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Sample records for city centre apartments

  1. Seasonal cycle of indoor-VOCs: comparison of apartments and cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlink, U.; Rehwagen, M.; Damm, M.; Richter, M.; Borte, M.; Herbarth, O.

    On the basis of 2103 measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in indoor air we study the intensity of a seasonal pattern. The data are representative for the German population and were gathered in different cities (Leipzig, München, Köln), in rooms of different type (children's, living, sleeping rooms, and other rooms), and in households of smokers and non-smokers. In addition to the randomly selected different apartments that were sampled each month, we repeatedly measured in a fixed set of 10 apartments. The analysis comprised concentrations of 30 VOCs belonging to the groups of alkanes, cycloalkanes, aromatics, volatile halogenated hydrocarbons, and terpenes. The annual cycle for total VOC concentrations was observed at every site. Seasonality proved to be the most dominant pattern, but it may be modified by further factors, such as the city, the considered VOC component, and the type of the considered room. Highest concentrations occurred during the winter months and amount to approximately three to four times the summer burden. As seasonality may bias the results of health effect studies we fit a seasonal model to our measurements and develop a procedure for seasonal adjustment, which enables to roughly estimate the annual peak concentration utilizing one monthly observation. The seasonal pattern proved to be a general feature of indoor VOC concentrations and, therefore, this adjustment procedure may be generally applicable. For Leipzig, München, and Köln we present site-specific adjustment factors for indoor concentrations of aromatics, terpenes, and alkanes.

  2. Distribution and determinants of mouse allergen exposure in low-income New York City apartments.

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Ginger L; Perzanowski, Matthew S; Miller, Rachel L; Correa, Juan C; Hoepner, Lori A; Jusino, Carlos M; Becker, Mark G; Kinney, Patrick L

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies of mouse allergens and laboratory-animal-worker-related allergy and asthma suggest that quantifying mouse allergen levels in homes could augment our understanding of inner-city asthma. We hypothesized that levels of mouse allergen in inner-city homes would be related to certain household characteristics. Dust samples were collected from the kitchens and beds of 221 mothers enrolled in a prospective birth cohort study, 92 of African American and 129 of Dominican ethnicity. Samples were analyzed for mouse urinary protein. The geometric mean for kitchen samples was 4.6 micro g/g [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 3.2-6.5] and for bed samples was 0.9 micro g/g (95% CI, 0.8-1.1). The variables associated with mouse allergen levels in the home were frequency of mouse sightings, use of traps or pesticides for mice, presence of holes in ceilings or walls, absence of a cat, and living in a building with fewer than eight floors. Statistically significant neighborhood differences in levels of mouse allergen and report of rodents in the home were also observed. In conclusion, mouse allergen was prevalent among inner-city apartments, and the positive predictive value of self-reported frequent mouse sightings was high (90% for kitchens). However, high levels of mouse allergen were also found in many homes where mothers reported never seeing mice. PMID:12896857

  3. Living Together Apart: Residential Segregation in Mixed Arab-Jewish Cities in Israel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falah, Ghazi

    1996-01-01

    Examines features of residential segregation in five mixed Arab-Jewish cities in Israel and the role of ideology and state politics among the charter group (Jewish) as a dominant factor in this social process. Findings reveal all five cities exhibit high indices of segregation and hypersegregation--a situation of neighbors without neighborly…

  4. An inventory of trees in Dublin city centre.

    PubMed

    Ningal, Tine; Mills, Gerald; Smithwick, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    While urban areas are often considered to be comprised chiefly of artificial surfaces, they can contain a substantial portion of green space and a great diversity of natural habitats. These spaces include public parks, private gardens and street trees, all of which can provide valuable environmental services, such as improved air quality. Trees play a particular role in cities as they are often placed along roadsides and in the median strip of busy streets. As such they regulate access to sunshine, restrict airflow, provide shelter, scavenge air pollutants and manage noise at the street level. A tree planting policy can be an important part of a broader environmental strategy aimed at improving the quality of life in urban areas but this requires up-to-date knowledge of the current tree stock, which does not exist for Dublin. This article presents an inventory of trees in Dublin's city centre, defined as the area between the Grand and Royal canals. The results show that there are over 10,000 trees in the study area representing a density of 684 trees km-2 or one tree to approximately every 50 residents of the city centre. The tree canopy extent when in full foliage was nearly 1 km2 in extent or 6% of the study area. A more detailed analysis of those trees planted along streets shows little species variation but clear distinction in the sizes of trees, which is indicative of the age of planting. These data are used to estimate the carbon stored in Dublin's trees. PMID:21197800

  5. Airport and city-centre temperatures in the evaluation of the association between heat and mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de'Donato, F. K.; Stafoggia, M.; Rognoni, M.; Poncino, S.; Caranci, N.; Bisanti, L.; Demaria, M.; Forastiere, F.; Michelozzi, P.; Pelosini, R.; Perucci, C. A.

    2008-03-01

    A variety of ambient exposure indicators have been used to evaluate the impact of high temperature on mortality and in the identification of susceptible population sub-groups, but no study has evaluated how airport and city centre temperatures differ in their association with mortality during summer. This study considers the differences in temperatures measured at the airport and in the city centre of three Italian cities (Milan, Rome and Turin) and investigates the impact of these measures on daily mortality. The case-crossover design was applied to evaluate the association between daily mean apparent temperature (MAT) and daily total mortality. The analysis was conducted for the entire population and for subgroups defined by demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status and chronic comorbidity (based on hospitalisation during the preceding 2 years). The percentage risk of dying, with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI), on a day with MAT at the 95th percentile with respect to the 25th percentile of the June-September daily distribution was estimated. Airport and city-centre temperature distributions, which vary among cities and between stations, have a heterogeneous impact on mortality. Milan was the city with the greatest differences in mean MAT between airport and city stations, and the overall risk of dying was greater when airport MAT (+47% increase, 95%CI 38-57) was considered in comparison to city MAT (+37% increase, 95%CI 30-45). In Rome and Turin, the results were very similar for both apparent temperature measures. In all cities, the elderly, women and subjects with previous psychiatric conditions, depression, heart and circulation disorders and cerebrovascular disease were at higher risk of dying during hot days, and the degree of effect modification was similar using airport or city-centre MAT. Studies on the impact of meteorological variables on mortality, or other health indicators, need to account for the possible differences between airport and

  6. Investigating traffic light violations by cyclists in Dublin City Centre.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Matthew; Caulfield, Brian

    2015-11-01

    This research examines the behaviour of cyclists in Dublin City with specific regard to red light running. A number of specific research questions are raised by this study. These questions address the impact of different infrastructure types on red light running, as well as the behavioural patterns and demographics of offending cyclists. Two data collection methods were used to gather information on cyclists in Dublin City - an observational survey and an online questionnaire. The observational surveys examined cyclist compliance with different traffic signal systems and the impact of on-road and off-road cycle infrastructure. An online questionnaire was used to get direct feedback from cyclists in Dublin City on the reasons (if any) they decide to commit infringement at traffic lights. With the recent growth of cycling in Dublin City (as well as many other international cities) it is vital to accommodate and manage this growing demand by ensuring the safety and road discipline of cyclists. The next few years will be crucial for the continued development of cycling in Dublin, particularly due to the increasing investment by transport planners in cycle infrastructure. It is therefore important to identify now the main factors which influence cyclist's decisions to break red lights in order to guide local traffic authorities in their efforts to reduce such transgressions. PMID:26320736

  7. Tracing Discourses of Social Action: Inner-City Sydney Neighbourhood Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, John

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on my doctoral research around community organizations in the inner city of Sydney, Australia. The neighbourhood centres (NCs) provide a case study of sites where discourses of feminism, multiculturalism and urban environmentalism have been activated within a social justice framework. The research participants were activists…

  8. Warehoused Apartments/Warehoused People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coalition for the Homeless, New York, NY.

    Between 45,000 and 90,000 habitable New York City apartments are being kept deliberately vacant ("warehoused") by the speculators who own them. Most of these apartments have reasonable rents, affordable by middle- and low-income families. Meanwhile, the housing crisis for poor New Yorkers has grown steadily worse. As many as 75,000 people are…

  9. A structured methodology to calculate traffic emissions inventories for city centres.

    PubMed

    Ariztegui, Javier; Casanova, Jesus; Valdes, Manuel

    2004-12-01

    This study presents a methodology to estimate traffic emissions inventories for the case of city centres. It deals with the problem in a structured manner, identifying the sources and the formats of the input data as well as labelling the steps needed to perform the calculation. It describes a method to calculate the total mileage driven around the city using the concept of mileage per zone. Although the methodology employs a classical approach through the use of emission factors developed for mean speeds, it also discusses the possibility of applying these factors to instantaneous speeds. Finally, the study focuses on the influence of two critical factors: time resolution and the estimate of the total mileage. In both cases, the results indicate that the assumptions made are adequate and yield accurate results. The methodology has been applied to the city of Madrid as an example. PMID:15504496

  10. Radioactivity concentrations in soil and dose assessment for Samsun city centre, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Tufan, Mustafa Çağatay; Bostancı, Selma

    2012-09-01

    In this study, natural gamma radioactivity levels were determined in the soil samples of the Samsun city centre by using the gamma ray spectrometry method. The analysis carried out with the high-purity germanium gamma spectrometry system has shown that average activity concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs were 19±2, 22±4, 521±23 and 15±1 Bq kg(-1), respectively. From the gamma analysis of soil samples, the average value of the absorbed gamma dose rates in air and the average value of the external annual effective dose rates were calculated as 45±4 nGy h(-1) and 55±5 µSv y(-1), respectively. The external hazard index has also been calculated and it has been found that the radiation hazard in Samsun is insignificant. PMID:22456989

  11. APART 2: A generalized MATHEMATICA Apart function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The MATHEMATICA function Apart has been generalized to any dimension in APART package [1], we upgrade this package to the 2nd version, in which the core part has been completely rewritten. The new version is more efficient than the 1st version of APART, and the output is now more compact and more suitable for the input for the FIRE [2] or FIESTA [3].

  12. Using Art Installations as Action Research to Engage Children and Communities in Evaluating and Redesigning City Centre Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Percy-Smith, Barry; Carney, Clare

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses learning from a project that set out to explore how the general public perceived the value of public art in the context of urban regeneration of a city centre space. Whilst not set up explicitly as an action research project, the paper discusses the way in which participatory public art projects of this kind can be understood…

  13. Assessment of flood hazard in a combined sewer system in Reykjavik city centre.

    PubMed

    Hlodversdottir, Asta Osk; Bjornsson, Brynjolfur; Andradottir, Hrund Olof; Eliasson, Jonas; Crochet, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Short-duration precipitation bursts can cause substantial property damage and pose operational risks for wastewater managers. The objective of this study was to assess the present and possible future flood hazard in the combined sewer system in Reykjavik city centre. The catchment is characterised by two hills separated by a plain. A large portion of the pipes in the aging network are smaller than the current minimum diameter of 250 mm. Runoff and sewer flows were modelled using the MIKE URBAN software package incorporating both historical precipitation and synthetic storms derived from annual maximum rainfall data. Results suggest that 3% of public network manholes were vulnerable to flooding during an 11-year long rainfall sequence. A Chicago Design Storm (CDS) incorporating a 10-minute rainfall burst with a 5-year return period predicted twice as many flooded manholes at similar locations. A 20% increase in CDS intensity increased the number of flooded manholes and surface flood volume by 70% and 80%, respectively. The flood volume tripled if rainfall increase were combined with urban re-development, leading to a 20% increase in the runoff coefficient. Results highlight the need for reducing network vulnerabilities, which include decreased pipe diameters and low or drastically varying pipe grades. PMID:26442488

  14. Involvement of citizens in hazardous waste management and use of recycling centres in the city of Madrid (Spain).

    PubMed

    Díaz, María José; Martínez, Elvira; Piñeiro, Concepción; Palavecinos, Mireya; Benayas, Javier; Toribio, M Angeles

    2012-07-01

    In Spain, hazardous household waste management by citizens occurs via fixed recycling centres (FRC) and mobile recycling centres (MRC) which usually depend on local governments. This paper addresses a request by the Madrid City Council, in an attempt to improve the service it provides to the city of Madrid. The aim of the study involved analysing the information people possess in relation to hazardous waste and to the use of available equipment, and conducting a post-evaluation of the effectiveness of an environmental communication campaign conducted by the Madrid City Council and aimed at providing awareness of the existence of new FRCs and MRCs. To this end, a questionnaire was conducted with 5644 inhabitants of the city of Madrid. Qualitative data was categorized using content analysis followed by chi-squared tests, considering some socio-demographic characteristics of the sample, such as age or place of residence (district). Communication campaigns influenced citizen awareness of what constituted hazardous waste, of how to properly separate waste and of the existence of FRCs and MRCs. However, few citizens actually used FRCs or MRC (18% across four districts), a fact that might be related to a lack of knowledge of downstream waste treatment issues, or to self-limiting hindrances to householders, such as distance to recycling centres. It is recommended that future communication campaigns investigate householder needs and pre-conceptions in relation to recycling, as well as tailored education aimed at addressing the barriers, perceived or otherwise, facing citizens. PMID:22452955

  15. Deterioration of the volcanic kerb and pavement stones in a humid environment in the city centre of Izmir, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, A. B.

    2006-11-01

    İzmir is the third largest city in Turkey and has being the centre of art, culture, tourism and trade activities throughout the 5,000 years of its history. Natural stones brought from different parts of the world have been widely used for construction of the prestigious buildings, monuments and roads etc., in the past in the city. Renovation of the street pavements and public gathering areas in the city centre has been undertaken by the Metropolitan Municipality in 2000 and continued through the year of 2001. These renovation activities have mainly been carried out in the streets running parallel to the sea shore. Volcanic rocks brought from the Central Anatolia Ankara-Gölbaşı (andesites) and Kayseri-İncesu (tuffs) have been used in the renovation works. These rocks have shown extensive deteriorations within 4 years of their usage between 2001 and 2005 under the influence of different environmental factors. In this study, the deteriorations developed in the recently placed volcanic rocks used as kerb and pavement stones in the city centre of İzmir in the light of their mineralogical, chemical, physical and mechanical properties, used locations and the environmental factors are presented.

  16. Selected characteristics of the atmospheric turbulence over a central European city centre - spectral statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortuniak, K.

    2010-09-01

    Knowledge of the structure of turbulence is essential for many practical applications including atmospheric dispersion. In accordance of Monin-Obukhov (M-O) similarity theory, over homogenous surface both spectra and normalized velocity standard deviations, should depend on stability parameter, z/L, where L is Obukhov length and z sensor height. In the urban atmosphere applicability of M-O is still questionable because shrinking of inertial sublayer where this theory is supposed to work. The objective of this study is to investigate spectral turbulence statistics at two urban measurement points located in Łódź, central Poland (population ca 750,000). Turbulent fluxes were measured with the aid of fast respond sensors (sonic anemometers and gas analyzers) at two points in the city centre. At the firs point data were collected in years 2000-2003 and at the second point measurements are continued since 2005. At both stations sensors were mounted at thin masts at the level (37m and 42m above ground) significantly exciding mean building height (11m and 17m respectively). Calculated spectral characteristics include spectra and cospectra in different stability classes focused on verification of the Monin-Obukhov relationships. Results show that power spectra of wind components for close to neutral conditions fit to reference spectrum based on Kansas experiment. For a non-neutral stability wind spectral peaks show a shift to lower frequencies as instability increases. Results for a temperature spectra and cospectra do not lead to clear conclusion on spectral function shape and applicability of M-O theory.

  17. Indoor and outdoor characterisation of organic and inorganic compounds in city centre and suburban elementary schools of Aveiro, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegas, P. N.; Nunes, T.; Alves, C. A.; Silva, J. R.; Vieira, S. L. A.; Caseiro, A.; Pio, C. A.

    2012-08-01

    Pollutants inside school buildings may affect children's health and influence learning performance and attendance. This study investigated pollutant concentrations inside and outside school buildings at different locations (city centre and suburban) in Aveiro, Portugal, between April and June 2010. The aim was to evaluate simultaneously comfort parameters (temperature, relative humidity, CO2 and CO) and indoor and outdoor concentrations of VOCs, NO2, PM10 and bioaerosols. PM10 samples were analysed and characterised, for the first time, for the water soluble inorganic ions (WSII), organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), carbonates, and detailed organic speciation. The CO2 and bioaerosol levels were higher than the acceptable maximum values to the occupants' comfort. Concentrations of the traffic tracer NO2 were higher outdoors. The daily indoor PM10 levels were always higher than those outdoors, except on weekends, suggesting that the physical activity of pupils and class works highly contributed to the emission and resuspension of particles. Almost all identified VOCs showed I/O ratios higher than one, which denotes an important contribution from indoor sources at both schools. The suburban school was more exposed to industrial emissions than the institution located in the city centre. Especially at the city centre, infiltration of outdoor particulates leads to contamination of school indoor environment with vehicle emissions and biomass burning smoke likely coming from biofuel use in nearby restaurants and bakeries.

  18. $Apart: A generalized MATHEMATICA Apart function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Feng

    2012-10-01

    We have generalized the MATHEMATICA function Apart from 1 to N dimensions: the generalized function Apart can decompose any linear dependent elements in Vx∗ to irreducible ones. The elements in Vx∗ can be viewed as the corresponding propagators which involve loop momenta, and the decomposition will be useful when one tries to perform loop calculations using packages such as FIRE and REDUZE, which have implemented the integration by parts (IBP) identities and Lorentz invariance (LI) identities. A description on how to use this package, combined with FIRE, FEYNARTS, and FEYNCALC packages, to do one-loop calculations in double quarkonium production in e+e- colliders is given, and the full source code for a specific process (e+e-→J/ψ+ηc) is also available. Program summary Program title: Apart Catalogue identifier: AEMK_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMK_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 451006 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4598053 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica. Computer: Any computer where Mathematica is running. Operating system: Any capable of running Mathematica. Classification: 11.1. External routines: FeynCalc, FeynArts, Fire (all included in the distribution file). Nature of problem: The traditional method of computing cross sections for a physical process in perturbative quantum field theory involves generating the amplitudes via Feynman diagrams and performing the dimensionally regularized loop integrals [1]. Simplifications of the expressions are performed at the analytical level; there, an essential part is the reduction of these loop integrals to a small number of standard integrals. This step can be performed at the amplitude level for tensor

  19. Hybrid modelling for ATES planning and operation in the Utrecht city centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaxa-Rozen, Marc; Bloemendal, Martin; Kwakkel, Jan; Rostampour, Vahab

    2016-04-01

    Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) systems can significantly reduce the energy use and greenhouse gas emissions of buildings in temperate climates. However, the rapid adoption of these systems has evidenced a number of emergent issues with the operation and management of urban ATES systems, which require careful spatial planning to avoid thermal interferences or conflicts with other subsurface functions. These issues have become particularly relevant in the Netherlands, which are currently the leading market for ATES (Bloemendal et al., 2015). In some urban areas of the country, the adoption of ATES technology is thus becoming limited by the available subsurface space. This scarcity is partly caused by current approaches to ATES planning; as such, static permits tend to overestimate pumping rates and yield excessive safety margins, which in turn hamper the energy savings which could be realized by new systems. These aspects are strongly influenced by time-dependent dynamics for the adoption of ATES systems by building owners and operators, and by the variation of ATES well flows under uncertain conditions for building energy demand. In order to take these dynamics into account, previous research (Jaxa-Rozen et al., 2015) introduced a hybrid simulation architecture combining an agent-based model of ATES adoption, a Matlab control design, and a MODFLOW/SEAWAT aquifer model. This architecture was first used to study an idealized case of urban ATES development. This case evidenced a trade-off between the thermal efficiency of individual systems and the collective energy savings realized by ATES systems within a given area, which had already been suggested by other research (e.g. Sommer et al., 2015). These results also indicated that current layout guidelines may be overly conservative, and limit the adoption of new systems. The present study extends this approach to a case study of ATES planning in the city centre of Utrecht, in the Netherlands. This case is

  20. Hybrid modelling for ATES planning and operation in the Utrecht city centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaxa-Rozen, Marc; Bloemendal, Martin; Kwakkel, Jan; Rostampour, Vahab

    2016-04-01

    Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) systems can significantly reduce the energy use and greenhouse gas emissions of buildings in temperate climates. However, the rapid adoption of these systems has evidenced a number of emergent issues with the operation and management of urban ATES systems, which require careful spatial planning to avoid thermal interferences or conflicts with other subsurface functions. These issues have become particularly relevant in the Netherlands, which are currently the leading market for ATES (Bloemendal et al., 2015). In some urban areas of the country, the adoption of ATES technology is thus becoming limited by the available subsurface space. This scarcity is partly caused by current approaches to ATES planning; as such, static permits tend to overestimate pumping rates and yield excessive safety margins, which in turn hamper the energy savings which could be realized by new systems. These aspects are strongly influenced by time-dependent dynamics for the adoption of ATES systems by building owners and operators, and by the variation of ATES well flows under uncertain conditions for building energy demand. In order to take these dynamics into account, previous research (Jaxa-Rozen et al., 2015) introduced a hybrid simulation architecture combining an agent-based model of ATES adoption, a Matlab control design, and a MODFLOW/SEAWAT aquifer model. This architecture was first used to study an idealized case of urban ATES development. This case evidenced a trade-off between the thermal efficiency of individual systems and the collective energy savings realized by ATES systems within a given area, which had already been suggested by other research (e.g. Sommer et al., 2015). These results also indicated that current layout guidelines may be overly conservative, and limit the adoption of new systems. The present study extends this approach to a case study of ATES planning in the city centre of Utrecht, in the Netherlands. This case is

  1. Applying the OSPM model to the calculation of PM 10 concentration levels in the historical centre of the city of Thessaloniki

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assael, M. J.; Delaki, M.; Kakosimos, K. E.

    In this paper, the OSPM model is employed for the calculation of the PM 10 concentration levels in the historical centre of the city of Thessaloniki (Greece). Although measurements of the background concentration are available at a suburban station, and a few measurements of PM 10 concentrations do exist at particular areas inside the historical city centre, further assumptions had to be made (e.g., for the traffic load) in order to implement OSPM. To validate this approach, NO x and NO 2 measurements were employed in addition to data for PM 10. The good agreement observed allowed the prediction of PM 10 concentrations in all streets in the historical city centre. The very high PM 10 concentration levels obtained in almost all streets are indicative of the city's situation today. Finally, developments in vehicle's technology are invoked to model possible future scenarios.

  2. Accessory apartment conversion programs.

    PubMed

    Retsinas, J; Retsinas, N P

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, state housing finance agencies have joined with state units on aging to develop programs to help the frail, elderly homeowner. Under an accessory apartment conversion program, a low-income homeowner will borrow money at a reduced interest rate to underwrite conversion of excess space into a rental apartment. The tenant will provide additional income as well as, ideally, certain kinds of personal assistance and a friendly presence. To date, few elderly clients have used this option. The initial rationale for the program is explained as are plausible reasons for the fact that it has not met expectations. PMID:10186784

  3. Collaboration-Centred Cities through Urban Apps Based on Open and User-Generated Data.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Unai; López-de-Ipiña, Diego; Pérez, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the IES Cities platform conceived to streamline the development of urban apps that combine heterogeneous datasets provided by diverse entities, namely, government, citizens, sensor infrastructure and other information data sources. This work pursues the challenge of achieving effective citizen collaboration by empowering them to prosume urban data across time. Particularly, this paper focuses on the query mapper; a key component of the IES Cities platform devised to democratize the development of open data-based mobile urban apps. This component allows developers not only to use available data, but also to contribute to existing datasets with the execution of SQL sentences. In addition, the component allows developers to create ad hoc storages for their applications, publishable as new datasets accessible by other consumers. As multiple users could be contributing and using a dataset, our solution also provides a data level permission mechanism to control how the platform manages the access to its datasets. We have evaluated the advantages brought forward by IES Cities from the developers' perspective by describing an exemplary urban app created on top of it. In addition, we include an evaluation of the main functionalities of the query mapper. PMID:27376300

  4. Collaboration-Centred Cities through Urban Apps Based on Open and User-Generated Data

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Unai; López-de-Ipiña, Diego; Pérez, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the IES Cities platform conceived to streamline the development of urban apps that combine heterogeneous datasets provided by diverse entities, namely, government, citizens, sensor infrastructure and other information data sources. This work pursues the challenge of achieving effective citizen collaboration by empowering them to prosume urban data across time. Particularly, this paper focuses on the query mapper; a key component of the IES Cities platform devised to democratize the development of open data-based mobile urban apps. This component allows developers not only to use available data, but also to contribute to existing datasets with the execution of SQL sentences. In addition, the component allows developers to create ad hoc storages for their applications, publishable as new datasets accessible by other consumers. As multiple users could be contributing and using a dataset, our solution also provides a data level permission mechanism to control how the platform manages the access to its datasets. We have evaluated the advantages brought forward by IES Cities from the developers’ perspective by describing an exemplary urban app created on top of it. In addition, we include an evaluation of the main functionalities of the query mapper. PMID:27376300

  5. Air borne heavy metal pollution of Cedrus libani (A. Rich.) in the city centre of Konya (Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onder, Serpil; Dursun, Sukru

    The contents of heavy metal accumulated by air pollution in the cedar tree needles from the green area of Konya city centre were measured by chemical analyses. The needle samples were collected from two types of trees (about 10-15 and 20-25-years-old trees) from eight different pollution regions for two different sampling periods. Results of sulphur dioxide and particle matter analyses were used for measurement of air pollution effect on accumulation of heavy metals in the vegetation. Contents of heavy metals (Pb, Cu, Zn, Co, Cr, Cd and V) were determined for sampling periods, tree ages and sampling places. Results of the present study showed that accumulations of heavy metals in the old trees were generally higher than those of young trees. Similarly, heavy metal contents of needles collected in spring 2004 were higher than those of needles collected in autumn 2003. Accumulation of heavy metals via sulphur dioxide pollution and particle matter originated from usage of low quality fossil fuels, which might affect the living organisms in the city centre. On the other hand, Pb levels in the samples from Karatay Industry Park (3.53 ppm in 2004) showed that people are health living around the industry, and heavy traffic area is under risk. According to the other sampling areas, the chromium levels were also very high around the Chrome-Magnesite Factory Garden (87.15 ppm in 2004); it could be a toxic risk for people working around the factory. The heavy metal levels obtained from the other samples were not as high a risk level for the living organisms in the sampling areas.

  6. Monitoring of Heavy Metals Content in Soil Collected from City Centre and Industrial Areas of Misurata, Libya

    PubMed Central

    Elbagermi, M. A.; Edwards, H. G. M.; Alajtal, A. I.

    2013-01-01

    The present paper deals with the assessment of heavy metals in soil and roadside dust around Misurata City Centre and industrial areas/roads in the period of October 2011–May 2012. The levels of Pb, Fe, Zn, Ni, Cd, Cr, and Cu in settled dust samples collected near small streets, playgrounds, gas stations and main streets in the Misurata Area have been determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Also, the levels of same heavy metals in industrial areas have been determined. Metal concentration trend variation was also discussed in relation with traffic density and other sources of fugitive emission around different sites on each road/area. The overall mean concentration for main streets was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than for other small streets, where Misurata has been the centre of fierce fighting and is located in a frontline battle zone in the Libyan war; therefore most of metal concentrations in surface soil in the fighting area Tripoli Street and Benghazi Street were higher than those from the other sites (outside fighting area). PMID:23762061

  7. Effects of Urban Morphology on Intra-Urban Temperature Differences: Two Squares in Glasgow City Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drach, P. R. C.; Emmanuel, R.

    2014-12-01

    The perspective of climate change increases the necessity of tackling the urban over heating effects, by developing strategies to mitigate/adapt to changes. Analysing the influence of urban form on intra-urban temperature dynamics could be a helpful way of reducing its negative consequences. Also, it would help untangle the urban effect from the effect caused by atmospheric conditions. The present paper presents the effect of atmospheric conditions as exemplified by atmospheric stability (modified Pasquill-Gifford-Turner classification system) and urban morphology as measured by the Sky View Factor (SVF) on intra-urban variations in air temperature in a cold climate city, in and around the mature urban area of Glasgow, UK (55° 51' 57.294"N, 4° 15' 0.2628"W). The aim is to highlight their combined importance and to make preliminary investigations on the local warming effect of urban morphology under specific atmospheric stability classes. The present work indicates that the maximum intra-urban temperature differences (i.e. temperature difference between the coolest and the warmest spots in a given urban region) is strongly correlated with atmospheric stability. The spatial patterns in local temperature variations consistently show that water bodies and urban parks have lower temperature variations. Thus, greenery and urban materials could play an important role in influencing the local climate in cold cities. The knowledge of urban morphology's influence on local temperature variations could be an important tool for devising appropriate planning/design strategies to face urban overheating in the coming years as the background climate continues to warm.

  8. Comparison of Environmental Attitudes and Experiences of Five-Year-Old Children Receiving Preschool Education in the Village and City Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durkan, Nazmi; Güngör, Hande; Fetihi, Leyla; Erol, Ahmet; Gülay Ogelman, Hülya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to compare environmental attitudes and experiences of five-year-old children receiving preschool education in the village and city centre. The first group comprised 54 five-year-old children who received preschool education and attended kindergartens of two primary schools in the Karateke and Kocabas villages of Honaz…

  9. Prescription patterns of antihypertensives in a community health centre in Mexico City: a drug utilization study.

    PubMed

    Alba-Leonel, Adela; Carvajal, Alfonso; Fierro, Immaculada; Castillo-Nájera, Fernando; Campos-Ramos, Oscar; Villa-Romero, Antonio; Molina-Guarneros, Juan

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension is highly prevalent; in Mexico, the 2012 National Health and Nutrition Survey reported a prevalence of hypertension of 31.5% in the adult population. Pharmacological treatment is the commonest intervention and has been shown to reduce cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, and total mortality. Accordingly, the type and number of antihypertensives used and the outcome - in terms of blood pressure (BP) control - are important. Therefore, our purpose is to learn the pattern of antihypertensive drug prescription and explore the determinants of BP control in an urban population in Mexico. A retrospective cross-sectional drug utilization study was conducted. Medical records from a community health centre were searched to identify those corresponding to patients diagnosed with hypertension; information upon antihypertensives used and control of the disease was carefully retrieved. A logistic regression model was built to know the main determinants of BP control. A sample of 345 clinical records of interest was identified. Most patients received antihypertensives (86.4%); the leading medications used were angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, 63.8%; beta-blockers (26.5%), diuretics (19.8%), angiotensin-receptor blockers (15.8%) and calcium-channel blockers (6.4%). Only the age (≥55 years) and BMI (>30) of the patients, and the age of the doctors (≥55 years), had an important influence on BP control. Obesity is a particular and important determinant of uncontrolled hypertension; it is worth to act on body weight, on an individual basis. As lack of control has been also tied to elderly doctors, an education programme could be envisaged. PMID:26787266

  10. Initial integration of chiropractic services into a provincially funded inner city community health centre: a program description

    PubMed Central

    Passmore, Steven R.; Toth, Audrey; Kanovsky, Joel; Olin, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Background: The burden of fees for chiropractic services rendered often falls on the patient and must be provided out-of-pocket regardless of their socioeconomic status and clinical need. Universal healthcare coverage reduces the financial barrier to healthcare utilization, thereby increasing the opportunity for the financially disadvantaged to have access to care. In 2011 the Canadian Province of Manitoba initiated a pilot program providing access to chiropractic care within the Mount Carmel Clinic (MCC), a non-secular, non-profit, inner city community health centre. Objective: To describe the initial integration of chiropractic services into a publically funded healthcare facility including patient demographics, referral patterns, treatment practices and clinical outcomes. Method: A retrospective database review of chiropractic consultations in 2011 (N=177) was performed. Results: The typical patient referred for chiropractic care was a non-working (86%), 47.3(SD=16.8) year old, who self-identified as Caucasian (52.2%), or Aboriginal (35.8%) and female (68.3%) with a body mass index considered obese at 30.4(SD=7.0). New patient consultations were primarily referrals from other health providers internal to the MCC (71.2%), frequently primary care physicians (76%). Baseline to discharge comparisons of numeric rating scale scores for the cervical, thoracic, lumbar, sacroiliac and extremity regions all exceeded the minimally clinically important difference for reduction in musculoskeletal pain. Improvements occurred over an average of 12.7 (SD=14.3) treatments, and pain reductions were also statistically significant at p<0.05. Conclusion: Chiropractic services are being utilized by patients, and referring providers. Clinical outcomes indicate that services rendered decrease musculoskeletal pain in an inner city population. PMID:26816049

  11. College and University Apartment Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey-Powell, Deborah, Ed.

    The purpose of this book is to update housing professionals on the current issues and future trends facing college and university apartment operations in the 21st century. Its chapters are: (1) "The History of Apartment Housing" (Rena Buchan); (2) "Research in Apartment Housing" (Donald Whalen); (3) "Community Services and Programming: A Search…

  12. Leases and Landlords: Apartment Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thypin, Marilyn; Glasner, Lynne

    A short fictional work for limited English speakers presents the problems of a young couple having a leaky pipe fixed in their apartment and the experiences of their sister-in-law in finding a suitable apartment for herself. The maintenace man in the couple's apartment delays fixing their leaky pipe for a week, at which time they write a letter to…

  13. The effects of booking body mass index on obstetric and neonatal outcomes in an inner city UK tertiary referral centre

    PubMed Central

    Chereshneva, Maria; Hinkson, Larry; Oteng-Ntim, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of booking body mass index (BMI) on obstetric and neonatal outcomes in an inner city UK tertiary referral maternity centre. The Guy's and St Thomas' Maternity and Gynaecology (Terranova Healthware) Database was studied. All women that delivered at St Thomas' during 2005 with normal and high BMI were included in the study. Subjects were divided into three groups: BMI 19–24.9 (normal); 25–29.9 (overweight) and 30 or greater (obese). Groups were compared using Stata Statistical software. The study included 3642 patients: 2169 normal, 945 overweight and 528 obese. Both overweight and obese groups had a statistically significant association with gestational diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 5.7 and 11.6), hypertension in pregnancy (including preeclampsia [ORs 1.5 and 2.4], preterm rupture of membranes (ORs 3.7 and 5.0) and preterm delivery (ORs 1.4 and 1.6). The rate for caesarean delivery was increased in both overweight and obese women (ORs 1.4 and 1.7). Obesity is an independent risk factor for adverse obstetric outcomes and is significantly associated with caesarean section delivery.

  14. Clinicopathological characterization of primary oral and sinonasal melanoma in a referral centre in Mexico City: 2000-2012.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Mendoza, J; Ramírez-Amador, V; Anaya-Saavedra, G; Irigoyen-Camacho, M E; Ruíz-Godoy, L; Ruíz-García, E; Meneses-García, A

    2015-04-01

    In Mexico, there have been few studies on primary oral and sinonasal melanoma, an aggressive neoplasm with a low survival rate and few therapeutic alternatives. Further, there is limited information about its clinical and histopathological characteristics. The aim of this retrospective study was to describe the clinicopathological profile of these tumours in patients attending a major oncology reference centre in Mexico City over a 12-year period. Demographic and clinical data were obtained from the clinical charts, and histopathological features were evaluated. χ(2), Fisher's exact, and Mann-Whitney U-tests were used for analysis; significance was set at P<0.05. Thirty-three cases were studied (73% sinonasal melanoma (SNM) and 27% oral melanoma (OM)); 58% were female and the median age was 66 (Q1-Q3 55.5-75) years. Compared with OM patients, SNM patients had a shorter time to diagnosis (16.7 vs. 11.7 months, P=0.022), were identified at earlier stages (33.3% vs. 58.3%, P=0.010), and all presented symptoms (66.7% vs. 100%, P=0.015). All samples showed vertical growth and 96.9% exhibited pleomorphism. A higher proportion of cases with pleomorphism developed metastases at follow-up than those without (60% vs. 12.5%, P=0.026). The present study provides valuable information that could form the basis of future studies in the search for advanced therapy modalities. PMID:25467736

  15. Eddy covariance measurements of the net turbulent methane flux in the city centre - results of 2-year campaign in Łódź, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, Włodzimierz; Fortuniak, Krzysztof

    2016-07-01

    To investigate temporal variability of methane (CH4) fluxes in an urban environment, air-surface exchange fluxes of CH4 were continuously measured using eddy covariance techniques at a city-centre site in Łódź, Poland, from July 2013 to August 2015. In the immediate vicinity of the measurement site, potential methane sources include vehicle traffic, dense sewerage infrastructure and natural gas networks. Sensible and latent heat fluxes have also been measured since 2000 and carbon dioxide fluxes since 2007 at this site. Upward CH4 fluxes dominated during the measurement period, indicating that the city centre is a net source of CH4 to the troposphere. The highest monthly fluxes were observed in winter (2.0 to 2.7 g m-2 month-1) and the lowest in summer (0.8 to 1.0 g m-2 month-1). Fluxes on working days were around 6 % higher than on weekends. The cumulative flux indicates that the city centre emitted a net quantity of nearly 18 g m-2 of CH4 in 2014. Stable values of the FCO2/ FCH4 ratio in months (minimum 2.41 × 10-3, maximum 5.3 × 10-3) and the lack of a clear annual course suggest comparable magnitude of both fluxes.

  16. Provision of Vocational Skills Education to Orphans: Lessons from Orphanage Centres in Dar es Salaam City, Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meli, Benjamin Mbeba

    2015-01-01

    This paper utilises data from a study that investigated the efficacy of vocational skills training provided to orphans from three orphanages in Temeke District, Dar es Salaam. The three orphanage centres that were studied are Kurasini National Children Home, Saudia and Don Bosco Vocational Centre. The sample comprised of 45 orphans, an official…

  17. Teaching Ethics with Apartment Leases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pomerenke, Paula J.

    1998-01-01

    Describes an assignment in a corporate-communications class in which students examine the design and the language of their apartment leases. Discusses how this assignment teaches students about the Plain English laws and the need for plain English in leases and in ethics. (SR)

  18. Sexual Orientation and Risk Factors for Suicidal Ideation and Suicide Attempts: a Multi-centre Cross-Sectional Study in Three Asian Cities

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Qiguo; Zuo, Xiayun; Lou, Chaohua; Gao, Ersheng; Cheng, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Despite robust empirical and theoretical evidence for higher rates of suicide among lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youths, little is known about the relationship between suicide and sexual orientation among Asian youths. This study examined differences in prevalence of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts between LGB and heterosexual youths in the cities of Hanoi, Shanghai, and Taipei, China. Methods The data are from a community-based multi-centre cross-sectional study conducted from 2006 to 2007, with a sample of 17 016 youths aged 15–24 years from Hanoi, Shanghai, and Taipei. Chi-square test and logistic regression were used to evaluate correlates of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. Results The overall prevalence of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts in the preceding 12 months in LGB youths were both higher than in heterosexual youth (12.8% vs. 8.1% and 4.0% vs. 2.4%, respectively). Stratified by city, the prevalence of suicidal ideation was lowest in Hanoi (2.2%), followed by Shanghai (8.0%) and Taipei (17.0%). Similar trends were observed in the prevalence of suicide attempts, which was lowest in Hanoi (0.3%), followed by Shanghai (1.2%) and Taipei (2.5%). Of note, however, multivariate logistic regression results revealed that LGB youth were at a higher risk for suicidal ideation than heterosexual youth only in Taipei (odds ratio 1.65). Conclusions Suicidality is common among Asian youth, with higher prevalence observed in urbanized cities. LGB youths are at greater risk of suicidal ideation than their heterosexual counterparts in Taipei than in the other two examined cities. PMID:25446798

  19. Profile of substance use among patients attending De-addiction centres in a coastal city of southern India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nithin; Kanchan, Tanuj; Unnikrishnan, Bhaskaran; Thapar, Rekha; Mithra, Prasanna; Kulkarni, Vaman; Papanna, Mohan Kumar; Holla, Ramesh; Sarathy, Saran

    2013-01-01

    Drug dependence is still to be recognized in developing countries as a significant public health problem and literature on the magnitude of this problem is limited. The present research was planned to study the socio-demographic profile and the reasons for substance use among patients admitted at De-addiction centres in Mangalore, India. In this cross-sectional study, all the patients admitted at the De-addiction centres during the study period were interviewed. The data was analyzed and the results obtained were expressed in proportions. A total of 83 patients were included in the study, all of whom were males. A positive family history of substance use was evident in 63% of the respondents. The mean age of the study participants was 41.9 (SD±11.2) years and the mean age for starting substance use was 20.9 (SD±7.7) years. The most common substance used was alcohol (95.2%). Majority of the subjects (56.6%) cited peer pressure as a reason for initiating substance use. Our findings suggest that the initiation of substance use occurs during late teenage years and mostly due to peer pressure. Our observations point towards the vulnerability of younger age towards substance use and hence, it is proposed that the preventive health policies in this regard should be targeted specifically during teenage years. PMID:23469075

  20. Protein supplementation and dietary behaviours of resistance trained men and women attending commercial gyms: a comparative study between the city centre and the suburbs of Palermo, Italy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is anecdotally recognized that commercial gym users assume supplements in order to improve performance or health. However, dietary behaviours of people and athletes attending commercial gyms have been poorly studied. The exact amount and frequency of dietary supplements consumption are still needed to be investigated. The main purpose of this study is to understand the quantity and quality of food intake, as well as dietary supplementation in people attending commercial gyms. Secondly to compare the city centre and the suburbs of Palermo, Italy. Methods A face-to-face questionnaire was administered to 561 subjects, 207 from the city centre (CC) and 354 from the suburbs (SB) of Palermo, Italy. Frequency of protein supplements use and association with dietary behaviours were investigated. Subsequently, the frequency distribution was used for demographic assessment. Results Frequency of protein consumption was similar in both groups (30% for CC and 28.8% for SB). Males show greater consumption percentages than females (30.5% in males and 6.9% in females). Milk and chicken are the most frequently consumed foods. Data show that non-supplement users (NSU) consume significantly more snacks and bakery products than supplement users (SU) (P < 0.001). While, SU consume significantly higher quantities of vegetables, nuts, fresh fish, eggs and canned tuna (P < 0.001). SU consume less low protein food and higher protein foods than NSU. No differences were found between CC and SB. Conclusions Protein consumption among commercial gym users is 30% for the CC and 28.8% for the SB. Significant differences were found between CC and SB females, underlining an interesting discrepancy, indicating to dietary supplement industries regarding regional implications. Subjects that use protein supplements also consume larger quantities of high protein food compared to NSU. NSU also eat higher proportions of unhealthy food compared to SU. PMID:24976800

  1. Factors of Stream Instability in Urban Centres of Southern Nigeria: Case Study of Port Harcourt City River Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amangabara, G. T.

    2006-05-01

    There are two main drainage rivers in the Port Harcourt Metropolis - The Ntamogba and the Woji creek (Abam, 2004). There are a few other drainage rivers that are equally important e.g. the Nwaja River that drains Rumukalagbor, Elekahia, New GRA Phases IV and V, Presidential Housing Estate and Sun Ray publications Area of Aba Road. These river systems drain the entire Port Harcourt City dividing the City into three major drainage zones. Since the discovery of oil in Nigeria in the 1950s, the country has been suffering the negative environmental consequences of oil development. The growth of the country's oil industry, combined with population explosion and a lack of environmental regulations, led to substantial damage to Nigeria's environment, especially in the Niger Delta region, the center of the country's oil industry. Uncontrolled population movement as well as spontaneous housing development on marginal lands such as stream corridors, has led to the degradation of all major stream channels in the Nation's oil capital - Port Harcourt City. The longitudinal profiles and cross sections of reaches of three major streams (Ntamogba, Nwaja, and Oginigba streams) were investigated. Land use maps of 1979 1999 and 2004 were used. Our result showed that 1). Almost all of the stream corridors have been built up without adequate plan 2). The natural grades have been distorted by channelisation for the purpose of flood evacuation without geomorphic consideration .3). Our research also shows that the interface of saline water and fresh water has extended upstream affecting urban infrastructure. 4) localized damming and sedimentation behind hydraulic structures were common occurrences) our overall result indicate that two episodes of channel incision on Oginigba stream had increased slope reduced sinuosity increased entrenchment and reduce width-depth ratio . Conclusively the factors of the instability of theses urban streams are manly the processes of urbanization which

  2. Impact of a city centre on the dispersal of a regional pollen cloud. Cas of Montréal, Canada.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyette-Pernot, J.

    2003-04-01

    Highly allergenic ragweed pollen is released into the air in large quantities at the end of every summer in and around Montreal. More than 19% of the city's population experiences hay fever (DSP-Montreal Center, 2000). The aim of this study is to obtain a deeper insight into the manner in which a North American urban area may influence the dispersal of a regional pollen clouds, how it modifies the dispersal and thereby its concentration. Downtown areas provide particular surface characteristics that result in strong disturbances to regional meteorological conditions. Strong pollen concentrations are modified by the passage of fronts and may increase the occurrence of regional-scale pollen peaks. They offer the best conditions for the local dilution of pollen and even the best dynamic conditions for external pollen that reaches Montreal from southern regions. On the contrary, anticyclonic situations seem to offer the best conditions for local production but inhibit dilution on a larger scale. Observations have been made in order to investigate the vertical as well as the regional versus the local and street-level differences in pollen abundance. The aim is to develop an original statistical downscaling technique, inferring pollen concentrations from the largest to the smallest scales. At the regional scale, the emphasis is placed on the typical meteorological conditions or weather types influencing the regional pollen cloud. At the street level, the discussion focuses on whether these prior regional conditions continue to influence the micro-scale pollen diffusion or whether they are themselves modified by the characteristics of the surface. If this were to be the case, then it would be essential to address the issue of how it affects the pollen concentrations at the pedestrian level, with all this may imply in term of public health.

  3. Giant Black Hole Rips Apart Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-02-01

    Thanks to two orbiting X-ray observatories, astronomers have the first strong evidence of a supermassive black hole ripping apart a star and consuming a portion of it. The event, captured by NASA's Chandra and ESA's XMM-Newton X-ray Observatories, had long been predicted by theory, but never confirmed. Astronomers believe a doomed star came too close to a giant black hole after being thrown off course by a close encounter with another star. As it neared the enormous gravity of the black hole, the star was stretched by tidal forces until it was torn apart. This discovery provides crucial information about how these black holes grow and affect surrounding stars and gas. "Stars can survive being stretched a small amount, as they are in binary star systems, but this star was stretched beyond its breaking point," said Stefanie Komossa of the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) in Germany, leader of the international team of researchers. "This unlucky star just wandered into the wrong neighborhood." While other observations have hinted stars are destroyed by black holes (events known as "stellar tidal disruptions"), these new results are the first strong evidence. Evidence already exists for supermassive black holes in many galaxies, but looking for tidal disruptions represents a completely independent way to search for black holes. Observations like these are urgently needed to determine how quickly black holes can grow by swallowing neighboring stars. Animation of Star Ripped Apart by Giant Black Hole Star Ripped Apart by Giant Black Hole Observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton, combined with earlier images from the German Roentgen satellite, detected a powerful X-ray outburst from the center of the galaxy RX J1242-11. This outburst, one of the most extreme ever detected in a galaxy, was caused by gas from the destroyed star that was heated to millions of degrees Celsius before being swallowed by the black hole. The energy liberated in the process

  4. Management of pericardial effusion by drainage: a survey of 10 years' experience in a city centre general hospital serving a multiracial population

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, C.; Watson, R.; Singh, S.; Lip, G.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the aetiology of large and symptomatic pericardial effusions and to review the management and subsequent outcome. A survey was done on a consecutive cases of patients who had undergone percutaneous pericardiocentesis over a 10 year period in a city centre general hospital serving a multiethnic catchment population. In all, 46 patients (24 male, 22 female; age range 16 to 90 years, mean 54 years) underwent a total of 51 pericardial drainage procedures (or attempted pericardiocentesis) between 1989 and 1998. Malignancy (44%), tuberculosis (26%), idiopathic (11%), and post-cardiac surgery (9%) were the most common causes of pericardial effusion. The most common presenting symptoms were breathlessness (90%), chest pain (74%), cough (70%), abdominal pain (61%) (presumed to be related to hepatic congestion), and unexplained fever (28%). In the 12 cases of tuberculous pericarditis, nine occurred in patients of Indo-Asian origin, and three in patients of Afro-Caribbean origin. Fever, night sweats, and weight loss were common among these patients, occurring in over 80% of cases of tuberculous pericarditis. Pulsus paradoxus was the most specific sign (100%) for the presence of echocardiographic features of tamponade, with strongest positive predictive value (100%). Although malignancy remains the most common cause in developed countries, tuberculous disease should be considered in patients from areas where tuberculosis is endemic. Percutaneous pericardiocentesis remains an effective measure for the immediate relief of symptoms in patients with cardiac tamponade, although its diagnostic yield in tuberculous pericarditis is relatively low.


Keywords: tuberculosis; pericardial effusions; percutaneous pericardiocentesis PMID:11085787

  5. Giant black hole rips star apart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-02-01

    Astronomers believe that a doomed star came too close to a giant black hole after a close encounter with another star threw it off course. As it neared the enormous gravity of the black hole, the star was stretched by tidal forces until it was torn apart. This discovery provides crucial information on how these black holes grow and affect the surrounding stars and gas. "Stars can survive being stretched a small amount, as they are in binary star systems, but this star was stretched beyond its breaking point," said Dr Stefanie Komossa of the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) in Germany, who led the international team of researchers. "This unlucky star just wandered into the wrong neighbourhood." While other observations have hinted that stars are destroyed by black holes (events known as ‘stellar tidal disruptions’), these new results are the first strong evidence. Observations with XMM-Newton and Chandra, combined with earlier images from the German Roentgensatellite (ROSAT), detected a powerful X-ray outburst from the centre of the galaxy RXJ1242-11. This outburst, one of the most extreme ever detected in a galaxy, was caused by gas from the destroyed star that was heated to millions of degrees before being swallowed by the black hole. The energy liberated in this process is equivalent to that of a supernova. "Now, with all of the data in hand, we have the smoking gun proof that this spectacular event has occurred," said co-author Prof. Guenther Hasinger, also of MPE. The black hole in the centre of RX J1242-11 is estimated to have a mass about 100 million times that of the Sun. By contrast, the destroyed star probably had a mass about equal to that of the Sun, making it a lopsided battle of gravity. "This is the ultimate ‘David versus Goliath’ battle, but here David loses," said Hasinger. The astronomers estimated that about one hundredth of the mass of the star was ultimately consumed, or accreted, by the black hole. This small

  6. Lithospheric-scale centrifuge models of pull-apart basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corti, Giacomo; Dooley, Tim P.

    2015-11-01

    We present here the results of the first lithospheric-scale centrifuge models of pull-apart basins. The experiments simulate relative displacement of two lithospheric blocks along two offset master faults, with the presence of a weak zone in the offset area localising deformation during strike-slip displacement. Reproducing the entire lithosphere-asthenosphere system provides boundary conditions that are more realistic than the horizontal detachment in traditional 1 g experiments and thus provide a better approximation of the dynamic evolution of natural pull-apart basins. Model results show that local extension in the pull-apart basins is accommodated through development of oblique-slip faulting at the basin margins and cross-basin faults obliquely cutting the rift depression. As observed in previous modelling studies, our centrifuge experiments suggest that the angle of offset between the master fault segments is one of the most important parameters controlling the architecture of pull-apart basins: the basins are lozenge shaped in the case of underlapping master faults, lazy-Z shaped in case of neutral offset and rhomboidal shaped for overlapping master faults. Model cross sections show significant along-strike variations in basin morphology, with transition from narrow V- and U-shaped grabens to a more symmetric, boxlike geometry passing from the basin terminations to the basin centre; a flip in the dominance of the sidewall faults from one end of the basin to the other is observed in all models. These geometries are also typical of 1 g models and characterise several pull-apart basins worldwide. Our models show that the complex faulting in the upper brittle layer corresponds at depth to strong thinning of the ductile layer in the weak zone; a rise of the base of the lithosphere occurs beneath the basin, and maximum lithospheric thinning roughly corresponds to the areas of maximum surface subsidence (i.e., the basin depocentre).

