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Sample records for citrate-capped gold nanoparticles

  1. Selective photothermal efficiency of citrate capped gold nanoparticles for destruction of cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Raji, V.; Kumar, Jatish; Rejiya, C.S.; Vibin, M.; Shenoi, Vinesh N.; Abraham, Annie

    2011-08-15

    Gold nanoparticles are recently having much attention because of their increased applications in biomedical fields. In this paper, we demonstrated the photothermal efficacy of citrate capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for the destruction of A431 cancer cells. Citrate capped AuNPs were synthesized successfully and characterized by UV-visible-NIR spectrophotometry and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM). Further, AuNPs were conjugated with epidermal growth factor receptor antibody (anti-EGFR) and applied for the selective photothermal therapy (PTT) of human epithelial cancer cells, A431. PTT experiments were conducted in four groups, Group I-control cells, Group II-cells treated with laser light alone, Group III-cells treated with unconjugated AuNP and further laser irradiation and Group IV-anti-EGFR conjugated AuNP treated cells irradiated by laser light. After laser irradiation, cell morphology changes that were examined using phase contrast microscopy along with the relevant biochemical parameters like lactate dehydrogenase activity, reactive oxygen species generation and caspase-3 activity were studied for all the groups to determine whether cell death occurs due to necrosis or apoptosis. From these results we concluded that, these immunotargeted nanoparticles could selectively induce cell death via ROS mediated apoptosis when cells were exposed to a low power laser light.

  2. Comparison of the peroxidase-like activity of unmodified, amino-modified, and citrate-capped gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Chen, Wei; Liu, Ai-Lin; Hong, Lei; Deng, Hao-Hua; Lin, Xin-Hua

    2012-04-10

    The origin of the peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles and the impact of surface modification are studied. Furthermore, some influencing factors, such as fabrication process, redox property of the modifier, and charge property of the substrate, are investigated. Compared to amino-modified or citrate-capped gold nanoparticles, unmodified gold nanoparticles show significantly higher catalytic activity toward peroxidase substrates, that is, the superficial gold atoms are a contributing factor to the observed peroxidase-like activity. The different catalytic activities of amino-modified and citrate-capped gold nanoparticles toward 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) show that the charge characteristics of the nanoparticles and the substrate also play an important role in the catalytic reactions. PMID:22383315

  3. Self-healable and reversible liposome leakage by citrate-capped gold nanoparticles: probing the initial adsorption/desorption induced lipid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Liu, Juewen

    2015-09-01

    We herein report that the adsorption/desorption of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) transiently causes leakage in fluid phase DOPC liposomes, while the liposomes do not leak with AuNPs capped with mercaptopropionic acid (MPA). Leakage also fails to occur for gel phase DPPC liposomes. Citrate-capped (but not MPA-capped) AuNPs raise the phase transition temperature of DPPC. We conclude that citrate-capped AuNPs interact with the PC liposomes very strongly, inducing a local fluid-to-gel lipid phase transition for DOPC. Leakage takes place during this transition, and the membrane integrity is resumed after the transition. Citrate-capped AuNPs allow stronger van der Waals forces than MPA-capped AuNPs with PC liposomes, since the latter are separated from the liposome surface by the ~0.3 nm MPA layer.We herein report that the adsorption/desorption of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) transiently causes leakage in fluid phase DOPC liposomes, while the liposomes do not leak with AuNPs capped with mercaptopropionic acid (MPA). Leakage also fails to occur for gel phase DPPC liposomes. Citrate-capped (but not MPA-capped) AuNPs raise the phase transition temperature of DPPC. We conclude that citrate-capped AuNPs interact with the PC liposomes very strongly, inducing a local fluid-to-gel lipid phase transition for DOPC. Leakage takes place during this transition, and the membrane integrity is resumed after the transition. Citrate-capped AuNPs allow stronger van der Waals forces than MPA-capped AuNPs with PC liposomes, since the latter are separated from the liposome surface by the ~0.3 nm MPA layer. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Methods, TEM, UV-vis and DLS data. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04805b

  4. Characterization of citrate capped gold nanoparticle-quercetin complex: Experimental and quantum chemical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Rajat; Panigrahi, Swati; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay; Chakraborti, Abhay Sankar

    2013-08-01

    Quercetin and several other bioflavonoids possess antioxidant property. These biomolecules can reduce the diabetic complications, but metabolize very easily in the body. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of a flavonoid may further increase its efficacy. Gold nanoparticle is used by different groups as vehicle for drug delivery, as it is least toxic to human body. Prior to search for the enhanced efficacy, the gold nanoparticle-flavonoid complex should be prepared and well characterized. In this article, we report the interaction of gold nanoparticle with quercetin. The interaction is confirmed by different biophysical techniques, such as Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Circular Dichroism (CD), Fourier-Transform InfraRed (FT-IR) spectroscopy and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) and cross checked by quantum chemical calculations. These studies indicate that gold clusters are covered by citrate groups, which are hydrogen bonded to the quercetin molecules in the complex. We have also provided evidences how capping is important in stabilizing the gold nanoparticle and further enhances its interaction with other molecules, such as drugs. Our finding also suggests that gold nanoparticle-quercetin complex can pass through the membranes of human red blood cells.

  5. Adsorption of doxorubicin on citrate-capped gold nanoparticles: insights into engineering potent chemotherapeutic delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Dennis; Cameron, Amanda; MacDonald, Bruce; Nganou, Collins; Scheller, Hope; Marsh, James; Beale, Stefanie; Lu, Mingsheng; Shan, Zhi; Kaliaperumal, Rajendran; Xu, Heping; Servos, Mark; Bennett, Craig; Macquarrie, Stephanie; Oakes, Ken D.; Mkandawire, Martin; Zhang, Xu

    2015-11-01

    Gold nanomaterials have received great interest for their use in cancer theranostic applications over the past two decades. Many gold nanoparticle-based drug delivery system designs rely on adsorbed ligands such as DNA or cleavable linkers to load therapeutic cargo. The heightened research interest was recently demonstrated in the simple design of nanoparticle-drug conjugates wherein drug molecules are directly adsorbed onto the as-synthesized nanoparticle surface. The potent chemotherapeutic, doxorubicin often serves as a model drug for gold nanoparticle-based delivery platforms; however, the specific interaction facilitating adsorption in this system remains understudied. Here, for the first time, we propose empirical and theoretical evidence suggestive of the main adsorption process where (1) hydrophobic forces drive doxorubicin towards the gold nanoparticle surface before (2) cation-π interactions and gold-carbonyl coordination between the drug molecule and the cations on AuNP surface facilitate DOX adsorption. In addition, biologically relevant compounds, such as serum albumin and glutathione, were shown to enhance desorption of loaded drug molecules from AuNP at physiologically relevant concentrations, providing insight into the drug release and in vivo stability of such drug conjugates.Gold nanomaterials have received great interest for their use in cancer theranostic applications over the past two decades. Many gold nanoparticle-based drug delivery system designs rely on adsorbed ligands such as DNA or cleavable linkers to load therapeutic cargo. The heightened research interest was recently demonstrated in the simple design of nanoparticle-drug conjugates wherein drug molecules are directly adsorbed onto the as-synthesized nanoparticle surface. The potent chemotherapeutic, doxorubicin often serves as a model drug for gold nanoparticle-based delivery platforms; however, the specific interaction facilitating adsorption in this system remains understudied

  6. The Radiation Enhancement of 15 nm Citrate-Capped Gold Nanoparticles Exposed to 70 keV/μm Carbon Ions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Liu, Xi; Jin, Xiaodong; He, Pengbo; Zheng, Xiaogang; Ye, Fei; Chen, Weiqiang; Li, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Radiotherapy is an important modality for tumor treatment. The central goal of radiotherapy is to deliver a therapeutic dose to the tumor as much as possible whilst sparing the surrounding normal tissues. On one hand, heavy ion radiation induces maximum damage at the end of the track (called the Bragg Peak). Hadron therapy based on heavy ions is considered superior to conventional X-rays and γ-rays radiations for tumors sited in sensitive tissues, childhood cases and radioresistant cancers. On the other hand, radiation sensitizers enhanced the radiation effects in tumors by increasing the dose specifically to the tumor cells. Recently, the use of gold nanoparticles as potential tumor selective radio-sensitizers has been proposed as a breakthrough in radiotherapy with conventional radiations. The enhanced radiation effect of heavy ions in tumor by using gold nanoparticles as radio-sensitizer may provide alternative in hadron therapy. In this study, we investigated the radiosensitizing effects of carbon ions with a linear energy transfer of 70 keV/μm in the presence of 15 nm citrate-capped AuNPs. The existing of AuNPs resulted in 5.5-fold enhancement in hydroxyl radical production and 24.5% increment in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for carbon-ion-irradiated HeLa cells. The study indicated gold nanoparticles can be used as potential radio-sensitizer in carbon ions therapy. PMID:27455642

  7. Small-angle neutron scattering studies of mineralization on BSA coated citrate capped gold nanoparticles used as a model surface for membrane scaling in RO wastewater desalination.

    PubMed

    Dahdal, Y N; Pipich, V; Rapaport, H; Oren, Y; Kasher, R; Schwahn, D

    2014-12-23

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) coated on citrate capped gold nanoparticles (BSA-GNPs) was exposed to a simulated wastewater effluent (SSE) in order to study the mineralization and thereby mimic scaling at biofouled membranes of reverse osmosis (RO) wastewater desalination plants. RO is a leading technology of achieving freshwater quality as it has the capability of removing both dissolved inorganic salts and organic contaminants from tertiary wastewater effluents. The aim was to better understand one of the major problems facing this technology which is fouling of the membranes, mainly biofouling and scaling by calcium phosphate. The experiments were performed using the small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique. The nanoparticles, GNPs, stabilized by the citrate groups showed 30 Å large particles having a homogeneous distribution of gold and citrate with a gold volume fraction of the order of 1%. On the average two BSA monomers are grafted at 2.4 GNPs. The exposed BSA-GNPs to SSE solution led to immediate mineralization of stable composite particles of the order of 0.2 μm diameter and a mineral volume fraction between 50% and 80%. The volume fraction of the mineral was of the order of 10(-5), which is roughly 3 times larger but an order of magnitude smaller than the maximum possible contents of respectively calcium phosphate and calcium carbonate in the SSE solution. Considering the extreme low solubility product of calcium phosphate, we suggest total calcium phosphate and partially (5-10%) calcium carbonate formation in the presence of BSA-GNPs. PMID:25458085

  8. Cytotoxicity, intracellular localization and exocytosis of citrate capped and PEG functionalized gold nanoparticles in human hepatocyte and kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Tlotleng, Nonhlanhla; Vetten, Melissa A; Keter, Frankline K; Skepu, Amanda; Tshikhudo, Robert; Gulumian, Mary

    2016-08-01

    Surface-modified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are nanomaterials that hold promise in drug delivery applications. In this study, the cytotoxicity, uptake, intracellular localization, and the exocytosis of citrate-stabilized (Cit-AuNP) and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified gold nanoparticles with the carboxyl (COOH) terminal functional group were assessed in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) and the human caucasian hepatocytes carcinoma (Hep G2) cell systems, representing two major accumulation sites for AuNPs. The zeta (ζ)-potential measurements confirmed the negative surface charge of the AuNPs in water and in cell growth medium. The transmission electron microscopy confirmed the size and morphology of the AuNPs. Both types of AuNPs were shown to induce cytotoxic effects in cells. The Hep G2 cells were more sensitive cell type, with the COOH-PEG-AuNPs inducing the highest toxicity at higher concentrations. Dark field microscopy and TEM images revealed that the AuNPs were internalized in cells, mostly as agglomerates. TEM micrographs further revealed that the AuNPs were confined as agglomerates inside vesicle-like compartments, likely to be endosomal and lysosomal structures as well as in the cytosol, mostly as individual particles. The AuNPs were shown to remain in cellular compartments for up to 3 weeks, but thereafter, clearance of the gold nanoparticles from the cells by exocytosis was evident. The results presented in this study may therefore give an indication on the fate of AuNPs on long-term exposure to cells and may also assist in safety evaluation of AuNPs. PMID:27184667

  9. Toxicity of Citrate-Capped Silver Nanoparticles in Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byoungcheun; Duong, Cuong Ngoc; Cho, Jaegu; Lee, Jaewoo; Kim, Kyungtae; Seo, Youngrok; Kim, Pilje; Choi, Kyunghee; Yoon, Junheon

    2012-01-01

    Juvenile common carp (Cyprinus carpio) were used as a model to investigate acute toxicity and oxidative stress caused by silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs). The fish were exposed to different concentrations of Ag-NPs for 48 h and 96 h. After exposure, antioxidant enzyme levels were measured, including glutathione-S-transferase (GST), superoxidase dismutase, and catalase (CAT). Other biochemical parameters and histological abnormalities in different tissues (i.e., the liver, gills, and brain) were also examined. The results showed that Ag-NPs agglomerated in freshwater used during the exposure experiments, with particle size remaining <100 nm. Ag-NPs had no lethal effect on fish after 4 days of exposure. Biochemical analysis showed that enzymatic activities in the brain of the fish exposed to 200 μg/L of Ag-NPs were significantly reduced. Varied antioxidant enzyme activity was recorded in the liver and gills. Varied antioxidant enzyme activity was recorded for CAT in the liver and GST in the gills of the fish. However, the recovery rate of fish exposed to 200 μg/L of Ag-NPs was slower than when lower particle concentrations were used. Other biochemical indices showed no significant difference, except for NH3 and blood urea nitrogen concentrations in fish exposed to 50 μg/L of Ag-NPs. This study provides new evidence about the effects of nanoparticles on aquatic organisms. PMID:23093839

  10. Stability of citrate-capped silver nanoparticles in exposure media and their effects on the development of embryonic zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kwangsik; Tuttle, George; Sinche, Federico; Harper, Stace L.

    2014-01-01

    The stability of citrate-capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and the embryonic developmental toxicity were evaluated in the fish test water. Serious aggregation of AgNPs was observed in undiluted fish water (DM-100) in which high concentration of ionic salts exist. However, AgNPs were found to be stable for 7 days in DM-10, prepared by diluting the original fish water (DM-100) with deionized water to 10%. The normal physiology of zebrafish embryos were evaluated in DM-10 to see if DM-10 can be used as a control vehicle for the embryonic fish toxicity test. As results, DM-10 without AgNPs did not induce any significant adverse effects on embryonic development of zebrafish determined by mortality, hatching, malformations and heart rate. When embryonic toxicity of AgNPs was tested in both DM-10 and in DM-100, AgNPs showed higher toxicity in DM-10 than in DM-100. This means that the big-sized aggregates of AgNPs were low toxic compared to the nano-sized AgNPs. AgNPs induced delayed hatching, decreased heart rate, pericardial edema, and embryo death. Accumulation of AgNPs in the embryo bodies was also observed. Based on this study, citrate-capped AgNPs are not aggregated in DM-10 and it can be used as a control vehicle in the toxicity test of fish embryonic development. PMID:23325492

  11. Sensitive and selective SERS probe for trivalent chromium detection using citrate attached gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yingjie; Liu, Honglin; Yang, Liangbao; Liu, Jinhuai

    2012-09-01

    In this article, we have demonstrated a sensitive and selective surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) probe, based on citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), for trivalent chromium (Cr3+) detection. After introducing Tween 20 to a solution of citrate-capped AuNPs, the as-prepared Tween 20/citrate-AuNP probe could recognize Cr3+ at a 50 × 10-9 M level in an aqueous medium at a pH of 6.0. Tween 20 can stabilize the citrate-capped AuNPs against conditions of high ionic strength. Due to the chelation between Cr3+ and citrate ions, AuNPs undergo aggregation. As a result, it formed several hot spots and provided a significant enhancement of the Raman signal intensity through electromagnetic (EM) field enhancements. A detailed mechanism for tremendous SERS intensity change had been discussed. The selectivity of this system toward Cr3+ was 400-fold, remarkably greater than other metal ions.In this article, we have demonstrated a sensitive and selective surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) probe, based on citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), for trivalent chromium (Cr3+) detection. After introducing Tween 20 to a solution of citrate-capped AuNPs, the as-prepared Tween 20/citrate-AuNP probe could recognize Cr3+ at a 50 × 10-9 M level in an aqueous medium at a pH of 6.0. Tween 20 can stabilize the citrate-capped AuNPs against conditions of high ionic strength. Due to the chelation between Cr3+ and citrate ions, AuNPs undergo aggregation. As a result, it formed several hot spots and provided a significant enhancement of the Raman signal intensity through electromagnetic (EM) field enhancements. A detailed mechanism for tremendous SERS intensity change had been discussed. The selectivity of this system toward Cr3+ was 400-fold, remarkably greater than other metal ions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1-S5. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr31985c

  12. Effect of a thioalkane capping layer on the first hyperpolarizabilities of gold and silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    El Harfouch, Yara; Benichou, Emmanuel; Bertorelle, Franck; Russier-Antoine, Isabelle; Jonin, Christian; Lascoux, Noelle; Brevet, Pierre F

    2012-03-28

    We have measured the first hyperpolarizabilities of thioalkane capped silver and gold metallic nanoparticles. The values found are β(AgC 12-10 nm) = (2.10 ± 0.23) × 10(-26) esu for 10 nm diameter silver nanoparticles and β(AuC 18-18 nm) = (3.37 ± 0.08) × 10(-26) esu for 18 nm diameter gold nanoparticles at the fundamental wavelength of 784 nm. By comparison to the corresponding values reported for citrate capped silver and gold metallic nanoparticles, after size corrections, decreases by factors of 4.3 and 6.5 respectively are observed. These decreases are tentatively attributed to the bonds formed between the gold and silver surface atoms and the sulfur atoms of the capping layer. PMID:22395007

  13. Gold-Nanoparticle-Based Colorimetric Sensor Array for Discrimination of Organophosphate Pesticides.

    PubMed

    Fahimi-Kashani, Nafiseh; Hormozi-Nezhad, M Reza

    2016-08-16

    There is a growing interest in developing high-performance sensors monitoring organophosphate pesticides, primarily due to their broad usage and harmful effects on mammals. In the present study, a colorimetric sensor array consisting of citrate-capped 13 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has been proposed for the detection and discrimination of several organophosphate pesticides (OPs). The aggregation-induced spectral changes of AuNPs upon OP addition has been analyzed with pattern recognition techniques, including hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). In addition, the proposed sensor array has the capability to identify individual OPs or mixtures of them in real samples. PMID:27412472

  14. Monomer adsorption of indocyanine green to gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrini, Luca; Hartsuiker, Liesbeth; Manohar, Srirang; Otto, Cees

    2011-10-01

    NIR-dye encoded gold nanoparticles (GNP) are rapidly emerging as contrast agents in many bio-imaging/sensing applications. The coding process is usually carried out without control or a clear understanding of the metal-liquid interface properties which, in contrast, are critical in determining the type and extension of dye-metal interaction. In this paper, we investigated the effect of gold surface composition on the adsorption of indocyanine green (ICG) on GNP, simulating the surface conditions of gold nanorods on citrate-capped gold nanospheres. These substrates allowed a careful control of the metal-liquid interface composition and, thus, detailed absorption and fluorescence concentration studies of the effects of each individual chemical in the colloidal solution (i.e. bromide anions, cetyl trimethylammonium ions and Ag+ ions) on the ICG-gold interaction. This study reveals the drastic effect that these experimental parameters can have on the ICG adsorption on GNP.NIR-dye encoded gold nanoparticles (GNP) are rapidly emerging as contrast agents in many bio-imaging/sensing applications. The coding process is usually carried out without control or a clear understanding of the metal-liquid interface properties which, in contrast, are critical in determining the type and extension of dye-metal interaction. In this paper, we investigated the effect of gold surface composition on the adsorption of indocyanine green (ICG) on GNP, simulating the surface conditions of gold nanorods on citrate-capped gold nanospheres. These substrates allowed a careful control of the metal-liquid interface composition and, thus, detailed absorption and fluorescence concentration studies of the effects of each individual chemical in the colloidal solution (i.e. bromide anions, cetyl trimethylammonium ions and Ag+ ions) on the ICG-gold interaction. This study reveals the drastic effect that these experimental parameters can have on the ICG adsorption on GNP. Electronic supplementary

  15. 1,4-Benzenediboronic-Acid-Induced Aggregation of Gold Nanoparticles: Application to Hydrogen Peroxide Detection and Biotin-Avidin-Mediated Immunoassay with Naked-Eye Detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Chun; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2016-05-17

    Hydrogen-peroxide (H2O2)-induced growth of small-sized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is often implemented for H2O2 sensing and plasmonic immunoassay. In contrast, there is little-to-no information in the literature regarding the application of H2O2-inhibited aggregation of citrate-capped AuNPs. This study discloses that benzene-1,4-diboronic acid (BDBA) was effective in driving the aggregation of citrate-capped AuNPs through an interaction between α-hydroxycarboxylate of citrate and boronic acids of BDBA. The H2O2-mediated oxidation of BDBA resulted in the conversion of boronic acid groups to phenol groups. The oxidized BDBA was incapable of triggering the aggregation of citrate-capped AuNPs. Thus, the presence of H2O2 prohibited BDBA-induced aggregation of citrate-capped AuNPs. The BDBA-induced aggregation of citrate-capped AuNPs can be paired with the glucose oxidase (GOx)-glucose system to design a colorimetric probe for glucose. Moreover, a H2O2·BDBA·AuNP probe was integrated with sandwich immunoassay, biotinylated antibody, and avidin-conjugated GOx for the selective naked-eye detection of rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) and human-prostate-specific antigen (PSA). The lowest detectable concentrations of rabbit IgG and human PSA by the naked eye were down to 0.1 and 4 ng/mL, respectively. More importantly, the proposed plasmonic immunoassay allowed the naked-eye quantification of 0-10 ng/mL PSA at an interval of 2 ng/mL in plasma samples. PMID:27091002

  16. Phase transfer of citrate stabilized gold nanoparticles using nonspecifically adsorbed polymers.

    PubMed

    Alkilany, Alaaldin M; Caravana, Aidan C; Hamaly, Majd A; Lerner, Kevin T; Thompson, Lucas B

    2016-01-01

    Many synthetic approaches for gold nanoparticles rely on an aqueous media, resulting in water-soluble nanoparticles, which limits the ability to incorporate gold nanoparticles into other organic solvents or hydrophobic polymeric composites. Surface functionalization and phase transfer approaches using alkylthiols or alkylamines, which strongly bind the gold surface, are common routes to overcome this limitation, however they are typically challenging methods. In this paper we report an approach to transport citrate capped gold nanoparticles into a variety of solvents, including ones that are hydrophobic and not miscible with water without the need for phase transfer agents. We suspend gold nanoparticles in a water-miscible polar organic solvent that also is a solvent for a hydrophobic polymer. After drying, polymer-stabilized gold nanoparticles were found to be dispersible in various hydrophobic solvents with maintained colloidal stability. This work investigates two hydrophobic polymers, namely (polymethylmethacrylate and polyvinylacetate), which share common chemical motifs but have significantly different physiochemical properties. Interestingly, a significant difference in their ability to stabilize the transferred gold nanoparticles is observed and discussed. PMID:26397907

  17. Preparation of gold nanoparticles by microwave heating and application of spectroscopy to study conjugate of gold nanoparticles with antibody E. coli O157:H7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanh Ngo, Vo Ke; Phuong Uyen Nguyen, Hoang; Phat Huynh, Trong; Nguyen Pham Tran, Nguyen; Lam, Quang Vinh; Dat Huynh, Thanh

    2015-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of 15-20 nm size range have attracted attention for producing smart sensing devices as diagnostic tools in biomedical sciences. Citrate capped AuNPs are negatively charged, which can be exploited for electrostatic interactions with some positively charged biomolecules like antibodies. In this paper we describe a method for the low cost synthesis of gold nanoparticles using sodium citrate (Na3Ct) reduction in chloroauric acid (HAuCl4.3H2O) by microwave heating (diameter about 13-15 nm). Gold nanoparticles were functionalized with surface activation by 3-mercaptopropionic acid for attaching antibody. These nanoparticles were then reacted with anti-E. coli O157:H7, using N-hydroxy succinimide (NHS) and carbondimide hydrochloride (EDC) coupling chemistry. The product was characterized with UV-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and zeta potential. In addition, the binding of antibody-gold nanoparticles conjugates to E. coli O157:H7 was demonstrated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  18. Highly sensitive detection of chromium (III) ions by resonance Rayleigh scattering enhanced by gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Min; Cai, Huai-Hong; Yang, Fen; Lin, Dewen; Yang, Pei-Hui; Cai, Jiye

    2014-01-01

    Simple and sensitive determination of chromium (III) ions (Cr3+) has potential applications for detecting trace contamination in environment. Here, the assay is based on the enhancement of resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) by Cr3+-induced aggregation of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy were employed to characterize the nanostructures and spectroscopic properties of the Cr3+-AuNP system. The experiment conditions, such as reaction time, pH value, salt concentration and interfering ions, were investigated. The combination of signal amplification of Cr3+-citrate chelation with high sensitivity of RRS technique allow a selective assay of Cr3+ ions with a detection limit of up to 1.0 pM. The overall assay can be carried out at room temperature within only twenty minutes, making it suitable for high-throughput routine applications in environment and food samples.

  19. Gold Nanoparticles Cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironava, Tatsiana

    Over the last two decades gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been used for many scientific applications and have attracted attention due to the specific chemical, electronic and optical size dependent properties that make them very promising agents in many fields such as medicine, imagine techniques and electronics. More specifically, biocompatible gold nanoparticles have a huge potential for use as the contrast augmentation agent in X-ray Computed Tomography and Photo Acoustic Tomography for early tumor diagnostic as well these nanoparticles are extensively researched for enhancing the targeted cancer treatment effectiveness such as photo-thermal and radiotherapy. In most biomedical applications biocompatible gold nanoparticles are labeled with specific tumor or other pathology targeting antibodies and used for site specific drug delivery. However, even though gold nanoparticles poses very high level of anti cancer properties, the question of their cytotoxicity ones they are released in normal tissue has to be researched. Moreover, the huge amount of industrially produced gold nanoparticles raises the question of these particles being a health hazard, since the penetration is fairly easy for the "nano" size substances. This study focuses on the effect of AuNPs on a human skin tissue, since it is fall in both categories -- the side effects for biomedical applications and industrial workers and users' exposure during production and handling. Therefore, in the present project, gold nanoparticles stabilized with the biocompatible agent citric acid were generated and characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The cytotoxic effect of AuNPs release to healthy skin tissue was modeled on 3 different cell types: human keratinocytes, human dermal fibroblasts, and human adipose derived stromal (ADS) cells. The AuNPs localization inside the cell was found to be cell type dependent. Overall cytotoxicity was found to be dependent

  20. Cardiac Ischemia Reperfusion Injury Following Instillation of 20 nm Citrate-capped Nanosilver

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Nathan A.; Becak, Daniel P.; Shanahan, Jonathan H.; Brown, Jared M.; Carratt, S. A.; Van Winkle, Laura S.; Pinkerton, Kent E.; Wang, Chong M.; Munusamy, Prabhakaran; Baer, Donald R.; Sumner, Susan J.; Fennell, T. R.; Lust, R. M.; Wingard, Chistopher J.

    2015-02-26

    Background: Silver nanoparticles (AgNP) have garnered much interest due to their antimicrobial properties, becoming one of the most utilized nano scale materials. However, any potential evocable cardiovascular injury associated with exposure has not been previously reported. We have previously demonstrated expansion of myocardial infarction after intratracheal (IT) instillation of other nanomaterials. We hypothesized that pulmonary exposure to Ag core AgNP induces persistent increase in circulating cytokines, expansion of cardiac ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and associated with altered coronary vessel reactivity. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 200 µg of 20 nm citrate capped Ag core AgNP, or a citrate vehicle intratracheally (IT). One and 7 days following IT instillation lungs were evaluated for inflammation and silver presence, serum was analyzed for concentrations of selected cytokines, and cardiac I/R injury and coronary artery reactivity was assessed. Results: AgNP instillation resulted in modest pulmonary injury with detection of silver in lung tissue and infiltrating cells, elevation of serum cytokines: G-CSF, MIP-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-13, IL-10, IL-18, IL-17, TNFα, and RANTES, expansion of I/R injury and depression of the coronary vessel reactivity at 1 day post IT compared to vehicle treated rats. Seven days post IT instillation was associated with persistent detection of silver in lungs, elevation in cytokines: IL-2, IL-13, and TNFα and expansion of I/R injury. Conclusions: Based on these data, IT instillation of AgNP increases circulating levels of several cytokines, which may contribute to persistent expansion of I/R injury possibly through an impaired vascular responsiveness.

  1. Peptide modified gold nanoparticles for improved cellular uptake, nuclear transport, and intracellular retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C.; Uertz, J.; Yohan, D.; Chithrani, B. D.

    2014-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are being extensively used in cancer therapeutic applications due to their ability to act both as an anticancer drug carrier in chemotherapy and as a dose enhancer in radiotherapy. The therapeutic response can be further enhanced if nanoparticles (NPs) can be effectively targeted into the nucleus. Here, we present an uptake and removal of GNPs functionalized with three peptides. The first peptide (RGD peptide) enhanced the uptake, the second peptide (NLS peptide) facilitated the nuclear delivery, while the third one (pentapeptide) covered the rest of the surface and protected it from the binding of serum proteins onto the NP surface. The pentapeptide also stabilized the conjugated GNP complex. The peptide-capped GNPs showed a five-fold increase in NP uptake followed by effective nuclear localization. The fraction of NPs exocytosed was less for peptide-capped NPs as compared to citrate-capped ones. Enhanced uptake and prolonged intracellular retention of peptide-capped GNPs could allow NPs to perform their desired applications more efficiently in cells. These studies will provide guidelines for developing NPs for therapeutic applications, which will require ``controlling'' of the NP accumulation rate while maintaining low toxicity.Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are being extensively used in cancer therapeutic applications due to their ability to act both as an anticancer drug carrier in chemotherapy and as a dose enhancer in radiotherapy. The therapeutic response can be further enhanced if nanoparticles (NPs) can be effectively targeted into the nucleus. Here, we present an uptake and removal of GNPs functionalized with three peptides. The first peptide (RGD peptide) enhanced the uptake, the second peptide (NLS peptide) facilitated the nuclear delivery, while the third one (pentapeptide) covered the rest of the surface and protected it from the binding of serum proteins onto the NP surface. The pentapeptide also stabilized the conjugated GNP

  2. Highly sensitive colorimetric determination of amoxicillin in pharmaceutical formulations based on induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhond, Morteza; Absalan, Ghodratollah; Ershadifar, Hamid

    2015-05-01

    A novel, simple and highly sensitive colorimetric method is developed for determination of Amoxicillin (AMX). The system is based on aggregation of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNP) in acetate buffer (pH = 4.5) in the presence of the degradation product of Amoxicillin (DPAMX). It was found that the color of gold nanoparticles changed from red to purple and the intensity of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak of AuNPs decreased. A new absorption band was appeared in the wavelength range of 600-700 nm upon addition of DPAMX. The absorbance ratio at the wavelength of 660 and 525 nm (A660/A525) was chosen as the analytical signal indirectly related to AMX concentration. The linearity of the calibration graph was found over the concentration range of 0.3-4.5 μM AMX with a correlation coefficient of 0.9967. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the detection limit was found to be 0.15 μM. The applicability of the method was successfully demonstrated by analysis of AMX in pharmaceutical formulations including capsules and oral suspensions.

  3. The adjuvanticity of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykman, Lev A.; Bogatyrev, Vladimir A.; Staroverov, Sergey A.; Pristensky, Dmitry V.; Shchyogolev, Sergey Yu.; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G.

    2006-06-01

    A new variant of a technique for in vivo production of antibodies to various antigens with colloidal-gold nanoparticles as carrier is discussed. With this technique we obtained highly specific and relatively high-titre antibodies to different antigens. The antibodies were tested by an immunodot assay with gold nanoparticle markers. Our results provide the first demonstration that immunization of animals with colloidal gold complexed with either haptens or complete antigens gives rise to highly specific antibodies even without the use of complete Freund's adjuvant. These findings may attest to the adjuvanticity of gold nanoparticles itself. We provide also experimental results and discussion aimed at elucidation of possible mechanisms of the discovered colloidal-gold-adjuvanticity effect.

  4. Quantification of Heteroaggregation between Citrate-Stabilized Gold Nanoparticles and Hematite Colloids.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian M; Pike, Daniel J; Kelly, Michael O; Nason, Jeffrey A

    2015-11-01

    Collisions with and attachment to natural colloids (heteroaggregation) is likely to influence significantly the fate, transport, and toxicity of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs). This study investigated heteroaggregation between hematite (α-Fe2O3) colloids and citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (Cit-AuNPs) using a novel approach involving time-resolved dynamic light scattering and parallel experiments designed to quantify nanoparticle attachment and heteroaggregate surface charge. Experiments were performed in low ionic strength synthetic water at environmentally relevant pH in the presence and absence of Suwannee River Natural Organic Matter (SRNOM). In the absence of SRNOM at pH values where Cit-AuNPs and hematite are oppositely charged, attachment efficiencies are high and Cit-AuNPs are capable of destabilizing hematite following an "electrostatic patch" mechanism. Furthermore, maximum observed surface coverages were far below those predicted by geometry alone, a fact predicted by the random sequential adsorption (RSA) model that has significant implications for the estimation of heteroaggregate attachment efficiencies. At pH values where both particles are negative or in the presence of small amounts of SRNOM, attachment was minimal. Calculated attachment efficiencies using the measured surface coverages corroborate these findings. The calculation of attachment efficiencies and the identification of mechanisms governing heteroaggregation represents an important step toward predicting the transport, fate, and toxicity of ENPs in the environment. PMID:26444131

  5. Shaped gold and silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yugang; An, Changhua

    2011-03-01

    Advance in the synthesis of shaped nanoparticles made of gold and silver is reviewed in this article. This review starts with a new angle by analyzing the relationship between the geometrical symmetry of a nanoparticle shape and its internal crystalline structures. According to the relationship, the nanoparticles with well-defined shapes are classified into three categories: nanoparticles with single crystallinity, nanoparticles with angular twins, and nanoparticles with parallel twins. Discussion and analysis on the classical methods for the synthesis of shaped nanoparticles in each category are also included and personal perspectives on the future research directions in the synthesis of shaped metal nanoparticles are briefly summarized. This review is expected to provide a guideline in designing the strategy for the synthesis of shaped nanoparticles and analyzing the corresponding growth mechanism.

