (14) were from PACU and 5% (10) were from ward (P = 0.5285). Positive skin swab culture was 38% (150), of them 20% (80) were from PACU and 18% (70) were from ward (P = 0.3526). The relation between positive tip culture and positive skin swab culture in same patients is extremely significant showing a strong linear relationship (95% confidence interval = 0.1053-0.2289). The most common microorganism isolated was Staphylococcus epidermidis. No patient had signs of local or epidural infection. There is no difference in the incidence of epidural catheter tip culture and skin swab culture of patients from the general ward and PACU. Epidural analgesia can be administered safely for 48 h in general wards without added risk of infection. The presence of positive tip culture is not a predictor of epidural space infection, and colonization is not equivalent to infection; hence, routine culture is not needed. Bacterial migration from the skin along the epidural track is the most common mode of bacterial colonization; hence, strict asepsis is necessary. PMID:27076712

  19. A comparative study of epidural catheter colonization and infection in Intensive Care Unit and wards in a Tertiary Care Public Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Harde, Minal; Bhadade, Rakesh; Iyer, Hemlata; Jatale, Amol; Tiwatne, Sagar

    2016-01-01

    Infection is a potentially serious complication of epidural analgesia and with an increase in its use in wards there is a necessity to demonstrate its safety. We aimed to compare the incidence of colonization of epidural catheters retained for short duration (for 48 h) postoperative analgesia in postanesthesia care unit and wards. It was a prospective observational study done in a tertiary care teaching public hospital over a period of 2 years and included 400 patients with 200 each belonged to two groups PACU and ward. We also studied epidural tip culture pattern, skin swab culture at the entry point of the catheter, their relation to each other and whether colonization is equivalent to infection. Data were analyzed using statistical software GraphPad. Overall positive tip culture was 6% (24), of them 7% (14) were from PACU and 5% (10) were from ward (P = 0.5285). Positive skin swab culture was 38% (150), of them 20% (80) were from PACU and 18% (70) were from ward (P = 0.3526). The relation between positive tip culture and positive skin swab culture in same patients is extremely significant showing a strong linear relationship (95% confidence interval = 0.1053–0.2289). The most common microorganism isolated was Staphylococcus epidermidis. No patient had signs of local or epidural infection. There is no difference in the incidence of epidural catheter tip culture and skin swab culture of patients from the general ward and PACU. Epidural analgesia can be administered safely for 48 h in general wards without added risk of infection. The presence of positive tip culture is not a predictor of epidural space infection, and colonization is not equivalent to infection; hence, routine culture is not needed. Bacterial migration from the skin along the epidural track is the most common mode of bacterial colonization; hence, strict asepsis is necessary. PMID:27076712

  20. The politics of black patients' identity: ward-rounds on the 'black side' of a South African psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Swartz, L

    1991-06-01

    There are many macrosocial studies of the political organisation of health and mental health care in South Africa, and the maldistribution of resources by race is well known. Little attention, however, has been given to the minutiae of the negotiation of power in the clinical setting. This article, which reports on part of a larger study of aspects of culture in South African psychiatry, focuses on interactions in ward-rounds on the 'Black side' of a South African psychiatric hospital. Through analysis of cases, the complexity of interpreting what transpires in such a setting and the central role that the concept of culture has in debates amongst staff members are demonstrated. Close analysis demonstrates the inadequacy of models which seek to locate the institutional racism of apartheid psychiatry in the motives of individual clinicians. Clinicians may simultaneously reproduce and subvert aspects of apartheid practice. A consideration of the social positioning of the clinician both as a South African and as a practitioner of psychiatry is central to the development of psychiatry in a post-apartheid South Africa. PMID:1874004

  1. Medically unexplained illness and the diagnosis of hysterical conversion reaction (HCR) in women’s medicine wards of Bangladeshi hospitals: a record review and qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Frequent reporting of cases of hysterical conversion reaction (HCR) among hospitalized female medical patients in Bangladesh’s public hospital system led us to explore the prevalence of “HCR” diagnoses within hospitals and the manner in which physicians identify, manage, and perceive patients whom they diagnose with HCR. Methods We reviewed admission records from women’s general medicine wards in two public hospitals to determine how often and at what point during hospitalization patients received diagnoses of HCR. We also interviewed 13 physicians about their practices and perceptions related to HCR. Results Of 2520 women admitted to the selected wards in 2008, 6% received diagnoses of HCR. HCR patients had wide-ranging symptoms including respiratory distress, headaches, chest pain, convulsions, and abdominal complaints. Most doctors diagnosed HCR in patients who had any medically-unexplained physical symptom. According to physician reports, women admitted to medical wards for HCR received brief diagnostic evaluations and initial treatment with short-acting tranquilizers or placebo agents. Some were referred to outpatient psychiatric treatment. Physicians reported that repeated admissions for HCR were common. Physicians noted various social factors associated with HCR, and they described failures of the current system to meet psychosocial needs of HCR patients. Conclusions In these hospital settings, physicians assign HCR diagnoses frequently and based on vague criteria. We recommend providing education to increase general physicians’ awareness, skill, and comfort level when encountering somatization and other common psychiatric issues. Given limited diagnostic capacity for all patients, we raise concern that when HCR is used as a "wastebasket" diagnosis for unexplained symptoms, patients with treatable medical conditions may go unrecognized. We also advocate introducing non-physician hospital personnel to address psychosocial needs of HCR

  2. Epidemiology and resistance features of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from the ward environment and patients in the burn ICU of a Chinese hospital.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yali; Shen, Xiaodong; Huang, Guangtao; Zhang, Cheng; Luo, Xiaoqiang; Yin, Supeng; Wang, Jing; Hu, Fuquan; Peng, Yizhi; Li, Ming

    2016-08-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important opportunistic pathogen that causes severe nosocomial infections, especially in intensive care units (ICUs). Over the past decades, an everincreasing number of hospital outbreaks caused by A. baumannii have been reported worldwide. However, little attention has been directed toward the relationship between A. baumannii isolates from the ward environment and patients in the burn ICU. In this study, 88 A. baumannii isolates (26 from the ward environment and 62 from patients) were collected from the burn ICU of the Southwest Hospital in Chongqing, China, from July through December 2013. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing results showed that drug resistance was more severe in isolates from patients than from the ward environment, with all of the patient isolates being fully resistant to 10 out of 19 antimicrobials tested. Isolations from both the ward environment and patients possessed the β-lactamase genes bla OXA-51, bla OXA-23, bla AmpC, bla VIM, and bla PER. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), these isolates could be clustered into 4 major PFGE types and 4 main sequence types (ST368, ST369, ST195, and ST191) among which, ST368 was the dominant genotype. Epidemiologic and molecular typing data also revealed that a small-scale outbreak of A. baumannii infection was underway in the burn ICU of our hospital during the sampling period. These results suggest that dissemination of β-lactamase genes in the burn ICU might be closely associated with the high-level resistance of A. baumannii, and the ICU environment places these patients at a high risk for nosocomial infection. Cross-contamination should be an important concern in clinical activities to reduce hospitalacquired infections caused by A. baumannii. PMID:27480635

  3. PHOTOCOPY OF A 1942 ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING TITLED: "STANDARD WARD, WARDJH. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PHOTOCOPY OF A 1942 ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING TITLED: "STANDARD WARD, WARD-J-H. FLOOR, FOUNDATION AND FRAMING PLANS." OCTOBER 31, 1942. - Madigan Hospital, Standard & Combination Wards, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  4. Adverse Drug Reactions Causing Admission to Medical Wards: A Cross-Sectional Survey at 4 Hospitals in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Mouton, Johannes P; Njuguna, Christine; Kramer, Nicole; Stewart, Annemie; Mehta, Ushma; Blockman, Marc; Fortuin-De Smidt, Melony; De Waal, Reneé; Parrish, Andy G; Wilson, Douglas P K; Igumbor, Ehimario U; Aynalem, Getahun; Dheda, Mukesh; Maartens, Gary; Cohen, Karen

    2016-05-01

    Limited data exist on the burden of serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in sub-Saharan Africa, which has high HIV and tuberculosis prevalence. We determined the proportion of adult admissions attributable to ADRs at 4 hospitals in South Africa. We characterized drugs implicated in, risk factors for, and the preventability of ADR-related admissions.We prospectively followed patients admitted to 4 hospitals' medical wards over sequential 30-day periods in 2013 and identified suspected ADRs with the aid of a trigger tool. A multidisciplinary team performed causality, preventability, and severity assessment using published criteria. We categorized an admission as ADR-related if the ADR was the primary reason for admission.There were 1951 admissions involving 1904 patients: median age was 50 years (interquartile range 34-65), 1057 of 1904 (56%) were female, 559 of 1904 (29%) were HIV-infected, and 183 of 1904 (10%) were on antituberculosis therapy (ATT). There were 164 of 1951 (8.4%) ADR-related admissions. After adjustment for age and ATT, ADR-related admission was independently associated (P ≤ 0.02) with female sex (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.51, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.06-2.14), increasing drug count (aOR 1.14 per additional drug, 95% CI 1.09-1.20), increasing comorbidity score (aOR 1.23 per additional point, 95% CI 1.07-1.41), and use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) if HIV-infected (aOR 1.92 compared with HIV-negative/unknown, 95% CI 1.17-3.14). The most common ADRs were renal impairment, hypoglycemia, liver injury, and hemorrhage. Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, insulin, rifampicin, and warfarin were most commonly implicated, respectively, in these 4 ADRs. ART, ATT, and/or co-trimoxazole were implicated in 56 of 164 (34%) ADR-related admissions. Seventy-three of 164 (45%) ADRs were assessed as preventable.In our survey, approximately 1 in 12 admissions was because of an ADR. The range of ADRs and implicated drugs reflect South Africa's high HIV

  5. Governing patient safety: lessons learned from a mixed methods evaluation of implementing a ward-level medication safety scorecard in two English NHS hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Angus I G; Turner, Simon; Cavell, Gillian; Oborne, C Alice; Thomas, Rebecca E; Cookson, Graham; Fulop, Naomi J

    2014-01-01

    Background Relatively little is known about how scorecards presenting performance indicators influence medication safety. We evaluated the effects of implementing a ward-level medication safety scorecard piloted in two English NHS hospitals and factors influencing these. Methods We used a mixed methods, controlled before and after design. At baseline, wards were audited on medication safety indicators; during the ‘feedback’ phase scorecard results were presented to intervention wards on a weekly basis over 7 weeks. We interviewed 49 staff, including clinicians and managers, about scorecard implementation. Results At baseline, 18.7% of patients (total n=630) had incomplete allergy documentation; 53.4% of patients (n=574) experienced a drug omission in the preceding 24 h; 22.5% of omitted doses were classified as ‘critical’; 22.1% of patients (n=482) either had ID wristbands not reflecting their allergy status or no ID wristband; and 45.3% of patients (n=237) had drugs that were either unlabelled or labelled for another patient in their drug lockers. The quantitative analysis found no significant improvement in intervention wards following scorecard feedback. Interviews suggested staff were interested in scorecard feedback and described process and culture changes. Factors influencing scorecard implementation included ‘normalisation’ of errors, study duration, ward leadership, capacity to engage and learning preferences. Discussion Presenting evidence-based performance indicators may potentially influence staff behaviour. Several practical and cultural factors may limit feedback effectiveness and should be considered when developing improvement interventions. Quality scorecards should be designed with care, attending to evidence of indicators’ effectiveness and how indicators and overall scorecard composition fit the intended audience. PMID:24029440

  6. PREVALENCE OF METHICILLIN RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS FROM NOSE AND THROAT OF PATIENTS ON ADMISSION TO MEDICAL WARDS OF DR SOETOMO HOSPITAL, SURABAYA, INDONESIA.

    PubMed

    Kuntaman, K; Hadi, Usman; Setiawan, Firman; Koendori, Eko Budi; Rusli, Musofa; Santosaningsih, Dewi; Severin, Juliette; Verbrugh, Henri A

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage in Indonesian hospitals are still scarce. These data are required for health management of infectious diseases in order to control hospital MRSA. The carriage rate of MRSA in nose and throat of patients on admission to Dr Soetomo Hospital Surabaya, Indonesia was 8.1% of 643 patients, 5.4% from throat, 3.9% from nose and 1.2% from both sites. Prevalence of MRSA among patients admitted to surgical and non-surgical ward was not different (8.2% and 8.0%, respectively). Although MRSA prevalence in Indonesian hospitals is low compared to many other countries worldwide, appropriate health strategies will be needed to be implemented if this infection is to be controlled. PMID:27086426

  7. Protocol to describe the analysis of text-based communication in medical records for patients discharged from intensive care to hospital ward

    PubMed Central

    Parsons Leigh, Jeanna; Brown, Kyla; Buchner, Denise; Stelfox, Henry T

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Effective communication during hospital transitions of patient care is fundamental to ensuring patient safety and continuity of quality care. This study will describe text-based communication included in patient medical records before, during and after patient transfer from the intensive care unit (ICU) to a hospital ward (n=10 days) by documenting (1) the structure and focus of physician progress notes within and between medical specialties, (2) the organisation of subjective and objective information, including the location and accessibility of patient data and whether/how this changes during the hospital stay and (3) missing, illegible and erroneous information. Methods This study is part of a larger mixed methods prospective observational study of ICU to hospital ward transfer practices in 10 ICUs across Canada. Medical records will be collected and photocopied for each consenting patient for a period of up to 10 consecutive days, including the final 2 days in the ICU, the day of transfer and the first 7 days on the ward (n=10 days). Textual analysis of medical record data will be completed by 2 independent reviewers to describe communication between stakeholders involved in ICU transfer. Ethics and dissemination Research ethics board approval has been obtained at all study sites, including the coordinating study centre (which covers 4 Calgary-based sites; UofC REB 13-0021) and 6 additional study sites (UofA Pro00050646; UBC PHC Hi4-01667; Sunnybrook 336-2014; QCH 20140345-01H; Sherbrooke 14-172; Laval 2015-2171). Findings from this study will inform the development of an evidence-based tool that will be used to systematically analyse the series of notes in a patient's medical record. PMID:27401367

  8. Mobile and Fixed Computer Use by Doctors and Nurses on Hospital Wards: Multi-method Study on the Relationships Between Clinician Role, Clinical Task, and Device Choice

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Pia; Lindgaard, Anne-Mette; Prgomet, Mirela; Creswick, Nerida

    2009-01-01

    Background Selecting the right mix of stationary and mobile computing devices is a significant challenge for system planners and implementers. There is very limited research evidence upon which to base such decisions. Objective We aimed to investigate the relationships between clinician role, clinical task, and selection of a computer hardware device in hospital wards. Methods Twenty-seven nurses and eight doctors were observed for a total of 80 hours as they used a range of computing devices to access a computerized provider order entry system on two wards at a major Sydney teaching hospital. Observers used a checklist to record the clinical tasks completed, devices used, and location of the activities. Field notes were also documented during observations. Semi-structured interviews were conducted after observation sessions. Assessment of the physical attributes of three devices—stationary PCs, computers on wheels (COWs) and tablet PCs—was made. Two types of COWs were available on the wards: generic COWs (laptops mounted on trolleys) and ergonomic COWs (an integrated computer and cart device). Heuristic evaluation of the user interfaces was also carried out. Results The majority (93.1%) of observed nursing tasks were conducted using generic COWs. Most nursing tasks were performed in patients’ rooms (57%) or in the corridors (36%), with a small percentage at a patient’s bedside (5%). Most nursing tasks related to the preparation and administration of drugs. Doctors on ward rounds conducted 57.3% of observed clinical tasks on generic COWs and 35.9% on tablet PCs. On rounds, 56% of doctors’ tasks were performed in the corridors, 29% in patients’ rooms, and 3% at the bedside. Doctors not on a ward round conducted 93.6% of tasks using stationary PCs, most often within the doctors’ office. Nurses and doctors were observed performing workarounds, such as transcribing medication orders from the computer to paper. Conclusions The choice of device was related

  9. Frequent Prescription of Antibiotics and High Burden of Antibiotic Resistance among Deceased Patients in General Medical Wards of Acute Care Hospitals in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Yee Gyung; Moon, Chisook; Kim, Eu Suk; Kim, Baek-Nam

    2016-01-01

    Background Antibiotics are often administered to terminally ill patients until death, and antibiotic use contributes to the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs). We investigated antibiotic use and the isolation of MDROs among patients who died in general medical wards. Methods All adult patients who died in the general internal medicine wards at four acute care hospitals between January and June 2013 were enrolled. For comparison with these deceased patients, the same number of surviving, discharged patients was selected from the same divisions of internal medicine subspecialties during the same period. Results During the study period, 303 deceased patients were enrolled; among them, 265 (87.5%) had do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders in their medical records. Antibiotic use was more common in patients who died than in those who survived (87.5% vs. 65.7%, P<0.001). Among deceased patients with DNR orders, antibiotic use was continued in 59.6% of patients after obtaining their DNR orders. Deceased patients received more antibiotic therapy courses (two [interquartile range (IQR) 1–3] vs. one [IQR 0–2], P<0.001). Antibiotics were used for longer durations in deceased patients than in surviving patients (13 [IQR 5–23] vs. seven days [IQR 0–18], P<0.001). MDROs were also more common in deceased patients than in surviving patients (25.7% vs. 10.6%, P<0.001). Conclusions Patients who died in the general medical wards of acute care hospitals were exposed to more antibiotics than patients who survived. In particular, antibiotic prescription was common even after obtaining DNR orders in patients who died. The isolation of MDROs during the hospital stay was more common in these patients who died. Strategies for judicious antibiotic use and appropriate infection control should be applied to these patient populations. PMID:26761461

  10. SDS-PAGE Analysis of the Outer Membrane Proteins of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Isolated from Patients in Different Wards of Nemazee Hospital, Shiraz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Behzad; Mottamedifar, Mohammad; Khoshkharam-Roodmajani, Hossein; Hassanzadeh, Amir; Zomorrodian, Kamyar; Rahimi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Background: Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) constitute the main structure and about half of the cell wall of Gram-negative bacteria. The OMPs of Escherichia coli (E. coli) play an important role in its drug resistance. Previous studies have shown that the OMPs of E. coli enhance its pathogenic effects by helping the bacterium to evade the immune defense and promote its adsorption to host cells. We sought to compare E. coli isolates collected from different hospital wards and to perform a primary investigation of the association between the serotypes and profiles of their OMPs. We also aimed to detect the diversity of the E. coli isolates from the hospitalized patients. Methods: A total of 115 isolates of E. coli were collected from patients hospitalized in Nemazee Hospital, Shiraz, Iran. After biochemical and serological tests, OMPs were extracted by using glass beads and N-Lauroylsarcosine sodium. OMP typing was done by 10% SDS-PAGE and Coomassie brilliant blue staining. In terms of the number of protein bands, OMP-I was detected with 2 bands, OMP-α with 3 bands, and OMP-β with1 band. Results: Of the 115 isolates, 103 were OMP-I and 12 were OMP-α; none of the isolates belonged to OMP-β. Our statistical analyses showed a relationship between OMP patterns and other factors, including hospital wards and source of samples. Serotyping showed that the majority of the isolates were O128. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated some similarities between the OMP band patterns of the analyzed groups of E. coli. Of all the OMPs in the isolates from the hospitalized and outpatient department patients, OmpA and OmpC were the most prevalent proteins in the outer membrane of the studied uropathogenic E. coli. PMID:27582589

  11. On-ward participation of a hospital pharmacist in a Dutch intensive care unit reduces prescribing errors and related patient harm: an intervention study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) are at high risk for prescribing errors and related adverse drug events (ADEs). An effective intervention to decrease this risk, based on studies conducted mainly in North America, is on-ward participation of a clinical pharmacist in an ICU team. As the Dutch Healthcare System is organized differently and the on-ward role of hospital pharmacists in Dutch ICU teams is not well established, we conducted an intervention study to investigate whether participation of a hospital pharmacist can also be an effective approach in reducing prescribing errors and related patient harm (preventable ADEs) in this specific setting. Methods A prospective study compared a baseline period with an intervention period. During the intervention period, an ICU hospital pharmacist reviewed medication orders for patients admitted to the ICU, noted issues related to prescribing, formulated recommendations and discussed those during patient review meetings with the attending ICU physicians. Prescribing issues were scored as prescribing errors when consensus was reached between the ICU hospital pharmacist and ICU physicians. Results During the 8.5-month study period, medication orders for 1,173 patients were reviewed. The ICU hospital pharmacist made a total of 659 recommendations. During the intervention period, the rate of consensus between the ICU hospital pharmacist and ICU physicians was 74%. The incidence of prescribing errors during the intervention period was significantly lower than during the baseline period: 62.5 per 1,000 monitored patient-days versus 190.5 per 1,000 monitored patient-days, respectively (P < 0.001). Preventable ADEs (patient harm, National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention severity categories E and F) were reduced from 4.0 per 1,000 monitored patient-days during the baseline period to 1.0 per 1,000 monitored patient-days during the intervention period (P = 0.25). Per

  12. Standardized Glycemic Management with a Computerized Workflow and Decision Support System for Hospitalized Patients with Type 2 Diabetes on Different Wards

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Katharina M.; Höll, Bernhard; Aberer, Felix; Donsa, Klaus; Augustin, Thomas; Schaupp, Lukas; Spat, Stephan; Beck, Peter; Fruhwald, Friedrich M.; Schnedl, Christian; Rosenkranz, Alexander R.; Lumenta, David B.; Kamolz, Lars-Peter; Plank, Johannes; Pieber, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: This study investigated the efficacy, safety, and usability of standardized glycemic management by a computerized decision support system for non-critically ill hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes on four different wards. Materials and Methods: In this open, noncontrolled intervention study, glycemic management of 99 patients with type 2 diabetes (62% acute admissions; 41 females; age, 67±11 years; hemoglobin A1c, 65±21 mmol/mol; body mass index, 30.4±6.5 kg/m2) on clinical wards (Cardiology, Endocrinology, Nephrology, Plastic Surgery) of a tertiary-care hospital was guided by GlucoTab® (Joanneum Research GmbH [Graz, Austria] and Medical University of Graz [Graz, Austria]), a mobile decision support system providing automated workflow support and suggestions for insulin dosing to nurses and physicians. Results: Adherence to insulin dosing suggestions was high (96.5% bolus, 96.7% basal). The primary outcome measure, percentage of blood glucose (BG) measurements in the range of 70–140 mg/dL, occurred in 50.2±22.2% of all measurements. The overall mean BG level was 154±35 mg/dL. BG measurements in the ranges of 60–70 mg/dL, 40–60 mg/dL, and <40 mg/dL occurred in 1.4%, 0.5%, and 0.0% of all measurements, respectively. A regression analysis showed that acute admission to the Cardiology Ward (+30 mg/dL) and preexisting home insulin therapy (+26 mg/dL) had the strongest impact on mean BG. Acute admission to other wards had minor effects (+4 mg/dL). Ninety-one percent of the healthcare professionals felt confident with GlucoTab, and 89% believed in its practicality and 80% in its ability to prevent medication errors. Conclusions: An efficacious, safe, and user-accepted implementation of GlucoTab was demonstrated. However, for optimized personalized patient care, further algorithm modifications are required. PMID:26355756

  13. Introduction of a new observation chart and education programme is associated with higher rates of vital-sign ascertainment in hospital wards.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Helen; Jones, Aaron; Herkes, Robert; Cook, Kathy; Stirling, Anne; Halbert, Tanya; Yates, Amanda; Lal, Sean; Gardo, Alan; Donnelly, Roy; Gattas, David J

    2011-09-01

    INTRODUCTION Local and national awareness of the need to improve the recognition and response to the clinical deterioration of hospital inpatients is high. The authors designed and implemented a programme to improve recognition of deteriorating patients in their hospital; a new observation chart for vital signs was one of the major elements. The aim of the study is to evaluate the impact of the new chart and associated education programme on the completeness of vital-sign recording in ward areas. METHODS The setting is a university-affiliated teaching hospital in Sydney, Australia. Three study periods, each lasting 14 days (preintervention, 2 weeks postintervention, 3 months postintervention), were carried out in three wards. The new observation chart was supported by an education programme. The primary outcome measures were the ascertainment rates of individual vital signs as a proportion of total observation sets. RESULTS Documentation of respiratory rate increased from 47.8% to 97.8% (p<0.001) and was sustained at 3 months postintervention (98.5%). Collection of a full set of vital signs also improved by a similar magnitude. Basic neurological observation for all patients was introduced in the new chart; the uptake of this was very good (93.1%). Ascertainment rates of blood pressure and oxygen saturation also increased by small but significant amounts from good baseline rates of 97% or higher. CONCLUSION The introduction of a new observation chart, and education regarding its use and importance, was associated with a major improvement in the recording of respiratory rate and other vital signs. PMID:21441604

  14. Characteristics and dying trajectories of adult hospital patients from acute care wards who die following review by the rapid response team.

    PubMed

    Coombs, M A; Nelson, K; Psirides, A J; Suter, N; Pedersen, A

    2016-03-01

    A third of patients reviewed by rapid response teams (RRT) require end-of-life care. However, little is known about the characteristics and management of these patients following RRT review. This paper presents results of a retrospective, descriptive audit that explored the dying trajectory of adult ward inpatients who died outside of intensive care following RRT review. The study setting was a 430-bed tertiary New Zealand hospital during 2013. RRT, inpatient databases and hospital notes were used to identify 100 consecutive adult inpatients who died subsequent to RRT review. Outcome measures included time from RRT review to death, place of death, pre-existing co-morbidities and frequency of medical review. Results demonstrated that patients were old (median 77 years, IQR 63-85years), emergency admissions (n=100) and admitted under a medical specialty (n=71). All but one of the cohort had pre-existing co-morbidities (mean 3.2, SD 1.7), almost a third (n=31) had cancer and 51% had 1-4 previous inpatient admissions within the previous 12 months. The mean length of stay prior to RRT review was 4.9 days (SD 5.5) during which patients were frequently reviewed by senior medical staff (mean 6.8 times, SD 6.9, range 0-44). Twenty per cent of patients died after their first RRT review with a further 40% receiving treatment limitation/palliation. Fifty-two per cent of patients had a pre-existing DNAR. Eighty per cent of patients died in hospital. Whilst the RRT fulfils an unmet need in decision-making at end of life, there is a need to understand what RRT, instead of ward-based or palliative care teams, offers dying patients. PMID:27029659

  15. Prescribing patterns of antibiotics and sensitivity patterns of common microorganisms in the Internal Medicine ward of a teaching hospital in Western Nepal: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Ravi Pathiyil; Partha, Praveen; Shenoy, Nagesh Kumar; Easow, Joshy Maducolil; Brahmadathan, Kottallur Narayanan

    2003-01-01

    Background Information about antibiotic use and resistance patterns of common microorganisms are lacking in hospitals in Western Nepal. Excessive and inappropriate use of antibiotics contributes to the development of bacterial resistance. The parameter: Defined daily dose/100 bed-days, provides an estimate of consumption of drugs among hospital in-patients. This study was carried out to collect relevant demographic information, antibiotic prescribing patterns and the common organisms isolated including their antibiotic sensitivity patterns. Methods The study was carried out over a 3-month period (01.04.2002 to 30.06.2002) at the Manipal Teaching Hospital, Western Nepal. The median number of days of hospitalization and mean ± SD cost of antibiotics prescribed during hospital stay were calculated. The use of antibiotics was classified for prophylaxis, bacteriologically proven infection or non-bacteriologically proven infection. Sensitivity patterns of the common organisms were determined. Defined daily dose/100 bed-days of the ten most commonly prescribed antibiotics were calculated. Results 203 patients were prescribed antibiotics; 112 were male. Median duration of hospitalization was 5 days. 347 antibiotics were prescribed. The most common were ampicillin, amoxicillin, metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and benzylpenicillin. Mean ± SD cost of antibiotics was 16.5 ± 13.4 US$. Culture and sensitivity testing was carried out in 141 patients. The common organisms isolated were H. influenzae, E. coli, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus. Conclusions Antibiotic resistance is becoming a problem in the Internal Medicine ward. Formulation of a policy for hospital antibiotic use and an educational programme especially for junior doctors is required. PMID:12904265

  16. Pattern of Hepatitis A Virus Epidemiology in Nursing Students and Adherence to Preventive Measures at Two Training Wards of a University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Campagna, Marcello; Maria Mereu, Noemi; Mulas, Lucia; Pilia, Roberta; Francesca Piazza, Maria; Spada, Laura; Lai, Alberto; Portoghese, Igor; Galletta, Maura; Masia, Giuseppina; Restivo, Angelo; Mura, Paolo; Finco, Gabriele; Cristina Coppola, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Background Nursing students can be exposed to patients with hepatitis A virus (HAV) and can represent a vehicle of transmission both for health personnel, patients and relatives. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the risk of HAV infection in nursing students during their internship. Patients and Methods A seroprevalence survey on HAV infection was performed on nursing students at the Cagliari university-hospital, together with the assessment of the compliance to preventive measures to decrease the risk of infection during their internship. Blood specimens were obtained from 253 students. All serum samples were tested for anti-HAV antibodies (IgG) by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Compliance to preventive measures was recorded by trained personnel. Results Overall HAV seropositivity in nursing students (mean age 24, range 17 - 45 years) was 3%. Compliance to preventive measures was not uniform (6% - 76%) and extremely low in some specific measures targeted to decrease the oral-fecal transmission. Conclusions The high proportion of susceptible nursing students can contribute to an increase in the risk of nosocomial transmission, especially when specific preventive measures are not completely applied. Nursing education packages, before starting medical internship, should be implemented in order to increase their compliance to preventive measures, especially in wards at higher risk. Vaccination should be considered in wards at higher risk. PMID:27195012

  17. Teaching a 'good' ward round.

    PubMed

    Powell, Natalie; Bruce, Christopher G; Redfern, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    Ward rounds are a vital part of hospital medicine and junior doctors play a key role in their delivery. Despite the importance of ward rounds to patient care and experience, we believe that junior doctors may lack the training and skills to carry them out most effectively. We designed a simulation-based training session focusing on ward round skills themed to key patient safety issues and have delivered the training to over 100 learners (medical students and foundation year one doctors). Few learners had any prior training in ward rounds. The session was highly valued by all participants and surveys completed both before and after the session showed statistically significant improvements in confidence in leading and documenting ward rounds. In addition, 94% of final year medical students and 93% of doctors felt such training should be included in the undergraduate curriculum. We believe there is a current gap in training around ward round skills and would strongly encourage simulation-based ward round training to be developed for undergraduates. Further sessions following qualification may then consolidate and develop ward round skills adapted to the level of the doctor. PMID:25824064

  18. Implementation of routine counselor-initiated opt-out HIV testing on the adult medical ward at Kamuzu Central Hospital, Lilongwe, Malawi

    PubMed Central

    LaCourse, Sylvia M.; Chester, Frances M.; Matoga, Mitch; Munthali, Charles; Nsona, Dominic; Haac, Bryce; Hoffman, Irving F.; Hosseinipour, Mina C.

    2015-01-01

    The optimal approach of provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling (PITC) for inpatients in high-burden settings is unknown. We prospectively evaluated the implementation of task-shifting from clinician-referral to counselor-initiated PITC on the medical wards of Kamuzu Central Hospital, Malawi. The majority of patients (1905/3154, 60.4%) had an unknown admission HIV status. Counselors offered testing to 66.6% (1268/1905). HIV prevalence was 39.3%. Counselor-initiated PITC significantly increased HIV testing by 79% (643/2957 vs. 1228/3154), resulting in an almost 2-fold increase in patients with known HIV status (2447/3154 vs. 1249/3154) (both p<.0001), with 18.4% of those tested receiving a new diagnosis of HIV. PMID:25622063

  19. Clinical Assessment of Nursing Care Regarding Hemovigilance in Neonatal Wards and Neonatal Intensive Care Units in Selected Hospitals Affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences (2013 - 2014)

    PubMed Central

    Tajalli, Saleheh; Nourian, Manijeh; Rassouli, Maryam; Baghestani, Ahmad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hemovigilance is a series of surveillance procedures encompassing the entire transfusion chain from the collection of blood and its components to the follow-up of its recipients. It is intended to collect and access information on unanticipated or adverse effects stemming from the therapeutic use of labile blood products. Blood transfusion, particularly in neonates, requires meticulous clinical assessment to ensure safety before, during, and after the procedure. Therefore, it is essential to investigate how nurses and other health care providers implement hemovigilance with a view to elevating the standards of care. Objectives: The aim of this study, conducted between 2013 and 2014, was to assess nursing care regarding hemovigilance in the neonatal wards and neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) of selected hospitals affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study assessed nursing care concerning hemovigilance in 144 neonates. Data were collected using a checklist at the neonatal wards and NICUs of Mahdiyeh, Mofid, and Imam Hussain hospitals affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences. The checklist contained information on the standard of care in relation to neonatal hemovigilance in three components of request, transfusion, and documentation. Descriptive statistics with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (version 21) were used to analyze the collected data. Results: The rates of compliance with the hemovigilance guidelines in terms of request, transfusion, and documentation were 47%, 63.2%, and 68%, correspondingly, with a total score of 59.6% in all areas of research. Accordingly, compliance with hemovigilance guidelines was highest in documentation (68%), followed by transfusion (63.2%) and request (47%). Conclusions: The overall score of nursing care as regards adherence to the neonatal hemovigilance guidelines was 59.6% in the present study, indicating a lack

  20. Evaluation of the Use and Reasons for Not Using a Helmet by Motorcyclists Admitted to the Emergency Ward of Shahid Bahonar Hospital in Kerman

    PubMed Central

    Faryabi, Javad; Rajabi, Mahboobeh; Alirezaee, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Motorcycle crashes are the cause of severe morbidity and mortality especially because of head injuries. It seems that wearing a helmet has an effective role in protection against head injuries. Nevertheless, motorcyclists usually have no tendency to wear a helmet when driving in cities and have several reasons for this behavior. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the use and reasons for not using a helmet by motorcyclists admitted to an emergency ward of a trauma hospital due to accident in Kerman, Iran. Patients and Methods: This study was carried out by recoding the opinions of motorcyclists who had been transferred to the emergency ward of Shahid Bahonar Hospital (Kerman/Iran). Since no data was available on the frequency of the use of helmets, a pilot study was carried out and a sample size of 377 was determined for the main study. Then a researcher-made questionnaire was used to investigate the motorcyclists’ reasons for not using a helmet. Results: Only 21.5% of the motorcyclists had been wearing helmets at the time of the accident. The most frequent reasons for not using a helmet were the heavy weight of the helmet (77%), feeling of heat (71.4%), pain in the neck (69.4%), feeling of suffocation (67.7%), limitation of head and neck movements (59.6%) and all together, physical discomfort was the main cause of not wearing a helmet during motorcycle rides. Conclusions: In general, it appears that it is possible to increase the use of helmets by eliminating its physical problems, and increasing the knowledge of community members in relation to the advantages of helmet use, which will result in a significant decrease in traumas resulting from motorcycle accidents. PMID:25599066

  1. Usage Pattern and Serum Level Measurement of Amikacin in the Internal Medicine Ward of the Largest Referral Hospital in the South of Iran: A Pharmacoepidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Soha; Sagheb, Mohammad Mahdi; Hashempour, Mohammad Mahdi; Sadatsharifi, Arman

    2016-01-01

    Background: The inappropriate use of aminoglycosides has harmful effects such as the development of resistant pathogens and the incidence of nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity. Therefore, drug utilization evaluation of these drugs may improve their usage remarkably. The aim of this study was to assess the usage pattern of amikacin in an internal medicine ward. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Internal Medicine Ward of Nemazee Teaching Hospital, Shiraz, Iran, in 2011. The guideline for amikacin use was approved by the institutional Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee, and the study criteria were developed to assess several parameters involved in amikacin therapy such as appropriateness of drug use, dosage, duration of therapy, toxicity monitoring, and serum concentration assay. Serum concentration was assayed using a Cobas Mira AutoAnalyzer. Clinical and paraclinical parameters such as glomerular filtration rate, culture, microbial sensitivity, white blood cell count, and fever were collected. Results: Sixty-three patients were evaluated. Fifty-seven percent of the patients needed dose readjustment; however, it was not performed for 89% of them. Culture between 48 and 72 hours after amikacin administration was not controlled for 79% of the patients. In 19% of the patients, optimum therapeutic effect was not achieved. The mean±SD of the trough and peak concentrations was 7.63±5.4 μg/mL and 15.67±7.79 μg/mL, respectively. Forty-five percent of the trough and 38% of the peak levels were within the therapeutic range. The overall adherence of amikacin usage to the guideline was only 48%. Conclusion: To achieve appropriate treatment and prevent toxic effects, we recommend that pharmacokinetic dosing methods, amikacin guideline, and serum monitoring be considered. PMID:27217603

  2. Understanding and evaluating the effects of implementing an electronic paediatric prescribing system on care provision and hospital work in paediatric hospital ward settings: a qualitatively driven mixed-method study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Farre, Albert; Cummins, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Electronic prescribing systems can improve the quality and safety of healthcare services, but their implementation is not straightforward and may create unexpected change. However, the added complexity of paediatric prescribing (eg, dose calculations, dilutions, manipulations) may pose additional challenges. This study will aim to (1) understand the complex organisational reality of a paediatric hospital in which a new electronic paediatric prescribing (ePP) system will be introduced; (2) describe ePP-related change, over time, in paediatric hospital ward settings; (3) explore staff perspectives in relation to currently established practices and processes; and (4) assess the impact of ePP on care provision and hospital work from the perspective of paediatricians, paediatric nurses and managers. Methods and analysis A qualitatively driven mixed-method approach will be adopted, including 3 inter-related substudies. The core component of the study will be qualitative (substudy 1): we will use ethnographic research methods, including non-participant observation in wards and informal conversational interviews with members of staff. In addition, the design will include 2 embedded supplementary components: a qualitative 1 (substudy 2) based on in-depth interviews and/or focus groups with paediatricians, paediatric nurses, paediatric pharmacists/pharmacy technicians and managers; and a quantitative 1 (substudy 3) in which a staff survey will be developed and administered before and after the ePP implementation. Analytic themes will be identified from ethnographic field notes and interview data. Survey data will be analysed using descriptive statistics and baseline and follow-up data compared to establish impact evaluation measures. Ethics and dissemination A favourable ethical opinion has been obtained from a National Health Service (NHS) Research Ethics Committee (15/SS/0157). NHS research governance approval has been obtained at the relevant hospital site

  3. Pain, agitation, and behavioural problems in people with dementia admitted to general hospital wards: a longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Elizabeth L.; White, Nicola; Lord, Kathryn; Leurent, Baptiste; Vickerstaff, Victoria; Scott, Sharon; Jones, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pain is underdetected and undertreated in people with dementia. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of pain in people with dementia admitted to general hospitals and explore the association between pain and behavioural and psychiatric symptoms of dementia (BPSD). We conducted a longitudinal cohort study of 230 people, aged above 70, with dementia and unplanned medical admissions to 2 UK hospitals. Participants were assessed at baseline and every 4 days for self-reported pain (yes/no question and FACES scale) and observed pain (Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia scale [PAINAD]) at movement and at rest, for agitation (Cohen–Mansfield Agitating Inventory [CMAI]) and BPSD (Behavioural Pathology in Alzheimer Disease Scale [BEHAVE-AD]). On admission, 27% of participants self-reported pain rising to 39% on at least 1 occasion during admission. Half of them were able to complete the FACES scale, this proportion decreasing with more severe dementia. Using the PAINAD, 19% had pain at rest and 57% had pain on movement on at least 1 occasion (in 16%, this was persistent throughout the admission). In controlled analyses, pain was not associated with CMAI scores but was strongly associated with total BEHAVE-AD scores, both when pain was assessed on movement (β = 0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.07-0.32, P = 0.002) and at rest (β = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.14-0.69, P = 0.003). The association was the strongest for aggression and anxiety. Pain was common in people with dementia admitted to the acute hospital and associated with BPSD. Improved pain management may reduce distressing behaviours and improve the quality of hospital care for people with dementia. PMID:25790457

  4. Evaluation of organizational maturity based on people capacity maturity model in medical record wards of Iranian hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H.; Tavakoli, Nahid; Shams, Assadollah; Hatampour, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    Context: People capacity maturity model (PCMM) is one of the models which focus on improving organizational human capabilities. Aims: The aim of this model's application is to increase people ability to attract, develop, motivate, organize and retain the talents needed to organizational continuous improvement. Settings and Design: In this study, we used the PCMM for investigation of organizational maturity level in medical record departments of governmental hospitals and determination strengths and weaknesses of their staff capabilities. Materials and Methods: This is an applied research and cross sectional study in which data were collected by questionnaires to investigation of PCMM model needs in medical record staff of governmental hospitals at Isfahan, Iran. We used the questionnaire which has been extracted from PCMM model and approved its reliability with Cronbach's Alpha 0.96. Statistical Analysis Used: Data collected by the questionnaire was analyzed based on the research objectives using SPSS software and in accordance with research questions descriptive statistics were used. Results: Our findings showed that the mean score of medical record practitioners, skill and capability in governmental hospitals was 35 (62.5%) from maximum 56 (100%). There is no significant relevance between organizational maturity and medical record practitioners, attributes. Conclusions: Applying PCMM model is caused increasing staff and manager attention in identifying the weaknesses in the current activities and practices, so it will result in improvement and developing processes. PMID:25077147

  5. Cost-Minimization Model of a Multidisciplinary Antibiotic Stewardship Team Based on a Successful Implementation on a Urology Ward of an Academic Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Dik, Jan-Willem H.; Hendrix, Ron; Friedrich, Alex W.; Luttjeboer, Jos; Nannan Panday, Prashant; Wilting, Kasper R.; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R.; Postma, Maarten J.; Sinha, Bhanu

    2015-01-01

    Background In order to stimulate appropriate antimicrobial use and thereby lower the chances of resistance development, an Antibiotic Stewardship Team (A-Team) has been implemented at the University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands. Focus of the A-Team was a pro-active day 2 case-audit, which was financially evaluated here to calculate the return on investment from a hospital perspective. Methods Effects were evaluated by comparing audited patients with a historic cohort with the same diagnosis-related groups. Based upon this evaluation a cost-minimization model was created that can be used to predict the financial effects of a day 2 case-audit. Sensitivity analyses were performed to deal with uncertainties. Finally, the model was used to financially evaluate the A-Team. Results One whole year including 114 patients was evaluated. Implementation costs were calculated to be €17,732, which represent total costs spent to implement this A-Team. For this specific patient group admitted to a urology ward and consulted on day 2 by the A-Team, the model estimated total savings of €60,306 after one year for this single department, leading to a return on investment of 5.9. Conclusions The implemented multi-disciplinary A-Team performing a day 2 case-audit in the hospital had a positive return on investment caused by a reduced length of stay due to a more appropriate antibiotic therapy. Based on the extensive data analysis, a model of this intervention could be constructed. This model could be used by other institutions, using their own data to estimate the effects of a day 2 case-audit in their hospital. PMID:25955494

  6. Drug utilisation and off-label use of medications in anaesthesia in surgical wards of a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Amol E; Shetty, Yashashri C; Gajbhiye, Snehalata V; Salgaonkar, Sweta V

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: When a drug is used in a way that is different from that described in regulatory body approved drug label, it is said to be ‘off label use’. Perioperative phase is sensitive from the point of view of patient safety and off-label drug use in this setup can prove to be hazardous to patient. Hence, it was planned to assess the pattern of drug utilisation and off-label use of perioperative medication during anaesthesia. Methods: Preoperatively, demographic details and adverse events check list were filled from a total of 400 patients from general surgery, paediatric surgery and orthopaedics departments scheduled to undergo surgery. The perioperative assessment form was assessed to record all prescriptions followed by refilling of adverse events checklist in case record form. World Health Organization (WHO) prescribing indicators were used for analysis of drug utilisation data. National Formulary of India 2011 was used as reference material to decide off-label drug use in majority instances along with package insert. Results: A total of 3705 drugs were prescribed to the 400 participants and average number of drugs per patient was 9.26 ± 3.33. Prescriptions by generic name were 68.07% whereas 85.3% drugs were prescribed from hospital schedule. Off-label drugs overall formed 20.19% of the drugs prescribed. At least one off-label drug was prescribed to 82.5% of patients. Inappropriate dose was the most common form of off-label use. There was 1.6 times greater risk of occurrence of adverse events associated with the use of off-label drugs. Conclusion: Prescription indicators were WHO compliant. Off-label drug use was practiced in anaesthesia department with questionable clinical justification in some instances. PMID:26755837

  7. A Comparative Study to Assess the Determinants and Outcomes of Sepsis Treated in Medical Wards and ICU in an Indian Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Gautom, Debdutta; Nath, Neena; Saikia, Hiranya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis is the primary cause of death from infection worldwide. In resource-limited countries, increasing number of sepsis is managed in non-ICU settings, in Medical Wards (MW). Aim To compare the burden, aetiology and short term outcome of sepsis treated in MW with ICU. Materials and Methods Prospective, observational, analytical study in sepsis patients in general MW and medical ICU in a tertiary care hospital. Two hundred forty five sepsis patients (MW=150, ICU=95), ≥18 years, selected randomly, were studied to compare aetiology, co-morbidities, clinical & microbiological profile and short-term outcome between MW and ICU sepsis. Sepsis following surgery, trauma, those transferred to/from ICU, those with other life threatening diseases were excluded. Chi-square test/Fisher’s-exact test was used for comparing ratios. A ’p-value’ <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Sepsis was more common in elderly males, both in MW and ICU (median age: 56.7, 59.2 years; male: female ratios = 1.34:1, 1.63:1 respectively). Frequency of presenting symptoms, co-morbidities and sources of sepsis were similar in both groups (p>0.05). Frequency of positive microbiological culture, pattern of microbial flora and antimicrobial resistance patterns were similar in both groups (p>0.05). Number of antibiotics used was significantly higher in ICU compared to MW (p<0.01); multi-organ dysfunction and mortality were significantly higher in ICU settings (55.8% vs. 38.7%, p=0.04; 48.4% vs. 32.6%, p=0.041 respectively). While sepsis and severe sepsis were significantly higher in MW (34.6% vs. 22.1 %, p=0.03; 47.3% vs. 26.3%, p<0.01 respectively), septic shock was significantly higher in ICU (51.6% vs. 18.0%, p<0.01). Mortality in both settings was highest in septic shock (55.5% and 61.2%, p>0.05) and multi-organ dysfunction (55.1% and 64.2%, p>0.05). Duration of hospital stay was significantly shorter in MW than ICU (7.3 vs. 11.0 days, p<0.01). Conclusion Our

  8. Dissemination of IncFII(K)-type plasmids in multiresistant CTX-M-15-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates from children in hospital paediatric oncology wards.

    PubMed

    Dolejska, Monika; Brhelova, Eva; Dobiasova, Hana; Krivdova, Jana; Jurankova, Jana; Sevcikova, Alena; Dubska, Lenka; Literak, Ivan; Cizek, Alois; Vavrina, Martin; Kutnikova, Lucia; Sterba, Jaroslav

    2012-12-01

    In this study, extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates in children with malignancies hospitalised at a paediatric oncology department in the Czech Republic were investigated. From June 2009 to January 2010, a total of 50 ESBL-producing faecal isolates of Enterobacteriaceae were obtained from 28 patients. These isolates were characterised with regard to ESBL enzymes, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and plasmids conferring resistance to cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones. ESBL-producing isolates included Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=36), Escherichia coli (n=7), Klebsiella oxytoca (n=3), Enterobacter cloacae (n=2) and Citrobacter freundii (n=2). Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates belonged to 7 MLST types, including sequence types ST280, ST321, ST323 and ST416 as well as the novel types ST626, ST627 and ST628. The multiresistant epidemic clone E. coli B2-O25b-ST131 was detected in one patient. The gene bla(CTX-M-15) was found on large conjugative IncFII(K) plasmids along with bla(TEM-1), bla(OXA-1), qnrB1, aac(6')-Ib-cr, strA, sul2, aac(3')-II and tet(A) genes in most isolates. Dissemination of IncFII(K) plasmids among various Enterobacteriaceae isolates was considered an important aspect of nosocomial colonisation in the wards by Enterobacteriaceae species producing ESBLs. This is the first study documenting multiple antibiotic resistance elements, including qnr genes, in IncFII(K) plasmids in various bacterial species isolated in a single hospital department. The results highlight the evolution of IncFII(K) plasmids into new variants containing novel antibiotic resistance elements and their important role in spreading ESBL-producing bacteria among hospitalised patients. PMID:23043911

  9. Simple interventions can greatly improve clinical documentation: a quality improvement project of record keeping on the surgical wards at a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Glen, Peter; Earl, Naomi; Gooding, Felix; Lucas, Emily; Sangha, Nicole; Ramcharitar, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Clinical documentation is an integral part of the healthcare professional's job. Good record keeping is essential for patient care, accurate recording of consultations and for effective communication within the multidisciplinary team. Within the surgical department at the Great Western Hospital, Swindon, the case notes were deemed to be bulky and cumbersome, inhibiting effective record keeping, potentially putting patients' at risk. The aim of this quality improvement project was therefore to improve the standard of documentation, the labelling of notes and the overall filing. A baseline audit was firstly undertaken assessing the notes within the busiest surgical ward. A number of variables were assessed, but notably, only 12% (4/33) of the case notes were found to be without loose pages. Furthermore, less than half of the pages with entries written within the last 72 hours contained adequate patient identifiers on them. When assessing these entries further, the designation of the writer was only recorded in one third (11/33) of the cases, whilst the printed name of the writer was only recorded in 65% (21/33) of the entries. This project ran over a 10 month period, using a plan, do study, act methodology. Initial focus was on simple education. Afterwards, single admission folders were introduced, to contain only information required for that admission, in an attempt to streamline the notes and ease the filing. This saw a global improvement across all data subsets, with a sustained improvement of over 80% compliance seen. An educational poster was also created and displayed in clinical areas, to remind users to label their notes with patient identifying stickers. This saw a 4-fold increase (16%-68%) in the labelling of notes. In conclusion, simple, cost effective measures in streamlining medical notes, improves the quality of documentation, facilitates the filing and ultimately improves patient care. PMID:26734440

  10. Psychiatric wards: places of safety?

    PubMed

    Jones, J; Nolan, P; Bowers, L; Simpson, A; Whittington, R; Hackney, D; Bhui, K

    2010-03-01

    In recent years, the purpose and quality of provision delivered in acute inpatient psychiatric settings have been increasingly questioned. Studies from a service user perspective have reported that while some psychiatric inpatients feel safe and cared for, others feel their time in hospital is neither safe nor therapeutic. This paper explores the experiences of service users on acute inpatient psychiatric wards in England, with a particular focus on their feelings of safety and security. Interviews were conducted with 60 psychiatric inpatients in England. The majority of service users felt safe in hospital and felt supported by staff and other service users. However, anything that threatened their sense of security such as aggression, bullying, theft, racism and the use of alcohol and drugs on the ward, made some respondents feel insecure and unsafe. Psychiatric wards are still perceived by many as volatile environments, where service users feel forced to devise personal security strategies in order to protect themselves and their property. It would appear that there remains much to do before research findings and policies are implemented in ways that facilitate all service users to derive the maximum benefit from their inpatient experience. PMID:20465757

  11. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) contamination in bedside surfaces of a hospital ward and the potential effectiveness of enhanced disinfection with an antimicrobial polymer surfactant.