  7. Rust City: Brockport College Apartments, Brockport, N.Y.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Suzanne

    1975-01-01

    To hold down construction costs of student housing, Brockport College decided on a fixed-cost competition, in which architects had to team up with contractors. The winning firm used a French industrialized building system and exterior panels of weathered steel to construct a village of 27 four-story buildings. (JG)

  8. Winnipeg Centre Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg.

    The Winnipeg Centre Project is a field-based, work-study program that attempts to create more appropriate education for the inner-city child. Sponsored by the Planning and Research Branch of the Department of Colleges and Universities Affairs and administered by Brandon University in consultation with the Winnipeg School Division, the project is…

  9. Evolution: drift will tear us apart.

    PubMed

    Maderspacher, Florian

    2012-11-01

    That the widely scattered geographical distribution of some animals could be due to continental drift is a neat idea. Now, cave animals provide evidence for extreme long-term persistence on continents drifting apart. PMID:23137684

  10. Temperature conditions and heat supply of apartments in an apartment house with individual regulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilevskii, L. N.

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents the results of mathematical modeling of the values of the temperature and the heat source power in apartments of an apartment house with individual regulators. It has been shown that for the existing structures of buildings the heat transfer between apartments with individual thermoregulation strongly influences the values of the heat source power established in apartments in the process of regulation. Without changing the total heating load of the building, this process leads to considerable deviations of readings of the thermal energy meters in apartments from the thermal energy actually consumed for their heating. This fact throws doubt upon the expediency of installing individual calorimeters in an apartment house with thermoregulation in each apartment.

  11. Finding Good Areas for Renting Apartments Using Apartments Information and Users' Trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, R.; Lu, M.; Arikawa, M.; Asami, Y.; Iwasaki, J.

    2014-04-01

    Current apartment renting web sites provide services to search apartments by attribute filters while they lack the services to help find areas that are convenient for living and meet customers' personal preference. In many cases, people not only need attributes of the apartments meeting their requirements, but also need the attributes of the area be satisfied. We propose an IT service that can find appropriate areas for customers to rent apartments while they want to move to new places. The areas are picked according to users' life styles mined from their former moving trajectories and to the attributes of the areas calculated from preferences of present rooms of users.

  12. Educational Alliance for a Sustainable Toronto: The University of Toronto and the City's United Nations University (UNU) Regional Centre of Expertise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefanovic, Ingrid Leman

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the role that the University of Toronto has had in helping to establish a Regional Centre of Expertise (RCE) on Education for Sustainable Development in Toronto, Canada. The way in which the RCE initiative has helped to move forward the university's own five-year plan will also be discussed.…

  13. Communicating astronomy by the Unizul Science Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beesham, A.; Beesham, N.

    2015-03-01

    The University of Zululand, situated along the east coast of KwaZulu-Natal, has a thriving Science Centre (USC) situated in the developing port city of Richards Bay. Over 30 000 learners visit the centre annually, and it consists of an exhibition area, an auditorium, lecture areas and offices. The shows consist of interactive games, science shows, competitions, quizzes and matriculation workshops. Outreach activities take place through a mobile science centre for schools and communities that cannot visit the centre.

  14. Bound by Children: Intermittent Cohabitation and Living Together Apart

    PubMed Central

    Cross-Barnet, Caitlin; Cherlin, Andrew; Burton, Linda

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we examine variations in low-income mothers' patterns of intermittent cohabitation and the voluntary and involuntary nature of these unions. Intermittent cohabitation involves couples living together and separating in repeating cycles. Using Three-City Study ethnographic data, we identified 45 low-income mothers involved in these arrangements, 18 of whom resided with their children's fathers occasionally while saying that they were not in a cohabiting relationship. We term such relationships living together apart (LTA). Data analysis revealed that distinct patterns of voluntary and involuntary separations and reunifications characterized intermittent cohabitation and LTA and that these relationships were shaped by the bonds that shared parenting created and the economic needs of both parents. We argue that these dimensions may explain some disparate accounts of cohabitation status in low-income populations. They also demonstrate previously unexplored diversity in cohabiting relationships and suggest further questioning contemporary definitions of families. PMID:25435641

  15. The effectiveness of an electronic security management system in a privately owned apartment complex.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, David F; Roush, Jeffrey B

    2009-02-01

    Poisson and negative binomial regression methods are used to analyze the monthly time series data to determine the effects of introducing an integrated security management system including closed-circuit television (CCTV), door alarm monitoring, proximity card access, and emergency call boxes to a large privately-owned complex of apartment buildings in New York City. Crime rates in a control apartment complex under the same ownership, and in the police precinct in which the 2 complexes are located, serve as controls. PMID:19001121

  16. Compact Solar Combisystem for an Apartment Building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolonina, Alona; Rochas, Claudio; Kibure, Inese; Rosa, Marika; Blumberga, Dagnija

    2010-01-01

    The Riga Technical University Institute of Energy Systems and Environment, in cooperation with three Latvian companies, is implementing the project "Compact solar and pellet module" financed by the European Union. Within the framework of this project a combisystem will be installed in the Grandeg Ltd modular pellet boiler house. The solar combisystem will provide domestic hot water and space heating load for an apartment building in Sigulda. Due to the limited amount of space in the modular boiler house, optimal decisions should be made on the technical parameters of the system, including the volume of the heat storage tank and the surface area of solar collectors. Every alternative has both advantages and disadvantages. Economic factors of various alternatives are analyzed.

  17. Soil archives of a Fluvisol: Subsurface analysis and soil history of the medieval city centre of Vlaardingen, the Netherlands - an integral approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluiving, Sjoerd; De Ridder, Tim; Van Dasselaar, Marcel; Roozen, Stan; Prins, Maarten; Van Mourik, Jan

    2016-04-01

    In Medieval times the city of Vlaardingen (the Netherlands) was strategically located on the confluence of three rivers, the Meuse, the Merwede and the Vlaarding. A church of early 8th century was already located here. In a short period of time Vlaardingen developed into an international trading place, the most important place in the former county of Holland. Starting from the 11th century the river Meuse threatened to flood the settlement. These floods have been registered in the archives of the fluvisol and were recognised in a multidisciplinary sedimentary analysis of these archives. To secure the future of this vulnerable soil archive currently an extensive interdisciplinary research (76 mechanical drill holes, grain size analysis (GSA), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), archaeological remains, soil analysis, dating methods, micromorphology, and microfauna has started in 2011 to gain knowledge on the sedimentological and pedological subsurface of the mound as well as on the well-preserved nature of the archaeological evidence. Pedogenic features are recorded with soil descriptive, micromorphological and geochemical (XRF) analysis. The soil sequence of 5 meters thickness exhibits a complex mix of 'natural' as well as 'anthropogenic layering' and initial soil formation that enables to make a distinction for relatively stable periods between periods with active sedimentation. In this paper the results of this large-scale project are demonstrated in a number of cross-sections with interrelated geological, pedological and archaeological stratification. Distinction between natural and anthropogenic layering is made on the occurrence of chemical elements phosphor and potassium. A series of four stratigraphic / sedimentary units record the period before and after the flooding disaster. Given the many archaeological remnants and features present in the lower units, we assume that the medieval landscape was drowned while it was inhabited in the 12th century AD. After a

  18. Poles apart: Scott, Amundsen and science.

    PubMed

    Larson, Edward J

    2011-12-01

    One hundred years ago, teams led by Roald Amundsen and Robert Scott may have been heading in the same direction but they were poles apart in the way they sought their goals. Amundsen led a five-person team of expert Nordic skiers and dog-sledders with a single goal: getting to the South Pole first. He planned and executed the effort brilliantly. Scott, in contrast, led a complex and multi-faceted Antarctic expedition with 33 explorers and scientists, many of whom were focused on ambitious and often taxing scientific research projects that had nothing whatsoever to do with reaching the Pole. Although Scott failed to reach the South Pole first and died with four men on the return trip, his expedition made significant contributions to Antarctic science. Indeed, at least some of Scott's failure to reach the Pole first and the subsequent death of his polar party on the return trip can be attributed to burden of trying to do too much and not focusing on reaching the pole. PMID:22055019

  19. Soil archives of a Fluvisol: subsurface analysis and soil history of the medieval city centre of Vlaardingen, the Netherlands - an integral approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluiving, Sjoerd; de Ridder, Tim; van Dasselaar, Marcel; Roozen, Stan; Prins, Maarten

    2016-06-01

    The medieval city of Vlaardingen (the Netherlands) was strategically located on the confluence of three rivers, the Maas, the Merwede, and the Vlaarding. A church of the early 8th century AD was already located here. In a short period of time, Vlaardingen developed in the 11th century AD into an international trading place and into one of the most important places in the former county of Holland. Starting from the 11th century AD, the river Maas repeatedly threatened to flood the settlement. The flood dynamics were registered in Fluvisol archives and were recognised in a multidisciplinary sedimentary analysis of these archives. To secure the future of these vulnerable soil archives an extensive interdisciplinary research effort (76 mechanical drill holes, grain size analysis (GSA), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), archaeological remains, soil analysis, dating methods, micromorphology, and microfauna) started in 2011 to gain knowledge on the sedimentological and pedological subsurface of the settlement mound as well as on the well-preserved nature of the archaeological evidence. Pedogenic features are recorded with soil description, micromorphological, and geochemical (XRF - X-ray fluorescence) analysis. The soil sequence of 5 m thickness exhibits a complex mix of "natural" as well as "anthropogenic" layering and initial soil formation that enables us to make a distinction between relatively stable periods and periods with active sedimentation. In this paper the results of this interdisciplinary project are demonstrated in a number of cross-sections with interrelated geological, pedological, and archaeological stratification. A distinction between natural and anthropogenic layering is made on the basis of the occurrence of the chemical elements phosphor and potassium. A series of four stratigraphic and sedimentary units record the period before and after the flooding disaster. Given the many archaeological remnants and features present in the lower units, in

  20. Prevalence and predictors of urinary tract infection and severe malaria among febrile children attending Makongoro health centre in Mwanza city, North-Western Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In malaria endemic areas, fever has been used as an entry point for presumptive treatment of malaria. At present, the decrease in malaria transmission in Africa implies an increase in febrile illnesses related to other causes among underfives. Moreover, it is estimated that more than half of the children presenting with fever to public clinics in Africa do not have a malaria infection. Thus, for a better management of all febrile illnesses among under-fives, it becomes relevant to understand the underlying aetiology of the illness. The present study was conducted to determine the relative prevalence and predictors of P. falciparum malaria, urinary tract infections and bacteremia among under-fives presenting with a febrile illness at the Makongoro Primary Health Centre, North-Western Tanzania. Methods From February to June 2011, a cross-sectional analytical survey was conducted among febrile children less than five years of age. Demographic and clinical data were collected using a standardized pre-tested questionnaire. Blood and urine culture was done, followed by the identification of isolates using in-house biochemical methods. Susceptibility patterns to commonly used antibiotics were investigated using the disc diffusion method. Giemsa stained thin and thick blood smears were examined for any malaria parasites stages. Results A total of 231 febrile under-fives were enrolled in the study. Of all the children, 20.3% (47/231, 95%CI, 15.10-25.48), 9.5% (22/231, 95%CI, 5.72-13.28) and 7.4% (17/231, 95%CI, 4.00-10.8) had urinary tract infections, P. falciparum malaria and bacteremia respectively. In general, 11.5% (10/87, 95%CI, 8.10-14.90) of the children had two infections and only one child had all three infections. Predictors of urinary tract infections (UTI) were dysuria (OR = 12.51, 95% CI, 4.28-36.57, P < 0.001) and body temperature (40-41 C) (OR = 12.54, 95% CI, 4.28-36.73, P < 0.001). Predictors of P. falciparum severe malaria were pallor (OR = 4

  1. HUBBLE WATCHES STAR TEAR APART ITS NEIGHBORHOOD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has snapped a view of a stellar demolition zone in our Milky Way Galaxy: a massive star, nearing the end of its life, tearing apart the shell of surrounding material it blew off 250,000 years ago with its strong stellar wind. The shell of material, dubbed the Crescent Nebula (NGC 6888), surrounds the 'hefty,' aging star WR 136, an extremely rare and short-lived class of super-hot star called a Wolf-Rayet. Hubble's multicolored picture reveals with unprecedented clarity that the shell of matter is a network of filaments and dense knots, all enshrouded in a thin 'skin' of gas [seen in blue]. The whole structure looks like oatmeal trapped inside a balloon. The skin is glowing because it is being blasted by ultraviolet light from WR 136. Hubble's view covers a small region at the northeast tip of the structure, which is roughly three light-years across. A picture taken by a ground-based telescope [lower right] shows almost the entire nebula. The whole structure is about 16 light-years wide and 25 light-years long. The bright dot near the center of NGC 6888 is WR 136. The white outline in the upper left-hand corner represents Hubble's view. Hubble's sharp vision is allowing scientists to probe the intricate details of this complex system, which is crucial to understanding the life cycle of stars and their impact on the evolution of our galaxy. The results of this study appear in the June issue of the Astronomical Journal. WR 136 created this web of luminous material during the late stages of its life. As a bloated, red super-giant, WR 136 gently puffed away some of its bulk, which settled around it. When the star passed from a super-giant to a Wolf-Rayet, it developed a fierce stellar wind - a stream of charged particles released from its surface - and began expelling mass at a furious rate. The star began ejecting material at a speed of 3.8 million mph (6.1 million kilometers per hour), losing matter equal to that of our Sun's every 10

  2. 94. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING, SURFACE BUILDINGS, GENERAL, APARTMENT HOUSE, LOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    94. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING, SURFACE BUILDINGS, GENERAL, APARTMENT HOUSE, LOWER CAMP, SOUTH END - Kennecott Copper Corporation, On Copper River & Northwestern Railroad, Kennicott, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  3. 93. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING, SURFACE BUILDINGS, GENERAL, APARTMENT HOUSE, LOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    93. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING, SURFACE BUILDINGS, GENERAL, APARTMENT HOUSE, LOWER CAMP, SOUTH END - Kennecott Copper Corporation, On Copper River & Northwestern Railroad, Kennicott, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  4. Molecular markers reveal infestation dynamics of the bed bug (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) within apartment buildings.

    PubMed

    Booth, Warren; Saenz, Virna L; Santangelo, Richard G; Wang, Changlu; Schal, Coby; Vargo, Edward L

    2012-05-01

    The bed bug, Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae), has experienced an extraordinary global resurgence in recent years, the reasons for which remain poorly understood. Once considered a pest of lower socioeconomic classes, bed bugs are now found extensively across all residential settings, with widespread infestations established in multiapartment buildings. Within such buildings, understanding the population genetic structure and patterns of dispersal may prove critical to the development of effective control strategies. Here, we describe the development of 24 high-resolution microsatellite markers through next generation 454 pyrosequencing and their application to elucidate infestation dynamics within three multistory apartment buildings in the United States. Results reveal contrasting characteristics potentially representative of geographic or locale differences. In Raleigh, NC, an infestation within an apartment building seemed to have started from a single introduction followed by extensive spread. In Jersey City, NJ, two or more introductions followed by spread are evident in two buildings. Populations within single apartments in all buildings were characterized by high levels of relatedness and low levels of diversity, indicative of foundation from small, genetically depauperate propagules. Regardless of the number of unique introductions, genetic data indicate that spread within buildings is extensive, supporting both active and human-mediated dispersal within and between adjacent rooms or apartments spanning multiple floors. PMID:22679860

  5. Republication of "Linking an Apartment School with an Elementary School"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovitt, Thomas C.; Perry, Leslie; Hughes, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    Why not set up a school in an apartment complex? After all, that is where children reside before and after they attend an actual school, and that is where they are during the summers when their actual school is closed. It is also where their parents are after work. And why not unite this school at an apartment complex with the school attended by…

  6. 12. INTERIOR OF COVERED WALKWAY BEHIND SECOND FLOOR APARTMENTS FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. INTERIOR OF COVERED WALKWAY BEHIND SECOND FLOOR APARTMENTS FROM OPPOSITE VIEW OF CA-XXX-11. DOOR AT PHOTO LEFT OPENS INTO THE KITCHEN OF THE WEST SIDE SECOND FLOOR APARTMENT. VIEW TO EAST. - Lee Vining Creek Hydroelectric System, Triplex Cottage, Lee Vining Creek, Lee Vining, Mono County, CA

  7. City 2020+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, C.; Buttstädt, M.; Merbitz, H.; Sachsen, T.; Ketzler, G.; Michael, S.; Klemme, M.; Dott, W.; Selle, K.; Hofmeister, H.

    2010-09-01

    This research initiative CITY 2020+ assesses the risks and opportunities for residents in urban built environments under projected demographic and climate change for the year 2020 and beyond, using the City of Aachen as a case study. CITY 2020+ develops scenarios, options and tools for planning and developing sustainable future city structures. We investigate how urban environment, political structure and residential behavior can best be adapted, with attention to the interactions among structural, political, and sociological configurations and with their consequences on human health. Demographers project that in the EU-25-States by 2050, approximately 30% of the population will be over age 65. Also by 2050, average tem¬peratures are projected to rise by 1 to 2 K. Combined, Europe can expect enhanced thermal stress and higher levels of particulate matter. CITY 2020+ amongst other sub-projects includes research project dealing with (1) a micro-scale assessment of blockages to low-level cold-air drainage flow into the city centre by vegetation and building structures, (2) a detailed analysis of the change of probability density functions related to the occurrence of heat waves during summer and the spatial and temporal structure of the urban heat island (UHI) (3) a meso-scale analysis of particulate matter (PM) concentrations depending on topography, local meteorological conditions and synoptic-scale weather patterns. First results will be presented specifically from sub-projects related to vegetation barriers within cold air drainage, the assessment of the UHI and the temporal and spatial pattern of PM loadings in the city centre. The analysis of the cold air drainage flow is investigated in two consecutive years with a clearing of vegetation stands in the beginning of the second year early in 2010. The spatial pattern of the UHI and its possible enhancement by climate change is addressed employing a unique setup using GPS devices and temperature probes fixed to

  8. 28. Brick apartment buildings with arched window openings, string courses, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Brick apartment buildings with arched window openings, string courses, a brick cornice, and an interrupted brick frieze. - Butte Historic District, Bounded by Copper, Arizona, Mercury & Continental Streets, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

  9. 29. SECOND FLOOR EAST SIDE APARTMENT EAST BEDROOM INTERIOR. ALUMINUMFRAME ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. SECOND FLOOR EAST SIDE APARTMENT EAST BEDROOM INTERIOR. ALUMINUM-FRAME SLIDING-GLASS WINDOWS ARE REPLACEMENTS. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Lee Vining Creek Hydroelectric System, Triplex Cottage, Lee Vining Creek, Lee Vining, Mono County, CA

  10. 8. Second floor front apartment showing ornately painted pressed metal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Second floor front apartment showing ornately painted pressed metal ceiling, as well as modern partitions and wall treatments. View looking north. - Franklin Grocery Company Building, 1 South Main Street, Franklin, Merrimack County, NH

  11. 8. General view of firstfloor living room, E apartment; looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. General view of first-floor living room, E apartment; looking SE. (Ceronie and Harms) - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 360, Gillespie Avenue between Rodman Avenue & North Avenue, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  12. Apartment Compartmentalization With an Aerosol-Based Sealing Process

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Sean; Berger, David; Harrington, Curtis

    2015-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Building America Team, Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, sought to demonstrate this new technology application in a new construction multifamily building in Queens, New York. The effectiveness of the sealing process was evaluated by three methods: air leakage testing of overall apartment before-and-after sealing, point-source testing of individual leaks, and pressure measurements in the walls of an apartment during sealing.

  13. Ventilation and infiltration in high-rise apartment buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, R.C.; Feustel, H.E.; Dickerhoff, D.J.

    1996-03-01

    Air flow, air leakage measurements and numerical simulations were made on a 13-story apartment building to characterize the ventilation rates for the individual apartments. Parametric simulations were performed for specific conditions, e.g., height, orientation, outside temperature and wind speed. Our analysis of the air flow simulations suggest that the ventilation to the individual units varies considerably. With the mechanical ventilation system disabled and no wind, units at the lower level of the building have adequate ventilation only on days with high temperature differences, while units on higher floors have no ventilation at all. Units facing the windward side will be over-ventilated when the building experiences wind directions between west and north. At the same time, leeward apartments did not experience any fresh air-because, in these cases, air flows enter the apartments from the corridor and exit through the exhaust shafts and the cracks in the facade. Even with the mechanical ventilation system operating, we found wide variation in the air flows to the individual apartments. In addition to the specific case presented here, these findings have more general implications for energy retrofits and health and comfort of occupants in high-rise apartment buildings.

  14. Tomorrow's City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Emrys

    1979-01-01

    Examines several simple models of cities, discussing possible future changes in city design. The concepts of the megalopolis, linear city, tower block, imploded or miniaturized city, and dispersed city are described. (CS)

  15. Science Learning Centres Roundup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The national network of Science Learning Centres aims to raise the quality of science teaching from Key Stage 1 through post-16 (ages 5-19). Short courses are provided locally through the regional Science Learning Centres and longer, more intensive programmes are available at the National Science Learning Centre in York. There are a growing number…

  16. 30. SECOND FLOOR EAST SIDE APARTMENT WEST BEDROOM INTERIOR SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. SECOND FLOOR EAST SIDE APARTMENT WEST BEDROOM INTERIOR SHOWING PAIRED 6-LIGHT OVER 6-LIGHT DOUBLE-HUNG, WOOD-FRAME WINDOWS THROUGH NORTH WALL. ORIGINAL LOUVERED DOORS FRAME CLOSET AT PHOTO LEFT. VIEW TO NORTH. - Lee Vining Creek Hydroelectric System, Triplex Cottage, Lee Vining Creek, Lee Vining, Mono County, CA

  17. 14. FIRST FLOOR APARTMENT LIVING ROOM INTERIOR. FRONT ENTRY DOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. FIRST FLOOR APARTMENT LIVING ROOM INTERIOR. FRONT ENTRY DOOR IS AT PHOTO CENTER FLANKED BY A PAIRED 4-LIGHT OVER 4-LIGHT DOUBLE-HUNG, WOOD-FRAME WINDOWS. OPEN DOORWAY TO PHOTO RIGHT OPENS TO NORTH BEDROOM. DOORWAY TO PHOTO LEFT OPENS TO KITCHEN. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Lee Vining Creek Hydroelectric System, Triplex Cottage, Lee Vining Creek, Lee Vining, Mono County, CA

  18. 37. SECOND FLOOR WEST SIDE APARTMENT EAST BEDROOM INTERIOR SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. SECOND FLOOR WEST SIDE APARTMENT EAST BEDROOM INTERIOR SHOWING PAIRED 6-LIGHT OVER 6-LIGHT DOUBLE-HUNG, WOOD-FRAME WINDOWS ON NORTH WALL. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Lee Vining Creek Hydroelectric System, Triplex Cottage, Lee Vining Creek, Lee Vining, Mono County, CA

  19. 20. FIRST FLOOR APARTMENT NORTH BEDROOM INTERIOR LOOKING THROUGH DOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. FIRST FLOOR APARTMENT NORTH BEDROOM INTERIOR LOOKING THROUGH DOOR FROM LIVING ROOM. GROUP OF THREE 6-LIGHT OVER 6-LIGHT DOUBLE-HUNG, WOOD-FRAME WINDOWS AT PHOTO CENTER THROUGH NORTH (FRONT) WALL OF HOUSE. VIEW TO EAST. - Lee Vining Creek Hydroelectric System, Triplex Cottage, Lee Vining Creek, Lee Vining, Mono County, CA

  20. 16. FIRST FLOOR APARTMENT KITCHEN INTERIOR SHOWING OPEN DOORWAY TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. FIRST FLOOR APARTMENT KITCHEN INTERIOR SHOWING OPEN DOORWAY TO LIVING ROOM AND PAIRED 6-LIGHT OVER 6-LIGHT DOUBLE-HUNG, WOOD-FRAME WINDOWS OVER SINK. VIEW TO EAST. - Lee Vining Creek Hydroelectric System, Triplex Cottage, Lee Vining Creek, Lee Vining, Mono County, CA

  1. 31. SECOND FLOOR WEST SIDE APARTMENT LIVING ROOM INTERIOR SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. SECOND FLOOR WEST SIDE APARTMENT LIVING ROOM INTERIOR SHOWING PAIRED 4-LIGHT OVER 4-LIGHT DOUBLE-HUNG, WOOD-FRAME WINDOWS FLANKING ENTRY DOOR WITH UNUSUAL 8-LIGHT WINDOW. OPEN DOORWAY TO PHOTO LEFT LEADS TO KITCHEN. VIEW TO WEST. - Lee Vining Creek Hydroelectric System, Triplex Cottage, Lee Vining Creek, Lee Vining, Mono County, CA

  2. 38. SECOND FLOOR WEST SIDE APARTMENT WEST BEDROOM INTERIOR SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. SECOND FLOOR WEST SIDE APARTMENT WEST BEDROOM INTERIOR SHOWING PAIRED 6-LIGHT OVER 6-LIGHT DOUBLE-HUNG, WOOD-FRAME WINDOWS ON WEST WALL AND OPEN DOORWAY TO LIVING ROOM. VIEW TO WEST. - Lee Vining Creek Hydroelectric System, Triplex Cottage, Lee Vining Creek, Lee Vining, Mono County, CA

  3. 23. SECOND FLOOR EAST SIDE APARTMENT LIVING ROOM INTERIOR. PAIRED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. SECOND FLOOR EAST SIDE APARTMENT LIVING ROOM INTERIOR. PAIRED 4-LIGHT OVER 1-LIGHT DOUBLE-HUNG, WOOD-FRAME WINDOWS FLANK ENTRY DOOR. DOORWAY AT PHOTO RIGHT OPENS TO KITCHEN. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Lee Vining Creek Hydroelectric System, Triplex Cottage, Lee Vining Creek, Lee Vining, Mono County, CA

  4. 36. SECOND FLOOR WEST SIDE APARTMENT EAST BEDROOM INTERIOR. OPEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. SECOND FLOOR WEST SIDE APARTMENT EAST BEDROOM INTERIOR. OPEN DOORWAY AT PHOTO LEFT CENTER LEADS TO CLOSET, AND OPEN DOORWAY AT PHOTO RIGHT CENTER LEADS TO LIVING ROOM. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Lee Vining Creek Hydroelectric System, Triplex Cottage, Lee Vining Creek, Lee Vining, Mono County, CA

  5. 15. FIRST FLOOR APARTMENT LIVING ROOM INTERIOR. OPEN DOORWAY AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. FIRST FLOOR APARTMENT LIVING ROOM INTERIOR. OPEN DOORWAY AT PHOTO CENTER OPENS TO KITCHEN. OPEN DOORWAY AT PHOTO LEFT OPENS TO BATHROOM. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Lee Vining Creek Hydroelectric System, Triplex Cottage, Lee Vining Creek, Lee Vining, Mono County, CA

  6. 24. SECOND FLOOR EAST SIDE APARTMENT LIVING ROOM INTERIOR SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. SECOND FLOOR EAST SIDE APARTMENT LIVING ROOM INTERIOR SHOWING DOORWAY INTO KITCHEN AT PHOTO CENTER LEFT AND OPEN DOORWAY INTO BATHROOM AT PHOTO RIGHT. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Lee Vining Creek Hydroelectric System, Triplex Cottage, Lee Vining Creek, Lee Vining, Mono County, CA

  7. 32. SECOND FLOOR WEST SIDE APARTMENT LIVING ROOM INTERIOR SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. SECOND FLOOR WEST SIDE APARTMENT LIVING ROOM INTERIOR SHOWING DOORWAY INTO KITCHEN AT PHOTO CENTER RIGHT, AND OPEN DOORWAY IN BATHROOM AT PHOTO LEFT. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Lee Vining Creek Hydroelectric System, Triplex Cottage, Lee Vining Creek, Lee Vining, Mono County, CA

  8. Method for fabricating a substrate having spaced apart microcapillaries thereon

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, E.E.

    1995-01-24

    Methods are disclosed for manufacturing a self-supporting substrate having a plurality of spaced-apart needles (spikes or microcapillaries) projecting upwardly from a major surface of the substrate. In a preferred method, metal is deposited onto a porous membrane such that the metal extends into the pores, after which the membrane is dissolved. 9 figures.

  9. Method for fabricating a substrate having spaced apart microcapillaries thereon

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, Eric E.

    1995-01-01

    Methods for manufacturing a self-supporting substrate having a plurality of spaced-apart needles (spikes or microcapillaries) projecting upwardly from a major surface of the substrate. In a preferred method, metal is deposited onto a porous membrane such that the metal extends into the pores, after which the membrane is dissolved.

  10. 25. SECOND FLOOR EAST SIDE APARTMENT KITCHEN INTERIOR SHOWING GROUP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. SECOND FLOOR EAST SIDE APARTMENT KITCHEN INTERIOR SHOWING GROUP OF THREE 6-LIGHT WOOD-FRAME CASEMENT WINDOWS OVER THE SINK, AND OPEN DOORWAY TO TOP OF EXTERIOR STAIR LANDING AND WALKWAY AT REAR OF HOUSE. WALKWAY IS VISIBLE THROUGH KITCHEN WINDOWS. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Lee Vining Creek Hydroelectric System, Triplex Cottage, Lee Vining Creek, Lee Vining, Mono County, CA

  11. 34. SECOND FLOOR WEST SIDE APARTMENT KITCHEN INTERIOR. DOORWAY AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. SECOND FLOOR WEST SIDE APARTMENT KITCHEN INTERIOR. DOORWAY AT PHOTO LEFT LEADS TO PANTRY. GROUP OF THREE 6-LIGHT WOOD-FRAME CASEMENT WINDOWS OPEN TO WALKWAY AT REAR OF BUILDING. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Lee Vining Creek Hydroelectric System, Triplex Cottage, Lee Vining Creek, Lee Vining, Mono County, CA

  12. Families Apart: Ten Keys to Successful Co-Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blau, Melinda

    Many researchers have cited the trauma of divorce as being second only to that incurred by the death of child. Yet divorce does not mean the end of a family or of parenting responsibilities. This book focuses on co-parenting and how real divorced parents attempt to make a "family apart" function successfully. The stories and quotes were taken from…

  13. Worlds Apart: One City, Two Libraries, and Ten Years of Watching Inequality Grow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuman, Susan B.; Celano, Donna C.

    2012-01-01

    Like a bright beacon on the hill, the Lillian Marrero public library rises majestically above the deserted buildings and bulldozed voids below on Germantown Avenue. Here in the heart of what is known as the Philadelphia Badlands, makeshift garbage dumps line the sidewalks. The tall grass that surrounds abandoned lots does nothing to obscure the…

  14. Thermal Performance Analysis of Solar Collectors Installed for Combisystem in the Apartment Building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žandeckis, A.; Timma, L.; Blumberga, D.; Rochas, C.; Rošā, M.

    2012-01-01

    The paper focuses on the application of wood pellet and solar combisystem for space heating and hot water preparation at apartment buildings under the climate of Northern Europe. A pilot project has been implemented in the city of Sigulda (N 57° 09.410 E 024° 52.194), Latvia. The system was designed and optimised using TRNSYS - a dynamic simulation tool. The pilot project was continuously monitored. To the analysis the heat transfer fluid flow rate and the influence of the inlet temperature on the performance of solar collectors were subjected. The thermal performance of a solar collector loop was studied using a direct method. A multiple regression analysis was carried out using STATGRAPHICS Centurion 16.1.15 with the aim to identify the operational and weather parameters of the system which cause the strongest influence on the collector's performance. The parameters to be used for the system's optimisation have been evaluated.

  15. Apartment Compartmentalization With an Aerosol-Based Sealing Process

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.; Berger, D.; Harrington, C.

    2015-03-01

    Air sealing of building enclosures is a difficult and time-consuming process. Current methods in new construction require laborers to physically locate small and sometimes large holes in multiple assemblies and then manually seal each of them. The innovation demonstrated under this research study was the automated air sealing and compartmentalization of buildings through the use of an aerosolized sealant, developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at University of California Davis. CARB sought to demonstrate this new technology application in a multifamily building in Queens, NY. The effectiveness of the sealing process was evaluated by three methods: air leakage testing of overall apartment before and after sealing, point-source testing of individual leaks, and pressure measurements in the walls of the target apartment during sealing.

  16. 43. CUTTING APART PIECES OF A MOSAIC. WHEN SEPARATED, THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. CUTTING APART PIECES OF A MOSAIC. WHEN SEPARATED, THE PIECES CAN BE INDIVIDUALLY GLAZED, SMOKED, OR FINISH FIRED TO PRODUCE A MULTI-COLORED IMAGE WHEN REASSEMBLED. NOTE THE SUBSTITUTION OF BUFF FOR RED CLAY IN SEVERAL PIECES OF MOSAIC ON THE LEFT. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  17. Indoor Environmental Quality Benefits of Apartment Energy Retrofits

    SciTech Connect

    Noris, Federico; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Delp, William W.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Russell, Marion; Singer, Brett C.; Spears, Michael; Vermeer, Kimberly; Fisk, William J.

    2013-06-01

    Sixteen apartments serving low-income populations in three buildings were retrofit with the goal of simultaneously reducing energy consumption and improving indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Retrofit measures varied among apartments and included, among others, envelope sealing, installation of continuous mechanical ventilation systems, upgrading bathroom fans and range hoods, attic insulation, replacement of heating and cooling systems, and adding wall-mounted particle air cleaners. IEQ parameters were measured, generally for two one-week periods before and after the retrofits. The measurements indicate an overall improvement in IEQ conditions after the retrofits. Comfort conditions, bathroom humidity, and concentrations of carbon dioxide, acetaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, and particles generally improved. Formaldehyde and nitrogen dioxide levels decreased in the building with the highest concentrations, were unchanged in a second building, and increased in a third building. IEQ parameters other than particles improved more in apartments with continuous mechanical ventilation systems installed. In general, but not consistently, larger percent increases in air exchange rates were associated with larger percent decreases in indoor levels of the pollutants that primarily come from indoor sources.

  18. Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage of Apartments and Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Price, P.N.; Shehabi, A.; Chan, R.W.; Gadgil, A.J.

    2006-06-01

    We compiled and analyzed available data concerning indoor-outdoor air leakage rates and building leakiness parameters for commercial buildings and apartments. We analyzed the data, and reviewed the related literature, to determine the current state of knowledge of the statistical distribution of air exchange rates and related parameters for California buildings, and to identify significant gaps in the current knowledge and data. Very few data were found from California buildings, so we compiled data from other states and some other countries. Even when data from other developed countries were included, data were sparse and few conclusive statements were possible. Little systematic variation in building leakage with construction type, building activity type, height, size, or location within the u.s. was observed. Commercial buildings and apartments seem to be about twice as leaky as single-family houses, per unit of building envelope area. Although further work collecting and analyzing leakage data might be useful, we suggest that a more important issue may be the transport of pollutants between units in apartments and mixed-use buildings, an under-studied phenomenon that may expose occupants to high levels of pollutants such as tobacco smoke or dry cleaning fumes.

  19. Centres of excellence.

    PubMed

    Watson, J M

    1980-05-16

    The present Government may not be enthusiastic about health centres. But Dr Joyce M. Watson, of Glasgow University Department of General Practice and based at Woodside Health Centre in Glasgow, writes with enthusiasm of their advantages for the practice of medicine and the care of patients. PMID:10247174

  20. VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST OF CITY OF GREENBELT SPRINGHILL LAKE RECREATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST OF CITY OF GREENBELT SPRINGHILL LAKE RECREATION CENTER, 6101 CHERRYWOOD LANE. NOTE CLUBHOUSE FROM FORMER SPRINGHILL LAKE GOLF COURSE IN FOREGROUND. - Springhill Lake Apartments, 9230 Edmonston Road, Greenbelt, Prince George's County, MD

  1. Newporter Apartments: Deep Energy Retrofit Short-Term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, A.; Howard, L.; Kunkle, R.; Lubliner, M.; Auer, D.; Clegg, Z.

    2012-12-01

    This project demonstrates a path to meet the goal of the Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30% in multi-family buildings. The project demonstrates cost effective energy savings targets as well as improved comfort and indoor environmental quality (IEQ) associated with deep energy retrofits by a large public housing authority as part of a larger rehabilitation effort. The project focuses on a typical 1960's vintage low-rise multi-family apartment community (120 units in three buildings).

  2. Newporter Apartments. Deep Energy Retrofit Short Term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Andrew; Howard, Luke; Kunkle, Rick; Lubliner, Michael; Auer, Dan; Clegg, Zach

    2012-12-01

    This project demonstrates a path to meet the goal of the Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30% in multi-family buildings. The project demonstrates cost-effective energy savings targets as well as improved comfort and indoor environmental quality (IEQ) associated with deep energy retrofits by a large public housing authority as part of a larger rehabilitation effort. The project focuses on a typical 1960’s vintage low-rise multi-family apartment community (120 units in three buildings).

  3. Characterization of the variation of carbonyl compounds concentrations before, during, and after the renovation of an apartment at Niterói, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Soraya de Mendonça; Furtado, Leonardo de Almeida; Cerqueira, Wildson Vieira; Pereira Netto, Annibal Duarte

    2016-08-01

    The present work reports the variation of 31 carbonyl compounds (CC) in an apartment located at Niterói City, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Eight sampling campaigns were conducted through a 1-year period, and three areas (living room, kitchen, and bedroom) were evaluated before, during, and after the renovation activities and reoccupation of the apartment. Samples were collected using SEP-PAK cartridges impregnated with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine, and the hydrazones were analyzed using rapid resolution liquid chromatography with UV detection. The lowest total concentration of CC (19.0 ± 1.5 μg m(-3)) was found before the renovation when the apartment was empty, but door varnishing resulted in highest contamination of the apartment (1386 ± 384 μg m(-3)); however, an important dispersion of CC was observed in the subsequent sampling (148 ± 1.8 μg m(-3)). After apartment reoccupation, the indoor contamination seemed to depend on the routine activities taken there, such as household product use and cooking activities, but apparently, local temperature increase favored the vaporization of the volatile CC from the building materials in the apartment. As far as we are concerned, this is the first study comparing the concentrations of 31 CC in residential areas before, during, and after renovation activities taken in Brazil. PMID:27130339

  4. West Village Student Housing Phase I: Apartment Monitoring and Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    German, A.; Bell, C.; Dakin, B.; Hoeschele, M.

    2014-06-01

    Building America team Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) worked with the University of California, Davis (UC Davis) and the developer partner West Village Community Partnership (WVCP) to evaluate performance on 192 student apartments completed in September, 2011 as part of Phase I of the multi-purpose West Village project. West Village, the largest planned zero net energy community in the United States. The campus neighborhood is designed to enable faculty, staff and students to affordably live near campus, take advantage of environmentally friendly transportation options, and participate fully in campus life. The aggressive energy efficiency measures that are incorporated in the design contribute to source energy reductions of 37% over the B10 Benchmark. The energy efficiency measures that are incorporated into these apartments include increased wall & attic insulation, high performance windows, high efficiency heat pumps for heating and cooling, central heat pump water heaters (HPWHs), 100% high efficacy lighting, and ENERGY STAR major appliances. Results discuss how measured energy use compares to modeling estimates over a 10 month monitoring period and includes a cost effective evaluation.

  5. Pretoria Centre Reaches Out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosman, Olivier

    2014-08-01

    On 5 July 2014 six members of the Pretoria Centre of ASSA braved the light pollution of one of the shopping malls in Centurion to reach out to shoppers a la John Dobson and to show them the moon, Mars and Saturn. Although the centre hosts regular monthly public observing evenings, it was felt that we should take astronomy to the people rather than wait for the people to come to us.

  6. Bound by Children: Intermittent Cohabitation and Living Together Apart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross-Barnet, Caitlin; Cherlin, Andrew; Burton, Linda

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we examine variations in low-income mothers' patterns of intermittent cohabitation and the voluntary and involuntary nature of these unions. Intermittent cohabitation involves couples living together and separating in repeating cycles. Using Three-City Study ethnographic data, we identified 45 low-income mothers involved in these…

  7. Reducing The Operating Costs Of An Apartment Building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takács, Ján; Rácz, Lukáš

    2015-09-01

    Circulation pumps are mechanical devices, which are used to create the overpressure required for the transportation of a heat-transfer medium in heating technology as well as in other related technologies. In a circulation pump the mechanical energy generated by the drive machine - an electric motor is transformed to hydraulic energy, which consists of kinetic and static energy. In the pipeline of a heating system circulation pumps represent a source of hydraulic energy (positive differential pressure), which is consumed to transport the heat-transfer medium. During the flow, the heat-transfer medium puts up resistance to the so-called passive resistors, which consist of pressure losses from friction in the pipes and pressure losses due to local resistance. In this article the authors analyze the effect of a circulation pump on the operating costs in an apartment building. Different types of circulating pumps, ranging from the most unfavorable to the optimal, were selected.

  8. 50. The apartment building on the left (164166 West Granite) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. The apartment building on the left (164-166 West Granite) was built about 1885-1886, and was used as a combination of residence and rooming house. It is one of the few remaining wood-frame structures dating from the beginning of Butte's economic and building development. Modifications, both interior and exterior, have been minimal, and the historic integrity of the structure has been retained. The Courthouse Grocery on the right (ca. 1887), is another early wood-frame building, and was also originally used as a residence and rooming house. It was modified in the early 20th century to accomodate commercial use on the ground floor, but the historic fabric of the structure is largely intact. - Butte Historic District, Bounded by Copper, Arizona, Mercury & Continental Streets, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

  9. Cenozoic pull-apart basins in southwest Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppel, E.T. )

    1991-06-01

    Faults and fault zones bounding the mountain ranges of southwest Montana commonly have been described as normal faults, and the region has been considered to be a northern extension of the Basin and Range. New geologic mapping suggests, however, that Cenozoic movements along most of the zones of steep faults in southwest Montana and in east-central Idaho have been strike-slip, and the intermontane basins appear to be pull-aparts. The principal fault zones trend about north, northwest, east, and north-northeast; the north-trending zones are Cenozoic in age, but the others are of Archean ancestry and are rooted in basement rocks. These faults break the region into rhomboidal mountain blocks separated by broad basins with parallel sides. The basins are as much as 5,000 m deep, and their floors are deeply indented by centers of subsidence wherre they are crossed by major fault zones. The basins are floored by Archean or Proterozoic rocks and are filled with tuffaceous sedimentary rocks of late Oligocene to late Miocene age. The Big Hole basin and the smaller basins in upper Grasshopper Creek and Horse Prairie are interpreted to be pull-aparts between zones of east-trending right-lateral faults. The cratonic basins farther east in southwest Montana are interpreted to be basement-floored openings between mountain blocks that have been separated by subcrustal flow to the northwest. The interpretations suggest that significant accumulations of oil or gas are not likely to be found in this region.

  10. Education Cities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaked, Haim

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, several cities in Israel have labeled themselves "Education Cities," concentrating on education as their central theme. Employing qualitative techniques, this article aims to describe, define, and conceptualize this phenomenon as it is being realized in three such cities. Findings show that Education Cities differ from…

  11. Lidar Calibration Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Freudenthaler, Volker; Nicolae, Doina; Mona, Lucia; Belegante, Livio; D'Amico, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the newly established Lidar Calibration Centre, a distributed infrastructure in Europe, whose goal is to offer services for complete characterization and calibration of lidars and ceilometers. Mobile reference lidars, laboratories for testing and characterization of optics and electronics, facilities for inspection and debugging of instruments, as well as for training in good practices are open to users from the scientific community, operational services and private sector. The Lidar Calibration Centre offers support for trans-national access through the EC HORIZON2020 project ACTRIS-2.

  12. Energy Impacts of Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits of Apartments in California

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Norris, Federico; Singer, Brett C.

    2013-11-01

    Monthly gas and electricity use data from a set of 13 study apartments and 20 control apartments from three apartment buildings (B1 B3) in California were analyzed. The study apartments were retrofit with simultaneous energy savings and indoor environmental quality (IEQ) improvements as the goal. The control apartments were not retrofit. Pre-retrofit modeling indicated annual energy savings of 21percent, 17percent, and 27percent for the study apartments in B1-B3, respectively. Based on a comparison of changes in energy use of study apartments to energy use changes of control apartments, total measured savings of gas energy plus site electrical energy were 28percent in B1, 5percent in B2, and 3percent in B3. Given the small number of study apartments and the substantial changes in energy use within control apartments, the project yielded no conclusive evidence of energy savings. Apartment energy use increased with number of occupants and with floor area; however, the association with occupancy was most evident. Climate differences did not appear to be the major driver for the variability in energy use among apartments. Changes in occupant behaviors affecting energy use may have overwhelmed and obscured the energy savings in this small number of buildings. Much larger prior studies employing similar retrofits indicate that the retrofits usually do save energy.

  13. Remotely Telling Humans and Computers Apart: An Unsolved Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Castro, Carlos Javier; Ribagorda, Arturo

    The ability to tell humans and computers apart is imperative to protect many services from misuse and abuse. For this purpose, tests called CAPTCHAs or HIPs have been designed and put into production. Recent history shows that most (if not all) can be broken given enough time and commercial interest: CAPTCHA design seems to be a much more difficult problem than previously thought. The assumption that difficult-AI problems can be easily converted into valid CAPTCHAs is misleading. There are also some extrinsic problems that do not help, especially the big number of in-house designs that are put into production without any prior public critique. In this paper we present a state-of-the-art survey of current HIPs, including proposals that are now into production. We classify them regarding their basic design ideas. We discuss current attacks as well as future attack paths, and we also present common errors in design, and how many implementation flaws can transform a not necessarily bad idea into a weak CAPTCHA. We present examples of these flaws, using specific well-known CAPTCHAs. In a more theoretical way, we discuss the threat model: confronted risks and countermeasures. Finally, we introduce and discuss some desirable properties that new HIPs should have, concluding with some proposals for future work, including methodologies for design, implementation and security assessment.

  14. West Village Student Housing Phase I: Apartment Monitoring and Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    German, A.; Bell, C.; Dakin, B.; Hoeschele, M.

    2014-06-01

    Building America team Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) worked with the University of California, Davis and the developer partner West Village Community Partnership (WVCP) to evaluate performance on 192 student apartments completed in September, 2011 as part of Phase I of the multi-purpose West Village project. West Village is the largest planned zero net energy community in the United States. The campus neighborhood is designed to enable faculty, staff, and students to affordably live near campus, take advantage of environmentally friendly transportation options, and participate fully in campus life. The aggressive energy efficiency measures that are incorporated in the design contribute to source energy reductions of 37% over the B10 Benchmark. These measures include increased wall and attic insulation, high performance windows, high efficiency heat pumps for heating and cooling, central heat pump water heaters (HPWHs), 100% high efficacy lighting, and ENERGY STAR major appliances. The report discusses how measured energy use compares to modeling estimates over a 10-month monitoring period and includes a cost effective evaluation.

  15. Living Together Apart in France and the United States

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Claude; Cherlin, Andrew; Cross-Barnet, Caitlin

    2014-01-01

    Union formation involves a number of stages, as does union dissolution, and new couples often spend an initial period in a non-cohabiting intimate relationship. Yet while certain couples never share the same dwelling, “living apart together”1 has not developed widely as a long-term lifestyle option. Claude Martin in France, and Andrew Cherlin and Caitlin Cross-Barnet in the United States have studied a symmetrical phenomenon, that of couples who continue to live together while considering themselves to be separated. In this article, they draw together their analyses to describe an arrangement which, while marginal, reveals situations where residential separation is not possible, either because of the need to keep up appearances, often for the children’s sake, or because total separation is too frightening or living in separate homes is unaffordable. Beyond the differences between the two countries and the two survey fields, the authors analyse the ways in which persons who “live together apart” describe their loveless relationship that has led to explicit conjugal separation within a shared home. PMID:25170338

  16. Do Pions Pull or Push the Nucleons Apart?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2004-10-01

    My derivation of the strong force coupling constant, a conventional calculation, my optical probing, direction of string theory, some observations, Einstein's view and more [1], [2] give compelling reasons for the existence of strong gravity, raising a question about the Nature's purpose of pions. Could pions be pushing the nucleons apart to stop gravitational collapse of the nucleus? Its observed range limited to the size of nuclei is logically consistent with this possibility. Since the spin-dependent nuclear force could be negative or positive, its tiny long-range effects can add an indistinguishable negative component to gravitation. Repulsive gravity in expanding universe implies negative gravity at cosmic scale too. Since graviton is based on positive gravity, a second question rises if photons, theorized to mediate both, positive and negative forces, could be the particles mediating gravity. These questions lie at the heart of our understanding of other important issues. References: [1] Gravity and Nuclear Forces: A Potential Link, arXiv.org/pdf/physics/0210040 by Shantilal G. Goradia [2] http://www.gravityresearchinstitute.org

  17. Microbial investigation of the air in an apartment building.

    PubMed Central

    Simard, C.; Trudel, M.; Paquette, G.; Payment, P.

    1983-01-01

    The microbial and viral flora in the ventilating ducts of an apartment building was evaluated. Several types of sampler (slit sampler, Andersen sampler, large volume air sampler) were used to evaluate the hourly, weekly and seasonal variation of this flora. The mean bacterial concentration was 17.2 e.f.u./m3 with a maximum level at 07.30 h (41.3 c.f.u./m3) and a minimal concentration in the early afternoon (8 c.f.u./m3). The bacterial concentration observed correlated with the relative humidity in the air-ducts although there were no seasonal differences. The bacteria were mainly gram-positive cocci (73.5%) represented by a large number of Micrococcaceae (47.1%); gram-positive bacilli accounted for 14.2% of the isolates, gram-negative bacilli 12.0% and gram-negative cocci 0.3%. The majority of the bacteria-carrying particles were in the respirable range with 80.4% of them being less than 5 microns. The methods used did not result in the isolation of viruses during the winter sampling period. PMID:6358346

  18. Implementing Responsibility Centre Budgeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vonasek, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Recently, institutes of higher education (universities) have shown a renewed interest in organisational structures and operating methodologies that generate productivity and innovation; responsibility centre budgeting (RCB) is one such process. This paper describes the underlying principles constituting RCB, its origin and structural elements, and…

  19. Maple Leaf Outdoor Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguire, Molly; Gunton, Ric

    2000-01-01

    Maple Leaf Outdoor Centre (Ontario) has added year-round outdoor education facilities and programs to help support its summer camp for disadvantaged children. Schools, youth centers, religious groups, and athletic teams conduct their own programs, collaborate with staff, or use staff-developed programs emphasizing adventure education and personal…

  20. The GSO Data Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paletou, F.; Glorian, J.-M.; Génot, V.; Rouillard, A.; Petit, P.; Palacios, A.; Caux, E.; Wakelam, V.

    2015-12-01

    Hereafter we describe the activities of the Grand Sud-Ouest Data Centre operated for INSU (CNRS) by the OMP--IRAP and the Université Paul Sabatier in Toulouse, in a collaboration with the OASU--LAB in Bordeaux and OREME--LUPM in Montpellier.

  1. Wycheproof Education Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetnam and Godfrey, Melbourne (Australia).

    The Wycheproof township in New South Wales (Australia) is the regional center for a grain farming community. The Wycheproof Education Centre was formed by the merger of a separate primary and secondary school (on one site with existing buildings), into a single governing body that is educationally structured into junior, middle, and senior…

  2. Astronomers detect matter torn apart by black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Astronomers have used two different telescopes simultaneously to study the violent flares from the supermassive black hole in the centre of the Milky Way. They have detected outbursts from this region, known as Sagittarius A*, which reveal material being stretched out as it orbits in the intense gravity close to the central black hole. Glowing Stellar Nurseries ESO PR Photo 41/08 Submillimetre and infrared view of the Galactic Centre The team of European and US astronomers used ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope, both in Chile, to study light from Sagittarius A* at near-infrared wavelengths and the longer submillimetre wavelengths respectively. This is the first time that astronomers have caught a flare with these telescopes simultaneously. The telescopes' location in the southern hemisphere provides the best vantage point for studying the Galactic Centre. "Observations like this, over a range of wavelengths, are really the only way to understand what's going on close to the black hole," says Andreas Eckart of the University of Cologne, who led the team. Sagittarius A* is located at the centre of our own Milky Way Galaxy at a distance from Earth of about 26 000 light-years. It is a supermassive black hole with a mass of about four million times that of the Sun. Most, if not all, galaxies are thought to have a supermassive black hole in their centre. "Sagittarius A* is unique, because it is the nearest of these monster black holes, lying within our own galaxy," explains team member Frederick K. Baganoff of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, USA. "Only for this one object can our current telescopes detect these relatively faint flares from material orbiting just outside the event horizon." The emission from Sagittarius A* is thought to come from gas thrown off by stars, which then orbits and falls into the black hole. Making the simultaneous observations required careful planning between

  3. Space-Centred English Language Learning: The Cyprus Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurt, Mustafa; Kurt, Sevinc

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses a study conducted in the Ledra/Lokmaci Milieu in Cyprus, the area in the centre of the divided walled city of Nicosia where Greek and Turkish Cypriots have to use English to communicate with one another. The aim of the study was to locate the effects of a learning space on language learners, teachers and syllabus designers.…

  4. SPOT4 Management Centre

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labrune, Yves; Labbe, X.; Roussel, A.; Vielcanet, P.

