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Sample records for city general hospital

  1. Hospital Waste Management in Nonteaching Hospitals of Lucknow City, India

    PubMed Central

    Manar, Manish Kumar; Sahu, Krishna Kumar; Singh, Shivendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess hospital waste management in nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow city. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted on the staffs of nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow from September 2012 to March 2013. A total of eight hospitals were chosen as the study sample size. Simple random sampling technique was used for the selection of the nonteaching hospitals. A pre-structured and pre-tested interview questionnaire was used to collect necessary information regarding the hospitals and biomedical waste (BMW) management of the hospitals. The general information about the selected hospitals/employees of the hospitals was collected. Results: Mean hospital waste generated in the eight nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow was 0.56 kg/bed/day. About 50.5% of the hospitals did not have BMW department and colored dustbins. In 37.5% of the hospitals, there were no BMW records and segregation at source. Incinerator was used only by hospital A for treatment of BMW. Hospital G and hospital H had no facilities for BMW treatment. Conclusion: There is a need for appropriate training of staffs, strict implementation of rules, and continuous surveillance of the hospitals of Lucknow to improve the BMW management and handling practices. PMID:25657950

  2. 26. 'CITY HOSPITAL, BLACKWELL'S ISLAND.' (Source: New York City Department ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. 'CITY HOSPITAL, BLACKWELL'S ISLAND.' (Source: New York City Department of Public Finance, Real Estate Owned by the City of New York under Jurisdiction of the Department of Public Charities, 1909.) - Island Hospital, Roosevelt Island, New York County, NY

  3. The general NFP hospital model.

    PubMed

    Al-Amin, Mona

    2012-01-01

    Throughout the past 30 years, there has been a lot of controversy surrounding the proliferation of new forms of health care delivery organizations that challenge and compete with general NFP community hospitals. Traditionally, the health care system in the United States has been dominated by general NFP (NFP) voluntary hospitals. With the number of for-profit general hospitals, physician-owned specialty hospitals, and ambulatory surgical centers increasing, a question arises: “Why is the general NFP community hospital the dominant model?” In order to address this question, this paper reexamines the history of the hospital industry. By understanding how the “general NFP hospital” model emerged and dominated, we attempt to explain the current dominance of general NFP hospitals in the ever changing hospital industry in the United States. PMID:22324062

  4. Management of pericardial effusion by drainage: a survey of 10 years' experience in a city centre general hospital serving a multiracial population

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, C.; Watson, R.; Singh, S.; Lip, G.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the aetiology of large and symptomatic pericardial effusions and to review the management and subsequent outcome. A survey was done on a consecutive cases of patients who had undergone percutaneous pericardiocentesis over a 10 year period in a city centre general hospital serving a multiethnic catchment population. In all, 46 patients (24 male, 22 female; age range 16 to 90 years, mean 54 years) underwent a total of 51 pericardial drainage procedures (or attempted pericardiocentesis) between 1989 and 1998. Malignancy (44%), tuberculosis (26%), idiopathic (11%), and post-cardiac surgery (9%) were the most common causes of pericardial effusion. The most common presenting symptoms were breathlessness (90%), chest pain (74%), cough (70%), abdominal pain (61%) (presumed to be related to hepatic congestion), and unexplained fever (28%). In the 12 cases of tuberculous pericarditis, nine occurred in patients of Indo-Asian origin, and three in patients of Afro-Caribbean origin. Fever, night sweats, and weight loss were common among these patients, occurring in over 80% of cases of tuberculous pericarditis. Pulsus paradoxus was the most specific sign (100%) for the presence of echocardiographic features of tamponade, with strongest positive predictive value (100%). Although malignancy remains the most common cause in developed countries, tuberculous disease should be considered in patients from areas where tuberculosis is endemic. Percutaneous pericardiocentesis remains an effective measure for the immediate relief of symptoms in patients with cardiac tamponade, although its diagnostic yield in tuberculous pericarditis is relatively low.


Keywords: tuberculosis; pericardial effusions; percutaneous pericardiocentesis PMID:11085787

  5. [General coordination of hospital activity].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Paz; Serra, José Antonio

    2005-03-01

    The present article describes the organizational and general coordination measures taken by the hospital management to attend the 325 victims who arrived at our hospital after the terrorist attack on the morning of 11 March. Firstly, we summarize the activity performed by the extra-hospital emergency services and the distribution of the victims in centers. Secondly, we describe in greater detail the interventions performed to initiate the External Emergency Action Plan in our hospital, the triage system and identification of patients who used it, as well as the resources in terms of beds, operating rooms and personnel that were used on that day. Lastly, by way of discussion, we provide a critical analysis of our interventions. PMID:15771833

  6. Epsom General Hospital orthopaedic theatre.

    PubMed

    1992-11-01

    The Surrey Section of the London Branch held a very successful meeting on Wednesday 9th September 1992 at which Mr Stephen Kirby BSc, CEng, Director of Estates, gave a talk and tour of the new Private Ward Unit and Ultra Clean Ventilation Theatre at Epsom General Hospital. The new Northey Ward, is a result of the refurbishment of what was a 31 bed section of the Hospital Surgical Block on the 5th floor. The new Ward provides a total of 18 single bed Wards, each complete with bathroom/WC, the Unit also accommodates a 5 bed Day Ward. All the facilities provided are of extremely high standard, which given the very tight building programme, detailed elsewhere, is indicative of the dedication of both the Designers and Contractors who are congratulated on their achievement. With regard to the UCV Theatre the following information was prepared by Aidan Hardy who is a Project Engineer with Epsom General Hospital. We are delighted to be able to print this report for our readers. PMID:10122458

  7. 25. 'VIEW OF CITY HOSPITAL DISTRICT, BLACKWELL'S ISLAND, FROM MANHATTAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. 'VIEW OF CITY HOSPITAL DISTRICT, BLACKWELL'S ISLAND, FROM MANHATTAN SHORE.' (Source: New York City Department of Public Finance, Real Estate Owned by the City of New York Under Jurisdiction of the Department of Public Charities, 1909.) - Island Hospital, Roosevelt Island, New York County, NY

  8. [Family and psychiatric hospitalization in a general hospital].

    PubMed

    de Mello, Rita Mello; Schneider, Jacó Fernando

    2011-06-01

    This study aims to identify the reasons that lead relatives to hospitalize patients in a psychiatric unit of a general hospital. It is a qualitative study based on Alfred Schutz' phenomenological sociology. Fourteen relatives, each with one family member hospitalized, were interviewed from August to October 2009. The guiding question of the phenomenological interview was "What do you expect from psychiatric hospitalization in a general hospital?". Phenomenological sociology was used to understand and interpret the interviews. Statements showed three concrete categories, that lead to the reasons for: treatment guidelines and continuity; prospects for improvement; ideas about normality. This research shows the experiences of relatives, contributing with mental health professionals' reflection about their actions and about the involvement of families in a general hospital's psychiatric unit. PMID:21987981

  9. Examining General Hospitals' Smoke-Free Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitman, Marilyn V.; Harbison, Phillip Adam

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the level of smoke-free policies in general hospitals and the barriers faced in implementing restrictive policies banning smoking inside buildings and on surrounding grounds. Design/methodology/approach; A survey was developed to gather data on hospitals' current smoke-free policies, including the challenges…

  10. General Practice Teaching--Within the Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drury, M.

    1976-01-01

    A program of integrated teaching by consultants and general practitioners is described. The teaching took place in the hospitals used for the purpose by the Medical Faculty of the University of Birmingham. (Author)

  11. Appropriateness of hospital admissions in general hospitals in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Al-Tehewy, M; Shehad, E; Al Gaafary, M; Al-Houssiny, M; Nabih, D; Salem, B

    2009-01-01

    We measured the rate of inappropriate admissions, and associated factors, in 3 general hospitals in Egypt. A total of 1191 admissions were reviewed using the Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol for adult patients and the Pediatric Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol for paediatric patients. Inappropriate admissions were 66.3% and 78.9% of admissions in the surgery departments of 2 hospitals compared with 1.9% in the 3rd hospital that followed a specific admission protocol for elective surgery. The paediatrics department had the lowest rates of inappropriate admissions in all hospitals (0%, 1.0% and 1.9%). On logistic regression analysis, the route of admission was the only factor significantly associated with inappropriate admissions in the departments of surgery, obstetrics/gynaecology and internal medicine. PMID:20214126

  12. 3. General view of site from Lawrence General Hospital parking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. General view of site from Lawrence General Hospital parking deck (former location of coating mill) showing north side of structures; view to southeast. - Champion-International Paper Company, West bank of Spicket River at Canal Street, Lawrence, Essex County, MA

  13. Psychiatric disorder in the general hospital.

    PubMed

    Mayou, R; Hawton, K

    1986-08-01

    There have been many reports of psychiatric disorder in medical populations, but few have used standard methods on representative patient groups. Even so, there is consistent evidence for considerable psychiatric morbidity in in-patient, out-patient and casualty department populations, much of which is unrecognised by hospital doctors. We require a better classification of psychiatric disorder in the general hospital, improved research measures, and more evidence about the nature and course of the many different types of problem so that we can provide precise advice for their management of routine clinical practice. PMID:3535978

  14. Psychiatric inpatient services in general hospitals.

    PubMed

    HUME, P B; RUDIN, E

    1960-10-01

    Traditional asylum care of psychiatric patients leads to the isolation, confinement, and restraint of the patients, and to isolation of psychiatric practice from the rest of medicine. Modern psychiatric advances have demonstrated the disadvantages to both patients and their families of such isolation, confinement and restraint. It is in the best interests of patients and professional workers that inpatient psychiatric services be continuous with, and contiguous to, other medical services and to rehabilitation services of all kinds. Examination of currently available information reveals a shortage of psychiatric beds in California, particularly for diagnosis and brief treatment. Thus, not only is there a need to develop psychiatric inpatient facilities, but also an opportunity to develop them along several different lines. Since both the Hill-Burton Act (federal) and the Short-Doyle Act (state) give financial assistance to only those psychiatric services established in general hospitals or affiliated with general hospitals, this requirement calls for examination in the light of experience with services so operated. At first, the Short-Doyle Act was perceived as a panacea for the psychiatric ills of the state. Now it is beginning to be recognized as one method of providing additional mental health resources, rather than the exclusive method. As more short-term cases are treated in local, tax-supported, psychiatric units in general hospitals, an impact can be expected on the state hospital program. In its administration of the Short-Doyle Act, the Department of Mental Hygiene attempts to respond to community needs as locally determined. It tries to insure local option and encourage local responsibility while furthering high standards of staffing and of service. PMID:13716797

  15. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF ENTRANCE INTO ALUMINUM CITY TERRACE ALONG ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF ENTRANCE INTO ALUMINUM CITY TERRACE ALONG EAST HILL DRIVE. BUILDING 1 ON RIGHT, BUILDING 2 ON LEFT, FACING EAST. - Aluminum City Terrace, East Hill Drive, New Kensington, Westmoreland County, PA

  16. 20. West Elevation and Section, Ward 'K', Letterman General Hospital, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. West Elevation and Section, Ward 'K', Letterman General Hospital, Presidio of San Francisco, Cal. Sheet No. 2. May 1917. BUILDING 1049. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 12, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  17. 19. First and Second Floors. Ward 'K', Letterman General Hospital, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. First and Second Floors. Ward 'K', Letterman General Hospital, Presidio of San Francisco, Cal. Sheet No. 1. May 1917. BUILDING 1049. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 12, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  18. Changes in HIV-related hospitalizations during the HAART era in an inner-city hospital.

    PubMed

    Pulvirenti, Joseph; Muppidi, Uma; Glowacki, Robert; Cristofano, Michael; Baker, Laurie

    2007-08-01

    We evaluated admissions of HIV-positive persons to an inner-city hospital from 2000 to 2005. There was a decline in the number of substance abusers, homeless persons, injection drug abusers, and African Americans, and there was an increase in patients older than 50 years. There were no significant changes in CD4 counts or in utilization of highly active antiretroviral therapy,m but there were more admissions of persons with HIV RNA levels less than 1000 copies/mL, internal medicine problems, cancers, and skin infections. Changes in the demographics of this patient population may reflect external factors (eg, gentrification of low-income housing areas, opening of a new hospital). Lower viral loads suggest better response in those on a highly active antiretroviral regimen, and changes in diagnoses leading to hospitalization may reflect the aging of the HIV population. PMID:17717882

  19. Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of Building No. 516, East of corridor connecting Building No. 511 to Building No. 515, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  20. 3. GENERAL VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST; CITY OF CHICAGO CENTRAL OFFICE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. GENERAL VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST; CITY OF CHICAGO CENTRAL OFFICE BUILDING (1913) TO THE RIGHT - Chicago River Bascule Bridge, Clarke Street, Spanning Chicago River at Clarke Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  1. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF NORTH END; CITY OF CHICAGO CENTRAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF NORTH END; CITY OF CHICAGO CENTRAL OFFICE BUILDING (1913) SEEN IN CENTER - Chicago River Bascule Bridge, LaSalle Street, Spanning Chicago River at North LaSalle Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  2. Out of the frying pan: New York City hospitals in an age of deregulation.

    PubMed

    Salit, Sharon; Fass, Steven; Nowak, Mark

    2002-01-01

    For several decades New York City hospitals had been distinguished by their tightly regulated environment, chronically weak finances, high occupancy rates, teaching intensity, dependency on public payers, low managed care penetration, and minimal merger activity. Then in the late 1990s a rapid convergence of forces--the Balanced Budget Act, managed care growth, state deregulation of commercial rates, escalating costs, and plunging hospital occupancy rates--threw the city's hospital industry into turmoil. In this paper we describe this period of turbulent change that has left most of the city's safety-net and small community hospitals near bankruptcy. PMID:11900065

  3. [Experience in liver transplantation (1996-2011) at the UMAE, General Hospital Gaudencio González Garza, National Medical Center La Raza, Mexican Institute of Social Security, Mexico City, D.F].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Domínguez, José Mariano; Holm-Corzo, Alberto; Santos-Caballero, Marlene; Porras-Ramos, Miguel Angel; Gómez-Casanova, Pedro; Pérez-Molina, Lorenzo; Villaseñor-Colín, César; Muñiz-Toledo, Vérulo; López-Sánchez, Héctor; Hernández-Becerril, Hector; Espinosa-González, Alfonso; Martínez-Jiménez, Oscar; Torres-Amaya, Mario; D'ector-Lira, Dulce; Medina-Ramírez, Marino; Sanabria-Trujillo, Giovanni; Villafuerte-Muñoz, Gloria; Alanís-Jacobo, Verenice; Rocha-Avila, Gustavo; Zaldívar-Cervera, Jaime

    2011-09-01

    We present the experience of General Hospital CMN La Raza from 1996 to 2011. In this period, we have made 40 liver transplants in adults and 22 pediatric liver transplants. A 100% of adult population received a graft from deceased donor; while in the pediatric age group, 60% were from deceased donor and 40% from living donor. The long-term follow-up is shown only for adult group due to lack of data in the pediatric group. The mean age for the adult group is 42 years old and 4.5 years for the pediatric group. The main indications for liver transplantation in adults were: cirrhosis due to chronic hepatitis C in 47.5% and cirrhosis due to alcohol abuse in 15% of the group. In the pediatric group was more likely the biliary atresia (60%) as an indication for liver transplantation followed by fulminant hepatitis (15%). We show the evolution of the hepatectomy's technique in the adult group: it was initially using conventional technique and later it changed to preservation of cava vein (Piggy Back). In the same way, the reconstruction of the bile-duct was initially made using a T-tube stenting and currently, we use end to end bile-duct reconstruction. The patient's survival at 1, 5, and 10 years was 41.5, 27.2, and 13.6%, respectively; with a median of global survival of 6.2 months. Long-term patient's survival has improved after 2004 compared to previous period. PMID:22916613

  4. [High-quality hospital discharge summaries - general practitioners expectations].

    PubMed

    Bally, Klaus; Lingenhel, Sabine; Tschudi, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Hospital discharge summaries ensure treatment continuity after hospital discharge. In Switzerland discharge letters are a celebrated custom and a tool for training young colleagues. The primary purpose is to guarantee high-quality care of patients treated by hospital staff and general practitioners. From the perspective of the patient's general practitioner discharge summaries should convey current and accurate medically important patient data to the physician responsible for follow-up care. In the era of highly developed electronic data transfer and introduction of diagnose related groups (DRGs), it will be necessary to transmit hospital discharge information selectively to different target groups. Nevertheless data protection and medical secret must be complied with. PMID:22198930

  5. East and north sides. Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    East and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of Building No. 516, East of corridor connecting Building No. 511 to Building No. 515, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  6. North side. Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of Building No. 516, East of corridor connecting Building No. 511 to Building No. 515, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  7. East and north sides of building Fitzsimons General Hospital, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    East and north sides of building - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Golf Course Waiting Shelter, Southwest area of Golf Course, 700 feet Northeast of intersection of West Harlow Avenue & Peoria Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  8. A system dynamics approach for hospital waste management in a city in a developing country: the case of Nablus, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Al-Khatib, Issam A; Eleyan, Derar; Garfield, Joy

    2016-09-01

    Hospitals and health centers provide a variety of healthcare services and normally generate hazardous waste as well as general waste. General waste has a similar nature to that of municipal solid waste and therefore could be disposed of in municipal landfills. However, hazardous waste poses risks to public health, unless it is properly managed. The hospital waste management system encompasses many factors, i.e., number of beds, number of employees, level of service, population, birth rate, fertility rate, and not in my back yard (NIMBY) syndrome. Therefore, this management system requires a comprehensive analysis to determine the role of each factor and its influence on the whole system. In this research, a hospital waste management simulation model is presented based on the system dynamics technique to determine the interaction among these factors in the system using a software package, ithink. This model is used to estimate waste segregation as this is important in the hospital waste management system to minimize risk to public health. Real data has been obtained from a case study of the city of Nablus, Palestine to validate the model. The model exhibits wastes generated from three types of hospitals (private, charitable, and government) by considering the number of both inpatients and outpatients depending on the population of the city under study. The model also offers the facility to compare the total waste generated among these different types of hospitals and anticipate and predict the future generated waste both infectious and non-infectious and the treatment cost incurred. PMID:27488196

  9. Grade pending: lessons for hospital quality reporting from the New York City restaurant sanitation inspection program.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Andrew M; Detsky, Allan S

    2015-02-01

    Public quality reporting programs have been widely implemented in hospitals in an effort to improve quality and safety. One such program is Hospital Compare, Medicare's national quality reporting program for US hospitals. The New York City sanitary grade inspection program is a parallel effort for restaurants. The aims of Hospital Compare and the New York City sanitary inspection program are fundamentally similar: to address a common market failure resulting from consumers' lack of information on quality and safety. However, by displaying easily understandable information at the point of service, the New York City sanitary inspection program is better designed to encourage informed consumer decision making. We argue that this program holds important lessons for public quality reporting of US hospitals. PMID:25425498

  10. Guide to Choosing a Hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... the following and more: • Find hospitals by name, city, county, state, or ZIP code. • Check the results ... by the hospital name, or by ZIP Code, City, State or Territory, or County. • Select General Search, ...

  11. General Surgery Programs in Small Rural New York State Hospitals: A Pilot Survey of Hospital Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuckerman, Randall; Doty, Brit; Gold, Michael; Bordley, James; Dietz, Patrick; Jenkins, Paul; Heneghan, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Context: Hospitals play a central role in small rural communities and are frequently one of the major contributors to the local economy. Surgical services often account for a substantial proportion of hospital revenues. The current shortage of general surgeons practicing in rural communities may further threaten the financial viability of rural…

  12. Evaluation of Patient Safety Indicators in Semnan City Hospitals by Using the Patient Safety Friendly Hospital Initiative (PSFHI)

    PubMed Central

    Babamohamadi, Hassan; Nemati, Roghayeh Khabiri; Nobahar, Monir; Keighobady, Seifullah; Ghazavi, Soheila; Izadi-Sabet, Farideh; Najafpour, Zhila

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, patient safety issue is among one of the main concerns of the hospital policy worldwide. This study aimed to evaluate the patient safety status in hospitals affiliated to Semnan city, using the WHO model for Patient Safety Friendly Hospital Initiatives (PSFHI) in summer 2014. Methods: That was a cross sectional descriptive study that addressed patient safety, which explained the current status of safety in the Semnan hospitals using by instrument of Patient safety friendly initiative standards (PSFHI). Data was collected from 5 hospitals in Semnan city during four weeks in May 2014. Results: The finding of 5 areas examined showed that some components in critical standards had disadvantages. Critical standards of hospitals including areas of leadership and administration, patient and public involvement and safe evidence-based clinical practice, safe environment with and lifetime education in a safe and secure environment were analyzed. The domain of patient and public involvement obtained the lowest mean score and the domain of safe environment obtained the highest mean score in the surveyed hospitals. Conclusion: All the surveyed hospitals had a poor condition regarding standards based on patient safety. Further, the identified weak points are almost the same in the hospitals. Therefore, In order to achieve a good level of all aspects of the protocol, the goals should be considered in the level of strategic planning at hospitals. An effective execution of patient safety creatively may depend on the legal infrastructure and enforcement of standards by hospital management, organizational liability to expectation of patients, safety culture in hospitals. PMID:27045391

  13. 34. August, 1971. PHOTOCOPY: GENERAL VIEW OF CITY OF MERCUR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. August, 1971. PHOTOCOPY: GENERAL VIEW OF CITY OF MERCUR CA. 1910 (THIS HISTORIC VIEW IS TAKEN FROM A PUBLICATION BY UTAH POWER & LIGHT CO. CREDIT REQUESTED TO COMPANY.). (SEE UT-10-2 FOR PRESENT DAY VIEW). - DeLamar Mercur Mines Company, Golden Gate Mill, Ophir, Tooele County, UT

  14. General surgery at rural Tennessee hospitals: a survey of rural Tennessee hospital administrators.

    PubMed

    Cofer, Joseph B; Petros, Tommy J; Burkholder, Hans C; Clarke, P Chris

    2011-07-01

    Rural communities face an impending surgical workforce crisis. The purpose of this study is to describe perceptions of rural Tennessee hospital administrators regarding the importance of surgical services to their hospitals. In collaboration with the Tennessee Hospital Association, we developed and administered a 13-item survey based on a recently published national survey to 80 rural Tennessee hospitals in August 2008. A total of 29 responses were received for an overall 36.3 per cent response rate. Over 44 per cent of rural surgeons were older than 50 years of age, and 27.6 per cent of hospitals reported they would lose at least one surgeon in the next 2 years. The responding hospitals reported losing 10.4 per cent of their surgical workforce in the preceding 2 years. Over 53 per cent were actively recruiting a general surgeon with an average time to recruit a surgeon of 11.8 months. Ninety-seven per cent stated that having a surgical program was very important to their financial viability with the mean and median reported revenue generated by a single general surgeon being $1.8 million and $1.4 million, respectively. Almost 11 per cent of the hospitals stated they would have to close if they lost surgical services. Although rural Tennessee hospitals face similar difficulties to national rural hospitals with regard to retaining and hiring surgeons, slightly more Tennessee hospitals (54 vs 36%) were actively attempting to recruit a general surgeon. The shortage of general surgeons is a threat to the accessibility of comprehensive hospital-based care for rural Tennesseans. PMID:21944341

  15. A STUDY OF PROBLEM DRINKERS IN A GENERAL HOSPITAL

    PubMed Central

    Babu, R. Sateesh; Sengupta, S.N.