  6. Biomedical applications of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cabuzu, Daniela; Cirja, Andreea; Puiu, Rebecca; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles may be used in different domains, one of most important being the biomedical field. They have suitable properties for controlled drug delivery, cancer treatment, biomedical imaging, diagnosis and many others, due to their excellent compatibility with the human organism, low toxicity and tunable stability, small dimensions, and possibility to interact with a variety of substances. They also have optical properties, being able to absorb infrared light. Moreover, due to their large surface and the ability of being coated with a variety of therapeutic agents, gold nanoparticles have been showed a great potential to be used as drug delivery systems. Gold nanoparticles are intensively studied in biomedicine, and recent studies revealed the fact that they can cross the blood-brain barrier, may interact with the DNA and produce genotoxic effects. Because of their ability of producing heat, they can target and kill the tumors, being used very often in photodynamic therapy. Gold nanoparticles can be synthesized in many ways, but the most common are the biological and chemical methods, however the chemical method offers the advantage of better controlling the size and shape of the nanoparticles. In this review, we present the principal applications of gold nanoparticles in the biomedical field, like cancer treatment, amyloid-like fibrillogenesis inhibitors, transplacental treatment, the development of specific scaffolds and drug delivery systems. PMID:25877087

  7. Pegylation increases platelet biocompatibility of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Santos-Martinez, Maria Jose; Rahme, Kamil; Corbalan, J Jose; Faulkner, Colm; Holmes, Justin D; Tajber, Lidia; Medina, Carlos; Radomski, Marek Witold

    2014-06-01

    The increasing use of gold nanoparticles in medical diagnosis and treatment has raised the concern over their blood compatibility. The interactions of nanoparticles with blood components may lead to platelet aggregation and endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, medical applications of gold nanoparticles call for increased nanoparticle stability and biocompatibility. Functionalisation of nanoparticles with polythelene glycol (PEGylation) is known to modulate cell-particle interactions. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of PEGylated-gold nanoparticles on human platelet function and endothelial cells in vitro. Gold nanoparticles, 15 nm in diameter, were synthesised in water using sodium citrate as a reducing and stabilising agent. Functionalised polyethylene glycol-based thiol polymers were used to coat and stabilise pre-synthesised gold nanoparticles. The interaction of gold nanoparticles-citrate and PEGylated-gold nanoparticles with human platelets was measured by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation. Platelet-nanoparticles interaction was imaged using phase-contrast, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The inflammatory effects of gold nanoparticles-citrate and PEGylated-gold nanoparticles in endothelial cells were measured by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. PEGylated-gold nanoparticles were stable under physiological conditions and PEGylated-gold nanoparticles-5400 and PEGylated-gold nanoparticles-10800 did not affect platelet aggregation as measured by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation. In addition, PEGylated-gold nanoparticles did not induce an inflammatory response when incubated with endothelial cells. Therefore, this study shows that PEGylated-gold nanoparticles with a higher molecular weight of the polymer chain are both platelet- and endothelium-compatible making them attractive candidates for biomedical applications. PMID:24749395

  8. Ultrastable and Biofunctionalizable Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Akash; Moyano, Daniel F; Parnsubsakul, Attasith; Papadopoulos, Alexander; Wang, Li-Sheng; Landis, Ryan F; Das, Riddha; Rotello, Vincent M

    2016-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles provide an excellent platform for biological and material applications due to their unique physical and chemical properties. However, decreased colloidal stability and formation of irreversible aggregates while freeze-drying nanomaterials limit their use in real world applications. Here, we report a new generation of surface ligands based on a combination of short oligo (ethylene glycol) chains and zwitterions capable of providing nonfouling characteristics while maintaining colloidal stability and functionalization capabilities. Additionally, conjugation of these gold nanoparticles with avidin can help the development of a universal toolkit for further functionalization of nanomaterials. PMID:27191946

  9. Gold nanoparticles enhancing protontherapy efficiency.

    PubMed

    Torrisi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The insertion of gold nanoparticles in biological liquids, tissues and organs permits to increase the equivalent atomic number of the medium that, if used as target to be irradiated by ionizing radiation, permits an increment of the absorbed dose. No toxic nanoparticles, such as the Au, can be injected in the cancer tissues at different concentrations before using a localized treatment that uses energetic proton beams for radiotherapy. Due to the high density and atomic number of the used gold nanoparticles, the absorbed radiation dose can be increased to about a factor six per cent using relatively low concentration of nanoparticles injectable as solution in the tumor tissue. This means to reduce the exposition to ionizing radiation or to increase the dose to the tumor site. Simulation programs of proton energy loss in tissues, using SRIM Code, are employed to evaluate the Bragg peak enhancing in presence of Au nanoparticles, so it will be presented and discussed. Some research findings and patents in the gold nanoparticle preparation and application to Medicine are reviewed in the present paper. PMID:25986229

  10. Cell-specific optoporation with near-infrared ultrafast laser and functionalized gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Eric; Boutopoulos, Christos; Martel, Rosalie; Torres, Alexandre; Rodriguez, Camille; Niskanen, Jukka; Lebrun, Jean-Jacques; Winnik, Françoise M.; Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Meunier, Michel

    2015-10-01

    Selective targeting of diseased cells can increase therapeutic efficacy and limit off-target adverse effects. We developed a new tool to selectively perforate living cells with functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and near-infrared (NIR) femtosecond (fs) laser. The receptor CD44 strongly expressed by cancer stem cells was used as a model for selective targeting. Citrate-capped AuNPs (100 nm in diameter) functionalized with 0.01 orthopyridyl-disulfide-poly(ethylene glycol) (5 kDa)-N-hydroxysuccinimide (OPSS-PEG-NHS) conjugated to monoclonal antibodies per nm2 and 5 μM HS-PEG (5 kDa) were colloidally stable in cell culture medium containing serum proteins. These AuNPs attached mostly as single particles 115 times more to targeted CD44+ MDA-MB-231 and CD44+ ARPE-19 cells than to non-targeted CD44- 661W cells. Optimally functionalized AuNPs enhanced the fs laser (800 nm, 80-100 mJ cm-2 at 250 Hz or 60-80 mJ cm-2 at 500 Hz) to selectively perforate targeted cells without affecting surrounding non-targeted cells in co-culture. This novel highly versatile treatment paradigm can be adapted to target and perforate other cell populations by adapting to desired biomarkers. Since living biological tissues absorb energy very weakly in the NIR range, the developed non-invasive tool may provide a safe, cost-effective clinically relevant approach to ablate pathologically deregulated cells and limit complications associated with surgical interventions.Selective targeting of diseased cells can increase therapeutic efficacy and limit off-target adverse effects. We developed a new tool to selectively perforate living cells with functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and near-infrared (NIR) femtosecond (fs) laser. The receptor CD44 strongly expressed by cancer stem cells was used as a model for selective targeting. Citrate-capped AuNPs (100 nm in diameter) functionalized with 0.01 orthopyridyl-disulfide-poly(ethylene glycol) (5 kDa)-N-hydroxysuccinimide (OPSS

  11. Gold nanoparticles for photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanwan; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a biomedical imaging modality that provides functional information regarding the cellular and molecular signatures of tissue by using endogenous and exogenous contrast agents. There has been tremendous effort devoted to the development of PA imaging agents, and gold nanoparticles as exogenous contrast agents have great potential for PA imaging due to their inherent and geometrically induced optical properties. The gold-based nanoparticles that are most commonly employed for PA imaging include spheres, rods, shells, prisms, cages, stars and vesicles. This article provides an overview of the current state of research in utilizing these gold nanomaterials for PA imaging of cancer, atherosclerotic plaques, brain function and image-guided therapy. PMID:25600972

  12. Gold nanoparticles for photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wanwan; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a biomedical imaging modality that provides functional information regarding the cellular and molecular signatures of tissue by using endogenous and exogenous contrast agents. There has been tremendous effort devoted to the development of PA imaging agents, and gold nanoparticles as exogenous contrast agents have great potential for PA imaging due to their inherent and geometrically induced optical properties. The gold-based nanoparticles that are most commonly employed for PA imaging include spheres, rods, shells, prisms, cages, stars and vesicles. This article provides an overview of the current state of research in utilizing these gold nanomaterials for PA imaging of cancer, atherosclerotic plaques, brain function and image-guided therapy. PMID:25600972

  13. Fabrication of Gold Nanoparticles/Graphene-PDDA Nanohybrids for Bio-detection by SERS Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mevold, Andreas H. H.; Hsu, Wei-Wu; Hardiansyah, Andri; Huang, Li-Ying; Yang, Ming-Chien; Liu, Ting-Yu; Chan, Tzu-Yi; Wang, Kuan-Syun; Su, Yu-An; Jeng, Ru-Jong; Wang, Juen-Kai; Wang, Yuh-Lin

    2015-10-01

    In this research, graphene nanosheets were functionalized with cationic poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) and citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) bio-detection application. AuNPs were synthesized by the traditional citrate thermal reduction method and then adsorbed onto graphene-PDDA nanohybrid sheets with electrostatic interaction. The nanohybrids were subject to characterization including X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), zeta potential, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results showed that the diameter of AuNPs is about 15-20 nm immobilized on the graphene-PDDA sheets, and the zeta potential of various AuNPs/graphene-PDDA ratio is 7.7-38.4 mV. Furthermore, the resulting nanohybrids of AuNPs/graphene-PDDA were used for SERS detection of small molecules (adenine) and microorganisms ( Staphylococcus aureus), by varying the ratios between AuNPs and graphene-PDDA. AuNPs/graphene-PDDA in the ratio of AuNPs/graphene-PDDA = 4:1 exhibited the strongest SERS signal in SERS detection of adenine and S. aureus. Thus, it is promising in the application of rapid and label-free bio-detection of bacteria or tumor cells.

  14. Gold nanoparticles assisted characterization of amine functionalized polystyrene multiwell plate and glass slide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharanivasan, Gunasekaran; Rajamuthuramalingam, Thangavelu; Michael Immanuel Jesse, Denison; Rajendiran, Nagappan; Kathiravan, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated citrate-capped gold nanoparticles assisted characterization of amine functionalized polystyrene plate and glass slide surfaces through AuNPs staining method. The effect of AuNPs concentration on the characterization of amine modified surfaces was also studied with different concentration of AuNPs (ratios 1.0-0.0). 3-Aminopropylyl triethoxy silane has been used as amine group source for the surface modification. The interactions of AuNPs on modified and unmodified surfaces were investigated using atomic force microscopy and the dispersibility, and the aggregation of AuNPs was analyzed using UV-visible spectrophotometer. Water contact angle measurement and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to further confirmation of amine modified surfaces. The aggregation of AuNPs in modified multiwell plate leads to the color change from red to purple and they are found to be adsorped on the modified surfaces. Aggregation and adsorption of AuNPs on the modified surfaces through the electrostatic interactions and the hydrogen bonds were revealed by XPS analysis. Remarkable results were found even in the very low concentration of AuNPs (ratio 0.2). This AuNPs staining method is simple, cost-effective, less time consuming, and required very low concentration of AuNPs. These results can be read out through the naked eye without the help of sophisticated equipments.

  15. Application of Gold Nanoparticles to Paint Colorants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Hideo

    Metal nanoparticles possess unique properties that they do not exhibit in their bulk states. One of these properties is the color due to surface plasmon resonance. Gold nanoparticles appear red. This color has been utilized in glass for a long long time. In recent years, highly concentrated pastes of gold and silver nanoparticles have been successfully produced by using a special type of protective polymer and a mild reductant. The paste of gold nanoparticles can be used for paint and other materials as red colorants. In this article,application examples of gold nanoparticles as colorant are introduced. Recently, methods for producing bimetal nanoparticles such as gold/silver and gold/copper have been developed. These nanoparticles allow colors from yellow to green to be created. These methods and colors they produce are also described in this article.

  16. Gold nanoparticles and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Salazar-González, Jorge Alberto; González-Ortega, Omar; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal vaccines constitute an advantageous immunization approach to achieve broad immunization against widespread diseases; however, improvements in this field are still required to expand their exploitation. As gold nanoparticles are biocompatible and can be easily functionalized with antigens, they have been proposed as carriers for the delivery of vaccines. The study of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in vaccinology has been of interest for a number of research groups in recent years and important advances have been made. This review provides a summary of the AuNPs synthesis methodologies and an updated overview of the current AuNPs-based vaccines under development. The implications of these advances for the development of new mucosal vaccines as well as future prospects for the field are discussed. PMID:26152550

  17. Interactions of iodoperfluorobenzene compounds with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Blakey, Idriss; Merican, Zul; Rintoul, Llewellyn; Chuang, Ya-Mi; Jack, Kevin S; Micallef, Aaron S

    2012-03-14

    Understanding the interactions of small molecules with gold nanoparticles is important for controlling their surface chemistry and, hence, how they can be used in specific applications. The interaction of iodoperfluorobenzene compounds with gold nanoparticles was investigated by UV-Vis difference spectroscopy, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and Synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results from UV-Vis difference spectroscopy demonstrated that iodoperfluorobenzene compounds undergo charge transfer complexation with gold nanoparticles. SERS of the small molecule-gold nanoparticle adducts provided further evidence for formation of charge transfer complexes, while Synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy provided evidence of the binding mechanism. Demonstration of interactions of iodoperfluorobenzene compounds with gold nanoparticles further expands the molecular toolbox that is available for functionalising gold nanoparticles and has significant potential for expanding the scope for generation of hybrid halogen bonded materials. PMID:22314792

  18. Ordering Gold Nanoparticles with DNA Origami Nanoflowers.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Robert; Santiago, Ibon; Ardavan, Arzhang; Turberfield, Andrew J

    2016-08-23

    Nanostructured materials, including plasmonic metamaterials made from gold and silver nanoparticles, provide access to new materials properties. The assembly of nanoparticles into extended arrays can be controlled through surface functionalization and the use of increasingly sophisticated linkers. We present a versatile way to control the bonding symmetry of gold nanoparticles by wrapping them in flower-shaped DNA origami structures. These "nanoflowers" assemble into two-dimensonal gold nanoparticle lattices with symmetries that can be controlled through auxiliary DNA linker strands. Nanoflower lattices are true composites: interactions between the gold nanoparticles are mediated entirely by DNA, and the DNA origami will fold into its designed form only in the presence of the gold nanoparticles. PMID:27341272

  19. Unprecedented inhibition of tubulin polymerization directed by gold nanoparticles inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Diptiman; Xavier, Paulrajpillai Lourdu; Chaudhari, Kamalesh; John, Robin; Dasgupta, Anjan Kumar; Pradeep, Thalappil; Chakrabarti, Gopal

    2013-05-01

    The effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the polymerization of tubulin has not been examined till now. We report that interaction of weakly protected AuNPs with microtubules (MTs) could cause inhibition of polymerization and aggregation in the cell free system. We estimate that single citrate capped AuNPs could cause aggregation of ~105 tubulin heterodimers. Investigation of the nature of inhibition of polymerization and aggregation by Raman and Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopies indicated partial conformational changes of tubulin and microtubules, thus revealing that AuNP-induced conformational change is the driving force behind the observed phenomenon. Cell culture experiments were carried out to check whether this can happen inside a cell. Dark field microscopy (DFM) combined with hyperspectral imaging (HSI) along with flow cytometric (FC) and confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) analyses suggested that AuNPs entered the cell, caused aggregation of the MTs of A549 cells, leading to cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase and concomitant apoptosis. Further, Western blot analysis indicated the upregulation of mitochondrial apoptosis proteins such as Bax and p53, down regulation of Bcl-2 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) confirming mitochondrial apoptosis. Western blot run after cold-depolymerization revealed an increase in the aggregated insoluble intracellular tubulin while the control and actin did not aggregate, suggesting microtubule damage induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The observed polymerization inhibition and cytotoxic effects were dependent on the size and concentration of the AuNPs used and also on the incubation time. As microtubules are important cellular structures and target for anti-cancer drugs, this first observation of nanoparticles-induced protein's conformational change-based aggregation of the tubulin-MT system is of high importance, and would be useful in the understanding of cancer therapeutics

  20. Cetyltrimethylammonium Bromide-Modified Spherical and Cube-Like Gold Nanoparticles as Extrinsic Raman Lables in Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Based Heterogeneous Immunoassays

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, R.; Lipert, R.; Porter, M.

    2008-02-22

    This paper reports on the characterization and preliminary comparison of gold nanoparticles of differing surface modification and shape when used as extrinsic Raman labels (ERLs) in high-sensitivity heterogeneous immunoassays based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). ERLs are gold nanoparticles coated with an adlayer of an intrinsically strong Raman scatterer, followed by a coating of a molecular recognition element (e.g., antibody). Three types of ERLs, all with a nominal size of {approx}30 nm, were fabricated by using spherical citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (sp-cit-Au NPs), spherical CTAB-capped gold nanoparticles (sp-CTAB-Au NPs), or cube-like CTAB-capped gold nanoparticles (cu-CTAB-Au NPs) as cores. The performance of these particles was assessed via a sandwich immunoassay for human IgG in phosphate buffered saline. The ERLs fabricated with sp-CTAB-Au NPs as cores proved to be more than 50 times more sensitive than those with sp-cit-Au NPs as cores; the same comparison showed that the ERLs with cu-CTAB-Au NPs as cores were close to 200 times more sensitive. Coupled with small differences in levels of nonspecific adsorption, these sensitivities translated to a limit of detection (LOD) of 94, 2.3, and 0.28 ng/mL, respectively, for the detection of human IgG in the case of sp-cit-Au NPs, sp-CTAB-Au NPs, and cu-CTAB-Au NPs. The LOD of the cu-CTAB-Au NPs is therefore {approx}340 times below that for the sp-cit-Au NPs. Potential applications of these labels to bioassays are briefly discussed.

  1. Gold Nanoparticles for Nucleic Acid Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ya; Jiang, Ziwen; Saha, Krishnendu; Kim, Chang Soo; Kim, Sung Tae; Landis, Ryan F; Rotello, Vincent M

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles provide an attractive and applicable scaffold for delivery of nucleic acids. In this review, we focus on the use of covalent and noncovalent gold nanoparticle conjugates for applications in gene delivery and RNA-interference technologies. We also discuss challenges in nucleic acid delivery, including endosomal entrapment/escape and active delivery/presentation of nucleic acids in the cell. PMID:24599278

  2. Gold nanoparticle photosensitized radical photopolymerization.

    PubMed

    Anyaogu, Kelechi C; Cai, Xichen; Neckers, Douglas C

    2008-12-01

    We report the photopolymerization of an acrylic monomer using thiol-stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and [4-[(octyloxy)phenyl] phenyl] iodonium hexafluoroantimonate (OPPI) as photoinitiator and coinitiator, respectively. Polymerization occurred only when the AuNPs, in the presence of the iodonium salt, were irradiated at the particle plasmonic absorption region (lambda>450 nm). The AuNPs activate the coinitiator by intermolecular electron transfer since OPPI has no absorption in the visible region. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to monitor polymerization. UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy measurements were used to characterize the NPs. PMID:19037499

  3. Gold Nanoparticle Interference Study during the Isolation, Quantification, Purity and Integrity Analysis of RNA

    PubMed Central

    Sanabria, Natasha M.; Vetten, Melissa; Andraos, Charlene; Boodhia, Kailen; Gulumian, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Investigations have been conducted regarding the interference of nanoparticles (NPs) with different toxicological assay systems, but there is a lack of validation when conducting routine tests for nucleic acid isolation, quantification, integrity, and purity analyses. The interference of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was investigated herein. The AuNPs were added to either BEAS-2B bronchial human cells for 24 h, the isolated pure RNA, or added during the isolation procedure, and the resultant interaction was assessed. Total RNA that was isolated from untreated BEAS-2B cells was spiked with various concentrations (v/v%) of AuNPs and quantified. A decrease in the absorbance spectrum (220–340 nm) was observed in a concentration-dependent manner. The 260 and 280 nm absorbance ratios that traditionally infer RNA purity were also altered. Electrophoresis was performed to determine RNA integrity, but could not differentiate between AuNP-exposed samples. However, the spiked post-isolation samples did produce differences in spectra (190–220 nm), where shifts were observed at a shorter wavelength. These shifts could be due to alterations to chromophores found in nucleic acids. The co-isolation samples, spiked with 100 µL AuNP during the isolation procedure, displayed a peak shift to a longer wavelength and were similar to the results obtained from a 24 h AuNP treatment, under non-cytotoxic test conditions. Moreover, hyperspectral imaging using CytoViva dark field microscopy did not detect AuNP spectral signatures in the RNA isolated from treated cells. However, despite the lack of AuNPs in the final RNA product, structural changes in RNA could still be observed between 190–220 nm. Consequently, full spectral analyses should replace the traditional ratios based on readings at 230, 260, and 280 nm. These are critical points of analyses, validation, and optimization for RNA-based techniques used to assess AuNPs effects. PMID:25470814

  4. [Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by Azospirillum brasilense].

    PubMed

    Kupriashina, M A; Vetchinkina, E P; Burov, A M; Ponomareva, E G; Nikitina, V E

    2014-01-01

    Plant-associated nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria Azospirillum brasilense were shown to reduce the gold of chloroauric acid to elemental gold, resulting in formation of gold nanoparicles. Extracellular phenoloxidizing enzymes (laccases and Mn peroxidases) were shown to participate in reduction of Au+3 (HAuCl4) to Au(0). Transmission electron microscopy revealed accumulation of colloidal gold nanoparticles of diverse shape in the culture liquid of A. brasilense strains Sp245 and Sp7. The size of the electron-dense nanospheres was 5 to 50 nm, and the size of nanoprisms varied from 5 to 300 nm. The tentative mechanism responsible for formation of gold nanoparticles is discussed. PMID:25423733

  5. Functionalization of gold nanoparticles as antidiabetic nanomaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatachalam, M.; Govindaraju, K.; Mohamed Sadiq, A.; Tamilselvan, S.; Ganesh Kumar, V.; Singaravelu, G.

    2013-12-01

    In the present investigation, functionalization of gold nanoparticles synthesized using propanoic acid 2-(3-acetoxy-4,4,14-trimethylandrost-8-en-17-yl) (PAT) an active biocomponent isolated from Cassia auriculata is studied in detail. On reaction of PAT with aqueous HAuCl4, rapid formation of stable gold nanoparticles was achieved. Formation of gold nanoparticles was confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy, XRD, GC-MS, FTIR, TEM and SEM with EDAX. Gold nanoparticles mostly were monodisperse, spherical in shape and ranged in size 12-41 nm. Gold nanoparticles synthesised using PAT was administered to alloxan (150 mg/kg body weight) induced diabetic male albino rats at different doses (0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 mg/kg body weight) for 28 days. Plasma glucose level, cholesterol and triglyceride were significantly (p < 0.001) reduced in experimental animals treated with gold nanoparticles at dosage of 0.5 mg/kg body weight and plasma insulin increased significantly. The newly genre green gold nanoparticles exhibit remarkable protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitory activity.

  6. Direct Analysis of Triacylglycerols from Crude Lipid Mixtures by Gold Nanoparticle-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Jeongjin; Lee, Gwangbin; Cha, Sangwon

    2014-05-01

    Triacylglycerols (TAGs), essential energy storage lipids, are easily detected by conventional MALDI MS when occurring on their own. However, their signals are easily overwhelmed by other lipids, mainly phosphatidylcholines (PCs) and, therefore, require purification. In order to profile TAGs from crude lipid mixtures without prefractionation, we investigated alternative matrixes that can suppress phospholipid ion signals and enhance cationization of TAGs. We found that an aqueous solution of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with a diameter of 12 nm is a superior matrix for the laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI MS) of TAGs in crude lipid mixtures. The AuNP matrix effectively suppressed other lipid signals such as phospholipids and also provided 100 times lower detection limit for TAGs than 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), the best conventional MALDI matrix for TAGs. The AuNP-assisted LDI MS enabled us to obtain detailed TAG profiles including minor species directly from crude beef lipid extracts without phospholipid interference. In addition, we could detect TAGs at a trace level from a total brain lipid extract.

  7. Cell-specific optoporation with near-infrared ultrafast laser and functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Eric; Boutopoulos, Christos; Martel, Rosalie; Torres, Alexandre; Rodriguez, Camille; Niskanen, Jukka; Lebrun, Jean-Jacques; Winnik, Françoise M; Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Meunier, Michel

    2015-11-14

    Selective targeting of diseased cells can increase therapeutic efficacy and limit off-target adverse effects. We developed a new tool to selectively perforate living cells with functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and near-infrared (NIR) femtosecond (fs) laser. The receptor CD44 strongly expressed by cancer stem cells was used as a model for selective targeting. Citrate-capped AuNPs (100 nm in diameter) functionalized with 0.01 orthopyridyl-disulfide-poly(ethylene glycol) (5 kDa)-N-hydroxysuccinimide (OPSS-PEG-NHS) conjugated to monoclonal antibodies per nm(2) and 5 μM HS-PEG (5 kDa) were colloidally stable in cell culture medium containing serum proteins. These AuNPs attached mostly as single particles 115 times more to targeted CD44(+) MDA-MB-231 and CD44(+) ARPE-19 cells than to non-targeted CD44(-) 661W cells. Optimally functionalized AuNPs enhanced the fs laser (800 nm, 80-100 mJ cm(-2) at 250 Hz or 60-80 mJ cm(-2) at 500 Hz) to selectively perforate targeted cells without affecting surrounding non-targeted cells in co-culture. This novel highly versatile treatment paradigm can be adapted to target and perforate other cell populations by adapting to desired biomarkers. Since living biological tissues absorb energy very weakly in the NIR range, the developed non-invasive tool may provide a safe, cost-effective clinically relevant approach to ablate pathologically deregulated cells and limit complications associated with surgical interventions. PMID:26459958

  8. Therapeutic gold, silver, and platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Miko; Foote, Matthew; Prow, Tarl W

    2015-01-01

    There are an abundance of nanoparticle technologies being developed for use as part of therapeutic strategies. This review focuses on a narrow class of metal nanoparticles that have therapeutic potential that is a consequence of elemental composition and size. The most widely known of these are gold nanoshells that have been developed over the last two decades for photothermal ablation in superficial cancers. The therapeutic effect is the outcome of the thickness and diameter of the gold shell that enables fine tuning of the plasmon resonance. When these metal nanoparticles are exposed to the relevant wavelength of light, their temperature rapidly increases. This in turn induces a localized photothermal ablation that kills the surrounding tumor tissue. Similarly, gold nanoparticles have been developed to enhance radiotherapy. The high-Z nature of gold dramatically increases the photoelectric cross-section. Thus, the photoelectric effects are significantly increased. The outcome of these interactions is enhanced tumor killing with lower doses of radiation, all while sparing tissue without gold nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles have been used for their wound healing properties in addition to enhancing the tumor-killing effects of anticancer drugs. Finally, platinum nanoparticles are thought to serve as a reservoir for platinum ions that can induce DNA damage in cancer cells. The future is bright with the path to clinical trials is largely cleared for some of the less complex therapeutic metal nanoparticle systems. PMID:25521618

  9. Gold Nanoparticle Labels Amplify Ellipsometric Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatasubbarao, Srivatsa

    2008-01-01

    The ellipsometric method reported in the immediately preceding article was developed in conjunction with a method of using gold nanoparticles as labels on biomolecules that one seeks to detect. The purpose of the labeling is to exploit the optical properties of the gold nanoparticles in order to amplify the measurable ellipsometric effects and thereby to enable ultrasensitive detection of the labeled biomolecules without need to develop more-complex ellipsometric instrumentation. The colorimetric, polarization, light-scattering, and other optical properties of nanoparticles depend on their sizes and shapes. In the present method, these size-and-shape-dependent properties are used to magnify the polarization of scattered light and the diattenuation and retardance of signals derived from ellipsometry. The size-and-shape-dependent optical properties of the nanoparticles make it possible to interrogate the nanoparticles by use of light of various wavelengths, as appropriate, to optimally detect particles of a specific type at high sensitivity. Hence, by incorporating gold nanoparticles bound to biomolecules as primary or secondary labels, the performance of ellipsometry as a means of detecting the biomolecules can be improved. The use of gold nanoparticles as labels in ellipsometry has been found to afford sensitivity that equals or exceeds the sensitivity achieved by use of fluorescence-based methods. Potential applications for ellipsometric detection of gold nanoparticle-labeled biomolecules include monitoring molecules of interest in biological samples, in-vitro diagnostics, process monitoring, general environmental monitoring, and detection of biohazards.

  10. Resonance elastic light scattering (RELS) spectroscopy of fast non-Langmuirian ligand-exchange in glutathione-induced gold nanoparticle assembly.

    PubMed

    Stobiecka, Magdalena; Coopersmith, Kaitlin; Hepel, Maria

    2010-10-01

    The interactions of a biomolecule glutathione (GSH) with citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNP) have been investigated to evaluate the viability of a rapid GSH-capture by gold nanoparticle carriers, as a model system for applications ranging from designing nanoparticle-enhanced functional biosensor interfaces to nanomedicine. The measurements, performed using resonance elastic light scattering (RELS) spectroscopy, have shown a strong dependence of GSH-induced scattering cross-section on gold nanoparticle size. A large increase in RELS intensity after injection of GSH, in a short reaction time (tau=60 s), has been observed for small AuNP (5nm dia.) and ascribed to the fast ligand-exchange followed by AuNP assembly. The unexpected non-Langmuirian concentration dependence of scattering intensity for AuNP (5 nm) indicates on a 2D nucleation and growth mechanism of the ligand-exchange process. The ligand-exchange and small nanoparticle ensemble formation followed by relaxation have been observed in long term (10 h) monitoring of GSH-AuNP interactions by RELS. The results of molecular dynamics and quantum mechanical calculations corroborate the mechanism of the formation of hydrogen-bonded GSH-linkages and interparticle interactions and show that the assembly is driven by multiple H-bonding between GSH-capped AuNP and electrostatic zwitterionic interactions. The RELS spectroscopy has been found as a very sensitive tool for studying interparticle interactions. The application of RELS can be expanded to monitor reactivities and assembly of other monolayer-protected metal clusters, especially in very fast processes which cannot be followed by other techniques. PMID:20591439

  11. Metal enhanced fluorescence with gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattingly, Shaina LaRissa Strating

    A novel hybrid nanocomposite of Au nanoparticle-modified silicon nanowire was developed for surface enhanced fluorescence applications. The designed nanocomposite contained a silicon nanowire, gold nanoparticles and a silica layer doped with dye molecules. The hybrid nanomaterial was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), fluorescence measurements, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The results showed that the gold nanoparticles were uniformly adhered on the silicon nanowires and covered by a thin silica layer. The nanostructure exhibited strong capacity for surface enhanced fluorescence. Different enhancement factors were obtained by changing synthetic conditions. The second goal of the project was to determine if the shape of gold nanoparticles affects the extent of its fluorescence enhancement under constant external factors. Two shapes of gold nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized by SEM, STEM, zeta potential and absorbance measurements. Then they were coated with fluorescent dye-doped silica and the fluorescence intensity was measured and compared to the pure fluorescent dye. Gold nanorods enhanced fluorescence more than gold nanostars and that the fluorescent dye Alexafluor 700 showed a greater fluorescence intensity change in the presence of nanoparticles than methylene blue.

  12. Radiofrequency Heating Pathways for Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Collins, C. B.; McCoy, R. S.; Ackerson, B. J.; Collins, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    This feature article reviews the thermal dissipation of nanoscopic gold under radiofrequency (RF) irradiation. It also presents previously unpublished data addressing obscure aspects of this phenomenon. While applications in biology motivated initial investigation of RF heating of gold nanoparticles, recent controversy concerning whether thermal effects can be attributed to nanoscopic gold highlight the need to understand the involved mechanism or mechanisms of heating. Both the nature of the particle and the nature of the RF field influence heating. Aspects of nanoparticle chemistry and physics, including the hydrodynamic diameter of the particle, the oxidation state and related magnetism of the core, and the chemical nature of the ligand shell may all strongly influence to what extent a nanoparticle heats in an RF field. Aspects of RF include: power, frequency and antenna designs that emphasize relative strength of magnetic or electric fields, and also influence the extent to which a gold nanoparticle heats in RF. These nanoparticle and RF properties are analysed in the context of three heating mechanisms proposed to explain gold nanoparticle heating in an RF field. This article also makes a critical analysis of the existing literature in the context of the nanoparticle preparations, RF structure, and suggested mechanisms in previously reported experiments. PMID:24962620

  13. Gold nanoparticles extraction from dielectric scattering background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xin; Wang, Jingxin

    2014-11-01

    The unique advantages such as brightness, non-photobleaching, good bio-compatibility make gold nanoparticles desirable labels and play important roles in biotech and related research and applications. Distinguishing gold nanoparticles from other dielectric scattering particles is of more importance, especially in bio-tracing and imaging. The enhancement image results from the localized surface plasmon resonance associated with gold nanopartilces makes themselves distinguishable from other dielectric particles, based on which, we propose a dual-wavelength detection method by employing a high sensitive cross-polarization microscopy.

  14. Biosynthesis of Gold Nanoparticles Using Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Abd El-Aziz, M.; Badr, Y.; Mahmoud, M. A.

    2007-02-14

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used for extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). Consequently, Au NPs were formed due to reduction of gold ion by bacterial cell supernatant of P. aeruginos ATCC 90271, P. aeruginos (2) and P. aeruginos (1). The UV-Vis. and fluorescence spectra of the bacterial as well as chemical prepared Au NPs were recorded. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) micrograph showed the formation of well-dispersed gold nanoparticles in the range of 15-30 nm. The process of reduction being extracellular and may lead to the development of an easy bioprocess for synthesis of Au NPs.

  15. Gold Nanoparticle Mediated Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Joao Paulo Mattos; Figueroa, Elizabeth Raquel; Drezek, Rebekah Anna

    2013-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the field of cancer immunotherapy, where the goal is to activate or modulate the body’s immune response against cancer. However, current immunotherapy approaches exhibit limitations of safety and efficacy due to systemic delivery. In this context, the use of nanotechnology for the delivery of cancer vaccines and immune adjuvants presents a number of advantages such as targeted delivery to immune cells, enhanced therapeutic effect, and reduced adverse outcomes. Recently, gold nanoparticles (AuNP) have been explored as immunotherapy carriers, creating new AuNP applications that merit a critical overview. This review highlights recent advances in the development of AuNP mediated immunotherapies that harness AuNP biodistribution, optical properties and their ability to deliver macromolecules such as peptides and oligonucleotides. It has been demonstrated that the use of AuNP carriers can improve the delivery and safety of immunotherapy agents, and that AuNP immunotherapies are well suited for synergistic combination therapy with existing cancer therapies like photothermal ablation. PMID:24103304

  16. Subchronic inhalation toxicity of gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gold nanoparticles are widely used in consumer products, including cosmetics, food packaging, beverages, toothpaste, automobiles, and lubricants. With this increase in consumer products containing gold nanoparticles, the potential for worker exposure to gold nanoparticles will also increase. Only a few studies have produced data on the in vivo toxicology of gold nanoparticles, meaning that the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) of gold nanoparticles remain unclear. Results The toxicity of gold nanoparticles was studied in Sprague Dawley rats by inhalation. Seven-week-old rats, weighing approximately 200 g (males) and 145 g (females), were divided into 4 groups (10 rats in each group): fresh-air control, low-dose (2.36 × 104 particle/cm3, 0.04 μg/m3), middle-dose (2.36 × 105 particle/cm3, 0.38 μg/m3), and high-dose (1.85 × 106 particle/cm3, 20.02 μg/m3). The animals were exposed to gold nanoparticles (average diameter 4-5 nm) for 6 hours/day, 5 days/week, for 90-days in a whole-body inhalation chamber. In addition to mortality and clinical observations, body weight, food consumption, and lung function were recorded weekly. At the end of the study, the rats were subjected to a full necropsy, blood samples were collected for hematology and clinical chemistry tests, and organ weights were measured. Cellular differential counts and cytotoxicity measurements, such as albumin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and total protein were also monitored in a cellular bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Among lung function test measurements, tidal volume and minute volume showed a tendency to decrease comparing control and dose groups during the 90-days of exposure. Although no statistically significant differences were found in cellular differential counts, histopathologic examination showed minimal alveoli, an inflammatory infiltrate with a mixed cell type, and increased macrophages in the high-dose rats. Tissue distribution of gold

  17. Novel amino-acid-based polymer/multi-walled carbon nanotube bio-nanocomposites: highly water dispersible carbon nanotubes decorated with gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nanjundan Ashok; Bund, Andreas; Cho, Byung Gwon; Lim, Kwon Taek; Jeong, Yeon Tae

    2009-06-01

    A well-reproducible and completely green route towards highly water dispersible multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) is achieved by a non-invasive, polymer wrapping technique, where the polymer is adsorbed on the MWNT's surface. Simply mixing an amino-acid-based polymer derivative, namely poly methacryloyl β-alanine (PMBA) with purified MWNTs in distilled water resulted in the formation of PMBA-MWNT nanocomposite hybrids. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were further anchored on the polymer-wrapped MWNTs, which were previously sonicated in distilled water, via the hydrogen bonding interaction between the carboxylic acid functional groups present in the polymer-modified MWNTs and the citrate-capped AuNPs. The surface morphologies and chemistries of the hybrids decorated with nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. Additionally, the composites were also prepared by the in situ free radical polymerization of the monomer, methacryloyl β-alanine (MBA), with MWNTs. Thus functionalized MWNTs were studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and TEM. Both methods were effective in the nanotube functionalization and ensured good dispersion and high stability in water over three months. Due to the presence of the high densities of carboxylic acid functionalities on the surface of CNTs, various colloidal nanocrystals can be attached to MWNTs.