    PubMed

    Yuen, John W M; Chung, Terence W K; Loke, Alice Y

    2015-03-01

    The aim in this study was to assess the effectiveness of a quaternary ammonium chloride (QAC) surfactant in reducing surface staphylococcal contamination in a routinely operating medical ward occupied by patients who had tested positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The QAC being tested is an antibacterial film that is sprayed onto a surface and can remain active for up to 8 h. A field experimental study was designed with the QAC plus daily hypochlorite cleaning as the experimental group and hypochlorite cleaning alone as the control group. The method of swabbing on moistened surfaces was used for sampling. It was found that 83% and 77% of the bedside surfaces of MRSA-positive and MRSA-negative patients respectively were contaminated with staphylococci at 08:00 hours, and that the staphylococcal concentrations increased by 80% at 1200 h over a 4-hour period with routine ward and clinical activities. Irrespective of the MRSA status of the patients, high-touch surfaces around the bed-units within the studied medical ward were heavily contaminated (ranged 1 to 276 cfu/cm2 amongst the sites with positive culture) with staphylococcal bacteria including MRSA, despite the implementation of daily hypochlorite wiping. However, the contamination rate dropped significantly from 78% to 11% after the application of the QAC polymer. In the experimental group, the mean staphylococcal concentration of bedside surfaces was significantly (p<0.0001) reduced from 4.4±8.7 cfu/cm2 at 08:00 hours to 0.07±0.26 cfu/cm2 at 12:00 hours by the QAC polymer. The results of this study support the view that, in addition to hypochlorite wiping, the tested QAC surfactant is a potential environmental decontamination strategy for preventing the transmission of clinically important pathogens in medical wards. PMID:25768241

  12. 4. FIRE BREAK BETWEEN PSYCHIATRIC WARD AND NEXT WARD TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. FIRE BREAK BETWEEN PSYCHIATRIC WARD AND NEXT WARD TO THE SOUTH - Fort Randall, Neuro-Psychiatric Ward, Northeast of intersection of California Boulevard & Nurse Drive, Cold Bay, Aleutian Islands, AK

  13. Wards from hell.

    PubMed

    Bates, Jane

    2016-03-16

    'You're kidding,' I thought, having just realised the special care baby unit where I intended to work was next to the ward where they performed terminations of pregnancy. To make matters worse, women who had miscarried were on the same ward. PMID:26982847

  14. The effect of Computerized Physician Order Entry and decision support system on medication errors in the neonatal ward: experiences from an Iranian teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Alireza; Ellenius, Johan; Pourasghar, Faramarz; Tofighi, Shahram; Salehi, Aref; Amanati, Ali; Fors, Uno G H

    2011-02-01

    Medication dosing errors are frequent in neonatal wards. In an Iranian neonatal ward, a 7.5 months study was designed in three periods to compare the effect of Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE) without and with decision support functionalities in reducing non-intercepted medication dosing errors in antibiotics and anticonvulsants. Before intervention (Period 1), error rate was 53%, which did not significantly change after the implementation of CPOE without decision support (Period 2). However, errors were significantly reduced to 34% after that the decision support was added to the CPOE (Period 3; P < 0.001). Dose errors were more often intercepted than frequency errors. Over-dose was the most frequent type of medication errors and curtailed-interval was the least. Transcription errors did not reduce after the CPOE implementation. Physicians ignored alerts when they could not understand why they appeared. A suggestion is to add explanations about these reasons to increase physicians' compliance with the system's recommendations. PMID:20703588

  15. 2. STREETSCAPE SHOWING NORTH ENDS OF STANDARD AND COMBINATION WARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. STREETSCAPE SHOWING NORTH ENDS OF STANDARD AND COMBINATION WARDS ON RAMP NO. 4. ON LEFT IS BUILDING NO. 9952-B, FOLLOWED BY THE B (NORTH) SIDES OF BUILDING NOS. 9953-9958. - Madigan Hospital, Standard & Combination Wards, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  16. 1. STREETSCAPE WITH THE SOUTH ENDS OF STANDARD WARDS ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. STREETSCAPE WITH THE SOUTH ENDS OF STANDARD WARDS ON RAMP NO. 4 ON WEST SIDE OF COMPLEX. CAMERA IS POINTED NORTHWEST. IN RIGHT FOREGROUND IN BUILDING NO. 9930-A, FOLLOWED BY THE A (SOUTH) SIDES OF BUILDING NOS. 9931-9937. - Madigan Hospital, Standard & Combination Wards, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  17. Interior view of typical ward on second floor, south wing; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of typical ward on second floor, south wing; camera facing northwest. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Hospital Headquarters, Johnson Lane, west side at intersection of Johnson Lane & Cossey Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  18. Discharged from a mental health admission ward: is it safe to go home? A review on the negative outcomes of psychiatric hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Loch, Alexandre Andrade

    2014-01-01

    Before psychiatry emerged as a medical discipline, hospitalizing individuals with mental disorders was more of a social stigmatizing act than a therapeutic act. After the birth of the mental health disciplines, psychiatric hospitalization was legitimized and has proven to be indispensable, preventing suicides and helping individuals in need. However, despite more than a century passing since this legitimization occurred, psychiatric hospitalization remains a controversial issue. There is the question of possible negative outcomes after a psychiatric admission ceases to take its protective effect, and even of whether the psychiatric admission itself is related to a negative setback after discharge. This review aims to summarize some of the most important negative outcomes after discharge from a psychiatric institution. These experiences were organized into two groups: those after a brief psychiatric hospitalization, and those after a long-stay admission. The author further suggests possible ways to minimize these adversities, emphasizing the need of awareness related to this important issue. PMID:24812527

  19. Ward rounds, participants, roles and perceptions: literature review.

    PubMed

    Walton, Victoria; Hogden, Anne; Johnson, Julie; Greenfield, David

    2016-05-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to classify and describe the purpose of ward rounds, who attends each round and their role, and participants' perception of each other's role during the respective ward rounds. Design/methodology/approach - A literature review of face-to-face ward rounds in medical wards was conducted. Peer reviewed journals and government publications published between 2000 and 2014 were searched. Articles were classified according to the type of round described in the study. Purposes were identified using keywords in the description of why the round was carried out. Descriptions of tasks and interactions with team members defined participant roles. Findings - Eight round classifications were identified. The most common were the generalised ward; multidisciplinary; and consultant rounds. Multidisciplinary rounds were the most collaborative round. Medical officers were the most likely discipline to attend any round. There was limited reference to allied health clinicians and patient involvement on rounds. Perceptions attendees held of each other reiterated the need to continue to investigate teamwork. Practical implications - A collaborative approach to care planning can occur by ensuring clinicians and patients are aware of different ward round processes and their role in them. Originality/value - Analysis fulfils a gap in the literature by identifying and analysing the different ward rounds being undertaken in acute medical wards. It identifies the complexities in the long established routine hospital processes of the ward round. PMID:27142947

  20. Multi-Criteria Knapsack Problem for Disease Selection in an Observation Ward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurkittikul, N.; Kittithreerapronchai, O.

    2014-06-01

    The aging population and the introduction of Thailand universal healthcare have increased inpatients and outpatients to public hospitals, particularly to a hospital that provides special and comprehensive health services. Many inpatient wards have experienced large influx of inpatients as the hospitals have to admit all patients regardless their conditions. These overcrowding wards cause stress to medical staffs, block access between medical departments, hospital-acquired infections, and ineffective uses of resources. One way to manage such inundated inpatient is to select some patients whose conditions require less clinical attention or whose lengths of stay are predictable and short and, then, place them at an observation ward. This intermediate ward increases turnover of beds and reduces unnecessary paperwork as patients are considered to be outpatients. In this article, we studied inpatient data of a tertiary care hospital in which an observation ward was considered to alleviate the overcrowding problem at Internal Medicine Department. The analysis of data showed that the hospital can balance inpatient flow by managing a group of patients who is admitted because of treatments ordered by its special clinics. Having explored several alternatives, we suggested patient selection criteria and proposed a layout at an observation ward. The hospital should increase medical beds in a new building ward because the current observation ward can handle 27.3% of total short stay patients, while the observation ward is projected to handle 80% of total short stay patients.

  1. Hospital Acquired Pneumonia Due to Achromobacter spp. in a Geriatric Ward in China: Clinical Characteristic, Genome Variability, Biofilm Production, Antibiotic Resistance and Integron in Isolated Strains

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Pan, Fei; Guo, Jun; Yan, Weifeng; Jin, Yi; Liu, Changting; Qin, Long; Fang, Xiangqun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) due to Achromobacter has become a substantial concern in recent years. However, HAP due to Achromobacter in the elderly is rare. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on 15 elderly patients with HAP due to Achromobacter spp., in which the sequence types (STs), integrons, biofilm production and antibiotic resistance of the Achromobacter spp. were examined. Results: The mean age of the 15 elderly patients was 88.8 ± 5.4 years. All patients had at least three underlying diseases and catheters. Clinical outcomes improved in 10 of the 15 patients after antibiotic and/or mechanical ventilation treatment, but three patients had chronic infections lasting more than 1 year. The mortality rate was 33.3% (5/15). All strains were resistant to aminoglycosides, aztreonam, nitrofurantoin, and third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins (except ceftazidime and cefoperazone). Six new STs were detected. The most frequent ST was ST306. ST5 was identified in two separate buildings of the hospital. ST313 showed higher MIC in cephalosporins, quinolones and carbapenems, which should be more closely considered in clinical practice. All strains produced biofilm and had integron I and blaOXA-114-like. The main type was blaOXA-114q. The variable region of integron I was different among strains, and the resistance gene of the aminoglycosides was most commonly inserted in integron I. Additionally, blaPSE-1 was first reported in this isolate. Conclusion: Achromobacter spp. infection often occurs in severely ill elders with underlying diseases. The variable region of integrons differs, suggesting that Achromobacter spp. is a reservoir of various resistance genes. PMID:27242678

  2. Prospective monitoring study: isolating Legionella pneumophila in a hospital water system located in the obstetrics and gynecology ward after eradication of Legionella anisa and reconstruction of shower units.

    PubMed

    Koide, Michio; Owan, Tomoko; Nakasone, Chikara; Yamamoto, Natsuo; Haranaga, Shusaku; Higa, Futoshi; Tateyama, Masao; Yamane, Nobuhisa; Fujita, Jiro

    2007-02-01

    We previously reported on the sporadic contamination by Legionella anisa of shower units and sink taps at Ryukyu University Hospital. Starting in July 2003, the neonatal area underwent an 8-month reconstruction, and in March 2005, the boiler system was replaced. We therefore examined shower water and tap water for the presence of Legionella just after replacement of the boiler system. In 3 of the 8 water samples collected from the remodeled area, we isolated Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 and L. anisa. Moreover, L. pneumophila serogroup 1 was isolated in 4 of the 5 water samples gathered from the unreconstructed area of the same floor. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis suggested that a single clone of L. pneumophila might exist throughout the floors of the water distribution system. We replaced the shower units at the Legionella-positive site, and began flushing the sink-faucets with water heated to 55N for at least 1 h every morning. As a result, Legionella was not subsequently isolated in water samples. In this prospective study, we identified a central contamination by L. pneumophila serogroup 1 and showed that flushing with hot tap water was effective to counter this situation. PMID:17314417

  3. A study of snake bite among children presenting to a paediatric ward in the main Teaching Hospital of North Central Province of Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Snake bite is a common problem in the North Central province of Sri Lanka. Common krait (Bungarus careuleus), Ceylon krait (Bungarus ceylonicus), Cobra (Naja naja), Russell’s viper (Daboia russelii), Saw-scaled viper (Echis carinatus) and Hump-nosed pit viper (Hypnale hypnale) are the six species of venomous land snakes in Sri Lanka. A significant number of adults and children are bitten by snakes every year. However, the majority of research studies done in Sri Lanka and other countries show adults bitten by snakes and studies describing children bitten by snakes are very sparse. Methods A descriptive cross sectional study was performed in the Teaching Hospital Anuradhapura in the North Central Province of Sri Lanka from May 2010 to 2011 May to describe the characteristics associated with cases of snake bite. Results There were 24 males and 20 females. The highest numbers of bites (48%) were in the range of ages 6-12 years. The majority of the bites occurred between 6 pm to 6 am (59%).The foot was the most common bitten site (48%). Out of all the venomous bites, the Hump-nosed pit viper (Hypnale hypnale) accounted for the highest number (44%) and Russell’s viper (Daboia ruselii) accounted for the second highest number (27%). A significant number of venomous bites occurred indoors while sleeping (22%). Antivenom serum was given to (39%) of venomous bites. Deaths occurred in (11%) of the venomous bites. Conclusions Hump-nosed pit viper (Hypnale hypnale) accounted for the highest number of venomous bites. Majority of the bites occurred between 6 pm and 6 am. Foot was the most common bitten site. A significant number of venomous bites occurred indoor while sleeping. Antivenom serum was given to a significant number of venomous bites. Educating the public on making their houses snake proof and using a torch when going out during night time will help in the prevention of getting bitten by snakes. PMID:25073710

  4. Noise Pollution in Intensive Care Units and Emergency Wards

    PubMed Central

    Khademi, Gholamreza; Roudi, Masoumeh; Shah Farhat, Ahmad; Shahabian, Masoud

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The improvement of technology has increased noise levels in hospital Wards to higher than international standard levels (35-45 dB). Higher noise levels than the maximum level result in patient’s instability and dissatisfaction. Moreover, it will have serious negative effects on the staff’s health and the quality of their services. The purpose of this survey is to analyze the level of noise in intensive care units and emergency wards of the Imam Reza Teaching Hospital, Mashhad. Procedure: This research was carried out in November 2009 during morning shifts between 7:30 to 12:00. Noise levels were measured 10 times at 30-minute intervals in the nursing stations of 10 wards of the emergency, the intensive care units, and the Nephrology and Kidney Transplant Departments of Imam Reza University Hospital, Mashhad. The noise level in the nursing stations was tested for both the maximum level (Lmax) and the equalizing level (Leq). The research was based on the comparison of equalizing levels (Leq) because maximum levels were unstable. Results: In our survey the average level (Leq) in all wards was much higher than the standard level. The maximum level (Lmax) in most wards was 85-86 dB and just in one measurement in the Internal ICU reached 94 dB. The average level of Leq in all wards was 60.2 dB. In emergency units, it was 62.2 dB, but it was not time related. The highest average level (Leq) was measured at 11:30 AM and the peak was measured in the Nephrology nursing station. Conclusion: The average levels of noise in intensive care units and also emergency wards were more than the standard levels and as it is known these wards have vital roles in treatment procedures, so more attention is needed in this area. PMID:24303374

  5. 15. New York Connecting Railroad: Wards Island Viaduct. Wards Island, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. New York Connecting Railroad: Wards Island Viaduct. Wards Island, New York Co., NY. Sec. 4207, MP 7.65. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New Jersey/New York & New York/Connecticut State Lines, New York County, NY

  6. Regular ward checks raise standards of care.

    PubMed

    Dean, Erin

    2012-05-01

    This article reports on the introduction of intentional rounding at University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust. The approach was piloted and implemented on the initiative of two nurses in wards that ranged from orthopaedic to general medical. Intentional rounding aims to put patients at the centre of care and consists of checking on their condition at hourly or two-hourly intervals, recording their nutritional status and skin integrity, and asking if they need pain relief or help with eating. The introduction of the approach follows concerns about failures in care highlighted by a number of recent high-profile reports. PMID:22690424

  7. The cleaning of ward floors and the bacteriological study of floor-cleaning machines

    PubMed Central

    Bate, J. G.

    1961-01-01

    Current trends in ward flooring materials and cleaning methods are considered from the point of view of the hospital bacteriologist. Methods employed in an investigation into the bacteriological safety of a number of floor-cleaning machines are described, and some considerations governing the choice of vacuum cleaners for ward use are discussed. Images PMID:13687726

  8. 14. Photocopy of ca. 1891 rendering of Receiving Ward, built ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photocopy of ca. 1891 rendering of Receiving Ward, built at west end 1892-94. Designed by George W. Hewitt and his brother, William D. Hewitt of Philadelphia. - Hospital of Protestant Episcopal Church in Philadelphia, Front Street & Lehigh Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  9. Circular Coinduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosu, Grigore; Goguen, Joseph; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Circular coinduction is a technique for behavioral reasoning that extends cobasis coinduction to specifications with circularities. Because behavioral satisfaction is not recursively enumerable, no algorithm can work for every behavioral statement. However. algorithms using circular coinduction can prove every practical behavioral result that we know. This paper proves the correctness of circular coinduction and some consequences.

  10. Douglas House. Seven years' experience of a community hostel ward.

    PubMed

    Creighton, F J; Hyde, C E; Farragher, B

    1991-10-01

    Of 24 residents of a ten-bed, community-based hostel ward suffering chronic psychiatric illness, nine have been resettled in the community, with four more expected to follow them. Five residents have made Douglas House their home but another six have manifested behavioural disturbance necessitating return to hospital wards. We found community discharge to be associated with illnesses having good prognostic features, while organic illness militated against such placement. Indicators of a prior history of behavioural disturbance seem to predict difficulties in managing a patient in this environment. PMID:1751859

  11. Safer Wards: reducing violence on older people's mental health wards.

    PubMed

    Brown, Juliette; Fawzi, Waleed; McCarthy, Cathy; Stevenson, Carmel; Kwesi, Solomon; Joyce, Maggie; Dusoye, Jenny; Mohamudbucus, Yasin; Shah, Amar

    2015-01-01

    Through the Safer Wards project we aimed to reduce the number of incidents of physical violence on older people's mental health wards. This was done using quality improvement methods and supported by the Trust's extensive programme of quality improvement, including training provided by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. Violence can be an indicator of unmet needs in this patient population, with a negative effect on patient care and staff morale. Reducing harm to patients and staff is a strategic aim of our Trust. We established a multi-disciplinary group who led on the project on each ward and used a Pareto diagram to establish the focus of our work. We established a dashboard of measures based on our incident reporting system Datix, including number of incidents of violence, days between incidents, days of staff sickness, days between staff injury, use of restraint, and use of rapid tranquilisation (the last two being balancing measures in the reduction of violence). Each team identified factors driving physical violence on the wards, under headings of unmet patient needs, staff needs and staff awareness, which included lack of activity and a safe and therapeutic environment. Using driver diagrams, we identified change ideas that included hourly rounding (proactive checks on patient well-being), the addition of sensory rooms, flexible leave for patients, and a structured activity programme. We also introduced exercise to music, therapeutic groups led by patients, and focused on discharge planning and pet therapy, each of which starting sequentially over the course of a one year period from late 2013 and subject to a cycle of iterative learning using PDSA methods. The specific aim was a 20% decrease in violent incidents on three wards in City and Hackney, and Newham. Following our interventions, days between violent incidents increased from an average of three to an average of six. Days between staff injury due to physical violence rose from an average of

  12. Safer Wards: reducing violence on older people's mental health wards

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Juliette; Fawzi, Waleed; McCarthy, Cathy; Stevenson, Carmel; Kwesi, Solomon; Joyce, Maggie; Dusoye, Jenny; Mohamudbucus, Yasin; Shah, Amar

    2015-01-01

    Through the Safer Wards project we aimed to reduce the number of incidents of physical violence on older people's mental health wards. This was done using quality improvement methods and supported by the Trust's extensive programme of quality improvement, including training provided by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. Violence can be an indicator of unmet needs in this patient population, with a negative effect on patient care and staff morale. Reducing harm to patients and staff is a strategic aim of our Trust. We established a multi-disciplinary group who led on the project on each ward and used a Pareto diagram to establish the focus of our work. We established a dashboard of measures based on our incident reporting system Datix, including number of incidents of violence, days between incidents, days of staff sickness, days between staff injury, use of restraint, and use of rapid tranquilisation (the last two being balancing measures in the reduction of violence). Each team identified factors driving physical violence on the wards, under headings of unmet patient needs, staff needs and staff awareness, which included lack of activity and a safe and therapeutic environment. Using driver diagrams, we identified change ideas that included hourly rounding (proactive checks on patient well-being), the addition of sensory rooms, flexible leave for patients, and a structured activity programme. We also introduced exercise to music, therapeutic groups led by patients, and focused on discharge planning and pet therapy, each of which starting sequentially over the course of a one year period from late 2013 and subject to a cycle of iterative learning using PDSA methods. The specific aim was a 20% decrease in violent incidents on three wards in City and Hackney, and Newham. Following our interventions, days between violent incidents increased from an average of three to an average of six. Days between staff injury due to physical violence rose from an average of

  13. Patients' satisfaction with psychiatric treatment: comparison between an open and a closed ward.

    PubMed

    Müller, Matthias J; Schlösser, Ralf; Kapp-Steen, Gisela; Schanz, Benno; Benkert, Otto

    2002-01-01

    The study compared patients' satisfaction with psychiatric inpatient treatment between an open and a closed ward. During a six-month period, all voluntarily participating patients on two wards of a psychiatric University hospital were investigated anonymously at admission and/or before discharge. A self-rating questionnaire (SATQ-98) was used to assess satisfaction with several domains of psychiatric inpatient treatment. In total, 135 questionnaires were received (retrieval rate 49%). The general level of satisfaction with treatment was high. General satisfaction, satisfaction with medication, ward equipment, visiting opportunities, and regulations for going out were significantly lower at discharge on the closed ward. Dissatisfaction with medication was related to low actual mood, and to low satisfaction with the frequency of psychotherapeutic interventions, visiting opportunities, and with the treating doctor. The results thus far strongly support the need for patients' satisfaction with treatment to be taken into account in order to improve psychiatric inpatient services, particularly on closed wards. PMID:12025725

  14. 45 CFR 46.409 - Wards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Protections for Children Involved as Subjects in Research § 46.409 Wards. (a) Children who are wards of the state or any other agency, institution, or entity can be included in research approved under § 46.406 or § 46.407 only if such research is: (1) Related to their status as wards; or (2) Conducted in...

  15. Assessment of knowledge among patients of surgical wards regarding clinical symptoms and diagnostics of the most common malignant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kozłowska, Elżbieta

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the study The aim of this work was to evaluate the knowledge of symptoms and prophylaxis among hospitalized patients. Material and methods The research was carried in the Provincial Hospital in Bydgoszcz (i.e. general surgery, gynecology and obstetrics, urology, breast surgery and thoracic surgery). 250 hospitalized patients took part in the tests, as well as 50 healthy people. The scientific method used was a specially designed questionnaire. The Bioethics Committee of Collegium Medicum of Mikołaj Kopernik University in Bydgoszcz approved these tests. Results Patients from the Breast Diseases Ward had better knowledge about cancers than the control group. Symptoms of lung cancer were known to both groups to the same extent. Patients from the Clinical Ward of Thoracic Surgery were very knowledgeable about lung cancer, but they did not know anything about other malignant types of cancer. Patients from Gynecology and Obstetrics wards are better than the control group only at knowledge about symptoms and screening of cervix cancer. Patients from the Urology Ward have the best knowledge about screening of prostate cancer and colon cancer. Those hospitalized at the Surgery Ward do not know symptoms of colon cancer, but they have knowledge about its screening. Conclusions Patients from the Clinical Ward of Thoracic and Cancer Surgery and the Clinical Surgery Ward had the least knowledge about malignant tumors.Patients from Urology, Gynecology and Obstetrics wards have better knowledge about malignant tumors treated there. PMID:23788944

  16. Benefits of automated surface decontamination of a radioiodine ward.

    PubMed

    Westcott, Eliza; Broadhurst, Alicia; Crossley, Steven; Lee, Lloyd; Phan, Xuyen; Scharli, Rainer; Xu, Yan

    2012-02-01

    A floor-washing robot has been acquired to assist physicists with decontamination of radioiodine therapy ward rooms after discharge of the patient at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital. The effectiveness of the robot in decontaminating the ward has been evaluated. A controlled experiment was performed by deliberately contaminating a polyvinyl chloride flooring offcut with 131I followed by automated decontamination with the robot. The extent of fixed and removable contamination was assessed before and after decontamination by two methods: (1) direct Geiger-Mueller counting and (2) beta-counting wipe tests. Surface contamination was also assessed in situ on the ward by Geiger-Mueller counting and wipe testing. Contamination maps confirmed that contamination was removed rather than spread around by the robot. Wipe testing revealed that the robot was successful in clearing approximately 60-80% of removable contamination. The robotic floor-washing device was considered suitable to provide effective automated decontamination of the radioiodine ward. In addition, the robot affords other benefits: the time spent by the physicists decontaminating the room is greatly reduced offering financial and occupational safety and health benefits. The robot has also found utility in other decontamination applications in the healthcare environment. PMID:22249471

  17. iPad use during ward rounds: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Lehnbom, Elin C; Adams, Kristian; Day, Richard O; Westbrook, Johanna I; Baysari, Melissa T

    2014-01-01

    Much clinical information is computerised and doctors' use of mobile devices such as iPad tablets to access this information is expanding rapidly. This study investigated the use of iPads during ward rounds and their usefulness in providing access to information during ward rounds. Ten teams of doctors at a large teaching hospital were given iPads for ten weeks and were observed on ward rounds for 77.3 hours as they interacted with 525 patients. Use of iPads and other information technology devices to access clinical information was recorded. The majority of clinical information was accessed using iPads (56.2%), followed by computers-on-wheels (35.8%), stationary PCs (7.9%) and smartphones (0.1%). Despite having read-only access on iPads, doctors were generally happy using iPads on ward rounds. These findings provide evidence of the value of iPads as a tool to access information at the point of care. PMID:25087529

  18. 4GL ward management system.

    PubMed Central

    Brandejs, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    After many years of extensive research of computerized information systems for nursing, inpatient care, clinics and HMOs, laboratories, diagnostic imaging, pharmacy and other services, an integrated Ward Patient Management system was developed. A mature, relational data base management system (RDBMS) ORACLE was selected as the design tool. The system is running under VMS, DOS and UNIX operating systems and ORACLE version 6 on nearly all computer platforms, although multiprocessors are preferred. A host of potentials and pitfalls is associated with the implementation of this new approach to Patient Management. PMID:1807662

  19. Circular motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Isaac; Henry, Richard Conn

    2000-07-01

    An extraordinarily simple and transparent derivation of the formula for the acceleration that occurs in uniform circular motion is presented, and is advocated for use in high school and college freshman physics textbooks.

  20. Drug related admissions to medical wards

    PubMed Central

    Hallas, Jesper; Gram, Lars F.; Grodum, Ellen; Damsbo, Niels; Brøsen, Kim; Haghfelt, Torben; Harvald, Bent; Beck-Nielsen, Jørgen; Worm, Jørgen; Birger Jensen, Kurt; Davidsen, Otto; Frandsen, Niels E.; Hagen, Claus; Andersen, Morten; Frølund, Flemming; Kromann-Andersen, Hans; Schou, Jens

    1992-01-01

    1 In total 1999 consecutive admissions to six medical wards were subjected to a prospective high-intensity drug event monitoring scheme to assess the extent and pattern of admissions caused by adverse drug reactions (ADRs) or dose related therapeutic failures (TF), in a population-based design. The wards were sub-specialised in general medicine, geriatrics, endocrinology, cardiology, respiratory medicine and gastroenterology. 2 Considering definite, probable and possible drug events, the prevalence of drug related hospital admissions was 11.4% of which 8.4% were caused by ADRs and 3.0% by TFs. There were large inter-department differences. 3 The six classes of drugs most frequently involved in admissions caused by ADRs were anti-rheumatics and analgesics (27%), cardiovascular drugs (23%), psychotropic drugs (14%), anti-diabetics (12%), antibiotics (7%), and corticosteroids (5%). Non-compliance accounted for 66% of the TFs with diuretics and anti-asthmatics most frequently involved. 4 The pattern of drugs involved in ADRs was compared with the regional drug sales statistics. Drugs with a particularly high rate of ADR related admissions per unit dispensed were nitrofurantoin and insulin (617 and 182 admissions per 1,000,000 defined daily doses), while low rates were seen for diuretics and benzodiazepines (10 and 7 admissions per 1,000,000 defined daily doses). Confidence intervals were wide. 5 Patients who had their therapy prescribed by a hospital doctor had a slightly higher prevalence of drug events than those who were treated by a general practitioner (12.6% vs 11.8%). The reverse applied for drug events assessed as avoidable (3.3% vs 4.6%). Although these differences were not statistically significant, it may suggest general practitioners as the appropriate target for interventive measures. 6 Only one ADR was reported to The Danish Committee on Adverse Drug Reactions, indicating a severe under-reporting and a potential for gross selectivity. The data collection

  1. Geriatric consultation services-are wards more effective than teams?

    PubMed

    Cameron, Ian D; Kurrle, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Geriatric consultation teams are one of the models for bringing comprehensive geriatric assessment to vulnerable and frail older people in the acute care hospital setting. While ward-based comprehensive geriatric assessment has been established as effective with reference to improving functional status and other outcomes, the team-based variant remains unproven for outcomes other than mortality in the medium term, as shown in a recent study published in BMC Medicine by Deschodt and colleagues. Further research might establish the effectiveness of the team-based model but, for current clinical practice, the emphasis should be on streaming older people with complex problems needing multidisciplinary assessment and treatment to ward-based models of comprehensive geriatric assessment. PMID:23433506

  2. Students' Perceptions on an Interprofessional Ward Round Training – A Qualitative Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Nikendei, C.; Huhn, D.; Pittius, G.; Trost, Y.; Bugaj, T. J.; Koechel, A.; Schultz, J.-H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Ward rounds are an essential activity for interprofessional teams in hospital settings and represent complex tasks requiring not only medical knowledge but also communication skills, clinical technical skills, patient management skills and team-work skills. The present study aimed to analyse final year students’, nurses’ as well as physiotherapists’ views on a simulation-based interprofessional ward round training. Methods: In two successive passes a total number of 29 final year students, nursing students and physiotherapy students (16 in the first run, 13 in the second) volunteered to participate in two standardized patient ward round scenarios: (1) patient with myocardial infarction, and (2) patient with poorly controlled diabetes. Views on the interprofessional ward round training were assessed using focus groups. Results: Focus group based feedback contained two main categories (A) ward round training benefits and (B) difficulties. Positive aspects enfolded course preparation, setting of the training, the involvement of the participants during training and the positive learning atmosphere. Difficulties were seen in the flawed atmosphere and realization of ward rounds in the daily clinical setting with respect to inter-professional aspects, and course benefit for the different professional groups. Conclusion: The presented inter-professional ward round training represents a well received and valuable model of interprofessional learning. Further research should assess its effectiveness, processes of interprofessional interplay and transfer into clinical practice. PMID:27280125

  3. Patients' feelings about ward nursing regimes and involvement in rule construction.

    PubMed

    Alexander, J

    2006-10-01

    This study compared two acute psychiatric ward nursing regimes, focusing on ward rules as a means of investigating the relationship between the flexibility/inflexibility of the regimes and patient outcomes. Previous studies identified an association between ward rules and patient aggression. A link between absconding and nurses' attitudes towards rule enforcement has also been explored. However, an in-depth exploration of ward rules from the perspective of nurses and patients had not been undertaken previously. The study aimed to discover the content of rules within acute psychiatric wards; to explore patients' responses to the rules; to evaluate the impact of rules and rule enforcement on nurse-patient relationships and on ward events; and to investigate the relationship between ward rules, ward atmosphere and ward design. The relevance of sociological theory emerged from the data analysis. During this process, the results were moved up to another conceptual level to represent the meaning of lived experience at the level of theory. For example, nurses' descriptions of their feelings in relation to rule enforcement were merged as role ambivalence. This concept was supported by examples from the transcripts. Other possible explanations for the data and the connections between them were checked by returning to each text unit in the cluster and ensuring that it fitted with the emergent theory. The design centred on a comparative interview study of 30 patients and 30 nurses within two acute psychiatric wards in different hospitals. Non-participant observations provided a context for the interview data. Measures of the Ward Atmosphere Scale, the Hospital-Hostel Practices Profile, ward incidents and levels of as required (PRN) medication were obtained. The analysis of the quantitative data was assisted by spss, and the qualitative analysis by QSR *NUDIST. Thematic and interpretative phenomenological methods were used in the analysis of the qualitative data. A series of

  4. Concept of a Paediatric Emergency Ward for the Cities of a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Leary, P. M.

    1972-01-01

    Children's hospitals in developing countries carry an enormous patient load. Available facilities must be organized to provide essential care for all. At the Red Cross Children's Hospital in Cape Town this has been achieved by the development of an emergency ward attached to the outpatient department. It is suggested that this concept should be applied in large hospitals of other developing countries. Imagesp722-ap722-bp722-cp722-dp722-ep722-f PMID:4646852

  5. Improving patients' sleep: reducing light and noise levels on wards at night.

    PubMed

    Hewart, Carol; Fethney, Loveday

    2016-02-01

    There is much research concerning the psychological and physical effects of sleep deprivation on patients in healthcare systems, yet interrupted sleep on hospital wards at night remains a problem. Staff at Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Devon, wanted to identify the factors that prevent patients from sleeping well at night. Two audits were carried out, between April and August 2015, to assess noise and light levels on wards at night, and to engage nurses in ways of reducing these. A number of recommendations were made based on the audit findings, many of which have been put into practice. PMID:26938911

  6. 34 CFR 97.409 - Wards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Are Subjects in Research § 97.409 Wards. (a) Children who are wards of the State or any other agency, institution, or entity may be included in research approved under § 97.406 or § 97.407 only if that research... research is approved under paragraph (a) of this section, the IRB shall require appointment of an...

  7. Alternatives to ward admission from the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Penelope A; Hopper, Sandy M

    2016-02-01

    There is ever-increasing pressure on hospital resources in general and emergency departments (ED) in particular. At the same time, there is increasing recognition that traditional inpatient ward-based care is not necessary for the majority of children presenting to the ED with acute illness, and that there are patient, family and hospital benefits to pursuing other options. Here, we describe alternative pathways for children presenting to the ED, including short stay and observational medicine, hospital-in-the-home and non-admission enhanced care, in other words, additional management practices or pathways for children who are discharged from the ED. We discuss the principles, models and practical considerations involved in each of these. PMID:27062630

  8. Medical academia clinical experiences of Ward Round Teaching curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Haghani, Fariba; Arabshahi, Seyed Kamran Soltani; Bigdeli, Shoaleh; Alavi, Mousa; Omid, Athar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Medical students spend most of their time in hospital wards and it is necessary to study clinical educational opportunities. This study was aimed to explore faculty members’ experience on Ward Round Teaching content. Methods and Materials: This qualitative study was conducted by purposive sampling with the maximum variation of major clinical departments faculty members in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (n = 9). Data gathering was based on deep and semi-structured interviews. Data gathering continued till data saturation. Data was analyzed through the Collaizzi method and validated. Strategies to ensure trustworthiness of data (credibility, dependability, conformability, transferability) were employed (Guba and Lincoln). Results: Basic codes extracted from the analyzed data were categorized into two main themes and related subthemes, including (1) tangible teachings (analytic intelligence, technical intelligence, legal duties) and (2) implied teachings (professionalism, professional discipline, professional difficulties). Conclusion: Ward round teaching is a valuable opportunity for learners to learn not only patient care aspects but also ethical values. By appropriate planning, opportunities can be used to teach capabilities that are expected of general practitioners. PMID:24627858

  9. The Use of Smartphones on General Internal Medicine Wards

    PubMed Central

    Morra, D.; Lo, V.; Quan, S.; Wu, R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective To describe the uses of institutional and personal smartphones on General Internal Medicine wards and highlight potential consequences from their use. Methods A mixed methods study consisting of both quantitative and qualitative research methods was conducted in General Internal Medicine wards across four academic teaching hospitals in Toronto, Ontario. Participants included medical students, residents, attending physicians and allied health professionals. Data collection consisted of work shadowing observations, semi-structured interviews and surveys. Results Personal smartphones were used for both clinical communication and non-work-related activities. Clinicians used their personal devices to communicate with their medical teams and with other medical specialties and healthcare professionals. Participants understood the risks associated with communicating confidential health information via their personal smartphones, but appear to favor efficiency over privacy issues. From survey responses, 9 of 23 residents (39%) reported using their personal cell phones to email or text patient information that may have contained patient identifiers. Although some residents were observed using their personal smartphones for non-work-related activities, personal use was infrequent and most residents did not engage in this activity. Conclusion Clinicians are using personal smartphones for work-related purposes on the wards. With the increasing popularity of smartphone devices, it is anticipated that an increasing number of clinicians will use their personal smartphones for clinical work. This trend poses risks to the secure transfer of confidential personal health information and may lead to increased distractions for clinicians. PMID:25298819

  10. Moving Home: The Experiences of Women with Severe Intellectual Disabilities in Transition from a Locked Ward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Katherine; Hubert, Jane; Hollins, Sheila

    2008-01-01

    Previous research into deinstitutionalization has largely ignored the perspective of people with intellectual disabilities, especially those with severe intellectual disabilities. This research aimed first to understand how women with severe intellectual disabilities experienced transition from a locked ward of an old long-stay hospital into other…

  11. [Medical economics in tuberculosis management: what will come after the TB ward?].

    PubMed

    Yotsumoto, Hideki

    2009-11-01

    Current unprofitability of medical services in tuberculosis (TB) ward in Japan has been induced by low medical fee and long-term hospital stays, aggravated by unoccupied beds due to the decrease in the number of patients. For the solution of this issue, the increase of medical fee, shortening of the length of hospital stay and drastic reduction of oversupplied beds are essential. An increment of medical fee by the change in the system would be appreciated, but even under the current system, the balance between revenue and expenditure could be obtained by reducing the length of hospital stay toward 4 weeks, and the elimination of deficit in TB ward could be accomplished by these efforts; shortening of length of hospital stay and reduction of TB beds. Although the latter might result in the difficulty of sustaining TB wards, these patients could be treated in the infectious disease ward. The integration of TB Control Law to Infectious Disease Control Law suggests that TB is not a special disease in Japan. If a true "short course therapy" era would be realized by novel anti-tuberculosis drugs, a dramatic change in TB management would occur in the near future. PMID:19999596

  12. Improving room layouts for venepuncture, cannulation and ABG equipment on surgical wards.

    PubMed

    Pedley, Ryan; Whitehouse, Anna; Hammond, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    The Productive Ward series has effectively helped to standardise the storage of equipment in hospital ward treatment rooms; however, in our organisation equipment for venepunture and cannulation had been excluded. This resulted in clinicians having to navigate several unfamiliar environments while on-call and hence waste valuable time searching for basic equipment. We aimed to make it easier to locate and identify the basic equipment used for cannulation, venepuncture, and arterial blood gas sampling and more efficient to collect. We examined the initial layout of equipment on four surgical wards in a large teaching hospital. The time taken for junior doctors, nurses, health care assistants, and physician assistants to gather equipment on these wards was recorded along with a process map of steps involved. Our intervention was to relocate the equipment into adjacent storage and make it easily identifiable by the use of a 'red dot'. Following these changes we repeated the measurements. There was an overall reduction in the mean time taken to gather the equipment required to insert a venous cannula on an unfamiliar ward from 2 min 41 s pre-intervention (range 52 s to 6 mins 58 s, n = 23) to 26 s post-intervention (range 8 s to 1 min 20 s, n = 51). Additionally, the number of steps involved in the process was reduced from 16 to five. All of the 32 junior doctors surveyed felt that faster identification improved patient safety. A significant reduction in the time wasted by clinicians searching for venepuncture equipment on surgical wards has been achieved by simplifying the storage, layout, and identification of this kit. The accumulated benefit includes increased productivity, familiarity, and safety, which is paramount when attending unwell patients on unfamiliar wards. PMID:26734247

  13. Stress Among Iranian Nurses in Critical Wards

    PubMed Central

    Hashemian, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Farzanegan, Behrooz; Fathi, Mohammad; Ardehali, Seyed Hossein; Vahedian-Azimi, Amir; Asghari-Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Hajiesmaeili, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stress has been recognized as a significant psychosocial and physiologic component in educational and practical processes. Objectives: The purpose of present study was to survey stress among Iranian nurses in critical wards. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 3643 anonymous questionnaires were disseminated among nurses in different hospitals in Tehran, Iran, by utilizing multistage random sampling. The questionnaire consisted of two sections: demographic characteristics and a 22-item list on a five-point Likert scale. The association of variables with stress was evaluated using hierarchical logistic regression. Results: A total of 3043 completed questionnaires were completed and returned (response rate, 83.53%). Age (> 33 years, 1571 (51.63%); < 33 years old, 1472 (48.37%)), marital status (single, 188 (6.18%); married, 2685 (88.24%); and widow, 170 (5.59%)), working shift (morning, 605 (19.88%); evening, 631 (20.74%); night, 603 (19.82%); and rotation, 1204 (39.57%)), and the years of experience of nurses (1 - 5 years, 413 (13.57%); 6 - 10 years, 589 (19.36%); 11 - 15 years, 832 (27.34%); 16 - 20 years, 758 (24.91%); and 21-25 years, 451 (14.82%)) had significant association with the level of stress (P < 0.05 for all parameters). However, sex (male, 937 (30.79%); and female, 2106 (69.21%)), education (associate, 444 (14.59%); baccalaureate, 2250 (73.94%); and master, 349 (11.47%)), and body mass index (> 24.6 kg/m2, 2514 (49.75%); and < 24.6 kg/m2, 1529 (50.25%)) showed no significant association with the level of stress (P > 0.05 for all parameters). Conclusions: Considering the personal and background characteristics of personnel and understanding their association with stress and stressful situations encompasses the ability to persevere and adapt to contextual stressors. PMID:26380798

  14. Anxiety and depression on an acute respiratory ward

    PubMed Central

    Thew, Graham R; MacCallam, Jackie; Salkovskis, Paul M; Suntharalingam, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Psychological difficulties are a common complication among patients with respiratory disease, and are associated with poorer health outcomes and increased use of healthcare. As prevalence studies typically sample patients from community settings, this study aimed to explore the extent and nature of psychological difficulties during acute hospital admission. Methods: A case example of an acute respiratory ward is presented. In total, 41 acute respiratory inpatients completed standardised measures of depression, anxiety, and health anxiety. Results: Rates of clinically significant depression, anxiety, and health anxiety were 71%, 40%, and 21%, respectively, with 76% of participants showing clinically significant scores on at least one measure. Comparison to existing literature suggests depression rates may be elevated in the acute inpatient context. The difficulties experienced encompassed both contextual factors related to being in hospital and broader health concerns. Conclusion: We suggest that psychological distress may be particularly prevalent in inpatient settings and that larger-scale studies are warranted. PMID:27508081

  15. Improving the communication between teams managing boarded patients on a surgical specialty ward.

    PubMed

    Puvaneswaralingam, Shobitha; Ross, Daniella

    2016-01-01

    Transferring patients from the ward of their specialty or consultant is described as boarding. 1 Boarding patients is becoming increasingly prevalent due to greater pressure on hospital capacity. This practice compromises patient safety through delayed investigations, prolonged hospital stays, and increased risk of hospital-acquired infections. 1 2 We evaluated how regularly boarded patients were reviewed, and how effectively information regarding their management was communicated from their primary specialty to ward staff. We aimed to improve the frequency of patient reviews by ensuring that each patient was reviewed every weekday and increase communication between primary specialty, and medical and nursing teams by 20% from baseline during the data collection period. The project was based in the Otolaryngology ward in Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, where there was a high prevalence of boarded patients. Baseline data showed a clear deficit in communication between the primary specialty and ward staff with only 31% of patient reviews being communicated to ward doctors. We designed and implemented a communication tool, in the form of a sticker, to be inserted into patients' medical notes for use by the primary specialty. Implementation of the sticker improved communication between teams as stickers were completed in 93% of instances. In 88% of patient reviews, the junior doctor was informed of the management plan, showing a large increase from baseline. Through PDSA cycles, we aimed to increase the sustainability and reliability of the sticker; however, we faced challenges with sustainability of sticker insertion. We aim to engage more stakeholders to raise awareness of the problem, brainstorm solutions together, and review the production and implementation of stickers with senior hospital management to discuss the potential use of this tool within practice. There is potentially a large scope for utilisation of this communication tool on a local level, which we hope

  16. Improving the communication between teams managing boarded patients on a surgical specialty ward

    PubMed Central

    Puvaneswaralingam, Shobitha; Ross, Daniella

    2016-01-01

    Transferring patients from the ward of their specialty or consultant is described as boarding. 1 Boarding patients is becoming increasingly prevalent due to greater pressure on hospital capacity. This practice compromises patient safety through delayed investigations, prolonged hospital stays, and increased risk of hospital-acquired infections. 1 2 We evaluated how regularly boarded patients were reviewed, and how effectively information regarding their management was communicated from their primary specialty to ward staff. We aimed to improve the frequency of patient reviews by ensuring that each patient was reviewed every weekday and increase communication between primary specialty, and medical and nursing teams by 20% from baseline during the data collection period. The project was based in the Otolaryngology ward in Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, where there was a high prevalence of boarded patients. Baseline data showed a clear deficit in communication between the primary specialty and ward staff with only 31% of patient reviews being communicated to ward doctors. We designed and implemented a communication tool, in the form of a sticker, to be inserted into patients' medical notes for use by the primary specialty. Implementation of the sticker improved communication between teams as stickers were completed in 93% of instances. In 88% of patient reviews, the junior doctor was informed of the management plan, showing a large increase from baseline. Through PDSA cycles, we aimed to increase the sustainability and reliability of the sticker; however, we faced challenges with sustainability of sticker insertion. We aim to engage more stakeholders to raise awareness of the problem, brainstorm solutions together, and review the production and implementation of stickers with senior hospital management to discuss the potential use of this tool within practice. There is potentially a large scope for utilisation of this communication tool on a local level, which we hope

  17. [Comparison of activities of daily living for a convalescent rehabilitation ward and general ward for stroke patients].

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Nariaki; Mizutani, Chiemi; Menjho, Masafumi; Deguchi, Akira; Takase, Koujirou; Hamaguchi, Hitoshi; Kawamura, Youichi; Suzuki, Shigeyuki; Sugimura, Kimiya

    2004-11-01

    We investigated changes in the Activities of Daily Living (ADL) of stroke patients in a convalescent rehabilitation ward and a general ward using a Functional Independent Measure (FIM). The subjects were 109 patients hospitalized for rehabilitation purposes at the Oyamada Memorial Spa Hospital. The change in FIM at the time of hospitalization and that at 1 week later was investigated in 81 patients in the convalescent rehabilitation group (CRG) and 28 patients in the control group (CG). In addition, the CRG was investigated again after one month. Intensive rehabilitation service based on ADL and worksheets was introduced in the CRG. On the other hand, these were not introduced in the CG. The total score of FIM increased significantly (p<0.01) in the first week after hospitalization in both groups. The FIM-gain after one week in the CRG was high. With regard to each item, a significant improvement was observed in patients' motor skills while eating, grooming, bathing, dressing the upper body, dressing the lower body, toilet, bladder management, transfer bed/chair, toilet and tub, and walking/wheelchair (11/13). Multiple regressions were used to assess the relationships between FIM-gain (one week, one month), age, rehabilitation intensity and other predictive variables. Better rehabilitation outcomes were observed in patients with lower level of dementia and high rehabilitation intensity. It was thought that planned rehabilitation based on ADL was effective in the CRG, and it was suggested that the CRG's system is effective in the rehabilitation of stroke patients. PMID:15651383

  18. 35. Basement, passage beneath main entrance porch, showing circular skylight ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Basement, passage beneath main entrance porch, showing circular skylight opening, view to northwest - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Hospital Building, Rixey Place, bounded by Williamson Drive, Holcomb Road, & The Circle, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  19. The effects of physical environments in medical wards on medication communication processes affecting patient safety.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Manias, Elizabeth; Gerdtz, Marie

    2014-03-01

    Physical environments of clinical settings play an important role in health communication processes. Effective medication management requires seamless communication among health professionals of different disciplines. This paper explores how physical environments affect communication processes for managing medications and patient safety in acute care hospital settings. Findings highlighted the impact of environmental interruptions on communication processes about medications. In response to frequent interruptions and limited space within working environments, nurses, doctors and pharmacists developed adaptive practices in the local clinical context. Communication difficulties were associated with the ward physical layout, the controlled drug key and the medication retrieving device. Health professionals should be provided with opportunities to discuss the effects of ward environments on medication communication processes and how this impacts medication safety. Hospital administrators and architects need to consider health professionals' views and experiences when designing hospital spaces. PMID:24486620

  20. Developing a general ward nursing dashboard.

    PubMed

    Russell, Margot; Hogg, Maggie; Leach, Stuart; Penman, Mags; Friel, Susan

    2014-12-15

    The seventh and final article in the series on Leading Better Care explores some of the challenges in clinical practice relating to the use of data and making information meaningful to senior charge nurses and ward sisters. It describes the collaborative approach taken by NHS Lanarkshire, which involved nursing staff, programme leads and the eHealth team in the development of a general ward nursing dashboard as a means of ensuring safe, effective person-centred care. The article also illustrates how this web-based data-reporting programme is used to support clinical practice. PMID:25492791

  1. Peptic ulcer in hospital

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, H. Daintree

    1962-01-01

    This study corresponds to an estimated 142,250 admissions for peptic ulcer to the wards of National Health Service hospitals in England and Wales during the two years 1956 and 1957. It presents a picture of the incidence and mortality of complications and surgical treatment throughout England and Wales. PMID:14036965

  2. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis outbreak on an HIV ward--Madrid, Spain, 1991-1995.

    PubMed

    1996-04-26

    Beginning in 1990, outbreaks of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) have been reported in hospitals and prisons in the eastern United States (1). During June 1991-January 1995, MDR-TB was diagnosed in 47 patients and one health-care worker at a 120-bed, infectious disease referral hospital in urban Madrid; on April 19, 1995, the Spanish Field Epidemiology Training Program was asked to investigate this outbreak. This report summarizes the findings of this investigation, which suggested that nosocomial transmission of MDR-TB occurred on a hospital ward for patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. PMID:8602134

  3. Barriers to Nurse-Patient Communication in Cardiac Surgery Wards: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Shafipour, Vida; Mohammad, Eesa; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2014-01-01

    Background: An appropriate and effective nurse-patient communication is of the most important aspect of caring. The formation and continuation of such a relationship depends on various factors such as the conditions and context of communication and a mutual understanding between the two. A review of the literature shows that little research is carried out on identification of such barriers in hospital wards between the patients and the healthcare staff. Objectives: The present study was therefore conducted to explore the experiences of nurses and patients on communication barriers in hospital cardiac surgery wards. Design and Methods: This qualitative research was carried out using a content analysis method (Graneheim & Lundman, 2004). The participants were selected by a purposeful sampling and consist of 10 nurses and 11 patients from the cardiac surgery wards of three teaching hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Data was gathered by unstructured interviews. All interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Results: Findings were emerged in three main themes including job dissatisfaction (with the sub-themes of workload tension and decreased motivation), routine-centered care (with the sub-themes of habitual interventions, routinized and technical interventions, and objective supervision), and distrust in competency of nurses (with the sub-themes of cultural contrast, less responsible nurses, and their apathy towards the patients). Conclusions: Compared to other studies, our findings identified different types of communication barriers depending on the nursing settings. These findings can be used by the ward clinical nursing managers at cardiac surgery wards to improve the quality of nursing care. PMID:25363126

  4. "Ward v. Wilbanks": Counselor Educators Respond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkholder, David; Hall, Stephanie F.; Burkholder, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This article investigated 71 counselor educators' perspectives and pedagogical practices related to "Ward v. Wilbanks" (2009) and the American Counseling Association (ACA) response to the case. The authors used qualitative content analysis to identify 6 themes from survey data: (a) views on gatekeeping and student training; (b)…

  5. Limits of Freedom: The Ward Churchill Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Nell, Robert M.

    2006-01-01

    The University of Colorado's Ward Churchill is but the latest in a long line of professors whose volatile statements have created controversy for themselves and their universities. Specific personnel matters in the case have been meticulously addressed in Boulder, but several larger questions have been curiously neglected. One might well ask, for…

  6. Henry Ward Beecher: A Nation's Tribune.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Daniel Ross

    Henry Ward Beecher was America's most prominent 19th century liberal preacher and a major spokesperson for New England Transcendentalism. His philosophy integrated four fundamental themes: the creation of a moral code based on the internalization of values and peer group pressures, the establishment of the reform ideal of the impartial nonpartisan…

  7. Differences in selected medical care parameters in rheumatic disease ward patients of different ages of life

    PubMed Central

    Pobrotyn, Piotr; Susło, Robert; Milczanowski, Piotr; Drobnik, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatic diseases are becoming more and more common in Poland with the ageing of the population. Nearly 18% of the total hospital admissions in Poland result from rheumatic diseases, which was equivalent to 350 thousand cases in the year 2008. These diseases tend to last for many decades, decreasing both the quality of life and income of the patients as well as increasing the medical institutions’ workload and society's financial burden. The aim of the study was to determine whether the medical care parameters in a rheumatic disease hospital ward show any significant differences among different patient age groups – especially such that would support taking them into account as a basis for adjusting the financial coverage level of medical services. Material and methods Data on hospitalizations at the Rheumatic Diseases Ward of Wroclaw University Hospital in Wroclaw in the years 2009–2015 were analyzed, taking into account the age groups, number of hospital admissions, their duration and causes. Relevant statistical data analysis was performed. Discussion The study revealed that the number of old patients hospitalized at the rheumatic diseases ward increased over the last 6 years and that such statistically significant differences do exist: on average the old patients not only tend to stay much longer at the hospital, but also suffer from a different and more diverse spectrum of diseases in comparison to their younger counterparts. Conclusions The detected differences in medical care parameters support the need for more individualized medical care and increased cost of the hospital stay in the case of older patients. Consequently, those factors justify the necessity to increase the value of medical services in the case of old patients, possibly also taking into account the variation between age subgroups. PMID:27407280

  8. 3. PSYCHIATRIC WARD IN 24' X 60' QUONSET HUT, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. PSYCHIATRIC WARD IN 24' X 60' QUONSET HUT, VIEW OF SOUTH FACE - Fort Randall, Neuro-Psychiatric Ward, Northeast of intersection of California Boulevard & Nurse Drive, Cold Bay, Aleutian Islands, AK

  9. Survey of unlicensed and off label drug use in paediatric wards in European countries

    PubMed Central

    Conroy, Sharon; Choonara, Imti; Impicciatore, Piero; Mohn, Angelika; Arnell, Henrik; Rane, Anders; Knoeppel, Carmen; Seyberth, Hannsjoerg; Pandolfini, Chiara; Raffaelli, Maria Pia; Rocchi, Francesca; Bonati, Maurizio; Jong, Geert ‘t; de Hoog, Matthijs; van den Anker, John

    2000-01-01

    Objective To determine the extent of use of unlicensed and off label drugs in children in hospital in five European countries. Design Prospective study of drugs administered to children in general paediatric medical wards over four weeks. Setting Children’s wards in five hospitals (one each in the United Kingdom, Sweden, Germany, Italy, and the Netherlands). Subjects Children aged 4 days to 16 years admitted to general paediatric medical wards. Main outcome measure Proportion of drugs that were used in an unlicensed or off label manner. Results 2262 drug prescriptions were administered to 624 children in the five hospitals. Almost half of all drug prescriptions (1036; 46%) were either unlicensed or off label. Of these 1036, 872 were off label and 164 were unlicensed. Over half of the patients (421; 67%) received an unlicensed or off label drug prescription. Conclusions Use of off label or unlicensed drugs to treat children is widespread. This problem is likely to affect children throughout Europe and requires European action. Key messagesMany drugs are not tested in children, which means that they are not specifically licensed for use in childrenLicensed drugs are often prescribed outside the terms of the product license (off label) in relation to age, indication, dose of frequency, route of administration, or formulationOver two thirds (67%) of 624 children admitted to wards in five European hospitals received drugs prescribed in an unlicensed or off label manner39% of the 2262 drug prescriptions given to children were off labelThe problem of off label and unlicensed drug prescribing in children is a European problem that requires European action PMID:10625257

  10. Safewards: a new model of conflict and containment on psychiatric wards

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, L

    2014-01-01

    Accessible summary Rates of violence, self-harm, absconding and other incidents threatening patients and staff safety vary a great deal by hospital ward. Some wards have high rates, other low. The same goes for the actions of staff to prevent and contain such incidents, such as manual restraint, coerced medication, etc. The Safewards Model provides a simple and yet powerful explanation as to why these differences in rates occur. Six features of the inpatient psychiatric system have the capacity to give rise to flashpoints from which adverse incidents may follow. The Safewards Model makes it easy to generate ideas for changes that will make psychiatric wards safer for patients and staff. Abstract Conflict (aggression, self-harm, suicide, absconding, substance/alcohol use and medication refusal) and containment (as required medication, coerced intramuscular medication, seclusion, manual restraint, special observation, etc.) place patients and staff at risk of serious harm. The frequency of these events varies between wards, but there are few explanations as to why this is so, and a coherent model is lacking. This paper proposes a comprehensive explanatory model of these differences, and sketches the implications on methods for reducing risk and coercion in inpatient wards. This Safewards Model depicts six domains of originating factors: the staff team, the physical environment, outside hospital, the patient community, patient characteristics and the regulatory framework. These domains give risk to flashpoints, which have the capacity to trigger conflict and/or containment. Staff interventions can modify these processes by reducing the conflict-originating factors, preventing flashpoints from arising, cutting the link between flashpoint and conflict, choosing not to use containment, and ensuring that containment use does not lead to further conflict. We describe this model systematically and in detail, and show how this can be used to devise strategies for promoting

  11. [Nursing support at a rooming-in maternity ward].