    1997-01-01

    349 new admissions in the wards of Medicine, General Surgery & Orthopedics in a general hospital were screened with MAST & AUDIT for problem use of alcohol. Problem drinking was present in 14.6% of the inpatients. The severity and the need for additional treatment were measured with Addiction Severity Index (ASI). Majority of the patients had problems in more than one ar?a. Nevertheless, only one fourth of the patients were referred for psychiatric treatment. The findings indicate the need to develop services towards the recognition and referrals of the problem drinkers in general hospitals PMID:21584037

  16. Psychiatry and the general hospital in an age of uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    LIPSITT, DON R

    2003-01-01

    General hospitals have had an illustrious role in the evolution of psychiatry. They have provided a rich soil for the growth of inpatient psychiatric units, consultation-liaison psychiatry, psychosomatic medicine, med-psych units, outpatient psychiatric clinics, emergency services and a whole spectrum of resources for the communities in which they dwell. In some respects, whether attached to universities or not, they have functioned as small colleges for the education and training of scores of health professionals. In the setting of the general hospital, psychiatry has had opportunities to become remedicalized and integrated into the mainstream of medicine. However, recent trends in health care run the risk of jeopardizing these accomplishments. Managed care has had a profound impact on the way psychiatry is practiced, taught, and reimbursed. Concerns about cost-containment have raised questions about whether the general hospital will remain the best and most economical setting for psychiatric services. If the primacy of the patient is lost, psychiatry's role in the general hospital will be uncertain. The need to safeguard psychiatry's achievements must be a worldwide endeavor. PMID:16946901

  17. Primary Supervision: Massachusetts General Hospital's child and adolescent psychiatry seminar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jellinek, Michael S.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes "Primary Supervision", a seminar he has led for approximately 20 years, which is designed for the entire class of nine first-year residents in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry training at Massachusetts General Hospital. The seminar meets for 1 hour each week throughout the first year. Through 900 hours of…

  18. [Evaluation of customer satisfaction with the hospital catering system in the city of Palermo (Italy)].

    PubMed

    Firenze, Alberto; Morici, Mariagrazia; Calamus, Giuseppe; Gelsomino, Viviana; Aprea, Luigi; Di Benedetto, Antonino; Muangala, Muana A Luila; Centineo, Giovanni; Romano, Nino

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate patients' customer satisfaction with the hospital catering services of two public hospitals and one private sector hospital in the city of Palermo (Italy). A multiple choice questionnaire was administered by face-to-face interview to 207 of 227 hospitalized patients. Positive responses regarding the perceived quality of food were given especially by patients of the private sector hospital, 80% of which reported being satisfied with the catering service. A higher percentage of patients in the private sector hospital were satisfied with the food distribution modalities with respect to the two public hospitals. Only 3% of patients in the private sector hospital required their families to bring food from home, with respect to 7.9% and 30% respectively in the two public hospitals. Private sector patients also reported appreciating the wide availability of food and the help given by health care workers (79% vs a mean of 55% in the two public hospitals). No differences were found amongst hospitals with regards to the hygienic characteristics of meals. The results of this study indicate the need to make changes in the management of the catering service of one of the involved public hospitals especially. PMID:19494921

  19. [Clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of acute diarrhea in adults at a hospital from Cordoba city].

    PubMed

    Polo Friz, H; Toloza, S; Acosta, H; Toloza, C; Unsain, F; Marconetto, G; Massanet, P; Canova, S; Celli, J; Abdala, O; Gandini, B

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the clinical and epidemiologic presentation features of adult acute diarrhea in a general hospital form Córdoba City. All the patients older than 14 years old who assisted to the Hospital Nacional de Clínicas Central Guard for acute diarrhea, during the periods: A (15-12-89 to 15-03-90), B (15-12-93 to 15-03-94) and C (15-12-94 to 15-03-95), were included. 594 patients were studied: 337 female (56.7%) and 257 male, 143 in the period A, 250 in B and 201 in C. The means +/- SD age was 34.6 +/- 13.3 and stool loose per day at admission 7.3 +/- 4.7. Eighty six percent of patients presented liquid consistent stool, 89.6% abdominal pain, 44.7% vomiting and 18.8% bloody stools. The rate of patients who consulted Central Guard referring acute diarrhea increased from period A (2.4%) to B (3.61%); p = 0.002 and decreased form B to C (2.85%); p = 0.01. The mean (+/- SD) days transcurred from the beginning of diarrhea episode till consultation was 3.5 +/- 2.7; 2.7 +/- 2.3 y 2.9 +/- 3.5 in the periods A, B and C respectively, statistically significant difference between A and B, p < 0.01. Thirty six percent, 21.1% and 23.1% of patients presented mucus with their stools in the periods A, B and C (p = 0.01), and high temperature 61.1%, 48.1% and 48.5% respectively (p = 0.04). Twenty seven percent of stools samples cultures became positive in the periods A, 17.6% in B and 11.5% in C, statistically significant difference between A and C; p = 0.008. The results show that in a general hospital from Córdoba City the adult acute diarrhea is a frequent cause of consult. In the last years there were modifications in its clinical an epidemiologic presentation features. PMID:10436614

  20. Hospital morbidity in a medium-sized city: differentials between men and women

    PubMed Central

    de Arruda, Guilherme Oliveira; Molena-Fernandes, Carlos Alexandre; Mathias, Thais Aidar de Freitas; Marcon, Sonia Silva

    2014-01-01

    Objective characterize the hospital morbidity of adults living in the city of Maringá, PR, Brazil, between 2000 and 2011, focusing on the differential between men and women. Method this descriptive study was developed based on data from the Hospital Information System of the Unified Health System in order to investigate the association between groups of hospitalization causes and the average length of hospitalization per gender, in three-year periods. Results the main groups of hospitalization causes for men were: mental disorders, lesions and circulatory diseases; and, among women: tumors, circulatory and genitourinary diseases. Mental disorders and lesions, tumors, circulatory and genitourinary diseases were significantly associated with the female and male genders across the study period. Although not significant, the mean length of hospitalization dropped across the four three-year periods, and only showed a significant difference between men and women in the second triennium. Conclusion differences in the hospital morbidity profile between men and women underline the need for specific health and nursing actions, especially in primary health care, with a view to reducing hospitalizations due to the main groups of causes in the city. PMID:24553699

  1. Comparative Quality Indicators for Hospital Choice: Do General Practitioners Care?

    PubMed Central

    Ferrua, Marie; Sicotte, Claude; Lalloué, Benoît; Minvielle, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Context The strategy of publicly reporting quality indicators is being widely promoted through public policies as a way to make health care delivery more efficient. Objective To assess general practitioners’ (GPs) use of the comparative hospital quality indicators made available by public services and the media, as well as GPs’ perceptions of their qualities and usefulness. Method A telephone survey of a random sample representing all self-employed GPs in private practice in France. Results A large majority (84.1%–88.5%) of respondents (n = 503; response rate of 56%) reported that they never used public comparative indicators, available in the mass media or on government and non-government Internet sites, to influence their patients’ hospital choices. The vast majority of GPs rely mostly on traditional sources of information when choosing a hospital. At the same time, this study highlights favourable opinions shared by a large proportion of GPs regarding several aspects of hospital quality indicators, such as their good qualities and usefulness for other purposes. In sum, the results show that GPs make very limited use of hospital quality indicators based on a consumer choice paradigm but, at the same time, see them as useful in ways corresponding more to the usual professional paradigms, including as a means to improve quality of care. PMID:26840429

  2. Effect of introduction of colposcopy into a district general hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Pill, C. F.; Letchworth, A. T.; Noble, A. D.

    1984-01-01

    Management of cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia, in a district general hospital, was examined for two 22-month periods before and after the introduction of colposcopy. This technique enables the clinician to evaluate the extent and severity of pre-malignant change, and makes treatment, using less radical destructive techniques, possible. The method of conservative treatment in this hospital was diathermy, and the cure rate of cases so treated was 97%. The use of diathermy treatment resulted in a 75% reduction in the incidence of cone biopsy in women below the age of 40 years. A further advantage of colposcopy has been recognized, which is that some women with "mild or moderate changes" are discovered to have more severe lesions, and receive appropriate treatment without delay. It follows that all patients with an abnormal smear should be referred for colposcopy, unless there is an obvious local cause of the abnormality, such as easily treatable infection, and that the post-treatment smear reverts to normal. In this hospital the cost of establishing a colposcopic service was low, and the cost benefits, as well as the improved management of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia suggests that the service should be introduced in all district general hospitals. PMID:6462994

  3. GENERAL VIEW LOOKING EAST, CITY FARM LANE OVERPASS OVER THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW LOOKING EAST, CITY FARM LANE OVERPASS OVER THE CONRAIL (RIGHT) AND CSX (LEFT) RIGHT OF WAYS. STRUCTURES IN FRONT OF TRESTLE INCLUDE (LEFT TO RIGHT): STOREHOUSE, CONSTRUCTION WAREHOUSE AND "HOLE IN THE WALL" (ARCH OPENING AT RIGHT). BEHIND BRIDGE ARE: MACHINE SHOP NO. 2, VERTICAL FURNACE BUILDING, AND PIT FURNACES OF THE STRUCTURAL MILL. STACKS OF THE CARRIE FURNACE CAN BE SEEN ACROSS THE RIVER AT RIGHT REAR. - U.S. Steel Homestead Works, Along Monongahela River, north of Eighth Avenue, Homestead, Allegheny County, PA

  4. Comparative Investigation of Health Literacy Level of Cardiovascular Patients Hospitalized in Private and Educational Hospitals of Kerman City, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Malekzadeh, Sajedeh; Azami, Mohammad; Mirzaei, Moghadameh; Motamedi, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: literacy involves a complex set of abilities to understand and use symbolic systems of a culture for personal development and social development in a diverse set of skills required as an adult to exercise behavior are considered in society Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate Comparative investigation of health literacy level of cardiovascular patients hospitalized in private and public educational hospitals of Kerman city Methods: This study used survey methods, analytical and cross-sectional manner. Data was collected through questionnaires distributed among 200 patients of cardiovascular-hospitalization took place in the city of Kerman. To analyze the data in the description of the mean, standard deviation and frequency distribution tables and the level of analysis to determine the relationship between gender and marital status of health literacy test or nonparametric test Mann-Whitney T-Test and, for the relationship between group employment and residence, a one-way analysis of variance or Kruskal-Wallis test, to evaluate the relationship between age and income, Pearson and Spearman correlation to investigate the relationship between level of education and health literacy of SPPS software version 21 was used. Results: The results showed that 10% of patients at educational hospitals in Kerman adequate health literacy, and 48% of patients in private hospitals had adequate health literacy. As a result, there is a significant difference of health literacy between the two types of hospital (p-value <0/0001). Conclusions: The results showed that most patients had inadequate and border health literacy have been. Health plans, preparation of simple educational system and understanding, spending more time and have a discussion with the lower speed In connection with the patient’s doctor and medical staff, Including ways to help patients with low health literacy and improve their health literacy is. PMID:27041812

  5. Proximal gastric vagotomy: a district general hospital experience.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, J. J.; Ryan, J. M.; Anders, C. J.

    1983-01-01

    A district general hospital experience with proximal gastric vagotomy over a nine-year period is reported. One hundred and eight patients undergoing the operation for chronic duodenal ulcer were assessed. The follow-up period was 1-9 years (mean 4 years and 7 months). The results were graded using a modification of the classification of Visick (1948). Over 85% of our patients were satisfied with their results. (Visick 1 and 2). Recurrent ulceration was noted in 3.9% of our series (4 cases). There were no deaths and few complications. The technique used by us is described briefly and the role of proximal gastric vagotomy in a district general hospital is discussed. PMID:6859783

  6. Psychogeriatric consultation. General Hospital versus home for the aged.

    PubMed

    Lippert, G P; Conn, D; Schogt, B; Ickowicz, A

    1990-09-01

    As more elderly persons are institutionalized in long-term care settings, there will be an increasing need for psychiatric consultation-liaison (C/L) services. An understanding of how patterns of C/L service provision differ in these settings from those in the general hospital is important for efficient use of resources. In this study, certain characteristics of psychiatric consultations for the elderly patients in a general hospital were compared to consultations in a home for the aged. Three groups of 30 patients were examined: patients age 60 and over in a general hospital (GH), patients under age 60 in a general hospital (GHY), and patients in a home for the aged (HA). GH and GHY shared many characteristics, but there were significant differences between HA and GH: Consultations for HA were less likely to be urgent and more likely to be for management. Dementia was diagnosed in 70% of HA versus 27% in GH. Types of interventions were similar in GH and HA except that more psychotherapy was done in HA. In HA more contact was made with allied health professionals, while in GH there was more contact with medical personnel. GH patients were seen more intensively during the first 2 weeks following referral. We conclude that the major part-time attendance of a psychiatrist skilled in both the behavioral management of demented patients and liaison with allied health professionals is likely to be sufficient in long-term care institutions for elderly patients. However, the psychiatrist must also be proficient in the education of the staff of the institution so as to encourage the referral of all those patients who require psychiatric attention. PMID:2210349

  7. Risk Factors for Nonelective Hospitalization in Frail and Older Adult, Inner-City Outpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damush, Teresa M.; Smith, David M.; Perkins, Anthony J.; Dexter, Paul R.; Smith, Faye

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: In our study, we sought to improve the accuracy of predicting the risk of hospitalization and to identify older, inner-city patients who could be targeted for preventive interventions. Design and Methods: Participants (56% were African American) in a randomized trial were from a primary care practice and included 1,041 patients living in…

  8. Abusive Head Trauma at a Tertiary Care Children's Hospital in Mexico City. A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz-Olavarrieta, Claudia; Garcia-Pina, Corina A.; Loredo-Abdala, Arturo; Paz, Francisco; Garcia, Sandra G.; Schilmann, Astrid

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Determine the prevalence, clinical signs and symptoms, and demographic and family characteristics of children attending a tertiary care hospital in Mexico City, Mexico, to illustrate the characteristics of abusive head trauma among this population. Methods: This is a cross-sectional descriptive study of infants and children under 5,…

  9. Risk and outcome of aspiration pneumonia in a city hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, J.

    1993-01-01

    Because aspiration pneumonia contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients, this study was undertaken to identify risk factors for morbidity and mortality associated with aspiration pneumonia. Patients with a discharge diagnosis of aspiration pneumonia in 1985 and 1990 were studied. Factors associated with death from aspiration pneumonia were: altered mental status, cerebrovascular accident, endotracheal intubation, tachycardia, and hypoxemia. Fever, cough, and unilateral infiltrates on chest radiograph were associated with survival. Attention to proper positioning of comatose patients, aggressive treatment of gastroesophageal reflux, and strict attention to endotracheal tubes and tracheostomies should decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with aspiration pneumonia. PMID:8350375

  10. Analysis of hospitalization occurred due to motorcycles accidents in São Paulo city

    PubMed Central

    Gorios, Carlos; Armond, Jane de Eston; Rodrigues, Cintia Leci; Pernambuco, Henrique; Iporre, Ramiro Ortiz; Colombo-Souza, Patrícia

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize the motorcycle accidents occurred in the city of São Paulo, SP, Brazil in the year 2013, with emphasis on information about hospital admissions from SIH/SUS. METHODS: This is a retrospective cross-sectional study. The study covered 5,597 motorcyclists traumatized in traffic accident during the year 2013 occurred in the city of São Paulo. A survey was conducted using secondary data from the Information System of Hospitalization Health System (SIH/SUS). RESULTS: In 2013, in the city of São Paulo there were 5,597 admissions of motorcyclists traumatized in traffic accidents, of which 89.8% were male. The admission diagnosis were: leg fracture, femur fracture, and intracranial injury. CONCLUSION: This study confirms other preliminary studies on several points, among which stands out the highest prevalence of male young adults. Level of Evidence II, Retrospective Study. PMID:26327804

  11. The impact of heat, cold, and heat waves on hospital admissions in eight cities in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Ji-Young; Bell, Michelle L.; Lee, Jong-Tae

    2014-01-01

    Although the impact of temperature on mortality is well documented, relatively fewer studies have evaluated the associations of temperature with morbidity outcomes such as hospital admissions, and most studies were conducted in North America or Europe. We evaluated weather and hospital admissions including specific causes (allergic disease, asthma, selected respiratory disease, and cardiovascular disease) in eight major cities in Korea from 2003 to 2008. We also explored potential effect modification by individual characteristics such as sex and age. We used hierarchical modeling to first estimate city-specific associations between heat, cold, or heat waves and hospitalizations, and then estimated overall effects. Stratified analyses were performed by cause of hospitalization, sex, and age (0-14, 15-64, 65-74, and ≥75 years). Cardiovascular hospitalizations were significantly associated with high temperature, whereas hospitalizations for allergic disease, asthma, and selected respiratory disease were significantly associated with low temperature. The overall heat effect for cardiovascular hospitalization was a 4.5 % (95 % confidence interval 0.7, 8.5 %) increase in risk comparing hospitalizations at 25 to 15 °C. For cold effect, the overall increase in risk of hospitalizations comparing 2 with 15 °C was 50.5 (13.7, 99.2 %), 43.6 (8.9, 89.5 %), and 53.6 % (9.8, 114.9 %) for allergic disease, asthma, and selected respiratory disease, respectively. We did not find statistically significant effects of heat waves compared with nonheat wave days. Our results suggest susceptible populations such as women and younger persons. Our findings provide suggestive evidence that both high and low ambient temperatures are associated with the risk of hospital admissions, particularly in women or younger person, in Korea.