  18. Accumulation of Gold Nanoparticles in Brassic Juncea

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, A.T.; Haverkamp, R.G.; Davies, C.E.; Parsons, J.G.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.; Agterveld, D.van

    2009-06-03

    Enzymatic digestion is proposed as a method for concentrating gold nanoparticles produced in plants. The mild conditions of digestion are used in order to avoid an increase in the gold particle size, which would occur with a high-temperature process, so that material suitable for catalysis may be produced. Gold nanoparticles of a 5-50-nm diameter, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), at concentrations 760 and 1120 ppm Au, were produced within Brassica juncea grown on soil with 22-48 mg Au kg{sup -1}. X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) reveals that the plant contained approximately equal quantities of Au in the metallic (Au{sup 0}) and oxidized (Au{sup +1}) states. Enzymatic digestion dissolved 55-60 wt% of the plant matter. Due to the loss of the soluble gold fraction, no significant increase in the total concentration of gold in the samples was observed. However, it is likely that the concentration of the gold nanoparticles increased by a factor of two. To obtain a gold concentration suitable for catalytic reactions, around 95 wt% of the starting dry biomass would need to be solubilized or removed, which has not yet been achieved.

  19. Luminescent gold nanoparticles for bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen

    Inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) with tunable and diverse material properties hold great potential as contrast agents for better disease management. Over the past decades, luminescent gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with intrinsic emissions ranging from the visible to the near infrared have been synthesized and emerge as a new class of fluorophores for bioimaging. This dissertation aims to fundamentally understand the structure-property relationships in luminescent AuNPs and apply them as contrast agents to address some critical challenges in bioimaging at both the in vitro and in vivo level. In Chapter 2, we described the synthesized ~20 nm polycrystalline AuNPs (pAuNPs), which successfully integrated and enhanced plasmonic and fluorescence properties into a single AuNP through the grain size effect. The combination of these properties in one NP enabled AuNPs to serve as a multimodal contrast agent for in vitro optical microscopic imaging, making it possible to develop correlative microscopic imaging techniques. In Chapters 3-5, we proposed a feasible approach to optimize the in vivo kinetics and clearance profile of nanoprobes for multimodality in vivo bioimaging applications by using straightforward surface chemistry with luminescent AuNPs as a model. Luminescent glutathione-coated AuNPs of ~2 nm were synthesized. Investigation of the biodistribution showed that these glutathione-coated AuNPs (GS-AuNPs) exhibit stealthiness to the reticuloendothelial system (RES) organs and efficient renal clearance, with only 3.7+/-1.9% and 0.3+/-0.1% accumulating in the liver and spleen, and over 65% of the injection dose cleared out via the urine within the first 72 hours. In addition, ~2.5 nm NIR-emitting radioactive glutathione-coated [198Au]AuNPs (GS-[198Au]AuNPs) were synthesized for further evaluation of the pharmacokinetic profile of GS-AuNPs and potential multimodal imaging. The results showed that the GS-[198Au]AuNPs behave like small-molecule contrast agents in

  20. Gold Nanoparticle Quantitation by Whole Cell Tomography.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Aric W; Jeerage, Kavita M; Schwartz, Cindi L; Curtin, Alexandra E; Chiaramonti, Ann N

    2015-12-22

    Many proposed biomedical applications for engineered gold nanoparticles require their incorporation by mammalian cells in specific numbers and locations. Here, the number of gold nanoparticles inside of individual mammalian stem cells was characterized using fast focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy based tomography. Enhanced optical microscopy was used to provide a multiscale map of the in vitro sample, which allows cells of interest to be identified within their local environment. Cells were then serially sectioned using a gallium ion beam and imaged using a scanning electron beam. To confirm the accuracy of single cross sections, nanoparticles in similar cross sections were imaged using transmission electron microscopy and scanning helium ion microscopy. Complete tomographic series were then used to count the nanoparticles inside of each cell and measure their spatial distribution. We investigated the influence of slice thickness on counting single particles and clusters as well as nanoparticle packing within clusters. For 60 nm citrate stabilized particles, the nanoparticle cluster packing volume is 2.15 ± 0.20 times the volume of the bare gold nanoparticles. PMID:26563983

  1. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles: A green approach.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shakeel; Annu; Ikram, Saiqa; Yudha S, Salprima

    2016-08-01

    Nanotechnology is an immensely developing field due to its extensive range of applications in different areas of technology and science. Different types of methods are employed for synthesis of nanoparticles due to their wide applications. The conventional chemical methods have certain limitations with them either in the form of chemical contaminations during their syntheses procedures or in later applications and use of higher energy. During the last decade research have been focussed on developing simple, clean, non-toxic, cost effective and eco-friendly protocols for synthesis of nanoparticles. In order to get this objective, biosynthesis methods have been developed in order to fill this gap. The biosynthesis of nanoparticles is simple, single step, eco-friendly and a green approach. The biochemical processes in biological agents reduce the dissolved metal ions into nano metals. The various biological agents like plant tissues, fungi, bacteria, etc. are used for biosynthesis for metal nanoparticles. In this review article, we summarised recent literature on biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles which have revolutionised technique of synthesis for their applications in different fields. Due to biocompatibility of gold nanoparticles, it has find its applications in biomedical applications. The protocol and mechanism of biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles along with various applications have also been discussed. PMID:27236049

  2. Orientations of polyoxometalate anions on gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sharet, Shelly; Sandars, Ella; Wang, Yifeng; Zeiri, Offer; Neyman, Alevtina; Meshi, Louisa; Weinstock, Ira A

    2012-09-01

    Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy of polyoxometalate-protected gold nanoparticles reveals that the Preyssler ion, [NaP(5)W(30)O(110)](14-), lies "face down" with its C(5) axis perpendicular to the gold surface, while the Finke-Droege ion, [P(4)W(30)Zn(4)(H(2)O)(2)O(112)](16-), is "tilted", with its long axis close to 60° from the normal to the surface. PMID:22510818

  3. Optical Epitaxial Growth of Gold Nanoparticle Arrays.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ningfeng; Martínez, Luis Javier; Jaquay, Eric; Nakano, Aiichiro; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2015-09-01

    We use an optical analogue of epitaxial growth to assemble gold nanoparticles into 2D arrays. Particles are attracted to a growth template via optical forces and interact through optical binding. Competition between effects determines the final particle arrangements. We use a Monte Carlo model to design a template that favors growth of hexagonal particle arrays. We experimentally demonstrate growth of a highly stable array of 50 gold particles with 200 nm diameter, spaced by 1.1 μm. PMID:26230429

  4. Gold-coated nanoparticles for use in biotechnology applications

    DOEpatents

    Berning, Douglas E.; Kraus, Jr., Robert H.; Atcher, Robert W.; Schmidt, Jurgen G.

    2007-06-05

    A process of preparing gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles is disclosed and includes forming a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles within a suitable liquid, adding an amount of a reducible gold compound and a reducing agent to the suspension, and, maintaining the suspension for time sufficient to form gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

  5. Gold-coated nanoparticles for use in biotechnology applications

    DOEpatents

    Berning, Douglas E.; Kraus, Jr., Robert H.; Atcher; Robert W.; Schmidt, Jurgen G.

    2009-07-07

    A process of preparing gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles is disclosed and includes forming a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles within a suitable liquid, adding an amount of a reducible gold compound and a reducing agent to the suspension, and, maintaining the suspension for time sufficient to form gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

  6. Radiofrequency heating pathways for gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Collins, C B; McCoy, R S; Ackerson, B J; Collins, G J; Ackerson, C J

    2014-08-01

    This feature article reviews the thermal dissipation of nanoscopic gold under radiofrequency (RF) irradiation. It also presents previously unpublished data addressing obscure aspects of this phenomenon. While applications in biology motivated initial investigation of RF heating of gold nanoparticles, recent controversy concerning whether thermal effects can be attributed to nanoscopic gold highlight the need to understand the involved mechanism or mechanisms of heating. Both the nature of the particle and the nature of the RF field influence heating. Aspects of nanoparticle chemistry which may affect thermal dissipation include the hydrodynamic diameter of the particle, the oxidation state and related magnetism of the core, and the chemical nature of the ligand shell. Aspects of RF which may affect thermal dissipation include power, frequency and antenna designs that emphasize relative strength of magnetic or electric fields. These nanoparticle and RF properties are analysed in the context of three heating mechanisms proposed to explain gold nanoparticle heating in an RF field. This article also makes a critical analysis of the existing literature in the context of the nanoparticle preparations, RF structure, and suggested mechanisms in previously reported experiments. PMID:24962620

  7. Applications of gold nanoparticles in cancer nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weibo; Gao, Ting; Hong, Hao; Sun, Jiangtao

    2008-01-01

    It has been almost 4 decades since the “war on cancer” was declared. It is now generally believed that personalized medicine is the future for cancer patient management. Possessing unprecedented potential for early detection, accurate diagnosis, and personalized treatment of cancer, nanoparticles have been extensively studied over the last decade. In this review, we will summarize the current state-of-the-art of gold nanoparticles in biomedical applications targeting cancer. Gold nanospheres, nanorods, nanoshells, nanocages, and surface enhanced Raman scattering nanoparticles will be discussed in detail regarding their uses in in vitro assays, ex vivo and in vivo imaging, cancer therapy, and drug delivery. Multifunctionality is the key feature of nanoparticle-based agents. Targeting ligands, imaging labels, therapeutic drugs, and other functionalities can all be integrated to allow for targeted molecular imaging and molecular therapy of cancer. Big strides have been made and many proof-of-principle studies have been successfully performed. The future looks brighter than ever yet many hurdles remain to be conquered. A multifunctional platform based on gold nanoparticles, with multiple receptor targeting, multimodality imaging, and multiple therapeutic entities, holds the promise for a “magic gold bullet” against cancer. PMID:24198458

  8. Applications of gold nanoparticles in cancer nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weibo; Gao, Ting; Hong, Hao; Sun, Jiangtao

    2013-01-01

    It has been almost 4 decades since the “war on cancer” was declared. It is now generally believed that personalized medicine is the future for cancer patient management. Possessing unprecedented potential for early detection, accurate diagnosis, and personalized treatment of cancer, nanoparticles have been extensively studied over the last decade. In this review, we will summarize the current state-of-the-art of gold nanoparticles in biomedical applications targeting cancer. Gold nanospheres, nanorods, nanoshells, nanocages, and surface enhanced Raman scattering nanoparticles will be discussed in detail regarding their uses in in vitro assays, ex vivo and in vivo imaging, cancer therapy, and drug delivery. Multifunctionality is the key feature of nanoparticle-based agents. Targeting ligands, imaging labels, therapeutic drugs, and other functionalities can all be integrated to allow for targeted molecular imaging and molecular therapy of cancer. Big strides have been made and many proof-of-principle studies have been successfully performed. The future looks brighter than ever yet many hurdles remain to be conquered. A multifunctional platform based on gold nanoparticles, with multiple receptor targeting, multimodality imaging, and multiple therapeutic entities, holds the promise for a “magic gold bullet” against cancer. PMID:24163578

  9. Gold Nanoparticle Hyperthermia Reduces Radiotherapy Dose

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lynn; Slatkin, Daniel N.; Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Vadas, Timothy M.; Smilowitz, Henry M.

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles can absorb near infrared light, resulting in heating and ablation of tumors. Gold nanoparticles have also been used for enhancing the dose of X-rays in tumors during radiotherapy. The combination of hyperthermia and radiotherapy is synergistic, importantly allowing a reduction in X-ray dose with improved therapeutic results. Here we intratumorally infused small 15 nm gold nanoparticles engineered to be transformed from infrared-transparent to infrared-absorptive by the tumor, which were then heated by infrared followed by X-ray treatment. Synergy was studied using a very radioresistant subcutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCCVII) in mice. It was found that the dose required to control 50% of the tumors, normally 55 Gy, could be reduced to <15 Gy (a factor of >3.7). Gold nanoparticles therefore provide a method to combine hyperthermia and radiotherapy to drastically reduce the X-ray radiation needed, thus sparing normal tissue, reducing the side effects, and making radiotherapy more effective. PMID:24990355

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations on the melting of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Zhiwei; Feng, Haijun; Zhou, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics is employed to study the melting of bulk gold and gold nanoparticles. PCFF, Sutton-Chen and COMPASS force fields are adopted to study the melting point of bulk gold and we find out that the Sutton-Chen force field is the most accurate model in predicting the melting point of bulk gold. Consequently, the Sutton-Chen force field is applied to study the melting points of spherical gold nanoparticles with different diameters. Variations of diffusion coefficient, potential energy and translational order parameter with temperature are analyzed. The simulated melting points of gold nanoparticles are between 615∼1115 K, which are much lower than that of bulk gold (1336 K). As the diameter of gold nanoparticle drops, the melting point also descends. The melting mechanism is also analyzed for gold nanoparticles.

  11. Thermal optical nonlinearity enhanced by gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Rogério F.; Alencar, Márcio A. R. C.; Nascimento, César M.; da Silva, Monique G. A.; Meneghetti, Mario R.; Hickmann, Jandir M.

    2006-08-01

    We report on the observation of a large thermal nonlinearity of an organic material enhanced by the presence of gold nanoparticles. The studied system consisted of a colloid of castor oil and gold particles with average diameter of 10 nm, with filling factor of 4.0x10 -5. Z-scan measurements were performed for an excitation wavelength tuned at 810 nm in the CW regime. It was observed that this colloidal system presents a large thermal nonlinear refractive index, which was equal to -7.4x10 -8 cm2/W. This value is about 41 times larger than the n II of the host material. The thermo-optic coefficient of the colloid was also evaluated, and a large enhancement was observed in its value owing to the presence of the gold nanoparticles in the organic material.

  12. Gold nanoparticle mediated designing of non-hydrolytic sol-gel cross-linked metformin imprinted polymer network: a theoretical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ekta; Patra, Santanu; Madhuri, Rashmi; Sharma, Prashant K

    2014-03-01

    A sensitive and selective electrochemical sensor based on molecularly imprinted polymers was developed for trace level detection of metformin-an antidiabetic drug. For the first time, we have applied non-hydrolytic sol-gel matrix as a cross-linking agent in the field of molecular imprinting. To create the sol-gel matrix and enhance the electro-conductivity of the proposed sensor citrate-capped gold nanoparticle were used. The morphologies and properties of the sensor were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, cyclic voltammetry, electron impedance spectroscopy, chronocoulometry and differential pulse voltammetry. Energy of the HOMO and LUMO orbitals and Mülliken's atomic charges of template molecule were also calculated using density functional theory utilizing B3LYP with 3-21G-basis set. The theoretical results allied to the diagnostic criteria of the cyclic voltammetry indicate that the metformin redox mechanism is associated to the irreversible oxidation process of metformin-imino-group to N-hydroxyimino-group. The results demonstrated that the prepared sensor had excellent selectivity and high sensitivity for metformin in the linear range from 0.02 to 80 ng ml(-1) with a detection limit of 0.005 ng ml(-1) (S/N=3). The sensor was also successfully employed to detect metformin in pharmaceutical sample. PMID:24468360

  13. Morphological responses of Legionella pneumophila biofilm to nanoparticle exposure.

    PubMed

    Stojak, Amber R; Raftery, Tara; Klaine, Stephen J; McNealy, Tamara L

    2011-12-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a pathogenic bacterium that forms biofilms in natural and anthropogenic habitats. This feature not only facilitates colonization but also limits the effectiveness of biocides. L. pneumophila was exposed to three sizes of citrate-capped gold nanospheres in both planktonic and biofilm stages. TEM micrographs indicated that gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) adsorbed to the bacterial cell surface, were absorbed into the cells, aggregated within the cells, and integrated into the extrapolymeric matrix of the biofilm. Both 4 and 18 nm, but not 50 nm AuNPs caused an alteration of biofilm morphology. Treatment with 20 nm polystyrene spheres did not induce these changes suggesting that the response was a result of the gold and not just the presence of the nanosphere. The morphological changes observed in the biofilm suggest that aquatic ecosystems may be affected by nanoparticle exposure. This may compromise ecosystem functions such as nutrient cycling facilitated by natural biofilms. PMID:21294606

  14. Antifungal activity of gold nanoparticles prepared by solvothermal method

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Tokeer; Wani, Irshad A.; Lone, Irfan H.; Ganguly, Aparna; Manzoor, Nikhat; Ahmad, Aijaz; Ahmed, Jahangeer; Al-Shihri, Ayed S.

    2013-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Gold nanoparticles (7 and 15 nm) of very high surface area (329 and 269 m{sup 2}/g) have been successfully synthesized through solvothermal method by using tin chloride and sodium borohydride as reducing agents. As-prepared gold nanoparticles shows very excellent antifungal activity against Candida isolates and activity increases with decrease in the particle size. Display Omitted Highlights: ► Effect of reducing agents on the morphology of gold nanoparticles. ► Highly uniform and monodisperse gold nanoparticles (7 nm). ► Highest surface area of gold nanoparticles (329 m{sup 2/}g). ► Excellent antifungal activity of gold nanoparticles against Candida strains. -- Abstract: Gold nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by solvothermal method using SnCl{sub 2} and NaBH{sub 4} as reducing agents. X-ray diffraction studies show highly crystalline and monophasic nature of the gold nanoparticles with face centred cubic structure. The transmission electron microscopic studies show the formation of nearly spherical gold nanoparticles of average size of 15 nm using SnCl{sub 2}, however, NaBH{sub 4} produced highly uniform, monodispersed and spherical gold nanoparticles of average grain size of 7 nm. A high surface area of 329 m{sup 2}/g for 7 nm and 269 m{sup 2}/g for 15 nm gold nanoparticles was observed. UV–vis studies assert the excitations over the visible region due to transverse and longitudinal surface plasmon modes. The gold nanoparticles exhibit excellent size dependant antifungal activity and greater biocidal action against Candida isolates for 7 nm sized gold nanoparticles restricting the transmembrane H{sup +} efflux of the Candida species than 15 nm sized gold nanoparticles.

  15. The golden age: gold nanoparticles for biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Dreaden, Erik C; Alkilany, Alaaldin M; Huang, Xiaohua; Murphy, Catherine J; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

    2012-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been used in biomedical applications since their first colloidal syntheses more than three centuries ago. However, over the past two decades, their beautiful colors and unique electronic properties have also attracted tremendous attention due to their historical applications in art and ancient medicine and current applications in enhanced optoelectronics and photovoltaics. In spite of their modest alchemical beginnings, gold nanoparticles exhibit physical properties that are truly different from both small molecules and bulk materials, as well as from other nanoscale particles. Their unique combination of properties is just beginning to be fully realized in range of medical diagnostic and therapeutic applications. This critical review will provide insights into the design, synthesis, functionalization, and applications of these artificial molecules in biomedicine and discuss their tailored interactions with biological systems to achieve improved patient health. Further, we provide a survey of the rapidly expanding body of literature on this topic and argue that gold nanotechnology-enabled biomedicine is not simply an act of 'gilding the (nanomedicinal) lily', but that a new 'Golden Age' of biomedical nanotechnology is truly upon us. Moving forward, the most challenging nanoscience ahead of us will be to find new chemical and physical methods of functionalizing gold nanoparticles with compounds that can promote efficient binding, clearance, and biocompatibility and to assess their safety to other biological systems and their long-term term effects on human health and reproduction (472 references). PMID:22109657

  16. X-ray optics of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Letfullin, Renat R; Rice, Colin E W; George, Thomas F

    2014-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been investigated as contrast agents for traditional x-ray medical procedures, utilizing the strong absorption characteristics of the nanoparticles to enhance the contrast of the detected x-ray image. Here we use the Kramers-Kronig relation for complex atomic scattering factors to find the real and imaginary parts of the index of refraction for the medium composed of single-element materials or compounds in the x-ray range of the spectrum. These complex index of refraction values are then plugged into a Lorenz-Mie theory to calculate the absorption efficiency of various size gold nanoparticles for photon energies in the 1-100 keV range. Since the output from most medical diagnostic x-ray devices follows a wide and filtered spectrum of photon energies, we introduce and compute the effective intensity-absorption-efficiency values for gold nanoparticles of radii varying from 5 to 50 nm, where we use the TASMIP model to integrate over all spectral energies generated by typical tungsten anode x-ray tubes with kilovolt potentials ranging from 50 to 150 kVp. PMID:25402878

  17. Assembly of functional gold nanoparticle on silica microsphere.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsuan-Lan; Lee, Fu-Cheng; Tang, Tse-Yu; Zhou, Chenguang; Tsai, De-Hao

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a controlled synthesis of silica microsphere with the surface-decorated functional gold nanoparticles. Surface of silica microsphere was modified by 3-aminopropypltriethoxysilane and 3-aminopropyldimethylethoxysilane to generate a positive electric field, by which the gold nanoparticles with the negative charges (unconjugated, thiolated polyethylene glycol functionalized with the traceable packing density and conformation) were able to be attracted to the silica microsphere. Results show that both the molecular conjugation on gold nanoparticle and the uniformity in the amino-silanization of silica microsphere influenced the loading and the homogeneity of gold nanoparticles on silica microsphere. The 3-aminopropyldimethylethoxysilane-functionalized silica microsphere provided an uniform field to attract gold nanoparticles. Increasing the ethanol content in aminosilane solution significantly improved the homogeneity and the loading of gold nanoparticles on the surface of silica microsphere. For the gold nanoparticle, increasing the molecular mass of polyethylene glycol yielded a greater homogeneity but a lower loading on silica microsphere. Bovine serum albumin induced the desorption of gold nanoparticles from silica microsphere, where the extent of desorption was suppressed by the presence of high-molecular mass polyethylene glycol on gold nanoparticles. This work provides the fundamental understanding for the synthesis of gold nanoparticle-silica microsphere constructs useful to the applications in chemo-radioactive therapeutics. PMID:26874272

  18. Irradiation stability and cytotoxicity of gold nanoparticles for radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Guo, Mei-Li; Wu, Hong-Ying; Sun, Yuan-Ming; Ding, Yan-Qiu; Feng, Xin; Zhang, Liang-An

    2009-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are promising as a kind of novel radiosensitizer in radiotherapy. If gold nanoparticles are shown to have good irradiation stability and biocompatibility, they would play an important role in radiotherapy. In this work, we investigated irradiation effects of gold nanoparticles under 2–10 kR gamma irradiation and cytotoxicity of gold nanoparticles with human K562 cells by using Cell Titre-Glo™ luminescent cell viability assay. The results revealed that gamma irradiation had not induced any obvious instability and size variations in gold nanoparticles. We found that gold nanoparticles showed excellent radiation hardness with an absorbed dose conversation factor of 9.491 rad/R. Meanwhile, the surface plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles was enhanced obviously after 2–10 kR gamma irradiation. Subsequently, cytotoxicity tests indicated that the extremely high concentration of gold nanoparticles could cause a sharp decrease in K562 cell viability, while the low concentration of gold nanoparticles had no obvious influence on the cell viability. Our results revealed that gold nanoparticles were stable under high-energy ray irradiation and showed concentration-dependent cytotoxicity. PMID:19774115

  19. Template based synthesis of gold nanotubes using biologically synthesized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ballabh, R; Nara, S

    2015-12-01

    Reliable experimental protocols using green technologies to synthesize metallic nanostructures widen their applications, both biological as well as biomedical. Here, we describe a method for synthesizing gold nanotubes using biologically synthesized gold nanoparticles in a template based approach. E. coli DH5α was used as bionanofactory to synthesize gold nanoparticles. These nanoparticles were then deposited on sodium sulfate (Na2SO4) nanowires which were employed as sacrificial template for gold nanotube (Au-NT) formation. The gold nanoparticles, sodium sulphate nanowires and gold nanotubes were appropriately characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The TEM results showed that the average diameter of gold nanotubes was 72 nm and length up to 4-7 μm. The method discussed herein is better than other reported conventional chemical synthesis approaches as it uses biologically synthesized gold nanoparticles, and does not employ any harsh conditions/solvents for template removal which makes it a clean and ecofriendly method. PMID:26742328

  20. Terminalia chebula mediated green and rapid synthesis of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan Kumar, Kesarla; Mandal, Badal Kumar; Sinha, Madhulika; Krishnakumar, Varadhan

    2012-02-01

    Biologically inspired experimental process in synthesising nanoparticles is of great interest in present scenario. Biosynthesis of nanoparticles is considered to be one of the best green techniques in synthesising metal nanoparticles. Here, an in situ green biogenic synthesis of gold nanoparticles using aqueous extracts of Terminalia chebula as reducing and stabilizing agent is reported. Gold nanoparticles were confirmed by surface plasmon resonance in the range of 535 nm using UV-visible spectrometry. TEM analysis revealed that the morphology of the particles thus formed contains anisotropic gold nanoparticles with size ranging from 6 to 60 nm. Hydrolysable tannins present in the extract of T. chebula are responsible for reductions and stabilization of gold nanoparticles. Antimicrobial activity of gold nanoparticles showed better activity towards gram positive S. aureus compared to gram negative E. coli using standard well diffusion method.

  1. Immobilization of gold nanoparticles on cell culture surfaces for safe and enhanced gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalies, Stefan; Heinemann, Dag; Schomaker, Markus; Gentemann, Lara; Meyer, Heiko; Ripken, Tammo

    2014-07-01

    In comparison to standard transfection methods, gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection has proven to be a versatile alternative. This is based on its minor influence on cell viability and its high efficiency, especially for the delivery of small molecules like small interfering RNA. However, in order to transfer it to routine usage, a safety aspect is of major concern: The avoidance of nanoparticle uptake by the cells is desired. The immobilization of the gold nanoparticles on cell culture surfaces can address this issue. In this study, we achieved this by silanization of the appropriate surfaces and the binding of gold nanoparticles to them. Comparable perforation efficiencies to the previous approaches of gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection with free gold nanoparticles are demonstrated. The uptake of the immobilized particles by the cells is unlikely. Consequently, these investigations offer the possibility of bringing gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection closer to routine usage.

  2. Protein Cages as Containers for Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aijie; Verwegen, Martijn; de Ruiter, Mark V; Maassen, Stan J; Traulsen, Christoph H-H; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M

    2016-07-01

    Abundant and highly diverse, viruses offer new scaffolds in nanotechnology for the encapsulation, organization, or even synthesis of novel materials. In this work the coat protein of the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) is used to encapsulate gold nanoparticles with different sizes and stabilizing ligands yielding stable particles in buffered solutions at neutral pH. The sizes of the virus-like particles correspond to T = 1, 2, and 3 Caspar-Klug icosahedral triangulation numbers. We developed a simple one-step process enabling the encapsulation of commercially available gold nanoparticles without prior modification with up to 97% efficiency. The encapsulation efficiency is further increased using bis-p-(sufonatophenyl)phenyl phosphine surfactants up to 99%. Our work provides a simplified procedure for the preparation of metallic particles stabilized in CCMV protein cages. The presented results are expected to enable the preparation of a variety of similar virus-based colloids for current focus areas. PMID:27135176

  3. Ligand-free gold nanoparticles as colorimetric probes for the non-destructive determination of total dithiocarbamate pesticides after solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Giannoulis, Kyriakos M; Giokas, Dimosthenis L; Tsogas, George Z; Vlessidis, Athanasios G

    2014-02-01

    In this work, we describe a simple and sensitive non-destructive method for the determination of the total concentration of dithiocarbamate fungicides (DTCs) in real samples. The proposed method combines for the first time the benefits of an extraction method for sample clean-up and preconcentration with a sensitive colorimetric assay based on gold nanoparticle probes. In this two-step procedure, the target DTCs are isolated from the matrix and preconcentrated by solid phase extraction onto commercially available C18 sorbents. Following elution, the extract containing the target dithiocarbamates, free from most interferences and matrix components, is delivered into an aqueous dispersion of plain citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) which aggregate in response to DTCs coordination on AuNPs surface through multiple gold thiolate bonds. This aggregation is evidenced by changes in the spectral properties of the solution involving a decrease in the original absorbance of Au nanoparticles at 522 nm and the appearance of a new absorption band above 700 nm. An ensuing chromatic shift of the solution from wine-red to purple-blue is observed which is visual by naked eye at concentrations as low as 50 μg L(-1). Further improvement in the detection limits can be accomplished by scaling-down the method to micro-volume conditions alleviating the need to preconcentrate larger sample volumes. Overall, by combining sample clean-up and preconcentration with the strong affinity of DTC thiol group for the gold surface, the total concentration of dithiocarbamate pesticides was successfully determined in various water samples at the low and ultra-low μg L(-1) levels without resorting to destructive techniques, sophisticated instrumentation or post-synthetic modification of gold nanoparticles. Method application in real samples showed good analytical features in terms of recoveries (81.0-94.0%), precision (5.6-8.9%) and reproducibility (~9%) rendering the method as an attractive

  4. Unprecedented inhibition of tubulin polymerization directed by gold nanoparticles inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Diptiman; Xavier, Paulrajpillai Lourdu; Chaudhari, Kamalesh; John, Robin; Dasgupta, Anjan Kumar; Pradeep, Thalappil; Chakrabarti, Gopal

    2013-05-01

    The effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the polymerization of tubulin has not been examined till now. We report that interaction of weakly protected AuNPs with microtubules (MTs) could cause inhibition of polymerization and aggregation in the cell free system. We estimate that single citrate capped AuNPs could cause aggregation of ~105 tubulin heterodimers. Investigation of the nature of inhibition of polymerization and aggregation by Raman and Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopies indicated partial conformational changes of tubulin and microtubules, thus revealing that AuNP-induced conformational change is the driving force behind the observed phenomenon. Cell culture experiments were carried out to check whether this can happen inside a cell. Dark field microscopy (DFM) combined with hyperspectral imaging (HSI) along with flow cytometric (FC) and confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) analyses suggested that AuNPs entered the cell, caused aggregation of the MTs of A549 cells, leading to cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase and concomitant apoptosis. Further, Western blot analysis indicated the upregulation of mitochondrial apoptosis proteins such as Bax and p53, down regulation of Bcl-2 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) confirming mitochondrial apoptosis. Western blot run after cold-depolymerization revealed an increase in the aggregated insoluble intracellular tubulin while the control and actin did not aggregate, suggesting microtubule damage induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The observed polymerization inhibition and cytotoxic effects were dependent on the size and concentration of the AuNPs used and also on the incubation time. As microtubules are important cellular structures and target for anti-cancer drugs, this first observation of nanoparticles-induced protein's conformational change-based aggregation of the tubulin-MT system is of high importance, and would be useful in the understanding of cancer therapeutics

  5. Detection of squamous carcinoma cells using gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Wei-Yun; Lee, Sze-tsen; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2015-03-01

    The goal of this study is to use gold nanoparticle as a diagnostic agent to detect human squamous carcinoma cells. Gold nanoparticles were synthesized and the gold nanoparticle size was 34.3 ± 6.2 nm. Based on the over-expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) biomarkers in squamous carcinoma cells, we hypothesized that EGFR could be a feasible biomarker with a target moiety for detection. We further modified polyclonal antibodies of EGFR on the surface of gold nanoparticles. We found selected squamous carcinoma cells can be selectively detected using EGFR antibody-modified gold nanoparticles via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Cell death was also examined to determine the survival status of squamous carcinoma cells with respect to gold nanoparticle treatment and EGFR polyclonal antibody modification.

  6. Gold nanoparticles as novel agents for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jain, S; Hirst, D G; O'Sullivan, J M

    2012-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are emerging as promising agents for cancer therapy and are being investigated as drug carriers, photothermal agents, contrast agents and radiosensitisers. This review introduces the field of nanotechnology with a focus on recent gold nanoparticle research which has led to early-phase clinical trials. In particular, the pre-clinical evidence for gold nanoparticles as sensitisers with ionising radiation in vitro and in vivo at kilovoltage and megavoltage energies is discussed. PMID:22010024

  7. Gold nanoparticles as novel agents for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Jain, S; Hirst, D G; O'Sullivan, J M

    2012-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles are emerging as promising agents for cancer therapy and are being investigated as drug carriers, photothermal agents, contrast agents and radiosensitisers. This review introduces the field of nanotechnology with a focus on recent gold nanoparticle research which has led to early-phase clinical trials. In particular, the pre-clinical evidence for gold nanoparticles as sensitisers with ionising radiation in vitro and in vivo at kilovoltage and megavoltage energies is discussed. PMID:22010024

  8. Thermally controlled photocatalytic coalescence of functionalized gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Moshik; Zalevsky, Zeev; Pocoví-Martínez, Salvador; Shahmoon, Asaf; Pérez-Prieto, Julia

    2014-05-01

    The selective synthesis of gold nanoparticles of any desired size is of great interest. Benzophenone in THF has proved to act as an efficient photocatalyst for the growth of thiolate-capped nanoparticles in the presence and in the absence of gold salts. Consequently, we explored the effect of applying thermal energy to control these processes. These studies have provided key information for the effective growth of gold nanoparticles tailored to specific applications.

  9. Sargassum myriocystum mediated biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalin Dhas, T.; Ganesh Kumar, V.; Stanley Abraham, L.; Karthick, V.; Govindaraju, K.

    2012-12-01

    Functionalized metal nanoparticles are unique in nature and are being developed for its specificity in drug targeting. In the present study, aqueous extract of Sargassum myriocystum is used for the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by the reduction of chloroauric acid. The formation of nanoparticles reaction was complete within 15 min at 76 °C. The size, shape and elemental analysis of AuNPs were carried out using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, FT-IR, TEM, SEM-EDAX, and XRD analysis. The newly formed AuNPs are stable, well-defined, polydispersed (triangular and spherical) and crystalline with an average size of 15 nm. The biomolecule involved in stabilizing AuNPs was identified using GC-MS.

  10. X-Ray Spectroscopy of Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.; Montenegro, M.; Pradhan, A. K.; Pitzer, R.

    2009-06-01

    Inner shell transitions, such as 1s-2p, in heavy elements can absorb or produce hard X-rays, and hence are widely used in nanoparticles. Bio-medical research for cancer treatment has been using heavy element nanoparticles, embeded in malignant tumor, for efficient absorption of irradiated X-rays and leading emission of hard X-rays and energetic electrons to kill the surrounding cells. Ejection of a 1s electron during ionization of the element by absorption of a X-ray photon initiates the Auger cascades of emission of photons and electrons. We have investigated gold nanoparticles for the optimal energy range, below the K-edge (1s) ionization threshold, that corresponds to resonant absorption of X-rays with large attenuation coefficients, orders of magnitude higher over the background as well as to that at K-edge threshold. We applied these attenuation coefficients in Monte Carlo simulation to study the intensities of emission of photons and electrons by Auger cascades. The numerical experiments were carried out in a phantom of water cube with a thin layer, 0.1mm/g, of gold nanoparticles 10 cm inside from the surface using the well-known code Geant4. We will present results on photon and electron emission spectra from passing monochromatic X-ray beams at 67 keV, which is the resonant energy for resonant K_{α} lines, at 82 keV, the K-shell ionization threshold, and at 2 MeV where the resonant effect is non-existent. Our findings show a high peak in the gold nanoparticle absorption curve indicating complete absorption of radiation within the gold layer. The photon and electron emission spectra show resonant features. Acknowledgement: Partially supported by a Large Interdisciplinary Grant award of the Ohio State University and NASA APRA program (SNN). The computational work was carried out on the Cray X1 and Itanium 4 cluster at the Ohio Supercomputer Center, Columbus Ohio. "Resonant X-ray Irradiation of High-Z Nanoparticles For Cancer Theranostics" (refereed

  11. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles and silver nanoparticles via green technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Zulfiqaar; Balu, S. S.

    2012-11-01

    The proposed work describes the comparison of various methods of green synthesis for preparation of Gold and Silver nanoparticles. Pure extracts of Lemon (Citrus limon) and Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) were mixed with aqueous solution of auric tetrachloride and silver nitrate. The resultant solutions were treated with four common techniques to assist in the reduction namely photo catalytic, thermal, microwave assisted reduction and solvo - thermal reduction. UV - Visible Spectroscopy results and STM images of the final solutions confirmed the formation of stable metallic nanoparticles. A preliminary account of the green synthesis work is presented here.