    PubMed

    Grochans, Elzbieta

    2003-01-01

    informational support was greater among primiparas than multiparas. In the lactation part, significant differences were noted for 25 determinants (Tab. 1). Similarly, significant differences were noted for 13 determinants of neonatal care and nursing (Tab. 2) and for 9 determinants of postpartum self-care (Tab. 3). A large demand for most determinants of emotional support was noted in the study and reference groups. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were revealed as to 3 determinants representing feeling of safety by the woman during hospitalization (Tab. 4). It was found that the demand for all determinants of instrumental support was greater among primiparas than multiparas (Tab. 5). There were no significant differences in worthing support needs (Tab. 6). Primiparas significantly more often expected informational and instrumental (p < 0.001), as well as emotional support (p < 0.05) (Tab. 7) in comparison to multiparas. The need for social support at a maternity ward was found to be independent of the available support (Tab. 8). The most frequently expected source of informational support is the nurse/midwife at the maternity ward, as well as the doctor at the ward and the outpatient unit. Worthing and instrumental support is usually expected of the husband and the family. The usual methods of delivering support include discussions, training, and demonstration. Brochures remain the preferred vehicle for delivering support (Tab. 9). PMID:15552859

  12. Forecasting Daily Patient Outflow From a Ward Having No Real-Time Clinical Data

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Truyen; Luo, Wei; Phung, Dinh; Venkatesh, Svetha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Modeling patient flow is crucial in understanding resource demand and prioritization. We study patient outflow from an open ward in an Australian hospital, where currently bed allocation is carried out by a manager relying on past experiences and looking at demand. Automatic methods that provide a reasonable estimate of total next-day discharges can aid in efficient bed management. The challenges in building such methods lie in dealing with large amounts of discharge noise introduced by the nonlinear nature of hospital procedures, and the nonavailability of real-time clinical information in wards. Objective Our study investigates different models to forecast the total number of next-day discharges from an open ward having no real-time clinical data. Methods We compared 5 popular regression algorithms to model total next-day discharges: (1) autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA), (2) the autoregressive moving average with exogenous variables (ARMAX), (3) k-nearest neighbor regression, (4) random forest regression, and (5) support vector regression. Although the autoregressive integrated moving average model relied on past 3-month discharges, nearest neighbor forecasting used median of similar discharges in the past in estimating next-day discharge. In addition, the ARMAX model used the day of the week and number of patients currently in ward as exogenous variables. For the random forest and support vector regression models, we designed a predictor set of 20 patient features and 88 ward-level features. Results Our data consisted of 12,141 patient visits over 1826 days. Forecasting quality was measured using mean forecast error, mean absolute error, symmetric mean absolute percentage error, and root mean square error. When compared with a moving average prediction model, all 5 models demonstrated superior performance with the random forests achieving 22.7% improvement in mean absolute error, for all days in the year 2014. Conclusions In the

  13. Information Needs Assessment for a Medicine Ward-Focused Rounding Dashboard.

    PubMed

    Aakre, Christopher A; Chaudhry, Rajeev; Pickering, Brian W; Herasevich, Vitaly

    2016-08-01

    To identify the routine information needs of inpatient clinicians on the general wards for the development of an electronic dashboard. Survey of internal medicine and subspecialty clinicians from March 2014-July 2014 at Saint Marys Hospital in Rochester, Minnesota. An information needs assessment was generated from all unique data elements extracted from all handoff and rounding tools used by clinicians in our ICUs and general wards. An electronic survey was distributed to 104 inpatient medical providers. 89 unique data elements were identified from currently utilized handoff and rounding instruments. All data elements were present in our multipurpose ICU-based dashboard. 42 of 104 (40 %) surveys were returned. Data elements important (50/89, 56 %) and unimportant (24/89, 27 %) for routine use were identified. No significant differences in data element ranking were observed between supervisory and nonsupervisory roles. The routine information needs of general ward clinicians are a subset of data elements used routinely by ICU clinicians. Our findings suggest an electronic dashboard could be adapted from the critical care setting to the general wards with minimal modification. PMID:27307266

  14. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurses Working in an Open Ward: Stress and Work Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Feeley, Nancy; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Genest, Christine; Robins, Stéphanie; Fréchette, Julie

    2016-01-01

    There is some research on the impact of open-ward unit design on the health of babies and the stress experienced by parents and nurses in neonatal intensive care units. However, few studies have explored the factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in open-ward neonatal intensive care units. The purpose of this study was to examine what factors are associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in an open-ward neonatal intensive care unit. A cross-sectional correlational design was used in this study. Participants were nurses employed in a 34-bed open-ward neonatal intensive care unit in a major university-affiliated hospital in Montréal, Quebec, Canada. A total of 94 nurses were eligible, and 86 completed questionnaires (91% response rate). Descriptive statistics were computed to describe the participants' characteristics. To identify factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction, correlational analysis and multiple regression analyses were performed with the Nurse Stress Scale and the Global Work Satisfaction scores as the dependent variables. Different factors predict neonatal intensive care unit nurses' stress and job satisfaction, including support, family-centered care, performance obstacles, work schedule, education, and employment status. In order to provide neonatal intensive care units nurses with a supportive environment, managers can provide direct social support to nurses and influence the culture around teamwork. PMID:27455363

  15. Patient-oriented pharmacy on a special ward: results of a pilot project in Germany.

    PubMed

    Litzinger, A; Rohde-Boehler, R

    1997-04-01

    In Germany a pilot project in patient-oriented pharmacy has been started in the Berufsgenossenschaftliche Unfallklinik Ludwigshafen to demonstrate the efficiency of this modem way of practising pharmacy in hospital. A special ward of the orthopaedic department (spinal injuries, 25 beds) was chosen for this project. Since February 1st, 1994, the pharmacists have taken over the stock management on the ward and dispense oral drugs in unit-dose systems for each patient. The pharmacists participate also in ward rounds and check the patients' medication charts in order to support and inform the physicians. So the project is a combination of improved patient care and an advisory service in pharmaceutical questions for the medical staff. In the first year of this project, which is still ongoing (February 1994-January 1995), 123 patients were treated on the ward; the average duration of stay was about 77 days. During this first year the pharmacists registered 111 questions and events leading to pharmaceutical interventions. The most important results of the project are the improvement in drug safety and more effective drug use. Other positive results are: during the course of the project the cooperation between the medical and pharmaceutical staff has been improved and the drug management by the pharmacy has resulted in a 17 per cent reduction of medication costs in comparison to the year before. All these results clearly demonstrate the success of these first steps in patient-oriented pharmacy. PMID:9151349

  16. Rationale for a home dialysis virtual ward: design and implementation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Home-based renal replacement therapy (RRT) [peritoneal dialysis (PD) and home hemodialysis (HHD)] offers independent quality of life and clinical advantages compared to conventional in-center hemodialysis. However, follow-up may be less complete for home dialysis patients following a change in care settings such as post hospitalization. We aim to implement a Home Dialysis Virtual Ward (HDVW) strategy, which is targeted to minimize gaps of care. Methods/design The HDVW Pilot Study will enroll consecutive PD and HHD patients who fulfilled any one of our inclusion criteria: 1. following discharge from hospital, 2. after interventional procedure(s), 3. prescription of anti-microbial agents, or 4. following completion of home dialysis training. Clinician-led telephone interviews are performed weekly for 2 weeks until VW discharge. Case-mix (modified Charlson Comorbidity Index), symptoms (the modified Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale) and patient satisfaction are assessed serially. The number of VW interventions relating to eight pre-specified domains will be measured. Adverse events such as re-hospitalization and health-services utilization will be ascertained through telephone follow-up after discharge from the VW at 2, 4, 12 weeks. The VW re-hospitalization rate will be compared with a contemporary cohort (matched for age, gender, renal replacement therapy and co-morbidities). Our protocol has been approved by research ethics board (UHN: 12-5397-AE). Written informed consent for participation in the study will be obtained from participants. Discussion This report serves as a blueprint for the design and implementation of a novel health service delivery model for home dialysis patients. The major goal of the HDVW initiative is to provide appropriate and effective supports to medically complex patients in a targeted window of vulnerability. Trial registration (NCT01912001). PMID:24528505

  17. [Comment on “Ward Off?”] More on Ward Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Dennis W.

    The May 23rd Eos “In Brief” could have been considerably more informative about Ward Valley and the work of the NAS panel in reviewing issues raised about the proposed site. The article should have included more comprehensive discussion by the scientific participants who reviewed the technical issues involved. In addition, the article raised two very different subjects—safety issues at Ward Valley and alleged bias of NAS panels—but did not separate the subjects well. Readers may not have distinguished between the Ward Valley panel and the NAS Board on Radioactive Waste Management in the question of bias. In addition, the nature of the reported-on attacks on scientific and personal integrity of the scientists may well discourage qualified but thinner-skinned geoscientists from public service on panels.

  18. Is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) contamination of ward-based computer terminals a surrogate marker for nosocomial MRSA transmission and handwashing compliance?

    PubMed

    Devine, J; Cooke, R P; Wright, E P

    2001-05-01

    A survey of two acute district general hospitals (A and B) was undertaken to investigate the extent of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) contamination of ward-based computer terminals. Of 25 terminals examined, MRSA was identified in six (24%). Environmental contamination was of a low level. Five of the MRSA positive terminals were from hospital A which had a significantly higher rate of MRSA transmission compared to hospital B (1.02 vs. 0.49 new inpatient MRSA cases per 100 hospital admissions for 1999). MRSA containment and handwashing policies were similar at both hospitals, though only hospital B actively audited handwashing compliance and had a 44% higher rate of paper towel usage per hospital bed. Ward-based computer terminals pose a low risk of MRSA cross-infection. This risk can be further reduced if all staff wash their hands before and after patient contact. PMID:11358473

  19. Epsom General Hospital orthopaedic theatre.

    PubMed

    1992-11-01

    The Surrey Section of the London Branch held a very successful meeting on Wednesday 9th September 1992 at which Mr Stephen Kirby BSc, CEng, Director of Estates, gave a talk and tour of the new Private Ward Unit and Ultra Clean Ventilation Theatre at Epsom General Hospital. The new Northey Ward, is a result of the refurbishment of what was a 31 bed section of the Hospital Surgical Block on the 5th floor. The new Ward provides a total of 18 single bed Wards, each complete with bathroom/WC, the Unit also accommodates a 5 bed Day Ward. All the facilities provided are of extremely high standard, which given the very tight building programme, detailed elsewhere, is indicative of the dedication of both the Designers and Contractors who are congratulated on their achievement. With regard to the UCV Theatre the following information was prepared by Aidan Hardy who is a Project Engineer with Epsom General Hospital. We are delighted to be able to print this report for our readers. PMID:10122458

  20. Reducing conflict and containment rates on acute psychiatric wards: The Safewards cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Len; James, Karen; Quirk, Alan; Simpson, Alan; Stewart, Duncan; Hodsoll, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute psychiatric wards manage patients whose actions may threaten safety (conflict). Staff act to avert or minimise harm (containment). The Safewards model enabled the identification of ten interventions to reduce the frequency of both. Objective To test the efficacy of these interventions. Design A pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial with psychiatric hospitals and wards as the units of randomisation. The main outcomes were rates of conflict and containment. Participants Staff and patients in 31 randomly chosen wards at 15 randomly chosen hospitals. Results For shifts with conflict or containment incidents, the experimental condition reduced the rate of conflict events by 15% (95% CI 5.6–23.7%) relative to the control intervention. The rate of containment events for the experimental intervention was reduced by 26.4% (95% CI 9.9–34.3%). Conclusions Simple interventions aiming to improve staff relationships with patients can reduce the frequency of conflict and containment. Trial registration IRSCTN38001825. PMID:26166187

  1. The private adolescent: privacy needs of adolescents in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Alison

    2002-02-01

    This report is based on an interpretative study that explored the meaning of space to adolescents in the hospital environment. Through designing their own adolescent ward and discussing their designs in an interview, participants articulated their spatial needs in the ward environment. This paper addresses the private space issues of the adolescent patient in the ward environment. Issues that are discussed include the use of the telephone, the bathroom, and the bedroom, and additional facilities needed to enhance privacy in the ward. PMID:11891498

  2. Characterization of Circular RNAs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Yang, Li; Chen, Ling-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated lines of evidence reveal that a large number of circular RNAs are produced in transcriptomes from fruit fly to mouse and human. Unlike linear RNAs shaped with 5' cap and 3' tail, circular RNAs are characterized by covalently closed loop structures without open terminals, thus requiring specific treatments for their identification and validation. Here, we describe a detailed pipeline for the characterization of circular RNAs. It has been successfully applied to the study of circular intronic RNAs derived from intron lariats (ciRNAs) and circular RNAs produced from back spliced exons (circRNAs) in human. PMID:26721494

  3. Nature and frequency of medication errors in a geriatric ward: an Indonesian experience

    PubMed Central

    Ernawati, Desak Ketut; Lee, Ya Ping; Hughes, Jeffery David

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the nature and frequency of medication errors during medication delivery processes in a public teaching hospital geriatric ward in Bali, Indonesia. Methods A 20-week prospective study on medication errors occurring during the medication delivery process was conducted in a geriatric ward in a public teaching hospital in Bali, Indonesia. Participants selected were inpatients aged more than 60 years. Patients were excluded if they had a malignancy, were undergoing surgery, or receiving chemotherapy treatment. The occurrence of medication errors in prescribing, transcribing, dispensing, and administration were detected by the investigator providing in-hospital clinical pharmacy services. Results Seven hundred and seventy drug orders and 7,662 drug doses were reviewed as part of the study. There were 1,563 medication errors detected among the 7,662 drug doses reviewed, representing an error rate of 20.4%. Administration errors were the most frequent medication errors identified (59%), followed by transcription errors (15%), dispensing errors (14%), and prescribing errors (7%). Errors in documentation were the most common form of administration errors. Of these errors, 2.4% were classified as potentially serious and 10.3% as potentially significant. Conclusion Medication errors occurred in every stage of the medication delivery process, with administration errors being the most frequent. The majority of errors identified in the administration stage were related to documentation. Provision of in-hospital clinical pharmacy services could potentially play a significant role in detecting and preventing medication errors. PMID:24940067

  4. Development of a self-assessment tool for measuring competences of obstetric nurses in rooming-in wards in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ju; Ye, Wenqin; Fan, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: To provide high-quality nursing care, a reliable and feasible competency assessment tool is critical. Although several questionnaire-based competency assessment tools have been reported, a tool specific for obstetric nurses in rooming-in wards is lacking. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to develop a competency assessment tool for obstetric rooming-in ward nurses. Methods: A literature review was conducted to create an individual intensive interview with 14 nurse managers, educators, and primary nurses in rooming-in wards. Expert reviews (n = 15) were conducted to identify emergent themes in a Delphi fashion. A competency assessment questionnaire was then developed and tested with 246 rooming-in ward nurses in local hospitals. Results: We constructed a three-factor linear model for obstetric rooming-in nurse competency assessment. Further refinement resulted in a self-assessment questionnaire containing three first-tier, 12 second-tier, and 43 third-tier items for easy implementation. The questionnaire was reliable, contained satisfactory content, and had construct validity. Discussion: Our competency assessment tool provides a systematic, easy, and operational subjective evaluation model for nursing managers and administrators to evaluate obstetric rooming-in ward primary nurses. The application of this tool will facilitate various human resources functions, such as nurse training/education effect evaluation, and will eventually promote high-quality nursing care delivery. PMID:26770468

  5. Fibrinolytic Therapy in CCU Instead of Emergency Ward: How It Affects Door to Needle Time?

    PubMed Central

    Zeraati, Fatemeh; Homayounfar, Shahram; Esna-Ashari, Farzaneh; Khalili, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The door-to-needle-time (DNT) is considered a standard time for scheduling thrombolysis for acute ST-segment elevation of myocardial infarction and this time can be reduced by minimizing the delay in starting thrombolytic treatment once the patient has reached to the hospital. This study was carried out on a sample of Iranian patients with acute myocardial infarction to determine the DNT in those after changing schedule of thrombolysis during 8 years from emergency to coronary care unit (CCU). Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out on all consecutive patients with a confirmed diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction admitted to the emergency ward of Ekbatan Hospital in Hamadan, Iran, within 2011 and had an indication of fibrinolytic therapy, which 47 patients were finally indicated to receive streptokinase in the part of CCU. Results: The mean time interval between arrival at the hospital and electrocardiogram (ECG) assessment was 6.30 min, taking ECG and patient's admission was 21.6 min and transferring the patient from admission to CCU ward was 31.9. The time between transferring the patients to CCU ward and fibrinolytic administration order and the time between its ordering and infusion was 31.2 min and 14.0 min respectively. In sum, the DNT was estimated 84.48 ± 53.00 min ranged 30-325 min that was significantly more than standard DNT (P <0.01). Furthermore, DNT mean in this study is significantly more than a study conducted 8 years ago in the same hospital (P <0.01). Conclusions: The DNT is higher than the standard level and higher than the estimated level in the past. This shows that DNT was longer after transferring to CCU. PMID:24829715

  6. Emergency room referral to internal medicine wards or to coronary care units of patients with first acute myocardial infarction. Israel Study Group on First Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Drory, Y; Shapira, I; Goldbourt, U; Fisman, E Z; Villa, Y; Tenenbaum, A; Pines, A

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess factors associated with ward assignment in the emergency room for patients < or = 65 years old with first acute myocardial infarction. We analysed uni- and multivariate predictors for ward assignment (coronary care unit versus internal ward). Eight major centrally located Israeli hospitals provided data during one year. The study population included 1252 patients, of whom 83% were men, 37% were hypertensives, 22% were diabetics, and 14% had previous anginal syndrome. Most patients (83%) were admitted to the coronary care unit. Internal medicine ward assignment was significantly associated with advanced age, history of hypertension or diabetes, a longer time from appearance of symptoms to arrival at the hospital, and myocardial infarction type (non-Q-wave or non-anterior). The likelihood of medical ward referral increased stepwise with the increasing number of a patient's predictive factors: those with > or = 4 factors had a > 30% chance of being assigned to a medical ward compared to a < 10% chance when there were 0-3 risk factors. Exclusion of patients with thrombolysis had no effect on the results. The shortage of cardiac care unit beds apparently leads to emergency room selection acting in detriment of patients with poorest prognoses. Clear guidelines for decision making in the emergency room are needed to resolve this paradoxical situation. PMID:10998758

  7. 40 CFR 30.6 - Availability of OMB circulars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Availability of OMB circulars. 30.6 Section 30.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE..., HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS General § 30.6 Availability of OMB circulars. OMB...

  8. 40 CFR 30.6 - Availability of OMB circulars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Availability of OMB circulars. 30.6 Section 30.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE..., HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS General § 30.6 Availability of OMB circulars. OMB...

  9. 1. VIEW OF HOSPITAL COMPLEX FROM MOVIE THEATER, SHOWING SOUTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF HOSPITAL COMPLEX FROM MOVIE THEATER, SHOWING SOUTHEAST SECTION OF COMPLEX - Fort Randall, Neuro-Psychiatric Ward, Northeast of intersection of California Boulevard & Nurse Drive, Cold Bay, Aleutian Islands, AK

  10. Quality of sleep for hospitalized patients in Rasoul-Akram hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari Jolfaei, Atefeh; Makvandi, Alena; Pazouki, Abdolreza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sleep disturbances have negative effects on medical conditions, mental health and cognitive performance. It was shown that about 60% of inpatients suffer from sleep problems. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between sleep quality and other factors in the inpatients of Rasoul-e-Akram hospital. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, all the hospitalized patients in twelve wards of Rasoul-e-Akram hospital during September 2012, were examined. Sleeping habits of 209 inpatients of different wards were assessed through the Persian version of Pittsburgh Sleep Questionnaire (PSQI). A self-designed 18- question questionnaire was conducted for all patients in order to assess their attitude to interior and atmosphere of wards. Content validity and test retest reliability were evaluated. The pain level was also measured by the visual analog scale (VAS) and scores analyzed by the statistical methods of frequency, percentage, chi-square and logistic regression. Results: The mean of the total scores in PSQI was 8.8±4.8 and 70.8% of the patients were 'poor sleepers' (global PSQI> 5). Age and gender had no effect on the PSQI total score, but the number of roommates, type of the ward, hospitalization period, presence and severity of pain, taking sleep medication and attitude toward the overall atmosphere and interior of wards have caused deviation in scores. Conclusion: Sleep problems are quite frequent in medical inpatients. Pain management and modification of the ward interior and atmosphere can impact inpatients sleep quality. PMID:25405138

  11. 34 CFR 300.45 - Ward of the State.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... child resides, is— (1) A foster child; (2) A ward of the State; or (3) In the custody of a public child welfare agency. (b) Exception. Ward of the State does not include a foster child who has a foster parent who meets the definition of a parent in § 300.30. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1401(36))...

  12. Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections in internal medicine wards: old and new drugs.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Marco; Concia, Ercole; Giusti, Massimo; Mazzone, Antonino; Santini, Claudio; Stefani, Stefania; Violi, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are a common cause of hospital admission among elderly patients, and traditionally have been divided into complicated and uncomplicated SSTIs. In 2010, the FDA provided a new classification of these infections, and a new category of disease, named acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs), has been proposed as an independent clinical entity. ABSSSIs include three entities: cellulitis and erysipelas, wound infections, and major cutaneous abscesses This paper revises the epidemiology of SSTIs and ABSSSIs with regard to etiologies, diagnostic techniques, and clinical presentation in the hospital settings. Particular attention is owed to frail patients with multiple comorbidities and underlying significant disease states, hospitalized on internal medicine wards or residing in nursing homes, who appear to be at increased risk of infection due to multi-drug resistant pathogens and treatment failures. Management of ABSSSIs and SSTIs, including evaluation of the hemodynamic state, surgical intervention and treatment with appropriate antibiotic therapy are extensively discussed. PMID:27084183

  13. Toroidal circular dichroism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raybould, T. A.; Fedotov, V. A.; Papasimakis, N.; Kuprov, I.; Youngs, I. J.; Chen, W. T.; Tsai, D. P.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that the induced toroidal dipole, represented by currents flowing on the surface of a torus, makes a distinct and indispensable contribution to circular dichroism. We show that toroidal circular dichroism supplements the well-known mechanism involving electric dipole and magnetic dipole transitions. We illustrate this with rigorous analysis of the experimentally measured polarization-sensitive transmission spectra of an artificial metamaterial, constructed from elements of toroidal symmetry. We argue that toroidal circular dichroism will be found in large biomolecules with elements of toroidal symmetry and should be taken into account in the interpretation of circular dichroism spectra of organics.

  14. Detection of Common Respiratory Viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in Patient-Occupied Rooms in Pediatric Wards

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Gwo-Hwa; Huang, Chung-Guei; Chung, Fen-Fang; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Few studies have assessed viral contamination in the rooms of hospital wards. This cross-sectional study evaluated the air and objects in patient-occupied rooms in pediatric wards for the presence of common respiratory viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Air samplers were placed at a short (60–80 cm) and long (320 cm) distance from the head of the beds of 58 pediatric patients, who were subsequently confirmed to be infected with enterovirus (n = 17), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (n = 13), influenza A virus (n = 13), adenovirus (n = 9), or M pneumoniae (n = 6). Swab samples were collected from the surfaces of 5 different types of objects in the patients’ rooms. All air and swab samples were analyzed via real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for the presence of the above pathogens. All pathogens except enterovirus were detected in the air, on the objects, or in both locations in the patients’ rooms. The detection rates of influenza A virus, adenovirus, and M pneumoniae for the long distance air sampling were 15%, 67%, and 17%, respectively. Both adenovirus and M pneumoniae were detected at very high rates, with high concentrations, on all sampled objects. The respiratory pathogens RSV, influenza A virus, adenovirus, and M pneumoniae were detected in the air and/or on the objects in the pediatric ward rooms. Appropriate infection control measures should be strictly implemented when caring for such patients. PMID:27057827

  15. Detection of Common Respiratory Viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in Patient-Occupied Rooms in Pediatric Wards.

    PubMed

    Wan, Gwo-Hwa; Huang, Chung-Guei; Chung, Fen-Fang; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2016-04-01

    Few studies have assessed viral contamination in the rooms of hospital wards. This cross-sectional study evaluated the air and objects in patient-occupied rooms in pediatric wards for the presence of common respiratory viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae.Air samplers were placed at a short (60-80 cm) and long (320 cm) distance from the head of the beds of 58 pediatric patients, who were subsequently confirmed to be infected with enterovirus (n = 17), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (n = 13), influenza A virus (n = 13), adenovirus (n = 9), or M pneumoniae (n = 6). Swab samples were collected from the surfaces of 5 different types of objects in the patients' rooms. All air and swab samples were analyzed via real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for the presence of the above pathogens.All pathogens except enterovirus were detected in the air, on the objects, or in both locations in the patients' rooms. The detection rates of influenza A virus, adenovirus, and M pneumoniae for the long distance air sampling were 15%, 67%, and 17%, respectively. Both adenovirus and M pneumoniae were detected at very high rates, with high concentrations, on all sampled objects.The respiratory pathogens RSV, influenza A virus, adenovirus, and M pneumoniae were detected in the air and/or on the objects in the pediatric ward rooms. Appropriate infection control measures should be strictly implemented when caring for such patients. PMID:27057827

  16. Team climate and attitudes toward information and communication technology among nurses on acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Koivunen, Marita; Anttila, Minna; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Katajisto, Jouko; Välimäki, Maritta

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the association of team climate with attitudes toward information and communication technology among nursing staff working on acute psychiatric wards. Background: Implementation of ICT applications in nursing practice brings new operating models to work environments, which may affect experienced team climate on hospital wards. Method: Descriptive survey was used as a study design. Team climate was measured by the Finnish modification of the Team Climate Inventory, and attitudes toward ICT by Burkes' questionnaire. The nursing staff (N = 181, n = 146) on nine acute psychiatric wards participated in the study. Results: It is not self-evident that experienced team climate associates with attitudes toward ICT, but there are some positive relationships between perceived team climate and ICT attitudes. The study showed that nurses' motivation to use ICT had statistically significant connections with experienced team climate, participative safety (p = 0.021), support for innovation (p = 0.042) and task orientation (p = 0.042). Conclusion: The results suggest that asserting team climate and supporting innovative operations may lead to more positive attitudes toward ICT. It is, in particular, possible to influence nurses' motivation to use ICT. More attention should be paid to psychosocial factors such as group education and co-operation at work when ICT applications are implemented in nursing. PMID:24393065

  17. Blood stream infections caused by Acinetobacter ursingii in an obstetrics ward.

    PubMed

    Horii, Toshinobu; Tamai, Kiyoko; Mitsui, Mayumi; Notake, Shigeyuki; Yanagisawa, Hideji

    2011-01-01

    The genus Acinetobacter is an important causative pathogen of nosocomial infections in the healthcare setting. The objectives of this study were to determine the species of causative pathogens and the sources of Acinetobacter blood stream infections that occurred in 2 immunocompetent pregnant women admitted to an obstetrics ward within a 2-month period. Phenotypic identification of the two isolates from blood stream infections was inconsistent among the ID test, the MicroScan WalkAway and the Vitek2 systems. In addition to the growth profile and detailed biochemical analysis, genotypic identification and phylogenetic tree analysis based on the almost complete 16S rRNA sequence and the partial rpoB gene sequence confirmed the identification of these isolates as A. ursingii. Environmental investigation of the obstetrics ward revealed A. ursingii and different strains of Acinetobacter junii in specimens obtained from the ward shower bath, although the source and route of transmission for the A. ursingii infections were not clarified. Our findings show that A. ursingii can inhabit the hospital environment. PMID:20969979

  18. [Emergence of linezolid-resistant Enterococcus faecalis strains from two inpatients in a pediatric ward].

    PubMed

    Nihonyanagi, Shin; Adachi, Yuzuru; Onuki, Tomoyo; Nakazaki, Nobuhiko; Hirata, Yasuyosi; Fujiki, Kuniko; Takayama, Yoko; Kanoh, Yuhsaku; Bandoh, Yuki; Dantsuji, Yurika; Hanaki, Hideaki; Sunakawa, Keisuke

    2012-09-01

    We report herein on the isolation of three linezolid-resistant Enterococcus faecalis strains in 2011 from two pediatric inpatients at Kitasato University Hospital, Japan. Three linezolid resistant strains were isolated from two patients who shared the same room of a pediatric inpatient ward. Two linezolid resistant strains were isolated from patient A who had been treated with a total of 17,600mg of linezolid during 60 days of hospitalization (strains 1 and 2). The linezolid resistant E. faecalis persisted through the time that the patient had been discharged from the hospital. Another linezolid resistant strain was isolated from patient B who had no history of linezolid administration. The resistant strain in patient B phased out spontaneously. The minimum inhibitory concentration of linezolid in these strains ranged from 8.0 to 16.0 microg/mL. PCR amplification of the chromosomal gene encoding domain V of the 23S rRNA and subsequent nucleotide sequencing revealed that all the strains had at least one G2576T mutation. The pulse-field-gel electrophoretograms of the DNA treated with the SmaI restriction enzyme showed an identical profile suggesting that they were derived from a single resistant strain. These results suggested that the resistant strain occurred in patient A and was transmitted to patient B within the inpatient ward. PMID:23198574

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission in a newborn nursery and maternity ward--New York City, 2003.

    PubMed

    2005-12-23

    Evaluating young children recently exposed to airborne Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a public health priority. If infected, children aged <2 years are at high risk for severe tuberculosis (TB) disease (e.g., TB meningitis). In December 2003, infectious pulmonary TB disease was diagnosed in a foreign-born nurse working in the newborn nursery and maternity ward of a New York City hospital (hospital A); the nurse had declined treatment for latent TB infection (LTBI) after testing positive 11 years earlier. An investigation including medical evaluation of contacts in the nursery and maternity ward was conducted by the Bureau of TB Control (BTBC) at the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, hospital A, and CDC. This report summarizes the results of that investigation, which determined that approximately 1,500 patients had been exposed to the nurse but the majority could not be located for evaluation. Among those who were tested, four infants had positive tuberculin skin test (TST) results, likely attributable to recent transmission of M. tuberculosis. The findings emphasize the difficulty of conducting contact investigations in certain settings and the importance of effective LTBI testing and treatment programs for health-care workers (HCWs) to prevent TB disease and subsequent health-care--associated transmission. PMID:16371943

  20. 1. Oblique view of east portion of Portsmouth Naval Hospital ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Oblique view of east portion of Portsmouth Naval Hospital Complex showing in middle ground, from left to right, Medical Ward A (HABS No. VA01287-G), Medical Ward B (HABS No. VA-1287-H), Medical Ward C (HABS No. VA-1287-I, Portsmouth Naval Hospital Building (HABS No. VA-1287-A), Hospital Point; and in foreground, from left to right, gardener's tool shed (HABS No. VA-1287-C), Service Building (HABS No. VA01287-D), garage (HABS No. VA-1287-F), Medical Officer's Quarters C (HABS No. VA-1287-B), and Medical Officer's Quarters B (HAQBS No. VA-1287-E), view to north from roof of 1960 high-rise hospital - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Bounded by Elizabeth River, Crawford Street, Portsmouth General Hospital, Parkview Avenue, & Scotts Creek, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  1. Continuous positive airway pressure for bronchiolitis in a general paediatric ward; a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is commonly used to relieve respiratory distress in infants with bronchiolitis, but has mostly been studied in an intensive care setting. Our prime aim was to evaluate the feasibility of CPAP for infants with bronchiolitis in a general paediatric ward, and secondary to assess capillary PCO2 (cPCO2) levels before and during treatment. Methods From May 1st 2008 to April 30th 2012, infants with bronchiolitis at Stavanger University Hospital were treated with CPAP in a general paediatric ward, but could be referred to an intensive care unit (ICU) when needed, according to in-house guidelines. Levels of cPCO2 were prospectively registered before the start of CPAP and at approximately 4, 12, 24 and 48 hours of treatment as long as CPAP was given. We had a continuous updating program for the nurses and physicians caring for the infants with CPAP. The study was population based. Results 672 infants (3.4%) were hospitalized with bronchiolitis. CPAP was initiated in 53 infants (0.3%; 7.9% of infants with bronchiolitis), and was well tolerated in all but three infants. 46 infants were included in the study, the majority of these (n = 33) were treated in the general ward only. These infants had lower cPCO2 before treatment (8.0; 7.7, 8.6)(median; quartiles) than those treated at the ICU (n = 13) (9.3;8.5, 9.9) (p < 0.001). The level of cPCO2 was significantly reduced after 4 h in both groups; 1.1 kPa (paediatric ward) (p < 0.001) and 1.3 kPa (ICU) (p = 0.002). Two infants on the ICU did not respond to CPAP (increasing cPCO2 and severe apnoe) and were given mechanical ventilation, otherwise no side effects were observed in either group treated with CPAP. Conclusion Treatment with CPAP for infants with bronchiolitis may be feasible in a general paediatric ward, providing sufficient staffing and training, and the possibility of referral to an ICU when needed. PMID:24886569

  2. Risk Assessment Tool for Pressure Ulcer Development in Indian Surgical Wards.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Sushma; Sharma, Deborshi; Rana, Anshika; Pathak, Reetesh; Lal, Romesh; Kumar, Ajay; Biswal, U C

    2015-06-01

    The aims of this paper were to compare the predictive validity of three pressure ulcer (PU) risk scales-the Norton scale, the Braden scale, and the Waterlow scale-and to choose the most appropriate calculator for predicting PU risk in surgical wards of India. This is an observational prospective cohort study in a tertiary educational hospital in New Delhi among 100 surgical ward patients from April to July 2011. The main outcomes measured included sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PVP) and negative predictive value (PVN), and the area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of the three PU risk assessment scales. Based on the cutoff points found most appropriate in this study, the sensitivity, specificity, PVP, and PVN were as follows: the Norton scale (cutoff, 16) had the values of 95.6, 93.5, 44.8, and 98.6, respectively; the Braden scale (cutoff, 17) had values of 100, 89.6, 42.5, and 100, respectively; and the Waterlow scale (cutoff, 11) had 91.3, 84.4, 38.8, and 97, respectively. According to the ROC curve, the Norton scale is the most appropriate tool. Factors such as physical condition, activity, mobility, body mass index (BMI), nutrition, friction, and shear are extremely significant in determining risk of PU development (p < 0.0001). The Norton scale is most effective in predicting PU risk in Indian surgical wards. BMI, mobility, activity, nutrition, friction, and shear are the most significant factors in Indian surgical ward settings with necessity for future comparison with established scales. PMID:26246703

  3. 2. Northwest circular bastion, seen from edge of southwest circular ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Northwest circular bastion, seen from edge of southwest circular bastion wall. Metal roof beams extend up to form peak. World War II gun installation at right. - Fort Hamilton, Northwest Circular Bastion, Rose Island, Newport, Newport County, RI

  4. Ward identity implies recursion relations in Yang-Mills theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang

    2012-07-01

    The Ward identity in gauge theory constrains the behavior of the amplitudes. We discuss the Ward identity for amplitudes with a pair of shifted lines with complex momenta. This will induce a recursion relation identical to Britto-Cachazo-Feng-Witten recursion relations at the finite poles of the complexified amplitudes. Furthermore, according to the Ward identity, it is also possible to transform the boundary term into a simple form, which can be obtained by a new recursion relation. For the amplitude with one off-shell line in pure Yang-Mills theory, we find this technique is effective for obtaining the amplitude even when there are boundary contributions.

  5. 1. VIEW OF DETENTION WARD AREA, LOOKING NORTHWEST FROM Y ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF DETENTION WARD AREA, LOOKING NORTHWEST FROM Y STREET - Fort McCoy, Building No. T-1065, Northeast of Intersection of South Ninth Avenue & South "Y" Street, Block 10, Sparta, Monroe County, WI

  6. Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Wards 201, 202, 203, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Wards 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208 & 209 - Type A Plan, 7601 Imperial Highway; bounded by Esperanza Street, Hawthorn Avenue, Laurel Street, and Descanso Street, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Ward Nos. 210 & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Ward Nos. 210 & 211 - Type B Plan, 7601 Imperial Highway; bounded by Esperanza Street, Laurel Street, Flores Street, and Descanso Street, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. Elevation of north facades of #156158 (triple wards) National ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation of north facades of #156-158 (triple wards) - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Pacific Branch, Mental Health Buildings, 11301 Wilshire Boulevard, West Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. Environmentalism in American Pedagogy: The Legacy of Lester Ward.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Laurel N.; Tanner, Daniel

    1987-01-01

    A review is presented of the legacy of Lester Frank Ward, widely recognized as the architect of environmentalism in American pedagogy and the creator of some of the most fundamental ideas about American curriculum. (CB)

  10. Do ward housekeepers free up time for care?

    PubMed

    Tye, Laura; Urmson, Stephanie; Maloney, Lindsey

    Introducing a ward housekeeping service may give nursing staff more time to focus on essential care. This small-scale evaluation found the role freed up healthcare assistant time and improved staff morale. PMID:22479768

  11. Protocol for an exploration of knowledge sharing for improved discharge from a mental health ward

    PubMed Central

    Rowley, Emma; Wright, Nicola; Waring, Justin; Gregoriou, Kyri; Chopra, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Strategies to reduce hospital admissions for mental health service users have received vast amounts of attention, yet the transfer of care from hospital to the community has been ignored. The discharge process is complex, messy, disjointed and inefficient, relying on cross-agency and organisational working. Focusing on one acute mental health admission ward, we will investigate whether the discharge process for people with severe mental health problems can be enhanced through the creation, implementation and utilisation of a knowledge sharing proforma that is used on their admission to the ward. Methods and analysis The project uses qualitative interviews to understand the complex processes associated with being admitted and discharged from inpatient mental health wards. Practitioners will be asked to identify and map the relevant stakeholders involved in admission and discharge, and discuss any problems with the process. The study team will work with clinicians to develop a knowledge collection proforma, which will be piloted for 2 months. Qualitative interviews will be carried out to collect reflections on the experiences of using the tool, with data used for further refinement of the intervention. Baseline and repeat quantitative measures will be taken to illustrate any changes to length of stay and readmission rates achieved as a result of the study. Ethics and dissemination A key issue is that participants are able to comment frankly on something that is a core part of their work, without fear or reprise. It is equally important that all participants are offered the opportunity to develop and coproduce the knowledge collection proforma, in order that the intervention produced is fit for purpose and usable in the real world, away from a research environment. The study has received ethical approval from Nottingham University Business School ethics committee, and has all appropriate National Health Service research governance clearances. PMID

  12. Transforming Ward Rounds Through Rounding-in-Flow

    PubMed Central

    Calderon, Alvin S.; Blackmore, C. Craig; Williams, Barbara L.; Chawla, Kavita P.; Nelson-Peterson, Dana L.; Ingraham, Michael D.; Smith, Donna L.; Kaplan, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Traditional “batched” bedside clinical care rounds, where rounds for all patients precede clinical tasks, may delay clinical care and reduce resident work efficiency. Innovation Using Lean concepts, we developed a novel “Rounding-in-Flow” approach, with the patient care team completing all tasks for a single patient before initiating any tasks for the next patient. Outcome measures included timely patient discharge and intern work hours. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study with historic and contemporaneous control groups, with time series adjustment for underlying temporal trends at a single medical center. Primary outcomes were timely patient discharge orders and resident duty hours. Participants were 17 376 consecutive hospital inpatients between January 1, 2011, and June 30, 2012, and medical ward rounding teams of interns, residents, and attending hospitalists. Results Timely discharge orders, defined as written by 9:00 am, improved from 8.6% to 26.6% (OR, 1.55; 95% CI 1.17–2.06; P  =  .003). Time of actual patient discharge was unchanged. Resident duty hour violations, defined as less than 10 hours between clinical duties, decreased from 2.96 to 0.98 per intern per rotation (difference, 1.98; 95% CI 1.09–2.87; P < .001). Average daily intern work hours decreased from 12.3 to 11.9 hours (difference, 0.4 hours; 95% CI 0.16–0.69; P  =  .002). Conclusions Compared with batched rounding, Lean Rounding-in-Flow using “1-piece flow” principles was associated with more discharge orders written before 9:00 am and fewer violations in the 10-hour break rule, with minimal changes to intern total work hours and actual patient discharge time. PMID:26140131

  13. Hypoglycaemia monitoring in a medical receiving ward

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that current care for diabetes inpatients remains inadequate and that greater attention is required for high quality management. In this project the aspect of hypoglycaemia was studied in a busy medical receiving ward at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. A large proportion of inpatients have diabetes and episodes of hypoglycaemia experienced by this population can delay discharge and indeed be detrimental to health. Thus it is important from both an organisational and patient perspective to manage this population well. In this project BM machine data was analysed to identify patients who were hypoglycaemic. These patients were then tracked down to study the subsequent management and compared this against recommended guidance. Following this an intervention was made to promote identification, management, documentation, and prevention of hypoglycaemia. This was deliberately a simple intervention involving discussions with staff and provision of basic documented guidance next to every BM machine. In the first phase 17 patients were identified and in a second and third phase 16 patients each time were further identified. Patients in the study were both type 1 and type 2 diabetics. Initial results in phase I were compared to results in phase II and III respectively. This intervention produced significant improvements in management with correct monitoring of low BMs (i.e. upon identification of low BM repeat within 1 hour) improving from 47% to 100% (for Phase II and III). Also, recording of preventative measures of hypoglycaemia improved from 35% to 88% and 94% with an improvement from 24% to 69% and 75% in recording of treatment given if needed. In conclusion, the study successfully demonstrated that simple measures can significantly improve the quality care of inpatient diabetic patients in relation to hypoglycaemia management. PMID:26734389

  14. Correction to Ward et al. (2015).

    PubMed

    Ward, Ryan D; Winiger, Vanessa; Higa, Kerin K; Kahn, Julia B; Kandel, Eric R; Balsam, Peter D; Simpson, Eleanor H

    2015-08-01

    Reports an error in "The impact of motivation on cognitive performance in an animal model of the negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia" by Ryan D. Ward, Vanessa Winiger, Kerin K. Higa, Julia B. Kahn, Eric R. Kandel, Peter D. Balsam and Eleanor H. Simpson (Behavioral Neuroscience, 2015[Jun], Vol 129[3], 292-299). There is a text error in the 4th paragraph of the Discussion section. The explanation for the abbreviation OFC was incorrectly listed as occipitofrontal circumference. It should have been orbitofrontal cortex. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2015-18639-001.) Interactions between motivation and cognition are implicated in producing functional impairments and poor quality of life in psychiatric patients. This interaction, however, is not well understood at either the behavioral or neural level. We developed a procedure for mice in which a cognitive measure, sustained attention, is modulated by a motivationally relevant signal that predicts reward probability on a trial-by-trial basis. Using this paradigm, we tested the interaction between motivation and cognition in mice that model the increased striatal D2 receptor activity observed in schizophrenia patients (D2R-OE mice). In control mice, attention was modulated by signaled-reward probability. In D2R-OE mice, however, attention was not modulated by reward-related cues. This impairment was not due to any global deficits in attention or maintenance of the trial-specific information in working memory. Turning off the transgene in D2R-OE mice rescued the motivational modulation of attention. These results indicate that deficits in motivation impair the ability to use reward-related cues to recruit attention and that improving motivation improves functional cognitive performance. These results further suggest that addressing motivational impairments in patients is critical to achieving substantive cognitive and functional gains. PMID:26214211

  15. Using Gamification Combined with Indoor Location to Improve Nurses' Hand Hygiene Compliance in an ICU Ward.

    PubMed

    Lapão, Luís Velez; Marques, Rita; Gregório, João; Pinheiro, Fernando; Póvoa, Pedro; Mira da Silva, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare acquired infections are among the biggest unsolved problems in healthcare, implying an increasing number of deaths, extra-days of hospital stay and hospital costs. Performing hand hygiene is a simple and inexpensive prevention measure, but healthcare workers compliance with it is still far from optimal. Recognized hurdles are lack of time, forgetfulness, wrong technique and lack of motivation. This study aims at exploring gamification to promote nurses' HH compliance self-awareness and action. Real-time data collected from an indoor location system will provide feedback information to a group of nurses working in an ICU ward. In this paper both the research's motivation and methods is presented, along with the first round of results and its discussion. PMID:27071865

  16. Squaring a Circular Segment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Russell

    2008-01-01

    Consider a circular segment (the smaller portion of a circle cut off by one of its chords) with chord length c and height h (the greatest distance from a point on the arc of the circle to the chord). Is there a simple formula involving c and h that can be used to closely approximate the area of this circular segment? Ancient Chinese and Egyptian…

  17. Tunable circular patch antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, G.-L.; Sengupta, D. L.

    1985-10-01

    A method to control the resonant or operating frequencies of circular patch antennas has been investigated experimentally and theoretically. It consists of the placement of passive metallic or tuning posts at approximate locations within the input region of the antenna. Comparison of measured and analytical results seems to establish the validity of a theoretical model proposed to determine the input performance of such circular patch antennas.

  18. Different characteristics associated with intensive care unit transfer from the medical ward between patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with and without pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hong-Joon; Park, Cheol-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Ok; Ban, Hee-Jung; Oh, In-Jae; Kim, Yu-Il; Kwon, Yong-Soo; Kim, Young-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Background The rate of hospitalization due to acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) is increasing. Few studies have examined the clinical, laboratory and treatment differences between patients in general wards and those who need transfer to an intensive care unit (ICU). Methods We retrospectively reviewed clinical, laboratory, and treatment characteristics of 374 patients who were initially admitted to the general ward at Chonnam National University Hospital in South Korea due to AECOPD (pneumonic, 194; non-pneumonic, 180) between January 2008 and March 2015. Of these patients, 325 were managed at the medical ward during their hospitalization period (ward group), and 49 required ICU transfer (ICU group). We compared the clinical, laboratory, and treatment characteristics associated with ICU transfer between patients with AECOPD with and without pneumonia. Results Male patients were 86.5% in the ward group and 79.6% in the ICU group. High glucose levels [median 154.5 mg/dL, interquartile range (IQR) 126.8–218.3 in ICU group vs. median 133.0, IQR 109.8–160.3 in ward group], high pneumonia severity index scores (median 100.5, IQR 85.5–118.5 vs. median 86.0, IQR 75.0–103.5), low albumin levels (median 2.9 g/dL, IQR 2.6–3.6 vs. median 3.4, IQR 3.0–3.7), and anemia (73.3% vs. 43.3%) independently increased the risk of ICU transfer in the pneumonic AECOPD group. High PaCO2 levels (median 53.1 mmHg in ICU group, IQR 38.5–84.6 vs. median 39.7, IQR 34.2–48.6 in ward group) independently increased the risk of ICU transfer in the non-pneumonic AECOPD group. Treatment with systemic corticosteroids (≥30 mg of daily prednisolone) during hospitalization in the medical ward independently reduced the risk of ICU transfer in both groups. Conclusions The characteristics associated with ICU transfer differed between the pneumonic and non-pneumonic AECOPD groups, and systemic corticosteroids use was associated with lower rate of ICU

  19. Circular free-electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Kurnit, Norman A.; Cooper, Richard K.

    1984-01-01

    A high efficiency, free electron laser utilizing a circular relativistic electron beam accelerator and a circular whispering mode optical waveguide for guiding optical energy in a circular path in the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator such that the circular relativistic electron beam and the optical energy are spatially contiguous in a resonant condition for free electron laser operation. Both a betatron and synchrotron are disclosed for use in the present invention. A free electron laser wiggler is disposed around the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator for generating a periodic magnetic field to transform energy from the circular relativistic electron beam to optical energy.

  20. Compact waveguide circular polarizer

    DOEpatents

    Tantawi, Sami G.

    2016-08-16

    A multi-port waveguide is provided having a rectangular waveguide that includes a Y-shape structure with first top arm having a first rectangular waveguide port, a second top arm with second rectangular waveguide port, and a base arm with a third rectangular waveguide port for supporting a TE.sub.10 mode and a TE.sub.20 mode, where the end of the third rectangular waveguide port includes rounded edges that are parallel to a z-axis of the waveguide, a circular waveguide having a circular waveguide port for supporting a left hand and a right hand circular polarization TE.sub.11 mode and is coupled to a base arm broad wall, and a matching feature disposed on the base arm broad wall opposite of the circular waveguide for terminating the third rectangular waveguide port, where the first rectangular waveguide port, the second rectangular waveguide port and the circular waveguide port are capable of supporting 4-modes of operation.

  1. Methods of Transposition of Nurses between Wards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Shigeji; Masuda, Masakazu

    In this paper, a computer-implemented method for automating the transposition of a hospital’s nursing staff is proposed. The model is applied to the real case example ‘O’ hospital, which performs a transposition of its nursing staff once a year. Results are compared with real data obtained from this hospital’s current manual transposition system. The proposed method not only significantly reduces the time taken to construct the transposition, thereby significantly reducing management labor costs, but also is demonstrated to increase nurses’ levels of satisfaction with the process.