  12. Do university hospitals perform better than general hospitals? A comparative analysis among Italian regions

    PubMed Central

    Grillo Ruggieri, Tommaso; Podetti, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this research was to investigate how university hospitals (UHs) perform compared with general hospitals (GHs) in the Italian healthcare system. Design and setting 27 indicators of overall performance were selected and analysed for UHs and GHs in 10 Italian regions. The data refer to 2012 and 2013 and were selected from two performance evaluation systems based on hospital discharge administrative data: the Inter-Regional Performance Evaluation System developed by the Management and Health Laboratory of the Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna of Pisa and the Italian National Outcome Evaluation Programme developed by the National Agency for Healthcare Services. The study was conducted in 2 stages and by combining 2 statistical techniques. In stage 1, a non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test was carried out to compare the performance of UHs and GHs on the selected set of indicators. In stage 2, a robust equal variance test between the 2 groups of hospitals was carried out to investigate differences in the amount of variability between them. Results The overall analysis gave heterogeneous results. In general, performance was not affected by being in the UH rather than the GH group. It is thus not possible to directly associate Italian UHs with better results in terms of appropriateness, efficiency, patient satisfaction and outcomes. Conclusions Policymakers and managers should further encourage hospital performance evaluations in order to stimulate wider competition aimed at assigning teaching status to those hospitals that are able to meet performance requirements. In addition, UH facilities could be integrated with other providers that are responsible for community, primary and outpatient services, thereby creating a joint accountability for more patient-centred and integrated care. PMID:27507233

  13. Undertaking capacity assessments for people with dementia in general hospitals.

    PubMed

    Murray, Aileen

    2016-08-01

    Ensuring that older patients are discharged from hospital in a safe and appropriate manner is a fundamental aspect of nursing care. However, it is clear from the literature and clinical practice that determining people's capacity and whether they are able to decide where they live on discharge is a significant challenge. There is variation in practice despite the legal framework provided by the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) 2005, covering England and Wales, which raises questions about adherence to the legislation. Using a case study, this article explores aspects of the MCA and clinical practice that affect older patients' outcomes on discharge from general hospital settings. It demonstrates how effective multidisciplinary working, using the legal frameworks available, can ensure that an individual's independence and well-being are maintained. PMID:27573964

  14. Recurrence of inguinal hernias repaired in a large hernia surgical specialty hospital and general hospitals in Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Atiqa; Bell, Chaim M.; Stukel, Thérèse A.; Urbach, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The effect of hospital specialization on the risk of hernia recurrence after inguinal hernia repair is not well described. Methods We studied Ontario residents who had primary elective inguinal hernia repair at an Ontario hospital between 1993 and 2007 using population-based, administrative health data. We compared patients from a large hernia specialty hospital (Shouldice Hospital) with those from general hospitals to determine the risk of recurrence. Results We studied 235 192 patients, 27.7% of whom had surgery at Shouldice hospital. The age-standardized proportion of patients who had a recurrence ranged from 5.21% (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.94%–5.49%) among patients who had surgery at the lowest volume general hospitals to 4.79% (95% CI 4.54%–5.04%) who had surgery at the highest volume general hospitals. In contrast, patients who had surgery at the Shouldice Hospital had an age-standardized recurrence risk of 1.15% (95% CI 1.05%–1.25%). Compared with patients who had surgery at the lowest volume hospitals, hernia recurrence among those treated at the Shouldice Hospital was significantly lower after adjustment for the effects of age, sex, comorbidity and income level (adjusted hazard ratio 0.21, 95% CI 0.19–0.23, p < 0.001). Conclusion Inguinal hernia repair at Shouldice Hospital was associated with a significantly lower risk of subsequent surgery for recurrence than repair at a general hospital. While specialty hospitals may have better outcomes for treatment of common surgical conditions than general hospitals, these benefits must be weighed against potential negative impacts on clinical care and the financial sustainability of general hospitals. PMID:26574701

  15. Hospital discharge summary scorecard: a quality improvement tool used in a tertiary hospital general medicine service.

    PubMed

    Singh, G; Harvey, R; Dyne, A; Said, A; Scott, I

    2015-12-01

    We assessed the impact of completion and feedback of discharge summary scorecards on the quality of discharge summaries written by interns in a general medicine service of a tertiary hospital. The scorecards significantly improved summary quality in the first three rotations of the intern year and could be readily adopted by other units as a quality improvement intervention for optimizing clinical handover to primary care providers. PMID:26444698

  16. Metformin associated lactic acidosis in Auckland City Hospital 2005 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Haloob, Imad; de Zoysa, Janak R

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the incidence, clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with metformin associated lactic acidosis (MALA). METHODS: Auckland City Hospital drains a population of just over 400000 people. All cases presenting with metabolic acidosis between July 2005 and July 2009 were identified using clinical coding. A retrospective case notes review identified patients with MALA. Prescribing data for metformin was obtained from the national pharmaceutical prescribing scheme. RESULTS: There were 42 cases of metabolic lactic acidosis over 1718000 patient years. There were 51000 patient years of metformin prescribed to patients over the study period. There were thirty two cases of lactic acidosis due to sepsis, seven in patients treated with metformin. Ten cases of MALA were identified. The incidence of MALA was estimated at 19.46 per 100000 patient year exposure to metformin. The relative risk of lactic acidosis in patients on metformin was 13.53 (95%CI: 7.88-21.66) compared to the general population. The mean age of patients with MALA was 63 years, range 40-83 years. A baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate was obtained in all patients and ranged from 23-130 mL/min per 1.73 m2. Only two patients had chronic kidney disease G4. Three patients required treatment with haemodialysis. Two patients died. CONCLUSION: Lactic acidosis is an uncommon but significant complication of use of metformin which carries a high risk of morbidity. PMID:27458565

  17. Mortality differences between New York City municipal and voluntary hospitals, for selected conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, M F; Park, R E; Keesey, J; Brook, R H

    1993-01-01

    To determine if mortality differences between municipal and voluntary hospitals in New York City persist after adjustment for computerized administrative data (age, sex, principal diagnosis, and secondary diagnosis), six conditions in those hospitals from 1984 through 1987 were studied. Unadjusted mortality was significantly higher in municipal hospitals for myocardial infarction, stroke, and head trauma, and lower for congestive heart failure and pneumonia. Adjustment using administrative data eliminated differences for myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and pneumonia, but not for stroke and head trauma. We conclude that adjustment using administrative data eliminates some but not all mortality differences between municipal and voluntary hospitals. Medical record review is needed to determine why these differences persist. PMID:8328598

  18. Financial management challenges for general hospital psychiatry 2001.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R J

    2001-01-01

    Psychiatry programs are facing significant business and financial challenges. This paper provides an overview of these management challenges in five areas: departmental, hospital, payment system, general finance, and policy. Psychiatric leaders will require skills in a variety of business management areas to ensure their program success. Many programs will need to develop new compensation models with more of an emphasis on revenue collection and overhead management. Programs which cannot master these areas are likely to go out of business. For academic programs, incentive systems must address not only clinical productivity, but academic and teaching output as well. General hospital programs will need to develop increased sophistication in differential cost accounting in order to be able to advocate for their patients and program in the current management climate. Clinical leaders will need the skills (ranging from actuarial to negotiations) to be at the table with contract development, since those decisions are inseparable from clinical care issues. Strategic planning needs to consider the value of improving integration with primary care, along with the ability to understand the advantages and disadvantages of risk-sharing models. Psychiatry leaders need to define and develop useful reports shared with clinical division leadership to track progress and identify problems and opportunities. Leaders should be responsible for a strategy for developing appropriate information system architecture and infrastructure. Finally, it is hoped that some leaders will emerge who can further our needs to address inequities in mental health fee schedules and parity issues which affect our program viability. PMID:11313073

  19. [Composition, abundance and infestation rate of ant species in a children's hospital in the city of Palmas, Tocantins, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Bragança, Marcos A L; Lima, Jefferson D

    2010-01-01

    This first survey of the ant fauna in a children's hospital in the city of Palmas, state of Tocantins, compares species composition, abundance and infestation rate of ants between rainy and dry seasons, day and night periods, and among 15 hospital sectors. Forty-eight collections, being 12 diurnal and 12 nocturnal in each season using five attractive baits distributed per sector, maintained for 3h per sampling. A total of 34,309 ants were collected, distributed in 12 species: Acromyrmex sp., Brachymyrmex sp., Camponotus spp. (four morphospecies), Dorymyrmex sp., Tetramorium sp., Solenopsis globularia (Creighton), Solenopsis saevissima Smith, Tapinoma melanocephalum (Fabricius) and Paratrechina longicornis (Latreille). The hospital presented an average building infestation rate (40.3%), when compared with hospitals from other Brazilian regions. In general, there was no difference in the species composition between seasons and the period of the day, although abundance of ants was higher at night. The dry season and the nocturnal period showed the highest infestation rate, mainly by T.melanocephalum and S.globularia. Gynecologic ward, lactation unit, preconception and pediatric ward access ramp showed higher infestation rate, although these varied between seasons. The significant infestation levels by the three species above, especially in sectors with restricted access such as lactation unit, laboratory, Intensive Care Unit e surgery center, indicate potential risks for contamination of patients by multi resistant pathogens possibly present in ants' bodies, as verified in others studies. PMID:20305908

  20. An Intervention to Increase Availability of Healthy Foods and Beverages in New York City Hospitals: The Healthy Hospital Food Initiative, 2010–2014

    PubMed Central

    Krepp, Erica M.; Johnson Curtis, Christine; Lederer, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    Background Hospitals serve millions of meals and snacks each year; however, hospital food is often unhealthy. Hospitals are ideal settings for modeling healthy eating, but few programs have sought to improve nutrition in all venues where food is served. Community Context The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene created the Healthy Hospital Food Initiative (HHFI) to improve the healthfulness of food served in hospitals. The HHFI built on prior work implementing mandatory nutrition standards for patient meals and vending in public hospitals. Public hospitals joined the HHFI by voluntarily adopting standards for cafeterias and cafés. Private hospitals joined by implementing nutrition standards for patient meals, food and beverage vending machines, and cafeterias and cafés. Methods Hospitals were recruited from 2010 through 2014 and provided technical assistance from health department staff. Implementation in each of the 4 areas was monitored through on-site assessments and menu review. Twenty-eight hospital cafeterias and cafés were evaluated at baseline and at the end of the HHFI to assess changes. Outcome Sixteen public hospitals and 24 private hospitals joined the HHFI. Most (n = 18) private hospitals implemented standards in at least 2 areas. In cafeterias, most hospitals introduced a healthy value meal (n = 19), removed unhealthy items from the entrance and checkout (n = 18), increased whole grains to at least half of all grains served (n = 17), and reduced calories in pastries and desserts (n = 15). Interpretation Most New York City hospitals joined the HHFI and voluntarily adopted rigorous nutrition standards. Partnerships between hospitals and local government are feasible and can lead to significant improvements in hospital food environments. PMID:27281392

  1. Maritime radio-medical services: the Singapore General Hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Lateef, Fatimah; Anantharaman, Venkataraman

    2002-07-01

    Medical care for the sick and injured on a variety of sea-faring vessels throughout the world represents a challenging area of medical care. The scope is extremely broad and unique in terms of the problems encountered at sea, logistical difficulties in assessment and treatment of patients, as well as the provision of definitive care. The problems of sparse resources availability, great distances, isolation, communications, accessibility, and weather are also very real. In Singapore, radio-medical advice was first coordinated by the Port Health Authority. In 1980, the accident and emergency department at Singapore General Hospital took over this responsibility. This report analyzes 2,320 calls received over a period of 21 years (January 1980 to December 2000). It highlights the common consultations, modes of communications, treatment and management prescribed, training requirements, as well as the challenges for the future. PMID:12098185

  2. 42 CFR 412.370 - General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital Capital Costs Special Rules for Puerto Rico Hospitals § 412.370 General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto Rico. Except as provided in § 412.374, hospitals located in Puerto Rico are subject to the rules in this subpart governing the prospective...

  3. Social responsibility of the hospitals in Isfahan city, Iran: Results from a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Keyvanara, Mahmoud; Sajadi, Haniye Sadat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Changes in modern societies develop the perception that the external environment is essential in organization’s practices, especially in the way they deal with aspects such as human rights, community needs, market demands and environmental interests. These issues are usually under the umbrella of the concept of social responsibility. Given the importance of this concept in the context of health care delivery, suggesting a new paradigm in hospital governance, the aim of this study was to measure the social responsibility in hospitals. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was employed to collect data from a sample of 946 hospital staff of Isfahan city. Data was obtained by structured and valid self-administrated questionnaire and analyzed by descriptive and analytic statistics using SPSS. Results: The mean score of hospitals’ social responsibility was 3.0 compared with the justified range from 1.0 to 5.0. Results showed that there was a significant relationship between social responsibility score and hospitals’ ownership (public or private). Also, there was no significant relationship between social responsibility and type of hospital specialty. Conclusion: It is recommended that hospital managers develop and apply appropriate policies and strategies to improve their hospitals’ social responsibility level, especially through concentrating on their staff’s working environment. PMID:26340391

  4. Increasing Prevalence of Electronic Cigarette Use Among Smokers Hospitalized in 5 US Cities, 2010–2013

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Kathleen F.; Richter, Kimber; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Sherman, Scott E.; Grossman, Ellie; Chang, Yuchiao; Tindle, Hilary A.; Ylioja, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Little is known about the pattern of electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use over time or among smokers with medical comorbidity. Methods: We assessed current cigarette smokers’ use of e-cigarettes during the 30 days before admission to 9 hospitals in 5 geographically dispersed US cities: Birmingham, AL; Boston, MA; Kansas City, KS; New York, NY; and Portland, OR. Each hospital was conducting a randomized controlled trial as part of the NIH-sponsored Consortium of Hospitals Advancing Research on Tobacco (CHART). We conducted a pooled analysis using multiple logistic regression to examine changes in e-cigarette use over time and to identify correlates of e-cigarette use. Results: Among 4,660 smokers hospitalized between July 2010 and December 2013 (mean age 57 years, 57% male, 71% white, 56% some college, average 14 cigarettes/day), 14% reported using an e-cigarette during the 30 days before admission. The prevalence of e-cigarette use increased from 1.1% in 2010 to 10.3% in 2011, 10.2% in 2012, and 18.4% in 2013; the increase was statistically significant (p < .0001) after adjustment for age, sex, education, and CHART study. Younger, better educated, and heavier smokers were more likely to use e-cigarettes. Smokers who were Hispanic, non-Hispanic black, and who had Medicaid or no insurance were less likely to use e-cigarettes. E-cigarette use also varied by CHART project and by geographic region. Conclusions: E-cigarette use increased substantially from 2010 to 2013 among a large sample of hospitalized adult cigarette smokers. E-cigarette use was more common among heavier smokers and among those who were younger, white, and who had higher socioeconomic status. PMID:25168031

  5. Accreditation of Management Communication and Information Systems in Public Hospitals of Sabzevar City, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Farzianpour, Fereshteh; Shojaei, Saeed; Arab, Mohammad; Foroushani, Abbas Rahimi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Information systems are “computer systems that collect, store, process, retrieve, show, and provide timely information required in practice, education, management, and research”. The purpose of these systems is to support hospital activities in practical, tactical, and strategic levels in order to provide better service to patients. This study aimed to evaluate the communication and information system (MCI) in public hospitals in Sabzevar city in 2014 from the perspective of human resources according to international standards of the Joint Commission Accreditation Hospital (JCAH). Methods: This study was a practical, descriptive, cross-sectional study. The study population consisted of Sabzevar nurses who used hospital information system. Sampling was done by classification method and in proportion to the number of nurses in each health care units in hospitals in 2014. The sample size was 200 and after referring to hospitals, 200 questionnaires were completed. Sample size was calculated by the formula n=Z2P (1-P)/d2 with P=0.5, α=0.05, d=0.05, and Z=1.96. Data collection tool was the questionnaire of assessment of hospital information systems of JCAH, which has 124 specific questions, including 6 areas. To assess the effect of demographic variables with MCI standards of two questionnaires (feasibility and implementation), the following steps were taken. 1. Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to determine whether responses were normal or not. 2. In case of normal data, t-test was used for dual groups and one-way ANOVA test for groups of three or more. 3. If not normal, Mann-Whitney test was used for dual groups and Kruskal-Wallis test for groups of three or more. Results: Research findings show the mean results of feasibility and implementation of all 6 areas of international standards MCI have feasibility in three hospitals in Sabzevar in 20 sections (H1=105.01±10.468), (H1=196.31±4.662), (H2=104.26±9.099), (H2=195.33±3.778) (H3=106.48±11.545) and

  6. "The City of the Hospital": On Teaching Medical Students to Write.

    PubMed

    Hellerstein, David J

    2015-12-01

    "The City of the Hospital" is a creative nonfiction writing workshop for medical students, which the author has conducted annually since 2002. Part of the required preclinical Narrative Medicine curriculum at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, this six-week intensive workshop includes close readings of literary works and in-class assignments that are then edited by fellow class members and rewritten for final submission. Over the years, students have produced a wide range of compelling essays and stories, and they describe the class as having an effect that lasts throughout their further medical training. This special section includes selected works from class members. PMID:26179365

  7. Nurse practitioners, certified nurse midwives, and nurse anesthetists: changing care in acute care hospitals in New York City.

    PubMed

    Mezey, M; Dougherty, M; Wade, P; Mersmann, C

    1994-12-01

    To respond to the shrinking pool of primary care physicians and to demands from managed care programs for cost containment, hospitals in New York City have increased their use of nurse practitioners, certified nurse midwives, and nurse anesthetists, creating an increased demand for these personnel. We report here on a survey of hospitals and schools of nursing in New York City and present findings on (a) current use of, and projected demand for nurse practitioners (NPs), certified nurse midwives (midwives) and nurse anesthetists (anesthetists) in hospitals in New York City; (b) the practice patterns of NPs, midwives, and anesthetists currently employed in hospitals; and (c) current and projected enrollment and curriculum in NP, midwifery, and anesthetist education programs in the New York metropolitan area. PMID:7853064

  8. Toshiba General Hospital PACS for routine in- and outpatient clinics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toshimitsu, Akihiro; Okazaki, Nobuo; Kura, Hiroyuki; Nishihara, Eitaro; Tsubura, Shinichi

    1996-05-01

    The Toshiba General Hospital introduced a departmental RIS/PACS (Radiology Information System/Picture Archiving and Communication System) in the radiology department in May, 1993. It has been used routinely since that time. In order to provide efficient means for clinicians to find and read many images, the system has been expanded to the neurosurgery and urology clinics and wards since May, 1995, and five image referring workstations now provide digital images to clinicians. In this paper we discuss an algorithm for image migration, one of the key issues to accomplish the expansion to outpatient clinics successfully, and propose the WYWIWYG (what you want is what you get) image transfer logic. This is the logic used to transfer images that physicians require refer without increasing the traffic between the image server and referring workstations. We accomplish the WYWIWYG logic by prioritizing exams the physicians have not yet viewed and by finding historical exams according to the modality, anatomy, and marking. Clinicians gave us comments from their first use of the system and suggested that the PACS enables clinicians to review images more efficiently compared to a film-based system. Our experience suggests that it is a key to the effective application of PACS in outpatient clinics to incorporate consideration patterns of clinicians on the migration algorithm.

  9. A Most Unusual Patient at the Massachusetts General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ruhnke, Gregory W.; Warshaw, Andrew L.

    2016-01-01

    This year marks 200 years of patient care at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). In celebration of this milestone, a unique Grand Rounds case is presented. A 450-year-old rotund man admitted 60 times presents with a classic triad of periumbilical pain, bilateral plantar burns, and a frozen scalp. Although this triad may at first strike a cord of familiarity among seasoned clinicians, the disease mechanism is truly noteworthy, being clarified only after a detailed occupational history. Ergo, the lessons hark back to the days of yesteryear, when the history and physical served as the cornerstone of Yuletide clinical diagnosis. A discussion of epidemiology and prognosis accompanies a detailed examination of the pathophysiholiday. Although some consider this patient uncouth, as you will see, he is quite a medical sleuth. The long-standing relationship between this patient and the MGH prompted his family to write a letter of appreciation, which will remind the reader of the meaning that our care brings to patients and their families. Harvey Cushing, who completed his internship at the MGH in 1895, professed “A physician is obligated to consider more than a diseased organ, more even than the whole man—he must view the man in his world.” We hope this unusual Grand Rounds case intrigues you as it reminds you of Cushing’s lesson and wishes you a joyous holiday season. PMID:22107737

  10. Large Epidemiological Influenza A Outbreak in a Teaching Hospital from Guatemala City

    PubMed Central

    Mejía, Carlos; Silvestre, Monica; Cazali, Iris; García, Judith; Sánchez, Ruth; García, Leticia; Castillo, Leticia; Escobar, Ingrid; Terraza, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To describe the characteristics and interventions to control a large epidemiological Influenza A Outbreak. Methods. During the months of February to April 2006, a large outbreak of Influenza A was detected, which affected Health Care Workers and hospitalized patients in a large teaching Hospital in Guatemala City. Interventions to interrupt transmission were implemented and included barrier methods (N95 masks, respiratory isolation measures, etc.) and enhanced hand hygiene, vaccination of healthy Health Care Workers (HCW), restrictions for patient visits. Results. From February to April 2006, 59 hospitalized patients diagnosed with Influenza A. 19 AIDS patients (mortality: 71%) and 5/40 (12.5%) in other diseases: cancer (3), severe cardiac failure (1) and severe malnutrition (1). The attack rate at day 20 in doctors and medical students was 21% while in other HCW it was 10.5%. Within 3 weeks of the beginning of the plan, deaths were stopped and no more cases in HCW were detected after 3 additional weeks. Conclusion. A rapid, comprehensive plan for the control of nosocomial epidemic Influenza A outbreaks is essential to limit severe morbidity and mortality in hospitals who attend large immunocompromised populations, including AIDS patients. HCW regular vaccinations programs are mandatory. PMID:24052881

  11. Remaking hospital space: The health care practices of injection drug users in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Szott, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Background Medical care has long been depicted by social scientists as a field of social control, as well as a branch of Foucauldian disciplinary power. This report focuses attention on the hospital, a highly regulated place in the United States, and examines how injection drug users (IDUs) negotiate the medical social control and institutionalized disciplinary power they encounter in this place. Methods Twenty-eight qualitative interviews were conducted in New York City with low-income people who inject drugs on a regular basis. Interview questions focused on their health and drug use and interactions with health care providers. Results A variety of practices were employed to avoid, defy and subvert medical power. Study participants reported leaving the hospital when they felt ready rather than waiting to be discharged, actively seeking the type of care they wanted and ignoring medical advice. Conclusion The hospital is not a site of total control in the narratives of IDUs, but rather a space to seek a self-determined amount and type of care. These results can re-orient providers of health care services towards understanding the productivity of the relationship between IDUs and the hospital. PMID:24418630

  12. 42 CFR 412.22 - Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES... after October 1, 1997— (i) Separate governing body. The hospital has a governing body that is separate from the governing body of the hospital occupying space in the same building or on the same campus....