  12. Gold nanoparticles: Opportunities and Challenges in Nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Arvizo, Rochelle; Bhattacharya, Resham; Mukherjee, Priyabrata

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Site-specific drug delivery is an important area of research that is anticipated to increase the efficacy of the drug and reduce potential side effects. Due to this, substantial work has been done developing non-invasive and targeted tumor treatment with nano-scale metallic particles. Areas covered in this review This review focuses on the work done in the last several years developing gold nanoparticles as cancer therapeutics and diagnostic agents. However, there are challenges in using gold nanoparticles as drug delivery systems such as biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and possible toxicity. Approaches to limit these issues are proposed. What the reader will gain Different approaches from several different disciplines are discussed. Potential clinical applications of these engineered nanoparticles is also presented. Take home message Because of their unique size-dependent physico-chemical and optical properties, adaptability, sub-cellular size, and bio-compatibility, these nanosized carriers offer an apt means of transporting small molecules as well as biomacromoleculs to diseased cells/ tissues. PMID:20408736

  13. Surface modification of silica particles with gold nanoparticles as an augmentation of gold nanoparticle mediated laser perforation.

    PubMed

    Kalies, Stefan; Gentemann, Lara; Schomaker, Markus; Heinemann, Dag; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko

    2014-08-01

    Gold nanoparticle mediated (GNOME) laser transfection/perforation fulfills the demands of a reliable transfection technique. It provides efficient delivery and has a negligible impact on cell viability. Furthermore, it reaches high-throughput applicability. However, currently only large gold particles (> 80 nm) allow successful GNOME laser perforation, probably due to insufficient sedimentation of smaller gold nanoparticles. The objective of this study is to determine whether this aspect can be addressed by a modification of silica particles with gold nanoparticles. Throughout the analysis, we show that after the attachment of gold nanoparticles to silica particles, comparable or better efficiencies to GNOME laser perforation are reached. In combination with 1 µm silica particles, we report laser perforation with gold nanoparticles with sizes down to 4 nm. Therefore, our investigations have great importance for the future research in and the fields of laser transfection combined with plasmonics. PMID:25136494

  14. Surface modification of silica particles with gold nanoparticles as an augmentation of gold nanoparticle mediated laser perforation

    PubMed Central

    Kalies, Stefan; Gentemann, Lara; Schomaker, Markus; Heinemann, Dag; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle mediated (GNOME) laser transfection/perforation fulfills the demands of a reliable transfection technique. It provides efficient delivery and has a negligible impact on cell viability. Furthermore, it reaches high-throughput applicability. However, currently only large gold particles (> 80 nm) allow successful GNOME laser perforation, probably due to insufficient sedimentation of smaller gold nanoparticles. The objective of this study is to determine whether this aspect can be addressed by a modification of silica particles with gold nanoparticles. Throughout the analysis, we show that after the attachment of gold nanoparticles to silica particles, comparable or better efficiencies to GNOME laser perforation are reached. In combination with 1 µm silica particles, we report laser perforation with gold nanoparticles with sizes down to 4 nm. Therefore, our investigations have great importance for the future research in and the fields of laser transfection combined with plasmonics. PMID:25136494

  15. Nanomanufacturing of gold nanoparticle superstructures from the "bottom-up"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Tingling

    Gold nanoparticles that can generate surface plasmons under appropriate conditions have attracted significant interest for their potential in optics, photonics, data storage and biological sensors. Developing high fidelity fabrication methods that yield gold nanoparticles with well-defined size, shape, composition and self-assembly allows manipulation of surface plasmonic properties for novel applications as well as revealing new aspects of the underlying science. This dissertation demonstrates multiple techniques that describe cost-effective bottom-up" fabrication methods that yield gold nano-superstructures. In my initial work, I outline the solution conditions for fabricating Janus nanoparticles composed of one gold nanoparticle per micelle. Poly(ethylene oxide)-b-polystyrene (PEO-b-PS) was synthesized and processed into spherical micelles, which served as the template to induce gold nanoparticles growth within the PEO corona in situ. Organic-inorganic hybrid nanoparticle formation was controlled kinetically by manipulating the concentration of both the micelle and reducing agent (HEPES). We also found that under certain condition, PEO-b-PS yielded micelles with pearl-like morphology, which possessed concentrated PEO domains at the interface between two adjacent PS cores. Careful manipulation of reaction conditions afforded gold nanoparticles that grew from the core-shell interface to form 1-dimensional (1-D) periodical gold nanoparticle chains. Based on similar principles, gold-gold dimers were synthesized by growing a second gold nanoparticle from a gold nanoparticle template surface-functionalized with PEO ligands. Gold dimers fabricated with this method exhibited strong enhancement properties via surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Instead of kinetic control, the number of newly grown gold nanoparticles on each particle template heavily relied on the PEO density on the nanoparticle template. As the size of the particle template increased from 10 nm to

  16. Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment Modules for Probing Gold Nanoparticle Interfacial Phenomena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karunanayake, Akila G.; Gunatilake, Sameera R.; Ameer, Fathima S.; Gadogbe, Manuel; Smith, Laura; Mlsna, Deb; Zhang, Dongmao

    2015-01-01

    Three gold-nanoparticle (AuNP) undergraduate experiment modules that are focused on nanoparticles interfacial phenomena have been developed. Modules 1 and 2 explore the synthesis and characterization of AuNPs of different sizes but with the same total gold mass. These experiments enable students to determine how particle size affects the AuNP…

  17. Advances in cancer research using gold nanoparticles mediated photothermal ablation

    PubMed Central

    MOCAN, LUCIAN; MATEA, CRISTIAN T.; BARTOS, DANA; MOSTEANU, OFELIA; POP, TEODORA; MOCAN, TEODORA; IANCU, CORNEL

    2016-01-01

    Recent research suggests that nanotechnologies may lead to the development of novel cancer treatment. Gold nanoparticles with their unique physical and chemical properties hold great hopes for the development of thermal-based therapies against human malignancies. This review will focus on various strategies that have been developed to use gold nanoparticles as photothermal agents against human cancers. PMID:27152068

  18. Application of gold nanoparticles in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chuan-tong; Liu, Zhen-bao

    2014-06-01

    With their unique physicochemical properties including excellent stability and biocompatibility, large specific surface area, and easy surface modification, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can be used as delivery vectors for drugs, genes, proteins, etc. In addition, AuNPs have excellent photothermal effects and radiosensitization characteristics, and therefore can be widely applied in the photothermal therapy and radiotherapy of cancers. This article reviews the construction, cellular uptake, and drug release of AuNPs drug-delivery systems and their applications in the treatment of tumors. PMID:24997828

  19. Monolayer coated gold nanoparticles for delivery applications

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Subinoy; Bajaj, Avinash; Mout, Rubul; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) provide attractive vehicles for delivery of drugs, genetic materials, proteins, and small molecules. AuNPs feature low core toxicity coupled with the ability to parametrically control particle size and surface properties. In this review, we focus on engineering of the AuNP surface monolayer, highlighting recent advances in tuning monolayer structures for efficient delivery of drugs and biomolecules. This review covers two broad categories of particle functionalization, organic monolayers and biomolecule coatings, and discusses their applications in drug, DNA/RNA, protein and small molecule delivery. PMID:21925556

  20. Green Chemistry Techniques for Gold Nanoparticles Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannavino, Sarah A.; King, Christy A.; Ferrara, Davon W.

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are often utilized in many technological and research applications ranging from the detection of tumors, molecular and biological sensors, and as nanoantennas to probe physical processes. As these applications move from the research laboratory to industrial settings, there is a need to develop efficient and sustainable synthesis techniques. Recent research has shown that several food products and beverages containing polyphenols, a common antioxidant, can be used as reducing agents in the synthesis of AuNPs in solution. In this study, we explore a variety of products to determine which allow for the most reproducible solution of nanoparticles based on the size and shapes of particles present. We analyzed the AuNPs solutions using extinction spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. We also develop a laboratory activity to introduce introductory chemistry and physics students to AuNP synthesis techniques and analysis.

  1. Silver and gold nanoparticles for sensor and antibacterial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindhu, M. R.; Umadevi, M.

    2014-07-01

    Green biogenic method for the synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles using Solanum lycopersicums extract as reducing agent was studied. The biomolecules present in the extract was responsible for reduction of Au3+ and Ag+ ions from HAuCl4 and AgNO3 respectively. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) technique to identify the size, shape of nanoparticles and biomolecules act as reducing agents. UV-visible spectra show the surface plasmon resonance peak at 546 nm and 445 nm corresponding to gold and silver nanoparticles respectively. Crystalline nature of the nanoparticles was evident from TEM images and XRD analysis. TEM images showed average size of 14 nm and 12 nm for prepared gold and silver nanoparticles respectively. FTIR analysis provides the presence of biomolecules responsible for the reduction and stability of the prepared silver and gold nanoparticles. XRD analysis of the silver and gold nanoparticles confirmed the formation of metallic silver and gold. The prepared gold and silver nanoparticles show good sensing and antimicrobial activity.

  2. Silver and gold nanoparticles for sensor and antibacterial applications.

    PubMed

    Bindhu, M R; Umadevi, M

    2014-07-15

    Green biogenic method for the synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles using Solanum lycopersicums extract as reducing agent was studied. The biomolecules present in the extract was responsible for reduction of Au(3+) and Ag(+) ions from HAuCl4 and AgNO3 respectively. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) technique to identify the size, shape of nanoparticles and biomolecules act as reducing agents. UV-visible spectra show the surface plasmon resonance peak at 546 nm and 445 nm corresponding to gold and silver nanoparticles respectively. Crystalline nature of the nanoparticles was evident from TEM images and XRD analysis. TEM images showed average size of 14 nm and 12 nm for prepared gold and silver nanoparticles respectively. FTIR analysis provides the presence of biomolecules responsible for the reduction and stability of the prepared silver and gold nanoparticles. XRD analysis of the silver and gold nanoparticles confirmed the formation of metallic silver and gold. The prepared gold and silver nanoparticles show good sensing and antimicrobial activity. PMID:24657466

  3. Growth of gold nanoparticles in human cells.

    PubMed

    Anshup, Anshup; Venkataraman, J Sai; Subramaniam, Chandramouli; Kumar, R Rajeev; Priya, Suma; Kumar, T R Santhosh; Omkumar, R V; John, Annie; Pradeep, T

    2005-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles of 20-100 nm diameter were synthesized within HEK-293 (human embryonic kidney), HeLa (human cervical cancer), SiHa (human cervical cancer), and SKNSH (human neuroblastoma) cells. Incubation of 1 mM tetrachloroaurate solution, prepared in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), pH 7.4, with human cells grown to approximately 80% confluency yielded systematic growth of nanoparticles over a period of 96 h. The cells, stained due to nanoparticle growth, were adherent to the bottom of the wells of the tissue culture plates, with their morphology preserved, indicating that the cell membrane was intact. Transmission electron microscopy of ultrathin sections showed the presence of nanoparticles within the cytoplasm and in the nucleus, the latter being much smaller in dimension. Scanning near field microscopic images confirmed the growth of large particles within the cytoplasm. Normal cells gave UV-visible signatures of higher intensity than the cancer cells. Differences in the cellular metabolism of cancer and noncancer cells were manifested, presumably in their ability to carry out the reduction process. PMID:16316080

  4. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using Cinnamomum zeylanicum leaf broth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smitha, S. L.; Philip, Daizy; Gopchandran, K. G.

    2009-10-01

    Development of biologically inspired experimental processes for the synthesis of nanoparticles is an important branch of nanotechnology. The synthesis of gold nanoparticles using Cinnamomum zeylanicum leaf broth as the reducing agent is reported. The morphology of the particles formed consists of a mixture of gold nanoprisms and spheres with fcc (1 1 1) structure of gold. At lower concentrations of the extract, formation of prism shaped Au particles dominates, while at higher concentrations almost spherical particles alone are observed. Good crystallinity of the nanoparticles with fcc phase is evident from XRD patterns, clear lattice fringes in the high resolution TEM image and bright circular rings in the SAED pattern. Au nanoparticles grown are observed to be photoluminescent and the intensity of photoemission is found to increase with increase in leaf broth concentration. The ability to modulate the shape of nanoparticles as observed in this study for gold nanoparticles opens up the exciting possibility of developing further synthetic routes employing ecofriendly sources.

  5. Microbial synthesis of Flower-shaped gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Singh, Priyanka; Kim, Yeon Ju; Wang, Chao; Mathiyalagan, Ramya; Yang, Deok Chun

    2016-09-01

    The shape of nanoparticles has been recognized as an important attribute that determines their applicability in various fields. The flower shape (F-shape) has been considered and is being focused on, because of its enhanced properties when compared to the properties of the spherical shape. The present study proposed the microbial synthesis of F-shaped gold nanoparticles within 48 h using the Bhargavaea indica DC1 strain. The F-shaped gold nanoparticles were synthesized extracellularly by the reduction of auric acid in the culture supernatant of B. indica DC1. The shape, size, purity, and crystalline nature of F-shaped gold nanoparticles were revealed by various instrumental techniques including UV-Vis, FE-TEM, EDX, elemental mapping, XRD, and DLS. The UV-Vis absorbance showed a maximum peak at 536 nm. FE-TEM revealed the F-shaped structure of nanoparticles. The EDX peak obtained at 2.3 keV indicated the purity. The peaks obtained on XRD analysis corresponded to the crystalline nature of the gold nanoparticles. In addition, the results of elemental mapping indicated the maximum distribution of gold elements in the nanoproduct obtained. Particle size analysis revealed that the average diameter of the F-shaped gold nanoparticles was 106 nm, with a polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.178. Thus, the methodology developed for the synthesis of F-shaped gold nanoparticles is completely green and economical. PMID:25943137

  6. Biophysical characterization of gold nanoparticles-loaded liposomes.

    PubMed

    Mady, Mohsen Mahmoud; Fathy, Mohamed Mahmoud; Youssef, Tareq; Khalil, Wafaa Mohamed

    2012-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles were prepared and loaded into the bilayer of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes, named as gold-loaded liposomes. Biophysical characterization of gold-loaded liposomes was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy as well as turbidity and rheological measurements. FTIR measurements showed that gold nanoparticles made significant changes in the frequency of the CH(2) stretching bands, revealing that gold nanoparticles increased the number of gauche conformers and create a conformational change within the acyl chains of phospholipids. The transmission electron micrographs (TEM) revealed that gold nanoparticles were loaded in the liposomal bilayer. The zeta potential of DPPC liposomes had a more negative value after incorporating of Au NPs into liposomal membranes. Turbidity studies revealed that the loading of gold nanoparticles into DPPC liposomes results in shifting the temperature of the main phase transition to a lower value. The membrane fluidity of DPPC bilayer was increased by loading the gold nanoparticles as shown from rheological measurements. Knowledge gained in this study may open the door to pursuing liposomes as a viable strategy for Au NPs delivery in many diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:22027546

  7. GOLD NANOPARTICLES: A REVIVAL IN PRECIOUS METAL ADMINISTRATION TO PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Thakor, AS; Jokerst, J; Zaveleta, C; Massoud, TF; Gambhir, SS

    2011-01-01

    Gold has been used as a therapeutic agent to treat a wide variety of rheumatic diseases including psoriatic arthritis, juvenile arthritis and discoid lupus erythematosus. Although the use of gold has been largely superseded by newer drugs, gold nanoparticles are being used effectively in laboratory based clinical diagnostic methods whilst concurrently showing great promise in vivo either as a diagnostic imaging agent or a therapeutic agent. For these reasons, gold nanoparticles are therefore well placed to enter mainstream clinical practice in the near future. Hence, the present review summarizes the chemistry, pharmacokinetics, bio-distribution, metabolism and toxicity of bulk gold in humans based on decades of clinical observation and experiments in which gold was used to treat patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The beneficial attributes of gold nanoparticles, such as their ease of synthesis, functionalization and shape control are also highlighted demonstrating why gold nanoparticles are an attractive target for further development and optimization. The importance of controlling the size and shape of gold nanoparticles to minimize any potential toxic side effects is also discussed. PMID:21846107

  8. Multifunctional gold nanoparticles for diagnosis and therapy of disease

    PubMed Central

    Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have a number of physical properties that make them appealing for medical applications. For example, the attenuation of X-rays by gold nanoparticles has led to their use in computed tomography imaging and as adjuvants for radiotherapy. AuNPs have numerous other applications in imaging, therapy and diagnostic systems. The advanced state of synthetic chemistry of gold nanoparticles offers precise control over physicochemical and optical properties. Furthermore gold cores are inert and are considered to be biocompatible and non-toxic. The surface of gold nanoparticles can easily be modified for a specific application and ligands for targeting, drugs or biocompatible coatings can be introduced. AuNPs can be incorporated into larger structures such as polymeric nanoparticles or liposomes that deliver large payloads for enhanced diagnostic applications, efficiently encapsulate drugs for concurrent therapy or add additional imaging labels. This array of features has led to the afore-mentioned applications in biomedical fields, but more recently in approaches where multifunctional gold nanoparticles are used for multiple methods, such as concurrent diagnosis and therapy, so called theranostics. The following review covers basic principles and recent findings in gold nanoparticle applications for imaging, therapy and diagnostics, with a focus on reports of multifunctional AuNPs. PMID:23360440

  9. Antibacterial efficacy of acridine derivatives conjugated with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Piyali; Chakraborty, Prabal Kumar; Saha, Partha; Ray, Pulak; Basu, Samita

    2014-10-01

    Adsorption of acridine derivatives viz. 9-aminoacridine hydrochloride hydrate (9AA-HCl), acridine yellow (AY), acridine orange (AO), and proflavine (Pro) on citrate stabilized gold nanoparticle surface were studied using different analytical techniques like UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The amine moiety of acridine derivative binds strongly to the gold nanoparticles as confirmed by spectroscopic studies. The plasmon band observed for the wine red colloidal gold at 525 nm in the UV-vis spectrum is characteristic of gold nanoparticles. However, with the addition of acridine derivatives the intensity of the absorption band at 525 nm decreases and a new peak emerges at red-end region - a signature of formation of gold-drug complex. The TEM images show the average size of citrate stabilized gold nanoparticles as 15-20 nm, which becomes larger in the presence of various drugs due to aggregation. From the thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) we have measured the number of drug molecules attached per gold nanoparticle (AuNP). These gold nanoparticles are very important as drug delivery vehicles and for clinical applications it is necessary to understand their activity in vivo. The antibacterial efficacy of drugs coated gold nanoparticles were studied against various strains of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. Among the four drugs, 9AA-HCl and AO showed antibacterial activity and for both of them the AuNP conjugated drug showed better antibacterial efficacy than the bare drug. Because of the high penetrating power and large surface area of Au(0), a single gold nanoparticle can adsorb multiple drug molecules, hence this total entity acts as a single group against the bacteria. PMID:25087507

  10. Oligonucleotide-Functionalized Anisotropic Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Matthew Robert

    In this thesis, we describe the properties of oligonucleotide-functionalized gold colloids under the unique set of conditions where the particles are geometrically anisotropic and have nanometer-scale dimensions. While nearly two decades of previous work elucidated numerous unexpected and emergent phenomena arising from the combination of inorganic nanoparticles with surface-bound DNA strands, virtually nothing was known about how these properties are altered when the shape of the nanoparticle core is chosen to be non-spherical. In particular, we are interested in understanding, and ultimately controlling, the ways in which these DNA-conjugated anisotropic nanostructures interact when their attraction is governed by programmable DNA hybridization events. Chapter 1 introduces the field of DNA-based materials assembly by discussing how nanoscale building blocks which present rigid, directional interactions can be thought of as possessing artificial versions of the familiar chemical principles of "bonds" and "valency". In chapter 2 we explore the fundamental interparticle binding thermodynamics of DNA-functionalized spherical and anisotropic nanoparticles, which reveals enormous preferences for collective ligand interactions occurring between flat surfaces over those that occur between curved surfaces. Using these insights, chapter 3 demonstrates that when syntheses produce mixtures of different nanoparticle shapes, the tailorable nature of DNA-mediated interparticle association can be used to selectively crystallize and purify the desired anisotropic nanostructure products, leaving spherical impurity particles behind. Chapter 4 leverages the principle that the flat facets of anisotropic particles generate directional DNA-based hybridization interactions to assemble a variety of tailorable nanoparticle superlattices whose symmetry and dimensionality are a direct consequence of the shape of the nanoparticle building block used in their construction. Chapter 5 explores

  11. Multifunctional gold nanoparticles for photodynamic therapy of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaing Oo, Maung Kyaw

    As an important and growing branch of photomedicine, photodynamic therapy (PDT) is being increasingly employed in clinical applications particularly for the treatment of skin cancer. This dissertation focuses on the synthesis, characterization and deployment of gold nanoparticles for enhanced PDT of fibrosarcoma cancer cells. We have developed robust strategies and methods in fabrication of gold nanoparticles with positively- and negatively-tethered surface charges by photo-reduction of gold chloride salt using branched polyethyleneimine and sodium citrate respectively. An optimal concentration window of gold salt has been established to yield the most stable and monodispersed gold nanoparticles. 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA), a photosensitizing precursor, has been successfully conjugated on to positively charged gold nanoparticles through electrostatic interactions. The 5-ALA/gold nanoparticle conjugates are biocompatible and have shown to be preferably taken up by cancer cells. Subsequent light irradiation results in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cancer cells, leading to their destruction without adverse effects on normal fibroblasts. We have demonstrated for the first time that gold nanoparticles can enhance PDT efficacy by 50% compared to the treatment with 5-ALA alone. Collected evidence has strongly suggested that this enhancement stems from the elevated formation of ROS via the strongly localized electric field of gold nanoparticles. Through single cell imaging using surface-enhanced Raman scattering enabled by the very same gold nanoparticles, we have shown that multifunctionality of gold nanoparticles can be harvested concurrently for biomedical applications in general and for PDT in specific. In other words, gold nanoparticles can be used not only for targeted drug delivery and field-enhanced ROS formation, but also for monitoring cell destructions during PDT. Finally, our COMSOL Multiphysics simulation of the size-dependent electric

  12. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles with different atomistic structural characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Esparza, R. . E-mail: roesparza@gmail.com; Rosas, G.; Lopez Fuentes, M.; Sanchez Ramirez, J.F.; Pal, U.; Ascencio, J.A.; Perez, R.

    2007-08-15

    A chemical reduction method was used to produce nanometric gold particles. Depending on the concentration of the main reactant compound different nanometric sizes and consequently different atomic structural configurations of the particles are obtained. Insights on the structural nature of the gold nanoparticles are obtained through a comparison between digitally-processed experimental high-resolution electron microscopy images and theoretically-simulated images obtained with a multislice approach of the dynamical theory of electron diffraction. Quantum molecular mechanical calculations, based on density functional theory, are carried out to explain the relationships between the stability of the gold nanoparticles, the atomic structural configurations and the size of nanoparticles.

  13. Gold Nanoparticle Conjugation Enhances the Antiacanthamoebic Effects of Chlorhexidine.

    PubMed

    Aqeel, Yousuf; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Anwar, Ayaz; Shah, Muhammad Raza; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2016-03-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is a serious infection with blinding consequences and often associated with contact lens wear. Early diagnosis, followed by aggressive topical application of drugs, is a prerequisite in successful treatment, but even then prognosis remains poor. Several drugs have shown promise, including chlorhexidine gluconate; however, host cell toxicity at physiologically relevant concentrations remains a challenge. Nanoparticles, subcolloidal structures ranging in size from 10 to 100 nm, are effective drug carriers for enhancing drug potency. The overall aim of the present study was to determine whether conjugation with gold nanoparticles enhances the antiacanthamoebic potential of chlorhexidine. Gold-conjugated chlorhexidine nanoparticles were synthesized. Briefly, gold solution was mixed with chlorhexidine and reduced by adding sodium borohydride, resulting in an intense deep red color, indicative of colloidal gold-conjugated chlorhexidine nanoparticles. The synthesis was confirmed using UV-visible spectrophotometry that shows a plasmon resonance peak of 500 to 550 nm, indicative of gold nanoparticles. Further characterization using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry showed a gold-conjugated chlorhexidine complex at m/z 699 ranging in size from 20 to 100 nm, as determined using atomic force microscopy. To determine the amoebicidal and amoebistatic effects, amoebae were incubated with gold-conjugated chlorhexidine nanoparticles. For controls, amoebae also were incubated with gold and silver nanoparticles alone, chlorhexidine alone, neomycin-conjugated nanoparticles, and neomycin alone. The findings showed that gold-conjugated chlorhexidine nanoparticles exhibited significant amoebicidal and amoebistatic effects at 5 μM. Amoebicidal effects were observed by parasite viability testing using a Trypan blue exclusion assay and flow-cytometric analysis using propidium iodide, while amoebistatic effects were observed using growth

  14. Gold Nanoparticle Conjugation Enhances the Antiacanthamoebic Effects of Chlorhexidine

    PubMed Central

    Aqeel, Yousuf; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Anwar, Ayaz; Shah, Muhammad Raza

    2015-01-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is a serious infection with blinding consequences and often associated with contact lens wear. Early diagnosis, followed by aggressive topical application of drugs, is a prerequisite in successful treatment, but even then prognosis remains poor. Several drugs have shown promise, including chlorhexidine gluconate; however, host cell toxicity at physiologically relevant concentrations remains a challenge. Nanoparticles, subcolloidal structures ranging in size from 10 to 100 nm, are effective drug carriers for enhancing drug potency. The overall aim of the present study was to determine whether conjugation with gold nanoparticles enhances the antiacanthamoebic potential of chlorhexidine. Gold-conjugated chlorhexidine nanoparticles were synthesized. Briefly, gold solution was mixed with chlorhexidine and reduced by adding sodium borohydride, resulting in an intense deep red color, indicative of colloidal gold-conjugated chlorhexidine nanoparticles. The synthesis was confirmed using UV-visible spectrophotometry that shows a plasmon resonance peak of 500 to 550 nm, indicative of gold nanoparticles. Further characterization using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry showed a gold-conjugated chlorhexidine complex at m/z 699 ranging in size from 20 to 100 nm, as determined using atomic force microscopy. To determine the amoebicidal and amoebistatic effects, amoebae were incubated with gold-conjugated chlorhexidine nanoparticles. For controls, amoebae also were incubated with gold and silver nanoparticles alone, chlorhexidine alone, neomycin-conjugated nanoparticles, and neomycin alone. The findings showed that gold-conjugated chlorhexidine nanoparticles exhibited significant amoebicidal and amoebistatic effects at 5 μM. Amoebicidal effects were observed by parasite viability testing using a Trypan blue exclusion assay and flow-cytometric analysis using propidium iodide, while amoebistatic effects were observed using growth

  15. Extracellular mycosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using Fusarium solani

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, K.; Arumugam, A.

    2014-08-01

    The development of eco-friendly methods for the synthesis of nanomaterial shape and size is an important area of research in the field of nanotechnology. The present investigation deals with the extracellular rapid biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using Fusarium solani culture filtrate. The UV-vis spectra of the fungal culture filtrate medium containing gold ion showed peak at 527 nm corresponding to the plasmon absorbance of gold nanoparticles. FTIR spectra provide an evidence for the presence of heterocyclic compound in the culture filtrate, which increases the stability of the synthesized gold nanoparticles. The X-ray analysis respects the Bragg's law and confirmed the crystalline nature of the gold nanoparticles. AFM analysis showed the results of particle sizes (41 nm). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the gold nanoparticles are spherical in shape with the size range from 20 to 50 nm. The use of F. solani will offer several advantages since it is considered as a non-human pathogenic organism. The fungus F. solani has a fast growth rate, rapid capacity of metallic ions reduction, NPs stabilization and facile and economical biomass handling. Extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles could be highly advantageous from the point of view of synthesis in large quantities, time consumption, eco-friendly, non-toxic and easy downstream processing.

  16. A Renewable Electrochemical Magnetic Immunosensor Based on Gold Nanoparticle Labels

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2005-05-24

    A particle-based renewable electrochemical magnetic immunosensor was developed by using magnetic beads and a gold nanoparticle label. Anti-IgG antibody-modified magnetic beads were attached to a renewable carbon paste transducer surface by magnets that were fixed inside the sensor. A gold nanoparticle label was capsulated to the surface of magnetic beads by sandwich immunoassay. Highly sensitive electrochemical stripping analysis offers a simple and fast method to quantify the capatured gold nanoparticle tracer and avoid the use of an enzyme label and substrate. The stripping signal of gold nanoparticle is related to the concentration of target IgG in the sample solution. A transmission electron microscopy image shows that the gold nanoparticles were successfully capsulated to the surface of magnetic beads through sandwich immunoreaction events. The parameters of immunoassay, including the loading of magnetic beads, the amount of gold nanoparticle conjugate, and the immunoreaction time, were optimized. The detection limit of 0.02 μg ml-1of IgG was obtained under optimum experimental conditions. Such particle-based electrochemical magnetic immunosensors could be readily used for simultaneous parallel detection of multiple proteins by using multiple inorganic metal nanoparticle tracers and are expected to open new opportunities for disease diagnostics and biosecurity.

  17. Exploitation of marine bacteria for production of gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have found wide range of applications in electronics, biomedical engineering, and chemistry owing to their exceptional opto-electrical properties. Biological synthesis of gold nanoparticles by using plant extracts and microbes have received profound interest in recent times owing to their potential to produce nanoparticles with varied shape, size and morphology. Marine microorganisms are unique to tolerate high salt concentration and can evade toxicity of different metal ions. However, these marine microbes are not sufficiently explored for their capability of metal nanoparticle synthesis. Although, marine water is one of the richest sources of gold in the nature, however, there is no significant publication regarding utilization of marine micro-organisms to produce gold nanoparticles. Therefore, there might be a possibility of exploring marine bacteria as nanofactories for AuNP biosynthesis. Results In the present study, marine bacteria are exploited towards their capability of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) production. Stable, monodisperse AuNP formation with around 10 nm dimension occur upon exposure of HAuCl4 solution to whole cells of a novel strain of Marinobacter pelagius, as characterized by polyphasic taxonomy. Nanoparticles synthesized are characterized by Transmission electron microscopy, Dynamic light scattering and UV-visible spectroscopy. Conclusion The potential of marine organisms in biosynthesis of AuNPs are still relatively unexplored. Although, there are few reports of gold nanoparticles production using marine sponges and sea weeds however, there is no report on the production of gold nanoparticles using marine bacteria. The present work highlighted the possibility of using the marine bacterial strain of Marinobacter pelagius to achieve a fast rate of nanoparticles synthesis which may be of high interest for future process development of AuNPs. This is the first report of AuNP synthesis by marine bacteria

  18. Modelling encapsulation of gold and silver nanoparticles inside lipid nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baowan, Duangkamon; Thamwattana, Ngamta

    2014-02-01

    Lipid nanotubes are of particular interest for use as a template to create various one-dimensional nanostructures and as a carrier for drug and gene delivery. Understanding the encapsulation process is therefore crucial for such development. This paper models the interactions between lipid nanotubes and spheres of gold and silver nanoparticles and determines the critical dimension of lipid nanotubes that maximises the interaction with the nanoparticles. Our results confirm the acceptance of gold and silver nanoparticles inside lipid nanotubes. Further, we find that the lipid nanotube of radius approximately 10.23 nm is most favourable to encapsulate both types of nanoparticles.

  19. Direct Patterning of Engineered Ionic Gold Nanoparticles via Nanoimprint Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xi; Pham, Jonathan; Subramani, Chandramouleeswaran; Creran, Brian; Yeh, Yi-Cheun; Du, Kan; Patra, Debabrata; Miranda, Oscar; Crosby, Alfred J.; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2012-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles are engineered for direct imprinting of stable structures. This imprinting strategy provides access to new device architectures, as demonstrated through the fabrication of a prototype photoswitchable device.

  20. Sonochemical intercalation of preformed gold nanoparticles into multilayered clays.

    PubMed

    Belova, Valentina; Möhwald, Helmuth; Shchukin, Dmitry G

    2008-09-01

    Multilayered Na (+)-montmorillonite clays intercalated with Au nanoparticles were synthesized by direct ultrasonic impregnation of preformed gold colloid into the clay matrix. The sonicated composite product then consists of Au nanoparticles homogeneously dispersed in the clay. The resulting clay/nano-Au composite was calcined at 800 degrees C and characterized by BET surface area analysis, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared measurements. Nearly spherical-shaped gold nanoparticles, with a size of 6 +/- 0.5 nm, are located in the pores of clay calcined at 800 degrees C. Their nanocomposites are thermally stable as was shown by thermogravimetric analysis. No aggregation of the gold nanoparticles was observed during calcination. The proposed ultrasonic intercalation approach is an universal one and can be employed for synthesis of catalytically active metal-clay nanocomposites stable at high temperatures with high dispersability of the metal nanoparticles in the clay matrix. PMID:18652497

  1. Chemically functionalized gold nanoparticles: Synthesis, characterization, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Weston Lewis

    This thesis focuses on the development and application of gold nanoparticle based detection systems and biomimetic structures. Each class of modified nanoparticle has properties that are defined by its chemical moieties that interface with solution and the gold nanoparticle core. In Chapter 2, a comparison of the biomolecular composition and binding properties of various preparations of antibody oligonucleotide gold nanoparticle conjugates is presented. These constructs differed significantly in terms of their structure and binding properties. Chapter 3 reports the use of electroless gold deposition as a light scattering signal enhancer in a multiplexed, microarray-based scanometric immunoassay using the gold nanoparticle probes evaluated in Chapter 2. The use of gold development results in greater signal enhancement than the typical silver development, and multiple rounds of metal development were found to increase the resulting signal compared to one development. Chapter 4 describes an amplified scanometric detection method for human telomerase activity. Gold nanoparticles functionalized with specific oligonucleotide sequences can efficiently capture telomerase enzymes and subsequently be elongated. Both the elongated and unmodified oligonucleotide sequences are simultaneously measured. At low telomerase concentrations, elongated strands cannot be detected, but the unmodified sequences, which come from the same probe particles, can be detected because their concentration is higher, providing a novel form of amplification. Chapter 5 reports the development of a novel colorimetric nitrite and nitrate ion assay based upon gold nanoparticle probes functionalized with Griess reaction reagents. This assay takes advantage of the distance-dependent plasmonic properties of the gold nanoparticles and the ability of nitrite ion to facilitate the cross coupling of novel nanoparticle probes. The assay works on the concept of a kinetic end point and can be triggered at the EPA

  2. Using femtosecond lasers to modify sizes of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Cordeiro, Thiago; Almeida de Matos, Ricardo; Silva, Flávia Rodrigues de Oliveira; Vieira, Nilson D.; Courrol, Lilia C.; Samad, Ricardo E.

    2016-04-01

    Metallic nanoparticles are important on several scientific, medical and industrial areas. The control of nanoparticles characteristics has fundamental importance to increase the efficiency on the processes and applications in which they are employed. The metallic nanoparticles present specific surface plasmon resonances (SPR). These resonances are related with the collective oscillations of the electrons presents on the metallic nanoparticle. The SPR is determined by the potential defined by the nanoparticle size and geometry. There are several methods of producing gold nanoparticles, including the use of toxic chemical polymers. We already reported the use of natural polymers, as for example, the agar-agar, to produce metallic nanoparticles under xenon lamp irradiation. This technique is characterized as a "green" synthesis because the natural polymers are inoffensive to the environment. We report a technique to produce metallic nanoparticles and change its geometrical and dimensional characteristics using a femtosecond laser. The 1 ml initial solution was irradiate using a laser beam with 380 mW, 1 kHz and 40 nm of bandwidth centered at 800 nm. The setup uses an Acousto-optic modulator, Dazzler, to change the pulses spectral profiles by introduction of several orders of phase, resulting in different temporal energy distributions. The use of Dazzler has the objective of change the gold nanoparticles average size by the changing of temporal energy distributions of the laser pulses incident in the sample. After the laser irradiation, the gold nanoparticles average diameter were less than 15 nm.

  3. Design and applications of gold nanoparticle conjugates by exploiting biomolecule-gold nanoparticle interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shao; Zuo, Xiaolei; Pan, Dun; Pei, Hao; Wang, Lianhui; Fan, Chunhai; Huang, Wei

    2013-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are a type of widely used nanomaterials with unique chemical and physical properties. AuNPs can be readily synthesized, and modified with various chemical or biological molecules, making them promising candidates for catalysis, drug delivery and biological imaging applications. In this review, we mainly focus on recent advances in the design and synthesis of conjugates of AuNPs by exploiting biomolecule-AuNP interactions. We will also discuss a variety of bioapplications of AuNP-based conjugates.

