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Sample records for cisalhamento vertical em

  1. Application of EM holographic methods to borehole vertical electric source data to map a fuel oil spill

    SciTech Connect

    Bartel, L.C.

    1993-04-01

    The multifrequency, multisource holographic method used in the analysis of seismic data is to extended electromagnetic (EM) data within the audio frequency range. The method is applied to the secondary magnetic fields produced by a borehole, vertical electric source (VES). The holographic method is a numerical reconstruction procedure based on the double focusing principle for both the source array and the receiver array. The approach used here is to Fourier transform the constructed image from frequency space to time space and set time equal to zero. The image is formed when the in-phase part (real part) is a maximum or the out-of-phase (imaginary part) is a minimum; i.e., the EM wave is phase coherent at its origination. In the application here the secondary magnetic fields are treated as scattered fields. In the numerical reconstruction, the seismic analog of the wave vector is used; i.e., the imaginary part of the actual wave vector is ignored. The multifrequency, multisource holographic method is applied to calculated model data and to actual field data acquired to map a diesel fuel oil spill.

  2. THE VERTICAL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albert, Stephen L.; Spencer, Jeffrey B.

    1994-01-01

    'THE VERTICAL' computer keyboard is designed to address critical factors which contribute to Repetitive Motion Injuries (RMI) (including Carpal Tunnel Syndrome) in association with computer keyboard usage. This keyboard splits the standard QWERTY design into two halves and positions each half 90 degrees from the desk. In order to access a computer correctly. 'THE VERTICAL' requires users to position their bodies in optimal alignment with the keyboard. The orthopaedically neutral forearm position (with hands palms-in and thumbs-up) reduces nerve compression in the forearm. The vertically arranged keypad halves ameliorate onset occurrence of keyboard-associated RMI. By utilizing visually-reference mirrored mylar surfaces adjustable to the user's eye, the user is able to readily reference any key indicia (reversed) just as they would on a conventional keyboard. Transverse adjustability substantially reduces cumulative musculoskeletal discomfort in the shoulders. 'THE VERTICAL' eliminates the need for an exterior mouse by offering a convenient finger-accessible curser control while the hands remain in the vertically neutral position. The potential commercial application for 'THE VERTICAL' is enormous since the product can effect every person who uses a computer anywhere in the world. Employers and their insurance carriers are spending hundreds of millions of dollars per year as a result of RMI. This keyboard will reduce the risk.

  3. Dissociated Vertical Deviation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Terms Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Dissociated Vertical Deviation En Español Read in Chinese What is Dissociated Vertical Deviation (DVD)? DVD is ...

  4. Vertical Map Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Joanne M.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the superiority of vertical filing of maps in compressor-style vertical units over horizontal filing in drawers, emphasizing such factors as physical protection of the collection, ease of filing and retrieval, and efficient use of space. Disadvantages of vertical filing are also reviewed. (Author/JL)

  5. Vertical bounce of two vertically aligned balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2007-11-01

    When a tennis ball rests on top of a basketball and both drop to the floor together, the tennis ball is projected vertically at high speed. A mass-spring model of the impact, as well as air track data, suggest that the tennis ball should be projected at relatively low speed. Measurements of the forces on each ball and the bounce of vertically aligned superballs are used to resolve the discrepancy.

  6. Vertical axis wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij

    2011-03-08

    A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

  7. Offset vertical radar profiling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witten, A.; Lane, J.

    2003-01-01

    Diffraction tomography imaging was applied to VRP data acquired by vertically moving a receiving antenna in a number of wells. This procedure simulated a vertical downhole receiver array. Similarly, a transmitting antenna was sequentially moved along a series of radial lines extending outward from the receiver wells. This provided a sequence of multistatic data sets and, from each data set, a two-dimensional vertical cross-sectional image of spatial variations in wave speed was reconstructed.

  8. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-04-01

    Blade fatigue life is an important element in determining the economic viability of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT). VAWT-SAL Vertical Axis Wind Turbine- Stochastic Aerodynamic Loads Ver 3.2 numerically simulates the stochastic (random0 aerodynamic loads of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) created by the atomspheric turbulence. The program takes into account the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and assumed turbulence properties.

  9. Vertical sleeve gastrectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... smaller stomach is about the size of a banana. It limits the amount of food you can ... staples. This creates a long vertical tube or banana-shaped stomach. The surgery does not involve cutting ...

  10. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Sommargren, Gary E.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1999-10-19

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  11. Vertical Seismoelectric Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araji, A.

    2011-12-01

    The seismoelectric method corresponds to the measurement of electromagnetic disturbances associated with the passage of seismic waves in a porous medium. The coupling is due to the existence of the electric double layer at the solid/water interfaces. We consider the case of vertical seismoelectric profiling in which we trigger a seismic source in a vertical borehole and measure the seismoelectric response on the surface. We aim to image hetrogeneities in that section of the subsurface by utilizing the seismoelectric sources created at interfaces. An iterative source localization inversion algorithm is used to achieve the imaging of interfaces.

  12. Aiding Vertical Guidance Understanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feary, Michael; McCrobie, Daniel; Alkin, Martin; Sherry, Lance; Polson, Peter; Palmer, Everett; McQuinn, Noreen

    1998-01-01

    A two-part study was conducted to evaluate modern flight deck automation and interfaces. In the first part, a survey was performed to validate the existence of automation surprises with current pilots. Results indicated that pilots were often surprised by the behavior of the automation. There were several surprises that were reported more frequently than others. An experimental study was then performed to evaluate (1) the reduction of automation surprises through training specifically for the vertical guidance logic, and (2) a new display that describes the flight guidance in terms of aircraft behaviors instead of control modes. The study was performed in a simulator that was used to run a complete flight with actual airline pilots. Three groups were used to evaluate the guidance display and training. In the training, condition, participants went through a training program for vertical guidance before flying the simulation. In the display condition, participants ran through the same training program and then flew the experimental scenario with the new Guidance-Flight Mode Annunciator (G-FMA). Results showed improved pilot performance when given training specifically for the vertical guidance logic and greater improvements when given the training and the new G-FMA. Using actual behavior of the avionics to design pilot training and FMA is feasible, and when the automated vertical guidance mode of the Flight Management System is engaged, the display of the guidance mode and targets yields improved pilot performance.

  13. Vertical Alignment and Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Donna; Calzada, Lucio; LaPointe, Nancy; Lee, Audra; Sullivan, Lynn

    This study investigated whether vertical (grade level sequence) alignment of the curriculum in conjunction with teacher collaboration would enhance student performance on the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS) test in south Texas school districts of various sizes. Surveys were mailed to the office of the superintendent of 47 school…

  14. Vertical shaft windmill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grana, D. C.; Inge, S. V., Jr. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A vertical shaft has several equally spaced blades mounted. Each blade consists of an inboard section and an outboard section skew hinged to the inboard section. The inboard sections automatically adjust their positions with respect to the fixed inboard sections with changes in velocity of the wind. This windmill design automatically governs the maximum rotational speed of shaft.

  15. Jamming in Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; Steel, Fiona

    2011-03-01

    We study jamming of low aspect-ratio cylindrical Delrin grains in a vertical channel. Grain heights are less than their diameter so the grains resemble antacid tablets, coins, or poker chips. These grains are allowed to fall through a vertical channel with a square cross section where the channel width is greater than the diameter of a grain and constant throughout the length of the channel with no obstructions or constrictions. Grains are sometimes observed to form jams, stable structures supported by the channel walls with no support beneath them. The probability of jam occurrence and the strength or robustness of a jam is effected by grain and channel sizes. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability and jam strength in this system and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories. Supported by an Undergraduate Research Grant from Penn State Erie, The Behrend College.

  16. Jamming in Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; McCausland, Jeffrey; Steel, Fiona

    2010-03-01

    We experimentally study jamming of cylindrical grains in a vertical channel. The grains have a low aspect-ratio (height/diameter < 1) so their shape is like antacid tablets or poker chips. They are allowed to fall through a vertical channel with a square cross section. The channel width is greater than the diameter of a grain and constant throughout the length of the channel with no obstructions or constrictions. It is observed that grains sometimes jam in this apparatus. In a jam, grains form a stable structure from one side of the channel to the other with nothing beneath them. Jams may be strong enough to support additional grains above. The probability of a jam occurring is a function of the grain height and diameter. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability in this system and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories.

  17. Vertical organic transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüssem, Björn; Günther, Alrun; Fischer, Axel; Kasemann, Daniel; Leo, Karl

    2015-11-01

    Organic switching devices such as field effect transistors (OFETs) are a key element of future flexible electronic devices. So far, however, a commercial breakthrough has not been achieved because these devices usually lack in switching speed (e.g. for logic applications) and current density (e.g. for display pixel driving). The limited performance is caused by a combination of comparatively low charge carrier mobilities and the large channel length caused by the need for low-cost structuring. Vertical Organic Transistors are a novel technology that has the potential to overcome these limitations of OFETs. Vertical Organic Transistors allow to scale the channel length of organic transistors into the 100 nm regime without cost intensive structuring techniques. Several different approaches have been proposed in literature, which show high output currents, low operation voltages, and comparatively high speed even without sub-μm structuring technologies. In this review, these different approaches are compared and recent progress is highlighted.

  18. Vertical bloch line memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R. (Inventor); Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor); Wu, Jiin-chuan (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A new read gate design for the vertical Bloch line (VBL) memory is disclosed which offers larger operating margin than the existing read gate designs. In the existing read gate designs, a current is applied to all the stripes. The stripes that contain a VBL pair are chopped, while the stripes that do not contain a VBL pair are not chopped. The information is then detected by inspecting the presence or absence of the bubble. The margin of the chopping current amplitude is very small, and sometimes non-existent. A new method of reading Vertical Bloch Line memory is also disclosed. Instead of using the wall chirality to separate the two binary states, the spatial deflection of the stripe head is used. Also disclosed herein is a compact memory which uses vertical Bloch line (VBL) memory technology for providing data storage. A three-dimensional arrangement in the form of stacks of VBL memory layers is used to achieve high volumetric storage density. High data transfer rate is achieved by operating all the layers in parallel. Using Hall effect sensing, and optical sensing via the Faraday effect to access the data from within the three-dimensional packages, an even higher data transfer rate can be achieved due to parallel operation within each layer.

  19. 'Endurance' Untouched (vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This navigation camera mosaic, created from images taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on sols 115 and 116 (May 21 and 22, 2004) provides a dramatic view of 'Endurance Crater.' The rover engineering team carefully plotted the safest path into the football field-sized crater, eventually easing the rover down the slopes around sol 130 (June 12, 2004). To the upper left of the crater sits the rover's protective heatshield, which sheltered Opportunity as it passed through the martian atmosphere. The 360-degree view is presented in a vertical projection, with geometric and radiometric seam correction.

  20. The vertical motion simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosein, Todd

    1988-01-01

    Today's flight simulators, such as NASA's multimillion dollar Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS), recreate an authentic aircraft environment, and reproduce the sensations of flight by mechanically generating true physical events. In addition to their application as a training tool for pilots, simulators have become essential in the design, construction, and testing of new aircraft. Simulators allow engineers to study an aircraft's flight performance and characteristics without the cost or risk of an actual test flight. Because of their practicality, simulators will become more and more important in the development and design of new, safer aircraft.

  1. Vertical wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Danson, D.P.

    1988-08-16

    This patent describes a wind driven turbine of the vertical axis type comprising: (a) a support base; (b) a generally vertical column rotatably mounted to the support base; (c) upper and lower support means respectively mounted on the column for rotation therewith; wind driven blades connected between the upper and lower support means for rotation about the column and each blade being individually rotatable about a blade axis extending longitudinally through the blade to vary a blade angle of attach thereof relative to wind velocity during rotation about the column; and (e) control means for variably adjusting angles of attack of each blade to incident wind, the control means including a connecting rod means having drive means for rotating each blade about the associated blade axis in response to radial movement of the connecting rod means and control shaft pivotally mounted within the column and having a first shaft portion connected to the connecting rod means and a second shaft portion radially offset from the first shaft portion and pivotally connected to radially displace the first portion and thereby the connecting rod means to vary the blade angles of attack during rotation about the column.

  2. Vertical organic transistors.

    PubMed

    Lüssem, Björn; Günther, Alrun; Fischer, Axel; Kasemann, Daniel; Leo, Karl

    2015-11-11

    Organic switching devices such as field effect transistors (OFETs) are a key element of future flexible electronic devices. So far, however, a commercial breakthrough has not been achieved because these devices usually lack in switching speed (e.g. for logic applications) and current density (e.g. for display pixel driving). The limited performance is caused by a combination of comparatively low charge carrier mobilities and the large channel length caused by the need for low-cost structuring. Vertical Organic Transistors are a novel technology that has the potential to overcome these limitations of OFETs. Vertical Organic Transistors allow to scale the channel length of organic transistors into the 100 nm regime without cost intensive structuring techniques. Several different approaches have been proposed in literature, which show high output currents, low operation voltages, and comparatively high speed even without sub-μm structuring technologies. In this review, these different approaches are compared and recent progress is highlighted. PMID:26466388

  3. Multicolored Vertical Silicon Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Kwanyong; Wober, Munib; Steinvurzel, P.; Schonbrun, E.; Dan, Yaping; Ellenbogen, T.; Crozier, K. B.

    2011-04-13

    We demonstrate that vertical silicon nanowires take on a surprising variety of colors covering the entire visible spectrum, in marked contrast to the gray color of bulk silicon. This effect is readily observable by bright-field microscopy, or even to the naked eye. The reflection spectra of the nanowires each show a dip whose position depends on the nanowire radii. We compare the experimental data to the results of finite difference time domain simulations to elucidate the physical mechanisms behind the phenomena we observe. The nanowires are fabricated as arrays, but the vivid colors arise not from scattering or diffractive effects of the array, but from the guided mode properties of the individual nanowires. Each nanowire can thus define its own color, allowing for complex spatial patterning. We anticipate that the color filter effect we demonstrate could be employed in nanoscale image sensor devices.

  4. Direct Observation of Ultralow Vertical Emittance using a Vertical Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, Kent

    2015-09-17

    In recent work, the first quantitative measurements of electron beam vertical emittance using a vertical undulator were presented, with particular emphasis given to ultralow vertical emittances [K. P. Wootton, et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams, 17, 112802 (2014)]. Using this apparatus, a geometric vertical emittance of 0.9 #6;± 0.3 pm rad has been observed. A critical analysis is given of measurement approaches that were attempted, with particular emphasis on systematic and statistical uncertainties. The method used is explained, compared to other techniques and the applicability of these results to other scenarios discussed.

  5. Measurement of ultralow vertical emittance using a calibrated vertical undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootton, K. P.; Boland, M. J.; Rassool, R. P.

    2014-11-01

    Very few experimental techniques are useful for the direct observation of ultralow vertical emittance in electron storage rings. In this work, quantitative measurements of ultralow (pm rad) electron beam vertical emittance using a vertical undulator are presented. An undulator radiation model was developed using the measured magnetic field of the APPLE-II type undulator. Using calibrated experimental apparatus, a geometric vertical emittance of ɛy=0.9 ±0.3 pm rad has been observed. These measurements could also inform modeling of the angular distribution of undulator radiation at high harmonics, for proposed diffraction-limited storage ring light sources.

  6. Observation of Picometer Vertical Emittance with a Vertical Undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootton, K. P.; Boland, M. J.; Dowd, R.; Tan, Y.-R. E.; Cowie, B. C. C.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Taylor, G. N.; Rassool, R. P.

    2012-11-01

    Using a vertical undulator, picometer vertical electron beam emittances have been observed at the Australian Synchrotron storage ring. An APPLE-II type undulator was phased to produce a horizontal magnetic field, which creates a synchrotron radiation field that is very sensitive to the vertical electron beam emittance. The measured ratios of undulator spectral peak heights are evaluated by fitting to simulations of the apparatus. With this apparatus immediately available at most existing electron and positron storage rings, we find this to be an appropriate and novel vertical emittance diagnostic.

  7. ON-LINE TOOLS FOR PROPER VERTICAL POSITIONING OF VERTICAL SAMPLING INTERVALS DURING SITE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation presents on-line tools for proper vertical positioning of vertical sampling intervals during site assessment. Proper vertical sample interval selection is critical for generate data on the vertical distribution of contamination. Without vertical delineation, th...

  8. 4. VIEW OF VERTICAL BORING MACHINE. (Bullard) Vertical turning lathe ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF VERTICAL BORING MACHINE. (Bullard) Vertical turning lathe (VTL). Machining the fixture for GE Turboshroud. G.S. O'Brien, operator. - Juniata Shops, Machine Shop No. 1, East of Fourth Avenue at Third Street, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  9. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  10. Vertically reciprocating auger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etheridge, Mark; Morgan, Scott; Fain, Robert; Pearson, Jonathan; Weldi, Kevin; Woodrough, Stephen B., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The mathematical model and test results developed for the Vertically Reciprocating Auger (VRA) are summarized. The VRA is a device capable of transporting cuttings that result from below surface drilling. It was developed chiefly for the lunar surface, where conventional fluid flushing while drilling would not be practical. The VRA uses only reciprocating motion and transports material through reflections with the surface above. Particles are reflected forward and land ahead of radially placed fences, which prevent the particles from rolling back down the auger. Three input wave forms are considered to drive the auger. A modified sawtooth wave form was chosen for testing, over a modified square wave or sine wave, due to its simplicity and effectiveness. The three-dimensional mathematical model predicted a sand throughput rate of 0.2667 pounds/stroke, while the actual test setup transported 0.075 pounds/stroke. Based on this result, a correction factor of 0.281 is suggested for a modified sawtooth input.

  11. The Gains from Vertical Scaling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Derek C.; Domingue, Ben

    2013-01-01

    It is often assumed that a vertical scale is necessary when value-added models depend upon the gain scores of students across two or more points in time. This article examines the conditions under which the scale transformations associated with the vertical scaling process would be expected to have a significant impact on normative interpretations…

  12. Scale Shrinkage in Vertical Equating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camilli, Gregory; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Three potential causes of scale shrinkage (measurement error, restriction of range, and multidimensionality) in item response theory vertical equating are discussed, and a more comprehensive model-based approach to establishing vertical scales is described. Test data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress are used to illustrate the…

  13. Vertical bloch line memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, R.; Wu, J.; Stadler, H.

    1990-01-01

    Vertical Bloch Line (VBL) memory is a recently conceived, integrated, solid-state, block-access, VLSI memory which offers the potential of 1Gbit/sq cm real storage density, gigabit per second data rates, and sub-millisecond average access times simultaneously at relatively low mass, volume, and power values when compared to alternative technologies. VBL's are micromagnetic structures within magnetic domain walls which can be manipulated using magnetic fields from integrated conductors. The presence or absence of VBL pairs are used to store binary information. At present, efforts are being directed at developing a single-chip memory using 25Mbit/sq cm technology in magnetic garnet material which integrates, at a single operating point, the writing, storage, reading, and amplification functions needed in a memory. This paper describes the current design architecture, functional elements, and supercomputer simulation results which are used to assist the design process. The current design architecture uses three metal layers, two ion implantation steps for modulating the thickness of the magnetic layer, one ion implantation step for assisting propagation in the major line track, one NiFe soft magnetic layer, one CoPt hard magnetic layer, and one reflective Cr layer for facilitating magneto-optic observation of magnetic structure. Data are stored in a series of elongated magnetic domains, called stripes, which serve as storage sites for arrays of VBL pairs. The ends of these stripes are placed near conductors which serve as VBL read/write gates. A major line track is present to provide a source and propagation path for magnetic bubbles. Writing and reading, respectively, are achieved by converting magnetic bubbles to VBL's and vice versa. The output function is effected by stretching a magnetic bubble and detecting it magnetoresistively. Experimental results from the past design cycle created four design goals for the current design cycle. First, the bias field ranges

  14. Vertical axis wind turbine airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij Vasiljevich

    2012-12-18

    A vertical axis wind turbine airfoil is described. The wind turbine airfoil can include a leading edge, a trailing edge, an upper curved surface, a lower curved surface, and a centerline running between the upper surface and the lower surface and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The airfoil can be configured so that the distance between the centerline and the upper surface is the same as the distance between the centerline and the lower surface at all points along the length of the airfoil. A plurality of such airfoils can be included in a vertical axis wind turbine. These airfoils can be vertically disposed and can rotate about a vertical axis.

  15. Horizontal and Vertical Line Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Pat

    2003-01-01

    Presents an art lesson in which students learn about the artist Piet Mondrian and create their own abstract artworks. Focuses on geometric shapes using horizontal and vertical lines. Includes background information about the artist. (CMK)

  16. Measurements of vertical bar Vcb vertical bar and vertical bar Vub vertical bar at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Rotondo, M.

    2005-10-12

    We report results from the BABAR Collaboration on the semileptonic B decays, highlighting the measurements of the magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements Vub and Vcb. We describe the techniques used to obtain the matrix element |Vcb| using the measurement of the inclusive B {yields} Xclv process and a large sample of exclusive B {yields} D*lv decays. The vertical bar Vub vertical bar matrix elements has been measured studying different kinematic variables of the B {yields} Xulv process, and also with the exclusive reconstruction of B {yields} {pi}({rho})lv decays.

  17. Vertical motion simulator familiarization guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danek, George L.

    1993-01-01

    The Vertical Motion Simulator Familiarization Guide provides a synoptic description of the Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) and descriptions of the various simulation components and systems. The intended audience is the community of scientists and engineers who employ the VMS for research and development. The concept of a research simulator system is introduced and the building block nature of the VMS is emphasized. Individual sections describe all the hardware elements in terms of general properties and capabilities. Also included are an example of a typical VMS simulation which graphically illustrates the composition of the system and shows the signal flow among the elements and a glossary of specialized terms, abbreviations, and acronyms.

  18. Congenital vertical talus: a review.

    PubMed

    McKie, Janay; Radomisli, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Congenital vertical talus, also known as congenital convex pes valgus, is an uncommon disorder of the foot, manifested as a rigid rocker-bottom flatfoot. Radiographically, it is defined by dorsal dislocation of the navicular on the talus. This condition requires surgical correction. If left untreated, this foot deformity results in a painful and rigid flatfoot with weak push-off power. This article provides an overview of this rare foot deformity, outlines appropriate workup of the disorder, and details current treatment options, with emphasis on the evolution of treatment of congenital vertical talus. PMID:19963176

  19. Vertical Instability at IPNS RCS.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Brumwell, F. R.; Dooling, J. C.; Harkay, K. C.; Kustom, R.; McMichael, G. E.; Middendorf, M. E.; Nassiri, A.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2008-01-01

    The rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) of the intense pulsed neutron source (IPNS) at ANL accelerates > 3.0 times 10{sup 12} protons from 50 MeV to 450 MeV with 30-Hz repetition frequency. During the acceleration cycle, the rf frequency varies from 2.21 MHz to 5.14 MHz. Presently, the beam current is limited by a vertical instability. By analyzing turn-by-turn beam position monitor (BPM) data, large- amplitude mode 0 and mode 1 vertical beam centroid oscillations were observed in the later part of the acceleration cycle. The oscillations start in the tail of the bunch, build up, and remain localized in the tail half of the bunch. This vertical instability was compared with a head-tail instability that was intentionally induced in the RCS by adjusting the trim sextupoles. It appears that our vertical instability is not a classical head-tail instability [1]. More data analysis and experiments were performed to characterize the instability.

  20. Physics and the Vertical Jump

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offenbacher, Elmer L.

    1970-01-01

    The physics of vertical jumping is described as an interesting illustration for motivating students in a general physics course to master the kinematics and dynamics of one dimensional motion. The author suggests that mastery of the physical principles of the jump may promote understanding of certain biological phenomena, aspects of physical…

  1. Vertical reactor coolant pump instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    The investigation conducted at the Tennessee Valley Authority's Sequoyah Nuclear Power Plant to determine and correct increasing vibrations in the vertical reactor coolant pumps is described. Diagnostic procedures to determine the vibration causes and evaluate the corrective measures taken are also described.

  2. Vertical Sextants give Good Sights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Mark

    Many texts stress the need for marine sextants to be held precisely vertical at the instant that the altitude of a heavenly body is measured. Several authors lay particular emphasis on the technique of the instrument in a small arc about the horizontal axis to obtain a good sight. Nobody, to the author's knowledge, however, has attempted to quantify the errors involved, so as to compare them with other errors inherent in determining celestial position lines. This paper sets out to address these issues and to pose the question: what level of accuracy of vertical alignment can reasonably be expected during marine sextant work at sea ?When a heavenly body is brought to tangency with the visible horizon it is particularly important to ensure that the sextant is held in a truly vertical position. To this end the instrument is rocked gently about the horizontal so that the image of the body describes a small arc in the observer's field of vision. As Bruce Bauer points out, tangency with the horizon must be achieved during the process of rocking and not a second or so after rocking has been discontinued. The altitude is recorded for the instant that the body kisses the visible horizon at the lowest point of the rocking arc, as in Fig. 2. The only other visual clue as to whether the sextant is vertical is provided by the right angle made by the vertical edge of the horizon glass mirror with the horizon. There may also be some input from the observer's sense of balance and his hand orientation.

  3. Kinematic Fitting of Detached Vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Mattione

    2007-05-01

    The eg3 experiment at the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector aims to determine the existence of the $\\Xi_{5}$ pentaquarks and investigate the excited $\\Xi$ states. Specifically, the exotic $\\Xi_{5}^{--}$ pentaquark will be sought by first reconstructing the $\\Xi^{-}$ particle through its weak decays, $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ and $\\Lambda\\to\\pi^{-}$. A kinematic fitting routine was developed to reconstruct the detached vertices of these decays, where confidence level cuts on the fits are used to remove background events. Prior to fitting these decays, the exclusive reaction $\\gamma D\\rightarrow pp\\pi^{-}$ was studied in order to correct the track measurements and covariance matrices of the charged particles. The $\\Lambda\\rightarrow p\\pi^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ decays were then investigated to demonstrate that the kinematic fitting routine reconstructs the decaying particles and their detached vertices correctly.

  4. Vertically Integrated Circuits at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Deptuch, Grzegorz; Demarteau, Marcel; Hoff, James; Lipton, Ronald; Shenai, Alpana; Trimpl, Marcel; Yarema, Raymond; Zimmerman, Tom; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    The exploration of the vertically integrated circuits, also commonly known as 3D-IC technology, for applications in radiation detection started at Fermilab in 2006. This paper examines the opportunities that vertical integration offers by looking at various 3D designs that have been completed by Fermilab. The emphasis is on opportunities that are presented by through silicon vias (TSV), wafer and circuit thinning and finally fusion bonding techniques to replace conventional bump bonding. Early work by Fermilab has led to an international consortium for the development of 3D-IC circuits for High Energy Physics. The consortium has submitted over 25 different designs for the Fermilab organized MPW run organized for the first time.

  5. NASA-Ames vertical gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    A national facility, the NASA-Ames vertical gun range (AVGR) has an excellent reputation for revealing fundamental aspects of impact cratering that provide important constraints for planetary processes. The current logistics in accessing the AVGR, some of the past and ongoing experimental programs and their relevance, and the future role of this facility in planetary studies are reviewed. Publications resulting from experiments with the gun (1979 to 1984) are listed as well as the researchers and subjects studied.

  6. 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Schematic drawing of 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel. Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris describe the tunnel in NACA TR No. 387: 'The tunnel has an open jet, an open test chamber, and a closed return passage. ... The air passes through the test section in a downward direction then enters the exit cone and passes through the first set of guide vanes to a propeller. From here it passes, by way of the return passage, through the successive sets of guide vanes at the corners, then through the honeycomb, and finally through the entrance cone.' In an earlier report, NACA TR 387, Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris supply this description of the tunnel: 'The vertical open-throat wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics ... was built mainly for studying the spinning characteristics of airplane models, but may be used as well for the usual types of wind-tunnel tests. A special spinning balance is being developed to measure the desired forces and moments with the model simulating the actual spin of an airplane. Satisfactory air flow has been attained with a velocity that is uniform over the jet to within 0.5%. The turbulence present in the tunnel has been compared with that of several other tunnels by means of the results of sphere drag tests and was found to average well with the values of those tunnels. Included also in the report are comparisons of results of stable autorotation and of rolling-moment tests obtained both in the vertical tunnel and in the old horizontal 5-foot atmospheric tunnel.' The design of a vertical tunnel having a 5-foot diameter jet was accordingly started by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in 1928. Actual construction of the new tunnel was completed in 1930, and the calibration tests were then made.'

  7. Next generation vertical electrode cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Craig

    2001-05-01

    The concept of the vertical electrode cell (VEC) for aluminum electrowinning is presented with reference to current research. Low-temperature electrolysis allows nonconsumable metal-alloy anodes to show ongoing promise in laboratory tests. The economic and environmental advantages of the VEC are surveyed. The unique challenges of bringing VEC technology into practice are discussed. The current status of laboratory research is summarized. New results presented show that commercial purity aluminum can be produced with promisingly high current efficiency.

  8. 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction of 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel. The 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel was built to study spinning characteristics of aircraft. It was an open throat tunnel capable of a maximum speed of 80 mph. NACA engineer Charles H. Zimmerman designed the tunnel starting in 1928. Construction was completed in December 1929. It was one of two tunnels which replaced the original Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (The other was the 7x10-Foot Wind Tunnel.). In NACA TR 387 (p. 499), Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris report that 'the tunnel passages are constructed of 1/8-inch sheet iron, stiffened with angle iron and bolted together at the corners. The over-all dimensions are: Height 31 feet 2 inches; length, 20 feet 3 inches; width, 10 feet 3 inches.' The tunnel was partially constructed in the Langley hanger as indicated by the aircraft in the background. Published in NACA TR 387, 'The Vertical Wind Tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics,' by Carl J. Wenzinger and Thomas A. Harris, 1931.

  9. A method for vertical electromagnetic moldless casting of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, L.R.; Lari, R.J.; Praeg, W.F.

    1988-05-01

    Several approaches have been studied for the vertical casting of thin (3 mm-8 mm) sheets of steel. Each approach employs electromagnetic (EM) forces, avoids the need for contact between the solidifying steel and a solid mold. The most promising approach uses a high-frequency (HF:>100 kHz) oval solenoid magnet to provide containment of the liquid steel and a low-frequency (LF:/approximately/60 Hz) traveling field, similar to the double-sided linear induction pump, to provide levitation. The low field level of the solenoid and the low frequency of the levitation magnet result in acceptably low EM heating of the steel. The LF field penetrates the steel and provides a body force exactly counteracting the force of gravity everywhere except near the edges of the solidifying sheet. Additional HF traveling field magnets augment the levitation force near the edges but generate more EM heating. Other means of extending the levitating force to the edge and other approaches using stationary or traveling fields have also been studied. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  10. [Vertical fractures: apropos of 2 clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Félix Mañes Ferrer, J; Micò Muñoz, P; Sánchez Cortés, J L; Paricio Martín, J J; Miñana Laliga, R

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the study is to present a clinical review of the vertical root fractures. Two clinical cases are presented to demonstrates the criteria for obtaining a correct diagnosis of vertical root fractures. PMID:1659859

  11. Vertical separation of the two beams

    SciTech Connect

    Heifets, S.

    1985-10-01

    The author discusses the problem of design of insertion points on the SSC, and in particular keeping the length necessary for them under control. Here he considers the possibility of having vertically separated beams, without a vertical dispersion suppressor.

  12. Vertically aligned nanostructure scanning probe microscope tips

    SciTech Connect

    Guillorn, Michael A.; Ilic, Bojan; Melechko, Anatoli V.; Merkulov, Vladimir I.; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Simpson, Michael L.

    2006-12-19

    Methods and apparatus are described for cantilever structures that include a vertically aligned nanostructure, especially vertically aligned carbon nanofiber scanning probe microscope tips. An apparatus includes a cantilever structure including a substrate including a cantilever body, that optionally includes a doped layer, and a vertically aligned nanostructure coupled to the cantilever body.

  13. A design for vertical crossing insertions

    SciTech Connect

    Garren, A.

    1985-10-01

    A crossing insertion designed for an SSC with vertically separated 1-in-1 beam lines is presented in this note. The author supposes that the beam lines consist of separate magnets in separate cryostats separated by about 70 cm. He then describes the design, where vertical separation is done with four vertical dipoles producing a steplike beam line.

  14. Vertical Lift - Not Just For Terrestrial Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A

    2000-01-01

    Autonomous vertical lift vehicles hold considerable potential for supporting planetary science and exploration missions. This paper discusses several technical aspects of vertical lift planetary aerial vehicles in general, and specifically addresses technical challenges and work to date examining notional vertical lift vehicles for Mars, Titan, and Venus exploration.

  15. Vertical jumping and signaled avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Cándido, Antonio; Maldonado, Antonio; Vila, Jaime

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports an experiment intended to demonstrate that the vertical jumping response can be learned using a signaled-avoidance technique. A photoelectric cell system was used to record the response. Twenty female rats, divided equally into two groups, were exposed to intertrial intervals of either 15 or 40 s. Subjects had to achieve three successive criteria of acquisition: 3, 5, and 10 consecutive avoidance responses. Results showed that both groups learned the avoidance response, requiring increasingly larger numbers of trials as the acquisition criteria increased. No significant effect of intertrial interval was observed. PMID:16812559

  16. ?Vertical Sextants give Good Sights?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richey, Michael

    Mark Dixon suggests (Forum, Vol. 50, 137) that nobody thus far has attempted to quantify the errors from tilt that arise while observing with the marine sextant. The issue in fact, with the related problem of what exactly is the axis about which the sextant is rotated whilst being (to define the vertical), was the subject of a lively controversy in the first two volumes of this Journal some fifty years ago. Since the consensus of opinion seems to have been that the maximum error does not necessarily occur at 45 degrees, whereas Dixon's table suggests that it does, some reiteration of the arguments may be in order.

  17. Vertical-Bloch-Line Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R.; Wu, Jiin-Chuan; Stadler, Henry L.

    1993-01-01

    Vertical-Bloch-line memory is developmental very-large-scale integrated-circuit block-access magnetic memory. Stores data in form of localized pairs of twists (VBL pairs) in magnetic field at edge of ferromagnetic domain in each stripe. Presence or absence of VBL pair at bit position denotes one or zero, respectively. Offers advantages of resistance to ionizing radiation, potential areal storage density approximately less than 1 Gb/cm squared, data rates approximately less than 1 Gb/s, and average access times of order of milliseconds. Furthermore, mass, volume, and demand for power less than other magnetic and electronic memories.

  18. Neighbourly polytopes with few vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Devyatov, Rostislav A

    2011-10-31

    A family of neighbourly polytopes in R{sup 2d} with N=2d+4 vertices is constructed. All polytopes in the family have a planar Gale diagram of a special type, namely, with exactly d+3 black points in convex position. These Gale diagrams are parametrized by 3-trees (trees with a certain additional structure). For all polytopes in the family, the number of faces of dimension m containing a given vertex A depends only on d and m. Bibliography: 7 titles.

  19. 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1932-01-01

    The researcher is sitting above the exit cone of the 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel and is examining the new 6-component spinning balance. This balance was developed between 1930 and 1933. It was an important advance in the technology of rotating or rolling balances. As M.J. Bamber and C.H. Zimmerman wrote in NACA TR 456: 'Data upon the aerodynamic characteristics of a spinning airplane may be obtained in several ways; namely, flight tests with full-scale airplanes, flight tests with balanced models, strip-method analysis of wind-tunnel force and moment tests, and wind-tunnel tests of rotating models.' Further, they note: 'Rolling-balance data have been of limited value because it has not been possible to measure all six force and moment components or to reproduce a true spinning condition. The spinning balance used in this investigation is a 6-component rotating balance from which it is possible to obtain wind-tunnel data for any of a wide range of possible spinning conditions.' Bamber and Zimmerman described the balance as follows: 'The spinning balance consists of a balance head that supports the model and contains the force-measuring units, a horizontal turntable supported by streamline struts in the center of the jet and, outside the tunnel, a direct-current driving motor, a liquid tachometer, an air compressor, a mercury manometer, a pair of indicating lamps, and the necessary controls. The balance head is mounted on the turntable and it may be set to give any radius of spin between 0 and 8 inches.' In an earlier report, NACA TR 387, Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris supply this description of the tunnel: 'The vertical open-throat wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics ... was built mainly for studying the spinning characteristics of airplane models, but may be used as well for the usual types of wind-tunnel tests. A special spinning balance is being developed to measure the desired forces and moments with the model simulating the actual

  20. Competitive avoidance not edaphic specialization drives vertical niche partitioning among sister species of ectomycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Mujic, Alija B; Durall, Daniel M; Spatafora, Joseph W; Kennedy, Peter G

    2016-02-01

    Soil depth partitioning is thought to promote the diversity of ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungal communities, but little is known about whether it is controlled by abiotic or biotic factors. In three bioassay experiments, we tested the role of vertical soil heterogeneity in determining the distributions and competitive outcomes of the EM sister species Rhizopogon vinicolor and Rhizopogon vesiculosus. We planted Pseudotsuga menziesii seedlings into soils that were either a homogenized mix of upper and lower depths or vertically stratified combinations mimicking natural field conditions. We found that both species colonized the upper or lower soil depths in the absence of competition, suggesting that their distributions were not limited by abiotic edaphic factors. In competition within homogeneous soils, R. vesiculosus completely excluded colonization by R. vinicolor, but R. vinicolor was able to persist when soils were stratified. The amount of colonization by R. vinicolor in the stratified soils was also significantly correlated with the number of multilocus genotypes present. Taken together, our findings suggest that the differential vertical distributions of R. vinicolor and R. vesiculosus in natural settings are probably attributable to competition rather than edaphic specialization, but that soil heterogeneity may play a key role in promoting EM fungal diversity. PMID:26391726

  1. Advancements of vertically aligned liquid crystal displays.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pankaj; Jaggi, Chinky; Sharma, Vandna; Raina, Kuldeep Kumar

    2016-02-01

    This review describes the recent advancements in the field of the vertical aligned (VA) liquid crystal displays. The process and formation of different vertical alignment modes such as conventional VA, patterned VA, multi-domain VA, and polymer stabilised VA etc are widely discussed. Vertical alignment of liquid crystal due to nano particle dispersion in LC host, bifunctional PR-SAM formed by silane coupling reaction to oxide surfaces, azo dye etc., are also highlighted and discussed. Overall, the article highlights the advances in the research of vertical aligned liquid crystal in terms of their scientific and technological aspects. PMID:26800482

  2. Vertical motion requirements for landing simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the significance of vertical acceleration cues in the simulation of the visual approach and landing maneuver. Landing performance measures were obtained for four subject pilots operating a visual landing simulation device which provides up to plus or minus 40 feet of vertical motion. Test results indicate that vertical motion cues are utilized in the landing task, and that they are particularly important in the simulation of aircraft with marginal longitudinal handling qualities. To assure vertical motion cues of the desired fidelity in the landing tasks, it appears that a simulator must have excursion capabilities of at least plus or minus 20 feet.

  3. Rupture of vertical soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rio, Emmanuelle

    2014-11-01

    Soap films are ephemeral and fragile objects. They tend to thin under gravity, which gives rise to the fascinating variations of colors at their interfaces but leads systematically to rupture. Even a child can create, manipulate and admire soap films and bubbles. Nevertheless, the reason why it suddenly bursts remains a mystery although the soap chosen to stabilize the film as well as the humidity of the air seem very important. One difficulty to study the rupture of vertical soap films is to control the initial solution. To avoid this problem we choose to study the rupture during the generation of the film at a controlled velocity. We have built an experiment, in which we measure the maximum length of the film together with its lifetime. The generation of the film is due to the presence of a gradient of surface concentration of surfactants at the liquid/air interface. This leads to a Marangoni force directed toward the top of the film. The film is expected to burst only when its weight is not balanced anymore by this force. We will show that this leads to the surprising result that the thicker films have shorter lifetimes than the thinner ones. It is thus the ability of the interface to sustain a surface concentration gradient of surfactants which controls its stability.

  4. The Ames Vertical Gun Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karcz, J. S.; Bowling, D.; Cornelison, C.; Parrish, A.; Perez, A.; Raiche, G.; Wiens, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    The Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) is a national facility for conducting laboratory- scale investigations of high-speed impact processes. It provides a set of light-gas, powder, and compressed gas guns capable of accelerating projectiles to speeds up to 7 km s(exp -1). The AVGR has a unique capability to vary the angle between the projectile-launch and gravity vectors between 0 and 90 deg. The target resides in a large chamber (diameter approximately 2.5 m) that can be held at vacuum or filled with an experiment-specific atmosphere. The chamber provides a number of viewing ports and feed-throughs for data, power, and fluids. Impacts are observed via high-speed digital cameras along with investigation-specific instrumentation, such as spectrometers. Use of the range is available via grant proposals through any Planetary Science Research Program element of the NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) calls. Exploratory experiments (one to two days) are additionally possible in order to develop a new proposal.

  5. HL-20 Vertical Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The HL-20 space taxi, Langley's candidate personnel launch system, is one of several designs being considered by NASA as a complement to the Space Shuttle. Human factors studies, using Langley volunteers as subjects, have been ongoing since March 1991 to verify crew seating arrangements, habitability, ingress and egress, equipment layout and maintenance and handling operations, and to determine visibility requirements during docking and landing operations. Langley volunteers, wearing flight suits and helmets, were put through a series of tests with the craft placed both vertically and horizontally to simulate launch and landing attitudes, The HL-20 would be launched into a low orbit by an expendable rocket and then use its own propulsion system to boost itself to the space station. Following exchange of crews or delivery of small payload, the HL-20 would return to Earth like the space shuttle, making a runway landing near the launch site, The full-scale engineering research model of the HL-20 design was constructed by students and faculty at North Carolina State University and North Carolina A&T State University with the Mars Mission Research Center under a grant from NASA Langley.

  6. Opportunity at 'Cook Islands' (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,825th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 12, 2009). North is at the top.

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

    The rover had driven half a meter (1.5 feet) earlier on Sol 1825 to fine-tune its location for placing its robotic arm onto an exposed patch of outcrop including a target area informally called 'Cook Islands.' On the preceding sol, Opportunity turned around to drive frontwards and then drove 4.5 meters (15 feet) toward this outcrop. The tracks from the SOl 1824 drive are visible near the center of this view at about the 11 o'clock position. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches). Opportunity had previously been driving backward as a strategy to redistribute lubrication in a wheel drawing more electrical current than usual.

    The outcrop exposure that includes 'Cook Islands' is visible just below the center of the image.

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

  7. Vertical gating of sketched nanodevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Yun-Yi; Park, Dong-Wook; Huang, Mengchen; Annadi, Anil; Lee, Hyungwoo; Ma, Zhenqiang; Eom, Chang-Beom; Irvin, Patrick; Levy, Jeremy

    Conductive-atomic force microscope (c-AFM) lithography at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface has enabled the creation of various classes of nanostructures, such as nanoscale transistors, single-electron transistors and has proven to be a promising testbed for mesoscopic physics. To date, these devices have used lithographically-defined side gates, which are limited by leakage currents. To reduce leakage and improve the electric field effect, we have investigated nanostructures with in-situ grown gold top gate. We will discuss designs of logic devices such as inverters, NAND, and NOR gates. In the quantum regime, we compare the performance of in-situ vertical top gates and that of written coplanar side gates with Quantum Dot devices. We gratefully acknowledge financial support from the following agencies and grants: AFOSR (FA9550-­10-­1­-0524(JL), FA9550-­12-­1-­0342(CBE)), NSF (DMR­1124131 (JL, CBE) and DMR­1234096 (CBE)), ONR (N00014-15-1-2847 (JL)).

  8. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is disclosed. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  9. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  10. Vertical and horizontal access configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Spampinato, P.T.

    1987-01-01

    A number of configuration features and maintenance operations are influenced by the choice of whether a design is based on vertical or horizontal access for replacing reactor components. The features which are impacted most include the first wall/blanket segmentation, the poloidal field coil locations, the toroidal field coil number and size, access port size for in-vessel components, and facilities. Since either configuration can be made to work, the choice between the two is not clear cut because both have certain advantages. It is apparent that there are large cost benefits in the poloidal field coil system for ideal coil locations for high elongation plasmas and marginal savings for the INTOR case. If we assume that a new tokamak design will require a higher plasma elongation, the recommendation is to arrange the poloidal field coils in a cost-effective manner while providing reasonable midplane access for heating interfaces and test modules. If a new design study is not based on a high elongation plasma, it still appears prudent to consider this approach so that in-vessel maintenance can be accomplished without moving very massive structures such as the bulk shield. 10 refs., 29 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Vertical combustor for particulate refuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, P. M.; Carlson, L.

    1981-03-01

    A one-dimensional model is constructed of a vertical combustor for refuse particle combustion in order to analyze it for waste energy recovery. The three components of the model, fuel particles, inert solid particles and the gaseous mixture are described by momentum, energy, and mass conservation equations, resulting in three different flow velocities and temperatures for the medium. The gaseous component is further divided into six chemical species that evolve in combustion at temperatures below about 1367 K. A detailed description is given of the fuel particle combustion through heating, devolatilization, and combustion of the volatile gas in the boundary layer, return of the flame sheet to the fuel surface, and char combustion. The solutions show the combustor to be viable for U.S. refuse which consists of combustibles that can be volatilized up to 85 to 95% below 1366 K. Char combustion, however, is found to be too slow to be attempted in the combustor, where the fuel residence time is of the order of 2 s.

  12. EM International. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    It is the intent of EM International to describe the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management`s (EM`s) various roles and responsibilities within the international community. Cooperative agreements and programs, descriptions of projects and technologies, and synopses of visits to international sites are all highlighted in this semiannual journal. Focus on EM programs in this issue is on international collaboration in vitrification projects. Technology highlights covers: in situ sealing for contaminated sites; and remote sensors for toxic pollutants. Section on profiles of countries includes: Arctic contamination by the former Soviet Union, and EM activities with Germany--cooperative arrangements.

  13. Vertical Integration, Monopoly, and the First Amendment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Timothy J.

    This paper addresses the relationship between the First Amendment, monopoly of transmission media, and vertical integration of transmission and content provision. A survey of some of the incentives a profit-maximizing transmission monopolist may have with respect to content is followed by a discussion of how vertical integration affects those…

  14. Teaching Students the Verticality of Technical Documentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Peter J.

    1992-01-01

    Advocates making technical writing courses more vertical in structure by including an extensive study of at least one specific form of technical documentation. Examines how students can gain experience in the vertical process by designing, writing, testing, and producing user manuals for on-campus cooperative education clients. Lists the benefits…

  15. The biomechanics of vertical hopping: a review.

    PubMed

    Lamontagne, Mario; Kennedy, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Repetitive vertical hopping is a simple and relatively controlled task useful for studying basic neuromuscular properties and tissue mechanics. However, several biomechanical and physiological factors are involved. This article provides an overview of muscle and tendon properties and how these interact during vertical hopping. Muscle properties discussed are force-velocity and force-length relationships, electromechanical delay, muscle fiber type, stretch induced contraction amplification, and muscle spindle afferent feedback. Tendon properties include storage and reuse of elastic energy, tendon stiffness, afferent information from Golgi tendon organs, and failure points. These muscle and tendon properties interact to generate vertical hopping force and power. In addition to these basic properties, there are other more complicated factors to consider when analyzing vertical hopping such as balance and coordination. A wealth of information can be gathered by studying vertical hopping. Caution should be taken, however, to prevent inappropriate conclusions being drawn about hop performance due to oversimplification. PMID:24067123

  16. Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmsen, Carl W.; Temkin, Henryk; Coldren, Larry A.

    2002-01-01

    1. Introduction to VCSELs L. A. Coldren, C. W. Wilmsen and H. Temkin; 2. Fundamental issues in VCSEL design L. A. Coldren and Eric R. Hegblom; 3. Enhancement of spontaneous emission in microcavities E. F. Schubert and N. E. J. Hunt; 4. Epitaxy of vertical-cavity lasers R. P. Schneider Jr and Y. H. Young; 5. Fabrication and performance of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers Kent D. Choquette and Kent Geib; 6. Polarization related properties of vertical cavity lasers Dmitri Kuksenkov and Henryk Temkin; 7. Visible light emitting vertical cavity lasers Robert L. Thornton; 8. Long-wavelength vertical-cavity lasers Dubrakovo I. Babic, Joachim Piprek and John E. Bowers; 9. Overview of VCSEL applications Richard C. Williamson; 10. Optical interconnection applications and required characteristics Kenichi Kasahara; 11. VCSEL-based fiber-optic data communications Kenneth Hahn and Kirk Giboney; 12. VCSEL-based smart pixels for free space optoelectronic processing C. W. Wilmsen.

  17. Vertical grid of retrieved atmospheric profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccherini, Simone; Carli, Bruno; Raspollini, Piera

    2016-05-01

    The choice of the vertical grid of atmospheric profiles retrieved from remote sensing observations is discussed considering the two cases of profiles used to represent the results of individual measurements and of profiles used for subsequent data fusion applications. An ozone measurement of the MIPAS instrument is used to assess, for different vertical grids, the quality of the retrieved profiles in terms of profile values, retrieval errors, vertical resolutions and number of degrees of freedom. In the case of individual retrievals no evident advantage is obtained with the use of a grid finer than the one with a reduced number of grid points, which are optimized according to the information content of the observations. Nevertheless, this instrument dependent vertical grid, which seems to extract all the available information, provides very poor results when used for data fusion applications. A loss of about a quarter of the degrees of freedom is observed when the data fusion is made using the instrument dependent vertical grid relative to the data fusion made using a vertical grid optimized for the data fusion product. This result is explained by the analysis of the eigenvalues of the Fisher information matrix and leads to the conclusion that different vertical grids must be adopted when data fusion is the expected application.

  18. Methods of testing parameterizations: Vertical ocean mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tziperman, Eli

    1992-01-01

    The ocean's velocity field is characterized by an exceptional variety of scales. While the small-scale oceanic turbulence responsible for the vertical mixing in the ocean is of scales a few centimeters and smaller, the oceanic general circulation is characterized by horizontal scales of thousands of kilometers. In oceanic general circulation models that are typically run today, the vertical structure of the ocean is represented by a few tens of discrete grid points. Such models cannot explicitly model the small-scale mixing processes, and must, therefore, find ways to parameterize them in terms of the larger-scale fields. Finding a parameterization that is both reliable and plausible to use in ocean models is not a simple task. Vertical mixing in the ocean is the combined result of many complex processes, and, in fact, mixing is one of the less known and less understood aspects of the oceanic circulation. In present models of the oceanic circulation, the many complex processes responsible for vertical mixing are often parameterized in an oversimplified manner. Yet, finding an adequate parameterization of vertical ocean mixing is crucial to the successful application of ocean models to climate studies. The results of general circulation models for quantities that are of particular interest to climate studies, such as the meridional heat flux carried by the ocean, are quite sensitive to the strength of the vertical mixing. We try to examine the difficulties in choosing an appropriate vertical mixing parameterization, and the methods that are available for validating different parameterizations by comparing model results to oceanographic data. First, some of the physical processes responsible for vertically mixing the ocean are briefly mentioned, and some possible approaches to the parameterization of these processes in oceanographic general circulation models are described in the following section. We then discuss the role of the vertical mixing in the physics of the

  19. Composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Hou, H.Q.; Chow, W.W.; Geib, K.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1998-05-01

    The use of two coupled laser cavities has been employed in edge emitting semiconductor lasers for mode suppression and frequency stabilization. The incorporation of coupled resonators within a vertical cavity laser opens up new possibilities due to the unique ability to tailor the interaction between the cavities. Composite resonators can be utilized to control spectral and temporal properties within the laser; previous studies of coupled cavity vertical cavity lasers have employed photopumped structures. The authors report the first composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode consisting of two optical cavities and three monolithic distributed Bragg reflectors. Cavity coupling effects and two techniques for external modulation of the laser are described.