    1994-01-01

    In the context of the CNES SPOT4 program CISI is particularly responsible for the development of the SPOT4 Management Centre, part of the SPOT4 ground control system located at CNES Toulouse (France) designed to provide simultaneous control over two satellites. The main operational activities are timed to synchronize with satellite visibilities (ten usable passes per day). The automatic capability of this system is achieved through agenda services (sequence of operations as defined and planned by operator). Therefore, the SPOT4 Management Centre offers limited, efficient and secure human interventions for supervision and decision making. This paper emphasizes the main system characteristics as degree of automation, level of dependability and system parameterization.

  5. Elderly Care Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagiman, Aliani; Haja Bava Mohidin, Hazrina; Ismail, Alice Sabrina

    2016-02-01

    The demand for elderly centre has increased tremendously abreast with the world demographic change as the number of senior citizens rose in the 21st century. This has become one of the most crucial problems of today's era. As the world progress into modernity, more and more people are occupied with daily work causing the senior citizens to lose the care that they actually need. This paper seeks to elucidate the best possible design of an elderly care centre with new approach in order to provide the best service for them by analysing their needs and suitable activities that could elevate their quality of life. All these findings will then be incorporated into design solutions so as to enhance the living environment for the elderly especially in Malaysian context.

  6. SPOT4 Management Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrune, Yves; Labbe, X.; Roussel, A.; Vielcanet, P.

    1994-11-01

    In the context of the CNES SPOT4 program CISI is particularly responsible for the development of the SPOT4 Management Centre, part of the SPOT4 ground control system located at CNES Toulouse (France) designed to provide simultaneous control over two satellites. The main operational activities are timed to synchronize with satellite visibilities (ten usable passes per day). The automatic capability of this system is achieved through agenda services (sequence of operations as defined and planned by operator). Therefore, the SPOT4 Management Centre offers limited, efficient and secure human interventions for supervision and decision making. This paper emphasizes the main system characteristics as degree of automation, level of dependability and system parameterization.

  7. Children's Preferences for Group Musical Activities in Child Care Centres: A Cross-Cultural Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yim, Hoi Yin Bonnie; Ebbeck, Marjory

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a cross-cultural research study of children's preferences for group musical activities in child care centres. A total of 228 young children aged 4-5 years in seven child care centres in Hong Kong and in the Adelaide City of South Australia participated in the study. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected via a…

  8. Can Chemistry Teachers' Centres Survive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garforth, F. M.

    1972-01-01

    The difficulties faced by the Hull Chemistry Teachers' Centre in England are discussed. The lack of finances and time, as well as organizational difficulties in relationship with Science Centres and universities are among the problems. (TS)

  9. The DESY Grid Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haupt, A.; Gellrich, A.; Kemp, Y.; Leffhalm, K.; Ozerov, D.; Wegner, P.

    2012-12-01

    DESY is one of the world-wide leading centers for research with particle accelerators, synchrotron light and astroparticles. DESY participates in LHC as a Tier-2 center, supports on-going analyzes of HERA data, is a leading partner for ILC, and runs the National Analysis Facility (NAF) for LHC and ILC in the framework of the Helmholtz Alliance, Physics at the Terascale. For the research with synchrotron light major new facilities are operated and built (FLASH, PETRA-III, and XFEL). DESY furthermore acts as Data-Tier1 centre for the Neutrino detector IceCube. Established within the EGI-project DESY operates a grid infrastructure which supports a number of virtual Organizations (VO), incl. ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb. Furthermore, DESY hosts some of HEP and non-HEP VOs, such as the HERA experiments and ILC as well as photon science communities. The support of the new astroparticle physics VOs IceCube and CTA is currently set up. As the global structure of the grid offers huge resources which are perfect for batch-like computing, DESY has set up the National Analysis Facility (NAF) which complements the grid to allow German HEP users for efficient data analysis. The grid infrastructure and the NAF use the same physics data which is distributed via the grid. We call the conjunction of grid and NAF the DESY Grid Centre. In the contribution to CHEP2012 we will in depth discuss the conceptional and operational aspects of our multi-VO and multi-community Grid Centre and present the system setup. We will in particular focus on the interplay of Grid and NAF and present experiences of the operations.

  10. Volatile organic compound concentrations, emission rates, and source apportionment in newly-built apartments at pre-occupancy stage.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung H; Jo, Wan K

    2012-10-01

    The present study investigated the indoor concentrations of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and formaldehyde and their indoor emission characteristics in newly-built apartments at the pre-occupancy stage. In total, 107 apartments were surveyed for indoor and outdoor VOC concentrations in two metropolitan cities and one rural area in Korea. A mass balanced model was used to estimate surface area-specific emission rates of individual VOCs and formaldehyde. Seven (benzene, ethyl benzene, toluene, m,p-xylene, o-xylene, n-hexane, and n-heptane) of 40 target compounds were detectable in all indoor air samples, whereas the first five were detected in all outdoor air samples. Formaldehyde was also predominant in the indoor air samples, with a high detection frequency of 96%. The indoor concentrations were significantly higher than the outdoor concentrations for aromatics, alcohols, terpenes, and ketones. However, six halogenated VOCs exhibited similar concentrations for indoor and outdoor air samples, suggesting that they are not major components emitted from building materials. It was also suggested that a certain portion of the apartments surveyed were constructed by not following the Korean Ministry of Environment guidelines for formaldehyde emissions. Toluene exhibited the highest emission rate with a median value of 138 μg m(-2) h(-1). The target compounds with median emission rates greater than 20 μg m(-2) h(-1) were toluene, 1-propanol, formaldehyde, and 2-butanone. The wood panels/vinyl floor coverings were the largest indoor pollutant source, followed by floorings, wall coverings, adhesives, and paints. The wood panels/vinyl floor coverings contributed nearly three times more to indoor VOC concentrations than paints. PMID:22698369

  11. Building characterization and aerosol infiltration into a naturally ventilated three-story apartment building.

    PubMed

    Rodes, Charles E; Vanosdell, Douglas W; Portzer, Jeffrey W; Seagraves, Jeremy; Hahn, Intaek; Henkle, Stacy W; Wiener, Russell W

    2009-12-01

    Understanding infiltration of outdoor pollutants was an integral part of the Brooklyn Traffic Real-Time Ambient Pollutant Penetration and Environmental Dispersion (B-TRAPPED) study. For this reason, the structural and air exchange properties of the three-story row house in Brooklyn, NY, USA, that was used in the B-TRAPPED experiments were fully characterized. Factors investigated included representativeness of the construction and impact of building design features on the natural ventilation and infiltration of outdoor aerosol. Both blower door and perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) air exchange rate (AER) experiments showed that the ventilation rates of the building were quite typical of similar structures in the New York City (NYC) metropolitan area. Indoor/outdoor (I/O) aerosol count ratios by particle size were comparable to a similar vintage naturally ventilated building in Boston, MA, USA. I/O ratio analyses were consistent with literature findings and showed I/O ratios ranging from 0.310 to 0.601, varying across particle sizes (from 0.3 to 5.0 [corrected] mum) and between first and second floor apartments. An effort to apply the rebound method of Thatcher et al. (Aerosol Sci. Technol., 2003, 37, 847-864) in determining aerosol infiltration rates proved unsuccessful due to unexpectedly long (>60 min) equilibration times after the filtration period. Uninsulated interior wall renovations in the study house created a cavity that resulted in a large intermediate dead volume (for infiltration) that apparently could not be accommodated by a simple infiltration model. Simple two-compartment models evidently have finite application limitations for even modestly complex settings. PMID:20024015

  12. 20 CFR 404.349 - When is a child living apart from me in my care?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., and help in his or her upbringing and development. (b) Not in your care. A child living apart from you... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false When is a child living apart from me in my... Benefits; Period of Disability Benefits for Spouses and Divorced Spouses § 404.349 When is a child...

  13. 20 CFR 404.349 - When is a child living apart from me in my care?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., and help in his or her upbringing and development. (b) Not in your care. A child living apart from you... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false When is a child living apart from me in my... Benefits; Period of Disability Benefits for Spouses and Divorced Spouses § 404.349 When is a child...

  14. 20 CFR 404.349 - When is a child living apart from me in my care?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., and help in his or her upbringing and development. (b) Not in your care. A child living apart from you... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When is a child living apart from me in my... Benefits; Period of Disability Benefits for Spouses and Divorced Spouses § 404.349 When is a child...

  15. 40. PHOTOGRAPHY OF ORIGINAL PLAN (MINNEAPOLIS CITY ENGINEER) PLAN OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. PHOTOGRAPHY OF ORIGINAL PLAN (MINNEAPOLIS CITY ENGINEER) PLAN OF SOUTH HALF CENTRE PIER, STEEL ARCH BRIDGE (4 x 5 negative) - Steel Arch Bridge, Hennepin Avenue spanning west channel of Mississippi River, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  16. [The primary healthcare centres].

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Antonio; Maciocco, Gavino

    2014-04-01

    The central attributes of primary care are: first contact (accessibility), longitudinality (person- focused preventive and curative care overtime), patient-oriented comprehensiveness and coordination (including navigation towards secondary and tertiary care). Besides taking care of the needs of the individuals, primary health care teams are also looking at the community, especially when addressing social determinants of health. The rationale for the benefits for primary care for health has been found in: 1) greater access to needed services; 2) better quality of care; 3) a greater focus on prevention; 4) early management of health problems; 5) organizing and delivering high quality care for chronic non-communicable diseases. This paper describes the role of primary healthcare centres in strengthening community primary services and in reducing health inequalities. Furthemore, the experiences of Regional Health Services from Tuscany and Emilia-Romagna are discussed, with a brief overview of the literature. PMID:24770539

  17. Integral Turbulence Statistics Over a Central European City Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortuniak, Krzysztof; Pawlak, Włodzimierz; Siedlecki, Mariusz

    2013-02-01

    Atmospheric measurements over 5 years (2005-2010) at two sites in Łódź, central Poland have been analyzed to develop a better understanding of turbulence in urban areas. Fast response wind velocity, temperature, humidity and CO2 concentration were measured using sonic anemometers and gas analyzers, placed on narrow masts at 37 and 42 m above the ground. The measurements were used to calculate standard deviations of each parameter, and were then normalized according to local Monin-Obukhov similarity theory and plotted as a function of stability parameter ζ = z'/ L. Results for the wind components show typical scaling with a power law with exponent ±1/3 in the free convection limit, and that approaches a constant value close to neutral stratification. For stable conditions, the constant value in the neutral limit remains the same for stability parameters lower than 0.1-0.2, then increases. The normalized standard deviation of temperature fits the -1/3 law in the free convection limit, approaching a constant value within a stable limit. However, it exhibits hyperbolic characteristics for close to neutral stratification. The normalized standard deviations for humidity and CO2 concentration exhibit scaling similar to the wind components in the unstable regime and remain constant in the stable domain. The results for the wind components and for temperature are in the range of various functions found in other studies. The absolute values for humidity and CO2 concentration seem to be slightly higher, but only single examples of such investigations can be found in the literature.

  18. Mexico City

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    ... Mexico City has one of the world's most serious air pollution problems. The city is located atop a high plain at an altitude of ... as the orange and red areas, and mountainous areas appear light blue and green. The position of the clouds within the 70-degree image are ...

  19. City Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dargan, Amanda; Zeitlin, Steve

    2000-01-01

    Today, fewer city blocks preserve the confidence of lifestyle and urban geography that sustain traditional games and outdoor play. Large groups of children choosing sides and organizing Red Rover games are no longer commonplace. Teachers must encourage free play; urban planners must build cities that are safe play havens. (MLH)

  20. Automatic computation for optimum height planning of apartment buildings to improve solar access

    SciTech Connect

    Seong, Yoon-Bok; Kim, Yong-Yee; Seok, Ho-Tae; Choi, Jeong-Min; Yeo, Myoung-Souk; Kim, Kwang-Woo

    2011-01-15

    The objective of this study is to suggest a mathematical model and an optimal algorithm for determining the height of apartment buildings to satisfy the solar rights of survey buildings or survey housing units. The objective is also to develop an automatic computation model for the optimum height of apartment buildings and then to clarify the performance and expected effects. To accomplish the objective of this study, the following procedures were followed: (1) The necessity of the height planning of obstruction buildings to satisfy the solar rights of survey buildings or survey housing units is demonstrated by analyzing through a literature review the recent trend of disputes related to solar rights and to examining the social requirements in terms of solar rights. In addition, the necessity of the automatic computation system for height planning of apartment buildings is demonstrated and a suitable analysis method for this system is chosen by investigating the characteristics of analysis methods for solar rights assessment. (2) A case study on the process of height planning of apartment buildings will be briefly described and the problems occurring in this process will then be examined carefully. (3) To develop an automatic computation model for height planning of apartment buildings, geometrical elements forming apartment buildings are defined by analyzing the geometrical characteristics of apartment buildings. In addition, design factors and regulations required in height planning of apartment buildings are investigated. Based on this knowledge, the methodology and mathematical algorithm to adjust the height of apartment buildings by automatic computation are suggested and probable problems and the ways to resolve these problems are discussed. Finally, the methodology and algorithm for the optimization are suggested. (4) Based on the suggested methodology and mathematical algorithm, the automatic computation model for optimum height of apartment buildings is

  1. Energy savings from operation and maintenance training for apartment boiler heating systems. An energy study on ten low-income apartments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The Portland Energy Office provided operation and maintenance (O&M) training to the operators of boiler heating systems for ten low-income apartment complexes in the Fall of 1990. This study tracked energy usage before and after O&M training to see if savings occurred. Training was provided on both weatherized and non-weatherized apartments to find out if weatherization impacted the amount of O&M savings to be obtained. Also, energy savings from the O&M training and building shell weatherization are compared. The O&M training averaged about four hours per building. Content was adjusted at each site to match needs of the boiler and operator. The Energy Office also provided a boiler tune-up by a service technician. The training stressed low-cost and no-cost measures which operators could either do themselves or hire service help to implement. It also emphasized boiler safety. Nine of the ten apartment complexes in the study used less energy per heating degree-day after the O&M help. Average savings were 10%. Four apartments chosen randomly as controls had negative savings; they used slightly more energy during the same post-O&M time frame. Weatherized and unweatherized apartments showed similar savings after the O&M help, 10% and 11% percent respectively. Savings from weatherization of six of the apartments in the winter of 1988--1989 were also measured. A low average of only 4% was observed, reflecting negative savings in two buildings.

  2. Analysis of Change in the Wind Speed Ratio according to Apartment Layout and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Hyung, Won-gil; Kim, Young-Moon; You, Ki-Pyo

    2014-01-01

    Apartment complexes in various forms are built in downtown areas. The arrangement of an apartment complex has great influence on the wind flow inside it. There are issues of residents' walking due to gust occurrence within apartment complexes, problems with pollutant emission due to airflow congestion, and heat island and cool island phenomena in apartment complexes. Currently, the forms of internal arrangements of apartment complexes are divided into the flat type and the tower type. In the present study, a wind tunnel experiment and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation were performed with respect to internal wind flows in different apartment arrangement forms. Findings of the wind tunnel experiment showed that the internal form and arrangement of an apartment complex had significant influence on its internal airflow. The wind velocity of the buildings increased by 80% at maximum due to the proximity effects between the buildings. The CFD simulation for relaxing such wind flows indicated that the wind velocity reduced by 40% or more at maximum when the paths between the lateral sides of the buildings were extended. PMID:24688430

  3. The cosmos of the Paris apartment: working-class family life in the nineteenth century.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Eliza

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on Bachelard's notion of “cosmicity” this article investigates the living conditions of Parisian working-class families in the second half of the nineteenth century. Nineteenth-century social critics claimed that the lack of privacy in urban apartments made decent family life impossible. However, evidence from judicial dossiers concerning attentat à la pudeur (intimate assault against children) illuminates the lived experience of children and their families in Paris apartments. Rather than a sharp divide between public and private, children experienced their apartment homes as the core of a social and spatial world under the surveillance of parents, neighbors, and other children. PMID:21158198

  4. Protocol for Maximizing Energy Savings and Indoor Environmental Quality Improvements when Retrofiting Apartments

    SciTech Connect

    Noris, Federico; Delp, William W.; Vermeer, Kimberly; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Singer, Brett C.; Fisk, William J.

    2012-06-18

    The current focus on building energy retrofit provides an opportunity to simultaneously improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Toward this end, we developed a protocol for selecting packages of retrofits that both save energy and improve IEQ in apartments. The protocol specifies the methodology for selecting retrofits from a candidate list while addressing expected energy savings, IEQ impacts, and costs in an integrated manner. Interviews, inspections and measurements are specified to collect the needed input information. The protocol was applied to 17 apartments in three buildings in two different climates within California. Diagnostic measurements and surveys conducted before and after retrofit implementation indicate enhanced apartment performance.

  5. Protocol for maximizing energy savings and indoor environmental quality improvements when retrofitting apartments

    SciTech Connect

    Noris, Federico; Delp, William W.; Vermeer, Kimberly; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Singer, Brett C.; Fisk, William J.

    2013-06-01

    The current focus on building energy retrofit provides an opportunity to simultaneously improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Toward this end, we developed a protocol for selecting packages of retrofits that both save energy and improve IEQ in apartments. The protocol specifies the methodology for selecting retrofits from a candidate list while addressing expected energy savings, IEQ impacts, and costs in an integrated manner. Interviews, inspections and measurements are specified to collect the needed input information. The protocol was applied to 17 apartments in three buildings in two different climates within California. Diagnostic measurements and surveys conducted before and after retrofit implementation indicate enhanced apartment performance.

  6. Patient-centred care: making cancer treatment centres accountable.

    PubMed

    Zucca, Alison; Sanson-Fisher, Rob; Waller, Amy; Carey, Mariko

    2014-07-01

    Patient-centred care is argued to be an essential component in the delivery of quality health and cancer care. This manuscript discusses the need to generate credible data which indicates the quality of patient-centred care provided by cancer treatment centres. Patient-centred care covers six domains including physical comfort; emotional support; respect for patients' preferences and values; integration and coordination; involvement of family and friends; and the provision of information, communication and education to enable patients to understand and make informed decisions about their care. First, we identify priority areas within each domain. Next, we propose three questions that should be asked of every patient across the six domains of patient-centred care. The first question explores whether patients were specifically asked by a healthcare provider at the cancer treatment centre about their concerns, values and preferences. Research indicates that it cannot be assumed that clinicians are aware of patient's needs or preferences in these six areas. Second, if the answer from the patient suggests that they would like assistance, then it would be expected that this would be offered. Thirdly, if the patient indicates that they would like such assistance and it is provided, then it might be expected that the patient would report that the provided assistance did relieve their suffering, or the assistance provided was consistent with their preferences, needs and values. Regular measurement and reporting of these aspects of patient-centred cancer care has the potential to identify deficits and inequities in care delivery, allow for comparisons across treatment centres and stimulate an improvement in the patient-centred care provided to cancer patients. PMID:24696084

  7. CMCC Data Distribution Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisio, Giovanni; Fiore, Sandro; Negro, A.

    2010-05-01

    The CMCC Data Distribution Centre (DDC) is the primary entry point (web gateway) to the CMCC. It is a Data Grid Portal providing a ubiquitous and pervasive way to ease data publishing, climate metadata search, datasets discovery, metadata annotation, data access, data aggregation, sub-setting, etc. The grid portal security model includes the use of HTTPS protocol for secure communication with the client (based on X509v3 certificates that must be loaded into the browser) and secure cookies to establish and maintain user sessions. The CMCC DDC is now in a pre-production phase and it is currently used only by internal users (CMCC researchers and climate scientists). The most important component already available in the CMCC DDC is the Search Engine which allows users to perform, through web interfaces, distributed search and discovery activities by introducing one or more of the following search criteria: horizontal extent (which can be specified by interacting with a geographic map), vertical extent, temporal extent, keywords, topics, creation date, etc. By means of this page the user submits the first step of the query process on the metadata DB, then, she can choose one or more datasets retrieving and displaying the complete XML metadata description (from the browser). This way, the second step of the query process is carried out by accessing to a specific XML document of the metadata DB. Finally, through the web interface, the user can access to and download (partially or totally) the data stored on the storage device accessing to OPeNDAP servers and to other available grid storage interfaces. Requests concerning datasets stored in deep storage will be served asynchronously.

  8. Workshop on Hemispheres Apart: The Origin and Modification of the Martian Crustal Dichotomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the Workshop on Hemispheres Apart: The Origin and Modification of the Martian Crustal Dichotomy, September 30-October 1, 2004, Houston, Texas.

  9. 22. FIRST FLOOR APARTMENT SOUTH BEDROOM INTERIOR SHOWING PAIRED 6LIGHT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. FIRST FLOOR APARTMENT SOUTH BEDROOM INTERIOR SHOWING PAIRED 6-LIGHT OVER 6-LIGHT DOUBLE-HUNG, WOOD-FRAMED WINDOWS. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Lee Vining Creek Hydroelectric System, Triplex Cottage, Lee Vining Creek, Lee Vining, Mono County, CA

  10. Analysis of theoretical and real values of heat consumption in units of the apartment building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavloková, Petra; Richter, Aleš; Janša, Jan

    2016-06-01

    This article is focused on heat consumption in the apartment building and the factors affecting it. The apartment building has three entrances and four over ground floors and one underground floor. In the entire apartment building there are 24 flats, which they are identical (kitchen, bedroom, living room and bathroom). In flats on radiators were installed the ratio heat meters according to Act 318/2012 Coll. by the Metrology Act. The ratio heat meters are used for fair billing of the heat costs for all owners. Continuous monitoring of the actual heat consumption in the flats were collected data of the real heat consumption. The theoretical values of heat consumption were counted in software ENERGIE. The apartment building is divided into24 flats and the calculation was made for each of them. The theoretical and real heat consumption was compared.

  11. Air Monitoring System in Elders' Apartment with QCM Type Gas Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Masashi; Ito, Tsukasa; Shiratori, Seimei

    The gas monitoring system for elders' apartment using QCM sensors was newly developed. The QCM sensors for sulfide gas and ammonia gas were used for this system. The system for bodily wastes was fabricated and applied to nursing care system in elders' apartment. This system is composed by the sensor unit, communication unit and data server. Care person can see whether the linen should be changed or not without seeing over each room. The QCM sensors have some problems such as the interference of humidity and temperature, therefore these influences were dissolved using humidity sensor and temperature sensor as feedback source. The sensors were placed in several points of elders' apartment for 2 weeks. This system can be used in elders' apartment successfully.

  12. Basement structural control on Cretaceous pull-apart basins of the central Eastern Egypt Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, K.; El Kazzaz, Y.; Holdsworth, B.

    2006-12-01

    The present-day Red Sea / Gulf of Suez rift system is attributed to extensional block faulting with along-axis segmentation into sub-basins with different dip polarities. The northwestern margin of the Red Sea - Gulf of Suez rift system is exposed for about 400 km along the northwestern Red Sea coast near Quseir to the tip of the Gulf of Suez at Suez City. This area contains elements of the pre-Red Sea structural pattern which has been viewed in similar terms as one of fault-related basin formation. Four distinct depocenters (sub-basins) separated by complex accommodation zones are present containing 500-700m thick section ranging in age from the Late Cretaceous to the Middle Eocene. Each sub-basin is asymmetric, bounded on one side by a major NW-trending border fault system with large throws (3-6 km in general) with a dominant strata dip direction toward the border fault system. These basins are arranged in en echelon patterns and now form separate elongated ridges surrounded by basement rocks. Our study of the tectonic evolution of the central eastern section of the Gulf of Suez rift and the Northwestern Red Sea has focused on the interaction of pre-existing basement fabrics with the pre-Red Sea structural development. The study involved analysis of LandsatTM images and aerial photographs integrated with results from reconnaissance geological mapping. Our provisional results indicate that the Gebel Um Hammad/Duwi and Hammadat sub-basins were sited in pull-apart structures created by dextral reactivation of E-W to ENE-WSW trending basement fault zones. We show how the basin-bounding fault systems, lower order normal faults and folds in both hangingwall sequences and in basement are compatible with a Late Cretaceous to Early Eocene strike-slip regime. In contrast, the main Red Sea Gulf of Suez rift shows no evidence for strike-slip influence with the main boundary faults cutting across basement fabrics, however, as pointed out by previous authors, rift segmentation

  13. Determination of VOCs in the Indoor Air of a New and a Renovated Apartment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meciarova, Ludmila; Vilcekova, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    This study deals with the occurrence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the indoor environment of a new and a renovated apartment. Qualitative determination of VOCs was carried out with a gas chromatograph with surface acoustic wave detector (GC/SAW). Concentrations of total volatile organic compounds (TVOC) were determined by a photoionization detector with UV lamp. Simultaneously, temperature and relative humidity were monitored with a data logger. The aim of this study was to determine of TVOC concentrations, to use of GC/SAW for determination of individual VOCs in indoor air as well as to predict possible sources of VOCs in these apartments. Measurements were performed after each construction work for better resolution of the contributions of individual materials to the levels of VOC. Mean concentrations of TVOC were 624 μg/m3 in the renovated apartment and 1,686 μg/m3 in the new apartment after completion of all works. The results from the renovated apartment showed that the use of new materials can lead to lower levels of organic compounds in indoor air compared to old materials that were less environmentally friendly. Many types of VOCs were found in both apartments. After reviewing the possible sources, it seems that the main sources of these substances were applied coatings and flooring materials.

  14. Energy savings from operation and maintenance training for apartment boiler heating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tooze, David

    1992-02-01

    The Portland Energy Office provided operation and maintenance (O M) training to the operators of boiler heating systems for ten low-income apartment complexes in the Fall of 1990. This study tracked energy usage before and after O M training to see if savings occurred. Training was provided on both weatherized and non-weatherized apartments to find out if weatherization impacted the amount of O M savings to be obtained. Also, energy savings from the O M training and building shell weatherization are compared. The O M training averaged about four hours per building. Content was adjusted at each site to match needs of the boiler and operator. The Energy Office also provided a boiler tune-up by a service technician. The training stressed low-cost and no-cost measures which operators could either do themselves or hire service help to implement. It also emphasized boiler safety. Nine of the ten apartment complexes in the study used less energy per heating degree-day after the O M help. Average savings were 10%. Four apartments chosen randomly as controls had negative savings; they used slightly more energy during the same post-O M time frame. Weatherized and unweatherized apartments showed similar savings after the O M help, 10% and 11% percent respectively. Savings from weatherization of six of the apartments in the winter of 1988--1989 were also measured. A low average of only 4% was observed, reflecting negative savings in two buildings.

  15. Minister unveils new nanotech centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumé, Belle

    2009-06-01

    Three new nanotechnology research centres are to be set up in France as part of a €70m government plan to help French companies in the sector. Researchers at the new centres, which will be located in Grenoble, Saclay (near Paris) and Toulouse, will be encouraged to collaborate with industry to develop new nanotech-based products. Dubbed NANO-INNOV, the new plan includes €46m for two new buildings at Saclay, with the rest being used to buy new equipment at the three centres and to fund grant proposals from staff to the French National Research Agency (ANR).

  16. Comparison of Three Bed Bug Management Strategies in a Low-Income Apartment Building

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changlu; Saltzmann, Kurt; Bennett, Gary; Gibb, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Bed bug (Cimex lectularius L.) infestations are currently controlled by a variety of non-chemical and chemical methods. There have been few studies on the comparative effectiveness of these control techniques. We evaluated three bed bug management strategies in an apartment building: (1) non-chemical methods only (n = 9); (2) insecticides only (n = 6); and (3) integrated pest management including both non-chemical methods and insecticides (n = 9). The apartments were one-bedroom units occupied by seniors or people with disabilities. Bed bug numbers in each apartment were determined by visual inspection and/or installing intercepting devices under bed and sofa legs. The median (min, max) bed bug counts in the non-chemical methods only, insecticides only, and integrated pest management (IPM) treatment were: 4 (1, 57), 19 (1, 250), and 14 (1, 219), respectively prior to the treatments. The apartments were retreated if found necessary during biweekly to monthly inspections. After 10 weeks, bed bugs were found to be eliminated from 67, 33, and 44% of the apartments in the three treatment groups, respectively. The final (after 10 weeks) median (min, max) bed bug counts in the non-chemical methods only, insecticides only, and IPM treatment were: 0 (0, 134), 11.5 (0, 58), and 1 (0, 38), respectively. There were no significant differences in the speed of bed bug count reduction or the final bed bug counts. Lack of resident cooperation partially contributed to the failure in eliminating bed bugs from some of the apartments. Results of this study suggest that non-chemical methods can effectively eliminate bed bugs in lightly infested apartments. PMID:26466533

  17. Contemporary design for 'landmark' centre.

    PubMed

    2009-08-01

    As one of the UK's largest builders of healthcare facilities, construction company Morgan Ashurst is accustomed to delivering complex, challenging hospital projects. The construction of a new oncology centre at Musgrove Park Hospital, Taunton for Taunton and Somerset NHS Foundation Trust-- said to be the first new stand-alone radiotherapy centre to be built in the UK for almost 20 years--was no exception. Health Estate Journal reports. PMID:19711668

  18. RTEMS Centre - Support and Maintenance Centre to RTEMS Operating System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, H.; Constantino, A.; Freitas, D.; Coutinho, M.; Faustino, S.; Mota, M.; Colaço, P.; Sousa, J.; Dias, L.; Damjanovic, B.; Zulianello, M.; Rufino, J.

    2009-05-01

    RTEMS CENTRE - Support and Maintenance Centre to RTEMS Operating System is a joint ESA/Portuguese Task Force initiative to develop a support and maintenance centre to the Real-Time Executive for Multiprocessor Systems (RTEMS). This paper gives a high level visibility of the progress, the results obtained and the future work in the RTEMS CENTRE [6] and in the RTEMS Improvement [7] projects. RTEMS CENTRE started officially in November 2006, with the RTEMS 4.6.99.2 version. A full analysis of RTEMS operating system was produced. The architecture was analysed in terms of conceptual, organizational and operational concepts. The original objectives [1] of the centre were primarily to create and maintain technical expertise and competences in this RTOS, to develop a website to provide the European Space Community an entry point for obtaining support (http://rtemscentre.edisoft.pt), to design, develop, maintain and integrate some RTEMS support tools (Timeline Tool, Configuration and Management Tools), to maintain flight libraries and Board Support Packages, to develop a strong relationship with the World RTEMS Community and finally to produce some considerations in ARINC-653, DO-178B and ECSS E-40 standards. RTEMS Improvement is the continuation of the RTEMS CENTRE. Currently the RTEMS, version 4.8.0, is being facilitated for a future qualification. In this work, the validation material is being produced following the Galileo Software Standards Development Assurance Level B [5]. RTEMS is being completely tested, errors analysed, dead and deactivated code removed and tests produced to achieve 100% statement and decision coverage of source code [2]. The SW to exploit the LEON Memory Management Unit (MMU) hardware will be also added. A brief description of the expected implementations will be given.

  19. Influence of domestic pets on soil concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus under turfgrass in apartment complexes of Central Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, M.; Aitkenhead-Peterson, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    High nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) watershed loading rates increases the concentration and loads present in urban streams and rivers, resulting in eutrophication and degradation of surface water quality. Domestic pet animal feed may represent a significant proportion of nitrogen loading in urban watersheds, and because it is deposited directly on the watershed surface may have a large effect on N loads in urban surface waters (Baker et al. 2001). Animal manure has long been used to increase soil N and phosphorus concentrations for the purpose of growing agricultural crops; however, little is known about unintentional urban manuring resulting from a high density of domesticated pets. The purpose of this study is to determine if the presence of domesticated animals in high density urban developments results in increased concentrations of soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC), N, and P and the potential to contribute to loading of urban streams. Composite soil samples from the 0 to 5 cm and 5 to 10 cm soil depth were collected from apartment complexes in Bryan/College Station (BCS) and San Antonio, Texas during August, 2009. Apartment complexes were randomly located around the city and were chosen based on their rules regarding pet ownership. Four apartment complexes that allowed all domestic pets were compared to four that did not allow any domestic pets on the property. A 10:1 water extraction of field moist soil was conducted immediately after sampling. Soil water extracts were analyzed for DOC, total dissolved nitrogen (TDN), nitrate-N, ammonium-N, dissolved organic N, and orthophosphate-P. Results indicated significantly increased concentrations of DOC and N species at both depths in BCS apartments that allowed pets compared to those that did not; however, opposite trends were found in San Antonio. There is a trend for increased concentrations of orthophosphate-P at both locations. Baker, L.A., D. Hope, Y. Xu, et al. 2001. Nitrogen balance for the central Arizona

  20. City Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markle, Sandra

    1989-01-01

    This article provides information on the evolution of the building material, concrete, and suggests hands-on activities that allow students to experience concrete's qualities, test the heat absorbency of various ground surface materials, discover how an area's geology changes, and search for city fossils. A reproducible activity sheet is included.…

  1. Apartment residents' and day care workers' exposures to tetrachloroethylene and deficits in visual contrast sensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Judith S; Hudnell, H Kenneth; Geller, Andrew M; House, Dennis E; Aldous, Kenneth M; Force, Michael S; Langguth, Karyn; Prohonic, Elizabeth J; Parker, Jean C

    2002-01-01

    Tetrachloroethylene (also called perchloroethylene, or perc), a volatile organic compound, has been the predominant solvent used by the dry-cleaning industry for many years. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) classified perc as a hazardous air pollutant because of its potential adverse impact on human health. Several occupational studies have indicated that chronic, airborne perc exposure adversely affects neurobehavioral functions in workers, particularly visual color discrimination and tasks dependent on rapid visual-information processing. A 1995 study by Altmann and colleagues extended these findings, indicating that environmental perc exposure at a mean level of 4,980 microg/m(3) (median=1,360 microg/m(3)) alters neurobehavioral functions in residents living near dry-cleaning facilities. Although the U.S. EPA has not yet set a reference concentration guideline level for environmental exposure to airborne perc, the New York State Department of Health set an air quality guideline of 100 microg/m(3). In the current residential study, we investigated the potential for perc exposure and neurologic effects, using a battery of visual-system function tests, among healthy members of six families living in two apartment buildings in New York City that contained dry-cleaning facilities on the ground floors. In addition, a day care investigation assessed the potential for perc exposure and effects among workers at a day care center located in the same one-story building as a dry-cleaning facility. Results from the residential study showed a mean exposure level of 778 microg/m(3) perc in indoor air for a mean of 5.8 years, and that perc levels in breath, blood, and urine were 1-2 orders of magnitude in excess of background values. Group-mean visual contrast sensitivity (VCS), a measure of the ability to detect visual patterns, was significantly reduced in the 17 exposed study participants relative to unexposed matched-control participants. The groups did not

  2. 24 CFR 221.300 - Changes in the plan of apartment ownership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... AUTHORITIES LOW COST AND MODERATE INCOME MORTGAGE INSURANCE-SAVINGS CLAUSE Contract Rights and Obligations-Low... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Changes in the plan of apartment ownership. 221.300 Section 221.300 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and...

  3. 33. SECOND FLOOR WEST SIDE APARTMENT KITCHEN INTERIOR. 6LIGHT PANEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. SECOND FLOOR WEST SIDE APARTMENT KITCHEN INTERIOR. 6-LIGHT PANEL DOOR AND 6-LIGHT CASEMENT WINDOW AT PHOTO CENTER AND PHOTO RIGHT RESPECTIVELY OPEN TO EXTERIOR STAIRWAY LANDING. VIEW TO WEST. - Lee Vining Creek Hydroelectric System, Triplex Cottage, Lee Vining Creek, Lee Vining, Mono County, CA

  4. Trends in Adolescent Emotional Problems in England: A Comparison of Two National Cohorts Twenty Years Apart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collishaw, Stephan; Maughan, Barbara; Natarajan, Lucy; Pickles, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Background: Evidence about trends in adolescent emotional problems (depression and anxiety) is inconclusive, because few studies have used comparable measures and samples at different points in time. We compared rates of adolescent emotional problems in two nationally representative English samples of youth 20 years apart using identical symptom…

  5. Medication Manager for Child Caring Facilities, MR (Less than 15 Bed Facilities), Supervised Apartment Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Coll. of Education.

    This guide contains materials for use in conducting a 10-hour classroom and laboratory course to train individuals in the safe administration of nonparenteral medications in a 15-bed or smaller residential facility for mentally retarded persons, a child care facility, or a supervised apartment living setting. The guide begins with a course…

  6. The Cultural Impact upon Human Struggle for Social Existence in Chinua Achebe's "Things Fall Apart"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Dessouky, Mohamed Fawzy

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims at introducing an insight into the nature of cultural conflict as depicted in Chinua Achebe's "Things Fall Apart." This study shows how the African black culture represented by Ibo tribe comes into disagreement with the white one imposed by the British imperialism. The greatness of Achebe lies in the vivid description of…

  7. Training Apartment Upkeep Skills to Rehabilitation Clients: A Comparison of Task Analytic Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, George E.; Cuvo, Anthony J.

    1986-01-01

    Six severely handicapped clients were taught to perform upkeep responses on their air conditioner-heating unit, electric range, refrigerator, and electrical appliances. Results showed acquisition, long-term maintenance, and generalization of upkeep skills to a nontraining apartment. General task analyses were recommended for assessment and…

  8. Merchant Marine and Commuter Families: A Comparison of Couples Who Live Apart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Harriet Engel; And Others

    A study compared commuter and Merchant Marine families with traditional households in order to separate effects related to living apart from those related to the career status (single vs. dual) of families. During the study researchers conducted in-depth interviews with 50 wives and 30 husbands representing 58 Merchant Marine families of whom 22…

  9. Worlds Apart in the Curriculum: Heidegger, Technology, and the "Poietic" Attunement of Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magrini, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    In this article I elucidate a conception of small worlds, or "ontological" contexts, within the curriculum that stand out and beyond the horizon of technological-scientific reality, which might be linked with forgotten, marginal ways of being and thinking. As I attempt to demonstrate, it is possible that such ontological worlds apart from…

  10. The Journey Travelled: A View of Two Settings a Decade Apart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parry, John; Rix, Jonathan; Sheehy, Kieron; Simmons, Katy

    2013-01-01

    Inclusion is generally recognised as an ongoing, active process which reflects shifts in policies, practice and values as well as political choices made over long periods of time. Drawing upon research visits set 10 years apart, this study aims to examine how two schools with clear inclusive aspirations and intentions have weathered the last…

  11. Do Environmental Similarities Explain the Similarity in Intelligence of Identical Twins Reared Apart?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouchard, Thomas J., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Taylor (1980) claims to show that the similarity in IQ between monozygotic twins reared apart found in prior studies is due to similarity in their environments. A reanalysis using Taylor's classification of environments but an alternative IQ measure shows that his findings do not constructively replicate. (Author/RD)

  12. Sources of Human Psychological Differences: The Minnesota Study of Twins Reared Apart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouchard, Thomas J., Jr.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Described is an ongoing study of monozygotic and dizygotic twins, separated in infancy and reared apart. Discussed are the procedures and results of this study with interpretations of the results. The effects of parenting, education, and other interventions are considered. (CW)

  13. Chinua Achebe's "Things Fall Apart": Oral and Literary Strategies. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    Chinua Achebe is one of Africa's best-known contemporary writers. His first novel, "Things Fall Apart," deals with the clash of cultures and the violent transitions in life and values brought about by the onset of British colonialism in Nigeria at the end of the 19th century. Published in 1958, just before Nigerian independence, the novel recounts…

  14. Chinua Achebe's "Things Fall Apart": Teaching through the Novel. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    Chinua Achebe is one of Africa's best-known and most influential contemporary writers. His first novel, "Things Fall Apart," is a narrative about the European colonization of Africa told from the viewpoint of the colonized people. Published in 1958, the novel recounts the life of the warrior and village hero Okonkwo and describes the arrival of…

  15. Technology Solutions Case Study: Apartment Compartmentalization with an Aerosol-Based Sealing Process

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-01

    Air sealing of building enclosures is a difficult and time-consuming process. Current methods in new construction require laborers to physically locate small and sometimes large holes in multiple assemblies and then manually seal each of them. This research study by Building America team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings demonstrated the automated air sealing and compartmentalization of buildings through the use of an aerosolized sealant developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at University of California Davis. CARB demonstrated this new technology application in a multifamily building in Queens, NY. The effectiveness of the sealing process was evaluated by three methods: air leakage testing of overall apartment before and after sealing, point-source testing of individual leaks, and pressure measurements in the walls of the target apartment during sealing. Aerosolized sealing was successful by several measures in this study. Many individual leaks that are labor-intensive to address separately were well sealed by the aerosol particles. In addition, many diffuse leaks that are difficult to identify and treat were also sealed. The aerosol-based sealing process resulted in an average reduction of 71% in air leakage across three apartments and an average apartment airtightness of 0.08 CFM50/SF of enclosure area.

  16. 26 CFR 1.66-2 - Treatment of community income where spouses live apart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Treatment of community income where spouses live apart. 1.66-2 Section 1.66-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Definition of Gross Income, Adjusted Gross Income, and Taxable Income § 1.66-2...

  17. Parallel line raster eliminates ambiguities in reading timing of pulses less than 500 microseconds apart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, A. P.

    1966-01-01

    Parallel horizontal line raster is used for precision timing of events occurring less than 500 microseconds apart for observation of hypervelocity phenomena. The raster uses a staircase vertical deflection and eliminates ambiguities in reading timing of pulses close to the end of each line.

  18. A Calculated Gamble Pays Off: Villa Julie College's Leasing of Off-Campus Apartments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    June, Audrey Williams

    2007-01-01

    Officials at Villa Julie College marvel at how quickly the institution's transformation took place, from serving commuters to becoming a much more residential campus. As recently as the 2003-2004 academic year, Villa Julie, located in an affluent suburb of Baltimore, was leasing off-campus apartments to house more than 300 students because zoning…

  19. Questioning Centre-Periphery Platforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Postiglione, Gerard A.

    2005-01-01

    How much is hegemony and how much is self-determination in the higher education systems in Southeast Asia? This paper argues that while the question of centre and periphery is still relevant to the analysis of international university systems, the analytical frameworks from which it has arisen may lose viability in the long term. Southeast Asian…

  20. Normal block faulting in the Airport Graben, Managua pull-apart rift, Nicaragua: gravity and magnetic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-Enriquez, J. O.; Zambrana Arias, X.; Keppie, D.; Ramón Márquez, V.

    2012-12-01

    Regional scale models have been proposed for the Nicaraguan depression: 1) parallel rifting of the depression (and volcanic front) due to roll back of the underlying subducted Cocos plate; 2) right-lateral strike-slip faulting parallel to the depression and locally offset by pull-apart basins; 3) right-lateral strike-slip faulting parallel to the depression and offset by left-lateral transverse or bookshelf faults. At an intermediate scale, Funk et al. (2011) interpret the depression as half graben type structures. The E-W Airport graben lies in the southeastern part of the Managua graben (Nicaragua), across which the active Central American volcanic arc is dextrally offset, possibly the result of a subducted transform fault where the subduction angle changes. The Managua graben lies within the late Quaternary Nicaragua depression produced by backarc rifting during roll back of the Middle American Trench. The Managua graben formed as a pull-apart rift associated with dextral bookshelf faulting during dextral shear between the forearc and arc and is the locus of two historical, large earthquakes that destroyed the city of Managua. In order to asses future earthquake risk, four E-W gravity and magnetic profiles were undertaken to determine its structure across the Airport graben, which is bounded by the Cofradia and Airport fault zones, to the east and west, respectively. These data indicated the presence of a series of normal faults bounding down-thrown and up-thrown fault blocks and a listric normal fault, Sabana Grande Fault. The models imply that this area has been subjected to tectonic extension. These faults appear to be part of the bookshelf suite and will probably be the locus of future earthquakes, which could destroy the airport and surrounding part of Managua. Three regional SW-NE gravity profiles running from the Pacific Ocean up to the Caribbean See indicate a change in crustal structure: from north to south the crust thins. According to these regional

  1. Physics and New York City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bederson, Benjamin

    When I was approached by the editors of Physics in Perspective to prepare an article on New York City for The Physical Tourist section, I was happy to do so. I have been a New Yorker all my life, except for short-term stays elsewhere on sabbatical leaves and other visits. My professional life developed in New York, and I married and raised my family in New York and its environs. Accordingly, writing such an article seemed a natural thing to do. About halfway through its preparation, however, the attack on the World Trade Center took place. From my apartment house I watched as the South Tower collapsed. Writing about New York and the role it has played in the history of physics in the United States and the world has now taken on a very different meaning.

  2. Re-Shaping Teacher Identity? The Liverpool Teachers' Centre 1973-1976

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Between 1972 and 1975 Eric Midwinter, Principal of the Liverpool Teachers' Centre, established a unified organisational structure responsible for delivering continuing professional development (CPD) to Liverpool schools. His ambition was to embed community education practices across the city's entire teaching force. However, during a…

  3. Learning Cities as Healthy Green Cities: Building Sustainable Opportunity Cities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearns, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses a new generation of learning cities we have called EcCoWell cities (Economy, Community, Well-being). The paper was prepared for the PASCAL International Exchanges (PIE) and is based on international experiences with PIE and developments in some cities. The paper argues for more holistic and integrated development so that…

  4. Box City Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Understanding the Built Environment, Prairie Village, KS.

    This curriculum packet contains two lesson plans about cities and architecture intended for use with students in upper elementary grades and middle schools. The first lesson plan, "City People, City Stories" (Jan Ham), states that understanding architecture and cities must begin with an understanding of the people of the city. The children create…

  5. EAC: The European Astronauts Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripoll, Andres

    The newly established European Astronauts Centre (EAC) in Cologne represents the European Astronauts Home Base and will become a centre of expertise on European astronauts activities. The paper gives an overview of the European approach to man-in-space, describes the European Astronauts Policy and presents the major EAC roles and responsibilities including the management of selection, recruitment and flight assignment of astronauts; the astronauts support and medical surveillance; the supervision of the astronauts' non-flight assignments; crew safety; the definition of the overall astronauts training programme; the scheduling and supervision of the training facilities; the implementation of Basic Training; the recruitment, training and certification of instructors, and the interface to NASA in the framework of the Space Station Freedom programme. An overview is given on the organisation of EAC, and on the European candidate astronauts selection performed in 1991.

  6. Genetic and environmental influences on applied creativity: A reared-apart twin study

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez, Jaime A.; Segal, Nancy L.; Horwitz, Briana N.

    2015-01-01

    Applied creativity involves bringing innovation to real-life activities. The first reared-apart twin study assessing genetic and environmental origins of applied creativity, via Draw-a-House (DAH) and Draw-a-Person (DAP) tasks, is presented. Participants included 69 MZA and 53 DZA twin pairs from the Minnesota Study of Twins Reared Apart. Drawings were evaluated by four artists and four non-artists. Genetic effects were demonstrated for the DAP (.38–.47), but not for the DAH. Creative personality showed genetic effects (.50), and modest, but significant correlations with scores on the two drawings (rs = .17–.26). Both genetic and nonshared environmental influences underlie variance in applied creativity. Individuals concerned with enhancing creativity among students and others may better understand individual differences in performance and training. PMID:26366030

  7. Assessment of indoor air in Austrian apartments with and without visible mold growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, D.; Habib, J.; Galler, H.; Buzina, W.; Schlacher, R.; Marth, E.; Reinthaler, F. F.

    Fungal spores are transported across great distances in the outdoor air and are also regularly found indoors. Building conditions and behavior-related problems in apartments may lead to massive growth of mold within a very short period of time. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the visible growth of mold indoors influences the concentration of fungal spores in the air as well as the variety of their species. Samples were collected from 66 households in Austria. For each sampling, the corresponding outdoor air was measured as reference value. The size of the visible mold growth was categorized in order to correlate the extent of mold growth with the concentration of airborne spores as well as the fungal genera. In order to determine fungal spore concentrations in the air, the one-stage MAS-100 ® air sampler was used. Malt extract agar (MEA) and dichloran glycerol agar (DG18) plates were used as culture media. The total colony forming units (CFU) per m 3 were determined. The fungi were identified from the isolated colonies. The results show that in apartments visibly affected by mold, the median values were significantly higher than those of apartments without visible mold growth. The extent of visible mold growth is significantly correlated with both concentration of fungal spores ( p<0.001) as well as the predominance of Penicillium sp. and Aspergillus sp. ( p<0.001) in indoor air. The total fungal concentration of Penicillium and Aspergillus in the air of apartments is recommended for assessing fungal exposure.

  8. Using APART for wall visibility calculations in the calibration channel of wide field planetary camera II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholl, James W.; Scholl, Marija S.

    1993-01-01

    The cone visibility from the CCD detector array plane in the calibration channel of wide field planetary camera II (WFPC II) is analyzed, using APART, for three representative wavelengths as characterized by indices of refraction. The light pipe walls are visible from the corners of the equivalent CCD detector array when imaging with the smallest index of refraction, n = 1.375. Painting the inside of the light pipe walls will result in a decrease in their visibility.

  9. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Conway Street Apartments - Greenfield, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-01

    Through recent research efforts, CARB has been evaluating strategies and technologies that can make dramatic improvements in energy performance in multifamily buildings. In this project, the team helped to transform a 100-year-old empty school building into 12 high performance apartments with low energy costs. The advanced features included an excellent thermal envelope of closed-cell spray foam and triple-pane windows, ductless heat pumps, solar thermal hot water system, and photovoltaic system.