  2. Salmonella isolation from hospital areas.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, R. W.; Price, T. H.; Joynson, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Evidence of the presence of salmonellas in a paediatric ward, a special care baby unit, a maternity unit and a hospital kitchen was obtained by culture of sewer swabs, faeces and food samples. The survey was designed to cause as little administrative interference as possible. The technical aspects of the survey did not strain laboratory facilities. Minimal secondary spread of salmonella infection was experienced. PMID:390044

  3. Improving VTE risk assessment at point of admission to a tertiary centre cardiology ward.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Cardiology wards are generally high turnover units, which may receive primary PCI, high-risk NSTEMI patients, and other general cardiac admissions from a large geographical area. Many centres also provide national specialist services for rarer cardiac conditions for which admissions may be lengthy. Cardiac patients have significant risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE) as immobility may be due to systolic dysfunction, attachment to continuous monitoring and predisposition to chest pain, or cardiac syncope. It is recommended by NICE that an initial VTE risk assessment is undertaken at the time of patient admission, with reassessment within 24 hours. For this purpose a risk assessment tool is featured on the front of many Trust drug charts. It is noted that this risk assessment is electronic in other trusts. We undertook an audit into the drug chart documentation of VTE risk assessment on the cardiology ward and the Coronary Care Unit (CCU) at The Royal Free Hospital. It was evident that documentation of VTE risk assessment was poor. The audit interventions were; a teaching presentation to the cardiology department, an educational poster, several update emails to the department and the identification of a 'VTE risk assessment champion' to audit ongoing compliance. Following these measures the second audit round demonstrated that documentation of initial risk assessment was slightly improved, but significant improvement was seen in documentation of risk assessment at 24 hours post admission. Results from a third audit cycle indicated that the improvement in initial VTE risk assessment was sustained, and that there was a significant sustained improvement in risk assessment at 24 hours (p <0.05). Recommendations for sustained improvement included: redesigning the drug chart so that the VTE risk assessment tool was linked to the VTE prophylaxis prescription box, and designating the responsibility of the initial VTE risk assessment to the on call junior doctor who

  4. Improving VTE risk assessment at point of admission to a tertiary centre cardiology ward

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Cardiology wards are generally high turnover units, which may receive primary PCI, high-risk NSTEMI patients, and other general cardiac admissions from a large geographical area. Many centres also provide national specialist services for rarer cardiac conditions for which admissions may be lengthy. Cardiac patients have significant risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE) as immobility may be due to systolic dysfunction, attachment to continuous monitoring and predisposition to chest pain, or cardiac syncope. It is recommended by NICE that an initial VTE risk assessment is undertaken at the time of patient admission, with reassessment within 24 hours. For this purpose a risk assessment tool is featured on the front of many Trust drug charts. It is noted that this risk assessment is electronic in other trusts. We undertook an audit into the drug chart documentation of VTE risk assessment on the cardiology ward and the Coronary Care Unit (CCU) at The Royal Free Hospital. It was evident that documentation of VTE risk assessment was poor. The audit interventions were; a teaching presentation to the cardiology department, an educational poster, several update emails to the department and the identification of a ‘VTE risk assessment champion’ to audit ongoing compliance. Following these measures the second audit round demonstrated that documentation of initial risk assessment was slightly improved, but significant improvement was seen in documentation of risk assessment at 24 hours post admission. Results from a third audit cycle indicated that the improvement in initial VTE risk assessment was sustained, and that there was a significant sustained improvement in risk assessment at 24 hours (p <0.05). Recommendations for sustained improvement included: redesigning the drug chart so that the VTE risk assessment tool was linked to the VTE prophylaxis prescription box, and designating the responsibility of the initial VTE risk assessment to the on call junior doctor

  5. Physician experience and outcomes among patients admitted to general internal medicine teaching wards

    PubMed Central

    McAlister, Finlay A.; Youngson, Erik; Bakal, Jeffrey A.; Holroyd-Leduc, Jayna; Kassam, Narmin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Physician scores on examinations decline with time after graduation. However, whether this translates into declining quality of care is unknown. Our objective was to determine how physician experience is associated with negative outcomes for patients admitted to hospital. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study involving all patients admitted to general internal medicine wards over a 2-year period at all 7 teaching hospitals in Alberta, Canada. We used files from the Alberta College of Physicians and Surgeons to determine the number of years since medical school graduation for each patient’s most responsible physician. Our primary outcome was the composite of in-hospital death, or readmission or death within 30 days postdischarge. Results: We identified 10 046 patients who were cared for by 149 physicians. Patient characteristics were similar across physician experience strata, as were primary outcome rates (17.4% for patients whose care was managed by physicians in the highest quartile of experience, compared with 18.8% in those receiving care from the least experienced physicians; adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.88, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.72–1.06). Outcomes were similar between experience quartiles when further stratified by physician volume, most responsible diagnosis or complexity of the patient’s condition. Although we found substantial variability in length of stay between individual physicians, there were no significant differences between physician experience quartiles (mean adjusted for patient covariates and accounting for intraphysician clustering: 7.90 [95% CI 7.39–8.42] d for most experienced quartile; 7.63 [95% CI 7.13–8.14] d for least experienced quartile). Interpretation: For patients admitted to general internal medicine teaching wards, we saw no negative association between physician experience and outcomes commonly used as proxies for quality of inpatient care. PMID:26283716

  6. Yeasts in a hospital for patients with skin diseases

    PubMed Central

    Somerville, Dorothy A.

    1972-01-01

    The incidence and acquisition of Candida albicans and other yeasts in two wards of a skin hospital is described. Carriage rates on the skin in hospital patients is higher than is generally supposed, and cutaneous sites may act as sources of infection with these organisms. PMID:4567312

  7. The Abuse of Status Offenders in Private Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robin, Michael

    1982-01-01

    Although status offenders (young people defined as incorrigible, runaways, or truants) have often been abused previously, their placement in hospital psychiatric wards constitutes further abuse. Insecure, insufficiently trained hospital staffers are one of the major problems that perpetuates the cycle of provocation and punishment in…

  8. Seizures: awareness and observation in the ward environment.

    PubMed

    Spray, Jennifer

    The preconceived 'foaming' and 'violent' seizure stereotypes are misrepresentations, particularly by non-specialist health professionals. Thus the vast semiology (signs and symptoms) of seizures and their subtle signs too easily go unrecognised by the untrained eye. Nevertheless, a significant proportion of adult patients admitted to the ward for treatment of their current illness will have a pre-existing seizure disorder (epilepsy). Furthermore, such hospitalised patients are more likely to suffer a seizure within the ward environment as triggering factors are unavoidably present. Thus, it is essential that nurses are prepared to encounter seizures, irrespective of the reason for admission. This article discusses the clinical semiology of the various seizure types in association with the underpinning neuropathophysiology, as well as the potential seizure triggers. It thereby enhances nurses' awareness and observations of seizure activity in patients in the ward environment. PMID:26500124

  9. Development of competent children's ward co-ordinators.

    PubMed

    Scaife, Clair; October, Margaret; Kellett, Valerie

    2014-07-01

    Taking charge of a clinical shift on a ward is daunting for newly qualified staff nurses. This article describes the co-ordinators competency pathway, written to guide and assess band 5 ward nurses, and a co-ordinators development day, which is a simulation-based training day developed by a team of senior nurses to prepare band 5 nurses to become competent children's ward co-ordinators. Each of two groups - of either experienced or less experienced band 5s - starts with the training day as a base for either 12 or 18 months of in-work training that follow. A new job description matching the trust's workforce reorganisation enabled this development of the band 5 nurse's role. A service evaluation has found staff are more competent and confident as a result of this initiative. PMID:25004046

  10. Delivering dementia care differently—evaluating the differences and similarities between a specialist medical and mental health unit and standard acute care wards: a qualitative study of family carers’ perceptions of quality of care

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Karen; Foster, Pippa; Whittamore, Kathy H; Goldberg, Sarah E; Harwood, Rowan H

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine in depth carers’ views and experiences of the delivery of patient care for people with dementia or delirium in an acute general hospital, in order to evaluate a specialist Medical and Mental Health Unit (MMHU) compared with standard hospital wards. This qualitative study complemented the quantitative findings of a randomised controlled trial. Design Qualitative semistructured interviews were conducted with carers of patients with cognitive impairment admitted to hospital over a 4-month period. Setting A specialist MMHU was developed in an English National Health Service acute hospital aiming to deliver the best-practice care. Specialist mental health staff were integrated with the ward team. All staff received enhanced training in dementia, delirium and person-centred care. A programme of purposeful therapeutic and leisure activities was introduced. The ward environment was optimised to improve patient orientation and independence. A proactive and inclusive approach to family carers was encouraged. Participants 40 carers who had been recruited to a randomised controlled trial comparing the MMHU with standard wards. Results The main themes identified related closely to family carers’ met or unmet expectations and included activities and boredom, staff knowledge, dignity and fundamental care, the ward environment and communication between staff and carers. Carers from MMHU were aware of, and appreciated, improvements relating to activities, the ward environment and staff knowledge and skill in the appropriate management of dementia and delirium. However, communication and engagement of family carers were still perceived as insufficient. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the extent to which the MMHU succeeded in its goal of providing the best-practice care and improving carer experience, and where deficiencies remained. Neither setting was perceived as neither wholly good nor wholly bad; however, greater satisfaction (and less dissatisfaction

  11. Formalized prescribing error feedback from hospital pharmacists: doctors' attitudes and opinions.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, M; Watmough, S D; O'Brien, S V; Furlong, N; Hardy, K

    2015-12-01

    Doctors have reported a lack of awareness of their prescribing errors with lack of feedback considered a system failure. This article summarizes the views of hospital doctors about receiving formal prescribing error feedback from ward-based pharmacists. PMID:26646334

  12. Adverse Drug Reactions Causing Admission to Medical Wards

    PubMed Central

    Mouton, Johannes P.; Njuguna, Christine; Kramer, Nicole; Stewart, Annemie; Mehta, Ushma; Blockman, Marc; Fortuin-De Smidt, Melony; De Waal, Reneé; Parrish, Andy G.; Wilson, Douglas P.K.; Igumbor, Ehimario U.; Aynalem, Getahun; Dheda, Mukesh; Maartens, Gary; Cohen, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Limited data exist on the burden of serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in sub-Saharan Africa, which has high HIV and tuberculosis prevalence. We determined the proportion of adult admissions attributable to ADRs at 4 hospitals in South Africa. We characterized drugs implicated in, risk factors for, and the preventability of ADR-related admissions. We prospectively followed patients admitted to 4 hospitals’ medical wards over sequential 30-day periods in 2013 and identified suspected ADRs with the aid of a trigger tool. A multidisciplinary team performed causality, preventability, and severity assessment using published criteria. We categorized an admission as ADR-related if the ADR was the primary reason for admission. There were 1951 admissions involving 1904 patients: median age was 50 years (interquartile range 34–65), 1057 of 1904 (56%) were female, 559 of 1904 (29%) were HIV-infected, and 183 of 1904 (10%) were on antituberculosis therapy (ATT). There were 164 of 1951 (8.4%) ADR-related admissions. After adjustment for age and ATT, ADR-related admission was independently associated (P ≤ 0.02) with female sex (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.51, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.06–2.14), increasing drug count (aOR 1.14 per additional drug, 95% CI 1.09–1.20), increasing comorbidity score (aOR 1.23 per additional point, 95% CI 1.07–1.41), and use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) if HIV-infected (aOR 1.92 compared with HIV-negative/unknown, 95% CI 1.17–3.14). The most common ADRs were renal impairment, hypoglycemia, liver injury, and hemorrhage. Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, insulin, rifampicin, and warfarin were most commonly implicated, respectively, in these 4 ADRs. ART, ATT, and/or co-trimoxazole were implicated in 56 of 164 (34%) ADR-related admissions. Seventy-three of 164 (45%) ADRs were assessed as preventable. In our survey, approximately 1 in 12 admissions was because of an ADR. The range of ADRs and implicated drugs reflect

  13. Prevalence of and Reasons for Patients Leaving Against Medical Advice from Paediatric Wards in Oman.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghafri, Mohamed; Al-Bulushi, Abdullah; Al-Qasmi, Ahmed

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of and reasons for patients leaving against medical advice (LAMA) in a paediatric setting in Oman. This retrospective study was carried out between January 2007 and December 2009 and assessed patients who left the paediatric wards at the Royal Hospital, Muscat, Oman, against medical advice. Of 11,482 regular discharges, there were 183 cases of LAMA (prevalence: 1.6%). Dissatisfaction with treatment and a desire to seek a second opinion were collectively the most cited reasons for LAMA according to data from the hospital's electronic system (27.9%) and telephone conversations with patients' parents (55.0%). No reasons for LAMA were documented in the hospital's electronic system for 109 patients (59.6%). The low observed prevalence of LAMA suggests good medical practice at the Royal Hospital. This study indicates the need for thorough documentation of all LAMA cases to ensure the availability of high-quality data for healthcare workers involved in preventing LAMA. PMID:26909217

  14. Salmonella heidelberg enteritis and bacteremia. An epidemic on two pediatric wards.

    PubMed

    Rice, P A; Craven, C; Wells, J G

    1976-04-01

    Symptomatic infection with Salmonella heidelberg developed in 55 children after their admission to the pediatric wards of two adjacent hospiatls in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Many of these children had been hospitalized for the treatment of diarrhea of unidentified etiology. In 25 of these patients, Salmonella bacteremia was documented. Five had clinically unsuspected and untreated bacteremia with no evidence of complications during the follow-up period of four and a half months. The remaining 30 had "standard" symptomatic infection due to S. heidelberg. Eight children died; four of these proved to be bacteremic. The index patient, who also introduced the infection into one of the hospitals, was identified. Person to person spread perpetuated the outbreak within and between the two hospitals for nearly four months. Although neonates with salmonellosis had a higher rate of bacteremia than other children, no other specific predisposing factors for Salmonella bacteremia were identified. Laboratory studies of the epidemic strain revealed neither invasive nor enterotoxic properties of the organisms, nor enhanced virulence in laboratory mice. Cohort nursing and isolation of patients with positive cultures halted the epidemic. Nontyphoid Salmonella bacteremia, sometimes clinically unsuspected and self-limited, should be recognized as a frequent accompaniment of Salmonella enteritis in young hospitalized children. PMID:1274984

  15. Social Determinants of Discharge Outcomes in Older People Admitted to a Geriatric Medicine Ward.

    PubMed

    Hawker, M; Romero-Ortuno, R

    2016-01-01

    The factors determining hospital discharge outcomes in older people are complex. This retrospective study was carried out in an in-patient geriatric ward over a month in 2015 and aimed to explore if self-reported feeling of loneliness and clinical frailty contribute to longer hospital stays or higher rates of readmission to hospital after discharge in the older population. Twenty-two men and twenty-five women (mean age 85.1 years) were assessed. There was a significant multivariate association between both self-reported loneliness (p=0.021) and the Clinical Frailty Scale (p=0.010) with length of stay, after adjusting for age, dementia and living alone. In multivariate analysis, patients who lived alone were more likely to be readmitted to hospital within 30 days (p=0.036). Loneliness, living alone and clinical frailty were associated with adverse discharge outcomes. Lower thresholds for referral to voluntary organisations and for psychosocial interventions in patients who report loneliness or live alone may be beneficial. PMID:27224503

  16. Molecular epidemiology of apparent outbreak of invasive aspergillosis in a hematology ward.

    PubMed Central

    Leenders, A; van Belkum, A; Janssen, S; de Marie, S; Kluytmans, J; Wielenga, J; Löwenberg, B; Verbrugh, H

    1996-01-01

    During a 2-month period, five patients suffering from invasive infections caused by Aspergillus flavus or Aspergillus fumigatus were identified in the Hematology Department of the University Hospital Dijkzigt (Rotterdam, The Netherlands). To study the epidemiological aspects of invasive aspergillosis, strains from these patients and from the hospital environment, isolated during extensive microbiological screening, were subjected to genotyping. A novel DNA extraction technique, involving freezing, grinding, and direct lysis in guanidium isothiocyanate-containing buffers of mycelial material, was applied. DNA isolation was followed by typing by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. This showed that strains isolated from all patients infected with the same fungal species were genotypically distinct, thus providing evidence against the possibility of an ongoing, single-source nosocomial outbreak. Strains could also be differentiated from strains of geographically diverse origins. However, an A. flavus strain from one of the patients was also frequently encountered in the hospital environment. As all environmental strains were collected after this patient had been diagnosed with invasive disease, the epidemiological value of this observation could not be ascertained. Intensive investigations showed no single source of A. flavus or other aspergilli. RAPD genotyping proved that the outbreak of invasive aspergillosis in the hematology ward consisted of a series of unrelated events and was not due to a common source within the hospital. RAPD fingerprinting of aspergilli may greatly facilitate future investigations of the epidemiology of invasive disease caused by these pathogens. PMID:8789013

  17. Patient and organisational variables associated with pressure ulcer prevalence in hospital settings: a multilevel analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bredesen, Ida Marie; Bjøro, Karen; Gunningberg, Lena; Hofoss, Dag

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association of ward-level differences in the odds of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) with selected ward organisational variables and patient risk factors. Design Multilevel approach to data from 2 cross-sectional studies. Settings 4 hospitals in Norway were studied. Participants 1056 patients at 84 somatic wards. Primary outcome measure HAPU. Results Significant variance in the odds of HAPUs was found across wards. A regression model using only organisational variables left a significant variance in the odds of HAPUs across wards but patient variables eliminated the across-ward variance. In the model including organisational and patient variables, significant ward-level HAPU variables were ward type (rehabilitation vs surgery/internal medicine: OR 0.17 (95% CI 0.04 to 0.66)), use of preventive measures (yes vs no: OR 2.02 (95% CI 1.12 to 3.64)) and ward patient safety culture (OR 0.97 (95% CI 0.96 to 0.99)). Significant patient-level predictors were age >70 vs <70 (OR 2.70 (95% CI 1.54 to 4.74)), Braden scale total score (OR 0.73 (95% CI 0.67 to 0.80)) and overweight (body mass index 25–29.99 kg/m2) (OR 0.32 (95% CI 0.17 to 0.62)). Conclusions The fact that the odds of HAPU varied across wards, and that across-ward variance was reduced when the selected ward-level variables entered the explanatory model, indicates that the HAPU problem may be reduced by ward-level organisation of care improvements, that is, by improving the patient safety culture and implementation of preventive measures. Some wards may prevent pressure ulcers better than other wards. The fact that ward-level variation was eliminated when patient-level HAPU variables were included in the model indicates that even wards with the best HAPU prevention will be challenged by an influx of high-risk patients. PMID:26316647

  18. Wiimote Experiments: Circular Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouh, Minjoon; Holz, Danielle; Kawam, Alae; Lamont, Mary

    2013-01-01

    The advent of new sensor technologies can provide new ways of exploring fundamental physics. In this paper, we show how a Wiimote, which is a handheld remote controller for the Nintendo Wii video game system with an accelerometer, can be used to study the dynamics of circular motion with a very simple setup such as an old record player or a…

  19. Copyright Basics. Circular 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC. Copyright Office.

    This circular answers some of the questions that are frequently asked about copyright, a form of protection provided by the laws of the United States to authors of "original works of authorship" including library, dramatic musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. The Copyright Act of 1976 (title 17 of the United States Code), which…

  20. Wiimote Experiments: Circular Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouh, Minjoon; Holz, Danielle; Kawam, Alae; Lamont, Mary

    2013-03-01

    The advent of new sensor technologies can provide new ways of exploring fundamental physics. In this paper, we show how a Wiimote, which is a handheld remote controller for the Nintendo Wii video game system with an accelerometer, can be used to study the dynamics of circular motion with a very simple setup such as an old record player or a bicycle wheel.

  1. Safewards: a new model of conflict and containment on psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Bowers, L

    2014-08-01

    Conflict (aggression, self-harm, suicide, absconding, substance/alcohol use and medication refusal) and containment (as required medication, coerced intramuscular medication, seclusion, manual restraint, special observation, etc.) place patients and staff at risk of serious harm. The frequency of these events varies between wards, but there are few explanations as to why this is so, and a coherent model is lacking. This paper proposes a comprehensive explanatory model of these differences, and sketches the implications on methods for reducing risk and coercion in inpatient wards. This Safewards Model depicts six domains of originating factors: the staff team, the physical environment, outside hospital, the patient community, patient characteristics and the regulatory framework. These domains give risk to flashpoints, which have the capacity to trigger conflict and/or containment. Staff interventions can modify these processes by reducing the conflict-originating factors, preventing flashpoints from arising, cutting the link between flashpoint and conflict, choosing not to use containment, and ensuring that containment use does not lead to further conflict. We describe this model systematically and in detail, and show how this can be used to devise strategies for promoting the safety of patients and staff. PMID:24548312

  2. "On the spot" interventions by mental health nurses in inpatient psychiatric wards in Greece.

    PubMed

    Koukia, Evmorfia; Madianos, Michael G; Katostaras, Theofanis

    2009-05-01

    The objective of this research was to explore the "on-the spot" clinical interventions mental health nurses make in critical incidents on inpatient psychiatric wards. Mental health nurses play a key role in the management of psychiatric critical incidents. Nurses' autonomy, decision-making, and training in clinical interventions are important issues in psychiatric nursing practice. A descriptive study was conducted among mental health nurses working on inpatient wards of three major psychiatric hospitals in the greater Athens area, using semi-structured interviews. Nurses' personal views also were documented. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 103 mental health nurses, who were encouraged to make personal remarks. The results of this study show that in the majority of critical incidents, the nurses were found to be in contact with the psychiatrist on call; physical restraints were used frequently in violent episodes; reassurance and support were common interventions; the majority of nurses would have preferred not to intervene with critical incidents; and nurses expressed a need for skills training and higher autonomy. The nurses implemented a specific number of interventions in confronting the various types of crises. The need for specialized training was noticed and problems like accountability, autonomy, and medication administration, were considered crucial by the mental heath nurses. PMID:19437252

  3. Caring for patients with cancer in non-specialist wards: the nurse experience.

    PubMed

    Mohan, S; Wilkes, L M; Ogunsiji, O; Walker, A

    2005-07-01

    This study aims to describe the experiences of nurses caring for cancer patients in non-specialist wards. The study was conducted in a large (420 beds) and small (32 beds) hospital in an area health service with urban and rural populations in the west of Sydney. A qualitative descriptive approach was utilized to collect data from the nurses. Data were collected using a survey and in-depth interviews of nurses working in non-specialist cancer wards. Transcribed data were managed with Nudist Vivo software and analysed for common themes using process of constant comparison and contrast. Twenty-five surveys were returned and five nurses volunteered to be interviewed. The six major themes that emerged from analysis of data were: emotional nature of care, lack of time, lack of knowledge of cancer treatment, family support, environment not conducive to proper care and dealing with patient's non-acceptance of cancer diagnosis. The nurses in this study wished to provide quality supportive care for cancer patients and their families but the inconducive environment and inadequate relevant training hindered the nurses' efforts. This then presents further need of relevant training for nurses in cancer care and time management, to meet up with these challenges. PMID:15952970

  4. Outbreak of multiresistant OXA-24- and OXA-51-producing Acinetobacter baumannii in an internal medicine ward.

    PubMed

    Tena, Daniel; Martínez, Nora Mariela; Oteo, Jesús; Sáez, David; Vindel, Ana; Azañedo, María Luisa; Sánchez, Lorenzo; Espinosa, Alfredo; Cobos, Juan; Sánchez, Rosario; Otero, Ignacio; Bisquert, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Here we describe the clinical, microbiological, epidemiological, and molecular characterization of an outbreak of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MRAB) involving 5 patients admitted to the internal medicine ward of our hospital. Over a 6-week period, 5 MRAB isolates were recovered from 5 patients, including 1 with fatal meningitis, 3 with skin and soft tissue infections, and 1 with respiratory colonization. One sample obtained during environmental monitoring in the ward was A. baumannii-positive. According to the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing results, the strains isolated from all patients and the environmental sample belonged to a single clone, identified as ST79 by multilocus sequence typing. The blaOXA-24 and blaOXA-51 carbapenemases were detected in all isolates. Four patients died, but only the death of the meningitis patient was probably related to the A. baumannii infection. The infection source was probably the hands of the healthcare workers because the outbreak strain was isolated from the surface of a serum container. The results of the present study revealed the importance of strict adherence to control measures by all healthcare workers because the consequences of noncompliance can be very serious. PMID:23883845

  5. Nursing dependency in registered nursing homes and long term care geriatric wards in Edinburgh.

    PubMed Central

    Capewell, A E; Primrose, W R; MacIntyre, C

    1986-01-01

    There has been growing interest and public investment in registered nursing homes, apparently based on the assumption that these homes are the private equivalent of hospital long term care. We have tested this hypothesis in a survey comparing 400 patients in 18 registered nursing homes with 217 patients in 11 geriatric long term care wards in Edinburgh. The nursing home patients formed a distinct and separate group: 362 (92%) were women, 392 (98%) were single or widowed, and 358 (90%) were self financing, whereas in the geriatric long term care group 148 (68%) were women and 35 (16%) were still married. Patients in nursing homes were also far less dependent than those in geriatric long term care wards (p less than 0.005). This study suggests that there may be large differences between the patients in these two types of institution, particularly with regard to nursing dependency. This finding has important implications in the future planning of long term places for the dependent elderly. PMID:3089370

  6. National survey of hospital patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bruster, S.; Jarman, B.; Bosanquet, N.; Weston, D.; Erens, R.; Delbanco, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To survey patients' opinions of their experiences in hospital in order to produce data that can help managers and doctors to identify and solve problems. DESIGN--Random sample of 36 NHS hospitals, stratified by size of hospital (number of beds), area (north, midlands, south east, south west), and type of hospital (teaching or non-teaching, trust or directly managed). From each hospital a random sample of, on average, 143 patients was interviewed at home or the place of discharge two to four weeks after discharge by means of a structured questionnaire about their treatment in hospital. SUBJECTS--5150 randomly chosen NHS patients recently discharged from acute hospitals in England. Subjects had been patients on medical and surgical wards apart from paediatric, maternity, psychiatric, and geriatric wards. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Patients' responses to direct questions about preadmission procedures, admission, communication with staff, physical care, tests and operations, help from staff, pain management, and discharge planning. Patients' responses to general questions about their degree of satisfaction in hospitals. RESULTS--Problems were reported by patients, particularly with regard to communication with staff (56% (2824/5020) had not been given written or printed information); pain management (33% (1042/3162) of those suffering pain were in pain all or most of the time); and discharge planning (70% (3599/5124) had not been told about warning signs and 62% (3177/5119) had not been told when to resume normal activities). Hospitals failed to reach the standards of the Patient's Charter--for example, in explaining the treatment proposed and giving patients the option of not taking part in student training. Answers to questions about patient satisfaction were, however, highly positive but of little use to managers. CONCLUSIONS--This survey has highlighted several problems with treatment in NHS hospitals. Asking patients direct questions about what happened

  7. Results of a multicentre randomised controlled trial of statistical process control charts and structured diagnostic tools to reduce ward-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: the CHART Project.

    PubMed

    Curran, E; Harper, P; Loveday, H; Gilmour, H; Jones, S; Benneyan, J; Hood, J; Pratt, R

    2008-10-01

    Statistical process control (SPC) charts have previously been advocated for infection control quality improvement. To determine their effectiveness, a multicentre randomised controlled trial was undertaken to explore whether monthly SPC feedback from infection control nurses (ICNs) to healthcare workers of ward-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (WA-MRSA) colonisation or infection rates would produce any reductions in incidence. Seventy-five wards in 24 hospitals in the UK were randomised into three arms: (1) wards receiving SPC chart feedback; (2) wards receiving SPC chart feedback in conjunction with structured diagnostic tools; and (3) control wards receiving neither type of feedback. Twenty-five months of pre-intervention WA-MRSA data were compared with 24 months of post-intervention data. Statistically significant and sustained decreases in WA-MRSA rates were identified in all three arms (P<0.001; P=0.015; P<0.001). The mean percentage reduction was 32.3% for wards receiving SPC feedback, 19.6% for wards receiving SPC and diagnostic feedback, and 23.1% for control wards, but with no significant difference between the control and intervention arms (P=0.23). There were significantly more post-intervention 'out-of-control' episodes (P=0.021) in the control arm (averages of 0.60, 0.28, and 0.28 for Control, SPC and SPC+Tools wards, respectively). Participants identified SPC charts as an effective communication tool and valuable for disseminating WA-MRSA data. PMID:18723251

  8. Recreation for the Mentally Retarded: A Handbook for Ward Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    Designed primarily for use by ward personnel in residential facilities for the mentally retarded, the manual presents an overview of recreational services. Four papers introduce the importance of recreation and consider approaches for its provision: "Why Recreation?" (W. Lawler); "The Role of the Attendant in Providing Recreation for the Retarded"…

  9. Reply to Ward's Comment on "Economic Rewards through Collective Negotiations."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuelke, Dennis C.

    1985-01-01

    Replies to James G. Ward's objections to the author's recent "Journal of Education Finance" article, which concluded that comprehensive collective bargaining had no significant effect on teachers' salaries or fringe benefits in Wisconsin school districts during 1979-80. Calls for alternative strategies to improve teachers' economic condition. (MLH)

  10. 20. View of south side of East Ward Street east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. View of south side of East Ward Street east of South McDonald Avenue, facing southeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

  11. 19. View of southeast corner of East Ward Street and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. View of southeast corner of East Ward Street and South McDonald Avenue, facing southeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

  12. 14. View of southwest corner of East Ward Street and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. View of southwest corner of East Ward Street and South McDonald Avenue, facing southwest. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

  13. 2. View of north side of East Ward Street east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of north side of East Ward Street east of North Coweta Avenue, facing northeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

  14. 17. View of north side of East Ward Street east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. View of north side of East Ward Street east of North McDonald Avenue, facing northwest. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

  15. 6. Views of southeast corner of East Ward Street and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Views of southeast corner of East Ward Street and South Coweta Avenue, facing southeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

  16. 21. View of south side of East Ward Street midblock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. View of south side of East Ward Street midblock between South McDonald Avenue and Fales Avenue, facing southeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

  17. 16. View of northeast corner of East Ward Street and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. View of northeast corner of East Ward Street and North McDonald Avenue, facing northeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

  18. 13. View of south side of East Ward Street east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. View of south side of East Ward Street east of Sibett Avenue, facing southwest. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

  19. 11. View of north side of East Ward Street midblock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. View of north side of East Ward Street midblock between Dewey AVenue and North McDonald Avenue, facing northeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

  20. 3. View of north side of East Ward Street midblock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of north side of East Ward Street midblock between North Coweta Avenue and Dewey Avenue. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

  1. 12. View of south side of East Ward Street west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. View of south side of East Ward Street west of Sibett Avenue, facing southwest. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

  2. 10. View of north side of East Ward Street midblock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. View of north side of East Ward Street midblock between Dewey Avenue and North McDonald Avenue, facing northeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

  3. 15. View of north side of East Ward Street at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. View of north side of East Ward Street at the intersection with North McDonald Avenue, facing northeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

  4. 8. View of south side of East Ward Street midblock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. View of south side of East Ward Street midblock between South Coweta Avenue and Sibett Avenue, facing southwest. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

  5. 1. View of north side of East Ward Street west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View of north side of East Ward Street west of North Coweta Avenue, facing northwest. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

  6. 7. View of south side of East Ward Street east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View of south side of East Ward Street east of South Coweta Avenue, facing southwest. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

  7. 4. View of north side of East Ward Street west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View of north side of East Ward Street west of Dewey Avenue, facing northeast. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

  8. 18. View of north side of East Ward Street at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. View of north side of East Ward Street at the intersection with North Dart Street, facing northwest. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

  9. 5. View of northwest corner of East Ward Street and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View of northwest corner of East Ward Street and Dewey Avenue, facing northwest. - Gaskin Avenue Neighborhood, Bounded by Dart Street to east, CSX Railroad to south, Pearl & Madison Avenues to west, & Wilson & Gordon Streets to north, Douglas, Coffee County, GA

  10. 17. New York Connecting Railroad: Little Hell Gate Bridge. Wards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. New York Connecting Railroad: Little Hell Gate Bridge. Wards Island, New York Co., NY. Sec. 4207, MP 8.02. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New Jersey/New York & New York/Connecticut State Lines, New York County, NY

  11. Influence of Parental Encouragement towards Health Care of Their Wards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sophia, R. Grace; Veliappan, A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to explore how parents are encouraging towards health care of their wards. A "Survey Method" was used in the present study. A standardized "Agarwal Parental Encouragement Scale (APES)" was used to collect information from the students. The sample consists of thousand and ninety five higher…

  12. [Hygiene and motivation factors of nursing work in a cardiology ward].

    PubMed

    Somense, Carolina Bueno; Duran, Erika Christiane Marocco

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to identify hygienic and motivational factors in the nursing work according to the Two-Factor Theory, as well as their relation with professional satisfaction/dissatisfaction. This exploratory-descriptive study involved nine nurses from the cardiology ward of a hospital in the interior of the State of São Paulo, between August and September 2013. A self-applied questionnaire was used, including open and closed questions. The data were categorized as hygienic and motivational. Results show the nurses' satisfaction with autonomy, work itself and teamwork, duties, content and responsibilities of the job. Dissatisfaction is related to career growth possibilities; work, political and administrative conditions at the institution, supervision and lack of institutional support. Satisfaction and dissatisfaction factors include relationships, acknowledgements and remuneration. Nurses' satisfaction is determined by multiple and often controversial factors. PMID:25474845

  13. Nutritional survey of patients in a general surgical ward: is there an effective predictor of malnutrition?

    PubMed Central

    Neithercut, W D; Smith, A D; McAllister, J; La Ferla, G

    1987-01-01

    A survey of patients in a general surgical ward was undertaken to establish biochemical and anthropometric standards which could be used to detect malnourished patients in hospital. Results of biochemical and anthropometric tests of nutritional status were compared with assessment by a clinician and the quick nutritional index of Seltzer. Triceps skinfold thickness and serum albumin concentrations indicated that 29% and 35% of patients, respectively, were undernourished compared with 16% by clinical assessment and 17% by the quick nutritional index. Significant correlations (p less than 0.001) between serum albumin and transferrin concentrations and arm muscle area were found for men but not for women. Poor nutritional specificity and sensitivity of some anthropometric and biochemical tests may account for the difference in the level of undernutrition found by these tests and clinical assessment. This shows the importance of the choice of test in influencing the level of undernutrition detected. PMID:3624502

  14. Prediction of mortality in patients in acute medical wards using basic laboratory and anthropometric data.

    PubMed Central

    Woo, J.; Mak, Y. T.; Lau, J.; Swaminathan, R.

    1992-01-01

    The value of anthropometric and biochemical indices in predicting short-term mortality among patients in general medical wards was assessed in 294 patients admitted consecutively to a district hospital over a one month period. Using a stepwise logistic regression model and supported by the linear discriminant analysis method, mortality within 3 months could be predicted with sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 84% using the following variables: sex, functional ability, urea, total protein, alkaline phosphatase and albumin-adjusted calcium. Addition of anthropometric values and biochemical nutritional indices did little to improve the accuracy of the prediction, contrary to previous findings among surgical patients and elderly residents of long-term care institutions. PMID:1494524

  15. Refusing analgesics: using continuous improvement to improve pain management on a surgical ward.

    PubMed

    Carr, Eloise C J

    2002-11-01

    Despite advances in pain control many patients experience moderate to severe pain whilst in hospital. Contributory factors include inadequate assessment and documentation of pain, as well as patient and professional misconceptions. A 28-bedded surgical ward in a District General Hospital in the South of England was the setting for the project. A small preliminary audit of pain on this ward indicated that some patients experienced postoperative pain, which was not effectively controlled. A 'continuous improvement' framework was used to increase understanding of the problem and identify an aim for the project, which was to reduce the number of patients refusing analgesics when offered by nurses. An audit to ascertain how many patients refused analgesia revealed that, of 133 patients offered, 93 (70%) refused. Using the 'Model for Improvement' (Langley et al., 1996) a number of changes were introduced, including a patient information sheet, regular documented pain assessment and an innovative staff education programme. To evaluate if the changes in practice had been successful, further audit data were collected from 167 patients. Sixty-three (44%) accepted analgesics, indicating a significant decrease in the number refusing (P = 0.005). This small project demonstrated that continuous improvement methodology can improve the management of pain and quality of care for patients. Such an approach brings practitioner and patient into meaningful understanding and offers solutions which are realistic, achievable and sustainable over time. Despite finite resources and increased pressure on staff it is possible to motivate people when they feel they have ownership and change is meaningful. Continuous improvement methods offer an exciting, feasible, patient-centred approach to improving care. PMID:12427179

  16. Turbulent Atmosphere-Based Dominant Management Behavior of the Head Nurses in Clinical Wards: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Salar, Ali Reza; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Navipour, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nursing management is the most important aspect for providing high-quality nursing care. Therefore, skillful nursing managers, such as head nurses, are required to accomplish this goal. High-quality nursing care is one of the most important principles of health organizations to ensure society’s health. Objectives: The goal of the conventional content analysis is to explain the dominant experienced-based behavior of the head nurses in clinical wards. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted by applying a quality study approach with a common content analysis model (Granheim and Lundmen). The participants were 25 head nurses who were working in the wards of various hospitals in Zahedan City. They were selected via the purposeful sampling method. The data were collected thoroughly and continued until a saturation stage was reached. Results: The result of data analysis was the theme “turbulent atmosphere-based management,” which consists of five categories as follows: the work culture of the ward, job burnout, negligent evaluation, job conflict, and decision making with limited effects. Conclusions: The analysis of the findings of the present study through considering the defined categories demonstrated that, to modify and correct the turbulent atmosphere-based management, several important measures are required and need to be continually monitored. PMID:27186386

  17. Circular inferences in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Jardri, Renaud; Denève, Sophie

    2013-11-01

    A considerable number of recent experimental and computational studies suggest that subtle impairments of excitatory to inhibitory balance or regulation are involved in many neurological and psychiatric conditions. The current paper aims to relate, specifically and quantitatively, excitatory to inhibitory imbalance with psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia. Considering that the brain constructs hierarchical causal models of the external world, we show that the failure to maintain the excitatory to inhibitory balance results in hallucinations as well as in the formation and subsequent consolidation of delusional beliefs. Indeed, the consequence of excitatory to inhibitory imbalance in a hierarchical neural network is equated to a pathological form of causal inference called 'circular belief propagation'. In circular belief propagation, bottom-up sensory information and top-down predictions are reverberated, i.e. prior beliefs are misinterpreted as sensory observations and vice versa. As a result, these predictions are counted multiple times. Circular inference explains the emergence of erroneous percepts, the patient's overconfidence when facing probabilistic choices, the learning of 'unshakable' causal relationships between unrelated events and a paradoxical immunity to perceptual illusions, which are all known to be associated with schizophrenia. PMID:24065721

  18. Switchable circular beam deflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xiaobing; Joshi, Pankaj; Tan, Jin-Yi; De Smet, Jelle; Cuypers, Dieter; Baghdasaryan, Tigran; Vervaeke, Michael; Thienpont, Hugo; De Smet, Herbert

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we report two types of electrically tunable photonic devices with circularly symmetric polarization independent beam steering performance (beam condensing resp. beam broadening). The devices consist of circular micro grating structures combined with nematic liquid crystal (LC) layers with anti-parallel alignment. A single beam deflector converts a polarized and monochromatic green laser beam (λ =543.5 nm) into a diffraction pattern, with the peak intensity appearing at the third order when 0~{{V}\\text{pp}} is applied and at the zeroth order (no deflection) for voltages above 30~{{V}\\text{pp}} . Depending on the shape of the grating structure (non-inverted or inverted), the deflection is inwards or outwards. Both grating types can be made starting from the same diamond-tooled master mold. A polarized white light beam is symmetrically condensed resp. broadened over 2° in the off state and is passed through unchanged in the on state. By stacking two such devices with mutually orthogonal LC alignment layers, polarization independent switchable circular beam deflectors are realized with a high transmittance (>80%), and with the same beam steering performance as the polarization dependent single devices.

  19. [Ground-based speleo-climatic wards and the experience with their use in bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Krasnoshteĭn, A E; Barannikov, V G; Shchekotov, V V; Lebedeva, T M; Bitinskaia, L N; Khasanova, R B; Surovtseva, M V; Mezentseva, E V; Isaevich, A G; Lysenko, D I

    1999-01-01

    Ambient air in ground wards made to contain natural potassium-sodium salt is close in characteristics to the atmosphere of underground wards but has a number of specificities: daily fluctuations of concentrations of light aeroions and aerosol particles, elevated concentration of light aeroions concentration, low radiation background, minimal bacterial contamination. The stay in ground wards brings great benefit for patients with bronchial asthma. Ground speleo-climatic wards are perspective in nonpharmacological treatment of patients with allergic respiratory diseases. PMID:10429568

  20. 78 FR 14543 - Ward Transformer Superfund Site; Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... AGENCY Ward Transformer Superfund Site; Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Agency has entered into a settlement at the Ward Transformer Superfund Site located in Raleigh, Wake... EPA Region 4 contact Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Ward...

  1. 75 FR 81269 - Ward Transformer Superfund Site Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... AGENCY Ward Transformer Superfund Site Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlements AGENCY... Ward Transformer Superfund Site located in Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina for publication. DATES... your comments, identified by Docket ID No. EPA-RO4- SFUND-2010-1053 or Site name Ward...

  2. Youth Health Coordinating Council Ward 8 Secret Health Clinic Shopper Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrens, Donna

    2010-01-01

    There are over 70,000 residents in Ward 8, the poorest area of Washington, DC and along with Ward 7, it's most geographically remote. Approximately 36% of the Ward 8 population consists of children and youth, 18 years or younger. Children in the District of Columbia are at greater risk for poorer health and life outcomes than children in other…

  3. Does antimicrobial use density at the ward level influence monthly central line-associated bloodstream infection rates?

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Junichi; Harada, Yukiko; Kikuchi, Tetsuya; Asano, Ikuyo; Ueno, Takako; Matsubara, Nobuo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate risk factors, including ward antimicrobial use density (AUD), for central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in a 430-bed community hospital using central venous lines with closed-hub systems. We calculated AUD as (total dose)/(defined daily dose × patient days) ×1,000 for a total of 20 drugs, nine wards, and 24 months. Into each line day data, we inputed AUD and device utilization ratios, number of central line days, and CLABSI. The ratio of susceptible strains in isolates were subjected to correlation analysis with AUD. Of a total of 9,997 line days over 24 months, CLABSI was present in 33 cases (3.3 ‰), 14 (42.4%) of which were on surgical wards out of nine wards. Of a total of 43 strains isolated, eight (18.6%) were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); none of the MRSA-positive patients had received cefotiam before the onset of infection. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis showed that central line day 7 had the highest accuracy. Logistic regression analysis showed the central line day showed an odds ratio of 5.511 with a 95% confidence interval of 1.936–15.690 as did AUD of cefotiam showing an odds ratio of 0.220 with 95% confidence interval of 0.00527–0.922 (P=0.038). Susceptible strains ratio and AUD showed a negative correlation (R2=0.1897). Thus, CLABSI could be prevented by making the number of central line days as short as possible. The preventative role of AUD remains to be investigated. PMID:25525373

  4. Noether's second theorem and Ward identities for gauge symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avery, Steven G.; Schwab, Burkhard U. W.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, a number of new Ward identities for large gauge transformations and large diffeomorphisms have been discovered. Some of the identities are reinterpretations of previously known statements, while some appear to be genuinely new. We use Noether's second theorem with the path integral as a powerful way of generating these kinds of Ward identities. We reintroduce Noether's second theorem and discuss how to work with the physical remnant of gauge symmetry in gauge fixed systems. We illustrate our mechanism in Maxwell theory, Yang-Mills theory, p-form field theory, and Einstein-Hilbert gravity. We comment on multiple connections between Noether's second theorem and known results in the recent literature. Our approach suggests a novel point of view with important physical consequences.

  5. Ward identities in a general axial gauge. II. Quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Capper, D.M.; Leibbrandt, G.

    1982-02-15

    We have calculated the pole part of the one-loop graviton self-energy in the noncovariant axial gauge n/sub ..mu../phi/sub munu/ = 0, n/sup 2/not =0, where phi/sub munu/ is the physical graviton field and n/sub ..mu../ is an arbitrary but constant vector. It is shown that the self-energy is, unexpectedly, both nontransverse and n/sub ..mu../ dependent, even though it satisfies the correct gravitational Ward identity. This Ward identity is found to contain a term corresponding to a ''pincer'' Feynman diagram which is directly responsible for the nontransversality of the graviton self-energy. Ghost particles do not contribute to the graviton amplitude. All axial-gauge integrals are consistently evaluated in the context of dimensional regularization and by applying the principal-value prescription.

  6. Ward identities in a general axial gauge. II. Quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capper, D. M.; Leibbrandt, George

    1982-02-01

    We have calculated the pole part of the one-loop graviton self-energy in the noncovariant axial gauge nμφμν=0, n2≠0, where φμν is the physical gravition field and nμ is an arbitrary but constant vector. It is shown that the self-energy is, unexpectedly, both nontransverse and nμ dependent, even though it satisfies the correct gravitational Ward identity. This Ward identity is found to contain a term corresponding to a "pincer" Feynman diagram which is directly responsible for the nontransversality of the graviton self-energy. Ghost particles do not contribute to the graviton amplitude. All aixal-gauge integrals are consistently evaluated in the context of dimensional regularization and by applying the principal-value prescription.

  7. Possible adverse drug events leading to hospital admission in a Brazilian teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Varallo, Fabiana Rossi; Capucho, Helaine Carneiro; da Silva Planeta, Cleópatra; de Carvalho Mastroianni, Patrícia

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Drug safety problems can lead to hospital admission. In Brazil, the prevalence of hospitalization due to adverse drug events is unknown. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of hospitalization due to adverse drug events and to identify the drugs, the adverse drug events, and the risk factors associated with hospital admissions. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was performed in the internal medicine ward of a teaching hospital in São Paulo State, Brazil, from August to December 2008. All patients aged ≥18 years with a length of stay ≥24 hours were interviewed about the drugs used prior to hospital admission and their symptoms/complaints/causes of hospitalization. RESULTS: In total, 248 patients were considered eligible. The prevalence of hospitalization due to potential adverse drug events in the ward was 46.4%. Overprescribed drugs and those indicated for prophylactic treatments were frequently associated with possible adverse drug events. Frequently reported symptoms were breathlessness (15.2%), fatigue (12.3%), and chest pain (9.0%). Polypharmacy was a risk factor for the occurrence of possible adverse drug events. CONCLUSION: Possible adverse drug events led to hospitalization in a high-complexity hospital, mainly in polymedicated patients. The clinical outcomes of adverse drug events are nonspecific, which delays treatment, hinders causality analysis, and contributes to the underreporting of cases. PMID:24626940

  8. Ward identities and relations between conductivities and viscosities in holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyos, Carlos; Fernández, David Rodríguez

    2016-01-01

    We derive relations between viscosities and momentum conductivity in 2 + 1 dimensions by finding a generalization of holographic Ward identities for the energy-momentum tensor. The generalization is novel in the sense that it goes beyond the usual identities obtained from holographic renormalization. Our results are consistent with previous field theory analysis. The main tools we use are a constant `probability current' in the gravity dual, that we are able to define for any system of linear ODEs, and parity symmetry.

  9. Midwifery students first encounter with the maternity ward.

    PubMed

    Thunes, Sissel; Sekse, Ragnhild Johanne Tveit

    2015-05-01

    Considerable research has been made in order to find what promotes students' learning in general, but few studies have included midwifery students and their learning in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to get a better understanding of the midwifery students' first encounter with the maternity ward and of what was essential to them in the learning environment. A qualitative study, based on in-depth interviews with six students during their first clinical practice at a maternity ward, was conducted. The findings show that the students needed to feel their presence desired and to be included in the activities in the ward. Learning needed to be based on the students' expectations, understanding and previous experiences. The most important factor influencing the students' well-being and learning was their relationships with their mentor. In conclusion, learning in a clinical setting required more than just motivated students. Engaged mentors, who linked the students' previous experiences and expectations to the clinical practice, were crucial to learning outcomes. Mutual engagement, shared understanding and common goals were imperative for the students' experiences of a good learning environment. PMID:25701290

  10. Effectiveness of a Web-Based Simulation in Improving Nurses’ Workplace Practice With Deteriorating Ward Patients: A Pre- and Postintervention Study

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Lai Fun; Lim, Eunice Ya Ping; Ang, Sophia Bee Leng; Mujumdar, Sandhya; Ho, Jasmine Tze Yin; Mordiffi, Siti Zubaidah; Ang, Emily Neo Kim

    2016-01-01

    Background Nurses play an important role in detecting patients with clinical deterioration. However, the problem of nurses failing to trigger deteriorating ward patients still persists despite the implementation of a patient safety initiative, the Rapid Response System. A Web-based simulation was developed to enhance nurses’ role in recognizing and responding to deteriorating patients. While studies have evaluated the effectiveness of the Web-based simulation on nurses’ clinical performance in a simulated environment, no study has examined its impact on nurses’ actual practice in the clinical setting. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of Web-based simulation on nurses' recognition of and response to deteriorating patients in clinical settings. The outcomes were measured across all levels of Kirkpatrick’s 4-level evaluation model with clinical outcome on triggering rates of deteriorating patients as the primary outcome measure. Methods A before-and-after study was conducted on two general wards at an acute care tertiary hospital over a 14-month period. All nurses from the two study wards who undertook the Web-based simulation as part of their continuing nursing education were invited to complete questionnaires at various time points to measure their motivational reaction, knowledge, and perceived transfer of learning. Clinical records on cases triggered by ward nurses from the two study wards were evaluated for frequency and types of triggers over a period of 6 months pre- and 6 months postintervention. Results The number of deteriorating patients triggered by ward nurses in a medical general ward increased significantly (P<.001) from pre- (84/937, 8.96%) to postintervention (91/624, 14.58%). The nurses reported positively on the transfer of learning (mean 3.89, SD 0.49) from the Web-based simulation to clinical practice. A significant increase (P<.001) on knowledge posttest score from pretest score was also reported. The

  11. Isolation usage in a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Kim, M H; Mindorff, C; Patrick, M L; Gold, R; Ford-Jones, E L

    1987-05-01

    In a prospective 12-month study at a university-affiliated pediatric hospital, isolation usage was quantitated by ward/service, season, isolation category and type of infection (community-acquired vs nosocomial). Such information may be helpful in designing hospitals, recognizing time utilization of the pediatric infection control nurse, and defining educational and isolation needs. Hospitals with multiple bed rooms and inadequate numbers of single rooms may be unable to meet current federal isolation guidelines. The mean number of isolation days was 153 per 1000 patient days or 15.3% of bed days used. This ranged from 18.5% on the infant/toddler/preschool medical ward to 2.8% on child/teenage orthopedic surgery. Isolation requirements vary seasonally and rose to 32% in winter on one ward. Proportional frequencies of isolation category included enteric--29%, protective--28%, strict--16%, barrier (contact)--10%, multiply resistant organism (MRO)--8%, wound--5%, pregnant women (careful handwashing)--3%, blood and body fluid precautions--1%. Isolation of patients with and contacts of nosocomial infections account for 32% of isolation usage. During one third of the 365-day year, the hospital is unable to provide adequate numbers of single rooms for one to 20 patients. PMID:3647940

  12. Standardising the organisation of clinical equipment on surgical wards at North Bristol NHS Trust: a quality improvement initiative

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Joseph; Spencer, Robin; Soo, Eleanor; finucane, katherine

    2015-01-01

    Poorly organised clinical equipment can waste significant amounts of time otherwise available for direct patient care. As a group of foundation year one doctors, we identified the organisation of clinical equipment across surgical wards at North Bristol NHS Trust to be poor with stocks often low and items frequently difficult to locate. Time-motion studies (n=80) were confirmatory demonstrating that the mean time to collect equipment necessary for venepuncture, cannulation, arterial blood gases, or blood cultures ranged from 121 to 174 seconds between different areas. By applying a plan-do-study-act (PDSA) methodology, surveying peers as well as working with nursing staff and senior managers, we were able to purchase and implement clinical equipment trolleys on 10 surgical wards across the trust to reduce the time-taken to locate clinical equipment to between 38 to 45 seconds (p=0.01). We feel the key factors for the success of our initiative were strong multidisciplinary engagement and a simple uniform idea. Clinical equipment trolleys organised in a standardised manner have now been rolled out hospital-wide in the new Southmead Hospital Brunel building. PMID:26734373

  13. Preliminary study of the fungal ecology at the haematology and medical-oncology ward in Bamako, Mali.

    PubMed

    Niaré-Doumbo, Safiatou; Normand, Anne Cécile; Diallo, Yacouba Lazarre; Dembelé, Abdoul Karim; Thera, Mahamadou A; Diallo, Dapa; Piarroux, Renaud; Doumbo, Ogobara; Ranque, Stéphane

    2014-08-01

    Data on fungal epidemiology in sub-Saharan African countries are scarce. This exploratory study aimed to characterize the fungal flora at the Onco-Haematology ward of the National Teaching Hospital of Point G in Bamako, Mali. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in the dry and in the rainy seasons. Nasal swab and sputum samples were collected from the hospitalized patients while airborne fungal spores were collected using electrostatic dust-fall collectors. Fungi were identified by their morphological characteristics and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Candida albicans was the most frequent yeast species colonizing patients; Aspergillus species were isolated in 86 % of the patients and were the main airborne environmental contaminants. Overall, airborne fungal contamination rates increased from 33.8 % in the dry to 66.2 % in the rainy season (p < 0.001). The most frequent Aspergillus species were Aspergillus niger (36.6 %) and Aspergillus flavus (32.92 %). In contrast, Aspergillus fumigatus (5.43 %) was relatively rare. This high level of fungal exposure raises concern regarding the management of at-risk patients in this Onco-Haematology ward and stresses the need for strengthening the mycological diagnostic capacities to accompany the implementation of adapted fungal infection prevention and management policies. PMID:24889723

  14. A standardised storage solution for venepuncture/cannulation equipment could save an NHS hospital the equivalent of a whole junior doctor

    PubMed Central

    Lindley, Steven; Robertson, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Junior doctors, nursing staff, and phlebotomists spend a large proportion of their time taking blood samples and siting (venous) cannulae. Approximately 350 blood samples are taken daily across 25 wards at the Royal United Hospital Bath NHS Trust. There is no standard storage solution for venepuncture or cannulation equipment. On-call junior doctors cover most of the hospital's wards. Time is wasted locating essential equipment on unfamiliar wards and nurses are frequently interrupted to assist. These delays can compromise patient safety in emergencies as well as contributing to a source of daily inefficiency. Junior doctors were timed collecting equipment needed for venepuncture and cannulation on unfamiliar wards. Initial results suggested large variation between timings on different wards. The medical admissions unit (MAU), which organises items for venepuncture and cannulation on a single trolley, was 4 times quicker than the mean of all other wards. MAU mean time 21.0s vs. Non-standardised wards mean time 103.0s (p<0.0001). Estimates suggest approximately 47 hours per week (the equivalent of a fulltime doctor) could be saved by implementing a standard trust-wide storage solution. We set out to introduce the MAU trolley format to all adult inpatient wards. All ward managers agreed to implement the trolley. 18 wards (72% of adult inpatient wards) already possessed the ‘MAU style’ trolley, which we standardised using an easy-to-follow inventory and laminated draw inlays. Feedback was very positive from doctors and ward staff alike. We repeated timings to validate the change and successfully presented a business case to senior management for a further 10 trolleys (£3623.78) for full adult inpatient ward coverage. As junior doctors, we identified a common problem, tested solutions, and made early simple affordable changes. Initial work helped us present a compelling case for patient safety and efficiency improvements, releasing money to implement modest trust

  15. A standardised storage solution for venepuncture/cannulation equipment could save an NHS hospital the equivalent of a whole junior doctor.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Steven; Robertson, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Junior doctors, nursing staff, and phlebotomists spend a large proportion of their time taking blood samples and siting (venous) cannulae. Approximately 350 blood samples are taken daily across 25 wards at the Royal United Hospital Bath NHS Trust. There is no standard storage solution for venepuncture or cannulation equipment. On-call junior doctors cover most of the hospital's wards. Time is wasted locating essential equipment on unfamiliar wards and nurses are frequently interrupted to assist. These delays can compromise patient safety in emergencies as well as contributing to a source of daily inefficiency. Junior doctors were timed collecting equipment needed for venepuncture and cannulation on unfamiliar wards. Initial results suggested large variation between timings on different wards. The medical admissions unit (MAU), which organises items for venepuncture and cannulation on a single trolley, was 4 times quicker than the mean of all other wards. MAU mean time 21.0s vs. Non-standardised wards mean time 103.0s (p<0.0001). Estimates suggest approximately 47 hours per week (the equivalent of a fulltime doctor) could be saved by implementing a standard trust-wide storage solution. We set out to introduce the MAU trolley format to all adult inpatient wards. All ward managers agreed to implement the trolley. 18 wards (72% of adult inpatient wards) already possessed the 'MAU style' trolley, which we standardised using an easy-to-follow inventory and laminated draw inlays. Feedback was very positive from doctors and ward staff alike. We repeated timings to validate the change and successfully presented a business case to senior management for a further 10 trolleys (£3623.78) for full adult inpatient ward coverage. As junior doctors, we identified a common problem, tested solutions, and made early simple affordable changes. Initial work helped us present a compelling case for patient safety and efficiency improvements, releasing money to implement modest trust

  16. The prevalence of depression among elderly warded in a tertiary care centre in Wilayah Persekutuan.

    PubMed

    Sherina, M S; Rampal, L; Hanim, M Arfah; Thong, P L

    2006-03-01

    Depression is characterized by symptoms like disturbance in behavior, cognition and mood. This is commonly known to affect people aged 60 years and above especially those who are also afflicted with illnesses. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of depression and its associated factors among the elderly in a tertiary care centre in Wilayah Persekutuan. A cross sectional study design was done. Stratified cluster sampling method was used to select the respondents. All elderly patients were selected from the orthopaedic, surgical, gynaecology and medical wards in a government hospital in Wilayah Persekutuan. A 30-item Geriatric Depression Scale questionnaire was used as a screening instrument. Out of the 246 elderly subjects, 198 were interviewed giving a response rate of 80.5%. The results showed that 54% of the elderly respondents were found to have depressive symptoms. Age (p=0.022), sex (p=0.008), ethnicity (p=0.022) and functional disabilities in bathing (p=0.001), grooming (p=0.007), dressing (p= 0.007), using the toilet (p=0.002), transferring from bed to chair and back (p=0.000), mobility (p=0.000) and climbing stairs (p=0.000) were all found to be significantly associated with depression among the elderly respondents. The outcome of this study will have an important impact on the implementation of the health policy for the elderly patients admitted to hospitals. PMID:16708729

  17. Five-year review of absconding in three acute psychiatric inpatient wards in Australia.

    PubMed

    Gerace, Adam; Oster, Candice; Mosel, Krista; O'Kane, Deb; Ash, David; Muir-Cochrane, Eimear

    2015-02-01

    Absconding, where patients under an involuntary mental health order leave hospital without permission, can result in patient harm and emotional and professional implications for nursing staff. However, Australian data to drive nursing interventions remain sparse. The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate absconding in three acute care wards from January 2006 to June 2010, in order to determine absconding rates, compare patients who did and did not abscond, and to examine incidents. The absconding rate was 17.22 incidents per 100 involuntary admissions (12.09% of patients), with no significant change over time. Being male, young, diagnosed with a schizophrenia or substance-use disorder, and having a longer hospital stay were predictive of absconding. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients had higher odds of absconding than Caucasian Australians. Over 25% of absconding patients did so multiple times. Patients absconded early in admission. More incidents occurred earlier in the year, during summer and autumn, and later in the week, and few incidents occurred early in the morning. Almost 60% of incidents lasted ≤24 hours. Formulation of prospective interventions considering population demographic factors and person-specific concerns are required for evidence-based nursing management of the risks of absconding and effective incident handling when they do occur. PMID:25444670

  18. Condensation of circular DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starostin, E. L.

    2013-04-01

    A simple model of a circularly closed double-stranded DNA in a poor solvent is considered as an example of a semi-flexible polymer with self-attraction. To find the ground states, the conformational energy is computed as a sum of the bending and torsional elastic components and the effective self-attraction energy. The model includes a relative orientation or sequence dependence of the effective attraction forces between different pieces of the polymer chain. Two series of conformations are analysed: a multicovered circle (a toroid) and a multifold two-headed racquet. The results are presented as a diagram of state. It is suggested that the stability of particular conformations may be controlled by proper adjustment of the primary structure. Application of the model to other semi-flexible polymers is considered.