  20. Vertical transmission of Salmonella paratyphi A.

    PubMed

    Raveendran, R; Wattal, C; Sharma, A; Kler, N; Garg, P; Gujral, K; Khera, N

    2007-08-01

    Neonatal enteric fever is a rare but life-threatening illness. Patients may present with varying severity, Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi causing more severe illness than Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi A. Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi A is considered to cause milder infection with fewer complications. We report a rare case of vertical transmission of Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi A with severe complications and high mortality. Even though there are case reports of vertical transmission of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi, to our knowledge, this is the first case report of vertical transmission of Salmonella enterica serotype ParatyphiA. The role of blood culture in accurate diagnosis and treatment is also discussed. PMID:17785907

  1. Tobacco smoking and vertical periodontal bone loss.

    PubMed

    Baljoon, Mostafa

    2005-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with increased prevalence and severity of destructive periodontal disease in terms of periodontal pocketing, periodontal bone loss, and tooth loss. The smoking destructive effect on periodontal bone may be of even "horizontal" and vertical "angular" pattern. The vertical bone loss or the "vertical defect" is a sign of progressive periodontal breakdown that involves the periodontal bone. Water pipe smoking has a sharp rise by the popularity in the recent years by men and women in Middle East countries. The general objective of this thesis was to investigate the relationship between tobacco smoking and vertical periodontal bone loss cross-sectionally and longitudinally. This thesis is based on two study populations, Swedish musicians and a Saudi Arabian population. All participants had a full set of intra-oral radiographs including 16 periapical and 4 bitewing projections that were assessed with regard to presence or absence of vertical defects. In Study I, the number of defects per person increased with age. Vertical defects were more common in the posterior as compared to the anterior region of the dentition and the distribution of defects within the maxilla as well as the mandible typically revealed a right-left hand side symmetry. Cigarette smoking was significantly associated with the prevalence and severity of vertical bone defects (Studies II and III). The relative risk associated with cigarette smoking was 2 to 3-fold increased. The impact of water pipe smoking was of the same magnitude as that of cigarette smoking and the relative risk associated with water pipe smoking was 6-fold increased compared to non-smoking. In addition, the risk of vertical defects increased with increased exposure in cigarette smokers as well as water pipe smokers (Study III). In Study IV, the proportion of vertical defects increased over a 10-year period and the increase over time was significantly associated with smoking. Moreover, the 10-year

  2. Displaced vertices in extended supersymmetric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesselbach, S.; Franke, F.; Fraas, H.

    2000-10-01

    In extended supersymmetric models with additional singlet Higgs fields displaced vertices could be observed if the decay width of the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle becomes very small due to a singlino dominated LSP. We study the supersymmetric parameter space where displaced vertices of the second lightest neutralino exist in the NMSSM and an E6 inspired model. For a mass difference between LSP and NLSP of more than 10 GeV the singlet vacuum expectation value has to be at least of the order of /100 TeV in order to obtain a lightest neutralino with a singlino component large enough for displaced vertices.

  3. Surface tension profiles in vertical soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, N.; Caps, H.

    2015-01-01

    Surface tension profiles in vertical soap films are experimentally investigated. Measurements are performed by introducing deformable elastic objets in the films. The shape adopted by those objects once set in the film is related to the surface tension value at a given vertical position by numerically solving the adapted elasticity equations. We show that the observed dependency of the surface tension versus the vertical position is predicted by simple modeling that takes into account the mechanical equilibrium of the films coupled to previous thickness measurements.

  4. Unconventional vertical word-order impairs reading.

    PubMed

    Bonfiglioli, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Western written languages unfold across both the horizontal (from left to right) and the vertical (from top to bottom) dimensions. Culturally determined horizontal reading/writing habits are so pervasive that their influence can be found not only in visual scanning but also in performance across different domains and tasks. However, little is known on the effects of vertical word order. In the present study, a lexical decision task is used to show that reading performance is less efficient when verbal material is vertically arranged following a bottom-to-top order. PMID:21692428

  5. Vertical Motions of Oceanic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, D. A.; Moore, J. G.

    2006-12-01

    lasting a few hundred thousand years as the island migrates over a broad flexural arch related to isostatic compensation of a nearby active volcano. The arch is located about 190±30 km away from the center of volcanic activity and is also related to the rejuvenated volcanic stage on the islands. Reefs on Oahu that are uplifted several tens of m above sea level are the primary evidence for uplift as the islands over-ride the flexural arch. At the other end of the movement spectrum, both in terms of magnitude and length of response, are the rapid uplift and subsidence that occurs as magma is accumulated within or erupted from active submarine volcanoes. These changes are measured in days to years and are of cm to m variation; they are measured using leveling surveys, tiltmeters, EDM and GPS above sea level and pressure gauges and tiltmeters below sea level. Other acoustic techniques to measure such vertical movement are under development. Elsewhere, evidence for subsidence of volcanoes is also widespread, ranging from shallow water carbonates on drowned Cretaceous guyots, to mapped shoreline features, to the presence of subaerially-erupted (degassed) lavas on now submerged volcanoes. Evidence for uplift is more limited, but includes makatea islands with uplifted coral reefs surrounding low volcanic islands. These are formed due to flexural uplift associated with isostatic loading of nearby islands or seamounts. In sum, oceanic volcanoes display a long history of subsidence, rapid at first and then slow, sometimes punctuated by brief periods of uplift due to lithospheric loading by subsequently formed nearby volcanoes.

  6. 23. INCLINED END POST / VERTICAL / DIAGONAL / PORTAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. INCLINED END POST / VERTICAL / DIAGONAL / PORTAL BRACING DETAIL. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Abraham Lincoln Memorial Bridge, Spanning Missouri River on Highway 30 between Nebraska & Iowa, Blair, Washington County, NE

  7. 30. BEARING SHOE / VERTICAL / DIAGONAL / UPPER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. BEARING SHOE / VERTICAL / DIAGONAL / UPPER AND LOWER CHORD DETAIL OF DECK TRUSS. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Abraham Lincoln Memorial Bridge, Spanning Missouri River on Highway 30 between Nebraska & Iowa, Blair, Washington County, NE

  8. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundation parameter study

    SciTech Connect

    Lodde, P.F.

    1980-07-01

    The dynamic failure criterion governing the dimensions of prototype Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundations is treated as a variable parameter. The resulting change in foundation dimensions and costs is examined.

  9. The solid angle through the vertical rectangle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröer, H.

    We want to determine the solid angle through the vertical rectangle. We use the cosine law for sides and the spherical law of sines. The relation to luminous flux (radiant flux or radiant power) is shown.

  10. Vertically stabilized elongated cross-section tokamak

    DOEpatents

    Sheffield, George V.

    1977-01-01

    This invention provides a vertically stabilized, non-circular (minor) cross-section, toroidal plasma column characterized by an external separatrix. To this end, a specific poloidal coil means is added outside a toroidal plasma column containing an endless plasma current in a tokamak to produce a rectangular cross-section plasma column along the equilibrium axis of the plasma column. By elongating the spacing between the poloidal coil means the plasma cross-section is vertically elongated, while maintaining vertical stability, efficiently to increase the poloidal flux in linear proportion to the plasma cross-section height to achieve a much greater plasma volume than could be achieved with the heretofore known round cross-section plasma columns. Also, vertical stability is enhanced over an elliptical cross-section plasma column, and poloidal magnetic divertors are achieved.

  11. Congenital Vertical Talus: Etiology and Management.

    PubMed

    Miller, Mark; Dobbs, Matthew B

    2015-10-01

    Congenital vertical talus is a rare foot deformity. If left untreated, it causes significant disability, including pain and functional limitations. Although the etiology of vertical talus is likely heterogeneous, recent evidence strongly supports a genetic cause linking it to genes expressed during early limb development. Traditional management for vertical talus involves extensive surgeries that are associated with significant short- and long-term complications. A minimally invasive approach that relies on serial manipulation and casting to achieve most of the correction has been shown to produce excellent short-term results with regard to clinical and radiographic correction in both isolated and nonisolated cases of vertical talus. Although long-term studies are needed, achieving correction without extensive surgery may lead to more flexible and functional feet, much as Ponseti method has done for clubfeet. PMID:26337950

  12. Vertical sounding balloons for long duration flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaterre, P.

    1994-02-01

    Vertical soundings in the lower stratosphere are possible on command with an Infrared Montgolfiere, between 16 km and 28 km. Results of simulations are presented. The first test flight of a 7800 m3 Montgolfiere with a relief valve, has been conducted in Arctic area (Spitzbergen, July 1992). The flight of an Infrared Montgolfiere, with full vertical sounding capabilities, is planned for the end of 1993, from Ecuador (South AMERICA).

  13. Vertical sounding balloons for long duration flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaterre, P.

    1994-02-01

    Vertical soundings in the lower stratosphere are possible on command with an Infrared Montgolfiere, between 16 km and 28 km. Results of simulations are presented. The first test flight of a 7800 cu m Montgolfiere with a relief valve, has been conducted in Arctic area (Spitzbergen, July 1992). The flight of an Infrared Montgolfiere, with full vertical sounding capabilities, is planned for the end of 1993, from Ecuador (South AMERICA).

  14. [Is the sense of verticality vestibular?].

    PubMed

    Barra, J; Pérennou, D

    2013-06-01

    The vestibular system constitutes an inertial sensor, which detects linear (otoliths) and angular (semicircular canals) accelerations of the head in the three dimensions. The otoliths are specialized in the detection of linear accelerations and can be used by the brain as a "plumb line" coding earth gravity acceleration (direction). This property of otolithic system suggested that the sense of verticality is supported by the vestibular system. The preeminence of vestibular involvement in the sense of verticality stated in the 1900s was progressively supplanted by the notion of internal models of verticality. The internal models of verticality involve rules and properties of integration of vestibular graviception, somaesthesic graviception, and vision. The construction of a mental representation of verticality was mainly modeled as a bottom-up organization integrating visual, somatosensory and vestibular information without any cognitive modulations. Recent studies reported that the construction of internal models of verticality is not an automatic multi-sensory integration process but corresponds to more complex mechanisms including top-down influences such as awareness of body orientation or spatial representations. PMID:23856176

  15. Effect of vertical motion on current meters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kallio, Nicholas A.

    1966-01-01

    The effect of vertical motion on the performance of current meters at various stream velocities was evaluated to determine whether accurate discharge measurements can be made from a bobbing boat. Three types of current meters--Ott, Price, and vane types--were tested under conditions simulating a bobbing boat. A known frequency and amplitude of vertical motion were imparted to the current meter, and the related effect on the measured stream velocity was determined. One test of the Price meter was made under actual conditions, using a boat and standard measuring gear. The results of the test under actual conditions verified those obtained by simulating the vertical movements of a boat. The tests show that for stream velocities below 2.5 feet per second the accuracy of all three meters is significantly affected when the meters are subjected to certain conditions of vertical motion that can occur during actual field operations. Both the rate of vertical motion and the frequency of vertical oscillation affect the registration of the meter. The results of these tests, presented in the form of graphs and tables, can be used as a guide to determine whether wind and stream flow are within an acceptable range for a reliable discharge measurement from a boat.

  16. Horizontal wires replace the vertical files.

    PubMed

    Colburn, J L

    1997-01-01

    Traditionally, clippings of newspaper articles, pictures from magazines, pamphlets, charts, graphs, posters, proceedings, or copies thereof, and other miscellaneous information sources have been stored in vertical files in libraries. The practice of creating and maintaining vertical files is extremely time consuming. In a medical library, in particular, old information about diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis can quickly become incorrect, misleading, and possibly harmful. Adequately tending to the vertical files can require a librarian to create a balancing act between properly maintaining vertical files and meeting the needs of the users in other areas of the library. The maintenance of vertical files is, by nature, highly consumptive of paper and space consuming. A reasonable alternative to the traditional vertical files is the World-Wide Web. Search engines exist for locating specific information, and bookmarks and/or links which point users to particularly useful sites can be set in search software. Some methods for searching are discussed, and a variety of World-Wide Web information sources are offered. PMID:10173596

  17. Reconstructing the vertical profile of humidity on the basis of the vertical profile of temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bazlova, T. I.

    1974-01-01

    The vertical profile of humidity in the atmosphere is developed on the basis of the vertical profile of temperature using an empirical formula linking changes in humidity with changes in temperature and altitude. The atmosphere is divided into three layers by altitude, since the condition for the formation of humidity varies with altitude.

  18. Liquid storage tanks under vertical excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Philippacopoulos, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    Until recently, the hydrodynamic effects on liquid storage tanks induced by an earthquake excitation were basically treated for the horizontal component of the earthquake. Recent studies, however, showed that the hydrodynamic effects due to the vertical component of an earthquake may be significant. In these studies the tank is assumed to be fixed at the bottom. This paper is concerned with the hydrodynamic behavior of liquid storage tanks induced by vertical earthquake input excitation. First, the fluid-tank system is treated as a fixed-base system and a simple formula is obtained for the coupled fluid-structure natural frequency. Second, additional interaction effects due to the foundation flexibility on the fluid-tank system are investigated. It is concluded that the foundation flexibility may have a significant effect on the hydrodynamic behavior of the liquid storage tanks under a vertical ground shaking.

  19. On The Vertical Speeds Of Airways Traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magill, S. A. N.

    Knowledge of the statistics of aircraft vertical speeds is important both for the construction of realistic traffic simulators and for the development of trajectory prediction tools for use in future air traffic control (ATC) systems. This paper reports on the analysis of radar data recordings for nearly 10000 civil flights on airways. Results are presented for the means and spreads of vertical speeds as functions of altitude. Evidence is presented that roughly half of the observed spreads arise from fluctuations within each aircraft's trajectory, as opposed to variation from one aircraft to another. A simple procedure is proposed for simulating vertical speed data which has statistics similar to those obtained from the radar recordings. Some consequences of the results for the development of trajectory prediction tools for use in future ATC systems are discussed. The results suggest that the provision of accurate trajectory prediction tools is not as straightforward as it might at first appear to be.

  20. Vertical cable surveys deliver additional seismic data

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    Texaco and a Norwegian seismic firm have patented a new system for deploying hydrophones on vertical cables for offshore surveys. The system was used in Texaco North Sea UK Ltd.`s Strathspey field during the summer. The new technique was introduced in the article, ``Peaceful use for war technology,`` published in Texaco UK`s Agenda monthly news magazine, October 1995. That article is summarized here. Using technology developed by the US Navy for antisubmarine warfare, the vertical-cable survey relies on hydrophones attached at regular intervals vertically along cables secured to the ocean floor and held taut by a buoy. The shooting vessel fires the airguns in a pattern over a large area on the surface, over and around the cables. The cables are then moved to a new location and the process is repeated, up to six times in the Strathspey application described here.

  1. Vertical gradients of sunspot magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Teuber, D.; West, E. A.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Henze, W., Jr.; Beckers, J. M.; Bruner, M.; Hyder, C. L.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1983-04-01

    The results of a Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) guest investigation to determine the vertical gradients of sunspot magnetic fields for the first time from coordinated observations of photospheric and transition-region fields are described. Descriptions are given of both the photospheric vector field of a sunspot, derived from observations using the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograph, and of the line-of-sight component in the transition region, obtained from the SMM Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter instrument. On the basis of these data, vertical gradients of the line-of-sight magnetic field component are calculated using three methods. It is found that the vertical gradient of Bz is lower than values from previous studies and that the transition-region field occurs at a height of approximately 4000-6000 km above the photosphere.

  2. Vertical gradients of sunspot magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Teuber, D.; West, E. A.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Henze, W., Jr.; Beckers, J. M.; Bruner, M.; Hyder, C. L.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) guest investigation to determine the vertical gradients of sunspot magnetic fields for the first time from coordinated observations of photospheric and transition-region fields are described. Descriptions are given of both the photospheric vector field of a sunspot, derived from observations using the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograph, and of the line-of-sight component in the transition region, obtained from the SMM Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter instrument. On the basis of these data, vertical gradients of the line-of-sight magnetic field component are calculated using three methods. It is found that the vertical gradient of Bz is lower than values from previous studies and that the transition-region field occurs at a height of approximately 4000-6000 km above the photosphere.

  3. THE VERTICAL COMPONENT OF THE SUPERGRANULAR MOTION

    SciTech Connect

    Duvall, T. L. Jr.; Birch, A. C.

    2010-12-10

    Supergranules are observed at the solar photosphere as a cellular horizontal flow pattern with flow diverging from cell centers and converging on cell boundaries. Clark and Johnson calculated that mass conservation leads to an expected vertical flow of only 10 m s{sup -1}, which has been difficult to observe. In the present work, Doppler images near the disk center from Michelson Doppler Imager are averaged about locations of cell centers to obtain the necessary signal-to-noise ratio to see the vertical flow. It is found that, for an average over 1100 cell centers, there is a 10 m s{sup -1} upflow at cell center and a 5 m s{sup -1} downflow at the cell boundaries, confirming the previous estimate. The rms vertical flow is 4 m s{sup -1}, smaller than Giovanelli's upper limit of 10 m s{sup -1}.

  4. Vertical Velocity Measurements in Warm Stratiform Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, E. P.; Kollias, P.

    2013-12-01

    Measurements of vertical air motion in warm boundary layer clouds are key for quantitatively describing cloud-scale turbulence and for improving our understanding of cloud and drizzle microphysical processes. Recently, a new technique that produces seamless measurements of vertical air velocity in the cloud and sub-cloud layers for both drizzling and non-drizzling stratocumulus clouds has been developed. The technique combines radar Doppler spectra-based retrievals of vertical air motion in cloud and light drizzle conditions with a novel neural network analysis during heavily drizzling periods. Observations from Doppler lidars are used to characterize sub-cloud velocities and to evaluate the performance of the technique near the cloud base. The technique is applied to several cases of stratiform clouds observed by the ARM Mobile Facility during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) campaign in Cape Cod. The observations clearly illustrate coupling of the sub-cloud and cloud layer turbulent structures.

  5. Hydraulic induced instability on a vertical service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosmans, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    The case history contained provides insight toward the mechanical and hydraulic behavior of a vertical pump. It clearly demonstrates the need for measurements on the rotor at or near the impeller area. The results are reported of an analysis on a service water pump. This pump is typical of the water pumps used throughout the power generation industry. Although little is known of the mechanical behavior of vertical pumps because of difficulty in modeling the rotor system, recent developments in the application of submersible proximity transducers have made possible the measurement of pump dynamics under operating conditions. The purpose of this study was to determine the proper selection and installation of vibration-monitoring transducers as well as to measure the effects of imbalance, misalignment, and hydraulics on the performance and reliability of vertical pumps. In addition, the cause of shaft failures on this pump was to be determined.

  6. Purification process for vertically aligned carbon nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V.; Delziet, Lance; Matthews, Kristopher; Chen, Bin; Meyyappan, M.

    2003-01-01

    Individual, free-standing, vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes or nanofibers are ideal for sensor and electrode applications. Our plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition techniques for producing free-standing and vertically aligned carbon nanofibers use catalyst particles at the tip of the fiber. Here we present a simple purification process for the removal of iron catalyst particles at the tip of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers derived by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The first step involves thermal oxidation in air, at temperatures of 200-400 degrees C, resulting in the physical swelling of the iron particles from the formation of iron oxide. Subsequently, the complete removal of the iron oxide particles is achieved with diluted acid (12% HCl). The purification process appears to be very efficient at removing all of the iron catalyst particles. Electron microscopy images and Raman spectroscopy data indicate that the purification process does not damage the graphitic structure of the nanotubes.

  7. Modeling the CAPTEX vertical tracer concentration profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Draxler, R.R.; Stunder, B.J.B.

    1988-05-01

    Perfluorocarbon tracer concentration profiles measured by aircraft 600--900 km downwind of the release locations during CAPTEX are discussed and compared with some model results. In general, the concentrations decreased with height in the upper half of the boundary layer where the aircraft measurements were made. The results of a model sensitivity study suggested that the shape of the profile was primarily due to winds increasing with height and relative position of the sampling with respect to the upwind and downwind edge of the plume. Further modeling studies showed that relatively simple vertical mixing parameterizations could account for the complex vertical plume structure when the model had sufficient vertical resolution. In general, the model performed better with slower winds and corresponding longer transport times.

  8. Modeling the CAPTEX Vertical Tracer Concentration Profiles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draxler, Roland R.; Stunder, Barbara J. B.

    1988-05-01

    Perfluorocarbon tracer concentration profiles measured by aircraft 600-900 km downwind of the release locations during CAPTEX are discussed and compared with some model results. In general, the concentrations decreased with height in the upper half of the boundary layer where the aircraft measurements were made. The results of a model sensitivity study suggested that the shape of the profile was primarily due to winds increasing with height and relative position of the sampling with respect to the upwind and downwind edge of the plume. Further modeling studies showed that relatively simple vertical mixing parameterizations could account for the complex vertical plume structure when the model had sufficient vertical resolution. In general, the model performed better with slower winds and corresponding longer transport times.

  9. Top-down vertical itemset mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi, Mohammad Karim; Ghods, Vahid

    2015-03-01

    Vertical itemset mining is an important frequent pattern mining problem with broad applications. It is challenging since one may need to examine a combinatorial explosive number of possible patterns of items of a dataset in a traditional horizontal algorithm. Since high dimensional datasets typically contain a large number of columns and a small number of rows, vertical itemset mining algorithms, which extract the frequent itemsets of dataset by producing all combination of rows ids, are a good alternative for horizontal algorithms in mining frequent itemsets from high dimensional dataset. Since a rowset can be simply produced from its subsets by adding a new row id to a sub rowset, many bottom up vertical itemset mining algorithms are designed and represented in the literature. However, bottom up vertical mining algorithms suffer from a main drawback. Bottom-up algorithms start the process of generating and testing of rowsets from the small rowsets and go on to the larger rowsets, whereas the small rowsets cannot produce a frequent itemsets because they contain less than minimum support threshold number of rows. In this paper, we described a new efficient vertical top down algorithm called VTD (Vertical Top Down) to conduct mining of frequent itemsets in high dimensional datasets. Our top down approach employed the minimum support threshold to prune the rowsets which any itemset could not be extracted from them. Several experiments on real bioinformatics datasets showed that VTD is orders of magnitude better than previous closed pattern mining algorithms. Our performance study showed that this algorithm outperformed substantially the best former algorithms.

  10. Turbulence in vertical axis wind turbine canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzel, Matthias; Araya, Daniel B.; Dabiri, John O.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental results from three different full scale arrays of vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWTs) under natural wind conditions are presented. The wind velocities throughout the turbine arrays are measured using a portable meteorological tower with seven, vertically staggered, three-component ultrasonic anemometers. The power output of each turbine is recorded simultaneously. The comparison between the horizontal and vertical energy transport for the different turbine array sizes shows the importance of vertical transport for large array configurations. Quadrant-hole analysis is employed to gain a better understanding of the vertical energy transport at the top of the VAWT arrays. The results show a striking similarity between the flows in the VAWT arrays and the adjustment region of canopies. Namely, an increase in ejections and sweeps and decrease in inward and outward interactions occur inside the turbine array. Ejections are the strongest contributor, which is in agreement with the literature on evolving and sparse canopy flows. The influence of the turbine array size on the power output of the downstream turbines is examined by comparing a streamwise row of four single turbines with square arrays of nine turbine pairs. The results suggest that a new boundary layer forms on top of the larger turbine arrays as the flow adjusts to the new roughness length. This increases the turbulent energy transport over the whole planform area of the turbine array. By contrast, for the four single turbines, the vertical energy transport due to turbulent fluctuations is only increased in the near wake of the turbines. These findings add to the knowledge of energy transport in turbine arrays and therefore the optimization of the turbine spacing in wind farms.

  11. European Vertical Reference System Influence in Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celms, A.; Reķe, I.; Ratkevičs, A.

    2015-11-01

    Till 1 December, 2014, in Latvia the heights were determined in Baltic Normal Height System 1977. The national height system is determined by the Cabinet of Ministers and internal laws. Now for the change of the national height system to reconcile it with the European Vertical Reference System, amendments to the laws and regulations have been developed, but so far only the amendment to the Geospatial Information Law is in force, the amendment to the regulation of the Cabinet of Ministers is still not approved. This amendment declares the Latvia Height System based on the European Vertical Reference System in Latvia as the national height system. For height transformation, there is a transformation formula for each European country. After calculations it is seen that height difference between Baltic Normal Height System 1977 and European Vertical Reference System depends on point location in the territory (coordinates). This unequal height difference between both height systems will cause unequal height values on border connection points between Baltic countries. The aim of the research is to evaluate the European Vertical Reference System in Latvia. To reach the aim the following tasks are set: 1) to evaluate the components of transformation formulas; 2) using the transformation formulas to calculate height differences between Baltic Normal Height System 1977 and the European Vertical Reference System realization EVRF2007 for the territory of Latvia and also between Baltic Normal Height System 1977 and the Latvia Normal Height System; 3) to get height differences in the European Vertical Reference System on the borderlines of Latvia - Estonia and Latvia - Lithuania.

  12. Vertical Tears of the Lateral Meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Kanu S.; Pan, Tiffany J.; Tran, Diane; Dumpe, Samuel C.; Zhang, Xudong; Harner, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Lateral meniscal tears are often seen with acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and may be left in situ, repaired, or treated with meniscectomy. Clinical studies have shown good outcomes with vertical tears left in situ and poor outcomes following meniscectomy. However, clinically relevant studies are needed to establish a biomechanical foundation for treatment of these tears, particularly regarding the effects of meniscectomy. Purpose: To compare tibiofemoral joint mechanics following vertical lateral meniscal tears and meniscectomies. We hypothesized that a peripheral vertical tear of the lateral meniscus would alter joint mechanics, increasing contact pressure and area, and that more drastic effects would be seen following meniscectomy, at higher knee flexion angles, and with increased loads. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Ten fresh-frozen cadaveric knees (average age, 55 ± 12 years) were tested with 5 lateral meniscus states: intact, short vertical tear, extended vertical tear, posterior horn partial meniscectomy (rim intact), and posterior horn subtotal meniscectomy (rim excised). The specimens were loaded axially at knee flexion angles of 0°, 30°, and 60°, and musculotendinous forces were applied, simulating a 2-legged squat. Intra-articular contact pressures were measured using pressure-sensitive Fuji film. Kinematic data were acquired through digitization of fiducial markers. Results: Vertical tears did not cause a significant change in contact pressure or area. Partial meniscectomy increased maximum contact pressures in the lateral compartment at 30° and 60° from 5.3 MPa to 7.2 MPa and 7.6 MPa, respectively (P = .02, P = .007). Subtotal meniscectomy (8.4 MPa) significantly increased contact pressure compared with partial meniscectomy (7.6 MPa) at 60° (P = .04). Both meniscectomy states significantly increased contact pressures with increasing flexion from 0° to 60° (P < .001, P < .001). Conclusion

  13. Photochemistry and vertical mixing. [in Uranus atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atreya, S. K.; Sandel, B. R.; Romani, P. N.

    1991-01-01

    Earth-based observations relevant to the question of photochemistry and vertical mixing are discussed. Phytolysis of methane, the only known photochemically active volatile in the Uranian atmosphere, produces heavier hydrocarbons, the most abundant of which are ethane, acetylene, and the polyacetylenes. Unlike Jupiter and Saturn, these hydrocarbon products condense at the low temperatures prevalent in the middle atmosphere. Contrary to the pre-Voyager notion that the atmosphere of Uranus is remarkable clear, it is found that the aerosols are widely and extensively distributed. Despite its photodestruction, methane remains stable in the Uranian atmosphere. The vertical mixing on Uranus is found to be the least efficient of any of the planetary atmospheres.

  14. CIRSS vertical data integration, San Bernardino study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodson, W.; Christenson, J.; Michel, R. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    The creation and use of a vertically integrated data base, including LANDSAT data, for local planning purposes in a portion of San Bernardino County, California are described. The project illustrates that a vertically integrated approach can benefit local users, can be used to identify and rectify discrepancies in various data sources, and that the LANDSAT component can be effectively used to identify change, perform initial capability/suitability modeling, update existing data, and refine existing data in a geographic information system. Local analyses were developed which produced data of value to planners in the San Bernardino County Planning Department and the San Bernardino National Forest staff.

  15. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of...

  16. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of...

  17. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of...

  18. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of...

  19. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of...

  20. On the measurement of vertical velocity by MST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gage, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    An overview is presented of the measurement of atmospheric vertical motion utilizing the MST radar technique. Vertical motion in the atmosphere is briefly discussed as a function of scale. Vertical velocity measurement by MST radars is then considered from within the context of the expected magnitudes to be observed. Examples are drawn from published vertical velocity observations.

  1. Determining the propagation angle for non-vertical surface-breaking cracks and its effect on crack sizing using an ACFM sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, J. L.; Zhou, L.; Rowshandel, H.; Nicholson, G. L.; Davis, C. L.

    2015-11-01

    Alternating current field measurement (ACFM) probes are used to detect and size cracks in a range of engineering components. Crack sizing for this, and other electromagnetic (EM) based NDT systems, relies on relating the signal obtained to the actual crack length. For cracks that do not propagate vertically, such as rolling contact fatigue cracks in rails, predicting the crack depth, which determines the rail depth to be removed by grinding, requires an assumed propagation angle into the material as no method to determine crack vertical angle from the EM signals has been reported. This paper discusses the relationship between ACFM signals and propagation angles for surface-breaking cracks using a COMSOL model. The Bx signal accurately predicts the crack pocket length when the vertical angle is 30-90° but underestimates pocket length for shallower angles, e.g. a 50% underestimate is seen for a 3.2 mm pocket length crack propagating at a vertical angle of 10°. A new measure, the Bz trough-peak ratio, is proposed to determine the crack vertical angle. These are verified by experimental measurements using a commercial ACFM pencil probe for cracks with a range of vertical angles between 10° and 90°.

  2. [From vertical to horizontal. Writing in adolescence].

    PubMed

    Catheline-Antipoff, N

    1995-04-01

    Writing at adolescence has a non negligible part in identity's construction. Vertical writing as tags, graphs and graffiti refer to a narcissism deficiency and express a pulsional necessity, whereas, horizontal writing as private diaries, letters and novels express object's search and are made in dreaming attitude. PMID:7618823

  3. Vertical transport processes in unconfined aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostendorf, David W.; Reckhow, David A.; Popielarczyk, David J.

    1989-02-01

    We derive simple two-dimensional mathematical models describing the unsteady transport of conservative contaminants through an unconfined aquifer with a gently sloping aquiclude subject to advection, recharge, and vertical dispersion. The inclusion of vertical transport terms permits the proper nonreactive analysis of closed and open chemical systems, with the latter allowing dispersion of volatile constituents across the water table. These systems exhibit conservative and pseudoreactive behavior respectively when the pollution is analyzed on a depth-integrated basis, as is common in present one-dimensional models of groundwater contamination. Vertical and longitudinal chloride and total inorganic carbon observations at the well-documented Babylon, Long Island sanitary landfill plume are used to calibrate and test the analyses with a modest level of accuracy, using the vertical dispersivity as a calibration factor in this testing process. The parameter is important in the determination of reaeration rates across the water table and nutrient mixing from below in the related problem of biological transformations near the free surface.

  4. Tailored airfoils for vertical axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Klimas, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    The evolution of a family of airfoil sections designed to be used as blade elements of a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) is described. This evolution consists of extensive computer simulation, wind tunnel testing and field testing. The process reveals that significant reductions in system costs-of-energy and increases in fatigue lifetime may be expected for VAWT systems using these blade elements.

  5. Tailored airfoils for Vertical Axis Wind Turbines*

    SciTech Connect

    Klimas, P.C.

    1984-08-01

    The evolution of a family of airfoil sections designed to be used as blade elements of a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) is described. This evolution consists of extensive computer simulation, wind tunnel testing and field testing. The process reveals that significant reductions in system cost-ofenergy and increases in fatigue lifetime may be expected for VAWT systems using these blade elements.

  6. Tailored airfoils for vertical axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Klimas, P.C.

    1984-11-01

    The evolution of a family of airfoil sections designed to be used as blade elements of a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) is described. This evolution consists of extensive computer simulation, wind tunnel testing and field testing. The process reveals that significant reductions in system costs-of-energy and increases in fatigue lifetime may be expected for VAWT systems using these blade elements.

  7. 46 CFR 108.160 - Vertical ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vertical ladders. 108.160 Section 108.160 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT... fitted with a cage or ladder safety device meeting ANSI Standard 14.3 (1974) for fixed ladders. (d)...

  8. Leak-tight vertical membrane microvalves.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Jonas; Hillmering, Mikael; Haraldsson, Tommy; van der Wijngaart, Wouter

    2016-04-12

    Pneumatic microvalves are fundamental control components in a large range of microfluidic applications. Their key performance parameters are small size, i.e. occupying a minimum of microfluidic real estate, low flow resistance in the open state, and leak-tight closing at limited control pressures. In this work we present the successful design, realization and evaluation of the first leak-tight, vertical membrane, pneumatic microvalves. The realization of the vertical membrane microvalves is enabled by a novel dual-sided molding method for microstructuring monolithic 3D microfluidic networks in PDMS in a single step, eliminating the need for layer-to-layer alignment during bonding. We demonstrate minimum lateral device features down to 20-30 μm in size, and vertical via density of ∼30 000 per cm(2), which provides significant gains in chip real estate compared to previously reported PDMS manufacturing methods. In contrast to horizontal membrane microvalves, there are no manufacturing restrictions on the cross-sectional geometry of the flow channel of the vertical membrane microvalves. This allows tuning the design towards lower closing pressure or lower open state flow resistance compared to those of horizontal membrane microvalves. PMID:26983557

  9. A Simple Vertical Slab Gel Electrophoresis Apparatus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, J. B.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive, easily constructed, and safe vertical slab gel kit used routinely for sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis research and student experiments. Five kits are run from a single transformer. Because toxic solutions are used, students are given plastic gloves and closely supervised during laboratory…

  10. Vertical root fractures and their management

    PubMed Central

    Khasnis, Sandhya Anand; Kidiyoor, Krishnamurthy Haridas; Patil, Anand Basavaraj; Kenganal, Smita Basavaraj

    2014-01-01

    Vertical root fractures associated with endodontically treated teeth and less commonly in vital teeth represent one of the most difficult clinical problems to diagnose and treat. In as much as there are no specific symptoms, diagnosis can be difficult. Clinical detection of this condition by endodontists is becoming more frequent, where as it is rather underestimated by the general practitioners. Since, vertical root fractures almost exclusively involve endodontically treated teeth; it often becomes difficult to differentiate a tooth with this condition from an endodontically failed one or one with concomitant periodontal involvement. Also, a tooth diagnosed for vertical root fracture is usually extracted, though attempts to reunite fractured root have been done in various studies with varying success rates. Early detection of a fractured root and extraction of the tooth maintain the integrity of alveolar bone for placement of an implant. Cone beam computed tomography has been shown to be very accurate in this regard. This article focuses on the diagnostic and treatment strategies, and discusses about predisposing factors which can be useful in the prevention of vertical root fractures. PMID:24778502

  11. Viewing Vertical Objects with an Overhead Projector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wild, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the use of an overhead projector for the deflection of a vertical image to a screen. Describes three demonstrations: magnetizing of a steel ball bearing and paper clip; convection currents of a hot liquid within a cold liquid; and oscillation of concentrated salt solution into fresh water. (YP)

  12. Modeling vertical coral connectivity and mesophotic refugia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holstein, Daniel M.; Paris, Claire B.; Vaz, Ana C.; Smith, Tyler B.

    2016-03-01

    Whether mesophotic reefs will behave as refugia for corals threatened by global climate change and coastal development depends on vertical exchange of larvae between diverse habitats. Here we use a biophysical model of larval dispersal to estimate vertical connectivity of a broadcasting ( Orbicella faveolata) and a brooding ( Porites astreoides) species of coral in the US Virgin Islands. Modeling predicts subsidy to shallow areas by mesophotic larvae of both species based on local hydrology, adult reproductive characteristics, larval traits, and a wide range of scenarios developed to test depth-sensitive factors, such as fertilization rates and post-settlement survivorship. In extreme model scenarios of reduced fertilization and post-settlement survivorship of mesophotic larvae, 1-10 % local mesophotic subsidy to shallow recruitment is predicted for both species, which are demographically significant. Although direct vertical connectivity is higher for the broadcaster, the brooder demonstrates higher local multigenerational vertical connectivity, which suggests that local P. astreoides populations are more resilient than those of O. faveolata, and corroborates field studies. As shallow habitat degrades, mesophotic-shallow subsidy is predicted to increase for both species. This study is the first of its kind to simulate larval dispersal and settlement between habitats of different depths, and these findings have local, regional, and global implications for predicting and managing coral reef persistence in a changing climate.

  13. Vertical Alveolar Ridge Augmentation by Distraction Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, N. Nanda; Ravindran, C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Compromised alveolar ridge in vertical and horizontal dimension is a common finding in patients visiting practitioners for dental prosthesis. Various treatment modalities are available for correction of deficient ridges among which alveolar distraction osteogenesis is one. Aim To study the efficacy of alveolar distraction osteogenesis in augmentation of alveolar ridges deficient in vertical dimension. Materials and Methods Ten patients aged 16 to 46 years with deficient alveolar ridge underwent ridge augmentation in 11 alveolar segments using the distraction osteogenesis method. For each patient a custom made distraction device was fabricated. The device was indigenously manufactured with SS-316 (ISO 3506). Results The vertical bone gain reached more than 10mm without the use of bone transplantation. Certain complications like incorrect vector of distraction, paresthesia, pain and loss of transport segment were encountered during the course of the study. Conclusion Alveolar vertical distraction osteogenesis is a reliable and predictable technique for both hard and soft tissue genesis. Implant placement is feasible with primary stability in neogenerated bone at the level of the distracted areas. PMID:26816991

  14. Vertical distribution of Pahang River plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taher, T. M.; Lihan, T.; Mustapha, M. A.

    2013-11-01

    Large rivers transported high amount of discharge towards the sea and induced the river plume formation. The contents of the plume consist of suspended solids, nutrients, pollutants and other particles. Productivity at estuary depends on the organic and nutrient contents from the river discharge. Due to many possible factors, the dispersal of the plume shows spatial variation horizontally and vertically. The monsoonal wind is a factor that effecting plume vertical profile pattern. This study determines the vertical distribution pattern of the plumeat Pahang River through field observation. Several water parameters were measured during cruises conducted at respective monsoon. Data collected includes depth, chlorophyll-a, salinity, temperature and suspended particulate matter. Depth at Pahang's offshore usually does not reached more than 15 m depth because of the shallow continental shelf at South China Sea. The plume has higher concentration at the mouth of the river which causes the area to be less saline and it decreases as the station furthers from the river. Chlorophyll-a is distributed mainly at the surface level where the area is warmer and received freshwater runoff. Suspended particulate matter shows downward distribution from the front of the estuary towards deep water column depth (10 m). Temperature pattern shows warmer surface layer with depth less than 5 m while deeper water column has lower temperature. Vertical profile pattern of Pahang River plume generally shows slight difference between each monsoon by referring to particular parameter.

  15. Vertically aligned biaxially textured molybdenum thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Rahul; Riley, Michael; Lee, Sabrina; Lu, Toh-Ming

    2011-09-15

    Vertically aligned, biaxially textured molybdenum nanorods were deposited using dc magnetron sputtering with glancing flux incidence (alpha = 85 degrees with respect to the substrate normal) and a two-step substrate-rotation mode. These nanorods were identified with a body-centered cubic crystal structure. The formation of a vertically aligned biaxial texture with a [110] out-of-plane orientation was combined with a [-110] in-plane orientation. The kinetics of the growth process was found to be highly sensitive to an optimum rest time of 35 seconds for the two-step substrate rotation mode. At all other rest times, the nanorods possessed two separate biaxial textures each tilted toward one flux direction. While the in-plane texture for the vertical nanorods maintains maximum flux capture area, inclined Mo nanorods deposited at alpha = 85 degrees without substrate rotation display a [-1-1-4] in-plane texture that does not comply with the maximum flux capture area argument. Finally, an in situ capping film was deposited with normal flux incidence over the biaxially textured vertical nanorods resulting in a thin film over the porous nanorods. This capping film possessed the same biaxial texture as the nanorods and could serve as an effective substrate for the epitaxial growth of other functional materials.

  16. Vertical motions in the equatorial middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisman, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    A single station vertical velocity equation which considers ageostrophic and diabatic effects derived from the first law of thermodynamics and a generalized thermal wind relation is presented. An analysis and verification procedure which accounts for measurement and calculation errors as well as time and space continuity arguments and theoretical predictions are described. Vertical velocities are calculated at every kilometer between 25 and 60 km and for approximately every three hours for the above diurnal period at Kourou (French Guiana), Fort Sherman (Panama Canal Zone), Ascension Island, Antigua (British West Indies) and Natal (Brazil). The results, plotted as time series cross sections, suggest vertical motions ranging in magnitude from 1 or 2 cm/sec at 30 km to as much as 15 cm/sec at 60 km. Many of the general features of the results agree well with atmospheric tidal predictions but many particular features suggest that both smaller time scale gravity waves (periods less than 6 hours) and synoptic type waves (periods greater than 1 day) may be interacting significantly with the tidal fields. The results suggest that vertical motions can be calculated for the equatorial middle atmosphere and must be considered a significant part of the motion for time scales from 8 to 24 hours.

  17. Electrostatic comb drive for vertical actuation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A. P., LLNL

    1997-07-10

    The electrostatic comb finger drive has become an integral design for microsensor and microactuator applications. This paper reports on utilizing the levitation effect of comb fingers to design vertical-to-the-substrate actuation for interferometric applications. For typical polysilicon comb drives with 2 {micro}m gaps between the stationary and moving fingers, as well as between the microstructures and the substrate, the equilibrium position is nominally 1-2 {micro}m above the stationary comb fingers. This distance is ideal for many phase shifting interferometric applications. Theoretical calculations of the vertical actuation characteristics are compared with the experimental results, and a general design guideline is derived from these results. The suspension flexure stiffnesses, gravity forces, squeeze film damping, and comb finger thicknesses are parameters investigated which affect the displacement curve of the vertical microactuator. By designing a parallel plate capacitor between the suspended mass and the substrate, in situ position sensing can be used to control the vertical movement, providing a total feedback-controlled system. Fundamentals of various capacitive position sensing techniques are discussed. Experimental verification is carried out by a Zygo distance measurement interferometer.

  18. Vertical Arc for ILC Low Emittance Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, P.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

    2005-06-07

    The design and parameters of a vertical arc for the ILC Low Emittance Transport (LET) are reviewed. A 1 TeV CM ILC which relies upon 30 MV/m accelerating cavities with a packing fraction of 65% will require almost 48 km of main linac, which suggests that the total site length including BDS and bunch compressors will be on the order of 53 km. If built in a laser-straight tunnel with the low-energy ends near the surface, and assuming a perfectly spherical ''cue ball'' planetary surface with radius 6370 km, the collider halls will necessarily be 55 meters below grade, as shown in the top plot of Figure 1. Such depths would demand extensive use of deep tunneling, which would potentially drive up the cost and difficulty of ILC construction. An alternate solution is to use discrete vertical arcs at a few locations to allow a ''piecewise straight'' construction in which the depth of the tunnel below grade does not vary by more than a few meters. This approach is shown schematically in the bottom plot of Figure 1. In this Note we consider the issues for a design with one such vertical arc at the 250 GeV/c point (ie, midway down the linac for 1 TeV CM), and a second arc at the entrance to the BDS (ie, the entire BDS lies in one plane, with vertical arcs at each end).

  19. Model of 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Model of 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel. Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris wrote in NACA TR 387: 'The vertical open-throat wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics ... was built mainly for studying the spinning characteristics of airplane models, but may be used as well for the usual types of wind-tunnel tests. A special spinning balance is being developed to measure the desired forces and moments with the model simulating the actual spin of an airplane. Satisfactory air flow has been attained with a velocity that is uniform over the jet to within 0.5 per cent. The turbulence present in the tunnel has been compared with that of several other tunnels by means of the results of sphere drag tests and was found to average well with the values of those tunnels. Included also in the report are comparisons of results of stable autorotation and of rolling-moment tests obtained both in the vertical tunnel and in the old horizontal 5-foot atmospheric tunnel.' The design of a vertical tunnel having a 5-foot diameter jet was accordingly started by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in 1928. Actual construction of the new tunnel was completed in 1930, and the calibration tests were then made.'

  20. Vertical pump with free floating check valve

    DOEpatents

    Lindsay, Malcolm

    1980-01-01

    A vertical pump with a bottom discharge having a free floating check valve isposed in the outlet plenum thereof. The free floating check valve comprises a spherical member with a hemispherical cage-like member attached thereto which is capable of allowing forward or reverse flow under appropriate conditions while preventing reverse flow under inappropriate conditions.

  1. A Vertical Approach to Math Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gojak, Linda

    2012-01-01

    In the current era of mathematics standards, whether they are Common Core State Standards or other state standards, effective vertical mathematics teams offer an opportunity for teachers to grow professionally through shared experiences, for leadership to grow among the faculty, and for the school to change its perspective on the teaching and…

  2. Vertical Acoustic Arrays in the Deep Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, F.

    2002-12-01

    The R/P FLIP has made possible the deployments of vertical arrays to study sound propagation and ambient noise in the deep ocean in ways never before possible from existing research vessels. Long vertical arrays can be deployed without the flow noise contamination from platform motion, long a bane for making such studies. The vertical stability of FLIP combined with the deep mooring capability developed by Earl D. Bronson made it possible to deploy multi-element arrays beginning with a versatile 20 element array with variable spacing developed by Bill Whitney in Fred Spiess's group. The 20 element array consisted of bungee mounted hydrophones in metal cages at either uniform spacing or variable spacing to meet directivity or other requirements. It was assembled on station in the vertical and deployed to the desired depths for the elements. Gerald Morris at MPL conducted ambient noise studies using variable spacing of the elements to below the critical depth as well as in the water column above. Vic Anderson used it for his DIMUS processing system for detecting low level signals masked by ambient noise. As a 500 meter array, I used it for a series of CONTRACK (Continuous Tracking of signals at long range) experiments to resolve multipaths so they wouldn't interfere with one another. The VEKA vertical array developed by Rick Swenson of NORDA was deployed in very deep (below 3300 m) water by Dan Ramsdale of NORDA using the winch and double lay armored cable on FLIP, the same cable system for the MPL 20 element array. In my group Bruce Williams designed a rapidly deployable array to study vertical anisotropy of ambient noise as a function of range from near shore shipping via downslope conversion in a series of 48 hours FLIP stations 350, 1000 and 1500 miles from the Pacific coast. A short 120 element array, 1000 meters long, was built by John Hildebrands's group for a test of matched field processing and the SLICE experiment in acoustic tomography research of Peter

  3. Modifications in vertical scar breast reduction.

    PubMed

    Beer, G M; Morgenthaler, W; Spicher, I; Meyer, V E

    2001-06-01

    The use of vertical-scar breast reduction techniques is only slowly increasing, even though they have been advocated by Lassus and Lejour and are requested by patients. Possible reasons why surgeons are reluctant to use these techniques are that they are said to be more difficult to learn, they require considerable experience and intuition, and their applicability is confined to small breasts. Several surgeons have developed modifications, combining vertical-scar breast reduction techniques with details of the familiar inverted-T-scar technique. We present a procedure involving two further modifications of the vertical-scar breast reduction technique: first, a standardised, geometrical preoperative drawing from our superior-pedicle T technique, with the aim of establishing a reproducible method of reduction requiring no particular intuitive touch, and, second, the addition of a periareolar skin resection, to give the breast the desired round shape. Between September 1998 and December 1999 we used this technique in a prospective series of 52 patients. The median resection weight was 450 g. The maximal postoperative follow-up was 15 months. There were no acute postoperative complications necessitating reoperation. The late complication rate was within the expected range for such procedures (seven patients, 13.5%) and included vertical-scar widening, areolar distortion, residual wrinkles due to incomplete shrinkage of the undermined skin in the inferior pole and asymmetry of the breast. This procedure enables us to offer patients with moderate to marked hypertrophy a reproducible versatile vertical breast reduction technique. The technique is easy to teach and easy to learn, especially for those who are familiar with the superior pedicle inverted-T-scar technique. PMID:11355991

  4. Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) Vertical Cylinder Habitat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, Alan; Kennedy, Kriss J.; Gill, Tracy R.; Tri, Terry O.; Toups, Larry; Howard, Robert I.; Spexarth, Gary R.; Cavanaugh, Stephen; Langford, William M.; Dorsey, John T.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Constellation Architecture Team defined an outpost scenario optimized for intensive mobility that uses small, highly mobile pressurized rovers supported by portable habitat modules that can be carried between locations of interest on the lunar surface. A compact vertical cylinder characterizes the habitat concept, where the large diameter maximizes usable flat floor area optimized for a gravity environment and allows for efficient internal layout. The module was sized to fit into payload fairings for the Constellation Ares V launch vehicle, and optimized for surface transport carried by the All-Terrain Hex-Limbed Extra-Terrestrial Explorer (ATHLETE) mobility system. Launch and other loads are carried through the barrel to a top and bottom truss that interfaces with a structural support unit (SSU). The SSU contains self-leveling feet and docking interfaces for Tri-ATHLETE grasping and heavy lift. A pressurized module needed to be created that was appropriate for the lunar environment, could be easily relocated to new locations, and could be docked together in multiples for expanding pressurized volume in a lunar outpost. It was determined that horizontally oriented pressure vessels did not optimize floor area, which takes advantage of the gravity vector for full use. Hybrid hard-inflatable habitats added an unproven degree of complexity that may eventually be worked out. Other versions of vertically oriented pressure vessels were either too big, bulky, or did not optimize floor area. The purpose of the HDU vertical habitat module is to provide pressurized units that can be docked together in a modular way for lunar outpost pressurized volume expansion, and allow for other vehicles, rovers, and modules to be attached to the outpost to allow for IVA (intra-vehicular activity) transfer between them. The module is a vertically oriented cylinder with a large radius to allow for maximal floor area and use of volume. The modular, 5- m-diameter HDU vertical habitat

  5. Nation's tallest VAWT (Vertical Axis Wind Turbine) turning out the watts. [Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.

    1988-05-01

    This article describes the development of the tallest and most powerful windmill of its kind in the U.S. Known as a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT), the machine is meant for testing new concepts in vertical axis turbine design. As part of its overall testing program, the turbine will supply electricity to automated water pumps used in irrigation research at the Research Laboratory in Bushland, Texas. Excess power will go to the Southwestern Public Service Company for the area power system.

  6. Ultimately short ballistic vertical graphene Josephson junctions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gil-Ho; Kim, Sol; Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Hu-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Much efforts have been made for the realization of hybrid Josephson junctions incorporating various materials for the fundamental studies of exotic physical phenomena as well as the applications to superconducting quantum devices. Nonetheless, the efforts have been hindered by the diffusive nature of the conducting channels and interfaces. To overcome the obstacles, we vertically sandwiched a cleaved graphene monoatomic layer as the normal-conducting spacer between superconducting electrodes. The atomically thin single-crystalline graphene layer serves as an ultimately short conducting channel, with highly transparent interfaces with superconductors. In particular, we show the strong Josephson coupling reaching the theoretical limit, the convex-shaped temperature dependence of the Josephson critical current and the exceptionally skewed phase dependence of the Josephson current; all demonstrate the bona fide short and ballistic Josephson nature. This vertical stacking scheme for extremely thin transparent spacers would open a new pathway for exploring the exotic coherence phenomena occurring on an atomic scale. PMID:25635386

  7. Lunar vertical-shaft mining system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Introne, Steven D. (Editor); Krause, Roy; Williams, Erik; Baskette, Keith; Martich, Frederick; Weaver, Brad; Meve, Jeff; Alexander, Kyle; Dailey, Ron; White, Matt

    1994-01-01

    This report proposes a method that will allow lunar vertical-shaft mining. Lunar mining allows the exploitation of mineral resources imbedded within the surface. The proposed lunar vertical-shaft mining system is comprised of five subsystems: structure, materials handling, drilling, mining, and planning. The structure provides support for the exploration and mining equipment in the lunar environment. The materials handling subsystem moves mined material outside the structure and mining and drilling equipment inside the structure. The drilling process bores into the surface for the purpose of collecting soil samples, inserting transducer probes, or locating ore deposits. Once the ore deposits are discovered and pinpointed, mining operations bring the ore to the surface. The final subsystem is planning, which involves the construction of the mining structure.

  8. Laser drilling of vertical vias in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.D.; Gassman, R.A.; Keicher, D.M.

    1993-08-01

    Any advance beyond the density of standard 2D Multichip Modules (MCM) will require a vertical interconnect technology that can produce reliable area array interconnection with small feature sizes. Laser drilled vertical vias have been controllably produced in standard silicon (Si) wafers down to 0.035mm (0.0014 inches) in diameter. Several laser systems and their system parameters have been explored to determine the optimum parametric set for repeatable vias in Si. The vias produced have exhibited clean smooth interior surfaces with an aspect ratio of up to 20:1 with little or no taper. All laser systems used, their system parameters, design modifications, theory of operation, and drilling results are discussed.