  13. 42 CFR 412.22 - Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES... after October 1, 1997— (i) Separate governing body. The hospital has a governing body that is separate from the governing body of the hospital occupying space in the same building or on the same campus....

  14. New York's role as a center for health care: an analysis of nonresident patients served by New York City hospitals.

    PubMed

    Finkler, S; Knickman, J; Krasner, M; Szapiro, N

    1986-10-01

    Patients who reside outside of New York City have long been an important segment of the patient population at New York City hospitals. Each year, as far back as systematic data are available, approximately 10 percent of all patients at New York City hospitals have been non residents. Increasing competition and changing reimbursement policies compel hospitals in New York City to assess their role in caring for these patients and its economic implications. This report provides a comprehensive assessment of the characteristics of nonresident patients and their significance to the city's hospitals. Using data from all New York City hospitals, the report analyzes the demographics, insurance coverage, and case-mix characteristics of nonresident and resident patients. And, using more detailed data from New York University Medical Center and Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, it addresses the financial and reimbursement policy questions posed by the care of nonresident patients. The key findings of the report are as follows: A total of 115,307 nonresidents were hospitalized in New York City in 1982; this figure represents 10.4 percent of all patients in city hospitals. Over 80 percent of nonresident patients come from 14 counties surrounding New York City. Nonresident patients are a crucial component of the patient population at six hospitals that are the principal affiliates of a medical school and the six specialty hospitals. At academic health centers, nonresidents represent 25 percent of all inpatients; at the specialty hospitals, they represent 36 percent. Manhattan hospitals account for 69 percent of all nonresident discharges in the city. Outside of Manhattan, only Montefiore Medical Center and Long Island Jewish Medical Center have substantial numbers of nonresident patients. Among nonresident patients, 75 percent of admissions are scheduled in advance and 72 percent of hospital stays are for surgical procedures. In contrast, among resident patients, only 50

  15. Effect of Cause-of-Death Training on Agreement Between Hospital Discharge Diagnoses and Cause of Death Reported, Inpatient Hospital Deaths, New York City, 2008–2010

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Paulina; Gambatese, Melissa; Begier, Elizabeth; Zimmerman, Regina; Soto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Accurate cause-of-death reporting is required for mortality data to validly inform public health programming and evaluation. Research demonstrates overreporting of heart disease on New York City death certificates. We describe changes in reported causes of death following a New York City health department training conducted in 2009 to improve accuracy of cause-of-death reporting at 8 hospitals. The objective of our study was to assess the degree to which death certificates citing heart disease as cause of death agreed with hospital discharge data and the degree to which training improved accuracy of reporting. Methods We analyzed 74,373 death certificates for 2008 through 2010 that were linked with hospital discharge records for New York City inpatient deaths and calculated the proportion of discordant deaths, that is, death certificates reporting an underlying cause of heart disease with no corresponding discharge record diagnosis. We also summarized top principal diagnoses among discordant reports and calculated the proportion of inpatient deaths reporting sepsis, a condition underreported in New York City, to assess whether documentation practices changed in response to clarifications made during the intervention. Results Citywide discordance between death certificates and discharge data decreased from 14.9% in 2008 to 9.6% in 2010 (P < .001), driven by a decrease in discordance at intervention hospitals (20.2% in 2008 to 8.9% in 2010; P < .001). At intervention hospitals, reporting of sepsis increased from 3.7% of inpatient deaths in 2008 to 20.6% in 2010 (P < .001). Conclusion Overreporting of heart disease as cause of death declined at intervention hospitals, driving a citywide decline, and sepsis reporting practices changed in accordance with health department training. Researchers should consider the effect of overreporting and data-quality changes when analyzing New York City heart disease mortality trends. Other vital records jurisdictions

  16. Hospitable archean climates simulated by a general circulation model.

    PubMed

    Wolf, E T; Toon, O B

    2013-07-01

    Evidence from ancient sediments indicates that liquid water and primitive life were present during the Archean despite the faint young Sun. To date, studies of Archean climate typically utilize simplified one-dimensional models that ignore clouds and ice. Here, we use an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a mixed-layer ocean model to simulate the climate circa 2.8 billion years ago when the Sun was 20% dimmer than it is today. Surface properties are assumed to be equal to those of the present day, while ocean heat transport varies as a function of sea ice extent. Present climate is duplicated with 0.06 bar of CO2 or alternatively with 0.02 bar of CO2 and 0.001 bar of CH4. Hot Archean climates, as implied by some isotopic reconstructions of ancient marine cherts, are unattainable even in our warmest simulation having 0.2 bar of CO2 and 0.001 bar of CH4. However, cooler climates with significant polar ice, but still dominated by open ocean, can be maintained with modest greenhouse gas amounts, posing no contradiction with CO2 constraints deduced from paleosols or with practical limitations on CH4 due to the formation of optically thick organic hazes. Our results indicate that a weak version of the faint young Sun paradox, requiring only that some portion of the planet's surface maintain liquid water, may be resolved with moderate greenhouse gas inventories. Thus, hospitable late Archean climates are easily obtained in our climate model. PMID:23808659

  17. Seroepidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii infection in general population in a Northern Mexican city

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a lack of information about the seroepidemiology of T. gondii infection in the general population of Durango City, Mexico. Anti-T. gondii IgG and IgM antibodies were sought in 974 inhabitants in Durango City, Mexico using enzyme-linked immunoassays. In total, 59 (6.1%) of 974 participants (...

  18. Air pollution and risk of respiratory and cardiovascular hospitalizations in the most populous city in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Phung, Dung; Hien, To Thi; Linh, Ho Nhut; Luong, Ly M T; Morawska, Lidia; Chu, Cordia; Binh, Nguyen Duy; Thai, Phong K

    2016-07-01

    Air pollution has become an alarming issue in Vietnam recently; however, there was only one study so far on the effects of ambient air pollution on population health. Our study aimed to investigate the short-term effects of air pollutants including PM10, NO2, SO2, and O3 on respiratory and cardiovascular hospitalizations in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), the largest city in Vietnam. Data on hospitalization from the two largest hospitals in HCMC and daily records of PM10, NO2, SO2, O3 and meteorological data were collected from February 2004 to December 2007. A time-series regression analysis with distributed lag model was applied for data analysis. Changes in levels of NO2 and PM10 were strongly associated with hospital admissions for both respiratory and cardiovascular diseases (CVD); whereas levels of SO2 were only moderately associated with respiratory and CVD hospital admissions and O3 concentration was not associated with any of them. For a 10μg/m(3) increase of each air pollutant, the risk of respiratory admissions increased from 0.7% to 8% while the risk of CVD admissions increased from 0.5% to 4%. Females were found to be more sensitive than males to exposure to air pollutants in regard to respiratory diseases. In regard to CVD, females (RR, 1.04, 95% CI, 1.01-1.07) had a slightly higher risk of admissions than males (RR, 1.03, 95% CI, 1-1.06) to exposure to NO2. In contrast, males (RR, 1.007, 95%CI, 1-1.01) had a higher risk of admission than females (RR, 1.004, 95%CI, 1.001-1.007) to exposure to PM10. People in the age group of 5-65year-olds had a slightly higher risk of admissions caused by air pollutants than the elderly (65+years old) except for a significant effect of PM10 on the risk of cardiovascular admissions was found for the elderly only. PMID:27016680

  19. Readmissions due to traffic accidents at a general hospital 1

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Luciana; Monteiro, Damiana Aparecida Trindade; Pompeo, Daniele Alcalá; Ciol, Márcia Aparecida; Dantas, Rosana Aparecida Spadotti; Rossi, Lídia Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to verify the occurrence and the causes of hospital readmissions within a year after discharge from hospitalizations due to traffic accidents. Methods: victims of multiple traumas due to traffic accidents were included, who were admitted to an Intensive Care Unit. Sociodemographic data, accident circumstances, body regions affected and cause of readmission were collected from the patient histories. Results: among the 109 victims of traffic accidents, the majority were young and adult men. Most hospitalizations due to accidents involved motorcycle drivers (56.9%). The causes of the return to the hospital were: need to continue the surgical treatment (63.2%), surgical site infection (26.3%) and fall related to the physical sequelae of the trauma (10.5%). The rehospitalization rate corresponded to 174/1,000 people/year. Conclusion: the hospital readmission rate in the study population is similar to the rates found in other studies. Victims of severe limb traumas need multiple surgical procedures, lengthier hospitalizations and extended rehabilitation. PMID:26444172

  20. Annual economic burden of hepatitis B virus-related diseases among hospitalized patients in twelve cities in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Ma, Q; Liang, S; Xiao, H; Zhuang, G; Zou, Y; Tan, H; Liu, J; Zhang, Y; Zhang, L; Feng, X; Xue, L; Hu, D; Cui, F; Liang, X

    2016-03-01

    A nationwide survey of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-associated economic burden has not previously been performed in China. The purpose of this study was to examine the direct, indirect, and intangible costs of HBV-related diseases within the span of one year. A random sample was taken from specialty and general hospitals across 12 cities in six provinces of China. Intangible costs were estimated based on willingness to pay or open-ended answers provided by patients. The results showed that 27 hospitals were enrolled, with a sample population of 4726 patients (77.7% response rate). The average annual costs were $4454.0 (direct), $924.3 (indirect), and $6611.10 (intangible), corresponding to 37.3%, 7.7%, and 55.1% of the total costs, respectively. The direct medical fees were substantially greater than the non-medical fees. Annual indirect costs were divided into outpatient ($112.9) and inpatient ($811.40) loss of income. The intangible costs of chronic HBV were notably higher than either the direct or indirect costs, consistent with the social stigma in China. The comparison amongst individual cities for the average ratio of direct to indirect costs revealed that the sizes of ratios were negatively correlated with the socioeconomic status of the regions. This study suggested that as a whole in China, the HBV-related diseases caused a heavy financial burden which was positively associated with disease severity. Although the intangible costs coincided with a high prevalence of discrimination against CHB patients in Chinese society, our study may serve as future reference for detailed exploration. PMID:26663525

  1. Prevalence trends of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Mexico City’s General Hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Guerrero, Juan C.; Jacinto-Alemán, Luís F.; Jiménez-Farfán, María D.; Macario-Hernández, Alejandro; Hernández-Flores, Florentino

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Recent reports suggest an increase in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) frequency. To improve programs in public health, it is necessary to understand the epidemiological conditions. The aim of this study was to analyze the trend in gender, age, anatomic zone and OSCC stage from Mexico City’s General Hospital patients from 1990 to 2008. Study design: A retrospective review of all OSCC cases diagnosed by the Pathology Department of the Mexico City General Hospital was performed. Demographic data, in addition to anatomic zone and histological degree of differentiation were obtained. Central tendency, dispersion and prevalence rate per 100,000 individuals were determined. Results: A total of 531 patients were diagnosed with OSCC; 58.4% were men, giving a male:female ratio of 1.4:1, and the mean age was 62.5 ± 14.9 years. The predominant anatomic zone was the tongue (44.7%), followed by the lips (21.2%) and gums (20.5%). The most frequent histological degree was moderately differentiated in 325 cases (61.2%). The rates of OSCC prevalence showed similar patterns in terms across time. A significant correlation (P = 0.007) between anatomic zone and age was observed. Conclusion: According to our results, the prevalence of OSCC does not show important variations; however, a relationship between age and anatomic zone was observed. These data could be used as parameters for the diagnosis of OSCC as well as for the development and dissemination of preventive programs for the early detection of oral cancer. Key words:Oral squamous cell carcinoma, prevalence, histology degree and anatomic zone. PMID:23385493

  2. "Evil reports" for "ignorant minds"? Patient experience and public confidence in the emerging modern hospital: Vancouver General Hospital, 1912.

    PubMed

    Gagan, D; Gagan, R

    2001-01-01

    The process whereby the 19th-century Canadian charity hospital for the sick poor was transformed into a centre for scientific health care for the whole community was well in hand by World War I. To fund this transition, and to cope with the subsequent unrelieved demand from all social classes for accessibility to hospitalization, hospitals instituted differentiated services, offering premium care and privacy to paying patients whose fees, in turn, sustained a more economical level of open ward maintenance for indigent patients. As the record of a 1912 public investigation into patient grievances and complaints against the Vancouver General Hospital reveals, the commodification of hospital-based health care reproduced in the hospital environment the social attitudes, controls, and structures of the wider community. This development appeared to contradict the hospitals promise of undifferentiated, scientifically-mediated, medical efficiency and efficacy for all, and its reputation as a humane and caring institution. Notwithstanding the inquiry's conclusion that these grievances were "evil reports" designed to appeal to "ignorant minds," they reveal a patient population of already informed consumers ready, willing and able to discriminate between the promise and the reality of hospital-centred health care for all. PMID:14518465

  3. Occurrence of drug–drug interactions in Adama Referral Hospital, Adama city, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Gunasekaran, Thirumurugan; Dejene, Natsanet; Satyaveni, Vanapalli V.; Dhanaraju, Magharla Dasaratha

    2015-01-01

    Objective Many medications have potential interactions with other drugs or substances when prescribed together. This study was intended to investigate the extent of poly-pharmacy, event of drug–drug interactions and associated ADRs in Adama Referral Hospital, Oromia regional State, Ethiopia to create awareness of potential drug interactions and for development of clinical strategies to prevent the occurrence of DDIs. Methods A retrospective study was done at Adama Referral hospital, Adama city, Ethiopia during March–May 2014. Medscape online were used for DDIs and ADRs detection purposes. Results The average number of drugs prescribed per person (encounter) in this study was found to be 2.6, showing the presence of poly-pharmacy prescribing practice based on WHO recommendations (1.4–2.4). With 788 medications prescribed, 267 DDIs were found in this study and 62 (20.7%) were categorized as serious DDIs, 95 (31.7%) as significant DDIs, and 110 (36.7%) as minor DDIs. DDIs occurrence was also categorized according to the mechanisms, Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions; the highest frequency of DDIs was observed in 85 (31.8%), attributable to metabolism interaction followed by Antagonistic effect in 51 (21.4%), and Synergistic/Additive effect in 44 (16.5%). It was observed that serious DDIs most often caused possible cardiovascular ADRs. Conclusions The results of the study showed the high number of drugs per person compared to the WHO-reported average number of drugs per person and occurrence of DDIs associated with severe cardiovascular risk ADRs in the Adama Referral Hospital. This study recommends that the drug information center facilities and drug prescription validation is done by the pharmacist and the development of pharmacotherapeutic guidelines supporting selection of drugs in Ethiopian hospitals for preventing DDIs and ADRs.

  4. The Sociology of the Deceased Harvard Medical Unit at Boston City Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Tishler, Peter V.

    2015-01-01

    Many graduates of the Harvard Medical Unit (HMU) at Boston City Hospital, in either the clinical training/residency program or the research program at the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, contributed in major ways to the HMU and constantly relived their HMU experiences. The HMU staff physicians, descending from founder and mentor physicians Francis W. Peabody, Soma Weiss, and George R. Minot, were dedicated to the teaching, development, and leadership of its clinical and research trainees, whose confidence and dedication to patient care as a result of their mentorship led many to lifelong achievements as clinicians, teachers, and mentors. Their experience also led to a lifelong love of the HMU (despite its loss), camaraderie, happiness, and intense friendships with their associates. PMID:26604868

  5. [Environmental impact of a public hospital in the city of Lima, Peru].

    PubMed

    Bambarén-Alatrista, Celso; Alatrista-Gutiérrez de Bambarén, María del Socorro

    2014-01-01

    The operation of hospitals produces negative effects on the environment which contributes to air pollution and climate change. The institution in this study is a category III health care facility located in the city of Lima. It generates 4.89 kg/bed/day of solid waste, and consumes 1.36 m3/bed/day of water; 25.22 kWh/bed/day of electricity, and 2.76 liters/bed/day of fuel. The level of PM10 and measured parameters of disposal to the public network are within legal limits, while mobile source noise exceeds the maximum allowable limit. The institution releases into the atmosphere 2,291 tons of CO2 equivalents per year. In conclusion, the institution studied generates a negative impact on the environment. PMID:25597723

  6. FURTHER MAPPING OF THE NATALITY CHRONOME IN TODA CITY (JAPAN) MATERNITY HOSPITAL

    PubMed Central

    YAMANAKA, T.; CORNÉLISSEN, G.; KAZUMA, M.; KAZUMA, N.; MURAKAMI, S.; OTSUKA, K.; SIEGELOVÁ, J.; DUŠEK, J.; SOSÍKOVÁ, M.; HALBERG, F.

    2008-01-01

    In order to investigate any circannual and/or circaseptan variations in birth incidence and birth weight in Toda City (Japan), data on 4,411 consecutive births were obtained from the city’s Maternity Hospital between 1 Jan 1999 and 31 Dec 2001. Data were analysed by cosinor separately for babies with birth weights in given ranges, and separately for boys and girls born at different gestational ages. A circannual rhythm was detected with statistical significance (P=0.047) for birth incidence of all vaginal deliveries, with an acrophase in the fall. A similar result for caesarean sections was of borderline statistical significance. A circaseptan component with a relatively consistent acrophase around midweek was of borderline statistical significance for birth incidence in some of the groups investigated. About-yearly and about-weekly variations were also found to characterize birth weight in some of the groups investigated. PMID:18978949

  7. Patterns of traumatic injury in New York City prisoners requiring hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Henning, Justin; Frangos, Spiros; Simon, Ronald; Pachter, H Leon; Bholat, Omar S

    2015-01-01

    Bellevue Hospital's prison ward cares for male prisoners requiring medical attention that exceeds the capabilities of New York City Department of Correction (NYC-DOC) infirmaries. This study evaluated the injury patterns that occur in this patient population. Data were collected on consecutive prisoners transferred from NYC-DOC for traumatic injuries from June 1, 2003, to June 1, 2006, and analyzed by retrospective chart review. Overall, 251 patients were evaluated for traumatic injuries. Injury mechanisms were violent (75.7%), nonviolent (23.5%), and self-inflicted (0.8%). Of the 241 (96%) patients admitted, 213 (84.9%) required operative intervention. The most common injuries were mandible fractures (46.5%) and facial fractures (14.9%). PMID:25559630

  8. The Sociology of the Deceased Harvard Medical Unit at Boston City Hospital.

    PubMed

    Tishler, Peter V

    2015-12-01

    Many graduates of the Harvard Medical Unit (HMU) at Boston City Hospital, in either the clinical training/residency program or the research program at the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, contributed in major ways to the HMU and constantly relived their HMU experiences. The HMU staff physicians, descending from founder and mentor physicians Francis W. Peabody, Soma Weiss, and George R. Minot, were dedicated to the teaching, development, and leadership of its clinical and research trainees, whose confidence and dedication to patient care as a result of their mentorship led many to lifelong achievements as clinicians, teachers, and mentors. Their experience also led to a lifelong love of the HMU (despite its loss), camaraderie, happiness, and intense friendships with their associates. PMID:26604868

  9. Can We Humanize Dying in the General Hospital?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Stephen

    This paper reviews the literature on the behavior and attitudes of medical-nursing personnel toward the dying person and illustrates the frequent conflict between hospital staff and the needs of dying. Inner perturbation stemming from feelings of vicarious suffering, vicarious disintegration, or personal anxiety about death, education deficiencies…

  10. Reducing elective general surgery cancellations at a Canadian hospital

    PubMed Central

    Azari-Rad, Solmaz; Yontef, Alanna L.; Aleman, Dionne M.; Urbach, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Background In Canadian hospitals, which are typically financed by global annual budgets, overuse of operating rooms is a financial risk that is frequently managed by cancelling elective surgical procedures. It is uncertain how different scheduling rules affect the rate of elective surgery cancellations. Methods We used discrete event simulation modelling to represent perioperative processes at a hospital in Toronto, Canada. We tested the effects of the following 3 scenarios on the number of surgical cancellations: scheduling surgeons’ operating days based on their patients’ average length of stay in hospital, sequencing surgical procedures by average duration and variance, and increasing the number of post-surgical ward beds. Results The number of elective cancellations was reduced by scheduling surgeons whose patients had shorter average lengths of stay in hospital earlier in the week, sequencing shorter surgeries and those with less variance in duration earlier in the day, and by adding up to 2 additional beds to the postsurgical ward. Conclusion Discrete event simulation modelling can be used to develop strategies for improving efficiency in operating rooms. PMID:23351498

  11. An indoor radon survey of the X-ray rooms of Mexico City hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juárez, Faustino; Reyes, Pedro G.; Espinosa, Guillermo

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents the results of measurements of indoor radon concentrations in the X-ray rooms of a selection of hospitals in the metropolitan area of Mexico City. The metropolitan area of Mexico City is Mexico's largest metropolitan area by population; the number of patients requiring the use of X-rays is also the highest. An understanding of indoor radon concentrations in X-ray rooms is necessary for the estimation of the radiological risk to which patients, radiologists and medical technicians are exposed. The indoor radon concentrations were monitored for a period of six months using nuclear track detectors (NTD) consisting of a closed-end cup system with CR-39 (Lantrack®) polycarbonate as detector material. The indoor radon concentrations were found to be between 75 and 170 Bq m-3, below the USEPA-recommended indoor radon action level for working places of 400 Bq m-3. It is hoped that the results of this study will contribute to the establishment of recommended action levels by the Mexican regulatory authorities responsible for nuclear safety.