  19. CIRCULAR CAVITY SLOT ANTENNA

    DOEpatents

    Kerley, P.L.

    1959-01-01

    A small-size antenna having a doughnut-shaped field pattern and which can act both as an antenna and a resonant circuit is described. The antenna is of the slotted type and comprises a resonant cavity with a center hole. A circular slot is provided in one wall of the cavity concentric with the hole and a radio frequency source is connected across the slot. The pattern and loading of the antenna are adjusted by varying the position and shape of a center element slidably disposed within the hole and projecting from the slotted side of the resonant cavity. The disclosed structure may also be used to propagate the oscillator signal down a transniission line by replacing the center element with one leg of the transmission line in a spaced relation from the walls of the cavity.

  20. Children's Sensitivity to Circular Explanations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Laura A.; Danovitch, Judith H.; Keil, Frank C.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to evaluate the quality of explanations is an essential part of children's intellectual growth. Explanations can be faulty in structural ways such as when they are circular. A circular explanation reiterates the question as if it were an explanation rather than providing any new information. Two experiments (N=77) examined children's…

  1. Circular chemiresistors for microchemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Clifford K.

    2007-03-13

    A circular chemiresistor for use in microchemical sensors. A pair of electrodes is fabricated on an electrically insulating substrate. The pattern of electrodes is arranged in a circle-filling geometry, such as a concentric, dual-track spiral design, or a circular interdigitated design. A drop of a chemically sensitive polymer (i.e., chemiresistive ink) is deposited on the insulating substrate on the electrodes, which spreads out into a thin, circular disk contacting the pair of electrodes. This circularly-shaped electrode geometry maximizes the contact area between the pair of electrodes and the polymer deposit, which provides a lower and more stable baseline resistance than with linear-trace designs. The circularly-shaped electrode pattern also serves to minimize batch-to-batch variations in the baseline resistance due to non-uniform distributions of conductive particles in the chemiresistive polymer film.

  2. Effect of the maternity ward system on the lactation success of low-income urban Mexican women.

    PubMed

    Perez-Escamilla, R; Segura-Millán, S; Pollitt, E; Dewey, K G

    1992-11-01

    We compared the lactation performance of 165 healthy mothers who planned to breastfeed and gave birth by vaginal delivery, without complications to a healthy infant in either a nursery (NUR) (n = 58) or a rooming-in hospital where formula supplementation was not allowed. In the rooming-in hospital, women were randomly assigned to a group that received breastfeeding guidance during the hospital stay (RIBFG) (n = 53) or to a control group (RI) (n = 54). Women were interviewed in the hospital and at 8, 70 and 135 days post-partum (pp). The groups were similar in socio-economic, demographic, anthropometric, previous breastfeeding experience and prenatal care variables. Non-parametric survival analyses adjusting for potential confounding factors show that breastfeeding guidance had a positive impact (P < or = 0.05) on breastfeeding duration among primiparous women who delivered in the rooming-in hospital. Among primiparae, the RI and RIBFG groups had higher (P < or = 0.05) full breastfeeding rates than the NUR group in the short term. In the longer term, only the difference between the RIBFG and the NUR group remained statistically significant. The maternity ward system did not have a statistically significant effect on the lactation performance of multiparae. PMID:1486816

  3. [Out-of-hospital births].

    PubMed

    Fernández Domínguez, N; Leal Gómez, E; García Lavandeira, S; Vázquez Rodríguez, M

    2016-01-01

    Childbirth is a physiological process and, as such, there should be limited assistance for the woman to ensure that it follows its natural process, avoiding any possible complication and, if they do appear, attempting to resolve them. Health personnel should try to achieve a balance between safety and the least possible outside assistance. The out-of-hospital delivery is considered an emergency as it happens unexpectedly, that is, without being previously planned. Given that it has to be treated outside the ideal conditions of a maternity ward, it is considered as an emergency. PMID:26006314

  4. Measuring the impact of modern matrons in the ward setting.

    PubMed

    Shanley, Oliver

    With the The NHS Plan (Department of Health, 2000) the government made it clear there was a need to reintroduce the role of matron to establish a clear responsibility for standards in the ward setting. The role of modern matron is now considered to be a fundamental part of clinical governance, ensuring the quality of the care provided is of the highest standard. Staff at South Essex Partnership NHS Trust instituted an audit to provide an accurate picture of the impact of modern matrons. PMID:15552487

  5. The educational value of ward rounds for junior trainees

    PubMed Central

    Laskaratos, Faidon-Marios; Wallace, Deirdre; Gkotsi, Despoina; Burns, Aine; Epstein, Owen

    2015-01-01

    The ward round (WR) is a complex task and medical teachers are often faced with the challenge of finding a balance between service provision and clinical development of learners. The educational value of WRs is an under-researched area. This short communication aims to evaluate the educational role of WRs for junior trainees and provides insight into current practices. It also identifies obstacles to effective teaching/training in this setting and provides suggestions for improving the quality of WR teaching. PMID:25907002

  6. Compactified twistor fibration and topology of Ward unitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plansangkate, Prim

    2016-06-01

    We use the compactified twistor correspondence for the (2 + 1) -dimensional integrable chiral model to prove a conjecture of Ward. In particular, we construct the correspondence space of a compactified twistor fibration and use it to prove that the second Chern numbers of the holomorphic vector bundles, corresponding to the uniton solutions of the integrable chiral model, equal the third homotopy classes of the restricted extended solutions of the unitons. Therefore we deduce that the total energy of a time-dependent uniton is proportional to the second Chern number.

  7. Ward-Takahashi identities for Abelian chiral gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima, Ana Paula Cardoso Rodrigues; Dias, Sebastião Alves

    2016-04-01

    By considering a general Abelian chiral gauge theory, we investigate the behavior of anomalous Ward-Takahashi (WT) identities concerning their prediction for the usual relationship between the vertex and two-point fermion functions. Using gauge anomaly vanishing results, we show that the usual (in the nonanomalous case) WT identity connecting the vertex and two-point fermion 1PI functions is modified for Abelian chiral gauge theories. The modification, however, implies a relation between fermion and charge renormalization constants that can be important in a future study of renormalization of such theories.

  8. Ward identities and chiral anomalies for coupled fermionic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, L. C.; Ferraz, A.; Mastropietro, Vieri

    2013-12-01

    Coupled fermionic chains are usually described by an effective model written in terms of bonding and anti-bonding fermionic fields with linear dispersion in the vicinities of the respective Fermi points. We derive for the first time exact Ward Identities (WI) for this model, proving the existence of chiral anomalies which verify the Adler-Bardeen non-renormalization property. Such WI are expected to play a crucial role in the understanding of the thermodynamic properties of the system. Our results are non-perturbative and are obtained analyzing Grassmann functional integrals by means of constructive quantum field theory methods.

  9. The educational value of ward rounds for junior trainees.

    PubMed

    Laskaratos, Faidon-Marios; Wallace, Deirdre; Gkotsi, Despoina; Burns, Aine; Epstein, Owen

    2015-01-01

    The ward round (WR) is a complex task and medical teachers are often faced with the challenge of finding a balance between service provision and clinical development of learners. The educational value of WRs is an under-researched area. This short communication aims to evaluate the educational role of WRs for junior trainees and provides insight into current practices. It also identifies obstacles to effective teaching/training in this setting and provides suggestions for improving the quality of WR teaching. PMID:25907002

  10. YACHIYO HOSPITAL; Center of SUPER CARE MIX--Comprehensive Care from Emergency to Home for the community.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takatoshi; Iyomasa, Shinsuke; Fukatsu, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Anjo City has two general hospitals. Kosei Hospital, a central medical center for advanced care, and our Yachiyo Hospital for regional care. Recently, Kosei Hospital faced over-capacity problem because of overflow in emergency visits and congested wards due to shortage of post-acute beds. We planned a project to ease the congestion of the central hospital and manage post-acute patients. PMID:27180467

  11. Psychiatric hospital challenges for healthcare security officers.

    PubMed

    White, Donald E

    2003-01-01

    Security and Safety managers in today's healthcare facilities need to use creative thinking and resourcefulness, to juggle competing issues in psychiatric hospitals, wards, or units. Using a 3-step process of accountability, access control, and scenario exercises, these managers can mitigate the real-world risk assessment discoveries that might not be evident in well-documented facility policies, staff training, or even written surveys. PMID:12629788

  12. The development of an automated ward independent delirium risk prediction model.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Hugo A J M; Winkens, Bjorn; Mestres Gonzalvo, Carlota; Hurkens, Kim P G M; Mulder, Wubbo J; Janknegt, Rob; Verhey, Frans R; van der Kuy, Paul-Hugo M; Schols, Jos M G A

    2016-08-01

    Background A delirium is common in hospital settings resulting in increased mortality and costs. Prevention of a delirium is clearly preferred over treatment. A delirium risk prediction model can be helpful to identify patients at risk of a delirium, allowing the start of preventive treatment. Current risk prediction models rely on manual calculation of the individual patient risk. Objective The aim of this study was to develop an automated ward independent delirium riskprediction model. To show that such a model can be constructed exclusively from electronically available risk factors and thereby implemented into a clinical decision support system (CDSS) to optimally support the physician to initiate preventive treatment. Setting A Dutch teaching hospital. Methods A retrospective cohort study in which patients, 60 years or older, were selected when admitted to the hospital, with no delirium diagnosis when presenting, or during the first day of admission. We used logistic regression analysis to develop a delirium predictive model out of the electronically available predictive variables. Main outcome measure A delirium risk prediction model. Results A delirium risk prediction model was developed using predictive variables that were significant in the univariable regression analyses. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of the "medication model" model was 0.76 after internal validation. Conclusions CDSSs can be used to automatically predict the risk of a delirium in individual hospitalised patients' by exclusively using electronically available predictive variables. To increase the use and improve the quality of predictive models, clinical risk factors should be documented ready for automated use. PMID:27177868

  13. Nuclear spin circular dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Vaara, Juha; Rizzo, Antonio; Kauczor, Joanna; Norman, Patrick; Coriani, Sonia

    2014-04-07

    Recent years have witnessed a growing interest in magneto-optic spectroscopy techniques that use nuclear magnetization as the source of the magnetic field. Here we present a formulation of magnetic circular dichroism (CD) due to magnetically polarized nuclei, nuclear spin-induced CD (NSCD), in molecules. The NSCD ellipticity and nuclear spin-induced optical rotation (NSOR) angle correspond to the real and imaginary parts, respectively, of (complex) quadratic response functions involving the dynamic second-order interaction of the electron system with the linearly polarized light beam, as well as the static magnetic hyperfine interaction. Using the complex polarization propagator framework, NSCD and NSOR signals are obtained at frequencies in the vicinity of optical excitations. Hartree-Fock and density-functional theory calculations on relatively small model systems, ethene, benzene, and 1,4-benzoquinone, demonstrate the feasibility of the method for obtaining relatively strong nuclear spin-induced ellipticity and optical rotation signals. Comparison of the proton and carbon-13 signals of ethanol reveals that these resonant phenomena facilitate chemical resolution between non-equivalent nuclei in magneto-optic spectra.

  14. How Can Ward Teaching Be Made More Systematic?

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    : Editor's note: From its first issue in 1900 through to the present day, AJN has unparalleled archives detailing nurses' work and lives over more than a century. These articles not only chronicle nursing's growth as a profession within the context of the events of the day, but they also reveal prevailing societal attitudes about women, health care, and human rights. Today's nursing school curricula rarely include nursing's history, but it's a history worth knowing. To this end, From the AJN Archives highlights articles selected to fit today's topics and times.This month's article, from the June 1926 issue, offers ideas "by which we hope to make ward experiences of more value to the student." Author Mina A. McKay originally presented this material at a meeting of the Massachusetts State League of Nursing Education. She calls for more comprehensive morning and evening reports ("not just a mere reading of… orders"), the use of student experience records, ward clinics ("the type of bedside talk which supplements class room lectures"), and case reports presented by the students themselves. Efforts to improve clinical nursing education are ongoing, and in "'Flipping' the Classroom" in this month's AJN, Diane M. Billings describes a relatively new way of translating clinical concepts into practice. PMID:27560341

  15. Upgrading the Ward Beecher Planetarium for the 21st Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrell, P. R.; Young, W.; Pirko, R.; Shanks, S. L.; Neiheisel, J.; Dean, M. E.; Kotel, R.; Schaefer, S.; Morlan, R.; Wilson, A.; Feldmeier, J. J.

    2005-12-01

    We report on recent progress and future public outreach plans in light of a significant upgrade of the Ward Beecher Planetarium at Youngstown State University. Over a period of 40 years, the facility has been a first-rate 150 seat planetarium and introductory astronomy classroom, and in its history has seen over 50 000 undergraduate students and over 750 000 visits from people in the surrounding area and beyond. Through a recent generous donation from the Ward Beecher Foundation, we have added the SciDome full-dome visualization system, and soon will be replacing our Spitz A3P planetarium star projector. These upgrades, in addition to new digital video projectors and a complete overhaul of our roof-top observatory, are being done in order to further enhance both the education of YSU students and our ability to continue numerous public outreach programs, including full-dome digital planetarium shows, public observing, shows for both elementary and high school students, and home-schooling programs.

  16. A virtual psychiatric ward for orientating patients admitted for the first time.

    PubMed

    Lau, Wai-Chi; Choi, Kup-Sze; Chung, Wai-Yee

    2010-12-01

    Misconceptions about psychiatric wards frequently cause newly admitted mental patients to stay away from these wards despite their need for treatment. Although ward orientation is typically conducted by nurses in an attempt to help patients to adapt to the new environment, it is considered time-consuming, and the method of orientation and the explanations given may vary among different nurses. This situation calls for a more effective and standardized approach to orientating mental patients on their first admission. To this end, a computer-based interactive virtual environment was developed based on a real psychiatric ward by using virtual reality (VR) technologies. It enables the patient to navigate around to gain understanding about the ward through a virtual guided tour. The effectiveness of this VR orientation approach was investigated by a randomized controlled trial with consecutive sampling. Fifty-four Chinese participants were randomly assigned to undergo ward orientation by either using the VR-based approach or reading text-based electronic information sheets about the ward with a computer. Subjective and objective measures were obtained respectively using the Chinese version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory questionnaire and the heart-rate variability measurement before and after the intervention. In addition, a test on the level of understanding about the ward was administered at the end of the session. The results showed that the VR orientation approach is helpful in reducing patients' anxiety while also improving their level of understanding about the ward. PMID:21142988

  17. Circular Scan Streak Tube Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nevin, S.

    1980-01-01

    A streak tube having circular scan was designed, built and tested. Continuous circular scan, easily derived from out of phase sine waves applied to the conventional deflection plates, permits the timing of pulses traveling long baselines. At the tube's output a circular array of 720 elements is scanned to provide 30 to 40 picosecond resolution. Initial difficulties with electron bombarded silicon arrays were circumvented by using microchannel plates within the streak tube to provide the needed electronic amplification and digital sensitivity and coupling the 720 element arrays to the electron beam by means of a phosphor on a fiber optics. Two ceramic body tubes with S-20 photocathodes were tested and delivered.

  18. Delayed Recognition of Deterioration of Patients in General Wards Is Mostly Caused by Human Related Monitoring Failures: A Root Cause Analysis of Unplanned ICU Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Driesen, Babiche E. J. M.; Merten, Hanneke; Ludikhuize, Jeroen; van der Spoel, Johannes I.; Kramer, Mark H. H.; Nanayakkara, Prabath W. B.

    2016-01-01

    Background An unplanned ICU admission of an inpatient is a serious adverse event (SAE). So far, no in depth-study has been performed to systematically analyse the root causes of unplanned ICU-admissions. The primary aim of this study was to identify the healthcare worker-, organisational-, technical,- disease- and patient- related causes that contribute to acute unplanned ICU admissions from general wards using a Root-Cause Analysis Tool called PRISMA-medical. Although a Track and Trigger System (MEWS) was introduced in our hospital a few years ago, it was implemented without a clear protocol. Therefore, the secondary aim was to assess the adherence to a Track and Trigger system to identify deterioration on general hospital wards in patients eventually transferred to the ICU. Methods Retrospective observational study in 49 consecutive adult patients acutely admitted to the Intensive Care Unit from a general nursing ward. 1. PRISMA-analysis on root causes of unplanned ICU admissions 2. Assessment of protocol adherence to the early warning score system. Results Out of 49 cases, 156 root causes were identified. The most frequent root causes were healthcare worker related (46%), which were mainly failures in monitoring the patient. They were followed by disease-related (45%), patient-related causes (7, 5%), and organisational root causes (3%). In only 40% of the patients vital parameters were monitored as was instructed by the doctor. 477 vital parameter sets were found in the 48 hours before ICU admission, in only 1% a correct MEWS was explicitly documented in the record. Conclusions This in-depth analysis demonstrates that almost half of the unplanned ICU admissions from the general ward had healthcare worker related root causes, mostly due to monitoring failures in clinically deteriorating patients. In order to reduce unplanned ICU admissions, improving the monitoring of patients is therefore warranted. PMID:27537689

  19. Beam Rounders for Circular Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    A. Burov; S. Nagaitsev; Ya. Derbenev

    2001-07-01

    By means of linear optics, an arbitrary uncoupled beam can be locally transformed into a round (rotation-invariant) state and then back. This provides an efficient way to round beams in the interaction region of circular colliders.

  20. Circularly-Polarized Microstrip Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanton, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Microstrip construction compact for mobile applications. Circularly polarized microstrip antenna made of concentric cylindrical layers of conductive and dielectric materials. Coaxial cable feedlines connected to horizontal and vertical subelements from inside. Vertical subelement acts as ground for horizontal subelement.

  1. [Haikou issues circular on planned parenthood].

    PubMed

    1981-02-01

    The Organization Department of the Haikou Municipal CCP Committee, the municipal grain, finance, commerce, education bureau, personnel, public security, labor, civil affairs, public health, and housing bureaus, supply and marketing cooperative, and planned parenthood office recently issued a joint circular on implementing the provincial planned parenthood regulations. The circular demanded that the marriage registration and census system be seriously implemented. When people are registering for marriage, we must teach them to have only 1 child. We must give priority in housing and employment to an only child and his parents. When commercial, supply, and marketing departments are distributing coupons for fuel, and nonstaple food, they should supply a double amount to the only child. We must carry out serious health care for an only child and give them regular physical check-ups. When they are ill, hospitals should give them priority in registration, treatment, reservation of beds and medicines. The circular reiterated: We must seriously implement the stipulations on rewards and punishments contained in the provincial planned parenthood regulations. Cadres, staff, or workers who apply to have only 1 child must be given lump sums in addition to enjoying the relevant rewards stipulated by the regulations. Cadres, staff, workers, inhabitants, and commune workers who depend on state grain who violate the regulations must be punished according to the regulation. As for those who have 3 or more than 3 children, a 2nd child without planning, or an illegitimate child, the child's grain ration will be sold at negotiated price up to the age of 14. The grain department will distribute to them a supply ticket for negotiated price grain to buy grain in assigned grain shops. PMID:12338059

  2. Medication at discharge in an orthopaedic surgical ward: quality of information transmission and implementation of a medication reconciliation form.

    PubMed

    Monfort, Anne-Solène; Curatolo, Niccolo; Begue, Thierry; Rieutord, André; Roy, Sandrine

    2016-08-01

    Background Medication reconciliation (MedRec) at discharge is a cumbersome but necessary process to reduce the risk of medication errors at transitions of care. The main barriers to implementing such a process are the large number of professionals involved and a lack of collaboration among caregivers. Objective This study was designed to assess the need for a medication reconciliation form at discharge in an orthopaedic surgical ward. Setting The study was conducted in the orthopaedic surgery ward among inpatients at a 407-bed French teaching hospital. Method We first performed a retrospective audit to evaluate the quality of discharge medication information in the medical record, after which a 5-week prospective study was conducted in 2013. All patients admitted to the orthopaedic surgery unit who had at least two chronic diseases and three medications underwent MedRec at discharge. We designed a Best Possible Medication at Discharge List (BPMDL) to be completed by hospital staff and transmitted to community caregivers. Mean outcome measures We assessed the completeness of medication information in the medical records, discrepancies between medications noted on the BPMDL and those prescribed on the discharge order, and the value of the BPMDL for stakeholders. Results Thirty patients were included in the study. Only 4 % of medical records contained a discharge summary with complete medication information. In 67 % of cases, treatment discontinuations at admission were justified, and medications were reintroduced before discharge, while 107 treatments (45 %) were added but not prescribed on discharge orders. Discontinuations prior to discharge were justified in 60 % of cases (treatments were ended or supportive treatment was required during hospitalization). An average of 2.1 treatments were prescribed on discharge orders (vs. 9.4 prescribed on the BPMDL). Patients, general practitioners (GP), and physicians in long-term care settings (PLTCS) rated the format

  3. [Treating mother and baby in conjoint hospitalization in a psychiatric hospital].

    PubMed

    Maizel, S; Fainstein, V; Katzenelson, S K

    1998-09-01

    Since 1990 we have been admitting mothers with postpartum psychiatric morbidity together with their babies to our open psychiatric ward. The aim of conjoint hospitalization is to maintain and develop the bond between mother and baby while treating the mother's psychiatric disorder. The presence of the infant in the hospital allows both a thorough evaluation of the mothers' maternal ability and to use the infant as a facilitator of the mothers' recovery by engaging maternal functions. It prevents the infants from being placed in a foster home for the duration of the mothers' hospitalization. Readily available in Britain and Australia, such conjoint hospitalization is controversial and rarely available elsewhere. In the past 5 years we hospitalized 10 women with 11 babies (1 woman was hospitalized twice, after different births). All women had received psychiatric treatment prior to childbirth, but this was the first psychiatric hospitalization for 2 of them. Diagnoses (DSM-IIIR) were chronic paranoid schizophrenia (4), affective disorder (4), schizo-affective schizophrenia (1) and borderline personality disorder (1). 8 were suffering from active psychotic symptoms on admission. They were treated pharmacologically, received individual and group psychotherapy, and participated in all ward activities. Families were engaged in marital, family and/or individual therapy according to need. All participated in cognitive-behavior treatment tailored to individual need to build and enrich the mother-infant bond. All improved significantly and were able to function independently on discharge, but in 1 case adoption was recommended. PMID:9885632

  4. Circularization time of binary galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junqueira, S.; de Freitas Pacheco, J. A.

    1994-11-01

    We report the results of numerical experiments performed to study the orbital circularization time of binary galaxies. We find that the time scale is quite long (larger than the Hubble time), confirming earlier calculations. The results depend on the initial conditions. From our simulations we obtained a fitting formula for the circularization time as a function of the initial orbital parameters like the pericentric distance, mass ratio, and eccentricity.

  5. [Assessment of medical waste management in a Palestinian hospital].

    PubMed

    Al-Khatib, I A; Khatib, R A

    2006-01-01

    We studied medical waste management in a Palestinian hospital in the West Bank and the role of municipality in this management. In general, "good management practices" were inadequate; there was insufficient separation between hazardous and non-hazardous wastes, an absence of necessary rules and regulations for the collection of wastes from the hospital wards and the on-site transport to a temporary storage location inside and outside the hospital and inadequate waste treatment and disposal of hospital wastes along with municipal garbage. Moreover, training of personnel was lacking and protective equipment and measures for staff were not available. No special landfills for hazardous wastes were found within the municipality. PMID:17037705

  6. A contact investigation of the transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from a nurse working in a newborn nursery and maternity ward.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Hitoshi; Ikegami, Yumiko; Kishida, Kenji; Yamamoto, Yoshiaki; Ikeda, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Takashi; Ikeda, Takeshi; Sato, Atsuo; Kurasawa, Takuya; Miyanomae, Ken

    2008-02-01

    A nurse working in a newborn nursery and maternity ward developed 3+ smear-positive lung tuberculosis. The hospital infection control committee, in collaboration with the local public health and welfare center, conducted a contact investigation. The infection period was defined as April to August 2006. The investigation included 109 infant and mother pairs, 28 children aged under 10 years and their guardians, 62 coworkers, and 63 household visitors to the ward. Tuberculosis infection in infants and children aged under 5 years was primarily determined by tuberculin skin test (TST), while subjects aged 5 years or more were tested using QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFT). The first investigation, in August 2006, was conducted in all subjects, and the second investigation, in October 2006, targeted selected subjects. No infants were TST-positive. Two children aged 1 year or under, vaccinated with bacillus Calmette-Guérin, were positive for TST, as determined by the criteria of the Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association; however, other tests for tuberculosis were negative. Of the 13 QFT-positive adult subjects, 1 mother and 2 coworkers could have become infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis through exposure to the index nurse. Fifty-four infants and 6 children underwent "window-period" prophylaxis, and 4 adults completed 6-month prophylactic treatment with isoniazid. To date, no secondary cases of tuberculosis disease have occurred. PMID:18297454

  7. The impact of facility relocation on patients' perceptions of ward atmosphere and quality of received forensic psychiatric care.

    PubMed

    Alexiou, Eirini; Degl' Innocenti, Alessio; Kullgren, Anette; Wijk, Helle

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, large groups of forensic psychiatric patients have been relocated into new medium- and maximum-security forensic psychiatric facilities in Sweden, where a psychosocial care approach is embedded. From this perspective and on the assumption that physical structures affect the therapeutic environment, a prospective longitudinal study was designed to investigate the impact of the facility relocation of three forensic psychiatric hospitals on patients' perceptions of ward atmosphere and quality of received forensic psychiatric care. Participants were patients over 18 years of age sentenced to compulsory forensic psychiatric treatment. Data were obtained by validated questionnaires. Overall, 58 patients (78%) answered the questionnaires at baseline with a total of 25 patients (34%) completing follow-up 1 at six months and 11 patients (15%) completing follow-up 2, one year after relocation. Approximately two-thirds of the participants at all time-points were men and their age range varied from 18 to 69. The results of this study showed that poor physical environment features can have a severe impact on care quality and can reduce the possibilities for person-centered care. Furthermore, the study provides evidence that the patients' perceptions of person-centered care in forensic psychiatric clinics are highly susceptible to factors in the physical and psychosocial environment. Future work will explore the staff's perception of ward atmosphere and the possibilities to adapt a person-centered approach in forensic psychiatric care after facility relocation. PMID:27213839

  8. Ward assessment of SmartIdeas Project: bringing source isolation to the patient.

    PubMed

    Moore, G; Ali, S; FitzGerald, G; Muzslay, M; Atkinson, S; Smith, S; Cryer, P; Gush, C; Wilson, A P R

    2010-10-01

    Most UK hospitals lack enough single rooms to provide source isolation for all infected patients. The aim of this study was to test prototype isolation systems on general wards together with specifically designed portable sink units and toilets. Questionnaires were offered to staff, patients and visitors covering ease of use and acceptability. A total of 53 patients were isolated, with concurrent collection of environmental samples and staff hand hygiene audit. Blocking of beds next to infected patients was avoided but patients and staff were concerned about limited space and communication. Hand hygiene compliance on entry or exit to/from an isolated bed space significantly improved [43/76 (56.6%) to 107/147 (72.8%), P<0.05]. Although popular, the toilets were mechanically unreliable. Low levels of microbial contamination (<1-3.4cfu/cm(2)) were present within all isolated bed spaces. The highest colony counts were obtained from high contact sites (e.g. remote controls). Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was present at similar levels inside all systems. Although one system was designed to provide airborne as well as contact isolation, MRSA was isolated from air inside and outside the system suggesting poor efficiency of the air door. The finding was confirmed by aerobiology tests at the Health Protection Agency Laboratory, Porton Down, UK. A trial of redesigned units is required to establish efficacy (Trial Identifier: ISRCTN02681602). PMID:20561713

  9. Infrastructural arrangements for integrated care: implementing an electronic nursing plan in a psychogeriatric ward

    PubMed Central

    Ellingsen, Gunnar; Munkvold, Glenn

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The paper contributes to the conceptualisation of “integrated care” in heterogeneous work practices. A dynamic perspective is developed, emphasising how integrated care is malleable, open, and achieved in practice. Furthermore, we explore the role of nursing plans in integrated care practices, underscoring the inherent difficulties of building one common infrastructural system for integrated care. Methods Empirically, we studied the implementation of an electronic nursing plan in a psychiatric ward at the University Hospital of North Norway. We conducted 80 hours of participant observation and 15 interviews. Results While the nursing plan was successful as a formal tool among the nurses, it was of limited use in practice where integrated care was carried out. In some instances, the use of the nursing plan even undermined integrated care. Conclusion Integrated care is not a constant entity, but is much more situated and temporal in character. A new infrastructural system for integrated care should not be envisioned as replacing most of the existing information sources, but rather seen as an extension to the heterogeneous ensemble of existing ones. PMID:17627295

  10. Modeling Clinical Context: Rediscovering the Social History and Evaluating Language from the Clinic to the Wards

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Colin; Elhadad, Noémie

    2014-01-01

    Social, behavioral, and cultural factors are clearly linked to health and disease outcomes. The medical social history is a critical evaluation of these factors performed by healthcare providers with patients in both inpatient and outpatient care settings. Physicians learn the topics covered in the social history through education and practice, but the topics discussed and documented in real-world clinical narrative have not been described at scale. This study applies large-scale automated topic modeling techniques to discover common topics discussed in social histories, to compare those topics to the medical textbook representation of those histories, and to compare topics between clinical settings to illustrate differences of clinical context on narrative content. Language modeling techniques are used to consider the extent to which inpatient and outpatient social histories share in their language use. Our findings highlight the fact that clinical context and setting are distinguishing factors for social history documentation, as the language of the hospital wards is not the same as that of the ambulatory clinic. Moreover, providers receive little feedback on the quality of their documentation beyond that needed for billing processes. The findings in this study demonstrate a number of topics described in textbooks – schooling, religion, alternative health practices, stressors, for example - do not appear in social histories in either clinical setting. PMID:25717417

  11. Psychiatric nursing as 'different' care: experience of Iranian mental health nurses in inpatient psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Zarea, K; Nikbakht-Nasrabadi, A; Abbaszadeh, A; Mohammadpour, A

    2013-03-01

    Patients with mental illness require unique and specific care. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of nurses, who provide such care for mentally ill people, within the context of Iranian culture. This hermeneutic phenomenological study was carried out in a university-affiliated hospital in an urban area of Iran. We interviewed 10 mental health nurses to capture in detail their experiences in psychiatric units, and the approach developed by Diekelmann et al. was employed to analyse the data. Four themes and five sub-themes were identified: 'being engaged with patients' (sub-themes: 'struggle for monitor/control', 'safety/security concerns', 'supporting physiological and emotional needs'), 'being competent', 'altruistic care' and 'facing difficulties and challenges' (sub-themes: 'socio-cultural' and 'organizational challenges'). The results provide valuable insights and greater understanding of the professional experiences of psychiatric nurses in Iran, and indicate the need for a stable and responsible organizational structure for those nurses who are expected to manage patient care in psychiatric wards. PMID:22384949

  12. Ward round documentation in a major trauma centre: can we improve patient safety?

    PubMed Central

    Green, Gemma; Aframian, Arash; bernard, jason

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to improve documentation and patient safety in a major trauma centre. A retrospective audit was undertaken in March 2014. Ward round entries for each orthopaedic patients on three dates were assessed against standards and analysed. The audit was repeated in April 2014, and again in August 2014. Thorough documentation is paramount in a major trauma centre. It forms a useful record of the patients hospital stay, is a legal document and is highlighted in national guidelines. It provides a basis for good handover, ensuring continuation of care and maintaining patient safety. Resultant poor compliance with Royal College guidelines in the initial audit led to the production of a new electronic based note keeping system. A meeting was held with all staff prior to introduction. Our initial results gained 75 entries, and none showed full compliance. Mean compliance per entry was 59% (0–81%). The second attempt gained 90 entries, with 30 from the weekend. Mean compliance per entry 97%. Third attempt received 61 entries, with 27 from the weekend. Mean compliance was 96%, meaning that the improvement was being maintained. Recent distressing reports regarding patient highlighted the importance of patient. Our initial audit proved there were many areas lacking in our documentation and improvement was necessary. Prior to introducing electronic systems, the implemented change has produced improvement in documentation, and provides a useful handover tool for staff. PMID:26734307

  13. The Educational Value Of Post-Take Ward Rounds For Senior Trainees

    PubMed Central

    Parry, David; El-Mileik, Hanan

    2016-01-01

    Background The educational value of post-take ward rounds (PTWRs) is an under-researched area of postgraduate medical education. Objective We investigated perceptions of this activity amongst higher specialty trainees. Methods The project was conducted in a large district general hospital in London, UK. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected to establish opinions of the PTWR amongst higher specialty trainees in medicine. Eighteen senior trainees were eligible to participate. Of these, 14 (78%) responded to our questionnaire and 4 were selected by purposive sampling to participate in semi-structured interviews. Results Most trainees felt that the focus of PTWRs was service provision with little time devoted to teaching (79% of respondents) and that feedback was rarely provided (71% of respondents). Trainees commented on learning opportunities available on PTWRs, as well as consultant behaviour they considered valuable. The main barriers to teaching and learning were time pressures, workload, interruptions, management (rather than patient assessment) focus, lack of follow-up of cases and feedback. The data included useful suggestions for improving the educational value of PTWRs. Conclusions PTWRs are currently a wasted educational opportunity. Radical change to organisation and practice will be necessary to address this. There will be resource implications. PMID:27601766

  14. Contamination of environmental surfaces by Staphylococcus aureus in a dermatological ward and its preventive measures.

    PubMed

    Oie, Shigeharu; Yanagi, Chikashige; Matsui, Hiroto; Nishida, Tomoko; Tomita, Masaaki; Kamiya, Akira

    2005-01-01

    We investigated contamination of environmental surfaces by Staphylococcus aureus from April 1 to the end of June in 2002 in the dermatological ward (37 beds) of a university hospital. For surfaces contaminated by high levels of S. aureus, disinfection methods were evaluated. 100-10(5) colony forming units (cfu) of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) or methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) were detected on items such as an immersion bathtub (examined area, about 900 cm2), foot washbowl, stretcher for an immersion bath, and chair for the shower. After disinfection, no S. aureus was detected on smooth surfaces such as the immersion bathtub and foot washbowl; however, S. aureus was detected even after disinfection on porous surfaces made of sponge-like materials (polyethylene foam) such as the stretcher for the immersion bath and the shower chair. Scanning electron microscopy of the porous surfaces showed formation of a large amount of coccus and bacillus biofilms on the walls of pores in the multi-pore structure. Material that is porous should not be used in patient care settings because it is not possible to disinfect it properly. PMID:15635175

  15. Norovirus - hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Gastroenteritis - norovirus; Colitis - norovirus; Hospital acquired infection - norovirus ... fluids ( dehydration ). Anyone can become infected with norovirus. Hospital patients who are very old, very young, or ...

  16. 4WARD: A European Perspective towards the Future Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Marcus; Abramowicz, Henrik; Niebert, Norbert; Correia, Luis M.

    In this paper, we describe several approaches to address the challenges of the network of the future. Our main hypothesis is that the Future Internet must be designed for the environment of applications and transport media of the 21st century, vastly different from the initial Internet's life space. One major requirement is the inherent support for mobile and wireless usage. A Future Internet should allow for the fast creation of diverse network designs and paradigms and must also support their co-existence at run-time. We detail the technical and business scenarios that lead the development in the EU FP7 4WARD project towards a framework for the Future Internet.

  17. The prevalence of drivers in acute geriatric wards.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, R.; Turnbull, C. J.; King, D.

    1995-01-01

    An audit of 150 patients on five acute geriatric wards found that 28 (19%) still drove. Forty-three (28%) used to drive but had given up, whilst 79 (53%) (76 of whom were female) had never driven. Former drivers gave the main reason for stopping as cost. No driver could recall being advised about driving by a doctor. Twenty-two drivers (79%) had a significant clinical condition that could affect driving, ranging from blackouts to arthritis. It is recommended that all elderly patients should be asked if they drive and any clinical conditions they might have that would adversely affect their driving be sought. Appropriate advice should be given by doctors to their elderly patients in order to safeguard them and the public from road traffic accidents. PMID:8545286

  18. Supporting breastfeeding mothers on children's wards: an overview.

    PubMed

    Narramore, Naomi

    2007-02-01

    Just under half of all six-week-old babies in the U.K. are breastfed, and just under a quarter are still being breastfed at six months old so it is likely that children's nurses will frequently encounter breastfed babies on children's wards. Support for breastfeeding has traditionally been left to midwives but Department of Health guidance requires that all relevant staff have training in this practice. Children's nurses need to understand the principles and practice of breastfeeding support including correct positioning and attachment, prevention and management of breastfeeding problems, mothers' needs and safe use of breast pumps. Breastfeeding should be part of the curriculum for children's nursing courses, including practical sessions to observe breastfeeding support in the clinical setting. Children's nurses should be aware that literature and learning resources written for midwives might be appropriate for them to access to increase their understanding in this important area of practice. PMID:17326552

  19. Authenticity in Learning--Nursing Students' Experiences at a Clinical Education Ward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manninen, Katri; Henriksson, Elisabet Welin; Scheja, Max; Silen, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore and understand first year nursing students' experiences of learning at a clinical education ward. Design/methodology/approach: The setting is a clinical education ward for nursing students at a department of infectious diseases. A qualitative study was carried out exploring students' encounters with patients,…

  20. Controlled Confrontation: The Ward Grievance Procedure of the California Youth Authority. An Exemplary Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice (Dept. of Justice/LEAA), Washington, DC.

    The Ward Grievance Procedure of the California Youth Authority is one of 17 programs that earned the National Institute's "Exemplary" label. This brochure provides the requisite practical information for those who wish to test or consider testing the ward grievance procedure. The program was developed as a way of dealing with the questions raised…

  1. Creating Readers: Vonda Ward--Broward County Library, Fort Lauderdale, FL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This article details the work of Vonda Ward--a middle-school teacher turned librarian. When Vonda Ward was a middle-school teacher, she could not get her students to share her excitement about history because they could not read its stories. That is when she realized how much subject mastery depended on the basics. Broward County Library's leaders…

  2. Circular polarization interferometry: circularly polarized modes of cholesteric liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Castillo, A; Eslami, S; Giesselmann, F; Fischer, P

    2014-12-15

    We describe a novel polarization interferometer which permits the determination of the refractive indices for circularly-polarized light. It is based on a Jamin-Lebedeff interferometer, modified with waveplates, and permits us to experimentally determine the refractive indices nL and nR of the respectively left- and right-circularly polarized modes in a cholesteric liquid crystal. Whereas optical rotation measurements only determine the circular birefringence, i.e. the difference (nL - nR), the interferometer also permits the determination of their absolute values. We report refractive indices of a cholesteric liquid crystal in the region of selective (Bragg) reflection as a function of temperature. PMID:25607071

  3. Postdischarge Treatment Costs Following Closure of a State Geropsychiatric Ward: Comparison of 2 Levels of Community Care

    PubMed Central

    St. Dennis, Clarke; Hendryx, Michael; Henriksen, Anne-Lenora; Setter, Stephen M.; Singer, Brandy

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: The purposes of this study were to (1) examine the cost of community-based health care services for geropsychiatric inpatients discharged into the community after the closure of an inpatient state geropsychiatric unit and (2) compare costs for patients treated with extra support through an Expanded Community Services (ECS) program to patients treated traditionally. Method: This study was a 6-month prospective, observational analysis of 30 patients discharged in conjunction with a ward closure in October 2002 (17 patients were nonrandomly assigned to the ECS program, and 13, to standard care). We analyzed costs of care, mortality, and rehospitalization rates derived from Medicaid paid claims and other data sources and compared costs to an estimate of hospital costs had the patients not been discharged. Patients were discharged to various community placements including long-term care facilities, assisted living facilities, and adult family homes in Eastern Washington State. Results: Costs for community care were approximately half of estimated costs for hospital care. Patients treated in the ECS program, representing the most severely in-need discharges, had costs of care that were nonsignificantly higher than non-ECS patients but still significantly lower than estimated hospital care. No differences in mortality or rehospitalization rates were found between ECS and non-ECS patients. Conclusion: Costs of community care were significantly lower than hospital care. Quality of life for patients in the community settings versus the hospital was not assessed. The ECS program was able to maintain high-risk geropsychiatric patients in the community comparably to less severely ill patients at less than hospital costs. Recommendations are provided for ways to establish community treatment programs for deinstitutionalized elderly patients with serious mental illness. PMID:17235384

  4. Caring for children with cerebral malaria: insights gleaned from 20 years on a research ward in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Terrie E

    2009-04-01

    Clinicians treating patients with severe malaria in endemic areas confront a variety of challenges inherent to resource-poor settings, but it is possible to provide excellent care. The basic requirements, in addition to a thorough clinical examination of the patient, include assessing parasitaemia; determining anaemia (via haematocrit or haemoglobin); estimating blood glucose and lactate concentrations; establishing and maintaining i.v. access; measuring oxygen saturation and providing supplemental oxygen when necessary; grouping, cross-matching and transfusing blood. This paper provides practical information on determining the Blantyre Coma Score, collecting cerebrospinal fluid and measuring the opening pressure, and administering controlled volumes of i.v. fluids. Included is a narrative protocol describing the approach to patients with cerebral malaria used on the research ward at the Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital in Blantyre, Malawi. PMID:19128813

  5. Use of novel psychoactive substances by inpatients on general adult psychiatric wards

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Jack L; Mogford, Daniel V; Lawrence, Rebecca J; Lawrie, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Non-illicit alternatives to controlled drugs, known as novel psychoactive substances (NPS), have recently risen to prominence. They are readily available, with uncertain pharmacology and no widely available assay. Given that psychiatric patients are at risk of comorbid substance abuse, we hypothesised that NPS use would be present in the psychiatric population, and sought to determine its prevalence and investigate the characteristics of those who use these drugs with a retrospective review of discharge letters. Setting General adult inpatient wards of a psychiatric hospital in a Scottish city. Participants All adult inpatients (18–65) discharged from general psychiatric wards between 1 July 2014 and 31 December 2014. Of the 483 admissions identified, 46 were admissions for maintenance electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and were excluded. Of the remaining 437 admissions, 49 discharge letters were unobtainable, leaving 388 admissions to analyse. Primary outcome measure The mention, or lack thereof, of NPS use in discharge letters was our planned primary outcome measure and was also the primary outcome measure we used in our analysis. Results NPS use was identified in 22.2% of admissions, contributing to psychiatric symptoms in 59.3%. In comparison to non-users, NPS users were younger (p<0.01), male and more likely to have a forensic history ((p<0.001) for both). The diagnosis of drug-induced psychosis was significantly more likely in NPS users (p<0.001, OR 18.7, 95% CI 8.1 to 43.0) and the diagnosis of depression was significantly less likely (p<0.005, OR 0.133, CI 0.031 to 0.558). Use of cannabis was significantly more likely in NPS users (p<0.001, OR 4.2, CI 2.5 to 7.1), as was substitute opiate prescribing (p<0.001, OR 3.7, CI 1.8 to 7.4). Conclusions NPS use was prevalent among young, male psychiatric inpatients, in particular those with drug-induced psychosis and often occurred alongside illicit drug use. PMID:27165643

  6. Generalized bi-circular projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Pei-Kee

    2008-04-01

    Recall that a projection P on a complex Banach space X is a generalized bi-circular projection if P+[lambda](I-P) is a (surjective) isometry for some [lambda] such that [lambda]=1 and [lambda][not equal to]1. It is easy to see that every hermitian projection is generalized bi-circular. A generalized bi-circular projection is said to be nontrivial if it is not hermitian. Botelho and Jamison showed that a projection P on C([0,1]) is a nontrivial generalized bi-circular projection if and only if P-(I-P) is a surjective isometry. In this article, we prove that if P is a projection such that P+[lambda](I-P) is a (surjective) isometry for some [lambda], then either P is hermitian or [lambda] is an nth unit root of unity. We also show that for any nth unit root [lambda] of unity, there are a complex Banach space X and a nontrivial generalized bi-circular projection P on X such that P+[lambda](I-P) is an isometry.