  9. Instability of Rotating Vertical Viscous Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribe, Neil; Badr, Sarah; Morris, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    We have studied experimentally and theoretically the instability of a jet of viscous fluid (corn syrup) ejected downward from a nozzle that rotates about a vertical axis with an angular velocity Ω. For small values of Ω, the jet behaves in a way similar to that of normal (Ω = 0) liquid rope coiling. Above a critical value of Ω, however, a bifurcation occurs to a whirling spiral state in which the jet is strongly deflected from the vertical almost immediately after its exit from the nozzle. Experiments conducted for Ω increasing and decreasing show that the transition between the undeflected and spiral states is hysteretic. We will report results of a linear stability analysis of the undeflected state as a function of the dimensionless parameters that characterize the system, and will compare the results with our experimental measurements.

  10. Ozone vertical profile changes over South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oltmans, S. J.; Hofmann, D. J.; Komhyr, W. D.; Lathrop, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Important changes in the ozone vertical profile over South Pole, Antarctica have occurred both during the recent period of measurements, 1986-1991, and since an earlier set of soundings was carried out from 1967-1971. From the onset of the 'ozone hole' over Antarctica in the early 1980s, there has been a tendency for years with lower spring ozone amounts to alternate with years with somewhat higher (although still depleted) ozone amounts. Beginning in 1989 there have been three consecutive years of strong depletion although the timing of the breakdown of the vortex has varied from year to year. Comparison of the vertical profiles between the two periods of study reveals the dramatic decreases in the ozone amounts in the stratosphere between 15-21 km during the spring. In addition, it appears that summer values are also now much lower in this altitude region.

  11. Jamming of Cylindrical Grains in Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; Spier, Gregory; Barr, Nicholas; Steel, Fiona

    2012-02-01

    We study jamming of low aspect-ratio cylindrical Delrin grains in a vertical channel. These cylindrical grains resemble antacid tablets, poker chips, or coins since their height is less than their diameter. Grains are allowed to fall through a vertical channel with a square cross section where the channel width is greater than the diameter of a grain and constant throughout the length of the channel with no obstructions or constrictions. Within this channel, grains are sometimes observed to form jams, stable structures supported by the channel walls with no support beneath them. The probability of jam occurrence and the strength or robustness of a jam is effected by the grain dimensions and channel size. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability and jam strength in this system and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories.

  12. Experimental Studies in Helicopter Vertical Climb Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKillip, Robert M., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Data and analysis from an experimental program to measure vertical climb performance on an eight-foot model rotor are presented. The rotor testing was performed using a unique moving-model facility capable of accurately simulating the flow conditions during axial flight, and was conducted from July 9, 1992 to July 16, 1992 at the Dynamic Model Track, or 'Long Track,' just prior to its demolition in August of 1992. Data collected during this brief test program included force and moment time histories from a sting-mounted strain gauge balance, support carriage velocity, and rotor rpm pulses. In addition, limited video footage (of marginal use) was recorded from smoke flow studies for both simulated vertical climb and descent trajectories. Analytical comparisons with these data include a series of progressively more detailed calculations ranging from simple momentum theory, a prescribed wake method, and a free-wake prediction.

  13. Extreme wave runup on a vertical cliff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Francesco; Dutykh, Denys; Dudley, John M.; Dias, FréDéRic

    2013-06-01

    Wave impact and runup onto vertical obstacles are among the most important phenomena which must be taken into account in the design of coastal structures. From linear wave theory, we know that the wave amplitude on a vertical wall is twice the incident wave amplitude with weakly nonlinear theories bringing small corrections to this result. In this present study, however, we show that certain simple wave groups may produce much higher runups than previously predicted, with particular incident wave frequencies resulting in runup heights exceeding the initial wave amplitude by a factor of 5, suggesting that the notion of the design wave used in coastal structure design may need to be revisited. The results presented in this study can be considered as a note of caution for practitioners, on one side, and as a challenging novel material for theoreticians who work in the field of extreme wave-coastal structure interaction.

  14. Flow boiling in vertical down-flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Fighetti, C.; Reddy, G.; Yang, B.; Jafri, T. ); McAssey, E. ); Qureshi, Z. )

    1989-01-01

    An experimental program has been conducted to investigate the onset of Ledinegg instability in vertical down-flow. For three size uniformly heated test sections with L/D ratios from 100 to 150, the pressure drop under subcooled boiling conditions has been obtained for a wide range of operating parameters. The results are presented in non-dimensional forms which correlate the important variables and provide techniques for predicting the onset of flow instability. 3 refs.

  15. Flow boiling in vertical down-flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Fighetti, C.; Reddy, G.; Yang, B.; Jafri, T.; McAssey, E.; Qureshi, Z.

    1989-12-31

    An experimental program has been conducted to investigate the onset of Ledinegg instability in vertical down-flow. For three size uniformly heated test sections with L/D ratios from 100 to 150, the pressure drop under subcooled boiling conditions has been obtained for a wide range of operating parameters. The results are presented in non-dimensional forms which correlate the important variables and provide techniques for predicting the onset of flow instability. 3 refs.

  16. Electrically floating, near vertical incidence, skywave antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Allen A.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Tremblay, Paul A.; Mays, Belva L.

    2014-07-08

    An Electrically Floating, Near Vertical Incidence, Skywave (NVIS) Antenna comprising an antenna element, a floating ground element, and a grounding element. At least part of said floating ground element is positioned between said antenna element and said grounding element. The antenna is separated from the floating ground element and the grounding element by one or more electrical insulators. The floating ground element is separated from said antenna and said grounding element by one or more electrical insulators.

  17. Vertical flight path steering system for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambregts, Antonius A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Disclosed is a vertical flight path angle steering system for aircraft, utilizing a digital flight control computer which processes pilot control inputs and aircraft response parameters into suitable elevator commands and control information for display to the pilot on a cathode ray tube. The system yields desirable airplane control handling qualities and responses as well as improvements in pilot workload and safety during airplane operation in the terminal area and under windshear conditions.

  18. Ozone vertical distribution in Mars polar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komitov, B.

    On the basis of an ultraviolet spectrum obtained over the north polar region of Mars by Mariner-9, the vertical profile of the ozone density is calculated. A density maximum is found at about 25 km height over the surface of the planet. Its value is about 1×1010molecules cm-3. The obtained result is compared to the results obtained by other authors.

  19. The distinctive vertical heterophoria of dyslexics.

    PubMed

    Quercia, Patrick; Quercia, Madeleine; Feiss, Léonard J; Allaert, François

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we looked for the presence of vertical heterophoria (VH) in 42 dyslexic children (22 males and 20 females) aged 118.5±12.9 months who were compared with a control group of 22 nondyslexic children (eleven males and eleven females) aged 112±9.8 months. Dyslexics presented a low-level (always <1 prism diopter) VH combined with torsion. This oculomotor feature clearly separates the dyslexic group from the normal readers group. It is independent of the type of dyslexia. The essential feature of this VH is a lability that appears during specific stimulation of sensory receptors involved in postural regulation. This lability is demonstrated using a vertical Maddox test conducted under very specific conditions in which postural sensors are successively stimulated in a predetermined order. A quantitative variation in this VH may be seen during the Bielchowsky Head Tilt Test, which reveals hypertonia of the lower or upper oblique muscles. Vertical orthophoria can be achieved by placing low-power prisms asymmetrically within the direction of action of the superior or inferior oblique muscles. The selection of power and axis is not only guided by elements of the eye examination but also from observation of postural muscle tone. All these elements suggest that the VH could be of postural origin and somehow related to the vertical action of the oblique muscles. VH and torsion are not harmful per se. There is no statistical relationship between their level and the various parameters used to assess the reading skills of dyslexic children. VH and torsion could be a clinical marker of global proprioceptive dysfunction responsible for high-level multisensory disturbances secondary to poor spatial localization of visual and auditory information. This dysfunction might also explain the motor disorders concomitant to dyslexia. PMID:26445526

  20. Inverse scattering problem for quantum graph vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Cheon, Taksu; Turek, Ondrej; Exner, Pavel

    2011-06-15

    We demonstrate how the inverse scattering problem of a quantum star graph can be solved by means of diagonalization of the Hermitian unitary matrix when the vertex coupling is of the scale-invariant (or Fueloep-Tsutsui) form. This enables the construction of quantum graphs with desired properties in a tailor-made fashion. The procedure is illustrated on the example of quantum vertices with equal transmission probabilities.

  1. Understanding Vertical Jump Potentiation: A Deterministic Model.

    PubMed

    Suchomel, Timothy J; Lamont, Hugh S; Moir, Gavin L

    2016-06-01

    This review article discusses previous postactivation potentiation (PAP) literature and provides a deterministic model for vertical jump (i.e., squat jump, countermovement jump, and drop/depth jump) potentiation. There are a number of factors that must be considered when designing an effective strength-power potentiation complex (SPPC) focused on vertical jump potentiation. Sport scientists and practitioners must consider the characteristics of the subject being tested and the design of the SPPC itself. Subject characteristics that must be considered when designing an SPPC focused on vertical jump potentiation include the individual's relative strength, sex, muscle characteristics, neuromuscular characteristics, current fatigue state, and training background. Aspects of the SPPC that must be considered for vertical jump potentiation include the potentiating exercise, level and rate of muscle activation, volume load completed, the ballistic or non-ballistic nature of the potentiating exercise, and the rest interval(s) used following the potentiating exercise. Sport scientists and practitioners should design and seek SPPCs that are practical in nature regarding the equipment needed and the rest interval required for a potentiated performance. If practitioners would like to incorporate PAP as a training tool, they must take the athlete training time restrictions into account as a number of previous SPPCs have been shown to require long rest periods before potentiation can be realized. Thus, practitioners should seek SPPCs that may be effectively implemented in training and that do not require excessive rest intervals that may take away from valuable training time. Practitioners may decrease the necessary time needed to realize potentiation by improving their subject's relative strength. PMID:26712510

  2. Spirit 360-Degree View, Sol 388 (vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on Spirit's 388th martian day, or sol (Feb. 4, 2005). Spirit had driven about 13 meters (43 feet) uphill toward 'Cumberland Ridge' on this sol. This location is catalogued as Spirit's Site 102, Position 513. The view is presented in a vertical projection with geometric and brightness seam correction.

  3. Vertical shear in the Jovian equatorial zone.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layton, R. G.

    1971-01-01

    Jupiter photographs taken in two different wavelength regions (blue and red) are studied for clues to differing Jovian atmosphere motions. The relative motions of features visible on these photographs may be interpreted as a vertical shear at visible cloud level. The value obtained implies that the north equatorial zone must be about 0.35 deg K warmer than the adjacent equatorial zone. Deeper in the atmosphere the reverse must hold.

  4. Vertical Carbon Nanotube Device in Nanoporous Templates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maschmann, Matthew Ralph (Inventor); Fisher, Timothy Scott (Inventor); Sands, Timothy (Inventor); Bashir, Rashid (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A modified porous anodic alumina template (PAA) containing a thin CNT catalyst layer directly embedded into the pore walls. CNT synthesis using the template selectively catalyzes SWNTs and DWNTs from the embedded catalyst layer to the top PAA surface, creating a vertical CNT channel within the pores. Subsequent processing allows for easy contact metallization and adaptable functionalization of the CNTs and template for a myriad of applications.

  5. The distinctive vertical heterophoria of dyslexics

    PubMed Central

    Quercia, Patrick; Quercia, Madeleine; Feiss, Léonard J; Allaert, François

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we looked for the presence of vertical heterophoria (VH) in 42 dyslexic children (22 males and 20 females) aged 118.5±12.9 months who were compared with a control group of 22 nondyslexic children (eleven males and eleven females) aged 112±9.8 months. Dyslexics presented a low-level (always <1 prism diopter) VH combined with torsion. This oculomotor feature clearly separates the dyslexic group from the normal readers group. It is independent of the type of dyslexia. The essential feature of this VH is a lability that appears during specific stimulation of sensory receptors involved in postural regulation. This lability is demonstrated using a vertical Maddox test conducted under very specific conditions in which postural sensors are successively stimulated in a predetermined order. A quantitative variation in this VH may be seen during the Bielchowsky Head Tilt Test, which reveals hypertonia of the lower or upper oblique muscles. Vertical orthophoria can be achieved by placing low-power prisms asymmetrically within the direction of action of the superior or inferior oblique muscles. The selection of power and axis is not only guided by elements of the eye examination but also from observation of postural muscle tone. All these elements suggest that the VH could be of postural origin and somehow related to the vertical action of the oblique muscles. VH and torsion are not harmful per se. There is no statistical relationship between their level and the various parameters used to assess the reading skills of dyslexic children. VH and torsion could be a clinical marker of global proprioceptive dysfunction responsible for high-level multisensory disturbances secondary to poor spatial localization of visual and auditory information. This dysfunction might also explain the motor disorders concomitant to dyslexia. PMID:26445526

  6. Engineering high-performance vertical cavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lear, K.L.; Hou, H.Q.; Hietala, V.M.; Choquette, K.D.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    The cw and high-speed performance of vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes (VCSELs) are affected by both electrical and optical issues arising from the geometry and fabrication of these devices. Structures with low resistance semiconductor mirrors and Al-oxide confinement layers address these issues and have produced record performance including 50% power conversion efficiency and modulation bandwidths up to 20 GHz at small bias currents.

  7. Vertical leaf pressure filter LVAzh 225

    SciTech Connect

    Fomichev, V.I.; Abramov, V.P.; Gutin, Y.V.

    1984-01-01

    A new vertical lead pressure filter LVAzh 225 has been developed with an arrangement for hydraulic coke removal. Industrial trials of the filter, however, showed the service life of the rubber seals of the butterfly valves to be short, so that butterfly valves were replaced by shut-off valves with a pneumatic drive. The prototype of the LVAzh 225 leaf filter has been recommended for series production.

  8. Vertically Integrated Nanowire-Based Unified Memory.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Hyun; Ahn, Dae-Chul; Kang, Min-Ho; Jeon, Seung-Bae; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2016-09-14

    A vertically integrated nanowire-based device for multifunctional unified memory that combine dynamic random access memory (DRAM) and flash memory in a single transistor is demonstrated for the first time. The device utilizes a gate-all-around (GAA) structure that completely surrounds the nanowire; the structure is built on a bulk silicon wafer. A vertically integrated unified memory (VIUM) device composed of five-story channels was fabricated via the one-route all-dry etching process (ORADEP) with reliable reproducibility, stiction-free stability, and high uniformity. In each DRAM and flash memory operation, the five-story VIUM showed a remarkably enhanced sensing current drivability compared with one-story unified memory (UM) characteristics. In addition to each independent memory mode, the switching endurance of the VIUM was evaluated in the unified mode, which alternatively activates two memory modes, resulting in an even higher sensing memory window than that of the UM. In addition to our previous work on a logic transistor joining high performance with good scalability, this work describes a novel memory hierarchy design with high functionality for system-on-chip (SoC) architectures, demonstrating the practicality and versatility of the vertically integrated nanowire configuration for use in various applications. PMID:27579769

  9. Lunar and Vertical Distribution of Myctophidae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsarin, S.

    The Myctophidae are the most numerous of the mesopelagic fishes in all oceans. Daily vertical migrations which connected with nutrition and energy exchange, are charac- teristic feature of the myctophids behavior. Myctophidae in main during the nighttime basic feed. There are two ecological groups of Myctophidae on the type of vertical migrations. (Some scientists select the third intermediate group). Superficial (nyc- toepipelagic) myctophids are species, which during the nighttime arrive at surface of water. Layer myctophids are fishes, which are located in the main pycnocline (thermo- and halocline) and enter into composition of fauna of sound scattering layers (SSL) during the nighttime. However lunar light is hardly influenced on the upper bound of myctophids localization during the night. Agrees Barham (1970) all Myctophidae are divided on two morphoecological types: active and inactive. These types differ on morphology, on a response on light, under the contents of lipids into organism. To the first type concern all superficial Myctophidae and majority of myctophids of the night zone of pycnocline, including the most numerous genus - Diaphus. To an inactive type concern myctophids of the second genus on number of species from the family - Lam- panyctus. Superficial Myctophidae do not achieve the surfaces of water for want of vertical migrations for want of maximum and intensive lunar light. They are located in SSL. Inactive layer myctophids are in this case located deeper than main SSL. Lunar light practically does not influence on remaining active layer Myctophidae.

  10. Sunrise enhancement of equatorial vertical plasma drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Libo; Zhang, Ruilong; Le, Huijun

    2016-04-01

    Sunrise enhancement in vertical plasma drift over equatorial regions is not discernible in the statistical picture compared with the significant enhancement during dusk hours. In this report, it is the first time to investigate the occurrence of the dawn enhancement in the equatorial ionospheric vertical plasma drift from ROCSAT-1 observations during geomagnetic quiet times. The dawn enhancements occur most frequently in June solstice and least frequently in December solstice. The statistical survey shows that the occurrence depends on the magnetic declination. The enhancement has the strongest amplitude in regions near 320° longitude and peaks during June solstice. The dawn enhancement reaches its peak after the sunrise in conjugated E regions. Furthermore, it is found that the dawn enhancement is closely related to the difference between the sunrise times in the conjugated E regions (sunrise time lag). The dawn enhancement occurs easily in regions with a large sunrise time lag. Moreover, we will report the effects of the sunrise enhancement of vertical plasma drift on the equatorial ionosphere as indicated from the observations and model simulations. We thanks National Central University of Taiwan providing the ROCSAT-1 data. The Ap and F107 indices are obtained from the National Geophysical Data Center (http://spidr.ngdc.noaa.gov/spidr/). This research is supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (41231065), the Chinese Academy of Sciences project (KZZD-EW-01-3), National Key Basic Research Program of China (2012CB825604) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (41321003).

  11. Diffusion weighted vertical gradient and spin echo.

    PubMed

    Engström, Mathias; Bammer, Roland; Skare, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    In this work, diffusion weighting and parallel imaging is combined with a vertical gradient and spin echo data readout. This sequence was implemented and evaluated on healthy volunteers using a 1.5 and a 3 T whole-body MR system. As the vertical gradient and spin echo trajectory enables a higher k-space velocity in the phase-encoding direction than single-shot echo planar imaging, the geometrical distortions are reduced. When combined with parallel imaging such as generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition, the geometric distortions are reduced even further, while also keeping the minimum echo time reasonably low. However, this combination of a diffusion preparation and multiple refocusing pulses during the vertical gradient and spin echo readout, generally violates the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill condition, which leads to interferences between echo pathways. To suppress the stimulated echo pathway, refocusing pulses with a sharper slice profiles and an odd/even crusher variation scheme were implemented and evaluated. Being a single-shot acquisition technique, the reconstructed images are robust to rigid-body head motion and spatially varying brain motion, both of which are common sources of artifacts in diffusion MRI. PMID:23008151

  12. Rotation of vertically oriented objects during earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinzen, Klaus-G.

    2012-10-01

    Vertically oriented objects, such as tombstones, monuments, columns, and stone lanterns, are often observed to shift and rotate during earthquake ground motion. Such observations are usually limited to the mesoseismal zone. Whether near-field rotational ground motion components are necessary in addition to pure translational movements to explain the observed rotations is an open question. We summarize rotation data from seven earthquakes between 1925 and 2009 and perform analog and numeric rotation testing with vertically oriented objects. The free-rocking motion of a marble block on a sliding table is disturbed by a pulse in the direction orthogonal to the rocking motion. When the impulse is sufficiently strong and occurs at the `right' moment, it induces significant rotation of the block. Numeric experiments of a free-rocking block show that the initiation of vertical block rotation by a cycloidal acceleration pulse applied orthogonal to the rocking axis depends on the amplitude of the pulse and its phase relation to the rocking cycle. Rotation occurs when the pulse acceleration exceeds the threshold necessary to provoke rocking of a resting block, and the rocking block approaches its equilibrium position. Experiments with blocks subjected to full 3D strong motion signals measured during the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake confirm the observations from the tests with analytic ground motions. Significant differences in the rotational behavior of a monolithic block and two stacked blocks exist.

  13. Vertical nanopillars for highly localized fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chong; Hanson, Lindsey; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2011-01-01

    Observing individual molecules in a complex environment by fluorescence microscopy is becoming increasingly important in biological and medical research, for which critical reduction of observation volume is required. Here, we demonstrate the use of vertically aligned silicon dioxide nanopillars to achieve below-the-diffraction-limit observation volume in vitro and inside live cells. With a diameter much smaller than the wavelength of visible light, a transparent silicon dioxide nanopillar embedded in a nontransparent substrate restricts the propagation of light and affords evanescence wave excitation along its vertical surface. This effect creates highly confined illumination volume that selectively excites fluorescence molecules in the vicinity of the nanopillar. We show that this nanopillar illumination can be used for in vitro single-molecule detection at high fluorophore concentrations. In addition, we demonstrate that vertical nanopillars interface tightly with live cells and function as highly localized light sources inside the cell. Furthermore, specific chemical modification of the nanopillar surface makes it possible to locally recruit proteins of interest and simultaneously observe their behavior within the complex, crowded environment of the cell. PMID:21368157

  14. [Vertical talus: current diagnostic and therapy options].

    PubMed

    Arbab, D; Rath, B; Quack, V; Lüring, C; Tingart, M

    2013-06-01

    Congenital vertical talus is a rare condition which presents as an isolated deformity or in association with neuromuscular and/or genetic disorders. Pathoanatomically the deformity shows a dislocated talonavicular and subtalar joint. The etiology and pathogenesis are still not finally determined although in some cases a genetic basis has been identified. The clinical picture is that of a flat, convex longitudinal arch with abduction and dorsiflexion of the forefoot and an elevated heel. Clinical diagnosis is confirmed by plain radiographic imaging. Congenital vertical talus should not be confused with other deformities of the foot, such as congenital oblique talus, flexible flat feet or pes calcaneus. The object of treatment of congenital vertical talus is to restore a normal anatomical relationship between the talus, navicular and calcaneus to obtain a pain-free foot. Major reconstructive surgery has been reported to be effective but is associated with substantial complications. Good early results of a modified non-operative treatment using serial manipulation, cast treatment and minimally invasive surgery may change therapeutic concepts. PMID:23685500

  15. Human sensitivity to vertical self-motion.

    PubMed

    Nesti, Alessandro; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Macneilage, Paul R; Bülthoff, Heinrich H

    2014-01-01

    Perceiving vertical self-motion is crucial for maintaining balance as well as for controlling an aircraft. Whereas heave absolute thresholds have been exhaustively studied, little work has been done in investigating how vertical sensitivity depends on motion intensity (i.e., differential thresholds). Here we measure human sensitivity for 1-Hz sinusoidal accelerations for 10 participants in darkness. Absolute and differential thresholds are measured for upward and downward translations independently at 5 different peak amplitudes ranging from 0 to 2 m/s(2). Overall vertical differential thresholds are higher than horizontal differential thresholds found in the literature. Psychometric functions are fit in linear and logarithmic space, with goodness of fit being similar in both cases. Differential thresholds are higher for upward as compared to downward motion and increase with stimulus intensity following a trend best described by two power laws. The power laws' exponents of 0.60 and 0.42 for upward and downward motion, respectively, deviate from Weber's Law in that thresholds increase less than expected at high stimulus intensity. We speculate that increased sensitivity at high accelerations and greater sensitivity to downward than upward self-motion may reflect adaptations to avoid falling. PMID:24158607

  16. Longitudinal variability of black carbon vertical profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, J. P.; Weinzierl, B.; Samset, B. H.; Perring, A. E.; Dollner, M.; Heimerl, K.; Markovic, M. Z.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol contributes substantially to both climate forcing and climate forcing uncertainty. An important source of this uncertainty derives from the difficulty in predicting BC's global abundance and vertical distribution. Here we present a multi-year record of black carbon (BC) vertical concentration profiles from both sides of the Atlantic, obtained from airborne Single Particle Soot Photometers (SP2s) flown on the NASA DC-8, and the DLR Falcon research aircraft from the CONCERT, ACCESS, DC3, SEAC4RS, and SALTRACE campaigns. The measurements constrain the relative rates of BC transport/removal from, and zonal mixing in, the upper troposphere, as well as the range of BC loadings in these regions. They also constrain the time-rates of change of BC loads in altitudes at which it is a highly efficient (although sparse) climate forcer, and a relatively long-lived aerosol tracer. We find that concentration of BC in the upper troposphere can vary by a factor 10. Over the Northern mid-latitudes concentrations are however consistent to a fraction of this range over wide longitudinal ranges, over month-long timescales. The data show that BC becomes zonally mixed here starting at 500 hPa and extending to near the tropopause. These results imply broader value than previously associated with measured vertical profiles in constraining global scale BC loadings aloft.

  17. Vertical variations of coral reef drag forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asher, Shai; Niewerth, Stephan; Koll, Katinka; Shavit, Uri

    2016-05-01

    Modeling flow in a coral reef requires a closure model that links the local drag force to the local mean velocity. However, the spatial flow variations make it difficult to predict the distribution of the local drag. Here we report on vertical profiles of measured drag and velocity in a laboratory reef that was made of 81 Pocillopora Meandrina colony skeletons, densely arranged along a tilted flume. Two corals were CT-scanned, sliced horizontally, and printed using a 3-D printer. Drag was measured as a function of height above the bottom by connecting the slices to drag sensors. Profiles of velocity were measured in-between the coral branches and above the reef. Measured drag of whole colonies shows an excellent agreement with previous field and laboratory studies; however, these studies never showed how drag varies vertically. The vertical distribution of drag is reported as a function of flow rate and water level. When the water level is the same as the reef height, Reynolds stresses are negligible and the drag force per unit fluid mass is nearly constant. However, when the water depth is larger, Reynolds stress gradients become significant and drag increases with height. An excellent agreement was found between the drag calculated by a momentum budget and the measured drag of the individual printed slices. Finally, we propose a modified formulation of the drag coefficient that includes the normal dispersive stress term and results in reduced variations of the drag coefficient at the cost of introducing an additional coefficient.

  18. The vertical distribution of tropospheric ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.; Hoell, J. M.; Augustsson, T. R.

    1980-01-01

    A one-dimensional tropospheric photochemical model is used to simulate measured profiles of NH3 obtained with the Infrared Heterodyne Radiometer. The relative roles of homogeneous loss, heterogeneous loss, and vertical eddy transport are discussed in terms of selecting parameters which best fit the measurements. The best fit was obtained for a vertical eddy diffusion coefficient of 200,000/sq cm per sec or greater (corresponding to a characteristic vertical transport time in excess of about 35 days), and a characteristic heterogeneous loss time in excess of 10 days. The characteristic homogeneous chemical loss time was found to be about 40 days at the surface and decreased to about 180 days at 10 km, and not very sensitive to model chemical perturbations. Increased ground-level concentrations of NH3 to about 10 ppb, compared to background surface concentrations of about 1 ppb, were measured several weeks after application of ammonium nitrate fertilizer. This suggests that the volatilization of ammonium nitrate fertilizer is rapid, and an important source of NH3. Because of the characteristic times for the loss mechanisms, synoptic time-scale phenomena may play an important role in determining the tropospheric distribution of NH3 concentrations.

  19. Orthogonal Thin Film Photovoltaics on Vertical Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Ahnood, Arman; Zhou, H; Suzuki, Y; Sliz, R; Fabritius, T; Nathan, Arokia; Amaratunga, G A J

    2015-12-01

    Decoupling paths of carrier collection and illumination within photovoltaic devices is one promising approach for improving their efficiency by simultaneously increasing light absorption and carrier collection efficiency. Orthogonal photovoltaic devices are core-shell type structures consisting of thin film photovoltaic stack on vertical nanopillar scaffolds. These types of devices allow charge collection to take place in the radial direction, perpendicular to the path of light in the vertical direction. This approach addresses the inherently high recombination rate of disordered thin films, by allowing semiconductor films with minimal thicknesses to be used in photovoltaic devices, without performance degradation associated with incomplete light absorption. This work considers effects which influence the performance of orthogonal photovoltaic devices. Illumination non-uniformity as light travels across the depth of the pillars, electric field enhancement due to the nanoscale size and shape of the pillars, and series resistance due to the additional surface structure created through the use of pillars are considered. All of these effects influence the operation of orthogonal solar cells and should be considered in the design of vertically nanostructured orthogonal photovoltaics. PMID:26676997

  20. Orthogonal Thin Film Photovoltaics on Vertical Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahnood, Arman; Zhou, H.; Suzuki, Y.; Sliz, R.; Fabritius, T.; Nathan, Arokia; Amaratunga, G. A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Decoupling paths of carrier collection and illumination within photovoltaic devices is one promising approach for improving their efficiency by simultaneously increasing light absorption and carrier collection efficiency. Orthogonal photovoltaic devices are core-shell type structures consisting of thin film photovoltaic stack on vertical nanopillar scaffolds. These types of devices allow charge collection to take place in the radial direction, perpendicular to the path of light in the vertical direction. This approach addresses the inherently high recombination rate of disordered thin films, by allowing semiconductor films with minimal thicknesses to be used in photovoltaic devices, without performance degradation associated with incomplete light absorption. This work considers effects which influence the performance of orthogonal photovoltaic devices. Illumination non-uniformity as light travels across the depth of the pillars, electric field enhancement due to the nanoscale size and shape of the pillars, and series resistance due to the additional surface structure created through the use of pillars are considered. All of these effects influence the operation of orthogonal solar cells and should be considered in the design of vertically nanostructured orthogonal photovoltaics.

  1. Using the in-line component for fixed-wing EM 1D inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiarowski, Adam

    2015-09-01

    Numerous authors have discussed the utility of multicomponent measurements. Generally speaking, for a vertical-oriented dipole source, the measured vertical component couples to horizontal planar bodies while the horizontal in-line component couples best to vertical planar targets. For layered-earth cases, helicopter EM systems have little or no in-line component response and as a result much of the in-line signal is due to receiver coil rotation and appears as noise. In contrast to this, the in-line component of a fixed-wing airborne electromagnetic (AEM) system with large transmitter-receiver offset can be substantial, exceeding the vertical component in conductive areas. This paper compares the in-line and vertical response of a fixed-wing airborne electromagnetic (AEM) system using a half-space model and calculates sensitivity functions. The a posteriori inversion model parameter uncertainty matrix is calculated for a bathymetry model (conductive layer over more resistive half-space) for two inversion cases; use of vertical component alone is compared to joint inversion of vertical and in-line components. The joint inversion is able to better resolve model parameters. An example is then provided using field data from a bathymetry survey to compare the joint inversion to vertical component only inversion. For each inversion set, the difference between the inverted water depth and ship-measured bathymetry is calculated. The result is in general agreement with that expected from the a posteriori inversion model parameter uncertainty calculation.

  2. ostglacial rebound from VLBI Geodesy: On Establishing Vertical Reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argus, Donald .

    1996-01-01

    I propose that a useful reference frame for vertical motions is that found by minimizing differences between vertical motions observed with VLBI [Ma and Ryan, 1995] and predictions from postglacial rebound predictions [Peltier, 1995].

  3. 6. DETAIL OF VERTICAL LIFT SPAN AND FIXED SPAN IMMEDIATELY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL OF VERTICAL LIFT SPAN AND FIXED SPAN IMMEDIATELY NORTH OF VERTICAL LIFT SPAN, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Shippingsport Bridge, Spanning Illinois River at State Route 51, La Salle, La Salle County, IL

  4. 24. PIN CONNECTION AT VERTICAL AND BOTTOM CHORD ON CAMELBACK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. PIN CONNECTION AT VERTICAL AND BOTTOM CHORD ON CAMELBACK THROUGH TRUSS. VERTICAL AND BOTTOM CHORD MADE OF HAND-FORGED EYE BARS - New River Bridge, Spanning New River at State Route 623, Pembroke, Giles County, VA

  5. 19. VERTICAL VIEW, FROM DECK, SHOWING CONNECTION OF CENTER TRUSS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VERTICAL VIEW, FROM DECK, SHOWING CONNECTION OF CENTER TRUSS TENSION BARS, DIAGONAL TENSION RODS, AND LATTICE-JOINED VERTICAL CHANNELS - Lenox Bridge, Spanning Obion River, Rural Road S8025, Lenox, Dyer County, TN

  6. Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross Bracing Joint, Vertical Cross Bracing End Detail - Ceylon Covered Bridge, Limberlost Park, spanning Wabash River at County Road 900 South, Geneva, Adams County, IN

  7. A Vertical Grid Module for Baroclinic Models of the Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, John B

    2008-04-01

    The vertical grid of an atmospheric model assigns dynamic and thermo- dynamic variables to grid locations. The vertical coordinate is typically not height but one of a class of meteorological variables that vary with atmo- spheric conditions. The grid system is chosen to further numerical approx- imations of the boundary conditions so that the system is terrain following at the surface. Lagrangian vertical coordinates are useful in reducing the numerical errors from advection processes. That the choices will effect the numercial properties and accuracy is explored in this report. A MATLAB class for Lorentz vertical grids is described and applied to the vertical struc- ture equation and baroclinic atmospheric circulation. A generalized meteo- rolgoical coordinate system is developed which can support σ, isentropic θ vertical coordinate, or Lagrangian vertical coordinates. The vertical atmo- spheric column is a MATLAB class that includes the kinematic and ther- modynamic variables along with methods for computing geopoentials and terms relevant to a 3D baroclinc atmospheric model.

  8. emGain: Determination of EM gain of CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, Olivier; Carignan, Claude; Blais-Ouellette, Sebastien

    2012-01-01

    The determination of the EM gain of the CCD is best done by fitting the histogram of many low-light frames. Typically, the dark+CIC noise of a 30ms frame itself is a sufficient amount of signal to determine accurately the EM gain with about 200 512x512 frames. The IDL code emGain takes as an input a cube of frames and fit the histogram of all the pixels with the EM stage output probability function. The function returns the EM gain of the frames as well as the read-out noise and the mean signal level of the frames.

  9. Adsorption to fish sperm of vertically transmitted fish viruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, D.; Pascho, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    More than 99 percent of a vertically transmitted fish rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus, was removed from suspension in less than 1 minute by adsorption to the surface membrane of sperm from two genera of salmonid fishes. The vertically transmitted, infectious pancreatic necrosis virus adsorbed to a lesser degree, but no adsorption occurred with a second fish rhabdovirus that is not vertically transmitted. Such adsorption may be involved in vertical transmission of these viruses.

  10. Mechanical design of NASA Ames Research Center vertical motion simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelbert, D. F.; Bakke, A. P.; Chargin, M. K.; Vallotton, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    NASA has designed and is constructing a new flight simulator with large vertical travel. Several aspects of the mechanical design of this Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) are discussed, including the multiple rack and pinion vertical drive, a pneumatic equilibration system, and the friction-damped rigid link catenaries used as cable supports.

  11. The Impact of Vertical Scaling Decisions on Growth Interpretations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Derek C.; Weeks, Jonathan P.

    2009-01-01

    Most growth models implicitly assume that test scores have been vertically scaled. What may not be widely appreciated are the different choices that must be made when creating a vertical score scale. In this paper empirical patterns of growth in student achievement are compared as a function of different approaches to creating a vertical scale.…

  12. 49 CFR 179.14 - Coupler vertical restraint system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... material failure, vertical loads of at least 200,000 pounds (90,718.5 kg) applied in upward and downward... mating coupler (or simulated coupler) having only frictional vertical force resistance at the mating... section. A test is successful when a vertical disengagement or material failure does not occur during...

  13. Diel Vertical Migration Thresholds of Karenia brevis (Dinophyceae).

    EPA Science Inventory

    Light and nutrient availability change throughout dinoflagellate diel vertical migration (DVM) and/or with subpopulation location in the water column along the west Florida shelf. Typically, the vertical depth of the shelf is greater than the distance a subpopulation can vertical...

  14. 46 CFR 190.10-15 - Vertical ladders not accepted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vertical ladders not accepted. 190.10-15 Section 190.10-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 190.10-15 Vertical ladders not accepted. (a) Vertical...

  15. 46 CFR 190.10-15 - Vertical ladders not accepted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vertical ladders not accepted. 190.10-15 Section 190.10-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Means of Escape § 190.10-15 Vertical ladders not accepted. (a) Vertical ladders and deck scuttles shall not in general...

  16. The Temporal Structure of Vertical Arm Movements

    PubMed Central

    Gaveau, Jérémie; Papaxanthis, Charalambos

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigates how the CNS deals with the omnipresent force of gravity during arm motor planning. Previous studies have reported direction-dependent kinematic differences in the vertical plane; notably, acceleration duration was greater during a downward than an upward arm movement. Although the analysis of acceleration and deceleration phases has permitted to explore the integration of gravity force, further investigation is necessary to conclude whether feedforward or feedback control processes are at the origin of this incorporation. We considered that a more detailed analysis of the temporal features of vertical arm movements could provide additional information about gravity force integration into the motor planning. Eight subjects performed single joint vertical arm movements (45° rotation around the shoulder joint) in two opposite directions (upwards and downwards) and at three different speeds (slow, natural and fast). We calculated different parameters of hand acceleration profiles: movement duration (MD), duration to peak acceleration (D PA), duration from peak acceleration to peak velocity (D PA-PV), duration from peak velocity to peak deceleration (D PV-PD), duration from peak deceleration to the movement end (D PD-End), acceleration duration (AD), deceleration duration (DD), peak acceleration (PA), peak velocity (PV), and peak deceleration (PD). While movement durations and amplitudes were similar for upward and downward movements, the temporal structure of acceleration profiles differed between the two directions. More specifically, subjects performed upward movements faster than downward movements; these direction-dependent asymmetries appeared early in the movement (i.e., before PA) and lasted until the moment of PD. Additionally, PA and PV were greater for upward than downward movements. Movement speed also changed the temporal structure of acceleration profiles. The effect of speed and direction on the form of acceleration

  17. Vertical deformation at western part of Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Febriyani, Caroline; Prijatna, Kosasih; Meilano, Irwan

    2015-04-01

    This research tries to make advancement in GPS signal processing to estimate the interseismic vertical deformation field at western part of Sumatra Island. The data derived by Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) from Badan Informasi Geospasial (BIG) between 2010 and 2012. GPS Analyze at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (GAMIT) software and Global Kalman Filter (GLOBK) software are used to process the GPS signal to estimate the vertical velocities of the CGPS station. In order to minimize noise due to atmospheric delay, Vienna Mapping Function 1 (VMF1) is used as atmospheric parameter model and include daily IONEX file provided by the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) as well. It improves GAMIT daily position accuracy up to 0.8 mm. In a second step of processing, the GLOBK is used in order to estimate site positions and velocities in the ITRF08 reference frame. The result shows that the uncertainties of estimated displacement velocity at all CGPS stations are smaller than 1.5 mm/yr. The subsided deformation patterns are seen at the northern and southern part of west Sumatra. The vertical deformation at northern part of west Sumatra indicates postseismic phase associated with the 2010 and 2012 Northern Sumatra earthquakes and also the long-term postseismic associated with the 2004 and 2005 Northern Sumatra earthquakes. The uplifted deformation patterns are seen from Bukit Tinggi to Seblat which indicate a long-term interseismic phase after the 2007 Bengkulu earthquake and 2010 Mentawai earthquake. GANO station shows a subsidence at rate 12.25 mm/yr, indicating the overriding Indo-Australia Plate which is dragged down by the subducting Southeast Asian Plate.

  18. Centropages behaviour: Swimming and vertical migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaraz, Miguel; Saiz, Enric; Calbet, Albert

    2007-02-01

    The evolutionary success of any species living in a variable environment depends on its capacity to enhance the probability of finding food and mates, and escaping predators. In the case of copepods of the genus Centropages, as in all planktonic copepods, their swimming behaviour is closely tied to these vital aspects, and shows a high degree of plasticity and adaptive capacity. Swimming mechanisms of Centropages change radically during development, mainly in the transition between naupliar stages to the 1st copepodite; nauplii do not produce feeding currents, whereas copepodites do. Adults and late developmental stages of C. typicus, C. hamatus and C. velificatus spend most of the time in slow swimming and resting breaks, with occasional and brief fast swimming (escape reactions) and grooming events. Slow swimming is closely related to the creation of feeding currents, and results from the beating of the cephalic appendages in a “fling and clap” manner. The proportion of time allocated to the different swimming activities depends on sensory cues like type and concentration of food, presence of potential mates, light intensity, hydrodynamic flow, etc. The responses of Centropages to changes in flow velocity fluctuations (small-scale turbulence) are similar to the escape responses (fast swimming) triggered by the presence of potential predators. Centropages generally have standard nocturnal vertical migration patterns involving considerable vertical displacements. This behaviour is closely related to the narrow spectral sensitivity and the low intensity threshold of the genus, and has important consequences for the active vertical transport of matter and energy. The variety of responses of Centropages to environmental changes, and in general all the aspects related to its swimming behaviour seem to be controlled by the trade-off between energetic gains (food intake), losses (swimming energy expenditure), and predation risk. Behavioural plasticity and adaptation

  19. Vertical deformation at western part of Sumatra

    SciTech Connect

    Febriyani, Caroline Prijatna, Kosasih Meilano, Irwan

    2015-04-24

    This research tries to make advancement in GPS signal processing to estimate the interseismic vertical deformation field at western part of Sumatra Island. The data derived by Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) from Badan Informasi Geospasial (BIG) between 2010 and 2012. GPS Analyze at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (GAMIT) software and Global Kalman Filter (GLOBK) software are used to process the GPS signal to estimate the vertical velocities of the CGPS station. In order to minimize noise due to atmospheric delay, Vienna Mapping Function 1 (VMF1) is used as atmospheric parameter model and include daily IONEX file provided by the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) as well. It improves GAMIT daily position accuracy up to 0.8 mm. In a second step of processing, the GLOBK is used in order to estimate site positions and velocities in the ITRF08 reference frame. The result shows that the uncertainties of estimated displacement velocity at all CGPS stations are smaller than 1.5 mm/yr. The subsided deformation patterns are seen at the northern and southern part of west Sumatra. The vertical deformation at northern part of west Sumatra indicates postseismic phase associated with the 2010 and 2012 Northern Sumatra earthquakes and also the long-term postseismic associated with the 2004 and 2005 Northern Sumatra earthquakes. The uplifted deformation patterns are seen from Bukit Tinggi to Seblat which indicate a long-term interseismic phase after the 2007 Bengkulu earthquake and 2010 Mentawai earthquake. GANO station shows a subsidence at rate 12.25 mm/yr, indicating the overriding Indo-Australia Plate which is dragged down by the subducting Southeast Asian Plate.

  20. Vertical Flume Testing of WIPP Surrogate Waste Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrick, C. G.; Schuhen, M.; Kicker, D.

    2012-12-01

    considering inventory, changes in the underground environment, and theoretical and experimental results. The recipes represent the degraded waste in its weakest condition; simulating 50, 75, and 100% degradation by weight. The percent degradation indicates the anticipated amount of iron corrosion and decomposition of cellulosics, plastics, and rubbers. Samples were die compacted to two pressures, 2.3 and 5.0 MPa. Testing has established that the less degraded the surrogate material is and the higher the compaction stress it undergoes, the stronger the sample is. The 50% degraded surrogate waste material was accepted for use in obtaining input parameters for another WIPP PA model by a conceptual model peer review panel and the EPA. The use of a 50% degraded surrogate waste in vertical flume testing would provide an improved estimate of the waste shear strength and establish consistency between PA models in the approach used to obtain input parameters. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This research is funded by WIPP programs administered by the Office of Environmental Management (EM) of the U.S Department of Energy.

  1. Vertical Flume Testing of WIPP Surrogate Waste Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrick, C. G.; Schuhen, M.; Kicker, D.

    2013-12-01

    considering inventory, changes in the underground environment, and theoretical and experimental results. The recipes represent the degraded waste in its weakest condition; simulating 50, 75, and 100% degradation by weight. The percent degradation indicates the anticipated amount of iron corrosion and decomposition of cellulosics, plastics, and rubbers. Samples were die compacted to two pressures, 2.3 and 5.0 MPa. Testing has established that the less degraded the surrogate material is and the higher the compaction stress it undergoes, the stronger the sample is. The 50% degraded surrogate waste material was accepted for use in obtaining input parameters for another WIPP PA model by a conceptual model peer review panel and the EPA. The use of a 50% degraded surrogate waste in vertical flume testing would provide an improved estimate of the waste shear strength and establish consistency between PA models in the approach used to obtain input parameters. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This research is funded by WIPP programs administered by the Office of Environmental Management (EM) of the U.S Department of Energy.

  2. Effect of vertical magnetic field on convection and segregation in vertical Bridgman crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Do Hyun; Adornato, Peter M.; Brown, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    A previous finite-element analysis of vertical Bridgman growth for dilute and nondilute alloys is extended to include the effect of a vertically-aligned magnetic field in the limit of zero magnetic Reynolds number. Calculations are presented for growth of a dilute gallium-germanium alloy in a vertically stabilized Bridgman-Stockbarger system and in a furnace with a uniform temperature gradient imposed along the ampoule. Steady cellular convection driven by radial temperature gradients causes good axial and radial mixing in both systems without a magnetic field. A weak magnetic field decreases the intensity of convection and the effectiveness of solute mixing. The radial nonuniformity is greatest for an intermediate field strength. Stronger fields suppress flow recirculation completely, and lead to uniform solute segregation across the crystal and to diffusion-controlled axial segregation.

  3. Numerical modeling of vertical cavity semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, W.W.; Hadley, G.R.

    1996-08-01

    A vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) is a diode laser whose optical cavity is formed by growing or depositing DBR mirror stacks that sandwich an active gain region. The resulting short cavity supports lasing into a single longitudinal mode normal to the wafer, making these devices ideal for a multitude of applications, ranging from high-speed communication to high-power sources (from 2D arrays). This report describes the development of a numerical VCSEL model, whose goal is to both further their understanding of these complex devices and provide a tool for accurate design and data analysis.

  4. Long wavelength vertical cavity surface emitting laser

    DOEpatents

    Choquette, Kent D.; Klem, John F.

    2005-08-16

    Selectively oxidized vertical cavity lasers emitting near 1300 nm using InGaAsN quantum wells are reported for the first time which operate continuous wave below, at and above room temperature. The lasers employ two n-type Al.sub.0.94 Ga.sub.0.06 As/GaAs distributed Bragg reflectors each with a selectively oxidized current aperture adjacent to the active region, and the top output mirror contains a tunnel junction to inject holes into the active region. Continuous wave single mode lasing is observed up to 55.degree. C.

  5. Spirit Keeps on Trekking (vertical eye)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This vertical-projection mosaic was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 121 (May 6, 2004). Continuing its trek toward the 'Columbia Hills,' Spirit drove 96.8 meters (318 feet) -- half of which was performed in auto-navigation mode -- and broke its record for the longest distance traveled in one sol. That drive brought the mission total to 1,669 meters (1.04 miles), flipping the rover's odometer over the one-mile mark.

  6. Propulsion systems for vertical flight aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, A.

    1990-01-01

    The present evaluation of VTOL airframe/powerplant integration configurations combining high forward flight speed with safe and efficient vertical flight identifies six configurations that can be matched with one of three powerplant types: turboshafts, convertible-driveshaft lift fans, and gas-drive lift fans. The airframes configurations are (1) tilt-rotor, (2) folded tilt-rotor, (3) tilt-wing, (4) rotor wing/disk wing, (5) lift fan, and (6) variable-diameter rotor. Attention is given to the lift-fan VTOL configuration. The evaluation of these configurations has been conducted by both a joint NASA/DARPA program and the NASA High Speed Rotorcraft program. 7 refs.

  7. Vertical cloud structure of Jupiter's equatorial plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoker, C. R.; Hord, C.

    1985-01-01

    Multiple-scattering radiative transfer calculations were used to deduce the vertical cloud structure (VCS) of Jupiter's equatorial region. The VCS model of the equatorial plumes is obtained through an analysis of Voyager images of the 6190-A methane band and the 6000-A continuum, and ground-based 8900-A methane band images. The VCS of the equatorial plumes is found to be consistent with the hypothesis that the plumes are caused by upwelling at the ammonia condensation level produced by buoyancy due to latent heat release from the condensation of water clouds nearly three scale heights below the plumes.

  8. Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers for communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rorison, J. M.

    2000-12-01

    Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs) are a novel type of laser in which the lasing light is emitted from the surface of the device, perpendicular to the gain layer, rather than from the edge of the laser, parallel to the gain layer. These lasers show interesting behavior, particularly involving mode dynamics and polarization. They show promising characteristics for use in communications applications but their behavior needs to be further understood before they can reach their potential. This chapter attempts to review VCSELs generally and discuss their use in communications systems.

  9. Vertical Isolation for Photodiodes in CMOS Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata

    2008-01-01

    In a proposed improvement in complementary metal oxide/semi conduct - or (CMOS) image detectors, two additional implants in each pixel would effect vertical isolation between the metal oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) and the photodiode of the pixel. This improvement is expected to enable separate optimization of the designs of the photodiode and the MOSFETs so as to optimize their performances independently of each other. The purpose to be served by enabling this separate optimization is to eliminate or vastly reduce diffusion cross-talk, thereby increasing sensitivity, effective spatial resolution, and color fidelity while reducing noise.

  10. Vertical-Screw-Auger Conveyer Feeder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Otis (Inventor); Vollmer, Hubert J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A conical feeder is attached to a vertically conveying screw auger. The feeder is equipped with scoops and rotated from the surface to force-feed regolith the auger. Additional scoops are possible by adding a cylindrical section above the conical funnel section. Such then allows the unit to collect material from swaths larger in diameter than the enclosing casing pipe of the screw auger. A third element includes a flexible screw auger. All three can be used in combination in microgravity and zero atmosphere environments to drill and recover a wide area of subsurface regolith and entrained volatiles through a single access point on the surface.

  11. Vertical Cable Seismic Survey for Hydrothermal Deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, E.; Murakami, F.; Sekino, Y.; Okamoto, T.; Ishikawa, K.; Tsukahara, H.; Shimura, T.