  12. An indoor radon survey of the X-ray rooms of Mexico City hospitals

    SciTech Connect

    Juarez, Faustino; Reyes, Pedro G.; Espinosa, Guillermo

    2013-07-03

    This paper presents the results of measurements of indoor radon concentrations in the X-ray rooms of a selection of hospitals in the metropolitan area of Mexico City. The metropolitan area of Mexico City is Mexico's largest metropolitan area by population; the number of patients requiring the use of X-rays is also the highest. An understanding of indoor radon concentrations in X-ray rooms is necessary for the estimation of the radiological risk to which patients, radiologists and medical technicians are exposed. The indoor radon concentrations were monitored for a period of six months using nuclear track detectors (NTD) consisting of a closed-end cup system with CR-39 (Lantrack Registered-Sign ) polycarbonate as detector material. The indoor radon concentrations were found to be between 75 and 170 Bq m{sup -3}, below the USEPA-recommended indoor radon action level for working places of 400 Bq m{sup -3}. It is hoped that the results of this study will contribute to the establishment of recommended action levels by the Mexican regulatory authorities responsible for nuclear safety.

  13. The pattern of parasitic infection in human gut at the Specialist Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Obiamiwe, B A

    1977-03-01

    In a survey of 6213 persons conducted between January 1973 to December 1974, at the Specialist Hospital, Benin City, the most common helminths were Necator americanus (16.8%), Ascaris lumbricoides (19l5%) and Trichuris trichiur (5-9%). Dicrocoelium hospes (0-06%) was also recorded and this may become an important liver parasite of man in Nigeria. Its snail vectors are believed to be species of Limicolaria and Achatina which are widely dispersed in Nigeria. Entamoeba coli and E. histolytica showed peaks during the "fly seasons", indicating that the housefly, as well as water, may be an important source of contamination. Trichomonas hominis showed peaks in the rainy seasons, and this suggests that in Benin City transmission is chiefly via contaminated domestic water-supply. The incidence of A. lumbricoides and N. americanus was high throughout the rainy and dry seasons, indicating poor disposal of human excreta and a continuous pattern of infection. The type of food and method of cooking prevented or reduced the incidence of Taenia solium, T. saginata, Diphyllobothrium latum and Fasciola gigantica. PMID:849017

  14. Microbial Contamination of Ice Machines Is Mediated by Activated Charcoal Filtration Systems in a City Hospital.

    PubMed

    Yorioka, Katsuhiro; Oie, Shigeharu; Hayashi, Koji; Kimoto, Hiroo; Furukawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    Although microbial contamination of ice machines has been reported, no previous study has addressed microbial contamination of ice produced by machines equipped with activated charcoal (AC) filters in hospitals. The aim of this study was to provide clinical data for evaluating AC filters to prevent microbial contamination of ice. We compared microbial contamination in ice samples produced by machines with (n = 20) and without an AC filter (n = 40) in Shunan City Shinnanyo Municipal Hospital. All samples from the ice machine equipped with an AC filter contained 10-116 CFUs/g of glucose nonfermenting gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Chryseobacterium meningosepticum. No microorganisms were detected in samples from ice machines without AC filters. After the AC filter was removed from the ice machine that tested positive for Gram-negative bacteria, the ice was resampled (n = 20). Analysis found no contaminants. Ice machines equipped with AC filters pose a serious risk factor for ice contamination. New filter-use guidelines and regulations on bacterial detection limits to prevent contamination of ice in healthcare facilities are necessary. PMID:27348980

  15. Involving older people in improving general hospital care.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Nicky; Dearnley, Barbara

    2007-05-01

    User involvement is high on the NHS agenda. At King's College Hospital, London, older people helped to develop the Improving Hospital Care for Older People project by producing teaching and learning materials for staff using e-learning. The project was set up by holding focus groups with older people. Staff surveys were also conducted to explore views and identify issues to be addressed. Older people's representatives were selected and directly involved in developing learning materials. This article describes the process of working together and includes the personal reflections of some of the key players. It discusses barriers to effective user involvement work between staff and older people, and identifies some benefits and opportunities presented by this approach. PMID:17518196

  16. A Survey on the Users’ Satisfaction with the Hospital Information Systems (HISs) based on DeLone and McLean’s Model in the Medical-Teaching Hospitals in Isfahan City

    PubMed Central

    Saghaeiannejad-Isfahani, Sakineh; Jahanbakhsh, Maryam; Habibi, Mahboobeh; Mirzaeian, Razieh; Nasirian, Mansoreh; Rad, Javad Sharifi

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: The user’s satisfaction with information system in fact denotes the extent the user is satisfied with the system’s achievement in fulfilling his/her information requirements. This study tries to explore the users’ satisfaction with hospital information systems (HISs) based on DeLone and McLean’s model focusing on the medical-teaching hospitals of Isfahan city. Methodology: This study which was applied and descriptive-analytical in nature was carried out in the medical-teaching hospitals of Isfahan city in 2009. Research population consisted of the system users from which a sample was selected using random sampling method. The size of the sample was 228. Data collection instrument was a self-developed questionnaire produced based on the satisfaction criterion in the DeLone and McLean’s model. Its content validity was assessed based on the opinions given by the computer sciences professionals with its estimated Cronbach’s alpha found to be 92.2%. The data were analyzed using SPSS software. Findings: As the findings of the study showed, the differences among the mean scores obtained for the satisfaction with different kinds of HISs in use in the hospitals were statistically significant (p value≤0.05). Generally, Kowsar System (old version) and Pouya Samaneh Diva system gained the highest and lowest mean scores for the criterion in question, respectively. The overall mean score for the satisfaction was 54.6% for different types of systems and 55.6% among the hospitals. Conclusion: Given the findings of the study, it can be argued that based on the used model, the level of users’ satisfaction with the systems in question was relatively good. However, to achieve the total optimum condition, when designing the system, the factors affecting the enhancement of the users’ satisfaction and the type of hospital activity and specialty must be given special consideration. PMID:25132711

  17. Elihu Yale and the medicine he promoted: the government general hospital and Madras Medical College, India.

    PubMed Central

    Mariappan, M. Rajan; Narayan, Deepak; Fadare, Oluwole; Sankarand, J. R.

    2004-01-01

    Much has been written about the philanthropist Elihu Yale and his life in the Americas and England, where he spent his beginnings and end. Less publicized is his life in India, where he spent the majority of his adult life and where he raised his family. A major contribution of Elihu Yale to medicine in India was his promotion of a local hospital in the major Indian trading port city of Madras. This essay briefly describes the history of that hospital and the medical college that grew out of it. PMID:15829148

  18. Impact of Influenza on Outpatient Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths by Using a Time Series Poisson Generalized Additive Model

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ru-ning; Zheng, Hui-zhen; Ou, Chun-quan; Huang, Li-qun; Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Xin; Liang, Can-kun; Lin, Jin-yan; Zhong, Hao-jie; Song, Tie; Luo, Hui-ming

    2016-01-01

    Background The disease burden associated with influenza in developing tropical and subtropical countries is poorly understood owing to the lack of a comprehensive disease surveillance system and information-exchange mechanisms. The impact of influenza on outpatient visits, hospital admissions, and deaths has not been fully demonstrated to date in south China. Methods A time series Poisson generalized additive model was used to quantitatively assess influenza-like illness (ILI) and influenza disease burden by using influenza surveillance data in Zhuhai City from 2007 to 2009, combined with the outpatient, inpatient, and respiratory disease mortality data of the same period. Results The influenza activity in Zhuhai City demonstrated a typical subtropical seasonal pattern; however, each influenza virus subtype showed a specific transmission variation. The weekly ILI case number and virus isolation rate had a very close positive correlation (r = 0.774, P < 0.0001). The impact of ILI and influenza on weekly outpatient visits was statistically significant (P < 0.05). We determined that 10.7% of outpatient visits were associated with ILI and 1.88% were associated with influenza. ILI also had a significant influence on the hospitalization rates (P < 0.05), but mainly in populations <25 years of age. No statistically significant effect of influenza on hospital admissions was found (P > 0.05). The impact of ILI on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was most significant (P < 0.05), with 33.1% of COPD-related deaths being attributable to ILI. The impact of influenza on the mortality rate requires further evaluation. Conclusions ILI is a feasible indicator of influenza activity. Both ILI and influenza have a large impact on outpatient visits. Although ILI affects the number of hospital admissions and deaths, we found no consistent influence of influenza, which requires further assessment. PMID:26894876

  19. Public and Private Hospital Nurses’ Perceptions of the Ethical Climate in Their Work Settings, Sari City, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Ali Asghar; Hesamzadeh, Ali; Khademloo, Mohammad; Khalili, Salimeh; Hesamzadeh, Shamim; Berger, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nurses’ perceptions of ethical climate patterns have certain undeniable effects on hospitals. There is little evidence of possible differences in this element between public and private hospitals and contributing factors. Objectives: This study investigated whether the perceptions of the ethical climate in nurses’ working in public hospitals differ from that of nurses in private hospitals, and which factors may affect nurses’ perceptions. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study of randomly selected registered nurses (n = 235), working in four public hospitals affiliated to Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, and three private hospitals, was conducted in Sari City, Iran. A self-administered questionnaire, containing demographic characteristics and the Hospital Ethical Climate Survey (HECS), were used to assess registered nurses’ perceptions of public and private hospitals ethical climate. An independent t-test and one-way ANOVA were used to analyze the data. Results: Across the five factors of HECS, the highest and lowest mean scores pertained to managers and physicians, respectively, in both public and private hospitals. Nurses who had a conditional employment situation and those working in pediatric intensive care units showed significantly more positive perceptions of the ethical work climate when compared to their peers (P < 0.05). Although the mean score of ethical work climate in private hospitals (3.82 ± 0.61) was higher than that in public hospitals (3.76 ± 0.54), no significant difference was found (P = 0.44). Conclusions: Hospital managers need to discover better ways to promote safety and health programs for their staff according to nurses’ area of work and their type of units. They should also encourage greater levels of participation in safety-enhancing initiatives in the hospital’s ethical climate, especially in the areas of nurses’ perceptions of their physician colleagues, and for nurses with a conditional

  20. Fitzsimons General Hospital, Bachelor Officers' Quarters/Officers' Club, West Harlowe Avenue, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Fitzsimons General Hospital, Bachelor Officers' Quarters/Officers' Club, West Harlowe Avenue, South side, 200 feet West of intersection of West Harlow Avenue & South First Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  1. Evaluation of an electroconvulsive therapy service in a general hospital.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Scott; Brunero, Scott; Barclay, Christopher; Wijeratne, Chanaka

    2011-06-01

    There has been much recent literature on the technical parameters of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) with regard to improving efficacy and minimizing adverse effects, but relatively little on ECT service delivery. This paper will discuss the development and characteristics of an ECT service at a teaching hospital in metropolitan Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. A mixture of qualitative and quantitative methods, including a selective literature review and audit of ECT use were used. The results of the audit were compared with the 2007 revision of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists' clinical memorandum on ECT. We discuss issues, such as the optimal site for ECT delivery, ECT mental health nurse coordinator role, credentialing of psychiatrists, registrar supervision, and the development of an ECT committee. A significant finding of the audit was that the majority of patients were treated under the New South Wales Mental Health Act, and voluntary patients were more likely to have a diagnosis of a depressive disorder, whereas involuntary patients were more likely to have a non-mood disorder diagnosis. This study has shown that auditing of ECT practices and services by mental health nurses is essential for quality improvement processes. The audit highlighted areas of service delivery that should be subject to review and evaluation against professional standards. PMID:21492361

  2. Treatment and diagnostic accuracy of neurosyphilis at Boston City Hospital's Neurological Unit, 1930-1979.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Diana; Vilensky, Joel A; Robertson, Wendy M; Berger, Joseph

    2012-03-15

    The twentieth century was marked with frequent advances in the treatment and diagnosis of neurosyphilis. Once considered one of the most serious human diseases, neurosyphilis was paramount to a death sentence often preceded by agonizing pain and/or diminishing mental capacities. Since the introduction of penicillin in 1943, however, the prevalence of neurosyphilis has declined dramatically and the prognosis of the few still affected has been greatly improved. We examined patient records from Boston City Hospital's (BCH) Neurologic Unit from 1930 to 1979 to obtain primary data on treatment modalities for neurosyphilis during this period, with particular attention to the use of malarial therapy. We also evaluated these same records to determine whether the "great imitator" moniker that was applied to neurosyphilis may have in part been due to systematic errors in diagnostic criteria and false positive tests. The BCH neurologists used all available treatment compounds, including arsenicals, bismuth, iodides, malaria, and typhoid. The data also suggest that the wide diversity of symptoms attributed to neurosyphilis was probably accurate. PMID:22129939

  3. The effect of alternative case-mix adjustments on mortality differences between municipal and voluntary hospitals in New York City.

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, M F; Park, R E; Keesey, J; Brook, R H

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study investigated how mortality differences between groups of municipal versus voluntary hospitals are affected by case-mix adjustment methods. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SETTING. We sampled about 10,000 random admissions from administrative data for patients hospitalized with each of six conditions in hospitals in New York City during 1984-1987. STUDY DESIGN. We developed logistic regression models adjusting for age and gender, for principal diagnosis, for "limited other diagnoses" (secondary diagnoses that were very unlikely to result from care received), for "full other diagnoses" (all secondary diagnoses irrespective of whether they might have been due to care received), for previous diagnoses, and for other variables. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. For five of the six conditions, when the limited other diagnoses adjustment was used there was higher mortality in the municipal hospitals (p < .05), with 3.3 additional deaths/100 admissions for myocardial infarction, 1.2 for pneumonia, 8.3 for stroke, 2.8 for head trauma, and 0.8 for hip repair. However, when the full other diagnoses adjustment was used, differences remained significant only for stroke (4.3 additional deaths/100 admissions) and head trauma (1.3) (p < .05). CONCLUSIONS. Estimates of mortality differences between New York City municipal and voluntary hospitals are substantially affected by which secondary diagnoses are used in case-mix adjustment. Judgments of quality should not be based on administrative data unless models can be developed that validly capture level of sickness at admission. PMID:8163382

  4. Well-Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: The Philippine General Hospital Experience

    PubMed Central

    Uy, Abigail T.; Maningat, Patricia Deanna D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Well-differentiated thyroid cancer (WDTC) is the most common form of thyroid malignancy. While it is typically associated with good prognosis, it may exhibit higher recurrence and mortality rates in selected groups, particularly Filipinos. This paper aims to describe the experience of a Philippine Hospital in managing patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of 723 patients with WDTC (649 papillary and 79 follicular), evaluating the clinicopathologic profiles, ultrasound features, management received, tumor recurrence, and eventual outcome over a mean follow-up period of 5 years. Results The mean age at diagnosis was 44±13 years (range, 18 to 82), with a majority of cases occurring in the younger age group (<45 years). Most tumors were between 2 and 4 cm in size. The majority of papillary thyroid cancers (PTCs, 63.2%) and follicular thyroid cancers (FTCs, 54.4%) initially presented as stage 1, with a greater proportion of FTC cases (12.7% vs. 3.7%) presenting with distant metastases. Nodal metastases at presentation were more frequent among patients with PTC (29.9% vs. 7.6%). A majority of cases were treated by complete thyroidectomy, followed by radioactive iodine therapy and thyroid stimulating hormone suppression, resulting in a disease-free state. Excluding patients with distant metastases at presentation, the recurrence rates for papillary and FTC were 30.1% and 18.8%, respectively. Conclusion Overall, PTC among Filipinos was associated with a more aggressive and recurrent behavior. FTC among Filipinos appeared to behave similarly with other racial groups. PMID:26754584

  5. [Organization of the hospital food service in a provincial general hospital. Criteria and initial evaluation].

    PubMed

    Palmo, A; Narracci, A; Balzola, F

    1982-01-28

    The results of restructuring the meals service in Ivrea Hospital are reported. 7 diet-sheets with food prepared by the central kitchen composed: 2 of normal nutritional content (the first cooked with normal ingredients; the second using special recipes for the bed-ridden); one hypoprotein (50 g/24 hrs of protein), one hypoglycidic (145-170-210 g/24 hrs of glycides), 1 hyposodic (0.6-1.4 g of N/24 hrs), one semiliquid and one divided into 6 small meals. Special diets were needed for 0.5-6-12-2-0.1% of the patients. The amount of uneaten food fell (from 30% to 10%) and there was a real increase in calories (1390 leads into 1870 cals/24 hrs) and protein consumption (70-95 g/24 hrs). The cost remained the same (2079-2176 lire/per day/per capita). PMID:7058011

  6. Evaluation retest on a hospital-refuse incinerator at Sutter General Hospital, Sacramento, California

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, A.; Ouchida, P.; Lew, G.

    1988-04-01

    An evaluation test program was conducted to evaluate the effect of incinerator design changes on emissions from the hospital-refuse incinerator. The test was conducted as a part of the California Air Resources Board's program to assess emissions from stationary sources. Daily average oxygen concentrations ranged from 12.1-15.6% and the daily average carbon dioxide concentrations ranged from 4.0-5.5%. Dioxin emissions ranged from 21.0 nanograms per second (ng/sec) for tetrachlorodioxin to 355 ng/sec for the heptachlorodioxin. Furan emission rates ranged from 253 ng/sec for the tetrachlorofuran to 477 ng/sec for the heptachlorofuran. The mass emission rates of hydrochloric acid ranged from 2.6 to 5.8 pounds per hour.

  7. Emergency abdominal re-exploration in a district general hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Wain, M. O.; Sykes, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    A series of 3600 consecutive patients undergoing laparotomy was studied prospectively. Fifty six patients required a total of 64 urgent re-explorations of the abdomen during the period of hospitalisation after the first operation. The re-exploration rate was 1.7%. Re-laparotomy was most often necessary in the elderly and following gastroduodenal or intestinal operations. The indication for re-operation must in part reflect the nature of surgical practice but in this general surgical unit the most common complications requiring re-laparotomy were sepsis, small bowel obstruction and wound dehiscence. Biliary operations were relatively uncomplicated. Mortality rose with age. Diagnosis depends upon the ability to distinguish the clinical symptoms and signs of developing complication from the clinical features inevitable following abdominal surgery. We believe that the decision to re-operate and the second operation should normally be undertaken by experienced surgical staff. PMID:3631874

  8. [Pharmaceutical Service after the Fukushima Disaster: A Case Report of Soma General Hospital].