  10. Chemical characterization of indoor and outdoor fine particulate matter in an occupied apartment in Rome, Italy.

    PubMed

    Perrino, C; Tofful, L; Canepari, S

    2016-08-01

    The daily concentration and chemical composition of PM2.5 was determined in indoor and outdoor 24-h samples simultaneously collected for a total of 5 weeks during a winter and a summer period in an apartment sited in Rome, Italy. The use of a specifically developed very quiet sampler (<35 dB) allowed the execution of the study while the family living in the apartment led its normal life. The indoor concentration of PM2.5 showed a small seasonal variation, while outdoor values were much higher during the winter study. Outdoor sources were found to contribute significantly to indoor PM concentration especially during the summer, when the apartment was naturally ventilated by opening the windows. During the winter the infiltration of outdoor PM components was lower and mostly regulated by the particle dimensions. Organics displayed In/Out ratios higher than unity during both periods; their indoor production increased significantly during the weekends, where the family stayed mostly at home. PM components were grouped into macrosources (soil, sea, secondary inorganics, traffic, organics). During the summer the main contributions to outdoor PM2.5 came from soil (30%), secondary inorganics (29%) and organics (22%). Organics dominated both indoor PM2.5 during the summer (60%) and outdoor and indoor PM2.5 during the winter (51% and 66%, respectively). PMID:26184798

  11. Effect of music intervention on the cognitive and depression status of senior apartment residents in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Shu-Yu; Wang, Ling-Chun; Yang, Yuan-Han

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify the effect of music intervention on cognitive function and depression status of residents in senior citizen apartments based on the existing evidence regarding music therapy. Methods An experimental study was conducted from November 2008 to December 2009. Sixty healthy senior apartment residents over 65 years of age were recruited and separated into two groups. According to their opinion, 41 took part in the music intervention group and 19 in the comparison group. The music intervention involved Buddhist hymns. The short-term effects were evaluated based on the measurement of cognitive function and depression level using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Geriatric Depression Scale-short form (GDS-SF) at the baseline, 1 month, and 4 months. Results The means of the initial and the 1-month MMSE and GDS-SF scores did not differ between the two groups. The 4-month MMSE score significantly declined compared with the initial level in the comparison group, whereas no significant change was observed in the experimental group. Moreover, the 4-month GDS-SF score significantly improved in both groups compared with the initial level. Conclusion Music intervention may postpone cognitive decline in healthy residents preferring Buddhist hymns in the senior citizen apartments in 4 months follow-up, and intense contact with participants may improve their mood status. PMID:26109859

  12. Mark-Release-Recapture Reveals Extensive Movement of Bed Bugs (Cimex lectularius L.) within and between Apartments

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Richard; Wang, Changlu; Singh, Narinderpal

    2015-01-01

    Understanding movement and dispersal of the common bed bug (Cimex lectularius L.) under field conditions is important in the control of infestations and for managing the spread of bed bugs to new locations. We investigated bed bug movement within and between apartments using mark-release-recapture (m-r-r) technique combined with apartment-wide monitoring using pitfall-style interceptors. Bed bugs were collected, marked, and released in six apartments. The distribution of marked and unmarked bed bugs in these apartments and their 24 neighboring units were monitored over 32 days. Extensive movement of marked bed bugs within and between apartments occurred regardless of the number of bed bugs released or presence/absence of a host. Comparison of marked and unmarked bed bug distributions confirms that the extensive bed bug activity observed was not an artifact of the m-r-r technique used. Marked bed bugs were recovered in apartments neighboring five of six m-r-r apartments. Their dispersal rates at 14 or 15 d were 0.0–5.0%. The estimated number of bed bugs per apartment in the six m-r-r apartments was 2,433–14,291 at 4–7 d after release. Longevity of bed bugs in the absence of a host was recorded in a vacant apartment. Marked large nymphs (3rd– 5th instar), adult females, and adult males continued to be recovered up to 57, 113, and 134 d after host absence, respectively. Among the naturally existing unmarked bed bugs, unfed small nymphs (1st– 2nd instar) were recovered up to 134 d; large nymphs and adults were still found at 155 d when the study ended. Our findings provide important insight into the behavioral ecology of bed bugs in infested apartments and have significant implications in regards to eradication programs and managing the spread of bed bugs within multi-occupancy dwellings. PMID:26352145

  13. Mark-Release-Recapture Reveals Extensive Movement of Bed Bugs (Cimex lectularius L.) within and between Apartments.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Richard; Wang, Changlu; Singh, Narinderpal

    2015-01-01

    Understanding movement and dispersal of the common bed bug (Cimex lectularius L.) under field conditions is important in the control of infestations and for managing the spread of bed bugs to new locations. We investigated bed bug movement within and between apartments using mark-release-recapture (m-r-r) technique combined with apartment-wide monitoring using pitfall-style interceptors. Bed bugs were collected, marked, and released in six apartments. The distribution of marked and unmarked bed bugs in these apartments and their 24 neighboring units were monitored over 32 days. Extensive movement of marked bed bugs within and between apartments occurred regardless of the number of bed bugs released or presence/absence of a host. Comparison of marked and unmarked bed bug distributions confirms that the extensive bed bug activity observed was not an artifact of the m-r-r technique used. Marked bed bugs were recovered in apartments neighboring five of six m-r-r apartments. Their dispersal rates at 14 or 15 d were 0.0-5.0%. The estimated number of bed bugs per apartment in the six m-r-r apartments was 2,433-14,291 at 4-7 d after release. Longevity of bed bugs in the absence of a host was recorded in a vacant apartment. Marked large nymphs (3rd- 5th instar), adult females, and adult males continued to be recovered up to 57, 113, and 134 d after host absence, respectively. Among the naturally existing unmarked bed bugs, unfed small nymphs (1st- 2nd instar) were recovered up to 134 d; large nymphs and adults were still found at 155 d when the study ended. Our findings provide important insight into the behavioral ecology of bed bugs in infested apartments and have significant implications in regards to eradication programs and managing the spread of bed bugs within multi-occupancy dwellings. PMID:26352145

  14. The Notting Dale Urban Studies Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Chris; Lynas, Sue

    1976-01-01

    Founded in 1974, the Centre is one of the most intensively used resource centres in the United Kingdom. Adults and students from elementary to college level use its facilities to learn about the urban environment. (BD)

  15. Clean Cities Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-01-01

    This fact sheet explains the Clean Cities Program and provides contact information for all coalitions and regional offices. It answers key questions such as: What is the Clean Cities Program? What are alternative fuels? How does the Clean Cities Program work? What sort of assistance does Clean Cities offer? What has Clean Cities accomplished? What is Clean Cities International? and Where can I find more information?

  16. Notes on the Psychological Basis of Environmental Design: The Right-Left Dimension in Apartment Floor Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Michael R.

    1977-01-01

    The previously recognized right-left asymmetry in aesthetic balance was applied to preferences in architectural design. Preferences for right-and left-oriented apartments in apartment floor plan layouts were noted in sophomore psychology students. Data examined from preferences of 67 right-handed and 5 left-handed students revealed that…

  17. 17 CFR 240.15a-2 - Exemption of certain securities of cooperative apartment houses from section 15(a).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exemption of certain securities of cooperative apartment houses from section 15(a). 240.15a-2 Section 240.15a-2 Commodity and... Securities from Section 15(a) § 240.15a-2 Exemption of certain securities of cooperative apartment...

  18. 17 CFR 240.15a-2 - Exemption of certain securities of cooperative apartment houses from section 15(a).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exemption of certain securities of cooperative apartment houses from section 15(a). 240.15a-2 Section 240.15a-2 Commodity and... Securities from Section 15(a) § 240.15a-2 Exemption of certain securities of cooperative apartment...

  19. 17 CFR 240.15a-2 - Exemption of certain securities of cooperative apartment houses from section 15(a).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Exemption of certain securities of cooperative apartment houses from section 15(a). 240.15a-2 Section 240.15a-2 Commodity and... Securities from Section 15(a) § 240.15a-2 Exemption of certain securities of cooperative apartment...

  20. 17 CFR 240.15a-2 - Exemption of certain securities of cooperative apartment houses from section 15(a).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exemption of certain securities of cooperative apartment houses from section 15(a). 240.15a-2 Section 240.15a-2 Commodity and... Securities from Section 15(a) § 240.15a-2 Exemption of certain securities of cooperative apartment...

  1. 17 CFR 240.15a-2 - Exemption of certain securities of cooperative apartment houses from section 15(a).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Exemption of certain securities of cooperative apartment houses from section 15(a). 240.15a-2 Section 240.15a-2 Commodity and... Securities from Section 15(a) § 240.15a-2 Exemption of certain securities of cooperative apartment...

  2. Sensing data centres for energy efficiency.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Terzis, Andreas

    2012-01-13

    Data centres are large energy consumers today, and their consumption is expected to increase further, driven by the growth in cloud services. The large monetary cost and the environmental impact of this consumption have motivated operators to optimize data centre management. We argue that one of the underlying reasons for the low-energy utilization is the lack of visibility into a data centre's highly dynamic operating conditions. Wireless sensor networks promise to remove this veil of uncertainty by delivering large volumes of data collected at high spatial and temporal fidelities. The paper summarizes data centre operations in order to describe the parameters that a data centre sensing network should collect and motivate the challenges that such a network faces. We present technical approaches for the problems of data collection and management and close with an overview of a data centre genome, an end-to-end data centre sensing system. PMID:22124086

  3. Large-scale patterns of recent sedimentation along the Cayman Troughpull-apart basin, Caribbean Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Debalko, D.; Mann, P. )

    1990-05-01

    The North American-Caribbean plate boundary zone consists of a broad zone of active strike-slip deformation that extends 3,200 km from Middle America to the Lesser Antilles. An 1,100-km-long, 100-km-wide pull-apart basin the Cayman Trough is the dominant structural element of the submerged central part of the plate boundary zone between Jamaica and Honduras. In order to investigate large-scale patterns of recent sedimentation in a fully marine pull-apart setting, the authors surveyed a 90,000-km{sup 2} area along the southern edge of the Cayman Trough using SeaMARC II side-scan sonar, 3.5 KHz, and digital single-channel reflection techniques. These data allow them to divide the southern margin of the Cayman Trough pull-apart into three provinces of recent sedimentation: (1) an eastern terrigenous province characterized by straight short canyon systems (average 1-3 km wide and 10-15 km long) and associated small, lobate fans; canyon-fan systems are sourced by clastic spillover from filled borderland-type basins and by erosion of emergent fault-block islands; (2) a central carbonate province characterized by periplatform carbonate detritus fringing four isolated carbonate banks which collectively make up the Nicaraguan Rise; canyon systems (1-3 km wide, 15-80 km long) are highly meandering when unfaulted and straight when faulted; and (3) an eastern carbonate and terrigenous province characterized by both carbonate sediments shed off the easternmost bank of the Nicaraguan Rise bank and by terrigenous sediment derived from Jamaica.

  4. Numerical simulation of a sphere moving down an incline with identical spheres placed equally apart

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ling, Chi-Hai; Jan, Chyan-Deng; Chen, Cheng-lung; Shen, Hsieh Wen

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical study of an elastic sphere moving down an incline with a string of identical spheres placed equally apart. Two momentum equations and a moment equation formulated for the moving sphere are solved numerically for the instantaneous velocity of the moving sphere on an incline with different angles of inclination. Input parameters for numerical simulation include the properties of the sphere (the radius, density, Poison's ratio, and Young's Modulus of elasticity), the coefficient of friction between the spheres, and a damping coefficient of the spheres during collision.

  5. Sleep disturbance before and after traffic noise attenuation in an apartment building.

    PubMed

    Ohrström, E; Björkman, M

    1983-03-01

    A study on traffic noise sleep disturbance was made in an apartment building before and after the installation of noise insulating windows. Three tenants completed a questionnaire each morning one week before and one week after the insulation of windows, and body movements during sleep were recorded during these periods. All persons demonstrated a decrease in the number of body movements after the windows had been insulated and two reported improved sleep quality. The results suggest that subjectively judged sleep quality as well as recordings of bed movements are useful tools for evaluating actions to reduce noise. PMID:6841813

  6. Perceptual centres in speech - an acoustic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Sophie Kerttu

    Perceptual centres, or P-centres, represent the perceptual moments of occurrence of acoustic signals - the 'beat' of a sound. P-centres underlie the perception and production of rhythm in perceptually regular speech sequences. P-centres have been modelled both in speech and non speech (music) domains. The three aims of this thesis were toatest out current P-centre models to determine which best accounted for the experimental data bto identify a candidate parameter to map P-centres onto (a local approach) as opposed to the previous global models which rely upon the whole signal to determine the P-centre the final aim was to develop a model of P-centre location which could be applied to speech and non speech signals. The first aim was investigated by a series of experiments in which a) speech from different speakers was investigated to determine whether different models could account for variation between speakers b) whether rendering the amplitude time plot of a speech signal affects the P-centre of the signal c) whether increasing the amplitude at the offset of a speech signal alters P-centres in the production and perception of speech. The second aim was carried out by a) manipulating the rise time of different speech signals to determine whether the P-centre was affected, and whether the type of speech sound ramped affected the P-centre shift b) manipulating the rise time and decay time of a synthetic vowel to determine whether the onset alteration was had more affect on P-centre than the offset manipulation c) and whether the duration of a vowel affected the P-centre, if other attributes (amplitude, spectral contents) were held constant. The third aim - modelling P-centres - was based on these results. The Frequency dependent Amplitude Increase Model of P-centre location (FAIM) was developed using a modelling protocol, the APU GammaTone Filterbank and the speech from different speakers. The P-centres of the stimuli corpus were highly predicted by attributes of

  7. The City as Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Stephen K.

    The author gives a rationale for utilizing the city as a place to learn. The city has many problems and although logistics require that we conduct most education in the school building, the author argues for putting out best brains to the task of bringing the city to the classroom and to exploiting the city as a classroom when appropriate.…

  8. Transtensional faulting patterns ranging from pull-apart basins to transform continental margins: an experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile, Christophe; Brun, Jean Pierre

    1999-01-01

    Seventeen small-scale experiments were performed to study the deformation induced in brittle-ductile models by a releasing stepover between two transform faults, and by intersection between transform and divergent plate boundaries. In both cases, faulting depends on the rheological layering (presence and strength of a ductile layer at depth) and the width of the basal stepover. Successive types of pull-apart basins are observed in the first set of experiments, which are compared with natural examples. Firstly, a lazy Z-shaped basin appears, which is bounded by Y faults above transform boundaries and R faults propagating from each corner of the stepover. Then, R' faults replace R faults, leading to a rhomb-shaped graben. At every stage, the basin length-to-width ratio remains between 2.2 and 3.8, suggesting that scale independence of pull-apart basins is related to the geometrical shape of bounding faults. In a second set of experiments, deformation at the end of a transform boundary is characterized by a horsetail splay bounding a divergent basin. Within the horsetail splay, block tilting and block rotation about vertical axes lead to a surface slope perpendicular to the slope of the divergent basin, a feature that can be compared with marginal ridges at transform margins.

  9. Three-dimensional structure and evolution of an asymmetric pull-apart basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagy, Amir; Hamiel, Yariv

    2016-07-01

    The structure of a ~250-m-long asymmetrical pull-apart basin developed in carbonate rocks at the Galilee heights, Israel, is herein analyzed. The reconstruction of the basin geometry is based on detailed mapping and LiDAR measurements of fault scarps. The architecture of faults is then used as a boundary condition for calculating the stress pattern in the vicinity of the basin, using a dislocation model. The basin is found to be an asymmetrical V-shaped structure bordered by two longitudinal oblique right-lateral strike-slip faults. The strike of one of the faults is bent at the eastern edge of the basin, generating a transverse boundary fault which joins the second boundary fault orthogonally. The overall lateral displacement is smaller than the basin length, and no transverse or diagonal fault is observed in the western end of the basin. The deformation around the basin is mostly displayed by fractures. Yet, folds and fault branches are observed near the tips of the boundary faults and near kink points of fault segments. Stress analysis obtained by the three-dimensional model is in general agreement with the orientation of fractures and location of high deformation regions in and around the basin. Based on our observations, we present a conceptual model which demonstrates the development of asymmetric basins in releasing bends and sheds light on the structures of similar large pull-apart basins.

  10. Solar-assisted gas-energy water-heating feasibility for apartments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, E. S.

    1975-01-01

    Studies of residential energy use, solar-energy technology for buildings, and the requirements for implementing technology in the housing industry led to a project to develop a solar water heater for apartments. A design study for a specific apartment was used to establish a solar water-heater cost model which is based on plumbing contractor bids and manufacturer estimates. The cost model was used to size the system to minimize the annualized cost of hot water. The annualized cost of solar-assisted gas-energy water heating is found to be less expensive than electric water heating but more expensive than gas water heating. The feasibility of a natural gas utility supplying the auxiliary fuel is evaluated. It is estimated that gas-utilizing companies will find it profitable to offer solar water heating as part of a total energy service option or on a lease basis when the price of new base-load supplies of natural gas reaches $2.50-$3.00 per million Btu.

  11. Relationships between non-acoustic factors and subjective reactions to floor impact noise in apartment buildings.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Hee; Lee, Pyoung Jik; Yang, Kwan Seop; Kim, Kyoung Woo

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an understanding of how residents in apartment buildings perceive and react to impact sounds coming from the upstairs neighbours' dwellings. Based on existing theoretical and empirical studies on environmental noise, a conceptual model was developed to explain relationships among noise annoyance and non-acoustic factors. The model was then tested using structural equation modelling with survey data from residents living in apartment buildings (N = 487). The findings showed that the conceptual model was consistent with other models developed for environmental noises. The results indicated that annoyance induced by floor impact noise was associated with perceived disturbance, coping, and self-reported health complaints. Noise sensitivity had a direct impact on perceived disturbance and an indirect impact on annoyance, and moderating variables affected the non-acoustic factors. Exposure to footstep noises increased the impact size of noise sensitivity to disturbance. Predictability, marital status, and house ownership were found to influence the relationship between attitudes towards authorities and coping. In addition, a negative attitude towards neighbours (i.e., the noise source) moderated the positive relationship between annoyance and coping. PMID:27036252

  12. 41. PHOTOGRAPHY OF BLUE PRINT (MINNEAPOLIS CITY ENGINEER) END AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. PHOTOGRAPHY OF BLUE PRINT (MINNEAPOLIS CITY ENGINEER) END AND CENTRE CASTING OF CAST STEEL, MASONRY CASTING OF CAST IRON CASTING, FOR MINNEAPOLIS STEEL ARCH (4 x 5 negative) - Steel Arch Bridge, Hennepin Avenue spanning west channel of Mississippi River, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  13. Improving operational efficiency in an inner-city emergency department.

    PubMed

    Bordoloi, Sanjeev K; Beach, Keith

    2007-05-01

    Saving lives in a high-volume, high-acuity inner-city trauma centre demands operational excellence. We conducted our research in an emergency department where treatment of Acute Coronary Syndrome is a critical operation. Our study results in a better understanding of patient flow, analysis of the waiting lines and an optimization model for labour cost minimization. PMID:17524222

  14. A Concept of Regional Adult Education (Quad Cities Concept).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beveridge, A. Allan

    A Quad Cities Centre has been proposed for regional adult education in the area of Galt, Guelph, Kitchener, and Waterloo in southwestern Ontario. Conestoga College of Applied Arts and Technology, the Universities of Guelph and Waterloo, and Waterloo Lutheran University would begin by appointing a steering committee for proposing an executive…

  15. Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, G.; Potukuchi, P.; Roy, A.

    1995-08-01

    Argonne is collaborating with the Nuclear Science Centre (NSC), New Delhi, to develop a new type of superconducting accelerating structure for low-velocity heavy ions. A copper model has been evaluated and tests on the niobium prototype are currently in progress. Some technical details of this project are described in the Superconducting Linac Development section of this report. All funding for the prototype has come from the NSC, and they have also stationed two staff members at ATLAS for the past two years to gain experience and work on this project. Additional NSC personnel visited ATLAS for extended periods during 1994 for electronics and cryogenics experience and training. Two NSC staff members are scheduled to spend several months at ANL during 1995 to continue tests and developments of the prototype resonators and to initiate fabrication of the production models for their linac project.

  16. The network of WHO Collaborating Centres in Occupational Health and the role of maritime centres.

    PubMed

    Kortum, Evelyn; Fingerhut, Marilyn A

    2003-01-01

    The WHO Network of Collaborating Centres in Occupational Health comprises 70 Collaborating Centres. Four of these Centres are specialised in Maritime Occupational Health and they are situated in Poland, Germany, Denmark and the Ukraine. All Collaborating Centres follow the mandate of the Occupational Health Programme in WHO, which is the Global Strategy on Occupational Health for All. Collaborating Centres in Maritime Occupational Health cover a specific group of workers who are exposed to different work environments than workers on land. They are often not at all or only insufficiently covered by any health services. The Collaborating Centres in Maritime Occupational Health provide an excellent example of international collaboration. PMID:14974788

  17. Bangalore looks to new interdisciplinary science centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Ramaseshan

    2008-09-01

    A new centre to boost interdisciplinary research in India is being established in Bangalore - India's IT and software capital. The International Centre for Theoretical Sciences (ICTS) will be led by Spenta Wadia, a theoretical physicist from the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) in Mumbai, which is setting up the new centre. He expects construction of the ICTS, the first of its kind in India, to start by November 2009.

  18. AXIS-SVO Data Centre Creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceballos, M. Teresa

    We present the process followed to create the AXIS-SVO Data Centre at the Instituto de Física de Cantabria under the standards of the Virtual Observatory using the publication tools elaborated by the ESA-VO team at the European Space Astronomy Centre (ESAC). The current content of this Data Centre is a sample of optical spectra which are part of the AXIS-XMS sample, based on observations of the XMM-Newton X-ray observatory.

  19. Three-dimensional numerical models of the evolution of pull-apart basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrunin, A. G.; Sobolev, S. V.

    2008-12-01

    Pull-apart basins are depressions that form as the result of crustal extension along strike-slip systems where the sense of fault stepping or bending coincides with that of fault slip. They are common features of strike-slip systems. We perform a number of numerical thermomechanical experiments to explore how the rheology of the lithosphere influences basin evolution and lithospheric structure beneath the basin. Our modeling shows that basin subsidence results from the competition of extension of the brittle part of the lithosphere, which leads to its subsidence, and of the compensating flow of the deeper ductile part of the lithosphere, which pushes the extended brittle block upwards. The result of this competition is the subsidence rate. Strain partitioning beneath the basin and crustal structures is controlled by (i) the thickness of the brittle layer and basin width, (ii) the magnitude of strike-slip displacement, (iii) the rate of frictional softening of the crust, and (iv) the viscosity of the ductile part of the lithosphere. The thickness of the brittle layer and the viscosity of the underlying ductile part of the lithosphere in turn depend on temperature, composition and material softening. We interpret the modeling results, deducing simple analytical expressions based on the "brittle brick stretching" (BBS) approach, which despite its simplicity describes the structure and evolution of pull-apart basins reasonably well. We also demonstrate that the structure and evolution of the Dead Sea Basin, located at a left step of the Dead Sea Transform in the Middle East, is consistent with a BBS type of deformation with only a minor contribution from compensational flow in the ductile part of the lithosphere. Finally, we show that the formation of a deep narrow pull-apart basin in relatively cold lithosphere, as in the Dead Sea Basin, requires very low friction at major faults (lower than 0.1-0.2). If this condition is not satisfied, strike-slip deformation does

  20. The International Centre for Theoretical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Faheem

    2008-07-01

    This talk traces in brief the genesis of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, as one of Prof. Abdus Salam's major achievements. It outlines why Salam felt the necessity for establishing such a centre to help physicists in the developing world. It situates the founding of the Centre within Salam's broader vision of the causes of underdevelopment and of science as an engine for scientific, technological, economic and social development. The talk reviews the successes and failures of the ICTP and gives a brief overall view of the current status of the Centre.

  1. Solar project description for Cathedral Square 10-story apartment building, Burlington, Vermont

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beers, D.

    1982-01-01

    A system is described for preheating domestic hot water (DHW) for a 10-story Vermont apartment building. The system consists of 2012 square feet of roof-mounted flat plate collectors, a 3000 gallon storage tank, a water-glycerol solution for heat collection and transfer, and a natural gas-fired hot boiler for auxiliary heating. The total system is described and diagrammed, and the design of the collector, storage, energy-to-load, and auxiliary subsystems are individually outlined. Five modes of operation are described: collector-to-storage; storage-to-DHW preheat; DHW storage-to-preheat; DHW circulation and distribution; and auxiliary-to-DHW heating. Performance evaluation instrumentation for the National Solar Data Network is also described. Original cost estimate for provisioning and installation of the solar energy system are given.

  2. Together but apart: Caring for a spouse with dementia resident in a care facility.

    PubMed

    Hemingway, Dawn; MacCourt, Penny; Pierce, Joanna; Strudsholm, Tina

    2016-07-01

    This longitudinal, exploratory study was designed to better understand the lived experience of spousal caregivers age 60 and older providing care to partners with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias resident in a care facility. Twenty eight spousal caregivers were interviewed up to three times over a period of 2 years, and long-term care facility staff from four locations across British Columbia (BC), Canada participated in four focus groups. Thematic analysis of interview and focus group transcripts revealed a central, unifying theme 'together but apart'. The results identify key targets for policy makers and service providers to support positive health and well-being outcomes for spousal caregivers providing care to their partners diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and related dementia and living in care facilities. PMID:25027632

  3. Radar walking speed measurements of seniors in their apartments: technology for fall prevention.

    PubMed

    Cuddihy, Paul E; Yardibi, Tarik; Legenzoff, Zachary J; Liu, Liang; Phillips, Calvin E; Abbott, Carmen; Galambos, Colleen; Keller, James; Popescu, Mihail; Back, Jessica; Skubic, Marjorie; Rantz, Marilyn J

    2012-01-01

    Falls are a significant cause of injury and accidental death among persons over the age of 65. Gait velocity is one of the parameters which have been correlated to the risk of falling. We aim to build a system which monitors gait in seniors and reports any changes to caregivers, who can then perform a clinical assessment and perform corrective and preventative actions to reduce the likelihood of falls. In this paper, we deploy a Doppler radar-based gait measurement system into the apartments of thirteen seniors. In scripted walks, we show the system measures gait velocity with a mean error of 14.5% compared to the time recorded by a clinician. With a calibration factor, the mean error is reduced to 10.5%. The radar is a promising sensing technology for gait velocity in a day-to-day senior living environment. PMID:23365880

  4. Intra-couple Caregiving of Older Adults Living Apart Together: Commitment and Independence.

    PubMed

    De Jong Gierveld, Jenny

    2015-09-01

    Recently, rising numbers of mid-life and older adults are starting a "living apart together" (LAT) relationship following divorce or widowhood. LAT describes an intimate relationship wherein partners maintain separate households. This study investigated the characteristics of care arrangements in older long-term LAT couples and elicited personal comments about intra-couple care. We interviewed 25 LAT partners and a comparison group of 17 remarried older adults in the Netherlands in a side study of the Netherlands Kinship Panel Study. Results showed that about half of the LAT partners intended to exchange care if needed (partnership commitment); the other half had ambiguous feelings or intentions to refuse care (independence orientation). However, for those LAT partners already confronted with illness in their current relationship, all provided care to the partner in need. The minority of LAT partners who would not exchange care reciprocally are more likely to give as opposed to receive care. PMID:26300191

  5. Monitoring of the performance of a solar heated and cooled apartment building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vliet, G. C.; Srubar, R. L.

    1980-03-01

    An all electric apartment building in Texas was retrofitted for solar heating and cooling and hot water. The system consisted of an array of 1280 square feet of Northrup concentrating tracking collectors, a 5000 gallon hot water storage vessel, a 500 gallon chilled water storage vessel, a 25 ton Arkla Industries absorption chiller, and a two pipe hydronic air conditioning system. The solar air conditioning equipment was installed in parallel with the existing conventional electric heating and cooling system, and the solar domestic water heating served as preheat to the existing electric water heaters. The system was fully instrumented for monitoring. Detailed descriptions of the solar system, the performance monitoring system, and the data reduction processes are given.

  6. User's manual for University of Arizona APART program (Analysis Program - Arizona Radiation Trace)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breault, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    A description and operating instructions for the Analysis Program Arizona Radiation Trace (APART) are given. This is a computer program that is able to efficiently and accurately predict the off-axis rejection characteristics of unwanted stray radiation for complex rotationally symmetric optical systems. The program first determines the critical objects or areas that scatter radiation to the image plane either directly or through imaging elements: this provides the opportunity to modify, if necessary, the design so that the number of critical areas seen by the image plane is reduced or the radiation to these critical areas is minimized. Next, the power distribution reaching the image plane and a sectional power map of all internal surfaces are computed. Angular information is also provided that relates the angle by which the radiation came into a surface to the angle by which the radiation is scattered out of the surface.

  7. Secondhand smoke in apartment buildings: renter and owner or manager perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hewett, Martha J; Sandell, Sandra D; Anderson, John; Niebuhr, Marsha

    2007-01-01

    This study explored the views of Minnesota renters and apartment owners or managers about environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) transfer between units in multifamily buildings and about smoke-free housing. A convenience sample of 49 decision makers who manage 27,116 rental units in Minnesota were aware of some ETS transfer in their buildings, but most felt it was rarely or never a significant factor in tenants' decisions to rent or to move. Most of those who had never designated a building smoke free had little or no interest in doing so, due to concerns that it would increase vacancy rates, constitute discrimination, or engender costs for enforcement. Owners who had already designated smoke-free buildings, however, had seen mostly neutral or positive effects on vacancies, turnover, and time required to manage the buildings, and planned to continue offering them. A total of 48% of households in a random sample of 405 reported that at times ETS enters their apartment from elsewhere; 10% said this occurs often or most of the time. Of those experiencing ETS transfer, 37% said it bothered them a lot or so much that they were thinking of moving. Only a small fraction of renters currently live in smoke-free buildings, but nearly half would be extremely or very interested in doing so. Interest is high across ethnicities, income levels, rent levels, and age groups and regardless of whether the household has children. 54% of respondents would be very likely to choose a smoke-free building, all other things being equal, and 34% would be willing to pay more to live in one. PMID:17365725

  8. Neotectonic of Dead Sea pull-apart basin. A new tectonic model for its northern closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Awabdeh, Mohammad; Pérez-Peña, J. Vicente; Azañón, J. Miguel; Booth-Rea, Guillermo

    2014-05-01

    The Dead Sea is a pull-apart basin formed by the relative motion of two active fault segments of the southern Dead Sea Transform Fault system (DSTF); the Wadi Araba Fault (WAF) and the Jordan Valley Fault (JVF) in northwest Jordan. Both of them are sinistral strike slip faults, however, the WAF has slightly faster slip-rate than the JVF. The northern termination of the Dead Sea basin is not well constrained, without clear transverse structures closing the basin. However, geophysical data suggest an abrupt thinning in this northern termination. Based on fieldwork and observations of recent tectonic structures, we suggest that the northern closure of this pull-apart basin corresponds to an active NW-SE normal fault system to the north of the Kafrain Dam (28 km southwest Amman; the capital of Jordan). These normal faults constitute a transtensional zone formed by the partial reactivation of two major structures; the Shueib and the Amman Hallabat structures (SHS and AHS). Normal faults dipping SW present low to moderate throws, lateral ramps coalescing in the SHS, and probably they merge into a low-dipping main plane. This fault system is also the responsible of the extension of the upper Cretaceous formations to the NE of Kafrain Dam and has associated colluvial wedges of Holocene sediments, indicating a seismic component with related small to medium earthquakes. This work reveals the Quaternary reactivation of tectonic structures that thought inactive in the Neogene and how they accommodate part of the stress in the region alongside with the DSFT.

  9. Why do intimate partners live apart? Evidence on LAT relationships across Europe

    PubMed Central

    Liefbroer, Aart C.; Poortman, Anne-Rigt; Seltzer, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Most research asks whether or not cohabitation has come to rival marriage. Little is known about the meaning of living apart together (LAT) relationships, and whether LAT is an alternative to marriage and cohabitation or a dating relationship. OBJECTIVE We examine across Europe: (1) the prevalence of LAT, (2) the reasons for LAT, and (3) the correlates of (a) LAT relationships vis-à-vis being single, married, or cohabiting, and (b) different types of LAT union. METHODS Using Generations and Gender Survey data from ten Western and Eastern European countries, we present descriptive statistics about LATs and estimate multinominal logistic regression models to assess the correlates of being in different types of LAT unions. RESULTS LAT relationships are uncommon, but they are more common in Western than Eastern Europe. Most people in LAT unions intend to live together but are apart for practical reasons. LAT is more common among young people, those enrolled in higher education, people with liberal attitudes, highly educated people, and those who have previously cohabited or been married. Older people and divorced or widowed persons are more likely to choose LAT to maintain independence. Surprisingly, attitudinal and educational differences are more pronounced in Eastern Europe than in Western Europe. CONCLUSIONS A tentative conclusion is that LAT is more often a stage in the union formation process than an alternative to marriage and cohabitation. Yet some groups do view LAT as substituting for marriage and cohabitation, and these groups differ between East and West. In Eastern Europe a cultural, highly educated elite seems to be the first to resist traditional marriage norms and embrace LAT (and cohabitation) as alternative living arrangements, whereas this is less the case in Western Europe. In Western Europe, LAT unions are mainly an alternative for persons who have been married before or had children in a prior relationship. PMID:26085812

  10. Jerusalem: City of Dreams, City of Sorrows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricks, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Jerusalem is more than an intriguing global historical city; it is a classroom for liberal learning and international understanding. It had never been a city of one language, one religion and one culture. Looking at the origins of Jerusalem's name indicates its international and multicultural nature. While Israelis designate Jerusalem as their…

  11. The European NEO Coordination Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perozzi, E.; Borgia, B.; Micheli, M.

    An operational approach to NEO (Near-Earth Object) hazard monitoring has been developed at European level within the framework of the Space Situational Awareness Program (SSA) of the European Space Agency (ESA). Through federating European assets and profiting of the expertise developed in European Universities and Research Centers, it has been possible to start the deployment of the so-called SSA NEO Segment. This initiative aims to provide a significant contribution to the worldwide effort to the discovery, follow-up and characterization of the near-Earth object population. A major achievement has been the inauguration in May 2013 of the ESA NEO Coordination Centre located at ESRIN (Frascati, Italy). The goal of the NEOCC Precursor Service operations is twofold: to make available updated information on the NEO population and the associated hazard and to contribute to optimize the NEO observational efforts. This is done by maintaining and improving a Web Portal publicly available at http://neo.ssa.esa.int and by performing follow-up observations through a network of collaborating telescopes and facilities. An overview of the SSA-NEO System and a summary of the first two years of NEOCC operations is presented.

  12. The European standards of Haemophilia Centres

    PubMed Central

    Giangrande, Paul; Calizzani, Gabriele; Menichini, Ivana; Candura, Fabio; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio; Makris, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The European haemophilia community of professionals and patients has agreed on the principles of haemophilia care to address comprehensive optimal delivery of care which is nowadays scattered throughout Europe. Many of the health facilities call themselves Haemophilia Centres despite their variation in size, expertise and services provided. Only a small number of countries have Haemophilia Centre accreditation systems in place. Methods In the framework of the European Haemophilia Network project, following an inclusive process of stakeholder involvement, the European Guidelines for the certification of haemophilia centres have been developed in order to set quality standards for European Haemophilia Centres and criteria for their certification. Results The Guidelines define the standards and criteria for the designation of two levels of care delivery: European Haemophilia Treatment Centres, providing local routine care, and European Haemophilia Comprehensive Care Centres, providing specialised and multi-disciplinary care and functioning as tertiary referral centres. Additionally, they define standards about general requirements, patient care, provision of an advisory service and establishment of network of clinical and specialised services. Conclusions The implementation of the European Guidelines for the certification of Haemophilia Centres will contribute to the reduction of health inequalities through the standardisation of quality of care in European Union Member States and could represent a model to be taken into consideration for other rare disease groups. PMID:24922293

  13. The Press Research Centre, 1956-1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Press Research Centre, Krakow (Poland).

    In 1956, the Press Research Centre was established in Cracow, Poland by a group of journalists and publishers, for the purpose of instituting press research that would have practical applications. The aims of the Centre were to conduct studies on the history of the Polish press, the contemporary press, press readership, and editorial techniques.…

  14. Promotion in Call Centres: Opportunities and Determinants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorjup, Maria Tatiana; Valverde, Mireia; Ryan, Gerard

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the quality of jobs in call centres by focusing on the opportunities for promotion in this sector. More specifically, the research questions focus on discovering whether promotion is common practise in the call centre sector and on identifying the factors that affect this.…

  15. The European Centre for Leisure and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Convergence, 1969

    1969-01-01

    Supported by UNESCO, the European Centre for Leisure and Education is an establishment of the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences. The task of the Centre lies in the search for common trends of leisure and education in Europe, involving four types of activity: research, editorial, bibliographic, and documentary. It has sponsored conferences, and has…

  16. The Irish Centre for Talented Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilheany, Sheila

    2005-01-01

    Conducting potency tests on penicillin, discussing rocket technology with a NASA astronaut, analysing animal bone fragments from medieval times, these are just some of the activities which occupy the time of students at The Irish Centre for Talented Youth. The Centre identifies young students with exceptional academic ability and then provides…

  17. Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organisation Fifth Meeting of the Coordinating Committee for the Regional English Language Centre (Singapore). Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional English Center (Singapore).

    The fifth meeting of the Regional English Language Centre Coordinating Committee held in Quezon City, Philippines in March 1969 was attended by Committee members from Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. S. Thavisakdi, SEAMES Director, was present, as were consultants from Thailand, the RELC Staff, and observers…

  18. What Is Clean Cities?

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-08-01

    This Clean Cities Program fact sheet describes the purpose and scope of this DOE program. Clean Cities facilitates the use of alternative and advanced fuels and vehicles to displace petroleum in the transportation sector.

  19. Exome Sequencing in Classic Hairy Cell Leukaemia Reveals Widespread Variation in Acquired Somatic Mutations between Individual Tumours Apart from the Signature BRAF V(600)E Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Weston-Bell, Nicola J.; Tapper, Will; Gibson, Jane; Bryant, Dean; Moreno, Yurany; John, Melford; Ennis, Sarah; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Collins, Andrew R.; Sahota, Surinder S.

    2016-01-01

    In classic Hairy cell leukaemia (HCLc), a single case has thus far been interrogated by whole exome sequencing (WES) in a treatment naive patient, in which BRAF V(600)E was identified as an acquired somatic mutation and confirmed as occurring near-universally in this form of disease by conventional PCR-based cohort screens. It left open however the question whether other genome-wide mutations may also commonly occur at high frequency in presentation HCLc disease. To address this, we have carried out WES of 5 such typical HCLc cases, using highly purified splenic tumour cells paired with autologous T cells for germline. Apart from BRAF V(600)E, no other recurrent somatic mutation was identified in these HCLc exomes, thereby excluding additional acquired mutations as also prevalent at a near-universal frequency in this form of the disease. These data then place mutant BRAF at the centre of the neoplastic drive in HCLc. A comparison of our exome data with emerging genetic findings in HCL indicates that additional somatic mutations may however occur recurrently in smaller subsets of disease. As mutant BRAF alone is insufficient to drive malignant transformation in other histological cancers, it suggests that individual tumours utilise largely differing patterns of genetic somatic mutations to coalesce with BRAF V(600)E to drive pathogenesis of malignant HCLc disease. PMID:26871591

  20. The role of the sexual assault centre.

    PubMed

    Eogan, Maeve; McHugh, Anne; Holohan, Mary

    2013-02-01

    Sexual Assault Centres provide multidisciplinary care for men and women who have experienced sexual crime. These centres enable provision of medical, forensic, psychological support and follow-up care, even if patients chose not to report the incident to the police service. Sexual Support Centres need to provide a ring-fenced, forensically clean environment. They need to be appropriately staffed and available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to allow prompt provision of medical and supportive care and collection of forensic evidence. Sexual Assault Centres work best within the context of a core agreed model of care, which includes defined multi-agency guidelines and care pathways, close links with forensic science and police services, and designated and sustainable funding arrangements. Additionally, Sexual Assault Centres also participate in patient, staff and community education and risk reduction. Furthermore, they contribute to the development, evaluation and implementation of national strategies on domestic, sexual and gender-based violence. PMID:22975433

  1. The development of an intelligent laboratory information system for a community health promotion centre.

    PubMed

    Chae, Young Moon; Lim, Hwan-Sub; Lee, Ju Hon; Bae, Mi Young; Kim, Gyu Hyung

    2002-01-01

    This study aimed to develop an Intelligent Laboratory Information System (ILIS) for the community health promotion centre in Kwachun city to help process an increasing amount of laboratory test data in an efficient manner, and to support the clinical decision-making of public health doctors. A sample of 170 cases was used for validation of the system. Overall, the system correctly predicted 92.5% of the cases. This paper also analysed the economic feasibility of the ILIS based on the Information Economics approach. The results showed that the ILIS not only helps screen more people by increasing the capacity of a health promotion centre, but also brings in more revenue to the centre. PMID:12862409

  2. Effects of Various Interventions, Including Mass Trapping with Passive Pitfall Traps, on Low-Level Bed Bug Populations in Apartments.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Richard; Wang, Changlu; Singh, Narinderpal

    2016-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of various interventions on low-level bed bug, Cimex lectularius L., populations in occupied apartments. The first experiment was conducted in occupied apartments under three intervention conditions: never treated (Group I), recently treated with no further treatment (Group II), and recently treated with continued treatment (Group III). Each apartment was monitored with pitfall-style traps (interceptors) installed at beds and upholstered furniture (sleeping and resting areas) along with ∼18 additional interceptors throughout the apartment. The traps were inspected every 2 wk. After 22 wk, bed bugs had been eliminated (zero trap catch for eight consecutive weeks and none detected in visual inspections) in 96, 87, and 100% of the apartments in Groups I, II, and III, respectively. The second experiment investigated the impact of interceptors as a control measure in apartments with low-level infestations. In the treatment group, interceptors were continuously installed at and away from sleeping and resting areas and were inspected every 2 wk for 16 wk. In the control group, interceptors were placed in a similar fashion as the treatment group but were only placed during 6–8 and 14–16 wk to obtain bed bug counts. Bed bug counts were significantly lower at 8 wk in the treatment group than in the control group. At 16 wk, bed bugs were eliminated in 50% of the apartments in the treatment group. The implications of our results in the development of bed bug management strategies and monitoring protocols are discussed. PMID:26637535

  3. New Zealand Earthquake Forecast Testing Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstenberger, Matthew C.; Rhoades, David A.

    2010-08-01

    The New Zealand Earthquake Forecast Testing Centre is being established as one of several similar regional testing centres under the umbrella of the Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability (CSEP). The Centre aims to encourage the development of testable models of time-varying earthquake occurrence in the New Zealand region, and to conduct verifiable prospective tests of their performance over a period of five or more years. The test region, data-collection region and requirements for testing are described herein. Models must specify in advance the expected number of earthquakes with epicentral depths h ≤ 40 km in bins of time, magnitude and location within the test region. Short-term models will be tested using 24-h time bins at magnitude M ≥ 4. Intermediate-term models and long-term models will be tested at M ≥ 5 using 3-month, 6-month and 5-year bins, respectively. The tests applied will be the same as at other CSEP testing centres: the so-called N test of the total number of earthquakes expected over the test period; the L test of the likelihood of the earthquake catalogue under the model; and the R test of the ratio of the likelihoods under alternative models. Four long-term, three intermediate-term and two short-term models have been installed to date in the testing centre, with tests of these models commencing on the New Zealand earthquake catalogue from the beginning of 2008. Submission of models is open to researchers worldwide. New models can be submitted at any time. The New Zealand testing centre makes extensive use of software produced by the CSEP testing centre in California. It is envisaged that, in time, the scope of the testing centre will be expanded to include new testing methods and differently-specified models, nonetheless that the New Zealand testing centre will develop in parallel with other regional testing centres through the CSEP international collaborative process.

  4. CITY III Director's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Envirometrics, Inc., Washington, DC.

    CITY III is a computer-assisted simulation game which allows the participants to make decisions affecting various aspects of the economic, governmental, and social sectors of a simulated urban area. The game director selects one of five possible starting city configurations, may set a number of conditions in the city before the start of play, and…

  5. Big Surveys, Big Data Centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schade, D.

    2016-06-01

    Well-designed astronomical surveys are powerful and have consistently been keystones of scientific progress. The Byurakan Surveys using a Schmidt telescope with an objective prism produced a list of about 3000 UV-excess Markarian galaxies but these objects have stimulated an enormous amount of further study and appear in over 16,000 publications. The CFHT Legacy Surveys used a wide-field imager to cover thousands of square degrees and those surveys are mentioned in over 1100 publications since 2002. Both ground and space-based astronomy have been increasing their investments in survey work. Survey instrumentation strives toward fair samples and large sky coverage and therefore strives to produce massive datasets. Thus we are faced with the "big data" problem in astronomy. Survey datasets require specialized approaches to data management. Big data places additional challenging requirements for data management. If the term "big data" is defined as data collections that are too large to move then there are profound implications for the infrastructure that supports big data science. The current model of data centres is obsolete. In the era of big data the central problem is how to create architectures that effectively manage the relationship between data collections, networks, processing capabilities, and software, given the science requirements of the projects that need to be executed. A stand alone data silo cannot support big data science. I'll describe the current efforts of the Canadian community to deal with this situation and our successes and failures. I'll talk about how we are planning in the next decade to try to create a workable and adaptable solution to support big data science.

  6. The Canadian Astronomy Data Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Nicholas M.; Schade, D.; Astronomy Data Centre, Canadian

    2011-01-01

    The Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC) is the world's largest astronomical data center, holding over 0.5 Petabytes of information, and serving nearly 3000 astronomers worldwide. Its current data collections include BLAST, CFHT, CGPS, FUSE, Gemini, HST, JCMT, MACHO, MOST, and numerous other archives and services. It provides extensive data archiving, curation, and processing expertise, via projects such as MegaPipe, and enables substantial day-to-day collaboration between resident astronomers and computer specialists. It is a stable, powerful, persistent, and properly supported environment for the storage and processing of large volumes of data, a condition that is now absolutely vital for their science potential to be exploited by the community. Through initiatives such as the Common Archive Observation Model (CAOM), the Canadian Virtual Observatory (CVO), and the Canadian Advanced Network for Astronomical Research (CANFAR), the CADC is at the global forefront of advancing astronomical research through improved data services. The CAOM aims to provide homogeneous data access, and hence viable interoperability between a potentially unlimited number of different data collections, at many wavelengths. It is active in the definition of numerous emerging standards within the International Virtual Observatory, and several datasets are already available. The CANFAR project is an initiative to make cloud computing for storage and data-intensive processing available to the community. It does this via a Virtual Machine environment that is equivalent to managing a local desktop. Several groups are already processing science data. CADC is also at the forefront of advanced astronomical data analysis, driven by the science requirements of astronomers both locally and further afield. The emergence of 'Astroinformatics' promises to provide not only utility items like object classifications, but to directly enable new science by accessing previously undiscovered or intractable

  7. Pull-Apart vs. Subduction Rollback Mechanisms For The Cenozoic Formation Of Bohai Basin, Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, H. A.; Mann, P.

    2005-12-01

    The Bohai basin of eastern China covers an area of about 200,000 km2 and forms one of a family of basins that record Cenozoic extension along the eastern margin of Asia from Viet Nam to northeastern Russia. Two very different deformational mechanisms have been proposed for the Cenozoic formation of the Bohai basin. The first model proposes a two-stage extension model consisting of Paleogene rifting in a WNW-ESE direction followed by Neogene thermal subsidence that controlled overlying and less deformed sag basins above the rifted section (Ye et al., 1985). The mechanism for two-stage rifting is generally attributed to rollback of the subducted Pacific plate beneath the Asian continent, lithospheric extension of the overriding continental plate, and thermally-driven, regional subsidence. A second model invokes a more localized Cenozoic pull-apart basin formed at a right-step in a right-lateral shear system parallel to the Asian continental margin (Allen et al., 1997). Earthquakes and GPS data indicate that right-lateral strike-slip faulting continues to the present-day in a pattern consistent with the regional-scale "lazy-Z" map pattern of the Cenozoic Bohai depocenter. Allen et al. (1997) propose the subsurface of the large pull-apart structure contains diffuse, sub-parallel strike-slip faults offset by smaller-scale, intrabasinal stepovers. In order to better distinguish the timing and mechanism for the formation of the Bohai basin, we have interpreted 1400 km of offshore 2D seismic data, a 3D seismic volume, and integrated lithostratigraphic data from 6 wells that are tied to these reflection data. Three major units were identified and mapped on a basin-wide scale: basement, a syn-rift unit, and a post-rift sag unit. Thickening trends and ages indicate the syn-rift phase occurred from late Paleocene to late Oligocene. Basin opening occurred on a series of half-grabens trending NNE-SSW. Rifting ended during the late Oligocene when a regional uplift and erosional

  8. Strategy for introduction of rainwater management facility considering rainfall event applied on new apartment complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, H.; Lee, D. K.; Yoo, S.

    2014-12-01

    As regional torrential rains become frequent due to climate change, urban flooding happens very often. That is why it is necessary to prepare for integrated measures against a wide range of rainfall. This study proposes introduction of effective rainwater management facilities to maximize the rainwater runoff reductions and recover natural water circulation for unpredictable extreme rainfall in apartment complex scale. The study site is new apartment complex in Hanam located in east of Seoul, Korea. It has an area of 7.28ha and is analysed using the EPA-SWMM and STORM model. First, it is analyzed that green infrastructure(GI) had efficiency of flood reduction at the various rainfall events and soil characteristics, and then the most effective value of variables are derived. In case of rainfall event, Last 10 years data of 15 minutes were used for analysis. A comparison between A(686mm rainfall during 22days) and B(661mm/4days) knew that soil infiltration of A is 17.08% and B is 5.48% of the rainfall. Reduction of runoff after introduction of the GI of A is 24.76% and B is 6.56%. These results mean that GI is effective to small rainfall intensity, and artificial rainwater retarding reservoir is needed at extreme rainfall. Second, set of target year is conducted for the recovery of hydrological cycle at the predevelopment. And an amount of infiltration, evaporation, surface runoff of the target year and now is analysed on the basis of land coverage, and an arrangement of LID facilities. Third, rainwater management scenarios are established and simulated by the SWMM-LID. Rainwater management facilities include GI(green roof, porous pavement, vegetative swale, ecological pond, and raingarden), and artificial rainwater. Design scenarios are categorized five type: 1)no GI, 2)conventional GI design(current design), 3)intensive GI design, 4)GI design+rainwater retarding reservoir 5)maximized rainwater retarding reservoir. Intensive GI design is to have attribute value to

  9. Perceptions of healthcare professionals and managers regarding the effectiveness of GP-led walk-in centres in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Arain, Mubashir; Baxter, Susan; Nicholl, Jon P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to identify the perceptions of healthcare professionals regarding the effectiveness and the impact of a new general practitioner-led (GP-led) walk-in centre in the UK. Setting This qualitative study was conducted in a large city in the North of England. In the past few years, there has been particular concern about an increase in the use of emergency department (ED) services provided by the National Health Service and part of the rationale for introducing the new GP-led walk-in centres has been to stem this increase. The five institutes included in the study were EDs, a minor injuries unit, a primary care trust, a GP-led walk-in centre and GP surgeries. Participants Semistructured interviews were conducted with healthcare providers at an adult ED, an ED at a children's hospital, a minor injuries unit, a GP-led walk-in centre, GPs from surrounding surgeries and GPs. Results 11 healthcare professionals and managers were interviewed. Seven key themes were identified within the data: the clinical model of the GP-led walk-in centre; public awareness of the services; appropriate use of the centre; the impact of the centre on other services; demand for healthcare services; choice and confusion and mixed views (positive and negative) of the walk-in services. There were discrepancies between the managers and healthcare professionals regarding the usefulness of the GP-led walk-in centre in the current urgent care system. Conclusions Participants did not notice declines in the demand for EDs after the GP-led walk-in centre. Most of the healthcare professionals believed that the GP-led walk-in centre duplicated existing healthcare services. There is a need to have a better communication system between the GP-led walk-in centres and other healthcare providers to have an integrated system of urgent care delivery. PMID:26297367

  10. The Drosophila wings apart gene anchors a novel, evolutionarily conserved pathway of neuromuscular development.

    PubMed

    Morriss, Ginny R; Jaramillo, Carmelita T; Mikolajczak, Crystal M; Duong, Sandy; Jaramillo, Maryann S; Cripps, Richard M

    2013-11-01

    wings apart (wap) is a recessive, semilethal gene located on the X chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster, which is required for normal wing-vein patterning. We show that the wap mutation also results in loss of the adult jump muscle. We use complementation mapping and gene-specific RNA interference to localize the wap locus to the proximal X chromosome. We identify the annotated gene CG14614 as the gene affected by the wap mutation, since one wap allele contains a non-sense mutation in CG14614, and a genomic fragment containing only CG14614 rescues the jump-muscle phenotypes of two wap mutant alleles. The wap gene lies centromere-proximal to touch-insensitive larva B and centromere-distal to CG14619, which is tentatively assigned as the gene affected in introverted mutants. In mutant wap animals, founder cell precursors for the jump muscle are specified early in development, but are later lost. Through tissue-specific knockdowns, we demonstrate that wap function is required in both the musculature and the nervous system for normal jump-muscle formation. wap/CG14614 is homologous to vertebrate wdr68, DDB1 and CUL4 associated factor 7, which also are expressed in neuromuscular tissues. Thus, our findings provide insight into mechanisms of neuromuscular development in higher animals and facilitate the understanding of neuromuscular diseases that may result from mis-expression of muscle-specific or neuron-specific genes. PMID:24026097

  11. Physical Health of Young, Australian Women: A Comparison of Two National Cohorts Surveyed 17 Years Apart

    PubMed Central

    Rowlands, Ingrid J; Dobson, Annette J; Mishra, Gita D

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Very little is known about the extent of physical health issues among young women in early adulthood and whether this is changing over time. Methods We used data from two national samples of young women aged 18–23 years, surveyed 17 years apart, who participated in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health. We used multinomial logistic regression to compare the women’s physical health (i.e., self-rated health, common symptoms and conditions) and identify whether sociodemographic factors, health behaviours and stress explained any physical health differences between the samples. Results Women aged 18–23 years in 2013 (N = 17,069) were more likely to report poor self-rated health and physical symptoms (particularly urogenital and bowel symptoms) than women aged 18–23 years in 1996 (N = 14,247). Stress accounted for a large proportion of the physical health differences between the cohorts, particularly for allergies, headaches, self-rated health, severe tiredness, skin problems, severe period pain and hypertension. Conclusions Women’s health appears to be changing, with young women born in more recent decades reporting greater physical symptom levels. Changing socio-cultural and economic conditions may place pressure on young adults, negatively affecting their health and wellbeing. Assessing the extent to which social structures and health care policies are offering adequate support to young women may offer avenues for promoting positive health and wellbeing. PMID:26528902

  12. Organophosphate and phthalate esters in settled dust from apartment buildings in Stockholm.

    PubMed

    Luongo, G; Östman, C

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the occurrence of nine phthalate diesters (phthalates) and 14 organophosphorus flame retardants (PFRs) was investigated in 62 house dust samples collected from 19 buildings in Stockholm area during the year 2008. Eight phthalates were detected in almost all samples, with median concentrations ranging from 0.47 μg/g to 449 μg/g with di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate being the most abundant compound. Twelve PFRs were detected with median concentrations ranging from 0.19 μg/g to 11 μg/g. Within this class of compounds, the most abundant were tris(2-chloroisopropyl) and tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate. Both classes of compounds were also measured in the air of the apartments, but no correlation between air and dust concentrations could be found. Based on these measurements, exposure, via house dust ingestion and air inhalation, was calculated for adults and toddlers, and compared to published limit values in order to estimate potential health risks. In an extreme exposure scenario for toddlers, di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate, tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate, and tributyl phosphate were close to the reference dose for chronic oral exposure or the tolerable daily intake. Standard Reference Material SRM 2585 was used as a quality control sample, and the levels of diisononyl and diisodecyl phthalates were determined in this material. PMID:25929991

  13. Teasing apart the effects of seed size and energy content on rodent scatter-hoarding behavior.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Yang, Xiaolan

    2014-01-01

    Scatter-hoarding rodents are known to play a crucial role in the seed dispersal of many plant species. Numerous studies have indicated that both seed size and the energy content of seeds can affect rodent foraging behavior. However, seed size is usually associated with energy content per seed, making it difficult to isolate how seed size and energy affect rodent foraging preferences. This study used 99 treatments of artificial seeds (11 seed sizes×9 levels of energy content) to tease apart the effect of seed size and energy content on rodent seed-caching behavior. Both seed traits showed significant effects, but their details depended on the stage of the rodent foraging process. Seeds with higher energy content were harvested more rapidly while seed size only had a modest effect on harvest rate. However, after harvesting, seed size showed a much stronger effect on rodent foraging behavior. Rodents' choice of which seeds to remove and cache, as well as seed dispersal distance, seemed to reflect an optimal seed size. Our findings could be adapted in future studies to gain a better understanding of scatter-hoarding rodent foraging behavior, and the co-evolutionary dynamics between plant seed production and seed dispersers. PMID:25350369

  14. Theoretical model of the hydrogeology of a pull-apart basin

    SciTech Connect

    White, P.M.