  7. Circular codes, symmetries and transformations.

    PubMed

    Fimmel, Elena; Giannerini, Simone; Gonzalez, Diego Luis; Strüngmann, Lutz

    2015-06-01

    Circular codes, putative remnants of primeval comma-free codes, have gained considerable attention in the last years. In fact they represent a second kind of genetic code potentially involved in detecting and maintaining the normal reading frame in protein coding sequences. The discovering of an universal code across species suggested many theoretical and experimental questions. However, there is a key aspect that relates circular codes to symmetries and transformations that remains to a large extent unexplored. In this article we aim at addressing the issue by studying the symmetries and transformations that connect different circular codes. The main result is that the class of 216 C3 maximal self-complementary codes can be partitioned into 27 equivalence classes defined by a particular set of transformations. We show that such transformations can be put in a group theoretic framework with an intuitive geometric interpretation. More general mathematical results about symmetry transformations which are valid for any kind of circular codes are also presented. Our results pave the way to the study of the biological consequences of the mathematical structure behind circular codes and contribute to shed light on the evolutionary steps that led to the observed symmetries of present codes. PMID:25008961

  8. Attitudes towards patient gender among psychiatric hospital staff: results of a case study with focus groups.

    PubMed

    Krumm, Silvia; Kilian, Reinhold; Becker, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    There is an increasing awareness of gender-related issues in psychiatry. However, empirical findings on attitudes of psychiatric staff towards patient gender are limited. Gender-related issues are particularly relevant in the debate about mixed versus segregated sex wards, yet while the appropriateness of mixed-sex wards is questioned in Great Britain this is not the case in Germany. To investigate attitudes of psychiatric staff towards both patient gender and mixed versus segregated sex wards, we conducted a case study using focus groups with members of professional teams. We evaluated the transition process from two single-sex wards to two mixed-sex wards in a 330-bed psychiatric hospital in a rural area in south Germany. Staff described female patients as more externally oriented, motivating of others, demanding, and even sexually aggressive. Male patients, on the other hand, were described as more quiet, modest, or lazy. Furthermore, participants described the mixing process as a positive development whereas they did not see a need for gender-separated wards in order to protect vulnerable female patients. Some gender descriptions by professionals are "reversed" in comparison with gender stereotypes supposed to be present in wider society. The perception of crossed gender norms may affect staff attitudes towards the vulnerability of female patients in psychiatric settings and the provision of single-sex wards in in-patient psychiatric care. Practical implications are discussed against the background of a high rate of female patients with sexual abuse histories. PMID:16157434

  9. Molecular epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains causing neonatal toxic shock syndrome-like exanthematous disease in neonatal and perinatal wards.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Ken; Takahashi, Naoto; Piao, Chuncheng; Totsuka, Kyoichi; Nishida, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Takehiko

    2003-07-01

    Neonatal toxic shock syndrome-like exanthematous disease (NTED) is a new neonatal disease caused by toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1). We conducted a prospective surveillance study and characterized the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains isolated from patients with NTED and compared them with the strains from patients with other MRSA infections and asymptomatic carriers. The study was performed in the neonatal intensive care unit and a general neonatal and maternal ward in the Tokyo Women's Medical University Hospital (TWMUH) from September to December 1998. Among 103 patients eligible for the study, MRSA was detected in 62 (60.2%) newborns; of these 62 newborns, 8 (12.9%) developed NTED, 1 (1.6%) had another MRSA infection, and 53 (85.5%) were asymptomatic MRSA carriers. Sixty-nine MRSA strains were obtained from the 62 newborns. DNA fingerprinting by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed two clusters: clone A with 8 subtypes and clone B. Sixty-seven of the 69 MRSA strains (97.1%) belonged to clone A, and type A1 was the most predominant (42 of 69 strains; 60.9%) in every neonatal and perinatal ward. All but one of the clone A strains had the TSST-1 and staphylococcal enterotoxin C genes. We also analyzed eight MRSA strains from eight NTED patients in five hospitals in Japan other than TWMUH. All the MRSA strains from NTED patients also belonged to clone A. These results suggest that a single clone that predominated in the neonatal wards of six hospitals might have caused NTED. However, the occurrence of NTED might not be dependent on the presence of an NTED-specific strain. PMID:12843033

  10. Poor mobility in hospitalized adults of all ages.

    PubMed

    Mudge, Alison M; McRae, Prue; McHugh, Kirstie; Griffin, Lauren; Hitchen, Andrew; Walker, James; Cruickshank, Mark; Morris, Norman R; Kuys, Suzanne

    2016-04-01

    Low levels of activity in hospital inpatients contribute to functional decline. Previous studies have shown low levels of activity in older inpatients, but few have investigated younger inpatients (aged <65 years). This observational study measured activity in older (aged ≥65 years) and younger hospital inpatients on 3 wards (medical, surgical, oncology) in a major teaching hospital in Brisbane, Australia, as part of a quality-improvement intervention to enhance mobility. Using structured behavioral mapping protocols, participants were observed for 2-minute intervals throughout 4, 4-hour daytime observation periods. The proportion of time spent at different activity levels was calculated for each participant, and time spent standing, walking or wheeling was compared between age group and wards. There were 3272 observations collected on 132 participants (median, 30 per patient; range, 9-35). The most time was spent lying in bed (mean 57%), with 9% standing or walking. There were significant differences among wards, but no difference between older and younger subgroups. Low mobility is common in adult inpatients of all ages. Behavioral mapping provided measures suitable for use in quality improvement. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:289-291. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine. PMID:26797978

  11. Europe's first children's hospital in a park.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    Just a year after the centenary of the completion of the 1914-built children's hospital which it will soon replace, this autumn will see the opening of a new Alder Hey Children's Hospital in Liverpool, dubbed Alder Hey in the Park thanks to its attractive parkland setting. The 270-bedded hospital, designed by architects, landscape architects, and interior designers, BDP, and built by Laing O'Rourke, is located in Springfield Park on Liverpool's northern fringes, and features a highly striking external design, with the three distinctive 'fingers' housing the wards bordered by extensive greenery, and the buildings topped by green undulating roofs. All the inpatient bedrooms, and indeed many other internal spaces, will enjoy parkland views. The new hospital will also reportedly offer some of Europe's most advanced children's healthcare. HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, reports on the construction of this stunning new healthcare facility, where children's views were key in shaping the design. PMID:26548125

  12. Circular birefringence of banded spherulites.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaoyan; Shtukenberg, Alexander G; Freudenthal, John; Nichols, Shane; Kahr, Bart

    2014-04-01

    Crystal optical properties of banded spherulites of 21 different compounds--molecular crystals, polymers, and minerals--with helically twisted fibers were analyzed with Mueller matrix polarimetry. The well-established radial oscillations in linear birefringence of many polycrystalline ensembles is accompanied by oscillations in circular birefringence that cannot be explained by the natural optical activity of corresponding compounds, some of which are centrosymmetric in the crystalline state. The circular birefringence is shown to be a consequence of misoriented, overlapping anisotropic lamellae, a kind of optical activity associated with the mesoscale stereochemistry of the refracting components. Lamellae splay as a consequence of space constraints related to simultaneous twisting of anisometric lamellae. This mechanism is supported by quantitative simulations of circular birefringence arising from crystallite twisting and splaying under confinement. PMID:24625095

  13. Education for Ward Nurses Influences the Quality of Inpatient's Bowel Preparation for Colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Kim, Eun Soo; Park, Kyung Sik; Cho, Kwang Bum; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Chung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Jae Seok

    2015-08-01

    Although adequate bowel preparation is a prerequisite for colonoscopy, preparation among inpatients is often suboptimal. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of ward nurse education on the quality of bowel preparation of inpatients.A prospective, double-blinded, non-randomized, controlled study was performed. Expert endoscopists provided enhanced education to nurses who belonged to an "educated ward" followed by training that was repeated every week for 1 month. The primary outcome was the quality of the bowel preparation, which was based on the Ottawa Bowel Preparation Scale (OBPS). Patient compliance and their subjective feelings and the factors affecting inadequate bowel preparation were also analyzed.One hundred three inpatients in the educated ward and 102 patients in the control ward were enrolled. Baseline data were comparable between the 2 wards. The mean values of the total OBPS scores were 4.42 ± 2.23 and 6.15 ± 2.38 in the educated and control wards, respectively (P < 0.001). The rate of poor preparation (OBPS ≥ 6) in the educated ward was significantly lower than that in the control ward (31.1% vs 58.8%, P < 0.001). Compliance with preparation and diet instructions in the educated ward was superior to that in the control ward (P<0.001). Control patients were more likely to be anxious before colonoscopy (P < 0.001), whereas patients in the educated ward showed higher level of satisfaction (P = 0.001) and better sleep quality (P < 0.001). A lack of ward nurse education (OR 2.365, P = 0.025), constipation (OR 6.517, P < 0.001), and insufficient water ingestion (OR 2.044, P = 0.042) were independently associated with inadequate bowel preparation among inpatients.Ward nurse education effectively improved the quality of bowel preparation, and relevant colonoscopic outcomes among inpatients. Additional efforts are needed to control constipation and to encourage additional water ingestion in inpatients for

  14. The Revolving Door Phenomenon in an Italian Acute Psychiatric Ward: A 5-Year Retrospective Analysis of the Potential Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, Rosaria; Sagona, Marco; Landi, Giulia; Martire, Lisa; Piemonte, Chiara; Del Giovane, Cinzia

    2016-09-01

    To highlight the revolving door (RD) phenomenon in an acute psychiatric ward, we retrospectively identified the patients hospitalized three or more times in a calendar year from 1/1/2009 to 31/12/2013 as RD patients (RDP). We collected sociodemographic and clinical variables of RDP and statistically analyzed the potential RD risk factors. We divided RDP into "high" and "extremely high" utilizers and evaluated the variables related to more frequent readmissions. RDP represented 5.68% of all patients and their hospitalizations (RDH) 25% of all admissions. The statistically significant risk factors for all RDH were "disability pension," "substance abuse/dependence," "mild/severe aggressiveness," and "psychiatric and social rehabilitative programs". The comparison between "high" and "extremely high" utilizers showed that "manic episodes" and "personality disorders," among the diagnoses, "familial relational conflicts" and "violence/suicidality", among the hospitalization reasons, were statistically significant risk factors for more frequent readmissions. RD phenomenon was greatly affected by severe clinical conditions with social disability. PMID:27227558

  15. Infant feeding policies in maternity wards and their effect on breast-feeding success: an analytical overview.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Escamilla, R; Pollitt, E; Lönnerdal, B; Dewey, K G

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this review is to examine the plausibility of a causal relationship between maternity ward practices and lactation success. METHODS. Studies were located with MEDLINE, from our personal files, and by contacting researchers working in this field. Of the 65 studies originally reviewed, 18 met our inclusion criteria (i.e., hospital-based intervention, experimental design with randomization procedures, or quasi-experimental design with adequate documentation). RESULTS. Meta-analysis indicated that commercial discharge packs had an adverse effect on lactation performance. The impact of early mother-infant contact on lactation success was unclear. Rooming-in and breast-feeding guidance in a rooming-in context had a beneficial impact on breast-feeding among primiparae. Breast-feeding on demand was positively associated with lactation success. In-hospital formula supplementation of 48 mL per day was not associated with poor breast-feeding performance. CONCLUSIONS. Hospital-based breast-feeding interventions can have a beneficial effect on lactation success, particularly among primiparous women. PMID:8279619

  16. [Notre Dame à la Rose Hospital of Lessines].

    PubMed

    Debusschere, P M

    1996-10-01

    At the beginning of the 13th century the town of Lessines was an important town in Hainaut. In 1243, following the examples of Tournai, Brugge or Brussels, the town was equipped with a hospital, 200 years before the building of the hospital in Beaune. The hospital was called "Hospital of the Poor" or "Notre-Dame (Our Lady) Hospital". At the end of the 19th century its name was changed into "Notre-Dame à la Rose (Our Lady with the Rose) Hospital". The wards transformed in the years 60 in geriatrics were closed down in December 1980, after nearly 750 years of service. For the hospital begun than its new life:its complete conversion into a museum. PMID:8992550

  17. Podokinetic circular vection: characteristics and interaction with optokinetic circular vection.

    PubMed

    Becker, W; Kliegl, K; Kassubek, J; Jürgens, R

    2016-07-01

    Stabilising horizontal body orientation in space without sight on a rotating platform by holding to a stationary structure and circular 'treadmill' stepping in the opposite direction can elicit an illusion of self-turning in space (Bles and Kapteyn in Agressologie 18:325-328, 1977). Because this illusion is analogous to the well-known illusion of optokinetic circular vection (oCV), we call it 'podokinetic circular vection' (pCV) here. Previous studies using eccentric stepping on a path tangential to the rotation found that pCV was always contraversive relative to platform rotation. In contrast, when our subjects stepped at the centre of rotation about their vertical axis, we observed an inverted, ipsiversive pCV as a reproducible trait in many of our subjects. This ipCV occurred at the same latency as the pCV of subjects reporting the actually expected contraversive direction, but had lower gain. In contrast to pCV, the nystagmus accompanying circular treadmill stepping had the same direction in all individuals (slow phase in the direction of platform motion). The direction of an individual's pCV predicted the characteristics of the CV resulting from combined opto- and podokinetic stimulation (circular treadmill stepping while viewing a pattern rotating together with the platform): in individuals with contraversive pCV, latency shortened and both gain and felt naturalness increased in comparison with pure oCV, whereas the opposite (longer latency, reduced gain and naturalness) occurred in individuals with ipCV. Taken together, the reproducibility of ipCV, the constant direction of nystagmus and the fact that pCV direction predicts the outcome of combined stimulation suggest that ipCV is an individual trait of many subjects during compensatory stepping at the centre of rotation. A hypothetical model is presented of how ipCV possibly could arise. PMID:26965438

  18. Maximal dinucleotide and trinucleotide circular codes.

    PubMed

    Michel, Christian J; Pellegrini, Marco; Pirillo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-21

    We determine here the number and the list of maximal dinucleotide and trinucleotide circular codes. We prove that there is no maximal dinucleotide circular code having strictly less than 6 elements (maximum size of dinucleotide circular codes). On the other hand, a computer calculus shows that there are maximal trinucleotide circular codes with less than 20 elements (maximum size of trinucleotide circular codes). More precisely, there are maximal trinucleotide circular codes with 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19 elements and no maximal trinucleotide circular code having less than 14 elements. We give the same information for the maximal self-complementary dinucleotide and trinucleotide circular codes. The amino acid distribution of maximal trinucleotide circular codes is also determined. PMID:26382231

  19. The acoustic environment of intensive care wards based on long period nocturnal measurements.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hui; Kang, Jian

    2012-01-01

    The patients in the Intensive Care Units are often exposed to excessive levels of noise and activities. They can suffer from sleep disturbance, especially at night, but they are often too ill to cope with the poor environment. This article investigates the acoustic environment of typical intensive care wards in the UK, based on long period nocturnal measurements, and examines the differences between singlebed and multibed wards, using statistical analysis. It has been shown that the acoustic environment differs significantly every night. There are also significant differences between the noise levels in the singlebed and multibed wards, where acoustic ceilings are present. Despite the similar background noises in both ward types, more intrusive noises tend to originate from the multibed wards, while more extreme sounds are likely to occur in the single wards. The sound levels in the measured wards for each night are in excess of the World Health Organization's (WHO) guide levels by at least 20 dBA, dominantly at the middle frequencies. Although the sound level at night varies less than that in the daytime, the nocturnal acoustic environment is not dependant on any specific time, thus neither the noisiest nor quietest period can be determined. It is expected that the statistical analysis of the collected data will provide essential information for the development of relevant guidelines and noise reduction strategies. PMID:23117538

  20. The USA's nurse managers and UK's ward sisters: critical roles for empowerment.

    PubMed

    Cameron-Buccheri, R; Ogier, M E

    1994-07-01

    The nurse manager/ward sister role is becoming endangered as many of these nurses are being asked to take fiscal and personnel responsibility for multiple units/programmes and supervise more non-registered nursing staff. Loss of this important nurse manager/ward sister role could severely decrease nursing's voice in the development and implementation of policies that affect nurses and the care they deliver. The authors review 20 years of literature from both the USA and the UK regarding supportive supervision and the role of the nurse manager/ward sister. Nurse managers/ward sisters were found to be key individuals within the entire health-care organization. Nurse managers/ward sisters can empower the nurses they supervise to initiate changes that will improve patient care. Nurse managers/ward sisters can also improve the working conditions and thus increase the job satisfaction and retention of those they supervise. Strategies for being more supportive of these overworked and endangered nurse managers/ward sisters are suggested. PMID:8055167

  1. Circular RNA expands its territory.

    PubMed

    Bao, Chunyang; Lyu, Dongbin; Huang, Shenglin

    2016-03-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) represent a novel class of widespread non-coding RNAs in eukaryotes. They are unusually stable RNA molecules with cell type-specific expression patterns, and are predominantly present in the cytoplasm. We recently demonstrated the existence of abundant circRNAs in exosomes and suggest a potential application of exosomal circRNAs for cancer detection. PMID:27308606

  2. Education for Ward Nurses Influences the Quality of Inpatient's Bowel Preparation for Colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Kim, Eun Soo; Park, Kyung Sik; Cho, Kwang Bum; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Chung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Jae Seok

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although adequate bowel preparation is a prerequisite for colonoscopy, preparation among inpatients is often suboptimal. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of ward nurse education on the quality of bowel preparation of inpatients. A prospective, double-blinded, non-randomized, controlled study was performed. Expert endoscopists provided enhanced education to nurses who belonged to an “educated ward” followed by training that was repeated every week for 1 month. The primary outcome was the quality of the bowel preparation, which was based on the Ottawa Bowel Preparation Scale (OBPS). Patient compliance and their subjective feelings and the factors affecting inadequate bowel preparation were also analyzed. One hundred three inpatients in the educated ward and 102 patients in the control ward were enrolled. Baseline data were comparable between the 2 wards. The mean values of the total OBPS scores were 4.42 ± 2.23 and 6.15 ± 2.38 in the educated and control wards, respectively (P < 0.001). The rate of poor preparation (OBPS ≥ 6) in the educated ward was significantly lower than that in the control ward (31.1% vs 58.8%, P < 0.001). Compliance with preparation and diet instructions in the educated ward was superior to that in the control ward (P<0.001). Control patients were more likely to be anxious before colonoscopy (P < 0.001), whereas patients in the educated ward showed higher level of satisfaction (P = 0.001) and better sleep quality (P < 0.001). A lack of ward nurse education (OR 2.365, P = 0.025), constipation (OR 6.517, P < 0.001), and insufficient water ingestion (OR 2.044, P = 0.042) were independently associated with inadequate bowel preparation among inpatients. Ward nurse education effectively improved the quality of bowel preparation, and relevant colonoscopic outcomes among inpatients. Additional efforts are needed to control constipation and to encourage additional water ingestion in

  3. Do post-take ward round proformas improve communication and influence quality of patient care?

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, A; Jacob, K; Fulton, J; McGavin, C

    2004-01-01

    The post-take ward round is a critical time for reviewing the initial history, examination and results, and the stage at which further treatment and investigations will be determined. However documentation of this ward round is often inadequate, so the benefits of decision making are lost. The documentation of 95 ward rounds was assessed for key items of information before and after the introduction of a proforma sheet. The introduction of the proforma led to a significant improvement in the documentation of a diagnosis, management plan, prophylaxis for deep vein thrombosis, and resuscitation status (p<0.05), which will have a significant impact on patient care. PMID:15537856

  4. Profiling psychotropic discharge medication from a children's psychiatric ward.

    PubMed

    Akram, Gazala

    2015-10-01

    Background Community prescribing of medication to treat psychiatric illness in children is increasing. However, details about medication prescribed at discharge from psychiatric inpatient services for children are scarce. Objectives Characterise the nature of psychotropic medication prescribed on discharge from a children's psychiatric ward over a 15-year period. Method Retrospective analysis of discharge summary letters of all discharges occurring between Jan 1997 to Dec 2012. Results 234 children (152 males and 82 females) were discharged with 117 (50%) prescribed psychotropic medication at discharge. 133 medicines were prescribed (stimulants n = 49, antipsychotics n = 31, antidepressants n = 22, mood stabilisers n = 1, other ADHD medication n = 11, melatonin n = 10, benzodiazepines n = 7, other n = 2). Risperidone was the most popular antipsychotic at a mean daily dose of 1 mg (range 0.25-4 mg). Fifty per cent were given an unlicensed medicine or a licensed drug was used in an unlicensed manner, of which risperidone was the most common (n = 14). Sleep disturbance and tics were most often treated using unlicensed/off label medication (n = 10). Conclusion Psychotropic medication is routinely used in inpatient children's services, with the majority of use confined to stimulants and atypical antipsychotics. Much of the antipsychotic use is for unlicensed indications or at unlicensed doses. PMID:25893488

  5. Antimicrobial stewardship: Improving antibiotic prescribing practice in a respiratory ward.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Jing Ming

    2016-01-01

    International efforts have mandated guidelines on antibiotic use and prescribing, therefore the focus is now on encouraging positive behavioral changes in antibiotic prescribing practice. Documentation of indication and intended duration of antibiotic use in drug charts is an evidence-based method of reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescribing. It is also a standard detailed in our local antimicrobial guidelines. We collected baseline data on compliance with documentation of indication and duration in drug charts in a respiratory ward which revealed compliance rates of 24% and 39% respectively. We introduced interventions to improve accessibility to the guideline and to increase awareness by distributing antibiotic guardian pocket cards with a three-point checklist and strategically-placed mini-posters. We also aim to increase team motivation by obtaining their feedback in multidisciplinary team meetings and by introducing certificates for their involvement in the quality improvement process. The results of the second cycle post-intervention showed an increase in compliance rates for documentation of indication and duration of 97% and 69% respectively. After a further awareness and discussion session at the multidisciplinary team meeting with the local antimicrobial management team audit nurses, a third cycle showed compliance rates of 94% and 71% for indication and duration respectively. This project has highlighted the importance of improving accessibility and of encouraging interventions that would bring about a change in personal value and subsequently in behavior and individual practice. PMID:26893898

  6. Ward identities and gauge independence in general chiral gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmi, Damiano

    2015-07-01

    Using the Batalin-Vilkovisky formalism, we study the Ward identities and the equations of gauge dependence in potentially anomalous general gauge theories, renormalizable or not. A crucial new term, absent in manifestly nonanomalous theories, is responsible for interesting effects. We prove that gauge invariance always implies gauge independence, which in turn ensures perturbative unitarity. Precisely, we consider potentially anomalous theories that are actually free of gauge anomalies thanks to the Adler-Bardeen theorem. We show that when we make a canonical transformation on the tree-level action, it is always possible to re-renormalize the divergences and re-fine-tune the finite local counterterms, so that the renormalized Γ functional of the transformed theory is also free of gauge anomalies, and is related to the renormalized Γ functional of the starting theory by a canonical transformation. An unexpected consequence of our results is that the beta functions of the couplings may depend on the gauge-fixing parameters, although the physical quantities remain gauge independent. We discuss nontrivial checks of high-order calculations based on gauge independence and determine how powerful they are.

  7. [The Importance of Vector Management for Prevention of Hospital Infections].

    PubMed

    Çetin, Hüseyin

    2015-09-01

    Many researches show that cockroaches, ants, some other arthropods and also rodents in hospitals, can act as potential vectors of medically important bacteria, fungi and parasites. The results of microbiological studies show that these animals play a significant role in the epidemiology of hospital infections. These vectors may be found inside of the kitchens, patient rooms, toilets, medicine stores, canteen and wards in health care environments. The importance of vector control in order to prevent the spread of nosocomial infections in healthcare facilities was discussed in this paper. This study also gives information on integrated control methods for vectors in hospitals. PMID:26470931

  8. Hospital choice by rural medicare beneficiaries: does hospital ownership matter?--a Colorado case.

    PubMed

    Roh, Chul-Young; Lee, Keon-Hyung

    2006-01-01

    About 45 percent of rural patients in Colorado bypassed their local rural hospitals during the 1990s. The effect of this phenomenon is a reduction in occupancy rates and a decrease in the competitiveness of rural hospitals, thereby ultimately causing rural hospitals to close and adversely affecting the communities that they were designed to serve. This study tests whether hospital ownership affects hospital choice by patients after controlling for institutional and individual dimensions. A conditional logistic regression is used to analyze Colorado Inpatient Discharge Data (CIDD) on 85,529 patients in addition to hospital data. Rural Medicare beneficiaries are influenced to choose a particular hospital by a combination of hospital characteristics (the number of beds, the number of services, accreditation, ownership type, and distance from patient residence) and patient characteristics (medical condition, age, gender, race, and total charge for services). Increasing rural hospitals' survivability, collaborating with other rural hospitals, expanding the number of available services, making strategic alliance with other providers are possible strategies that may help ward off encroachment by urban competitors. PMID:16583743

  9. A stepped wedge, cluster controlled trial of an intervention to improve safety and quality on medical wards: the HEADS-UP study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Pannick, Samuel; Beveridge, Iain; Ashrafian, Hutan; Long, Susannah J; Athanasiou, Thanos; Sevdalis, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The majority of preventable deaths in healthcare are due to errors on general wards. Staff perceptions of safety correlate with patient survival, but effectively translating ward teams’ concerns into tangibly improved care remains problematic. The Hospital Event Analysis Describing Significant Unanticipated Problems (HEADS-UP) trial evaluates a structured, multidisciplinary team briefing, capturing safety threats and adverse events, with rapid feedback to clinicians and service managers. This is the first study to rigorously assess a simpler intervention for general medical units, alongside an implementation model applicable to routine clinical practice. Methods/analysis 7 wards from 2 hospitals will progressively incorporate the intervention into daily practice over 14 months. Wards will adopt HEADS-UP in a pragmatic sequence, guided by local clinical enthusiasm. Initial implementation will be facilitated by a research lead, but rapidly delegated to clinical teams. The primary outcome is excess length of stay (a surplus stay of 24 h or more, compared to peer institutions’ Healthcare Resource Groups-predicted length of stay). Secondary outcomes are 30-day readmission or excess length of stay; in-hospital death or death/readmission within 30 days; healthcare-acquired infections; processes of escalation of care; use of traditional incident-reporting systems; and patient safety and teamwork climates. HEADS-UP will be analysed as a stepped wedge cluster controlled trial. With 7840 patients, using best and worst case predictions, the study would achieve between 75% and 100% power to detect a 2–14% absolute risk reduction in excess length of stay (two-sided p<0.05). Regression analysis will use generalised linear mixed models or generalised estimating equations, and a time-to-event regression model. A qualitative analysis will evaluate facilitators and barriers to HEADS-UP implementation and impact. Ethics and dissemination Participating

  10. A qualitative investigation of smoke-free policies on hospital property

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Annette S.H.; Finegan, Barry; Nykiforuk, Candace I.J.; Kvern, Margaret A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Many hospitals have adopted smoke-free policies on their property. We examined the consequences of such polices at two Canadian tertiary acute-care hospitals. Methods: We conducted a qualitative study using ethnographic techniques over a six-month period. Participants (n = 186) shared their perspectives on and experiences with tobacco dependence and managing the use of tobacco, as well as their impressions of the smoke-free policy. We interviewed inpatients individually from eight wards (n = 82), key policy-makers (n = 9) and support staff (n = 14) and held 16 focus groups with health care providers and ward staff (n = 81). We also reviewed ward documents relating to tobacco dependence and looked at smoking-related activities on hospital property. Results: Noncompliance with the policy and exposure to secondhand smoke were ongoing concerns. Peoples’ impressions of the use of tobacco varied, including divergent opinions as to whether such use was a bad habit or an addiction. Treatment for tobacco dependence and the management of symptoms of withdrawal were offered inconsistently. Participants voiced concerns over patient safety and leaving the ward to smoke. Interpretation: Policies mandating smoke-free hospital property have important consequences beyond noncompliance, including concerns over patient safety and disruptions to care. Without adequately available and accessible support for withdrawal from tobacco, patients will continue to face personal risk when they leave hospital property to smoke. PMID:22042991

  11. 17 CFR 230.253 - Offering circular.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... in boldfaced type at least as large as that used generally in the body of such offering circular: THE... COMPLETENESS OF ANY OFFERING CIRCULAR OR OTHER SELLING LITERATURE. THESE SECURITIES ARE OFFERED PURSUANT TO...

  12. The Mind-Body Connection - How to Fight Stress and Ward Off Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues The Mind-Body Connection How to Fight Stress and Ward Off Illness Past Issues / Winter 2008 ... system's ability to fight disease." Dangers of Chronic Stress Unhealthy levels of stress come in many guises. ...

  13. View of compartment C110, senior officers ward room from port ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of compartment C-110, senior officers ward room from port to starboard, showing wooden furnishings, deck stanchions and the olympia's piano. (084) - USS Olympia, Penn's Landing, 211 South Columbus Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  14. A Pill to Ward Off Cavities? Scientists Say It Could Happen

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Pill to Ward Off Cavities? Scientists Say It Could Happen Researchers spotted a strain of 'good' ... cavity-causing bacteria in check. The investigators said it might be possible to use this beneficial bacteria ...

  15. The Mind-Body Connection - How to Fight Stress and Ward Off Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues The Mind-Body Connection How to Fight Stress and Ward Off ... the question, Dr. Sternberg suggests meditation to rest body and mind. "Evidence shows that meditation bolsters immune function by ...

  16. Factors Influencing Communication Between the Patients with Cancer and their Nurses in Oncology Wards

    PubMed Central

    Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Rassouli, Maryam; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Nikanfar, Alireza; Alavi-Majd, Hamid; Ghahramanian, Akram

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the factors influencing nurse-patient communication in cancer care in Iran. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with a qualitative conventional content analysis approach in oncology wards of hospitals in Tabriz. Data was collected through purposive sampling by semi-structured deep interviews with nine patients, three family members and five nurses and analyzed simultaneously. Robustness of data analysis was evaluated by the participants and external control. Results: The main theme of the research emerged as “three-factor effects” that demonstrates all the factors related to the patient, nurse, and the organization and includes three categories of “Patient as the center of communication”, “Nurse as a human factor”, and “Organizational structures”. The first category consists of two sub-categories of “Imposed changes by the disease” and the “patient's particular characteristics”. The second category includes sub-categories of “sense of vulnerability” and “perception of professional self: Pre-requisite of patient-centered communication”. The third category consists of the sub-categories of “workload and time imbalance”, “lack of supervision”, and “impose duties in context of neglecting nurse and patient needs”. Characteristics of the patients, nurses, and care environment seemed to be the influential factors on the communication. Conclusions: In order to communicate with cancer patients effectively, changes in philosophy and culture of the care environment are essential. Nurses must receive proper trainings which meet their needs and which focus on holistic and patient-centered approach. PMID:24600177

  17. Cross-year peer tutoring on internal medicine wards: results of a qualitative focus group analysis

    PubMed Central

    Krautter, Markus; Andreesen, Sven; Köhl-Hackert, Nadja; Hoffmann, Katja; Herzog, Wolfgang; Nikendei, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Background Peer-assisted learning (PAL) has become a well-accepted teaching method within medical education. However, descriptions of on-ward PAL programs are rare. A focus group analysis of a newly established PAL program on an internal medicine ward was conducted to provide insights into PAL teaching from a student perspective. Purpose To provide insights into students’ experiences regarding their on-ward training with and without accompanying PAL tutors. Methods A total of N=168 medical students in their sixth semester participated in the investigation (intervention group: N=88; control group: N=80). The intervention group took part in the PAL program, while the control group received standard on-ward training. There were seven focus groups with N=43 participants (intervention group: four focus groups, N=28 participants; control group: three focus groups, N=15 participants). The discussions were analyzed using content analysis. Results The intervention group emphasized the role of the tutors as competent and well-trained teachers, most beneficial in supervising clinical skills. Tutors motivate students, help them to integrate into the ward team, and provide a non-fear-based working relationship whereby students’ anxiety regarding working on ward decreases. The control group had to rely on autodidactic learning strategies when neither supervising physicians nor final-year students were available. Conclusion On-ward PAL programs represent a particularly valuable tool for students’ support in training clinical competencies on ward. The tutor–student working alliance acts through its flat hierarchy. Nevertheless, tutors cannot represent an adequate substitute for experienced physicians. PMID:25278789

  18. Irreversible rapid changes of magnetic field associated with the 2012 October 23 circular near-limb X1.8 Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Dan-Dan; Liu, Chang; Wang, Haimin

    2016-06-01

    It has been found that photospheric magnetic fields can change in accordance with restructuring of the three-dimensional magnetic field following solar eruptions. Previous studies mainly use vector magnetic field data taken for events near the disk center. In this paper, we analyze the magnetic field evolution associated with the 2012 October 23 X1.8 flare in NOAA AR 11598 that is close to the solar limb, using both the 45 s cadence line-of-sight and 12 min cadence vector magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board Solar Dynamics Observatory. This flare is classified as a circular-ribbon flare with spine-fan type magnetic topology containing a null point. In the line-of-sight magnetograms, there are two apparent polarity inversion lines (PILs). The PIL closer to the limb is affected more by the projection effect. Between these two PILs there lie positive polarity magnetic fields, which are surrounded by negative polarity fields outside the PILs. We find that after the flare, both the apparent limb-ward and disk-ward negative fluxes decrease, while the positive flux in-between increases. We also find that the horizontal magnetic fields have a significant increase along the disk-ward PIL, but in the surrounding area, they decrease. Synthesizing the observed field changes, we conclude that the magnetic fields collapse toward the surface above the disk-ward PIL as depicted in the coronal implosion scenario, while the peripheral field turns to a more vertical configuration after the flare. We also suggest that this event is an asymmetric circular-ribbon flare: a flux rope is likely present above the disk-ward PIL. Its eruption causes instability of the entire fan-spine structure and the implosion near that PIL.

  19. [Frequency of drug adverse reactions among hospitalized patients].

    PubMed

    González Martínez, L

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the frequency of adverse reactions to drugs in a sample of hospitalized patients in the internal medicine ward seen during a year's term. Of 61 medical charts, we found 8 patients with adverse reactions to drugs during their hospital stay and another 4 patients hospitalized due to adverse reactions to drugs. The majority of the adverse reactions were of moderate degree (75%) and were related to drugs of cardiovascular action (58%). The frequency of reactions in hospitalized patients (13%) is comparable with the results obtained from other hospitals. Yet, the real magnitude of the problem is probably greater since the source of information (hospital charts) the totality of the clinical manifestations are not registered. PMID:8581452

  20. Cancer Ward Staff Group: An Intervention Designed to Prevent Disaster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, William H.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a case study illustrating organizational and system contingencies for introducing and maintaining a support group for oncology nursing staff in a large general hospital culture. Criteria for long-run survivability of innovation in a work system are applied to a group structured like that described by Balint for training physicians in…

  1. Circular on planned parenthood, 1987.

    PubMed

    1987-01-01

    In 1987 fourteen units of the Government of Henan issued a Circular stating that: "Planned parenthood must be publicized deep into the grass roots and among the people, and importance must be attached to results." The Circular stresses: "In the propaganda drive, it is necessary to successfully grasp three key links: 1. It is necessary to disseminate intensively the important directive on population problems that is contained in the report of the 13th CPC National Congress and the seriousness of the population situation of our country and province so that the cadres and the masses can understand the relationship between population control and the achievement of the strategic target of the three big steps, understand the reason for carrying out planned parenthood, understand that the one-child policy is still advocated, and conscientiously carry out planned parenthood. 2. It is essential to succeed in propagating knowledge of contraception, sterilization, childbirth, and child care and in conducting ideological education for those who undergo operations and for their family members. 3. It is imperative to visit those who have undergone operations and to help them solve practically their difficulties in making a living." The Circular concludes by demanding that under the unified leadership of party committees and governments at all levels, the propaganda drive be carried out by relying on the efforts of all of society. In conjunction with their own work, departments, including the propaganda, education, public health, and cultural departments, must carry out propaganda and education for planned parenthood. PMID:12346601

  2. The circular internal hydraulic jump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, S. A.; Kavcic, I.

    Circular hydraulic jumps are familiar in single layers. Here we report the discovery of similar jumps in two-layer flows. A thin jet of fluid impinging vertically onto a rigid horizontal plane surface submerged in a deep layer of less-dense miscible fluid spreads radially, and a near-circular internal jump forms within a few centimetres from the point of impact with the plane surface. A jump is similarly formed as a jet of relatively less-dense fluid rises to the surface of a deep layer of fluid, but it appears less stable or permanent in form. Several experiments are made to examine the case of a downward jet onto a horizontal plate, the base of a square or circular container. The inlet Reynolds numbers, Re, of the jet range from 112 to 1790. Initially jumps have an undular, laminar form with typically 2-4 stationary waves on the interface between the dense and less-dense layers but, as the depth of the dense layer beyond the jump increases, the transitions become more abrupt and turbulent, resulting in mixing between the two layers. During the transition to a turbulent regime, single and sometimes moving multiple cusps are observed around the periphery of jumps. A semi-empirical model is devised that relates the parameters of the laboratory experiment, i.e. flow rate, inlet nozzle radius, kinematic viscosity and reduced gravity, to the layer depth beyond the jump and the radius at which an undular jump occurs. The experiments imply that surface tension is not an essential ingredient in the formation of circular hydraulic jumps and demonstrate that stationary jumps can exist in stratified shear flows which can be represented as two discrete layers. No stationary circular undular jumps are found, however, in the case of a downward jet of dense fluid when the overlying, less-dense, fluid is stratified, but a stationary turbulent transition is observed. This has implications for the existence of stationary jumps in continuously stratified geophysical flows: results

  3. Hospital radio: advertisements get an airing.

    PubMed

    1980-08-15

    As a DHSS circular opens the door to advertising on hospital radio, someone who describes himself mysteriously as a "senior health service administrator in North London with a special interest in radio communication and allied subjects' reports how one station has risen to the challenge. PMID:10248328

  4. Geriatric care in a provincial hospital.

    PubMed

    De V Meiring, P

    1977-03-26

    Much of the work of the public medical wards at Grey's Hospital is concerned with the care of aged persons. In the absence of separate geriatric facilities, this work forms an integral part of internal medicine. During the last decade two surveys, and experience gained, have determined a comprehensive approach to the social and medical problems encountered. While team work can accomplish much, the responsibility for care of the aged currently remains divided among a number of government and private agencies. Without a unified policy and further expenditure of a certain amount of money, many of our senior citizens will continue to be denied easy access to health care facilities. PMID:857323

  5. Exon circularization requires canonical splice signals.

    PubMed

    Starke, Stefan; Jost, Isabelle; Rossbach, Oliver; Schneider, Tim; Schreiner, Silke; Hung, Lee-Hsueh; Bindereif, Albrecht

    2015-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs), an abundant class of noncoding RNAs in higher eukaryotes, are generated from pre-mRNAs by circularization of adjacent exons. Using a set of 15 circRNAs, we demonstrated their cell-type-specific expression and circular versus linear processing in mammalian cells. Northern blot analysis combined with RNase H cleavage conclusively proved a circular configuration for two examples, LPAR1 and HIPK3. To address the circularization mechanism, we analyzed the sequence requirements using minigenes derived from natural circRNAs. Both canonical splice sites are required for circularization, although they vary in flexibility and potential use of cryptic sites. Surprisingly, we found that no specific circRNA exon sequence is necessary and that potential flanking intron structures can modulate circularization efficiency. In combination with splice inhibitor assays, our results argue that the canonical spliceosomal machinery functions in circRNA biogenesis, constituting an alternative splicing mode. PMID:25543144

  6. Glycemic control and diabetes management in hospitalized patients in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of tight blood glucose control among outpatients with diabetes mellitus is well established, however, the management of diabetes in the hospital setting is generally considered secondary in importance. This study sought to assess glycemic control and diabetes management in adult patients admitted to hospitals in Brazil. Methods A cross-sectional and nationwide survey was conducted from July 2010 to January 2012. Eligible cases were 18 years of age or older, had a diagnosis of diabetes and a hospitalization length of stay ≥72 hours. Socio-demographic information, hospitalization details, and data on diabetes diagnosis, management and treatment were collected for all patients by chart review. Information on all blood glucose (BG) readings for a maximum of 20 consecutive days of hospitalization was recorded for each patient. Results Overall, 2,399 patients were surveyed in 24 hospitals located in 13 cities from all five Brazilian regions. The prevalence of patients presenting hyperglycemic (BG >180 mg/dL) or hypoglycemic (BG <70 mg/dL) events was 89.4% and 30.9% in patients in general wards, and 88.2% and 27.7% in those in Intensive Care Units (ICUs), respectively. In addition, a BG measure >180 mg/dL was recorded in two-thirds of the patient-days. A high proportion of patients were treated with sliding-scale insulin regimen alone in the general wards (52.0%) and in the ICUs (69.2%), and only 35.7% and 3.9% received appropriate insulin therapy in general wards (basal + bolus insulin) and in ICUs (continuous IV insulin), respectively. Conclusions Inpatient glycemic control and diabetes management needs improvement. Opportunities to improve care in Brazilian hospitals include expanded use of intravenous insulin and subcutaneous basal-bolus insulin protocols, avoiding use of sliding-scale insulin alone, increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring, and institution wide quality improvement efforts targeting both physician and nursing

  7. Disposable products in the hospital waste stream.

    PubMed Central

    Gilden, D. J.; Scissors, K. N.; Reuler, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    Use of disposable products in hospitals continues to increase despite limited landfill space and dwindling natural resources. We analyzed the use and disposal patterns of disposable hospital products to identify means of reducing noninfectious, nonhazardous hospital waste. In a 385-bed private teaching hospital, the 20 disposable products of which the greatest amounts (by weight) were purchased, were identified, and total hospital waste was tabulated. Samples of trash from three areas were sorted and weighed, and potential waste reductions from recycling and substituting reusable items were calculated. Business paper, trash liners, diapers, custom surgical packs, paper gowns, plastic suction bottles, and egg-crate pads were among the 20 top items and were analyzed individually. Data from sorted trash documented potential waste reductions through recycling and substitution of 78, 41, and 18 tonnes per year (1 tonne = 1,000 kg = 1.1 tons) from administration, the operating room, and adult wards, respectively (total hospital waste was 939 tonnes per year). We offer specific measures to substantially reduce nonhazardous hospital waste through substitution, minimization, and recycling of select disposable products. Images PMID:1595242

  8. Reflections by clinical nurse specialists on changing ward practice.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Catherine; Ramcharan, Angie

    In September 2010, palliative care clinical nurse specialists at North Middlesex University Hospital Trust introduced competencies for all nurses in setting up and using syringe drivers. This was done after the trust identified a high level of clinical incidents involving syringe drivers. This article discusses how the competencies were implemented and assessed, explores the importance of understanding change management to achieve change, and how different leadership styles affect changes to practice. PMID:21957520

  9. Costs and effects of a nursing information system in three Dutch hospitals.

    PubMed

    van Gennip, E M; Klaassen-Leil, C C; Stokman, R; van Valkenburg, R K

    1995-01-01

    VISION is an integrated nursing information system developed in the Netherlands. In mid-1992, a technology assessment of this system was started: the VISTA project. Its aim is to assess the costs and effects of VISION in three different types of hospitals: a University Hospital, a General Hospital, and a Psychiatric Hospital. The study was financially supported by the Dutch Ministry of Welfare, Health, and Culture. Each hospital selected an experimental ward at which VISION parts were installed (VISION was not yet complete during the study). Also, control wards were selected at which no VISION parts were installed. A series of two measurements were carried out at the experimental and control wards. The first experiences show that VISION can be used in various applications, in different environments. Although the second measurements were done just a few weeks after the installation of VISION parts, first effects could already be demonstrated. Nurses were enthusiastic and the quality of coordination of care increased. Time savings have not yet been demonstrated, but are expected after a longer, more extensive use of the system. Extrapolation of costs for hospital-wide implementation revealed that the costs of VISION are low compared to similar systems in the US. After reviewing the first results, each hospital decided to continue the implementation of VISION parts. More measurements are planned. PMID:8591462

  10. [The depression ward--a review of the current status].

    PubMed

    Wolfersdorf, M; Bahnmüller, J; Bretschneider, S; Brisch, U H; Freeman, G; Heuft, H; Heuft, G; Hrubesch, C; Jontza, T; Keller, F

    1988-07-01

    New therapeutic concepts are usually developed and realised step by step. Over the past years changes occurred mainly in two ways. There is a trend to reduce the size of the psychiatric hospital as such and/or to section off certain areas by introducing specialised units. From the experience with the so called "Affective Disorder Units" or "Mood Clinics" developed the concept of a Depression Unit, first introduced in Europe for research purposes at the Psychiatric University Hospital in Basle in 1968. In Germany the first Depression Unit was established at the PLK Weissenau in 1976. Similar units followed over the years at the PLK Reichenau, Weinsberg, the BKH Günzburg, the Landesklinik Nordschwarzwald Hirsau/Calw and the Rheinische Landesklinik Bedburg-Hau, other hospitals are planning them. Existing units are described in terms of their structural organisation, staffing situation and the service they provide. The concept of the Depression Unit according to criteria laid down agreed upon in the literature is summed up, and emotional atmosphere, structural organisation, activation, and individual therapeutic measures, discussed. Advantages are mentioned such as better understanding of patients, allowing them to let go and be cared for, aimed regression, the effects of being taken along, improved communication, and a way of dealing with suicidal thoughts and depressive behavior that reduces anxiety. Disadvantages such as the danger of spoiling patients or inducing a sense of resignation both in patients and staff are discussed. PMID:3043523

  11. Learning from positively deviant wards to improve patient safety: an observational study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Ruth; Taylor, Natalie; Kellar, Ian; Lawton, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Positive deviance is an asset-based approach to improvement which has recently been adopted to improve quality and safety within healthcare. The approach assumes that solutions to problems already exist within communities. Certain groups or individuals identify these solutions and succeed despite having the same resources as others. Within healthcare, positive deviance has previously been applied at individual or organisational levels to improve specific clinical outcomes or processes of care. This study explores whether the positive deviance approach can be applied to multidisciplinary ward teams to address the broad issue of patient safety among elderly patients. Methods and analysis Preliminary work analysed National Health Service (NHS) Safety Thermometer data from 34 elderly medical wards to identify 5 ‘positively deviant’ and 5 matched ‘comparison’ wards. Researchers are blinded to ward status. This protocol describes a multimethod, observational study which will (1) assess the concurrent validity of identifying positively deviant elderly medical wards using NHS Safety Thermometer data and (2) generate hypotheses about how positively deviant wards succeed. Patient and staff perceptions of safety will be assessed on each ward using validated surveys. Correlation and ranking analyses will explore whether this survey data aligns with the routinely collected NHS Safety Thermometer data. Staff focus groups and researcher fieldwork diaries will be completed and qualitative thematic content analysis will be used to generate hypotheses about the strategies, behaviours, team cultures and dynamics that facilitate the delivery of safe patient care. The acceptability and sustainability of strategies identified will also be explored. Ethics and dissemination The South East Scotland Research Ethics Committee 01 approved this study (reference: 14/SS/1085) and NHS Permissions were granted from all trusts. Findings will be published in peer

  12. A cross-sectional survey of patient needs in hospital evacuation.

    PubMed

    Rimstad, Rune; Holtan, Anders

    2015-01-01

    To aid development of contingency plans, a cross-sectional survey of inpatient needs in the event of a total hospital evacuation within a few hours was undertaken. The hospital is a part of a tertiary care facility with a mixed surgical and medical population and a relatively large load of emergency medicine. A doctor or nurse on each ward registered patients' physical mobility, special needs complicating transportation (intensive care, labor, isolation, etc), and the lowest acceptable level of care after evacuation. Of the 760 included patients, 57.8 percent could walk, 20.0 percent needed wheelchair, and 22.2 percent needed transport on stretcher. Special needs were registered for 18.2 percent of patients. Only 49.7 percent of patients needed to be evacuated to another hospital to continue care on an acceptable level, while 37.6 percent could be discharged to their own home, and 12.6 percent could be evacuated to a nursing home. Patients in psychiatric wards and high dependency units had distinctly different needs than patients in ordinary somatic wards. The differences between patients in surgical and nonsurgical wards were minor. Patient discharge seems to be a considerable capacity buffer in a hospital crisis situation. PMID:26312655

  13. A cross-sectional survey of patient needs in hospital evacuation.

    PubMed

    Rimstad, Rune; Holtan, Anders

    2015-01-01

    To aid development of contingency plans, a cross-sectional survey of inpatient needs in the event of a total hospital evacuation within a few hours was undertaken. The hospital is a part of a tertiary care facility with a mixed surgical and medical population and a relatively large load of emergency medicine. A doctor or nurse on each ward registered patients' physical mobility, special needs complicating transportation (intensive care, labor, isolation, etc), and the lowest acceptable level of care after evacuation. Of the 760 included patients, 57.8 percent could walk, 20.0 percent needed wheelchair, and 22.2 percent needed transport on stretcher. Special needs were registered for 18.2 percent of patients. Only 49.7 percent of patients needed to be evacuated to another hospital to continue care on an acceptable level, while 37.6 percent could be discharged to their own home, and 12.6 percent could be evacuated to a nursing home. Patients in psychiatric wards and high dependency units had distinctly different needs than patients in ordinary somatic wards. The differences between patients in surgical and nonsurgical wards were minor. Patient discharge seems to be a considerable capacity buffer in a hospital crisis situation. PMID:27149311

  14. Social Relations and Innovation: Changing the State of Play in Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, David J.

    Data on the process and impact of introducing play therapy in children's hospitals in England and Wales are presented in this book. The effects of the introduction of play therapy on children's behaviors in children's wards and on the relationships between parents, doctors, nurses, ancillary staff, and playleaders are described. The responsiveness…

  15. The Hospital as Predictor of Children's and Adolescents' Length of Stay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leon, Scott C.; Snowden, Jessica; Bryant, Fred B.; Lyons, John S.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To predict psychiatric hospital length of stay (LOS) for a sample of Illinois Department of Children and Family Services wards across 4 fiscal years. Method: A prospective design was implemented using the Children's Severity of Psychiatric Illness scale, a reliable and valid measure of psychiatric severity, risk factors, youth…

  16. Audit of hand hygiene at Broadmoor, a high secure psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, K

    2010-06-01

    Increased security measures at high secure psychiatric hospitals can complicate hand hygiene. This audit assessed the availability of appropriate hand hygiene equipment and the practice of good hand hygiene at Broadmoor Hospital using the local hand hygiene policy as the standard for comparison. A data collection tool used to audit the hand hygiene equipment on 23 wards in the hospital showed that there were significant deficits in the supply of hand hygiene equipment on the wards. In addition, a staff survey was conducted using a questionnaire designed to assess awareness, training and hand decontamination practice among nursing staff. This survey identified a need to increase awareness of the hand hygiene policy and the appropriate timing of hand decontamination procedures. As a result of the audit, appropriate equipment was ordered and the duties of infection prevention link nurses on each ward were made more explicit; namely, to check and order equipment for hand hygiene as necessary, to conduct regular reminder sessions of the hand decontamination procedure and to raise awareness of hand hygiene policy. Posters were also placed on wards in patient areas to increase awareness of hand hygiene among patients, and alcohol gel dispensers were introduced into nursing stations. Similar audits may prove beneficial at other psychiatric hospitals. PMID:20304525

  17. Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS) Identifies Critical Illness among Ward Patients in a Resource Restricted Setting in Kampala, Uganda: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Kruisselbrink, Rebecca; Kwizera, Arthur; Crowther, Mark; Fox-Robichaud, Alison; O'Shea, Timothy; Nakibuuka, Jane; Ssinabulya, Isaac; Nalyazi, Joan; Bonner, Ashley; Devji, Tahira; Wong, Jeffrey; Cook, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Providing optimal critical care in developing countries is limited by lack of recognition of critical illness and lack of essential resources. The Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS), based on physiological parameters, is validated in adult medical and surgical patients as a predictor of mortality. The objective of this study performed in Uganda was to determine the prevalence of critical illness on the wards as defined by the MEWS, to evaluate the MEWS as a predictor of death, and to describe additional risk factors for mortality. Methods We conducted a prospective observational study at Mulago National Referral Teaching Hospital in Uganda. We included medical and surgical ward patients over 18 years old, excluding patients discharged the day of enrolment, obstetrical patients, and patients who self-discharged prior to study completion. Over a 72-hour study period, we collected demographic and vital signs, and calculated MEWS; at 7-days we measured outcomes. Patients discharged prior to 7 days were assumed to be alive at study completion. Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were performed. Results Of 452 patients, the median age was 40.5 (IQR 29–54) years, 53.3% were male, 24.3% were HIV positive, and 45.1% had medical diagnoses. MEWS ranged from 0 to 9, with higher scores representing hemodynamic instability. The median MEWS was 2 [IQR 1–3] and the median length of hospital stay was 9 days [IQR 4–24]. In-hospital mortality at 7-days was 5.5%; 41.4% of patients were discharged and 53.1% remained on the ward. Mortality was independently associated with medical admission (OR: 7.17; 95% CI: 2.064–24.930; p = 0.002) and the MEWS ≥ 5 (OR: 5.82; 95% CI: 2.420–13.987; p<0.0001) in the multivariable analysis. Conclusion There is a significant burden of critical illness at Mulago Hospital, Uganda. Implementation of the MEWS could provide a useful triage tool to identify patients at greatest risk of death. Future research should include

  18. Nursing practice environment, quality of care, and morale of hospital nurses in Japan.

    PubMed

    Anzai, Eriko; Douglas, Clint; Bonner, Ann

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe Japanese hospital nurses' perceptions of the nursing practice environment and examine its association with nurse-reported ability to provide quality nursing care, quality of patient care, and ward morale. A cross-sectional survey design was used including 223 nurses working in 12 acute inpatient wards in a large Japanese teaching hospital. Nurses rated their work environment favorably overall using the Japanese version of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. Subscale scores indicated high perceptions of physician relations and quality of nursing management, but lower scores for staffing and resources. Ward nurse managers generally rated the practice environment more positively than staff nurses except for staffing and resources. Regression analyses found the practice environment was a significant predictor of quality of patient care and ward morale, whereas perceived ability to provide quality nursing care was most strongly associated with years of clinical experience. These findings support interventions to improve the nursing practice environment, particularly staffing and resource adequacy, to enhance quality of care and ward morale in Japan. PMID:23855754

  19. Flexural Vibrations of Circular Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, I. K.

    1998-03-01

    For circular cylindrical beams, the Timoshenko theory, which includes shear and rotary effects, can be applied by introducing a constantK‧=0·9. The study presented here takes into account the actual configuration and thus makes it an integral part of the analysis. A variational approach previously used [7] is followed. A simplification of the three-dimensional problem is obtained using the inverse method due to St. Venant. A biquadratic equation yields numerical results for the natural frequencies of the first three modes for the following cases: simply supported, fixed-fixed, free-free and fixed-free.