    2012-04-01

    The vertical cable seismic is one of the reflection seismic methods. It uses hydrophone arrays vertically moored from the seafloor to record acoustic waves generated by surface, deep-towed or ocean bottom sources. Analyzing the reflections from the sub-seabed, we could look into the subsurface structure. This type of survey is generally called VCS (Vertical Cable Seismic). Because VCS is an efficient high-resolution 3D seismic survey method for a spatially-bounded area, we proposed the method for the hydrothermal deposit survey tool development program that the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) started in 2009. We are now developing a VCS system, including not only data acquisition hardware but data processing and analysis technique. Our first experiment of VCS surveys has been carried out in Lake Biwa, JAPAN in November 2009 for a feasibility study. Prestack depth migration is applied to the 3D VCS data to obtain a high quality 3D depth volume. Based on the results from the feasibility study, we have developed two autonomous recording VCS systems. After we carried out a trial experiment in the actual ocean at a water depth of about 400m and we carried out the second VCS survey at Iheya Knoll with a deep-towed source. In this survey, we could establish the procedures for the deployment/recovery of the system and could examine the locations and the fluctuations of the vertical cables at a water depth of around 1000m. The acquired VCS data clearly shows the reflections from the sub-seafloor. Through the experiment, we could confirm that our VCS system works well even in the severe circumstances around the locations of seafloor hydrothermal deposits. We have, however, also confirmed that the uncertainty in the locations of the source and of the hydrophones could lower the quality of subsurface image. It is, therefore, strongly necessary to develop a total survey system that assures a accurate positioning and a deployment techniques

  12. Intraoperative monitoring of torsion to prevent vertical deviations during augmented vertical rectus transposition surgery

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Jonathan M.; Hatt, Sarah R.; Leske, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Total transposition of the superior and inferior rectus muscle laterally, with augmentation sutures, may be complicated by induction of an undesirable vertical deviation. Induced vertical misalignment may be associated with changes in torsion. We have developed a simple method to monitor intraoperative torsion that may reduce the incidence of vertical deviations. Methods We reviewed consecutive cases of total abducens palsy or esotropic Duane syndrome treated with augmented lateral transposition of the superior and inferior rectus muscles, where the 12 o’clock and 6 o’clock intraoperative positions were initially marked with a dot at the limbus using a surgical pen. The location of the marks was monitored during tying of the augmentation sutures; changes in torsion were monitored intraoperatively. Results Records of 9 cases of augmented vertical rectus transposition were reviewed. Based on intraoperative assessment of torsion by observing the position of the preplaced limbal dots, the inferior rectus augmentation suture was tied less tightly than the superior rectus suture, leaving a gap of 1–3 mm between the inferior and lateral rectus muscles in 8 of 9 cases. The augmentation suture was totally removed in 1 case. Following these intraoperative adjustments, there was no induced intraoperative torsion, whereas further tightening of the inferior suture induced extorsion. Six weeks postoperatively, 8 of 9 patients did not experience a symptomatic vertical deviation. Conclusions When performing augmented transposition procedures, intraoperative monitoring of torsion may reduce the incidence of inadvertent vertical deviations and torsion. This technique may also be useful in other cases where correction or avoidance of torsion is needed. PMID:22525168

  13. The perception of body verticality (subjective postural vertical) in peripheral and central vestibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Bisdorff, A R; Wolsley, C J; Anastasopoulos, D; Bronstein, A M; Gresty, M A

    1996-10-01

    The perception of body verticality (subjective postural vertical, SPV) was assessed in normal subjects and in patients with peripheral and central vestibular lesions and the data were compared with conventional neuro-otological assessments. Subjects were seated with eyes closed in a motorized gimbal which executed cycles of tilt at low constant speed (1.5 degrees s-1), both in the frontal (roll) and sagittal (pitch) planes. Subjects indicated with a joystick when they entered and left verticality, thus defining a sector of subjective uprightness in each plane. The mean angle of tilt (identifying a bias of the SPV) and the width of the sector (defining sensitivity of the SPV) were then determined. In normal subjects, the angle of the "verticality' sector was 5.9 degrees for pitch and roll. Patients with bilateral absence of vestibular function, patients with vertigo, i.e. acute unilateral lesions, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and Ménière's disease, and patients with positionally modulated up-/downbeat nystagmus all had enlarged sectors (i.e. loss in sensitivity). Mean sector angle in these groups ranged from 7.8 to 11 degrees and the abnormality was present both in pitch and roll, regardless of the direction of nystagmus or body sway. Patients with chronic unilateral peripheral vestibular lesions and those with position-independent vertical nystagmus had normal sensitivities. No significant bias of the SPV was found in any patient group, not even those with acute unilateral vestibular lesions who had marked tilts of the subjective visual vertical (SVV). Complementary experiments in normal subjects tested under galvanic vestibular or roll-plane optokinetic stimulation also failed to show biases of the SPV. In contrast, a significant bias in the SPV could be induced in normal subjects by asymmetric cycles of gimbals tilt, presumably by proprioceptive adaptation. The following conclusions can be drawn. (i) The perception of body verticality whilst

  14. Free-flight model investigation of a vertical-attitude VTOL fighter with twin vertical tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grafton, S. B.; Anglin, E. L.

    1975-01-01

    Free-flight tests were conducted in the Langley full-scale tunnel to determine the stability and control characteristics of a vertical-attitude VTOL fighter having twin vertical tails and a pivoted fuselage forebody (nose-cockpit) arrangement. The flight tests included hovering flights and transition flights from hover to conventional forward flight. Static force tests were also made to aid in the analysis of the flight tests. The model exhibited satisfactory stability and control characteristics, and the transition from hovering flight to conventional forward flight was relatively smooth and straightforward.

  15. Control system for a vertical axis windmill

    DOEpatents

    Brulle, Robert V.

    1983-10-18

    A vertical axis windmill having a rotating structure is provided with a series of articulated vertical blades whose positions are controlled to maintain a constant RPM for the rotating structure, when wind speed is sufficient. A microprocessor controller is used to process information on wind speed, wind direction and RPM of the rotating structure to develop an electrical signal for establishing blade position. The preferred embodiment of the invention, when connected to a utility grid, is designed to generate 40 kilowatts of power when exposed to a 20 mile per hour wind. The control system for the windmill includes electrical blade actuators that modulate the blades of the rotating structure. Blade modulation controls the blade angle of attack, which in turn controls the RPM of the rotor. In the preferred embodiment, the microprocessor controller provides the operation logic and control functions. A wind speed sensor provides inputs to start or stop the windmill, and a wind direction sensor is used to keep the blade flip region at 90.degree. and 270.degree. to the wind. The control system is designed to maintain constant rotor RPM when wind speed is between 10 and 40 miles per hour.

  16. Vertical profile of 137Cs in soil.

    PubMed

    Krstić, D; Nikezić, D; Stevanović, N; Jelić, M

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, a vertical distribution of 137Cs in undisturbed soil was investigated experimentally and theoretically. Soil samples were taken from the surroundings of the city of Kragujevac in central Serbia during spring-summer of 2001. The sampling locations were chosen in such a way that the influence of soil characteristics on depth distribution of 137Cs in soil could be investigated. Activity of 137Cs in soil samples was measured using a HpGe detector and multi-channel analyzer. Based on vertical distribution of 137Cs in soil which was measured for each of 10 locations, the diffusion coefficient of 137Cs in soil was determined. In the next half-century, 137Cs will remain as the source of the exposure. Fifteen years after the Chernobyl accident, and more than 30 years after nuclear probes, the largest activity of 137Cs is still within 10 cm of the upper layer of the soil. This result confirms that the penetration of 137Cs in soil is a very slow process. Experimental results were compared with two different Green functions and no major differences were found between them. While both functions fit experimental data well in the upper layer of soil, the fitting is not so good in deeper layers. Although the curves obtained by these two functions are very close to each other, there are some differences in the values of parameters acquired by them. PMID:15388151

  17. Uniform head in horizontal and vertical wells.

    PubMed

    Steward, David R; Jin, Wei

    2006-01-01

    The steady-state head within a fully penetrating well may be estimated by evaluating the Thiem equation at the radius of the well. A method is presented here to extend results from the Thiem equation to horizontal wells and to partially penetrating wells. The particular model used in this investigation is based upon the analytic element method; it accurately reproduces a boundary condition of uniform head along the cylindrical surface at the perforated face of the well. This model is exercised over a representative range of parameters including the well's length, radius, and pumping rate, and the aquifer's hydraulic conductivity and thickness. Results are presented in a set of figures and tables that compare the well's drawdown to the drawdown that would have been obtained using the Thiem solution with the same pumping rate and radius. A methodology is presented to estimate the head within a horizontal or partially penetrating well by adding a correction term to results that can be readily obtained from computer models of vertical fully penetrating wells. This approach may also be used to contrast the differences in head between horizontal and vertical wells of various lengths, radii, and placement elevations. PMID:16405471

  18. Determinants of Arbovirus Vertical Transmission in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Lequime, Sebastian; Paul, Richard E.; Lambrechts, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Vertical transmission (VT) and horizontal transmission (HT) of pathogens refer to parental and non-parental chains of host-to-host transmission. Combining HT with VT enlarges considerably the range of ecological conditions in which a pathogen can persist, but the factors governing the relative frequency of each transmission mode are poorly understood for pathogens with mixed-mode transmission. Elucidating these factors is particularly important for understanding the epidemiology of arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) of public health significance. Arboviruses are primarily maintained by HT between arthropod vectors and vertebrate hosts in nature, but are occasionally transmitted vertically in the vector population from an infected female to her offspring, which is a proposed maintenance mechanism during adverse conditions for HT. Here, we review over a century of published primary literature on natural and experimental VT, which we previously assembled into large databases, to identify biological factors associated with the efficiency of arbovirus VT in mosquito vectors. Using a robust statistical framework, we highlight a suite of environmental, taxonomic, and physiological predictors of arbovirus VT. These novel insights contribute to refine our understanding of strategies employed by arboviruses to persist in the environment and cause substantial public health concern. They also provide hypotheses on the biological processes underlying the relative VT frequency for pathogens with mixed-mode transmission that can be tested empirically. PMID:27171170

  19. Vertical Slot Convection: A linear study

    SciTech Connect

    McAllister, A.; Steinolfson, R.; Tajima, T.

    1992-11-01

    The linear stability properties of fluid convection in a vertical slot were studied. We use a Fourier-Chebychev decomposition was used to set up the linear eigenvalue problems for the Vertical Slot Convection and Benard problems. The eigenvalues, neutral stability curves, and critical point values of the Grashof number, G, and the wavenumber were determined. Plots of the real and imaginary parts of the eigenvalues as functions of G and {alpha} are given for a wide range of the Prandtl number, Pr, and special note is made of the complex mode that becomes linearly unstable above Pr {approximately} 12.5. A discussion comparing different special cases facilitates the physical understanding of the VSC equations, especially the interaction of the shear-flow and buoyancy induced physics. Making use of the real and imaginary eigenvalues and the phase properties of the eigenmodes, the eigenmodes were characterized. One finds that the mode structure becomes progressively simpler with increasing Pr, with the greatest complexity in the mid ranges where the terms in the heat equation are of roughly the same size.

  20. Vertical Slot Convection: A linear study

    SciTech Connect

    McAllister, A. ); Steinolfson, R. ); Tajima, T. . Inst. for Fusion Studies)

    1992-11-01

    The linear stability properties of fluid convection in a vertical slot were studied. We use a Fourier-Chebychev decomposition was used to set up the linear eigenvalue problems for the Vertical Slot Convection and Benard problems. The eigenvalues, neutral stability curves, and critical point values of the Grashof number, G, and the wavenumber were determined. Plots of the real and imaginary parts of the eigenvalues as functions of G and [alpha] are given for a wide range of the Prandtl number, Pr, and special note is made of the complex mode that becomes linearly unstable above Pr [approximately] 12.5. A discussion comparing different special cases facilitates the physical understanding of the VSC equations, especially the interaction of the shear-flow and buoyancy induced physics. Making use of the real and imaginary eigenvalues and the phase properties of the eigenmodes, the eigenmodes were characterized. One finds that the mode structure becomes progressively simpler with increasing Pr, with the greatest complexity in the mid ranges where the terms in the heat equation are of roughly the same size.

  1. Vertical shaft V-type engine

    SciTech Connect

    Fujikawa, T.; Hirata, M.; Tamba, S.

    1987-04-21

    A vertical crankshaft V-type engine is described which consists of a vertical crankshaft having an upper end, a pair of cylinders arranged horizontally forming a V with respect to each other, and each having a cylinder head; a carburetor operatively connected to the cylinders and mounted in the V defined by the cylinders. An air cleaner is operatively connected to the carburetor and mounted upwardly of the carburetor; a flywheel is secured to the upper end of the crankshaft; an air fan is mounted on top of the flywheel; a fan housing covers the cylinders and the air fan, and has a side wall along the crankshaft; and means provide air from the fan to the air cleaner and to the cylinder heads for cooling the latter. The means include an air-intake port leading to the air cleaner and extending substantially normal from the side wall. The means also include an air duct mounted inside the side wall located substantially perpendicular to the port and connected to the air fan in communication therewith for conducting air to the cylinder heads.

  2. Vertical Profiling of Air Pollution at RAPCD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newchurch, Michael J.; Fuller, Kirk A.; Bowdle, David A.; Johnson, Steven; Knupp, Kevin; Gillani, Noor; Biazar, Arastoo; Mcnider, Richard T.; Burris, John

    2004-01-01

    The interaction between local and regional pollution levels occurs at the interface of the Planetary Boundary Layer and the Free Troposphere. Measuring the vertical distribution of ozone, aerosols, and winds with high temporal and vertical resolution is essential to diagnose the nature of this interchange and ultimately for accurately forecasting ozone and aerosol pollution levels. The Regional Atmospheric Profiling Center for Discovery, RAPCD, was built and instrumented to address this critical issue. The ozone W DIAL lidar, Nd:YAG aerosol lidar, and 2.1 micron Doppler wind lidar, along with balloon- borne ECC ozonesondes form the core of the W C D instrumentation for addressing this problem. Instrumentation in the associated Mobile Integrated Profiling (MIPS) laboratory includes 91 5Mhz profiler, sodar, and ceilometer. The collocated Applied particle Optics and Radiometry (ApOR) laboratory hosts an FTIR along with MOUDI and optical particle counters. With MODELS-3 analysis by colleagues in the National Space Science and Technology Center on the UAH campus and the co- located National Weather Service Forecasting Office in Huntsville, AL we are developing a unique facility for advancing the state of the science of pollution forecasting.

  3. Determinants of Arbovirus Vertical Transmission in Mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Lequime, Sebastian; Paul, Richard E; Lambrechts, Louis

    2016-05-01

    Vertical transmission (VT) and horizontal transmission (HT) of pathogens refer to parental and non-parental chains of host-to-host transmission. Combining HT with VT enlarges considerably the range of ecological conditions in which a pathogen can persist, but the factors governing the relative frequency of each transmission mode are poorly understood for pathogens with mixed-mode transmission. Elucidating these factors is particularly important for understanding the epidemiology of arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) of public health significance. Arboviruses are primarily maintained by HT between arthropod vectors and vertebrate hosts in nature, but are occasionally transmitted vertically in the vector population from an infected female to her offspring, which is a proposed maintenance mechanism during adverse conditions for HT. Here, we review over a century of published primary literature on natural and experimental VT, which we previously assembled into large databases, to identify biological factors associated with the efficiency of arbovirus VT in mosquito vectors. Using a robust statistical framework, we highlight a suite of environmental, taxonomic, and physiological predictors of arbovirus VT. These novel insights contribute to refine our understanding of strategies employed by arboviruses to persist in the environment and cause substantial public health concern. They also provide hypotheses on the biological processes underlying the relative VT frequency for pathogens with mixed-mode transmission that can be tested empirically. PMID:27171170

  4. High vertical resolution crosswell seismic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Lazaratos, Spyridon K.

    1999-12-07

    A method for producing high vertical resolution seismic images from crosswell data is disclosed. In accordance with one aspect of the disclosure, a set of vertically spaced, generally horizontally extending continuous layers and associated nodes are defined within a region between two boreholes. The specific number of nodes is selected such that the value of a particular characteristic of the subterranean region at each of the nodes is one which can be determined from the seismic data. Once values are established at the nodes, values of the particular characteristic are assigned to positions between the node points of each layer based on the values at node within that layer and without regard to the values at node points within any other layer. A seismic map is produced using the node values and the assigned values therebetween. In accordance with another aspect of the disclosure, an approximate model of the region is established using direct arrival traveltime data. Thereafter, the approximate model is adjusted using reflected arrival data. In accordance with still another aspect of the disclosure, correction is provided for well deviation. An associated technique which provides improvements in ray tracing is also disclosed.

  5. Photoresponse in Graphene Boron Nitride Vertical Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Trond; Ma, Qiong; Lui, Chun-Hung; Nair, Nityan; Gabor, Nathaniel; Young, Andrea; Fang, Wenjing; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kong, Jing; Gedik, Nuh; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo

    2015-03-01

    Combining two-dimensional materials into vertical heterostructures reveals diverse, intriguing phenomena and provides a novel way of engineering materials with desired electronic properties. Placing graphene on hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has given particularly interesting results, including enhanced mobility, opening of a band gap, and highly controllable photo-induced doping. We explore the photoresponse of vertical graphene-hBN-graphene heterostructures in a high electronic temperature regime where thermionic emission dominates. Near the charge neutral point, we observe a pronounced conductance peak, which we attribute to a cooling bottleneck that appears at low carrier density, thus suggesting hot carrier enhanced thermionic emission. To further investigate the mechanism by which current is generated, we conduct two-pulse correlation measurements and study the temporal dynamics of the system. We observe a positive correlation, implying that the hot carriers thermalize before crossing the hBN barrier. Finally, we propose an advanced, modified two-temperature model, which allows for numerical simulations that are consistent with our measurements.

  6. Seismic Behaviour of Vertical Mass Isolated Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Nekooei, M.; Ziyaeifar, M.

    2008-07-08

    In this paper, the seismic behaviour of vertical mass isolated structures against the earthquake is studied. These structures are assumed to be consisted of two subsystems. Mass subsystem possesses low lateral stiffness but carries the major part of mass of the system. Stiffness subsystem, however, controls the deformation of the mass subsystem and attributes with much higher stiffness. The isolator layer is, therefore, located in between the mass and the stiffness subsystems and assumed to be a viscous damper layer. The analytical model used for this investigation is a dual mass-spring model which is an extended form of the three element Maxwell model. In this study, the ability of mass isolation techniques in reducing earthquake effects on buildings with two approaches, parametric and numerical approaches, is shown. In the parametric approach, by definition an isolation factor for structure and determination the dynamic characteristics of system, the relative optimum value of the isolator damping coefficient is obtained. The results provide an insight on role of relative stiffness and mass ratio of the two subsystems. Finally, in the numerical approach, the spectral responses of these structures due to the earthquake are investigated. The results show a noticeable decrease in earthquake input force to vertical mass isolated structures in comparison with non-isolated structures.

  7. Vertically Velocity Characteristics of Oceanic Convection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, David P.; Lemone, Margaret A.

    1989-03-01

    Oceanic cumulonimbus updraft and downdraft events observed in the Western Pacific during the TAMEX program by NOAA P-3 research aircraft are analyzed and discussed. The basic dataset consists of flight-level data from 10 missions in the Taiwan region during May and June 1987. The 1 Hz time series of vertical velocity is used to define convective updrafts using the criteria that the velocity must be continuously positive for at least 0.5 km and exceed 0.5 m s1 for 1 s. A subset of the strongest drafts, termed cores, are defined as events that exceed 1 m s1 for 0.5 km. Downdrafts and downdraft cores are defined analogously. The statistics are from a total of 12 841 km of flight legs and consist of 359 updrafts and 466 downdrafts at altitudes from 150 m to 6.8 km MSL. The populations of average vertical velocity, maximum vertical velocity, diameter, and mass transport for both drafts and cores are approximately log-normally distributed, consistent with the results of previous studies of convective characteristics in other locations. TAMEX drafts and cores are comparable in size and strength with those measured in GATE and hurricanes but much weaker than those measured in continental thunderstorms.The median core updraft was less than 3 m s1, implying a time scale for ascent from cloud base to the freezing level of about 35 min. The microphysical implications of the low updraft rates are illustrated by comparing vertical profiles of radar reflectivity for TAMEX with those in other regions. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that the oceanic convection that was studied in GATE, hurricanes, and TAMEX is dominated by warm rain coalescence processes and that a large fractional rainout occurs below the freezing level. The rapid reduction of cloud water and radar reflectivity above the freezing level, as well as observations of abundant ice particles in all but the strongest updraft cores at temperatures just below 0°C, implies a rapid conversion of cloud water and

  8. Derivation of vertical air velocity from conventional Radiosonde ascents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manguttathil Gopalakrishnan, Manoj; Mohanakumar, Kesavapillai; Samson, Titu; Kottayil, Ajil; Varadarajan, Rakesh; Rebello, Rejoy

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we devise a method to estimate air vertical velocity from ascending radiosondes similar to that described in published results, but with certain differences in deriving the balloon parameters and the drag coefficient, while not considering explicitly the heat exchange between the balloon and the environment. We basically decompose the observed balloon ascent rate into vertical velocity in still air due to buoyancy force and that due to vertical air motion. The first part is computed from basic hydrodynamical principles and the vertical velocity is derived as the difference between observed ascent rate and the estimated still air vertical velocity. The derived values agree reasonably well (r=0.66) with vertical velocities observed with a collocated wind profiler radar, and the sources of uncertainties are discussed. Since vertical velocity is a difficult quantity to measure directly without expensive methods, derivation of the same from the conventional radiosonde ascents could be of great importance to the meteorological communities.

  9. Vertical beam emittance correction with independent component analysis measurement method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei

    The storage ring performance is determined by the vertical beam size, that is by the vertical emittance, which is determined by two factors: the vertical dispersion generated in the bending magnets, and the coupling of the oscillations in the vertical and horizontal plane. In this dissertation, a detailed study of the main source of the vertical emittance and effective correction methods are presented. Simulations show that the vertical emittance is dominated by the contribution due to photon emission with non-zero vertical dispersion in bending magnets. An effective method to make vertical dispersion correction is to analysis the harmonics of the vertical dispersion and to eliminate the largest components of the stopband integral with harmonics near the vertical betatron tune. A stopband correction scheme is being implemented in which the excitation of skew-quadrupole correctors is determined from measurements of the resonance strengths (stopband widths) of major resonances. This method can correct the vertical dispersion function and the coupling strength simultaneously without identifying the source of errors. Studies show the coupling strength and the vertical dispersion can be controlled individually in the quadruple-bend achromatic low emittance lattice. Resulting improvement in machine performance is that the equilibrium vertical emittance is reduced by the factor of 7. Effective correction depends on precise beam measurements. Independent component analysis for BPM turn-by-turn data has shown the potential to be a useful tool for diagnostics and optics verification. The effectiveness of employing the independent component analysis (ICA) method to measure the vertical dispersion function is studied. This method for extracting the beta function and phase advance for the beam position monitors is presented. The accuracy of optical functions thus calculated is affected by different factors in a different manner. The most influent factors on the accuracy are

  10. Direct Observation of Ultralow Vertical Emittance using a Vertical Undulator - presentation slides

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, Kent

    2015-09-17

    Direct emittance measurement based on vertical undulator is discussed. Emittance was evaluated from peak ratios, the smallest measured being 𝜀𝑦 =0.9 ±0.3 pm rad. The angular distribution of undulator radiation departs from Gaussian approximations, a fact of which diffraction-limited light sources should be aware.

  11. The EM Earthquake Precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, K. B., II; Saxton, P. T.

    2013-12-01

    Many attempts have been made to determine a sound forecasting method regarding earthquakes and warn the public in turn. Presently, the animal kingdom leads the precursor list alluding to a transmission related source. By applying the animal-based model to an electromagnetic (EM) wave model, various hypotheses were formed, but the most interesting one required the use of a magnetometer with a differing design and geometry. To date, numerous, high-end magnetometers have been in use in close proximity to fault zones for potential earthquake forecasting; however, something is still amiss. The problem still resides with what exactly is forecastable and the investigating direction of EM. After the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake, American earthquake investigators predetermined magnetometer use and a minimum earthquake magnitude necessary for EM detection. This action was set in motion, due to the extensive damage incurred and public outrage concerning earthquake forecasting; however, the magnetometers employed, grounded or buried, are completely subject to static and electric fields and have yet to correlate to an identifiable precursor. Secondly, there is neither a networked array for finding any epicentral locations, nor have there been any attempts to find even one. This methodology needs dismissal, because it is overly complicated, subject to continuous change, and provides no response time. As for the minimum magnitude threshold, which was set at M5, this is simply higher than what modern technological advances have gained. Detection can now be achieved at approximately M1, which greatly improves forecasting chances. A propagating precursor has now been detected in both the field and laboratory. Field antenna testing conducted outside the NE Texas town of Timpson in February, 2013, detected three strong EM sources along with numerous weaker signals. The antenna had mobility, and observations were noted for recurrence, duration, and frequency response. Next, two

  12. Vertical tail buffeting of fighter aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B. H. K.

    2000-04-01

    Vertical tail buffeting at high angles of attack is a phenomenon associated with the impact of vortical flows generated by the aircraft on the fins. This poses a serious problem for both single- and twin-tail fighter aircraft from the point of view of combat maneuverability and structural integrity. The research activities to understand the flow physics with an aim to alleviate buffet loads were quite intense during the period from the late 1970s to the early 1990s. Most of the investigations were carried out on the F/A-18 mainly because of two international programs involving countries that operate the F/A-18 in their air force. This review begins with a description of the water tunnel experiments showing some flow visualization results of the leading-edge extension (LEX) burst vortical flows. Wind tunnel studies on a 1/9 scale F/A-18 model in Australia, a 1/6.65 scale model in the United Kingdom, a 6% scale model in Canada, 12%, 16% and full-scale models in the United States are summarized. Scale effects can be deduced from the various sub- and full-scale models tested. Flight test results conducted on the High Alpha Research Vehicle in the United States and on an instrumented CF-18 test aircraft in Canada are presented. The accuracy of analytical methods utilizing wind tunnel data to predict buffet loads at flight conditions is discussed. The use of CFD to compute vertical fin buffeting is challenging and requires a large amount of computing power. A brief exposure to the methodology is given and results from the only available computational case study carried out by NASA Ames are compared with wind tunnel and flight test data. A short introduction to statistical non-stationary effects is given. Hysteresis effect of the LEX vortex burst on the buffet loads is discussed, and a statistical non-stationary buffet prediction method is outlined. This review provides a useful reference to the results collected from the High Alpha Technology Program, The Technical

  13. Predicting vertical jump height from bar velocity.

    PubMed

    García-Ramos, Amador; Štirn, Igor; Padial, Paulino; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Javier; De la Fuente, Blanca; Strojnik, Vojko; Feriche, Belén

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the use of maximum (Vmax) and final propulsive phase (FPV) bar velocity to predict jump height in the weighted jump squat. FPV was defined as the velocity reached just before bar acceleration was lower than gravity (-9.81 m·s(-2)). Vertical jump height was calculated from the take-off velocity (Vtake-off) provided by a force platform. Thirty swimmers belonging to the National Slovenian swimming team performed a jump squat incremental loading test, lifting 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of body weight in a Smith machine. Jump performance was simultaneously monitored using an AMTI portable force platform and a linear velocity transducer attached to the barbell. Simple linear regression was used to estimate jump height from the Vmax and FPV recorded by the linear velocity transducer. Vmax (y = 16.577x - 16.384) was able to explain 93% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.47 cm. FPV (y = 12.828x - 6.504) was able to explain 91% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.66 cm. Despite that both variables resulted to be good predictors, heteroscedasticity in the differences between FPV and Vtake-off was observed (r(2) = 0.307), while the differences between Vmax and Vtake-off were homogenously distributed (r(2) = 0.071). These results suggest that Vmax is a valid tool for estimating vertical jump height in a loaded jump squat test performed in a Smith machine. Key pointsVertical jump height in the loaded jump squat can be estimated with acceptable precision from the maximum bar velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer.The relationship between the point at which bar acceleration is less than -9.81 m·s(-2) and the real take-off is affected by the velocity of movement.Mean propulsive velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer does not appear to be optimal to monitor ballistic exercise performance. PMID:25983572

  14. Vertical and Interfacial Transport in Wetlands (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Variano, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this work is to understand the fluxes connecting the water column, substrate, and atmosphere in wetland environments. To do this, analytical, numerical, and laboratory models have been used to quantify the hydrodynamic contributions to vertical fluxes. A key question is whether the hydrodynamic transport can be modeled as a diffusivity, and, if so, what the vertical structure of this diffusivity is. This question will be addressed in a number of flow types and for a number of fluxes. The fluxes of interest are heat, sediment, dissolved gases (such as methane and oxygen) and other dissolved solutes (such as nutrients and pollutants). The flows of interest include: unidirectional current, reversing flow (under waves, seiches, and tides), wind-sheared surface flows, and thermal convection. Rain and bioturbation can be important, but are not considered in the modeling work discussed herein. Specifically, we will present results on gas transport at wind-sheared free surface, sediment transport in unidirectional flow, and heat transfer in an oscillating flow cause by a seiche. All three of these will be used to consider the question of appropriate analytical models for vertical transport. The analytic models considered here are all 1D models that assume homogeneity in the horizontal plane. The numerical models use finite element methods and resolve the flow around individual vegetation stems in an idealized geometry. Laboratory models discussed herein also use an idealized geometry. Vegetation is represented by an array of cylinders, whose geometry is modeled after Scirpus spp. wetlands in Northern California. The laboratory model is constructed in a way that allows optical access to the flow, even in dense vegetation and far from boundaries. This is accomplished by using fluoropolymer plastics to construct vegetation models. The optical access allows us to employ particle image velocimetry (PIV) and planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) to measure

  15. Integrated Vertical Bloch Line (VBL) memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, R. R.; Wu, J. C.; Stadler, H. L.

    1991-01-01

    Vertical Bloch Line (VBL) Memory is a recently conceived, integrated, solid state, block access, VLSI memory which offers the potential of 1 Gbit/sq cm areal storage density, data rates of hundreds of megabits/sec, and submillisecond average access time simultaneously at relatively low mass, volume, and power values when compared to alternative technologies. VBLs are micromagnetic structures within magnetic domain walls which can be manipulated using magnetic fields from integrated conductors. The presence or absence of BVL pairs are used to store binary information. At present, efforts are being directed at developing a single chip memory using 25 Mbit/sq cm technology in magnetic garnet material which integrates, at a single operating point, the writing, storage, reading, and amplification functions needed in a memory. The current design architecture, functional elements, and supercomputer simulation results are described which are used to assist the design process.

  16. The vertical profile of winds on Titan.

    PubMed

    Bird, M K; Allison, M; Asmar, S W; Atkinson, D H; Avruch, I M; Dutta-Roy, R; Dzierma, Y; Edenhofer, P; Folkner, W M; Gurvits, L I; Johnston, D V; Plettemeier, D; Pogrebenko, S V; Preston, R A; Tyler, G L

    2005-12-01

    One of Titan's most intriguing attributes is its copious but featureless atmosphere. The Voyager 1 fly-by and occultation in 1980 provided the first radial survey of Titan's atmospheric pressure and temperature and evidence for the presence of strong zonal winds. It was realized that the motion of an atmospheric probe could be used to study the winds, which led to the inclusion of the Doppler Wind Experiment on the Huygens probe. Here we report a high resolution vertical profile of Titan's winds, with an estimated accuracy of better than 1 m s(-1). The zonal winds were prograde during most of the atmospheric descent, providing in situ confirmation of superrotation on Titan. A layer with surprisingly slow wind, where the velocity decreased to near zero, was detected at altitudes between 60 and 100 km. Generally weak winds (approximately 1 m s(-1)) were seen in the lowest 5 km of descent. PMID:16319831

  17. A flexible vertical sheet in waves

    SciTech Connect

    Meylan, M.

    1994-12-31

    The problem of a vertical elastic sheet subjected to a train of ocean waves in infinitely deep water is solved. The sheet is assumed to be thin and governed by the Bernoulli-Euler equations, and to extend from the water surface to a finite depth. The solution utilizes the Green`s function for water waves and the transformation of the Bernoulli-Euler equation to an integral equation. The model predicts that there will be substantial reflection when the sheet is held rigidly at the top end and penetrates the water to a significant fraction of the wavelength. Resonances at which the reflection is reduced, or is zero, also exist for certain values of the stiffness, mass and frequency. A sheet which is free at both ends does not reflect significantly for any values of mass, stiffness or depth of the sheet.

  18. Vertical movements on the territory of Tallinn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kall, Tarmo; Torim, Ants

    2003-07-01

    Studies based on repeat levelling performed in the city of Tallinn show local earth surface deformations in the area of ancient valleys buried under quaternary sediments. Until 1964, the highest rate of sinking (up to 30 mm/year) was observed in the area south of Tallinn Old Port until Liivalaia Street. The maps of vertical movements drawn up on the basis of earlier levelling data indicate local sinking in the region of the city centre since 1951. From 1964 onwards, the intensity of the sinking has been steadily decreasing. The data obtained from the latest levelling works show that the sinking of the area under study has stopped or reversed into rising (up to +0.4 mm per year). Sinking of Tallinn is connected with the geological structure and ground water level.

  19. Vertical Transport in Ferroelectric/Superconductor Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begon-Lours, Laura; Trastoy, Juan; Bernard, Rozenn; Jacquet, Eric; Carretero, Cecile; Bouzehouane, Karim; Fusil, Stephane; Garcia, Vincent; Xavier, Stephane; Girod, Stephanie; Deranlot, Cyrile; Bibes, Manuel; Barthelemy, Agnes; Villegas, Javier E.

    2015-03-01

    We study electric field-effects in superconducting films by measuring vertical transport in ferroelectric/superconductor heterostructures. These are based on ultrathin (4 to 8 nm thick) BiFeO3-Mn grown on YBa2Cu3O7 by pulsed laser deposition. Nanoscale contacts are defined on the BiFeO3 via a series of nanofabrication steps which include e-beam lithography, metal deposition (Nb or Co capped with Pt) and lift-off. Conductive-tip atomic force microscopy and piezoresponse force microscopy are used to characterize the transport across the ferroelectric barrier as a function of its polarization (up/down). The observed electro-resistance, measured at various temperatures, allows studying the different electric-field screening in the normal and superconducting states. Work supported by DIM Oxymore.

  20. Stability of vertical and horizontal axis Levitrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, M. M.; Taylor, D. B.

    2015-11-01

    The stability of the new horizontal axis Levitron3 is compared with that of the vertical axis device. The rotation frequency ranges are similar because they are determined by the same precessional micro-trap, for which some theory is given. But the macro-trap of the horizontal axis system gives it far greater mechanical stability. Field-line studies allow this to be more easily visualized. The greater stability allows for educational experiments which could only be contemplated with the old Levitron: driven precession and nutation and motion along the field lines. These experiments illustrate some very fundamental space dynamics and several other topics. The enhanced stability may also lead to electro-mechanical applications.

  1. Development of Vertical Cable Seismic System (2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, E.; Murakami, F.; Tsukahara, H.; Ishikawa, K.

    2012-12-01

    The vertical cable seismic is one of the reflection seismic methods. It uses hydrophone arrays vertically moored from the seafloor to record acoustic waves generated by surface, deep-towed or ocean bottom sources. Analyzing the reflections from the sub-seabed, we could look into the subsurface structure. This type of survey is generally called VCS (Vertical Cable Seismic). Because VCS is an efficient high-resolution 3D seismic survey method for a spatially-bounded area, we proposed the method for the hydrothermal deposit survey tool development program that the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) started in 2009. We are now developing a VCS system, including not only data acquisition hardware but data processing and analysis technique. Our first experiment of VCS surveys has been carried out in Lake Biwa, JAPAN in November 2009 for a feasibility study. Prestack depth migration is applied to the 3D VCS data to obtain a high quality 3D depth volume. Based on the results from the feasibility study, we have developed two autonomous recording VCS systems. After we carried out a trial experiment in the actual ocean at a water depth of about 400m and we carried out the second VCS survey at Iheya Knoll with a deep-towed source. In this survey, we could establish the procedures for the deployment/recovery of the system and could examine the locations and the fluctuations of the vertical cables at a water depth of around 1000m. The acquired VCS data clearly shows the reflections from the sub-seafloor. Through the experiment, we could confirm that our VCS system works well even in the severe circumstances around the locations of seafloor hydrothermal deposits. We have carried out two field surveys in 2011. One is a 3D survey with a boomer for a high-resolution surface source and the other one for an actual field survey in the Izena Cauldron an active hydrothermal area in the Okinawa Trough. Through these surveys, we have confirmed that the

  2. Vertical and rotational motion of mahogany seed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camposano, A. V. C.; Virtudes, N. C.; Otadoy, R. E. S.; Violanda, R.

    2015-06-01

    Starting with a set of basic assumptions and with the application of well-known Newtonian physics, a theoretical model has been established for the flight of the mahogany winged seed. Using a high-speed camera, we successfully confirmed that the mahogany winged seed attains a vertical and rotational terminal velocity. From our model the mahogany seed has a terminal speed of 1.45 m/s. The experimental value of the terminal velocity on the average is 1.47 m/s (only about 1% error). The experimental value of the angular velocity was found to be around 54.33 rad/s, about 14% error compared to the predicted terminal velocity of 47.5 rad/s. The high predictable nature of a mahogany's terminal velocity can facilitate the biologist's study of mahogany mass seed dispersal.

  3. The Vertical Profile of Ocean Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, R. M.; Nikurashin, M.; McDougall, T. J.; Mashayek, A.

    2014-12-01

    The upwelling of bottom waters through density surfaces in the deep ocean is not possible unless the sloping nature of the sea floor is taken into account. The bottom--intensified mixing arising from interaction of internal tides and geostrophic motions with bottom topography implies that mixing is a decreasing function of height in the deep ocean. This would further imply that the diapycnal motion in the deep ocean is downward, not upwards as is required by continuity. This conundrum regarding ocean mixing and upwelling in the deep ocean will be resolved by appealing to the fact that the ocean does not have vertical side walls. Implications of the conundrum for the representation of ocean mixing in climate models will be discussed.

  4. Oceanography. Vertical mixing in the ocean.

    PubMed

    Webb, D J; Suginohara, N

    2001-01-01

    The thermohaline circulation of the ocean results primarily from downwelling at sites in the Nordic and Labrador Seas and upwelling throughout the rest of the ocean. The latter is often described as being due to breaking internal waves. Here we reconcile the difference between theoretical and observed estimates of vertical mixing in the deep ocean by presenting a revised view of the thermohaline circulation, which allows for additional upwelling in the Southern Ocean and the separation of the North Atlantic Deep Water cell from the Antarctic Bottom Water cell. The changes also mean that much less wind and tidal energy needs to be dissipated in the deep ocean than was originally thought. PMID:11343103

  5. Dynamic soil pressures on rigid vertical walls

    SciTech Connect

    Veletsos, A.S.; Younan, A.H.

    1992-12-01

    A critical evaluation is made of the dynamic pressures and the associated forces induced by ground shaking on a rigid, straight, vertical wall retaining a semi-infinite, uniform viscoelastic layer of constant thickness. The effects of both harmonic and earthquake-induced excitations are examined. Simple approximate expressions for the responses of the system are developed, and comprehensive numerical data are presented which elucidate the effects and relative importance of the various parameters involved. These solutions are then compared with those obtained by use of a simple model proposed previously by Scott, and the accuracy of this model is assessed. Finally, two versions of an alternative model are proposed which better approximate the action of the system. In the first, the properties of the model are defined by frequency-dependent parameters, whereas in the second, which is particularly helpful in analyses of transient response, they are represented by frequency-independent, constant parameters.

  6. Experimental spinal injuries with vertical impact.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, N; Sances, A; Maiman, D J; Myklebust, J B; Pech, P; Larson, S J

    1986-11-01

    Fifteen fresh, intact, human male cadavers suspended head down were dropped vertically from a height of 0.9-1.5 meters. In eight specimens the heads were restrained to simulate muscle forces. The head-neck complex was oriented for maximal axial loading of the cervical and upper thoracic spine. In several cadavers, load cells were placed in cervical bodies. Head impact forces of 3,000-7,000 N in the unrestrained, and 9,800-14,600 N in the restrained, cadavers were recorded. There were more cervical and upper thoracic fractures in the restrained cadavers than in the nonrestrained subjects. The biomechanic and pathologic findings, including results of cryomicrotomography and computed tomography (CT), are discussed. PMID:3824059

  7. Vertical integration of thermally activated heat pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.C.

    1985-01-01

    Many thermally activated heat pump systems are being developed along technology lines, such as, engine-driven and absorption heat pumps. Their thermal performances are temperature dependent. Based on the temperature-dependent behavior of heat pump cycle performance and the energy cascading idea, the concept of vertically integrating various thermally activated heat pump technologies to maximize resources utilization is explored. Based on a preliminary analysis, it is found that integrating a desiccant dehumidification subsystem to an engine-driven heat pump could improve its cooling performance by 36% and integrating an ejector to it could improve its cooling performance by 20%. The added advantage of an ejector-coupled engine-driven heat pump is its system simplicity which should result in equipment cost savings.

  8. Neck after vertical hemilaryngectomy: computed tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    DiSantis, D.J.; Balfe, D.M.; Hayden, R.; Sessions, D.; Sagel, S.S.

    1984-06-01

    Computed tomographic scans in 22 postoperative vertical hemilaryngectomy patients were analyzed retrospectively to determine the normal postoperative appearance and to evaluate the role of CT in assessing recurrent neoplasm. Twelve patients without clinical evidence of recurrence illustrated the normal postoperative changes. In the six patients with recurrent neoplasm, the CT manifestations included increased width of the remaining true vocal cord, convexity of the surgically formed pseudocord at glottic level, subglottic tumor, and extralaryngeal neck masses. Recurrence was mimicked in four patients by bulky soft tissue at the endolaryngeal operative site at both CT and laryngoscopy. CT supplemented the physical examination and indirect laryngoscopy, providing information regarding the presence and extent of tumor that was useful in planning the mode or scope of subsequent therapy.

  9. Aerodynamic drag reduction by vertical splitter plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilliéron, Patrick; Kourta, Azeddine

    2010-01-01

    The capacity of vertical splitter plates placed at the front or the rear of a simplified car geometry to reduce drag, with and without skew angle, is investigated for Reynolds numbers between 1.0 × 106 and 1.6 × 106. The geometry used is a simplified geometry to represent estate-type vehicles, for the rear section, and MPV-type vehicle. Drag reductions of nearly 28% were obtained for a zero skew angle with splitter plates placed at the front of models of MPV or utility vehicles. The results demonstrate the advantage of adapting the position and orientation of the splitter plates in the presence of a lateral wind. All these results confirm the advantage of this type of solution, and suggest that this expertise should be used in the automotive field to reduce consumption and improve dynamic stability of road vehicles.

  10. Vertical integration and optimal reimbursement policy

    PubMed Central

    Afendulis, Christopher C.

    2011-01-01

    Health care providers may vertically integrate not only to facilitate coordination of care, but also for strategic reasons that may not be in patients’ best interests. Optimal Medicare reimbursement policy depends upon the extent to which each of these explanations is correct. To investigate, we compare the consequences of the 1997 adoption of prospective payment for skilled nursing facilities (SNF PPS) in geographic areas with high versus low levels of hospital/SNF integration. We find that SNF PPS decreased spending more in high integration areas, with no measurable consequences for patient health outcomes. Our findings suggest that integrated providers should face higher-powered reimbursement incentives, i.e., less cost-sharing. More generally, we conclude that purchasers of health services (and other services subject to agency problems) should consider the organizational form of their suppliers when choosing a reimbursement mechanism. PMID:21850551

  11. Aberrations of a horizontal-vertical depolarizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclain, Stephen C.; Chipman, Russell A.; Hillman, Lloyd W.

    1992-01-01

    Ray-trace equations for uniaxial birefringent materials are used here to derive third-order estimates for aberrations that are produced in imaging through uniaxial plates and horizontal-vertical (HV) depolarizers. An HV depolarizer is a spatial pseudodepolarizer; it converts a uniform input polarization state into a continuum of spatially varying polarization states in an output beam. An HV depolarizer consists of two birefringent wedges whose crystal axes are crossed at 90 deg. The interface between the wedges is included, which leads to a spatially varying retardance that provides the spatial pseudodepolarization. In HV depolarizers, spherical aberration, astigmatism, and image doubling are the principal aberrations for on-axis objects. Only spherical aberration occurs in isotropic plates, while the presence of birefringent wedges introduces astigmatism and image doubling. It is shown that image separation is proportional to the magnitude of the retardance variation.

  12. Multispectral imaging with vertical silicon nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyunsung; Crozier, Kenneth B.

    2013-01-01

    Multispectral imaging is a powerful tool that extends the capabilities of the human eye. However, multispectral imaging systems generally are expensive and bulky, and multiple exposures are needed. Here, we report the demonstration of a compact multispectral imaging system that uses vertical silicon nanowires to realize a filter array. Multiple filter functions covering visible to near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths are simultaneously defined in a single lithography step using a single material (silicon). Nanowires are then etched and embedded into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), thereby realizing a device with eight filter functions. By attaching it to a monochrome silicon image sensor, we successfully realize an all-silicon multispectral imaging system. We demonstrate visible and NIR imaging. We show that the latter is highly sensitive to vegetation and furthermore enables imaging through objects opaque to the eye. PMID:23955156

  13. Hydroelastic wave diffraction by a vertical cylinder.

    PubMed

    Brocklehurst, Paul; Korobkin, Alexander; Părău, Emilian I

    2011-07-28

    A linear three-dimensional problem of hydroelastic wave diffraction by a bottom-mounted circular cylinder is analysed. The fluid is of finite depth and is covered by an ice sheet, which is clamped to the cylinder surface. The ice stretches from the cylinder to infinity in all lateral directions. The hydroelastic behaviour of the ice sheet is described by linear elastic plate theory, and the fluid flow by a potential flow model. The two-dimensional incident wave is regular and has small amplitude. An analytical solution of the coupled problem of hydroelasticity is found by using a Weber transform. We determine the ice deflection and the vertical and horizontal forces acting on the cylinder and analyse the strain in the ice sheet caused by the incident wave. PMID:21690136

  14. Vertical axis wind turbine control strategy

    SciTech Connect

    McNerney, G.M.

    1981-08-01

    Early expensive in automatic operation of the Sandia 17-m vertical axis research wind turbine (VAWT) has demonstrated the need for a systematic study of control algorithms. To this end, a computer model has been developed that uses actual wind time series and turbine performance data to calculate the power produced by the Sandia 17-m VAWT operating in automatic control. The model has been used to investigate the influence of starting algorithms on annual energy production. The results indicate that, depending on turbine and local wind characteristics, a bad choice of a control algorithm can significantly reduce overall energy production. The model can be used to select control algorithms and threshold parameters that maximize long-term energy production. An attempt has been made to generalize these results from local site and turbine characteristics to obtain general guidelines for control algorithm design.

  15. Gas-solid flow in vertical tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Pita, J.A.; Sundaresan, S. )

    1991-07-01

    This paper reports on a computational study of fully-developed flow of gas-particle suspensions in vertical pipes which was carried out, using the model proposed recently by Sinclair and Jackson, to understand the predicted scale-up characteristics. It was shown that the model can capture the existence of steady-state multiplicity wherein different pressure gradients can be obtained for the same gas and solids fluxes. A pronounced and nonmonotonic variation of the pressure gradient required to achieve desired fluxes of solid and gas with tube diameter was predicted by the model, and this is explained on a physical basis. The computed results were compared with the experimental data. The model manifests an unsatisfactory degree of sensitivity to the inelasticity of the particle-particle collisions and the damping of particle-phase fluctuating motion by the gas.

  16. Track of Right-Wheel Drag (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 360-degree panorama combines several frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's 313th martian day (Nov. 19, 2004). The site, labeled Spirit site 93, is in the 'Columbia Hills' inside Gusev Crater. The rover tracks point westward. Spirit had driven eastward, in reverse and dragging its right front wheel, for about 30 meters (100 feet) on the day the picture was taken. Driving backwards while dragging that wheel is a precautionary strategy to extend the usefulness of the wheel for when it is most needed, because it has developed more friction than the other wheels. The right-hand track in this look backwards shows how the dragging disturbed the soil. This view is presented in a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

  17. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1687 (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,687th Martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (Oct. 22, 2008).

    Opportunity had driven 133 meters (436 feet) that sol, crossing sand ripples up to about 10 centimeters (4 inches) tall. The tracks visible in the foreground are in the east-northeast direction.

    Opportunity's position on Sol 1687 was about 300 meters southwest of Victoria Crater. The rover was beginning a long trek toward a much larger crater, Endeavour, about 12 kilometers (7 miles) to the southeast.

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

  18. Opportunity's Surroundings After Sol 1820 Drive (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,820th to 1,822nd Martian days, or sols, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 7 to 9, 2009).

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction. North is at the top.

    The rover had driven 20.6 meters toward the northwest on Sol 1820 before beginning to take the frames in this view. Tracks from that drive recede southwestward. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and small exposures of lighter-toned bedrock.

  19. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1818 (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,818th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 5, 2009). South is at the center; north at both ends.

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction. North is at the top.

    The rover had driven 80.3 meters (263 feet) southward earlier on that sol. Tracks from the drive recede northward in this view.

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

  20. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1798 (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 180-degree view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,798th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (Feb. 13, 2009). North is on top.

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

    The rover had driven 111 meters (364 feet) southward on the preceding sol. Tracks from that drive recede northward in this view. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

  1. Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Mesh Generator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-01-24

    VAWTGen is a mesh generator for creating a finite element beam mesh of arbitrary vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWT). The software accepts input files specifying tower and blade structural and aerodynamic descriptions and constructs a VAWT using a minimal set of inputs. VAWTs with an arbitrary number of blades can be constructed with or without a central tower. Strut connections between the tower and blades can be specified in an arbitrary manner. The software also facilitatesmore » specifying arbitrary joints between structural components and concentrated structural tenns (mass and stiffness). The output files which describe the VAWT configuration are intended to be used with the Offshore Wind ENergy Simulation (OWENS) Toolkit software for structural dynamics analysis of VAWTs. Furthermore, VAWTGen is useful for visualizing output from the OWENS analysis software.« less

  2. Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Mesh Generator

    SciTech Connect

    2014-01-24

    VAWTGen is a mesh generator for creating a finite element beam mesh of arbitrary vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWT). The software accepts input files specifying tower and blade structural and aerodynamic descriptions and constructs a VAWT using a minimal set of inputs. VAWTs with an arbitrary number of blades can be constructed with or without a central tower. Strut connections between the tower and blades can be specified in an arbitrary manner. The software also facilitates specifying arbitrary joints between structural components and concentrated structural tenns (mass and stiffness). The output files which describe the VAWT configuration are intended to be used with the Offshore Wind ENergy Simulation (OWENS) Toolkit software for structural dynamics analysis of VAWTs. Furthermore, VAWTGen is useful for visualizing output from the OWENS analysis software.

  3. Vertical oscillations of fluid and stellar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widrow, Lawrence M.; Bonner, Gage

    2015-06-01

    A satellite galaxy or dark matter subhalo that passes through a stellar disc may excite coherent oscillations in the disc perpendicular to its plane. We determine the properties of these modes for various self-gravitating plane symmetric systems (Spitzer sheets) using the matrix method of Kalnajs. In particular, we find an infinite series of modes for the case of a barotropic fluid. In general, for a collisionless system, there is a double series of modes, which include normal modes and/or Landau-damped oscillations depending on the phase space distribution function of the stars. Even Landau-damped oscillations may decay slowly enough to persist for several hundred Myr. We discuss the implications of these results for the recently discovered vertical perturbations in the kinematics of solar neighbourhood stars and for broader questions surrounding secular phenomena such as spiral structure in disc galaxies.

  4. Ultrahigh efficiencies in vertical epitaxial heterostructure architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fafard, S.; York, M. C. A.; Proulx, F.; Valdivia, C. E.; Wilkins, M. M.; Arès, R.; Aimez, V.; Hinzer, K.; Masson, D. P.

    2016-02-01

    Optical to electrical power converting semiconductor devices were achieved with breakthrough performance by designing a Vertical Epitaxial Heterostructure Architecture. The devices are featuring modeled and measured conversion efficiencies greater than 65%. The ultrahigh conversion efficiencies were obtained by monolithically integrating several thin GaAs photovoltaic junctions tailored with submicron absorption thicknesses and grown in a single crystal by epitaxy. The heterostructures that were engineered with a number N of such ultrathin junctions yielded an optimal external quantum efficiencies approaching 100%/N. The heterostructures are capable of output voltages that are multiple times larger than the corresponding photovoltage of the input light. The individual nanoscale junctions are each generating up to ˜1.2 V of output voltage when illuminated in the infrared. We compare the optoelectronic properties of phototransducers prepared with designs having 5 to 12 junctions and that are exhibiting voltage outputs between >5 V and >14 V.

  5. Bioterrorism awareness for EMS.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Richard W

    2004-04-01

    It is important to understand that the issues surrounding bioterrorism and all weapons of mass destruction are complex. In an effort to enhance response to such events, EMS should handle all incidents from the perspective of an all-hazards approach. Prevention, preparation, response and recovery are essential to the safe mitigation of all incidents. Organizations must be prepared. Plan now for a safer tomorrow. Your personnel and communities depend on you. PMID:15131906

  6. Vertical structure of recent Arctic warming.

    PubMed

    Graversen, Rune G; Mauritsen, Thorsten; Tjernström, Michael; Källén, Erland; Svensson, Gunilla

    2008-01-01

    Near-surface warming in the Arctic has been almost twice as large as the global average over recent decades-a phenomenon that is known as the 'Arctic amplification'. The underlying causes of this temperature amplification remain uncertain. The reduction in snow and ice cover that has occurred over recent decades may have played a role. Climate model experiments indicate that when global temperature rises, Arctic snow and ice cover retreats, causing excessive polar warming. Reduction of the snow and ice cover causes albedo changes, and increased refreezing of sea ice during the cold season and decreases in sea-ice thickness both increase heat flux from the ocean to the atmosphere. Changes in oceanic and atmospheric circulation, as well as cloud cover, have also been proposed to cause Arctic temperature amplification. Here we examine the vertical structure of temperature change in the Arctic during the late twentieth century using reanalysis data. We find evidence for temperature amplification well above the surface. Snow and ice feedbacks cannot be the main cause of the warming aloft during the greater part of the year, because these feedbacks are expected to primarily affect temperatures in the lowermost part of the atmosphere, resulting in a pattern of warming that we only observe in spring. A significant proportion of the observed temperature amplification must therefore be explained by mechanisms that induce warming above the lowermost part of the atmosphere. We regress the Arctic temperature field on the atmospheric energy transport into the Arctic and find that, in the summer half-year, a significant proportion of the vertical structure of warming can be explained by changes in this variable. We conclude that changes in atmospheric heat transport may be an important cause of the recent Arctic temperature amplification. PMID:18172495

  7. Vertical integration of ultrafast semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, D. J. H. C.; Bellancourt, A.-R.; Rudin, B.; Golling, M.; Unold, H. J.; Südmeyer, T.; Keller, U.