    1991-03-01

    An accurate model of the hydrogeology of a basin is important in assessing the migration path of oil and its potential for remaining within a trap. Fluid flow in a basin is influenced by three driving forces: gravity, compaction, and density. The hydrogeology of most basins is affected by a combination of these three forces, but one is usually dominant. The hydrogeology of a pull-apart basin, such as the Los Angeles basin, is controlled by a combination of gravity and compaction forces. Tectonic movement within the Los Angeles basin has produced a number of small mountain ranges. These elevated features produce a large hydraulic head, driving groundwater into the basin. At the same time, the basin is undergoing compaction driving groundwater out of the basin. The complex interaction of these two forces has influenced the hydrogeologic flow within the Los Angeles basin. Oilgen, a computer modeling program, was used to develop a theoretical model for fluid flow within the Los Angeles basin. Extraction of oil in the early part of this century caused extensive subsidence in parts of the basin. To prevent further subsidence Long Beach established a water injection program in 1958. The water injection program has been successful in inhibiting subsidence and has even produced small, but measurable, amounts of rebound. Modeling was done both pre- and postinjection to allow the effects of the water injection on the hydrology of the basin to be evaluated.

  15. Review of CERN Data Centre Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, P.; Bell, T.; van Eldik, J.; McCance, G.; Panzer-Steindel, B.; Coelho dos Santos, M.; Traylen and, S.; Schwickerath, U.

    2012-12-01

    The CERN Data Centre is reviewing strategies for optimizing the use of the existing infrastructure and expanding to a new data centre by studying how other large sites are being operated. Over the past six months, CERN has been investigating modern and widely-used tools and procedures used for virtualisation, clouds and fabric management in order to reduce operational effort, increase agility and support unattended remote data centres. This paper gives the details on the project's motivations, current status and areas for future investigation.

  16. Towards Human-Centred Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannon, Liam J.

    The field of HCI has evolved and expanded dramatically since its origin in the early 1980’s. The HCI community embraces a large community of researchers and practitioners around the world, from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds in the human and social sciences, engineering and informatics, and more recently, the arts and design disciplines. This kaleidoscope of cultures and disciplines as seen at INTERACT Conferences provides a rich pool of resources for examining our field. Applications are increasingly exploring our full range of sensory modalities, and merging the digital and physical worlds. WiFi has opened up a huge design space for mobile applications. A focus on usability of products and services has been complemented by an emphasis on engagement, enjoyment and experience. With the advent of ubiquitous computing, and the emergence of “The Internet of Things”, new kinds of more open infrastructures make possible radically new kinds of applications. The sources of innovation have also broadened, to include human and social actors outside of the computing and design organizations. The question is to what extent is our mainstream thinking in the HCI field ready for the challenges of this Brave New World? Do the technological and social innovations that we see emerging require us to re-shape, or even, re-create, our field, or is it a case of a more gradual evolution and development of that which we already know? In this closing Keynote, I will provide a perspective on the evolution and development of the HCI field, looking backwards as well as forwards, in order to determine what are some of the changes of significance in the field. This “broad-brush” approach to what I term “ human-centred design” will be complemented by the examination of specific projects and applications, to help anchor some of the discussion. Areas such as user-centred design, participatory design, computer-supported cooperative work and learning, and interaction design, in

  17. Profiling 'centres of excellence' in CAM research.

    PubMed

    Hentschel, C

    2002-03-01

    Several 'centres of excellence' of research in complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) have emerged in recent years. This study represents an attempt to profile the most productive of these centres. Medline searches (1995-2001) were performed with a long list of individuals directing CAM research groups as key words. Eight of them (all male) had published in excess of 20 Medline-listed articles between 1995-2001, and this group was evaluated in further detail. Three originated from the US and two from the UK. Collectively this group had published 32 clinical trials, an equal number of surveys and 95 systematic reviews. The range of research subjects for most centres was narrow. It is concluded that several active CAM research centres are well established. Their output is variable and, in most cases, leave room for improvement. Probably because of funding difficulties, clinical trials remain rare. PMID:12442823

  18. Identity Theft: A Study in Contact Centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moir, Iain; Weir, George R. S.

    This paper explores the recent phenomenon of identity theft. In particular, it examines the contact centre environment as a mechanism for this to occur. Through a survey that was conducted amongst forty-five contact centre workers in the Glasgow area we determined that contact centres can and do provide a mechanism for identity theft. Specifically, we found a particularly high incidence of agents who had previously dealt with phone calls that they considered suspicious. Furthermore, there are agents within such environments who have previously been offered money in exchange for customers' details, or who know of fellow workers who received such offers. Lastly, we identify specific practices within contact centres that may contribute to the likelihood of identity theft.

  19. Recent Earthquake Breaks At The Sea of Marmara Pull-apart (North Anatolian Fault)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucarkus, G.; Armijo, R.; Cakir, Z.; Schmidt, S.; Meyer, B.

    2008-12-01

    The North Anatolian Fault (NAF) makes a major transtensional step-over in the west which forms the lithospheric scale Sea of Marmara pull-apart, between the strike-slip Ganos and Izmit faults. Smaller strike- slip segments and pull-apart basins alternate within the main step-over, combining strike-slip and normal faulting. During the MARMARASCARPS cruise clear morphologic evidence of recent faulting activity was found along several segments of the NAF in the Sea of Marmara. Sets of well-preserved earthquake scarps extend offshore from the Ganos and Izmit faults on land. Our observations from visual exploration and ultra- high resolution bathymetry data (microbathymetry) suggest that those scarps correspond to the submarine ruptures of the purely strike-slip 1999 Izmit (Mw 7.4) and the 1912 Ganos (Ms 7.4) earthquakes. One break extends offshore eastward of the Ganos fault and cuts continuously the Tekirdag basin and Western High up to the Central basin over 60 km. Scarps, here, are very well preserved and show fine-scale morphology typical of strike-slip faulting. The age of the last earthquake break is difficult to assess directly with dating approaches. However, recent sedimentation rates can provide information on the age of the sediment covering the scarps. With that purpose, ROV (remote operated vehicle) sampled interface cores (up to 35 cm) into the disturbed sediment in the immediate vicinity of those scarps. Our first geochronological analysis with 210Pb seems to confirm the connection of fresh fault scarps to the 1912 Ganos earthquake rupture. Sedimentation rates determined from 210Pb profiles (excluding disturbed layers) on cores show a narrow range between 0.1-0.2 cm/yr. Another very fresh break is seen where the Izmit fault enters westward into the Cinarcik Basin. It crosses the bottom of a submarine canyon at 180 m depth, 10 km west of the Hersek peninsula. Microbathymetry suggests the 1999 fault scarp is there 0.5 m high. The flat floor of the canyon

  20. High concordance of daidzein-metabolizing phenotypes in individuals measured 1 to 3 years apart.

    PubMed

    Frankenfeld, Cara L; Atkinson, Charlotte; Thomas, Wendy K; Gonzalez, Alex; Jokela, Tuija; Wähälä, Kristiina; Schwartz, Stephen M; Li, Shuying S; Lampe, Johanna W

    2005-12-01

    Particular intestinal bacteria are capable of metabolizing the soya isoflavone daidzein to equol and/or O-desmethylangolensin (O-DMA), and the presence of these metabolites in urine after soya consumption are markers of particular intestinal bacteria profiles. Prevalences of equol producers and O-DMA producers are approximately 30-50 % and 80-90 %, respectively, and limited observations have suggested that these daidzein-metabolizing phenotypes are stable within individuals over time. Characterizing stability of these phenotypes is important to understand their potential as markers of long-term exposure to particular intestinal bacteria and their associations with disease risk. We evaluated concordance within an individual for the equol-producer and O-DMA-producer phenotypes measured at two time points (T1, T2), 1-3 years apart. Phenotypes were ascertained by analysing equol and O-DMA using GC-MS in a spot urine sample collected after 3 d soya (source of daidzein) supplementation. In ninety-two individuals without recent (within 3 months before phenotyping) or current antibiotics use, 41 % were equol producers at T1 and 45 % were equol producers at T2, and 90 % were O-DMA producers at T1 and 95 % were O-DMA producers at T2. The percentage agreement for the equol-producer phenotype was 82 and for the O-DMA-producer phenotype was 89. These results indicate that these phenotypes are stable in most individuals over time, suggesting that they provide a useful biomarker for evaluating disease risk associated with harbouring particular intestinal bacteria responsible for, or associated with, the metabolism of the soya isoflavone daidzein. PMID:16351761

  1. The Ontogeny of Sexual Size Dimorphism of a Moth: When Do Males and Females Grow Apart?

    PubMed Central

    Stillwell, R. Craig; Daws, Andrew; Davidowitz, Goggy

    2014-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism in body size (sexual size dimorphism) is common in many species. The sources of selection that generate the independent evolution of adult male and female size have been investigated extensively by evolutionary biologists, but how and when females and males grow apart during ontogeny is poorly understood. Here we use the hawkmoth, Manduca sexta, to examine when sexual size dimorphism arises by measuring body mass every day during development. We further investigated whether environmental variables influence the ontogeny of sexual size dimorphism by raising moths on three different diet qualities (poor, medium and high). We found that size dimorphism arose during early larval development on the highest quality food treatment but it arose late in larval development when raised on the medium quality food. This female-biased dimorphism (females larger) increased substantially from the pupal-to-adult stage in both treatments, a pattern that appears to be common in Lepidopterans. Although dimorphism appeared in a few stages when individuals were raised on the poorest quality diet, it did not persist such that male and female adults were the same size. This demonstrates that the environmental conditions that insects are raised in can affect the growth trajectories of males and females differently and thus when dimorphism arises or disappears during development. We conclude that the development of sexual size dimorphism in M. sexta occurs during larval development and continues to accumulate during the pupal/adult stages, and that environmental variables such as diet quality can influence patterns of dimorphism in adults. PMID:25184664

  2. Concentration and risk assessment of phthalates present in indoor air from newly decorated apartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, X. Q.; Song, M.; Guo, M.; Mo, F. F.; Shen, X. Y.

    2013-04-01

    Phthalate esters (PAEs) are ubiquitous in the indoor environment, owing to their use in consumer products. People spend a considerable amount of time indoors. As a result, human exposure to indoor contaminants is of great concern. People are exposed to phthalates through inhalation and dermal absorption of indoor air. In this study, the concentrations, characteristics and carcinogenic risks of gas-phase and particle-phase phthalates in indoor air from bedroom, living room and study room of 10 newly decorated apartments in Hangzhou, China were first investigated. The mean concentration of phthalates (gas-phase and particle-phase) present in household air was 12 096.4 ng m-3, of which diethyl phthalate (DEP), butylbenzyl phthalate (BBP) and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) were the most abundant compounds with concentrations of 2290 ng m-3, 3975 ng m-3 and 2437 ng m-3, respectively, totally accounting for 72.0% of ∑6PAEs. Contamination levels of phthalates varied in different compartments. The concentration of phthalates was the highest 17 363.7 ng m-3 in living room, followed with 11 389.5 ng m-3 in study room, and the lowest 9739.1 ng m-3 in bedroom. It was also found that phthalates mainly accumulated in gaseous form in household air. DEHP posed the greatest health risk to children aged 1-2. Carcinogenic risk of DEHP was evaluated to be 3.912 × 10-5, and was 39 times higher than the limit set by the U.S. EPA.

  3. Intraindividual variation in plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D measures 5 years apart among postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jennifer E.; Hovey, Kathleen M.; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Andrews, Christopher A; LaMonte, Michael J.; Horst, Ronald L.; Genco, Robert J.; Millen, Amy E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Current literature examining associations between vitamin D and chronic disease generally use a single assessment of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), assuming an individual’s 25(OH)D concentration is consistent over time. Methods We investigated the intraindividual variability between two measures of plasma 25(OH)D concentrations collected ~5 years apart (1997-2000 to 2002-2005) in 672 postmenopausal women participating in the Women’s Health Initiative. Plasma 25(OH)D was assessed using the DiaSorin LIAISON® chemiluminescence immunoassay. The within-pair coefficient of variation (CV) was 4.9% using blinded quality control samples. Mean and standard deviations (SD) of 25(OH)D at the two time points were compared using a paired t-test. An intraindividual CV and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) were used to assess intraindividual variability. A Spearman correlation coefficient (r) assessed the strength of the association between the two measures and concordance in vitamin D status at two time points Results Mean 25(OH)D concentrations (nmol/L) significantly increased over time from 60.0 (SD=22.2) to 67.8 (SD=22.2) (p<0.05). The CV was 24.6%, the ICC (95% Confidence Interval (CI)) was 0.59 (0.54-0.64), and the Spearman r was 0.61 (95% CI=0.56-0.66). Greater concordance over 5 years was observed in participants with sufficient compared to deficient or inadequate baseline 25(OH)D concentrations (weighted kappa=0.39). Reliability measures were moderately influenced by season of blood draw and vitamin D supplement use. Conclusion There is moderate intraindividual variation in 25(OH)D concentrations over approximately 5 years. Impact These data support the use of a one-time measure of blood 25(OH)D in prospective studies with ≤ 5 years of follow-up. PMID:22523182

  4. Human wings apart-like gene is specifically overexpressed in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    LU, XIAOQIN; CUI, JINQUAN; FU, MEIZHOU; WANG, WULIANG

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. The human wings apart-like (hWAPL) gene, which is 30,793 bp long and located on 10q23.2., is a human homologue of the WAPL gene in Drosophila melanogaster. hWAPL has the characteristics of an oncogene in uterine cervical cancer. The present study investigated the expression of the hWAPL gene in tissues, including 9 common cancers, consisting of cervical, gastric and lung cancers, liver, bladder, esophageal, endometrial, renal and rectal carcinomas, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and benign squamous epithelia. The immunohistochemical analysis was conducted using paraffin-embedded tissues obtained from 413 patients, consisting of 27 benign squamous epithelial tissue samples, and 47 cervical cancer, 30 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)I, 33 CINII, 38 CINIII, 29 gastric cancer, 28 liver carcinoma, 26 bladder carcinoma, 35 esophageal carcinoma, 25 endometrial, 26 renal carcinoma, 36 rectal carcinoma and 33 lung cancer tissues. The expression of hWAPL mRNA was evaluated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 8 benign squamous epithelia and 11 cervical cancer tissues. Compared to benign squamous epithelia and the 8 other cancers, hWAPL protein was significantly increased in cervical cancer (P<0.001). The expression of the hWAPL protein in cervical cancer and CINIII tissues was markedly increased compared to the expression in CINI and CINII tissues (P<0.001). Despite the significant difference in the staining scores (P<0.001), no significant difference was observed in the percentage of tissues expressing hWAPL (P=0.102) between cervical cancer and CINIII. The hWAPL gene may therefore be specifically overexpressed in cervical cancer. The overexpression of hWAPL may play an important role in occurrence and development of cervical cancer. PMID:27347120

  5. Global lightning dynamics deduced from Schumann resonance frequency variations at two sites ~ 550 km apart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satori, G.; Mushtak, V.; Neska, M.; Nagy, T.; Barta, V.

    2012-04-01

    Schumann resonance (SR) peak frequencies depend on the lightning source-observer angular distance. The modal phase shift interaction at nodal distances manifests itself as sharp frequency variations: increases or decreases depend on the direction of the source motion with respect to the observer and the mode number. Nagycenk Observatory (47.6° N, 16.7° E), Hungary and Belsk (51.8 ° N, 20.8 ° E), Poland, are relatively close to each other ( ~550 km apart) compared with SR wavelengths. Both stations can approach the nodal position with respect to the African source region for the third Ez mode and to the Asian/American "chimney" regions for the first Ez mode as lightning activity migrates as the seasons change. These two observation sites can be on the different sides of the nodal line region for some weeks twice during a year, indicating the fine seasonal motion of the source regions which causes relatively large frequency variations (some tenth Hz) and different frequency values at the two stations, especially for the third Ez mode. Source-observer distance dependent frequency variations are presented throughout a year by using simultaneous SR observations at Nagycenk (NCK) and Belsk (BLK). The observed frequency changes are supported by the simulation of the distance-dependent frequency variation based on the computed spectra of the vertical electric field components using the Two-Dimensional Telegraph Equation (TDTE) technique (Kirillov, 2002). For the tropical "chimney" regions the diurnal phase of greatest activity has well established spatial-temporal dynamics. Modal peak frequencies are obtained, along with modal intensities and quality factors, by means of the least-squares fitting of "experimental" spectra by the "classic" Lorentzian function (Williams et al., 2006).

  6. Perspectives on recycling centres and future developments.

    PubMed

    Engkvist, I-L; Eklund, J; Krook, J; Björkman, M; Sundin, E

    2016-11-01

    The overall aim of this paper is to draw combined, all-embracing conclusions based on a long-term multidisciplinary research programme on recycling centres in Sweden, focussing on working conditions, environment and system performance. A second aim is to give recommendations for their development of new and existing recycling centres and to discuss implications for the future design and organisation. Several opportunities for improvement of recycling centres were identified, such as design, layout, ease with which users could sort their waste, the work environment, conflicting needs and goals within the industry, and industrialisation. Combining all results from the research, which consisted of different disciplinary aspects, made it possible to analyse and elucidate their interrelations. Waste sorting quality was recognized as the most prominent improvement field in the recycling centre system. The research identified the importance of involving stakeholders with different perspectives when planning a recycling centre in order to get functionality and high performance. Practical proposals of how to plan and build recycling centres are given in a detailed checklist. PMID:26826952

  7. Air pollution assessment on city of Tirana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandija, F.; Zoga, P.

    2012-04-01

    Air pollution is one of the hot topics on nowadays studies. This problem is often encountered on urban centers, especially on metropolitan areas. These areas are usually characterized by densely population, heavy traffic rates and the presence of many industrial plants on their suburbs. Problems regarding to air pollution on these areas are more evident over metropolitan areas in developing countries. Air pollution is mostly related to health effects, especially in outdoor environments. These effects regards primarily on respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Air pollution assessment on a specific area requires not only the estimation of pollutant concentrations in that area, but also determination of their principal sources as well as prediction of eventual scenarios on the area under investigation. This study is focused on air pollution assessment on the city of Tirana, which is the major urban centre and the capital city of Albania. This city has about one million inhabitants. During the last 20 years, its population has grown about four fold, and it is still growing. Because of Albania is a developing country, its capital city is involved on serious environmental problems. Considering these facts, we have conducted continuous monitoring campaigns on several sites of Tirana. These monitoring campaigns consist on measurement of several pollutant gases (SO2, CO, CO2, NOx, etc.) and particulate matter over a period of 20 months. In this paper there are obtained diurnal and annual variations of pollutant concentrations, there is modeled their spatial distributions over the area of the city, and there are estimated the potential contributions of principal sources like traffic and industrial plants. During the entire monitoring campaign there are recorded also meteorological parameters, like temperature, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure, wind speed, wind direction, precipitations, etc. In this way we have tried to obtain the correlations between pollutant

  8. Mexico City Aerosol Transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, P. A.; Eichinger, W. E.; Prueger, J.; Holder, H. L.

    2007-12-01

    A radiative impact study was conducted in Mexico City during MILAGRO/MIRAGE campaign in March of 2006. On a day when the predominant wind was from the north to the south, authors measured radiative properties of the atmosphere in six locations across the city ranging from the city center, through the city south limits and the pass leading out of the city (causing pollutants to funnel through the area). A large change in aerosol optical properties has been noticed. The aerosol optical depth has generally increased outside of the city and angstrom coefficient has changed significantly towards smaller values. Aerosol size distribution was calculated using SkyRadPack. The total optical depths allowed coincidental lidar data to calculate total extinction profiles for all the locations for 1064nm.

  9. Spatial accessibility of the population to urban health centres in Kermanshah, Islamic Republic of Iran: a geographic information systems analysis.

    PubMed

    Reshadat, S; Saedi, S; Zangeneh, A; Ghasemi, S R; Gilan, N R; Karbasi, A; Bavandpoor, E

    2015-06-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) analysis has not been widely used in underdeveloped countries to ensure that vulnerable populations have accessibility to primary health-care services. This study applied GIS methods to analyse the spatial accessibility to urban primary-care centres of the population in Kermanshah city, Islamic Republic of Iran, by age and sex groups. In a descriptive-analytical study over 3 time periods, network analysis, mean centre and standard distance methods were applied using ArcGIS 9.3. The analysis was based on a standard radius of 750 m distance from health centres, walking speed of 1 m/s and desired access time to health centres of 12.5 mins. The proportion of the population with inadequate geographical access to health centres rose from 47.3% in 1997 to 58.4% in 2012. The mean centre and standard distance mapping showed that the spatial distribution of health centres in Kermanshah needed to be adjusted to changes in population distribution. PMID:26369997

  10. At the Same Time or Apart in Time? The Role of Presentation Timing and Retrieval Dynamics in Generalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlach, Haley A.; Ankowski, Amber A.; Sandhofer, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    Several bodies of research have found different results with regard to presentation timing, categorization, and generalization. Both presenting instances at the "same time" (simultaneous) and presenting instances "apart in time" (spacing) have been shown to facilitate generalization. In this study, we resolved these results by examining…

  11. Measures for the reduction of the noise and vibration level of apartment house elevators. [changes in construction and insulation measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enescu, N.; Munteanu, M.; Stan, A.

    1974-01-01

    The reduction of the level of elevator noise and vibrations in apartment buildings was studied. By improving the mounting and gearing conditions of the winch and soundproofing the winch chamber, as well as by covering the elevator's control panel, the noise and vibration level was appreciably reduced.

  12. Genetic and environmental influences on eating behavior - a study of twin pairs reared apart or reared together

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examined the relative influence of genetic versus environmental factors on specific aspects of eating behavior. Adult monozygotic twins (22 pairs and 3 singleton reared apart, 38 pairs and 9 singleton reared together, age 18-76 years, BMI 17-43 kg/m2) completed the Three Factor Eating Que...

  13. Nobody Said It Would Be Easy: Ethnolinguistic Group Challenges to Bilingual and Multicultural Education in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleyn, Tatyana; Reyes, Sharon Adelman

    2011-01-01

    New York City sets itself apart from many locations in the USA due to its citizens' unparalleled diversity. The degree to which schools either build upon or suppress the backgrounds of their linguistically and culturally diverse students is dependent on the degree to which they can provide an education that is both bilingual and multicultural.…

  14. Equality of Educational Opportunity in the Large Cities of America: The Relationship Between Decentralization and Racial Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Carroll F., Ed.; Usdan, Michael D., Ed.

    A 2-day institute examined the relationship between two central policy alternatives facing large city school districts: Decentralization and integration. Titles and authors of the 11 major addresses presented at the institute are as follows: (1) "Urban Schools: Issues in Responsiveness and Control," by John H. Fischer; (2) "Children Apart: Crisis…

  15. Interpersonal Sensitivity, Romantic Stress, and the Prediction of Depression: A Study of Inner-City, Minority Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizzo, Christie J.; Daley, Shannon E.; Gunderson, Brent H.

    2006-01-01

    The role of interpersonal sensitivity in the relation between romantic stress and depression was examined in 55 adolescent girls from an inner-city high school. Depression, interpersonal sensitivity, and chronic and episodic romantic stress were measured at two time points, 6 months apart. Interpersonal sensitivity was found to moderate the…

  16. 26. 'CITY HOSPITAL, BLACKWELL'S ISLAND.' (Source: New York City Department ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. 'CITY HOSPITAL, BLACKWELL'S ISLAND.' (Source: New York City Department of Public Finance, Real Estate Owned by the City of New York under Jurisdiction of the Department of Public Charities, 1909.) - Island Hospital, Roosevelt Island, New York County, NY

  17. Incident and Emergency Centre of the IAEA.

    PubMed

    Baciu, Florian; Buglova, Elena; Martincic, Rafael; Spiegelberg Planer, Rejane; Stern, Warren; Winkler, Guenther

    2010-06-01

    The Incident and Emergency Centre of the International Atomic Emergency Agency is the global focal point for preparedness, event reporting, and response to nuclear and radiological incidents and emergencies irrespective of their cause. The Centre continuously works to develop standards and guidance for strengthening Member States' preparedness; develops practical tools and training programs to assist Member States in promptly applying the standards and guidance; and organizes a variety of training events and exercises. The Centre evaluates national plans and assists in their development; facilitates effective communication between countries; develops response procedures; and supports national exercises. The Centre provides access to multiple information resources; assesses trends that may influence crisis and consequence management plans and response; and develops and continuously enhances methodology for identifying conditions needed for early warning and response. The Centre provides around-the-clock assistance to Member States in dealing with nuclear and radiological events, including security related events through timely and efficient services and the provision of a coordinated international response to such emergencies. PMID:20445379

  18. CMS centres worldwide: A new collaborative infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Lucas; Gottschalk, Erik; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Experiment at the LHC is establishing a global network of inter-connected 'CMS Centres' for controls, operations and monitoring. These support: (1) CMS data quality monitoring, detector calibrations, and analysis; and (2) computing operations for the processing, storage and distribution of CMS data. We describe the infrastructure, computing, software, and communications systems required to create an effective and affordable CMS Centre. We present our highly successful operations experiences with the major CMS Centres at CERN, Fermilab, and DESY during the LHC first beam data-taking and cosmic ray commissioning work. The status of the various centres already operating or under construction in Asia, Europe, Russia, South America, and the USA is also described. We emphasise the collaborative communications aspects. For example, virtual co-location of experts in CMS Centres Worldwide is achieved using high-quality permanently-running 'telepresence' video links. Generic Web-based tools have been developed and deployed for monitoring, control, display management and outreach.

  19. Data Centres In The Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, F.

    2006-08-01

    Astronomy has been at the forefront for the development of on-line services, and astronomers routinely retrieve data from observatory archives, information from value-added services provided by data centres, and bibliography from the ADS and electronic journals. The Virtual Observatory aims at going one step further by providing astronomers with seamless and transparent access to data and services, and data centres with a framework to publish their data and services. Many teams size the opportunity and express their willingness to provide VO services in their domains of expertise, such as data compilations or specific tools, including theory data and services. The VO allows astronomers to discover and use resources of interest for their research, and specific tools can be interfaced with more general VO portals. This means that even small teams can have a significant contribution if they choose the proper niche. VO projects are organising themselves to help these new data centres to uptake the VO framework. Traditional data centres also have a role to play in explaining the constraints linked to service quality and sustainability. The VO "Data Centre Alliance" opens exciting new prospects for increasing the sharing of knowledge throughout the community.

  20. Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Salt Lake City, Utah, will host the 2002 Winter Olympic Games. The city is located on the southeastern shore of the Great Salt Lake and sits to the west of the Wasatch Mountains, which rise more than 3,500 meters (10,000 feet) above sea level. The city was first settled in 1847 by pioneers seeking relief from religious persecution. Today Salt Lake City, the capital of Utah, is home to more than 170,000 residents. This true-color image of Salt Lake City was acquired by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), flying aboard Landsat 7, on May 26, 2000. The southeastern tip of the Great Salt Lake is visible in the upper left of the image. The furrowed green and brown landscape running north-south is a portion of the Wasatch Mountains, some of which are snow-capped (white pixels). The greyish pixels in the center of the image show the developed areas of the city. A number of water reservoirs can be seen east of the mountain range. Salt Lake City International Airport is visible on the northwestern edge of the city. About 20 miles south of the airport is the Bingham Canyon Copper Mine (tan pixels), the world's largest open pit excavation. See also this MODIS image of Utah. Image courtesy NASA Landsat7 Science Team and USGS Eros Data Center

  1. The Industrial City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohl, Raymond

    1976-01-01

    This article, the sixth installment in Environment's "Looking Back" series, traces the woes of America's industrialized cities to the movement that developed cities primarily as centers for industrial enterprise rather than as places for people to live. Today's social ills, from pollution to poverty, developed from that movement. (BT)

  2. Walkout in Crystal City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrios, Greg

    2009-01-01

    When students take action, they create change that extends far beyond the classroom. In this article, the author, who was a former teacher from Crystal City, Texas, remembers the student walkout that helped launch the Latino civil rights movement 40 years ago. The Crystal City student walkout remains a high point in the history of student activism…

  3. CITY III Player's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Envirometrics, Inc., Washington, DC.

    CITY III is a computer-assisted simulation game in which participants make decisions affecting the economic, governmental, and social conditions of a simulated urban area. In CITY III, the computer stores all the relevant statistics for the area, updates data when changes are made, and prints out yearly reports. The computer also simulates…

  4. CITY III Operator's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Envirometrics, Inc., Washington, DC.

    CITY III is a computer-assisted simulation game of an urban system involving player operation of and interaction with economic, social, and government components. The role of operator in the game is to take the handwritten inputs (decisions) from the CITY III participants, process them, and return output which initiates the next round of…

  5. Innovation and the City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleiman, Neil; Forman, Adam; Ko, Jae; Giles, David; Bowles, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    With Washington trapped in budget battles and partisan gridlock, cities have emerged as the best source of government innovation. Nowhere is this more visible than in New York City. Since taking office in 2002, Mayor Bloomberg has introduced a steady stream of innovative policies, from a competition to recruit a new applied sciences campus and a…

  6. Partnership Creates Centre for Union Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Carol; Roman, Stephen

    1978-01-01

    A unique cooperative venture between the city of Coventry and local trade unions is establishing a library collection of books, periodicals, historical documents, tapes, and films dealing with unions, labor studies, and industrial problems. (JAB)

  7. Emotional intelligence and patient-centred care

    PubMed Central

    Birks, Yvonne F; Watt, Ian S

    2007-01-01

    The principles of patient-centred care are increasingly stressed as part of health care policy and practice. Explanations for why some practitioners seem more successful in achieving patient-centred care vary, but a possible role for individual differences in personality has been postulated. One of these, emotional intelligence (EI), is increasingly referred to in health care literature. This paper reviews the literature on EI in health care and poses a series of questions about the links between EI and patient-centred outcomes. Papers concerning empirical examinations of EI in a variety of settings were identified to determine the evidence base for its increasing popularity. The review suggests that a substantial amount of further research is required before the value of EI as a useful concept can be substantiated. PMID:17682030

  8. Optimizing Data Centre Energy and Environmental Costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikema, David Hendrik

    Data centres use an estimated 2% of US electrical power which accounts for much of their total cost of ownership. This consumption continues to grow, further straining power grids attempting to integrate more renewable energy. This dissertation focuses on assessing and reducing data centre environmental and financial costs. Emissions of projects undertaken to lower the data centre environmental footprints can be assessed and the emission reduction projects compared using an ISO-14064-2-compliant greenhouse gas reduction protocol outlined herein. I was closely involved with the development of the protocol. Full lifecycle analysis and verifying that projects exceed business-as-usual expectations are addressed, and a test project is described. Consuming power when it is low cost or when renewable energy is available can be used to reduce the financial and environmental costs of computing. Adaptation based on the power price showed 10--50% potential savings in typical cases, and local renewable energy use could be increased by 10--80%. Allowing a fraction of high-priority tasks to proceed unimpeded still allows significant savings. Power grid operators use mechanisms called ancillary services to address variation and system failures, paying organizations to alter power consumption on request. By bidding to offer these services, data centres may be able to lower their energy costs while reducing their environmental impact. If providing contingency reserves which require only infrequent action, savings of up to 12% were seen in simulations. Greater power cost savings are possible for those ceding more control to the power grid operator. Coordinating multiple data centres adds overhead, and altering at which data centre requests are processed based on changes in the financial or environmental costs of power is likely to increase this overhead. Tests of virtual machine migrations showed that in some cases there was no visible increase in power use while in others power use

  9. Great cities look small.

    PubMed

    Sim, Aaron; Yaliraki, Sophia N; Barahona, Mauricio; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2015-08-01

    Great cities connect people; failed cities isolate people. Despite the fundamental importance of physical, face-to-face social ties in the functioning of cities, these connectivity networks are not explicitly observed in their entirety. Attempts at estimating them often rely on unrealistic over-simplifications such as the assumption of spatial homogeneity. Here we propose a mathematical model of human interactions in terms of a local strategy of maximizing the number of beneficial connections attainable under the constraint of limited individual travelling-time budgets. By incorporating census and openly available online multi-modal transport data, we are able to characterize the connectivity of geometrically and topologically complex cities. Beyond providing a candidate measure of greatness, this model allows one to quantify and assess the impact of transport developments, population growth, and other infrastructure and demographic changes on a city. Supported by validations of gross domestic product and human immunodeficiency virus infection rates across US metropolitan areas, we illustrate the effect of changes in local and city-wide connectivities by considering the economic impact of two contemporary inter- and intra-city transport developments in the UK: High Speed 2 and London Crossrail. This derivation of the model suggests that the scaling of different urban indicators with population size has an explicitly mechanistic origin. PMID:26179988

  10. Great cities look small

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Aaron; Yaliraki, Sophia N.; Barahona, Mauricio; Stumpf, Michael P. H.

    2015-01-01

    Great cities connect people; failed cities isolate people. Despite the fundamental importance of physical, face-to-face social ties in the functioning of cities, these connectivity networks are not explicitly observed in their entirety. Attempts at estimating them often rely on unrealistic over-simplifications such as the assumption of spatial homogeneity. Here we propose a mathematical model of human interactions in terms of a local strategy of maximizing the number of beneficial connections attainable under the constraint of limited individual travelling-time budgets. By incorporating census and openly available online multi-modal transport data, we are able to characterize the connectivity of geometrically and topologically complex cities. Beyond providing a candidate measure of greatness, this model allows one to quantify and assess the impact of transport developments, population growth, and other infrastructure and demographic changes on a city. Supported by validations of gross domestic product and human immunodeficiency virus infection rates across US metropolitan areas, we illustrate the effect of changes in local and city-wide connectivities by considering the economic impact of two contemporary inter- and intra-city transport developments in the UK: High Speed 2 and London Crossrail. This derivation of the model suggests that the scaling of different urban indicators with population size has an explicitly mechanistic origin. PMID:26179988

  11. Automated brightfield break-apart in situ hybridization (ba-ISH) application: ALK and MALT1 genes as models.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Hiroaki; Zhang, Wenjun; Kelly, Brian D; Miller, Melanie; Pestic-Dragovich, Lidija; Bieniarz, Christopher; Vasicek, Thomas J; Marafioti, Teresa; Rimsza, Lisa; Grogan, Thomas M

    2010-12-01

    Cancer diagnosis can be a complex process, which takes consideration of histopathological, clinical, immunophenotypic, and genetic features. Since non-random chromosomal translocations are specifically involved in the development of various cancers, the detection of these gene aberrations becomes increasingly important. In recent years, break-apart (or split-signal) fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has emerged as an advantageous technique to detect gene translocations on tissue sections. However, FISH assays are technically challenging and require specialized fluorescence microscopes. Furthermore, the FISH signal is not stable for long term archiving due to photo bleaching. Our objective was to demonstrate the feasibility of brightfield break-apart in situ hybridization (ba-ISH) for anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue translocation protein 1 (MALT1) genes as models. ALK or MALT1 break-apart probes were labeled with digoxigenin (DIG) or 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP) on both sides of a known gene breakpoint region and the hybridization sites were visualized with the combination of alkaline phosphatase (AP)-based blue and red detection. Therefore, normal genes are detected as purple dots by mixing blue and red colors while translocated genes are detected as isolated blue or red dots. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tonsil was used as control for the co-localized 5' and 3' probes. Gene translocations of ALK or MALT1 were detected as separate blue and red dots on ALCL and MALT lymphoma cases. Thus, ISH analyses of gene translocations can be conducted with a regular light microscope and the long term archiving of break-apart ISH slides can be achieved. PMID:20621192

  12. Towards a vibrational analysis of spheroidene. Resonance Raman spectroscopy of 13C-labelled spheroidenes in petroleum ether and in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centre.

    PubMed

    Kok, P; Köhler, J; Groenen, E J; Gebhard, R; van der Hoef, I; Lugtenburg, J; Hoff, A F; Farhoosh, R; Frank, H A

    1994-04-28

    We report resonance Raman spectra of the carotenoid spheroidene and its 14'-13C and 15'-13C substituted analogues in petroleum ether and bound to the reaction centre of Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26. The spectra in petroleum ether correspond to planar all-trans spheroidene while those of the reaction centres are consistent with a nonplanar 15,15'-cis spheroidene. The effect of 13C labelling is largest in the carbon-carbon double-bond stretching region. The 15'-13C substitution of the reaction centre bound spheroidene, however, hardly changes the C=C band as compared to that for the natural abundance spheroidene apart from a new weak band at 1508 cm(-1). This observation has been interpreted as a decoupling of the C15=C15' stretch from the other double-bond stretches in combination with a small intrinsic Raman intensity of this local mode for 15,15'-cis spheroidene. PMID:8167135

  13. City Lights of Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Growth in 'mega-cities' is altering the landscape and the atmosphere in such a way as to curtail normal photosynthesis. By using data from The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System, researchers have been able to look at urban sprawl by monitoring the emission of light from cities at night. By overlaying these 'light maps' onto other data such as soil and vegetation maps, the research shows that urbanization can have a variable but measurable impact on photosynthetic productivity. For more information, read Bright Lights, Big City Image by the NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio

  14. Cactus: The Centres of a Triangle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Hartley

    2009-01-01

    This is the first of two articles which describe how to use "JavaSketchPad" to explore the centres of a triangle. This introductory exercise is suggested in the GSP "Workshop Guide". Students can use "JavaSketchPad Interactive Geometry" (JSP) at home at no cost. They are likely to impress their parents with their enthusiasm for geometry and all…

  15. Student-Centred Learning: A Humanist Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tangney, Sue

    2014-01-01

    The notion of student-centred learning is often not defined; within the pedagogic literature it is generally associated with constructivism or principles associated with a constructivist environment such as building on prior knowledge, purposeful active learning and sense-making. An informal enquiry into conceptions of university staff prior to…

  16. Learner-Centred Education and "Cultural Translation"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Paul

    2013-01-01

    This paper contests the proposal that learner-centred education (LCE) may simply be a western construct, irrelevant to the current educational needs of developing countries, by arguing that its specific forms will be more effective when introduced through small-scale institutional relationships than through large-scale contracts with national…

  17. UV LED lighting for automated crystal centring

    PubMed Central

    Chavas, Leonard M. G.; Yamada, Yusuke; Hiraki, Masahiko; Igarashi, Noriyuki; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Wakatsuki, Soichi

    2011-01-01

    A direct outcome of the exponential growth of macromolecular crystallography is the continuously increasing demand for synchrotron beam time, both from academic and industrial users. As more and more projects entail screening a profusion of sample crystals, fully automated procedures at every level of the experiments are being implemented at all synchrotron facilities. One of the major obstacles to achieving such automation lies in the sample recognition and centring in the X-ray beam. The capacity of UV light to specifically react with aromatic residues present in proteins or with DNA base pairs is at the basis of UV-assisted crystal centring. Although very efficient, a well known side effect of illuminating biological samples with strong UV sources is the damage induced on the irradiated samples. In the present study the effectiveness of a softer UV light for crystal centring by taking advantage of low-power light-emitting diode (LED) sources has been investigated. The use of UV LEDs represents a low-cost solution for crystal centring with high specificity. PMID:21169682

  18. Centre for International Cooperation and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Open Univ., Walton, Bletchley, Bucks (England).

    The Centre for International Cooperation and Services (CICS), part of the Open University of the United Kingdom, is described. Distance learning is defined and related to the Open University. Information is provided on the establishment, work, services, and resources of the CICS. A wallet folder at the back of the booklet contains details of the…

  19. Myanmar: The Community Learning Centre Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middelborg, Jorn; Duvieusart, Baudouin, Ed.

    A community learning centre (CLC) is a local educational institution outside the formal education system, usually set up and managed by local people. CLCs were first introduced in Myanmar in 1994, and by 2001 there were 71 CLCs in 11 townships. The townships are characterized by remoteness, landlessness, unemployment, dependency on one cash crop,…

  20. Self Assessment and Student-Centred Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Betty

    2012-01-01

    This paper seeks to show how self assessment facilitates student-centred learning (SCL) and fills a gap in the literature. Two groups of students were selected from a single class in a tertiary educational institution. The control group of 25 was selected randomly by the tossing of an unbiased coin (heads = control group). They were trained in the…

  1. Person-Centred (Deictic) Expressions and Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, R. Peter; Garcia-Perez, Rosa M.; Lee, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    We employed semi-structured tests to determine whether children with autism produce and comprehend deictic (person-centred) expressions such as "this"/"tilde" "here"/"there" and "come"/"go", and whether they understand atypical non-verbal gestural deixis in the form of directed head-nods to indicate location. In Study 1, most participants…

  2. Crystallographic Data Centre Services and Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cambridge Univ. (England). Chemical Lab.

    The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre is concerned with the retrieval, evaluation, synthesis, and dissemination of structural data based on diffraction methods. The source of input is almost entirely primary journals. Bibliographic information and numeric data on crystal and molecular structures are on magnetic tapes. The bibliographic file…

  3. Youth Research Centre Annual Report, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melbourne Univ. (Australia). Youth Research Centre.

    This report details the activities of the Youth Research Centre (YRC) at the University of Melbourne in 2002 in research project work involving a balance between the completion of projects, the development of new areas, and the continuation of longer-term projects as well as the supervision and teaching of a range of postgraduate health and…

  4. Centring the Subject in Order to Educate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, R. Scott

    2007-01-01

    It is important for educators to recognise that the various calls to decentre the subject--or self--should not be interpreted as necessarily requiring the removal of the subject altogether. Through the individualism of the Enlightenment the self was centred. This highly individualistic notion of the sovereign self has now been decentred especially…

  5. Do We Need Teachers in Children's Centres?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grenier, Julian

    2006-01-01

    This account considers the need for qualified teachers and headteachers in Children's Centres in England. It describes the ongoing decline in the importance of nursery education, and the concurrent expansion of childcare. The author argues that the best response to increasingly formal approaches in the early years is to maintain the role of the…

  6. Visiting a science centre: what's on offer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Ian

    1990-09-01

    Science centres are a valuable resource, used more frequently by family groups and primary school parties than by secondary schools. The importance of affective learning, involving attitude changes, is stressed. Provided the right approach is used, accompanying adults can help children get the most out of a visit.

  7. In the Field: The Canadian Ecology Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magee, Clare

    2000-01-01

    The Canadian Ecology Centre (Ontario) offers year-round residential and day programs in outdoor and environmental education for secondary students, field placement and internship opportunities for college students, and ecotourism programs, while providing employment and tax revenues to the local community. Dubbed consensus environmentalism, the…

  8. Unique Programme of Indian Centre for Space Physics using large rubber Balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Sarkar, Ritabrata; Bhowmick, Debashis; Chakraborty, Subhankar

    Indian Centre for Space Physics (ICSP) has developed a unique capability to pursue space based studies at a very low cost. Here, large rubber balloons are sent to near space (~ 40km) with payloads of less than 4kg weight. These payloads can be cosmic ray detectors, X-ray detectors, muon detectors apart from communication device, GPS, and nine degrees of freedom measuring capabilities. With two balloons in orbiter-launcher configuration, ICSP has been able to conduct long duration flights upto 12 hours. ICSP has so far sent 56 Dignity missions to near space and obtained Cosmic Ray and muon variation on a regular basis, dynamical spectrum of solar flares and gamma ray burst apart from other usual parameters such as wind velocity components, temperature and pressure variations etc. Since all the payloads are retrieved by parachutes, the cost per mission remains very low, typically around USD1000.00. The preparation time is low. Furthermore, no special launching area is required. In principle, such experiments can be conducted on a daily basis, if need be. Presently, we are also incorporating studies relating to earth system science such as Ozone, aerosols, micro-meteorites etc.

  9. City College of New York CITY FACTS, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    City Univ. of New York, NY. City Coll.

    CITY FACTS is an annual publication of the City College of New York's (CCNY's) Institutional Research Office. It contains four main sections: Executive Summary and Commentary on CITY FACTS Tables, Student Data over the Past Decade, Employee and Financial Data, and Reference Sources. A brief commentary on each of the City Facts tables is included…

  10. The Sustainable City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gangloff, Deborah

    1995-01-01

    Focuses on methods to make cities more sustainable through the processes of energy efficiency, pollution and waste reduction, capture of natural processes, and the merger of ecological, economic, and social factors. (LZ)

  11. The sustainable city

    SciTech Connect

    Gangloff, D.

    1995-05-01

    Natural marshes are replacing expensive man-made sewage treatment plants. Leaves that once wound up in landfills are now enhancing soils. Ecological landscaping is cooling entire communities and reducing energy use. In coming to view our cities as ecosystems, we are learning to apply the concepts and principles that have sustained rural forests and farms for generations. The question now is, how can those concepts be applied to cities, and how can individual citizens - as well as community leaders - act to improve the sustainability of the places they call home. This article discusses the following topics in reference to developing cities which can sustain themselves: energy efficiency; pollution and waste reduction; capturing natural processes (taking advantage of species that thrive in and benefit the city); merging ecological, economic, and social factors. 6 figs.

  12. Cincinnati; Our Convention City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borchin, Anna

    1970-01-01

    During Easter week, 1971, Cincinnati will be the hostess of the 50th anniversary convention of the Catholic Library Association. Items of historical interest concerning the city are briefly described. (NH)

  13. Noise in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, Sergio

    2001-05-01

    Mexico City is known to be the largest city in the world, inhabited by some 20 percent of the national population, so noise pollution is not strange to it, particularly in view of the fact that industry is not concentrated, but rather spread throughout the city. The international airport also lies within the city limits, in the midst of residential areas. The heavy traffic during rush hours in the morning and in the evening and the activities of the populace, together with special events, produce a noise problem that is difficult to assess and to solve. Nevertheless, with educational programs begun several years ago and noise campaigns planned for the near future, in addition to existing regulations, the problem is not completely out of control. This paper presents a discussion of the general noise problem and describes how authorities and institutions are dealing with it.

  14. City sewer collectors biocorrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksiażek, Mariusz

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the biocorrosion of city sewer collectors impregnated with special polymer sulphur binders, polymerized sulphur, which is applied as the industrial waste material. The city sewer collectors are settled with a colony of soil bacteria which have corrosive effects on its structure. Chemoautotrophic nitrifying bacteria utilize the residues of halites (carbamide) which migrate in the city sewer collectors, due to the damaged dampproofing of the roadway and produce nitrogen salts. Chemoorganotrophic bacteria utilize the traces of organic substrates and produce a number of organic acids (formic, acetic, propionic, citric, oxalic and other). The activity of microorganisms so enables the origination of primary and secondary salts which affect physical properties of concretes in city sewer collectors unfavourably.

  15. Central electrical utility power for a satellite ring city in low earth orbit space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Ira T.; Faymon, Karl A.; Patton, A. D.

    1989-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form on central electrical power for a satellite ring city, defined as a group of large free flyers of 10 to 20 units with perhaps 100 people in each unit, and organized in a circle so that power can be fed from a central location. The free flyers would be located at 300 to 700 miles in altitude, and spaced about a kilometer apart. Potential activities of a ring city are listed as well as the electrical power needs. Information is given on costs and individual and centralized solar arrays and nuclear reactor systems.

  16. Sinking coastal cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkens, G.; Bucx, T.; Dam, R.; de Lange, G.; Lambert, J.

    2015-11-01

    In many coastal and delta cities land subsidence now exceeds absolute sea level rise up to a factor of ten. A major cause for severe land subsidence is excessive groundwater extraction related to rapid urbanization and population growth. Without action, parts of Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Bangkok and numerous other coastal cities will sink below sea level. Land subsidence increases flood vulnerability (frequency, inundation depth and duration of floods), with floods causing major economic damage and loss of lives. In addition, differential land movement causes significant economic losses in the form of structural damage and high maintenance costs for (infra)structure. The total damage worldwide is estimated at billions of dollars annually. As subsidence is often spatially variable and can be caused by multiple processes, an assessment of subsidence in delta cities needs to answer questions such as: what are the main causes? What is the current subsidence rate and what are future scenarios (and interaction with other major environmental issues)? Where are the vulnerable areas? What are the impacts and risks? How can adverse impacts be mitigated or compensated for? Who is involved and responsible to act? In this study a quick-assessment of subsidence is performed on the following mega-cities: Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Dhaka, New Orleans and Bangkok. Results of these case studies will be presented and compared, and a (generic) approach how to deal with subsidence in current and future subsidence-prone areas is provided.

  17. Learning Cities on the Move

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearns, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The modern Learning City concept emerged from the work of OECD on lifelong learning with streams of Learning Cities and Educating Cities having much in common but having little contact with each other. While the early development of Learning Cities in the West has not been sustained, the present situation is marked by the dynamic development of…

  18. Urban heat islands in the subsurface of German cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menberg, K.; Blum, P.; Zhu, K.; Bayer, P.

    2012-04-01

    In the subsurface of many cities there are widespread and persistent thermal anomalies (subsurface urban heat islands) that result in a warming of urban aquifers. The reasons for this heating are manifold. Possible heat sources are basements of buildings, leakage of sewage systems, buried district heating networks, re-injection of cooling water and solar irradiation on paved surfaces. In the current study, the reported groundwater temperatures in several German cities, such as Berlin, Munich, Cologne and Karlsruhe, are compared. Available data sets are supplemented by temperature measurements and depth profiles in observation wells. Trend analyses are conducted with time series of groundwater temperatures, and three-dimensional groundwater temperature maps are provided. In all investigated cities, pronounced positive temperature anomalies are present. The distribution of groundwater temperatures appears to be spatially and temporally highly variable. Apparently, the increased heat input into the urban subsurface is controlled by very local and site-specific parameters. In the long-run, the superposition of various heat sources results in an extensive temperature increase. In many cases, the maximum temperature elevation is found close to the city centre. Regional groundwater temperature differences between the city centre and the rural background are up to 5 °C, with local hot spots of even more pronounced anomalies. Particular heat sources, like cooling water injections or case-specific underground constructions, can cause local temperatures > 20°C in the subsurface. Examination of the long-term variations in isotherm maps shows that temperatures have increased by about 1°C in the city, as well as in the rural background areas over the last decades. This increase could be reproduced with trend analysis of temperature data gathered from several groundwater wells. Comparison between groundwater and air temperatures in Karlsruhe, for example, also indicates a

  19. Urban Shrinkage as a Performance of Whiteness: Neoliberal Urban Restructuring, Education, and Racial Containment in the Post-Industrial, Global Niche City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedroni, Thomas C.