  20. Leadership support for ward managers in acute mental health inpatient settings.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Gwen; McLaughlin, Sue

    2014-05-01

    This article shares findings of work undertaken with a group of mental health ward managers to consider their roles through workshops using an action learning approach. The tensions between the need to balance the burden of administrative tasks and act as clinical role models, leaders and managers are considered in the context of providing recovery-focused services. The group reviewed their leadership styles, broke down the administrative elements of their roles using activity logs, reviewed their working environments and considered how recovery focused they believed their wards to be. Findings support the notion that the ward manager role in acute inpatient settings is at times unmanageable. Administration is one aspect of the role for which ward managers feel unprepared and the high number of administrative tasks take them away from front line clinical care, leading to frustration. Absence from clinical areas reduces opportunities for role modeling good clinical practice to other staff. Despite the frustrations of administrative tasks, overall the managers thought they were supportive to their staff and that their wards were recovery focused. PMID:24779763

  1. Porphyria or Catatonia: Diagnostic Dilemma on the Medical Wards.

    PubMed

    Kurkjian, Natalie; Tucker, Phebe

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old Caucasian female, DD, was admitted to the medical service at an academic hospital with symptoms of weakness in bilateral lower extremities, falls, headaches, and altered mental status. Psychiatry was consulted to evaluate for psychiatric causes of her symptoms. This case presented a diagnostic challenge as the patient's identified symptoms changed almost daily, depending on what practitioner or medical service she encountered. In this study, we discuss the differential diagnoses, tests and treatments the patient received, with a review of literature helping differentiate between diagnostic parameters. PMID:27027143

  2. Physics at Future Circular Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotwal, Ashutosh

    2016-03-01

    The Large Hadron Collider has been a grand success with the discovery of the Higgs boson, with bright prospects for additional discoveries since the recent increase in collider energy and the anticipated large datasets. Big open questions such as the nature of dark matter, the origin of the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the Universe, and the theoretical puzzle of the finely-tuned parameters in the Higgs sector, demand new physics principles that extend the established Standard Model paradigm. Future circular colliders in a substantially larger tunnel can house both a high luminosity electron-positron collider for precision measurements of Higgs and electroweak parameters, as well as a very high energy proton-proton collider which can directly manifest particles associated with these new physics principles. We discuss the physics goals of these future circular colliders, and the prospects for elucidating fundamental new laws of nature that will significantly extend our understanding of the Universe. Detailed studies of the discovery potential in specific benchmark models will be presented, with implications for detector design.

  3. Method of oriented circular dichroism.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Y; Huang, H W; Olah, G A

    1990-01-01

    We present a new method for determining the orientation of alpha-helical sections of proteins or peptides in membrane. To apply this method, membranes containing proteins must be prepared in a multilayer array. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra of the multilayer sample are then measured at the normal as well as oblique incident angles with respect to the bilayer planes; we call such spectra oriented circular dichroism (OCD). The procedure of OCD measurement, particularly the ways to avoid the spectral artifacts due to the effects of dielectric interfaces, linear dichroism and birefringence, and the method of data analysis are described in detail. To illustrate the method, we analyze the OCD of alamethicin in diphytanoylphosphatidylcholine multilayers. We conclude unambiguously that the helical section of alamethicin is parallel to the membrane normal when the sample is in the full-hydration state, but the helical section rotates to the plane of membrane when the sample is in a low-hydration state. We also obtained the parallel and perpendicular CD spectra of alpha-helix, and found them to be in agreement with previous theoretical calculations based on the exciton theory. These spectra are useful for analyzing protein orientations in future experiments. Images FIGURE 5 PMID:2344464

  4. Design in mind: eliciting service user and frontline staff perspectives on psychiatric ward design through participatory methods

    PubMed Central

    Csipke, Emese; Papoulias, Constantina; Vitoratou, Silia; Williams, Paul; Rose, Diana; Wykes, Til

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Psychiatric ward design may make an important contribution to patient outcomes and well-being. However, research is hampered by an inability to assess its effects robustly. This paper reports on a study which deployed innovative methods to capture service user and staff perceptions of ward design. Method: User generated measures of the impact of ward design were developed and tested on four acute adult wards using participatory methodology. Additionally, inpatients took photographs to illustrate their experience of the space in two wards. Data were compared across wards. Results: Satisfactory reliability indices emerged based on both service user and staff responses. Black and minority ethnic (BME) service users and those with a psychosis spectrum diagnosis have more positive views of the ward layout and fixtures. Staff members have more positive views than service users, while priorities of staff and service users differ. Inpatient photographs prioritise hygiene, privacy and control and address symbolic aspects of the ward environment. Conclusions: Participatory and visual methodologies can provide robust tools for an evaluation of the impact of psychiatric ward design on users. PMID:26886239

  5. How to avoid catastrophic events on the ward.

    PubMed

    Bein, Berthold; Seewald, Stephan; Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten

    2016-06-01

    The number and disease severity of hospitalized patients have risen steadily. At the same time, the length of stay in the hospital has decreased and there is an increasing shortage of nursing staff and physicians. In order to enable a timely treatment of serious in-house emergencies (i.e., cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation) and to decrease the risk of unexpected deaths, early detection and treatment of critically ill patients are of paramount importance. Therefore, patients should be monitored according to their disease severity in order to detect a critical change in vital signs. Early critical incident warning systems may play a role in this context. Currently, different rapid warning systems have been established, but data that allow a choice for a certain system are still lacking. Alarm criteria based on a single variable (single-parameter system) are a simple, but less sensitive alternative to indicate a serious adverse event. Scoring systems enable early detection of critically ill patients and may trigger early treatment by staff specially trained to handle emergency situations. PMID:27396810

  6. The effect of continuing care on patient's quality-of-life after disc surgery in neurosurgery and very important person wards

    PubMed Central

    Alimohammadi, Nasrollah; Eslami, Manijeh; Yousefi, Hojatollah; Tabesh, Homayoon

    2015-01-01

    Background: Today, lumbar herniation discs, a prevalent problem with a sign of lumbar and feet pain in society. Removal of disk by surgery decrease pain but reduce quality-of-life (QOL). In some cases, lake of following and caring of patient after surgery, herniation disc recurrent. Previous studies show that patient education and followings is important, therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of continuing care on patient QOL after disc surgery in neurosurgery and very important person (VIP) ward in Al-Zahra Hospital. Materials and Methods: This study is a clinical trial conducted on 64 patients hospitalized in the neurosurgery and VIP wards of Al-Zahra Hospital, in Isfahan, Iran, in 2013. The patients were selected by simple sampling method and were randomly assigned to two groups (study and control). Patients’ response to short form-36 questionnaire before and 4 weeks and 3 months after continuing care in study group, and simultaneously, in the control group. Results: Repeated measures ANOVA showed a significant difference in mean of physical and psychological dimensions before and 4 weeks and 3 months after intervention in study group (P < 0.05), but in control group, the difference was not significant (P = 0.8). Pairwise comparison of mean physical and psychological dimensions at different time points by Fisher's least significant difference showed that there was a significant difference in the intervention group (P < 0.022). But in the control group, there was no significant difference between pairs of time points (P > 0.18). Conclusion: Continuing care improves dimensions of patients’ QOL, and it is recommended as a nursing and nonmedical intervention in disc surgery patients. PMID:27462648

  7. How hospitalized children and parents perceive nurses and hospital amenities: A qualitative descriptive study in Poland.

    PubMed

    Marcinowicz, Ludmiła; Abramowicz, Paweł; Zarzycka, Danuta; Abramowicz, Magdalena; Konstantynowicz, Jerzy

    2016-03-01

    A qualitative descriptive design using an interview guide approach was adopted to investigate the patient-nurse relationship and paediatric ward amenities from the perspective of parents and hospitalised children in Poland. The study included 26 parents or caregivers of hospitalised children (between 13 months and 15 years old) and 22 children (from 10 to 16 years old). Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the recorded verbal data. Data from patients' transcripts were coded and classified in terms of topics on the patient-nurse relationship and hospital care. We identified five main topics. 1. Nurse qualities; 2. Nurse verbal behaviour; 3. Nurse tone of voice and non-verbal behaviour; 4. Hospital amenities; 5. Parents' expectations towards nurses. Our study contributes to increased understanding of parents' and children's experiences of paediatric hospital care. PMID:25336237

  8. Improving the hospital 'soundscape': a framework to measure individual perceptual response to hospital sounds.

    PubMed

    Mackrill, J B; Jennings, P A; Cain, R

    2013-01-01

    Work on the perception of urban soundscapes has generated a number of perceptual models which are proposed as tools to test and evaluate soundscape interventions. However, despite the excessive sound levels and noise within hospital environments, perceptual models have not been developed for these spaces. To address this, a two-stage approach was developed by the authors to create such a model. First, semantics were obtained from listening evaluations which captured the feelings of individuals from hearing hospital sounds. Then, 30 participants rated a range of sound clips representative of a ward soundscape based on these semantics. Principal component analysis extracted a two-dimensional space representing an emotional-cognitive response. The framework enables soundscape interventions to be tested which may improve the perception of these hospital environments. PMID:24073684

  9. Outbreak of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in immunocompromised adults on a hematology ward.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Tomas Ostergaard; Stelzer-Braid, Sacha; Willenborg, Christiana; Cheung, Carol; Andresen, David; Rawlinson, William; Clezy, Kate

    2016-10-01

    We describe an outbreak of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection on a hematology ward without allogeneic stem cell transplant patients. Twelve patients and one staff member infected with RSV were identified from the laboratory database. Five patients had lower respiratory tract infection, seven had upper respiratory tract infection, one was asymptomatic, and there were two (15.4%) deaths. Most patients had overlapping periods of potential infectiousness on the ward. Sequencing was possible on eight specimens and five of these had identical sequences. Results were consistent with transmission occurring both on the ward and by introduction of RSV from the community. J. Med. Virol. 88:1827-1831, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990584

  10. Implementation and Evaluation of a Ward-Based eLearning Program for Trauma Patient Management.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Kate; Wiseman, Taneal; Kennedy, Belinda; Kourouche, Sarah; Goldsmith, Helen

    2016-01-01

    The majority of trauma nursing education is focused on the emergency phases of care. We describe the development and evaluation of a trauma eLearning module for the ward environment. The module was developed using adult learning principles and implemented in 2 surgical wards. There were 3 phases of evaluation: (1) self-efficacy of nurses; (2) relevance and usability of the module and; (3) application of knowledge learnt. The majority indicated they had applied new knowledge, particularly when performing a physical assessment (85.7%), communicating (91.4%), and identifying risk of serious illness (90.4%). Self-efficacy relating to confidence in caring for patients, communication, and escalating clinical deterioration improved (p = .023). An eLearning trauma patient assessment module for ward nursing staff improves nursing knowledge and self-efficacy. PMID:26745537

  11. Hospital infestations by the moth fly, Clogmia albipunctata (Diptera: Psychodinae), in Germany.

    PubMed

    Faulde, M; Spiesberger, M

    2012-06-01

    The moth fly Clogmia albipunctata, formerly a Mediterranean species, is now present in Germany, at latitudes exceeding 53°N. Its synanthropic behaviour allows frequent, year-round infestations in hospital buildings. Hospital infestations have been most common in shower and rest rooms in patient wards, followed by cellar storage rooms, and then rest and shower rooms in hospital kitchens. Preferred breeding sites included hair-clogged sinks in patient shower cubicles, infrequently used toilets and urinals as well as water sources stemming from neglected leaking pipes, suggesting that enhanced hospital water and pest management are necessary for control. PMID:22560402

  12. Circular permutant GFP insertion folding reporters

    SciTech Connect

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2013-04-16

    Provided are methods of assaying and improving protein folding using circular permutants of fluorescent proteins, including circular permutants of GFP variants and combinations thereof. The invention further provides various nucleic acid molecules and vectors incorporating such nucleic acid molecules, comprising polynucleotides encoding fluorescent protein circular permutants derived from superfolder GFP, which polynucleotides include an internal cloning site into which a heterologous polynucleotide may be inserted in-frame with the circular permutant coding sequence, and which when expressed are capable of reporting on the degree to which a polypeptide encoded by such an inserted heterologous polynucleotide is correctly folded by correlation with the degree of fluorescence exhibited.

  13. Circular permutant GFP insertion folding reporters

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2008-06-24

    Provided are methods of assaying and improving protein folding using circular permutants of fluorescent proteins, including circular permutants of GFP variants and combinations thereof. The invention further provides various nucleic acid molecules and vectors incorporating such nucleic acid molecules, comprising polynucleotides encoding fluorescent protein circular permutants derived from superfolder GFP, which polynucleotides include an internal cloning site into which a heterologous polynucleotide may be inserted in-frame with the circular permutant coding sequence, and which when expressed are capable of reporting on the degree to which a polypeptide encoded by such an inserted heterologous polynucleotide is correctly folded by correlation with the degree of fluorescence exhibited.

  14. Circular permutant GFP insertion folding reporters

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2011-06-14

    Provided are methods of assaying and improving protein folding using circular permutants of fluorescent proteins, including circular permutants of GFP variants and combinations thereof. The invention further provides various nucleic acid molecules and vectors incorporating such nucleic acid molecules, comprising polynucleotides encoding fluorescent protein circular permutants derived from superfolder GFP, which polynucleotides include an internal cloning site into which a heterologous polynucleotide may be inserted in-frame with the circular permutant coding sequence, and which when expressed are capable of reporting on the degree to which a polypeptide encoded by such an inserted heterologous polynucleotide is correctly folded by correlation with the degree of fluorescence exhibited.

  15. Circular permutant GFP insertion folding reporters

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2013-02-12

    Provided are methods of assaying and improving protein folding using circular permutants of fluorescent proteins, including circular permutants of GFP variants and combinations thereof. The invention further provides various nucleic acid molecules and vectors incorporating such nucleic acid molecules, comprising polynucleotides encoding fluorescent protein circular permutants derived from superfolder GFP, which polynucleotides include an internal cloning site into which a heterologous polynucleotide may be inserted in-frame with the circular permutant coding sequence, and which when expressed are capable of reporting on the degree to which a polypeptide encoded by such an inserted heterologous polynucleotide is correctly folded by correlation with the degree of fluorescence exhibited.

  16. A STUDY OF PROBLEM DRINKERS IN A GENERAL HOSPITAL

    PubMed Central

    Babu, R. Sateesh; Sengupta, S.N.

    1997-01-01

    349 new admissions in the wards of Medicine, General Surgery & Orthopedics in a general hospital were screened with MAST & AUDIT for problem use of alcohol. Problem drinking was present in 14.6% of the inpatients. The severity and the need for additional treatment were measured with Addiction Severity Index (ASI). Majority of the patients had problems in more than one ar?a. Nevertheless, only one fourth of the patients were referred for psychiatric treatment. The findings indicate the need to develop services towards the recognition and referrals of the problem drinkers in general hospitals PMID:21584037

  17. Marketing the mental health care hospital: identification of communication factors.

    PubMed

    Patzer, G L; Rawwas, M Y

    1994-01-01

    The current study provides guidance to hospital administrators in their effort to develop more effective marketing communication strategies. Two types of communication factors are revealed: primary and secondary. Marketers of psychiatric hospitals may use the primary factors as basic issues for their communication campaign, while secondary factors may be used for segmentation or positioning purposes. The primary factors are open wards, special treatment for adolescents, temporary absence, while patient, in-patient care, and visitation management. The secondary factors are temporary absence while a patient, voluntary consent to admit oneself, visitation management, health insurance, open staff, accreditation, physical plant, and credentials of psychiatrists. PMID:10137171

  18. Use of a fluorescent marker for assessing hospital bathroom cleanliness.

    PubMed

    Fattorini, Mattia; Ceriale, Emma; Nante, Nicola; Lenzi, Daniele; Manzi, Pietro; Basagni, Claudia; Messina, Gabriele

    2016-09-01

    A fluorescent marker was used to assess the efficacy of daily cleaning in hospital en suite bathrooms. We applied the marker on 218 surfaces and we assigned a score according how completely the mark had been removed. We found significant statistical differences among different surfaces and wards (P < .05). Microbiologic contamination and marker removal score did not seem to be correlated. Differences in cleanliness may indicate discrepancies in cleaning procedures. Fluorescent marker proved to be a practical and effective method and it could be adopted as a first-level control system to assess hospital cleanliness. PMID:27179392

  19. Hospital fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L; Hill, Austin D; Mead, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    Under the current system, orthopaedic trauma surgeons must work in some form of hospital setting as our primary service involves treatment of the trauma patient. We must not forget that just as a trauma center cannot exist without our services, we cannot function without their support. As a result, a clear understanding of the balance between physicians and hospitals is paramount. Historical perspective enables physicians and hospital personnel alike to understand the evolution of hospital-physician relationship. This process should be understood upon completion of this chapter. The relationship between physicians and hospitals is becoming increasingly complex and multiple forms of integration exist such as joint ventures, gain sharing, and co-management agreements. For the surgeon to negotiate well, an understanding of hospital governance and the role of the orthopaedic traumatologist is vital to success. An understanding of the value provided by the traumatologist includes all aspects of care including efficiency, availability, cost effectiveness, and research activities. To create effective and sustainable healthcare institutions, physicians and hospitals must be aligned over a sustained period of time. Unfortunately, external forces have eroded the historical basis for the working relationship between physicians and hospitals. Increased competition and reimbursement cuts, coupled with the increasing demands for quality, efficiency, and coordination and the payment changes outlined in healthcare reform, have left many organizations wondering how to best rebuild the relationship. The principal goal for the physician when partnering with a hospital or healthcare entity is to establish a sustainable model of service line management that protects or advances the physician's ability to make impactful improvements in quality of patient care, decreases in healthcare costs, and improvements in process efficiency through evidence-based practices and protocols. PMID

  20. Hospital outbreak control requires joint efforts from hospital management, microbiology and infection control.

    PubMed

    Ransjö, U; Lytsy, B; Melhus, A; Aspevall, O; Artinger, C; Eriksson, B-M; Günther, G; Hambraeus, A

    2010-09-01

    An outbreak of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae producing the extended-spectrum beta-lactamase CTX-M15 affected 247 mainly elderly patients in more than 30 wards in a 1000-bedded swedish teaching hospital between May 2005 and August 2007. A manual search of the hospital administrative records for possible contacts between cases in wards and outpatient settings revealed a complex chain of transmission. Faecal screening identified twice as many cases as cultures from clinical samples. Transmission occurred by direct and indirect patient-to-patient contact, facilitated by patient overcrowding. Interventions included formation of a steering group with economic power, increased bed numbers, better compliance with alcohol hand disinfection and hospital dress code, better hand hygiene for patients and improved cleaning. The cost of the interventions was estimated to be euro3 million. Special infection control policies were not necessary, but resources were needed to make existing policies possible to follow, and for educational efforts to improve compliance. PMID:20359768

  1. Study of cases of hypertension admitted at Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Dhungel, Sanjib; Shrestha, Ananta; Bhattarai, Prabeen; Paudel, Badri

    2004-06-01

    Hundred cases of hypertension admitted to medical ward at Nepal Medical College and Teaching Hospital were studied and analysed. They constituted 9.4% of the total admitted patients in the medical ward. Association of hypertension with other diseases is highlighted. Thirty two percent of these hypertensives were diabetic and 22.0% of hypertensives also had Chronic obstructive airway disease (COAD). Different types of complications of hypertension seen in the studied subjects are mentioned. Only 19.0% of hypertensives had their blood pressure controlled and the rest were uncontrolled hypertensives. PMID:15449651

  2. Experience based co-design reduces formal complaints on an acute mental health ward

    PubMed Central

    Springham, Neil; Robert, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    An acute mental health triage ward at Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust was attracting high levels of formal service user and family complaints. The Trust used experience based co-design to examine the issues and redesign procedures. This resulted in an immediate eradication of formal complaints for a period of 23 months. This paper describes two outcomes: firstly, the successful adaptations made to the experience based co-design methodology from its origins in physical care, in order to ensure it was safe and effective in an acute mental health setting; and, secondly, the changes made to the ward as a result of this quality improvement intervention. PMID:26734433

  3. Revision of the spider crab genus Sargassocarcinus Ward, 1936 (Crustacea: Brachyura: Epialtidae).

    PubMed

    Ng, Peter K L; Lin, Chia-Wei; Naruse, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    The Western Pacific epialtid genus Sargassocarcinus Ward, 1936, is revised. The genus had been regarded as monotypic but is here shown to contain three species: S. sublimis (Rathbun, 1916), S. cristatus (Balss, 1924), and S. foliatus Ward, 1936 (type species). The many unusual characters possessed by Sargassocarcinus are figured and discussed; and diagnostic features of the three species are clarified. The taxonomy of the three species and aspects of their ecology are discussed. Sargassocarcinus species are found free-living on coral rubble habitats and not associated with macrophytic algae. PMID:27615976

  4. The pain-free ward: myth or reality.

    PubMed

    Morton, Neil S

    2012-06-01

    Over the last 25 years, pediatric care has changed dramatically with increased survival after premature birth, more complex care, better outcomes, and reduced mortality. There is a better understanding of how pain pathways and receptor systems develop and also how to assess pain at different stages of development. The myth that children do not feel pain has been comprehensively dispelled. Safe analgesic dose regimens for neonates, infants, and children have been developed based upon a better understanding of developmental pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. It is a myth that pain in children cannot be prevented or treated safely and effectively because of the risks of adverse effects and addiction. Large-scale prospective audits have clarified the safety profile and risk-benefit balance for different techniques. There is now a substantial evidence base supporting many techniques of postoperative and procedural pain management for all age-groups of children. Guidelines based upon systematic review of this evidence have been published and updated, but the real challenge is in implementation of accurate pain assessment and safe, effective pain management comprehensively to all children whatever the procedure, clinical setting, developmental stage of the child, or comorbidities. In developed countries, these are core topics in the education of all doctors and nurses who care for children, and they are integrated into clinical practice by acute pediatric pain teams for most hospitals. However, it is disappointing that many country's healthcare systems do not give pediatric pain management a priority and in many parts of the world there are no analgesics available. So pain-free healthcare is sadly lacking in many hospitals. My hope is that the current knowledge can be used more effectively to relieve the unnecessary suffering of children in the 21st century. PMID:22594405

  5. Less is more: a project to reduce the number of PIMs (potentially inappropriate medications) on an elderly care ward

    PubMed Central

    Aung, Tin Htun; Judith Beck, Adèle; Siese, Thomas; Berrisford, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Potentially inappropriate prescribing in healthcare of the elderly (HCE) is associated with avoidable adverse drug events (ADEs).1,2 A recent set of prescribing criteria has been designed and validated, called “Screening Tool of Older Persons' Prescriptions” (STOPP), to rationalise prescribing in hospitalised patients on HCE wards.1,3 The aim of this quality improvement project was to identify how many potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) were prescribed on these wards, and remove them. This was executed by implementing a ward round checklist, which incorporated STOPP criteria, for the twice weekly, consultant led ward rounds. This quality improvement project was carried out over four months. In a pilot study, we identified eight inappropriate medical prescriptions among 148 medications (5.4% ) prescribed on one ward. After applying a checklist for a structured ward round, we reviewed the medications prescribed on that ward, and found 10 PIMs out of 192 (5.2% ). Utilising the increasingly recognised “plan, do, study, act” (PDSA) cycle,4 we implemented departmental teaching and meetings with other members of the multidisciplinary team, which raised awareness of PIMs among junior doctors, as well as involving our pharmacists in drug chart screening. During this process we continued with a further six cycles on a bi-weekly basis, and saw a gradual decrease in PIM to 1.5%. In conclusion, a structured ward round, facilitated by a checklist that included review of drug charts based on STOPP criteria, demonstrated a considerable reduction of PIMs. It would be interesting to apply this quality improvement project to non-HCE wards, including general surgical wards or adult psychiatry wards, as a means of not only reducing the effects of ADEs, but also the expenditure associated with unnecessary drug prescriptions, and the costs associated with additional care arising from associated ADEs. PMID:27096089

  6. Electrodynamics of circular dichroism and its application in the construction of a circular polaroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volobuev, A. N.

    2016-03-01

    Electrodynamic principles of circular dichroism are developed using a concept of conducting circular structures in matter. A simplified representation of material equations for an optically active medium is obtained in the absence of a transition to the complex domain. A dependence of the absorption coefficient of a circular polarization as a component of the linearly polarized radiation on material parameters is found. Such parameters are analyzed to reveal a possibility of construction of a circular polaroid.

  7. Hospital Hints

    MedlinePlus

    ... Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology Division of Neuroscience FAQs Funding Opportunities Intramural Research Program Office of ... have to spend the night in the hospital. Learning more about what to expect and about people ...

  8. Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients).

    PubMed

    Chiara, Mussi; Gianluigi, Galizia; Pasquale, Abete; Alessandro, Morrione; Alice, Maraviglia; Gabriele, Noro; Paolo, Cavagnaro; Loredana, Ghirelli; Giovanni, Tava; Franco, Rengo; Giulio, Masotti; Gianfranco, Salvioli; Niccolò, Marchionni; Andrea, Ungar

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82 ± 7 years, range 65-101). Falls were defined "accidental" (fall explained by a definite accidental cause), "medical" (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease), "dementia-related" (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia), and "unexplained" (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause). According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury. PMID:23533394

  9. Hospital philanthropy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dean G; Clement, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    It remains an open question whether hospital spending on fundraising efforts to garner philanthropy is a good use of funds. Research and industry reports provide conflicting results. We describe the accounting and data challenges in analysis of hospital philanthropy, which include measurement of donations, measurement of fundraising expenses, and finding the relationships among organizations where these cash flows occur. With these challenges, finding conflicting results is not a surprise. PMID:23614267

  10. Evaluation of hospital-wide computerised decision support in an intensive care unit: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Santucci, W; Day, R O; Baysari, M T

    2016-07-01

    We conducted an observational study with interviews in a 12-bed general/neurological intensive care unit (ICU) at a teaching hospital in Sydney, Australia, to determine whether hospital-wide computerised decision support (CDS) embedded in an electronic prescribing system is used and perceived as useful by doctors in an ICU setting. Twenty doctors were shadowed by the observer while on ward rounds (33.6 hours) and non-ward rounds (28 hours) in the ICU. These doctors were also interviewed to explore views of CDS. We found that computerised alerts were triggered frequently in the ICU (n=166, in 59% of orders), less than half of the alerts were read by doctors and only four alerts resulted in a medication order being changed. Pre-written orders were utilised frequently, however reference material was rarely accessed. Interviews with doctors revealed a willingness to use CDS features; however the primary barrier to use was lack of customisation for the ICU setting. Doctors working in the ICU triggered a high number of alerts when prescribing, 40% more alerts than doctors working on general wards of the same hospital. Certain procedures in place in the ICU (e.g. daily microbiology ward rounds) made many alerts redundant in this setting. Lack of customisation for the ICU led to dissatisfaction with CDS and infrequent use of some CDS features. PMID:27456183

  11. The periodicities in and biometeorological relationships with bed occupancy of an acute psychiatric ward in Antwerp, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, M.; de Meyer, F.; Peeters, D.; Meltzer, H.; Schotte, C.; Scharpe, S.; Cosyns, P.

    1993-06-01

    Recently, some investigators have established a seasonal pattern in normal human psychology, physiology and behaviour, and in the incidence of psychiatric psychopathology. In an attempt to elucidate the chronopsy and meteotropism in the latter, we have examined the chronograms of, and the biometeorological relationships to bed occupancy of the psychiatric ward of the Antwerp University Hospital during three consecutive calendar years (1987 1989). Weather data for the vicinity were provided by a local meteorological station and comprise mean atmospheric pressure, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and minutes of sunlight and precipitation/day. The number of psychiatric beds occupied during the study period exhibited a significant seasonal variation. Peaks in bed occupancy were observed in March and November, with lows in August. An important part of the variability in the number of beds occupied could be explained by the composite effects of weather variables of the preceding weeks. Our results suggest that short-term fluctuations in atmospheric activity may dictate some of the periodicities in psychiatric psychopathology.

  12. A Random Walk on a Circular Path

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, W.-K.; Lee, M. S.

    2005-01-01

    This short note introduces an interesting random walk on a circular path with cards of numbers. By using high school probability theory, it is proved that under some assumptions on the number of cards, the probability that a walker will return to a fixed position will tend to one as the length of the circular path tends to infinity.

  13. Microstrip Antenna Generates Circularly Polarized Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.

    1986-01-01

    Circular microstrip antenna excited with higher order transverse magnetic (TM) modes generates circularly polarized, conical radiation patterns. Found both theoretically and experimentally that peak direction of radiation pattern is varied within wide angular range by combination of mode selection and loading substrate with materials of different dielectric constants.

  14. Improving the quality and safety of care on the medical ward: A review and synthesis of the evidence base.

    PubMed

    Pannick, Samuel; Beveridge, Iain; Wachter, Robert M; Sevdalis, Nick

    2014-12-01

    Despite its place at the heart of inpatient medicine, the evidence base underpinning the effective delivery of medical ward care is highly fragmented. Clinicians familiar with the selection of evidence-supported treatments for specific diseases may be less aware of the evolving literature surrounding the organisation of care on the medical ward. This review is the first synthesis of that disparate literature. An iterative search identified relevant publications, using terms pertaining to medical ward environments, and objective and subjective patient outcomes. Articles (including reviews) were selected on the basis of their focus on medical wards, and their relevance to the quality and safety of ward-based care. Responses to medical ward failings are grouped into five common themes: staffing levels and team composition; interdisciplinary communication and collaboration; standardisation of care; early recognition and treatment of the deteriorating patient; and local safety climate. Interventions in these categories are likely to improve the quality and safety of care in medical wards, although the evidence supporting them is constrained by methodological limitations and inadequate investment in multicentre trials. Nonetheless, with infrequent opportunities to redefine their services, institutions are increasingly adopting multifaceted strategies that encompass groups of these themes. As the literature on the quality of inpatient care moves beyond its initial focus on the intensive care unit and operating theatre, physicians should be mindful of opportunities to incorporate evidence-based practice at a ward level. PMID:25457434

  15. Circular RNAs: diversity of form and function.

    PubMed

    Lasda, Erika; Parker, Roy

    2014-12-01

    It is now clear that there is a diversity of circular RNAs in biological systems. Circular RNAs can be produced by the direct ligation of 5' and 3' ends of linear RNAs, as intermediates in RNA processing reactions, or by "backsplicing," wherein a downstream 5' splice site (splice donor) is joined to an upstream 3' splice site (splice acceptor). Circular RNAs have unique properties including the potential for rolling circle amplification of RNA, the ability to rearrange the order of genomic information, protection from exonucleases, and constraints on RNA folding. Circular RNAs can function as templates for viroid and viral replication, as intermediates in RNA processing reactions, as regulators of transcription in cis, as snoRNAs, and as miRNA sponges. Herein, we review the breadth of circular RNAs, their biogenesis and metabolism, and their known and anticipated functions. PMID:25404635

  16. Gauge-Invariant Formulation of Circular Dichroism.

    PubMed

    Raimbault, Nathaniel; de Boeij, Paul L; Romaniello, Pina; Berger, J A

    2016-07-12

    Standard formulations of magnetic response properties, such as circular dichroism spectra, are plagued by gauge dependencies, which can lead to unphysical results. In this work, we present a general gauge-invariant and numerically efficient approach for the calculation of circular dichroism spectra from the current density. First we show that in this formulation the optical rotation tensor, the response function from which circular dichroism spectra can be obtained, is independent of the origin of the coordinate system. We then demonstrate that its trace is independent of the gauge origin of the vector potential. We also show how gauge invariance can be retained in practical calculations with finite basis sets. As an example, we explain how our method can be applied to time-dependent current-density-functional theory. Finally, we report gauge-invariant circular dichroism spectra obtained using the adiabatic local-density approximation. The circular dichroism spectra we thus obtain are in good agreement with experiment. PMID:27295541

  17. Evaluation of Mental Workload among ICU Ward's Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Mohsen; Mazloumi, Adel; Kazemi, Zeinab; Zeraati, Hojat

    2015-01-01

    Background: High level of workload has been identified among stressors of nurses in intensive care units (ICUs). The present study investigated nursing workload and identified its influencing perfor­mance obstacles in ICUs. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted, in 2013, on 81 nurses working in ICUs in Imam Khomeini Hospital in Tehran, Iran. NASA-TLX was applied for assessment of workload. Moreover, ICUs Performance Obstacles Questionnaire was used to identify performance obstacles associated with ICU nursing. Results: Physical demand (mean=84.17) was perceived as the most important dimensions of workload by nurses. The most critical performance obstacles affecting workload included: difficulty in finding a place to sit down, hectic workplace, disorganized workplace, poor-conditioned equipment, waiting for using a piece of equipment, spending much time seeking for supplies in the central stock, poor quality of medical materials, delay in getting medications, unpredicted problems, disorganized central stock, outpatient surgery, spending much time dealing with family needs, late, inadequate, and useless help from nurse assistants, and ineffective morning rounds (P-value<0.05). Conclusion: Various performance obstacles are correlated with nurses' workload, affirms the significance of nursing work system characteristics. Interventions are recommended based on the results of this study in the work settings of nurses in ICUs. PMID:26933647

  18. 6-PACK programme to decrease fall injuries in acute hospitals: cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Morello, Renata T; Wolfe, Rory; Brand, Caroline A; Haines, Terry P; Hill, Keith D; Brauer, Sandra G; Botti, Mari; Cumming, Robert G; Livingston, Patricia M; Sherrington, Catherine; Zavarsek, Silva; Lindley, Richard I; Kamar, Jeannette

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of the 6-PACK programme on falls and fall injuries in acute wards. Design Cluster randomised controlled trial. Setting Six Australian hospitals. Participants All patients admitted to 24 acute wards during the trial period. Interventions Participating wards were randomly assigned to receive either the nurse led 6-PACK programme or usual care over 12 months. The 6-PACK programme included a fall risk tool and individualised use of one or more of six interventions: “falls alert” sign, supervision of patients in the bathroom, ensuring patients’ walking aids are within reach, a toileting regimen, use of a low-low bed, and use of a bed/chair alarm. Main outcome measures The co-primary outcomes were falls and fall injuries per 1000 occupied bed days. Results During the trial, 46 245 admissions to 16 medical and eight surgical wards occurred. As many people were admitted more than once, this represented 31 411 individual patients. Patients’ characteristics and length of stay were similar for intervention and control wards. Use of 6-PACK programme components was higher on intervention wards than on control wards (incidence rate ratio 3.05, 95% confidence interval 2.14 to 4.34; P<0.001). In all, 1831 falls and 613 fall injuries occurred, and the rates of falls (incidence rate ratio 1.04, 0.78 to 1.37; P=0.796) and fall injuries (0.96, 0.72 to 1.27; P=0.766) were similar in intervention and control wards. Conclusions Positive changes in falls prevention practice occurred following the introduction of the 6-PACK programme. However, no difference was seen in falls or fall injuries between groups. High quality evidence showing the effectiveness of falls prevention interventions in acute wards remains absent. Novel solutions to the problem of in-hospital falls are urgently needed. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12611000332921. PMID:26813674

  19. Birth “Out-of-Hours”: An Evaluation of Obstetric Practice and Outcome According to the Presence of Senior Obstetricians on the Labour Ward

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Hannah E.; van der Meulen, Jan H.; Gurol-Urganci, Ipek; Smith, Gordon C.; Kiran, Amit; Thornton, Steve; Cameron, Alan; Cromwell, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Concerns have been raised that a lack of senior obstetricians (“consultants”) on the labour ward outside normal hours may lead to worse outcomes among babies born during periods of reduced cover. Methods and Findings We carried out a multicentre cohort study using data from 19 obstetric units in the United Kingdom between 1 April 2012 and 31 March 2013 to examine whether rates of obstetric intervention and outcome change “out-of-hours,” i.e., when consultants are not providing dedicated, on-site labour ward cover. At the 19 hospitals, obstetric rotas ranged from 51 to 106 h of on-site labour ward cover per week. There were 87,501 singleton live births during the year, and 55.8% occurred out-of-hours. Women who delivered out-of-hours had slightly lower rates of intrapartum caesarean section (CS) (12.7% versus 13.4%, adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.90 to 0.98) and instrumental delivery (15.6% versus 17.0%, adj. OR 0.92; 95% CI 0.89 to 0.96) than women who delivered at times of on-site labour ward cover. There was some evidence that the severe perineal tear rate was reduced in out-of-hours vaginal deliveries (3.3% versus 3.6%, adj. OR 0.92; 95% CI 0.85 to 1.00). There was no evidence of a statistically significant difference between out-of-hours and “in-hours” deliveries in the rate of babies with a low Apgar score at 5 min (1.33% versus 1.25%, adjusted OR 1.07; 95% CI 0.95 to 1.21) or low cord pH (0.94% versus 0.82%; adjusted OR 1.12; 95% CI 0.96 to 1.31). Key study limitations include the potential for bias by indication, the reliance upon an organisational measure of consultant presence, and a non-random sample of maternity units. Conclusions There was no difference in the rate of maternal and neonatal morbidity according to the presence of consultants on the labour ward, with the possible exception of a reduced rate of severe perineal tears in out-of-hours vaginal deliveries. Fewer women had operative deliveries

  20. Inpatient Performance of Primary Care Residents: Impact of Reduction in Time on the Ward.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Goroll, Allan H.

    1979-01-01

    The inpatient (ward/intensive care unit) performance of primary care medical residents was compared with that of their peers in the standard internal medicine residency program. Nearly identical performances of the two groups suggests that substantial time in the first two years of residency can be devoted successfully to ambulatory training.…

  1. Missed Opportunities for Nutritional Rehabilitation in Children Admitted to Surgical Wards

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Pooja; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar; Phatak, Ajay; Desai, Rajendra; Srivastava, Shirish

    2016-01-01

    Background. Malnutrition in children has serious health and economic consequences. We studied documentation of malnutrition, actual prevalence, and treatment given in children admitted to surgical wards. Methods. Retrospective study of 154 patients aged <5 yrs admitted to general surgical, orthopedic, and otorhinolaryngology wards. Records were evaluated for completeness of data, way of documentation, and data quality. Descriptive analysis was done. If malnutrition was not identified and/or proper action was not taken, it was defined as a “missed opportunity.” Results. Of 154 records audited, 100 (64.94%) were males, 108 (70.13%) were from general surgery ward, and 78 (50.65%) were residing in suburban area. The mean (SD) age of the study population was 2.32 (1.16) years whereas mean (SD) duration of stay was 5.84 (6.29) days. Weight and height were mentioned in 116 (75.32%) and 8 (5.19%) records, respectively, mostly by nonsurgical personnel. Documentation and treatment of malnutrition were poor. Out of 106 apparently correct weight records, 19 (17.93%) children were severely undernourished and 30 (28.30%) were moderately undernourished whereas 20 (18.87%) children were not undernourished but required nutritional attention. Conclusion. There is poor documentation of nutritional indicators of children admitted to surgical wards. From data that was available, it is apparent that malnutrition is at high levels. “Identification” and hence management of malnutrition need more attention. PMID:27429836

  2. Constructing and Evaluating a Validity Argument for the Final-Year Ward Simulation Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Till, Hettie; Ker, Jean; Myford, Carol; Stirling, Kevin; Mires, Gary

    2015-01-01

    The authors report final-year ward simulation data from the University of Dundee Medical School. Faculty who designed this assessment intend for the final score to represent an individual senior medical student's level of clinical performance. The results are included in each student's portfolio as one source of evidence of the student's…

  3. Astronaut Jack Lousma looks at map of Earth in ward room of Skylab cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Jack R. Lousma, Skylab 3 pilot, looks at a map of Earth at the food table in the ward room of the Orbital Workshop (OWS). In this photographic reproduction taken from a television transmission made by a color TV camera aboard the Skylab space station cluster in Earth orbit.

  4. As His Day in Court Arrives, Ward Churchill Is Depicted in Sharply Different Lights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The trial in Ward Churchill's lawsuit against the University of Colorado got under way here last week with lawyers for the opposing sides painting starkly different pictures of both the controversial ethnic-studies professor and the circumstances surrounding his dismissal by the university in 2007. In delivering their opening remarks in a crowded…

  5. "Living My Native Life Deadly": Red Lake, Ward Churchill, and the Discourses of Competing Genocides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Jodi A.

    2007-01-01

    In an attempt to understand how rival narratives of genocide compete even at the cost of disavowing other historical experiences, this article considers how the U.S. national media represented and framed Red Lake in the wake of Ward Churchill's emergence on the national radar. The first section of this article examines how nineteenth-century…

  6. Licensing and labelling of drugs in a paediatric oncology ward

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Henk; Tak, Nanda

    2011-01-01

    AIM Paediatric drug prescriptions are known for their high percentages of off-label and unlicensed use. In paediatric oncology data available are scarce. The aim of this paper is an analysis of the licensing and labelling status of all prescribed medication over a 2 week period in a Dutch paediatric oncology centre. METHODS An analysis of the delivery of medication by the hospital pharmacy to patients admitted to the paediatric oncology centre was carried out. RESULTS In total 268 precriptions were filed for 39 patients. In 87% of children unlicensed medication was used. Fifty-nine per cent of the children received at least two unlicensed drugs. In total 72% of the drugs were used licensed and on-label was found in 57% of the prescriptions. There was a trend that in younger children percentages were lower. International and local guidelines necessitated in many cases unlicensed use, e.g. intrathecal prednisolone, low dose medication such as heparin, ethanol and vancomycin for locking intravenous devices and higher intravenous vancomycin dosages. There were no major differences with respect to type of malignancy. CONCLUSION Our figures are substantially higher than the figures reported from adult oncology. Comparison with other paediatric reports are cumbersome, due to different percentages of diseases in the reports and other rules to dispense medication in the outpatient setting. Our data are in line with reports mentioning the higher percentages of unlicensed and off-label use. Our data further underpin the need for more research on suitable formulations, dosages, safety and efficacy in these children. PMID:21453298

  7. [Laennec Hospital].

    PubMed

    Dauphin, A; Mazin-Deslandes, C

    2000-01-01

    When the Laennec Hospital of Paris closed, after 366 years of activities for the patients, the articles about the circumstances of the foundation and the main stapes of the institution which became an very famous university hospital it present the available information of the history of the apothecaries, of the "gagnants-maitrise", pharmacists and the pharmacy's interns who succeeded themselves to create and dispense the medicaments necessary to the patients hospitalized or welcomed in ambulatory. It describes the evolution of the places, of the material, of forms, of the organization, of the medicaments and of the missions of what became the Pharmacy department after the recent individualization of the biological analysis in the biochemistry. PMID:11625687

  8. Circular RNAs in Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Huang, Chuan; Wang, Xiaolin; Shan, Ge

    2015-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are now recognized as large species of transcripts in eukaryotic cells. From model organisms such as C. elegans, Drosophila, mice to human beings, thousands of circRNAs formed from back-splicing of exons have been identified. The known complexity of transcriptome has been greatly expanded upon the discovery of these RNAs. Studies about the biogenesis and physiological functions have yielded substantial knowledge for the circRNAs, and they are now more likely to be viewed as regulatory elements coded by the genome rather than unavoidable noise of gene expression. Certain human diseases may also relate to circRNAs. These circRNAs show diversifications in features such as sequence composition and cellular localization, and thus we propose that they may be divided into subtypes such as cytoplasmic circRNAs, nuclear circRNAs, and exon-intron circRNAs (EIciRNAs). Here we summarize and discuss knowns and unknowns for these RNAs, and we need to keep in mind that the whole field is still at the beginning of exciting explorations. PMID:27047251

  9. Circular on family planning, 1988.

    PubMed

    1988-01-01

    This Hubei, China, Circular, issued near the end of 1988, provides the following: "The population growth situation in our country is grim. Since 1986, the natural population growth rate has risen continuously. To draw the prompt attention of the whole party and the entire people to the issue of our population, all localities must seriously unfold the activities of publicizing family planning (FP) this winter and next spring, in coordination with education in current affairs. It is necessary to publicize FP in an all-around way and with accuracy, and the activities of publicizing must be carried out effectively in a solid and deep-going way. In the rural areas, stress must be placed on areas where FP work is not carried out well and where there is a prevailing tendency toward early marriage, early child-bearing, and extra-budgetary births. In cities, publicity and education must be conducted especially among the transient population, individual households, and jobless households. During the period of publicity, large-scale street-corner publicity activities must be carried out in cities and towns so as to create strong public opinion and to combine the endeavor to publicize current affairs and policies with the effort to popularize knowledge about contraception and birth-control, to execute measures of contraception and birth control, and to establish FP associations in the countryside." PMID:12289626

  10. Circular protecting female students, 1988.

    PubMed

    1988-01-01

    In 1988 the Ministry of Education of Benin issued a Circular designed to protect female students from sexual advances from male students and teachers. Teachers who are suspected of having sexual relations with a student are to receive a note in their file or can be suspended for a month. Teachers who have raped a student or are responsible for a student's pregnancy are to be suspended for three months if the student was not in their class, and six months if she was. Teachers who have incited their sexual partner to have an abortion are subject to demotion. Teachers who are repeat offenders or whose actions have led to an abortion resulting in death are to be fired. Students who have made a female student pregnant are to be suspended from school until delivery of the child and then are to be enrolled in a different school. The directors of schools are asked to put an end to the provocative clothes, make-up, and hairstyles of female students. PMID:12289212

  11. Clinical and Organizational Factors Related to the Reduction of Mechanical Restraint Application in an Acute Ward: An 8-Year Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Di Lorenzo, Rosaria; Miani, Fiorenza; Formicola, Vitantonio; Ferri, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to describe the frequency of mechanical restraint use in an acute psychiatric ward and to analyze which variables may have significantly influenced the use of this procedure. Methods: This retrospective study was conducted in the Servizio Psichiatrico di Diagnosi e Cura (SPDC) of Modena Centro. The following variables of our sample, represented by all restrained patients admitted from 1-1-2005 to 31-12-2012, were analyzed: age, gender, nationality, psychiatric diagnoses, organic comorbidity, state and duration of admission, motivation and duration of restraints, nursing shift and hospitalization day of restraint, number of patients admitted at the time of restraint and institutional changes during the observation period. The above variables were statistically compared with those of all other non-restrained patients admitted to our ward in the same period. Results: Mechanical restraints were primarily used as a safety procedure to manage aggressive behavior of male patients, during the first days of hospitalization and night shifts. Neurocognitive disorders, organic comorbidity, compulsory state and long duration of admission were statistically significantly related to the increase of restraint use (p<.001, multivariate logistic regression). Institutional changes, especially more restricted guidelines concerning restraint application, were statistically significantly related to restraint use reduction (p<.001, chi2 test, multivariate logistic regression). Conclusion: The data obtained highlight that mechanical restraint use was influenced not only by clinical factors, but mainly by staff and policy factors, which have permitted a gradual but significant reduction in the use of this procedure through a multidimensional approach. PMID:25320635

  12. Prolonged clonal spreading and dynamic changes in antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli ST68 among patients who stayed in a respiratory care ward.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Ming; Ke, Se-Chin; Li, Chia-Ru; Chiou, Chien-Shun; Chang, Chao-Chin

    2014-11-01

    From 2007 to 2009, we collected a total of 83 bacteraemic isolates of Escherichia coli with reduced susceptibility or resistance to third-generation cephalosporins (TGCs). Isolates were genotyped by PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The PFGE patterns revealed two highly correlated clusters (cluster E: nine isolates; cluster G: 22 isolates) associated with this prolonged clonal spreading. Compared with cluster E isolates, cluster G isolates were significantly more likely to harbour aac(6')-Ib-cr (P<0.05), and most of these isolates were isolated during a later year than cluster E isolates (P<0.05). By MLST analysis, 94% of cluster E and G isolates (29/31) were ST68. Although no time or space clustering could be identified by the conventional hospital-acquired infection monitoring system, E. coli cases caused by cluster E and G isolates were significantly associated with having stayed in our hospital's respiratory care ward (P<0.05). Isolates obtained from patients who had stayed in the respiratory care ward had a significantly higher rate of aac(6')-Ib-cr and blaCTX-M-14 positivity, and were more likely to belong to ST68/S68-like (all P<0.05). To our knowledge, this is the first report of prolonged clonal spreading caused by E. coli ST68 associated with a stay in a long-term care facility. Using epidemiological investigations and PFGE and MLST analyses, we have identified long-term clonal spreading caused by E. coli ST68, with extra antimicrobial-resistance genes possibly acquired during the prolonged spreading period. PMID:25168964

  13. The Heart and Mind Coming Together: A Case Study of the Implementation of a University-Children's Hospital Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, C. Richele

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate the perceptions of university students serving as volunteers in an oncology ward at a local children's hospital. The implementation of this project was guided by the body of literature regarding service learning. Data were collected from the five students using a structured interview and was…

  14. Generation of circular polarization of the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarei, M.; Bavarsad, E.; Haghighat, M.; Mohammadi, R.; Motie, I.; Rezaei, Z.

    2010-04-01

    According to the standard cosmology, near the last scattering surface, the photons scattered via Compton scattering are just linearly polarized and then the primordial circular polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons is zero. In this work we show that CMB polarization acquires a small degree of circular polarization when a background magnetic field is considered or the quantum electrodynamic sector of standard model is extended by Lorentz-noninvariant operators as well as noncommutativity. The existence of circular polarization for the CMB radiation may be verified during future observation programs, and it represents a possible new channel for investigating new physics effects.

  15. Entanglement of quantum circular states of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horoshko, D. B.; De Bièvre, S.; Kolobov, M. I.; Patera, G.

    2016-06-01

    We present a general approach to calculating the entanglement of formation for superpositions of two-mode coherent states, placed equidistantly on a circle in phase space. We show that in the particular case of rotationally invariant circular states the Schmidt decomposition of two modes, and therefore the value of their entanglement, are given by analytical expressions. We analyze the dependence of the entanglement on the radius of the circle and number of components in the superposition. We also show that the set of rotationally invariant circular states creates an orthonormal basis in the state space of the harmonic oscillator, and this basis is advantageous for representation of other circular states of light.

  16. Circular Polarization in PKS 1519-273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, W.; Macquart, J. P.; Johnston, H.; Jauncey, D.

    2005-12-01

    The intra-day variable BL Lac PKS 1519-273 exhibits variations at centimeter wavelengths in total intensity, linear polarization, and circular polarization. Their variability is caused by scintillation due to the interstellar medium. PKS 1519-273 displays 4% circular polarization at 4.8 GHz and the variability has persisted as long as the source has been observed. We present observations of this source over several years, showing that the circularly polarized emission is highly variable on micro-arcsecond scales. We determine properties of the structure of the emission by examining the light curves and associated scintillation theory.

  17. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  18. Hospitality Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Canyons, Valencia, CA.