    2007-09-01

    Lasers generating short pulses - referred to as ultrafast lasers - enable many applications in science and technology. Numerous laboratory experiments have confirmed that ultrafast lasers can significantly increase telecommunication data rates [1], improve computer interconnects, and optically clock microprocessors [2, 3]. New applications in metrology [4], supercontinuum generation [5], and life sciences with two-photon microscopy [6] only work with ultrashort pulses but have relied on bulky and complex ultrafast solid-state lasers. Semiconductor lasers are ideally suited for mass production and widespread applications, because they are based on a wafer-scale technology with a high level of integration. Not surprisingly, the first lasers entering virtually every household were semiconductor lasers in compact disk players. Here we introduce a new concept and make the first feasibility demonstration of a new class of ultrafast semiconductor lasers which are power scalable, support both optical and electrical pumping and allow for wafer-scale fabrication. The laser beam propagates vertically (perpendicularly) through the epitaxial layer structure which has both gain and absorber layers integrated. In contrast to edge-emitters, these lasers have semiconductor layers that can be optimized separately by using different growth parameters and with no regrowth. This is especially important to integrate the gain and absorber layers, which require different quantum confinement. A saturable absorber is required for pulse generation and we optimized its parameters with a single self-assembled InAs quantum dot layer at low growth temperatures. We refer to this class of devices as modelocked integrated external-cavity surface emitting lasers (MIXSEL). Vertical integration supports a diffraction-limited circular output beam, transform-limited pulses, lower timing jitter, and synchronization to an external electronic clock. The pulse repetition rate scales from 1-GHz to 100-GHz by

  8. Vertical Localization of the Malar Prominence

    PubMed Central

    Kaptein, John S.; Markarian, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Background: During reconstruction or augmentation, it is important to localize the malar complex in a symmetrical and aesthetically pleasing position. Few studies have determined the location of this feature and none related the location to gender, age, or ethnicity. Some of these have attempted to relate the position to the aesthetically pleasing Golden Ratio φ. Methods: We assessed the vertical location of the malar prominence relative to other facial landmarks, determined consistency among individuals, and compared this with values used in artistry. Study population consisted of a convenience sample of 67 patients taken from an otolaryngology practice at a large urban medical center. Coordinates of the malar prominence were referenced to distinct facial landmarks from which the ratio of chin-to-malar prominence to chin-to-eye canthus was determined. Results: Average chin-to-malar prominence distance was 0.793 ± 0.023 (SD) of the chin-to-eye canthus distance. Variability due to the specific image chosen [coefficient of variation (CV) = 1.19%] and combined inter/intrareader variability (CV = 1.71%) validate the methodology. Variability among individuals (CV = 2.84%) indicates population consistency. No difference was found between gender and age groups or between whites and Hispanics. Individuals of other/unknown ethnicities were within the range common to whites and Hispanics. Our population’s value is not different from the value of 0.809 used in artistry, which is based on the Golden Ratio φ. Conclusions: The vertical position of the malar prominence is consistent among individuals, is clinically well-approximated by the value based on the Golden Ratio, and may be useful as a reference for surgical reconstruction or augmentation. PMID:26180712

  9. EM Sounding Characterization of Soil Environment toward Estimation of Potential Pollutant Load from Non-point Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Y.; Ide, J.; Somura, H.; Morisawa, T.

    2010-12-01

    A multi-frequency electro-magnetic (EM) sounding method was applied to agriculture fields to investigate the characteristics of non-point pollution load. Soil environmental properties such as differences in land management were analyzed with electrical conductivity (EC) maps. In addition, vertical EC profiles obtained from EM soundings were compared with EC in drainage ditch or river water. As results, surface soil EC maps successfully extracted the differences in land management affected by fertilizer application. Moreover, surface EC at the vertical profiles strongly related with drainage ditch or river EC, showing most of the EC in the water was explained by surface EC maps at the EM sounding data. The proposed method has strength in obtaining EC data without sampling river water, the situation we sometimes experienced at the field survey.

  10. Vertical profiles of BC direct radiative effect over Italy: high vertical resolution data and atmospheric feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Močnik, Griša; Ferrero, Luca; Castelli, Mariapina; Ferrini, Barbara S.; Moscatelli, Marco; Grazia Perrone, Maria; Sangiorgi, Giorgia; Rovelli, Grazia; D'Angelo, Luca; Moroni, Beatrice; Scardazza, Francesco; Bolzacchini, Ezio; Petitta, Marcello; Cappelletti, David

    2016-04-01

    Black carbon (BC), and its vertical distribution, affects the climate. Global measurements of BC vertical profiles are lacking to support climate change research. To fill this gap, a campaign was conducted over three Italian basin valleys, Terni Valley (Appennines), Po Valley and Passiria Valley (Alps), to characterize the impact of BC on the radiative budget under similar orographic conditions. 120 vertical profiles were measured in winter 2010. The BC vertical profiles, together with aerosol size distribution, aerosol chemistry and meteorological parameters, have been determined using a tethered balloon-based platform equipped with: a micro-Aethalometer AE51 (Magee Scientific), a 1.107 Grimm OPC (0.25-32 μm, 31 size classes), a cascade impactor (Siuotas SKC), and a meteorological station (LSI-Lastem). The aerosol chemical composition was determined from collected PM2.5 samples. The aerosol absorption along the vertical profiles was measured and optical properties calculated using the Mie theory applied to the aerosol size distribution. The aerosol optical properties were validated with AERONET data and then used as inputs to the radiative transfer model libRadtran. Vertical profiles of the aerosol direct radiative effect, the related atmospheric absorption and the heating rate were calculated. Vertical profile measurements revealed some common behaviors over the studied basin valleys. From below the mixing height to above it, a marked concentration drop was found for both BC (from -48.4±5.3% up to -69.1±5.5%) and aerosol number concentration (from -23.9±4.3% up to -46.5±7.3%). These features reflected on the optical properties of the aerosol. Absorption and scattering coefficients decreased from below the MH to above it (babs from -47.6±2.5% up to -71.3±3.0% and bsca from -23.5±0.8% up to -61.2±3.1%, respectively). Consequently, the Single Scattering Albedo increased above the MH (from +4.9±2.2% to +7.4±1.0%). The highest aerosol absorption was

  11. Decoration of vertical graphene with aerosol nanoparticles for gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Shumao; Guo, Xiaoru; Ren, Ren; Zhou, Guihua; Chen, Junhong

    2015-08-01

    A facile method was demonstrated to decorate aerosol Ag nanoparticles onto vertical graphene surfaces using a mini-arc plasma reactor. The vertical graphene was directly grown on a sensor electrode using a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method. The aerosol Ag nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple vapor condensation process using a mini-arc plasma source. Then, the nanoparticles were assembled on the surface of vertical graphene through the assistance of an electric field. Based on our observation, nonagglomerated Ag nanoparticles formed in the gas phase and were assembled onto vertical graphene sheets. Nanohybrids of Ag nanoparticle-decorated vertical graphene were characterized for ammonia gas detection at room temperature. The vertical graphene served as the conductance channel, and the conductance change upon exposure to ammonia was used as the sensing signal. The sensing results show that Ag nanoparticles significantly improve the sensitivity, response time, and recovery time of the sensor.

  12. Infants' sensitivity to vertical disparity for depth perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruhara, Aki; Kaneko, Hirohiko; Kanazawa, So; Otsuka, Yumiko; Shirai, Nobu; Yamaguchi, Masami K.

    2013-05-01

    Both horizontal and vertical binocular disparities produce depth perception in adults. In developmental studies, infants aged around 4 to 6 months were shown to perceive depth from horizontal disparity. However, infants' sensitivity to vertical disparity has not been shown clearly. To examine the sensitivity in infants, this study measured preferential looking behavior of infants aged 20 to 27 weeks. Results showed a significant preference for the stimulus with vertical disparity, providing the first evidence of infants' sensitivity to vertical disparity. The infants in the same age group did not show preference for stimulus with horizontal disparity when the stimulus were comparable to the stimulus with vertical disparity, while their sensitivity to horizontal disparity was confirmed with the stimuli used in a previous study. Our results would suggest that properties in processing horizontal and vertical disparities are different in infancy, and that the sensitivity to horizontal disparity are still premature in 27 weeks after birth.

  13. Verticality perception during and after galvanic vestibular stimulation.

    PubMed

    Volkening, Katharina; Bergmann, Jeannine; Keller, Ingo; Wuehr, Max; Müller, Friedemann; Jahn, Klaus

    2014-10-01

    The human brain constructs verticality perception by integrating vestibular, somatosensory, and visual information. Here we investigated whether galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) has an effect on verticality perception both during and after application, by assessing the subjective verticals (visual, haptic and postural) in healthy subjects at those times. During stimulation the subjective visual vertical and the subjective haptic vertical shifted towards the anode, whereas this shift was reversed towards the cathode in all modalities once stimulation was turned off. Overall, the effects were strongest for the haptic modality. Additional investigation of the time course of GVS-induced changes in the haptic vertical revealed that anodal shifts persisted for the entire 20-min stimulation interval in the majority of subjects. Aftereffects exhibited different types of decay, with a preponderance for an exponential decay. The existence of such reverse effects after stimulation could have implications for GVS-based therapy. PMID:25157799

  14. Robotic platform for traveling on vertical piping network

    DOEpatents

    Nance, Thomas A; Vrettos, Nick J; Krementz, Daniel; Marzolf, Athneal D

    2015-02-03

    This invention relates generally to robotic systems and is specifically designed for a robotic system that can navigate vertical pipes within a waste tank or similar environment. The robotic system allows a process for sampling, cleaning, inspecting and removing waste around vertical pipes by supplying a robotic platform that uses the vertical pipes to support and navigate the platform above waste material contained in the tank.

  15. A Vertical Differential Configuration in GPR prospecting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persico, Raffaele; Pochanin, Gennadiy; Varianytsia-Roshchupkina, Liudmyla; Catapano, Ilaria; Gennarelli, Gianluca; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    small objects and interfaces. This configuration can be labeled as a vertical differential configuration. At the conference, the reconstruction capabilities of this differential GPR configuration system will be discussed by means of an analysis of the problem based on a properly designed microwave tomographic inversion approach. The proposed approach exploits the Born approximation and faces the imaging as the solution of a linear inverse scattering problem. In this way, the problem of the local minima is avoided [7] and it is possible to impose some regularization to the problem in an easy way problem [8-9]. At the conference, a theoretical analysis of the mathematical propserties of the scattering operator under the vertical differential configuration will be presented showing that, with respect to the horizontal differential configuration, the vertical one allows to reject the direct coupling between the antennas but not the coupling of the antennas occurring through the air-soil interface. On the other hand, the filtering properties of the operator at hand con be considered, let say, less severe in some cases. At the conference, both some numerical and experimental results will be shown. References [1] R. Persico, F. Soldovieri, "Effects of the background removal in linear inverse scattering", IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens, vol. 46, pp. 1104-1114, April 2008. [2] L. Gurel, U. Oguz, "Three-Dimensional FDTD modeling of a ground penetrating radar", IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens, vol. 38, pp. 1513-1521, July 2000. [3] L. Gurel, U. Oguz, "Optimization of the transmitter-receiver separation in the ground penetrating radar", IEEE Trans. Antennas and Propag., vol. 51, no 3, pp. 362-370, March 2003. [4] R. Persico, F. Soldovieri, "A microwave tomography approach for a differential configuration in GPR prospecting", IEEE Trans. Antennas and Propag., vol. 54, pp. 3541 - 3548, 2006. [5] Y.A. Kopylov, S.A. Masalov, G.P. Pochanin, "The way of isolation between transmitting

  16. 7. VIEW NORTHWEST, DETAIL VERTICAL SUPPORT SYSTEM, STRINGER, CONNECTIONS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW NORTHWEST, DETAIL VERTICAL SUPPORT SYSTEM, STRINGER, CONNECTIONS AND TRAFFIC DECK - Hagerstown Road Bridge, Spanning Little Cotoctin Creek at Old Hagerstown Road, Middletown, Frederick County, MD

  17. Vertical silicon waveguide coupler bent by ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tomoya; Tajima, Syougo; Takei, Ryohei; Mori, Masahiko; Miura, Noboru; Sakakibara, Youichi

    2015-11-16

    We propose and demonstrate that vertically curved waveguides (VCWs) enable vertical coupling between silicon wire waveguides and optical fibers with low wavelength dependence and polarization dependence for wide telecommunication wavelength band light. To bend these VCWs, we implanted silicon ions into silicon wire cantilevers from the vertical direction. The internal stress distribution that was induced by ion implantation drove the bending force, and we achieved vertical bending of the waveguides, with curvature radii ranging from 3 to 25 μm. At a radius of curvature of 6 μm, we obtained a coupling loss of 3 dB using a lens fiber. PMID:26698428

  18. Reconstruction of the vertical electron density profile based on vertical TEC using the simulated annealing algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chunhua; Yang, Guobin; Zhu, Peng; Nishioka, Michi; Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Zhou, Chen; Song, Huan; Lan, Ting; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Yuannong

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a new method to reconstruct the vertical electron density profile based on vertical Total Electron Content (TEC) using the simulated annealing algorithm. The present technique used the Quasi-parabolic segments (QPS) to model the bottomside ionosphere. The initial parameters of the ionosphere model were determined from both International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) (Bilitza et al., 2014) and vertical TEC (vTEC). Then, the simulated annealing algorithm was used to search the best-fit parameters of the ionosphere model by comparing with the GPS-TEC. The performance and robust of this technique were verified by ionosonde data. The critical frequency (foF2) and peak height (hmF2) of the F2 layer obtained from ionograms recorded at different locations and on different days were compared with those calculated by the proposed method. The analysis of results shows that the present method is inspiring for obtaining foF2 from vTEC. However, the accuracy of hmF2 needs to be improved in the future work.

  19. Development of Vertical Cable Seismic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, E.; Murakami, F.; Sekino, Y.; Okamoto, T.; Ishikawa, K.; Tsukahara, H.; Shimura, T.

    2011-12-01

    In 2009, Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology(MEXT) started the survey system development for Hydrothermal deposit. We proposed the Vertical Cable Seismic (VCS), the reflection seismic survey with vertical cable above seabottom. VCS has the following advantages for hydrothermal deposit survey. (1) VCS is an efficient high-resolution 3D seismic survey in limited area. (2) It achieves high-resolution image because the sensors are closely located to the target. (3) It avoids the coupling problems between sensor and seabottom that cause serious damage of seismic data quality. (4) Because of autonomous recording system on sea floor, various types of marine source are applicable with VCS such as sea-surface source (GI gun etc.) , deep-towed or ocean bottom source. Our first experiment of 2D/3D VCS surveys has been carried out in Lake Biwa, JAPAN, in November 2009. The 2D VCS data processing follows the walk-away VSP, including wave field separation and depth migration. Seismic Interferometry technique is also applied. The results give much clearer image than the conventional surface seismic. Prestack depth migration is applied to 3D data to obtain good quality 3D depth volume. Seismic Interferometry technique is applied to obtain the high resolution image in the very shallow zone. Based on the feasibility study, we have developed the autonomous recording VCS system and carried out the trial experiment in actual ocean at the water depth of about 400m to establish the procedures of deployment/recovery and to examine the VC position or fluctuation at seabottom. The result shows that the VC position is estimated with sufficient accuracy and very little fluctuation is observed. Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo took the research cruise NT11-02 on JAMSTEC R/V Natsushima in February, 2011. In the cruise NT11-02, JGI carried out the second VCS survey using the autonomous VCS recording system with the deep towed source provided by

  20. Development of Vertical Cable Seismic System (3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, E.; Murakami, F.; Tsukahara, H.; Mizohata, S.; Ishikawa, K.

    2013-12-01

    The VCS (Vertical Cable Seismic) is one of the reflection seismic methods. It uses hydrophone arrays vertically moored from the seafloor to record acoustic waves generated by surface, deep-towed or ocean bottom sources. Analyzing the reflections from the sub-seabed, we could look into the subsurface structure. Because VCS is an efficient high-resolution 3D seismic survey method for a spatially-bounded area, we proposed the method for the hydrothermal deposit survey tool development program that the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) started in 2009. We are now developing a VCS system, including not only data acquisition hardware but data processing and analysis technique. We carried out several VCS surveys combining with surface towed source, deep towed source and ocean bottom source. The water depths of the survey are from 100m up to 2100m. The target of the survey includes not only hydrothermal deposit but oil and gas exploration. Through these experiments, our VCS data acquisition system has been completed. But the data processing techniques are still on the way. One of the most critical issues is the positioning in the water. The uncertainty in the positions of the source and of the hydrophones in water degraded the quality of subsurface image. GPS navigation system are available on sea surface, but in case of deep-towed source or ocean bottom source, the accuracy of shot position with SSBL/USBL is not sufficient for the very high-resolution imaging. We have developed another approach to determine the positions in water using the travel time data from the source to VCS hydrophones. In the data acquisition stage, we estimate the position of VCS location with slant ranging method from the sea surface. The deep-towed source or ocean bottom source is estimated by SSBL/USBL. The water velocity profile is measured by XCTD. After the data acquisition, we pick the first break times of the VCS recorded data. The estimated positions of

  1. Vertical Cable Seismic Survey for SMS exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, Eiichi; Murakami, Fumitoshi; Tsukahara, Hotoshi; Mizohata, Shigeharu

    2014-05-01

    The Vertical Cable Seismic (VCS) survey is one of the reflection seismic methods. It uses hydrophone arrays vertically moored from the seafloor to record acoustic waves generated by sea-surface, deep-towed or ocean bottom sources. Analyzing the reflections from the sub-seabed, we could look into the subsurface structure. Because the VCS is an efficient high-resolution 3D seismic survey method for a spatially-bounded area, we proposed it for the SMS survey tool development program that the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) started in 2009. We have been developing the VCS survey system, including not only data acquisition hardware but data processing and analysis technique. We carried out several VCS surveys combining with surface towed source, deep towed source and ocean bottom source. The water depths of these surveys are from 100m up to 2100 m. Through these experiments, our VCS data acquisition system has been also completed. But the data processing techniques are still on the way. One of the most critical issues is the positioning in the water. The uncertainty in the positions of the source and of the hydrophones in water degraded the quality of subsurface image. GPS navigation system is available on sea surface, but in case of deep-towed source or ocean bottom source, the accuracy of shot position with SSBL/USBL is not sufficient for the very high-resolution imaging. We have developed a new approach to determine the positions in water using the travel time data from the source to VCS hydrophones. In 2013, we have carried out the second VCS survey using the surface-towed high-voltage sparker and ocean bottom source in the Izena Cauldron, which is one of the most promising SMS areas around Japan. The positions of ocean bottom source estimated by this method are consistent with the VCS field records. The VCS data with the sparker have been processed with 3D PSTM. It gives the very high resolution 3D volume deeper than two

  2. High-resolution Vertical Profiling of Ocean Velocity and Water Properties Under Hurricane Frances in September 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, T. B.; D'Asarp, E. A.; Girton, J. B.; Price, J. F.; Webb, D. C.

    2006-12-01

    In ONR's CBLAST Hurricane research program observations were made of the upper ocean's response to Hurricane Frances. Three EM-APEX floats (velocity sensing versions of Webb Research APEX floats) and two Lagrangian floats were deployed north of Hispaniola from a C-130 aircraft ahead of Hurricane Frances in September 2004. The EM-APEX floats measured T, S and V over the upper 500 m starting about a day before the storm's arrival. The Lagrangian floats measured temperature and salinity while following the three- dimensional boundary layer turbulence in the upper 40 m. One EM-APEX float was directly under the track of the storm's eye, another EM-APEX and two Lagrangian floats went in about 50 km to the right of the track (where the surface winds are strongest) and the third float was about 100 km to the right. The EM-APEX floats profiled for 10 hours from the surface to 200 m, then continued profiling between 35 and 200 m with excursions to 500 m every half inertial period. After 5 days, the EM-APEX floats surfaced and transmitted the accumulated processed observations, then the floats profiled to 500 m every half inertial period until recovered early in October aided by GPS and Iridium. The float array sampled in unprecedented detail the upper-ocean turbulence, momentum, and salt and heat changes in response to the hurricane. The buildup of surface gravity waves in advance of the storm was also observed in the velocity profiles, with significant wave heights of up to 11 m. Rapid acceleration of inertial currents in the surface mixing layer (SML) to over 1 m/s stimulated vertical mixing by shear instability at the SML base, as indicated by low Richardson numbers and SML deepening from about 40 m to 120 m under the strongest wind forcing. Surface cooling of about 2.5 C was primarily due to the SML deepening and entrainment of colder water, with a small contribution from surface heat flux. Intense inertial pumping was observed under the eye, with vertical excursions of

  3. Investigation of dust vertical dispersion relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jie; Qiao, Ke; Hyde, Truell

    2007-11-01

    The dust acoustic wave (DAW) was first theoretically predicted in 1990 by Rao et al. [Ref] and later observed experimentally by Barkan, et al. [Ref. 2], Pieper and Goree [Ref. 3] and others. The charge on the dust, Debye length and various other fundamental complex plasma parameters can be obtained experimentally through measurement of the DAW. Since under normal laboratory conditions, ordered structures formed within a complex plasma are generally two dimensional in nature, the majority of experiments to date examining such a system's dispersion relationships have been conducted on the horizontal plane. We will present an experimental method providing for a vertical dispersion relationship measurement, and present corresponding data. References [1]. N. N. Rao, P. K. Shukla, and M. Y. Yu, ``Dust-acoustic waves in dusty plasmas,'' Planet. Space Sci. 38, 543-546 (1990). [2]. A. Barkan, R. L. Merlino, and N. D'Angelo, ``Laboratory observation of the dust-acoustic wave mode,'' Phys. Plasmas, 2, 3563-3565, 1995. [3]. J. B. Pieper, J. Goree, ``Dispersion of Plasma Dust Acoustic Waves in the Strong-Coupling Regime,'' Phys. Rev. Lett., 77, 3137-3140, 1996.

  4. Engineering design of vertical test stand cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Suhane, S.K.; Sharma, N.K.; Raghavendra, S.; Joshi, S.C.; Das, S.; Kush, P.K.; Sahni, V.C.; Gupta, P.D.; Sylvester, C.; Rabehl, R.; Ozelis, J.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Under Indian Institutions and Fermilab collaboration, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are jointly developing 2K Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostats for testing SCRF cavities at 2K. The VTS cryostat has been designed for a large testing aperture of 86.36 cm for testing of 325 MHz Spoke resonators, 650 MHz and 1.3 GHz multi-cell SCRF cavities for Fermilab's Project-X. Units will be installed at Fermilab and RRCAT and used to test cavities for Project-X. A VTS cryostat comprises of liquid helium (LHe) vessel with internal magnetic shield, top insert plate equipped with cavity support stand and radiation shield, liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) shield and vacuum vessel with external magnetic shield. The engineering design and analysis of VTS cryostat has been carried out using ASME B&PV Code and Finite Element Analysis. Design of internal and external magnetic shields was performed to limit the magnetic field inside LHe vessel at the cavity surface <1 {micro}T. Thermal analysis for LN{sub 2} shield has been performed to check the effectiveness of LN{sub 2} cooling and for compliance with ASME piping code allowable stresses.

  5. Mudflow rheology in a vertically rotating flume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmes, Jr., Robert R.; Westphal, Jerome A.; Jobson, Harvey E.

    1990-01-01

    Joint research by the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Missouri-Rolla currently (1990) is being conducted on a 3.05 meters in diameter vertically rotating flume used to simulate mudflows under steady-state conditions. Observed mudflow simulations indicate flow patterns in the flume are similar to those occurring in natural mudflows. Variables such as mean and surface velocity, depth, and average boundary shear stress can be measured in this flume more easily than in the field or in a traditional tilting flume. Sensitive variables such as sediment concentration, grain-size distribution, and Atterberg limits also can be precisely and easily controlled. A known Newtonian fluid, SAE 30 motor oil, was tested in the flume and the computed value for viscosity was within 12.5 percent of the stated viscosity. This provided support that the data from the flume can be used to determine the rheological properties of fluids such as mud. Measurements on mud slurries indicate that flows with sediment concentrations ranging from 81 to 87 percent sediment by weight can be approximated as Bingham plastic for strain rates greater than 1 per second. In this approximation, the yield stress and Bingham viscosity were extremely sensitive to sediment concentration. Generally, the magnitude of the yield stress was large relative to the change in shear stress with increasing mudflow velocity.

  6. Absolute Position Encoders With Vertical Image Binning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2005-01-01

    Improved optoelectronic patternrecognition encoders that measure rotary and linear 1-dimensional positions at conversion rates (numbers of readings per unit time) exceeding 20 kHz have been invented. Heretofore, optoelectronic pattern-recognition absoluteposition encoders have been limited to conversion rates <15 Hz -- too low for emerging industrial applications in which conversion rates ranging from 1 kHz to as much as 100 kHz are required. The high conversion rates of the improved encoders are made possible, in part, by use of vertically compressible or binnable (as described below) scale patterns in combination with modified readout sequences of the image sensors [charge-coupled devices (CCDs)] used to read the scale patterns. The modified readout sequences and the processing of the images thus read out are amenable to implementation by use of modern, high-speed, ultra-compact microprocessors and digital signal processors or field-programmable gate arrays. This combination of improvements makes it possible to greatly increase conversion rates through substantial reductions in all three components of conversion time: exposure time, image-readout time, and image-processing time.

  7. Nitrification in a vertically moving biofilm system.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, M; Healy, M G; Prendergast, J

    2006-05-01

    A laboratory continuous feed biofilm reactor, comprising a bulk fluid reactor, a biofilm plastic module, a feed tank, and pneumatic devices and controls, was operated for a total period of 257 days, including seeding time, to treat domestic-strength synthetic wastewater under increasing ammonium nitrogen (NH(4)(+)--N) loading rates, ranging from 0.17+/-0.01 (0.71+/-0.06 gm(-2)d(-1)) to 0.70+/-0.02 kgm(-3)d(-1) (2.9+/-0.1 gm(-2)d(-1)). The biofilm plastic module was moved vertically in and out of the wastewater in continuous cycles. The maximum NH(4)(+)-N removal rate was reached during the maximum loading phase, when a NH(4)(+)--N loading rate of 0.70+/-0.02 kgm(-3)d(-1) (2.9+/-0.1 gm(-2)d(-1)) was applied to the system. During this loading period, the average NH(4)(+)--N removal rate was 0.30+/-0.10 kgm(-3)d(-1) (1.30+/-0.40 gm(-2)d(-1)). PMID:16182437

  8. Microfluidic dielectrophoretic sorter using gel vertical electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jason; Nelson, Edward L.; Li, G. P.; Bachman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    We report the development and results of a two-step method for sorting cells and small particles in a microfluidic device. This approach uses a single microfluidic channel that has (1) a microfabricated sieve which efficiently focuses particles into a thin stream, followed by (2) a dielectrophoresis (DEP) section consisting of electrodes along the channel walls for efficient continuous sorting based on dielectric properties of the particles. For our demonstration, the device was constructed of polydimethylsiloxane, bonded to a glass surface, and conductive agarose gel electrodes. Gold traces were used to make electrical connections to the conductive gel. The device had several novel features that aided performance of the sorting. These included a sieving structure that performed continuous displacement of particles into a single stream within the microfluidic channel (improving the performance of downstream DEP, and avoiding the need for additional focusing flow inlets), and DEP electrodes that were the full height of the microfluidic walls (“vertical electrodes”), allowing for improved formation and control of electric field gradients in the microfluidic device. The device was used to sort polymer particles and HeLa cells, demonstrating that this unique combination provides improved capability for continuous DEP sorting of particles in a microfluidic device. PMID:24926390

  9. ATLAS LTCS Vertically Challenged System Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Deepak; Garrison, Matt; Ku, Jentung

    2014-01-01

    Re-planning of LTCS TVAC testing and supporting RTA (Receiver Telescope Assembly) Test Plan and Procedure document preparation. The Laser Thermal Control System (LTCS) is designed to maintain the lasers onboard Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) at their operational temperatures. In order to verify the functionality of the LTCS, a thermal balance test of the thermal hardware was performed. During the first cold start of the LTCS, the Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) was unable to control the laser mass simulators temperature. The control heaters were fully on and the loop temperature remained well below the desired setpoint. Thermal analysis of the loop did not show these results. This unpredicted behavior of the LTCS was brought up to a panel of LHP experts. Based on the testing and a review of all the data, there were multiple diagnostic performed in order to narrow down the cause. The prevailing theory is that gravity is causing oscillating flow within the loop, which artificially increased the control power needs. This resulted in a replan of the LTCS test flow and the addition of a GSE heater to allow vertical operation.

  10. A theoretical analysis of vertical flow equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Yortsos, Y.C.

    1992-01-01

    The assumption of Vertical Flow Equilibrium (VFE) and of parallel flow conditions, in general, is often applied to the modeling of flow and displacement in natural porous media. However, the methodology for the development of the various models is rather intuitive, and no rigorous method is currently available. In this paper, we develop an asymptotic theory using as parameter the variable R{sub L} = (L/H){radical}(k{sub V})/(k{sub H}). It is rigorously shown that present models represent the leading order term of an asymptotic expansion with respect to 1/R{sub L}{sup 2}. Although this was numerically suspected, it is the first time that is is theoretically proved. Based on the general formulation, a series of models are subsequently obtained. In the absence of strong gravity effects, they generalize previous works by Zapata and Lake (1981), Yokoyama and Lake (1981) and Lake and Hirasaki (1981), on immiscible and miscible displacements. In the limit of gravity-segregated flow, we prove conditions for the fluids to be segregated and derive the Dupuit and Dietz (1953) approximations. Finally, we also discuss effects of capillarity and transverse dispersion.

  11. Airfoil treatments for vertical axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Klimas, P.C.

    1985-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has taken three airfoil related approaches to decreasing the cost of energy of vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) systems; airfoil sections designed specifically for VAWTs, vortex generators (VGs), and ''pumped spoiling.'' SNL's blade element airfoil section design effort has led to three promising natural laminar flow (NLF) sections. One section is presently being run on the SNL 17-m turbine. Increases in peak efficiency and more desirable dynamic stall regulation characteristics have been observed. Vane-type VGs were fitted on one DOE/Alcoa 100 kW VAWT. With approximately 12% of span having VGs, annual energy production increased by 5%. Pumped spoiling utilizes the centrifugal pumping capabilities of hollow blades. With the addition of small perforations in the surface of the blades and valves controlled by windspeed at the ends of each blade, lift spoiling jets may be generated inducing premature stall and permitting lower capacity, lower cost drivetrain components. SNL has demonstrated this concept on its 5-m turbine and has wind tunnel tested perforation geometries on one NLF section.

  12. Numerical Simulations of Hot Vertical Displacement Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunkers, K. J.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2015-11-01

    Loss of vertical positioning control in tokamaks leads to instability where hot confined plasma rests against the chamber wall. Resistive-MHD modeling with the NIMROD code is applied to model these events. After divertor-coil current is perturbed, resistive diffusion through the non-ideal wall sets the timescale as the simulated tokamak evolves from a diverted equilibrium to a limited configuration. Results show that plasma outflow along opening magnetic surfaces, just outside the confinement zone, approaches the local ion-acoustic speed. The projection of the plasma flow velocity into the surface-normal direction (n . V) near the surface exceeds the local E × B drift speed; near surfaces n × E is approximately the same as n ×Ewall in the nearly steady conditions. The safety factor of flux surfaces that remain intact is approximately constant over the evolution time, which is much shorter than the plasma resistive diffusion time. Assessment of external-kink stability and initial findings from 3D nonlinear computations are presented. This effort is supported by the U.S. Dept. of Energy, award numbers DE-FG02-06ER54850 and DE-FC02-08ER54975.

  13. Premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, Kirill A.

    2016-04-01

    Analytical treatment of the premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes with smooth walls is given. Using the on-shell flame description, equations for a quasi-steady flame with a small but finite front thickness are obtained and solved numerically. It is found that near the limits of inflammability, solutions describing upward flame propagation come in pairs having close propagation speeds and that the effect of gravity is to reverse the burnt gas velocity profile generated by the flame. On the basis of these results, a theory of partial flame propagation driven by a strong gravitational field is developed. A complete explanation is given of the intricate observed behavior of limit flames, including dependence of the inflammability range on the size of the combustion domain, the large distances of partial flame propagation, and the progression of flame extinction. The role of the finite front-thickness effects is discussed in detail. Also, various mechanisms governing flame acceleration in smooth tubes are identified. Acceleration of methane-air flames in open tubes is shown to be a combined effect of the hydrostatic pressure difference produced by the ambient cold air and the difference of dynamic gas pressure at the tube ends. On the other hand, a strong spontaneous acceleration of the fast methane-oxygen flames at the initial stage of their evolution in open-closed tubes is conditioned by metastability of the quasi-steady propagation regimes. An extensive comparison of the obtained results with the experimental data is made.

  14. Vertical barriers with increased sorption capacities

    SciTech Connect

    Bradl, H.B.

    1997-12-31

    Vertical barriers are commonly used for the containment of contaminated areas. Due to the very small permeability of the barrier material which is usually in the order of magnitude of 10-10 m/s or less the advective contaminant transport can be more or less neglected. Nevertheless, there will always be a diffusive contaminant transport through the barrier which is caused by the concentration gradient. Investigations have been made to increase the sorption capacity of the barrier material by adding substances such as organoclays, zeolites, inorganic oxides and fly ashes. The contaminants taken into account where heavy metals (Pb) and for organic contaminants Toluole and Phenantrene. The paper presents results of model calculations and experiments. As a result, barrier materials can be designed {open_quotes}tailor-made{close_quotes} depending on the individual contaminant range of each site (e.g. landfills, gasworks etc.). The parameters relevant for construction such as rheological properties, compressive strength and permeability are not affected by the addition of the sorbents.

  15. Vertical Distribution of Vibrationally Excited Hydroxyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grygalashvyly, Mykhaylo; Becker, Erich; Sonnemann, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge about the vertical distribution of the vibrationally excited states of hydroxyl (OH*) is important for the interpretation of airglow measurements with respect to dynamical processes in the mesopause region. We derive an approximate analytical expression for the distribution of OH* that highlights the dependence on atomic oxygen and temperature. In addition, we use an advanced numerical model for the formation and relaxation of OH* and investigate the distributions of the different vibrationally exited states of OH*. For the production of OH*, the model includes the reaction of atomic hydrogen with ozone, as well as the reaction of atomic oxygen with hydroperoxy radicals. As loss processes we include 1) deactivation by atomic oxygen, molecular oxygen, and molecular nitrogen, 2) spontaneous emission, and 3) loss due to chemical reaction with atomic oxygen. All these processes take the dependence on the vibrational number into account. The quenching by molecular and atomic oxygen is parameterized by a multi-quantum relaxation scheme. This diagnostic model for OH* has been implemented as part of a chemistry-transport model that is driven by the dynamics simulated with the KMCM (Kühlungsborn Mechanistic general Circulation Model). Numerical results confirm that emission from excited states with higher vibrational number is weaker and emanates from higher altitudes. In addition we find that the OH*-peak altitudes depend significantly on season and latitude. This behavior is mainly controlled by the corresponding variations of atomic oxygen and temperature, as is also confirmed by the aforementioned approximate theory.

  16. Vertical Distribution of Water at Phoenix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamppari, L. K.; Lemmon, M. T.

    2011-01-01

    Phoenix results, combined with coordinated observations from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter of the Phoenix lander site, indicate that the water vapor is nonuniform (i.e., not well mixed) up to a calculated cloud condensation level. It is important to understand the mixing profile of water vapor because (a) the assumption of a well-mixed atmosphere up to a cloud condensation level is common in retrievals of column water abundances which are in turn used to understand the seasonal and interannual behavior of water, (b) there is a long history of observations and modeling that conclude both that water vapor is and is not well-mixed, and some studies indicate that the water vapor vertical mixing profile may, in fact, change with season and location, (c) the water vapor in the lowest part of the atmosphere is the reservoir that can exchange with the regolith and higher amounts may have an impact on the surface chemistry, and (d) greater water vapor abundances close to the surface may enhance surface exchange thereby reducing regional transport, which in turn has implications to the net transport of water vapor over seasonal and annual timescales.

  17. Free convective condensation in a vertical enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, R.J.; Peterson, P.F.; Corradini, M.L.; Pernsteiner, A.P.

    1995-09-01

    Free convective condensation in a vertical enclosure was studied numerically and the results were compared with experiments. In both the numerical and experimental investigations, mist formation was observed to occur near the cooling wall, with significant droplet concentrations in the bulk. Large recirculation cells near the end of the condensing section were generated as the heavy noncondensing gas collecting near the cooling wall was accelerated downward. Near the top of the enclosure the recirculation cells became weaker and smaller than those below, ultimately disappearing near the top of the condenser. In the experiment the mist density was seen to be highest near the wall and at the bottom of the condensing section, whereas the numerical model predicted a much more uniform distribution. The model used to describe the formation of mist was based on a Modified Critical Saturation Model (MCSM), which allows mist to be generated once the vapor pressure exceeds a critical value. Equilibrium, nonequilibrium, and MCSM calculations were preformed, showing the experimental results to lie somewhere in between the equilibrium and nonequilibrium predictions of the numerical model. A single adjustable constant (indicating the degree to which equilibrium is achieved) is used in the model in order to match the experimental results.

  18. Morpheus Vertical Test Bed Flight Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Jeremy; Devolites, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Morpheus Project has developed and tested a prototype planetary lander capable of vertical takeoff and landing, that is designed to serve as a testbed for advanced spacecraft technologies. The lander vehicle, propelled by a LOX/Methane engine and sized to carry a 500kg payload to the lunar surface, provides a platform for bringing technologies from the laboratory into an integrated flight system at relatively low cost. Morpheus onboard software is autonomous from ignition all the way through landing, and is designed to be capable of executing a variety of flight trajectories, with onboard fault checks and automatic contingency responses. The Morpheus 1.5A vehicle performed 26 integrated vehicle test flights including hot-fire tests, tethered tests, and two attempted freeflights between April 2011 and August 2012. The final flight of Morpheus 1.5A resulted in a loss of the vehicle. In September 2012, development began on the Morpheus 1.5B vehicle, which subsequently followed a similar test campaign culminating in free-flights at a simulated planetary landscape built at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility. This paper describes the integrated test campaign, including successes and setbacks, and how the system design for handling faults and failures evolved over the course of the project.

  19. Drop motion induced by vertical vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Paolo; Quagliati, Damiano; Varagnolo, Silvia; Pierno, Matteo; Mistura, Giampaolo; Magaletti, Francesco; Massimo Casciola, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    We have studied the motion of liquid drops on an inclined plate subject to vertical vibrations. The liquids comprised distilled water and different aqueous solutions of glycerol, ethanol and isopropanol spanning the range 1-39 mm2 s-1 in kinematic viscosities and 40-72 mN m-1 in surface tension. At sufficiently low oscillating amplitudes, the drops are always pinned to the surface. Vibrating the plate above a certain amplitude yields sliding of the drop. Further increasing the oscillating amplitude drives the drop upward against gravity. In the case of the most hydrophilic aqueous solutions, this motion is not observed and the drop only slides downward. Images taken with a fast camera show that the drop profile evolves in a different way during sliding and climbing. In particular, the climbing drop experiences a much bigger variation in its profile during an oscillating period. Complementary numerical simulations of 2D drops based on a diffuse interface approach confirm the experimental findings. The overall qualitative behavior is reproduced suggesting that the contact line pinning due to contact angle hysteresis is not necessary to explain the drop climbing.

  20. Functionalization of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Snyders, Rony; Colomer, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Summary This review focuses and summarizes recent studies on the functionalization of carbon nanotubes oriented perpendicularly to their substrate, so-called vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs). The intrinsic properties of individual nanotubes make the VA-CNTs ideal candidates for integration in a wide range of devices, and many potential applications have been envisaged. These applications can benefit from the unidirectional alignment of the nanotubes, the large surface area, the high carbon purity, the outstanding electrical conductivity, and the uniformly long length. However, practical uses of VA-CNTs are limited by their surface characteristics, which must be often modified in order to meet the specificity of each particular application. The proposed approaches are based on the chemical modifications of the surface by functionalization (grafting of functional chemical groups, decoration with metal particles or wrapping of polymers) to bring new properties or to improve the interactions between the VA-CNTs and their environment while maintaining the alignment of CNTs. PMID:23504581

  1. Vertical extensions of galactic spiral arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soukup, J. E.; Yuan, C.

    1981-01-01

    The vertical structure of the large scale galactic shock along spiral arms is studied in order to understand the extended features or the wings of spiral arms observed by Kepner (1970) and recently checked by Soukup (1979). Numerical calculations of two-dimensional gas flow were performed for two models of the gas. The results show that the shock front, standing perfectly perpendicular to the galactic plane, extends impressively above the scale height of the interstellar gas. In the extreme case of isothermal gas, the shock solution exists at any distance from the plane. In a realistic model in which the kinetic temperature of the gas is stratified, increasing with height, the shock can extend up to 700 pc. For both models, although the velocity component perpendicular to the galactic plane is small, the solutions corresponding to layered one-dimensional flow contain no shocks at such heights. In order to study the geometry of the shock front and the flow pattern near it, a simplified model is adopted, in which the Coriolis force is neglected. However, estimates show that including it will enhance the shock strength. The compression at the shock front makes the gas observable at high latitudes.

  2. Jetting during vertical impacts of spherical projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. C.; Bowling, T. J.; Melosh, H. J.

    2014-08-01

    The extreme pressures reached during jetting, a process by which material is squirted out from the contact point of two colliding objects, causes melting and vaporization at low impact velocities. Jetting is a major source of melting in shocked porous material, a potential source of tektites, a possible origin of chondrules, and even a conceivable origin of the Moon. Here, in an attempt to quantify the importance of jetting, we present numerical simulation of jetting during the vertical impacts of spherical projectiles on both flat and curved targets. We find that impacts on curved targets result in more jetted material but that higher impact velocities result in less jetted material. For an aluminum impactor striking a flat Al target at 2 km/s we find that 3.4% of a projectile mass is jetted while 8.3% is jetted for an impact between two equal sized Al spheres. Our results indicate that the theory of jetting during the collision of thin plates can be used to predict the conditions when jetting will occur. However, we find current analytic models do not make accurate predictions of the amount of jetted mass. Our work indicates that the amount of jetted mass is independent of model resolution as long as some jetted material is resolved. This is the result of lower velocity material dominating the mass of the jet.

  3. 19. VIEW SOUTHWEST OF INTERMEDIATE VERTICAL PENNSYLVANIA PETIT TRUSS WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW SOUTHWEST OF INTERMEDIATE VERTICAL PENNSYLVANIA PETIT TRUSS WITH CASTLE ROCK IN BACKGROUND. JUNCTION OF INTERMEDIATE VERTICAL AND TOP CHORD WITH STABILIZING LATERAL STRUT ABOVE AND SWAY STRUT BELOW. ORIGINAL PAIRED DIAGONAL EYE BARS LATER REINFORCED WITH TIE ROD - New River Bridge, Spanning New River at State Route 623, Pembroke, Giles County, VA

  4. Collaborative Inquiry and Vertical Team Teaching: Implications for Literacy Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciampa, Katia; Gallagher, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this collective case study was to explore the resultant effects of vertical team teaching and collaborative inquiry on elementary (Grade 8) and secondary (Grade 9) educators' literacy instructional and assessment practices. Key elements of the program included collaborative inquiry and vertical team teaching. The findings of this…

  5. Half-State Readout In Vertical-Bloch-Line Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R.; Wu, Jiin-Chuan; Stadler, Henry L.

    1994-01-01

    Potentially narrow margins of chirality-based chopping of magnetic stripes avoided. Half-state readout is experimental method of readout in Vertical-Bloch-Line (VBL) memory. Based on differential deflections of magnetic stripe domains in which data bits stored. To give meaning to explanation of half-state readout, see "Vertical-Bloch-Line Memory" (NPO-18467).

  6. 15. Detail showing lower chord pinconnected to vertical member, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Detail showing lower chord pin-connected to vertical member, showing floor beam riveted to extension of vertical member below pin-connection, and showing brackets supporting cantilevered sidewalk. View to southwest. - Selby Avenue Bridge, Spanning Short Line Railways track at Selby Avenue between Hamline & Snelling Avenues, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  7. Vertical distribution of phosphorus in agricultural drainage ditch soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pedological processes such as gleization and organic matter accumulation may affect the vertical distribution of P within agricultural drainage ditch soils. The objective of this study was to assess the vertical distribution of P as a function of horizonation in ditch soils at the University of Mary...

  8. SIMPLE PDF MODELS FOR CONVECTIVELY DRIVEN VERTICAL DIFFUSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mode of vertical velocity in convective boundary layers is usually negative and the probability distribution function(PDF) of w, pw is rarely symmetrlc. Consequently, vertical diffusion from elevated sources is usually asymmetric and exhibits a descending mode of concentratio...

  9. 33 CFR 118.160 - Vertical clearance gauges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vertical clearance gauges. 118.160 Section 118.160 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.160 Vertical clearance gauges. (a) When necessary for reasons of safety of navigation, the...

  10. Effects of Vertical Scaling Methods on Linear Growth Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lei, Pui-Wa; Zhao, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Vertical scaling is necessary to facilitate comparison of scores from test forms of different difficulty levels. It is widely used to enable the tracking of student growth in academic performance over time. Most previous studies on vertical scaling methods assume relatively long tests and large samples. Little is known about their performance when…

  11. 9. GENERAL INTERIOR VIEW OF THE VERTICAL FURNACE BUILDING (PART ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. GENERAL INTERIOR VIEW OF THE VERTICAL FURNACE BUILDING (PART OF MACHINE SHOP No. 2). TWO FURNACES, WITH THEIR SUPPORT FRAMEWORK, ARE VISIBLE TO THE RIGHT. THE TALL STRUCTURE IN THE CENTER TOWARD THE BACKGROUND IS THE VERTICAL QUENCH TOWER. - U.S. Steel Homestead Works, Machine Shop No. 2, Along Monongahela River, Homestead, Allegheny County, PA

  12. The Subjective Visual Vertical: Validation of a Simple Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesio, Luigi; Longo, Stefano; Rota, Viviana

    2011-01-01

    The study sought to provide norms for a simple test of visual perception of verticality (subjective visual vertical). The study was designed as a cohort study with a balanced design. The setting was the Rehabilitation Department of a University Hospital. Twenty-two healthy adults, of 23-58 years, 11 men (three left handed) and 11 women (three left…

  13. Experimental Vertical Stability Studies for ITER Performance and Design Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, D A; Casper, T A; Eidietis, N; Ferrera, M; Gates, D A; Hutchinson, I H; Jackson, G L; Kolemen, E; Leuer, J A; Lister, J; LoDestro, L L; Meyer, W H; Pearlstein, L D; Sartori, F; Walker, M L; Welander, A S; Wolfe, S M

    2008-10-13

    Operating experimental devices have provided key inputs to the design process for ITER axisymmetric control. In particular, experiments have quantified controllability and robustness requirements in the presence of realistic noise and disturbance environments, which are difficult or impossible to characterize with modeling and simulation alone. This kind of information is particularly critical for ITER vertical control, which poses some of the highest demands on poloidal field system performance, since the consequences of loss of vertical control can be very severe. The present work describes results of multi-machine studies performed under a joint ITPA experiment on fundamental vertical control performance and controllability limits. We present experimental results from Alcator C-Mod, DIII-D, NSTX, TCV, and JET, along with analysis of these data to provide vertical control performance guidance to ITER. Useful metrics to quantify this control performance include the stability margin and maximum controllable vertical displacement. Theoretical analysis of the maximum controllable vertical displacement suggests effective approaches to improving performance in terms of this metric, with implications for ITER design modifications. Typical levels of noise in the vertical position measurement which can challenge the vertical control loop are assessed and analyzed.

  14. SeedChaser: Vertical soil tillage distribution model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of the vertical distribution of surface residues, chemicals, or seeds following tillage operations is of paramount importance to a wide variety of soil research areas. This paper describes a 1-D empirical vertical soil tillage distribution model with 1-cm grid spacing (SeedChaser) that pre...

  15. A 3-approximation for the minimum tree spanning k vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, N.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper we give a 3-approximation algorithm for the problem of finding a minimum tree spanning any k-vertices in a graph. Our algorithm extends to a 3-approximation algorithm for the minimum tour that visits any k-vertices.

  16. Identified EM Earthquake Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Kenneth, II; Saxton, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Many attempts have been made to determine a sound forecasting method regarding earthquakes and warn the public in turn. Presently, the animal kingdom leads the precursor list alluding to a transmission related source. By applying the animal-based model to an electromagnetic (EM) wave model, various hypotheses were formed, but the most interesting one required the use of a magnetometer with a differing design and geometry. To date, numerous, high-end magnetometers have been in use in close proximity to fault zones for potential earthquake forecasting; however, something is still amiss. The problem still resides with what exactly is forecastable and the investigating direction of EM. After a number of custom rock experiments, two hypotheses were formed which could answer the EM wave model. The first hypothesis concerned a sufficient and continuous electron movement either by surface or penetrative flow, and the second regarded a novel approach to radio transmission. Electron flow along fracture surfaces was determined to be inadequate in creating strong EM fields, because rock has a very high electrical resistance making it a high quality insulator. Penetrative flow could not be corroborated as well, because it was discovered that rock was absorbing and confining electrons to a very thin skin depth. Radio wave transmission and detection worked with every single test administered. This hypothesis was reviewed for propagating, long-wave generation with sufficient amplitude, and the capability of penetrating solid rock. Additionally, fracture spaces, either air or ion-filled, can facilitate this concept from great depths and allow for surficial detection. A few propagating precursor signals have been detected in the field occurring with associated phases using custom-built loop antennae. Field testing was conducted in Southern California from 2006-2011, and outside the NE Texas town of Timpson in February, 2013. The antennae have mobility and observations were noted for

  17. Graphene vertical hot-electron terahertz detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhii, V.; Satou, A.; Otsuji, T.; Ryzhii, M.; Mitin, V.; Shur, M. S.

    2014-09-21

    We propose and analyze the concept of the vertical hot-electron terahertz (THz) graphene-layer detectors (GLDs) based on the double-GL and multiple-GL structures with the barrier layers made of materials with a moderate conduction band off-set (such as tungsten disulfide and related materials). The operation of these detectors is enabled by the thermionic emissions from the GLs enhanced by the electrons heated by incoming THz radiation. Hence, these detectors are the hot-electron bolometric detectors. The electron heating is primarily associated with the intraband absorption (the Drude absorption). In the frame of the developed model, we calculate the responsivity and detectivity as functions of the photon energy, GL doping, and the applied voltage for the GLDs with different number of GLs. The detectors based on the cascade multiple-GL structures can exhibit a substantial photoelectric gain resulting in the elevated responsivity and detectivity. The advantages of the THz detectors under consideration are associated with their high sensitivity to the normal incident radiation and efficient operation at room temperature at the low end of the THz frequency range. Such GLDs with a metal grating, supporting the excitation of plasma oscillations in the GL-structures by the incident THz radiation, can exhibit a strong resonant response at the frequencies of several THz (in the range, where the operation of the conventional detectors based on A{sub 3}B{sub 5} materials, in particular, THz quantum-well detectors, is hindered due to a strong optical phonon radiation absorption in such materials). We also evaluate the characteristics of GLDs in the mid- and far-infrared ranges where the electron heating is due to the interband absorption in GLs.