  4. Impedimetric investigation of gold nanoparticles - guanine modified electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Vulcu, A.; Pruneanu, S.; Berghian-Grosan, C.; Olenic, L.; Muresan, L. M.; Barbu-Tudoran, L.

    2013-11-13

    In this paper we report the preparation of a modified electrode with gold nanoparticles and guanine. The colloidal suspension of gold nanoparticles was obtained by Turkevich method and was next analyzed by UV-Vis spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The gold electrode was modified by self-assembling the gold nanoparticles with guanine, the organic molecule playing also the role of linker. The electrochemical characteristics of the bare and modified electrode were investigated by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). A theoretical model was developed based on an electrical equivalent circuit which contain solution resistance (R{sub s}), charge transfer resistance (R{sub ct}), Warburg impedance (Z{sub W}) and double layer capacitance (C{sub dl})

  5. Electrostatic assembly and growth of gold nanoparticles in cellulosic fibres.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Ricardo J B; Marques, Paula A A P; Martins, Manuel A; Neto, Carlos Pascoal; Trindade, Tito

    2007-08-15

    Synthetic studies of nanocomposites containing gold nanoparticles attached onto wood or bacterial cellulosic fibres have been performed in situ in the presence of the fibres or by polyelectrolyte-assisted deposition. The optical properties of the final nanocomposites could be tailored not only by the starting Au nanoparticles characteristics but also by the preparative method associated to the type of cellulosic fibres used as the substrate. Thus, gold nanoparticles assembled or generated in situ within cellulosic fibres, are excellent components for long term optical and chemically stable nanocomposites, which appear particularly interesting for security paper applications. PMID:17459404

  6. Gold, palladium, and gold-palladium alloy nanoshells on silica nanoparticle cores.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Hyun; Bryan, William W; Chung, Hae-Won; Park, Chan Young; Jacobson, Allan J; Lee, T Randall

    2009-05-01

    The synthesis of gold, palladium, and gold-palladium alloy nanoshells (approximately 15-20 nm thickness) was accomplished by the reduction of gold and palladium ions onto dielectric silica core particles (approximately 100 nm in diameter) seeded with small gold nanoparticles (approximately 2-3 nm in diameter). The size, morphology, elemental composition, and optical properties of the nanoshells were characterized using field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. The results demonstrate the successful growth of gold, palladium, and gold-palladium alloy nanoshells, where the optical properties systematically vary with the relative content of gold and palladium. The alloy nanoshells are being prepared for use in applications that stand to benefit from photoenhanced catalysis. PMID:20355892

  7. Amoxicillin functionalized gold nanoparticles reverts MRSA resistance.

    PubMed

    Kalita, Sanjeeb; Kandimalla, Raghuram; Sharma, Kaustav Kalyan; Kataki, Amal Chandra; Deka, Manab; Kotoky, Jibon

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we have described the biosynthesis of biocompatible gold nanoparticles (GNPs) from aqueous extract of the aerial parts of a pteridophyte, "Adiantum philippense" by microwave irradiation and its surface functionalization with broad spectrum beta lactam antibiotic, amoxicillin (Amox). The functionalization of amoxicillin on GNPs (GNP-Amox) was carried out via electrostatic interaction of protonated amino group and thioether moiety mediated attractive forces. The synthesized GNPs and GNP-Amox were physicochemically characterized. UV-Vis spectroscopy, Zeta potential, XRD, FTIR and SERS (surface enhanced raman spectra) results confirmed the loading of Amox into GNPs. Loading of Amox to GNPs reduce amoxicillin cytotoxicity, whereas GNPs were found to be nontoxic to mouse fibroblast cell line (L929) as evident from MTT and acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EtBr) live/dead cell assays. The GNP-Amox conjugates demonstrated enhanced broad-spectrum bactericidal activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Furthermore, in-vitro and in-vivo assays of GNP-Amox revealed potent anti-MRSA activity and improved the survival rate. This indicates the subversion of antibiotic resistance mechanism by overcoming the effect of high levels of β-lactamase produced by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Taken together, this study demonstrates the positive attributes from GNP-Amox conjugates as a promising antibacterial therapeutic agent against MRSA as well as other pathogens. PMID:26838902

  8. Gold Nanoparticles Inhibit Matrix Metalloproteases without Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, M; Sasaki, J I; Yamaguchi, S; Kawai, K; Kawakami, H; Iwasaki, Y; Imazato, S

    2015-08-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are currently the focus of considerable attention for dental applications; however, their biological effects have not been fully elucidated. The long-term, slow release of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) digests collagen fibrils within resin-dentin bonds. Therefore, MMP inhibitors can prolong the durability of resin-dentin bonds. However, there have been few reports evaluating the combined effect of MMP inhibition and the cytotoxic effects of NPs for dentin bonding. The aim of this study was to evaluate MMP inhibition and cytotoxic responses to gold (AuNPs) and platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) stabilized by polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in cultured murine macrophages (RAW264) by using MMP inhibition assays, measuring cell viability and inflammatory responses (quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction [RT-qPCR]), and conducting a micromorphological analysis by fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Cultured RAW264 cells were exposed to metal NPs at various concentrations (1, 10, 100, and 400 µg/mL). AuNPs and PtNPs markedly inhibited MMP-8 and MMP-9 activity. Although PtNPs were cytotoxic at high concentrations (100 and 400 µg/mL), no cytotoxic effects were observed for AuNPs at any concentration. Transmission electron microscopy images showed a significant nonrandom intercellular distribution for AuNPs and PtNPs, which were mostly observed to be localized in lysosomes but not in the nucleus. RT-qPCR analysis demonstrated inflammatory responses were not induced in RAW264 cells by AuNPs or PtNPs. The cytotoxicity of nanoparticles might depend on the core metal composition and arise from a "Trojan horse" effect; thus, MMP inhibition could be attributed to the surface charge of PVP, which forms the outer coating of NPs. The negative charge of the surface coating of PVP binds to Zn(2+) from the active center of MMPs by chelate binding and results in MMP inhibition. In summary, AuNPs are attractive NPs that effectively

  9. Responsive Block Copolymer and Gold Nanoparticle Hybrid Nanotubes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sehoon; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Young, Seth; Tsukruk, Vladimir

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate the facile fabrication of responsive polymer and metal nanoparticle composite nanotube structures. The nanotubes are comprised of responsive block copolymer, polystyrene-block-poly (2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP), and gold nanoparticles. PS-b-P2VP nanotubes were fabricated using porous alumina template and in situ reduction of the gold nanoparticles in P2VP domains. Owing to the pH sensitive nature of P2VP (anionic polymer with a pKa of 3.8), the nanotubes exhibit a dramatic change in topology in response to the changes in the external pH. Furthermore, the gold nanoparticles in the responsive block exhibit a reversible aggregation, causing a reversible change in optical properties such as absorption.

  10. Microscale Heat Transfer Transduced by Surface Plasmon Resonant Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Roper, D. Keith; Ahn, W.; Hoepfner, M.

    2008-01-01

    Visible radiation at resonant frequencies is transduced to thermal energy by surface plasmons on gold nanoparticles. Temperature in ≤10-microliter aqueous suspensions of 20-nanometer gold particles irradiated by a continuous wave Ar+ ion laser at 514 nm increased to a maximum equilibrium value. This value increased in proportion to incident laser power and in proportion to nanoparticle content at low concentration. Heat input to the system by nanoparticle transduction of resonant irradiation equaled heat flux outward by conduction and radiation at thermal equilibrium. The efficiency of transducing incident resonant light to heat by microvolume suspensions of gold nanoparticles was determined by applying an energy balance to obtain a microscale heat-transfer time constant from the transient temperature profile. Measured values of transduction efficiency were increased from 3.4% to 9.9% by modulating the incident continuous wave irradiation. PMID:19011696

  11. Thermo-optical properties of gold nanoparticles in colloidal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, M. A.; Rodriguez, L.; Castillo, J.; Piscitelli, V.; Fernandez, A.; Echevarria, L.

    2008-10-01

    In this work, we report the thermo-optical properties of nanoparticles in colloidal suspensions. Spherical gold nanoparticles obtained by laser ablation in condensed media were characterized using thermal lens spectroscopy pumping at 532 nm with a 10 ns pulse laser-Nd-YAG system. The obtained nanoparticles were stabilized in the time by surfactants (sodium dodecyl sulfate or SDS) in water with different molar concentrations. The morphology and size of the gold nanoparticles were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-visible techniques. The plasmonic resonance bands in gold nanoparticles are responsible for the light optical absorption, and the positions of the absorption maximum and bandwidth in the UV-visible spectra are given by the morphological characteristics of these systems. The thermo-optical constants such as thermal diffusion, thermal diffusivity, and (dn/dT) are functions of the nanoparticle sizes and the dielectric function of the media. For these reasons, the thermal lens (TL) signal is also dependent on nanoparticle sizes. An analysis of the TL signal of the nanoparticles reveals the existence of an inverse dependence between the thermo-optical functions and the size. This methodology can be used in order to evaluate these systems and characterize nanoparticles in different media. These results are expected to have an impact in bioimaging, biosensors, and other technological applications such as cooling systems.

  12. Synthesis of large uniform gold and core-shell gold-silver nanoparticles: Effect of temperature control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiunov, I. A.; Gorbachevskyy, M. V.; Kopitsyn, D. S.; Kotelev, M. S.; Ivanov, E. V.; Vinokurov, V. A.; Novikov, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    The temperatures of nucleation and growth for gold and silver nanoparticles are quite close to each other in citrate-based seeded-growth synthesis. Hence, thorough temperature control during the synthesis of gold and gold-silver core-shell nanoparticles is expected to improve the yield of uniform non-aggregated nanoparticles suitable for selective contrasting of surface defects. Gold and gold-silver core-shell nanoparticles of size ranging from 20 to 160 nm were synthesized using various means of temperature control. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Model nanocracks were milled on pipeline steel specimen by focused ion beam (FIB). It was found that to produce large uniform core-shell nanoparticles, thorough temperature control is required during formation of the gold seeds and the silver shell. Moreover, the synthesized nanoparticles were used for selective contrasting of defects on metal surface.

  13. Near Infrared Resonant Gold / Gold Sulfide Nanoparticles as a Photothermal Cancer Therapeutic Agent

    PubMed Central

    Gobin, André M.; Watkins, Emily M.; Quevedo, Elizabeth; Colvin, Vicki L.; West, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    The development and optimization of near-infrared (nIR) absorbing nanoparticles for use as photothermal cancer therapeutic agents has been ongoing. We have previously reported on larger layered gold / silica nanoshells (~140 nm) for combined therapy and imaging applications. This work exploits the properties of smaller gold / gold sulfide (GGS) nIR absorbing nanoparticles (~35–55 nm) that provide higher absorption (98% absorption & 2% scattering for GGS versus 70% absorption & 30% scattering for gold/silica nanoshells) as well as potentially better tumor penetration. In this work we demonstrate ability to ablate tumor cells in vitro, and efficacy for photothermal cancer therapy, where in an in vivo model we show significantly increased long-term, tumor-free survival. Further, enhanced circulation and bio-distribution is observed in vivo. This class of nIR absorbing nanoparticles has potential to improve upon photothermal tumor ablation for cancer therapy. PMID:20183810

  14. Dendritic functionalization of monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, Erin C.; Lundin, Erik; Garabato, B. Davis; Choi, Daeock; Shon, Young-Seok . E-mail: young.shon@wku.edu

    2007-06-05

    This paper describes the facile synthesis of nanoparticle-cored dendrimers (NCDs) and nanoparticle megamers from monolayer-protected gold clusters using either single or multi-step reactions. First, 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid/hexanethiolate-protected gold clusters were synthesized using the Schiffrin reaction followed by the ligand place-exchange reaction. A convergent approach for the synthesis of nanoparticle-cored dendrimers uses a single step reaction that is an ester coupling reaction of hydroxy-functionalized dendrons with carboxylic acid-functionalized gold clusters. A divergent approach, which is based on multi-step reactions, employs the repetition of an amide coupling reaction and a Michael addition reaction to build polyamidoamine dendritic architectures around a nanoparticle core. Nanoparticle megamers, which are large dendrimer-induced nanoparticle aggregates with an average diameter of more than 300 nm, were prepared by the amide coupling reaction between polyamiodoamine [G-2] dendrimers and carboxylic acid-functionalized gold clusters. {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used for the characterization of these hybrid nanoparticles.

  15. Zirconia coating for enhanced thermal stability of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastre, A.; Cristini-Robbe, O.; Bois, L.; Chassagneux, F.; Branzea, D.; Boé, A.; Kinowski, C.; Raulin, K.; Rolland, N.; Bernard, R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a rapid, simple and one-step method for the preparation of 2-4 nm diameter zirconia-coated gold nanoparticles at room temperature. These nanoparticles were synthesized by two simultaneous processes: the chemical reduction of tetrachloroauric acid with sodium borohydride and the formation of zirconia sol-gel matrices. All the gold nanoparticle sols were characterized by UV-visible absorption and transmission electron microscopy to determine the nanoparticle size and shape. The synthesis method is a combination of a polymeric structure of the amorphous zirconia and the use of a strong reducing agent, and it yields to very small quasi-spherical gold nanoparticles at room temperature. The thermal stability up to 1200 °C of the coated nanoparticles was studied by x-ray diffraction. The metastable tetragonal phase of the zirconia coating was obtained at 400 °C, and a progressive transformation from tetragonal to monoclinic phases of the zirconia coating was observed up to 1100 °C. After the heat treatment at 400 °C, the crystallite size of the gold nanoparticles was about 29 nm, and it remained unchanged from 400 °C to 1200 °C. These results are promising for the development of such materials as doping elements for optical fiber applications.

  16. Surface Charge Controls the Suborgan Biodistributions of Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Elci, Sukru Gokhan; Jiang, Ying; Yan, Bo; Kim, Sung Tae; Saha, Krishnendu; Moyano, Daniel F; Yesilbag Tonga, Gulen; Jackson, Liam C; Rotello, Vincent M; Vachet, Richard W

    2016-05-24

    Surface chemistry plays a deciding role in nanoparticle biodistribution, yet very little is known about how surface chemistry influences the suborgan distributions of nanomaterials. Here, using quantitative imaging based on laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), we demonstrate that surface charge dictates the suborgan distributions of nanoparticles in the kidney, liver, and spleen of mice intravenously injected with functionalized gold nanoparticles. Images of the kidney show that positively charged nanoparticles accumulate extensively in the glomeruli, the initial stage in filtering for the nephron, suggesting that these nanoparticles may be filtered by the kidney at a different rate than the neutral or negatively charged nanoparticles. We find that positively and negatively charged nanoparticles accumulate extensively in the red pulp of the spleen. In contrast, uncharged nanoparticles accumulate in the white pulp and marginal zone of the spleen to a greater extent than the positively or negatively charged nanoparticles. Moreover, these uncharged nanoparticles are also more likely to be found associated with Kupffer cells in the liver. Positively charged nanoparticles accumulate extensively in liver hepatocytes, whereas negatively charged nanoparticles show a broader distribution in the liver. Together these observations suggest that neutral nanoparticles having 2 nm cores may interact with the immune system to a greater extent than charged nanoparticles, highlighting the value of determining the suborgan distributions of nanomaterials for delivery and imaging applications. PMID:27164169

  17. Catalytic activity of allamanda mediated phytosynthesized anisotropic gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangwar, Rajesh K.; Dhumale, Vinayak A.; Gosavi, S. W.; Sharma, Rishi B.; Datar, Suwarna S.

    2013-12-01

    A simple and eco-friendly method has been developed for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles using allamanda flower extract. In this green synthesis method, chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) solution was reduced with the help of allamanda flower extract. The synthesized gold nanoparticles were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffraction technique for their morphological and structural analysis. The size of the spherical and triangular gold nanoparticles was found to be in the range of 5-40 and 20-70 nm, respectively. The x-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the crystallite size of face-centered cubic (FCC) gold nanoparticles was ˜ 11 nm. These synthesized gold nanoparticles exhibit good catalytic activity towards the reduction of H2O2. The fabricated sensor exhibits good sensitivity of 21.33 μA mM-1 cm-2 with linear relationship (R2 = 0.996) in the range from 2 to 10 mM of H2O2 concentration. This work can be extended further for potential applications such as antimicrobial studies, bio-imaging and drug-delivery owing to the known properties of the allamanda flower extract.

  18. Mycofabrication of gold nanoparticles and evaluation of their antioxidant activities.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Ipsita; Pradeepam, Roshan J; Kundu, Kanika; Singh, Pankaj K; Kundu, Subir

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have found prominence in pharmaceutical applications due to their unique physical properties as well as their inert nature. Mycosynthesis of noble metal nanoparticles is less stringent and eco-friendly. In this paper, we have reported the economically-viable synthesis of gold nanoparticles, mediated by five different fungal strains Aspergillus flavus NCIM650, Phoma exigua NCIM1237, Aspergillus niger NCIM 616, Aspergillus niger NCIM 1025 and Trichoderma reesei NCIM 1186. An efficient approach for fungal growth was discussed wherein the biomass was cultivated in non-limiting conditions, followed by addition of gold salt solution. Cyclic Voltammetry studies were conducted to show the varying reducing capacities of these strains. The surface plasmon peaks for gold nanoparticles produced by Aspergillus flavus NCIM650, Phoma exigua NCIM1237, Aspergillus niger NCIM 616, Aspergillus niger NCIM 1025 and Trichoderma reesei NCIM 1186 were recorded as 536nm, 543nm, 542nm, 560nm, 537nm respectively. Based on the cyclic voltammetry studies and UV-Visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis was done. Among the five strains, gold nanoparticles fabricated by Aspergillus niger NCIM 616 gave quite promising results. The antioxidant activities were evaluated using DPPH quenching assay and hydrogen peroxide assay. PMID:26044865

  19. Shape control technology during electrochemical synthesis of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiu-yu; Cui, Cong-ying; Cheng, Ying-wen; Ma, Hou-yi; Liu, Duo

    2013-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles with different shapes and sizes were prepared by adding gold precursor (HAuCl4) to an electrolyzed aqueous solution of poly( N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) and KNO3, which indicates the good reducing capacity of the PVP-containing solution after being treated by electrolysis. Using a catholyte and an anolyte as the reducing agents for HAuCl4, respectively, most gold nanoparticles were spherical particles in the former case but plate-like particles in the latter case. The change in the pH value of electrolytes caused by the electrolysis of water would be the origin of the differences in shape and morphology of gold nanoparticles. A hypothesis of the H+ or OH- catalyzed PVP degradation mechanism was proposed to interpret why the pH value played a key role in determining the shape or morphology of gold nanoparticles. These experiments open up a new method for effectively controlling the shape and morphology of metal nanoparticles by using electrochemical methods.

  20. Enhanced radiation therapy with multilayer microdisks containing radiosensitizing gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peipei; Qiao, Yong; Xia, Junfei; Guan, Jingjiao; Ma, Liyuan; Su, Ming

    2015-03-01

    A challenge of X-ray radiation therapy is that high dose X-rays at therapeutic conditions damage normal cells. This paper describes the use of gold nanoparticle-loaded multilayer microdisks to enhance X-ray radiation therapy, where each microdisk contains over 10(5) radiosensitizing nanoparticles. The microdisks are attached on cell membranes through electrostatic interaction. Upon X-ray irradiation, more photoelectrons and Auger electrons are generated in the vicinity of the nanoparticles, which cause water ionization and lead to the formation of free radicals that damage the DNA of adjacent cancer cells. By attaching a large amount of gold nanoparticles on cancer cells, the total X-ray dose required for DNA damage and cell killing can be reduced. Due to their controllable structure and composition, multilayer microdisks can be a viable choice for enhanced radiation therapy with nanoparticles. PMID:25679345

  1. Gold nanoparticle imaging and radiotherapy of brain tumors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hainfeld, James F; Smilowitz, Henry M; O'Connor, Michael J; Dilmanian, Farrokh Avraham; Slatkin, Daniel N

    2013-01-01

    Aim To test intravenously injected gold nanoparticles for x-ray imaging and radiotherapy enhancement of large, imminently lethal, intracerebral malignant gliomas. Materials & methods Gold nanoparticles approximately 11 nm in size were injected intravenously and brains imaged using microcomputed tomography. A total of 15 h after an intravenous dose of 4 g Au/kg was administered, brains were irradiated with 30 Gy 100 kVp x-rays. Results Gold uptake gave a 19:1 tumor-to-normal brain ratio with 1.5% w/w gold in tumor, calculated to increase local radiation dose by approximately 300%. Mice receiving gold and radiation (30 Gy) demonstrated 50% long term (>1 year) tumor-free survival, whereas all mice receiving radiation only died. Conclusion Intravenously injected gold nanoparticles cross the blood–tumor barrier, but are largely blocked by the normal blood–brain barrier, enabling high-resolution computed tomography tumor imaging. Gold radiation enhancement significantly improved long-term survival compared with radiotherapy alone. This approach holds promise to improve therapy of human brain tumors and other cancers. PMID:23265347

  2. Diffraction patterns and nonlinear optical properties of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majles Ara, M. H.; Dehghani, Z.; Sahraei, R.; Daneshfar, A.; Javadi, Z.; Divsar, F.

    2012-03-01

    Stable gold nanoparticles have been prepared by using soluble starch as both the reducing and stabilizing agents; this reaction was carried out at 40 °C for 5 h. The obtained gold nanoparticles were characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and z-scan technique. The size of these nanoparticles was found to be in the range of 12-22 nm as analyzed using transmission electron micrographs. The optical properties of gold nanoparticles have been measured showing the surface plasmon resonance. The second-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties were investigated by using a continuous-wave (CW) He-Ne laser beam with a wavelength of 632.8 nm at three different incident intensities by means of single beam techniques. The nonlinear refractive indices of gold nanoparticles were obtained from close aperture z-scan in order of 10-7 cm2/W. Then, they were compared with diffraction patterns observed in far-field. The nonlinear absorption of these nanoparticles was obtained from open aperture z-scan technique. The values of nonlinear absorption coefficient are obtained in order of 10-1 cm/W.

  3. Gold nanoparticle chemiresistors operating in biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Hubble, Lee J; Chow, Edith; Cooper, James S; Webster, Melissa; Müller, Karl-Heinz; Wieczorek, Lech; Raguse, Burkhard

    2012-09-01

    Functionalised gold nanoparticle (Au(NP)) chemiresistors are investigated for direct sensing of small organic molecules in biological fluids. The principle reason that Au(NP) chemiresistors, and many other sensing devices, have limited operation in biological fluids is due to protein and lipid fouling deactivating the sensing mechanism. In order to extend the capability of such chemiresistor sensors to operate directly in biofluids, it is essential to minimise undesirable matrix effects due to protein and lipidic components. Ultrafiltration membranes were investigated as semi-permeable size-selective barriers to prevent large biomolecule interactions with Au(NP) chemiresistors operating in protein-loaded biofluids. All of the ultrafiltration membranes protected the Au(NP) chemiresistors from fouling by the globular biomolecules, with the 10 kDa molecular weight cut-off size being optimum for operation in biofluids. Titrations of toluene in different protein-loaded fluids indicated that small molecule detection was possible. A sensor array consisting of six different thiolate-functionalised Au(NP) chemiresistors protected with a size-selective ultrafiltration membrane successfully identified, and discriminated the spoilage of pasteurised bovine milk. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates the on-chip protein separation and small metabolite detection capability, illustrating the potential for this technology in the field of microbial metabolomics. Overall, these results demonstrate that a sensor array can be protected from protein fouling with the use of a membrane, significantly increasing the possible application areas of Au(NP) chemiresistors ranging from the food industry to health services. PMID:22824995

  4. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles: an ecofriendly approach using Hansenula anomala.

    PubMed

    K, Sathish Kumar; R, Amutha; Arumugam, Palaniappan; Berchmans, Sheela

    2011-05-01

    This work describes a bioassisted approach for the preparation of metal nanoparticles using yeast species Hansenula anomala. Gold nanoparticles were prepared using gold salt as the precursor, amine-terminated polyamidoamine dendrimer as the stabilizer, and the extracellular material from H. anomala as the bioreductant. It could also be demonstrated that, using our approach, small molecules such as cysteine can act as stabilizers as well. This synthetic approach offers a greener alternative route to the preparation of gold sols that are devoid of cellular and toxic chemical components. The ability of as-synthesized gold sol to function as biological ink for producing patterns for the analysis of fingerprints and to act as an antimicrobial reagent is evaluated. The generality of this toxin-free synthetic approach to other metals was assessed using palladium and silver. PMID:21517037

  5. Femtosecond laser generated gold nanoparticles and their plasmonic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Rupali; Navas M., P.; Soni, R. K.

    2016-05-01

    The pulsed laser ablation in liquid medium is now commonly used to generate stable colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) in absence of any chemical additives or stabilizer with diverse applications. In this paper, we report generation of gold NPs (Au NPs) by ultra-short laser pulses. Femtosecond (fs) laser radiation (λ = 800 nm) has been used to ablate a gold target in pure de-ionized water to produce gold colloids with smallsize distribution. The average size of the particles can be further controlled by subjecting to laser-induced post-irradiation providing a versatile physical method of size-selected gold nanoparticles. The optical extinction and morphological dimensions were investigated with UV-Vis spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy measurements, respectively. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is employed to calculate localized surface plasmon (LSPR) wavelength and the near-field generated by Au NPs and their hybrids.

  6. Welding of gold nanoparticles on graphitic templates for chemical sensing.

    PubMed

    Ding, Mengning; Sorescu, Dan C; Kotchey, Gregg P; Star, Alexander

    2012-02-22

    Controlled self-assembly of zero-dimensional gold nanoparticles and construction of complex gold nanostructures from these building blocks could significantly extend their applications in many fields. Carbon nanotubes are one of the most promising inorganic templates for this strategy because of their unique physical, chemical, and mechanical properties, which translate into numerous potential applications. Here we report the bottom-up synthesis of gold nanowires in aqueous solution through self-assembly of gold nanoparticles on single-walled carbon nanotubes followed by thermal-heating-induced nanowelding. We investigate the mechanism of this process by exploring different graphitic templates. The experimental work is assisted by computational studies that provide additional insight into the self-assembly and nanowelding mechanism. We also demonstrate the chemical sensitivity of the nanomaterial to parts-per-billion concentrations of hydrogen sulfide with potential applications in industrial safety and personal healthcare. PMID:22280145

  7. Gold Nanoparticles in Biology and Medicine: Recent Advances and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Dykman, L.A.; Khlebtsov, N.G.

    2011-01-01

    Functionalized gold nanoparticles with controlled geometrical and optical properties are the subject of intensive studies and biomedical applications, including genomics, biosensorics, immunoassays, clinical chemistry, laser phototherapy of cancer cells and tumors, the targeted delivery of drugs, DNA and antigens, optical bioimaging and the monitoring of cells and tissues with the use of state-of-the-art detection systems. This work will provide an overview of the recent advances and current challenges facing the biomedical application of gold nanoparticles of various sizes, shapes, and structures. The review is focused on the application of gold nanoparticle conjugates in biomedical diagnostics and analytics, photothermal and photodynamic therapies, as a carrier for delivering target molecules, and on the immunological and toxicological properties. Keeping in mind the huge volume and high speed of the data update rate, 2/3 of our reference list (certainly restricted to 250 Refs.) includes publications encompassing the past 5 years. PMID:22649683

  8. Biochemical synthesis of gold and zinc nanoparticles in reverse micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, E. M.

    2010-04-01

    Gold and zinc nanoparticles were obtained in AOT reverse micelles in isooctane by reduction of the corresponding metal ions by the natural pigment quercetin (the biochemical synthesis technique). Gold and zinc ions were introduced into the micellar solution of quercetin in the form of aqueous solutions, HAuCl4 and [Zn(NH3)4]SO4, to the water to AOT molar ratios 1-3 and 3-4, respectively. The process of nanoparticle formation was investigated by spectrophotometry. Nanoparticle size and shape were determined by transmission electron microscopy. The data obtained allow to conclude that there are two steps in metal ion-quercetin interaction: (1) complex formation, and (2) complex dissociation with subsequent formation of nanoparticles and a second product, presumably oxidized quercetin. Gold nanoparticles were found to be of various shapes (spheres, hexahedrons, triangles, and cylinders) and sizes, mainly in the 10-20 nm range; zinc nanoparticles are chiefly spherical and ˜5 nm in size. In both cases, the nanoparticles are stable in the air in micellar solution over long periods of time (from a several months to a several years).

  9. Gold and Gallium Nanoparticle Growth on Silicon (100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Rees; Brown, Hunter L.; Ames, Sadie; Rasmussen, J. Leland; Tobler, Samuel

    2014-03-01

    Nanoparticles are used for various applications in today's research. Some researcher's interests involve using the nanoparticles to grow silicon nanowires on a silicon substrate. Before growing nanowires can be accomplished a study must be made of the formation of nanoparticles. Most often the metal used to make the nanoparticles is gold. In this study both gold and gallium were used to make the nanoparticles, by thermal evaporation. The gold and gallium nanoparticles were grown on silicon (100). Between one to three monolayers of material was added to the substrate, with the particle sizes ranging from 0.5 microns to 3 microns in diameter. Densities of nanoparticles varied based on the time of growth and on the intensity of the source. The variable sizes were seen with sample temperatures between 700 C and 900 C measured using a disappearing filament optical pyrometer. The growth process occurred at pressures below 3e-7 Torr. This presentation will summarize the growth process and show the similarities and differences between the two metals.

  10. Sub-chronic toxicity of gold nanoparticles in male mice

    PubMed Central

    Ajdary, Marziyeh; Ghahnavieh, Marziyeh Ziaee; Naghsh, Nooshin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gold nanoparticles have many industrial applications; moreover, they are photothermic agents for clinical treatment of cancer. This study was provided to investigate the effects associated with different doses of applied gold nanoparticles by injection and contact procedures on the alterations of the serum levels and certain factors in male mice. Materials and Methods: 72 male mice were randomly assigned into two protocols in terms of touching and injection. The injection protocol was included of five groups: Sham, control, 25, 50, and 100 ppm. They received gold nanoparticles at 25, 50, and 100 ppm concentrations administered in form of 0.3 ml/day for the period of 14 days and that of touching protocol were received 0.2 ml/day gold nanoparticles. Blood sample of which was taken to measure the serum level of creatine kinase phosphate, fasting blood, creatinine, albumin, blood urea nitrogen and eventually, the kidney was dissected for the intent of pathological analysis. Results: The serum level of creatine kinase phosphate and fasting blood sugar at middle dose was significantly different (P ≤ 0.05) in touching protocol. In both protocols, the serum level of creatinine in high and medium doses showed a significant difference (P < 0.05) associated with the treated group. In the touching method, in high and medium doses administered to the treated group, the alteration was significant (P ≤ 0.05). In the both protocols, the serum level of albumin in high and medium doses of the treated group showed significant difference (P < 0.05). Thus, the gold nanoparticles could result in undesirable effects upon kidney tissue. Conclusion: The result of this study indicated that the administration of gold nanoparticles by touching method was more effective on the serum levels of these factors than that of injection method. PMID:25878992

  11. In situgrowth of gold nanoparticles on latent fingerprints--from forensic applications to inkjet printed nanoparticle patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Irshad; Hussain, Syed Zajif; Habib-Ur-Rehman, Affa; Ihsan, Ayesha; Rehman, Asma; Khalid, Zafar M.; Brust, Mathias; Cooper, Andrew I.

    2010-12-01

    Latent fingerprints are made visible in a single step by in situgrowth of gold nanoparticles on ridge patterns. The chemicals, among the essential components of human sweat, found responsible for the formation and assembly of gold nanoparticles are screened and used as ink to write invisible patterns, using common ball pen and inkjet printer, which are then developed by selectively growing gold nanoparticles by soaking them in gold salt solution.Latent fingerprints are made visible in a single step by in situgrowth of gold nanoparticles on ridge patterns. The chemicals, among the essential components of human sweat, found responsible for the formation and assembly of gold nanoparticles are screened and used as ink to write invisible patterns, using common ball pen and inkjet printer, which are then developed by selectively growing gold nanoparticles by soaking them in gold salt solution. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed experimental procedure and some supporting images. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00593b

  12. Influence of gold nanoparticles on platelets functional activity in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akchurin, Garif G.; Akchurin, George G.; Ivanov, Alexey N.; Kirichuk, Vyacheslav F.; Terentyuk, George S.; Khlebtsov, Boris N.; Khlebtsov, Nikolay G.

    2008-02-01

    Now in the leading biomedical centers of the world approved new technology of laser photothermal destruction of cancer cells using plasmon gold nanoparticles. Investigations of influence of gold nanoparticles on white rat platelets aggregative activity in vitro have been made. Platelet aggregation was investigated in platelet rich plasma (PRP) with help of laser analyzer 230 LA <>, Russia). Aggregation inductor was ADP solution in terminal concentration 2.5 micromole (<>, Russia). Gold nanoshells soluted in salt solution were used for experiments. Samples of PRP were incubated with 50 or 100 μl gold nanoshells solution in 5 minute, after that we made definition ADP induced platelet aggregation. We found out increase platelet function activity after incubation with nanoparticles solution which shown in maximum ADP-induced aggregation degree increase. Increase platelet function activity during intravenous nanoshells injection can be cause of thrombosis on patients. That's why before clinical application of cancer cell destruction based on laser photothermal used with plasmon gold nanoparticles careful investigations of thrombosis process and detail analyze of physiological blood parameters are very necessary.