    A project was conducted at College of the Canyons (Valencia, California) to initiate a new 2-year hospitality program with career options in hotel or restaurant management. A mail and telephone survey of area employers in the restaurant and hotel field demonstrated a need for, interest in, and willingness to provide internships for such a program.…

  19. Reducing elective general surgery cancellations at a Canadian hospital

    PubMed Central

    Azari-Rad, Solmaz; Yontef, Alanna L.; Aleman, Dionne M.; Urbach, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Background In Canadian hospitals, which are typically financed by global annual budgets, overuse of operating rooms is a financial risk that is frequently managed by cancelling elective surgical procedures. It is uncertain how different scheduling rules affect the rate of elective surgery cancellations. Methods We used discrete event simulation modelling to represent perioperative processes at a hospital in Toronto, Canada. We tested the effects of the following 3 scenarios on the number of surgical cancellations: scheduling surgeons’ operating days based on their patients’ average length of stay in hospital, sequencing surgical procedures by average duration and variance, and increasing the number of post-surgical ward beds. Results The number of elective cancellations was reduced by scheduling surgeons whose patients had shorter average lengths of stay in hospital earlier in the week, sequencing shorter surgeries and those with less variance in duration earlier in the day, and by adding up to 2 additional beds to the postsurgical ward. Conclusion Discrete event simulation modelling can be used to develop strategies for improving efficiency in operating rooms. PMID:23351498

  20. A study in hospital noise - a case from Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Pai, Jar-Yuan

    2007-01-01

    Hospitals are places that allow patients to rest and recover, and therefore must be quiet inside and in the surrounding neighborhood. One medical center was chosen as a sample hospital. This hospital was a tertiary care center during the 2003 outbreak of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Taiwan. The measurement results show that the noise level in the wards and stations was between 50.3 and 68.1 dB which exceeded the suggested hospital ward sound level. The quietest units were the Surgical Intensive Care Unit and recovery rooms with a noise level lower than 50 dB during the night. The higher noise levels were in the hall and pharmacy which were highly populated areas. This study analyzed the causes of this excessive noise and used noise reduction methods. The paired t test was performed and the results showed improvement methods were successful. This study found the noise levels reached 98.5-107.5 dB in power generator rooms and air-conditioning facilities, and suggests employees use ear plugs. PMID:17362661

  1. An ethnographic study of tobacco control in hospital settings

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Annette S H; Bottorff, Joan L; Johnson, Joy L

    2006-01-01

    Background Tobacco control in hospital settings is characterised by a focus on protection strategies and an increasing expectation that health practitioners provide cessation support to patients. While practitioners claim to have positive attitudes toward supporting patient cessation efforts, missed opportunities are the practice norm. Objective To study hospital workplace culture relevant to tobacco use and control as part of a mixed‐methods research project that investigated hospital‐based registered nurses' integration of cessation interventions. Design The study was conducted at two hospitals situated in British Columbia, Canada. Data collection included 135 hours of field work including observations of ward activities and designated smoking areas, 85 unstructured conversations with nurses, and the collection of patient‐care documents on 16 adult in‐patient wards. Results The findings demonstrate that protection strategies (for example, smoking restrictions) were relatively well integrated into organisational culture and practice activities but the same was not true for cessation strategies. An analysis of resources and documentation relevant to tobacco revealed an absence of support for addressing tobacco use and cessation. Nurses framed patients' tobacco use as a relational issue, a risk to patient safety, and a burden. Furthermore, conversations revealed that nurses tended to possess only a vague awareness of nicotine dependence. Conclusion Overcoming challenges to extending tobacco control within hospitals could be enhanced by emphasising the value of addressing patients' tobacco use, raising awareness of nicotine dependence, and improving the availability of resources to address addiction issues. PMID:16885581

  2. Infectious disease during hospitalization is the major causative factor for prolonged hospitalization: multivariate analysis of diagnosis procedure combination (DPC) data of 20,876 cases in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Susumu; Hara, Megumi; Nonaka, Sayuri; Ishikawa, Shinichiro; Aoki, Yosuke; Anzai, Keizo; Morita, Shigeki; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Mawatari, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate causative factors for prolonged hospitalization based on hospitalization status, type of hospital ward, and comorbidities, specifically diabetes mellitus and infectious diseases, in 20,876 patients hospitalized in Saga University Hospital from April 1, 2012, to February 28, 2015. Prolonged hospitalization was defined as hospital days exceeding period 3 in the diagnosis procedure combination system. Among all factors, causative (risk) factors for prolonged hospitalization were evaluated by multiple logistic regression analysis. Multivariate analysis indicated causative factors for prolonged hospitalization were aging, comorbid diabetes mellitus, time spent in the intensive care unit, and infectious diseases contracted during hospitalization. The risk factors for contracting infectious diseases during hospitalization were aging, male sex, comorbid diabetes mellitus, and increased number of days spent in period 3 in the diagnosis procedure combination code. These data indicated that critical factors for discharge from hospital within an appropriate time frame were prevention of infectious diseases during hospitalization, and a fast and effective therapeutic approach to patients in the intensive care unit. PMID:27499579

  3. A replication study of the City nurse intervention: reducing conflict and containment on three acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Bowers, L; Flood, C; Brennan, G; Allan, T

    2008-11-01

    Conflict and containment on acute inpatient psychiatric wards pose a threat to patient and staff safety, and it is desirable to minimize the frequency of these events. Research has indicated that certain staff attitudes and behaviours might serve to accomplish this, namely, positive appreciation, emotional regulation and effective structure. A previous test of an intervention based on these principles, on two wards, showed a good outcome. In this study, we tested the same intervention on three further wards. Two 'City nurses' were employed to work with three acute wards, assisting with the implementation of changes according to the working model of conflict and containment generation. Evaluation was via before-and-after measures, with parallel data collected from five control wards. While simple before-and-after analysis of the two experimental wards showed significant reductions in conflict and containment, when a comparison with controls was conducted, with control for patient occupancy and clustering of results by ward, no effect of the intervention was found. The results were therefore ambiguous, and neither confirm nor contradict the efficacy of the intervention. A further intervention study may need to be conducted with a larger sample size to achieve adequate statistical power. PMID:18844799

  4. Implementation of the updated 2015 Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO) recommendations “Prevention and control of catheter-associated urinary tract infections” in the hospitals in Frankfurt/Main, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Heudorf, Ursel; Grünewald, Miriam; Otto, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO) updated the recommendations for the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections in 2015. This article will describe the implementation of these recommendations in Frankfurt’s hospitals in autumn, 2015. Material and methods: In two non-ICU wards of each of Frankfurt’s 17 hospitals, inspections were performed using a checklist based on the new KRINKO recommendations. In one large hospital, a total of 5 wards were inspected. The inspections covered the structure and process quality (operating instructions, training, indication, the placement and maintenance of catheters) and the demonstration of the preparation for insertion of a catheter using an empty bed and an imaginary patient, or insertion in a model. Results: Operating instructions were available in all hospital wards; approximately half of the wards regularly performed training sessions. The indications were largely in line with the recommendations of the KRINKO. Alternatives to urinary tract catheters were available and were used more often than the urinary tract catheters themselves (15.9% vs. 13.5%). In accordance with the recommendations, catheters were placed without antibiotic prophylaxis or the instillation of antiseptic or antimicrobial substances or catheter flushing solutions. The demonstration of catheter placement was conscientiously performed. Need for improvement was seen in the daily documentation and the regular verification of continuing indication for a urinary catheter, as well as the omission of regular catheter change. Conclusion: Overall, the recommendations of the KRINKO on the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections were adequately implemented. However, it cannot be ruled out that in situations with time pressure and staff shortage, the handling of urinary tract catheters may be of lower quality than that observed during the inspections, when catheter insertion was done by

  5. Dual frequency launcher for circularly polarized antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming H.

    1989-10-01

    A dual frequency antenna feed is formed from a central, circular waveguide connected to the flat boundry of circular, disk-shaped resonant cavity. A second circular waveguide is connected one end of a disk-shaped resonant cavity. Energy of one frequency enters and exits the cavity along the common axis of the waveguides. Energy of the second frequency is introduced to the same resonant cavity by way of a plurality of bandpass filters, also connected to the cavity. This energy enters by way of slots in the cylindrical walls of the cavity. The central circular waveguide is propagating at one frequency but cut off at the second frequency. These bandpass filters are at this pass band for the second frequency, but at the rejection band for the first frequency. Therefore, the isolation between these two input ports are obtained.

  6. Low energy aspects of circular accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, S.D.

    1990-12-01

    Performance in circular accelerators can be limited by some of the same sorts of phenomena described by Miller and Wangler in their lectures on low energy behavior in linear accelerators. In general the strength of the perturbation required to degrade performance is reduced in circular accelerators due to the repetitive nature of the orbits. For example, we shall see that space-charge can severely limit performance in circular accelerators even when operating far from the space-charge dominated regime'' as defined in linear accelerators. We will be discussing two particular aspects of low energy operation in circular accelerators -- space-charge and transition. Low energy'' is defined within the context of these phenomena. We shall see that the phenomena are really only relevant in hadron accelerators.

  7. Implementing an ecological approach to violence reduction at a forensic psychiatric hospital: approaches and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Bader, Shannon M; Evans, Sean E

    2015-06-01

    Existing literature on aggression within psychiatric hospitals suggests that treating an aggressive patient's symptoms could be complemented by (a) milieu environments that mitigate violence and (b) hospital-wide policies and procedures that focus on creating a safe environment. Described as an ecological approach, examples of how this broader, situational approach can reduce inpatient violence in psychiatric settings are provided throughout. The authors identify potential barriers to focusing on wards and institutional rules as well as patient treatment. Last, details of how this ecological approach has been implemented at one state hospital in California are provided. PMID:25882371

  8. CIRCULAR RIBBON FLARES AND HOMOLOGOUS JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Haimin; Liu Chang

    2012-12-01

    Solar flare emissions in the chromosphere often appear as elongated ribbons on both sides of the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL), which has been regarded as evidence of a typical configuration of magnetic reconnection. However, flares having a circular ribbon have rarely been reported, although it is expected in the fan-spine magnetic topology involving reconnection at a three-dimensional (3D) coronal null point. We present five circular ribbon flares with associated surges, using high-resolution and high-cadence H{alpha} blue wing observations obtained from the recently digitized films of Big Bear Solar Observatory. In all the events, a central parasitic magnetic field is encompassed by the opposite polarity, forming a circular PIL traced by filament material. Consequently, a flare kernel at the center is surrounded by a circular flare ribbon. The four homologous jet-related flares on 1991 March 17 and 18 are of particular interest, as (1) the circular ribbons brighten sequentially, with cospatial surges, rather than simultaneously, (2) the central flare kernels show an intriguing 'round-trip' motion and become elongated, and (3) remote brightenings occur at a region with the same magnetic polarity as the central parasitic field and are co-temporal with a separate phase of flare emissions. In another flare on 1991 February 25, the circular flare emission and surge activity occur successively, and the event could be associated with magnetic flux cancellation across the circular PIL. We discuss the implications of these observations combining circular flare ribbons, homologous jets, and remote brightenings for understanding the dynamics of 3D magnetic restructuring.

  9. Single particle dynamics in circular accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.

    1986-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the reader to the theory associated with the transverse dynamics of single particle, in circular accelerators. The discussion begins with a review of Hamiltonian dynamics and canonical transformations. The case of a single particle in a circular accelerator is considered with a discussion of non-linear terms and chromaticity. The canonical perturbation theory is presented and nonlinear resonances are considered. Finally, the concept of renormalization and residue criterion are examined. (FI)

  10. Circular DNA Molecules in the Genus Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Travaglini, E. C.; Schultz, J.

    1972-01-01

    The satellite DNA's from the embryos of five species of Drosophila (D. melanogaster, D. simulans, D. nasuta, D. virilis and D. hydei) have been analyzed for the presence of closed circular duplex DNA molecules, as determined by CsCl-EBr gradients. Circular DNA molecules were found in every species but D. melanogaster. Analyses of cell fractions from adult Drosophila and organ fractions from Drosophila larvae show that fractions containing mitochondria are highly enriched in these molecules. PMID:4643820

  11. Circular polarization of sunlight reflected by clouds.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    Measurements of circular polarization of visible light from planets have recently been reported. It is pointed out that the values measured for the circular polarization for Jupiter and Venus are of the magnitude expected for sunlight reflected by a cloudy planetary atmosphere. The variations of the sense of the polarization with phase angle and with location on the planetary disk are also consistent with expectations for reflection by clouds.

  12. Emergence of high ampicillin-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates in a kidney transplant ward: role of antibiotic pressure and cross transmission.

    PubMed

    Maillard, Olivier; Corvec, Stéphane; Dantal, Jacques; Reynaud, Alain; Lucet, Jean-Christophe; Bémer, Pascale; Lepelletier, Didier

    2010-06-01

    The epidemiology of patients associated with ampicillin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (ARE) was investigated by combining both clinical approach and molecular analysis in a kidney transplant patient's ward. A case-control study was performed to identify risk factors for ARE by matching each patient with ARE with two control patients without any isolated E. faecium strain. ARE isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. From June 2004 to May 2006, 18 cases with clinical ARE samples were detected and compared with 35 control patients. By univariate analysis, recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) (odds ratio [OR], 4.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-25.6), mean number of hospitalization days in the last year (p < 0.003), pyelonephritis or UTI (OR, 9.6; 95% CI, 2.2-46.1), oral third-generation cephalosporin use (OR, 12.42; 95% CI, 2.04-109.1), and fluoroquinolone use (OR, 4.4; 95% CI, 1.1-18.2) were significantly associated with ARE urinary tract colonization. By conditional logistic regression, hospitalization >21 days within 1 year (adjusted OR [aOR], 6.9; 95% CI, 1.0-46.5), recent medical history of pyelonephritis or UTI (aOR, 8.6; 95% CI, 1.5-49.1), and prior oral third-generation cephalosporin use (aOR, 13.1; 95% CI, 1.2-142.6) were identified as independent factors associated with ARE urinary tract colonization. Genotyping revealed a heterogeneous epidemiological situation with two major clones in patients hospitalized in successive rooms and 10 different single pulsotypes. Emergence of highly resistant enterococcal strains is a collateral damage from antibiotic prescription and represents a potential source of patient-to-patient transmission. Combining epidemiological approach and molecular analysis is a powerful tool to delineate mechanisms of emerging resistance. Improving our knowledge on ARE emergence in high antibiotic pressure hospital wards is a key factor to better control these colonizations/infections and to prevent the

  13. Use of Antibiotics in Pediatrics: 8-Years Survey in Italian Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Buccellato, Elena; Melis, Mauro; Biagi, Chiara; Donati, Monia; Motola, Domenico; Vaccheri, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate antibiotic consumption in the pediatric wards of Emilia-Romagna Region, from 2004 to 2011, with a focus on the antibiotics reserved to the most serious infections, and to analyse the ADRs reported for antibiotics by the pediatric wards of Emilia-Romagna hospitals. Methods Reference population was represented by all the patients (0–14 years old) admitted to the pediatric wards of all the hospitals of Emilia-Romagna Region. Drug consumption was expressed as number of DDDs per 100 Bed-Days (BD) and data were analysed by active substance, by therapeutic subgroups or by ward type. The time trends of antibiotic consumption were statistically analysed by linear regression. All the suspected ADR reports associated with antibiotics, reported between January 2004 and December 2011 were drawn by the Italian Spontaneous Reporting Database. Results Overall antibiotic consumption showed only a slight increase (p = 0.224). Among the pediatric wards, pediatric surgery showed the highest increase from 2004 to 2011 (p = 0.011). Penicillins and β-lactamase inhibitors was the first therapeutic group with a statistically significant increase over years (p = 0.038), whereas penicillins with extended spectrum presented a statistically significant reduction (p = 0.008). Moreover, only 5 drugs out of the 8 antibiotics reserved to the most serious infections were used. Pharmacovigilance data showed 27 spontaneous ADR reports associated to ATC J01 drugs. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid had the highest number of ADR reports (n = 7). Conclusions The steadily increasing consumption in penicillins and β-lactamase inhibitors, in association with a considerable decrease of plain penicillins, raises a serious concern. Pharmacovigilance reports seem to suggest a safe use of antibiotics in the hospital setting of Emilia-Romagna. Further studies to investigate the reason for prescribing antibiotics in children inpatients are needed. PMID:26405817

  14. Circular Data Images for Directional Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morpet, William J.

    2004-01-01

    Directional data includes vectors, points on a unit sphere, axis orientation, angular direction, and circular or periodic data. The theoretical statistics for circular data (random points on a unit circle) or spherical data (random points on a unit sphere) are a recent development. An overview of existing graphical methods for the display of directional data is given. Cross-over occurs when periodic data are measured on a scale for the measurement of linear variables. For example, if angle is represented by a linear color gradient changing uniformly from dark blue at -180 degrees to bright red at +180 degrees, the color image will be discontinuous at +180 degrees and -180 degrees, which are the same location. The resultant color would depend on the direction of approach to the cross-over point. A new graphical method for imaging directional data is described, which affords high resolution without color discontinuity from "cross-over". It is called the circular data image. The circular data image uses a circular color scale in which colors repeat periodically. Some examples of the circular data image include direction of earth winds on a global scale, rocket motor internal flow, earth global magnetic field direction, and rocket motor nozzle vector direction vs. time.

  15. Mathematical models for assessing the role of airflow on the risk of airborne infection in hospital wards

    PubMed Central

    Noakes, Catherine J.; Sleigh, P. Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the risk of airborne transmission can provide important information for designing safe healthcare environments with an appropriate level of environmental control for mitigating risks. The most common approach for assessing risk is to use the Wells–Riley equation to relate infectious cases to human and environmental parameters. While it is a simple model that can yield valuable information, the model used as in its original presentation has a number of limitations. This paper reviews recent developments addressing some of the limitations including coupling with epidemic models to evaluate the wider impact of control measures on disease progression, linking with zonal ventilation or computational fluid dynamics simulations to deal with imperfect mixing in real environments and recent work on dose–response modelling to simulate the interaction between pathogens and the host. A stochastic version of the Wells–Riley model is presented that allows consideration of the effects of small populations relevant in healthcare settings and it is demonstrated how this can be linked to a simple zonal ventilation model to simulate the influence of proximity to an infector. The results show how neglecting the stochastic effects present in a real situation could underestimate the risk by 15 per cent or more and that the number and rate of new infections between connected spaces is strongly dependent on the airflow. Results also indicate the potential danger of using fully mixed models for future risk assessments, with quanta values derived from such cases less than half the actual source value. PMID:19812072

  16. mec-A-mediated Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus in a Referral Hospital, Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rajabiani, Afsaneh; Kamrani, Fatemeh; Boroumand, Mohammad Ali; Saffar, Hiva

    2014-01-01

    Background: The emerge of rapid and accurate detection of Meticillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been highlighted. Objectives: The current study evaluated the prevalence of mec-A gene in biological specimens of various medical wards, in order to determine any possible relationship. Patients and Methods: Using traditional culture methods, 250 isolates were detected. The prevalence of mec-A mediated resistance was evaluated by PCR method. Results: Among 98 isolates (39.2%) with resistant inhibition zones, 92 isolates carried mec-A gene and were considered as MRSA. Significantly higher rate of MRSA was observed in the specimens from emergency department and intensive care unit (P value < 0.001). Although, the prevalence of MRSA was higher in patients with history of previous hospital admission within the past three months (P = 0.006), but only one case with the same history was hospitalized in the emergency ward that was among the wards with the highest rate of MRSA. Conclusions: The study findings show that, although there is higher rate of MRSA infection in patients with history of hospitalization, but even in cases without any history of medical admission, more detailed questions emphasizing on receiving any recent health care should be asked in a referral hospital, in order to determine the true community-acquired MRSA. PMID:25147695

  17. Hidden in Plain Sight on Locked Wards--On Finding and Being Found.

    PubMed

    Margulies, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    Lost and falling, the feeling that life is disorienting: none of us escapes the experience. For those clinicians who venture on to inpatient wards, lost-ness takes on a special urgency. But what does it mean to "find" another? Surely feeling lost is at the heart of our existential search for grounding. And so how does one find oneself? And why is another so important in this self-search? This paper explores two brief encounters on an inpatient ward where the lost-ness of psychosis and despair cover the shock of unbearable feelings. Yet the intolerable story is displayed as both a symptom and a sign, inscribed in the body, an uncanny symbol hidden in plain sight. And here may be a way in, and a way out-here a person might be found. PMID:27052608

  18. The quantity of nursing care on wards working 8- and 12-hour shifts.

    PubMed

    Reid, N; Robinson, G; Todd, C

    1993-10-01

    Interest in 12-hour nursing shifts has been renewed in response to demands for improved cost-effectiveness in the NHS, but the effects of this shift on the delivery of patient care have been unclear. This paper describes the results of a repeated-measures study of 10 wards, using activity analysis to describe patterns of care under an 8-hour compared to a 12-hour shift system. Significant reductions in the amount of direct patient care were found under the 12-hour shift, with corresponding increases in unofficial work-breaks. It is suggested that these findings, which were consistent over all study wards and throughout the whole 12-hour day, demonstrate a "pacing" effect by nurses who face 12 hours on duty. Such a detrimental effect should be a major consideration when coming to any decision to implement a 12-hour shift. PMID:8225806

  19. Uncovering paradoxes from physicians' experiences of patient-centered ward-round.

    PubMed

    Bååthe, Fredrik; Ahlborg, Gunnar; Edgren, Lars; Lagström, Annica; Nilsson, Kerstin

    2016-05-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to uncover paradoxes emerging from physicians' experiences of a patient-centered and team-based ward round, in an internal medicine department. Design/methodology/approach Abductive reasoning relates empirical material to complex responsive processes theory in a dialectical process to further understandings. Findings This paper found the response from physicians, to a patient-centered and team-based ward round, related to whether the new demands challenged or confirmed individual physician's professional identity. Two empirically divergent perspectives on enacting the role of physician during ward round emerged: We-perspective and I-perspective, based on where the physician's professional identity was centered. Physicians with more of a We-perspective experienced challenges with the new round, while physicians with more of an I-perspective experienced alignment with their professional identity and embraced the new round. When identity is challenged, anxiety is aroused, and if anxiety is not catered to, then resistance is likely to follow and changes are likely to be hampered. Practical implications For change processes affecting physicians' professional identity, it is important for managers and change leaders to acknowledge paradox and find a balance between new knowledge that needs to be learnt and who the physician is becoming in this new procedure. Originality/value This paper provides increased understanding about how physicians' professional identity is interacting with a patient-centered ward round. It adds to the knowledge about developing health care in line with recent societal requests and with sustainable physician engagement. PMID:27198705

  20. [open quotes]Victory[close quotes] a matter of perception in Ward Valley dispute

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, P.

    1994-02-17

    This article concerns the legal battle over the siting of Ward Valley, a proposed low-level nuclear waste site in California's Mojave Desert. The discussion centers around a judge's decision to deny a pretrial request for adjudicatory hearings to determine the site's suitability as a repository. The site is within an area designated as territory for the desert tortoise by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  1. Direct proof of the Ward-like identities in split field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdurrahman, Abdulmajeed; Abdurrahman, Ibrahim; Gassem, Mahmoud

    2016-03-01

    The bosonic representation of the split field theory of the open bosonic string ghost, in the full string basis, is examined. The proof that the split field theory 3- vertex (matter and ghost) in the bosonic representation satisfy the Ward like identities is established thus completing the proof of the Bose Fermi equivalence in the split field theory formalism of the open bosonic string. This work is supported by CFEST, Institute of Public Services, Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania.

  2. Estimation of Nursing Staff in Selected Hospitals of Ilam and Ahvaz Provinces, Western Iran

    PubMed Central

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Arab, Mohammad; Sadeghifar, Jamil; Ahmadi, Batoul; Salimi, Mohammad; Yghoubi, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Background: The nurses as the largest group among different groups of hospital workforce play a crucial role in success of the hospital activities and promotion of community health. Objectives: This study aimed to obtain an estimation of the necessary nursing workforce status in educational hospitals affiliated to Ilam and Ahvaz University of Medical Sciences based on the scientific formula. Materials and Methods: This research was a cross sectional-descriptive study, which was done in hospitals affiliated to Ilam and Ahvaz University of Medical Sciences during 2010. Using three researcher-made forms, data was collected from all clinical, para-clinical, financial, administrative and support departments of hospitals. Data was analyzed in accordance to the standards of Iran's Ministry of Health and Medical Education using the Excel software. Results: The results showed that the nursing staffs in the 42 wards (89.5 %) were lower than the standards, only one ward (2 %) matched the standards and the rest of the wards (8.5%) were higher than the standards. The organizational dislocation (utilization of nurses in non-related jobs) of nursing staffs obtained for Imam Khomeini of Ilam, Mostafa Khomeini, Taleghani, Razi and Imam Khomeini of Ahvaz Hospitals were 8, 5, 3, 8 and 21, respectively. Conclusion: Generally, the studied hospitals were faced with a lack of nursing manpower and distribution of manpower was not appropriate. Proper planning and management of manpower in accordance with the lack of personnel, compensates and achieves the standards required for hospital’s nursing manpower and this would lead to an increase in the efficiency of hospitals activities and can provide satisfaction for the nursing staff. PMID:25414862

  3. Clustering of soybean genotypes via Ward-MLM and ANNs associated with mixed models.

    PubMed

    Teodoro, P E; Torres, F E; Corrêa, A M

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to use mixed models to confirm the presence of genetic variability in 16 soybean genotypes, to compare clusters generated by artificial neural networks (ANNs) with those created by the Ward modified location model (MLM) technique, and to indicate parental combinations that hold promise for obtaining superior segregating populations of soybean. A field trial was conducted between November 2014 and February 2015 at Universidade Estadual de Mato Grosso do Sul, Aquidauana, MS. The experimental design consisted of four replications of randomized blocks, each containing 16 treatments. We assessed the following agronomic traits: plant height, first pod height, number of branches per plant, number of pods per plant, number of grains per pod, hundred-grain weight, and grain yield. Mixed models were used to estimate variance components and genetic parameters, and obtain genotypic values for each trait. After verifying the presence of genetic variability for all traits, genotypic values were submitted to both a Ward-MLM procedure and ANNs to estimate genetic divergence among genotypes. The number of groups formed by both methods was the same, but there were differences in group constitutions. ANN analysis improved soybean genotypes clustering patterns compared to Ward-MLM procedure. Based on these methods, divergent crosses may be made between genotype 97R73 with genotypes AS3797 and SYN9070, whereas convergent crosses may be made between genotypes AS3797 and SYN9070. PMID:27525912

  4. A safe place with space for learning: Experiences from an interprofessional training ward.

    PubMed

    Hallin, Karin; Kiessling, Anna

    2016-03-01

    Interprofessional learning in a real ward context effectively increases collaborative and professional competence among students. However, less is known on the processes behind this. The aim of this study was to explore medical, nurse, physiotherapy, and occupational therapy students' perspectives on the process of their own learning at an interprofessional training ward (IPTW). We performed a qualitative content analysis on free-text answers of 333 student questionnaires from the years 2004 to 2011. Two main themes emerged: first, students found that the IPTW provided an enriching learning environment-a safe place with space. It included authentic and relevant patients, well-composed and functioning student teams, competent and supportive supervisors, and adjusted ward structures to support learning. Second, they developed an awareness of their own development with faith in the future-from chaos to clarity. It included personal, professional, and interprofessional development towards a comprehensive view of practice and a faith in their ability to work as professionals in the future. Our findings are discussed with a social constructivist perspective. This study suggests that when an IPTW provides a supportive and permissive learning environment with possibilities to interact with one another-a safe place with space-it enables students to move from insecurity to faith in their abilities-from chaos to clarity. However, if the learning environment is impaired, the students' development could be halted. PMID:26940600

  5. Structural framework and sand genesis of Wilcox group, Travis Ward field, Jim Hogg County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Rolf, E.G.

    1987-09-01

    Since its discovery in 1983, there have been eight deep Wilcox and eight Queen City wells drilled in the Travis Ward field area. Of the eight Wilcox wells, four are producing gas from deep sands; three, that are capable of production, have been junked and abandoned, and one produces from the Hinnant sand at the top of the Wilcox. Only five of the eight Queen city wells have been completed; three are considered commercial. Wilcox gas reserve estimates range from 80 to 300 bcf. To date, Wilcox and Queen City production is related to normal faulting associated with a deep salt and/or shale ridge within the Rio Grande interior salt basin. Growth of the ridge has resulted in the Wilcox being as much as 2000 ft structurally higher than the areas immediately north and south of Travis Ward field. Knowledge of the ancestral development of ridge closure prior to faulting may be critical to successful completions at Travis Ward field. Ridge-associated sea floor topography, shelf currents, sediment source proximity, and rate of sedimentation have combined for local development of high quality clean reservoir sands.

  6. Improving the quality of care for medical inpatients by placing a higher priority on ward rounds.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Ash; Riyaz, Shahzad; Said, Elmhutady; Hale, Melissa; Mills, Andy; Kapur, Kapil

    2013-12-01

    Models suggested for managing acute, non-elective, medical admissions include expanding geriatric services, extending the role of the acute physician and rejuvenating the role of the general physician. We investigated improving inpatient care by changing consultants' work patterns and placing a higher priority on the ward rounds. A focus group and a questionnaire were used to study the impact on several ward round parameters. All respondents reported an overall satisfaction: 93% rated the quality of care as good or excellent, 75% reported increased safe patient discharges and 68% observed improved teamwork. Length of stay reduced to 4 days from 5.3 days without an increase in readmission. The main themes showed improved quality of care, better assured patients and relatives, and better consultant job satisfaction, but also showed reduced junior doctors' independent decision-making and a slight reduction in specialty-related activity. The study concluded that placing a higher priority on ward rounds by altering consultants' work patterns has a positive impact on inpatient care. PMID:24298094

  7. Drinking Water Quality Surveillance in a Vulnerable Urban Ward of Ahmedabad

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Veena; Choudhury, Nandini; Azhar, Gulrez Shah; Somvanshi, Bhushan

    2014-01-01

    The World Bank estimates that 21% of all communicable diseases in India are related to unsafe water with diarrhoea alone causing more than 0.1 million deaths annually. The WHO drinking water surveillance parameters of quality, quantity, accessibility, affordability and continuity were assessed in one vulnerable ward of Ahmedabad—a fast growing city in Western India. Interviews with key informants of the ward office, health centre and water supply department, secondary analysis and mapping of field test reports and a questionnaire-based survey of different household types were conducted. We found that Ahmedabad Municipal Corporation (AMC) supplies water to the ward intermittently for two hours during the day. Housing society clusters supplement their AMC water supply with untested bore-well water. The water quality surveillance system is designed for a twenty-four-hour piped distribution of treated surface water. However, in order to maintain surveillance over an intermittent supply that includes ground water, the sampling process should include periodic surveys of water actually consumed by the citizens. The laboratory capacity of the Central Water Testing Laboratory should expand to include more refined tests for microbial and chemical contamination. PMID:25254083

  8. Impediments to recovery in New Orleans' Upper and Lower Ninth Ward: one year after Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Green, Rebekah; Bates, Lisa K; Smyth, Andrew

    2007-12-01

    In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, a rapid succession of plans put forward a host of recovery options for the Upper and Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans. Much of the debate focused on catastrophic damage to residential structures and discussions of the capacity of low-income residents to repair their neighbourhoods. This article examines impediments to the current recovery process of the Upper and Lower Ninth Ward, reporting results of an October 2006 survey of 3,211 plots for structural damage, flood damage and post-storm recovery. By examining recovery one year after Hurricane Katrina, and by doing so in the light of flood and structural damage, it is possible to identify impediments to recovery that may disproportionately affect these neighbourhoods. This paper concludes with a discussion of how pre- and post-disaster inequalities have slowed recovery in the Lower Ninth Ward and of the implications this has for post-disaster recovery planning there and elsewhere. PMID:18028156

  9. 5 CFR 1310.3 - Availability of circulars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Availability of circulars. 1310.3 Section 1310.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES OMB CIRCULARS § 1310.3 Availability of circulars. Copies of individual circulars are available at OMB's Internet home page; you...

  10. 5 CFR 1310.5 - List of current circulars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false List of current circulars. 1310.5 Section 1310.5 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES OMB CIRCULARS § 1310.5 List of current circulars. The following list includes all circulars in effect as of December 1,...

  11. 5 CFR 1310.5 - List of current circulars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false List of current circulars. 1310.5 Section 1310.5 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES OMB CIRCULARS § 1310.5 List of current circulars. The following list includes all circulars in effect as of December 1,...

  12. 5 CFR 1310.5 - List of current circulars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false List of current circulars. 1310.5 Section 1310.5 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES OMB CIRCULARS § 1310.5 List of current circulars. The following list includes all circulars in effect as of December 1,...

  13. 5 CFR 1310.5 - List of current circulars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false List of current circulars. 1310.5 Section 1310.5 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES OMB CIRCULARS § 1310.5 List of current circulars. The following list includes all circulars in effect as of December 1,...

  14. 5 CFR 1310.5 - List of current circulars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false List of current circulars. 1310.5 Section 1310.5 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES OMB CIRCULARS § 1310.5 List of current circulars. The following list includes all circulars in effect as of December 1,...

  15. 39 CFR 233.2 - Circulars and rewards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Circulars and rewards. 233.2 Section 233.2 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION INSPECTION SERVICE AUTHORITY § 233.2 Circulars and rewards. (a) Wanted circulars. The Inspection Service issues wanted circulars to assist...

  16. 5 CFR 1310.3 - Availability of circulars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Availability of circulars. 1310.3 Section 1310.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES OMB CIRCULARS § 1310.3 Availability of circulars. Copies of individual circulars are available at OMB's Internet home page; you...

  17. 39 CFR 233.2 - Circulars and rewards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Circulars and rewards. 233.2 Section 233.2 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION INSPECTION SERVICE AUTHORITY § 233.2 Circulars and rewards. (a) Wanted circulars. The Inspection Service issues wanted circulars to assist in locating and arresting fugitive...

  18. 12 CFR 563g.8 - Use of the offering circular.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of the offering circular. 563g.8 Section... § 563g.8 Use of the offering circular. (a) An offering circular or amendment declared effective by the... therein is as of a date not more than 16 months prior to such use. (b) An offering circular filed...

  19. 24 CFR 574.605 - Applicability of OMB circulars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Federal Requirements § 574.605 Applicability of OMB circulars. The policies, guidelines, and requirements of 24 CFR part 85 (codified pursuant to OMB Circular No. A-102) and OMB Circular No. A-87 apply with... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Applicability of OMB circulars....

  20. 24 CFR 574.605 - Applicability of OMB circulars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Federal Requirements § 574.605 Applicability of OMB circulars. The policies, guidelines, and requirements of 24 CFR part 85 (codified pursuant to OMB Circular No. A-102) and OMB Circular No. A-87 apply with... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applicability of OMB circulars....

  1. 5 CFR 1310.3 - Availability of circulars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Availability of circulars. 1310.3 Section 1310.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES OMB CIRCULARS § 1310.3 Availability of circulars. Copies of individual circulars are available at OMB's Internet home page; you...

  2. 49 CFR 1544.305 - Security Directives and Information Circulars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Security Directives and Information Circulars... and Information Circulars. (a) TSA may issue an Information Circular to notify aircraft operators of... operator that receives a Security Directive or Information Circular and each person who...

  3. 12 CFR 563g.8 - Use of the offering circular.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Use of the offering circular. 563g.8 Section... § 563g.8 Use of the offering circular. (a) An offering circular or amendment declared effective by the... therein is as of a date not more than 16 months prior to such use. (b) An offering circular filed...

  4. "Evil reports" for "ignorant minds"? Patient experience and public confidence in the emerging modern hospital: Vancouver General Hospital, 1912.

    PubMed

    Gagan, D; Gagan, R

    2001-01-01

    The process whereby the 19th-century Canadian charity hospital for the sick poor was transformed into a centre for scientific health care for the whole community was well in hand by World War I. To fund this transition, and to cope with the subsequent unrelieved demand from all social classes for accessibility to hospitalization, hospitals instituted differentiated services, offering premium care and privacy to paying patients whose fees, in turn, sustained a more economical level of open ward maintenance for indigent patients. As the record of a 1912 public investigation into patient grievances and complaints against the Vancouver General Hospital reveals, the commodification of hospital-based health care reproduced in the hospital environment the social attitudes, controls, and structures of the wider community. This development appeared to contradict the hospitals promise of undifferentiated, scientifically-mediated, medical efficiency and efficacy for all, and its reputation as a humane and caring institution. Notwithstanding the inquiry's conclusion that these grievances were "evil reports" designed to appeal to "ignorant minds," they reveal a patient population of already informed consumers ready, willing and able to discriminate between the promise and the reality of hospital-centred health care for all. PMID:14518465

  5. Parents' perceptions and needs of children's hospital discharge information.

    PubMed

    Keatinge, Diana; Stevenson, Karen; Fitzgerald, Mary

    2009-08-01

    Two linked descriptive qualitative studies, conducted 12 months apart aimed to identify parents' perceptions of discharge information relating to a recent admission of their child to hospital. Study one participants included parents (n = 7) who telephoned a paediatric telephone triage service seeking information about their child's postdischarge care. Study 2 included parents (n = 12) of children admitted to a regional hospital's general paediatric ward. Data were collected via semi-structured interviews conducted with parents following their child's discharge from hospital. These data were analysed using qualitative content analysis separately. The studies were linked in so far as the results from study one informed the modification of the design of study two and its interview protocol. Both studies revealed verbal as well as written information is helpful to parents, plain language usage is important, messages from the health-care team are sometimes inconsistent, and parents need information specific to their particular circumstances. PMID:19703052

  6. Prevalence of Impaired Memory in Hospitalized Adults and Associations with In-Hospital Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Calev, Hila; Spampinato, Lisa M; Press, Valerie G; Meltzer, David O; Arora, Vineet M

    2015-01-01

    Background Effective inpatient teaching requires intact patient memory, but studies suggest hospitalized adults may have memory deficits. Sleep loss among inpatients could contribute to memory impairment. Objective To assess memory in older hospitalized adults, and to test the association between sleep quantity, sleep quality and memory, in order to identify a possible contributor to memory deficits in these patients. Design Prospective cohort study Setting General medicine and hematology/oncology inpatient wards Patients 59 hospitalized adults at least 50 years of age with no diagnosed sleep disorder. Measurements Immediate memory and memory after a 24-hour delay were assessed using a word recall and word recognition task from the University of Southern California Repeatable Episodic Memory Test (USC-REMT). A vignette-based memory task was piloted as an alternative test more closely resembling discharge instructions. Sleep duration and efficiency overnight in the hospital were measured using actigraphy. Results Mean immediate recall was 3.8 words out of 15 (SD=2.1). Forty-nine percent of subjects had poor memory, defined as immediate recall score of 3 or lower. Median immediate recognition was 11 words out of 15 (IQR=9, 13). Median delayed recall score was 1 word and median delayed recognition was 10 words (IQR= 8–12). In-hospital sleep duration and efficiency were not significantly associated with memory. The medical vignette score was correlated with immediate recall (r=0.49, p<0.01) Conclusions About half of inpatients studied had poor memory while in the hospital, signaling that hospitalization might not be an ideal teachable moment. In-hospital sleep was not associated with memory scores. PMID:25872763

  7. Bright circularly polarized soft X-ray high harmonics for X-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Tingting; Grychtol, Patrik; Knut, Ronny; Hernández-García, Carlos; Hickstein, Daniel D.; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Dollar, Franklin J.; Mancuso, Christopher A.; Hogle, Craig W.; Kfir, Ofer; Legut, Dominik; Carva, Karel; Ellis, Jennifer L.; Dorney, Kevin M.; Chen, Cong; Shpyrko, Oleg G.; Fullerton, Eric E.; Cohen, Oren; Oppeneer, Peter M.; Milošević, Dejan B.; Becker, Andreas; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A.; Popmintchev, Tenio; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first bright circularly polarized high-harmonic beams in the soft X-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and use them to implement X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements in a tabletop-scale setup. Using counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields at 1.3 and 0.79 µm, we generate circularly polarized harmonics with photon energies exceeding 160 eV. The harmonic spectra emerge as a sequence of closely spaced pairs of left and right circularly polarized peaks, with energies determined by conservation of energy and spin angular momentum. We explain the single-atom and macroscopic physics by identifying the dominant electron quantum trajectories and optimal phase-matching conditions. The first advanced phase-matched propagation simulations for circularly polarized harmonics reveal the influence of the finite phase-matching temporal window on the spectrum, as well as the unique polarization-shaped attosecond pulse train. Finally, we use, to our knowledge, the first tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the N4,5 absorption edges of Gd to validate the high degree of circularity, brightness, and stability of this light source. These results demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating the polarization, spectrum, and temporal shape of high harmonics in the soft X-ray region by manipulating the driving laser waveform. PMID:26534992

  8. Bright circularly polarized soft X-ray high harmonics for X-ray magnetic circular dichroism.

    PubMed

    Fan, Tingting; Grychtol, Patrik; Knut, Ronny; Hernández-García, Carlos; Hickstein, Daniel D; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Dollar, Franklin J; Mancuso, Christopher A; Hogle, Craig W; Kfir, Ofer; Legut, Dominik; Carva, Karel; Ellis, Jennifer L; Dorney, Kevin M; Chen, Cong; Shpyrko, Oleg G; Fullerton, Eric E; Cohen, Oren; Oppeneer, Peter M; Milošević, Dejan B; Becker, Andreas; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A; Popmintchev, Tenio; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C

    2015-11-17

    We demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first bright circularly polarized high-harmonic beams in the soft X-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and use them to implement X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements in a tabletop-scale setup. Using counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields at 1.3 and 0.79 µm, we generate circularly polarized harmonics with photon energies exceeding 160 eV. The harmonic spectra emerge as a sequence of closely spaced pairs of left and right circularly polarized peaks, with energies determined by conservation of energy and spin angular momentum. We explain the single-atom and macroscopic physics by identifying the dominant electron quantum trajectories and optimal phase-matching conditions. The first advanced phase-matched propagation simulations for circularly polarized harmonics reveal the influence of the finite phase-matching temporal window on the spectrum, as well as the unique polarization-shaped attosecond pulse train. Finally, we use, to our knowledge, the first tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the N4,5 absorption edges of Gd to validate the high degree of circularity, brightness, and stability of this light source. These results demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating the polarization, spectrum, and temporal shape of high harmonics in the soft X-ray region by manipulating the driving laser waveform. PMID:26534992

  9. 76 FR 62148 - Title VI; Proposed Circular, Environmental Justice; Proposed Circular

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ... Circular'' (76 FR 60593) and ``Environmental Justice; Proposed Circular'' (76 FR 60590). Corrections The... program questions, Amber Ontiveros, Office of Civil Rights, Federal Transit Administration, 1200 New Jersey Ave., SE., Washington, DC 20590, phone: (202) 366-4018, fax: (202) 366-3809, or e-mail,...

  10. [A method to determine hospital costs associated with nosocomial infections].

    PubMed

    Gianino, M M; Vallino, A; Anselmo, E; Minniti, D; Abbona, F; Mineccia, C; Silvaplana, P; Zotti, C M

    2007-01-01

    Several studies on the economic aspect of HAI have two major limitations: (1) the lack of distinction between resources attributable to the management of HAI and resources absorbed by the main clinical problem for which the patient was hospitalized, and (2) the lack of an adequate method for calculating the relative costs. The aim of the study was to test a cost modelling method that could overcome these limitations by applying Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (AEP) to the medical charts and by using cost-centre accounting. Two types of HAI were chosen: UTI and sepsis. The data analysis showed that using this system the extra-length of stay can be cut down to nil in General Surgery and Intensive Care for sepsis and in Intensive Care for the UTI. Moreover it becomes clear that the weight of the cost for the bed, or for the diagnostic services, or again for the pharmacological treatment, varied widely depending on the site of the HAI and the ward where the patient was hospitalized. Comparing cost of HAI calculated on the basis of the main total cost per day of hospitalization attributable to the HAI we have finally seen that some cases do not produce any costs, whereas others account costs due not to HAI (operating room) or more expensive costs than the really HAl-treatment-attributable ones, as sepsis in Urology ward (Euro 988.18 versus Euro 747.41) or UTI in General Surgery ward (Euro 603.77 versus Euro 479.30), in Neurology (Euro 4242.91 versus Euro 2278.48) and in Orthopedics (Euro 2328.99 versus Euro 1332.81). PMID:17937330

  11. Does spatial proximity drive norovirus transmission during outbreaks in hospitals?

    PubMed Central

    Harris, John P; Lopman, Ben A; Cooper, Ben S; O'Brien, Sarah J

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the role of spatial proximity, defined as patients sharing bays, in the spread of norovirus during outbreaks in hospitals. Design Enhanced surveillance of norovirus outbreaks between November 2009 and November 2011. Methods Data were gathered during 149 outbreaks of norovirus in hospital wards from five hospitals in two major cities in England serving a population of two million. We used the time between the first two cases of each outbreak to estimate the serial interval for norovirus in this setting. This distribution and dates of illness onset were used to calculate epidemic trees for each outbreak. We then used a permutation test to assess whether proximity, for all outbreaks, was more extreme than would be expected by chance under the null hypothesis that proximity was not associated with transmission risk. Results 65 outbreaks contained complete data on both onset dates and ward position. We estimated the serial interval to be 1.86 days (95% CI 1.6 to 2.2 days), and with this value found strong evidence to reject the null hypothesis that proximity was not significant (p<0.001). Sensitivity analysis using different values of the serial interval showed that there was evidence to reject the null hypothesis provided the assumed serial interval was less than 2.5 days. Conclusions Our results provide evidence that patients occupying the same bay as patients with symptomatic norovirus infection are at an increased risk of becoming infected by these patients compared with patients elsewhere in the same ward. PMID:23852138

  12. Repetitive elements regulate circular RNA biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wilusz, Jeremy E

    2015-01-01

    It was long assumed that eukaryotic precursor mRNAs (pre-mRNAs) are almost always spliced to generate a linear mRNA that is subsequently translated to produce a protein. However, it is now clear that thousands of protein-coding genes can be non-canonically spliced to produce circular noncoding RNAs, some of which are expressed at much higher levels than their associated linear mRNAs. How then does the splicing machinery decide whether to generate a linear mRNA or a circular RNA? Recent work has revealed that intronic repetitive elements, including sequences derived from transposons, are critical regulators of this decision. In most cases, circular RNA biogenesis appears to be initiated when complementary sequences from 2 different introns base pair to one another. This brings the splice sites from the intervening exon(s) into close proximity and facilitates the backsplicing event that generates the circular RNA. As many pre-mRNAs contain multiple intronic repeats, distinct circular transcripts can be produced depending on which repeats base pair to one another. Intronic repeats are thus critical regulatory sequences that control the functional output of their host genes, and potentially cause the functions of protein-coding genes to be highly divergent across species. PMID:26442181

  13. Circular and Elliptic Submerged Impinging Water Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudey, Eric; Benedicto, Olivier; Ravier, Emmanuel; Gutmark, Ephraim

    1999-11-01

    Experiments and CFD have been performed to study circular and elliptic jets in a submerged water jet facility. The tests included discharge coefficient measurement to evaluate pressure losses encountered in noncircular nozzles compared to circular ones. Three-dimensional pressure mappings on the impingement surface and PIV measurement of the jet mean and turbulent velocity have been performed at different compound impingement angles relative to the impingement surface and at different stand-off distances. The objective was to investigate the effect of the non-circular geometry on the flow field and on the impact region. The tests were performed in a close loop system in which the water was pumped through the nozzles into a clear Plexiglas tank. The Reynolds numbers were typically in the range of 250000. Discharge coefficients of the elliptic nozzle was somewhat lower than that of the circular jet but spreading rate and turbulence level were higher. Pressure mapping showed that the nozzle exit geometry had an effect on the pressure distribution in the impact region and that high-pressure zones were generated at specific impact points. PIV measurements showed that for a same total exit area, the elliptic jets affected a surface area that is 8the equivalent circular. The turbulence level in the elliptic jet tripled due to the nozzle design. Results of the CFD model were in good agreement with the experimental data.

  14. Environmental issues elimination through circular economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špirková, M.; Pokorná, E.; Šujanová, J.; Samáková, J.

    2016-04-01

    Environmental efforts of European Union are currently going towards circular economy. Tools like Extended Producer Responsibility and Eco-design were established. The circular economy deals with resources availability issue on one hand and waste management on the other hand. There are few pioneering companies all over the world with some kind of circular economy practice. Generally the concept is not very wide-spread. The paper aims to evaluate possibility of transition towards circular economy in Slovak industrial companies. They need to have an active approach to material treatment of their products after usage stage. Innovation is another important pre-condition for the transition. Main problem of current cradle to grave system is landfilling of valuable materials after one cycle of usage. Their potential value for next manufacturing cycles is lost. Companies may do not see connection between waste management and material resource prices and volatility of supplies. Municipalities are responsible for municipal waste collection and treatment in Slovakia. The circular economy operates by cradle to cradle principle. Company manages material flow until the material comes back to the beginning of manufacturing process by itself or by another partners. Stable material supplies with quite low costs are provided this way. It is necessary to deal with environmental problems in phase of product design. Questionnaire survey results show on one hand low involvement of industrial companies in waste management area, however on the other hand they are open to environmental innovations in future.

  15. A broadband, circular-polarization selective surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni Hasan Abadi, Seyed Mohamad Amin; Behdad, Nader

    2016-06-01

    We introduce a new technique for designing wideband circular-polarization selective surfaces (CPSSs) based on anisotropic miniaturized element frequency selective surfaces. The proposed structure is a combination of two linear-to-circular polarization converters sandwiching a linear polarizer. This CPSS consists of a number of metallic layers separated from each other by thin dielectric substrates. The metallic layers are in the form of two-dimensional arrays of subwavelength capacitive patches and inductive wire grids with asymmetric dimensions and a wire grid polarizer with sub-wavelength period. The proposed device is designed to offer a wideband circular-polarization selection capability allowing waves with left-hand circular polarization to pass through while rejecting those having right-hand circular polarization. A synthesis procedure is developed that can be used to design the proposed CPSS based on its desired band of operation. Using this procedure, a prototype of the proposed CPSS operating in the 12-18 GHz is designed. Full-wave electromagnetic simulations are used to predict the response of this structure. These simulation results confirm the validity of the proposed design concept and synthesis procedure and show that proposed CPSS operates within a fractional bandwidth of 40% with a co-polarization transmission discrimination of more than 15 dB. Furthermore, the proposed design is shown to be capable of providing an extremely wide field of view of ±60°.

  16. Nanofocusing in circular sector-like nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Zenin, Vladimir A; Pors, Anders; Han, Zhanghua; Eriksen, René L; Volkov, Valentyn S; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I

    2014-05-01

    Gold circular sector-like nanoantennas (with a radius of 500 nm and a taper angle of 60°, 90°, and 120°) on glass are investigated in a near-infrared wavelength range (900 - 2100 nm). Amplitude- and phase-resolved near-field images of circular sector-like antenna modes at telecom wavelength feature a concentric circular line of phase contrast, demonstrating resonant excitation of a standing wave of counter-propagating surface plasmons, travelling between a tip and opposite circular edge of the antenna. Transmission spectra obtained in the range 900 - 2100 nm are in good agreement with numerical simulations, revealing the main feature of this antenna configuration, viz., the resonance wavelength, in contrast to triangular antennas, does not depend on the taper angle and is determined only by the sector radius. This feature together with a robust and easily predictable frequency response makes circular sector-like nanoantennas very promising for implementing bowtie antennas and attractive for many applications. PMID:24921736

  17. Respiratory syncytial virus: its transmission in the hospital environment.

    PubMed

    Hall, C B

    1982-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) over the past two decades has been recognized as the most important cause of lower respiratory tract disease in infants and young children. Recently, it has also been identified as a major nosocomial hazard on pediatric wards. The potential for RSV to spread on such wards is underlined by several singular characteristics of RSV. It arrives in yearly epidemics and is highly contagious in all age groups. Immunity is of short duration, allowing repeated infections to occur. Thus, during an epidemic 20--40 percent of infants admitted for other conditions may acquire nosocomial RSV infection, as well as 50 percent of the ward personnel. The usual infection control procedures for respiratory illnesses have had limited success in controlling the spread of RSV. This may be due in part to the modes of transmission of RSV. Inoculation occurs mainly through the eye and nose, rather than the mouth. This may be via large-particle aerosols or droplets, requiring close contact. The virus, however, does not seem capable of traversing distances by small-particle aerosols. Nevertheless, it is able to remain infectious on various environmental surfaces, suggesting fomites as a source of spread. Indeed, inoculation after touching such contaminated surfaces can occur, and may be a major second means of spread, in hospitals as well as in families. PMID:6758370

  18. Transition from partial to full PACS at a 450,000 exams/year hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ro, Duk-Woo; Byun, Hong Sik; Choo, In W.; Kim, Bo K.; Lim, Jae H.

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the transition of a 1,100 beds tertiary hospital from 50 percent softcopy operation to full PACS operation. For the past 2 years, radiologists and clinicians have been using PACS to provide softcopy services to the outpatient clinics and inpatient wards of orthopedics surgery, neurosurgery and neurology as well as emergency room, surgical intensive care unit, medical intensive unit, pediatrics intensive care unit and neonatal intensive care unit. The examinations requested by these departments account for about 50 percent of hospital's radiological exams. In September 1996, we began the second phase of PACS implementation and installed additional workstations in the remaining wards and clinics, interfaced to PACS additional imaging modalities, and increased the capacity of both the image server and optical juke boxes. As of January 1997, we are in the final phase of moving away from conventional film system to full PACS operation.

  19. Dying in hospital: the residents' viewpoint

    PubMed Central

    Ahmedzai, S

    1982-01-01

    A survey of residents' (junior house officers') experiences and attitudes to the terminal care part of their work in four Glasgow teaching hospitals showed that even a month after starting work one-fifth of the respondents had not actively managed a dying patient. Sixty-four per cent thought that they had received inadequate teaching in terminal care. Depression and anxiety had been the most difficult symptoms encountered. The residents thought that the ward nursing staff contributed much more than their senior medical colleagues to both the medical and psychological aspects of terminal care. The results indicate a need for more undergraduate education in the most relevant areas, such as coping with the psychological problems of dying patients and their relatives. Newly qualified residents require more support from senior medical staff in looking after the terminally ill. PMID:6809204

  20. A Retrospective Analysis of Direct Medical Cost and Cost of Drug Therapy in Hospitalized Patients at Private Hospital in Western India

    PubMed Central

    Kumbar, Shivaprasad Kalakappa

    2015-01-01

    Background Pharmacoeconomics is analytical tool to know cost of hospitalization and its effect on health care system and society. In India, apart from the government health services, private sector also play big role to provide health care services. Objective To study the direct medical cost and cost of drug therapy in hospitalized patients at private hospital. Materials and Methods A retrospective study was conducted at private hospital in a metro city of Western India. Total 400 patients’ billing records were selected randomly for a period from 01/01/2013 to 31/12/2014. Data were collected from medical record of hospital with permission of medical director of hospital. Patients’ demographic profile age, sex, diagnosis and various costs like ICU charge, ventilator charge, diagnostic charge, etc. were noted in previously formed case record form. Data were analysed by Z, x2 and unpaired t-test. Result Patients were divided into less than 45 years and more than 45 year age group. They were divided into medical and surgical patients according to their admission in medical or surgical ward. Mortality, Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission, patients on ventilator were significantly (p<0.05) higher in medical patients. Direct medical cost, ward bed charge, ICU bed charge, ventilator charge and cost of drug therapy per patient were significantly (p<0.05) higher in medical patients while operation theatre and procedural charge were significantly (p<0.05) higher in surgical patients. Cost of fibrinolytics, anticoagulants, cardiovascular drugs were significantly (p<0.05) higher in medical patients. Cost of antimicrobials, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), antiemetics, analgesics, were significantly (p<0.05) higher in surgical patients. Conclusion Ward bed charge, ICU bed charge, ventilator charge accounted more than one third cost of direct medical cost in all the patients. Cost of drug therapy was one fourth of direct medical cost. Antimicrobials cost accounted 33% of cost