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Hisanori; Momonoi, Toshiyuki; Kumakawa, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

      Despite being damaged by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disaster, Soma General Hospital, located approximately 40 km north of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, was able to fulfill its role as a key regional hospital in northeast Fukushima. To elucidate the pharmaceutical service in response to the disaster, we investigated the hospital's operations in 2011 according to the medical records and prescriptions. One of the difficulties that the department of pharmaceutical service faced at that time was the increase in emergency healthcare requests by evacuated patients from other hospitals and clinics. Herein, we propose the following countermeasures to be considered in future disaster preparations: (1) establishing a medical and pharmaceutical service coordinator for disaster relief; (2) sharing all local patients' medical information in emergencies (at least contraindicated drugs or allergy history); and (3) reviewing disaster stockpiles, especially pharmaceuticals (both at the hospital and in nearby locations). PMID:26725681

  9. Causes of Hospitalization among Children Ages Zero to Nine Years Old in the City of São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Ana Paula Scoleze; Sucupira, Ana Cecília Silveira Lins; Grisi, Sandra Josefina Ferraz Ellero

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The profile of child morbidity is an important parameter for defining and altering health policies. Studies about infant mortality are more numerous than those on morbidity, especially related to hospital admissions. The objective of this study is to describe the causes of admission in the public health system for children from zero to nine years of age in the city of São Paulo during the years 2002 to 2006 and compare these results to those from the national data. METHOD: Through a cross-sectional study, data were obtained from the Hospital Information System, which is available in the Information System of the Unified Health System - DATASUS. RESULTS: Within the period, 16% of the total admissions corresponded to children from zero to nine years of age, with most of the children being younger than one year of age. In the city of São Paulo, the admission coefficient increased 11%, and in Brazil, it decreased 14%. Respiratory diseases were the main causes of hospitalization. In São Paulo, the second most frequent causes of admission were diseases that originated during the perinatal period (15.9%), and in Brazil, the second most frequent cause of admission was infectious-parasitic diseases (21.7%). Admissions for perinatal diseases increased 32% in São Paulo and 6% in Brazil. While hospitalizations for diarrhea decreased in Brazil, an increase was recorded in the city of São Paulo for children under five years old. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study show a paradoxical increase in the number of hospitalizations during an expansion of primary attention, indicating that the rise was not associated with a significant improvement in the quality of service. PMID:20126344

  10. The burden of intentional injuries in Mwanza City, north-western Tanzania: a tertiary hospital survey.

    PubMed

    Chalya, Phillipo L; Gilyoma, Japhet M

    2012-07-01

    Intenionai injuries are an emerging silent epiaemic in developing countries ana contribute significantly to global injury burden. A descriptive prospective study was conducted to establish the prevalence, contributing factors, injury pattern and treatment outcome of intentional injuries at Bugando Medical Centre in Northwestern Tanzania. Data was collected using a pre-tested, coded questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS software version 17.0. A total of 1642 (23.7%) patients with intentional injuries were studied. Of these, 97.7% resulted from interpersonal violence (homicide) and 2.3% were self-inflicted (suicide). Males outnumbered females by a ratio of 2.2:1. Their median age was 24 years. The majority of injuries (53.5%) occurred at home. Criminal violence was the most common reason for intentional injuries accounting for 52.1% of cases. In women, domestic violence was responsible for 64.6% of the admissions. Poverty, lack of education, unemployment and alcohol abuse were the most common contributing factors to intentional injuries. Blunt and sharp objects (48.6%) were the most common weapons used. Gunshot injuries were recorded in 11.6% of cases. The head/neck was commonly affected in 49.2%. Soft tissue injuries (87.3%) were the most frequent type of injuries. The majority (90.1%) of patients were treated surgically. Complication rate was 15.0%.The median hospital stay was 26 days (range 1 day to 114 days). Patients with long bone fractures and those who had complications stayed longer in the hospital (P < 0.001). Mortality rate was 13.3%. The mortality rate was significantly high in patients with severe injuries (Injury Severity Score > 15), severe head injuries and those who needed intensive care unit (ICU) admissions and ventilatory support (P< 0.001). Intentional injuries are an emerging but neglected epidemic in Mwanza City and contribute significantly to high morbidity and mortality. Urgent preventive measures targeting at the root causes of violence such

  11. Management of minor medical problems and trauma: general practice or hospital?

    PubMed Central

    Myers, P

    1982-01-01

    An assessment of the problems for which 1000 consecutive patients attended an accident and emergency department of a district general hospital showed that 54.2% could have been treated by general practitioner. Amongst 150 patients attending hospital for minor problems between the hours of 09:00 and 19:00 on weekdays, the main reason given for not going to a GP was their impression that only in hospital could the required treatment be provided. A postal survey of 50 GPs found that they tended to avoid regularly handling certain specified minor problems which often present to hospital. The current trend away from the community management of such problems is discussed. It is suggested that improving patient education and GPs' incentives, while decreasing list sizes and expanding the primary care team, may encourage the management by GPs of trivial trauma and minor medical problems. PMID:7143339

  12. Control Costs, Enhance Quality, and Increase Revenue in Three Top General Public Hospitals in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lue-Ping; Yu, Guo-Pei; Liu, Hui; Ma, Xie-Min; Wang, Jing; Kong, Gui-Lan; Li, Yi; Ma, Wen; Cui, Yong; Xu, Beibei; Yu, Na; Bao, Xiao-Yuan; Guo, Yu; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Jun; Li, Yan; Xie, Xue-Qin; Jiang, Bao-Guo; Ke, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Background With market-oriented economic and health-care reform, public hospitals in China have received unprecedented pressures from governmental regulations, public opinions, and financial demands. To adapt the changing environment and keep pace of modernizing healthcare delivery system, public hospitals in China are expanding clinical services and improving delivery efficiency, while controlling costs. Recent experiences are valuable lessons for guiding future healthcare reform. Here we carefully study three teaching hospitals, to exemplify their experiences during this period. Methods We performed a systematic analysis on hospitalization costs, health-care quality and delivery efficiencies from 2006 to 2010 in three teaching hospitals in Beijing, China. The analysis measured temporal changes of inpatient cost per stay (CPS), cost per day (CPD), inpatient mortality rate (IMR), and length of stay (LOS), using a generalized additive model. Findings There were 651,559 hospitalizations during the period analyzed. Averaged CPS was stable over time, while averaged CPD steadily increased by 41.7% (P<0.001), from CNY 1,531 in 2006 to CNY 2,169 in 2010. The increasing CPD seemed synchronous with the steady rising of the national annual income per capita. Surgical cost was the main contributor to the temporal change of CPD, while medicine and examination costs tended to be stable over time. From 2006 and 2010, IMR decreased by 36%, while LOS reduced by 25%. Increasing hospitalizations with higher costs, along with an overall stable CPS, reduced IMR, and shorter LOS, appear to be the major characteristics of these three hospitals at present. Interpretations These three teaching hospitals have gained some success in controlling costs, improving cares, adopting modern medical technologies, and increasing hospital revenues. Effective hospital governance and physicians' professional capacity plus government regulations and supervisions may have played a role. However, purely

  13. Factors that influence general practitioners' choice of hospital when referring patients for elective surgery.

    PubMed

    Mahon, A; Whitehouse, C; Wilkin, D; Nocon, A

    1993-07-01

    To describe the factors that influence general practitioners' choice of hospital when referring patients for elective surgery in three specialties, a postal questionnaire was distributed in January 1991 to 449 doctors who had referred patients to one of six hospitals in the North Western Regional Health Authority. Responses were received from 260 general practitioners (58%). Of the respondents 95% selected 'local and convenient' as a factor that commonly influenced their choice of hospital for at least one specialty and 65% mentioned this across all three specialties. Seventy four per cent mentioned patient preference as influencing choice for at least one specialty and 57% across all three specialties. Only 32% of doctors mentioned waiting times for appointment across the three specialties and 26% waiting times for surgery across the three specialties. When asked to select the single most important factor 'local and convenient' was selected by 33% of general practitioners for a least one specialty, the general standard of clinical care by 28% and waiting time for appointment by 23%. Patient preference was only selected by 6% of doctors as the most important factor. It is of note that 33% of general practitioners perceived there to be no choice of hospital for at least one specialty and 14% thought this to be the single most important influence on choice for at least one specialty. Approximately half the general practitioners (49%) considered it always or often appropriate to give their patients a choice. Most general practitioners received waiting time information from hospitals in their own health district but fewer received such information from hospitals outside their district.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8398242

  14. Attitudes of Malaysian general hospital staff towards patients with mental illness and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The context of the study is the increased assessment and treatment of persons with mental illness in general hospital settings by general health staff, as the move away from mental hospitals gathers pace in low and middle income countries. The purpose of the study was to examine whether general attitudes of hospital staff towards persons with mental illness, and extent of mental health training and clinical experience, are associated with different attitudes and behaviours towards a patient with mental illness than towards a patients with a general health problem - diabetes. Methods General hospital health professionals in Malaysia were randomly allocated one of two vignettes, one describing a patient with mental illness and the other a patient with diabetes, and invited to complete a questionnaire examining attitudes and health care practices in relation to the case. The questionnaires completed by respondents included questions on demographics, training in mental health, exposure in clinical practice to people with mental illness, attitudes and expected health care behaviour towards the patient in the vignette, and a general questionnaire exploring negative attitudes towards people with mental illness. Questionnaires with complete responses were received from 654 study participants. Results Stigmatising attitudes towards persons with mental illness were common. Those responding to the mental illness vignette (N = 356) gave significantly lower ratings on care and support and higher ratings on avoidance and negative stereotype expectations compared with those responding the diabetes vignette (N = 298). Conclusions Results support the view that, in the Malaysian setting, patients with mental illness may receive differential care from general hospital staff and that general stigmatising attitudes among professionals may influence their care practices. More direct measurement of clinician behaviours than able to be implemented through survey method is

  15. The association between job satisfaction and general health among employees of Golestan Hospital in Ahvaz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Khiavi, Farzad Faraji; Dashti, Rezvan; Zergani, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Job satisfaction is one of the most challenging organizational concepts, and it is the basis of management policies to increase productivity and efficiency of the organization. The general health rate may affect job satisfaction in several ways. This study aimed to determine the association between job satisfaction and general health among employees of Golestan Hospital in Ahvaz, Iran. Methods The study population of this cross-sectional research included 100 employees of Golestan Hospital in Ahvaz, Iran. The data collection instruments were the General Health Questionnaire (28-GHQ) and the Job Descriptive Index (JDI) questionnaire. The data were analyzed using Pearson’s product-moment correlation coefficient, independent samples t-test, and ANOVA statistical tests in SPSS software. Results The mean general health was calculated as 26.19 ± 11.04, which indicated a positive psychiatric condition. Job satisfaction with a mean score of 89.67 ± 23.3 was deemed to be relatively dissatisfied. A medium negative and significant association was observed between job satisfaction and general health and its subscales (physical health, anxiety, social, and depression). Conclusions General health subscales and job satisfaction are associated. Some actions must be planned to cope with the negative factors in general health in order to increase employees’ satisfaction in university educational hospitals. PMID:27280002

  16. Relationship between Psychiatric Nurse Work Environments and Nurse Burnout in Acute Care General Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Hanrahan, Nancy P.; Aiken, Linda H.; McClaine, Lakeetra; Hanlon, Alexandra L

    2010-01-01

    Following deinstitutionalization, inpatient psychiatric services moved from state institutions to general hospitals. Despite the magnitude of these changes, evaluations of the quality of inpatient care environments in general hospitals are limited. This study examined the extent to which organizational factors of the inpatient psychiatric environments are associated with psychiatric nurse burnout. Organizational factors were measured by an instrument endorsed by the National Quality Forum. Robust clustered regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between organizational factors in 67 hospitals and levels of burnout for 353 psychiatric nurses. Lower levels of psychiatric nurse burnout was significantly associated with inpatient environments that had better overall quality work environments, more effective managers, strong nurse-physician relationships, and higher psychiatric nurse-to-patient staffing ratios. These results suggest that adjustments in organizational management of inpatient psychiatric environments could have a positive effect on psychiatric nurses’ capacity to sustain safe and effective patient care environments. PMID:20144031

  17. Preliminary survey report: control technology for ethylene oxide sterilization at Selby General Hospital, Marietta, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Kercher, S.L.; Mortimer, V.D.; Todd, W.F.

    1985-08-01

    A survey of control technology for reducing exposure during ethylene oxide sterilization was conducted at Selby General Hospital, Marietta, Ohio on August 30, 1984. The Central Services Department performed ethylene oxide sterilization for obstetrics, neonatal care, respiratory therapy, cytology, isolation cases, and surgery. Engineering controls consisted of isolation of the sterilizer and aerators, local exhaust ventilation, a continuous fresh air purge on the sterilization cycle, in chamber aeration of the sterilizers, and general exhaust ventilation of the Central Services Department and the sterilizer room. The author concludes that the Central Services Department has instituted control technology that minimizes employee exposure to ethylene-oxide. The hospital should be considered a candidate for an in-depth survey in a NIOSH study of control technology for ethylene oxide sterilization in hospitals.

  18. Legal Outcomes of Sexually Abused Children Evaluated at the Philippine General Hospital Child Protection Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugue-Castillo, Mariella

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the legal outcomes and factors associated with case reaching court and conviction for sexual abuse of children seen at the Philippine General Hospital Child Protection Unit (PGH-CPU) from 1997 to 2000. Methods: Mixed transdisciplinary research design combined longitudinal cohort with qualitative methods. Data were obtained…

  19. Internal Revenue Service General Counsel's Memorandum threatens tax exemption for charitable hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ball, D W

    1992-01-01

    A recent memorandum from the General Counsel of the Internal Revenue Service changes the standard against which tax exempt entities will be measured, which change can adversely affect charitable hospitals' tax exempt status. In addition, the memorandum makes clear that a violation of the Anti-Kickback statute, discussed in Mr. Aaron's article, is inconsistent with tax exempt status. PMID:10141602

  20. Researches regarding the Morton ether inhaler at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston.

    PubMed

    Haridas, Rajesh P; Mifflin, Jeffrey A

    2013-11-01

    The Morton ether inhaler in the possession of Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, was traced back to 1906 when the earliest known photograph of it was published. The authors believe that the inhaler was given by William T. G. Morton, MD, to J. Mason Warren, MD, in January 1847. The inhaler was acquired by the Warren Anatomical Museum at an unknown date, loaned to Massachusetts General Hospital in October 1946, and placed on permanent loan to Massachusetts General Hospital in April 1948. Many documents relating to the inhaler have disappeared, and it was only identified in 2009 as the inhaler that probably belonged to J. Mason Warren, MD. The inhaler is not believed to be the one that Morton used on October 16, 1846, at Massachusetts General Hospital. It is the only known example of a Morton ether inhaler with valves (excluding replicas or reproduction inhalers) and is probably of similar design to the inhaler that Morton used on October 16, 1846. PMID:24036621

  1. Study of patients absconding behavior in a general hospital at southern region of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Khammarnia, Mohammad; Kassani, Aziz; Amiresmaili, Mohammadreza; Sadeghi, Ahmad; Karimi Jaberi, Zahra; Kavosi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients’ escape from hospital imposes a significant cost to patients as well as the health system. Besides, for these patients, exposure to adverse events (such as suicide, self-harm, violence and harm to hospital reputation) are more likely to occur compared to others. The present study aimed to determine the characteristics of the absconding patients in a general hospital through a case-control design in Shiraz, Iran. Methods: This case-control study was conducted on 413 absconded patients as case and 413 patients as control in a large general hospital in Shiraz, southern Iran. In this study, data on the case and control patients was collected from the medical records using a standard checklist in the period of 2011–3. Then, the data were analyzed using descriptive and analytical statistics, through SPSS 16. Results: The finding showed that 413 patients absconded (0.50%) and mean of age in case group was 40.98 ± 16.31 years. In univariate analysis, variables of gender [Odds Ratio (OR)= 2], ward (OR= 1.22), insurance status (OR= 0.41), job status (OR= 0.34) and residence expenditure were significant. However, in multivariate analysis significant variables were age (ORadj= 0.13), gender (ORadj= 2.15), self-employment/unemployed (ORadj= 0.47), emergency/admission (ORadj= 2.14), internal/admission (ORadj= 3.16), insurance status (ORadj= 4.49) and residence expenditure (ORadj= 1.15). Conclusion: Characteristics such as middle age, male gender, no insurance coverage, inability to afford hospital expenditures and admission in emergency department make patients more likely abscond from the hospital. Therefore, it may be necessary to focus efforts on high-risk groups and increase insurance coverage in the country to prevent absconding from hospital. PMID:25774367

  2. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates That Colonize Medical Students in a Hospital of the City of Cali, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Collazos Marín, Luis Fernando; Estupiñan Arciniegas, Gina; Chavez Vivas, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) represents a risk for the spread of bacteria. This study characterized the S. aureus isolated from medical students, who were in their clinical rotation at a hospital in the city of Cali. Materials and Methods. 216 students participated in the study and 63 isolates of S. aureus were evaluated for susceptibility and PCR amplification of agr and mecA genes. The origin of MRSA isolates was established by analyzing agr polymorphisms. Results. A total of 29.2% of students were colonized by S. aureus and nasal carriage rate was 23.6% and 14.3% MRSA. Three agr groups (agr II, and agr III) were identified; the agr I group was the most common, with a 35% prevalence; this group is from community origin. Conclusion. The present study demonstrates that medical students carry S. aureus strains, with the threat of spreading them both to community and hospital environments. PMID:26495001

  3. Clinical outcomes of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms that underwent endovascular repair in a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chih-Hsien; Chang, Chien-Jung; Huang, Jau-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of elective endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) in patients at a district general hospital. Methods A retrospective clinical study was conducted using data on 16 patients with elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and nine patients with consecutive rAAA treated with EVAR from January 2010 to December 2014 in a district general hospital in Taiwan. Results The preoperative characteristics of the two groups are listed. Thirty-six percent (9/25) of the patients were referred from other hospitals that did not offer surgical services. The percentage of patients with rAAA that were transferred from other hospitals was 55.5% (5/9). The stay durations in the intensive care unit for elective EVAR cases were shorter than those for emergent EVAR (1.75±1 d elective vs. 10±13.37 d emergent; P<0.019). The hospitalization days (11.06±4.07 d elective vs. 21.89±18.36 d emergent; P<0.031), operative time (183.63±57.24 min elective vs. 227.11±59.92 min emergent; P<0.009), and blood loss volumes (115.63±80.41 mL elective vs. 422.22±276.26 mL emergent; P<0.005) are shown; statistics for use of Perclose ProGlide® (7 cases elective vs. 0 case emergent; P<0.024) are compared. The overall 30-d mortality rate was 11.11% (1/9). Conclusions The results confirm that EVAR surgery can be safely performed in a district general hospital with an integrated health care system. Using Perclose ProGlide® for selected cases may reduce blood loss and operative time. PMID:27499945

  4. Acute generalized weakness in patients referred to Amirkola Children’s Hospital from 2005 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Salehiomran, Mohammad Reza; Naserkhaki, Somayeh; Hajiahmadi, Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diseases that cause acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) often progress rapidly, thus may cause life threatening complications, therefore, their diagnosis and cure are important. This study was carried out to investigate the causes of acute generalized weakness in children referred to Amirkola Children’s Hospital, in Babol, Iran. Methods: In this case series, the epidemiological causes of the disease and clinical features of 15 cases with acute generalized weakness from April 2005 to September 2010 were evaluated. The data were collected and analyzed. Results: The mean age of cases was 4.7±3.5 years. The male/female ratio was 2. Twenty cases had Guillain-Barre syndrome, two with myositis and one with periodic hyperkalemic paralysis. Conclusion: Guillain-Barre syndrome is the most common cause of AFP in children admitted due to acute generalized weakness in Amirkola Children’s Hospital. PMID:24358438

  5. Estimating the hospitalization burden associated with influenza and respiratory syncytial virus in New York City, 2003–2011

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Edward; Greene, Sharon K; Olson, Donald R; Hanage, William P; Lipsitch, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background Hospitalization burden associated with influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is uncertain due to ambiguity in the inference methodologies employed for its estimation. Objectives Utilization of a new method to quantitate the above burden. Methods Weekly hospitalization rates for several principal diagnoses from 2003 to 2011 in New York City by age group were regressed linearly against incidence proxies for the major influenza subtypes and RSV adjusting for temporal trends and seasonal baselines. Results Average annual rates of influenza-associated respiratory hospitalizations per 100 000 were estimated to be 129 [95% CI (79, 179)] for age <1, 36·3 (21·6, 51·4) for ages 1–4, 10·6 (7·5, 13·7) for ages 5–17, 25·6 (21·3, 29·8) for ages 18–49, 65·5 (54·0, 76·9) for ages 50–64, 125 (105, 147) for ages 65–74, and 288 (244, 331) for ages ≥75. Additionally, influenza had a significant contribution to hospitalization rates with a principal diagnosis of septicemia for ages 5–17 [0·76 (0·1, 1·4)], 18–49 [1·02 (0·3, 1·7)], 50–64 [4·0 (1·7, 6·3)], 65–74 [8·8 (2·2, 15·6)], and ≥75 [38·7 (25·7, 52·9)]. RSV had a significant contribution to the rates of respiratory hospitalizations for age <1 [1900 (1740, 2060)], ages 1–4 [117 (70, 167)], and ≥75 [175 (44, 312)] [including chronic lower respiratory disease, 90 (43, 140)] as well as pneumonia & influenza hospitalizations for ages 18–49 [6·2 (1·1, 11·3)] and circulatory hospitalizations for ages ≥75 [199 (13, 375)]. Conclusions The high burden of RSV hospitalizations among young children and seniors age ≥75 suggests the need for additional control measures such as vaccination to mitigate the impact of annual RSV epidemics. Our estimates for influenza-associated hospitalizations provide further evidence of the burden of morbidity associated with influenza, supporting current guidelines regarding influenza vaccination and antiviral treatment. PMID

  6. Prevalence of Non-Tuberculous Mycobacteria in Hospital Waters of Major Cities of Khuzestan Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Azar Dokht; Hashemi Shahraki, Abdolrazagh; Hashemzadeh, Mohammad; Sheini Mehrabzadeh, Rasa; Teimoori, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are among the emerging pathogens in immunocompromised individuals including hospitalized patients. So, it is important to consider hospitals water supplies as a source for infection. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of NTM in the hospital aquatic systems of Khuzestan, South west of Iran. In total, 258 hospital water samples were collected and examined. After initial sample processing, sediment of each sample were inoculated into two Lowenstein-Jensen medium. The positive cultures were studied with phenotypic tests including growth rate, colony morphology, and pigmentation, with subsequent PCR- restriction enzyme analysis (PRA) and rpoB gene sequence analysis. Mycobacterial strains were isolated from 77 samples (29.8%), comprising 52 (70.1%) rapid growing, and 25 (32.4%) slow growing mycobacteria. Based on the overall results, M. fortuitum (44.1%) was the most common mycobacterial species in hospital water samples, followed by M. gordonae (n = 13, 16.8%) and M. senegalense (n = 5, 7.7%). In conclusion, current study demonstrated the NTM strains as one of the major parts of hospital water supplies with probable potential source for nosocomial infections. This finding also help to shed light on to the dynamics of the distribution and diversity of NTM in the water system of hospitals in the region of study. PMID:27148491

  7. Autologous blood donation in a small general acute-care hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Mott, L. S.; Jones, M. J.