  18. 'Victoria Crater' from 'Duck Bay' (Vertical Projection)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Mars rover Opportunity edged 3.7 meters (12 feet) closer to the top of the 'Duck Bay' alcove along the rim of 'Victoria Crater' during the rover's 952nd Martian day, or sol (overnight Sept. 27 to Sept. 28), and gained this vista of the crater. The rover's navigation camera took the seven exposures combined into this mosaic view of the crater's interior. This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months.

    The far side of the crater is about 800 meters (one-half mile) away. The rim of the crater is composed of alternating promontories, rocky points towering approximately 70 meters (230 feet) above the crater floor, and recessed alcoves, such as Duck Bay. The bottom of the crater is covered by sand that has been shaped into ripples by the Martian wind. The rocky cliffs in the foreground have been informally named 'Cape Verde,' on the left, and 'Cabo Frio,' on the right.

    Victoria Crater is about five times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than 'Eagle Crater,' where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is an expectation that the thick stack of geological layers exposed in the crater walls could reveal the record of past environmental conditions over a much greater span of time than Opportunity has read from rocks examined earlier in the mission.

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

  19. Vertical diffusivities of active and passive tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Cheng, Y.; Howard, A. M.

    The climate models that include a carbon-cycle need the vertical diffusivity of a passive tracer. Since an expression for the latter is not available, it has been common practice to identify it with that of salt. The identification is questionable since T, S are active, not passive tracers. We present the first derivation of the diffusivity of a passive tracer in terms of Ri (Richardson number) and R ρ (density ratio, ratio of salinity over temperature z-gradients). The following results have emerged: The passive tracer diffusivity is an algebraic function of Ri, R ρ. In doubly stable regimes (DS, ∂ T/∂z > 0, ∂S/∂ z < 0), the passive scalar diffusivity is nearly the same as that of salt/heat for any values of R ρ < 0 and Ri > 0. In DC regimes (diffusive convection, ∂ T/∂ z < 0, ∂ S/∂ z < 0, R ρ > 1), the passive scalar diffusivity is larger than that of salt. At Ri = O(1), it can be more than twice as large. In SF regimes (salt fingers, ∂ T/∂ z > 0, ∂ S/∂ z > 0, R ρ < 1), the passive scalar diffusivity is smaller than that of salt. At Ri = O(1), it can be less than half of it. The passive tracer diffusivity predicted at the location of NATRE (North Atlantic Tracer Release Experiment) is discussed. Perhaps the most relevant conclusion is that the common identification of the tracer diffusivity with that of salt is valid only in DS regimes. In the Southern Ocean, where there is the largest CO 2 absorption, the dominant regime is diffusive convection discussed in (c) above.

  20. Partial diel vertical migrations in pelagic fish.

    PubMed

    Mehner, Thomas; Kasprzak, Peter

    2011-07-01

    1. Field studies on diel vertical migration (DVM) usually report uniform behaviour with population-wide ascents and descents during crepuscular periods. This contrasts partial seasonal migrations of many animal populations, where individuals choose either the resident or the migrant strategy depending on population density, feeding opportunity and predation risk in the resident and migrant habitats. 2. We tested whether DVM of freshwater zooplanktivorous fish (Coregonus spp.) resembles partial migrations. Twenty-eight hydroacoustic surveys were performed in the deep Lake Stechlin (Germany) between 2000 and 2010, with samplings encompassing all months between March and December. Zooplankton samples were simultaneously taken in epilimnetic and hypolimnetic layers. Fish obtained from depth-stratified samplings by a midwater trawl were used to test for individual differences between residents and migrants. 3. We show for the first time that DVMs of freshwater fish resemble patterns of partial migrations often found in seasonal environments. Across all samplings, 7-33% of fish did not ascend at dusk, but exhibited the resident strategy. The proportion or residents increased at low zooplankton feeding rates in the daytime habitat and during months when the temperature difference between daytime and night-time habitats was minor. 4. Slightly larger size and higher caloric density of migrants over residents in one of the coexisting Coregonus species suggested that individual differences contributed to the migration strategy performed. However, these results were based on one sample only, and extrapolation to the entire data set is not possible. 5. Our results are indirect evidence that the balance between migrants and residents may primarily depend on the trade-off between feeding gains and metabolic and predation costs of migration. However, the results also suggest that the global fitness consequences for the resident and migrant strategies may not be identical

  1. Vertical Diffusivities of Active and Passive Tracers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Cheng, Y.; Howard, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    The climate models that include a carbon-cycle need the vertical diffusivity of a passive tracer. Since an expression for the latter is not available, it has been common practice to identify it with that of salt. The identification is questionable since T, S are active, not passive tracers. We present the first derivation of the diffusivity of a passive tracer in terms of Ri (Richardson number) and Rq (density ratio, ratio of salinity over temperature z-gradients). The following results have emerged: (a) The passive tracer diffusivity is an algebraic function of Ri, Rq. (b) In doubly stable regimes (DS, partial derivative of T with respect to z > 0, partial derivative of S with respect to z < 0), the passive scalar diffusivity is nearly the same as that of salt/heat for any values of Rq < 0 and Ri > 0. (c) In DC regimes (diffusive convection, partial derivative of T with respect to z < 0, partial derivative of S with respect to z < 0, Rq > 1), the passive scalar diffusivity is larger than that of salt. At Ri = O(1), it can be more than twice as large. (d) In SF regimes (salt fingers, partial derivative of T with respect to z > 0, partial derivative of S with respect to z > 0, Rq < 1), the passive scalar diffusivity is smaller than that of salt. At Ri = O(1), it can be less than half of it. (e) The passive tracer diffusivity predicted at the location of NATRE (North Atlantic Tracer Release Experiment) is discussed. (f) Perhaps the most relevant conclusion is that the common identification of the tracer diffusivity with that of salt is valid only in DS regimes. In the Southern Ocean, where there is the largest CO2 absorption, the dominant regime is diffusive convection discussed in (c) above.

  2. Hydrodynamics of a vertical hydraulic fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    1987-03-24

    We have developed a numerical algorithm, HUBBERT, to simulate the hydrodynamics of a propagating vertical, rectangular fracture in an elastic porous medium. Based on the IFD method, this algorithm assumes fracture geometry to be prescribed. The breakdown and the creation of the incipient fracture is carried out according to the Hubbert-Willis theory. The propagation of the fracture is based on the criterion provided by Griffith, based on energy considerations. The deformation properties of the open fracture are based on simple elasticity solutions. The fracture is assumed to have an elliptical shape to a distance equal to the fracture height, beyond which the shape is assumed to be parallel plate. A consequence of Griffith's criterion is that the fracture must propagate in discrete steps. The parametric studies carried out suggest that for a clear understanding of the hydrodynamics of the hydraulic fracture many hitherto unrecognized parameters must be better understood. Among these parameters one might mention, efficiency, aperture of the newly formed fracture, stiffness of the newly formed fracture, relation between fracture aperture and permeability, and well bore compliance. The results of the studies indicate that the patterns of pressure transients and the magnitudes of fracture length appear to conform to field observations. In particular, the discrete nature of fracture propagation as well as the relevant time scales of interest inferred from the present work seem to be corroborated by seismic monitoring in the field. The results suggest that the estimation of least principal stress can be reliably made either with shut in data or with reinjection data provided that injection rates are very small.

  3. Spirit Near 'Stapledon' on Sol 1802 (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its navigation camera for the images assembled into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,802nd Martian day, or sol, (January 26, 2009) of Spirit's mission on the surface of Mars. North is at the top.

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

    Spirit had driven down off the low plateau called 'Home Plate' on Sol 1782 (January 6, 2009) after spending 12 months on a north-facing slope on the northern edge of Home Plate. The position on the slope (at about the 9-o'clock position in this view) tilted Spirit's solar panels toward the sun, enabling the rover to generate enough electricity to survive its third Martian winter. Tracks at about the 11-o'clock position of this panorama can be seen leading back to that 'Winter Haven 3' site from the Sol 1802 position about 10 meters (33 feet) away. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about one meter (40 inches).

    Where the receding tracks bend to the left, a circular pattern resulted from Spirit turning in place at a soil target informally named 'Stapledon' after William Olaf Stapledon, a British philosopher and science-fiction author who lived from 1886 to 1950. Scientists on the rover team suspected that the soil in that area might have a high concentration of silica, resembling a high-silica soil patch discovered east of Home Plate in 2007. Bright material visible in the track furthest to the right was examined with Spirit's alpha partical X-ray spectrometer and found, indeed, to be rich in silica.

    The team laid plans to drive Spirit from this Sol 1802 location back up onto Home Plate, then southward for the rover's summer field season.

  4. Theoretic base of Edge Local Mode triggering by vertical displacements

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z. T.; He, Z. X.; Wang, Z. H.; Wu, N.; Tang, C. J.

    2015-05-15

    Vertical instability is studied with R-dependent displacement. For Solovev's configuration, the stability boundary of the vertical instability is calculated. The pressure gradient is a destabilizing factor which is contrary to Rebhan's result. Equilibrium parallel current density, j{sub //}, at plasma boundary is a drive of the vertical instability similar to Peeling-ballooning modes; however, the vertical instability cannot be stabilized by the magnetic shear which tends towards infinity near the separatrix. The induced current observed in the Edge Local Mode (ELM) triggering experiment by vertical modulation is derived. The theory provides some theoretic explanation for the mitigation of type-I ELMS on ASDEX Upgrade. The principle could be also used for ITER.

  5. Driven acoustic oscillations within a vertical magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindman, Bradley W.; Zweibel, Ellen G.; Cally, P. S.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of a vertical magnetic field on p-mode frequencies, line widths, and eigenfunctions, are examined. A solar model, consisting of a neutrally stable polytropic interior matched to an isothermal chromosphere, is applied. The p-modes are produced by a spatially distributed driver. The atmosphere is threaded by a constant vertical magnetic field. The frequency shifts due to the vertical magnetic field are found to be much smaller than the shifts caused by horizontal fields of similar strength. A large vertical field of 2000 G produces shifts of several nHz. It is found that the frequency shifts decrease with increasing frequency and increase with field strength. The coupling of the acoustic fast mode to the escaping slow modes is inefficient. Constant vertical magnetic field models are therefore incapable of explaining the high level of absorption observed in sunspots and plage.

  6. Doppler Lidar Vertical Velocity Statistics Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, R. K.; Sivaraman, C.; Shippert, T. R.; Riihimaki, L. D.

    2015-07-01

    Accurate height-resolved measurements of higher-order statistical moments of vertical velocity fluctuations are crucial for improved understanding of turbulent mixing and diffusion, convective initiation, and cloud life cycles. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility operates coherent Doppler lidar systems at several sites around the globe. These instruments provide measurements of clear-air vertical velocity profiles in the lower troposphere with a nominal temporal resolution of 1 sec and height resolution of 30 m. The purpose of the Doppler lidar vertical velocity statistics (DLWSTATS) value-added product (VAP) is to produce height- and time-resolved estimates of vertical velocity variance, skewness, and kurtosis from these raw measurements. The VAP also produces estimates of cloud properties, including cloud-base height (CBH), cloud frequency, cloud-base vertical velocity, and cloud-base updraft fraction.

  7. A vertical handoff decision algorithm based on ARMA prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ru; Shen, Jiao; Chen, Jun; Liu, Qiuhuan

    2011-12-01

    With the development of computer technology and the increasing demand for mobile communications, the next generation wireless networks will be composed of various wireless networks (e.g., WiMAX and WiFi). Vertical handoff is a key technology of next generation wireless networks. During the vertical handoff procedure, handoff decision is a crucial issue for an efficient mobility. Based on auto regression moving average (ARMA) prediction model, we propose a vertical handoff decision algorithm, which aims to improve the performance of vertical handoff and avoid unnecessary handoff. Based on the current received signal strength (RSS) and the previous RSS, the proposed approach adopt ARMA model to predict the next RSS. And then according to the predicted RSS to determine whether trigger the link layer triggering event and complete vertical handoff. The simulation results indicate that the proposed algorithm outperforms the RSS-based scheme with a threshold in the performance of handoff and the number of handoff.

  8. A vertical handoff decision algorithm based on ARMA prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ru; Shen, Jiao; Chen, Jun; Liu, Qiuhuan

    2012-01-01

    With the development of computer technology and the increasing demand for mobile communications, the next generation wireless networks will be composed of various wireless networks (e.g., WiMAX and WiFi). Vertical handoff is a key technology of next generation wireless networks. During the vertical handoff procedure, handoff decision is a crucial issue for an efficient mobility. Based on auto regression moving average (ARMA) prediction model, we propose a vertical handoff decision algorithm, which aims to improve the performance of vertical handoff and avoid unnecessary handoff. Based on the current received signal strength (RSS) and the previous RSS, the proposed approach adopt ARMA model to predict the next RSS. And then according to the predicted RSS to determine whether trigger the link layer triggering event and complete vertical handoff. The simulation results indicate that the proposed algorithm outperforms the RSS-based scheme with a threshold in the performance of handoff and the number of handoff.

  9. Vertical disparity and binocular vision in the praying mantis.

    PubMed

    Rossel, S; Mathis, U; Collett, T

    1992-02-01

    We have investigated how the binocular control of prey capture in the praying mantis is affected by abnormally large vertical disparities, which were introduced by prisms placed in front of the eyes. The position of a target on the two retinae determines both the magnitude of head saccades made to fixate a target and its perceived distance. Over the whole range of vertical disparities tested (up to at least 30 deg), the frequency of fixating saccades is normal while the amplitude of their vertical component is a compromise between the saccades specified by each eye individually. Distance measurements are not affected by imposed vertical disparities. But the larger the vertical disparity, the more reluctant the mantid is to strike at the target until disparities exceed 15 deg when no strikes are elicited at all. PMID:1558828

  10. Impact of Vertical Wind Shear on Tropical Cyclone Rainfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Dan; Marchok, Tim

    2014-01-01

    While tropical cyclone rainfall has a large axisymmetric component, previous observational and theoretical studies have shown that environmental vertical wind shear leads to an asymmetric component of the vertical motion and precipitation fields. Composites consistently depict a precipitation enhancement downshear and also cyclonically downwind from the downshear direction. For consistence with much of the literature and with Northern Hemisphere observations, this is subsequently referred to as "Downshear-Left". Stronger shear magnitudes are associated with greater amplitude precipitation asymmetries. Recent work has reinforced the prior findings, and explored details of the response of the precipitation and kinematic fields to environmental vertical wind shear. Much of this research has focused on tropical cyclones away from land, to limit the influence of other processes that might distort the signal related to vertical wind shear. Recent evidence does suggest vertical wind shear can also play a major role in precipitation asymmetries during and after landfall.

  11. Reconciling vertical datum for seamless hydrographic data integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lihua; Zhu, Qing; Bao, Jingyang; Liu, Yanchun

    2005-10-01

    A reconciling vertical datum is fundamental for the seamless integration of multi-source hydrographic data. Based on the analyses of the current vertical datums used for hydrograph, this paper presents a new scheme to create a reconciling vertical datum. To resolve the problem of integrating geospatial data referred to different vertical surfaces, an ellipsoidal datum is adopted as a universal master reference surface; A (quasi) hydroid is defined and the method which determine the quasi hydroid is then introduced; The quasi geoid and hydroid are adopted as client datums. On the basis of the determination between the master datum and the client datums, the data derived from different datums can be aggregated seamlessly and discretionarily. Two methods which can transform depth data from one vertical datum to another when quickly aggregating hydrographic data are suggested, one is identical transformation parameters based on hierarchical grid, and the other is interpolation based on position.

  12. Steerable vertical to horizontal energy transducer for mobile robots

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Fischer, Gary J.; Feddema, John T.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a steerable vertical to horizontal energy transducer for mobile robots that less complex and requires less power than two degree of freedom tilt mechanisms. The present invention comprises an end effector that, when mounted with a hopping actuator, translates along axis (typically vertical) actuation into combined vertical and horizontal motion. The end effector, or foot, mounts with an end of the actuator that moves toward the support surface (typically a floor or the earth). The foot is shaped so that the first contact with the support surface is off the axis of the actuator. Off-axis contact with the support surface generates an on-axis force (typically resulting in vertical motion) and a moment orthogonal to the axis. The moment initiates a horizontal tumbling motion, and tilts the actuator so that its axis is oriented with a horizontal component and continued actuation generates both vertical and horizontal force.

  13. A Vertical Differential Configuration in GPR prospecting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persico, Raffaele; Pochanin, Gennadiy; Varianytsia-Roshchupkina, Liudmyla; Catapano, Ilaria; Gennarelli, Gianluca; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    small objects and interfaces. This configuration can be labeled as a vertical differential configuration. At the conference, the reconstruction capabilities of this differential GPR configuration system will be discussed by means of an analysis of the problem based on a properly designed microwave tomographic inversion approach. The proposed approach exploits the Born approximation and faces the imaging as the solution of a linear inverse scattering problem. In this way, the problem of the local minima is avoided [7] and it is possible to impose some regularization to the problem in an easy way problem [8-9]. At the conference, a theoretical analysis of the mathematical propserties of the scattering operator under the vertical differential configuration will be presented showing that, with respect to the horizontal differential configuration, the vertical one allows to reject the direct coupling between the antennas but not the coupling of the antennas occurring through the air-soil interface. On the other hand, the filtering properties of the operator at hand con be considered, let say, less severe in some cases. At the conference, both some numerical and experimental results will be shown. References [1] R. Persico, F. Soldovieri, "Effects of the background removal in linear inverse scattering", IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens, vol. 46, pp. 1104-1114, April 2008. [2] L. Gurel, U. Oguz, "Three-Dimensional FDTD modeling of a ground penetrating radar", IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens, vol. 38, pp. 1513-1521, July 2000. [3] L. Gurel, U. Oguz, "Optimization of the transmitter-receiver separation in the ground penetrating radar", IEEE Trans. Antennas and Propag., vol. 51, no 3, pp. 362-370, March 2003. [4] R. Persico, F. Soldovieri, "A microwave tomography approach for a differential configuration in GPR prospecting", IEEE Trans. Antennas and Propag., vol. 54, pp. 3541 - 3548, 2006. [5] Y.A. Kopylov, S.A. Masalov, G.P. Pochanin, "The way of isolation between transmitting

  14. The Subjective Visual Vertical and the Subjective Haptic Vertical Access Different Gravity Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Lindsey E.; Makooie, Bobbak; Harris, Laurence R.

    2015-01-01

    The subjective visual vertical (SVV) and the subjective haptic vertical (SHV) both claim to probe the underlying perception of gravity. However, when the body is roll tilted these two measures evoke different patterns of errors with SVV generally becoming biased towards the body (A-effect, named for its discoverer, Hermann Rudolph Aubert) and SHV remaining accurate or becoming biased away from the body (E-effect, short for Entgegengesetzt-effect, meaning “opposite”, i.e., opposite to the A-effect). We compared the two methods in a series of five experiments and provide evidence that the two measures access two different but related estimates of gravitational vertical. Experiment 1 compared SVV and SHV across three levels of whole-body tilt and found that SVV showed an A-effect at larger tilts while SHV was accurate. Experiment 2 found that tilting either the head or the trunk independently produced an A-effect in SVV while SHV remained accurate when the head was tilted on an upright body but showed an A-effect when the body was tilted below an upright head. Experiment 3 repeated these head/body configurations in the presence of vestibular noise induced by using disruptive galvanic vestibular stimulation (dGVS). dGVS abolished both SVV and SHV A-effects while evoking a massive E-effect in the SHV head tilt condition. Experiments 4 and 5 show that SVV and SHV do not combine in an optimally statistical fashion, but when vibration is applied to the dorsal neck muscles, integration becomes optimal. Overall our results suggest that SVV and SHV access distinct underlying gravity percepts based primarily on head and body position information respectively, consistent with a model proposed by Clemens and colleagues. PMID:26716835

  15. The Subjective Visual Vertical and the Subjective Haptic Vertical Access Different Gravity Estimates.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Lindsey E; Makooie, Bobbak; Harris, Laurence R

    2015-01-01

    The subjective visual vertical (SVV) and the subjective haptic vertical (SHV) both claim to probe the underlying perception of gravity. However, when the body is roll tilted these two measures evoke different patterns of errors with SVV generally becoming biased towards the body (A-effect, named for its discoverer, Hermann Rudolph Aubert) and SHV remaining accurate or becoming biased away from the body (E-effect, short for Entgegengesetzt-effect, meaning "opposite", i.e., opposite to the A-effect). We compared the two methods in a series of five experiments and provide evidence that the two measures access two different but related estimates of gravitational vertical. Experiment 1 compared SVV and SHV across three levels of whole-body tilt and found that SVV showed an A-effect at larger tilts while SHV was accurate. Experiment 2 found that tilting either the head or the trunk independently produced an A-effect in SVV while SHV remained accurate when the head was tilted on an upright body but showed an A-effect when the body was tilted below an upright head. Experiment 3 repeated these head/body configurations in the presence of vestibular noise induced by using disruptive galvanic vestibular stimulation (dGVS). dGVS abolished both SVV and SHV A-effects while evoking a massive E-effect in the SHV head tilt condition. Experiments 4 and 5 show that SVV and SHV do not combine in an optimally statistical fashion, but when vibration is applied to the dorsal neck muscles, integration becomes optimal. Overall our results suggest that SVV and SHV access distinct underlying gravity percepts based primarily on head and body position information respectively, consistent with a model proposed by Clemens and colleagues. PMID:26716835

  16. EC and EM surveys of a levee of the Tuolumne River, Stanislaus County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo, I.; Ferriz, H. D.

    2010-12-01

    The Tuolumne River Regional Park is built over a non-engineered levee, which allegedly included a portion of a 1920’s landfill. EC and EM surveys were conducted to substantiate this report. The conductivity measurements were acquired using a Geonics EM-31 MK2, Geonics EM-34, and the AGI Superstring Resistivity meters. The Geonics EM-31 MK2 acquired conductivity data in the horizontal and vertical dipole mode with theoretical penetration depths of 3 meters and 6 m respectively. The Geonics EM-34 acquired data at spacings of 10 and 20 m in both horizontal and vertical mode, with theoretical penetrations of 7.5 m, 15 m, and 30 m. The location of all electromagnetic measurements where tracked using a Trimble 114 GPS receiver. The AGI Superstring resistivity meter collected data in dipole-dipole mode over a 108-meter span with a four-meter spacing between each stake. The EM conductivity ranges from 20 mS/m to 50mS/m on the “background” portions of the levee, but the central portions of the profile include high conductivity anomalies (120 mS/m to 300 mS/m), which potentially represents the old landfill. The anomalies form “pockets” within the profile, rather than a continuous block, which leads us to believe that the profile cuts only the fringe of the landfill. Resistivity imaging confirms the presence of low resistivity materials (< 10 ohmm) at depths from 2 to 7 m, underlain by a zone of higher resistivities (20 to 80 ohmm) to a depth of 20 m. Because the area is used as a park, and is periodically irrigated, we cannot discount the possibility that some of the high conductivity/low resistivity anomalies could be related to increased water content in the soil.

  17. Longitudinal differences of ionospheric vertical density distribution and equatorial electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yizengaw, E.; Zesta, E.; Moldwin, M. B.; Damtie, B.; Mebrahtu, A.; Valladares, C. E.; Pfaff, R. F.

    2012-07-01

    Accurate estimation of global vertical distribution of ionospheric and plasmaspheric density as a function of local time, season, and magnetic activity is required to improve the operation of space-based navigation and communication systems. The vertical density distribution, especially at low and equatorial latitudes, is governed by the equatorial electrodynamics that produces a vertical driving force. The vertical structure of the equatorial density distribution can be observed by using tomographic reconstruction techniques on ground-based global positioning system (GPS) total electron content (TEC). Similarly, the vertical drift, which is one of the driving mechanisms that govern equatorial electrodynamics and strongly affect the structure and dynamics of the ionosphere in the low/midlatitude region, can be estimated using ground magnetometer observations. We present tomographically reconstructed density distribution and the corresponding vertical drifts at two different longitudes: the East African and west South American sectors. Chains of GPS stations in the east African and west South American longitudinal sectors, covering the equatorial anomaly region of meridian ˜37°E and 290°E, respectively, are used to reconstruct the vertical density distribution. Similarly, magnetometer sites of African Meridian B-field Education and Research (AMBER) and INTERMAGNET for the east African sector and South American Meridional B-field Array (SAMBA) and Low Latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (LISN) are used to estimate the vertical drift velocity at two distinct longitudes. The comparison between the reconstructed and Jicamarca Incoherent Scatter Radar (ISR) measured density profiles shows excellent agreement, demonstrating the usefulness of tomographic reconstruction technique in providing the vertical density distribution at different longitudes. Similarly, the comparison between magnetometer estimated vertical drift and other independent drift observation, such as

  18. Longitudinal Differences of Ionospheric Vertical Density Distribution and Equatorial Electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yizengaw, E.; Zesta, E.; Moldwin, M. B.; Damtie, B.; Mebrahtu, A.; Valledares, C.E.; Pfaff, R. F.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate estimation of global vertical distribution of ionospheric and plasmaspheric density as a function of local time, season, and magnetic activity is required to improve the operation of space-based navigation and communication systems. The vertical density distribution, especially at low and equatorial latitudes, is governed by the equatorial electrodynamics that produces a vertical driving force. The vertical structure of the equatorial density distribution can be observed by using tomographic reconstruction techniques on ground-based global positioning system (GPS) total electron content (TEC). Similarly, the vertical drift, which is one of the driving mechanisms that govern equatorial electrodynamics and strongly affect the structure and dynamics of the ionosphere in the low/midlatitude region, can be estimated using ground magnetometer observations. We present tomographically reconstructed density distribution and the corresponding vertical drifts at two different longitudes: the East African and west South American sectors. Chains of GPS stations in the east African and west South American longitudinal sectors, covering the equatorial anomaly region of meridian approx. 37 deg and 290 deg E, respectively, are used to reconstruct the vertical density distribution. Similarly, magnetometer sites of African Meridian B-field Education and Research (AMBER) and INTERMAGNET for the east African sector and South American Meridional B-field Array (SAMBA) and Low Latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (LISN) are used to estimate the vertical drift velocity at two distinct longitudes. The comparison between the reconstructed and Jicamarca Incoherent Scatter Radar (ISR) measured density profiles shows excellent agreement, demonstrating the usefulness of tomographic reconstruction technique in providing the vertical density distribution at different longitudes. Similarly, the comparison between magnetometer estimated vertical drift and other independent drift observation

  19. Effects of Loaded Squat Exercise with and without Application of Superimposed EMS on Physical Performance.

    PubMed

    Wirtz, Nicolas; Zinner, Christoph; Doermann, Ulrike; Kleinoeder, Heinz; Mester, Joachim

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a multiple set squat exercise training intervention with superimposed electromyostimulation (EMS) on strength and power, sprint and jump performance. Twenty athletes from different disciplines participated and were divided into two groups: strength training (S) or strength training with superimposed EMS (S+E). Both groups completed the same training program twice a week over a six week period consisting of four sets of the 10 repetition maximum of back squats. Additionally, the S+E group had EMS superimposed to the squat exercise with simultaneous stimulation of leg and trunk muscles. EMS intensity was adjusted to 70% of individual pain threshold to ensure dynamic movement. Strength and power of different muscle groups, sprint, and vertical jump performance were assessed one week before (pre), one week after (post) and three weeks (re) following the training period. Both groups showed improvements in leg press strength and power, countermovement and squat jump performance and pendulum sprint (p < 0.05), with no changes for linear sprint. Differences between groups were only evident at the leg curl machine with greater improvements for the S+E group (p < 0.05). Common squat exercise training and squat exercise with superimposed EMS improves maximum strength and power, as well as jumping abilities in athletes from different disciplines. The greater improvements in strength performance of leg curl muscles caused by superimposed EMS with improvements in strength of antagonistic hamstrings in the S+E group are suggesting the potential of EMS to unloaded (antagonistic) muscle groups. Key pointsSimilar strength adaptations occurred after a 6 week 10 RM back squat exercise program with superimposed EMS (S+E) and 10 RM back squat exercise (S) alone.Specific adaptations for S+E at the leg curl muscles were evident.S and S+E improved SJ, CMJ and pendulum sprint performance.No improvement occurred in linear sprint

  20. Effects of Loaded Squat Exercise with and without Application of Superimposed EMS on Physical Performance

    PubMed Central

    Wirtz, Nicolas; Zinner, Christoph; Doermann, Ulrike; Kleinoeder, Heinz; Mester, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a multiple set squat exercise training intervention with superimposed electromyostimulation (EMS) on strength and power, sprint and jump performance. Twenty athletes from different disciplines participated and were divided into two groups: strength training (S) or strength training with superimposed EMS (S+E). Both groups completed the same training program twice a week over a six week period consisting of four sets of the 10 repetition maximum of back squats. Additionally, the S+E group had EMS superimposed to the squat exercise with simultaneous stimulation of leg and trunk muscles. EMS intensity was adjusted to 70% of individual pain threshold to ensure dynamic movement. Strength and power of different muscle groups, sprint, and vertical jump performance were assessed one week before (pre), one week after (post) and three weeks (re) following the training period. Both groups showed improvements in leg press strength and power, countermovement and squat jump performance and pendulum sprint (p < 0.05), with no changes for linear sprint. Differences between groups were only evident at the leg curl machine with greater improvements for the S+E group (p < 0.05). Common squat exercise training and squat exercise with superimposed EMS improves maximum strength and power, as well as jumping abilities in athletes from different disciplines. The greater improvements in strength performance of leg curl muscles caused by superimposed EMS with improvements in strength of antagonistic hamstrings in the S+E group are suggesting the potential of EMS to unloaded (antagonistic) muscle groups. Key points Similar strength adaptations occurred after a 6 week 10 RM back squat exercise program with superimposed EMS (S+E) and 10 RM back squat exercise (S) alone. Specific adaptations for S+E at the leg curl muscles were evident. S and S+E improved SJ, CMJ and pendulum sprint performance. No improvement occurred in linear

  1. The vertical replacement-gate (VRG) MOSFET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hergenrother, J. M.; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Nigam, T.; Monroe, D.; Klemens, F. P.; Kornblit, A.

    2002-07-01

    We have fabricated and demonstrated a new device called the vertical replacement-gate (VRG) MOSFET. This is the first MOSFET ever built in which: (1) all critical transistor dimensions are controlled precisely without lithography and dry etch, (2) the gate length is defined by a deposited film thickness, independently of lithography and etch, and (3) a high-quality gate oxide is grown on a single-crystal Si channel. In addition to this unique combination, the VRG-MOSFET includes self-aligned source/drain extensions (SDEs) formed by solid source diffusion (SSD), small parasitic overlap, junction, and source/drain capacitances, and a replacement-gate approach to enable alternative gate stacks. We have demonstrated nMOSFETs with an initial VRG process, and pMOSFETs with a more mature process. Since both sides of the device pillar drive in parallel, the drive current per μm of coded width can far exceed that of advanced planar MOSFETs. Our 100 nm VRG-pMOSFETs with tOX=25 Å drive 615 μA/μm at 1.5 V with IOFF=8 nA/μm—80% more drive than specified in the 1999 ITRS Roadmap at the same IOFF. Our 50 nm VRG-pMOSFETs with tOX=25 Å approach the 1.0 V roadmap target of ION=350 μA/μm at IOFF=20 nA/μm without the need for a hyperthin (<20 Å) gate oxide. We have described a process for integrating n-channel and p-channel VRG-MOSFETs to form side-by-side CMOS that retains the key VRG advantages while providing packing density and process complexity that is competitive with traditional planar CMOS. All of this is achieved using current manufacturing methods, materials, and tools, and high-performance devices with 50 nm physical gate lengths ( LG) have been demonstrated with precise gate length control without advanced lithography.

  2. Subjective Visual Vertical and Postural Capability in Children Born Prematurely

    PubMed Central

    Bucci, Maria Pia; Wiener-Vacher, Sylvette; Trousson, Clémence; Baud, Olivier; Biran, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We compared postural stability and subjective visual vertical performance in a group of very preterm-born children aged 3-4 years and in a group of age-matched full-term children. Materials and Methods A platform (from TechnoConcept) was used to measure postural control in children. Perception of subjective visual vertical was also recorded with posture while the child had to adjust the vertical in the dark or with visual perturbation. Two other conditions (control conditions) were also recorded while the child was on the platform: for a fixation of the vertical bar, and in eyes closed condition. Results Postural performance was poor in preterm-born children compared to that of age-matched full-term children: the surface area, the length in medio-lateral direction and the mean speed of the center of pressure (CoP) were significantly larger in the preterm-born children group (p < 0.04, p < 0.01, and p < 0.04, respectively). Dual task in both groups of children significantly affected postural control. The subjective visual vertical (SVV) values were more variable and less precise in preterm-born children. Discussion-Conclusions We suggest that poor postural control as well as perception of verticality observed in preterm-born children could be due to immaturity of the cortical processes involved in the motor control and in the treatment of perception and orientation of verticality. PMID:25790327

  3. Vertical velocity estimates in the North Pacific using Argo floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeland, Howard J.

    2013-01-01

    Vertical velocity in the oceans is critical for maintenance of the structure of the main thermoclines and the transport of nutrients from deepwater towards the surface and thus is an important variable for understanding the dynamics of the ocean and the transport of scalar variables. In the mid 1970s the author was engaged in discussions with Tom Rossby about how SOFAR floats might be used to observe the vertical component of velocity. This paper in some sense follows on from those discussions almost 40 years later. In this paper the Argo array is used to compute the horizontal volume divergence in a control volume in the North Pacific. Divergence is found and this must be related to a volume flux through the base of the control volume. The implied vertical velocity is large and various tests are proposed to determine whether or not the estimate is plausible. The first test shows that a vertical velocity this large is necessary to close the salt budget. The second test shows that the vertical velocity balances about half of the observed heat divergence, the remainder is then accounted for by heat flux at the sea surface. Finally the time variable vertical velocity is computed and used to compute the evolution of the salt content in the control volume. Thus though the estimated vertical velocity is surprisingly large, it passes plausibility tests.

  4. VERTICAL BEAM SIZE CONTROL IN TLS AND TPS.

    SciTech Connect

    KUO, C.C.; CHEN, J.R.; CHOU, P.J.; CHANG, H.P.; HSU, K.T.; LUO, G.H.; TSAI, H.J.; WANG, D.J.; WANG, M.H.

    2006-06-26

    Vertical beam size control is an important issue in the light source operations. The horizontal-vertical betatron coupling and vertical dispersion were measured and corrected to small values in the TLS 1.5 GeV storage ring. Estimated beam sizes are compared with the measured values. By employing an effective transverse damping system, the vertical beam blow-up due to transverse coherent instabilities, such as the fast-ion beam instability, was suppressed. As a result, the light source is very stable. In NSRRC we are designing an ultra low emittance 3-GeV storage ring and its designed vertical beam size could be as small as a few microns. The ground and mechanic vibration effects, and coherent instabilities could spoil the expected photon brightness due to blow-up of the vertical beam size if not well taken care of. The contributions of these effects to vertical beam size increase will be evaluated and the counter measures to minimize them will be proposed and reported in this paper.

  5. Vertical fine structure observations in the eastern equatorial Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, S.P.

    1981-11-20

    Measurements of vertical displacement and horizontal velocity finestructure near the equator at 110/sup 0/W in the eastern Pacific Ocean are reported. Profiles were scaled to a constant Bruent-Vaeisaelae frequency ocean (N/sub 0/ = 1 cph) in accordance with a WKBJ approximation. A total of 57 CTD casts between 3/sup 0/N and 3/sup 0/S taken during five cruises in 1979 were analyzed. Results show an equatorial enhancement of vertical displacement is similar variance for vertical wavelengths longer than 50 sdbar (stretched decibars). This enhancement is similar to that which has been reported at 125/sup 0/W and 179/sup 0/E. Difference between locations can be accounted for by the observed temporal variability at 110/sup 0/W. Coherence between vertical displacement profiles separated in time by dealys of 2 hours to 120 hour indicate that the high wave number structures were largely associated with time scales of 4 days and less. Meridionally, vertical structures longer than 300 sdbar were coherent within 50 km of the equator. We interpret this vertical displacement fine structure enhancement as high wave number equatorially trapped inertial-gravity waves. The velocity fine structure measurements in July 1979 also indicate equatorially enhanced horizontal kinetic energy for vertical wave lengths longer than 100 sdbar. The velocity structures persisted over the 56 hour of measurement and appeared to have longer time scales than the vertical displacements. Meridional energy measurement and appeared to have longer time scales than the vertical displacements. Meridional energy exceeded zonal energy; however, the two components were coherent. We interpret these velocity structures as inertial-gravity waves which were produced off the equator and are propagating through the equatorial region.

  6. On the vertical structure of seasonal, interannual and intraseasonal flows

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, S.R.

    1992-01-01

    The vertical structure of the height and wind fields associated with the seasonal, interannual, and intraseasonal cycles is documented by making use of global ECMWF operational analyses for seven pressure levels (1000-100 mb) and spanning a 10 year period (1980-89). The role of tropical convection is examined for each of these time scales. The seasonal cycle is described through the structure of the geopotential height field standing waves, the vertical structure of the first seven wavenumbers of the rotational and divergent winds, and latitude/time cross-sections for the vertical structure of the planetary waves. The change in the vertical structure from the internal mode combinations found in the tropics to a dominant external mode of the extratropics occurs rapidly and within 10[degrees] of the convective source regions. Extensive use is made of a primitive equation (PE) model to explore the extent to which tropical heating might influence the extratropical vertical structure. The PE response indicates the possibility that 25-40[degrees] of the Northern Hemisphere and 30-55% of the Southern Hemisphere kinematic vertical structure could be the result of tropical heating. Two significant El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events occur during this 10 year period and their vertical structures are examined. The intraseasonal oscillation is composited for three seasons. A link between this oscillation and tropical convection is only clearly established during the convective phase. Composite cases for each season are selected to be in phase with one another and during times when the convective phase of the intraseasonal oscillation is strong. When convective regions in the composites are collocated with those present in the seasonal average, the kinematic vertical structure is dominated by the two deepest vertical modes. This is different for other locations, where the convection in the composites does not coincide with regions of convection in the seasonal average.

  7. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Lari, R.J.; Praeg, W.F.; Turner, L.R.; Battles, J.E.; Hull, J.R.; Rote, D.M.

    1988-06-17

    An apparatus for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent to the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel. 8 figs.

  8. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Lari, R.J.; Praeg, W.F.; Turner, L.R.; Battles, J.E.; Hull, J.R.; Rote, D.M.

    1990-12-04

    An apparatus is disclosed for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel. 9 figs.

  9. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Lari, Robert J.; Praeg, Walter F.; Turner, Larry R.; Battles, James E.; Hull, John R.; Rote, Donald M.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel.

  10. EPA LABORATORIES IMPLEMENT EMS PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper highlights the breadth and magnitude of carrying out an effective Environmental Management System (EMS) program at the U.S. EPA's research and development laboratories. Federal research laboratories have unique operating challenges compared to more centralized industr...

  11. Normalized vertical ice mass flux profiles from vertically pointing 8-mm-wavelength Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Brad W.; Kropfli, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    During the FIRE 2 (First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project Regional Experiment) project, NOAA's Wave Propagation Laboratory (WPL) operated its 8-mm wavelength Doppler radar extensively in the vertically pointing mode. This allowed for the calculation of a number of important cirrus cloud parameters, including cloud boundary statistics, cloud particle characteristic sizes and concentrations, and ice mass content (imc). The flux of imc, or, alternatively, ice mass flux (imf), is also an important parameter of a cirrus cloud system. Ice mass flux is important in the vertical redistribution of water substance and thus, in part, determines the cloud evolution. It is important for the development of cloud parameterizations to be able to define the essential physical characteristics of large populations of clouds in the simplest possible way. One method would be to normalize profiles of observed cloud properties, such as those mentioned above, in ways similar to those used in the convective boundary layer. The height then scales from 0.0 at cloud base to 1.0 at cloud top, and the measured cloud parameter scales by its maximum value so that all normalized profiles have 1.0 as their maximum value. The goal is that there will be a 'universal' shape to profiles of the normalized data. This idea was applied to estimates of imf calculated from data obtained by the WPL cloud radar during FIRE II. Other quantities such as median particle diameter, concentration, and ice mass content can also be estimated with this radar, and we expect to also examine normalized profiles of these quantities in time for the 1993 FIRE II meeting.

  12. 10. DETAIL OF JUNCTION BETWEEN LOWER CHORD, VERTICAL LACED CHANNEL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL OF JUNCTION BETWEEN LOWER CHORD, VERTICAL LACED CHANNEL, FLOOR BEAM, EYE BAR, AND U-BOLT. WEST ABUTMENT. - River Road Bridge, Spanning Spring Creek in Spring Creek Township, Hallton, Elk County, PA

  13. Vertical emission profiles for Europe based on plume rise calculations.

    PubMed

    Bieser, J; Aulinger, A; Matthias, V; Quante, M; Denier van der Gon, H A C

    2011-10-01

    The vertical allocation of emissions has a major impact on results of Chemistry Transport Models. However, in Europe it is still common to use fixed vertical profiles based on rough estimates to determine the emission height of point sources. This publication introduces a set of new vertical profiles for the use in chemistry transport modeling that were created from hourly gridded emissions calculated by the SMOKE for Europe emission model. SMOKE uses plume rise calculations to determine effective emission heights. Out of more than 40,000 different vertical emission profiles 73 have been chosen by means of hierarchical cluster analysis. These profiles show large differences to those currently used in many emission models. Emissions from combustion processes are released in much lower altitudes while those from production processes are allocated to higher altitudes. The profiles have a high temporal and spatial variability which is not represented by currently used profiles. PMID:21561695

  14. 12. DETAIL VIEW OF NORTHEAST CORNER, SHOWING HIP VERTICAL, INCLINED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL VIEW OF NORTHEAST CORNER, SHOWING HIP VERTICAL, INCLINED END POST, AND UPPER CHORD - Kennan-Jump River Bridge, Spanning South fork of Jump River on County Highway "N", Kennan, Price County, WI

  15. 13. DETAIL SHOWING EXPOSED VERTICAL LOG CONSTRUCTION WITH MEASURING TAPE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. DETAIL SHOWING EXPOSED VERTICAL LOG CONSTRUCTION WITH MEASURING TAPE, WEST ROOM AT REAR OF HOUSE, FIRST FLOOR - Pierre Delassus DeLuziereHouse, U.S. Route 61, Sainte Genevieve, Ste. Genevieve County, MO

  16. GROUND WATER SAMPLING FOR VERTICAL PROFILING OF CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate delineation of plume boundaries and vertical contaminant distribution are necessary in order to adequately characterize waste sites and determine remedial strategies to be employed. However, it is important to consider the sampling objectives, sampling methods, and sampl...

  17. 10. EYEBAR PIN CONNECTION JOINING VERTICAL SUSPENSION STRINGER WITH LATERAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. EYEBAR PIN CONNECTION JOINING VERTICAL SUSPENSION STRINGER WITH LATERAL BRACING MEMBERS - Spruce Street Bridge, East Spruce Street, 500 Block, spanning Power Canal, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  18. VERTICAL REDISTRIBUTION OF A POLLUTANT TRACER DUE TO CUMULUS CONVECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mathematical formalisms that incorporate the physical processes responsible for the vertical redistribution of a conservative pollutant tracer due to a convective cloud field are presented. Two modeling approaches are presented differing in the manner in which the cloud fields ar...

  19. VIEW OF PROCESS DEVELOPMENT PILE (PDP) TANK TOP, WITH VERTICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PROCESS DEVELOPMENT PILE (PDP) TANK TOP, WITH VERTICAL ELEMENTS IN BACKGROUND, LEVEL 0’, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Physics Assembly Laboratory, Area A/M, Savannah River Site, Aiken, Aiken County, SC

  20. 13. VIEW OF TOP CHORD CONNECTION, SHOWING DIAGONAL AND VERTICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW OF TOP CHORD CONNECTION, SHOWING DIAGONAL AND VERTICAL WEB MEMBERS AND TOP LATERAL BRACING, SOUTHEAST SPAN, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Linden Avenue Bridge, Spanning Purgatoire River on Linden Avenue, Trinidad, Las Animas County, CO

  1. 17. Detail showing roller nest for vertical strut sitting atop ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Detail showing roller nest for vertical strut sitting atop granite pier cap. View to southwest. - Selby Avenue Bridge, Spanning Short Line Railways track at Selby Avenue between Hamline & Snelling Avenues, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  2. View down into vertical flame channel of Test Stand 'A' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View down into vertical flame channel of Test Stand 'A' from superstructure. Wooden platform open side faces west. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand A, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  3. REACTOR BASE. THREE VERTICAL PIPES ON LEFT SIDE OF VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REACTOR BASE. THREE VERTICAL PIPES ON LEFT SIDE OF VIEW WILL BE FOR COOLING AIR. INL NEGATIVE NO. 514. Unknown Photographer, 8/30/1950 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. 22. PIN CONNECTION AT JUNCTURE OF INTERMEDIATE VERTICAL WITH BOTTOM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. PIN CONNECTION AT JUNCTURE OF INTERMEDIATE VERTICAL WITH BOTTOM CHORD ON PENNSYLVANIA PETIT TRUSS. HYDRAULICALLY FORGED EYES ON ROLLED STOCK. - New River Bridge, Spanning New River at State Route 623, Pembroke, Giles County, VA

  5. A study of vertical motion requirements for landing simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the significance of vertical acceleration cues in the simulation of the visual approach and landing maneuver. Landing performance measures were obtained for four subject pilots operating a visual landing simulation mechanized in the Ames Height Control Test Apparatus, a device that provides up to plus or minus 40 ft of vertical motion. Test results indicate that vertical motion cues are utilized in the landing task, and that they are particularly important in the simulation of aircraft with marginal longitudinal-handling qualities. To assure vertical motion cues of the desired fidelity in the landing task, it appears, that a simulator must have excursion capabilities of at least 20 ft in either direction.

  6. 11. DETAIL VIEW OF PANEL POINT, SHOWING CONNECTION BETWEEN VERTICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. DETAIL VIEW OF PANEL POINT, SHOWING CONNECTION BETWEEN VERTICAL POST, DECK BEAM AND CANTILEVERED SIDEWALK SUPPORT - Cedar Street Bridge, Spanning Kinnickinnic River, on Cedar Street, River Falls, Pierce County, WI

  7. Remotely operated gripper provides vertical control rod movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutter, E.; Koch, L. J.

    1968-01-01

    Remote actuation of a gripper shaft affects vertical engagement between a drive shaft and control rod. A secondary function of the gripper is to provide remote indication of positive completion of the gripping or ungripping operation.

  8. 10. View of end portals, top chords, diagonals, verticals and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. View of end portals, top chords, diagonals, verticals and strut connections. Looking from east span to east end of west span. - Boomershine Bridge, Spanning Twin Creek, Farmersville, Montgomery County, OH

  9. 20. Vertical lift span, north tower, bascule span, and Warren ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Vertical lift span, north tower, bascule span, and Warren truss spans, facing north - Sault Ste. Marie International Railroad Bridge, Spanning Soo Locks at St. Marys Falls Canal, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  10. VERTICAL MIXING OF LAKE SEDIMENTS BY TUBIFICID OLIGOCHAETES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vertical mixing of lake sediments by tubificid oligochaetes was studied in laboratory experiments by using a radioactive (cesium 137 labeled sediment) marker horizon. Results from these experiments were used to develop and test a mathematical model describing tubificid sediment m...

  11. 28. VIEW FROM AFT LOOKING FORWARD. VERTICAL SHAFT GOES TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. VIEW FROM AFT LOOKING FORWARD. VERTICAL SHAFT GOES TO CAPSTAN BARREL. LARGE DRUM ON LEFT PART OF SPUD ENGINE CABLE DRUM. - Dredge CINCINNATI, Docked on Ohio River at foot of Lighthill Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  12. 10. DETAIL OF UNDERSIDE OF ARCH, SHOWING LOWER CHORDS, VERTICALS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL OF UNDERSIDE OF ARCH, SHOWING LOWER CHORDS, VERTICALS, LATERAL BRACES AND ABUTMENTS, VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Navajo Bridge, Spanning Colorado River at U.S. Highway 89 Alternate, Page, Coconino County, AZ

  13. 23. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, MOTOR ROOM, VERTICAL DEFLECTOR SHEAVE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, MOTOR ROOM, VERTICAL DEFLECTOR SHEAVE, MOTORS. - Monongahela Incline Plane, Connecting North side of Grandview Avenue at Wyoming Street with West Carson Street near Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  14. 24. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, MOTOR ROOM, OFF VERTICAL DEFLECTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, MOTOR ROOM, OFF VERTICAL DEFLECTOR SHEAVE, MOTOR, BRAKE, PINION SHAFT, DRIVE WHEEL. - Monongahela Incline Plane, Connecting North side of Grandview Avenue at Wyoming Street with West Carson Street near Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  15. 22. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, MOTOR ROOM, VERTICAL DEFLECTOR SHEAVE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, MOTOR ROOM, VERTICAL DEFLECTOR SHEAVE, MOTORS. - Monongahela Incline Plane, Connecting North side of Grandview Avenue at Wyoming Street with West Carson Street near Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  16. 9. Detail view (looking east) of pin connection of vertical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Detail view (looking east) of pin connection of vertical tensile members at the fifth panel point north from south abutment of Moody Bridge. - Moody Bridge, Spanning South Fork Eel River, Garberville, Humboldt County, CA

  17. 11. Detail view (looking east) of pin connection of vertical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Detail view (looking east) of pin connection of vertical tensile members between panels nine end ten of Moody Bridge - Moody Bridge, Spanning South Fork Eel River, Garberville, Humboldt County, CA

  18. 8. Detail view (looking east) of pin connection of vertical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Detail view (looking east) of pin connection of vertical member at the third panel point north from south abutment of Moody Bridge. - Moody Bridge, Spanning South Fork Eel River, Garberville, Humboldt County, CA

  19. Detail of old rain shed (Building No. 43) showing vertical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of old rain shed (Building No. 43) showing vertical posts on concrete footing with diagonal timber bracing and wire bracing. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  20. INTERIOR OF WEST SPAN LOOKING WEST (SHADOW OF VERTICAL LAPS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF WEST SPAN LOOKING WEST (SHADOW OF VERTICAL LAPS PLACED ON ZONE III; ASPHALT ZONE IX) - Honey Run Bridge, Spanning Butte Creek, bypassed section of Honey Run Road (originally Carr Hill Road), Paradise, Butte County, CA

  1. Tree STEM Reconstruction Using Vertical Fisheye Images: a Preliminary Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berveglieri, A.; Tommaselli, A. M. G.

    2016-06-01

    A preliminary study was conducted to assess a tree stem reconstruction technique with panoramic images taken with fisheye lenses. The concept is similar to the Structure from Motion (SfM) technique, but the acquisition and data preparation rely on fisheye cameras to generate a vertical image sequence with height variations of the camera station. Each vertical image is rectified to four vertical planes, producing horizontal lateral views. The stems in the lateral view are rectified to the same scale in the image sequence to facilitate image matching. Using bundle adjustment, the stems are reconstructed, enabling later measurement and extraction of several attributes. The 3D reconstruction was performed with the proposed technique and compared with SfM. The preliminary results showed that the stems were correctly reconstructed by using the lateral virtual images generated from the vertical fisheye images and with the advantage of using fewer images and taken from one single station.

  2. 6. Detail, vertical guides adjacent to east portal of Tunnel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Detail, vertical guides adjacent to east portal of Tunnel 28, view to southwest, 135mm lens with electronic flash fill. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 28, Milepost 134.75, Applegate, Placer County, CA

  3. Glow phenomenon surrounding the vertical stabilizer and OMS pods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This 35mm frame, photographed as the Space Shuttle Columbia was orbiting Earth during a 'night' pass, documents the glow phenomenon surrounding the vertical stabilizer and the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) pods of the spacecraft.

  4. 49 CFR 179.14 - Coupler vertical restraint system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... tank car shall be equipped with couplers capable of sustaining, without disengagement or material... successful when a vertical disengagement or material failure does not occur during the application of any...

  5. 49 CFR 179.14 - Coupler vertical restraint system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... tank car shall be equipped with couplers capable of sustaining, without disengagement or material... successful when a vertical disengagement or material failure does not occur during the application of any...

  6. 49 CFR 179.14 - Coupler vertical restraint system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... tank car shall be equipped with couplers capable of sustaining, without disengagement or material... successful when a vertical disengagement or material failure does not occur during the application of any...