    2011-01-01

    Although Detroit is not a centre of global finance, and plays a declining role in global production, it nevertheless participates in the present remediation of the relationship between cities and the globe. Manoeuvring to reposition the city as the global hub of mobility technology, metropolitan Detroit's neoliberal leadership advances particular…

  20. Collaborating at a distance: operations centres, tools, and trends

    SciTech Connect

    Gottschalk, Erik E.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    Successful operation of the LHC and its experiments is crucial to the future of the worldwide high-energy physics program. Remote operations and monitoring centres have been established for the CMS experiment in several locations around the world. The development of remote centres began with the LHC{at}FNAL ROC and has evolved into a unified approach with distributed centres that are collectively referred to as 'CMS Centres Worldwide'. An overview of the development of remote centres for CMS will be presented, along with a synopsis of collaborative tools that are used in these centres today and trends in the development of remote operations capabilities for high-energy physics.

  1. Sinking Coastal Cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkens, G.; Stuurman, R.; De Lange, G.; Bucx, T.; Lambert, J.

    2014-12-01

    In many coastal cities land subsidence now exceeds absolute sea level rise up to a factor of ten. Without action, parts of Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Bangkok and numerous other coastal cities will continue to sink, even below sea level. The ever increasing industrial and domestic demand for water in these cities results in excessive groundwater extraction, causing severe subsidence. In addition, coastal cities are often faced with larger natural subsidence, as they are built on thick sequences of soft soil. The impacts of subsidence are further exacerbated by climate-induced sea level rise. Land subsidence results in two types damage: foremost it increases flood vulnerability (frequency, inundation depth and duration of floods), with floods causing major economic damage and loss of lives. Secondly, differential land movement causes significant economic losses in the form of structural damage and high maintenance costs of roads and transportation networks, sewage systems, buildings and foundations. The total damage worldwide is estimated at billions of dollars annually. To survey the extent of groundwater associated subsidence, we conducted a quick-assessment of subsidence in a series of mega-cities (Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Dhaka, New Orleans and Bangkok). For each city research questions included: what are the main causes, how much is the current subsidence rate and what are predictions, where are the vulnerable areas, what are the impacts and risks, how can adverse impacts can be mitigated or compensated for, and what governmental bodies are involved and responsible to act? Using the assessment, this paper discusses subsidence modelling and measurement results from the selected cities. The focus is on the importance of delayed settlement after increases in hydraulic heads, the role of the subsurface composition for subsidence rates and best practice solutions for subsiding cities. For the latter, urban (ground)water management, adaptive flood risk management

  2. CMS Centres Worldwide - a New Collaborative Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Lucas

    2011-12-01

    The CMS Experiment at the LHC has established a network of more than fifty inter-connected "CMS Centres" at CERN and in institutes in the Americas, Asia, Australasia, and Europe. These facilities are used by people doing CMS detector and computing grid operations, remote shifts, data quality monitoring and analysis, as well as education and outreach. We present the computing, software, and collaborative tools and videoconferencing systems. These include permanently running "telepresence" video links (hardware-based H.323, EVO and Vidyo), Webcasts, and generic Web tools such as CMS-TV for broadcasting live monitoring and outreach information. Being Web-based and experiment-independent, these systems could easily be extended to other organizations. We describe the experiences of using CMS Centres Worldwide in the CMS data-taking operations as well as for major media events with several hundred TV channels, radio stations, and many more press journalists simultaneously around the world.

  3. Building momentum: an ethnographic study of inner-city redevelopment.

    PubMed Central

    Fullilove, M T; Green, L; Fullilove, R E

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: One factor contributing to the decay of inner-city areas, and to consequent excess mortality, is the massive loss of housing. This report studied the effects of a redevelopment project on social functioning in an inner-city community. METHODS: This ethnographic study included the following elements: a longitudinal study of 10 families living in renovated housing, repeated observations and photographing of the street scene, focus groups, and informal interviews with area residents. The project was located in the Bradhurst section of Harlem in New York City and was focused on a redevelopment effort sponsored by local congregations. RESULTS: Those who were able to move into newly renovated housing found that their living conditions were greatly improved. Neighborhood revitalization lagged behind the rehabilitation of individual apartment houses. This uneven redevelopment was a visual and sensory reminder of "what had been." Residents missed the warmth and social support that existed in Harlem before its decline. CONCLUSIONS: Rebuilding damaged housing contributes greatly to the well-being of inner-city residents. The current pace and scope of rebuilding are insufficient to restore lost vitality. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:10358672

  4. The Propagation Processes of The North Anatolian Fault and The Evolution of The Sea of Marmara Pull-apart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armijo, R.; Meyer, B.; Navarro, S.; King, G.; Barka, A.

    Between 1939 and 1999 the North Anatolian fault (NAF) experienced a westward pro- gression of eight large earthquakes over 800 km along its morphological trace. The 2000-km-long North Anatolian transform fault has also grown by westward propa- gation through continental lithosphere over a much longer time scale (~10 m.y.). As the Arabia/Europe collision progressed in eastern Turkey it caused Anatolia to move to the West and the North Anatolian Fault to propagate along the Pontides and into the northern Aegean. The early slow extension in the Aegean started to be modi- fied about 5 Ma ago. At 1 Ma the process of propagation dramatically increased the activity of the Corinth Rift in Greece, where Pleistocene marine terraces have been rapidly uplifted. The Sea of Marmara is a large pull-apart which appears to have been a geometrical/mechanical obstacle encountered by the NAF during its westward prop- agation. New high-resolution data (bathymetry, side-scan sonar, seismics) provide a precise image of the structure and the evolution of the submarine fault system that forms a smaller pull-apart beneath the Northern Sea of Marmara, between two well- known strike-slip faults on land (Izmit and Ganos faults). The outstandingly clear submarine morphology shows a segmented fault system including pull-apart features at a range of scales, which indicate a dominant transtensional tectonic regime. There is no evidence for a single, throughgoing, purely strike-slip fault. This result is criti- cal to our understanding of the seismic behaviour of this region of the NAF, close to Istanbul. There is morphological and geological evidence for a stable kinematics con- sistent both with the long-term displacement field determined for the past 5 m.y. and with the present-day Anatolia/Eurasia motion determined with GPS. However, within the Sea of Marmara region the fault kinematics involves asymmetric slip partitioning which appears to have extended throughout the evolution of the pull-apart

  5. Comparison of fuel-cell and diesel integrated energy systems and a conventional system for a 500-unit apartment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, S. N.; Maag, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    The electrical and thermal energy utilization efficiencies of a 500 unit apartment complex are analyzed and compared for each of three energy supply systems. Two on-site integrated energy systems, one powered by diesel engines and the other by phosphoric-acid fuel cells were compared with a conventional system which uses purchased electricity and on-site boilers for heating. All fuels consumed on-site are clean, synthetic fuels (distillate fuel oil or pipeline quality gas) derived from coal. Purchased electricity was generated from coal at a central station utility. The relative energy consumption and economics of the three systems are analyzed and compared.

  6. Earth's City Lights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image of Earth's city lights was created with data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS). Originally designed to view clouds by moonlight, the OLS is also used to map the locations of permanent lights on the Earth's surface. The brightest areas of the Earth are the most urbanized, but not necessarily the most populated. (Compare western Europe with China and India.) Cities tend to grow along coastlines and transportation networks. Even without the underlying map, the outlines of many continents would still be visible. The United States interstate highway system appears as a lattice connecting the brighter dots of city centers. In Russia, the Trans-Siberian railroad is a thin line stretching from Moscow through the center of Asia to Vladivostok. The Nile River, from the Aswan Dam to the Mediterranean Sea, is another bright thread through an otherwise dark region. Even more than 100 years after the invention of the electric light, some regions remain thinly populated and unlit. Antarctica is entirely dark. The interior jungles of Africa and South America are mostly dark, but lights are beginning to appear there. Deserts in Africa, Arabia, Australia, Mongolia, and the United States are poorly lit as well (except along the coast), along with the boreal forests of Canada and Russia, and the great mountains of the Himalaya. The Earth Observatory article Bright Lights, Big City describes how NASA scientists use city light data to map urbanization. Image by Craig Mayhew and Robert Simmon, NASA GSFC, based on DMSP data

  7. Universities Scale Like Cities

    PubMed Central

    van Raan, Anthony F. J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies of urban scaling show that important socioeconomic city characteristics such as wealth and innovation capacity exhibit a nonlinear, particularly a power law scaling with population size. These nonlinear effects are common to all cities, with similar power law exponents. These findings mean that the larger the city, the more disproportionally they are places of wealth and innovation. Local properties of cities cause a deviation from the expected behavior as predicted by the power law scaling. In this paper we demonstrate that universities show a similar behavior as cities in the distribution of the ‘gross university income’ in terms of total number of citations over ‘size’ in terms of total number of publications. Moreover, the power law exponents for university scaling are comparable to those for urban scaling. We find that deviations from the expected behavior can indeed be explained by specific local properties of universities, particularly the field-specific composition of a university, and its quality in terms of field-normalized citation impact. By studying both the set of the 500 largest universities worldwide and a specific subset of these 500 universities -the top-100 European universities- we are also able to distinguish between properties of universities with as well as without selection of one specific local property, the quality of a university in terms of its average field-normalized citation impact. It also reveals an interesting observation concerning the working of a crucial property in networked systems, preferential attachment. PMID:23544062

  8. Extending 3D city models with legal information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, A. U.; Fuhrmann, T.; Navratil, G.

    2012-10-01

    3D city models represent existing physical objects and their topological and functional relations. In everyday life the rights and responsibilities connected to these objects, primarily legally defined rights and obligations but also other socially and culturally established rights, are of importance. The rights and obligations are defined in various laws and it is often difficult to identify the rules applicable for a certain case. The existing 2D cadastres show civil law rights and obligations and plans to extend them to provide information about public law restrictions for land use are in several countries under way. It is tempting to design extensions to the 3D city models to provide information about legal rights in 3D. The paper analyses the different types of information that are needed to reduce conflicts and to facilitate decisions about land use. We identify the role 3D city models augmented with planning information in 3D can play, but do not advocate a general conversion from 2D to 3D for the legal cadastre. Space is not anisotropic and the up/down dimension is practically very different from the two dimensional plane - this difference must be respected when designing spatial information systems. The conclusions are: (1) continue the current regime for ownership of apartments, which is not ownership of a 3D volume, but co-ownership of a building with exclusive use of some rooms; such exclusive use rights could be shown in a 3D city model; (2) ownership of 3D volumes for complex and unusual building situations can be reported in a 3D city model, but are not required everywhere; (3) indicate restrictions for land use and building in 3D city models, with links to the legal sources.

  9. The Albion Street Centre database, Sydney, Australia.

    PubMed

    Gold, J

    1998-01-01

    The Albion Street Centre was established in 1985 as an HIV testing and early management center. More than 22,000 people have been screened for HIV and other blood-borne infections at the Centre, and approximately 3,600 people with HIV/AIDS have been managed there. Approximately 1,600 patients with various stages of HIV disease are currently managed at the Centre by a staff of 60 health care professionals and about 1,000 volunteers. The Albion Street Centre's computer database began recording selected demographic, epidemiologic, clinical, and laboratory characteristics when the first patient presented in 1985. Since then, the complexity and utilization of the database has increased in parallel with improvement in the understanding of the natural history and pathogenesis of HIV infection. Over 100 peer-reviewed publications and presentations have been produced from the database and 45 clinical trials have used the database to identify potential subjects. All data are de-identified and are protected by multiple password codes. Approximately 700 variables are collected from each HIV-positive patient at the initial visit to the Centre and up to 200 variables are added at each subsequent routine clinic visit. The variables collected include the following: standard epidemiologic characteristics; transmission and behavioral parameters, clinical signs and symptoms; laboratory test results; treatments; nutritional history; body composition parameters; psychological assessment results; and management history, including neuropsychological testing. The overall number and characteristics of patients recorded in the database are reported monthly, and are used to plan services, for prevention and educational programs, and as an indicator of the effectiveness of campaigns to encourage HIV-positive people to attend clinics for early management. When these patients have been identified they are invited to participate in the study. Individual patient records are identified and

  10. Ultrafine particles in cities.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prashant; Morawska, Lidia; Birmili, Wolfram; Paasonen, Pauli; Hu, Min; Kulmala, Markku; Harrison, Roy M; Norford, Leslie; Britter, Rex

    2014-05-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs; diameter less than 100 nm) are ubiquitous in urban air, and an acknowledged risk to human health. Globally, the major source for urban outdoor UFP concentrations is motor traffic. Ongoing trends towards urbanisation and expansion of road traffic are anticipated to further increase population exposure to UFPs. Numerous experimental studies have characterised UFPs in individual cities, but an integrated evaluation of emissions and population exposure is still lacking. Our analysis suggests that the average exposure to outdoor UFPs in Asian cities is about four-times larger than that in European cities but impacts on human health are largely unknown. This article reviews some fundamental drivers of UFP emissions and dispersion, and highlights unresolved challenges, as well as recommendations to ensure sustainable urban development whilst minimising any possible adverse health impacts. PMID:24503484

  11. Building functional cities.

    PubMed

    Henderson, J Vernon; Venables, Anthony J; Regan, Tanner; Samsonov, Ilia

    2016-05-20

    The literature views many African cities as dysfunctional with a hodgepodge of land uses and poor "connectivity." One driver of inefficient land uses is construction decisions for highly durable buildings made under weak institutions. In a novel approach, we model the dynamics of urban land use with both formal and slum dwellings and ongoing urban redevelopment to higher building heights in the formal sector as a city grows. We analyze the evolution of Nairobi using a unique high-spatial resolution data set. The analysis suggests insufficient building volume through most of the city and large slum areas with low housing volumes near the center, where corrupted institutions deter conversion to formal sector usage. PMID:27199420

  12. Reproducing in cities.

    PubMed

    Mace, Ruth

    2008-02-01

    Reproducing in cities has always been costly, leading to lower fertility (that is, lower birth rates) in urban than in rural areas. Historically, although cities provided job opportunities, initially residents incurred the penalty of higher infant mortality, but as mortality rates fell at the end of the 19th century, European birth rates began to plummet. Fertility decline in Africa only started recently and has been dramatic in some cities. Here it is argued that both historical and evolutionary demographers are interpreting fertility declines across the globe in terms of the relative costs of child rearing, which increase to allow children to outcompete their peers. Now largely free from the fear of early death, postindustrial societies may create an environment that generates runaway parental investment, which will continue to drive fertility ever lower. PMID:18258904

  13. Finding the Lost City

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Nicholas Clapp, a filmmaker and archeology enthusiast, had accumulated extensive information concerning Ubar, the fabled lost city of ancient Arabia. When he was unable to identify its exact location, however, he turned to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for assistance in applying orbital remote sensing techniques. JPL scientists searched NASA's shuttle imaging radar, as well as Landsat and SPOT images and discovered ancient caravan tracks. This enabled them to prepare a map of the trails, which converged at a place known as Ash Shisr. An expedition was formed, which found structures and artifacts from a city that predates previous area civilization by a thousand years. Although it will take time to validate the city as Ubar, the discovery is a monumental archeological triumph.

  14. Centre-Based Child Care Quality in Urban Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishimine, Karin; Wilson, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the quality of childcare centres in urban Australian communities designated according to different bands of Centre Location Demographics (CLD). Childcare centres were assessed using the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale- Revised Edition (ECERS-R) and the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale-Extension (ECERS-E).…

  15. Canadian Educational Development Centre Websites: More Ebb than Flow?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines information portrayed on Canadian educational development (ED) centre websites and, in particular, whether information that corresponds to questions compiled from a literature search of ED centre practices is readily available from centre websites. This study phase is part of a larger national study of Canadian educational…

  16. 12. SOUTHWEST VIEW OF FIRST CENTRE FAMILY DWELLING HOUSE, LATER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. SOUTHWEST VIEW OF FIRST CENTRE FAMILY DWELLING HOUSE, LATER FARMER DEACON'S SHOP, WITH SECOND CENTRE FAMILY DWELLING HOUSE IN BACKGROUND - Shaker Centre Family Dwelling House (First), North side of Village Road, North of U.S. Route 68 & State Route 33 intersection, Shakertown, Mercer County, KY

  17. Dare to Dream: Discovery Children's Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatz, Ron

    2011-01-01

    This article features Discovery Children's Centre, one of the highest quality centres in the province of Manitoba, Canada. Discovery Children's Centre believes that children, who may have little or no voice in a democratic society, can be heard if some adult will speak on their behalf. Even as it has grown from 35 to 230 children, quality has…

  18. Centre of the Cell: Science Comes to Life

    PubMed Central

    Balkwill, Frances; Chambers, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Centre of the Cell is a unique biomedical science education centre, a widening participation and outreach project in London’s East End. This article describes Centre of the Cell’s first five years of operation, the evolution of the project in response to audience demand, and the impact of siting a major public engagement project within a research laboratory. PMID:26340279

  19. Reaching the Students that Student-Centred Learning Cannot Reach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hockings, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Student-centred learning has the potential to engage a more academically diverse student body than the more conventional teacher-centred approaches. In spite of the evidence in favour of student-centred learning, a recent study showed that it was ineffective for around 30% of undergraduates in a large and diverse group studying business operations…

  20. Study on Capacity and Operation Method of PEFC μCGS for Apartment Using Measured Electricity and Hot Water Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Yoshitaka; Muto, Toshihide; Maeda, Tetsuhiko

    The introduction of PEFC (polymer electrolyte fuel cell) μCGS (micro cogeneration system) into apartment is expected from the viewpoint of the energy saving effect in the home section. To introduce this system, the optimization of the equipment capacity of the fuel cell and the examination of its control method are indispensable. In this paper, therefore, the authors suppose a PEFC μCGS and examine its operation method based on the measured results of the electricity and hot water loads of an apartment in Fukuoka. At first, using the measured load patterns, the authors numerically determine the optimum operation schedule that maximizes the energy saving rate for various values of PEFC capacity and reveal the PEFC capacity suitable for the μCGS in both cases of each house installation and central installation. The relation between the seasonal change and the operation pattern of the PEFC in the case of central installation is also investigated. Next, the authors assume the central installation of the PEFC with the above suitable capacity, and propose a practically applicable prediction control method. The energy saving rate of the proposed control method is only a little lower than that of the optimum operation, indicating that the proposed control method has sufficiently high performance.

  1. A virtual reality apartment as a measure of medication management skills in patients with schizophrenia: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Matthew M; Baker, Elizabeth; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Astur, Robert S

    2007-09-01

    Performance on a novel, virtual reality (VR) assessment of medication management skills, the Virtual Reality Apartment Medication Management Assessment (VRAMMA), was investigated in 25 patients with schizophrenia and 18 matched healthy controls. The VRAMMA is a virtual 4-room apartment consisting of a living room with an interactive clock and TV, a bedroom, a kitchen, and a bathroom with an interactive medicine cabinet. After an exploratory phase, participants were given a mock prescription regimen to be taken 15 minutes later from pill bottles located in the medicine cabinet in the bathroom of the virtual environment. The VRAMMA was administered with a validated measure of medication management skills, several neurocognitive tests, and a symptom scale. Results revealed that (1) schizophrenic patients made significantly more quantitative errors in the number of pills taken, were less accurate at taking the prescribed medications at the designated time, and checked the interactive clock less frequently than healthy controls; (2) in patients with schizophrenia, there was significant agreement in classification of adherence vs nonadherence between a validated measure of medication management skills and the VRAMMA; and (3) in patients with schizophrenia, years of education and a measure of verbal learning and memory were linked to quantitative errors on the VRAMMA, while positive symptoms, specifically delusional symptoms, were inversely linked to distance traveled within the VRAMMA. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to provide evidence for the utility of VR technology in the assessment of instrumental role functioning in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:16956984

  2. A numerical study of strike-slip bend formation with application to the Salton Sea pull-apart basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jiyang; Liu, Mian; Wang, Hui

    2015-03-01

    How stepovers of strike-slip faults connect to form bends is a question important for understanding the formation of push-up ranges (restraining bends) and pull-apart basins (releasing bends). We investigated the basic mechanics of this process in a simple three-dimensional viscoelastoplastic finite element model. Our model predicts localized plastic strain within stepovers that may eventually lead to the formation of strike-slip bends. Major parameters controlling strain localization include the relative fault strength, geometry of the fault system, and the plasticity model assumed. Using the Drucker-Prager plasticity model, in which the plastic yield strength of the crust depends on both shear and normal stresses, our results show that a releasing bend is easier to develop than a restraining bend under similar conditions. These results may help explain the formation of the Salton Sea pull-apart basin in Southern California 0.5-0.1 Ma ago, when the stepover between the Imperial Fault and the San Andreas Fault was connected by the Brawley seismic zone.

  3. Inner City Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Togias, Alkis

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The inner city has long been recognized as an area of high asthma morbidity and mortality. A wide range of factors interact to create this environment. These factors include well-recognized asthma risk factors that are not specific to the inner city, the structure and delivery of health care, the location and function of the urban environment, and social inequities. This article will review these facets and discuss successful and unsuccessful interventions in order to understand what is needed to solve this problem. PMID:25459579

  4. Harmonization Process and Reliability Assessment of Anthropometric Measurements in the Elderly EXERNET Multi-Centre Study

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Cabello, Alba; Vicente-Rodríguez, Germán; Albers, Ulrike; Mata, Esmeralda; Rodriguez-Marroyo, Jose A.; Olivares, Pedro R.; Gusi, Narcis; Villa, Gerardo; Aznar, Susana; Gonzalez-Gross, Marcela; Casajús, Jose A.; Ara, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Background The elderly EXERNET multi-centre study aims to collect normative anthropometric data for old functionally independent adults living in Spain. Purpose To describe the standardization process and reliability of the anthropometric measurements carried out in the pilot study and during the final workshop, examining both intra- and inter-rater errors for measurements. Materials and Methods A total of 98 elderly from five different regions participated in the intra-rater error assessment, and 10 different seniors living in the city of Toledo (Spain) participated in the inter-rater assessment. We examined both intra- and inter-rater errors for heights and circumferences. Results For height, intra-rater technical errors of measurement (TEMs) were smaller than 0.25 cm. For circumferences and knee height, TEMs were smaller than 1 cm, except for waist circumference in the city of Cáceres. Reliability for heights and circumferences was greater than 98% in all cases. Inter-rater TEMs were 0.61 cm for height, 0.75 cm for knee-height and ranged between 2.70 and 3.09 cm for the circumferences measured. Inter-rater reliabilities for anthropometric measurements were always higher than 90%. Conclusion The harmonization process, including the workshop and pilot study, guarantee the quality of the anthropometric measurements in the elderly EXERNET multi-centre study. High reliability and low TEM may be expected when assessing anthropometry in elderly population. PMID:22860013

  5. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity The Norwegian Centre for Addiction Research (SERAF).

    PubMed

    Bramness, Jørgen G; Clausen, Thomas; Duckert, Fanny; Ravndal, Edle; Waal, Helge

    2011-08-01

    The Norwegian Centre for Addiction Research (SERAF) at the University of Oslo is a newly established, clinical addiction research centre. It is located at the Oslo University Hospital and has a major focus on opioid dependency, investigating Norwegian opioid maintenance treatment (OMT), with special interest in OMT during pregnancy, mortality, morbidity and criminality before, during and after OMT and alternatives to OMT, such as the use of naltrexone implants. The well-developed health registries of Norway are core assets that also allow the opportunity for other types of substance abuse research. This research includes health services, abuse of prescription drugs and drugs of abuse in connection with traffic. The centre also focuses upon comorbidity, investigating the usefulness and limitations of psychometric instruments, drug abuse in different psychiatric treatment settings and internet-based interventions for hazardous alcohol consumption. PMID:20735364

  6. Human-centred approaches in slipperiness measurement.

    PubMed

    Grönqvist, R; Abeysekera, J; Gard, G; Hsiang, S M; Leamon, T B; Newman, D J; Gielo-Perczak, K; Lockhart, T E; Pai, C Y

    2001-10-20

    A number of human-centred methodologies--subjective, objective, and combined--are used for slipperiness measurement. They comprise a variety of approaches from biomechanically-oriented experiments to psychophysical tests and subjective evaluations. The objective of this paper is to review some of the research done in the field, including such topics as awareness and perception of slipperiness, postural and balance control, rating scales for balance, adaptation to slippery conditions, measurement of unexpected movements, kinematics of slipping, and protective movements during falling. The role of human factors in slips and falls will be discussed. Strengths and weaknesses of human-centred approaches in relation to mechanical slip test methodologies are considered. Current friction-based criteria and thresholds for walking without slipping are reviewed for a number of work tasks. These include activities such as walking on a level or an inclined surface, running, stopping and jumping, as well as stair ascent and descent, manual exertion (pushing and pulling, load carrying, lifting) and particular concerns of the elderly and mobility disabled persons. Some future directions for slipperiness measurement and research in the field of slips and falls are outlined. Human-centred approaches for slipperiness measurement do have many applications. First, they are utilized to develop research hypotheses and models to predict workplace risks caused by slipping. Second, they are important alternatives to apparatus-based friction measurements and are used to validate such methodologies. Third, they are used as practical tools for evaluating and monitoring slip resistance properties of footwear, anti-skid devices and floor surfaces. PMID:11794763

  7. Human-centred approaches in slipperiness measurement

    PubMed Central

    Grönqvist, Raoul; Abeysekera, John; Gard, Gunvor; Hsiang, Simon M.; Leamon, Tom B.; Newman, Dava J.; Gielo-Perczak, Krystyna; Lockhart, Thurmon E.; Pai, Clive Y.-C.

    2010-01-01

    A number of human-centred methodologies—subjective, objective, and combined—are used for slipperiness measurement. They comprise a variety of approaches from biomechanically-oriented experiments to psychophysical tests and subjective evaluations. The objective of this paper is to review some of the research done in the field, including such topics as awareness and perception of slipperiness, postural and balance control, rating scales for balance, adaptation to slippery conditions, measurement of unexpected movements, kinematics of slipping, and protective movements during falling. The role of human factors in slips and falls will be discussed. Strengths and weaknesses of human-centred approaches in relation to mechanical slip test methodologies are considered. Current friction-based criteria and thresholds for walking without slipping are reviewed for a number of work tasks. These include activities such as walking on a level or an inclined surface, running, stopping and jumping, as well as stair ascent and descent, manual exertion (pushing and pulling, load carrying, lifting) and particular concerns of the elderly and mobility disabled persons. Some future directions for slipperiness measurement and research in the field of slips and falls are outlined. Human-centred approaches for slipperiness measurement do have many applications. First, they are utilized to develop research hypotheses and models to predict workplace risks caused by slipping. Second, they are important alternatives to apparatus-based friction measurements and are used to validate such methodologies. Third, they are used as practical tools for evaluating and monitoring slip resistance properties of foot wear, anti-skid devices and floor surfaces. PMID:11794763

  8. The "Magic" of Tutorial Centres in Hong Kong: An Analysis of Media Marketing and Pedagogy in a Tutorial Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koh, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Why do more than three-quarters of Hong Kong's senior secondary students flock to tutorial centres like moths to light? What is the "magic" that is driving the popularity of the tutorial centre enterprise? Indeed, looking at the ongoing boom of tutorial centres in Hong Kong (there are almost 1,000 of them), it is difficult not to ask…

  9. Hunting for hardware changes in data centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho dos Santos, M.; Steers, I.; Szebenyi, I.; Xafi, A.; Barring, O.; Bonfillou, E.

    2012-12-01

    With many servers and server parts the environment of warehouse sized data centres is increasingly complex. Server life-cycle management and hardware failures are responsible for frequent changes that need to be managed. To manage these changes better a project codenamed “hardware hound” focusing on hardware failure trending and hardware inventory has been started at CERN. By creating and using a hardware oriented data set - the inventory - with detailed information on servers and their parts as well as tracking changes to this inventory, the project aims at, for example, being able to discover trends in hardware failure rates.

  10. A South African outpatient drug treatment centre.

    PubMed

    Karassellos, C; Wilson, D

    1993-05-01

    The Cape Town Drug Counselling Centre is an outpatient drug treatment service which has been operational since 1985. Statistics obtained from 1990 are detailed, describing patient characteristics in respect of referral sources, age, sex, occupational status, educational level and drugs abused. The typical client profile that emerges is of a young employed male of limited education, referred from a non-professional source, who smokes cannabis alone or with methaqualone (Mandrax). Management of clients, which includes psychotherapy with an emphasis on group-work and medical intervention, is described, and proposed areas for further research are outlined. PMID:8211429

  11. Discrimination against Black Apartment-Seekers Increases Slightly in Western Kentucky, 1989. Staff Report 90-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Eric

    This study of racial discrimination toward blacks seeking rental units in seven Western Kentucky cities found that blacks were treated differently and negatively compared to whites at a rate of 9.8 percent in 1989, whereas the rate of discrimination in 1987 was 7.5 percent. Information was collected from tests by teams of black and white testers…

  12. Big-City Rules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Dan

    2011-01-01

    When it comes to implementing innovative classroom technology programs, urban school districts face significant challenges stemming from their big-city status. These range from large bureaucracies, to scalability, to how to meet the needs of a more diverse group of students. Because of their size, urban districts tend to have greater distance…

  13. Utah: Salt Lake City

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... mountains surrounding Salt Lake City are renowned for the dry, powdery snow that results from the arid climate and location at the ... should be used with the red filter placed over your left eye. The canyons and peaks of the Uinta and Wasatch Mountains are ...

  14. Model Cities Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Univ., Chattanooga.

    The Model Cities Training Program, the first in the country, is a 10-session course to be conducted in seminar form under the direction of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. The objective is to enable the 50 members of the Community Development Administration Board of Directors to: acquire knowledge of the structure of the Model Cities…

  15. India's Cities in Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryjak, George J.

    1984-01-01

    Indian cities are growing rapidly due to natural increase and migration from rural areas. This has caused huge pollution problems and has resulted in overcrowded schools and hospitals. Conflict between religious groups has increased; so has crime. India is modernizing, but not fast enough. (CS)

  16. Summer in the City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewertz, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the different experiences of the participants in an Outward Bound-sponsored "urban expedition" to New York City that was designed to make them better teachers by examining their beliefs and biases. The participants in this "urban expedition" came from schools that work with Outward Bound USA, the Garrison, New York,…

  17. Clean Cities Tools

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-19

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities offers a large collection of Web-based tools on the Alternative Fuels Data Center. These calculators, interactive maps, and data searches can assist fleets, fuels providers, and other transportation decision makers in their efforts to reduce petroleum use.

  18. America's Most Literate Cities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jack

    This study assessed factors related to literacy and literate behavior, rating the most and least literate U.S. cities. Data came from the U.S. Census Bureau, Audit Bureau of Circulations, American Booksellers Association, Yellow Pages, American Library Directory, and National Directory of Magazines. Thirteen measures were combined to form five…

  19. City Kids Go Green.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Tricia

    1993-01-01

    Describes Outward Bound Urban Resources Initiative, a six-week summer course whose goal is to work with urban youth to develop solutions for local environmental problems. Among the activities described include converting city lots into parks, neighborhood cleanup, and tree planting. (MDH)

  20. City Forms, Country Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guadadiello, Anthony S.

    1983-01-01

    The program for artistically talented in the Jersey City Public Schools primarily serves a disadvantaged population. Among its activities are field trips to the countryside and to local neighborhoods. Students get new visual experiences which they can compare to familiar ones and are encouraged to use in their artwork. (CS)

  1. Making Cities Green.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Neil B.; Engel, Jane

    1981-01-01

    Describes several examples of urban parks and the renewal of city open spaces. Community groups interested in getting funding from government or private sources must cope with budget restrictions by making effective, innovative use of available money. Government agencies with funds allocated for urban improvements are mentioned. (AM)

  2. City model enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, Philip D.; Quinn, Jonathan A.; Jones, Christopher B.

    The combination of mobile communication technology with location and orientation aware digital cameras has introduced increasing interest in the exploitation of 3D city models for applications such as augmented reality and automated image captioning. The effectiveness of such applications is, at present, severely limited by the often poor quality of semantic annotation of the 3D models. In this paper, we show how freely available sources of georeferenced Web 2.0 information can be used for automated enrichment of 3D city models. Point referenced names of prominent buildings and landmarks mined from Wikipedia articles and from the OpenStreetMaps digital map and Geonames gazetteer have been matched to the 2D ground plan geometry of a 3D city model. In order to address the ambiguities that arise in the associations between these sources and the city model, we present procedures to merge potentially related buildings and implement fuzzy matching between reference points and building polygons. An experimental evaluation demonstrates the effectiveness of the presented methods.

  3. Bug City: Beetles [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    "Bug City" is a video series created to help children learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic photography, fun…

  4. Bug City: Ants [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    "Bug City" is a video series created to help children (grades 1-6) learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic…

  5. New City, New Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Frank

    2010-01-01

    After eight years at the helm of the City College of New York, where Dr. Gregory Williams grew enrollment at the minority-serving institution by 60 percent, instituted more rigorous admissions standards and launched the college's first capital campaign that raised more than $300 million, last fall he became the 27th president of the University of…

  6. Atlantic City memories.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Franklin H

    2008-04-01

    Fifty years ago, the Atlantic City meetings, held the first week in May of every year, were attended by all the elite of American academic medicine and all who wanted to join that group. Part of the magic of those meetings was that professors and neophytes took each other seriously and talked to each other. PMID:18382726

  7. [City and County Records.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combs, Judith O.; And Others

    Six papers presented at the Institute were concerned with city and county records. They are: "EWEB and Its Records," which discusses the history, laws and records of the Eugene Water and Electric Board (EWEB);""Police Records: Eugene, Oregon," classifies police records, other than administrative, into three general categories: (1) case or…

  8. Accepted into Education City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asquith, Christina

    2006-01-01

    Qatar's Education City, perhaps the world's most diverse campus, is almost entirely unknown in the United States, but represents the next step in the globalization of American higher education--international franchising. Aided by technology such as online libraries, distance learning and streaming video, U.S. universities offer--and charge tuition…

  9. The Plains City Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Olphen, Marcela; Rios, Francisco; Berube, William; Dexter, Robin; McCarthy, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This case study portrays a contemporary phenomenon that affects many U.S. school districts. Specifically, the authors address the challenges that the superintendent of the Plains City school district faced as a result of a change in the demographic distribution of his district. The gradual development of the pig farming industry in Plains City…

  10. Bug City: Bees [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    "Bug City" is a video series created to help children learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic photography, fun…

  11. Nature in the City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferbert, Mary Lou

    1981-01-01

    Describes a science program developed by the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, "Nature in the City," in which students and teachers learn together about the natural community surrounding their school. Includes program's rationale, list of "adventures," and methods. Discusses strategies of Sherlock Holmes'"adventure" focusing on animal tracks…

  12. CITIES ARE CHANGING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RAVITZ, MEL

    THE EFFECT OF PHYSICAL AND SOCIAL CHANGES IN LARGE CITIES ARE DISCUSSED. POPULATION GROWTH IN THE LAST FEW YEARS HAS OCCURRED PRIMARILY IN THE SUBURBS. URBAN RENEWAL HAS REALIGNED AND RELOCATED THE RACES AND THE SOCIAL CLASSES, AND FREEWAY CONSTRUCTION HAS CREATED INTERURBAN STRIPS. CASUALTIES OF THESE CHANGES ARE CROWDING THE MIDDLE NEIGHBORHOODS…

  13. Comparison of primary health care services between urban and rural settings after the introduction of the first urban health centre in Vyronas, Greece

    PubMed Central

    Mariolis, Anargiros; Mihas, Constantinos; Alevizos, Alevizos; Mariolis-Sapsakos, Theodoros; Marayiannis, Konstantinos; Papathanasiou, Marek; Gizlis, Vassilios; Karanasios, Dimitris; Merkouris, Bodossakis

    2008-01-01

    Background Discrepancies in primary health care (PHC) services between urban and rural settings have already been studied in many countries; however, limited information exists regarding countries, such as Greece, where public Health Centres dedicated to primary care have not been in existence in major cities. The objective of this study was to evaluate points of divergence or convergence between an urban and a rural health centre, in an attempt to underline challenges faced by the introduction of urban health centres in Greece. Methods A cross-sectional analysis was conducted in the Health Centre of Vyronas, Athens, Greece and in the Health Centre of Nea (New) Madytos, Thessaloniki Prefecture, Greece between February 2004 and February 2006. The profile of the population seeking care, as well as data on the services provided were collected and compared. In addition, the reason for choosing each primary health care unit was also recorded. Results More patients visited the urban centre (145415 vs. 112513), while the pattern of services utilized by the citizens differed significantly (p < 0.001) between the two Health Centres. The frequency of diagnoses made according to ICPC-2 was not similar in the two Health Centres (p < 0.001). The three most frequent reasons for the adults choosing the Health Centre for their problem were low waiting time, proximity to residence and satisfaction with the services provided in previous visits in Vyronas. Conclusion The results of this study highlight the significant differences regarding PHC services utilization between an urban and a rural population. Urban citizens seem to have different health needs and reasons for choosing a PHC unit than residents of the Greek countryside. Proximity to health services and the public character of the urban health centre seem to be its main advantages. PMID:18541013

  14. Sinking coastal cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkens, Gilles; Bucx, Tom; Dam, Rien; De Lange, Ger; Lambert, John

    2014-05-01

    In many coastal and delta cities land subsidence now exceeds absolute sea level rise up to a factor of ten. Without action, parts of Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Bangkok and numerous other coastal cities will sink below sea level. Land subsidence increases flood vulnerability (frequency, inundation depth and duration of floods), with floods causing major economic damage and loss of lives. In addition, differential land movement causes significant economic losses in the form of structural damage and high maintenance costs. This effects roads and transportation networks, hydraulic infrastructure - such as river embankments, sluice gates, flood barriers and pumping stations -, sewage systems, buildings and foundations. The total damage worldwide is estimated at billions of dollars annually. Excessive groundwater extraction after rapid urbanization and population growth is the main cause of severe land subsidence. In addition, coastal cities are often faced with larger natural subsidence, as they are built on thick sequences of soft soil. Because of ongoing urbanization and population growth in delta areas, in particular in coastal megacities, there is, and will be, more economic development in subsidence-prone areas. The impacts of subsidence are further exacerbated by extreme weather events (short term) and rising sea levels (long term).Consequently, detrimental impacts will increase in the near future, making it necessary to address subsidence related problems now. Subsidence is an issue that involves many policy fields, complex technical aspects and governance embedment. There is a need for an integrated approach in order to manage subsidence and to develop appropriate strategies and measures that are effective and efficient on both the short and long term. Urban (ground)water management, adaptive flood risk management and related spatial planning strategies are just examples of the options available. A major rethink is needed to deal with the 'hidden' but urgent

  15. Understanding strain transfer and basin evolution complexities in the Salton pull-apart basin near the Southern San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kell, A. M.; Sahakian, V. J.; Kent, G. M.; Driscoll, N. W.; Harding, A. J.; Baskin, R. L.; Barth, M.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Active source seismic data in the Salton Sea provide insight into the complexity of the pull-apart system development. Seismic reflection data combined with tomographic cross sections give constraints on the timing of basin development and strain partitioning between the two dominant dextral faults in the region; the Imperial fault to the southwest and the Southern San Andreas fault (SSAF) to the northeast. Deformation associated with this step-over appears young, having formed in the last 20-40 k.a. The complexity seen in the Salton Sea is similar to that seen in pull-apart basins worldwide. In the southern basin of the Salton Sea, a zone of transpression is noted near the southern termination of the San Andreas fault, though this stress regime quickly transitions to a region of transtension in the northern reaches of the sea. The evolution seen in the basin architecture is likely related to a transition of the SSAF dying to the north, and giving way to youthful segments of the Brawley seismic zone and Imperial fault. Stratigraphic signatures seen in seismic cross-sections also reveal a long-term component of slip to the southwest on a fault 1-2 km west of the northeastern Salton Sea shoreline. Numerous lines of evidence, including seismic reflection data, high-resolution bathymetry within the Salton Sea, and folding patterns in the Borrego Formation to the east of the sea support an assertion of a previously unmapped fault, the Salton Trough fault (STF), parallel to the SAF and just offshore within the Salton Sea. Seismic observations are seen consistently within two datasets of varying vertical resolutions, up to depths of 4-5 km, suggesting that this fault strand is much longer-lived than the evolution seen in the southern sub-basin. The existence of the STF unifies discrepancies between the onshore seismic studies and data collected within the sea. The STF likely serves as the current bounding fault to the active pull-apart system, as it aligns with the "rung

  16. Spherical tokamaks with plasma centre-post

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Celso

    2013-10-01

    The metal centre-post (MCP) in tokamaks is a structure which carries the total toroidal field current and also houses the Ohmic heating solenoid in conventional or low aspect ratio (Spherical)(ST) tokamaks. The MCP and solenoid are critical components for producing the toroidal field and for the limited Ohmic flux in STs. Constraints for a ST reactor related to these limitations lead to a minimum plasma aspect ratio of 1.4 which reduces the benefit of operation at higher betas in a more compact ST reactor. Replacing the MCP is of great interest for reactor-based ST studies since the device is simplified, compactness increased, and maintenance reduced. An experiment to show the feasibility of using a plasma centre-post (PCP) is being currently under construction and involves a high level of complexity. A preliminary study of a very simple PCP, which is ECR(Electron Cyclotron Resonance)-assisted and which includes an innovative fuelling system based on pellet injection, has recently been reported. This is highly suitable for an ultra-low aspect ratio tokamak (ULART) device. Advances on this PCP ECR-assisted concept within a ULART and the associated fuelling system are presented here, and will include the field topology for the PCP ECR-assisted scheme, pellet ablation modeling, and a possible global equilibrium simulation. VIE-ITCR, IAEA-CRP contr.17592, National Instruments-Costa Rica.

  17. WISB: Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology Centre

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, John

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology promises to create high-impact solutions to challenges in the areas of biotechnology, human/animal health, the environment, energy, materials and food security. Equally, synthetic biologists create tools and strategies that have the potential to help us answer important fundamental questions in biology. Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology (WISB) pursues both of these mutually complementary ‘build to apply’ and ‘build to understand’ approaches. This is reflected in our research structure, in which a core theme on predictive biosystems engineering develops underpinning understanding as well as next-generation experimental/theoretical tools, and these are then incorporated into three applied themes in which we engineer biosynthetic pathways, microbial communities and microbial effector systems in plants. WISB takes a comprehensive approach to training, education and outreach. For example, WISB is a partner in the EPSRC/BBSRC-funded U.K. Doctoral Training Centre in synthetic biology, we have developed a new undergraduate module in the subject, and we have established five WISB Research Career Development Fellowships to support young group leaders. Research in Ethical, Legal and Societal Aspects (ELSA) of synthetic biology is embedded in our centre activities. WISB has been highly proactive in building an international research and training network that includes partners in Barcelona, Boston, Copenhagen, Madrid, Marburg, São Paulo, Tartu and Valencia. PMID:27284024

  18. Sofia University GNSS Analysis Centre (SUGAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeonov, Tzvetan; Sidorov, Dmitry; Teferle, Norman; Guerova, Guergana; Egova, Evgenia; Vassileva, Keranka; Milev, Ivo; Milev, Georgi

    2015-04-01

    The Sofia University GNSS Analysis Centre (SUGAC, suada.phys.uni-sofia.bg) is a new analysis centre established via collaboration between the Department of Meteorology and Geophysics of Sofia University, the IPOS - BuliPOS GNSS network in Bulgaria and the University of Luxembourg. In April 2014, the first processing campaign took place. One year GNSS data from 7 stations of the BuliPOS network are processed in collaboration with the University of Luxembourg. Tropospheric products (Zenith Total Delay and gradients) with 5 min temporal resolution are obtained using the NAPEOS software, developed by ESA. The tropospheric products from this campaign will be used for validation of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model as well as for case studies during intense precipitation events and fog. In this work the WRF model validation for Bulgaria will be presented. Future work will be the establishment of autonomous near real-time processing of the regional ground-based GNSS network in Southeast Europe in support of the EUMETNET E-GVAP and COST ES1206 "Advanced Global Navigation Satellite Systems for Severe Weather Events and Climate" projects.

  19. Pharmacist involvement in a diabetic education centre.

    PubMed

    Kanitz, J; Birken, B; Ward, V

    1982-01-01

    During the past two years, a multi-discipline health team has been meeting with selected diabetic "problem" patients on a regular basis at the North York General Hospital (NYGH). The patients are referred to the programme by their physicians when they appear to be having difficulty handling or coping with their diabetes. The participants in the programme attend the Diabetic Education Centre (DEC) for one week as day patients in the hospital and are exposed to various types of counselling from members of the Diabetic Education Centre Team (DECT), one of which is the pharmacist. Follow-up from this week of intensive education is made at annual intervals. The main purpose of the pharmacist in the clinic is to provide information for the patients regarding their prescriptions and over the counter (OTC) medication. This is achieved by means of individual patient interviews and informal group discussions, as well as rounds with other team members and contact with patients' families. This programme provides a forum for the patient and the patient's family to obtain valid information about diabetes, as well as problems associated with the disease, and aids in coping with these problems. The team concept enables the patient to be analyzed by all disciplines in order to assess his teaching needs and fulfill them. The pharmacist is continually involved in this information system and plays a valuable role on the team. PMID:10257341

  20. KNMI Data Centre: Easy access for all

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Vegte, John; Som de Cerff, Wim; Plieger, Maarten; de Vreede, Ernst; Sluiter, Raymond; Willem Noteboom, Jan; van der Neut, Ian; Verhoef, Hans; van Versendaal, Robert; van Binnendijk, Martin; Kalle, Henk; Knopper, Arthur; Spit, Jasper; Mastop, Joeri; Klos, Olaf; Calis, Gijs; Ha, Siu-Siu; van Moosel, Wim; Klein Ikkink, Henk-Jan; Tosun, Tuncay

    2013-04-01

    KNMI is the Dutch institute for weather, climate research and seismology. It disseminates weather information to the public at large, the government, aviation and the shipping industry in the interest of safety, the economy and a sustainable environment. To gain insight into long-term developments KNMI conducts research on climate change. Making the knowledge, data and information on hand at KNMI accessible is one core activity. A huge part of the KNMI information is from numerical models, insitu sensor networks and remote sensing satellites. This digital collection is mostly internal only available and is a collection of non searchable , non standardized file formats, lacking documentation and has no references to scientific publications. With the KNMI Data Centre (KDC) project these issues are tackled. In the project a user driven development approach with SCRUM was chosen to get maximum user involvement in a relative short development timeframe. Building on open standards and proven open source technology (which includes in-house developed software like ADAGUC WMS and Portal) resulted in a first release in December 2012 This presentation will focus on the aspects of KDC relating to its technical challenges, the development strategy and the initial usage results of the data centre.

  1. WISB: Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology Centre.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, John

    2016-06-15

    Synthetic biology promises to create high-impact solutions to challenges in the areas of biotechnology, human/animal health, the environment, energy, materials and food security. Equally, synthetic biologists create tools and strategies that have the potential to help us answer important fundamental questions in biology. Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology (WISB) pursues both of these mutually complementary 'build to apply' and 'build to understand' approaches. This is reflected in our research structure, in which a core theme on predictive biosystems engineering develops underpinning understanding as well as next-generation experimental/theoretical tools, and these are then incorporated into three applied themes in which we engineer biosynthetic pathways, microbial communities and microbial effector systems in plants. WISB takes a comprehensive approach to training, education and outreach. For example, WISB is a partner in the EPSRC/BBSRC-funded U.K. Doctoral Training Centre in synthetic biology, we have developed a new undergraduate module in the subject, and we have established five WISB Research Career Development Fellowships to support young group leaders. Research in Ethical, Legal and Societal Aspects (ELSA) of synthetic biology is embedded in our centre activities. WISB has been highly proactive in building an international research and training network that includes partners in Barcelona, Boston, Copenhagen, Madrid, Marburg, São Paulo, Tartu and Valencia. PMID:27284024

  2. New York City's Education Battles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Peter

    2008-01-01

    When Bloomberg gave his first State of the City address, in January, 2002, he announced his intention to seek mayoral control of the schools and abolish the infamous New York City Board of Education, which he called "a rinky-dink candy store." He joined a long list of New York mayors, educators, and business leaders who believed that the city's…

  3. Phenotypic Regulation of the Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor Miles Apart by G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved DRY motif at the end of the third helix of rhodopsin-like, class-A G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is a major regulator of receptor stability, signaling activity, and β-arrestin-mediated internalization. Substitution of the DRY arginine with histidine in the human vasopressin receptor results in a loss-of-function phenotype associated with diabetes insipidus. The analogous R150H substitution of the DRY motif in zebrafish sphingosine-1 phosphate receptor 2 (S1p2) produces a mutation, miles apart m93 (milm93), that not only disrupts signaling but also impairs heart field migration. We hypothesized that constitutive S1p2 desensitization is the underlying cause of this strong zebrafish developmental defect. We observed in cell assays that the wild-type S1p2 receptor is at the cell surface whereas in distinct contrast the S1p2 R150H receptor is found in intracellular vesicles, blocking G protein but not arrestin signaling activity. Surface S1p2 R150H expression could be restored by inhibition of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2). Moreover, we observed that β-arrestin 2 and GRK2 colocalize with S1p2 in developing zebrafish embryos and depletion of GRK2 in the S1p2 R150H miles apart zebrafish partially rescued cardia bifida. The ability of reduced GRK2 activity to reverse a developmental phenotype associated with constitutive desensitization supports efforts to genetically or pharmacologically target this kinase in diseases involving biased GPCR signaling. PMID:25555130

  4. The obtaining relative position of lunar centre masses and centre of the figure in selenocentric catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefedjev, Yu. A.; Valeev, S. G.; Rizvanov, N. G.; Mikeev, R. R.; Varaksina, N. Yu.

    2010-05-01

    The relative position of lunar center masses relative to center of the figure in Kazan and Kiev selenocentric catalogues was customized. The expansions by spherical harmonics N=5 degree and order of the lunar function h(λ, β) with using the package ASNI USTU were executed. Module of the expansion of the local area to surfaces to full sphere was used. The parameters of cosmic missions are given for comparison (SAI; Bills, Ferrari). The normalized coefficients from expansions for eight sources hypsometric information are obtained: - Clementine (N=40), - Kazan (N=5), - Kiev (N=5), - SAI (N=10; Chuikova (1975)), - Bills, Ferrari, - Каguуа (Selena, Japan mission), - ULCN (The Uuified Lunaz Control Network 2005). The displacements of the lunar centre figure relative to lunar centre of the masses were defined from equations (Chuikova (1975)). The results of the obtaining relative position of the lunar centre masses and centre of the figure in Kazan selenocentric catalogue give good agreement with modern cosmic mission data.