  13. Laser-targeted photofabrication of gold nanoparticles inside cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Nicholas I; Mochizuki, Kentaro; Niioka, Hirohiko; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Pavillon, Nicolas; Hobro, Alison J; Ando, Jun; Fujita, Katsumasa; Kumagai, Yutaro

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle manipulation is of increasing interest, since they can report single molecule-level measurements of the cellular environment. Until now, however, intracellular nanoparticle locations have been essentially uncontrollable. Here we show that by infusing a gold ion solution, focused laser light-induced photoreduction allows in situ fabrication of gold nanoparticles at precise locations. The resulting particles are pure gold nanocrystals, distributed throughout the laser focus at sizes ranging from 2 to 20 nm, and remain in place even after removing the gold solution. We demonstrate the spatial control by scanning a laser beam to write characters in gold inside a cell. Plasmonically enhanced molecular signals could be detected from nanoparticles, allowing their use as nano-chemical probes at targeted locations inside the cell, with intracellular molecular feedback. Such light-based control of the intracellular particle generation reaction also offers avenues for in situ plasmonic device creation in organic targets, and may eventually link optical and electron microscopy. PMID:25298313

  14. Bio-mediated synthesis, characterization and cytotoxicity of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Klekotko, Magdalena; Matczyszyn, Katarzyna; Siednienko, Jakub; Olesiak-Banska, Joanna; Pawlik, Krzysztof; Samoc, Marek

    2015-11-21

    We report here a "green" approach for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in which the Mentha piperita extract was applied for the bioreduction of chloroauric acid and the stabilization of the formed nanostructures. The obtained GNPs were characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The reduction of gold ions with the plant extract leads to the production of nanoparticles with various shapes (spherical, triangular and hexagonal) and sizes (from 10 to 300 nm). The kinetics of the reaction was monitored and various conditions of the synthesis were investigated. As a result, we established protocols optimized towards the synthesis of nanospheres and nanoprisms of gold. The cytotoxic effect of the obtained gold nanoparticles was studied by performing MTT assay, which showed lower cytotoxicity of the biosynthesized GNPs compared to gold nanorods synthesized using the usual seed-mediated growth. The results suggest that the synthesis using plant extracts may be a useful method to produce gold nanostructures for various biological and medical applications. PMID:26456245

  15. Gold nanoparticles in breast cancer treatment: Promise and potential pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jihyoun; Chatterjee, Dev Kumar; Lee, Min Hyuk; Krishnan, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Despite remarkable achievements in the treatment of breast cancer, some obstacles still remain. Gold nanoparticles may prove valuable in addressing these problems owing to their unique characteristics, including their enhanced permeability and retention in tumor tissue, their light absorbance and surface plasmon resonance in near-infrared light, their interaction with radiation to generate secondary electrons, and their ability to be conjugated with drugs or other agents. Herein, we discuss some basic concepts of gold nanoparticles, and early results from studies regarding their use in breast cancer, including toxicity and side effects. We also discuss these particles’ potential clinical applications. PMID:24556077

  16. Gold nanoparticles in breast cancer treatment: promise and potential pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihyoun; Chatterjee, Dev Kumar; Lee, Min Hyuk; Krishnan, Sunil

    2014-05-28

    Despite remarkable achievements in the treatment of breast cancer, some obstacles still remain. Gold nanoparticles may prove valuable in addressing these problems owing to their unique characteristics, including their enhanced permeability and retention in tumor tissue, their light absorbance and surface plasmon resonance in near-infrared light, their interaction with radiation to generate secondary electrons, and their ability to be conjugated with drugs or other agents. Herein, we discuss some basic concepts of gold nanoparticles, and early results from studies regarding their use in breast cancer, including toxicity and side effects. We also discuss these particles' potential clinical applications. PMID:24556077

  17. Effects of gestational age and surface modification on materno-fetal transfer of nanoparticles in murine pregnancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Sun, Cuiji; Fan, Zhenlin; Tian, Xin; Yan, Liang; Du, Libo; Liu, Yang; Chen, Chunying; Liang, Xing-Jie; Anderson, Gregory J.; Keelan, Jeffrey A.; Zhao, Yuliang; Nie, Guangjun

    2012-11-01

    Nanoparticle exposure in pregnancy may result in placental damage and fetotoxicity; however, the factors that determine fetal nanoparticle exposure are unclear. Here we have assessed the effect of gestational age and nanoparticle composition on fetal accumulation of maternally-administered nanomaterials in mice. We determined the placental and fetal uptake of 13 nm gold nanoparticles with different surface modifications (ferritin, PEG and citrate) following intravenous administration at E5.5-15.5. We showed that prior to E11.5, all tested nanoparticles could be visualized and detected in fetal tissues in significant amounts; however, fetal gold levels declined dramatically post-E11.5. In contrast, Au-nanoparticle accumulation in the extraembryonic tissues (EET) increased 6-15 fold with gestational age. Fetal and EET accumulation of ferritin- and PEG-modified nanoparticles was considerably greater than citrate-capped nanoparticles. No signs of toxicity were observed. Fetal exposure to nanoparticles in murine pregnancy is, therefore, influenced by both stage of embryonic/placental maturation and nanoparticle surface composition.

  18. Synthesis, characterization, and functionalization of gold nanoparticles for cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Craig, Gary A; Allen, Peter J; Mason, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    This chapter describes the methodology by which mAb-F19-conjugated gold nanoparticles were prepared and used to label human pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Specifically, gold nanoparticles were coated with dithiol bearing hetero-bifunctional PEG (polyethylene glycol), and cancer-specific mAb F19 was attached by means of NHS-EDC coupling chemistry taking advantage of a carboxylic acid group on the heterobifunctional PEG. These conjugates were completely stable and were characterized by a variety of methods, including UV-Vis absorbance spectrometry, darkfield microscopy, DLS (dynamic light scattering), TEM (transmission electron microscopy), SEC (size-exclusion chromatography), and confocal microscopy. Nanoparticle bioconjugates were used to label sections of healthy and cancerous human pancreatic tissue. Labeled tissue sections were examined by darkfield microscopy and indicate that these nanoparticle bioconjugates may selectively bind to cancerous tissue and provide a means of optical contrast. PMID:20217596

  19. Near-field heat transfer between gold nanoparticle arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Phan, Anh D.; Phan, The-Long; Woods, Lilia M.

    2013-12-07

    The radiative heat transfer between gold nanoparticle layers is presented using the coupled dipole method. Gold nanoparticles are modelled as effective electric and magnetic dipoles interacting via electromagnetic fluctuations. The effect of higher-order multipoles is implemented in the expression of electric polarizability to calculate the interactions at short distances. Our findings show that the near-field radiation reduces as the radius of the nanoparticles is increased. Also, the magnetic dipole contribution to the heat exchange becomes more important for larger particles. When one layer is displayed in parallel with respect to the other layer, the near-field heat transfer exhibits oscillatory-like features due to the influence of the individual nanostructures. Further details about the effect of the nanoparticles size are also discussed.

  20. Gold Nanoparticle-Polymer/Biopolymer Complexes for Protein Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Moyano, Daniel F.; Rana, Subinoy; Bunz, Uwe H. F.; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based sensor arrays have been used to distinguish a wide range of biomolecular targets through pattern recognition. Such biosensors require selective receptors that generate a unique response pattern for each analyte. The tunable surface properties of gold nanoparticles make these systems excellent candidates for the recognition process. Likewise, the metallic core makes these particles fluorescence superquenchers, facilitating transduction of the binding event. In this report we analyze the role of gold nanoparticles as receptors in differentiating a diversity of important human proteins different, and the role of the polymer/biopolymer fluorescent probes for transducing the binding event. A structure-activity relationship analysis of both the probes and the nanoparticles is presented, providing direction for the engineering of future sensor systems. PMID:22455037

  1. Gold nanoparticles deposited on glass: physicochemical characterization and cytocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznickova, Alena; Novotna, Zdenka; Kasalkova, Nikola Slepickova; Svorcik, Vaclav

    2013-05-01

    Properties of gold films sputtered under different conditions onto borosilicate glass substrate were studied. Mean thickness of sputtered gold film was measured by gravimetry, and film contact angle was determined by goniometry. Surface morphology was examined by atomic force microscopy, and electrical sheet resistance was determined by two-point technique. The samples were seeded with rat vascular smooth muscle cells, and their adhesion and proliferation were studied. Gold depositions lead to dramatical changes in the surface morphology and roughness in comparison to pristine substrate. For sputtered gold structures, the rapid decline of the sheet resistance appears on structures deposited for the times above 100 s. The thickness of deposited gold nanoparticles/layer is an increasing function of sputtering time and current. AFM images prove the creation of separated gold islands in the initial deposition phase and a continuous gold coverage for longer deposition times. Gold deposition has a positive effect on the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Largest number of cells was observed on sample sputtered with gold for 20 s and at the discharge current of 40 mA. This sample exhibits lowest contact angle, low relative roughness, and only mild increase of electrical conductivity.

  2. Complete light annihilation in an ultrathin layer of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Svedendahl, Mikael; Johansson, Peter; Käll, Mikael

    2013-07-10

    We experimentally demonstrate that an incident light beam can be completely annihilated in a single layer of randomly distributed, widely spaced gold nanoparticle antennas. Under certain conditions, each antenna dissipates more than 10 times the number of photons that enter its geometric cross-sectional area. The underlying physics can be understood in terms of a critical coupling to localized plasmons in the nanoparticles or, equivalently, in terms of destructive optical Fano interference and so-called coherent absorption. PMID:23806090

  3. Gold nanoparticle capture within protein crystal scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Ann E; Huber, Thaddaus R; Ni, Thomas W; Hartje, Luke F; Appel, Karina L; Yost, Jarad W; Ackerson, Christopher J; Snow, Christopher D

    2016-07-01

    DNA assemblies have been used to organize inorganic nanoparticles into 3D arrays, with emergent properties arising as a result of nanoparticle spacing and geometry. We report here the use of engineered protein crystals as an alternative approach to biologically mediated assembly of inorganic nanoparticles. The protein crystal's 13 nm diameter pores result in an 80% solvent content and display hexahistidine sequences on their interior. The hexahistidine sequence captures Au25(glutathione)∼17 (nitrilotriacetic acid)∼1 nanoclusters throughout a chemically crosslinked crystal via the coordination of Ni(ii) to both the cluster and the protein. Nanoparticle loading was validated by confocal microscopy and elemental analysis. The nanoparticles may be released from the crystal by exposure to EDTA, which chelates the Ni(ii) and breaks the specific protein/nanoparticle interaction. The integrity of the protein crystals after crosslinking and nanoparticle capture was confirmed by single crystal X-ray crystallography. PMID:27264210

  4. Gold nanoparticle capture within protein crystal scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Ann E.; Huber, Thaddaus R.; Ni, Thomas W.; Hartje, Luke F.; Appel, Karina L.; Yost, Jarad W.; Ackerson, Christopher J.; Snow, Christopher D.

    2016-06-01

    DNA assemblies have been used to organize inorganic nanoparticles into 3D arrays, with emergent properties arising as a result of nanoparticle spacing and geometry. We report here the use of engineered protein crystals as an alternative approach to biologically mediated assembly of inorganic nanoparticles. The protein crystal's 13 nm diameter pores result in an 80% solvent content and display hexahistidine sequences on their interior. The hexahistidine sequence captures Au25(glutathione)~17 (nitrilotriacetic acid)~1 nanoclusters throughout a chemically crosslinked crystal via the coordination of Ni(ii) to both the cluster and the protein. Nanoparticle loading was validated by confocal microscopy and elemental analysis. The nanoparticles may be released from the crystal by exposure to EDTA, which chelates the Ni(ii) and breaks the specific protein/nanoparticle interaction. The integrity of the protein crystals after crosslinking and nanoparticle capture was confirmed by single crystal X-ray crystallography.DNA assemblies have been used to organize inorganic nanoparticles into 3D arrays, with emergent properties arising as a result of nanoparticle spacing and geometry. We report here the use of engineered protein crystals as an alternative approach to biologically mediated assembly of inorganic nanoparticles. The protein crystal's 13 nm diameter pores result in an 80% solvent content and display hexahistidine sequences on their interior. The hexahistidine sequence captures Au25(glutathione)~17 (nitrilotriacetic acid)~1 nanoclusters throughout a chemically crosslinked crystal via the coordination of Ni(ii) to both the cluster and the protein. Nanoparticle loading was validated by confocal microscopy and elemental analysis. The nanoparticles may be released from the crystal by exposure to EDTA, which chelates the Ni(ii) and breaks the specific protein/nanoparticle interaction. The integrity of the protein crystals after crosslinking and nanoparticle capture was

  5. The structure and properties of graphene on gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Osváth, Z; Deák, A; Kertész, K; Molnár, Gy; Vértesy, G; Zámbó, D; Hwang, C; Biró, L P

    2015-03-12

    Graphene covered metal nanoparticles constitute a novel type of hybrid material, which provides a unique platform to study plasmonic effects, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and metal-graphene interactions at the nanoscale. Such a hybrid material is fabricated by transferring graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition onto closely spaced gold nanoparticles produced on a silica wafer. The morphology and physical properties of nanoparticle-supported graphene are investigated by atomic force microscopy, optical reflectance spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS), and confocal Raman spectroscopy. This study shows that the graphene Raman peaks are enhanced by a factor which depends on the excitation wavelength, in accordance with the surface plasmon resonance of the gold nanoparticles, and also on the graphene-nanoparticle distance which is tuned by annealing at moderate temperatures. The observed SERS activity is correlated with the nanoscale corrugation of graphene. STM and STS measurements show that the local density of electronic states in graphene is modulated by the underlying gold nanoparticles. PMID:25735599

  6. Banana peel extract mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bankar, Ashok; Joshi, Bhagyashree; Kumar, Ameeta Ravi; Zinjarde, Smita

    2010-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles were synthesized by using banana peel extract (BPE) as a simple, non-toxic, eco-friendly 'green material'. The boiled, crushed, acetone precipitated, air-dried peel powder was used to reduce chloroauric acid. A variety of nanoparticles were formed when the reaction conditions were altered with respect to pH, BPE content, chloroauric acid concentration and temperature of incubation. The reaction mixtures displayed vivid colors and UV-vis spectra characteristic of gold nanoparticles. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) studies revealed that the average size of the nanoparticles under standard synthetic conditions was around 300nm. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) confirmed these results. A coffee ring phenomenon, led to the aggregation of the nanoparticles into microcubes and microwire networks towards the periphery of the air-dried samples. X-ray diffraction studies of the samples revealed spectra that were characteristic for gold. Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) spectroscopy indicated the involvement of carboxyl, amine and hydroxyl groups in the synthetic process. The BPE mediated nanoparticles displayed efficient antimicrobial activity towards most of the tested fungal and bacterial cultures. PMID:20620890

  7. Vascular targeting of a gold nanoparticle to breast cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Peiris, Pubudu M.; Deb, Partha; Doolittle, Elizabeth; Doron, Gilad; Goldberg, Amy; Govender, Priya; Shah, Shruti; Rao, Swetha; Carbone, Sarah; Cotey, Thomas; Sylvestre, Meilyn; Singh, Sohaj; Schiemann, William P.; Lee, Zhenghong; Karathanasis, Efstathios

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of breast cancer deaths are due to metastatic disease. While deep tissue targeting of nanoparticles is suitable for some primary tumors, vascular targeting may be a more attractive strategy for micrometastasis. This study combined a vascular targeting strategy with the enhanced targeting capabilities of a nanoparticle to evaluate the ability of a gold nanoparticle to specifically target the early spread of metastatic disease. As a ligand for the vascular targeting strategy, we utilized a peptide targeting alpha(v) beta(3) integrin, which is functionally linked to the development of micrometastases at a distal site. By employing a straightforward radiolabeling method to incorporate Technetium-99m into the gold nanoparticles, we used the high sensitivity of radionuclide imaging to monitor the longitudinal accumulation of the nanoparticles in metastatic sites. Animal and histological studies showed that vascular targeting of the nanoparticle facilitated highly accurate targeting of micrometastasis in the 4T1 mouse model of breast cancer metastasis using radionuclide imaging and a low dose of the nanoparticle. Due to the efficient targeting scheme, 14% of the injected AuNP deposited at metastatic sites in the lungs within 60 min after injection, indicating that the vascular bed of metastasis is a viable target site for nanoparticles. PMID:26036431

  8. Effect of gold ion concentration on size and properties of gold nanoparticles in TritonX-100 based inverse microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Tokeer; Wani, Irshad A.; Ahmed, Jahangeer; Al-Hartomy, Omar A.

    2014-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been prepared successfully using TritonX-100 inverse microemulsion at different concentrations of HAuCl4 (0.1, 0.05, 0.04, 0.03, 0.02 and 0.01 M). We have studied the effect of gold ion concentration on the particle size, morphology, surface area and optical properties of the gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, UV-Visible spectroscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analysis. X-ray diffraction studies show the monophasic nature of the gold nanoparticles. TritonX-100 stabilized gold nanoparticles were appeared to be agglomerated at higher concentrations (0.1 and 0.05 M) of Au3+ with an average grain size of 60 and 50 nm, respectively. Monodisperse and uniform gold nanoparticles with well-defined morphologies of an average grain size of 15 and 25 nm were obtained at lower concentrations (0.01 and 0.02 M). UV-Visible spectroscopy shows the characteristic surface plasmon resonance peak ~540 nm along with the peaks at shorter and longer wavelengths may be due to the higher order plasmon resonance of the gold nanoparticles. The surface areas of the gold nanoparticles were found to be in the range of 5.8-107 m2/g which were well in agreement with the electron microscopic studies.

  9. Effect of gold ion concentration on size and properties of gold nanoparticles in TritonX-100 based inverse microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Tokeer; Wani, Irshad A.; Ahmed, Jahangeer; Al-Hartomy, Omar A.

    2013-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been prepared successfully using TritonX-100 inverse microemulsion at different concentrations of HAuCl4 (0.1, 0.05, 0.04, 0.03, 0.02 and 0.01 M). We have studied the effect of gold ion concentration on the particle size, morphology, surface area and optical properties of the gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, UV-Visible spectroscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analysis. X-ray diffraction studies show the monophasic nature of the gold nanoparticles. TritonX-100 stabilized gold nanoparticles were appeared to be agglomerated at higher concentrations (0.1 and 0.05 M) of Au3+ with an average grain size of 60 and 50 nm, respectively. Monodisperse and uniform gold nanoparticles with well-defined morphologies of an average grain size of 15 and 25 nm were obtained at lower concentrations (0.01 and 0.02 M). UV-Visible spectroscopy shows the characteristic surface plasmon resonance peak ~540 nm along with the peaks at shorter and longer wavelengths may be due to the higher order plasmon resonance of the gold nanoparticles. The surface areas of the gold nanoparticles were found to be in the range of 5.8-107 m2/g which were well in agreement with the electron microscopic studies.

  10. DNA-directed self-assembly of gold nanoparticles into binary and ternary nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Hui; Yi, Changqing; Tzang, Chi-Hung; Zhu, Junjie; Yang, Mengsu

    2007-01-01

    The assembly and characterization of gold nanoparticle-based binary and ternary structures are reported. Two strategies were used to assemble gold nanoparticles into ordered nanoscale architectures: in strategy 1, gold nanoparticles were functionalized with single-strand DNA (ssDNA) first, and then hybridized with complementary ssDNA-labelled nanoparticles to assemble designed architectures. In strategy 2, the designed architectures were constructed through hybridization between complementary ssDNA first, then by assembling gold nanoparticles to the scaffolding through gold-sulfur bonds. Both TEM measurements and agarose gel electrophoresis confirmed that the latter strategy is more efficient in generating the designed nanostructures.

  11. Synthesis, purification and assembly of gold and iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Penghe

    The aims of the current research include developing new synthetic strategies to prepare structurally complex gold nanoparticles and new size sorting methods to separate nanoparticles of larger size, as well as studying the assembly of nanoparticles into novel hierarchical structures through both template-assisted and template-free strategies. In the synthesis section of this dissertation (Chapters 2 & 3), a size controllable synthesis of dendritic gold nanoparticles through a seed-mediated process in ethanol is described. The effect of seeds size and shape as well as the carbon chain length of alkylamines on the formation of dendritic structure was investigated. The synthetic strategy developed is capable of forming dendritic structure on various substrates, like flat or rod-like gold particles. In another work, the shape evolution of gold nanoparticles in a seed-mediated growth as well as the kinetics of reduction of HAuCl4 in the presence of seeds was studied. The reduction of the gold precursor by sodium citrate could be greatly accelerated in the presence of seed nanoparticles. Along with the enhanced reaction kinetics, dramatic shape evolution of gold nanoparticles was observed by changing ratios of precursors. In the purification section (Chapter 4), a novel method of separating nanoparticles of different sizes in a viscosity gradient was developed. The viscosity gradient was created with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) aqueous solutions. Previously, such size separation was all achieved in the density gradient, while the hidden contribution of viscosity difference inside the density gradient was not well recognized. Through this work, it is clarified that the viscosity can contribute as importantly as density in the size sorting of nanoparticles through rate zonal centrifuge. It was also demonstrated both experimentally and mathematically that the viscosity gradient is more effective in separation of larger sized nanoparticles. In the assembly section (Chapter 5

  12. Gold Nanoparticles: Preparation, Properties, and Applications in Bionanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Yi-Cheun; Creran, Brian; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are important components for biomedical applications. AuNPs have been widely employed for diagnostics, and have seen increasing use in the area of therapeutics. In this mini-review, we present fabrication strategies for AuNPs and highlight a selection of recent applications of these materials in bionanotechnology. PMID:22076024

  13. Interaction between manufactured gold nanoparticles and naturally occurring organic macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Diegoli, Sara; Manciulea, Adriana L; Begum, Shakiela; Jones, Ian P; Lead, Jamie R; Preece, Jon A

    2008-08-25

    The increasing exploitation of nanomaterials into many consumer and other products is raising concerns as these nanomaterials are likely to be released into the environment. Due to our lack of knowledge about the environmental chemistry, transport and ecotoxicology of nanomaterials, it is of paramount importance to study how natural aquatic colloids can interact with manufactured gold nanoparticles as these interactions will determine their environmental fate and behaviour. In this context, our work aims to quantify the effect of naturally occurring riverine macromolecules--International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) Suwannee River Humic Acid Standard (SRHA)--on citrate- and acrylate-stabilized gold nanoparticles. The influence of SRHA on the stability of the gold colloids was studied as a function of pH by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). At high ionic strengths (0.1 M), extensive and rapid aggregation occurred, while more subtle effects were observed at lower ionic strength values. Evidence was found that SRHA enhances particle stability at extreme pH values (ionic strength<0.01 M) by substituting and/or over-coating the original stabilizer on the gold nanoparticle surface, thus affecting surface charge and chemistry. These findings have important implications for the fate and behaviour of nanoparticles in the environment and their ecotoxicity. PMID:18534664

  14. Resistive pressure sensors based on freestanding membranes of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlicke, Hendrik; Rebber, Matthias; Kunze, Svenja; Vossmeyer, Tobias

    2015-12-01

    In this communication the application of gold nanoparticle membranes as ambient pressure sensors with electromechanical signal transduction is demonstrated. The devices were fabricated by sealing microstructured cavities with membranes of 1,6-hexanedithiol cross-linked gold nanoparticles, which were electrically contacted by metal electrodes deposited on both sides of the cavities. Variations of the external pressure resulted in a deflection of the membranes and, thus, increased the average interparticle distances. Therefore, the pressure change could easily be detected by simply monitoring the resistance of the membranes.In this communication the application of gold nanoparticle membranes as ambient pressure sensors with electromechanical signal transduction is demonstrated. The devices were fabricated by sealing microstructured cavities with membranes of 1,6-hexanedithiol cross-linked gold nanoparticles, which were electrically contacted by metal electrodes deposited on both sides of the cavities. Variations of the external pressure resulted in a deflection of the membranes and, thus, increased the average interparticle distances. Therefore, the pressure change could easily be detected by simply monitoring the resistance of the membranes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06937h

  15. Multiple strategies to activate gold nanoparticles as antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuyun; Jiang, Xingyu

    2013-09-21

    Widespread antibiotic resistance calls for new strategies. Nanotechnology provides a chance to overcome antibiotic resistance by multiple antibiotic mechanisms. This paper reviews the progress in activating gold nanoparticles with nonantibiotic or antibiotic molecules to combat bacterial resistance, analyzes the gap between experimental achievements and real clinical application, and suggests some potential directions in developing antibacterial nanodrugs. PMID:23893008

  16. Multiple strategies to activate gold nanoparticles as antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuyun; Jiang, Xingyu

    2013-08-01

    Widespread antibiotic resistance calls for new strategies. Nanotechnology provides a chance to overcome antibiotic resistance by multiple antibiotic mechanisms. This paper reviews the progress in activating gold nanoparticles with nonantibiotic or antibiotic molecules to combat bacterial resistance, analyzes the gap between experimental achievements and real clinical application, and suggests some potential directions in developing antibacterial nanodrugs.

  17. Ligand adsorption and exchange on pegylated gold nanoparticles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous researchers proposed that thiolated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-SH) adopts a “mushroom-like” conformation on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in water. However, information regarding the size and permeability of the PEG-SH mushroom caps and surface area passivated by the PEG-SH mushroom stems are ...

  18. Aquatic Fern (Azolla Sp.) Assisted Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Anal K.; Prasad, K.

    2016-02-01

    Aquatic pteridophyte (Azolla sp.) was taken to assess its potential to synthesize the metal (Au) nanoparticles. The synthesized particles were characterized using X-ray, UV-visible, scanning and transmission electron microscopy analyses. Nanoparticles almost spherical in shape having the sizes of 5-17nm are found. UV-visible study revealed the surface plasmon resonance at 538nm. Responsible phytochemicals for the transformation were principally phenolics, tannins, anthraquinone glycosides and sugars present abundantly in the plant thereby bestowing it adaptive prodigality. Also, the use of Azolla sp. for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles offers the benefit of eco-friendliness.

  19. Shaping and patterning gold nanoparticles via micelle templated photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundrat, F.; Baffou, G.; Polleux, J.

    2015-09-01

    Shaping and positioning noble metal nanostructures are essential processes that still require laborious and sophisticated techniques to fabricate functional plasmonic interfaces. The present study reports a simple photochemical approach compatible with micellar nanolithography and photolithography that enables the growth, arrangement and shaping of gold nanoparticles with tuneable plasmonic resonances on glass substrates. Ultraviolet illumination of surfaces coated with gold-loaded micelles leads to the formation of gold nanoparticles with micro/nanometric spatial resolution without requiring any photosensitizers or photoresists. Depending on the extra-micellar chemical environment and the illumination wavelength, block copolymer micelles act as reactive and light-responsive templates, which enable to grow gold deformed nanoparticles (potatoids) and nanorings. Optical characterization reveals that arrays of individual potatoids and rings feature a localized plasmon resonance around 600 and 800 nm, respectively, enhanced photothermal properties and high temperature sustainability, making them ideal platforms for future developments in nanochemistry and biomolecular manipulation controlled by near-infrared-induced heat.Shaping and positioning noble metal nanostructures are essential processes that still require laborious and sophisticated techniques to fabricate functional plasmonic interfaces. The present study reports a simple photochemical approach compatible with micellar nanolithography and photolithography that enables the growth, arrangement and shaping of gold nanoparticles with tuneable plasmonic resonances on glass substrates. Ultraviolet illumination of surfaces coated with gold-loaded micelles leads to the formation of gold nanoparticles with micro/nanometric spatial resolution without requiring any photosensitizers or photoresists. Depending on the extra-micellar chemical environment and the illumination wavelength, block copolymer micelles act as

  20. Gold nanoparticles - the theranostic challenge for PPPM: nanocardiology application

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The article overviews the potential biomedical applications of nanoscale gold particles for predictive, preventive and personalised nanomedicine in cardiology. The review demonstrates the wide opportunities for gold nanoparticles due to their unique biological properties. The use of gold nanoparticles in cardiology is promising to develop fundamentally new methods of diagnosis and treatment. The nanotheranostics in cardiovascular diseases allows the non-invasive imaging associated with simultaneous therapeutic intervention and predicting treatment outcomes. Imaging may reflect the effectiveness of treatment and has become a fundamental optimisation setting for therapeutic protocol. Combining the application of biomolecular and cellular therapies with nanotechnologies foresees the development of complex integrated nanodevices. Nanocardiology may challenge existing healthcare system and economic benefits as cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality at present. PMID:23800174

  1. A simple gel electrophoresis method for separating polyhedral gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Suhee; Lee, Hye Jin

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a simple approach to separate differently shaped and sized polyhedral gold nanoparticles (NPs) within colloidal solutions via gel electrophoresis is described. Gel running parameters for separating efficiently gold NPs including gel composition, added surfactant types and applied voltage were investigated. The plasmonic properties and physical structure of the separated NPs extracted from the gel matrix were then investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-vis spectrophotometry respectively. Data analysis revealed that gel electrophoresis conditions of a 1.5 % agarose gel with 0.1 % sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant under an applied voltage of 100 V resulted in the selective isolation of ~ 50 nm polyhedral shaped gold nanoparticles. Further efforts are underway to apply the method to purify biomolecule-conjugated polyhedral Au NPs that can be readily used for NP-enhanced biosensing platforms.

  2. Extracellular microbial synthesis of gold nanoparticles using fungus Hormoconis resinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Anuj Narayan; Bhadauria, Seema; Gaur, Mulayam Singh; Pasricha, Renu

    2010-11-01

    In this study, the fungus Hormoconis resinae was screened from soil near a refinery and was found to produce stable gold nanoparticles extracellularly. The kinetics of the reaction was studied using UV-Vis spectroscopy and was further characterized by x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. These analyses revealed that the gold nanoparticles are spherical and in nano-regime. The most important feature of Hormoconis resinae fungi is the following fact: they have a widespread presence in soil and can produce huge biomass. Such a cheap source of material gives the opportunity for cost-effective preparation of various gold-based nanostructures.

  3. Synthesis, Structure, Stability and Redispersion of Gold-based Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiruvalam, Ram Chandra

    Nanoscale gold has been shown to possess an intriguing combination of unexpected optical, photochemical and catalytic properties. The ability to control the size, shape, morphology, composition and dispersion of gold-based nanostructures is key to optimizing their performance for nanotechnology applications. The advanced electron microscopy studies described in this thesis analyze three important aspects of gold and gold-palladium alloy nanoparticles: namely, (i) the ability to synthesize gold nanoparticles of controlled size and shape in an aqueous medium; (ii) the colloidal preparation of designer gold-palladium alloys for selective oxidation catalysis; and (iii) the ability to disperse gold as finely and homogeneously as possible on a metal oxide or carbon support. The ability to exploit the nanoscale properties of gold for various engineering applications often depends on our ability to control size and shape of the nanoscale entity by careful manipulation of the synthesis parameters. We have explored an aqueous based synthesis route, using oleylamine as both a reductant and surfactant, for preparing gold nanostructures. By systematically varying synthesis parameters such as oleylamine concentration, reaction temperature, and aging time it is possible to identify processing regimens that generate Au nanostructures having either pseudo-spherical, faceted polyhedral, nanostar or wire shaped morphologies. Furthermore, by quenching the reaction partway through it is possible to create a class of metastable Au-containing structures such as nanocubes, nanoboxes and nanowires. Possible formation mechanisms for these gold based nano-objects are discussed. There is a growing interest in using supported bimetallic AuPd alloy nanoparticles for selective oxidation reactions. In this study, a systematic series of size controlled AuPd bimetallic particles have been prepared by colloidal synthesis methods. Particles having random alloy structures, as well as `designer

  4. Can small hydrophobic gold nanoparticles inhibit β2-microglobulin fibrillation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brancolini, Giorgia; Toroz, Dimitrios; Corni, Stefano

    2014-06-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles stabilized by a shell of organic ligands can enhance or suppress the natural propensity of proteins to form fibrils. Functionalization facilitates targeted delivery of the nanoparticles to various cell types, bioimaging, drug delivery and other therapeutic and diagnostic applications. In this study, we provide a computational model of the effect of a prototypical thiol-protected gold nanoparticle, Au25L18- (L = S(CH2)2Ph) on the β2-microglobulin natural fibrillation propensity. To reveal the molecular basis of the protein-nanoparticle association process, we performed various simulations at multiple levels (Classical Molecular Dynamics and Brownian Dynamics) that cover multiple length- and timescales. The results provide a model of the ensemble of structures constituting the protein-gold nanoparticle complexes, and insights into the driving forces for the binding of β2-microglobulin to hydrophobic small size gold nanoparticles. We have found that the small nanoparticles can bind the protein to form persistent complexes. This binding of nanoparticles is able to block the active sites of domains from binding to another protein, thus leading to potential inhibition of the fibrillation activity. A comparison with the binding patches identified for the interaction of the protein with a known inhibitor of fibrillation, supports our conclusion.Inorganic nanoparticles stabilized by a shell of organic ligands can enhance or suppress the natural propensity of proteins to form fibrils. Functionalization facilitates targeted delivery of the nanoparticles to various cell types, bioimaging, drug delivery and other therapeutic and diagnostic applications. In this study, we provide a computational model of the effect of a prototypical thiol-protected gold nanoparticle, Au25L18- (L = S(CH2)2Ph) on the β2-microglobulin natural fibrillation propensity. To reveal the molecular basis of the protein-nanoparticle association process, we performed various

  5. Preparation of DPPE-Stabilized Gold Nanoparticles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dungey, Keenan E.; Muller, David P.; Gunter, Tammy

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is presented that introduces students to nanotechnology through the preparation of nanoparticles and their visualization using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experiment familiarizes the students with nonaqueous solvents, biphasic reactions, phase-transfer agents, ligands to stabilize growing nanoparticles, and bidentate…

  6. Dendritic assembly of gold nanoparticles during fuel-forming electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Manthiram, Karthish; Surendranath, Yogesh; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2014-05-21

    We observe the dendritic assembly of alkanethiol-capped gold nanoparticles on a glassy carbon support during electrochemical reduction of protons and CO2. We find that the primary mechanism by which surfactant-ligated gold nanoparticles lose surface area is by taking a random walk along the support, colliding with their neighbors, and fusing to form dendrites, a type of fractal aggregate. A random walk model reproduces the fractal dimensionality of the dendrites observed experimentally. The rate at which the dendrites form is strongly dependent on the solubility of the surfactant in the electrochemical double layer under the conditions of electrolysis. Since alkanethiolate surfactants reductively desorb at potentials close to the onset of CO2 reduction, they do not poison the catalytic activity of the gold nanoparticles. Although catalyst mobility is typically thought to be limited for room-temperature electrochemistry, our results demonstrate that nanoparticle mobility is significant under conditions at which they electrochemically catalyze gas evolution, even in the presence of a high surface area carbon and binder. A careful understanding of the electrolyte- and polarization-dependent nanoparticle aggregation kinetics informs strategies for maintaining catalyst dispersion during fuel-forming electrocatalysis. PMID:24766431

  7. Effects of protein shell on properties of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Anh; Hoang, Trinh X.; Tracy, Dustin A.; Woods, Lilia M.

    2014-03-01

    Optical properties and surface interactions between nanoparticles present opportunities for many novel applications. Protein-conjugated nanoparticles are of particular interest in regards to various medical applications. Theoretical investigations are presented of protein-coated gold nanoparticles using the Mie theory and the coupled dipole method. The Mie theory along with the absorption spectra can be used to quantitatively determine the number of protein bovine serum molecules that aggregate on the gold surfaces. The internal field of protein-conjugated gold nanoparticles remains constant for large wavelength of light due to screening from the protein shell. Effects from other nanoparticles significantly influence the peak position in the spectra. Our study shows the specific regimes in terms of optical characteristics where cascaded plasmon resonant field enhancement can be observed. Results for the maximum ratio of the internal field to the incident field is also obtained and discussed. This work was supported by the Nafosted Grant No. 103.01-2013.16. Lilia M. Woods acknowledges the Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-06ER46297.

  8. Thin porous alumina sheets as supports for stabilizing gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Lu, An-Hui; Li, Mingrun; Zhang, Weiping; Chen, Yong-Sheng; Tian, Dong-Xu; Li, Wen-Cui

    2013-06-25

    Thin porous alumina sheets have been synthesized using a lysine-assisted hydrothermal approach resulting in an extraordinary catalyst support that can stabilize Au nanoparticles at annealing temperatures up to 900 °C. Remarkably, the unique architecture of such an alumina with thin sheets (average thickness ~15 nm and length 680 nm) and rough surface is beneficial to prevent gold nanoparticles from sintering. HRTEM observations clearly showed that the epitaxial growth between Au nanoparticles and alumina support was due to strong interfacial interactions, further explaining the high sinter-stability of the obtained Au/Al2O3 catalyst. Consequently, despite calcination at 700 °C, the catalyst maintains its gold nanoparticles of size predominantly 2 ± 0.8 nm. Surprisingly, catalyst annealed at 900 °C retained the highly dispersed small gold nanoparticles. It was also observed that a few gold particles (6-25 nm) were encapsulated by an alumina layer (thickness less than 1 nm) to minimize the surface energy, revealing a surface restructuring of the gold/support interface. As a typical and size-dependent reaction, CO oxidation is used to evaluate the performance of Au/Al2O3 catalysts. The results obtained demonstrated Au/Al2O3 catalyst calcined at 700 °C exhibited excellent activity with a complete CO conversion at ∼30 °C (T100% = 30 °C), and even after calcination at 900 °C, the catalyst still achieved its T50% at 158 °C. In sharp contrast, Au catalyst prepared using conventional alumina support shows almost no activity under the same preparation and catalytic test conditions. PMID:23682983

  9. Optimization and stabilization of gold nanoparticles by using herbal plant extract with microwave heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasmin, Akbar; Ramesh, Kumaraswamy; Rajeshkumar, Shanmugam

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we have synthesized the gold nanoparticles by using Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, a medicinal plant. The gold nanoparticles were synthesized rapidly by the involvement of microwave heating. By changing of plant extract concentration, gold solution concentration, microwave heating time and power of microwave heating the optimized condition was identified. The surface Plasmon resonance found at 520 nm confirmed the gold nanoparticles synthesis. The spherical sized nanoparticles in the size range of 16-30 nm were confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). The stability of the nanoparticles is very well proved in the invitro stability tests. The biochemical like alkaloids and flavonoids play a vital role in the nanoparticles synthesis was identified using the Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Combining the phytochemical and microwave heating, the rapid synthesis of gold nanoparticles is the novel process for the medically applicable gold nanoparticles production.