  7. 49 CFR 179.14 - Coupler vertical restraint system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... tank car shall be equipped with couplers capable of sustaining, without disengagement or material... successful when a vertical disengagement or material failure does not occur during the application of any...

  8. Detail, east truss of south span, showing railing, vertical UL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, east truss of south span, showing railing, vertical U-L, diagonal eyebar U-L with turnbuckle - Castle Garden Bridge, Township Route 343 over Bennetts Branch of Sinnemahoning Creek, Driftwood, Cameron County, PA

  9. 1. GENERAL VIEW. OVERHANG, PAINTED RED, HAS VERTICAL SIDING AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW. OVERHANG, PAINTED RED, HAS VERTICAL SIDING AND FADED PAINTINGS OF FARM ANIMALS: COW, DONKEYS AND HORSE. - De Turck House, Barn, State Route 662 vicinity, Oley Township, Oley, Berks County, PA

  10. 8. UPPER INSIDE CHORD, VERTICAL, LATERAL STRUT, UPPER LATERAL & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. UPPER INSIDE CHORD, VERTICAL, LATERAL STRUT, UPPER LATERAL & GUSSET PLATE, ONE DIAGONAL BRACE - Enterprise Parker Truss Bridge, Spanning Smoky Hill River on K-43 Highway, Enterprise, Dickinson County, KS

  11. 7. UPPER INSIDE CHORD, VERTICAL, LATERAL STRUT, UPPER LATERAL & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. UPPER INSIDE CHORD, VERTICAL, LATERAL STRUT, UPPER LATERAL & GUSSET PLATE, TWO DIAGONAL BRACES - Enterprise Parker Truss Bridge, Spanning Smoky Hill River on K-43 Highway, Enterprise, Dickinson County, KS

  12. Modelling Of Random Vertical Irregularities Of Railway Tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podwórna, M.

    2015-08-01

    The study presents state-of-the-art in analytical and numerical modelling of random vertical irregularities of continuously welded ballasted railway tracks. The common model of railway track irregularity vertical profiles is applied, in the form of a stationary and ergodic Gaussian process in space. Random samples of track irregularity vertical profiles are generated with the Monte-Carlo method. Based on the numerical method developed in the study, the minimum and recommended sampling number required in the random analysis of railway bridges and number of frequency increments (harmonic components) in track irregularity vertical profiles simulation are determined. The lower and upper limits of wavelengths are determined based on the literature studies. The approach yields track irregularity random samples close to reality. The track irregularity model developed in the study can be used in the dynamic analysis of railway bridge / track structure / highspeed train systems.

  13. 8. CHESTNUT ST. (vertical line) LOOKING WEST BETWEEN FIFTH (upper) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. CHESTNUT ST. (vertical line) LOOKING WEST BETWEEN FIFTH (upper) AND FOURTH (lower) STS., SHOWING SECOND BANK OF U.S. - Independence National Historical Park, Walnut, Sixth, Chestnut & Second Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  14. 32. VERTICAL / STRUT / UPPER CHORD DETAIL AT PINCONNECTED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. VERTICAL / STRUT / UPPER CHORD DETAIL AT PIN-CONNECTED EXPANSION JOINT BETWEEN CANTILEVER ARM AND SUSPENDED SPAN. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - MacArthur Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River on Highway 34 between IA & IL, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  15. Models for extracting vertical crustal movements from leveling data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdahl, S. H.

    1978-01-01

    Various adjustment strategies are being used in North America to obtain vertical crustal movements from repeated leveling. The more successful models utilize polynomials or multiquadric analysis to describe elevation change with a velocity surface. Other features permit determination of nonlinear motions, motions associated with earthquakes or episodes, and vertical motions of blocks where boundaries are prespecified. The preferred models for estimating crustal motions permit the use of detached segments of releveling to govern the shape of a velocity surface and allow for input from nonleveling sources such as tide gages and paired lake gages. Some models for extracting vertical crustal movements from releveling data are also excellent for adjusting leveling networks, and permit mixing old and new data in areas exhibiting vertical motion. The new adjustment techniques are more general than older static models and will undoubtedly be used routinely in the future as the constitution of level networks becomes mainly relevelings.

  16. 't Hooft vertices, partial quenching, and rooted staggered QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Claude; Golterman, Maarten; Shamir, Yigal; Sharpe, Stephen R.

    2008-06-01

    We discuss the properties of 't Hooft vertices in partially quenched and rooted versions of QCD in the continuum. These theories have a physical subspace, equivalent to ordinary QCD, that is contained within a larger space that includes many unphysical correlation functions. We find that the 't Hooft vertices in the physical subspace have the expected form, despite the presence of unphysical 't Hooft vertices appearing in correlation functions that have an excess of valence quarks (or ghost quarks). We also show that, due to the singular behavior of unphysical correlation functions as the massless limit is approached, order parameters for nonanomalous symmetries can be nonvanishing in finite volume if these symmetries act outside of the physical subspace. Using these results, we demonstrate that arguments recently given by Creutz - claiming to disprove the validity of rooted staggered QCD - are incorrect. In particular, the unphysical 't Hooft vertices do not present an obstacle to the recovery of taste symmetry in the continuum limit.

  17. Vertical and horizontal mixing in the tropical tropopause layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glanville, Anne Alexandra

    Nearly all air enters the stratosphere through a single layer in the tropics. The tropical tropopause layer (TTL) is a transition region between the troposphere and stratosphere and its roles include regulating stratospheric chemistry and surface climate. Multiscale dynamics existing in the TTL range from transient convection to the hemispheric wave-driven circulation and the relative influences of these processes still remain unclear. This study pays special attention to vertical and horizontal mixing which are associated with breaking gravity waves and Rossby waves, respectively. Our study quantifies the roles of these dynamics by taking advantage of the conservative nature of water vapor in the lower stratosphere. Unable to change concentration in the lowermost stratosphere after passing through the cold point, water vapor becomes a tracer for total transport and its signal is known as the tape recorder. This tape recorder is studied using observations, reanalysis data, a chemistry-climate model (CCM), and simple idealized modeling. Modifying past methods, we are able to capture the seasonal cycle of effective transport in the TTL and we introduce seasonally-dependent dynamics to a one-dimensional model and perform a parameter-sweep to test all possible dynamical combinations. Simulating with unrealistic annual mean transports results in bimodality where either vertical advection or vertical mixing dominate. The solutions that depend on amplified vertical advection disappear when seasonally-dependent transports are used. Overall, all datasets show that vertical mixing is as important to TTL transport as vertical advection itself even during boreal winter when advection peaks. The reanalysis and CCM have increased effective transport compared to observations, however, they rely on different dynamics. The reanalysis has amplified vertical mixing while the CCM has amplified vertical advection. This hints at the possible influence of spurious diffusion from data

  18. Mathematical model of induced flow on the airplane vertical tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotaru, Constantin; Cîrciu, Ionicǎ; Edu, Raluca Ioana

    2016-06-01

    In this paper is presented a mathematical model of the flow around the vertical tail of an airplane, based on the general elements of the aerodynamic design, with details leading to the separate formulation of the Fourier coefficients in the series solution of the Prandtl's lifting-line equation. Numerical results are obtained in Maple soft environment, for a standard configuration of an airplane geometry. The results include the discussion of the vortex model for the sidewash gradient on the vertical stabilizer.

  19. Three-Dimensional Vertical-Bloch-Line Memory System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R.; Wu, Jiin-Chuan; Stadler, Henry L.

    1994-01-01

    In proposed magnetic memory system without moving parts, data is stored in stack of two-dimensional vertical-Bloch-line (VBL) memory chips or modules. System similar to one described in "Three-Dimensional Magnetic-Bubble Memory System" (NPO-18533). Each VBL module in this memory system silimar to module described in "Vertical-Bloch-Line Memory" (NPO-18467). Advantages include high storage density, high speed, nonvolatility, and insensitivity to ionizing radiation.

  20. Vertical-plane pendulum absorbers for minimizing helicopter vibratory loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amer, K. B.; Neff, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The use of pendulum dynamic absorbers mounted on the blade root and operating in the vertical plane to minimize helicopter vibratory loads was discussed. A qualitative description was given of the concept of the dynamic absorbers and some results of analytical studies showing the degree of reduction in vibratory loads attainable are presented. Operational experience of vertical plane dynamic absorbers on the OH-6A helicopter is also discussed.

  1. NASA Airborne-simulated Vertical Data in Google Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A.; Leptoukh, G.; Kempler, S.; Liu, Z.

    2008-12-01

    Google Earth has been widely used as a tool to visualize scientific data that have geospatial elements. The data can be two dimensional and three dimensional, or even four-dimensional. NASA A-Train constellation satellites such as CloudSat, CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation), and Aqua have been producing lots of vertical data about the atmosphere. Those data are being used for such scientific research as global climate change, weather forecast, etc. NASA also uses airplanes to load some instruments to simulate satellite flying for establishing the sensitivity, calibration, and initial validation of the instruments that will be loaded at satellites. The airborne simulated flying produces simulated vertical data of the atmosphere. Visualization of these kinds of vertical data in Google Earth is helpful for scientific research. Here, a new method is proposed to visualize the simulated vertical data in Google Earth to expose cloud, aerosol, and other atmospheric profiles in the form of curtain along the flying track of the airplane. An interface description language-based render is designed and implemented to process and display the simulated vertical data in the format of image. The image is further processed and cut into transparent small image slices according to the track of the airplane. A COLLADA (COLLAborative Design Activity) 3D model, which is supported by Google Earth, is devised to make the image slices vertically displayed in Google Earth. Using the COLLADA models and airplane flying track coordinates, an airplane track model is implemented in the format of KML (Keyhole Markup Language). The track curtain makes simulated vertical data viewable, transparently or opaquely, in Google Earth. Thus, airborne simulated vertical geospatial data are available to scientists and the general public in a popular venue.

  2. Characteristics of F/A-18 vertical tail buffeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheta, E. F.; Huttsell, L. J.

    2003-03-01

    A time-accurate computational analysis of vertical tail buffeting of full F/A-18 aircraft is conducted at typical flight conditions to identify the buffet characteristics of fighter aircraft. The F/A-18 aircraft is pitched at wide range of high angles of attack at Mach number of 0.243 and Reynolds number of 11 millions. Strong coupling between the fluid and structure is considered in this investigation. Strong coupling occurs when the inertial effect of the motion of the vertical tail is fed back into the flow field. The aerodynamic flow field around the F/A-18 aircraft is computed using the Reynolds-averaged full Navier-Stokes equations. The dynamical structural response of the vertical tail is predicted using direct finite-element analysis. The interface between the fluid and structure is applied using conservative and consistent interfacing methodology. The motion of the computational grid due to the deflection of the vertical tail is computed using transfinite interpolation module. The investigation revealed that the vertical tail is subject to bending and torsional responses, mainly in the first modes of vibrations. The buffet loads increase significantly as the onset of vortex breakdown moves upstream of the vertical tails. The inboard surface of the vertical tail has more significant contribution in the buffet excitation than the outboard surface. In addition, the pressure on the outboard surface of the vertical tail is less sensitive to the angle of attack than the pressure on the inboard surface. The buffet excitation peaks shift to lower frequency as the angle of attack increases. The computational results are compared, and they are in close agreement, with several flight and experimental data.

  3. Influence of aerosol vertical distribution on radiative budget and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabat, Pierre; Michou, Martine; Saint-Martin, David; Watson, Laura

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols interact with shortwave and longwave radiation with ensuing consequences on radiative budget and climate. Aerosols are represented in climate models either using an interactive aerosol scheme including prognostic aerosol variables, or using climatologies, such as monthly aerosol optical depth (AOD) fields. In the first case, aerosol vertical distribution can vary rapidly, at a daily or even hourly scale, following the aerosol evolution calculated by the interactive scheme. On the contrary, in the second case, a fixed aerosol vertical distribution is generally imposed by climatological profiles. The objective of this work is to study the impact of aerosol vertical distribution on aerosol radiative forcing, with ensuing effects on climate. Simulations have thus been carried out using CNRM-CM, which is a global climate model including an interactive aerosol scheme representing the five main aerosol species (desert dust, sea-salt, sulfate, black carbon and organic matter). Several multi-annual simulations covering the past recent years are compared, including either the prognostic aerosol variables, or monthly AOD fields with different aerosol vertical distributions. In the second case, AOD fields directly come from the first simulation, so that all simulations have the same integrated aerosol loads. The results show that modifying the aerosol vertical distribution has a significant impact on radiative budget, with consequences on global climate. These differences, highlighting the importance of aerosol vertical distribution in climate models, probably come from the modification of atmospheric circulation induced by changes in the heights of the different aerosols. Besides, nonlinear effects in the superposition of aerosol and clouds reinforce the impact of aerosol vertical distribution, since aerosol radiative forcing depends highly upon the presence of clouds, and upon the relative vertical position of aerosols and clouds.

  4. Water wave model with accurate dispersion and vertical vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokhove, Onno

    2010-05-01

    Cotter and Bokhove (Journal of Engineering Mathematics 2010) derived a variational water wave model with accurate dispersion and vertical vorticity. In one limit, it leads to Luke's variational principle for potential flow water waves. In the another limit it leads to the depth-averaged shallow water equations including vertical vorticity. Presently, focus will be put on the Hamiltonian formulation of the variational model and its boundary conditions.

  5. Alignment and operability analysis of a vertical sodium pump

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, V.K.; Fair, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    With the objective of identifying important alignment features of pumps such as FFTF, HALLAM, EBR II, PNC, PHENIX, and CRBR, alignment of the vertical sodium pump for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) is investigated. The CRBRP pump includes a flexibly coupled pump shaft and motor shaft, two oil-film tilting-pad hydrodynamic radial bearings in the motor plus a vertical thrust bearing, and two sodium hydrostatic bearings straddling the double-suction centrifugal impeller in the pump.

  6. Activity Based Startup Plan for Prototype Vertical Denitration Calciner

    SciTech Connect

    SUTTER, C.S.

    1999-08-16

    Testing activities on the Prototype Vertical Denitration Calciner at Plutonium Finish Plant (PFP) were suspended in January 1997 due to the hold on fissile material handling in the facility. The restart of testing activities will require a review through an activity based startup process based upon Integrated Safety Management (ISM) principles to verify readiness. The Activity Based Startup Plan for the Prototype vertical Denitration Calciner has been developed for this process.

  7. Design of vertical packaging technology for RF MEMS switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Deepak; Sharma, Akshdeep; Kaur, Maninder; Rangra, K. J.

    2012-10-01

    Wafer-level micro-encapsulation is an innovative, low-cost, wafer-level packaging method for encapsulating RF MEMS switches. This article presents an approach for design and processing steps related to encapsulation of individual RF components e.g. CPW, RF MEMS switches, in view of the variation in performance subsequent to packaging. Bottom contact vertical packaging is more prone to misalignment margin and easy to make connections. Cavity height of 30 µm is optimized for bottom contact vertical packaging.

  8. Mixed multilayered vertical heterostructures utilizing strained monolayer WS2.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Yuewen; Xu, Wenshuo; Wang, Xiaochen; He, Zhengyu; Rong, Youmin; Warner, Jamie H

    2016-02-01

    Creating alternating layers of 2D materials forms vertical heterostructures with diverse electronic and opto-electronic properties. Monolayer WS2 grown by chemical vapour deposition can have inherent strain due to interactions with the substrate. The strain modifies the band structure and properties of monolayer WS2 and can be exploited in a wide range of applications. We demonstrate a non-aqueous transfer method for creating vertical stacks of mixed 2D layers containing a strained monolayer of WS2, with Boron Nitride and Graphene. The 2D materials are all grown by CVD, enabling large area vertical heterostructures to be formed. WS2 monolayers grown by CVD directly on Si substrates with SiO2 surface are easily washed off by water and this makes aqueous based transfer methods challenging for creating vertical stacks on the growth substrate. 2D hexagonal Boron Nitride films are used to provide an insulating layer that limits interactions with a top graphene layer and preserve the strong photoluminescence from the WS2. This transfer method is suitable for layer by layer control of 2D material vertical stacks and is shown to be possible for all CVD grown samples, which opens up pathways for the rapid large scale fabrication of vertical heterostructure systems with atomic thickness depth control and large area coverage. PMID:26758782

  9. Microburst vertical wind estimation from horizontal wind measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, Dan D.

    1994-01-01

    The vertical wind or downdraft component of a microburst-generated wind shear can significantly degrade airplane performance. Doppler radar and lidar are two sensor technologies being tested to provide flight crews with early warning of the presence of hazardous wind shear. An inherent limitation of Doppler-based sensors is the inability to measure velocities perpendicular to the line of sight, which results in an underestimate of the total wind shear hazard. One solution to the line-of-sight limitation is to use a vertical wind model to estimate the vertical component from the horizontal wind measurement. The objective of this study was to assess the ability of simple vertical wind models to improve the hazard prediction capability of an airborne Doppler sensor in a realistic microburst environment. Both simulation and flight test measurements were used to test the vertical wind models. The results indicate that in the altitude region of interest (at or below 300 m), the simple vertical wind models improved the hazard estimate. The radar simulation study showed that the magnitude of the performance improvement was altitude dependent. The altitude of maximum performance improvement occurred at about 300 m.

  10. GPS vertical axis performance enhancement for helicopter precision landing approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denaro, Robert P.; Beser, Jacques

    1986-01-01

    Several areas were investigated for improving vertical accuracy for a rotorcraft using the differential Global Positioning System (GPS) during a landing approach. Continuous deltaranging was studied and the potential improvement achieved by estimating acceleration was studied by comparing the performance on a constant acceleration turn and a rough landing profile of several filters: a position-velocity (PV) filter, a position-velocity-constant acceleration (PVAC) filter, and a position-velocity-turning acceleration (PVAT) filter. In overall statistics, the PVAC filter was found to be most efficient with the more complex PVAT performing equally well. Vertical performance was not significantly different among the filters. Satellite selection algorithms based on vertical errors only (vertical dilution of precision or VDOP) and even-weighted cross-track and vertical errors (XVDOP) were tested. The inclusion of an altimeter was studied by modifying the PVAC filter to include a baro bias estimate. Improved vertical accuracy during degraded DOP conditions resulted. Flight test results for raw differential results excluding filter effects indicated that the differential performance significantly improved overall navigation accuracy. A landing glidepath steering algorithm was devised which exploits the flexibility of GPS in determining precise relative position. A method for propagating the steering command over the GPS update interval was implemented.

  11. Vertical load capacities of roof truss cross members

    PubMed Central

    Gearhart, David F.; Morsy, Mohamed Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Trusses used for roof support in coal mines are constructed of two grouted bolts installed at opposing forty-five degree angles into the roof and a cross member that ties the angled bolts together. The load on the cross member is vertical, which is transverse to the longitudinal axis, and therefore the cross member is loaded in the weakest direction. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the vertical load capacity and deflection of three different types of cross members. Single-point load tests, with the load applied in the center of the specimen and double-point load tests, with a span of 2.4 m, were conducted. For the single-point load configuration, the yield of the 25 mm solid bar cross member was nominally 98 kN of vertical load, achieved at 42 cm of deflection. For cable cross members, yield was not achieved even after 45 cm of deflection. Peak vertical loads were about 89 kN for 17 mm cables and 67 kN for the 15 mm cables. For the double-point load configurations, the 25 mm solid bar cross members yielded at 150 kN of vertical load and 25 cm of deflection. At 25 cm of deflection individual cable strands started breaking at 133 and 111 kN of vertical load for the 17 and 15 mm cable cross members respectively. PMID:27547484

  12. Evaluation of vertical variations in hydraulic conductivity in unconsolidated sediments.

    PubMed

    Dietze, Michael; Dietrich, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Detailed information on vertical variations in hydraulic conductivity (K) is essential to describe the dynamics of groundwater movement at contaminated sites or as input data used for modeling. K values in high vertical resolution should be determined because K tends to be more continuous in the horizontal than in the vertical direction. To determine K in shallow unconsolidated sediments and in the vertical direction, the recently developed direct-push injection logger can be used. The information obtained by this method serves as a proxy for K and has to be calibrated to obtain quantitative K values of measured vertical profiles. In this study, we performed direct-push soil sampling, sieve analyses and direct-push slug tests to obtain K values in vertical high resolution. Using the results of direct-push slug tests, quantitative K values obtained by the direct-push injection logger could be determined successfully. The results of sieve analyses provided lower accordance with the logs due to the inherent limitations of the sieving method. PMID:21883188

  13. Tide-driven fluid mud transport in the Ems estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Marius; Maushake, Christian; Winter, Christian

    2014-05-01

    The Ems estuary, located at the border between The Netherlands and Germany, experienced a significant change of the hydrodynamic regime during the past decades, as a result of extensive river engineering. With the net sediment transport now being flood-oriented, suspended sediment concentrations have increased dramatically, inducing siltation and formation of fluid mud layers, which, in turn, influence hydraulic flow properties, such as turbulence and the apparent bed roughness. Here, the process-based understanding of fluid mud is essential to model and predict mud accumulation, not only regarding the anthropogenic impact, but also in view of the expected changes of environmental boundary conditions, i.e., sea level rise. In the recent past, substantial progress has been made concerning the understanding of estuarine circulation and influence of tidal asymmetry on upstream sediment accumulation. While associated sediment transport formulations have been implemented in the framework of numerical modelling systems, in-situ data of fluid mud are scarce. This study presents results on tide-driven fluid mud dynamics, measured during four tidal cycles aside the navigation channel in the Ems estuary. Lutoclines, i.e., strong vertical density gradients, were detected by sediment echo sounder (SES). Acoustic Doppler current profiles (ADCP) of different acoustic frequencies were used to determine hydrodynamic parameters and the vertical distribution of suspended sediment concentrations in the upper part of the water column. These continuous profiling measurements were complemented by CTD, ADV, and OBS casts. SES and ADCP profiles show cycles of fluid mud entrainment during accelerating flow, and subsequent settling, and the reformation of a lutocline during decelerating flow and slack water. Significant differences are revealed between flood and ebb phase. Highest entrainment rates are measured at the beginning of the flood phase, associated with strong current shear and

  14. Cellular mechanism for selective vertical transmission of an obligate insect symbiont at the bacteriocyte-embryo interface.

    PubMed

    Koga, Ryuichi; Meng, Xian-Ying; Tsuchida, Tsutomu; Fukatsu, Takema

    2012-05-15

    Many insects are associated with obligate symbiotic bacteria, which are localized in specialized cells called bacteriocytes, vertically transmitted through host generations via ovarial passage, and essential for growth and reproduction of their hosts. Although vertical transmission is pivotal for maintenance of such intimate host-symbiont associations, molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the process are largely unknown. Here we report a cellular mechanism for vertical transmission of the obligate symbiont Buchnera in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. In the aphid body, Buchnera cells are transmitted from maternal bacteriocytes to adjacent blastulae at the ovariole tips in a highly coordinated manner. By making use of symbiont-manipulated strains of A. pisum, we demonstrated that the facultative symbiont Serratia is, unlike Buchnera, not transmitted from maternal bacteriocytes to blastulae, suggesting a specific mechanism for Buchnera transmission. EM observations revealed a series of exo-/endocytotic processes operating at the bacteriocyte-blastula interface: Buchnera cells are exocytosed from the maternal bacteriocyte, temporarily released to the extracellular space, and endocytosed by the posterior syncytial cytoplasm of the blastula. These results suggest that the selective Buchnera transmission is likely attributable to Buchnera-specific exocytosis by the maternal bacteriocyte, whereas both Buchnera and Serratia are nonselectively incorporated by the endocytotic activity of the posterior region of the blastula. The sophisticated cellular mechanism for vertical transmission of Buchnera must have evolved to ensure the obligate host-symbiont association, whereas facultative symbionts like Serratia may coopt the endocytotic component of the mechanism for their entry into the host embryos. PMID:22517738

  15. An electromagnetic sounding experiment in Germany using the vertical gradient of geomagnetic variations observed in a deep borehole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmucker, Ulrich; Spitzer, Klaus; Steveling, Erich

    2009-09-01

    We have recorded for 13 d, geomagnetic variations simultaneously on the Earth's surface and in a borehole at 832 m depth straight below, with a sampling rate of 1 Hz. In addition, geoelectric variations were observed at the same site near Bad Königshofen in Frankonia, Germany. The penetrated moderately conductive Triassic sediments lie above highly resistive Permian deposits. A presumably crystalline basement begins at 1500-1900 m depth. The purpose of the experiment is to determine the skin effect of geomagnetic variations and to derive from it the equivalent to the magnetotelluric (MT) surface impedance, using the vertical gradient (VG) method of electromagnetic (EM) sounding. In this way, we were able to reproduce all four elements of the MT impedance tensor, except for an unexplained but consistent downward shift of VG phases against MT phases by roughly 15° for the two off-diagonal elements. Hence, our tensor evaluation goes beyond the common practice, to express the skin effect by a single VG transfer function in response to a layered structure. The otherwise good agreement of VG and MT results implies that at our test site, the MT impedance tensor is largely distortion-free and that, for example, its pronounced anisotropy should be regarded as a genuine characteristic of the EM response for a laterally non-uniform or possibly anisotropic deep structure. The drilling site lies within the range of a widespread induction anomaly. We have observed the resulting variations of the vertical magnetic component at the surface and in the borehole and found them to be identical. The thus established absence of a skin effect for the vertical component allows us to treat the sedimentary layer down to the depth of the borehole instrument as a thin sheet, and the pertinent thin-sheet approximation for EM induction forms the basis of our analysis. We have derived the required estimate of conductance from the skin effect of horizontal components, noting that this estimate

  16. Advances in Vertical Cable Seismic (VCS) for Seafloor Massive Sulfide exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, E.; Murakami, F.; Tsukahara, H.; Tara, K.; Lee, S.; Saito, S.

    2015-12-01

    In 2014, the Japanese government started the Cross-ministerial Strategic Innovation Promotion Program (SIP), which includes 'Next-generation Ocean Resource Exploration Techniques' as an area of interest. J-MARES aims to establish "Multi-stage and integrated approach for SMSs exploration" using effectual geophysical exploration method and tools. JGI proposed the Vertical Cable Seismic (VCS) technique which is a reflection seismic method that uses hydrophone arrays vertically moored from the seafloor. It is useful to delineate detailed structures in a spatially-limited efficiently. We have developed autonomous VCS systems and carried out several VCS surveys in actual hydrothermal area in Okinawa Trough. These results successfully delineated sub-seabed structures that suggest the existence of buried SMS deposits. Based on the successful results of these surveys, we are continuing to polish up the VCS system with data processing methods. To obtain more detailed structure, we have manufactured four new-type of VCS with 16 hydrophones. Then we carry out the VCS survey using deep-tow high frequency source. The key points are (1) a high-frequency source close to the target, (2)efficiency of the surveys and (3)wide-angle reflections to detect of bottom interface of sulfide ore body. The most crucial technical issue is the positioning the deep-tow source. As for the data processing, we have applied Prestack Depth Migration to obtain the subsurface structure but the velocity cannot be estimated adequately. We adopt CSP-EOM processing to VCS data. It is based on scattering phenomena which is useful for the scattering dominant area such as SMS area. This method gives us the velocity estimation of the SMS. We consider VCS has high-potential for SMS exploration. The system will continue to be improved as part of the SIP project, along with other geophysical exploration techniques such as EM, magnetic and gravity.

  17. Influence of vertical flows in wells on groundwater sampling.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Lindsay A; Rivett, Michael O; Tellam, John H; Dumble, Peter; Sharp, Helen

    2014-11-15

    Pumped groundwater sampling evaluations often assume that horizontal head gradients predominate and the sample comprises an average of water quality variation over the well screen interval weighted towards contributing zones of higher hydraulic conductivity (a permeability-weighted sample). However, the pumping rate used during sampling may not always be sufficient to overcome vertical flows in wells driven by ambient vertical head gradients. Such flows are reported in wells with screens between 3 and 10m in length where lower pumping rates are more likely to be used during sampling. Here, numerical flow and particle transport modeling is used to provide insight into the origin of samples under ambient vertical head gradients and under a range of pumping rates. When vertical gradients are present, sample provenance is sensitive to pump intake position, pumping rate and pumping duration. The sample may not be drawn from the whole screen interval even with extended pumping times. Sample bias is present even when the ambient vertical flow in the wellbore is less than the pumping rate. Knowledge of the maximum ambient vertical flow in the well does, however, allow estimation of the pumping rate that will yield a permeability-weighted sample. This rate may be much greater than that recommended for low-flow sampling. In practice at monitored sites, the sampling bias introduced by ambient vertical flows in wells may often be unrecognized or underestimated when drawing conclusions from sampling results. It follows that care should be taken in the interpretation of sampling data if supporting flow investigations have not been undertaken. PMID:24999176

  18. Measuring the vertical permeability of horizontally- stratified sedimentary rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Novakowski, K.S.; Lapcevic, P.A. ); Reichart, T.M. )

    1993-03-01

    The vertical permeability of horizontally stratified rocks is usually assumed to be significantly less than the permeability of horizontal structural features such as bedding plane partings and sheeting structure. Consequently it is also assumed that this type of media provides suitable vertical barriers to the migration of both aqueous and non-aqueous phase groundwater contaminants. To investigate this assumption, a site adjacent to an inactive dolostone quarry was instrumented using nine boreholes drilled to a depth of approximately 25 m in a 30 x 30 m area. The area is immediately underlain by flat-lying thick-bedded dolostones of Middle-Silurian age. Six of the boreholes were drilled at angle of 45[degree] to intersect two vertical fracture sets oriented at 020[degree] and 110[degree] which were identified by mapping the fractures in the quarry. Detailed hydraulic tests (constant-head method) were conducted in each of the boreholes using a packer spacing of 0.5 m to determine the hydraulic properties of the individual horizontal and vertical fractures and fracture zones. In addition, four pumping tests were conducted in which a fracture zone in one of the vertical boreholes was shut-in and pumped and the hydraulic response was monitored in the observation boreholes using pressure transducer installed in 15 intervals isolated with multiple-packer strings. The results of the constant-head tests show that although the groundwater flow system in the dolostone is dominated by 3--4 horizontal fracture zones, the average permeability of the vertical fractures is only one order of magnitude less than the average permeability of the horizontal fractures. However, this aspect of the flow system is not detected using pumping tests, the results of which suggest that the average permeability is 3--4 orders of magnitude less in the vertical direction.

  19. Hydrodynamic Stability Criteria for Vertically Stratified Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Glen R.

    2014-11-01

    Whenever a vertically stratified circumstellar disk has a radial entropy gradient, the balance of forces in the radial and vertical directions implies that the unperturbed orbit frequency is a function of both radius and height above the midplane of the disk. This vertical shear in the orbit frequency can produce baroclinic instabilities that result in slanted convection in the r-z plane, vertical corrugations of the disk midplane, and outward angular momentum transport with an effective alpha of 0.001 (Nelson et al., MNRAS 435, 2610-2632, (2013)). It is difficult to derive a rigorous dispersion relation for this instability due to the inseparable nature of the r and z-dependence of the problem. Previously published stability criteria are limited to small vertical scales because they assume the vertical component of the star’s gravity to be independent of z. This limitation can be overcome if one assumes that the vertical structure near the disk midplane is nearly adiabatic, so that the anelastic approximation is valid. For this case, the problem can be reduced to a set of three evolution equations for the z-component of the angular momentum, the potential temperature, and the component of vorticity due to motions in the r-z plane. This reduced dynamical system has a Hamiltonian structure that allows one to readily derive a Liapunov functional that governs the linear and nonlinear stability of the problem. The stability criterion reduces to a statement about the relative slopes in the r-z plane of the surfaces of constant angular momentum and constant potential temperature in the unperturbed disk. This stability condition is analogous to the criterion for symmetric baroclinic instabilities in planetary atmospheres. Support from NASA’s Origins of Solar Systems program is gratefully acknowledged.

  20. Advanced Si solid phase crystallization for vertical channel in vertical NANDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangsoo; Son, Yong-Hoon; Hwang, Kihyun; Shin, Yoo Gyun; Yoon, Euijoon

    2014-07-01

    The advanced solid phase crystallization (SPC) method using the SiGe/Si bi-layer structure is proposed to obtain high-mobility poly-Si thin-film transistors in next generation vertical NAND (VNAND) devices. During the SPC process, the top SiGe thin film acts as a selective nucleation layer to induce surface nucleation and equiaxial microstructure. Subsequently, this SiGe thin film microstructure is propagated to the underlying Si thin film by epitaxy-like growth. The initial nucleation at the SiGe surface was clearly observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) when heating up to 600 °C. The equiaxial microstructures of both SiGe nucleation and Si channel layers were shown in the crystallized bi-layer plan-view TEM measurements. Based on these experimental results, the large-grained and less-defective Si microstructure is expected to form near the channel region of each VNAND cell transistor, which may improve the electrical characteristics.

  1. Advanced Si solid phase crystallization for vertical channel in vertical NANDs

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sangsoo; Son, Yong-Hoon; Hwang, Kihyun; Shin, Yoo Gyun; Yoon, Euijoon

    2014-07-01

    The advanced solid phase crystallization (SPC) method using the SiGe/Si bi-layer structure is proposed to obtain high-mobility poly-Si thin-film transistors in next generation vertical NAND (VNAND) devices. During the SPC process, the top SiGe thin film acts as a selective nucleation layer to induce surface nucleation and equiaxial microstructure. Subsequently, this SiGe thin film microstructure is propagated to the underlying Si thin film by epitaxy-like growth. The initial nucleation at the SiGe surface was clearly observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) when heating up to 600 °C. The equiaxial microstructures of both SiGe nucleation and Si channel layers were shown in the crystallized bi-layer plan-view TEM measurements. Based on these experimental results, the large-grained and less-defective Si microstructure is expected to form near the channel region of each VNAND cell transistor, which may improve the electrical characteristics.

  2. Is EMS communicating with the FCC?

    PubMed

    Johnson, M S; VanCott, C; Glass, C; Anderson, P B

    1989-07-01

    Radio communication problems in EMS run the spectrum from annoying to deadly. Dedicated radio frequencies for EMS, much like those exclusive to police and fire departments, are long overdue. PMID:10293680

  3. Surgery for Complete Vertical Rectus Paralysis Combined with Horizontal Strabismus

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Leilei; Liu, Rui; Liu, Yan; Lin, Jing; Liu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Aims. To report outcomes of the simultaneous surgical correction of vertical rectus paralysis combined with moderate-to-large angle horizontal strabismus. Methods. If a preoperative forced duction test was positive, antagonist muscle weakening surgery was performed, and then augmented partial rectus muscle transposition (APRMT) + partial horizontal rectus recession-resection was performed 2 months later. If a preoperative forced duction test was negative, APRMT + partial horizontal rectus recession-resection was performed. Antagonistic muscle weakening surgery and/or conventional recession-resection of the horizontal and/or vertical muscles of the contralateral eye was performed 2 months later, as needed. Results. Ten patients with a mean age of 22.3 ± 13.0 years were included and mean follow-up was 7.1 months. The mean vertical deviation that APRMT corrected was 21.4 ± 3.7 PD (prism diopter). The absolute deviation in horizontal significantly decreased from a preoperative value of 48.5 ± 27.4 PD to a value of 3.0 ± 2.3 PD 6 months postoperatively. The movement score decreased from a value of −5 ± 0 preoperatively to a value of −2.7 ± 0.8 at 6 months postoperatively. Conclusion. For patients with complete vertical rectus paralysis combined with a moderate- to-large angle of horizontal strabismus, combined APRMT and partial horizontal rectus recession-resection is safe and effective for correcting vertical and horizontal strabismus. PMID:24883204

  4. Storage coefficient revisited: is purely vertical strain a good assumption?

    PubMed

    Burbey, T J

    2001-01-01

    The storage coefficient that is used ubiquitously today was first defined by the analytical work of Theis and Jacob over a half-century ago. Inherent within this definition is the restriction of purely vertical compression of the aquifer during a reduction in pressure. The assumption is revisited and quantitatively evaluated by comparing numerical results using both one- and three-dimensional strain models in the presence of three-dimensional flow. Results indicate that (1) calculated hydraulic head values are nearly identical for both models; (2) the release of water from storage in terms of volume strain is nearly identical for both models and that the location of maximum production moves outward from the well as a function of time; (3) the vertical strain components are markedly different with at least 50% of the total volume of water pumped originating from horizontal strain (and increasing to as much as 70%); and (4) for the one-dimensional strain model to yield the necessary quantity of water to the pumped well, the resulting vertical compaction (land subsidence) is as much as four times greater and vertical strain is as much as 60% greater than the three-dimensional strain model. Results indicate that small changes in porosity resulting from horizontal strain can yield extremely large quantities of water to the pumping well. This study suggests that the assumption of purely vertical strain used in the definition of the storage coefficient is not valid. PMID:11341012

  5. RSRA vertical drag test report. [rotor systems research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemming, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The Rotor Systems Research Aircraft (RSRA), because of its ability to measure rotor loads, was used to conduct an experiment to determine vertical drag, tail rotor blockage, and thrust augmentation as affected by ground clearance and flight velocity. The RSRA was flown in the helicopter configuration at speeds from 0 to 15 knots for wheel heights from 5 to 150 feet, and to 60 knots out of ground effect. The vertical drag trends in hover, predicted by theory and shown in model tests, were generally confirmed. The OGE hover vertical drag is 4.0 percent, 1.1 percent greater than predicted. The vertical drag decreases rapidly as wheel height is reduced, and is zero at a wheel height of 6 feet. The vertical drag also decreases with forward speed, approaching zero at sixty knots. The test data show the effect of wheel height and forward speed on thrust, gross weight capability, and power, and provide the relationships for power and collective pitch at constant gross weight required for the simulation of helicopter takeoffs and landings.

  6. Evidence of diel vertical migration in Mnemiopsis leidyi.

    PubMed

    Haraldsson, Matilda; Båmstedt, Ulf; Tiselius, Peter; Titelman, Josefin; Aksnes, Dag L

    2014-01-01

    The vertical distribution and migration of plankton organisms may have a large impact on their horizontal dispersal and distribution, and consequently on trophic interactions. In this study we used video-net profiling to describe the fine scale vertical distribution of Mnemiopsis leidyi in the Kattegat and Baltic Proper. Potential diel vertical migration was also investigated by frequent filming during a 24-hour cycle at two contrasting locations with respect to salinity stratification. The video profiles revealed a pronounced diel vertical migration at one of the locations. However, only the small and medium size classes migrated, on average 0.85 m h(-1), corresponding to a total migration distance of 10 m during 12 h. Larger individuals (with well developed lobes, approx. >27 mm) stay on average in the same depth interval at all times. Biophysical data suggest that migrating individuals likely responded to light, and avoided irradiance levels higher than approx. 10 µmol quanta m(-2) s(-1). We suggest that strong stratification caused by low surface salinity seemed to prohibit vertical migration. PMID:24466162

  7. Subjective postural vertical in peripheral and central vestibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Bisdorff, A R; Anastasopoulos, D; Bronstein, A M; Gresty, M A

    1995-01-01

    The perception of subjective postural vertical was assessed in normals and patients with peripheral and central vestibular disorders and spasmodic torticollis. The subjects were seated in a motorized gimbal with the head and torso restrained and their eyes closed. The gimbal executed 7-10 cycles of tilt around the vertical at 1.5 degrees/s in either pitch or roll. Subjects indicated when they began to feel upright and again when they began to feel tilted by an analogous 3-position joystick. Normal subjects felt upright within a sector of 5-6 degrees around vertical in pitch and roll. Five patients with absent vestibular function, 25 torticollis patients and 3 patients with acute unilateral peripheral vestibular lesions showed a significant increase of the sector in pitch and roll, but only the latter had a mild directional bias. Two patients with long standing complete unilateral vestibular deficit and 8 patients with up or downbeat nystagmus in the vicinity of upright had abnormally large sectors within which they felt to be upright. The results suggest that vestibular function is important for the accurate perception of the postural vertical and that a directional asymmetry in vestibulo-ocular function or a head tilt does not necessarily correlate with a directional bias of subjective verticality. PMID:8749084

  8. Vertical plate motions in the West Siberian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vibe, Yulia; Clark, Stuart

    2015-04-01

    The West Siberian Basin is one of the world's largest sedimentary basins representing an important source of oil and gas. The Basin's history includes long periods of very slow subsidence coupled with periods of erosion and uplift. Despite that the Basin has been broadly explored the causes of these vertical motions are not yet understood. In this study we analyse the vertical motions by the means of backstripping. The new backstripping results refined by the paleo-water depth data give estimates of the subsidence and uplift rate. These results show a peculiar character of the vertical motions where the region of maximum subsidence migrated from the north to the south several times during the Basin's history. Such southward propagation of subsidence happened in the Late Jurassic, Aptian and in the Paleogene periods. The newly constrained local eustatic curve indicates that the Basin's vertical motions do not reflect the global sea level changes, but the more complicated tectonic processes. We put different data sets of the Basin's sediments and crust structure together with the new backstripping results in order to understand better the vertical motions and the processes underlying the irregular subsidence and uplift pattern of the West Siberian Basin

  9. Study of vertical breakwater reliability based on copulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Sheng; Li, Jingjing; Li, Xue; Wei, Yong

    2016-04-01

    The reliability of a vertical breakwater is calculated using direct integration methods based on joint density functions. The horizontal and uplifting wave forces on the vertical breakwater can be well fitted by the lognormal and the Gumbel distributions, respectively. The joint distribution of the horizontal and uplifting wave forces is analyzed using different probabilistic distributions, including the bivariate logistic Gumbel distribution, the bivariate lognormal distribution, and three bivariate Archimedean copulas functions constructed with different marginal distributions simultaneously. We use the fully nested copulas to construct multivariate distributions taking into account related variables. Different goodness fitting tests are carried out to determine the best bivariate copula model for wave forces on a vertical breakwater. We show that a bivariate model constructed by Frank copula gives the best reliability analysis, using marginal distributions of Gumbel and lognormal to account for uplifting pressure and horizontal wave force on a vertical breakwater, respectively. The results show that failure probability of the vertical breakwater calculated by multivariate density function is comparable to those by the Joint Committee on Structural Safety methods. As copulas are suitable for constructing a bivariate or multivariate joint distribution, they have great potential in reliability analysis for other coastal structures.

  10. Evidence of Diel Vertical Migration in Mnemiopsis leidyi

    PubMed Central

    Haraldsson, Matilda; Båmstedt, Ulf; Tiselius, Peter; Titelman, Josefin; Aksnes, Dag L.

    2014-01-01

    The vertical distribution and migration of plankton organisms may have a large impact on their horizontal dispersal and distribution, and consequently on trophic interactions. In this study we used video-net profiling to describe the fine scale vertical distribution of Mnemiopsis leidyi in the Kattegat and Baltic Proper. Potential diel vertical migration was also investigated by frequent filming during a 24-hour cycle at two contrasting locations with respect to salinity stratification. The video profiles revealed a pronounced diel vertical migration at one of the locations. However, only the small and medium size classes migrated, on average 0.85 m h−1, corresponding to a total migration distance of 10 m during 12 h. Larger individuals (with well developed lobes, approx. >27 mm) stay on average in the same depth interval at all times. Biophysical data suggest that migrating individuals likely responded to light, and avoided irradiance levels higher than approx. 10 µmol quanta m−2 s−1. We suggest that strong stratification caused by low surface salinity seemed to prohibit vertical migration. PMID:24466162

  11. Pressure as a limit to bloater (Coregonus hoyi) vertical migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    TeWinkel, Leslie M.; Fleischer, Guy W.

    1998-01-01

    Observations of bloater vertical migration showed a limit to the vertical depth changes that bloater experience. In this paper, we conducted an analysis of maximum differences in pressure encountered by bloater during vertical migration. Throughout the bottom depths studied, bloater experienced maximum reductions in swim bladder volume equal to approximately 50-60% of the volume in midwater. The analysis indicated that the limit in vertical depth change may be related to a maximum level of positive or negative buoyancy for which bloater can compensate using alternative mechanisms such as hydrodynamic lift. Bloater may be limited in the extent of migration by either their depth of neutral buoyancy or the distance above the depth of neutral buoyancy at which they can still maintain their position in the water column. Although a migration limit for the bloater population was evident, individual distances of migration varied at each site. These variations in migration distances may indicate differences in depths of neutral buoyancy within the population. However, in spite of these variations, the strong correlation between shallowest depths of migration and swim bladder volume reduction across depths provides evidence that hydrostatic pressure limits the extent of daily vertical movement in bloater.

  12. ITRF2014 GNSS vertical velocities and global Earth figure variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Métivier, Laurent; Rouby, Hélène; Rebischung, Paul; Altamimi, Zuheir

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the GNSS station vertical velocities provided by the new solution of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame, the ITRF2014. Constructed from a global network of approximately 1500 stations of the different space geodetic techniques, this new solution provides two times more GNSS station velocities than the ITRF2008, and shows a global pattern of vertical velocities very homogeneous regionally. As in the ITRF2008 solution, large vertical velocities can be seen over North America, Northern Europe, or Antarctica, probably induced predominantly by the Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) still occurring today since the last deglaciation. But the ITRF2014 solution shows also large vertical velocities over regions such as Greenland and Alaska clearly larger than in the ITRF2008, probably related to last decadal ice melting and its possible acceleration. We investigate different methods to calculate low degree spherical harmonics coefficient from ITRF2014 GNSS vertical velocities. We particularly focus on the components related to the geocenter motion, the ellipticity of the solid Earth, and the J2 rate, and we present time tendencies with respect to different GIA and recent ice melting models.

  13. Can vertical compaction within wedges promote accretion by backthrusts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeck, J.; Cooke, M. L.; Herbert, J. W.; Madden, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    In natural subduction zones, frontal accretion dominantly occurs via the propagation of forethrusts, whereas accretion via backthrusts has been observed in only a few active subduction zones, including the Cascadia margin. Similarly, in most analog experiments of accretionary wedges deformation is accommodated by forethrusts or backthrust/forethrust pairs, except for some experiments with a layer of silicone below sand, which can produce accretionary backthrusts. Vertical deflection of the detachment caused by the lateral flow of the silicone layer could promote the propagation of backthrusts in these analog experiments. Alternatively, the high Holocene sediment input in parts of the Cascadia margin could produce vertical compaction deep within the wedge that promotes backthrusting. To explore the effect of vertical compaction and deflection of the detachment on fault development in accretionary prisms we use the Boundary Element Method modeling tool Growth by Optimization of Work (GROW) to predict the vergence of faults in a deforming wedge. GROW predicts fault growth by propagating faults in the direction that maximizes the efficiency of the system, or minimizes the external work of the system. We simulate vertical compaction with compliant elements and observe that the addition of these elements deep in the wedge or along the detachment promotes backthrusting rather than forethrusts. Similarly, local downward deflection of the detachment promotes backthrust development over that of forethrusts. These numerical model results suggest that vertical compaction or local deflection of the megathrust may account for backthrust development in parts of the Cascadia margin.

  14. Distributed Turbo Product Codes with Multiple Vertical Parities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obiedat, Esam A.; Chen, Guotai; Cao, Lei

    2009-12-01

    We propose a Multiple Vertical Parities Distributed Turbo Product Code (MVP-DTPC) over cooperative network using block Bose Chaudhuri Hochquenghem (BCH) codes as component codes. The source broadcasts extended BCH coded frames to the destination and nearby relays. After decoding the received sequences, each relay constructs a product code by arranging the corrected bit sequences in rows and re-encoding them vertically using BCH as component codes to obtain an Incremental Redundancy (IR) for source's data. To obtain independent vertical parities from each relay in the same code space, we propose a new Circular Interleaver for source's data; different circular interleavers are used to interleave BCH rows before re-encoding vertically. The Maximum A posteriori Probability (MAP) decoding is achieved by applying maximum transfer of extrinsic information between the multiple decoding stages. This is employed in the modified turbo product decoder, which is proposed to cope with multiple parities. The a posteriori output from a vertical decoding stage is used to derive the soft extrinsic information, that are used as a priori input for the next horizontal decoding stage. Simulation results in Additive White Gaussian Noise (AWGN) channel using network scenarios show 0.3-0.5 dB gain improvement in Bit Error Rate (BER) performance over the non-cooperative Turbo Product Codes (TPC).

  15. Precision of vertical position estimates from very long baseline interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    It is found that the precision of VLBI measurements of vertical crustal motions is limited by errors in the modeling of the propagation delay through the earth's neutral atmosphere, and by errors in finding the orientation of a fixed crust coordinate system in the VLBI reference frame. The repeatability of baseline length measurements study indicates a vertical position precision of about 8 cm, averaged over 13 sites and 4.5 years of data, while the repeatability of vertical position estimates for a Richmond, FL site is found to yield a precision of about 7 cm for 42 observations made over an 11-month period. An overall precision of 8 cm for a 24-hour VLBI observing session is obtained, and the effects of earth orientation parameter errors is contingent on the distances between the VLBI sites.

  16. Mixed multilayered vertical heterostructures utilizing strained monolayer WS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Yuewen; Xu, Wenshuo; Wang, Xiaochen; He, Zhengyu; Rong, Youmin; Warner, Jamie H.

    2016-01-01

    Creating alternating layers of 2D materials forms vertical heterostructures with diverse electronic and opto-electronic properties. Monolayer WS2 grown by chemical vapour deposition can have inherent strain due to interactions with the substrate. The strain modifies the band structure and properties of monolayer WS2 and can be exploited in a wide range of applications. We demonstrate a non-aqueous transfer method for creating vertical stacks of mixed 2D layers containing a strained monolayer of WS2, with Boron Nitride and Graphene. The 2D materials are all grown by CVD, enabling large area vertical heterostructures to be formed. WS2 monolayers grown by CVD directly on Si substrates with SiO2 surface are easily washed off by water and this makes aqueous based transfer methods challenging for creating vertical stacks on the growth substrate. 2D hexagonal Boron Nitride films are used to provide an insulating layer that limits interactions with a top graphene layer and preserve the strong photoluminescence from the WS2. This transfer method is suitable for layer by layer control of 2D material vertical stacks and is shown to be possible for all CVD grown samples, which opens up pathways for the rapid large scale fabrication of vertical heterostructure systems with atomic thickness depth control and large area coverage.Creating alternating layers of 2D materials forms vertical heterostructures with diverse electronic and opto-electronic properties. Monolayer WS2 grown by chemical vapour deposition can have inherent strain due to interactions with the substrate. The strain modifies the band structure and properties of monolayer WS2 and can be exploited in a wide range of applications. We demonstrate a non-aqueous transfer method for creating vertical stacks of mixed 2D layers containing a strained monolayer of WS2, with Boron Nitride and Graphene. The 2D materials are all grown by CVD, enabling large area vertical heterostructures to be formed. WS2 monolayers grown by

  17. Vertical nanowire probes for intracellular signaling of living cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The single living cell action potential was measured in an intracellular mode by using a vertical nanoelectrode. For intracellular interfacing, Si nanowires were vertically grown in a controlled manner, and optimum conditions, such as diameter, length, and nanowire density, were determined by culturing cells on the nanowires. Vertical nanowire probes were then fabricated with a complimentary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process including sequential deposition of the passivation and electrode layers on the nanowires, and a subsequent partial etching process. The fabricated nanowire probes had an approximately 60-nm diameter and were intracellular. These probes interfaced with a GH3 cell and measured the spontaneous action potential. It successfully measured the action potential, which rapidly reached a steady state with average peak amplitude of approximately 10 mV, duration of approximately 140 ms, and period of 0.9 Hz. PMID:24484729

  18. Vertical nanowire probes for intracellular signaling of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ki-Young; Kim, Ilsoo; Kim, So-Eun; Jeong, Du-Won; Kim, Ju-Jin; Rhim, Hyewhon; Ahn, Jae-Pyeong; Park, Seung-Han; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2014-02-01

    The single living cell action potential was measured in an intracellular mode by using a vertical nanoelectrode. For intracellular interfacing, Si nanowires were vertically grown in a controlled manner, and optimum conditions, such as diameter, length, and nanowire density, were determined by culturing cells on the nanowires. Vertical nanowire probes were then fabricated with a complimentary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process including sequential deposition of the passivation and electrode layers on the nanowires, and a subsequent partial etching process. The fabricated nanowire probes had an approximately 60-nm diameter and were intracellular. These probes interfaced with a GH3 cell and measured the spontaneous action potential. It successfully measured the action potential, which rapidly reached a steady state with average peak amplitude of approximately 10 mV, duration of approximately 140 ms, and period of 0.9 Hz.