    1995-01-01

    Increased public concerns about infectious risk associated with homologous blood transfusions have led to a significant increase in autologous blood collections. In response, blood banks and large hospitals have implemented autologous blood donation programs (ABDPs). Small hospitals lack the technical resources and patient case loads to effectively institute ABDPs. A preoperative ABDP designed to increase availability and patient convenience--and, therefore, utilization--is described. The program created in a rural 90-bed general acute-care hospital processed 105 donors and collected 197 units over a 38-month period. The percentage of the collected units that were transfused was 44.7%, and only 6.1% of participating patients required homologous transfusions. Comparisons of hematological and clinical data with previously published results indicate that small-scale preoperative ABDPs are clinically effective, safe, and provide cost-efficient utilization of the safest blood supply available. PMID:7674344

  8. Child and adolescent psychiatry in general children's hospitals. A survey of chairs of psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Campo, J V; Kingsley, R S; Bridge, J; Mrazek, D

    2000-01-01

    This article characterizes the academic, administrative, clinical service, and fiscal characteristics of departments of psychiatry in traditional children's hospitals to determine the characteristics of fiscally successful programs. A survey of chairs of psychiatry from short-term general children's hospitals was conducted based on 38 questions addressing the descriptive characteristics of their respective departments. The characteristics of psychiatry programs identified as fiscally successful were compared to those of programs that required subsidy. Nine of 45 eligible children's hospitals (20%) did not have a department or section of psychiatry, and surveys were returned by 35 of 36 department chairs (97% response). Considerable variation exists in the academic, administrative, clinical services, and fiscal characteristics of programs, although over half are operating at a deficit. Fiscal success was associated with availability of inpatient and intermediate levels of psychiatric care, better integration of the psychiatry program within the children's hospital, and adequate fiscal information being provided to the psychiatry chair. Additional research regarding the potential of psychiatric services to generate clinical success and cost savings is warranted. Pediatric health care professionals and third-party payers should be educated regarding the relevance of psychiatric services within children's hospitals and in physically ill children. PMID:10749950

  9. Radionuclide radiologist directed nuclear medicine services in district general hospitals in the South Thames Region.

    PubMed

    Conry, B G; Burwood, R J

    2001-08-01

    The equipment, staffing levels and imaging workload of all 14 radiologist directed nuclear medicine services in district general hospitals in the South Thames Region are presented. These are generally single camera departments providing a broad range of imaging procedures, including cardiac studies and white cell labelling, as well as the more usual renal, lung, thyroid and bone examinations. All departments have a high throughput, averaging 2358 examinations per year. Departmental staffing levels are variable, with some institutions having inadequate consultant radiology sessions free of other commitments as well as inadequate physics support. Potentially, these are important quality and legal issues that departments may need to address with hospital Trusts and Commissioning Agencies. Four small departments provided a service without any formally contracted radiologist sessions for nuclear medicine in the radiologists' job plans. The three medium sized departments have a closer match between sessions contracted and those actually worked, but in only one of these did the contracted sessional commitment equal the recommendation of the Nuclear Medicine Committee of the Royal College of Physicians. There is a disparity between the number of contracted consultant sessions and those actually worked in most institutions (86%), being at least two sessions in eight hospitals. Recommendations are made regarding the adequacy of some of the elements of provision in South Thames and the legal and safety implications for hospital Trust management and Commissioning Agencies. PMID:11511496

  10. The Difference in the Online Medical Information Searching Behaviors of Hospital Patients and Their Relatives versus the General Public

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hung-Yuan; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is two-fold: to explore the differences in online medical information searching behaviors, including evaluative standards and search strategies, of the general public (general group) and those of hospital patients and their relatives (hospital group); and to compare the predictive relationship between the evaluative…

  11. From the emergency department to the general hospital: hospital ownership and market factors in the admission of the seriously mentally ill.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jay J; Cochran, Christopher R; Moseley, Charles B

    2008-01-01

    General hospitals are becoming the safety net provider for the seriously mentally ill (SMI) in the United States, but these patients are faced with a number of potential barriers when accessing these hospitals. Hospital ownership and market forces are two potential organizational and healthcare system barriers that may affect the SMI patient's access, because the psychiatric and medical services they need are unprofitable services. This study examines the relationship among hospital ownership, market forces, and admission of the SMI patient from the emergency department into the general hospital. This was a cross-sectional study of a large sample of SMI patients from the 2002 State Inpatient Datasets for five states. Multiple logistic regression was applied in the multivariable analysis. After controlling for patient, hospital, and county covariates and when compared with not-for-profit hospitals, public hospitals were more likely to admit while investor-owned hospitals were less likely to admit SMI patients. Hospitals in competitive markets were less likely to admit while hospitals with capitation revenues were slightly less likely to admit these patients. Policy options that can address this "market failure" include strengthening the public psychiatric inpatient care system, making private health insurance coverage of the SMI more equitable, revising Medicare prospective payment system to better reimburse the treatment of the SMI, and allowing not-for-profit hospitals to count care of the SMI as a community benefit. Results of this study will be useful to healthcare managers searching for ways to reduce unnecessary administrative costs while continuing to maintain the level of administrative activities required for the provision of safe, effective, and high-quality care. PMID:18720688

  12. Syphilitic Aortitis: Autopsy Experience at the Ottawa General Hospital Since 1950

    PubMed Central

    Heggtveit, H. Alexander

    1965-01-01

    Twenty-six cases of syphilitic aortitis were found among 4173 autopsies performed at the Ottawa General Hospital since 1950. Although 10 aortic aneurysms, nine instances of coronary ostial stenosis and five examples of aortic incompetence were present in 20 cases, a clinical diagnosis of syphilitic aortitis had been established in only two patients. It is paradoxical that the clinical diagnosis of syphilitic aortitis is becoming less accurate as surgical techniques for the correction of its complications are being constantly improved. PMID:14282945

  13. Antibiotic Resistance and Biofilm Production in Staphylococcus epidermidis Strains, Isolated from a Tertiary Care Hospital in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera-Contreras, Roberto; Morelos-Ramírez, Rubén; Galicia-Camacho, Ada Nelly; Meléndez-Herrada, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis strains isolated from nosocomial infections represent a serious problem worldwide. In various Mexican states several reports have shown isolates from hospitals with antibiotic resistance to methicillin. In Mexico City, there is scarce information on staphylococcal infections in hospitals. Here, our research findings are shown in a four-year period study (2006–2010) for Staphylococcus epidermidis strains. Susceptibility and/or resistance to antibiotics in SE strains were assessed by phenotypic and molecular methods as mecA gene by PCR, as well as the correlation with biofilm production for these isolates and the relationship to the infection site. Out of a total of 161 (66%) negative biofilm SE strains, just 103 (64%) SE strains were confirmed as MRSE by PCR to mecA gene. From 84 (34%) positive biofilm SE strains, 76 (91%) were confirmed as MRSE by PCR to mecA gene. Higher percentages of resistance to antibiotics and higher number of resistance markers were found in biofilm-forming clinical strains (9 to 14) than non-biofilm-forming SE strains (3 to 8). These research findings represent a guide to establish infection control programs for this hospital. PMID:23724338

  14. Knowledge and Attitude of 851 Nursing Personnel toward Depression in General Hospitals of Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Seon-Cheol; Lee, Hwa-Young; Lee, Dong-Woo; Hahn, Sang-Woo; Park, Sang-Ho; Kim, Yeo-Ju; Choi, Jae Sung; Lee, Ho-Sung; Lee, Soyoung Irene; Na, Kyoung-Sae; Jung, Sung Won; Shim, Se-Hoon; Choi, Joonho; Paik, Jong-Woo; Kwon, Young-Joon

    2015-07-01

    Our study aimed to examine the knowledge and attitude of nursing personnel toward depression in general hospitals of Korea. A total of 851 nursing personnel enrolled at four university-affiliated general hospitals completed self-report questionnaires. Chi-square tests were used to compare the knowledge and attitude of registered or assistant nurses toward depression. In addition, binary logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for the following confounders: age-group and workplace. Registered and assistant nurses differed in their knowledge and attitude toward depression. The proportion of rational and/or correct responses were higher in registered nurses than assistant nurses for the following: constellation of depressive symptoms defined by DSM-IV (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 3.876; P<0.001); suicide risk in depression recovery (aOR, 3.223; P=0.001) and psychological stress as a cause of depression (aOR, 4.370; P<0.001); the relationship between chronic physical disease and depression (aOR, 8.984; P<0.001); and other items. Our results suggest that in terms of the biological model of depression, the understanding of registered nurses is greater than that of assistant nurses. Moreover, specific psychiatric education programs for nursing personnel need to be developed in Korea. Our findings can contribute to the development of a general hospital-based model for early detection of depression in patients with chronic medical diseases. PMID:26130960

  15. Two decades of external peer review of cancer care in general hospitals; the Dutch experience.

    PubMed

    Kilsdonk, Melvin J; Siesling, Sabine; Otter, Rene; van Harten, Wim H

    2016-03-01

    External peer review was introduced in general hospitals in the Netherlands in 1994 to assess and improve the multidisciplinary team approach in cancer care. This paper aims to explore the value, perceived impact, and (future) role of external peer review in cancer care. Semistructured interviews were held with clinicians, oncology nurses, and managers from fifteen general hospitals that participated in three rounds of peer review over a period of 16 years. Interviewees reflected on the goals and expectations, experiences, perceived impact, and future role of external peer review. Transcriptions of the interviews were coded to discover recurrent themes. Improving clinical care and organization were the main motives for participation. Positive impact was perceived on multiple aspects of care such as shared responsibilities, internal prioritization of cancer care, improved communication, and a clear structure and position of cancer care within general hospitals. Establishing a direct relationship between the external peer review and organizational or clinical impact proved to be difficult. Criticism was raised on the content of the program being too theoretical and organization-focussed after three rounds. According to most stakeholders, external peer review can improve multidisciplinary team work in cancer care; however, the acceptance is threatened by a perceived disbalance between effort and visible clinical impact. Leaner and more clinically focused programs are needed to keep repeated peer reviews challenging and worthwhile. PMID:26714788

  16. Cost control of out-of-hours laboratory services in district general hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, K D

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To survey methods for cost control of out-of-hours laboratory services in district general hospitals in England and Wales. METHODS--A questionnaire was distributed to 66 district general hospital laboratories in England and Wales. RESULTS--The response rate was 61%. Most laboratories for which budgetary information was provided had on-call costs ranging between 10-21% of staff costs. Ninety five per cent of respondents had attempted to reduce workload by the use of various strategies. Seventy two per cent of responding laboratories had negotiated a wide variety of on-call agreements outside Whitley Council arrangements. Seventy two per cent were not satisfied with their on-call arrangements, the main desired objective being the introduction of the extended working day. CONCLUSIONS--From this study it seems that Whitley Council agreements for out-of-hours work are no longer appropriate for the average district general hospital laboratory. Workload reduction strategies should include the use of a limited list, audit of the use of the on-call service, and continued education of medical staff. Consideration may also be given to the introduction of fixed payments, extension of the working day, increased multidisciplinary on-call and increased bedside testing. PMID:7962643

  17. Short and medium-term outcomes for general surgery in nonagenarian patients in a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Hayes, A J; Davda, A; El-Hadi, M; Murphy, P; Papettas, T

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Surgeons are increasingly performing surgery on older patients. There are currently no tools specifically for risk prediction in this group. The aim of this study was to review general surgical operations carried out on patients aged over 90 years and their outcome, before comparing these with predictors of morbidity and mortality. Methods A retrospective review was carried out at our district general hospital of all general surgery patients aged over 90 years who underwent a general surgical operation over a period of 14 years. Information collected included demographics, details of procedures, P-POSSUM (Portsmouth Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the enUmeration of Mortality and morbidity), complications and outcomes. Results A total of 119 procedures were carried out, 72 involving entry into the peritoneal cavity. Overall, 14 patients (12%) died within 30 days and 34 (29%) died within one year. Postoperative complications included infection (56%), renal failure (24%), need for transfusion (17%) and readmission within 30 days (11%). Logistical regression analysis showed that the P-POSSUM correlated well with observed mortality and infection was a significant predictor of in-hospital mortality (p=0.003). Conclusions The P-POSSUM correlates significantly with outcome and should be used when planning major elective or emergency surgery in patients over 90 years of age. Infective complications appear to be a significant predictor of postoperative mortality. This study supports operative intervention as an option in this extreme age group but we emphasise the importance of appropriate patient selection and judicious clinical care. PMID:27138856

  18. IRS General Counsel Memorandum threatens some hospital-physician joint ventures.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, T L; Schieble, M T

    1992-03-01

    To defend against the heightened scrutiny of hospital-physician relations expected from the IRS, hospital management should closely examine any activities now conducted with physicians to determine whether each activity, as organized and operated, furthers the hospital's charitable mission of promoting the health of its community, rather than merely enhancing the financial health of the institution itself. Any arrangements that do not appear to satisfy the principles enunciated in GCM 39862 should be examined to see if they should be restructured or dissolved. In structuring new transactions and examining existing arrangements, the following principles should be kept in mind: 1. Transactions should not be premised upon increased utilization or physician referrals. Enhancing or protecting market share, even for the purpose of preserving an institution's presence in the community, will likely no longer be accepted as a justification for pursuing joint venture arrangements. In justifying such ventures, management must distinguish between benefit to the community and benefit to the institution. 2. Transactions whereby existing services or equipment are "spun off" to a hospital-physician joint venture run a serious risk of enhanced IRS scrutiny. 3. Transactions creating or providing new facilities or services should be more favorably perceived, particularly where participants other than the hospital take an active role in managing the venture. Where the hospital is the sole general partner and merely manages what it would have managed had there been no physician investors, the question of why physicians are involved will likely be of greater concern than it has been in the past.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:10118472

  19. Why are family carers of people with dementia dissatisfied with general hospital care? a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Families and other carers report widespread dissatisfaction with general hospital care for confused older people. Methods We undertook a qualitative interviews study of 35 family carers of 34 confused older patients to ascertain their experiences of care on geriatric and general medical, and orthopaedic wards of a large English hospital. Transcripts were analysed using a grounded theory approach. Themes identified in interviews were categorised, and used to build a model explaining dissatisfaction with care. Results The experience of hospital care was often negative. Key themes were events (illness leading to admission, experiences in the hospital, adverse occurrences including deterioration in health, or perceived poor care); expectations (which were sometimes unrealistic, usually unexplored by staff, and largely unmet from the carers’ perspective); and relationships with staff (poor communication and conflict over care). Expectations were influenced by prior experience. A cycle of discontent is proposed. Events (or ‘crises’) are associated with expectations. When these are unmet, carers become uncertain or suspicious, which leads to a period of ‘hyper vigilant monitoring’ during which carers seek out evidence of poor care, culminating in challenge, conflict with staff, or withdrawal, itself a crisis. The cycle could be completed early during the admission pathway, and multiple cycles within a single admission were seen. Conclusion People with dementia who have family carers should be considered together as a unit. Family carers are often stressed and tired, and need engaging and reassuring. They need to give and receive information about the care of the person with dementia, and offered the opportunity to participate in care whilst in hospital. Understanding the perspective of the family carer, and recognising elements of the ‘cycle of discontent’, could help ward staff anticipate carer needs, enable relationship building, to pre-empt or

  20. Paranoid symptoms in patients on a general hospital psychiatric unit. Implications for diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Freedman, R; Schwab, P J

    1978-03-01

    Paranoid symptoms were found in 40% of patients admitted to a university general hospital psychiatric unit during a ten-month period. Fifty-eight percent of this group had frank paranoid delusions, while the rest had ideas of reference or generalized suspiciousness. Only one half of those who had paranoid delusions had paranoid schizophrenia. A significant number had affective disorders or organic brain disorder. Ideas of reference and suspiciousness were found in many patients who were not psychotic. The therapeutic implications of these findings are reported in three patients who were inadequately treated for affective disorders because the presence of paranoid symptomatology had led to an incorrect diagnosis of schizophrenia. PMID:727891

  1. Physical Violence against General Practitioners and Nurses in Chinese Township Hospitals: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Kai; Jiao, Mingli; Ma, Hongkun; Qiao, Hong; Hao, Yanhua; Li, Ye; Gao, Lijun; Sun, Hong; Kang, Zheng; Liang, Libo; Wu, Qunhong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to identify risk factors of physical violence in Chinese township hospitals. Methods A cross-sectional survey was used in a sample of 442 general practitioners and 398 general nurses from 90 township hospitals located in Heilongjiang province, China (response rate = 84.8%). Results A total of 106 of the 840 (12.6%) respondents reported being physically attacked in their workplace in the previous 12 months. Most perpetrators were the patients’ relatives (62.3%), followed by the patient (22.6%); 73.6% of perpetrators were aged between 20 and 40 years. Of the physical violence incidents, about 56.6% (n = 60) resulted in a physical injury, and 45.4% of respondents took two or three days of sick leave. Reporting workplace violence in hospitals to superiors or authorities was low (9.4%). Most respondents (62.8%) did not receive training on how to avoid workplace violence. Logistic regression analyses indicated that general nurses, aged 35 years or younger, and with a higher-level professional title were more likely to experience physical violence. Healthcare workers with direct physical contact (washing, turning, lifting) with patients had a higher risk of physical violence compared to other health care workers. Procedures for reporting workplace violence were a protective factor for physical violence; when in place, reporting after psychological violence (verbal abuse, bullying/mobbing, harassment, and threats) was more protective than waiting until an instance of physical violence (beating, kicking, slapping, stabbing, etc.). Conclusions Physical violence in Chinese township hospitals is an occupational hazard of rural public health concern. Policies, procedures, and intervention strategies should be undertaken to manage this issue. PMID:26571388

  2. Enhancing patient safety through the management of Clostridium difficile at Toronto East General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Tomiczek, Arladeen; Stumpo, C; Downey, James F

    2006-01-01

    In 2005 Toronto East General Hospital experienced a steady increase in the number of C. difficile cases diagnosed within the hospital. This was identified as a patient safety issue, and several areas of the hospital came together to address the problem. Pharmacy immediately started a medication review of past cases. Environmental services took the lead on the environmental cleaning, and a process was put into place with Infection Control so that housekeeping knew of every room that contained a patient with C. difficile and enhanced cleaning could be practised. Staff, including nursing, housekeeping and porters, were educated on C. difficile and the methods of transmission. A business case was developed for a disposable bedpan system, and this was approved by the senior team. A new washable product was tried out with success for the overhead patient light pulls and bathroom call bell systems. Infection rates were shared with staff through a variety of venues. As a result of the initiatives, the hospital has seen a decrease of 50% in the rates of C. difficile. A bonus was that our MRSA rates dropped as well. PMID:17087168

  3. Air pollution and hospital admissions for asthma in a tropical city: Kaohsiung, Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Shang-Shyue Tsai; Meng-Hsuan Cheng; Hui-Fen Chiu; Trong-Neng Wu; Chun-Yuh Yang

    2006-07-15

    This study was undertaken to determine whether there is an association between air pollutants levels and hospital admissions for asthma in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Hospital admissions for asthma and ambient air pollution data for Kaohsiung were obtained for the period from 1996 through 2003. The relative risk of hospital admission was estimated using a case-crossover approach, controlling for weather variables, day of the week, seasonality, and long-term time trends. In the single-pollutant models, on warm days ({>=}25{sup o}C) statistically significant positive associations were found in all pollutants except sulfur dioxide. On cool days ({<=} 25{sup o}C) all pollutants were significantly associated with asthma admissions. For the two pollutant models, CO and O{sub 3} were significant in combination with each of the other four pollutants on warm days. On cool days NO{sub 2} remained statistically significant in all the two-pollutant models. This study provides evidence that higher levels of ambient pollutants increase the risk of hospital admissions for asthma.