  10. Photosensitivity of neurons enabled by cell-targeted gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho-de-Souza, João L.; Treger, Jeremy S.; Dang, Bobo; Kent, Stephen B. H.; Pepperberg, David R.; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Summary Unmodified neurons can be directly stimulated with light to produce action potentials, but such techniques have lacked localization of the delivered light energy. Here we show that gold nanoparticles can be conjugated to high-avidity ligands for a variety of cellular targets. Once bound to a neuron, these particles transduce millisecond pulses of light into heat which changes membrane capacitance, depolarizing the cell and eliciting action potentials. Compared to non-functionalized nanoparticles, ligand-conjugated nanoparticles highly resist convective washout, and enable photothermal stimulation with lower delivered energy and resulting temperature increase. Ligands targeting three different membrane proteins were tested; all showed similar activity and washout resistance. This suggests that many types of ligands can be bound to nanoparticles, preserving ligand and nanoparticle function, and that many different cell phenotypes can be targeted by appropriate choice of ligand. The findings have applications as an alternative to optogenetics, and potentially for therapies involving neuronal photostimulation. PMID:25772189

  11. Photosensitivity of neurons enabled by cell-targeted gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Carvalho-de-Souza, João L; Treger, Jeremy S; Dang, Bobo; Kent, Stephen B H; Pepperberg, David R; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2015-04-01

    Unmodified neurons can be directly stimulated with light to produce action potentials, but such techniques have lacked localization of the delivered light energy. Here we show that gold nanoparticles can be conjugated to high-avidity ligands for a variety of cellular targets. Once bound to a neuron, these particles transduce millisecond pulses of light into heat, which changes membrane capacitance, depolarizing the cell and eliciting action potentials. Compared to non-functionalized nanoparticles, ligand-conjugated nanoparticles highly resist convective washout and enable photothermal stimulation with lower delivered energy and resulting temperature increase. Ligands targeting three different membrane proteins were tested; all showed similar activity and washout resistance. This suggests that many types of ligands can be bound to nanoparticles, preserving ligand and nanoparticle function, and that many different cell phenotypes can be targeted by appropriate choice of ligand. The findings have applications as an alternative to optogenetics and potentially for therapies involving neuronal photostimulation. PMID:25772189

  12. Shape-Dependent Nonlinear Optical Properties of Anisotropic Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hua, Yi; Chandra, Kavita; Dam, Duncan Hieu M; Wiederrecht, Gary P; Odom, Teri W

    2015-12-17

    This Letter reports the shape-dependent third-order nonlinear optical properties of anisotropic gold nanoparticles. We characterized the nonlinear absorption coefficients of nanorods, nanostars, and nanoshells using femtosecond Z-scan measurements. By comparing nanoparticle solutions with a similar linear extinction at the laser excitation wavelength, we separated shape effects from that of the localized surface plasmon wavelength. We found that the nonlinear response depended on particle shape. Using pump-probe spectroscopy, we measured the ultrafast transient response of nanoparticles, which supported the strong saturable absorption observed in nanorods and weak nonlinear response in nanoshells. We found that the magnitude of saturable absorption as well as the ultrafast spectral responses of nanoparticles were affected by the linear absorption of the nanoparticles. PMID:26595327

  13. Surface plasma resonant effect of gold nanoparticles on the photoelectrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meen, Teen-Hang; Tsai, Jenn-Kai; Chao, Shi-Mian; Lin, Yu-Chien; Wu, Tien-Chuan; Chang, Tang-Yun; Ji, Liang-Wen; Water, Walter; Chen, Wen-Ray; Tang, I.-Tseng; Huang, Chien-Jung

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we prepared different shapes of gold nanoparticles by seed-mediated growth method and applied them on the photoelectrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) to study the surface plasma resonant (SPR) effect of gold nanoparticles on the photoelectrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells. The analyses of field emission scanning electron microscopy show that the average diameter of the spherical gold nanoparticles is 45 nm, the average length and width of the short gold nanorods were 55 and 22 nm, respectively, and the average length and width of the long gold nanorods were 55 and 14 nm, respectively. The aspect ratio of the short and long gold nanorods was about 2.5 and 4, respectively. The results of ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra show that the absorption wavelength is about 540 nm for spherical gold nanoparticles, and the absorption of the gold nanorods reveals two peaks. One is about 510 to 520 nm, and the other is about 670 and 710 nm for the short and long gold nanorods, respectively. The best conversion efficiency of the dye-sensitized solar cells with spherical gold nanoparticles and short and long gold nanorods added in is 6.77%, 7.08%, and 7.29%, respectively, and is higher than that of the cells without gold nanoparticles, which is 6.21%. This result indicates that the effect of gold nanoparticles on the photoelectrodes can increase the conductivity and reduce the recombination of charges in the photoelectrodes, resulting in the increase of conversion efficiency for DSSCs. In addition, the long gold nanorods have stronger SPR effect than the spherical gold nanoparticles and short gold nanorods at long wavelength. This may be the reason for the higher conversion efficiency of DSSCs with long gold nanorods than those of the cells with spherical gold nanoparticles and short gold nanorods.

  14. Gold nanoparticles in model biological membranes: A computational perspective.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Giulia; Monticelli, Luca

    2016-10-01

    The electronic, optical, catalytic, and magnetic properties of metal nanoparticles (NPs) make them extremely interesting for biomedical applications. In this rapidly moving field, monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles emerge both as a reference system and as promising candidates for drug and gene delivery, photothermal treatment, and imaging applications. Despite the technological relevance, there is still poor understanding of the molecular processes driving the interactions of metal nanoparticles with cells, and with cell membranes in particular. In this paper we review molecular-level computational studies of the interaction between monolayer-protected gold NPs and model lipid membranes. Our review comprises a brief description of the most relevant experimental results in this field and of the questions they raised, followed by a description of the computational achievements reported so far. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:27060434

  15. Optical absorption properties of dispersed gold and silver alloy nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wilcoxon, Jess

    2009-03-01

    The oldest topic in nanoscience is the size-dependent optical properties of gold and silver colloids or nanoparticles, first investigated scientifically by Michael Faraday in 1857. In the modern era, advances in both synthesis and characterization have resulted in new insights into the size-dependent absorbance of Au and Ag nanoparticles with sizes below the classical limit for Mie theory. In this paper we discuss the synthesis and properties of core/shell and nanoalloy particles of Au and Ag, compare them to particles of pure gold and silver, and discuss how alloying affects nanoparticle chemical stability. We show that composition, size, and nanostructure (e.g., core/shell vs quasi-random nanoalloy) can all be employed to adjust the optical absorbance properties. The type of nanostructure--core/shell vs alloy--is reflected in their optical absorbance features. PMID:19708105

  16. Characterization of Conventional One-Step Sodium Thiosulfate Facilitated Gold Nanoparticle Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saverot, Scott-Eugene; Reese, Laura M.; Cimini, Daniela; Vikesland, Peter J.; Bickford, Lissett Ramirez

    2015-05-01

    Gold-gold sulfide nanoparticles are of interest for drug delivery, biomedical imaging, and photothermal therapy applications due to a facile synthesis method resulting in small particles with high near-infrared (NIR) absorption efficiency. Previous studies suggest that the NIR sensitivity of these nanoparticles was due to hexagonally shaped metal-coated dielectric nanoparticles that consist of a gold sulfide core and gold shell. Here, we illustrate that the conventional synthesis procedure results in the formation of polydisperse samples of icosahedral gold particles, gold nanoplates, and small gold spheres. Importantly, through compositional analysis, via UV/vis absorption spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), we show that all of the nanoparticles exhibit identical face center cubic (FCC) gold crystalline structures, thus suggesting that sulfide is not present in the final fabricated nanoparticles. We show that icosahedrally shaped nanoparticles result in a blue-shifted absorbance, with a peak in the visible range. Alternatively, the nanoplate nanoparticles result in the characteristic NIR absorbance peak. Thus, we report that the NIR-contributing species in conventional gold-gold sulfide formulations are nanoplates that are comprised entirely of gold. Furthermore, polydisperse gold nanoparticle samples produced by the traditional one-step reduction of HAuCl4 by sodium thiosulfate show increased in vitro toxicity, compared to isolated and more homogeneous constituent samples. This result exemplifies the importance of developing monodisperse nanoparticle formulations that are well characterized in order to expedite the development of clinically beneficial nanomaterials.

  17. Sonosynthesis of gold nanoparticles from a geranium leaf extract.

    PubMed

    Franco-Romano, M; Gil, M L A; Palacios-Santander, J M; Delgado-Jaén, J J; Naranjo-Rodríguez, I; Hidalgo-Hidalgo de Cisneros, J L; Cubillana-Aguilera, L M

    2014-07-01

    A rapid in situ biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is proposed in which a geranium (Pelargonium zonale) leaf extract was used as a non-toxic reducing and stabilizing agent in a sonocatalysis process based on high-power ultrasound. The synthesis process took only 3.5 min in aqueous solution under ambient conditions. The stability of the nanoparticles was studied by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy with reference to the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band. AuNPs have an average lifetime of about 8 weeks at 4 °C in the absence of light. The morphology and crystalline phase of the gold nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The composition of the nanoparticles was evaluated by electron diffraction and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). A total of 80% of the gold nanoparticles obtained in this way have a diameter in the range 8-20 nm, with an average size of 12±3 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicated the presence of biomolecules that could be responsible for reducing and capping the biosynthesized gold nanoparticles. A hypothesis concerning the type of organic molecules involved in this process is also given. Experimental design linked to the simplex method was used to optimize the experimental conditions for this green synthesis route. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a high-power ultrasound-based sonocatalytic process and experimental design coupled to a simplex optimization process has been used in the biosynthesis of AuNPs. PMID:24530142

  18. Gold and silver nanoparticles from Trianthema decandra: synthesis, characterization, and antimicrobial properties

    PubMed Central

    Geethalakshmi, R; Sarada, DVL

    2012-01-01

    Background There is an increasing commercial demand for nanoparticles due to their wide applicability in various markets, including medicine, catalysis, electronics, chemistry, and energy. In this report, a simple and ecofriendly chemical reaction for the synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles from Trianthema decandra (Aizoaceae) has been developed. Methods and results On treatment of aqueous solutions containing chloroauric acid or silver nitrate with root extract of T. decandra, stable gold or silver nanoparticles were rapidly formed. The kinetics of reduction of gold and silver ions during the reaction was analyzed by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. Field emission-scanning electron microscopy showed formation of gold nanoparticles in various shapes, including spherical, cubical, triangular, and hexagonal, while silver nanoparticles were spherical. The size of the gold nanoparticles was 33–65 nm and that of the silver nanoparticles was 36–74 nm. Energy dispersive x-ray and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the presence of metallic gold and metallic silver in the respective nanoparticles. The antimicrobial properties of the synthesized nanoparticles were analyzed using the Kirby-Bauer method. The results show varied susceptibility of microorganisms to the gold and silver nanoparticles. Conclusion It is believed that phytochemicals present in T. decandra extract reduce the silver and gold ions into metallic nanoparticles. This strategy reduces the cost of production and the environmental impact. The silver and gold nanoparticles formed showed strong activity against all microorganisms tested. PMID:23091381

  19. Quantification of laser local hyperthermia induced by gold plasmonic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yakunin, Alexander N; Avetisyan, Yuri A; Tuchin, Valery V

    2015-05-01

    This paper discusses one of the key problems of laser-induced tissue/cell hyperthermia mediated by gold nanoparticles, namely, quantifying and precise prediction of the light exposure to provide a controllable local heating impact on living organisms. The distributions of such parameters as an efficiency factor of absorption, differential and integral absorbing power of a nanoparticle, temperature increment, and Arrhenius damage integral were used to quantify nanoparticle effectiveness in the two-dimensional coordinate space “laser wavelength (λ) × radius of gold nanoparticles (R).” It was found that the fulfillment of required spatial and temporal characteristics of temperature fields in the vicinity of nanoparticle determines the optimal λ and R. As a result, the area in the space (λ × R) with a minimal criticality to alterations of the local hyperthermia may be significantly displaced from the position of the plasmonic resonance. The aspects of generalization of the proposed methodology for the analysis of local hyperthermia using nanoparticles of different shapes (nanoshells, nanorods, nanostars) and short pulse laser radiation are discussed. PMID:25629389

  20. Photothermal lens detection of gold nanoparticles: theory and experiments.

    PubMed

    Brusnichkin, Anton V; Nedosekin, Dmitry A; Proskurnin, Mikhail A; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2007-11-01

    An approach for mode-mismatched two-beam (pump-probe) photothermal lens detection of multipoint light-absorbing targets in solution (e.g., gold nanoparticles) is developed for continuous-wave intensity-modulated laser-excitation mode. A description of the blooming of the thermooptical element (thermal lens) upon absorption of the excitation laser radiation is based on the summation of individual thermal waves from multiple heat sources. This description makes it possible to estimate the irregularities of the temperature (and, thus, the refractive index) profile for a discrete number of nanoparticles in the irradiated area and a change in the concentration and particle size parameters. Experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical dependences of the photothermal signal on nanoparticle size and concentration and excitation laser power. Calibration plots for particles from 2 to 250 nm show long linear ranges, limits of detection of gold nanoparticles at the level of hundreds of nanoparticles with the current setup, and the photothermal-lens sensitivity coefficient increases as a cubic function of particle size. Further improvements are discussed, including increasing the sensitivity thresholds up to one nanoparticle in the detected volume. PMID:18028698

  1. The optical nonlinearity of gold nanoparticles prepared by bioreduction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balbuena Ortega, A.; Arroyo Carrasco, M. L.; Gayou, V. L.; Orduña Díaz, A.; Delgado Macuil, R.; Rojas López, Marlon

    2013-11-01

    Nonlinear optical and electronic properties of nanosized metal particles have drawn considerable attention because of their strong and size-dependent plasmon resonance absorption. In a metal nanoparticle system such as gold dispersed in a transparent matrix, an absorption peak due to surface plasmon resonance is usually observed in the visible spectral region. Metal nanoparticles are of special interest as nonlinear materials for optical switching and computing because of their relatively large third-order nonlinearity (χ3) and ultrafast response time. The purpose of this study was to analyze the nonlinear optical properties of biosynthesized gold nanoparticles. The samples were prepared by biosynthesis method using yeast extract as reducing agent and the nonlinear optical properties of the nanoparticles were investigated using a single beam Z-scan technique with a beam power of 20 mW and operated at wavelength of 514 nm. The reaction between metal ions and yeast extracts were monitored by UV-visible spectra of Au nanoparticles in aqueous solution with different pH (3-6). The surface plasmon peak position was shifted from 528 nm to 573 nm, according to of pH variation 4 to 6. The average particle size was calculated by the absorption peak position using the Fernig method, from 42 to 103 nm. The z-scan curves showed a negative nonlocal nonlinear refractive index with a magnitude dependent on the nanoparticle size.

  2. Time-dependent Protein-directed Growth of Gold Nanoparticles within a Single Crystal of Lysozyme

    SciTech Connect

    H Wei; Z Wang; J Zhang; S House; Y Gao; L Yang; H Robinson; L Tan; H Xing; C Hou

    2011-12-31

    Gold nanoparticles are useful in biomedical applications due to their distinct optical properties and high chemical stability. Reports of the biogenic formation of gold colloids from gold complexes has also led to an increased level of interest in the biomineralization of gold. However, the mechanism responsible for biomolecule-directed gold nanoparticle formation remains unclear due to the lack of structural information about biological systems and the fast kinetics of biomimetic chemical systems in solution. Here we show that intact single crystals of lysozyme can be used to study the time-dependent, protein-directed growth of gold nanoparticles. The protein crystals slow down the growth of the gold nanoparticles, allowing detailed kinetic studies to be carried out, and permit a three-dimensional structural characterization that would be difficult to achieve in solution. Furthermore, we show that additional chemical species can be used to fine-tune the growth rate of the gold nanoparticles.

  3. Time-dependent, protein-directed growth of gold nanoparticles within a single crystal of lysozyme

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, H.; Robinson, H.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, J.; House, S.; Gao, Y.-G.; Yang, L.; Tan, L. H.; Xing, H.; Hou, C.; Robertson, I. M.; Zuo, J.-M.; Lu, Y.

    2011-01-30

    Gold nanoparticles are useful in biomedical applications due to their distinct optical properties and high chemical stability. Reports of the biogenic formation of gold colloids from gold complexes has also led to an increased level of interest in the biomineralization of gold. However, the mechanism responsible for biomolecule-directed gold nanoparticle formation remains unclear due to the lack of structural information about biological systems and the fast kinetics of biomimetic chemical systems in solution. Here we show that intact single crystals of lysozyme can be used to study the time-dependent, protein-directed growth of gold nanoparticles. The protein crystals slow down the growth of the gold nanoparticles, allowing detailed kinetic studies to be carried out, and permit a three-dimensional structural characterization that would be difficult to achieve in solution. Furthermore, we show that additional chemical species can be used to fine-tune the growth rate of the gold nanoparticles.

  4. Silver and Gold Nanoparticles Alter Cathepsin Activity In vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speshock, Janice L.; Braydich-Stolle, Laura K.; Szymanski, Eric R.; Hussain, Saber M.

    2011-12-01

    Nanomaterials are being incorporated into many biological applications for use as therapeutics, sensors, or labels. Silver nanomaterials are being utilized for biological implants and wound dressings as an antiviral material, whereas gold nanomaterials are being used as biological labels or sensors due to their surface properties and biocompatibility. Cytotoxicity data of these materials are becoming more prevalent; however, little research has been performed to understand how the introduction of these materials into cells affects cellular processes. Here, we demonstrate the impact that silver and gold nanoparticles have on cathepsin activity in vitro. Cathepsins are important cellular proteases that are imperative for proper immune system function. We have selected to examine gold and silver nanoparticles due to the increased use of these materials in biological applications. This manuscript depicts how both of these types of nanomaterials affect cathepsin activity, which could impact the host's immune system and its ability to respond to pathogens. Cathepsin B activity decreases in a dose-dependent manner with all nanoparticles tested. Alternatively, the impact of nanoparticles on cathepsin L activity depends greatly on the type and size of the material.

  5. Charging gold nanoparticles in ZnO by electric fields.

    PubMed

    Obradovic, M; Di Vece, M; Grandjean, D; Houben, K; Lievens, P

    2016-01-27

    Controlling the plasmon resonance frequency of metal nanostructures holds promise for both fundamental and applied research in optics. The plasmon resonance frequency depends on the number of free electrons in the metal. By adding or removing electrons to a metal nano-object, the plasmon resonance frequency shifts. In this study we indirectly change the number of free electrons in gold nanoparticles by applying an electrical potential difference over a heterostructure consisting of a ZnO layer with embedded gold nanoparticles. The potential difference induces shifts of defect energy levels in the ZnO by the electric field. This results in an exchange of electrons between particles and matrix which in turn modifies the gold nanoparticle plasmon properties. The positive charge shifts the ZnO optical absorption peak from 377 nm to 386 nm and shifts the nanoparticle plasmon from 549 nm to 542 nm. This electro-optical effect is a promising way to obtain fast optical switching in a solid state composition. PMID:26732742

  6. Field effect on digestive ripening of thiol-capped gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Meng-Lin; Peng, J. S.; Lee, Sanboh; Yang, Fuqian

    2014-02-07

    We studied the digestive ripening of thiol-capped gold nanoparticles under simultaneous action of electric field and reflux heating in a silicone oil bath at 130 °C, using transmission electron microscopy. Observation revealed that a polydispersed gold nanoparticle system reached the state of nearly monodispersity under the action of an electric field and the thiol-capped gold nanoparticles carried negative charges. The electric field caused the increase of the particle size for the nearly monodispersed gold nanoparticle system. The self-assembly of the nearly monodisperse gold nanoparticles under the action of an electric field of a high field intensity was observed. The gold nanoparticles tended to form self-assembled nanostructures of six-fold symmetry. This study provides a new route for system engineering to control the particle size of metallic nanoparticles by electric field and digestive ripening.

  7. Gold nanoparticles embedded silicon channel biosensor for improved sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, H. Y.; Arshad, M. K. Md.; M. Nuzaihan M., N.; Fathil, M. F. M.; Hashim, U.

    2016-07-01

    This project discusses the fabrication steps of a biosensor device on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer. Conventional photolithography technique is used to fabricate the device. The gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are then used to enhance the sensitivity of the device. By incorporating the GNPs, it is expected to get higher current compared with the device without GNPs due to better conductivity of gold and higher volume-to-ratio. Hence, with the addition of GNPs, it may boost up the signal and enhance the sensitivity of the device.

  8. Computational Investigation of Quantum Size Effects in Gold Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Electron density perturbation from carbon monoxide adsorption on a multi-hundred atom gold nanoparticle. The perturbation causes significant quantum size effects in CO catalysis on gold particles. Science: Jeff Greeley and Nick Romero, Argonne National Laboratory; Jesper Kleis, Karsten Jacobsen, Jens Nørskov, Technical University of Denmark
 Visualization: Joseph Insley, Argonne National Laboratory This research used resources of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility at Argonne National Laboratory, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Dept. of Energy under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  9. Synthesis of netlike gold nanoparticles using ampicillin as a stabilizing reagent and its application

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Y.Z.; Zhou, J.F.; Song, Y.; Cheng, Z.P.; Xu, J.

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Electrochemical deposition of netlike gold nanoparticles (GNPs) on the surface of glassy carbon electrode and preparation of netlike GNPs in aqueous solution using ampicillin as a stabilizing reagent were proposed. The catalytic properties of netlike gold nanoparticles on the glassy carbon electrode for dopamine were demonstrated. The results indicate that the netlike gold nanoparticle modified electrode has an excellent repeatability and reproducibility. Display Omitted Highlights: ► Synthesis of netlike gold nanoparticles using ampicillin as a stabilizing reagent. ► Excellent repeatability and reproducibility of netlike gold nanoparticle modified glassy carbon electrode. ► The catalytic properties of netlike gold nanoparticle for dopamine. -- Abstract: Electrochemical deposition of netlike gold nanoparticles on the surface of glassy carbon electrode and preparation of netlike GNPs in aqueous solution using ampicillin as a stabilizing reagent were proposed. The netlike gold nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, infrared spectrometer, UV spectrophotometer, powder X-ray diffractometer and electrochemical analyzer. The catalysis of the netlike gold nanoparticles on the glassy carbon electrode for dopamine was demonstrated. The results indicate that the gold nanoparticle modified electrode has an excellent repeatability and reproducibility.

  10. The biodistribution of gold nanoparticles designed for renal clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alric, Christophe; Miladi, Imen; Kryza, David; Taleb, Jacqueline; Lux, François; Bazzi, Rana; Billotey, Claire; Janier, Marc; Perriat, Pascal; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier

    2013-06-01

    Owing to their tunable optical properties and their high absorption cross-section of X- and γ-ray, gold nanostructures appear as promising agents for remotely controlled therapy. Since the efficiency of cancer therapy is not limited to the eradication of the tumour but rests also on the sparing of healthy tissue, a biodistribution study is required in order to determine whether the behaviour of the nanoparticles after intravenous injection is safe (no accumulation in healthy tissue, no uptake by phagocytic cell-rich organs (liver, spleen) and renal clearance). The biodistribution of Au@DTDTPA nanoparticles which are composed of a gold core and a DTDTPA (dithiolated polyaminocarboxylate) shell can be established by X-ray imaging (owing to the X-ray absorption of the gold core) and by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) since the DTDTPA shell was designed for the immobilization of paramagnetic gadolinium ions. However scintigraphy appears better suited for a biodistribution study owing to a great sensitivity. The successful immobilization of radioelements (99mTc, 111In) in the DTDTPA shell, instead of gadolinium ions, renders possible the follow up of Au@DTDTPA by scintigraphy which showed that Au@DTDTPA nanoparticles exhibit a safe behaviour after intravenous injection to healthy rats.Owing to their tunable optical properties and their high absorption cross-section of X- and γ-ray, gold nanostructures appear as promising agents for remotely controlled therapy. Since the efficiency of cancer therapy is not limited to the eradication of the tumour but rests also on the sparing of healthy tissue, a biodistribution study is required in order to determine whether the behaviour of the nanoparticles after intravenous injection is safe (no accumulation in healthy tissue, no uptake by phagocytic cell-rich organs (liver, spleen) and renal clearance). The biodistribution of Au@DTDTPA nanoparticles which are composed of a gold core and a DTDTPA (dithiolated polyaminocarboxylate

  11. Modeling the atomistic growth behavior of gold nanoparticles in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, C. Heath; Lei, Yu; Bao, Yuping

    2016-04-01

    The properties of gold nanoparticles strongly depend on their three-dimensional atomic structure, leading to an increased emphasis on controlling and predicting nanoparticle structural evolution during the synthesis process. In order to provide this atomistic-level insight and establish a link to the experimentally-observed growth behavior, a kinetic Monte Carlo simulation (KMC) approach is developed for capturing Au nanoparticle growth characteristics. The advantage of this approach is that, compared to traditional molecular dynamics simulations, the atomistic nanoparticle structural evolution can be tracked on time scales that approach the actual experiments. This has enabled several different comparisons against experimental benchmarks, and it has helped transition the KMC simulations from a hypothetical toy model into a more experimentally-relevant test-bed. The model is initially parameterized by performing a series of automated comparisons of Au nanoparticle growth curves versus the experimental observations, and then the refined model allows for detailed structural analysis of the nanoparticle growth behavior. Although the Au nanoparticles are roughly spherical, the maximum/minimum dimensions deviate from the average by approximately 12.5%, which is consistent with the corresponding experiments. Also, a surface texture analysis highlights the changes in the surface structure as a function of time. While the nanoparticles show similar surface structures throughout the growth process, there can be some significant differences during the initial growth at different synthesis conditions.

  12. Modeling the atomistic growth behavior of gold nanoparticles in solution.

    PubMed

    Turner, C Heath; Lei, Yu; Bao, Yuping

    2016-04-28

    The properties of gold nanoparticles strongly depend on their three-dimensional atomic structure, leading to an increased emphasis on controlling and predicting nanoparticle structural evolution during the synthesis process. In order to provide this atomistic-level insight and establish a link to the experimentally-observed growth behavior, a kinetic Monte Carlo simulation (KMC) approach is developed for capturing Au nanoparticle growth characteristics. The advantage of this approach is that, compared to traditional molecular dynamics simulations, the atomistic nanoparticle structural evolution can be tracked on time scales that approach the actual experiments. This has enabled several different comparisons against experimental benchmarks, and it has helped transition the KMC simulations from a hypothetical toy model into a more experimentally-relevant test-bed. The model is initially parameterized by performing a series of automated comparisons of Au nanoparticle growth curves versus the experimental observations, and then the refined model allows for detailed structural analysis of the nanoparticle growth behavior. Although the Au nanoparticles are roughly spherical, the maximum/minimum dimensions deviate from the average by approximately 12.5%, which is consistent with the corresponding experiments. Also, a surface texture analysis highlights the changes in the surface structure as a function of time. While the nanoparticles show similar surface structures throughout the growth process, there can be some significant differences during the initial growth at different synthesis conditions. PMID:27091290

  13. Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Renal Clearable Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Goel, Shreya; Hernandez, Reinier; Graves, Stephen A; Shi, Sixiang; Nickles, Robert J; Cai, Weibo

    2016-05-01

    Optical imaging has been the primary imaging modality for nearly all of the renal clearable nanoparticles since 2007. Due to the tissue depth penetration limitation, providing accurate organ kinetics non-invasively has long been a huge challenge. Although a more quantitative imaging technique has been developed by labeling nanoparticles with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) isotopes, the low temporal resolution of SPECT still limits its potential for visualizing the rapid dynamic process of renal clearable nanoparticles in vivo. The dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of renal clearable gold (Au) nanoparticles by labeling them with copper-64 ((64) Cu) to form (64) Cu-NOTA-Au-GSH is reported. Systematic nanoparticle synthesis and characterizations are performed to demonstrate the efficient renal clearance of as-prepared nanoparticles. A rapid renal clearance of (64) Cu-NOTA-Au-GSH is observed (>75%ID at 24 h post-injection) with its elimination half-life calculated to be less than 6 min, over 130 times shorter than previously reported similar nanoparticles. Dynamic PET imaging not only addresses the current challenges in accurately and non-invasively acquiring the organ kinetics, but also potentially provides a highly useful tool for studying renal clearance mechanism of other ultra-small nanoparticles, as well as the diagnosis of kidney diseases in the near future. PMID:27062146

  14. Singlet Oxygen Generation by Laser Irradiation of Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The formation of singlet oxygen by irradiation of gold nanoparticles in their plasmon resonance band with continuous or pulsed laser light has been investigated. Citrate-stabilized nanoparticles were found to facilitate the photogeneration of singlet oxygen, albeit with low quantum yield. The reaction caused by pulsed laser irradiation makes use of the equilibrated hot electrons that can reach temperatures of several thousand degrees during the laser pulse. Although less efficient, continuous irradiation, which acts via the short-lived directly excited primary “hot” electrons only, can produce enough singlet oxygen for photodynamic cancer therapy and has significant advantages for practical applications. However, careful design of the nanoparticles is needed, since even a moderately thick capping layer can completely inhibit singlet oxygen formation. Moreover, the efficiency of the process also depends on the nanoparticle size. PMID:27239247

  15. Shape and surface effects on the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles: Gold nanospheres versus gold nanostars.

    PubMed

    Favi, Pelagie Marlene; Gao, Ming; Johana Sepúlveda Arango, Liuda; Ospina, Sandra Patricia; Morales, Mariana; Pavon, Juan Jose; Webster, Thomas Jay

    2015-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles are materials with unique optical properties that have made them very attractive for numerous biomedical applications. With the increasing discovery of techniques to synthesize novel nanoparticles such as star-shaped gold nanoparticles for biomedical applications, the safety and performance of these new nanomaterials must be systematically assessed before use. In this study, gold nanostars (AuNSTs) with multibranched surface structures were synthesized, and their influence on the cytotoxicity of human skin fibroblasts and rat fat pad endothelial cells (RFPECs) were assessed and compared with that of gold nanospheres (AuNSPs) with unbranched surfaces. Results showed that the AuNSPs with diameters of approximately 61.46 nm showed greater toxicity with fibroblast cells and RFPECs compared with the synthesized AuNSTs with diameters of approximately 33.69 nm. The AuNSPs were lethal at concentrations of 40 μg/mL for both cell lines, whereas the AuNSTs were less toxic at higher concentrations (400 μg/mL). The calculated IC50 (50% inhibitory concentration) values of the AuNSPs exposed to fibroblast cells were greater at 1 and 4 days of culture (26.4 and 27.7 μg/mL, respectively) compared with the RFPECs (13.6 and 13.8 μg/mL, respectively), indicating that the AuNSPs have a greater toxicity to endothelial cells. It was proposed that possible factors that could be promoting the reduced toxicity effects of the AuNSTs to fibroblast cells and RFPECs, compared with the AuNSPs may be size, surface chemistry, and shape of the gold nanoparticles. The reduced cell toxicity observed with the AuNSTs suggests that AuNSTs may be a promising material for use in biomedical applications. PMID:25904210

  16. Enhanced chemiluminescence-based detection on gold substrate after electrografting of diazonium precursor-coated gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Houmed Adabo, Ali; Zeggari, Rabah; Mohamed Saïd, Nasser; Bazzi, Rana; Elie-Caille, Céline; Marquette, Christophe; Martini, Matteo; Tillement, Olivier; Perriat, Pascal; Chaix, Carole; Boireau, Wilfrid; Roux, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    Since it was demonstrated that nanostructured surfaces are more efficient for the detection based on the specific capture of analytes, there is a real need to develop strategies for grafting nanoparticles onto flat surfaces. Among the different routes for the functionalization of a surface, the reduction of diazonium salts appears very attractive for the covalent immobilization of nanoparticles because this method does not require a pre-treatment of the surface. For achieving this goal, gold nanoparticles coated by precursor of diazonium salts were synthesized by reduction of gold salt in presence of mercaptoaniline. These mercaptoaniline-coated gold nanoparticles (Au@MA) were successfully immobilized onto various conducting substrates (indium tin oxide (ITO), glassy carbon (GC) and gold electrodes with flat terraces) after addition of sodium nitrite at fixed potential. When applied onto the gold electrodes, such a grafting strategy led to an obvious enhancement of the luminescence of luminol used for the biodetection. PMID:26803605

  17. Effects of gold nanoparticles on the stability of microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Mohamedi, Graciela; Azmin, Mehrdad; Pastoriza-Santos, Isabel; Huang, Victoria; Pérez-Juste, Jorge; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Edirisinghe, Mohan; Stride, Eleanor

    2012-10-01

    Surfactant-coated microbubbles are utilized in a wide variety of applications, from wastewater purification to contrast agents in medical ultrasound imaging. In many of these applications, the stability of the microbubbles is crucial to their effectiveness. Controlling this, however, represents a considerable challenge. In this study, the potential for stabilizing microbubbles using solid nanoparticles adsorbed onto their surfaces was explored. A new theoretical model has been developed to describe the influence of interfacially adsorbed solid particles upon the dissolution of a gas bubble in a liquid. The aim of this work was to test experimentally the prediction of the model that the presence of the nanoparticles would inhibit gas diffusion and coalescence/disproportionation, thus increasing the life span of the bubbles. Near-monodisperse microbubbles (~100 μm diameter) were prepared using a microfluidic device and coated with a surfactant, with and without the addition of a suspension of spherical gold nanoparticles (~15 nm diameter). The experimental results confirmed the theoretical predictions that as the surface concentration of gold nanoparticles increased the bubbles underwent negligible changes in their size and size distribution over a period of 30 days at the ambient temperature and pressure. Under the same conditions, bubbles coated with the same surfactant but no nanoparticles survived only a matter of hours. PMID:22928997

  18. Dielectrophoresis of gold nanoparticles conjugated to DNA origami structures.

    PubMed

    Henning-Knechtel, Anja; Wiens, Matthew; Lakatos, Mathias; Heerwig, Andreas; Ostermaier, Frieder; Haufe, Nora; Mertig, Michael

    2016-01-01

    DNA nanostructures are promising construction materials to bridge the gap between self-assembly of functional molecules and conventional top-down fabrication methods in nanotechnology. Their positioning onto specific locations of a microstructured substrate is an important task towards this aim. Here we study manipulation and positioning of pristine and of gold nanoparticle-conjugated tubular DNA origami structures using ac dielectrophoresis. The dielectrophoretic behavior was investigated employing fluorescence microscopy. For the pristine origami, a significant dielectrophoretic response was found to take place in the megahertz range, whereas, due to the higher polarizability of the metallic nanoparticles, the nanoparticle/DNA hybrid structures required a lower electrical field strength and frequency for a comparable trapping at the edges of the electrode structure. The nanoparticle conjugation additionally resulted in a remarkable alteration of the DNA structure arrangement. The growth of linear, chain-like structures in between electrodes at applied frequencies in the megahertz range was observed. The long-range chain formation is caused by a local, gold nanoparticle-induced field concentration along the DNA nanostructures, which in turn, creates dielectrophoretic forces that enable the observed self-alignment of the hybrid structures. PMID:27547612

  19. Dielectrophoresis of gold nanoparticles conjugated to DNA origami structures

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Matthew; Lakatos, Mathias; Heerwig, Andreas; Ostermaier, Frieder; Haufe, Nora

    2016-01-01

    Summary DNA nanostructures are promising construction materials to bridge the gap between self-assembly of functional molecules and conventional top-down fabrication methods in nanotechnology. Their positioning onto specific locations of a microstructured substrate is an important task towards this aim. Here we study manipulation and positioning of pristine and of gold nanoparticle-conjugated tubular DNA origami structures using ac dielectrophoresis. The dielectrophoretic behavior was investigated employing fluorescence microscopy. For the pristine origami, a significant dielectrophoretic response was found to take place in the megahertz range, whereas, due to the higher polarizability of the metallic nanoparticles, the nanoparticle/DNA hybrid structures required a lower electrical field strength and frequency for a comparable trapping at the edges of the electrode structure. The nanoparticle conjugation additionally resulted in a remarkable alteration of the DNA structure arrangement. The growth of linear, chain-like structures in between electrodes at applied frequencies in the megahertz range was observed. The long-range chain formation is caused by a local, gold nanoparticle-induced field concentration along the DNA nanostructures, which in turn, creates dielectrophoretic forces that enable the observed self-alignment of the hybrid structures. PMID:27547612

  20. In vivo integrity of polymer-coated gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Abdelmonem, Abuelmagd M.; Ali, Zulqurnain; Alves, Frauke; Geiser, Marianne; Haberl, Nadine; Hartmann, Raimo; Hirn, Stephanie; de Aberasturi, Dorleta Jimenez; Kantner, Karsten; Khadem-Saba, Gülnaz; Montenegro, Jose-Maria; Rejman, Joanna; Rojo, Teofilo; de Larramendi, Idoia Ruiz; Ufartes, Roser; Wenk, Alexander; Parak, Wolfgang J.