  5. An analysis of a low-energy, low-water use community in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermudez Alcocer, Jose Luis

    This study investigated how to determine a potential scenario to reduce energy, water and transportation use in Mexico City by implementing low-energy, low-water use communities. The proposed mixed-use community has multi-family apartments and a small grocery store. The research included the analysis of: case studies, energy simulation, and hand calculations for water, transportation and cost analysis. The previous case studies reviewed include: communities in Mexico City, Mexico, Austin, Texas, Phoenix, Arizona, New York City, New York and San Diego, California in terms of successful low-energy, low-water use projects. The analysis and comparison of these centers showed that the Multifamiliar Miguel Aleman is an excellent candidate to be examined for Mexico City. This technical potential study evaluated energy conserving measures such as low-energy appliances and efficient lighting that could be applied to the apartments in Mexico City to reduce energy-use. The use of the simulations and manual calculations showed that the application of the mixed-use concept was successful in reducing the energy and water use and the corresponding carbon footprint. Finally, this technical potential study showed taking people out of their cars as a result of the presence of the on-site grocery store, small recreation center and park on the ground floor also reduced their overall transportation energy-use. The improvement of the whole community (i.e., apartments plus grocery store) using energy-efficient measures provided a reduction of 70 percent of energy from the base-case. In addition a 69 percent reduction in water-use was achieved by using water-saving fixtures and greywater reuse technologies for the complex. The combination of high-efficiency automobiles and the presence of the on-site grocery store, small recreation center and park potentially reduced the transportation energy-use by 65 percent. The analysis showed an energy cost reduction of 82 percent reduction for

  6. Interconnecting PV on New York City's Secondary Network Distribution System

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K; Coddington, M; Burman, K; Hayter, S; Kroposki, B; Watson, and A

    2009-11-01

    less expensive distributed PV system interconnections. To assess ways to improve the interconnection process, NREL conducted a four-part study with support from DOE. The NREL team then compiled the final reports from each study into this report. In Section 1PV Deployment Analysis for New York City we analyze the technical potential for rooftop PV systems in the city. This analysis evaluates potential PV power production in ten Con Edison networks of various locations and building densities (ranging from high density apartments to lower density single family homes). Next, we compare the potential power production to network loads to determine where and when PV generation is most likely to exceed network load and disrupt network protection schemes. The results of this analysis may assist Con Edison in evaluating future PV interconnection applications and in planning future network protection system upgrades. This analysis may also assist other utilities interconnecting PV systems to networks by defining a method for assessing the technical potential of PV in the network and its impact on network loads. Section 2. A Briefing for Policy Makers on Connecting PV to a Network Grid presents an overview intended for nontechnical stakeholders. This section describes the issues associated with interconnecting PV systems to networks, along with possible solutions. Section 3. Technical Review of Concerns and Solutions to PV Interconnection in New York City summarizes common concerns of utility engineers and network experts about interconnecting PV systems to secondary networks. This section also contains detailed descriptions of nine solutions, including advantages and disadvantages, potential impacts, and road maps for deployment. Section 4. Utility Application Process Reviewlooks at utility interconnection application processes across the country and identifies administrative best practices for efficient PV interconnection.

  7. Identical Twins Raised Apart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farnsworth, David L.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a bivariate data set that is interesting to students. Indeed, this particular data set, which involves twins and IQ, has sparked more student interest than any other set that I have presented. Specific uses of the data set are presented.

  8. Boys and Girls Apart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahood, Ramona M.; Orr, Donald R.

    This paper reports on a study to see whether girls in middle school who took tests separately from boys did better than when they were tested together. A mathematics attitude and anxiety instrument was administered as part of the study to determine if either had any effect on test performance. Results indicate that boys were more anxious than…

  9. A World Apart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2000-01-01

    Describes the Hutterites, a communal German-speaking Christian sect in the northwestern United States and western Canada, who typically school their children only through eighth grade and allow further education only for teacher training. Discusses how well Hutterite children do in public schools, Hutterite teacher education programs at…

  10. Comprehensive Evaluation of Drug De-addiction Centres (DDCs) in Punjab (Northern India)

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vikram Kumar; Kaur, Paramjeet; Singh, Gurmeet; Bansal, Priya; Sidhu, B. S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Drug addiction is on the rise in Punjab,India. There are 15 DDCs which are supported by the Indian Red Cross Society. There is alleged mushrooming of private Drug De-addiction Centres (DDCs) in the smaller towns, villages and cities of Punjab. Objective: This study aimed to evaluate DDCs in Punjab. Materials and Methods: A total of 10 DDCs were included in the study and scheduled visits were made to collect data by using a pre-tested questionnaire. Results: The duration of treatment was 1 month at the Red Cross DDCs and it was approximately 6 months at private DDCs. The staff at the private DDCs were inadequate. The major drugs which were abused by patients were Propoxyphene, Alcohol, Bhukki and Cannabis. Patients were usually referred to the DDCs either by family members (35.3%) or social workers (29.8%). About 72.5% of patients were married, 36.3% had passed 10th standard and 54.4% were employed. A majority dropped out of the DDCs due to personal reasons and lack of family support. On comparison, more patients were found to be treated at Red Cross centres (75.3%) than at private centres (65.8%). All DDCs had conducted regular sessions of individual, group and family counseling for patients. Red Cross DDCs ensured that ex-clients received follow-ups and home visits. More patients were satisfied with the services which were provided by the Red Cross DDCs. On the contrary, more patients at the private DDCs complained about harassment fromstaff personnel (p>0.05). Conclusion: It is recommended that all DDCs should be checked regularly, and that the private centres should be provided with additional support from the government, to help run them more efficiently. PMID:24783080

  11. Martian City Map

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    30 May 2004 Seasonal frost can enhance the view from orbit of polar polygonal patterns on the surface of Mars. Sometimes these patterns look something like a city map, or the view from above a city lit-up at night. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example from the south polar region near 80.7oS, 70.6oW. Polar polygons on Mars are generally believed, though not proven, to be the result of freeze/thaw cycles of ice occurring within the upper few meters (several yards) of the martian subsurface. The image shown here covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across; sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  12. Garden City, Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Center pivot irrigation systems create red circles of healthy vegetation in this image of croplands near Garden City, Kansas. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on September 25, 2000. This is a false-color composite image made using near infrared, red, and green wavelengths. The image has also been sharpened using the sensor's panchromatic band. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

  13. NHS Blood Tracking Pilot: City University Evaluation Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Kate; Shabestari, Omid; Adriano, Juan; Kay, Jonathan; Roudsari, Abdul

    Automation of healthcare processes is an emergent theme in the drive to increase patient safety. The Mayday Hospital has been chosen as the pilot site for the implementation of the Electronic Clinical Transfusion Management System to track blood from the point of ordering to the final transfusion. The Centre for Health Informatics at City University is carrying out an independent evaluation of the system implementation using a variety of methodologies to both formatively inform the implementation process and summatively provide an account of the lessons learned for future implementations.

  14. Human diffusion and city influence.

    PubMed

    Lenormand, Maxime; Gonçalves, Bruno; Tugores, Antònia; Ramasco, José J

    2015-08-01

    Cities are characterized by concentrating population, economic activity and services. However, not all cities are equal and a natural hierarchy at local, regional or global scales spontaneously emerges. In this work, we introduce a method to quantify city influence using geolocated tweets to characterize human mobility. Rome and Paris appear consistently as the cities attracting most diverse visitors. The ratio between locals and non-local visitors turns out to be fundamental for a city to truly be global. Focusing only on urban residents' mobility flows, a city-to-city network can be constructed. This network allows us to analyse centrality measures at different scales. New York and London play a central role on the global scale, while urban rankings suffer substantial changes if the focus is set at a regional level. PMID:26179991

  15. Human diffusion and city influence

    PubMed Central

    Lenormand, Maxime; Gonçalves, Bruno; Tugores, Antònia; Ramasco, José J.

    2015-01-01

    Cities are characterized by concentrating population, economic activity and services. However, not all cities are equal and a natural hierarchy at local, regional or global scales spontaneously emerges. In this work, we introduce a method to quantify city influence using geolocated tweets to characterize human mobility. Rome and Paris appear consistently as the cities attracting most diverse visitors. The ratio between locals and non-local visitors turns out to be fundamental for a city to truly be global. Focusing only on urban residents' mobility flows, a city-to-city network can be constructed. This network allows us to analyse centrality measures at different scales. New York and London play a central role on the global scale, while urban rankings suffer substantial changes if the focus is set at a regional level. PMID:26179991

  16. Person-centred (deictic) expressions and autism.

    PubMed

    Hobson, R Peter; García-Pérez, Rosa M; Lee, Anthony

    2010-04-01

    We employed semi-structured tests to determine whether children with autism produce and comprehend deictic (person-centred) expressions such as 'this'/'that', 'here'/'there' and 'come'/'go', and whether they understand atypical non-verbal gestural deixis in the form of directed head-nods to indicate location. In Study 1, most participants spontaneously produced deictic terms, often in conjunction with pointing. Yet only among children with autism were there participants who referred to a location that was distal to themselves with the terms 'this' or 'here', or made atypical points with unusual precision, often lining-up with an eye. In Study 2, participants with autism were less accurate in responding to instructions involving contrastive deictic terms, and fewer responded accurately to indicative head nods. PMID:19888642

  17. Twin Jets from the Centres of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundt, W.; Gopal-Krishna

    1981-04-01

    Conceivably, the centres of all massive galaxies emit continuous antipodal beams of relativistic particles. We shall argue that these beams consist of highly relativistic electrons and positrons. At formation, the beams plough a channel through the ambient medium; the swept-up matter repeatedly stalls the particles which thereby follow closely the ambient pressure gradient. Thereafter, when the relativistic beam particles traverse these swarms of swept-up filamentary matter, they are repeatedly forced to bypass individual filaments and radiate (in the direction of their instantaneous motion). This forward-peaked radiation pattern can explain the preferred one-sided-ness of the observed radio/optical/X-ray knots in the jets. Pressure confinement focusses the beams, and temporarily freezes the channels. Interaction with the intergalactic wind can bend the beams into the shape of a warpedU, on length scales above some 20 kpc. The observed morphologies of extragalactic radio sources find a common explanation.

  18. Children's Centre "3 in 1 - together"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gancheva, Hristina

    2013-04-01

    "There are only two ways to life your live. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle." Albert Einstein Children's Centre "3 in 1" is an extracurricular unit linked to the High School of Zlatartitsa, St. Cyril and St. Methodius, accomplished with the help of the municipality and many volunteers from the local community. With its activity it forms in children patriotic spirit, love for nature, active citizenship, and an impulse for a healthy life through communication with nature, saving the traditions and history, insurance of equality of the kids of the local five ethnicities and participation in activities in the sphere of science, art, sport and tourism. The educational work is mainly directed towards kids with difficulties with communication, hyperactivity, aggression, problems in their families, or those deprived of parental care. For a few years in the Children's Centre there have been clubs of interests: "Gardeners" - kids cultivate a garden. They plow, dig, plant, put in, irrigate and weed under the watch of Ms Stafka Nikolova, parents, and volunteers of the local community. The ecologically clean products - vegetables and fruits, kids use to cook delicious meals, sell, or give away. Weeds are also utilized; they are making herbarium out of them. "Cooks" - "What to have for lunch, when mom is out?". One can learn a lot of wonderful recipes from the club "Cooks". Products are own made, raised with love. In 2010, on the on the annual traditional holiday of the garden soup in Zlataritsa, the little cooks won third prize for making a delicious vegetable soup. On the same day, the 26 years old Nadezhda Savova, Cultural and Social Anthropology PhD in Princeton, founded the second community bakery in Bulgaria in Children's Centre "3 in1". Nadezhda Savova was declared traveler of 2012 by National Geographic. After the baking house in Gabrovo and Zlataritsa, Nadezhda also founded such projects in Sofia, Varna and Ruse

  19. Distant Operational Care Centre: Design Project Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this project is to outline the design of the Distant Operational Care Centre (DOCC), a modular medical facility to maintain human health and performance in space, that is adaptable to a range of remote human habitats. The purpose of this project is to outline a design, not to go into a complete technical specification of a medical facility for space. This project involves a process to produce a concise set of requirements, addressing the fundamental problems and issues regarding all aspects of a space medical facility for the future. The ideas presented here are at a high level, based on existing, researched, and hypothetical technologies. Given the long development times for space exploration, the outlined concepts from this project embodies a collection of identified problems, and corresponding proposed solutions and ideas, ready to contribute to future space exploration efforts. In order to provide a solid extrapolation and speculation in the context of the future of space medicine, the extent of this project's vision is roughly within the next two decades. The Distant Operational Care Centre (DOCC) is a modular medical facility for space. That is, its function is to maintain human health and performance in space environments, through prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. Furthermore, the DOCC must be adaptable to meet the environmental requirements of different remote human habitats, and support a high quality of human performance. To meet a diverse range of remote human habitats, the DOCC concentrates on a core medical capability that can then be adapted. Adaptation would make use of the DOCC's functional modularity, providing the ability to replace, add, and modify core functions of the DOCC by updating hardware, operations, and procedures. Some of the challenges to be addressed by this project include what constitutes the core medical capability in terms of hardware, operations, and procedures, and how DOCC can be adapted to different remote

  20. Common Myna Roosts Are Not Recruitment Centres

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, Manaswini; Arvind, Chiti; Lakshman, Abhilash; Vidya, T. N. C.

    2014-01-01

    We studied communal roosting in the Common Myna (Acridotheres tristis) in the light of the recruitment centre hypothesis and predation at the roost. The number and sizes of flocks departing from and arriving at focal roosts were recorded over a two year period. We also recorded the sizes and behaviour of foraging flocks. We found that flock sizes of birds departing from roosts at sunrise were larger than those at the feeding site, suggesting that there was no recruitment from the roosts. Flocks entering the roosts during sunset were larger on average than those leaving the following sunrise, suggesting no consolidation of flocks in the morning. Flocks entering the roosts at sunset were also larger on average than those that had left that sunrise, although there was no recruitment at the feeding site. There was no effect of group size on the proportion of time spent feeding. Contrary to expectation, single birds showed lower apparent vigilance than birds that foraged in pairs or groups, possibly due to scrounging tactics being used in the presence of feeding companions. Thus, the recruitment centre hypothesis did not hold in our study population of mynas. Predation at dawn and dusk were also not important to communal roosting: predators near the roosts did not result in larger flocks, and resulted in larger durations of arrival/departure contrary to expectation. Since flock sizes were smallest at the feeding site and larger in the evening than in the morning, but did not coincide with predator activity, information transfer unrelated to food (such as breeding opportunities) may possibly give rise to the evening aggregations. PMID:25122467

  1. Beef quality assessed at European research centres.

    PubMed

    Dransfield, E; Nute, G R; Roberts, T A; Boccard, R; Touraille, C; Buchter, L; Casteels, M; Cosentino, E; Hood, D E; Joseph, R L; Schon, I; Paardekooper, E J

    1984-01-01

    Loin steaks and cubes of M. semimembranosus from eight (12 month old) Galloway steers and eight (16-18 month old) Charolais cross steers raised in England and from which the meat was conditioned for 2 or 10 days, were assessed in research centres in Belgium, Denmark, England, France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Ireland, Italy and the Netherlands. Laboratory panels assessed meat by grilling the steaks and cooking the cubes in casseroles according to local custom using scales developed locally and by scales used frequently at other research centres. The meat was mostly of good quality but with sufficient variation to obtain meaningful comparisons. Tenderness and juiciness were assessed most, and flavour least, consistently. Over the 32 meats, acceptability of steaks and casseroles was in general compounded from tenderness, juiciness and flavour. However, when the meat was tough, it dominated the overall judgement; but when tender, flavour played an important rôle. Irish and English panels tended to weight more on flavour and Italian panels on tenderness and juiciness. Juciness and tenderness were well correlated among all panels except in Italy and Germany. With flavour, however, Belgian, Irish, German and Dutch panels ranked the meats similarly and formed a group distinct from the others which did not. The panels showed a similar grouping for judgements of acceptability. French and Belgian panels judged the steaks from the older Charolais cross steers to have more flavour and be more juicy than average and tended to prefer them. Casseroles from younger steers were invariably preferred although the French and Belgian panels judged aged meat from older animals equally acceptable. These regional biases were thought to be derived mainly from differences in cooking, but variations in experience and perception of assessors also contributed. PMID:22055992

  2. A Predictive Model of Apartment-Living Based on Socio-Economic and Demographic Factors With Health-Based Approach in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Pezhman; Armanmehr, Vajihe; Moradi, Noorallah; Moshki, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Due to importance and progressive growth of apartment-living phenomenon in the world today, it is essential to survey the different dimensions of this modern lifestyle. The aim of this study is to predict rate of apartment-living based on the different predicted variables of socio-economic and demographic factors with approach to different health aspects. Methods: A descriptive- analytic study was carried out between 600 apartment and 800 non-apartment residents in the Shiraz (Southern Region of Iran) through multi-stage cluster sampling during the year 2011. The statistical analysis was performed on the obtained data using multi-variable logistic regression as well as ANOVA analysis. Result: The rate for apartment-living in above 30 years old age group was 8.31 times more than 15-30 years old, 9.6 times more in employed vs. unemployed; 6.57 and 9.49 times more in families with average and high monthly incomes, respectively, vs. family with low monthly income; 8.73 times more in owner sub-group vs. renter sub-group; and 1.30 times more in people living lonely than those living with family. People living in an apartment are in poor health status considering physical, mental and social aspects. Conclusion: Based on the results, it is very important that policy makers in urban areas consider the determinative role of socio-economic and demographic factors, which are involved in selecting apartment-living lifestyle by urban residents and also are effective on health. PMID:25948464

  3. Commensal Rodents in the City of Buenos Aires: A Temporal, Spatial, and Environmental Analysis at the Whole City Level.

    PubMed

    Cavia, Regino; Muschetto, Emiliano; Cueto, Gerardo Rubén; Suárez, Olga Virginia

    2015-09-01

    Commensal rodents are some of the main vertebrate pests in urban areas; however, knowledge about factors that favor them at large scales is scarce. We studied spatial and temporal variations in rodent infestation levels at the whole city scale using the complaints of rodent sightings and questionnaire surveys to city neighbors. Demographic, socio-economic, and environmental characteristics handled with a geographic information system were evaluated as possible indicators of rodent infestation. The number of rodent sightings was lower in months with low mean temperature with two months time lag and higher in areas with high number of meat and metal industries. Rodent infestation estimated by the questionnaire survey showed spatial autocorrelation defining large areas with similar infestation levels. It decreased when the apartment density increased, while increased when the proportion of area occupied by shantytowns, the density of meat industries, and the proportion of area occupied by moderate urban development increased. Rodent control programs at the whole city level would have better results if public health pest agencies and/or governments will focus the efforts on areas with more precarious conditions as well as the industrial areas in the cold season when have lower rodent abundances. PMID:25681115

  4. Aggregate colour centres in impurity LiF crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Basiev, Tasoltan T; Karasik, Aleksandr Ya; Konyushkin, V A; Papashvili, A G; Pukhov, K K; Ermakov, I V; Gellermann, V

    2002-08-31

    LiF crystals with colour centres exhibiting a zero-phonon line (ZPL) at 1080 nm in absorption and luminescence are studied. The decay time of luminescence of colour centres at 10 K is 260 - 280 ns, the ZPL half-width is 4.7 cm{sup -1}, and colour centres are characterised by a weak electron - phonon interaction (the Huang - Rhys factor is S < 0.11). The polarisation analysis of luminescence showed that the transition dipole moments of colour centres are oriented along the crystal axes [100], [010], and [001]. The model of aggregate F{sub 4} colour centres having a spatial structure with three symmetry axes C{sub 2} may correspond to the colour centres studied in the paper. (active media. lasers)

  5. The Centre of Mass of a Triangular Plate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slusarenko, Viktor; Rojas, Roberto; Fuster, Gonzalo

    2008-01-01

    We present a derivation for the coordinates of the centre of mass--or centre of gravity--of a homogeneous triangular plate by using scaling and symmetry. We scale the triangular plate by a factor of 2 and divide its area into four plates identical to the original. By symmetry, we assert that the centre of mass of two identical masses lies at the…

  6. Complex Modelling Scheme Of An Additive Manufacturing Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Liliana Georgeta

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a modelling scheme sustaining the development of an additive manufacturing research centre model and its processes. This modelling is performed using IDEF0, the resulting model process representing the basic processes required in developing such a centre in any university. While the activities presented in this study are those recommended in general, changes may occur in specific existing situations in a research centre.

  7. Current Status of Hernia Centres Around the Globe.

    PubMed

    Kulacoglu, Hakan; Oztuna, Derya

    2015-12-01

    Institutions specifically dedicated to treatment of abdominal wall hernias have gained popularity over the last years. This study aimed to determine the current situation of hernia centres worldwide. A web-based search was conducted using the common search engines Google and PubMed. The details recorded were as follows: name of the centre, country, establishment year, administrative structure (hospital affiliated, private practice group, or independent solo practice), whether or not the centre has its own operation room, the number of employed surgeons, preferred anaesthesia type, preferred repair type, laparoscopic technique option, case volume per year, and the number of scientific publications. A total of 182 centres were found in 30 different countries. Eighty-one (44.5 %) centres provide services as part of an affiliation within a general hospital (18 in university hospitals). Only 28 (15.5 %) of the centres have published a paper on abdominal wall hernias indexed by PubMed. The total number of papers in PubMed by 182 centres is 354. We observed that clinical outcomes in hernia centres are not shared globally by publishing them in scientific journals, and whether specific hernia surgeons and centres provide better outcomes in treating abdominal wall hernias, compared to general surgeons who deal with all kinds of surgical procedures, remains unclear. PMID:27011503

  8. Large cities are less green

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Erneson A.; Andrade, José S.; Makse, Hernán A.

    2014-02-01

    We study how urban quality evolves as a result of carbon dioxide emissions as urban agglomerations grow. We employ a bottom-up approach combining two unprecedented microscopic data on population and carbon dioxide emissions in the continental US. We first aggregate settlements that are close to each other into cities using the City Clustering Algorithm (CCA) defining cities beyond the administrative boundaries. Then, we use data on CO2 emissions at a fine geographic scale to determine the total emissions of each city. We find a superlinear scaling behavior, expressed by a power-law, between CO2 emissions and city population with average allometric exponent β = 1.46 across all cities in the US. This result suggests that the high productivity of large cities is done at the expense of a proportionally larger amount of emissions compared to small cities. Furthermore, our results are substantially different from those obtained by the standard administrative definition of cities, i.e. Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). Specifically, MSAs display isometric scaling emissions and we argue that this discrepancy is due to the overestimation of MSA areas. The results suggest that allometric studies based on administrative boundaries to define cities may suffer from endogeneity bias.

  9. A Generic Ground Framework for Image Expertise Centres and Small-Sized Production Centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellé, A.

    2009-05-01

    Initiated by the Pleiadas Earth Observation Program, the CNES (French Space Agency) has developed a generic collaborative framework for its image quality centre, highly customisable for any upcoming expertise centre. This collaborative framework has been design to be used by a group of experts or scientists that want to share data and processings and manage interfaces with external entities. Its flexible and scalable architecture complies with the core requirements: defining a user data model with no impact on the software (generic access data), integrating user processings with a GUI builder and built-in APIs, and offering a scalable architecture to fit any preformance requirement and accompany growing projects. The CNES jas given licensing grants for two software companies that will be able to redistribute this framework to any customer.

  10. Securing water for the cities.

    PubMed

    Satterthwaite, D

    1993-01-01

    Many cities in developing countries have grown so much that they can no longer provide adequate, sustainable water. Over pumping in Dakar and Mexico City has forced those cities to obtain water from ever more distant sources. In Dakar, the result has been saltwater intrusion. Overpumping has caused Mexico City to sink, in some areas by as much as 9 m, resulting in serious damage to buildings and sewage and drainage pipes. Other cities facing similar water problems are coastal cities in Peru (e.g., Lima), La Rioja and Catamarca in Argentina, cities in Northern Mexico, and cities in dry areas of Africa. For some cities, the problem is not so much ever more distant water supplies but insufficient funds to expand supplies. Bangkok and Jakarta both face saltwater intrusion into their overdrawn aquifers. Even through agriculture is the dominant user of water in most countries, demand concentrated in a small area exhausts local and regional sources and pollutes rivers, lakes, and coasts with untreated human and industrial waste. Most cities in Africa and Asia do not have a sewerage system. Further, most cities do not have the drains to deal with storm water and external floodwater, causing frequent, seasonal flooding. The resulting stagnant water provides breeding grounds for insect vectors of diseases (e.g., malaria). The problems in most cities are a result of poor management, not lack of water. Reducing leaks in existing piped distribution systems from the usual 60% loss of water to leaks to 12% would increase the available water 2-fold. Another way to address water shortages would be commercial, industrial, and recreational use of minimally treated waste water, such as is the case in Madras and Mexico City. Political solutions are needed to resolve inadequate water supply and waste management. PMID:12287008

  11. The development and operation of Edinburgh Parallel Computing Centre`s summer scholarship programme

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, G.V.; MacDonald, N.B.; Thornborrow, C.; Brough, C.M.

    1994-12-31

    Between 1987 and 1994, more than 100 students in a broad range of disciplines worked as summer scholars at Edinburgh Parallel Computing Centre. Many of these students have since taken their parallel computing skills into graduate work and industry, and over a quarter of EPCC`s technical staff are alumni of the Programme. This report describes the evolution and present operation of the Summer Scholarship Programme, and its costs and benefits.

  12. A model of patient-centred care - turning good care into patient-centred care.

    PubMed

    Scambler, S; Asimakopoulou, K

    2014-09-01

    This paper builds on previous work reviewing patient-centred care in dentistry and acknowledges work that has questioned the measurement and effectiveness of patient-centredness in practice. In an attempt to move the debate from rhetoric to practice and enhance the practical utility of the concept, we present a practical hierarchy of patient-centredness that may aid the practical application of patient-centred care in clinical practice by making explicit a series of stages that a dental care professional needs to move through in order to provide care that is patient-centred. The model presented is illustrated through practical examples. The various stages inherent in it are described with the aim of making clear the perhaps automatic and taken for granted assumptions that are often made by dental care professionals and patients through the course of a consultation. Our aim is to encourage dental consultations to have more open, unambiguous communication, both about the risks and benefits of courses of action and about the choices available to patients. PMID:25213518

  13. CityGML - Interoperable semantic 3D city models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröger, Gerhard; Plümer, Lutz

    2012-07-01

    CityGML is the international standard of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) for the representation and exchange of 3D city models. It defines the three-dimensional geometry, topology, semantics and appearance of the most relevant topographic objects in urban or regional contexts. These definitions are provided in different, well-defined Levels-of-Detail (multiresolution model). The focus of CityGML is on the semantical aspects of 3D city models, its structures, taxonomies and aggregations, allowing users to employ virtual 3D city models for advanced analysis and visualization tasks in a variety of application domains such as urban planning, indoor/outdoor pedestrian navigation, environmental simulations, cultural heritage, or facility management. This is in contrast to purely geometrical/graphical models such as KML, VRML, or X3D, which do not provide sufficient semantics. CityGML is based on the Geography Markup Language (GML), which provides a standardized geometry model. Due to this model and its well-defined semantics and structures, CityGML facilitates interoperable data exchange in the context of geo web services and spatial data infrastructures. Since its standardization in 2008, CityGML has become used on a worldwide scale: tools from notable companies in the geospatial field provide CityGML interfaces. Many applications and projects use this standard. CityGML is also having a strong impact on science: numerous approaches use CityGML, particularly its semantics, for disaster management, emergency responses, or energy-related applications as well as for visualizations, or they contribute to CityGML, improving its consistency and validity, or use CityGML, particularly its different Levels-of-Detail, as a source or target for generalizations. This paper gives an overview of CityGML, its underlying concepts, its Levels-of-Detail, how to extend it, its applications, its likely future development, and the role it plays in scientific research. Furthermore, its

  14. A SDMS Model: Early Warning Coordination Centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Reyes, Jaime

    2010-05-01

    Following the tsunami disaster in 2004, the General Secretary of the United Nations (UN) Kofi Annan called for a global early warning system for all hazards and for all communities. He also requested the ISDR (International Strategy fort Disaster Reduction) and its UN partners to conduct a global survey of capacities, gaps and opportunities in relation to early warning systems. The produced report, "Global survey of Early Warning Systems", concluded that there are many gaps and shortcomings and that much progress has been made on early warning systems and great capabilities are available around the world. However, it may be argued that an early warning system (EWS) may not be enough to prevent fatalities due to a natural hazard; i.e., it should be seen as part of a ‘wider' or total system. Furthermore, an EWS may work very well when assessed individually but it is not clear whether it will contribute to accomplish the purpose of the ‘total disaster management system'; i.e., to prevent fatalities. For instance, a regional EWS may only work if it is well co-ordinated with the local warning and emergency response systems that ensure that the warning is received, communicated and acted upon by the potentially affected communities. It may be argued that without these local measures being in place, a regional EWS will have little impact in saving lives. Researchers argued that unless people are warned in remote areas, the technology is useless; for instance McGuire [5] argues that: "I have no doubt that the technical element of the warning system will work very well,"…"But there has to be an effective and efficient communications cascade from the warning centre to the fisherman on the beach and his family and the bar owners." Similarly, McFadden [6] states that: "There's no point in spending all the money on a fancy monitoring and a fancy analysis system unless we can make sure the infrastructure for the broadcast system is there,"… "That's going to require a lot

  15. Genetic and Environmental Influences on Eating Behavior - A Study of Twin Pairs Reared Apart or Reared Together

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Sonya J.; Neale, Michael C.; Fuss, Paul J.; Lichtenstein, Alice H.; Greenberg, Andrew S.; McCrory, Megan A.; Bouchard, Thomas J.; Saltzman, Edward; Roberts, Susan B.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relative influence of genetic versus environmental factors on specific aspects of eating behavior. Adult monozygotic twins (22 pairs and 3 singleton reared apart, 38 pairs and 9 singleton reared together, age 18–76 years, BMI 17–43 kg/m2) completed the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire. Genetic and environmental variance components were determined for the three eating behavior constructs and their subscales using model-fitting univariate and multivariate analyses. Unique environmental factors had a substantial influence on all eating behavior variables (explaining 45–71% of variance), and most strongly influenced external locus for hunger and strategic dieting behavior of restraint (explaining 71% and 69% of variance, respectively). Genetic factors had a statistically significant influence on only 4 variables: restraint, emotional susceptibility to disinhibition, situational susceptibility to disinhibition, and internal locus for hunger (heritabilities were 52%, 55%, 38% and 50%, respectively). Common environmental factors did not statistically significantly influence any variable assessed in this study. In addition, multivariate analyses showed that disinhibition and hunger share a common influence, while restraint appears to be a distinct construct. These findings suggest that the majority of variation in eating behavior variables is associated with unique environmental factors, and highlights the importance of the environment in facilitating specific eating behaviors that may promote excess weight gain. PMID:25067963

  16. A method to measure the ozone penetration factor in residences under infiltration conditions: application in a multifamily apartment unit.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Stephens, B

    2016-08-01

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that outdoor ozone reacts with materials inside residential building enclosures, potentially reducing indoor exposures to ozone or altering ozone reaction byproducts. However, test methods to measure ozone penetration factors in residences (P) remain limited. We developed a method to measure ozone penetration factors in residences under infiltration conditions and applied it in an unoccupied apartment unit. Twenty-four repeated measurements were made, and results were explored to (i) evaluate the accuracy and repeatability of the new procedure using multiple solution methods, (ii) compare results from 'interference-free' and conventional UV absorbance ozone monitors, and (iii) compare results against those from a previously published test method requiring artificial depressurization. The mean (±s.d.) estimate of P was 0.54 ± 0.10 across a wide range of conditions using the new method with an interference-free monitor; the conventional monitor was unable to yield meaningful results due to relatively high limits of detection. Estimates of P were not clearly influenced by any indoor or outdoor environmental conditions or changes in indoor decay rate constants. This work represents the first known measurements of ozone penetration factors in a residential building operating under natural infiltration conditions and provides a new method for widespread application in buildings. PMID:26114258

  17. Efficacy of an Essential Oil-Based Pesticide for Controlling Bed Bug (Cimex lectularius) Infestations in Apartment Buildings

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changlu; Singh, Narinderpal; Cooper, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Bed bugs (Cimex lectularius L. and Cimex hemipterus F.) are among the most difficult urban pests to manage. Many essential oil-based bed bug control products that are considered reduced risk to mammals compared to synthetic insect neurotoxins have become commercially available, but their effectiveness as a stand-alone control method is unknown. This study assessed the field efficacy of an essential oil-based bed bug control product (EcoRaider; a.i. 1% geraniol + 1% cedar oil + 2% sodium lauryl sulfate) compared to a pyrethroid and neonicotinoid mixture spray (0.075% Temprid SC; a.i. beta-cyfluthrin + imidacloprid). After 12 weeks, the three treatments—EcoRaider, Temprid SC, and EcoRaider + Temprid SC caused 92.5 ± 2.7, 92.9 ± 3.0, and 91.7% ± 2.7% bed bug count reduction, respectively. No significant differences existed in the bed bug reduction among the treatments. Bed bugs were eliminated from only 22% of the treated apartments. Among those still with bed bugs, 76% of the residents did not know bed bugs were present. We documented the residents’ self-control practices and discussed the potential of using essential oil-based insecticides in bed bug management programs to minimize the health risks to building occupants and pets and to slow down the development of insecticide resistance. PMID:26462944

  18. High-resolution 3D seismic imaging of a pull-apart basin in the Gulf of Cadiz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crutchley, G.; Berndt, C.; Klaeschen, D.; Gutscher, M.

    2009-12-01

    In 2006, high-resolution 3D seismic data were acquired in the Gulf of Cadiz and the Mediterranean Sea aboard the RRS Charles Darwin as part of the HERMES (Hotspot Ecosystem Research on the Margins of European Seas) project. The P-Cable system, a cost-efficient set-up for fast acquisition of 3D seismic data on 12 single-channel streamers, was utilized to acquire seismic cubes at four different targets. Here, we present results from the second target - a WNW-ESE-oriented pull-apart basin in the southeastern Gulf of Cadiz. Initial processing has included: 1) spatial positioning of each recording channel from GPS data acquired on the outer two channels, 2) improved positioning of shot points and channels from the inversion of first arrival times, 3) application of a swell filter to improve reflection coherency, 4) CDP binning and stacking and 5) migration. The new data confirm that the southeastern Gulf of Cadiz north of the Rharb submarine valley is structurally controlled by numerous strike slip faults that were active until quite recently (within the resolution of the data). Given the location of this basin, between the extensional domain on the upper slope and the compressional toe of the accretionary wedge, we interpret the origin to be gravitational sliding on a detachment layer, possibly containing salt, but at this stage not imaged by our profiles.

  19. Validation of break-apart and fusion MYC probes using a digital fluorescence in situ hybridization capture and imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Michael; Rowe, Leslie; Clement, Parker W.; Miles, Rodney R.; Salama, Mohamed E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Detection of MYC translocations using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is important in the evaluation of lymphomas, in particular, Burkitt lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Our aim was to validate a digital FISH capture and imaging system for the detection of MYC 8q24 translocations using LSI-MYC (a break-apart probe) and MYC 8;14 translocation using IGH-MYC (a fusion probe). Materials and Methods: LSI-MYC probe was evaluated using tissue sections from 35 patients. IGH-MYC probe was evaluated using tissue sections from forty patients. Sections were processed for FISH and analyzed using traditional methods. FISH slides were then analyzed using the GenASIs capture and analysis system. Results: Results for LSI-MYC had a high degree of correlation between traditional method of FISH analysis and digital FISH analysis. Results for IGH-MYC had a 100% concordance between traditional method of FISH analysis and digital FISH analysis. Conclusion: Annotated whole slide images of H and E and FISH sections can be digitally aligned, so that areas of tumor within a section can be matched and evaluated with a greater degree of accuracy. Images can be archived permanently, providing a means for examining the results retrospectively. Digital FISH imaging of the MYC translocations provides a better diagnostic tool compared to traditional methods for evaluating lymphomas. PMID:27217970

  20. Efficacy of an Essential Oil-Based Pesticide for Controlling Bed Bug (Cimex lectularius) Infestations in Apartment Buildings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changlu; Singh, Narinderpal; Cooper, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Bed bugs (Cimex lectularius L. and Cimex hemipterus F.) are among the most difficult urban pests to manage. Many essential oil-based bed bug control products that are considered reduced risk to mammals compared to synthetic insect neurotoxins have become commercially available, but their effectiveness as a stand-alone control method is unknown. This study assessed the field efficacy of an essential oil-based bed bug control product (EcoRaider; a.i. 1% geraniol + 1% cedar oil + 2% sodium lauryl sulfate) compared to a pyrethroid and neonicotinoid mixture spray (0.075% Temprid SC; a.i. beta-cyfluthrin + imidacloprid). After 12 weeks, the three treatments-EcoRaider, Temprid SC, and EcoRaider + Temprid SC caused 92.5 ± 2.7, 92.9 ± 3.0, and 91.7% ± 2.7% bed bug count reduction, respectively. No significant differences existed in the bed bug reduction among the treatments. Bed bugs were eliminated from only 22% of the treated apartments. Among those still with bed bugs, 76% of the residents did not know bed bugs were present. We documented the residents' self-control practices and discussed the potential of using essential oil-based insecticides in bed bug management programs to minimize the health risks to building occupants and pets and to slow down the development of insecticide resistance. PMID:26462944

  1. Genetic and Environmental Influences on Eating Behavior - A Study of Twin Pairs Reared Apart or Reared Together.

    PubMed

    Elder, Sonya J; Neale, Michael C; Fuss, Paul J; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Greenberg, Andrew S; McCrory, Megan A; Bouchard, Thomas J; Saltzman, Edward; Roberts, Susan B

    2012-04-01

    This study examined the relative influence of genetic versus environmental factors on specific aspects of eating behavior. Adult monozygotic twins (22 pairs and 3 singleton reared apart, 38 pairs and 9 singleton reared together, age 18-76 years, BMI 17-43 kg/m(2)) completed the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire. Genetic and environmental variance components were determined for the three eating behavior constructs and their subscales using model-fitting univariate and multivariate analyses. Unique environmental factors had a substantial influence on all eating behavior variables (explaining 45-71% of variance), and most strongly influenced external locus for hunger and strategic dieting behavior of restraint (explaining 71% and 69% of variance, respectively). Genetic factors had a statistically significant influence on only 4 variables: restraint, emotional susceptibility to disinhibition, situational susceptibility to disinhibition, and internal locus for hunger (heritabilities were 52%, 55%, 38% and 50%, respectively). Common environmental factors did not statistically significantly influence any variable assessed in this study. In addition, multivariate analyses showed that disinhibition and hunger share a common influence, while restraint appears to be a distinct construct. These findings suggest that the majority of variation in eating behavior variables is associated with unique environmental factors, and highlights the importance of the environment in facilitating specific eating behaviors that may promote excess weight gain. PMID:25067963

  2. The dynamics of city formation*

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, J. Vernon; Venables, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines city formation in a country whose urban population is growing steadily over time, with new cities required to accommodate this growth. In contrast to most of the literature there is immobility of housing and urban infrastructure, and investment in these assets is taken on the basis of forward-looking behavior. In the presence of these fixed assets cities form sequentially, without the population swings in existing cities that arise in current models, but with swings in house rents. Equilibrium city size, absent government, may be larger or smaller than is efficient, depending on how urban externalities vary with population. Efficient formation of cities with internalization of externalities involves local government intervention and borrowing to finance development. The paper explores the institutions required for successful local government intervention. PMID:25089087

  3. Constructing cities, deconstructing scaling laws

    PubMed Central

    Arcaute, Elsa; Hatna, Erez; Ferguson, Peter; Youn, Hyejin; Johansson, Anders; Batty, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Cities can be characterized and modelled through different urban measures. Consistency within these observables is crucial in order to advance towards a science of cities. Bettencourt et al. have proposed that many of these urban measures can be predicted through universal scaling laws. We develop a framework to consistently define cities, using commuting to work and population density thresholds, and construct thousands of realizations of systems of cities with different boundaries for England and Wales. These serve as a laboratory for the scaling analysis of a large set of urban indicators. The analysis shows that population size alone does not provide us enough information to describe or predict the state of a city as previously proposed, indicating that the expected scaling laws are not corroborated. We found that most urban indicators scale linearly with city size, regardless of the definition of the urban boundaries. However, when nonlinear correlations are present, the exponent fluctuates considerably. PMID:25411405

  4. Swasti: An International Health Resource Centre

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, N.S.

    2013-01-01

    Swasti, an International Health Resource Centre was established in 2002 in India. The objective was to enhance the health and well-being of communities, particularly the marginalized. Swasti’s main focus lies in the areas of primary health, sexual and reproductive health including HIV, communicable and non-communicable diseases, water, sanitation and hygiene and gender based violence. The organization, during the last decade has grown in leaps and bounds reaching out to the most affected communities through policy influence and grassroots level intervention reach. Swasti has an agile, passionate and multi-disciplinary team, who deliver in diverse situations across the development spectrum while integrating community needs, programs and policies. The organization’s focus is on quality support to deliver cutting edge, sustainable solutions. Swasti has a global approach and works with many development partners across many countries. So far it has been involved in over 200 engagements in over 20 countries with partners ranging from Government Departments, Bilateral and Multilateral Donors, Foundations, INGOs, FBOs, CBOs etc. With many awards and recognitions to its credit, Swasti also contributes to policy and is a part of many global platforms for advocacy.

  5. The young centre of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uggerhøj, U. I.; Mikkelsen, R. E.; Faye, J.

    2016-05-01

    We treat, as an illustrative example of gravitational time dilation in relativity, the observation that the centre of the Earth is younger than the surface by an appreciable amount. Richard Feynman first made this insightful point and presented an estimate of the size of the effect in a talk; a transcription was later published in which the time difference is quoted as ‘one or two days’. However, a back-of-the-envelope calculation shows that the result is in fact a few years. In this paper we present this estimate alongside a more elaborate analysis yielding a difference of two and a half years. The aim is to provide a fairly complete solution to the relativity of the ‘aging’ of an object due to differences in the gravitational potential. This solution—accessible at the undergraduate level—can be used for educational purposes, as an example in the classroom. Finally, we also briefly discuss why exchanging ‘years’ for ‘days’—which in retrospect is a quite simple, but significant, mistake—has been repeated seemingly uncritically, albeit in a few cases only. The pedagogical value of this discussion is to show students that any number or observation, no matter who brought it forward, must be critically examined.

  6. The Charles Perkins Centre's Twins Research Node.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Lucas C; Craig, Jeffrey M; Hopper, John L; Carrick, Susan E

    2016-08-01

    Twins can help researchers disentangle the roles of genes from those of the environment on human traits, health, and diseases. To realize this potential, the Australian Twin Registry (ATR), University of Melbourne, and the Charles Perkins Centre (CPC), University of Sydney, established a collaboration to form the Twins Research Node, a highly interconnected research facility dedicated specifically to research involving twins. This collaboration aims to foster the adoption of twin designs as important tools for research in a range of health-related domains. The CPC hosted their Twins Research Node's launch seminar entitled 'Double the power of your research with twin studies', in which experienced twin researchers described how twin studies are supporting scientific discoveries and careers. The launch also featured twin pairs who have actively participated in research through the ATR. Researchers at the CPC were surveyed before the event to gauge their level of understanding and interest in utilizing twin research. This article describes the new Twins Research Node, discusses the survey's main results and reports on the launch seminar. PMID:27302367

  7. Radio polarimetry of Galactic Centre pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Eatough, R. P.; Ferrière, K.; Kramer, M.; Lee, K. J.; Noutsos, A.; Shannon, R. M.

    2016-07-01

    To study the strength and structure of the magnetic field in the Galactic Centre (GC), we measured Faraday rotation of the radio emission of pulsars which are seen towards the GC. Three of these pulsars have the largest rotation measures (RMs) observed in any Galactic object with the exception of Sgr A⋆. Their large dispersion measures, RMs and the large RM variation between these pulsars and other known objects in the GC implies that the pulsars lie in the GC and are not merely seen in projection towards the GC. The large RMs of these pulsars indicate large line-of-sight magnetic field components between ˜ 16 and 33 μG; combined with recent model predictions for the strength of the magnetic field in the GC this implies that the large-scale magnetic field has a very small inclination angle with respect to the plane of the sky (˜12°). Foreground objects like the Radio Arc or possibly an ablated, ionized halo around the molecular cloud G0.11-0.11 could contribute to the large RMs of two of the pulsars. If these pulsars lie behind the Radio Arc or G0.11-0.11 then this proves that low-scattering corridors with lengths ≳100 pc must exist in the GC. This also suggests that future, sensitive observations will be able to detect additional pulsars in the GC. Finally, we show that the GC component in our most accurate electron density model oversimplifies structure in the GC.

  8. Ensemble Prediction at the Canadian Meteorological Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellerin, G.; Lefaivre, L.; Houtekamer, P. L.; Mitchell, H.

    2004-05-01

    A global ensemble prediction system (EPS) is running operationally at the Canadian Meteorological Centre (CMC) since February 1998. The number of members was increased from 8 to 16 members in august 1999 and the resolution was increased from 250km to 150km in June 2001. A multi-model approach is used to produce 10 day forecasts once a day. The Spectral Finite Element model (SEF) is used at TL149 and the Global Environment Multi-scale (GEM) model is used at the equivalent 1.2 degree resolution. The initial analyses are produced from an Optimal Interpolation (OI) technique developed at CMC in the early seventies is currently being replaced by an Ensemble Kalman Filter approach developed by Houtekamer and Mitchell. We will describe the new method to obtain the perturbed analyses using the Ensemble Kalman Filter and the verifications obtained to phase out the old OI technique. The ensemble approach is a natural tool to forecast the probability of precipitation (POP). Classes can be defined for different thresholds of 2, 5, 10 and 25 mm of precipitation of 24 hour periods. Improving the resolution of the EPS models has resulted in improvement of the POP over Canadian stations. Results of this evaluation as compared to the operational deterministic model will be shown.

  9. Radio polarimetry of Galactic centre pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Eatough, R. P.; Ferrière, K.; Kramer, M.; Lee, K. J.; Noutsos, A.; Shannon, R. M.

    2016-04-01

    To study the strength and structure of the magnetic field in the Galactic centre (GC) we measured Faraday rotation of the radio emission of pulsars which are seen towards the GC. Three of these pulsars have the largest rotation measures (RMs) observed in any Galactic object with the exception of Sgr A⋆. Their large dispersion measures, RMs and the large RM variation between these pulsars and other known objects in the GC implies that the pulsars lie in the GC and are not merely seen in projection towards the GC. The large RMs of these pulsars indicate large line-of-sight magnetic field components between ˜ 16 - 33 μG; combined with recent model predictions for the strength of the magnetic field in the GC this implies that the large-scale magnetic field has a very small inclination angle with respect to the plane of the sky (˜ 12°). Foreground objects like the Radio Arc or possibly an ablated, ionized halo around the molecular cloud G0.11-0.11 could contribute to the large RMs of two of the pulsars. If these pulsars lie behind the Radio Arc or G0.11-0.11 then this proves that low-scattering corridors with lengths ≳ 100 pc must exist in the GC. This also suggests that future, sensitive observations will be able to detect additional pulsars in the GC. Finally, we show that the GC component in our most accurate electron density model oversimplifies structure in the GC.

  10. Optimizing revenue at a cosmetic surgery centre

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Joanna M; Verheyden, Charles N; Mahabir, Raman C

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The demand for cosmetic surgery and services has diminished with recent fluctuations in the economy. To stay ahead, surgeons must appreciate and attend to the fiscal challenges of private practice. A key component of practice economics is knowledge of the common methods of payment. OBJECTIVE: To review methods of payment in a five-surgeon group practice in central Texas, USA. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of the financial records of a cosmetic surgery centre in Texas was conducted. Data were collected for the five-year period from 2003 to 2008, and included the method of payment, the item purchased (product, service or surgery) and the dollar amount. RESULTS: More than 11,000 transactions were reviewed. The most common method of payment used for products and services was credit card, followed by check and cash. For procedures, the most common form of payment was personal check, followed by credit card and financing. Of the credit card purchases for both products and procedures, an overwhelming majority of patients (more than 75%) used either Visa (Visa Inc, USA) or MasterCard (MasterCard Worldwide, USA). If the amount of the individual transaction surpassed US$1,000, the most common method of payment transitioned from credit card to personal check. CONCLUSIONS: In an effort to maximize revenue, surgeons should consider limiting the credit cards accepted by the practice and encourage payment through personal check. PMID:22942656

  11. Digging the city

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, S.L.

    1996-02-01

    For city dwellers and commuters, major construction and repair projects by underground utilities have traditionally meant torn-up streets, detours, snarled traffic, flaring tempers and other urban headaches. For store and business owners, utility projects also have frequently been harmful to the bottom line. Customer parking often is curtailed and deliveries are missed because of street excavations, and business hours may even have to be cut because of interruptions in utility service. But natural gas utilities in major cities across the country are working hard to change that reality. Their effort has two major focuses: community-relations programs that anticipate problems and ease tensions between the utility and local residents and business owners, and new technologies that drastically limit the amount of excavation that needs to be done in repairing or replacing gas distribution lines. The paper describes a case study in the community-relations side of the equation which involved a recent project by Pacific Gas and Electric Co. (PG and E) in the congested streets of San Francisco`s famed Chinatown.

  12. Centre for Applied Language Research at the University of Southampton

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Robert; Hyde-Simon, Caroline

    2009-01-01

    The Centre for Applied Language Research at the University of Southampton is one of two research centres within the discipline of Modern Languages. Established in 2004, CALR now has more than 50 members, predominantly faculty members working in the School of Humanities/Modern Languages, as well as growing number of postgraduate researchers. The…

  13. Examination and Evaluation of Websites of Science Centres in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozdogan, Aykut Emre; Bozdogan, Kerem

    2016-01-01

    Science centres which have a considerable importance and functions in developed countries are intended to be popularized in Turkey. At this point considering the fact that the first contact between science centres and visitors is usually provided with websites, it is quite important that the content of these websites should be designed and…

  14. Vocational Centres in Fiji Schools: A Needs Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBeath, Clare

    2005-01-01

    A needs analysis was conducted into the issues facing the Technical and Vocational Education sector in Fiji. Vocational Centre teachers, Principals and an Education Officer were interviewed, and their responses analysed. The survey pointed to the difficulties currently experienced by the Vocational Centres in the face of poor facilities and…

  15. National Centre for Research on Rural Education. Report for 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Research on Rural Education, Nedlands (Western Australia).