  19. Precipitating cloud vertical structure derived from passive microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummerow, Christian D.; Liberti, Gian L.

    1990-01-01

    A procedure for the retrieval of cloud vertical structure from passive microwave radiometry is demonstrated by using passive microwave radiometry observations made during the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission. The procedure uses a set of cloud radiative models, with each model consisting of five vertical layers, specifying a distinct cloud vertical structure in terms of the near-surface parameters. The retrieval procedure is separated into two tasks (1) retrieving a set of geophysical parameters for each cloud radiative model and (2) finding which of the cloud radiative models and its associated retrieved parameters best fit the observed geophysical conditions. It is shown that this retrieval technique can detect differences and similarities between precipitating systems.

  20. Vertically integrated high-silica channel waveguides on Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbarossa, G.; Laybourn, P. J. R.

    1992-02-01

    For the first time the vertical integration of high-silica content low-loss channel waveguides on an Si substrate is reported. The fabrication process, which has made the vertical integration feasible, consists of a practical multistep combination of flame hydrolysis deposition (FHD), photolithographic patterning, and reactive ion etching. The successful application to a double integration of single-mode waveguides at 1.55 micron is also reported. This result, which has been possible thanks to the FHD peculiarities, by extending the optical interaction to a third dimension, opens a wide range of original and promising applications, such as vertically coupled devices or parallel optical signal processes, and it effectively increases the density of optical guided-wave functions available on the same substrate.

  1. The vertical structure and thickness of Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.; Burns, J. A.; Durisen, R. H.; Hamill, P. M.

    1979-01-01

    An explanation for the vertical structure and thickness of Saturn's rings compatible with observational data is presented. The model of the rings as being many particles thick is shown to be possible, with random particle motions preventing the complete flattening of the system and a gaussian distribution of particle density with vertical displacement. The model prediction of a maximum ring thickness of tens of meters, however, is in conflict with observations of ring thickness of at least 0.8 km at ring-plane passage. It is shown that perturbations to ring particle orbits caused by the sun and Saturn's large satellites may produce long- and short-period coherent vertical ring displacements and a nonlinear displacement of the ring plane from the equatorial plane with radial distance, leading to an apparent edge-on thickness of a few hundred meters.

  2. Weather Research and Forecasting Model with Vertical Nesting Capability

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-08-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with vertical nesting capability is an extension of the WRF model, which is available in the public domain, from www.wrf-model.org. The new code modifies the nesting procedure, which passes lateral boundary conditions between computational domains in the WRF model. Previously, the same vertical grid was required on all domains, while the new code allows different vertical grids to be used on concurrently run domains. This new functionality improvesmore » WRF's ability to produce high-resolution simulations of the atmosphere by allowing a wider range of scales to be efficiently resolved and more accurate lateral boundary conditions to be provided through the nesting procedure.« less

  3. Recent vertical surface movements in the Carpathian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joó, I.

    1992-02-01

    Within the framework of the co-operation of the academies of sciences and geodetic services of European socialist countries, intensive and repeated geodetic investigations have been carried out with the purpose of revealing characteristic features of recent vertical movements of the area between the Urals and Eastern Europe. During the first period of investigations (the second half of the 1960s) the then available data from repeated levellings were used. Later geodetic surveys established a new levelling network of outstanding accuracy. By means of this net, the reliability of deduced velocities could be improved. Until now, maps of recent vertical movements were compiled twice at a scale of 1:1,000,000. Due to the above-mentioned investigations, recent vertical movements of the Carpathian Basin can be accurately described. This paper presents results for the main geologic and geographic units of the area.

  4. Weather Research and Forecasting Model with Vertical Nesting Capability

    SciTech Connect

    2014-08-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with vertical nesting capability is an extension of the WRF model, which is available in the public domain, from www.wrf-model.org. The new code modifies the nesting procedure, which passes lateral boundary conditions between computational domains in the WRF model. Previously, the same vertical grid was required on all domains, while the new code allows different vertical grids to be used on concurrently run domains. This new functionality improves WRF's ability to produce high-resolution simulations of the atmosphere by allowing a wider range of scales to be efficiently resolved and more accurate lateral boundary conditions to be provided through the nesting procedure.

  5. Identification of vehicle parameters and estimation of vertical forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imine, H.; Fridman, L.; Madani, T.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present work is to estimate the vertical forces and to identify the unknown dynamic parameters of a vehicle using the sliding mode observers approach. The estimation of vertical forces needs a good knowledge of dynamic parameters such as damping coefficient, spring stiffness and unsprung masses, etc. In this paper, suspension stiffness and unsprung masses have been identified by the Least Square Method. Real-time tests have been carried out on an instrumented static vehicle, excited vertically by hydraulic jacks. The vehicle is equipped with different sensors in order to measure its dynamics. The measurements coming from these sensors have been considered as unknown inputs of the system. However, only the roll angle and the suspension deflection measurements have been used in order to perform the observer. Experimental results are presented and discussed to show the quality of the proposed approach.

  6. Generation and evoluation of near-optimum vertical flight profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    The overall objectives of this research effort have been to develop and evaluate algorithms and flight management concepts for minimization of fuel or direct operating costs. These concepts are to be used for flight planning or for on-board computation and steering of turbojet transport aircraft in the vertical path. Within this research context, a computer program, called OPTIM, has been developed to use these algorithms to generate near-optimum vertical reference profiles. OPTIM contains control options to examine effects of various flight constraints on cost performance. A companion program, called TRAGEN, was developed to simulate an aircraft flying along a given vertical reference profile. TRAGEN is used to verify OPTIM's output , to examine the effects of parameter value uncertainty (such as prevailing wind), and to compare cost performance of profiles generated by different techniques. This paper describes OPTIM and TRAGEN and presents examples of the programs utility.

  7. Comparison of Vertical Light Wooden Constructions Insulated by Straw Bales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kováč, Miloslav

    2015-11-01

    The main task of configuring engineer by designing enclosure construction is to setup performances of the wall to the best options for existing conditions of the structure. Selecting and adjusting bearing elements of perimeter wall is the first step, however appropriateness and position of chosen materials has major influence on technical properties and architectural expression of structure. Besides light vertical constructions (LVC) there are light wooden constructions from glued elements (LPVC), heavy vertical constructions (HVC) and prefabricated vertical constructions (PVC). All types have specifications allowing alternatives in terms of layer structure and bearing elements position. Each type is considered in terms of: structure - 2D drawing and 3D model, thermal insulation, overall heat transfer coefficient, architectural examination.

  8. Vertical roughness of Mars from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvin, James B.; Frawley, James J.; Abshire, James B.

    The vertical roughness of the martian surface at ˜250 m spatial scales has been determined in two global latitude bands: an equatorial and a high northern band acquired from 18 tracks of data by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) during the Fall of 1997. The distribution of RMS vertical roughness, as derived from MOLA pulse widths, for the equatorial band is non-gaussian, with an overall mean of 2.8 m RMS, but with secondary populations at 1.5 m and 2-6 m RMS. The higher latitude northern plains of Mars are almost uniformly ˜1 m RMS in their vertical roughness characteristics, suggesting that they are smoother than virtually any terrestrial deserts. We suggest that dust mantling has muted the local topography of Mars, rendering it as smooth as 1-2 m RMS. Heavily cratered uplands near the martian equator are noticeably rougher, indicating more rugged and less-mantled local topography.

  9. Convective flows in enclosures with vertical temperature or concentration gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, L. W.; Chai, A. T.; Sun, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    The transport process in the fluid phase during the growth of a crystal has a profound influence on the structure and quality of the solid phase. In vertical growth techniques the fluid phase is often subjected to vertical temperature and concentration gradients. The main objective is to obtain more experimental data on convective flows in enclosures with vertical temperature or concentration gradients. Among actual crystal systems the parameters vary widely. The parametric ranges studied for mass transfer are mainly dictated by the electrochemical system employed to impose concentration gradients. Temperature or concentration difference are maintained between two horizontal end walls. The other walls are kept insulated. Experimental measurements and observations were made of the heat transfer or mass transfer, flow patterns, and the mean and fluctuating temperature distribution. The method used to visualize the flow pattern in the thermal cases is an electrochemical pH-indicator method. Laser shadowgraphs are employed to visualize flow patterns in the solutal cases.

  10. Observation of short ballistic Josephson effect in vertical graphene junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gil-Ho; Lee, Hu-Jong

    2014-03-01

    The current-phase relation (CPR) of vertical graphene Josephson junctions (vGJJs) was measured using phase-sensitive dc-SQUID interferometry. A vGJJ, realized by vertically sandwiching a monolayer graphene between two Al electrodes, had an atomically short channel with transparent contacts for the highly coherent junction nature. The measured CPR was almost perfectly skewed, which rigorously confirmed the short ballisticity of the vGJJs. The short ballistic character of a Josephson junction has been predicted since 1970's but has never been realized in scalable hybrid systems. The CPR also provided energy spectrum of Andreev levels formed inside the junction, which offered a promising prospect for scalable quantum information devices such as Andreev-level qubits. This vertical-junction scheme is also readily applicable to the other cleavable materials such as three-dimensional topological insulators or transition metal dichalcogenides, opening a new pathway for uncovering exotic coherence phenomena arising in an atomic scale.

  11. Vertically-oriented nanoparticle dimer based on focused plasmonic trapping.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhe; Su, Lei; Shen, Yao-Chun

    2016-07-11

    We proposed a vertically-oriented dimer structure based on focused plasmonic trapping of metallic nanoparticle. Quantitative FDTD calculations and qualitative analysis by simplified dipole approximation revealed that localized surface plasmon coupling dominates in the plasmon hybridization, and the vertically-oriented dimer can effectively make use of the dominant longitudinal component of the surface plasmon virtual probe thus providing much stronger electric field in the gap. Furthermore, for practical application the top nanoparticle of the dimer can be replaced with an atomic force microscope tip which enables the precise control of the gap distance of the dimer. Therefore the proposed vertically-oriented dimer structure provides both the scanning capability and the extremely-high electrical field necessary for the high sensitivity Raman imaging. PMID:27410874

  12. Reconstruction of Vertical Profile of Permittivity of Layered Media which is Probed Using Vertical Differential Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochanin, Gennadiy P.; Poyedinchuk, Anatoliy Y.; Varianytsia-Roshchupkina, Liudmyla A.; Pochanina, Iryna Ye.

    2016-04-01

    Results of this research are intended to use at GPR investigations of layered media (for example, at roads' inspection) for the processing of collected data and reconstruction of dependence of permittivity on the depth. Recently, an antenna system with a vertical differential configuration of receiving module (Patent UA81652) for GPR was suggested and developed The main advantage of the differential antennas in comparison with bistatic antennas is a high electromagnetic decoupling between the transmitting and receiving modules. The new vertical differential configuration has an additional advantage because it allows collecting GPR data reflected by layered media without any losses of information about these layers [1] and, potentially, it is a more accurate instrument for the layers thickness measurements [2]. The developed antenna system is tested in practice with the GPR at asphalt thickness measurements [3] and shown an accuracy which is better than 0.5 cm. Since this antenna system is good for sounding from above the surface (air coupled technique), the mobile laboratory was equipped with the developed GPR [3]. In order to process big set of GPR data that collected during probing at long routes of the roads, for the data processing it was tested new algorithm of the inverse problem solution. It uses a fast algorithm for calculation of electromagnetic wave diffraction by non-uniform anisotropic layers [4]. The algorithm is based on constructing a special case solution to the Riccati equation for the Cauchy problem and enables a qualitative description of the wave diffraction by the electromagnetic structure of the type within a unitary framework. At this stage as initial data we used synthetic GPR data that were obtained as results of the FDTD simulation of the problem of UWB electromagnetic impulse diffraction on layered media. Differential and bistatic antenna configurations were tested at several different profiles of permittivity. Meanings of permittivity of

  13. Statistical Analysis of GPS Vertical Uplift Rates in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, S. M.; Smith-Konter, B. R.; Frazer, L. N.; Tong, X.; Sandwell, D. T.

    2014-12-01

    Variations in crustal surface velocities obtained from GPS stations provide key constraints on physical models that predict surface deformation in response to earthquake cycle loading processes. Vertical GPS velocities, however, are highly susceptible to short scale (<10's km) variations in both magnitude and direction induced by local changes in water-storage, pore pressure, precipitation, and water runoff. These short-wavelength spatial variations both dominate and contaminate vertical GPS velocity measurements and often mask coherent long-wavelength deformation signals. Because of these complications, vertical GPS velocities, like those provided by EarthScope's Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), have traditionally been omitted from crustal deformation models. Here we attempt to overcome these obstacles by first eliminating GPS velocities influenced by non-tectonic deformation sources based on high-resolution InSAR data. Second, we employ model selection, a statistical technique that provides an objective and robust estimate of the velocity field that best describes the regional signal without overfitting the highly variable short-wavelength noise. Spline-based interpolation techniques are also used to corroborate these models. We compare these results to published physical models that simulate 3D viscoelastic earthquake cycle deformation and find that the statistical PBO vertical velocity model is in good agreement (0.55 mm/yr residual) with physical model predictions of vertical deformation in Southern California. We also utilize sources of disagreement as a tool for improving our physical model and to further inspect non-tectonic sources of deformation. Moreover, these results suggest that vertical GPS velocities can be used as additional physical model constraints, leading to a better understanding of faulting parameters that are critical to seismic hazard analyses.

  14. Twilight vertical migrations of zooplankton in a Chilean fjord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo; Castro, Leonardo; Cáceres, Mario; Pizarro, Oscar

    2014-12-01

    Time series of acoustic backscatter and vertical velocity profiles were obtained at three sites along a Chilean fjord with the purpose of determining dominant structures of vertical migrations of the sound scattering layer. Ancillary data obtained with stratified net samples indicated that the sound scattering layer may have been dominated by euphausiids and decapods. Therefore, distributions of acoustic backscatter anomalies and vertical velocities were attributed to vertical migrations of predominantly these organisms. Migration patterns were dominated by twilight excursions in which organisms swam toward the water surface at sunset, spent <0.5 h at a depth near the pycnocline (∼10 m) and then swam downward to depths between ∼20 and ∼60 m. After congregating at those depths during night-time, organisms swam upward again toward the pycnocline at sunrise, spent <1 h near the pycnocline and swam downward to their day-time depths (>100 m). This migration strategy can also be termed 'semidiel migration' as two double excursions were linked to light levels. The reasons for this twilight migration remain uncertain. But it is possible that the up and down motion around sunset was related to predation avoidance, hunger-satiation state, ontogeny, seaward transport evasion, or reaction to the environmental shock from the pycnocline, or a combination of all or some of them. In contrast, the sunrise double excursion was probably linked to feeding requirements by organisms that need to spend the day at great depth with no food available. This study demonstrated the existence of semidiel patterns throughout the fjord and through prolonged periods. In addition, identification of this pattern by acoustic backscatter was complemented by direct vertical velocity measurements. It is proposed that twilight vertical migration is a common strategy in Chilean fjords.

  15. Redressing dis-advantage: promoting vertical equity within South Africa.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, D; Gilson, L

    2000-01-01

    This paper represents the first attempt to apply vertical equity principles to the South African health sector. A vertical equity approach, which recognises that different groups have different starting points and therefore require differential treatment, appears to offer an appropriate basis for considering how best to redress the vast inequities which exist in post-Apartheid South Africa. Vertical equity principles are applied in critically analysing two areas of recent policy action which are particularly relevant to health sector equity in South Africa, namely public-private sector cross-subsidies and the allocation of government resources between provinces. Despite a strong political commitment to redressing historical inequities, recent government policy actions in these two areas appear to fall short of desirable goals when viewed through a vertical equity lens. In particular, policies since the first democratic elections in 1994 have done little to reduce the extent of government subsidies to the private health sector, which serves a minority of the population. In addition, recent proposals for a Social Health Insurance will allow minimal cross-subsidies between high- and low-income earners and would not adequately redress the currently inequitable public-private cross-subsidies. With respect to the allocation of government resources between provinces, a vertical equity approach would suggest that the most historically dis-advantaged provinces have an even greater claim on government resources than reflected in the current formula, as developed by the Department of Finance. This paper also considers the potential benefits of engaging with societal views in determining what constitutes dis-advantage in the South African context, in order to identify those who should receive priority in resource allocation decisions. It concludes with a review of a number of practical steps that can be taken to draw vertical equity principles into policy action. PMID:11186024

  16. Review of selected oceanic EM/EO scattering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, Merrick C.

    2010-02-01

    Electromagnetic and electro-optical (EM/EO) propagation and scattering in the ocean is of interest for a wide range of science problems. For example, the biological productivity of ocean waters through photochemical processes is governed by the vertical attenuation of solar radiation. Also, EO scattering theory is the primary basis for determining biogeochemical parameters (e.g. phytoplankton, suspended sediments, and dissolved matter) from the water leaving optical radiance. In addition, EO scattering from suspended sediments and bubbles is the limiting factor for active lidar systems used to map the sea bottom. This work will review specific applications of EO/EM scattering theory with regard to the influence of bubbles and droplets on remote sensing in the nearshore ocean. The current state of understanding concerning models and applications for optical scattering from bubbles in the water column as well as microwave scattering from water droplets produced by breaking waves at the ocean surface will be discussed as well as future research directions.

  17. Association between traditional standing vertical jumps and a soccer-specific vertical jump.

    PubMed

    Requena, Bernardo; Garcia, Inmaculada; Requena, Francisco; Bressel, Eadric; Saez-Saez de Villarreal, Eduardo; Cronin, John

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the relationships between a soccer-specific vertical jump (ssVJ) test, that included common elements of a soccer VJ (e.g. run-up and intention to head), and three traditional VJ tests using elite soccer players. A secondary purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of the VJs used in the analysis. A randomised order and counterbalanced design was used to assess the relationships between these VJs [countermovement jump (CMJ), drop jump for height (DJh), drop jump for maximum height and minimum ground contact time (DJh/t) and the ssVJ]. Take-off velocity, contact time and flight time were the dependent variables of interest and compared between jumps. Intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (CV) were used as measures of inter-session reliability. All VJ tests were found to have high ICCs (0.89-0.99) and acceptable within-subject CVs (<7.5%). All the ssVJ dependent variables were not significantly related (r<0.44) with similar variables from the CMJ and DJh tests and only moderately related (r=~0.49) with the DJh/t test variables. In addition, the DJh/t variables were not significantly correlated (r<0.47) with DJh and CMJ test variables. In conclusion, it would seem that the proposed ssVJ test and CMJ or DJh tests assess different leg qualities and thought should be given before using them interchangeably to assess or develop the same performance measures (i.e. velocity at take-off or jump height). PMID:24444234

  18. Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer

    Shupe, Matthew

    2013-05-22

    Time-height fields of retrieved in-cloud vertical wind velocity and turbulent dissipation rate, both retrieved primarily from vertically-pointing, Ka-band cloud radar measurements. Files are available for manually-selected, stratiform, mixed-phase cloud cases observed at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site during periods covering the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE, late September through early November 2004) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC, April-early May 2008). These time periods will be expanded in a future submission.

  19. Anomalously Strong Vertical Magnetic Fields from Distant Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silber, I.; Price, C. G.; Galanti, E.; Shuval, A.

    2014-12-01

    At distances of thousands of kilometers from lightning the vertical component of the magnetic field in the Very Low Frequencies (VLF - 3-30 kHz) and Extremely Low Frequencies (ELF - 3-3000 Hz) is expected to be very weak and several orders of magnitude lower than the horizontal magnetic components. However, measurements in Israel show a relatively strong vertical magnetic component in both the ELF and VLF bands, at the same order of magnitude as the horizontal components. Our measurements suggest that the real Earth-ionosphere waveguide might often be very different from the theoretical waveguide used in model calculations.

  20. Verification of the naval oceanic vertical aerosol model during FIRE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, K. L.; Deleeuw, G.; Gathman, S. G.; Jensen, D. R.

    1990-01-01

    The value of Naval Oceanic Vertical Aerosol Model (NOVAM) is illustrated for estimating the non-uniform and non-logarithmic extinction profiles, based on a severe test involving conditions close to and beyond the limits of applicability of NOVAM. A more comprehensive evaluation of NOVAM from the FIRE data is presented, which includes a clear-air case. For further evaluation more data are required on the vertical structure of the extinction in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL), preferably for different meteorological conditions and in different geographic areas (e.g., ASTEX).

  1. Vertical-cavity in-plane heterostructures: Physics and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Taghizadeh, Alireza; Mørk, Jesper; Chung, Il-Sug

    2015-11-02

    We show that in-plane (lateral) heterostructures realized in vertical cavities with high contrast grating reflectors can be used to significantly modify the anisotropic dispersion curvature, also interpreted as the photon effective mass. This design freedom enables exotic configurations of heterostructures and many interesting applications. The effects of the anisotropic photon effective mass on the mode confinement, mode spacing, and transverse modes are investigated. As a possible application, the method of boosting the speed of diode lasers by engineering the photon-photon resonance is discussed. Based on this platform, we propose a system of two laterally coupled cavities, which shows the breaking of parity-time symmetry in vertical cavity structures.

  2. Novel strategy for the synthesis of vertically orientated carbon nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Cabero, M.; Kuvshinov, D.; Guerrero-Ruiz, A.; Rodriguez-Ramos, I.

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents a first approach of a simple way to obtain vertically orientated carbon nanotubes. The used catalytic system consisted of quartz or graphite plates, on which some iron solutions (of precursors such as nitrates or phthalocyanines) were deposited by simple impregnation, generating homogeneous films. After drying, the plates were submitted to reduction and reaction procedure, which consisted in acetylene decomposition at 750 deg. C during 1 h. Samples after reaction were studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, which confirmed the formation of homogeneous and vertically orientated structures of carbon nanotubes over the plates.

  3. Vertical vibration and shape oscillation of acoustically levitated water drops

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, D. L.; Xie, W. J.; Yan, N.; Wei, B.

    2014-09-08

    We present the vertical harmonic vibration of levitated water drops within ultrasound field. The restoring force to maintain such a vibration mode is provided by the resultant force of acoustic radiation force and drop gravity. Experiments reveal that the vibration frequency increases with the aspect ratio for drops with the same volume, which agrees with the theoretical prediction for those cases of nearly equiaxed drops. During the vertical vibration, the floating drops undergo the second order shape oscillation. The shape oscillation frequency is determined to be twice the vibration frequency.

  4. Evaluation of vertical profiles to design continuous descent approach procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep, Priyank

    The current research focuses on predictability, variability and operational feasibility aspect of Continuous Descent Approach (CDA), which is among the key concepts of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). The idle-thrust CDA is a fuel economical, noise and emission abatement procedure, but requires increased separation to accommodate for variability and uncertainties in vertical and speed profiles of arriving aircraft. Although a considerable amount of researches have been devoted to the estimation of potential benefits of the CDA, only few have attempted to explain the predictability, variability and operational feasibility aspect of CDA. The analytical equations derived using flight dynamics and Base of Aircraft and Data (BADA) Total Energy Model (TEM) in this research gives insight into dependency of vertical profile of CDA on various factors like wind speed and gradient, weight, aircraft type and configuration, thrust settings, atmospheric factors (deviation from ISA (DISA), pressure and density of the air) and descent speed profile. Application of the derived equations to idle-thrust CDA gives an insight into sensitivity of its vertical profile to multiple factors. This suggests fixed geometric flight path angle (FPA) CDA has higher degree of predictability and lesser variability at the cost of non-idle and low thrust engine settings. However, with optimized design this impact can be overall minimized. The CDA simulations were performed using Future ATM Concept Evaluation Tool (FACET) based on radar-track and aircraft type data (BADA) of the real air-traffic to some of the busiest airports in the USA (ATL, SFO and New York Metroplex (JFK, EWR and LGA)). The statistical analysis of the vertical profiles of CDA shows 1) mean geometric FPAs derived from various simulated vertical profiles are consistently shallower than 3° glideslope angle and 2) high level of variability in vertical profiles of idle-thrust CDA even in absence of

  5. A thermobaric instability of Lagrangian vertical coordinate ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallberg, Robert

    Lagrangian- (and isopycnic-) vertical coordinate ocean models are subject to an exponentially growing numerical instability in weakly stratified regions when thermobaricity is not accurately compensated. Inaccurate compensation for compressibility in the pressure gradient terms leads to pressure gradient truncation errors (due to the vertical discretization) that can drive the Lagrangian coordinate surfaces to reinforce these errors. It is possible to avoid this instability while using the full non-linear equation of state for seawater by using an optimal alternate discretization of the pressure gradient terms and extracting a slowly spatially varying reference compressibility that approximates the compressibility of the ocean's mean state.

  6. Exploration of Titan using Vertical Lift Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, L. A.

    2001-01-01

    Autonomous vertical lift aerial vehicles (such as rotorcraft or powered-lift vehicles) hold considerable potential for supporting planetary science and exploration missions. Vertical lift aerial vehicles would have the following advantages/attributes for planetary exploration: low-speed and low-altitude detailed aerial surveys; remote-site sample return to lander platforms; precision placement of scientific probes; soft landing capability for vehicle reuse (multiple flights) and remote-site monitoring; greater range, speed, and access to hazardous terrain than a surface rover; greater resolution of surface details than an orbiter or balloons. Exploration of Titan presents an excellent opportunity for the development and usage of such vehicles.

  7. Thermally optimum spacing of vertical, natural convection cooled, parallel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, A.; Rohsenow, W. M.

    Vertical two-dimensional channels formed by parallel plates or fins are a frequently encountered configuration in natural convection cooling in air of electronic equipment. In connection with the complexity of heat dissipation in vertical parallel plate arrays, little theoretical effort is devoted to thermal optimization of the relevant packaging configurations. The present investigation is concerned with the establishment of an analytical structure for analyses of such arrays, giving attention to useful relations for heat distribution patterns. The limiting relations for fully-developed laminar flow, in a symmetric isothermal or isoflux channel as well as in a channel with an insulated wall, are derived by use of a straightforward integral formulation.

  8. Visualization of A-Train vertical profiles using Google Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aijun; Leptoukh, Gregory; Kempler, Steven; Lynnes, Christopher; Savtchenko, Andery; Nadeau, Denis; Farley, John

    2009-02-01

    Online tools, such as those pioneered by Google Earth (GE), are changing the way in which scientists and the general public interact with three-dimensional geospatial data in a virtual environment. However, while GE provides a number of features to facilitate geospatial data visualization, there is currently no readily available method for rendering vertical geospatial data derived from Earth—viewing remote sensing satellites as an orbit curtain seen from above. Here, a solution (one of many possible) is demonstrated to render vertical profiles of atmospheric data from the A-Train satellite formation in GE, using as a proof-of-concept data from one of the instruments—the NASA CloudSat satellite. CloudSat carries a nadir-viewing Cloud Profiling Radar that produces data revealing the vertical distribution of cloud characteristics along the satellite track. These data are first rendered into a long vertical image for a user-selected spatial range through the NASA Goddard Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure (G IOVANNI) system ( http://giovanni.gsfc.nasa.gov/). The vertical image is then chopped into small slices representing 15 s of satellite time (˜103 km long ground distance). Each small piece, as a texture, is fed into a generalized COLLAborative Design Activity (COLLADA) three-dimensional (3-D) model. Using the satellite orbit coordinates, the repeated 15 s "3-D model slices" are spliced together to form a vertical "curtain" image in Keyhole Markup Language (KML) format. Each model slice is geolocated along the CloudSat orbit path based on its size, scale and angle with the longitude line that are precisely calculated on the fly. The resulting vertical cloud data can be viewed in GE, either transparently or opaquely, superimposed above the Earth's surface with an exaggerated vertical scale. Since CloudSat is just a part of the A-Train formation, the full utility of this tool can be explored within the context of the A-Train Data Depot

  9. Entrainment instability and vertical motion as causes of stratocumulus breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, C. J.; Pearson, R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Entrainment instability is thought to be a cause of stratocumulus breakup. At the interface between the cloud and the overlying air, mixtures may form which are negatively buoyant because of cloud droplet evaporation. Quantities devised to predict breakup are obtained from aircraft observations and are tested against cloud observations from satellite. Often, the parameters indicate that breakup should occur but the clouds remain, sometimes for several days. One possible explanation for breakup is vertical motion from passing synoptic cyclones. Several cases suggest that breakup is associated with the downward vertical motion from the cold air advected behind an eastward moving cyclone.

  10. Simulator certification methods and the vertical motion simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Showalter, T. W.

    1981-01-01

    The vertical motion simulator (VMS) is designed to simulate a variety of experimental helicopter and STOL/VTOL aircraft as well as other kinds of aircraft with special pitch and Z axis characteristics. The VMS includes a large motion base with extensive vertical and lateral travel capabilities, a computer generated image visual system, and a high speed CDC 7600 computer system, which performs aero model calculations. Guidelines on how to measure and evaluate VMS performance were developed. A survey of simulation users was conducted to ascertain they evaluated and certified simulators for use. The results are presented.

  11. Process control improvements realized in a vertical reactor cluster tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkhoven, Chris J.; Granneman, E. H.; Lindow, E.

    1993-04-01

    Advance cell structures present in high-density memories and logic devices require high quality, ultra thin dielectric and conductor films. By controlling the interface properties of such films, remarkable process control enhancements of manufacturing proven, vertical LPCVD and oxidation processes are realized. To this end, an HF/H2O vapor etch reactor is integrated in a vacuum cluster tool comprising vertical reactors for the various LPCVD and oxidation processes. Data of process control improvement are provided for polysilicon emitters, polysilicon contacts, polysilicon gates, and NO capacitors. Finally, the cost of ownership of cluster tool use is compared with that of stand-along equipment.

  12. Vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser device

    DOEpatents

    Hadley, G. Ronald; Lear, Kevin L.; Awyoung, Adelbert; Choquette, Kent D.

    1999-01-01

    A vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser device. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) device comprises one or more VCSELs with each VCSEL having a mode-control region thereabout, with the mode-control region forming an optical cavity with an effective cavity length different from the effective cavity length within each VCSEL. Embodiments of the present invention can be formed as single VCSELs and as one- or two-dimensional arrays of VCSELs, with either an index-guided mode of operation or an index anti-guided mode of operation being defined by a sign of the difference in the two effective cavity lengths.

  13. Vertical vibration and shape oscillation of acoustically levitated water drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, D. L.; Xie, W. J.; Yan, N.; Wei, B.

    2014-09-01

    We present the vertical harmonic vibration of levitated water drops within ultrasound field. The restoring force to maintain such a vibration mode is provided by the resultant force of acoustic radiation force and drop gravity. Experiments reveal that the vibration frequency increases with the aspect ratio for drops with the same volume, which agrees with the theoretical prediction for those cases of nearly equiaxed drops. During the vertical vibration, the floating drops undergo the second order shape oscillation. The shape oscillation frequency is determined to be twice the vibration frequency.

  14. Alveolar Echinococcosis: Characterization of Diagnostic Antigen Em18 and Serological Evaluation of Recombinant Em18

    PubMed Central

    Sako, Yasuhito; Nakao, Minoru; Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Gottstein, Bruno; Lightowers, Marshall W.; Schantz, Peter M.; Ito, Akira

    2002-01-01

    The Echinococcus multilocularis protein Em18 is one of the most promising antigens for use in serodiagnosis of alveolar echinococcosis in human patients. Here we identify an antigenic relationship between Em18 and a 65-kDa immunodominant E. multilocularis surface protein previously identified as either EM10 or EmII/3. The NH2-terminal sequence of native Em18 was determined, revealing it to be a fragment of EM10. Experiments were undertaken to investigate the effect of proteinase inhibitors on the degradation of EM10 in crude extracts of E. multilocularis protoscoleces. Em18 was found to be the product of degradation of EM10 by cysteine proteinase. A recombinant Em18 (RecEm18, derived from 349K to 508K of EM10) was successfully expressed by using Escherichia coli expression system and then evaluated for use in serodiagnosis of alveolar echinococcosis. RecEm18 was recognized by 27 (87.1%) and 28 (90.3%) of 31 serum samples from clinically and/or pathologically confirmed alveolar echinococcosis patients by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblotting, respectively. Of 33 serum samples from cystic echinococcosis patients, 1 was recorded as having a weak positive reaction to RecEm18; however, none of the serum samples which were tested from neurocysticercosis patients (n = 10) or healthy people (n = 15) showed positive reactions. RecEm18 has the potential for use in the differential serodiagnosis of alveolar echinococcosis. PMID:12149326

  15. Segmental and Kinetic Contributions in Vertical Jumps Performed with and without an Arm Swing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feltner, Michael E.; Bishop, Elijah J.; Perez, Cassandra M.

    2004-01-01

    To determine the contributions of the motions of the body segments to the vertical ground reaction force ([F.sub.z]), the joint torques produced by the leg muscles, and the time course of vertical velocity generation during a vertical jump, 15 men were videotaped performing countermovement vertical jumps from a force plate with and without an arm…

  16. The European Mobile System (EMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jongejans, A.; Rogard, R.; Mistretta, I.; Ananasso, F.

    1993-01-01

    The European Space Agency is presently procuring an L band payload in order to promote a regional European L band system coping with the specific needs of the European market. The payload, and the two communications systems to be supported, are described below. The potential market for EMS in Europe is discussed.

  17. Vertical Integration: Corporate Strategy in the Information Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Lizzie; Cronin, Blaise

    1986-01-01

    Profiles the corporate strategies of three sectors of the information industry and the trend toward consolidation in electronic publishing. Three companies' acquisitions are examined in detail using qualitative data from information industry columns and interpreting it on the basis of game theory. (EM)

  18. Continental seismic events observed by the MPL vertical DIFAR array

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.B.; D`Spain, G.

    1993-11-01

    The vertical DIFAR array, an underwater acoustic sensor system, deployed by the Marine Physical Laboratory (MPL) was in place over the continental shelf off of Southern California and recorded the HUNTERS TROPHY nuclear test and nearly a score of after-shocks of the Landers/Big Bear earthquakes. Data from this array raise the possibility that detection thresholds for continental events may be significantly lower for arrays over the continental shelf than for arrays in the deep ocean basins. Offshore stations could be used to fill gaps in land-based seismic networks for monitoring the NPT and a CTBT, especially for monitoring non-cooperating nations with large coastlines. This preliminary report provides an analysis of the HUNTERS TROPHY observation as well as one of the Landers aftershocks. The analysis suggests detection thresholds for vertical hydrophone arrays below mb 3.0 at ranges between 3 and 4 degrees, and below mb 4.4 out to 6 degrees. This report also describes two signal processing techniques that enhance the detection potential of short vertical arrays. These methods are deterministic null steering to suppress horizontally propagating ambient ocean noise, and matched field processing for vertically-incident acoustic fields. The latter technique is ideally suited for acoustic fields derived from incident seismic waves, and may be viewed as a {open_quotes}synthetic aperture{close_quotes} approach to increase the effective aperture of the array.

  19. Vertical segregation of Calanus finmarchicus copepodites during the spring bloom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basedow, Sünnje L.; Edvardsen, Are; Tande, Kurt S.

    Factors influencing the vertical distribution of the most abundant grazer in the Norwegian Sea were studied in the open ocean. During May 5-14 2003 the upper 60 m of an oceanic area (10,000 km 2) in the northern Norwegian Sea were covered with a towed instrument platform collecting simultaneously in situ data on hydrography, chlorophyll a concentration and zooplankton abundance with high resolution in space and time. A consistent vertical distribution pattern of Calanus finmarchicus differing markedly from previously reported data was observed: CII-CIII copepodites were located below moderate to high chlorophyll a concentration, at depths below 30 m. CIV copepodites were located slightly higher in the water column and CV copepodites and adults were consistently found in the upper chlorophyll-rich layer. Partial constrained correspondence analysis revealed that the effect of physical factors and diel vertical migration was clearly secondary to chlorophyll a concentration in explaining the observed vertical segregation. The effects of toxic algae and predation are discussed in evolutionary context. These findings underline the importance of understanding stage-specific behaviour to build realistic models.

  20. Activity Based Startup Plan for Prototype Vertical Denitration Calciner

    SciTech Connect

    SUTTER, C.S.

    1999-08-31

    Testing activities on the Prototype Vertical Denitration Calciner at PFP were suspended in January 1997 due to the hold on fissile material handling in the facility. The restart of testing activities will require a review through an activity based startup process based upon Integrated Safety Management (ISM) principles to verify readiness. The Activity Based Startup Plan has been developed for this process.

  1. Origami building blocks: Generic and special four-vertices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waitukaitis, Scott; van Hecke, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Four rigid panels connected by hinges that meet at a point form a four-vertex, the fundamental building block of origami metamaterials. Most materials designed so far are based on the same four-vertex geometry, and little is known regarding how different geometries affect folding behavior. Here we systematically categorize and analyze the geometries and resulting folding motions of Euclidean four-vertices. Comparing the relative sizes of sector angles, we identify three types of generic vertices and two accompanying subtypes. We determine which folds can fully close and the possible mountain-valley assignments. Next, we consider what occurs when sector angles or sums thereof are set equal, which results in 16 special vertex types. One of these, flat-foldable vertices, has been studied extensively, but we show that a wide variety of qualitatively different folding motions exist for the other 15 special and 3 generic types. Our work establishes a straightforward set of rules for understanding the folding motion of both generic and special four-vertices and serves as a roadmap for designing origami metamaterials.

  2. Vertically Integrating Professional Skills throughout a Mathematics Major

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dziak, Clarice; Leventhal, Brian; Luttman, Aaron; Skufca, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    In response to a university mandate to include "professional issues" as a component of every major, we have developed a vertically integrated approach to incorporating the study of professional skills and issues into the mathematics curriculum. Beginning in the first year of study, mathematics majors take an inquiry-based course in…

  3. Modeling of Aerosol Vertical Profiles Using GIS and Remote Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Man Sing; Nichol, Janet E.; Lee, Kwon Ho

    2009-01-01

    The use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) by climatologists, environmentalists and urban planners for three dimensional modeling and visualization of the landscape is well established. However no previous study has implemented these techniques for 3D modeling of atmospheric aerosols because air quality data is traditionally measured at ground points, or from satellite images, with no vertical dimension. This study presents a prototype for modeling and visualizing aerosol vertical profiles over a 3D urban landscape in Hong Kong. The method uses a newly developed technique for the derivation of aerosol vertical profiles from AERONET sunphotometer measurements and surface visibility data, and links these to a 3D urban model. This permits automated modeling and visualization of aerosol concentrations at different atmospheric levels over the urban landscape in near-real time. Since the GIS platform permits presentation of the aerosol vertical distribution in 3D, it can be related to the built environment of the city. Examples are given of the applications of the model, including diagnosis of the relative contribution of vehicle emissions to pollution levels in the city, based on increased near-surface concentrations around weekday rush-hour times. The ability to model changes in air quality and visibility from ground level to the top of tall buildings is also demonstrated, and this has implications for energy use and environmental policies for the tall mega-cities of the future. PMID:22408531

  4. On the Conservation of the Vertical Action in Galactic Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera-Ciro, Carlos; D’Onghia, Elena

    2016-06-01

    We employ high-resolution N-body simulations of isolated spiral galaxy models, from low-amplitude, multi-armed galaxies to Milky Way-like disks, to estimate the vertical action of ensembles of stars in an axisymmetrical potential. In the multi-armed galaxy the low-amplitude arms represent tiny perturbations of the potential, hence the vertical action for a set of stars is conserved, although after several orbital periods of revolution the conservation degrades significantly. For a Milky Way-like galaxy with vigorous spiral activity and the formation of a bar, our results show that the potential is far from steady, implying that the action is not a constant of motion. Furthermore, because of the presence of high-amplitude arms and the bar, considerable in-plane and vertical heating occurs that forces stars to deviate from near-circular orbits, reducing the degree at which the actions are conserved for individual stars, in agreement with previous results, but also for ensembles of stars. If confirmed, this result has several implications, including the assertion that the thick disk of our Galaxy forms by radial migration of stars, under the assumption of the conservation of the action describing the vertical motion of stars.

  5. Modeling the vertical confinement of injection-well thermal fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, P.J.; Berry, P.J.; Gu, H. )

    1991-11-01

    Cooling of rock by water injection frequently causes fracturing of wells. This paper describes a 3D simulation model of thermally induced fracturing. It is used to show that fractures often tend to grow vertically into permeable zones. Procedures are outlined for confining fracture growth in wells where it will assist waterflood sweep performance.

  6. Vertical Photon Transport in Cloud Remote Sensing Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platnick, S.

    1999-01-01

    Photon transport in plane-parallel, vertically inhomogeneous clouds is investigated and applied to cloud remote sensing techniques that use solar reflectance or transmittance measurements for retrieving droplet effective radius. Transport is couched in terms of weighting functions which approximate the relative contribution of individual layers to the overall retrieval. Two vertical weightings are investigated, including one based on the average number of scatterings encountered by reflected and transmitted photons in any given layer. A simpler vertical weighting based on the maximum penetration of reflected photons proves useful for solar reflectance measurements. These weighting functions are highly dependent on droplet absorption and solar/viewing geometry. A superposition technique, using adding/doubling radiative transfer procedures, is derived to accurately determine both weightings, avoiding time consuming Monte Carlo methods. Superposition calculations are made for a variety of geometries and cloud models, and selected results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations. Effective radius retrievals from modeled vertically inhomogeneous liquid water clouds are then made using the standard near-infrared bands, and compared with size estimates based on the proposed weighting functions. Agreement between the two methods is generally within several tenths of a micrometer, much better than expected retrieval accuracy. Though the emphasis is on photon transport in clouds, the derived weightings can be applied to any multiple scattering plane-parallel radiative transfer problem, including arbitrary combinations of cloud, aerosol, and gas layers.

  7. Tensile Properties of the Murine Ventral Vertical Midline Incision

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Mark A.; Chakkalakal, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Background In clinical surgery, the vertical midline abdominal incision is popular but associated with healing failures. A murine model of the ventral vertical midline incision was developed in order to study the healing of this incision type. Methodology/Principal Findings The strength of the wild type murine ventral abdominal wall in the midline was contained within the dermis; the linea alba made a negligible contribution. Unwounded abdominal wall had a downward trend (nonsignificant) in maximal tension between 12 and 29 weeks of age. The incision attained 50% of its final strength by postoperative day 40. The maximal tension of the ventral vertical midline incision was nearly that of unwounded abdominal wall by postwounding day 60; there was no difference in unwounded vs. wounded maximal tension at postwounding day 120. Conclusions/Significance After 120 days of healing, the ventral vertical midline incision in the wild type mouse was not significantly different from age-matched nonwounded controls. About half of the final incisional strength was attained after 6 weeks of healing. The significance of this work was to establish the kinetics of wild type incisional healing in a model for which numerous genotypes and genetic tools would be available for subsequent study. PMID:21915298

  8. Horizontal and Vertical Simon Effect: Different Underlying Mechanisms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallesi, A.; Mapelli, D.; Schiff, S.; Amodio, P.; Umilta, C.

    2005-01-01

    Reaction times are usually faster when stimulus and response occur at the same location than when they do not, even if stimulus location is irrelevant to the task (Simon effect). This effect was found with both horizontal and vertical stimulus-response arrangements. The same mechanisms have been proposed to be involved in either case. Here, we…

  9. PARAMETRIC METHODOLOGIES OF CLOUD VERTICAL TRANSPORT FOR ACID DEPOSITION MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A CUmulus VENTing (CUVENT) cloud module has been developed that calculates the vertical flux of mass from the boundary layer to the cloud layer by an ensemble of nonprecipitating subgrid-scale air mass clouds. This model will be integrated into the Regional Acid Deposition Model ...

  10. Using Dynamic Solution Exercises to Achieve Vertical Course Alignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostler, Elliot; Flesch, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This paper justifies the need for, and offers some suggestions on, the selection and implementation of mathematical problems known as dynamic solution exercises (DSEs). The intent of this article is to help provide insight into how mathematics teachers can go about making "vertical articulation" a cooperative and tangible part of the mathematics…

  11. Active vertical tail buffeting suppression based on macro fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chengzhe; Li, Bin; Liang, Li; Wang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Aerodynamic buffet is unsteady airflow exerting forces onto a surface, which can lead to premature fatigue damage of aircraft vertical tail structures, especially for aircrafts with twin vertical tails at high angles of attack. In this work, Macro Fiber Composite (MFC), which can provide strain actuation, was used as the actuator for the buffet-induced vibration control, and the positioning of the MFC patches was led by the strain energy distribution on the vertical tail. Positive Position Feedback (PPF) control algorithm has been widely used for its robustness and simplicity in practice, and consequently it was developed to suppress the buffet responses of first bending and torsional mode of vertical tail. However, its performance is usually attenuated by the phase contributions from non-collocated sensor/actuator configuration and plants. The phase lag between the input and output signals of the control system was identified experimentally, and the phase compensation was considered in the PPF control algorithm. The simulation results of the amplitude frequency of the closed-loop system showed that the buffet response was alleviated notably around the concerned bandwidth. Then the wind tunnel experiment was conducted to verify the effectiveness of MFC actuators and compensated PPF, and the Root Mean Square (RMS) of the acceleration response was reduced 43.4%, 28.4% and 39.5%, respectively, under three different buffeting conditions.

  12. Vertical Flow Lithography for Fabrication of 3D Anisotropic Particles.

    PubMed

    Habasaki, Shohei; Lee, Won Chul; Yoshida, Shotaro; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-12-22

    A microfluidics-based method for the 3D fabrication of anisotropic particles is reported. The method uses a vertical microchannel where tunable light patterns solidify photocurable resins for stacking multiple layers of the resins, thus enabling an application of stereolithography concepts to conventional flow lithography. Multilayered, tapered, and angular compartmental microparticles are demonstrated. PMID:26551590

  13. Terminal Velocity of a Shuttlecock in Vertical Fall.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peastrel, Mark; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes a straightforward vertical fall experiment using a badminton shuttlecock, a tape measure, and a millisecond timer. The effects of air resistance are important and directly measurable. The experimental data best fit a predictive model which assumes a resistive force quadratic in the instantaneous speed of the falling object. (GS)

  14. Vertical uniformity of cells and nuclei in epithelial monolayers.

    PubMed

    Neelam, Srujana; Hayes, Peter Robert; Zhang, Qiao; Dickinson, Richard B; Lele, Tanmay P

    2016-01-01

    Morphological variability in cytoskeletal organization, organelle position and cell boundaries is a common feature of cultured cells. Remarkable uniformity and reproducibility in structure can be accomplished by providing cells with defined geometric cues. Cells in tissues can also self-organize in the absence of directing extracellular cues; however the mechanical principles for such self-organization are not understood. We report that unlike horizontal shapes, the vertical shapes of the cell and nucleus in the z-dimension are uniform in cells in cultured monolayers compared to isolated cells. Apical surfaces of cells and their nuclei in monolayers were flat and heights were uniform. In contrast, isolated cells, or cells with disrupted cell-cell adhesions had nuclei with curved apical surfaces and variable heights. Isolated cells cultured within micron-sized square wells displayed flat cell and nuclear shapes similar to cells in monolayers. Local disruption of nuclear-cytoskeletal linkages resulted in spatial variation in vertical uniformity. These results suggest that competition between cell-cell pulling forces that expand and shorten the vertical cell cross-section, thereby widening and flattening the nucleus, and the resistance of the nucleus to further flattening results in uniform cell and nuclear cross-sections. Our results reveal the mechanical principles of self-organized vertical uniformity in cell monolayers. PMID:26795751

  15. Horizontal stresses induced by vertical processes in planetary lithospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerdt, W. B.

    1993-01-01

    Understanding the state of stress in the elastic lithosphere is of fundamental importance for planetary geophysics, as it is the link between the observed geologic structures on the surface and the processes which form and modify these structures. As such, it can provide valuable constraints for the difficult problem of determining interior structure and processes. On the Earth, most large scale, organized deformation can be related to lateral tectonics associated with plate dynamics; however, the tectonics on many extraterrestrial bodies (such as the Moon, Mars, and most of the outer-planet satellites) appears to be primarily vertical in nature, and the horizontal stresses induced by vertical motions and loads are expected to dominate the deformation of their lithospheres. The largest stress contributions from vertical loading come from the flexure of the lithosphere, which induces both bending moments and membrane stresses. We are concerned here only with nonflexural changes in the state of stress induced by processes such as sedimentary and volcanic deposition, erosional denudation, and changes in the thermal gradient that induce uplift or subsidence. This analysis is important both for evaluating stresses for specific regions in which the vertical stress history can be estimated, as well as for applying the proper loading conditions to global stress models. It is also of interest for providing a reference state of stress for interpreting stress measurements in the crust of the Earth.

  16. AFC-Enabled Vertical Tail System Integration Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, Helen P.; Brandt, John B.; Lacy, Douglas S.; Whalen, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    This document serves as the final report for the SMAAART AFC-Enabled Vertical Tail System Integration Study. Included are the ground rule assumptions which have gone into the study, layouts of the baseline and AFC-enabled configurations, critical sizing information, system requirements and architectures, and assumed system properties that result in an NPV assessment of the two candidate AFC technologies.

  17. 24. DETAIL VIEW OF COLUMN #072 DEVIATING FROM VERTICAL IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. DETAIL VIEW OF COLUMN #072 DEVIATING FROM VERTICAL IN ROW OF INTACT COLUMNS, LOOKING NORTHEAST TO SOUTHWEST. (NOTE BOLTED BLOCK SCABBED TO COLUMN AS JOIST/TRUSS SUPPORT) - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  18. On the vertical-shear instability in astrophysical discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, A. J.; Latter, H. N.

    2015-06-01

    We explore the linear stability of astrophysical discs exhibiting vertical shear, which arises when there is a radial variation in the temperature or entropy. Such discs are subject to a `vertical-shear instability', which recent non-linear simulations have shown to drive hydrodynamic activity in the MRI-stable regions of protoplanetary discs. We first revisit locally isothermal discs using the quasi-global reduced model derived by Nelson et al. This analysis is then extended to global axisymmetric perturbations in a cylindrical domain. We also derive and study a reduced model describing discs with power-law radial entropy profiles (`locally polytropic discs'), which are somewhat more realistic in that they possess physical (as opposed to numerical) surfaces. The fastest growing modes have very short wavelengths and are localized at the disc surfaces (if present), where the vertical shear is maximal. An additional class of modestly growing vertically global body modes is excited, corresponding to destabilized classical inertial waves (`r modes'). We discuss the properties of both types of modes, and stress that those that grow fastest occur on the shortest available length-scales (determined either by the numerical grid or the physical viscous length). This ill-posedness makes simulations of the instability difficult to interpret. We end with some brief speculation on the non-linear saturation and resulting angular momentum transport.

  19. Nonlinear analysis on vertical distribution of suspended load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fuquan; Li, Houqiang; Ding, Jing

    1998-06-01

    In turbulent two-phase flows, the vertical distribution of suspended load has complex features under the actions of turbulence and gravity. The nonlinear dynamics and fractal features are investigated, and the nonlinear distribution is calculated. Some shortcomings of classical theories have been overcome.

  20. The vertical fingerprint of earthquake cycle loading in southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Samuel; Smith-Konter, Bridget; Frazer, Neil; Tong, Xiaopeng; Sandwell, David

    2016-08-01

    The San Andreas Fault System, one of the best-studied transform plate boundaries on Earth, is well known for its complex network of locked faults that slowly deform the crust in response to large-scale plate motions. Horizontal interseismic motions of the fault system are largely predictable, but vertical motions arising from tectonic sources remain enigmatic. Here we show that when carefully treated for spatial consistency, global positioning system-derived vertical velocities expose a small-amplitude (+/-2 mm yr-1), but spatially considerable (200 km), coherent pattern of uplift and subsidence straddling the fault system in southern California. We employ the statistical method of model selection to isolate this vertical velocity field from non-tectonic signals that induce velocity variations in both magnitude and direction across small distances (less than tens of kilometres; ref. ), and find remarkable agreement with the sense of vertical motions predicted by physical earthquake cycle models spanning the past few centuries. We suggest that these motions reveal the subtle, but identifiable, tectonic fingerprint of far-field flexure due to more than 300 years of fault locking and creeping depth variability. Understanding this critical component of interseismic deformation at a complex strike-slip plate boundary will better constrain regional mechanics and crustal rheology, improving the quantification of seismic hazards in southern California and beyond.