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles are frequently engineered with an organic surface coating to improve their physicochemical properties, and it is well known that their colloidal properties may change upon internalization by cells. While the stability of such nanoparticles is typically assayed in simple in vitro tests, their stability in a mammalian organism remains unknown. Here, we show that firmly grafted polymer shells around gold nanoparticles may degrade when injected into rats. We synthesized monodisperse radioactively labelled gold nanoparticles (198Au) and engineered an 111In-labelled polymer shell around them. Upon intravenous injection into rats, quantitative biodistribution analyses performed independently for 198Au and 111In showed partial removal of the polymer shell in vivo. While 198Au accumulates mostly in the liver, part of the 111In shows a non-particulate biodistribution similar to intravenous injection of chelated 111In. Further in vitro studies suggest that degradation of the polymer shell is caused by proteolytic enzymes in the liver. Our results show that even nanoparticles with high colloidal stability can change their physicochemical properties in vivo.

  1. Enhanced photoacoustic signal from DNA assembled gold nanoparticle networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchkremer, A.; Beckmann, M. F.; Linn, M.; Ruff, J.; Rosencrantz, R. R.; von Plessen, G.; Schmitz, G.; Simon, U.

    2014-12-01

    We report an experimental finding of photoacoustic signal enhancement from finite sized DNA-gold nanoparticle networks. We synthesized DNA-functionalized hollow and solid gold nanospheres (AuNS) to form finite sized networks, which were characterized by means of optical extinction spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and scanning electron microscopy in transmission mode. It is shown that the signal amplification scales with network size for networks comprising either hollow or solid AuNS as well as networks consisting of both types of nanoparticles. The laser intensities applied in our multispectral setup (λ = 650 nm, 850 nm, 905 nm) were low enough to maintain the structural integrity of the networks. This reflects that the binding and recognition properties of the temperature-sensitive cross-linking DNA-molecules are retained.

  2. Paper-based tuberculosis diagnostic devices with colorimetric gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Shen, Shu-Wei; Cheng, Chao-Min; Chen, Chien-Fu

    2013-08-01

    A colorimetric sensing strategy employing gold nanoparticles and a paper assay platform has been developed for tuberculosis diagnosis. Unmodified gold nanoparticles and single-stranded detection oligonucleotides are used to achieve rapid diagnosis without complicated and time-consuming thiolated or other surface-modified probe preparation processes. To eliminate the use of sophisticated equipment for data analysis, the color variance for multiple detection results was simultaneously collected and concentrated on cellulose paper with the data readout transmitted for cloud computing via a smartphone. The results show that the 2.6 nM tuberculosis mycobacterium target sequences extracted from patients can easily be detected, and the turnaround time after the human DNA is extracted from clinical samples was approximately 1 h.

  3. Towards Effective Photothermal/Photodynamic Treatment Using Plasmonic Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bucharskaya, Alla; Maslyakova, Galina; Terentyuk, Georgy; Yakunin, Alexander; Avetisyan, Yuri; Bibikova, Olga; Tuchina, Elena; Khlebtsov, Boris; Khlebtsov, Nikolai; Tuchin, Valery

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of different size and shape are widely used as photosensitizers for cancer diagnostics and plasmonic photothermal (PPT)/photodynamic (PDT) therapy, as nanocarriers for drug delivery and laser-mediated pathogen killing, even the underlying mechanisms of treatment effects remain poorly understood. There is a need in analyzing and improving the ways to increase accumulation of AuNP in tumors and other crucial steps in interaction of AuNPs with laser light and tissues. In this review, we summarize our recent theoretical, experimental, and pre-clinical results on light activated interaction of AuNPs with tissues and cells. Specifically, we discuss a combined PPT/PDT treatment of tumors and killing of pathogen bacteria with gold-based nanocomposites and atomic clusters, cell optoporation, and theoretical simulations of nanoparticle-mediated laser heating of tissues and cells. PMID:27517913

  4. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of gold nanoparticles on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    DeJarnette, Drew; Roper, D. Keith

    2014-08-07

    Plasmon excitation decay by absorption, scattering, and hot electron transfer has been distinguished from effects induced by incident photons for gold nanoparticles on graphene monolayer using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Gold nano-ellipses were evaporated onto lithographed graphene, which was transferred onto a silicon nitride transmission electron microscopy grid. Plasmon decay from lithographed nanoparticles measured with EELS was compared in the absence and presence of the graphene monolayer. Measured decay values compared favorably with estimated radiative and non-radiative contributions to decay in the absence of graphene. Graphene significantly enhanced low-energy plasmon decay, increasing mode width 38%, but did not affect higher energy plasmon or dark mode decay. This decay beyond expected radiative and non-radiative mechanisms was attributed to hot electron transfer, and had quantum efficiency of 20%, consistent with previous reports.

  5. Fabrication of Gold Nanoparticles for targeted therapy in pancreatic cancer**

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Bhattacharya, Resham; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Mukherjee, Priyabrata

    2009-01-01

    The targeted delivery of a drug should result in enhanced therapeutic efficacy with low to minimal side effects. This is a widely accepted concept, but limited in application due to lack of available technologies and process of validation. Biomedical nanotechnology can play an important role in this respect. Biomedical nanotechnology is a burgeoning field with myriads of opportunities and possibilities for advancing medical science and disease treatment. Cancer nanotechnology (1–100 nm size range) is expected to change the very foundations of cancer treatment, diagnosis and detection. Nanomaterials, especially gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have unique physicochemical properties, such as ultra small size, large surface area to mass ratio, and high surface reactivity, presence of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands, biocompatibility and ease of surface functionalization. In this review, we will discuss how the unique physico-chemical properties of gold nanoparticles may be utilized for targeted drug delivery in pancreatic cancer leading to increased efficacy of traditional chemotherapeutics. PMID:19914317

  6. The Formation and Binding of Gold Nanoparticles onto Wool Fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, James H.; Burridge, Kerstin A.; Kelly, Fern M.

    2009-07-23

    This paper presents the novel use of nanosize gold with different plasmon resonance colours, as stable colourfast colourants on wool fibres for use in high quality fabrics and textiles. The gold nanoparticles are synthesised by the controlled reduction of Au{sup 3+} in the AuCl{sub 4}{sup -} complex to Au{sup 0} onto the surface of the wool where they attach to the S in the cystine amino acids in wool keratin proteins. Scanning electronmicroscopy shows the nanoparticles are present on the cuticles of the fibre surface and are concentrated at the edges of these cuticles. EDS analysis shows a strong correlation of Au with S and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy suggests Au-S bond formation. Hence the nanogold colourants are chemically bound to the wool fibre surface and do not fade as traditional organic dyes do. A range of coloured fibres have been produced.

  7. Towards Effective Photothermal/Photodynamic Treatment Using Plasmonic Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bucharskaya, Alla; Maslyakova, Galina; Terentyuk, Georgy; Yakunin, Alexander; Avetisyan, Yuri; Bibikova, Olga; Tuchina, Elena; Khlebtsov, Boris; Khlebtsov, Nikolai; Tuchin, Valery

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of different size and shape are widely used as photosensitizers for cancer diagnostics and plasmonic photothermal (PPT)/photodynamic (PDT) therapy, as nanocarriers for drug delivery and laser-mediated pathogen killing, even the underlying mechanisms of treatment effects remain poorly understood. There is a need in analyzing and improving the ways to increase accumulation of AuNP in tumors and other crucial steps in interaction of AuNPs with laser light and tissues. In this review, we summarize our recent theoretical, experimental, and pre-clinical results on light activated interaction of AuNPs with tissues and cells. Specifically, we discuss a combined PPT/PDT treatment of tumors and killing of pathogen bacteria with gold-based nanocomposites and atomic clusters, cell optoporation, and theoretical simulations of nanoparticle-mediated laser heating of tissues and cells. PMID:27517913

  8. Plant-mediated biosynthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Amarendra Dhar; Gopal, Krishna

    2011-02-01

    Single-pot biosynthesis of silver and gold quasi-spherical nanoparticles (SNPs and GNPs) in the size range of 10-30 nm was attempted using Chenopodium album (an obnoxious weed). This method is rapid, facile, convenient and environmentally safe. Average crystal size was approximately 12 nm and 10 nm for silver and gold nanocrystals respectively. Synthesized NPs were stable in a wide range of pH as there was less variation in zeta potential values. In synthesis of SNPs and GNPs, naturally occurring oxalic acid played significant role in bio-reduction of silver nitrate and auric acid solution into their corresponding silver and gold nano-colloids in single step rapid process. PMID:21485852

  9. Vascular Targeting of a Gold Nanoparticle to Breast Cancer Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Peiris, Pubudu M; Deb, Partha; Doolittle, Elizabeth; Doron, Gilad; Goldberg, Amy; Govender, Priya; Shah, Shruti; Rao, Swetha; Carbone, Sarah; Cotey, Thomas; Sylvestre, Meilyn; Singh, Sohaj; Schiemann, William P; Lee, Zhenghong; Karathanasis, Efstathios

    2015-08-01

    The vast majority of breast cancer deaths are due to metastatic disease. Although deep tissue targeting of nanoparticles is suitable for some primary tumors, vascular targeting may be a more attractive strategy for micrometastasis. This study combined a vascular targeting strategy with the enhanced targeting capabilities of a nanoparticle to evaluate the ability of a gold nanoparticle (AuNP) to specifically target the early spread of metastatic disease. As a ligand for the vascular targeting strategy, we utilized a peptide targeting alpha(v) beta(3) integrin, which is functionally linked to the development of micrometastases at a distal site. By employing a straightforward radiolabeling method to incorporate Technetium-99m into the AuNPs, we used the high sensitivity of radionuclide imaging to monitor the longitudinal accumulation of the nanoparticles in metastatic sites. Animal and histological studies showed that vascular targeting of the nanoparticle facilitated highly accurate targeting of micrometastasis in the 4T1 mouse model of breast cancer metastasis using radionuclide imaging and a low dose of the nanoparticle. Because of the efficient targeting scheme, 14% of the injected AuNP deposited at metastatic sites in the lungs within 60 min after injection, indicating that the vascular bed of metastasis is a viable target site for nanoparticles. PMID:26036431

  10. Iron oxide and gold nanoparticles in cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotman, Irena; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S.; Gutmanas, Elazar Y.

    2016-08-01

    Continuous research activities in the field of nanomedicine in the past decade have, to a great extent, been focused on nanoparticle technologies for cancer therapy. Gold and iron oxide nanoparticles (NP) are two of the most studied inorganic nanomaterials due to their unique optical and magnetic properties. Both types of NPs are emerging as promising systems for anti-tumor drug delivery and for nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapy of cancer. In thermal therapy, localized heating inside tumors or in proximity of tumor cells can be induced, for example, with Au NPs by radiofrequency ablation heating or conversion of photon energy (photothermal therapy) and in iron oxide magnetic NPs by heat generation through relaxation in an alternating magnetic field (magnetic hyperthermia). Furthermore, the superparamagnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles have led to their use as potent MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) contrast agents. Surface modification/coating can produce NPs with tailored and desired properties, such as enhanced blood circulation time, stability, biocompatibility and water solubility. To target nanoparticles to specific tumor cells, NPs should be conjugated with targeting moieties on the surface which bind to receptors or other molecular structures on the cell surface. The article presents several approaches to enhancing the specificity of Au and iron oxide nanoparticles for tumor tissue by appropriate surface modification/functionalization, as well as the effect of these treatments on the saturation magnetization value of iron oxide NPs. The use of other nanoparticles and nanostructures in cancer treatment is also briefly reviewed.

  11. Antithrombotic functions of small molecule-capped gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yue; Zhao, Yuyun; Zheng, Wenfu; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Xingyu

    2014-07-01

    Here we report the antithrombotic functions of pyrimidinethiol-capped gold nanoparticles (Au_DAPT NPs). They can prolong coagulation parameters when injected intravenously in normal mice. Applied in two typical thrombosis models, mice tail thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism, gold NPs can inhibit both thrombosis and improve the survival rates of mice tremendously, without increasing the bleeding risk. The anticoagulant mechanisms include inhibiting the platelet aggregation as well as interfering with thrombin and fibrin generation.Here we report the antithrombotic functions of pyrimidinethiol-capped gold nanoparticles (Au_DAPT NPs). They can prolong coagulation parameters when injected intravenously in normal mice. Applied in two typical thrombosis models, mice tail thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism, gold NPs can inhibit both thrombosis and improve the survival rates of mice tremendously, without increasing the bleeding risk. The anticoagulant mechanisms include inhibiting the platelet aggregation as well as interfering with thrombin and fibrin generation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01937g

  12. Wavelength specific excitation of gold nanoparticle thin-films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Thomas M.; James, Kurtis T.; Beharic, Jasmin; Moiseeva, Evgeniya V.; Keynton, Robert S.; O'Toole, Martin G.; Harnett, Cindy K.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) continue to empower researchers with the ability to sense and actuate at the micro scale. Thermally driven MEMS components are often used for their rapid response and ability to apply relatively high forces. However, thermally driven MEMS often have high power consumption and require physical wiring to the device. This work demonstrates a basis for designing light-powered MEMS with a wavelength specific response. This is accomplished by patterning surface regions with a thin film containing gold nanoparticles that are tuned to have an absorption peak at a particular wavelength. The heating behavior of these patterned surfaces is selected by the wavelength of laser directed at the sample. This method also eliminates the need for wires to power a device. The results demonstrate that gold nanoparticle films are effective wavelength-selective absorbers. This "hybrid" of infrared absorbent gold nanoparticles and MEMS fabrication technology has potential applications in light-actuated switches and other mechanical structures that must bend at specific regions. Deposition methods and surface chemistry will be integrated with three-dimensional MEMS structures in the next phase of this work. The long-term goal of this project is a system of light-powered microactuators for exploring cellular responses to mechanical stimuli, increasing our fundamental understanding of tissue response to everyday mechanical stresses at the molecular level.

  13. Dual plasmonic gold nanoparticles for multispectral photoacoustic imaging application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, Vijay; Subhash, Hrebesh; Breathnach, Aedán.; Leahy, Martin; Dockery, Peter; Olivo, Malini

    2014-03-01

    Nanoparticle contrast agents for molecular targeted imaging have widespread interest in diagnostic applications with cellular resolution, specificity and selectivity for visualization and assessment of various disease processes. Of particular interest is gold nanoparticle owing to its tunability of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and its relative inertness. Here we present the synthesis of anisotropic multi-branched star shaped gold nanoparticles exhibiting dual-band plasmon absorption peaks and its application as a contrast agent for multispectral photoacoustic imaging. The transverse plasmon absorption peak of the synthesised dual plasmonic gold nanostar (DPGNS) was around 700 nm and that of longitudinal plasmon absorption in the longer wavelength region around 1050-1150 nm. Unlike most reported PA contrast agent with surface plasmon absorption in the range of 700 to 800 nm showing moderate tissue penetration, 1050-1200 nm range lies in the farther region of the optical window of biological tissue where scattering and the intrinsic optical extinction of endogenous chromophores is at its minimum. We also present a proof of principle demonstration of DPGNS as contrast agent for multispectral photoacoustic animal imaging. Our results show that DPGNS are promising for PA imaging with extended-depth imaging applications.

  14. Imaging and radiation effects of gold nanoparticles in tumour cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuaid, Harold N.; Muir, Mark F.; Taggart, Laura E.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Coulter, Jonathan A.; Hyland, Wendy B.; Jain, Suneil; Butterworth, Karl T.; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M.; Hirst, David G.; Botchway, Stanley W.; Currell, Fred J.

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle radiosensitization represents a novel technique in enhancement of ionising radiation dose and its effect on biological systems. Variation between theoretical predictions and experimental measurement is significant enough that the mechanism leading to an increase in cell killing and DNA damage is still not clear. We present the first experimental results that take into account both the measured biodistribution of gold nanoparticles at the cellular level and the range of the product electrons responsible for energy deposition. Combining synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays, intracellular gold particle imaging and DNA damage assays, has enabled a DNA damage model to be generated that includes the production of intermediate electrons. We can therefore show for the first time good agreement between the prediction of biological outcomes from both the Local Effect Model and a DNA damage model with experimentally observed cell killing and DNA damage induction via the combination of X-rays and GNPs. However, the requirement of two distinct models as indicated by this mechanistic study, one for short-term DNA damage and another for cell survival, indicates that, at least for nanoparticle enhancement, it is not safe to equate the lethal lesions invoked in the local effect model with DNA damage events.

  15. Imaging and radiation effects of gold nanoparticles in tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    McQuaid, Harold N.; Muir, Mark F.; Taggart, Laura E.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Coulter, Jonathan A.; Hyland, Wendy B.; Jain, Suneil; Butterworth, Karl T.; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M.; Hirst, David G.; Botchway, Stanley W.; Currell, Fred J.

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle radiosensitization represents a novel technique in enhancement of ionising radiation dose and its effect on biological systems. Variation between theoretical predictions and experimental measurement is significant enough that the mechanism leading to an increase in cell killing and DNA damage is still not clear. We present the first experimental results that take into account both the measured biodistribution of gold nanoparticles at the cellular level and the range of the product electrons responsible for energy deposition. Combining synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays, intracellular gold particle imaging and DNA damage assays, has enabled a DNA damage model to be generated that includes the production of intermediate electrons. We can therefore show for the first time good agreement between the prediction of biological outcomes from both the Local Effect Model and a DNA damage model with experimentally observed cell killing and DNA damage induction via the combination of X-rays and GNPs. However, the requirement of two distinct models as indicated by this mechanistic study, one for short-term DNA damage and another for cell survival, indicates that, at least for nanoparticle enhancement, it is not safe to equate the lethal lesions invoked in the local effect model with DNA damage events. PMID:26787230

  16. Multiplex Electrochemical Immunoassay Using Gold Nanoparticle Probes and Immunochromatographic Strips

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Xun; Baloda, Meenu; Gurung, Anant; Lin, Yuehe; Liu, Guodong

    2008-10-20

    We describe a multiplex electrochemical immunoassay based on the use of gold nanoparticle (Au-NP) probes and immunochromatographic strips (ISs). The approach takes advantage of the speed and low cost of the conventional IS tests and the high sensitivities of the nanoparticle-based electrochemical immunoassays. Rabbit IgG(R-IgG) and human IgM (H-IgM) were used as model targets for the demonstration of the proof of concept. The Au-NPs based sandwich immunoreactions were performed on the IS, and the captured gold nanoparticle labels on the test zones were determined by highly-sensitive stripping voltammetric measurement of the dissolved gold ions (III) with a carbon paste electrode. The detection limits are 1.0 and 1.5 ng/mL with the linear ranges of 2.5-250 ng/mL for quantitative detection of R-IgG and H-IgM, respectively. The total assay time is around 25 minutes. Such multiplex electrochemical immunoassay could be readily highly multiplexed to allow simultaneous parallel detection of numerous proteins and is expected to open new opportunities for protein diagnostics and biosecurity.

  17. Dependence of Gold Nanoparticle Radiosensitization on Functionalizing Layer Thickness.

    PubMed

    Spaas, Cedric; Dok, Rüveyda; Deschaume, Olivier; De Roo, Bert; Vervaele, Mattias; Seo, Jin Won; Bartic, Carmen; Hoet, Peter; Van den Heuvel, Frank; Nuyts, Sandra; Locquet, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles functionalized with polyethylene glycol of different chain lengths are used to determine the influence of the capping layer thickness on the radiosensitizing effect of the particles. The size variations in organic coating, built up with polyethylene glycol polymers of molecular weight 1-20 kDa, allow an evaluation of the decrease in dose enhancement percentages caused by the gold nanoparticles at different radial distances from their surface. With localized eradication of malignant cells as a primary focus, radiosensitization is most effective after internalization in the nucleus. For this reason, we performed controlled radiation experiments, with doses up to 20 Gy and particle diameters in a range of 5-30 nm, and studied the relaxation pattern of supercoiled DNA. Subsequent gel electrophoresis of the suspensions was performed to evaluate the molecular damage and consecutively quantify the gold nanoparticle sensitization. In conclusion, on average up to 58.4% of the radiosensitizing efficiency was lost when the radial dimensions of the functionalizing layer were increased from 4.1 to 15.3 nm. These results serve as an experimental supplement for biophysical simulations and demonstrate the influence of an important parameter in the development of nanomaterials for targeted therapies in cancer radiotherapy. PMID:26950059

  18. Preparation Of Gold Nanoparticle-Quercetin Complexes By Citrate Reduction Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Rajat; Chakraborti, Abhay Sankar

    2010-10-01

    Quercetin is an important flavonoid and possesses strong antioxidant property. The aim of the present study is to formulate and characterize quercetin coated gold nanoparticles. Quercetin was conjugated with gold nanoparticle during synthesis of the particle by citrate reduction of chloroauric acid. The conjugates were characterized by different techniques like Atomic Force Microscopy, Dynamic Light Scattering, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Absorption Spectroscopy, Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis. All these studies suggest formation of stable quercetin-gold nanoparticle complex.

  19. Toxicological risk assessment of elemental gold following oral exposure to sheets and nanoparticles - A review.

    PubMed

    Hadrup, Niels; Sharma, Anoop K; Poulsen, Morten; Nielsen, Elsa

    2015-07-01

    Elemental gold is used as a food coloring agent and in dental fillings. In addition, gold nanoparticles are gaining increasing attention due to their potential use as inert carriers for medical purposes. Although elemental gold is considered to be inert, there is evidence to suggest the release of gold ions from its surface. Elemental gold, or the released ions, is, to some extent, absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract. Gold is distributed to organs such as the liver, heart, kidneys and lungs. The main excretion route of absorbed gold is through urine. Data on the oral toxicity of elemental gold is limited. The acute toxicity of elemental gold seems to be low, as rats were unaffected by a single dose of 2000mg nanoparticles/kg of body weight. Information on repeated dose toxicity is very limited. Skin rashes have been reported in humans following the ingestion of liquors containing gold. In addition, gold released from dental restorations has been reported to increase the risk of developing gold hypersensitivity. Regarding genotoxicity, in vitro studies indicate that gold nanoparticles induce DNA damage in mammalian cells. In vivo, gold nanoparticles induce genotoxic effects in Drosophila melanogaster; however, genotoxicity studies in mammals are lacking. Overall, based on the literature and taking low human exposure into account, elemental gold via the oral route is not considered to pose a health concern to humans in general. PMID:25929617

  20. Targeted Placement of Gold Nanoparticles on SWCNT Transistors Using Electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yian; Barbara, Paola; Paranjape, Makarand

    2013-03-01

    We present a simple in-situ electrochemical method to target the deposition of gold and other metallic nanoparticles along a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) field effect transistor (CNTFET). The transistors, fabricated on SiO2/Si substrates, are passivated by a thin layer of poly(methyl-methacrylate), or PMMA. Areas of the PMMA along the carbon nanotube are exposed using electron-beam lithography to target the locations where Au nanoparticles need to be placed. An appropriate potential difference is applied between an in-situ sacrificial gold electrode and the SWCNT, all immersed under a droplet of electrolyte solution. By adjusting the applied voltage and time of deposition, the size of the Au nanoparticle can be controlled from 10 nm to over 100 nm. This method provides better control and is much easier to carry out compared to other site-specific deposition techniques. Such decorated Au nanoparticle/CNTFET heterostructures will allow for a better understanding of single-electron transport behavior, as well as finding application in site-specific biomolecule anchoring for the development of highly sensitive and selective biosensors.

  1. Oxidation of bioethanol using zeolite-encapsulated gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mielby, Jerrik; Abildstrøm, Jacob Oskar; Wang, Feng; Kasama, Takeshi; Weidenthaler, Claudia; Kegnaes, Søren

    2014-11-10

    With the ongoing developments in biomass conversion, the oxidation of bioethanol to acetaldehyde may become a favorable and green alternative to the preparation from ethylene. Here, a simple and effective method to encapsulate gold nanoparticles in zeolite silicalite-1 is reported and their high activity and selectivity for the catalytic gas-phase oxidation of ethanol are demonstrated. The zeolites are modified by a recrystallization process, which creates intraparticle voids and mesopores that facilitate the formation of small and disperse nanoparticles upon simple impregnation. The individual zeolite crystals comprise a broad range of mesopores and contain up to several hundred gold nanoparticles with a diameter of 2-3 nm that are distributed inside the zeolites rather than on the outer surface. The encapsulated nanoparticles have good stability and result in 50 % conversion of ethanol with 98 % selectivity toward acetaldehyde at 200 °C, which (under the given reaction conditions) corresponds to 606 mol acetaldehyde/mol Au hour(-1) . PMID:25196739

  2. Gold nanoparticle based surface enhanced fluorescence for detection of organophosphorus agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasary, Samuel S. R.; Rai, Uma S.; Yu, Hongtao; Anjaneyulu, Yerramilli; Dubey, Madan; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2008-07-01

    Organophosphorus agents (OPA) represent a serious concern to public safety as nerve agents and pesticides. Here we report the development of gold nanoparticle based surface enhanced fluorescence (NSEF) spectroscopy for rapid and sensitive screening of organophosphorus agents. Fluorescent from Eu 3+ ions that are bound within the electromagnetic field of gold nanoparticles exhibit a strong enhancement. In the presence of OPA, Eu 3+ ions are released from the gold nanoparticle surface and thus a very distinct fluorescence signal change was observed. We discussed the mechanism of fluorescence enhancement and the role of OPA for fluorescence intensity change in the presence of gold nanoparticles.

  3. High-Yield Synthesis and Applications of Anisotropic Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigderman, Leonid

    This work will describe research directed towards the synthesis of anisotropic gold nanoparticles as well as their functionalization and biological applications. The thesis will begin by describing a new technique for the high-yield synthesis of gold nanorods using hydroquinone as a reducing agent. This addresses important limitations of the traditional nanorod synthesis including low yield of gold ions conversion to metallic form and inability to produce rods with longitudinal surface plasmon peak above 850 nm. The use of hydroquinone was also found to improve the synthesis of gold nanowires via the nanorod-seed mediated procedure developed in our lab. The thesis will next present the synthesis of novel starfruitshaped nanorods, mesorods, and nanowires using a modified nanorod-seed mediated procedure. The starfruit particles displayed increased activity as surfaceenhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates as compared to smooth structures. Next, a method for the functionalization of gold nanorods using a cationic thiol, 16-mercaptohexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (MTAB), will be described. By using this thiol, we were able to demonstrate the complete removal of toxic surfactant from the nanorods and were also able to precisely quantify the grafting density of thiol molecules on the nanorod surface through a combination of several analytical techniques. Finally, this thesis will show that MTABfunctionalized nanorods are nontoxic and can be taken up in extremely high numbers into cancer cells. The thesis will conclude by describing the surprising uptake of larger mesorods and nanowires functionalized with MTAB into cells in high quantities.

  4. Gold Coated Lanthanide Phosphate Nanoparticles for Targeted Alpha Generator Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, Mark F; Woodward, Jonathan; Boll, Rose Ann; Wall, Jonathan; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Kennel, Steve J; Mirzadeh, Saed; Robertson, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Targeted radiotherapies maximize cytotoxicty to cancer cells. In vivo generators such as 225Ac, which emits four particles in its decay chain, can significantly amplify the radiation dose delivered to the target site. However, renal dose from unbound 213Bi escaping during the decay process limits the dose of 225Ac that can be administered. Traditional chelating moieties are unable to sequester the radioactive daughters because of the high recoil energy from alpha particle emission. To counter this, we demonstrate that an engineered multilayered nanoparticle-antibody conjugate can both deliver radiation and contain the decay daughters of the in vivo -generator 225Ac while targeting biologically relevant receptors. These multi-shell nanoparticles combine the radiation resistance of crystalline lanthanide phosphate to encapsulate and contain 225Ac and its radioactive decay daughters, the magnetic properties of gadolinium phosphate for easy separation, and established surface chemistry of gold for attachment of nanoparticles to targeting antibodies.

  5. Luminescence quantum yields of gold nanoparticles varying with excitation wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuqing; Lu, Guowei; He, Yingbo; Shen, Hongming; Zhao, Jingyi; Xia, Keyu; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-01-28

    Luminescence quantum yields (QYs) of gold nanoparticles including nanorods, nanobipyramids and nanospheres are measured elaborately at a single nanoparticle level with different excitation wavelengths. It is found that the QYs of the nanostructures are essentially dependent on the excitation wavelength. The QY is higher when the excitation wavelength is blue-detuned and close to the nanoparticles' surface plasmon resonance peak. A phenomenological model based on the plasmonic resonator concept is proposed to understand the experimental findings. The excitation wavelength dependent QY is attributed to the wavelength dependent coupling efficiency between the free electron oscillation and the intrinsic plasmon resonant radiative mode. These studies should contribute to the understanding of one-photon luminescence from metallic nanostructures and plasmonic surface enhanced spectroscopy. PMID:26731570

  6. Luminescence quantum yields of gold nanoparticles varying with excitation wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuqing; Lu, Guowei; He, Yingbo; Shen, Hongming; Zhao, Jingyi; Xia, Keyu; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-01-01

    Luminescence quantum yields (QYs) of gold nanoparticles including nanorods, nanobipyramids and nanospheres are measured elaborately at a single nanoparticle level with different excitation wavelengths. It is found that the QYs of the nanostructures are essentially dependent on the excitation wavelength. The QY is higher when the excitation wavelength is blue-detuned and close to the nanoparticles' surface plasmon resonance peak. A phenomenological model based on the plasmonic resonator concept is proposed to understand the experimental findings. The excitation wavelength dependent QY is attributed to the wavelength dependent coupling efficiency between the free electron oscillation and the intrinsic plasmon resonant radiative mode. These studies should contribute to the understanding of one-photon luminescence from metallic nanostructures and plasmonic surface enhanced spectroscopy.

  7. Poly(amino acid) functionalized maghemite and gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perego, Davide; Masciocchi, Norberto; Guagliardi, Antonietta; Domínguez-Vera, José Manuel; Gálvez, Natividad

    2013-02-01

    Bimodal MRI/OI imaging probes are of great interest in nanomedicine. Although many organic polymers have been studied thoroughly for in vivo applications, reports on the use of poly(amino acid)s as coating polymers are scarce. In this paper, poly-(d-glutamic acid, d-lysine) (PGL) has been used for coating maghemite and gold nanoparticles. An advantage of this flexible and biocompatible polymer is that, once anchored to the nanoparticle surface, dangling lysine amino groups are available for the incorporation of new functionalities. As an example, Alexa Fluor derivatives have been attached to PGL-coated maghemite nanoparticles to obtain magnetic/fluorescent materials. These dual-property materials could be used as bimodal MRI/OI probes for in vivo imaging.

  8. Investigating the toxicity, uptake, nanoparticle formation and genetic response of plants to gold.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Andrew F; Rylott, Elizabeth L; Anderson, Christopher W N; Bruce, Neil C

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the physiological and genetic responses of Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Arabidopsis) to gold. The root lengths of Arabidopsis seedlings grown on nutrient agar plates containing 100 mg/L gold were reduced by 75%. Oxidized gold was subsequently found in roots and shoots of these plants, but gold nanoparticles (reduced gold) were only observed in the root tissues. We used a microarray-based study to monitor the expression of candidate genes involved in metal uptake and transport in Arabidopsis upon gold exposure. There was up-regulation of genes involved in plant stress response such as glutathione transferases, cytochromes P450, glucosyl transferases and peroxidases. In parallel, our data show the significant down-regulation of a discreet number of genes encoding proteins involved in the transport of copper, cadmium, iron and nickel ions, along with aquaporins, which bind to gold. We used Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) to study nanoparticle uptake from hydroponic culture using ionic gold as a non-nanoparticle control and concluded that nanoparticles between 5 and 100 nm in diameter are not directly accumulated by plants. Gold nanoparticles were only observed in plants exposed to ionic gold in solution. Together, we believe our results imply that gold is taken up by the plant predominantly as an ionic form, and that plants respond to gold exposure by up-regulating genes for plant stress and down-regulating specific metal transporters to reduce gold uptake. PMID:24736522

  9. Investigating the Toxicity, Uptake, Nanoparticle Formation and Genetic Response of Plants to Gold

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Andrew F.; Rylott, Elizabeth L.; Anderson, Christopher W. N.; Bruce, Neil C.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the physiological and genetic responses of Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Arabidopsis) to gold. The root lengths of Arabidopsis seedlings grown on nutrient agar plates containing 100 mg/L gold were reduced by 75%. Oxidized gold was subsequently found in roots and shoots of these plants, but gold nanoparticles (reduced gold) were only observed in the root tissues. We used a microarray-based study to monitor the expression of candidate genes involved in metal uptake and transport in Arabidopsis upon gold exposure. There was up-regulation of genes involved in plant stress response such as glutathione transferases, cytochromes P450, glucosyl transferases and peroxidases. In parallel, our data show the significant down-regulation of a discreet number of genes encoding proteins involved in the transport of copper, cadmium, iron and nickel ions, along with aquaporins, which bind to gold. We used Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) to study nanoparticle uptake from hydroponic culture using ionic gold as a non-nanoparticle control and concluded that nanoparticles between 5 and 100 nm in diameter are not directly accumulated by plants. Gold nanoparticles were only observed in plants exposed to ionic gold in solution. Together, we believe our results imply that gold is taken up by the plant predominantly as an ionic form, and that plants respond to gold exposure by up-regulating genes for plant stress and down-regulating specific metal transporters to reduce gold uptake. PMID:24736522

  10. Cell type-dependent uptake, localization, and cytotoxicity of 1.9 nm gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Coulter, Jonathan A; Jain, Suneil; Butterworth, Karl T; Taggart, Laura E; Dickson, Glenn R; McMahon, Stephen J; Hyland, Wendy B; Muir, Mark F; Trainor, Coleman; Hounsell, Alan R; O’Sullivan, Joe M; Schettino, Giuseppe; Currell, Fred J; Hirst, David G; Prise, Kevin M

    2012-01-01

    Background This follow-up study aims to determine the physical parameters which govern the differential radiosensitization capacity of two tumor cell lines and one immortalized normal cell line to 1.9 nm gold nanoparticles. In addition to comparing the uptake potential, localization, and cytotoxicity of 1.9 nm gold nanoparticles, the current study also draws on comparisons between nanoparticle size and total nanoparticle uptake based on previously published data. Methods We quantified gold nanoparticle uptake using atomic emission spectroscopy and imaged intracellular localization by transmission electron microscopy. Cell growth delay and clonogenic assays were used to determine cytotoxicity and radiosensitization potential, respectively. Mechanistic data were obtained by Western blot, flow cytometry, and assays for reactive oxygen species. Results Gold nanoparticle uptake was preferentially observed in tumor cells, resulting in an increased expression of cleaved caspase proteins and an accumulation of cells in sub G1 phase. Despite this, gold nanoparticle cytotoxicity remained low, with immortalized normal cells exhibiting an LD50 concentration approximately 14 times higher than tumor cells. The surviving fraction for gold nanoparticle-treated cells at 3 Gy compared with that of untreated control cells indicated a strong dependence on cell type in respect to radiosensitization potential. Conclusion Gold nanoparticles were most avidly endocytosed and localized within cytoplasmic vesicles during the first 6 hours of exposure. The lack of significant cytotoxicity in the absence of radiation, and the generation of gold nanoparticle-induced reactive oxygen species provide a potential mechanism for previously reported radiosensitization at megavoltage energies. PMID:22701316