    The Centre was originally funded in 1980 for three years to undertake research on major issues and problems in rural education, to publish and disseminate results, and to act as a source of advice to government and private authorities as well as communities. Funding for the Centre has been extended through 1985, and its activities continue to be…

  16. Is "Object-Centred Neglect" a Homogeneous Entity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gainotti, Guido; Ciaraffa, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    The nature of object-centred (allocentric) neglect and the possibility of dissociating it from egocentric (subject-centred) forms of neglect are controversial. Originally, allocentric neglect was described by and in patients who reproduced all the elements of a multi-object scene, but left unfinished the left side of one or more of them. More…

  17. Design Considerations for an Intensive Autism Treatment Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deochand, Neil; Conway, Alissa A.; Fuqua, R. Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) who display severe and challenging behaviour sometimes require centre-based intensive applied behaviour analysis (ABA) therapy to meet their health, safety and educational needs. Unfortunately, despite the need for centre-based treatment, there is a paucity of empirical research on building and…

  18. Recognizing a Centre of Excellence in Ontario's Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litwin, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    The term "Centre of Excellence" is increasingly used by Ontario's colleges with the expectation of portraying a superior level of proficiency, expertise, or investment in a particular academic discipline or program cluster. This paper proposes that the term Centre of Excellence should have a clearer definition so that when one of Ontario's…

  19. Leading an Effective Improvement and Development Programme for Children's Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weston, Gill; Tyler, Mary

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the process and achievements of leadership of an improvement and development programme for children's centres in the context of public value and Ofsted inspection. It analyses how the capacity has been developed of children's centre managers to work more strategically and collectively. Distributed leadership theory is applied…

  20. Girls' Groups and Boys' Groups at a Municipal Technology Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salminen-Karlsson, Minna

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the Swedish initiative of municipal technology centres from a gender point of view. These centres provide after-school technology education for children aged 6-16. By means of an ethnographic study, the effects of the use of single-sex groups in increasing the interest of girls and boys in technical activities have been…

  1. "Getting Practical" and the National Network of Science Learning Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Georgina; Langley, Mark; Skilling, Gus; Walker, John

    2011-01-01

    The national network of Science Learning Centres is a co-ordinating partner in the Getting Practical--Improving Practical Work in Science programme. The principle of training provision for the "Getting Practical" programme is a cascade model. Regional trainers employed by the national network of Science Learning Centres trained the cohort of local…

  2. Problems and Prospects of Education Resource Centres in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekanem, Johnson Efiong

    2015-01-01

    Nigeria has good policies on Education and one of such policies is the establishment of Education Resource Centres in every State of the Federation, including the Federal Capital Territory, Abuja. The need is clearly articulated in the National Policy on Education. Despite the lofty plan, most of the centres are not fulfilling the need for their…

  3. Investigating Teachers' Views of Student-Centred Learning Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seng, Ernest Lim Kok

    2014-01-01

    Conventional learning is based on low levels of students' participation where students are rarely expected to ask questions or to challenge the theories of the academic. A paradigm shift in curriculum has resulted in implementing student-centred learning (SCL) approach, putting students as the centre of the learning process. This mode of…

  4. Evaluation of the Training Centre Infrastructure Fund (TCIF). Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Training Centre Infrastructure Fund (TCIF) was initially announced in Budget 2004 and represented an immediate measure of the broader Workplace Skills Strategy. TCIF was a three-year $25 million pilot project, designed to address the growing need for union-employer training centres to replace aging equipment and simulators that were not up to…

  5. Opportunity Centred Learning: An Innovation in Enterprise Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rae, David

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes an approach called opportunity centred learning that has been developed by the author and applied in the field of enterprise education. The relationship between opportunity centred learning and existing theory and practice in learning and education is outlined in comparison with problem-based learning and action learning, and…

  6. Science Centres: A Resource for School and Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilo, Miranda; Mantero, Alfonso; Marasco, Antonella

    2011-01-01

    We present a science centre established in Genoa on an agreement between Municipality of Genoa and Department of Physics of University of Genoa. The aim is to offer children, young people and community an opportunity to approach science in a playful way. The centre staffs guide the visitors through the exhibits, attracting their interests towards…

  7. Child-Centred Inquiry Learning: How Mathematics Understanding Emerges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calder, Nigel; Brough, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines how mathematical understandings might emerge through student-centred inquiry. Data is drawn from a research project on student-centred curriculum integration that situated mathematics within authentic problem-solving contexts and involved students in collaboratively constructed curriculum. The project involved case studies in…

  8. National survey of the injury prevention activities of children's centres

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Michael C; Mulvaney, Caroline A; Kendrick, Denise; Stewart, Jane; Coupland, Carol; Hayes, Mike; Wynn, Persephone

    2014-01-01

    Children's centres were established across England to provide a range of services including early education, social care and health to pre-school children and their families. We surveyed children's centres to ascertain the activities they were undertaking to prevent unintentional injuries in the under fives. A postal questionnaire was sent to a sample of children's centre managers (n = 694). It included questions on current activities, knowledge and attitudes to injury prevention, health priorities and partnership working. Responses were received from 384 (56%) children's centres. Overall, 58% considered unintentional injury prevention to be one of the three main child health priorities for their centre. Over half the respondents (59%) did not know if there was an injury prevention group in their area, and 21% did not know if there was a home safety equipment scheme. Knowledge of how child injury deaths occur in the home was poor. Only 11% knew the major cause of injury deaths in children under five. Lack of both staff time and funding were seen as important barriers by children's centre staff to undertake injury prevention activities. Nearly all stated that training (97%) and assistance with planning injury prevention (94%) would be helpful to their centres. Children's centres need further support if they are to effectively tackle this important public health area. PMID:23837887

  9. Research Informed Science Enrichment Programs at the Gravity Discovery Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venville, Grady; Blair, David; Coward, David; Deshon, Fred; Gargano, Mark; Gondwe, Mzamose; Heary, Auriol; Longnecker, Nancy; Pitts, Marina; Zadnik, Marjan

    2012-01-01

    Excursions to museums and science centres generally are great fun for students and teachers. The potential educational benefits beyond enjoyment, however, are rarely realised or analysed for their efficacy. The purpose of this paper is to describe four educational enrichment programs delivered at the Gravity Discovery Centre (GDC), near Gingin,…

  10. Reducing cooling energy consumption in data centres and critical facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Gareth

    Given the rise of our everyday reliance on computers in all walks of life, from checking the train times to paying our credit card bills online, the need for computational power is ever increasing. Other than the ever-increasing performance of home Personal Computers (PC's) this reliance has given rise to a new phenomenon in the last 10 years ago. The data centre. Data centres contain vast arrays of IT cabinets loaded with servers that perform millions of computational equations every second. It is these data centres that allow us to continue with our reliance on the internet and the PC. As more and more data centres become necessary due to the increase in computing processing power required for the everyday activities we all take for granted so the energy consumed by these data centres rises. Not only are more and more data centres being constructed daily, but operators are also looking at ways to squeeze more processing from their existing data centres. This in turn leads to greater heat outputs and therefore requires more cooling. Cooling data centres requires a sizeable energy input, indeed to many megawatts per data centre site. Given the large amounts of money dependant on the successful operation of data centres, in particular for data centres operated by financial institutions, the onus is predominantly on ensuring the data centres operate with no technical glitches rather than in an energy conscious fashion. This report aims to investigate the ways and means of reducing energy consumption within data centres without compromising the technology the data centres are designed to house. As well as discussing the individual merits of the technologies and their implementation technical calculations will be undertaken where necessary to determine the levels of energy saving, if any, from each proposal. To enable comparison between each proposal any design calculations within this report will be undertaken against a notional data facility. This data facility will

  11. Barriers to senior centre implementation of falls prevention programmes.

    PubMed

    Zachary, Ciara; Casteel, Carri; Nocera, Maryalice; Runyan, Carol W

    2012-08-01

    This study examined the prevalence of senior centres providing multi-component falls prevention education and the perceived barriers in implementing this education. A telephone interview was conducted in 2006 with 500 senior centres nationwide. Centre directors were asked about the types of multi-component falls prevention education offered (ie, balance exercise classes, medication management, home safety information) and barriers to offering this education. Seventy percent of senior centres offered balance exercise classes, 68% offered medication management and 53% provided home safety information. Thirty-two percent offered all three components. Lack of staff, time and staff not feeling they had sufficient knowledge to deliver falls prevention education were the leading barriers to providing multi-component education. Senior centres provide components of effective falls prevention education and, while some may not address all components of a multifaceted programme, many have existing resources that may be adapted for translation of evidence-based programmes. PMID:22328631

  12. Policies for control of communicable disease in day care centres.

    PubMed Central

    Chouillet, A; Maguire, H; Kurtz, Z

    1992-01-01

    A survey was carried out to identify the availability and quality of guidelines for the prevention and control of communicable disease and procedures in use in child day care centres within the South West Thames Regional Health Authority. A sample of 50 day care centres was investigated including those funded by social services and privately funded day care centres. Policies for the prevention and control of communicable disease for children and staff showed a wide variation between different centres. Exclusion criteria were unclear especially in relation to carriers of the hepatitis B virus and HIV positive children. Channels for reporting and seeking advice were inconsistent. It is recommended that clear and up to date written guidelines on the prevention and control of communicable diseases should be available in all day care centres with clear indications of good practice and channels for reporting and advice. It is desirable that guidelines are agreed by the different health and local authorities throughout the region. PMID:1417054

  13. Highlighting High Performance: Twenty River Terrace, Battery Park City, New York, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2002-08-01

    Case study on high performance building features of the Twenty River Terrace, Battery Park City building. Breezes off the Hudson River waft through Battery Park City, a planned development of residential and commercial buildings and open space at the tip of lower Manhattan. A riverfront walkway and several connecting public parks sprinkled with public art flank Battery Park City on one side, and New York's busy financial district vibrates on the other. Construction continues on Battery Park's newest building, Twenty River Terrace, the first residential apartment building to embrace sustainable design in a systematic way, and the first to follow the Hugh L. Carey Battery Park City Authority Residential Environmental Guidelines. According to the guidelines, which all future Battery Park City development must follow, they ''establish a process for the creation of environmentally responsible residential buildings that are appreciably ahead of current standards and practices for development.'' As a result of the guidelines, and the architects' commitment to incorporating best practices, this 27-story apartment building operates 35% more efficiently than required by the New York State Energy Code, and generates some of its own electricity from building-integrated photovoltaics, especially in the summer when New York power plants struggle to keep up with air-conditioning demands. The Authority hopes the guidelines will be a good model for other developments, in Manhattan and across the world, for incorporating energy-efficient design and renewable energy. The principles of environmentally sound, people-centered planning and development addressed by Twenty River Terrace continue to be a focus of the redevelopment of lower Manhattan.

  14. Smart cities of the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batty, M.; Axhausen, K. W.; Giannotti, F.; Pozdnoukhov, A.; Bazzani, A.; Wachowicz, M.; Ouzounis, G.; Portugali, Y.

    2012-11-01

    Here we sketch the rudiments of what constitutes a smart city which we define as a city in which ICT is merged with traditional infrastructures, coordinated and integrated using new digital technologies. We first sketch our vision defining seven goals which concern: developing a new understanding of urban problems; effective and feasible ways to coordinate urban technologies; models and methods for using urban data across spatial and temporal scales; developing new technologies for communication and dissemination; developing new forms of urban governance and organisation; defining critical problems relating to cities, transport, and energy; and identifying risk, uncertainty, and hazards in the smart city. To this, we add six research challenges: to relate the infrastructure of smart cities to their operational functioning and planning through management, control and optimisation; to explore the notion of the city as a laboratory for innovation; to provide portfolios of urban simulation which inform future designs; to develop technologies that ensure equity, fairness and realise a better quality of city life; to develop technologies that ensure informed participation and create shared knowledge for democratic city governance; and to ensure greater and more effective mobility and access to opportunities for urban populations. We begin by defining the state of the art, explaining the science of smart cities. We define six scenarios based on new cities badging themselves as smart, older cities regenerating themselves as smart, the development of science parks, tech cities, and technopoles focused on high technologies, the development of urban services using contemporary ICT, the use of ICT to develop new urban intelligence functions, and the development of online and mobile forms of participation. Seven project areas are then proposed: Integrated Databases for the Smart City, Sensing, Networking and the Impact of New Social Media, Modelling Network Performance

  15. Big City Education: Its Challenge to Governance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskew, Laurence D.

    This chapter traces the migration from farms to cities and the later movement from cities to suburbs and discusses the impact of the resulting big city environment on the governance of big city education. The author (1) suggests how local, State, and Federal governments can improve big city education; (2) discusses ways of planning for the future…

  16. Kid-Friendly Cities Report Card, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polansky, Lee S., Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This report examines the health and wellbeing of children in the United States' largest cities, covering every city with a population of 100,000 or more, as well as the largest cities in states without any cities of this size. Research shows that many cities are becoming more child-friendly, with better access to good education, jobs, and health…

  17. Half a World Apart? Overlap in Nonbreeding Distributions of Atlantic and Indian Ocean Thin-Billed Prions

    PubMed Central

    Quillfeldt, Petra; Cherel, Yves; Masello, Juan F.; Delord, Karine; McGill, Rona A. R.; Furness, Robert W.; Moodley, Yoshan; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2015-01-01

    Distant populations of animals may share their non-breeding grounds or migrate to distinct areas, and this may have important consequences for population differentiation and dynamics. Small burrow-nesting seabirds provide a suitable case study, as they are often restricted to safe breeding sites on islands, resulting in a patchy breeding distribution. For example, Thin-billed prions Pachyptila belcheri have two major breeding colonies more than 8,000 km apart, on the Falkland Islands in the south-western Atlantic and in the Kerguelen Archipelago in the Indian Ocean. We used geolocators and stable isotopes to compare at-sea movements and trophic levels of these two populations during their non-breeding season, and applied ecological niche models to compare environmental conditions in the habitat. Over three winters, birds breeding in the Atlantic showed a high consistency in their migration routes. Most individuals migrated more than 3000 km eastwards, while very few remained over the Patagonian Shelf. In contrast, all Indian Ocean birds migrated westwards, resulting in an overlapping nonbreeding area in the eastern Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. Geolocators and isotopic signature of feathers indicated that prions from the Falklands moulted at slightly higher latitudes than those from Kerguelen Islands. All birds fed on low trophic level prey, most probably crustaceans. The phenology differed notably between the two populations. Falkland birds returned to the Patagonian Shelf after 2-3 months, while Kerguelen birds remained in the nonbreeding area for seven months, before returning to nesting grounds highly synchronously and at high speed. Habitat models identified sea surface temperature and chlorophyll a concentration as important environmental parameters. In summary, we show that even though the two very distant populations migrate to roughly the same area to moult, they have distinct wintering strategies: They had significantly different realized niches

  18. Indoor phthalate concentration in residential apartments in Chongqing, China: Implications for preschool children's exposure and risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Zhongming; Zhang, Yinping; Mmereki, Daniel; Yu, Wei; Li, Baizhan

    2016-02-01

    Six phthalates - dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), di(isobutyl) phthalate (DiBP), di(n-butyl) phthalate (DnBP), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBzP) and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) - in indoor gas-phase and dust samples were measured in thirty residential apartments for the first time in Chongqing, China. Monte-Carlo simulation was used to estimate preschool children's exposure via inhalation, non-dietary ingestion and dermal absorption based on gas-phase and dust concentrations. Risk assessment was evaluated by comparing the modeled exposure doses with child-specific benchmarks specified in California's Proposition 65. The detection frequency for all the targeted phthalates was more than 80% except for BBzP. DMP was the most predominant compound in the gas-phase (median = 0.91 μg/m3 and 0.82 μg/m3 in living rooms and bedrooms, respectively), and DEHP was the most predominant compound in the dust samples (median = 1543 μg/g and 1450 μg/g in living rooms and bedrooms, respectively). Correlation analysis suggests that indoor DiBP and DnBP might come from the same emission sources. The simulations showed that the median DEHP daily intake was 3.18-4.28 μg/day/kg-bw in all age groups, suggesting that it was the greatest of the targeted phthalates. The risk assessment indicated that the exposure doses of DnBP and DEHP exceeded the child-specific benchmarks in more than 90% of preschool children in Chongqing. Therefore, from a children's health perspective, efforts should focus on controlling indoor phthalate concentrations and exposures.

  19. Half a world apart? Overlap in nonbreeding distributions of Atlantic and Indian Ocean thin-billed prions.

    PubMed

    Quillfeldt, Petra; Cherel, Yves; Masello, Juan F; Delord, Karine; McGill, Rona A R; Furness, Robert W; Moodley, Yoshan; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2015-01-01

    Distant populations of animals may share their non-breeding grounds or migrate to distinct areas, and this may have important consequences for population differentiation and dynamics. Small burrow-nesting seabirds provide a suitable case study, as they are often restricted to safe breeding sites on islands, resulting in a patchy breeding distribution. For example, Thin-billed prions Pachyptila belcheri have two major breeding colonies more than 8,000 km apart, on the Falkland Islands in the south-western Atlantic and in the Kerguelen Archipelago in the Indian Ocean. We used geolocators and stable isotopes to compare at-sea movements and trophic levels of these two populations during their non-breeding season, and applied ecological niche models to compare environmental conditions in the habitat. Over three winters, birds breeding in the Atlantic showed a high consistency in their migration routes. Most individuals migrated more than 3000 km eastwards, while very few remained over the Patagonian Shelf. In contrast, all Indian Ocean birds migrated westwards, resulting in an overlapping nonbreeding area in the eastern Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. Geolocators and isotopic signature of feathers indicated that prions from the Falklands moulted at slightly higher latitudes than those from Kerguelen Islands. All birds fed on low trophic level prey, most probably crustaceans. The phenology differed notably between the two populations. Falkland birds returned to the Patagonian Shelf after 2-3 months, while Kerguelen birds remained in the nonbreeding area for seven months, before returning to nesting grounds highly synchronously and at high speed. Habitat models identified sea surface temperature and chlorophyll a concentration as important environmental parameters. In summary, we show that even though the two very distant populations migrate to roughly the same area to moult, they have distinct wintering strategies: They had significantly different realized niches

  20. Review of low-energy construction, air tightness, ventilation strategies and indoor radon: results from Finnish houses and apartments.

    PubMed

    Arvela, H; Holmgren, O; Reisbacka, H; Vinha, J

    2014-12-01

    Low-energy and passive house construction practices are characterised by increased insulation, high air tightness of the building shell and controlled mechanical ventilation with heat recovery. As a result of the interaction of mechanical ventilation and high air tightness, the pressure difference in a building can be markedly enhanced. This may lead to elevated indoor radon levels. Minor leakages in the foundation can affect the radon concentration, even in the case where such leaks do not markedly reduce the total air tightness. The potential for high pressures to affect indoor radon concentrations markedly increases when the air tightness ACH50, i.e. the air change per hour induced by a pressure difference of 50 Pa, is <1.0 h(-1). Pressure differences in Finnish low-rise residential houses having mechanical supply and exhaust ventilation with heat recovery (MSEV) are typically 2-3 Pa, clearly lower than the values of 5-9 Pa in houses with only mechanical exhaust ventilation (MEV). In MSEV houses, radon concentrations are typically 30% lower than in MEV houses. In new MSEV houses with an ACH50 of 0.6 h(-1), the limit for passive construction, the analytical estimates predict an increase of 100% in the radon concentration compared with older houses with an ACH50 of 4.0 h(-1). This poses a challenge for efficient radon prevention in new construction. Radon concentrations are typically 30% lower in houses with two storeys compared with only one storey. The introduction of an MSEV ventilation strategy in typically very airtight apartments has markedly reduced pressure differences and radon concentrations. PMID:24243314

  1. Indian aspects of drug information resources and impact of drug information centre on community

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Nitesh; Moin, Sabeeya; Pandey, Anushree; Mittal, Ashu; Bajaj, Umakant

    2013-01-01

    Drug information centre refer to facility specially set aside for, and specializing in the provision of drug information and related issues. The purpose of drug information center is to provide authentic individualized, accurate, relevant and unbiased drug information to the consumers and healthcare professionals regarding medication related inquiries to the nation for health care and drug safety aspects by answering their call regarding the all critical problems on drug information, their uses and their side effects. Apart from that the center also provides in-depth, impartial source of crucial drug information to meet the needs of the practicing physicians, pharmacists and other health care professionals to safeguard the health, financial and legal interests of the patient and to broaden the pharmacist role visible in the society and community. The service should include collecting, reviewing, evaluating, indexing and distributing information on drugs to health workers. Drug and poisons information centers are best established within major teaching hospitals. This allows access to clinical experience, libraries, research facilities and educational activities. Information present in the current paper will not only enlighten the role of drug information center but also focused on the rational use of drug. PMID:23833748

  2. Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake City at several venues within the city, in nearby cities, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This simulated natural color image presents a late spring view of north central Utah that includes all of the Olympic sites. The image extends from Ogden in the north, to Provo in the south; and includes the snow-capped Wasatch Mountains and the eastern part of the Great Salt Lake.

    This image was acquired on May 28, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution

  3. Hillary Clinton impressed by the Centre's work.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    In April 1994, US First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, her daughter Chelsea, the Bangladesh Minister for Women and Children's Affairs, and the US Ambassador to Bangladesh visited the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B). The First Lady remarked that ICDDR,B's research programs on health and family planning have many important lessons for the developing and developed regions alike. She noted the development successes in Bangladesh that can be applied in the US and other countries: the Grameen Bank, oral rehydration solution (ORS), and the community outreach programs for health and family planning services. The First Lady was especially interested in ORS and its cost-effectiveness. Most of the 220,000 children hospitalized each year in the US for severe gastrointestinal illness are treated with expensive intravenous (IV) drips (average cost = $2300), while a few ORS packets would be a small fraction of the cost. The average cost of treatment per patient at ICDDR,B was only $12. Patients receive care free of charge. Less than 0.6% of the patients die. The previous year, a USAID administrator asked ICDDR,B for its expertise in fighting cholera at the Rwandan refugee camps in Goma, Zaire. ICDDR,B staff developed diagnostic antisera for the new cholera strain responsible for the epidemic in the Americas, described its pathophysiology, and established its mode of transmission in surface waters. ICDDR,B also provides technical support to the national family planning and maternal and child health programs. In the Matlab, ICDDR,B's work has contributed to a high contraceptive prevalence rate of more than 64% among poor and largely illiterate persons. PMID:12289844

  4. The "magic" of tutorial centres in Hong Kong: An analysis of media marketing and pedagogy in a tutorial centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Aaron

    2014-12-01

    Why do more than three-quarters of Hong Kong's senior secondary students flock to tutorial centres like moths to light? What is the "magic" that is driving the popularity of the tutorial centre enterprise? Indeed, looking at the ongoing boom of tutorial centres in Hong Kong (there are almost 1,000 of them), it is difficult not to ask these questions. This paper examines the phenomenon of tutorial centres in Hong Kong and seeks to understand what draws students to these centres. Combining theories of marketing semiotics and emotion studies, the author investigates the pivotal role of media marketing in generating the "magic" of tutorial centres, whose advertising strategy includes, for example, a display of billboard posters featuring stylishly-dressed "celebrity teachers". The author reviews some of the literature available on the subject of tutorial centres. In a case study approach, he then maps out the pedagogy he observed in an English tutorial class, seeking heuristic insights into the kind of teaching students in the study were looking for. He argues that part of the "magical" attraction of what are essentially "cram schools" is their formulaic pedagogy of teaching and reinforcing exam skills. Finally, the paper considers the social implications of the tutorial centre industry in terms of media marketing of education and unequal access to tutorial services.

  5. Rediscovering the Teacher within Indian Child-Centred Pedagogy: Implications for the Global Child-Centred Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smail, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The Child-Centred Approach (CCA) is increasingly promoted within India and internationally as a response to the challenge of delivering quality education. From identifying and examining Indian indigenous and global concepts of CCA within traditional and contemporary child-centred pedagogic discourse, this paper reveals the complexities of…

  6. Student-Centred and Teacher-Centred Learning Environment in Pre-Vocational Secondary Education: Psychological Needs, and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smit, Karin; de Brabander, Cornelis J.; Martens, Rob L.

    2014-01-01

    In this study the perception of psychological needs and motivation in a student-centred and a teacher-centred learning environment are compared, using Self Determination Theory as a framework. The self-report Intrinsic Motivation Inventory was completed by 230 students (mean age 16.1 years) in pre-vocational secondary education. School records on…

  7. The Repositioning of Language Centres: An Appreciation of David Ingram's "Language Centres--Their Roles, Functions and Management"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussex, Roland

    2004-01-01

    David Ingram's "Language Centres" (2001) offers a descriptive and analytical study of meta-centres, their constitution, operation and engagement with their constituencies. This article is a combination of a review and an appreciation of Ingram's study, and--benefiting from the latitude offered by the genre of the review article--a set of…

  8. Critiquing Child-Centred Pedagogy to Bring Children and Early Childhood Educators into the Centre of a Democratic Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langford, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Child-centred pedagogy is both an enduring approach and a revered concept in Western-based teacher preparation. This article weaves together major critiques of child-centred pedagogy that draw on critical feminist, postmodernist and post-structural theories. These critiques have particular relevance for conceptualizing what it can mean to be, and…

  9. The coupled social-hydrology of Bangalore city, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muddu, S.; Mehta, V. K.; Malghan, D.; Kemp-Benedict, E.

    2012-12-01

    modeling provides a distinction in impacts in different parts of the city. Increasing groundwater tables are modeled in the centre of the city, driven by leakage through water supply and sewerage pipes. Away from the center of the city, domestic water extraction seemed to show a decreasing water table, but the magnitudes are small. It is possible that higher industrial sector pumping in the outer areas of the city might drive water tables deeper in those areas. The paper concludes with recommendations towards improving the knowledge base on Bangalore's groundwater status and dynamics, including the importance of systematic collection of groundwater depths, and water extraction data from all sectors and all sources. A household survey currently in progress will provide a comprehensive water demand function for the first time, filling in one of the major knowledge gaps.

  10. City Planning Unit: Grade 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, William Edward

    Described is a project designed to make government lessons and economics more appealing to sixth-grade students by having them set up and run a model city. General preparation procedures and set-up of the project, specific lesson plans, additional activities, and project evaluation are examined. An actual 3-dimensional model city was set up on…

  11. Chicago, Illinois: The Windy City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Phyllis

    2008-01-01

    Once famous mainly for stockyards and steel mills, Chicago now boasts more top-rated five-star restaurants than any other city in the United States and has been voted by various publications as one of the "Top 10 U.S. Destinations," one of the "Best Walking Cities" in the United States, and one of the "Ten Best Places to…

  12. Social Planning for Small Cities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, James

    Derived mainly from publications by the League of California Cities, this guide to social planning for small cities presents the following: (1) social planning definitions; (2) a checklist of social planning concerns (provision for: adequate income and economic opportunity; optimal environmental conditions for basic material needs; optimal health…

  13. Knowledge Infrastructures for Solar Cities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderburg, Willem H.

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of contemporary cities into solar cities will be affected by the decisions of countless specialists according to an established intellectual and professional division of labor. These specialists belong to groups responsible for advancing and applying a body of knowledge, and jointly, these bodies of knowledge make up a knowledge…

  14. Educating Cities in Latin America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messina, Graciela; Valdés-Cotera, Raúl

    2013-01-01

    This article considers the development of educating cities from a political perspective, illustrating in detail the diversity of organisations and individuals involved and the challenges they are facing. Bearing in mind that educating cities were established from the 1990s onwards in Europe and spread to other continents from there, the purpose of…

  15. New York City: Musically Speaking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiex, Nola Kortner

    New York City as a subject has fascinated generations of artists, writers, and musicians. However, the glamorous image of the city has changed over the years, and in the 1960s, popular music, in particular, began to reflect a utopia/dystopia dichotomy in relation to New York. During the past twenty years, six popular singer-songwriters who have…

  16. "Learning City" Summer Migrant Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presson, Johnny E.; Baker, Wilbur L.

    "Learning City" is the theme of a summer education project that provides a unique teaching atmosphere for migrant children. For 2 summers, 130 students have participated in this program that sustains and enforces reading and math skills, as well as helps develop self-concept. Industries in Learning City are the various branches of study: reading…

  17. CHED Events: Salt Lake City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wink, Donald J.

    2009-03-01

    The Division of Chemical Education (CHED) Committee meetings planned for the Spring 2009 ACS Meeting in Salt Lake City will be in the Marriott City Center Hotel. Check the location of other CHED events, the CHED Social Event, the Undergraduate Program, Sci-Mix, etc. because many will be in the Salt Palace Convention Center.

  18. Educating cities in Latin America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Graciela; Valdés-Cotera, Raúl

    2013-09-01

    This article considers the development of educating cities from a political perspective, illustrating in detail the diversity of organisations and individuals involved and the challenges they are facing. Bearing in mind that educating cities were established from the 1990s onwards in Europe and spread to other continents from there, the purpose of this article is to demonstrate how this proposal was adopted in Latin America. After discussing the basic aims of educating cities, the paper focuses on the Latin American experience, giving examples of existing projects within the educating cities initiative. The authors are particularly interested in the contrast between the political intentions of educating cities on the one hand and the social, economic, political and cultural world on the other hand. They observe that in this context there is a danger of the individual being forgotten, which contradicts the actual intention of the educating city concept. They also discuss the problem of who should carry out the realisation of educating cities and how the various stakeholders might coordinate their actions. Contemplating new directions at the end of their paper, the authors sum up a number of guidelines and offer recommendations for action in developing educating cities.

  19. Archaeoastronomy and Calendar Cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campion, Nicholas

    2016-02-01

    The use of astronomy for collective purposes, both religious and political, is apparent in the earliest astronomical records, from the evidence for Palaeolithic lunar calendars to megalithic monuments and Mesopotamian celestial-omen reports. This paper will consider the application of the heavens to the organisation of the ‘Cosmic State’, the human polity modelled on the assumption of a close relationship between society on the one hand and planetary and stellar patterns on the other. I will also examine the foundation of Baghdad within the tradition of celestial town planning and argue that the city may be seen as a ‘talisman’, designed to connect heaven to Earth and ensure peace, stability and political success by harmonising time and space.

  20. Planetario Habana: A Cultural Centre For Science And Technology In A Developing Nation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Oscar

    2006-08-01

    Astronomical education in Cuba is not widespread in the educational system; nevertheless the public interest in sciences in general but particularly in Astronomy issues is very high as it has become reflected by the attention paid to educational and scientific program broadcasts in the national television channels. The "Planetario Habana" Cultural Centre for Science and Technology under construction is aimed at guiding the interest towards basic sciences and astronomical formation of the people, in the most populated and frequented area of the country. A key objective of this project shall be serving as an instructive motivation and entertainment for the casual or habitual visitors to these facilities, offering them the possibility to enjoy vivid representations, play with interactive amusement equipments and listen to instructive presentations on astronomy and related sciences, all guided by qualified specialists. Another fundamental purpose shall be the establishment of a plan for educational complementation in coordination with schools in order to allow children and young people to participate in activities enabling them to get into the fascinating world of Astronomy, Exploration of Outer Space and Life as Cosmic Phenomenon. The setting up of the Planetario Habana Cultural Centre for Science and Technology under the general administration of the Office of the Historian of the City of Havana, and methodologically lead by the Ministry of Science Technology and Environment, showing in function the GOTO Planetarium G Cuba custom obtained under a Japanese Cultural Grant Aid, shall develop into a nonpareil pole in the national environment for the scientific outreach and education of these sciences. Surrounded by the attractiveness of the colonial "ambience", it shall become a centre for dissemination of information about new discoveries and scientific programs developed at national and international level. Here we present a general view of the project, its present and

  1. Stand Together or Apart: A Thematic Unit for "The Chocolate War" by Robert Cormier and "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yinger, Lisa

    This thematic unit is all about what a classic novel about race relations in the 1930s American South, "To Kill a Mockingbird," and a frequently banned contemporary teen story about a candy sale, "The Chocolate War," have in common. The unit considers what people have in common, what it means to stand apart, and what individuals do when forced to…

  2. The Igbo People of Nigeria as Seen Through "Things Fall Apart" by Chinua Achebe. An Instructional Unit for Tenth Grade English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Odessa B.

    This teaching guide is intended to aid tenth grade English classroom teachers as they develop and implement educational programs on the Igbo-speaking people of Nigeria. The source material for this unit is "Things Fall Apart," by Chinua Achebe. The guide is a product of an interdisciplinary summer workshop for teachers on development of…

  3. Building America Case Study: Apartment Compartmentalization with an Aerosol-Based Sealing Process - Queens, NY; Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-01

    Air sealing of building enclosures is a difficult and time-consuming process. Current methods in new construction require laborers to physically locate small and sometimes large holes in multiple assemblies and then manually seal each of them. The innovation demonstrated under this research study was the automated air sealing and compartmentalization of buildings through the use of an aerosolized sealant, developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at University of California Davis.
    CARB sought to demonstrate this new technology application in a multifamily building in Queens, NY. The effectiveness of the sealing process was evaluated by three methods: air leakage testing of overall apartment before and after sealing, point-source testing of individual leaks, and pressure measurements in the walls of the target apartment during sealing. Aerosolized sealing was successful by several measures in this study. Many individual leaks that are labor-intensive to address separately were well sealed by the aerosol particles. In addition, many diffuse leaks that are difficult to identify and treat were also sealed. The aerosol-based sealing process resulted in an average reduction of 71% in air leakage across three apartments and an average apartment airtightness of 0.08 CFM50/SF of enclosure area.

  4. Native NIR-emitting single colour centres in CVD diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatto Monticone, D.; Traina, P.; Moreva, E.; Forneris, J.; Olivero, P.; Degiovanni, I. P.; Taccetti, F.; Giuntini, L.; Brida, G.; Amato, G.; Genovese, M.

    2014-05-01

    Single-photon sources are a fundamental element for developing quantum technologies, and sources based on colour centres in diamonds are among the most promising candidates. The well-known nitrogen vacancy centres are characterized by several limitations, and thus few other defects have recently been considered. In the present work, we characterize, in detail, native efficient single colour centres emitting in the near infra-red (λ = 740-780 nm) in both standard IIa single-crystal and electronic-grade polycrystalline commercial chemical vapour deposited (CVD) diamond samples. In the former case, a high-temperature (T > 1000 °C) annealing process in vacuum is necessary to induce the formation/activation of luminescent centres with good emission properties, while in the latter case the annealing process has marginally beneficial effects on the number and performance of native centres in commercially available samples. Although displaying significant variability in several photo-physical properties (emission wavelength, emission rate instabilities, saturation behaviours), these centres generally display appealing photophysical properties for applications as single photon sources: short lifetimes (0.7-3 ns), high emission rates (˜50-500 × 103 photons s-1) and strongly (>95%) polarized light. The native centres are tentatively attributed to impurities incorporated in the diamond crystal during the CVD growth of high-quality type-IIa samples, and offer promising perspectives in diamond-based photonics.

  5. Photosystem II reaction centre quenching: mechanisms and physiological role.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Alexander G; Sane, Prafullachandra V; Hurry, Vaughan; Oquist, Gunnar; Huner, Norman P A

    2008-01-01

    Dissipation of excess absorbed light energy in eukaryotic photoautotrophs through zeaxanthin- and DeltapH-dependent photosystem II antenna quenching is considered the major mechanism for non-photochemical quenching and photoprotection. However, there is mounting evidence of a zeaxanthin-independent pathway for dissipation of excess light energy based within the PSII reaction centre that may also play a significant role in photoprotection. We summarize recent reports which indicate that this enigma can be explained, in part, by the fact that PSII reaction centres can be reversibly interconverted from photochemical energy transducers that convert light into ATP and NADPH to efficient, non-photochemical energy quenchers that protect the photosynthetic apparatus from photodamage. In our opinion, reaction centre quenching complements photoprotection through antenna quenching, and dynamic regulation of photosystem II reaction centre represents a general response to any environmental condition that predisposes the accumulation of reduced Q(A) in the photosystem II reaction centres of prokaryotic and eukaryotic photoautotrophs. Since the evolution of reaction centres preceded the evolution of light harvesting systems, reaction centre quenching may represent the oldest photoprotective mechanism. PMID:18821028

  6. Healthy Cities: a guide to the literature.

    PubMed Central

    Kenzer, M

    2000-01-01

    The author reviews the literature on attempts by city governments, international agencies, and nongovernmental and community organizations to improve city life around the world through Healthy Cities projects. PMID:10968770

  7. The Death Throes of Ocean Core Complexes: Examples from the Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheadle, M. J.; John, B. E.; German, C. R.; Kusznir, N. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre (MCSC) is an ultraslow (full rate 15-17 mm/yr) mid-ocean ridge that is located within the Cayman Trough, at the boundary between the North American and Caribbean plates. It is 110km long, and at ~6km below sea level, is the deepest spreading centre in the world. In the Summer of 2011, during NOAA EX 1104, the RV Okeanos Explorer collected high resolution (50m) Simrad EM302 multibeam bathymetry, and high-resolution video using the ROV Little Hercules ,which together provide insight into the evolution (from birth to death) of oceanic core complexes (OCCs). The MCSC exhibits bathymetry typical of slow spreading, magmatically deficient, ridges with thick lithosphere. It has both well-developed OCCs with ~15km of detachment fault offset and smaller offset (6-7km) normal faults forming >40km long linear ridges. Mass wasting is conspicuous. The MCSC is flanked on both sides by three oceanic core complexes: i) the now inactive, Mount Emms to the northeast, ii) the near-recently active Mount Dent in the west centre of the axial valley, and iii) the decapitated Mount Hudson on the south east flank. Together these massifs show different stages of OCC termination. Mount Emms lies approximately 2Ma off axis, is the oldest of the OCCs, and is heavily dissected by faulting and mass wasting. Mount Hudson is terminated by a west dipping high angle normal fault, with 1.6km throw and was initially rifted apart ~0.5Ma. A recently active axial volcanic ridge (AVR) with ROV observed pahoehoe lava forms, and a line of conical volcanic edifices lie within the rifted remains at the toe of the OCC. In contrast, Mount Dent was the most recently active, but is now in the very initial stages of being rifted apart by the presently active AVR that currently intersects the OCC. Incipient high angle normal faults that lie along strike of the AVR cut the dome of Mount Dent, and host the active von Damm hydrothermal system. Mount Dent also shows excess (>1km) uplift

  8. PROC: a new Planetary Radars Operating Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catallo, C.; Alberti, G.; Flamini, E.; Olivieri, A.; Orosei, R.

    2009-12-01

    Planetary exploration by means of radar systems, mainly using Ground Penetrating Radars (GPR) is an important role of Italy and numerous scientific international space programs are carried out jointly with ESA and NASA by Italian Space Agency, the scientific community and the industry. Actually three important experiments under Italian leadership ( designed and manufactured by the Italian industry) provided by ASI within a NASA/ESA/ASI joint venture framework are operating in the frame of an extended missions : MARSIS on-board Mars Express, SHARAD on-board Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and CASSINI Radar on-board Cassini spacecraft. Three dedicated operational centers, namely SHOC, (Sharad Operating Centre), MOC (Marsis Operating Center) and CASSINI PAD are operating from the starting of the missions in order In order to support all the scientific communities, institutional customers and experiment teams operation Each center is dedicated to a single instrument management and control, data processing and distribution and even if they had been conceived to operate autonomously and independently one from each other, synergies and overlaps have been envisaged leading to the suggestion of a unified center, the Planetary Radar Processing Center (PROC). In order to harmonize operations either from logistics point of view and from HW/SW capabilities point of view PROC is designed and developed for offering improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and exploitation. PROC is, therefore, conceived as the Italian support facility to the scientific community for on-going and future Italian planetary exploration programs, such as Europa-Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) The paper describes how PROC is designed and developed, to allow SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD to operate as before, and to offer improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and

  9. Visualization in a Climate Computing Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier-Fleischer, Karin; Röber, Niklas; Böttinger, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Today, the extensive numerical simulations of climate models require elaborate visualization for understanding and communicating the results. Typical data sets of climate models are 3-dimensional, multivariate and time dependent, and can hence be very large. Interactive visual data analysis improves and accelerates the comprehension of these vast amounts of data. At DKRZ, the German Climate Computing Centre, a central high end visualization server, various domain specific visualization applications, and a remote 3D rendering solution enable users to interactively visualize their extensive model results right at their desktops. The DKRZ's visualization server is a heterogeneous Linux cluster, currently consisting of 10 state of the art visualization nodes equipped with 96 -256 GB RAM and high end NVidia GPUs. Since the parallel file system of the DKRZ's supercomputer is directly mounted over a powerful network, the model data can directly be analyzed and visualized. VirtualGL and TurboVNC are used for utilizing the server's GPUs for 3D rendering, while the TurboVNC client on the user's local computer continuously displays the resulting video stream. By using this central visualization server instead of a local computer, three main benefits are achieved: Time consuming transfers of large data sets from the supercomputer to the local computer are not needed. The hardware of the user's local workstation doesn't need to be powerful, no expensive GPU is required. Users don't have to install or buy visualization software. On the visualization server, a wide range of visualization software is installed. Avizo Green, a powerful commercial software customized for interactive 3D visualization of climate model data, is available, as well as SimVis and ParaView, which focus more on an exploratory visualization of data. SimVis and ParaView provide techniques like Linking & Brushing to emphasize or de-emphasize portions of the data. Furthermore, some domain specific 2D graphics

  10. L'asthme allergique au centre tunisien

    PubMed Central

    Joobeur, Samah; Mhamed, Saousen Cheikh; Saad, Ahmed Ben; Mribah, Hathami; Dekhil, Asma; Rouatbi, Naceur; El Kamel, Ali

    2015-01-01

    L'asthme allergique pose un réel problème de santé publique vu sa prévalence et son coût de prise en charge élevés. Etudier le profil clinique, fonctionnel respiratoire, allergologique, thérapeutique et évolutif de l'asthme allergique dans une région du centre tunisien. Etude rétrospective portant sur 1132 dossiers de patients porteurs d'asthme allergique suivis dans le service de pneumologie et d'allergologie à l'hôpital de Monastir (Tunisie). L’âge moyen est de 27 ± 12,5 ans. 61,1% des patients sont âgés entre 16 et 39 ans. Une prédominance féminine est notée (56,7%). L'identification de l'allergène en cause s'est basée essentiellement sur les tests cutanés allergologiques (99,4%). Les principaux pneumallergènes identifiés sont les acariens (91,2%), suivis par les pollens (22,8%) et les phanères des animaux (12%). La classification selon la sévérité a conclu à un asthme intermittent à persistant léger chez 87.1% de nos patients. Le traitement s'est basé essentiellement sur la corticothérapie inhalée (67,6%). L'asthme dans notre étude a été jugé contrôlé dans 68,3% des cas, partiellement contrôlé dans 24,8% et non contrôlé dans 6,9% des cas. L'asthme allergique est une affection répandue qui touche essentiellement le sujet jeune en pleine activité. Une prise en charge adéquate permet de contrôler la maladie et de réduire ses répercussions sur le patient et la collectivité. PMID:26097637

  11. An enhanced Planetary Radar Operating Centre (PROC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catallo, C.

    2010-12-01

    Planetary exploration by means of radar systems, mainly using GPRs is an important role of Italy and numerous scientific international space programs are carried out jointly with ESA and NASA by Italian Space Agency, the scientific community and the industry. Three experiments under Italian leadership ( designed and manufactured by the Italian industry) provided by ASI within a NASA/ESA/ASI joint venture framework are successfully operating: MARSIS on-board MEX, SHARAD on-board MRO and CASSINI Radar on-board Cassini spacecraft: the missions have been further extended . Three dedicated operational centers, namely SHOC, (Sharad Operating Centre), MOC (Marsis Operating Center) and CASSINI PAD are operating from the missions beginning to support all the scientific communities, institutional customers and experiment teams operation Each center is dedicated to a single instrument management and control, data processing and distribution and even if they had been conceived to operate autonomously and independently one from each other, synergies and overlaps have been envisaged leading to the suggestion of a unified center, the Planetary Radar Processing Center (PROC). In order to harmonize operations either from logistics point of view and from HW/SW capabilities point of view PROC is designed and developed for offering improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and exploitation. PROC is, therefore, conceived as the Italian support facility to the scientific community for on-going and future Italian planetary exploration programs, such as Europa-Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) The paper describes how the new PROC is designed and developed, to allow SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD to operate as before, and to offer improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and exploitation aiding scientists to increase their knowledge in the field of surface

  12. The Managua Graben and Las Sierras-Masaya volcanic complex (Nicaragua); pull-apart localization by an intrusive complex: results from analogue modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, Guillaume; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin

    2005-06-01

    There is a well-documented association between pull-apart basins in strike-slip zones and large volcanic caldera complexes. Las Sierras-Masaya volcanic complex, Nicaragua, is a large basaltic lava and ignimbrite shield with nested calderas. The widest caldera is partly underlain by a large and dense intrusive complex, evidenced by a positive gravity anomaly. The Las Sierras Caldera, relating to this cumulate complex, is less than 30,000 years old and is probably still hot and ductile. The inner Masaya Caldera hosts an active magmatic system. The volcanic complex is in a dextral transtensional tectonic context of the Nicaraguan Depression. The highly active Managua Graben is on the northern part of the volcano. We speculate that the graben and volcano are linked tectonically, with the graben initiating in response of a regional stress field modified around the dense, ductile intrusive complex. Previous field work and reappraisal of structures with digital elevation model morphological analysis show that the volcano is surrounded by a rhombic fault pattern that may form a nascent pull-apart basin. We have done scaled analogue models to test the effect of intrusion density and rheology anomalies on strike-slip fault geometries. The models show that intrusion density variations alone do not significantly change fault patterns. In contrast, ductile rocks (silicone in the models as analogue for hot mafic intrusive rocks) markedly alter strike-slip fault patterns. In transtension the presence of a ductile intrusion causes the formation of a pull-apart, while in pure strike-slip or transpression, uplift and thrusting is generated. Pull-apart and uplift structures are rhomb-shaped even when the ductile inclusion is circular. We conclude that a pull-apart is developing at Las Sierras-Masaya volcanic complex in response to the transtensive regional deformation regime and the dense, ductile intrusive complex. We suggest that the volcano and graben are one dynamic system and

  13. Staff concerns in heroin-assisted treatment centres.

    PubMed

    Demaret, I; Lemaître, A; Ansseau, M

    2012-08-01

    Heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) is a solution for improving the condition of treatment-resistant heroin addicts. Since 1994, six randomized controlled trials have concluded that HAT is more efficacious than oral methadone for severe heroin addicts. We visited seven HAT treatment centres in four countries in order to observe diacetylmorphine (DAM) administration and to study the main concerns of the staff. Nurses were concerned by the risk taken if a previously intoxicated patient received his dose of DAM. Another concern was the smuggling of DAM doses. The HAT centres face a dilemma: treating patients while at the same time allowing their risky street habits in the centre. PMID:22074590

  14. [The role of diabetes convention centres in Belgium].

    PubMed

    Nobels, F; Scheen, A J

    2005-01-01

    We briefly present the modes of functioning of Diabetes Convention Centres in Belgium. In those hospital centres, patients with both type 1 or type 2 diabetes, treated by at least two insulin injections per day, benefit of an intensive educational programme by a multidisciplinary team and receive free of charge material for home blood glucose monitoring, in order to optimize diabetes management. The collaboration between convention centres and general practitioners should be reinforced (share-care), especially to improve the management of type 2 diabetic patients, who are increasingly treated with various insulin regimens. PMID:16035339

  15. Dementia and the person-centred care approach.

    PubMed

    McGreevy, Jessica

    2015-10-01

    Approaches to care that focus solely on biomedical needs are still rife in dementia; however, a person-centred approach is emerging that focuses on 'seeing the person'. This article explores the literature on person-centred dementia care to determine if it is an ideal rather than a reality. The background to the development of person-centred care is presented with reference to policies in place in the UK. Using the setting of long-term care, the journey of people with dementia is explored at diagnosis, living well and end of life. PMID:26402212

  16. Soil investigation in cities of West Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidló, A.; Szżcs, P.; Horváth, A.; Kámán, O.; Németh, E.

    2012-04-01

    The antropogene effects have an influence on the environment since the flow of materials and energy is continuous and mutual. In order to investigate the soil properly we have collected samples from sample spots in three West Hungarian cities (Sopron, Szombathely and Székesfehévár). The soil samples were taken from 0-10 and 10-20 cms depth in each city within a standard network and also at industrial territories. The number of the sampling spots were between 104 and 144, depending on the size of the city and the problematic places in town. We have noted the GPS-coordinates of the point, the elevation over sea level, the date of collecting, the type of the urban area, the information about land usage, vegetation, grass covering, the type of cover and the origin of soil. We described the following characters of soil: the borderline between two layers, the amount of humus, the structure, the compactness, the root system, the skeletal percent, the color, the physical assortment, the separated element and the soil defect. We measured the soil samples in laboratory according to the following parameters: acidity (pHH2O, pHKCl), lime content, hidrolitical and exchange acidity, amount of exchangeable cation, the humus content, the total nitrogen content, the ammonium-lactat-acetous acid (AL) solvent potassium and phosphorus content, the KCl solvent magnesium and calcium content, the strength of ethylene-diamin-tetra-acetous (EDTA) and diethylene-triamin-penta-acetous (DTPA) measurements of manganese, copper, zinc and iron element, as well as the particle size distribution. The results of field and laboratory investigation are represented in a GIS system. We attempted to draw a conclusion in connection with the condition, contamination and history of contamination of soil. The results showed that there is close connection between the soil parameters and geological conditions. However, this connection shows a decrease in the centre of the city. The acidity and calcic soils

  17. Summer ammonia measurements in a densely populated Mediterranean city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandolfi, M.; Amato, F.; Reche, C.; Alastuey, A.; Otjes, R. P.; Blom, M. J.; Querol, X.

    2012-04-01

    Real-time measurements of ambient concentrations of gas-phase ammonia were performed in Barcelona (NE Spain) in summer between May and September 2011. Two measurement sites were selected: one in an urban background traffic-influenced area (UB) and the other in the historical city centre (CC). Levels of ammonia were higher at CC (5.6 ± 2.1 μg m-3 or 7.5 ± 2.8 ppbv) compared with UB (2.2 ± 1.0 μg m-3 or 2.9 ± 1.3 ppbv). This difference is attributed to the contribution from non-traffic sources such as waste containers, sewage systems, humans and open markets more dense in the densely populated historical city centre. Under high temperatures in summer these sources had the potential to increase the ambient levels of ammonia well above the urban-background-traffic-influenced UB measurement station. Measurements were used to assess major local emissions, sinks and diurnal evolution of NH3. The measured levels of NH3, especially high in the old city, may contribute to the high mean annual concentrations of secondary sulfate and nitrate measured in Barcelona compared with other cities in Spain affected by high traffic intensity. Ancillary measurements, including PM10, PM2.5, PM1 levels (Particulate Matter with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 10 μm, 2.5 μm, and 1 μm), gases and black carbon concentrations and meteorological data, were performed during the measurement campaign. The analysis of specific periods (3 special cases) during the campaign revealed that road traffic was a significant source of NH3. However, its effect was more evident at UB compared with CC where it was masked given the high levels of NH3 from non-traffic sources measured in the old city. The relationship between SO42- daily concentrations and gas-fraction ammonia (NH3/(NH3+NH4+)) revealed that the gas-to-phase partitioning (volatilization or ammonium salts formation) also played an important role in the evolution of NH3 concentration in summer in Barcelona.

  18. Summer ammonia measurements in a densely populated Mediterranean city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandolfi, M.; Amato, F.; Reche, C.; Alastuey, A.; Otjes, R. P.; Blom, M. J.; Querol, X.

    2012-08-01

    Real-time measurements of ambient concentrations of gas-phase ammonia (NH3) were performed in Barcelona (NE Spain) in summer between May and September 2011. Two measurement sites were selected: one in an urban background traffic-influenced area (UB) and the other in the historical city centre (CC). Levels of NH3 were higher at CC (5.6 ± 2.1 μg m-3 or 7.5 ± 2.8 ppbv) compared with UB (2.2 ± 1.0 μg m-3 or 2.9 ± 1.3 ppbv). This difference is attributed to the contribution from non-traffic sources such as waste containers, sewage systems, humans and open markets more dense in the densely populated historical city centre. Under high temperatures in summer these sources had the potential to increase the ambient levels of NH3 well above the urban-background-traffic-influenced UB measurement station. Measurements were used to assess major local emissions, sinks and diurnal evolution of NH3. The measured levels of NH3, especially high in the old city, may contribute to the high mean annual concentrations of secondary sulfate and nitrate measured in Barcelona compared with other cities in Spain affected by high traffic intensity. Ancillary measurements, including PM10, PM2.5, PM1 levels (Particulate Matter with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 10 μm, 2.5 μm, and 1 μm), gases and black carbon concentrations and meteorological data, were performed during the measurement campaign. The analysis of specific periods (3 special cases) during the campaign revealed that road traffic was a significant source of NH3. However, its effect was more evident at UB compared with CC where it was masked given the high levels of NH3 from non-traffic sources measured in the old city. The relationship between SO42- daily concentrations and gas-fraction ammonia (NH3/(NH3 + NH4+)) revealed that the gas-to-particle phase partitioning (volatilization or ammonium salts formation) also played an important role in the evolution of NH3 concentration in summer in Barcelona.

  19. Strengthening patient-centred communication in rural Ugandan health centres: A theory-driven evaluation within a cluster randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Nayiga, Susan; DiLiberto, Deborah; Taaka, Lilian; Nabirye, Christine; Haaland, Ane; Staedke, Sarah G.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a theory-driven evaluation of one component of an intervention to improve the quality of health care at Ugandan public health centres. Patient-centred services have been advocated widely, but such approaches have received little attention in Africa. A cluster randomized trial is evaluating population-level outcomes of an intervention with multiple components, including ‘patient-centred services.’ A process evaluation was designed within this trial to articulate and evaluate the implementation and programme theories of the intervention. This article evaluates one hypothesized mechanism of change within the programme theory: the impact of the Patient Centred Services component on health-worker communication. The theory-driven approach extended to evaluation of the outcome measures. The study found that the proximal outcome of patient-centred communication was rated 10 percent higher (p < 0.008) by care seekers consulting with the health workers who were at the intervention health centres compared with those at control health centres. This finding will strengthen interpretation of more distal trial outcomes. PMID:25983612

  20. The ecological future of cities.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Mark J; MacGregor-Fors, Ian

    2016-05-20

    The discipline of urban ecology arose in the 1990s, primarily motivated by a widespread interest in documenting the distribution and abundance of animals and plants in cities. Today, urban ecologists have greatly expanded their scope of study to include ecological and socioeconomic processes, urban management, planning, and design, with the goal of addressing issues of sustainability, environmental quality, and human well-being within cities and towns. As the global pace of urbanization continues to intensify, urban ecology provides the ecological and social data, as well as the principles, concepts and tools, to create livable cities. PMID:27199416