  4. Bacterial-resistance among outpatients of county hospitals in China: significant geographic distinctions and minor differences between central cities.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yonghong; Wei, Zeqing; Shen, Ping; Ji, Jinru; Sun, Ziyong; Yu, Hua; Zhang, Tiantuo; Ji, Ping; Ni, Yuxing; Hu, Zhidong; Chu, Yunzhuo; Li, Lanjuan

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey antibacterial resistance in outpatients of Chinese county hospitals. A total of 31 county hospitals were selected and samples continuously collected from August 2010 to August 2011. Drug sensitivity testing was conducted in a central laboratory. A total of 2946 unique isolates were collected, including 634 strains of Escherichia coli, 606 Klebsiella pneumoniae, 476 Staphylococcus aureus, 308 Streptococcus pneumoniae, and 160 Haemophilus influenzae. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases were detected in E. coli (42.3% strains), K. pneumoniae (31.7%), and Proteus mirabilis (39.0%). Ciprofloxacin-resistance was detected in 51.0% of E. coli strains. Salmonella spp. and Shigella spp. were sensitive to most antibacterial agents. Less than 8.0% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were resistant to carbapenem. For S. aureus strains, 15.3% were resistant to methicillin, and some strains of S. pneumoniae showed resistance to penicillin (1.6%), ceftriaxone (13.0%), and erythromycin (96.4%). β-lactamase was produced by 96.5% of Moraxella catarrhalis strains, and 36.2% of H. influenzae isolates were resistant to ampicillin. Azithromycin-resistant H. influenzae, imipenem-resistant but meropenem-sensitive Proteus, and ceftriaxone- and carbapenem non-sensitive M. catarrhalis were recorded. In conclusion, cephalosporin- and quinolone-resistant strains of E. coli and Klebsiella pneumonia and macrolide-resistant Gram-positive cocci were relatively prominent in county hospitals. The antibacterial resistance profiles of isolates from different geographical locations varied significantly, with proportions in county hospitals lower than those in their tertiary counterparts in the central cities, although the difference is diminishing. PMID:25708671

  5. Use of a General Level Framework to Facilitate Performance Improvement in Hospital Pharmacists in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Camilla; Coombes, Ian; Cardiff, Lynda; Duggan, Catherine; Yee, Mei-Ling; Wee Lim, Kiat; Bates, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the acceptability and validity of an adapted version of the General Level Framework (GLF) as a tool to facilitate and evaluate performance development in general pharmacist practitioners (those with less than 3 years of experience) in a Singapore hospital. Method. Observational evaluations during daily clinical activities were prospectively recorded for 35 pharmacists using the GLF at 2 time points over an average of 9 months. Feedback was provided to the pharmacists and then individualized learning plans were formulated. Results. Pharmacists’ mean competency cluster scores improved in all 3 clusters, and significant improvement was seen in all but 8 of the 63 behavioral descriptors (p ≤ 0.05). Nonsignificant improvements were attributed to the highest level of performance having been attained upon initial evaluation. Feedback indicated that the GLF process was a positive experience, prompting reflection on practice and culminating in needs-based learning and ultimately improved patient care. Conclusions. The General Level Framework was an acceptable tool for the facilitation and evaluation of performance development in general pharmacist practitioners in a Singapore hospital. PMID:22919083

  6. The impact of a 10-year audit cycle on blood usage in a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    James, R M; Brown, S; Parapia, L A; Williams, A T

    2001-10-01

    As clinical governance moves from concept to practice, it is emerging as a realistic strategy to promote and improve quality within the National Health Service, as well as satisfying the demand for external accountability. In the context of blood transfusion, the area of responsibility encompasses product liability, as well as efficient use of blood as a resource and transfusion as an appropriate clinical response. Clinical governance may be a modern catch phrase, but the principles it enshrines have long been established within blood transfusion, and in other aspects of haematology. Here, an audit cycle comprising four audits over a 10-year period to monitor the use of cross-matched blood in a large district general hospital is described. Initially, blood use was considered by hospital site, and by the surgical procedure for which it was requested. Later, the scope of the audit was expanded to consider usage by individual consultant. A standard of efficient use of cross-matched blood was taken to be a cross-match to transfusion ratio of < 1.5. The information was reviewed by the hospital transfusion committee, who have a key role in co-ordinating and assessing the practice of transfusion within a hospital. In this hospital, audit has been one of the main tools for improving practice, in particular by enabling the implementation and continuous revision of a maximum blood order schedule. Further, as the process of audit has developed, problem areas have been highlighted, and strategies to improve usage have been brought in with encouraging results. The audit is now being expanded again to include a greater focus on usage of cross-matched blood in the nonsurgical setting. PMID:11696230

  7. Severe cutaneous reactions to drugs in the setting of a general hospital*

    PubMed Central

    Grando, Luciana Rosa; Schmitt, Tatiana Aline Berger; Bakos, Renato Marchiori

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cutaneous drug reactions are frequently found. Assessing the clinical and epidemiological profile of severe forms is extremely relevant for their better recognition and management. Few studies have assessed the severe forms of cutaneous drug reactions in patients hospitalized in our setting. OBJECTIVES To assess the clinical and epidemiological aspects of severe cutaneous adverse reactions to drugs in a tertiary hospital in Porto Alegre, Brazil. METHODS All cases of severe cutaneous adverse reactions to drugs in patients hospitalized from January/2005 to December/2010 were retrospectively analyzed for clinical and epidemiological variables. Cases of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis, drug hypersensitivity syndrome or Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis were included. RESULTS An occurrence rate of 1 serious reaction for every 3,048 inpatients was found (total of 173,767 inpatients admitted in the period). Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms was the most frequent presentation. The drugs most frequently involved were anticonvulsants (40.4%), antibiotics (26.3%), and analgesics/anti-inflammatory drugs (10.5%). Thirty seven patients (64.9%) were admitted to hospital because of the cutaneous drug reaction. Ten patients (17.5%) died and in most of those (60%), the drug causing the reaction could not be determined. CONCLUSIONS The frequency of severe cutaneous adverse reactions to drugs in our setting is significant. Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms seems to be the most frequent presentation of severe cutaneous drug reactions. Most patients developed cutaneous drug reactions outside the hospital. Mortality rates were higher for Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis and this presentation significantly affected older people. Not knowing the drug causing the reaction was related to mortality. PMID:25184915

  8. The final outcome of indeterminate cytology of thyroid nodules in a District General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    DODDI, S.; CHOHDA, E.; MAGHSOUDI, S.; SHEEHAN, L.; SINHA, A.; CHANDAK, P.; SINHA, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diagnostic thyroid lobectomy is performed to resolve the dilemma of indeterminate (Thy3) cytology of thyroid nodules. But on final histology most nodules are benign thereby subjecting this group of patients to surgery with its associated risks. Aim To determine the proportion of cancers in patients with indeterminate thyroid nodules. Patients and methods This is a retrospective observational study of 621 patients who underwent fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of their thyroid nodules over a 60 month period in a district general hospital. Patient demographics, cytology and final histology results were extracted from the hospital database. Results On final analysis, 48 patients had an indeterminate cytology (7.7%) and 12 patients had cancer in this group (25%) following diagnostic lobectomy. Conclusion Till an alternative robust technology becomes widely available we need to continue to perform diagnostic lobectomy in patients with indeterminate cytology in view of the high incidence of thyroid cancer in this group of patients. PMID:26188757

  9. [Suicidality at the general hospital – perspective of consultation and liaison psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Imboden, Christian; Hatzinger, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Suicidality is a common problem in the general hospital. Patients with comorbid psychiatric disorders or during a psychosocial crisis can develop suicidal ideation during their stay at the general hospital, especially if they suffer from chronic disease. Some somatic disorders, such as cancer, epilepsy, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, stroke and chronic pain conditions are associated with an increased risk of suicide. The fact that (1) a major part of patients are treated in the emergency room (ER) after a suicide attempt and (2) a suicide attempt is the strongest predictor for later completed suicide emphasizes the importance of expertise in dealing with suicidal patients in the ER. In order to improve prevention of suicides and suicide attempts within the general hospital and after discharge it is important to educate staff concerning suicidality and enhance detection of suicidal patients. A consultation and liaison psychiatrist should always be involved when there are suicidal patients on wards and in the ER. Assessment of suicidal patients has always to include clear recommendations concerning patient safety and treatment of the underlying condition as well as specific approaches in dealing with suicidal thoughts. Safety measures can include close monitoring, constant observation, restriction to means of suicide, referral to a psychiatric clinic and treatment with sedatives, generally benzodiazepines. Psychiatric disorders are ideally treated according to guidelines and clear recommendations should be given concerning treatment after discharge. Specific psychotherapy for suicidal behaviour possibly reduces the risk of future suicides. A special situation is created by assisted suicides which attribute to suicides in the elderly with a recent increase in the Swiss population. In some cases, undiagnosed depression may contribute to the decision making process, hence, underlining the importance of improved detection and treatment of depression in

  10. Historical review: First facial pain patient admitted to Massachusetts General Hospital, February 1823 and first case series.

    PubMed

    Keith, David A; Dodson, Thomas B; Kaban, Leonard B

    2013-08-01

    Founded in 1811, the Massachusetts General Hospital recently celebrated its bicentennial. The War of 1812 delayed construction of the building so the first patient actually was admitted to the hospital 10 years later, on September 3, 1821. By 1823, the 60 hospital beds were full. Patient 66 was admitted on February 28, 1823, and his hospital course, as described in the admissions book, was transcribed for the Massachusetts General Hospital bicentennial celebration. That case history is reproduced and a case series of 6 similar patients published in 1828 by Dr John Warren, surgeon-in-chief and a founder of the hospital, is presented. In this report, the authors comment on the diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of these patients in the context of the contemporaneous health care environment and in light of the current knowledge of facial pain disorders. This article was adapted from the authors' commentary for the bicentennial celebration. PMID:23866949

  11. Partnerships between Medical Centres and General Hospitals Providing Normal Care Standards in Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Germany.

    PubMed

    Schütz, F; Maleika, A; Poeschl, J; Domschke, C; Seitz, H; Beuter-Winkler, P; Sohn, C

    2012-10-01

    Hospital managers and the heads of medical departments are nowadays being faced with ever increasing demands. It is becoming difficult for some small hospitals to find highly experienced or even experienced medical staff, to provide specific health-care services at break-even prices and to maintain their position in competition with other hospitals. On the other hand, large hospitals are facing enormous pressure in the investment and costs fields. Cooperation could provide a solution for these problems. For an optimal strategic exploitation of the hospitals, their direction could be placed in the hands of a joint medical director. However, the directorship of two hospitals is associated both with opportunities and with risks. The present article illustrates the widely differing aspects of the cooperation between a medical centre and a general hospital providing standard care from both a theoretical point of view and on the basis of practical experience with an actual cooperation of this type in Heidelberg. PMID:25308978

  12. Ecotoxicological and genotoxic evaluation of Buenos Aires city (Argentina) hospital wastewater.

    PubMed

    Magdaleno, Anahí; Juárez, Angela Beatriz; Dragani, Valeria; Saenz, Magalí Elizabeth; Paz, Marta; Moretton, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Hospital wastewater (HWW) constitutes a potential risk to the ecosystems and human health due to the presence of toxic and genotoxic chemical compounds. In the present work we investigated toxicity and genotoxicity of wastewaters from the public hospital of Buenos Aires (Argentina). The effluent from the sewage treatment plant (STP) serving around 10 million inhabitants was also evaluated. The study was carried out between April and September 2012. Toxicity and genotoxicity assessment was performed using the green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and the Allium cepa test, respectively. Toxicity assay showed that 55% of the samples were toxic to the algae (%I of growth between 23.9 and 54.8). The A. cepa test showed that 40% of the samples were genotoxic. The analysis of chromosome aberrations (CA) and micronucleus (MN) showed no significant differences between days and significant differences between months. The sample from the STP was not genotoxic to A. cepa but toxic to the algae (%I = 41%), showing that sewage treatment was not totally effective. This study highlights the need for environmental control programs and the establishment of advanced and effective effluent treatment plants in the hospitals, which are merely dumping the wastewaters in the municipal sewerage system. PMID:25214834

  13. Ecotoxicological and Genotoxic Evaluation of Buenos Aires City (Argentina) Hospital Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Juárez, Ángela Beatriz; Dragani, Valeria; Saenz, Magalí Elizabeth; Moretton, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Hospital wastewater (HWW) constitutes a potential risk to the ecosystems and human health due to the presence of toxic and genotoxic chemical compounds. In the present work we investigated toxicity and genotoxicity of wastewaters from the public hospital of Buenos Aires (Argentina). The effluent from the sewage treatment plant (STP) serving around 10 million inhabitants was also evaluated. The study was carried out between April and September 2012. Toxicity and genotoxicity assessment was performed using the green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and the Allium cepa test, respectively. Toxicity assay showed that 55% of the samples were toxic to the algae (%I of growth between 23.9 and 54.8). The A. cepa test showed that 40% of the samples were genotoxic. The analysis of chromosome aberrations (CA) and micronucleus (MN) showed no significant differences between days and significant differences between months. The sample from the STP was not genotoxic to A. cepa but toxic to the algae (%I = 41%), showing that sewage treatment was not totally effective. This study highlights the need for environmental control programs and the establishment of advanced and effective effluent treatment plants in the hospitals, which are merely dumping the wastewaters in the municipal sewerage system. PMID:25214834

  14. Modeling air quality in main cities of Peninsular Malaysia by using a generalized Pareto model.

    PubMed

    Masseran, Nurulkamal; Razali, Ahmad Mahir; Ibrahim, Kamarulzaman; Latif, Mohd Talib

    2016-01-01

    The air pollution index (API) is an important figure used for measuring the quality of air in the environment. The API is determined based on the highest average value of individual indices for all the variables which include sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O3), and suspended particulate matter (PM10) at a particular hour. API values that exceed the limit of 100 units indicate an unhealthy status for the exposed environment. This study investigates the risk of occurrences of API values greater than 100 units for eight urban areas in Peninsular Malaysia for the period of January 2004 to December 2014. An extreme value model, known as the generalized Pareto distribution (GPD), has been fitted to the API values found. Based on the fitted model, return period for describing the occurrences of API exceeding 100 in the different cities has been computed as the indicator of risk. The results obtained indicated that most of the urban areas considered have a very small risk of occurrence of the unhealthy events, except for Kuala Lumpur, Malacca, and Klang. However, among these three cities, it is found that Klang has the highest risk. Based on all the results obtained, the air quality standard in urban areas of Peninsular Malaysia falls within healthy limits to human beings. PMID:26718946

  15. [Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa Patients in General Hospitals with Psychiatric Wards Current Situation and Establishment of a Treatment System].

    PubMed

    Wada, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) exhibit physical and psychiatric symptoms, in addition to their behavioral problems, and often require admission to a general hospital with a psychiatric ward. There are only a few general hospitals with psychiatric wards available, and patients with AN tend to be concentrated in a small number of such institutions. Thus, it is difficult to provide adequate support for the treatment of patients with AN. In Kyoto, the number of general hospitals with a psychiatric ward is small. Patients with AN tend to be treated at the two university hospitals. However, our University Hospital cannot accept all patients with AN, especially the emergency admissions. Therefore, with respect to the inpatient treatment of AN, we established a cooperation agreement with other psychiatric hospitals. We are planning to divide the inpatient treatment of AN between our university hospital and other psychiatric hospitals, depending on the stage of AN and the severity of the patients' physical condition. With respect to the treatment of AN, it is necessary to establish a treatment system with each hospital playing a role. PMID:26502711

  16. A Prospective Multi-Center Observational Study of Children Hospitalized with Diarrhea in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Corinne N.; Phan, My V. T.; Hoang, Nguyen Van Minh; Minh, Pham Van; Vinh, Nguyen Thanh; Thuy, Cao Thu; Nga, Tran Thi Thu; Rabaa, Maia A.; Duy, Pham Thanh; Dung, Tran Thi Ngoc; Phat, Voong Vinh; Nga, Tran Vu Thieu; Tu, Le Thi Phuong; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Jenkins, Claire; Duong, Vu Thuy; Phuc, Hoang Le; Tuyet, Pham Thi Ngoc; Ngoc, Nguyen Minh; Vinh, Ha; Chinh, Nguyen Tran; Thuong, Tang Chi; Tuan, Ha Manh; Hien, Tran Tinh; Campbell, James I.; Chau, Nguyen Van Vinh; Thwaites, Guy; Baker, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    We performed a prospective multicenter study to address the lack of data on the etiology, clinical and demographic features of hospitalized pediatric diarrhea in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Vietnam. Over 2,000 (1,419 symptomatic and 609 non-diarrheal control) children were enrolled in three hospitals over a 1-year period in 2009–2010. Aiming to detect a panel of pathogens, we identified a known diarrheal pathogen in stool samples from 1,067/1,419 (75.2%) children with diarrhea and from 81/609 (13.3%) children without diarrhea. Rotavirus predominated in the symptomatic children (664/1,419; 46.8%), followed by norovirus (293/1,419; 20.6%). The bacterial pathogens Salmonella, Campylobacter, and Shigella were cumulatively isolated from 204/1,419 (14.4%) diarrheal children and exhibited extensive antimicrobial resistance, most notably to fluoroquinolones and third-generation cephalosporins. We suggest renewed efforts in generation and implementation of policies to control the sale and prescription of antimicrobials to curb bacterial resistance and advise consideration of a subsidized rotavirus vaccination policy to limit the morbidity due to diarrheal disease in Vietnam. PMID:25802437

  17. A prospective multi-center observational study of children hospitalized with diarrhea in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Corinne N; Phan, My V T; Hoang, Nguyen Van Minh; Minh, Pham Van; Vinh, Nguyen Thanh; Thuy, Cao Thu; Nga, Tran Thi Thu; Rabaa, Maia A; Duy, Pham Thanh; Dung, Tran Thi Ngoc; Phat, Voong Vinh; Nga, Tran Vu Thieu; Tu, Le Thi Phuong; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Jenkins, Claire; Duong, Vu Thuy; Phuc, Hoang Le; Tuyet, Pham Thi Ngoc; Ngoc, Nguyen Minh; Vinh, Ha; Chinh, Nguyen Tran; Thuong, Tang Chi; Tuan, Ha Manh; Hien, Tran Tinh; Campbell, James I; Chau, Nguyen Van Vinh; Thwaites, Guy; Baker, Stephen

    2015-05-01

    We performed a prospective multicenter study to address the lack of data on the etiology, clinical and demographic features of hospitalized pediatric diarrhea in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Vietnam. Over 2,000 (1,419 symptomatic and 609 non-diarrheal control) children were enrolled in three hospitals over a 1-year period in 2009-2010. Aiming to detect a panel of pathogens, we identified a known diarrheal pathogen in stool samples from 1,067/1,419 (75.2%) children with diarrhea and from 81/609 (13.3%) children without diarrhea. Rotavirus predominated in the symptomatic children (664/1,419; 46.8%), followed by norovirus (293/1,419; 20.6%). The bacterial pathogens Salmonella, Campylobacter, and Shigella were cumulatively isolated from 204/1,419 (14.4%) diarrheal children and exhibited extensive antimicrobial resistance, most notably to fluoroquinolones and third-generation cephalosporins. We suggest renewed efforts in generation and implementation of policies to control the sale and prescription of antimicrobials to curb bacterial resistance and advise consideration of a subsidized rotavirus vaccination policy to limit the morbidity due to diarrheal disease in Vietnam. PMID:25802437

  18. Factors associated with suicide method among psychiatric patients in a general hospital in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Subin; Ahn, Myung Hee; Na, Riji; Kim, Seon-Ok; Yoon, Jin Sang; Park, Jun-Hyuk; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2013-12-30

    This study aims to highlight the factors associated with suicide method among psychiatric patients in a general hospital in Korea. In a sample of 467 suicides by patients who had received mental health care in a general hospital in Korea, the relationship between suicide method and time of death as well as clinical characteristics, including psychiatric adiagnosis, was examined using multinomial logistic regression analysis. Compared with the general population, psychiatric patients, regardless of disorder, committed suicide by jumping from heights more often than by hanging (OR=2.35-8.64). In particular, patients with psychotic disorders and female patients were more likely to use jumping from a height than hanging to kill themselves (OR=2.98 and 1.83, respectively). Patients were more likely to use suicide methods other than hanging (e.g., OR=6.7 for jumping, 5.3 for drowning, and 2.7 for self-poisoning) between midnight and dawn. Possible suicide-prevention strategies suggested by this study include limiting access to or fencing off tall structures in close proximity to psychiatric institutions and residential care homes. At night, limiting access to or instituting heightened supervision of tall structures is specifically indicated. PMID:24055162

  19. Selected demographic, social and work characteristics of the Australian general medical practitioner workforce: comparing capital cities with regional areas.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, D

    2000-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare selected characteristics of the Australian general medical practitioner workforce in capital cities and regional areas. Data were derived from the 1996 Census of Population and Housing. Characteristics included age, sex, full- or part-time work, place of birth and change in residential address. Analyses were performed for each state and territory in Australia, the statistical division containing each capital city and all other statistical divisions in each state and territory. Of the 26,359 general medical practitioners identified, 68% were male. More female than male general medical practitioners were aged < 45 years (74 vs 52%, respectively; P < 0.0001). The proportion of general medical practitioners aged < 35 years was higher in capital cities (30%) than regional areas (24%; P < 0.0001). Overall, 32% of the general medical practitioner workforce was female and almost 50% of those aged < 35 years were female. The proportion of female general medical practitioners was higher in capital cities than regional areas, by up to 30%. While 13% of male general medical practitioners reported part-time work, 42% of females also reported part-time work and these figures were similar in capital cities and regional areas. Approximately 40% of the Australian general medical practitioner workforce was born outside Australia and while fewer migrants have entered in recent years they were more likely to be living in regional areas than the capitals. The census provides useful medical workforce data. The regional workforce tends to be made up of more males and is older than in capital cities. Monitoring trends in these characteristics could help to evaluate initiatives aimed at addressing regional workforce issues. PMID:11894793

  20. Antipsychotics for delirium in the general hospital setting in consecutive 2453 inpatients: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Hatta, Kotaro; Kishi, Yasuhiro; Wada, Ken; Odawara, Toshinari; Takeuchi, Takashi; Shiganami, Takafumi; Tsuchida, Kazuo; Oshima, Yoshio; Uchimura, Naohisa; Akaho, Rie; Watanabe, Akira; Taira, Toshihiro; Nishimura, Katsuji; Hashimoto, Naoko; Usui, Chie; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Objective Attention to risk of antipsychotics for older patients with delirium has been paid. A clinical question was whether risk of antipsychotics for older patients with delirium would exceed efficacy of those even in the general hospital setting. Methods A prospective observational study proceeded over a 1-year period at 33 general hospitals, where at least one psychiatrist worked full time. Subjects were patients who developed delirium during their admission due to acute somatic diseases or surgery, and who received antipsychotics for delirium. The primary outcome was rates and kinds of serious adverse events. Results Among 2834 patients who developed delirium, 2453 patients received antipsychotics, such as risperidone (34%), quetiapine (32%), and parenteral haloperidol (20%), for delirium. Out of 2453 patients, 22 serious adverse events (0.9%) were reported. Aspiration pneumonia was the most frequent (17 patients, 0.7%), followed by cardiovascular events (4 patients, 0.2%) and venous thromboembolism (1 patient, 0.0%). There was no patient with a fracture or intracranial injury due to a fall. No one died because of antipsychotic side effects. The mean Clinical Global Impressions—Improvement Scale score was 2.02 (SD 1.09). Delirium was resolved within 1 week in more than half of the patients (54%). Conclusions In the general hospital setting under management including fine dosage adjustment and early detection of side effects, risk of antipsychotics for older patients with delirium might be low, in contrast to antipsychotics for dementia in the nursing home or outpatient settings. A point may be not how to avoid using antipsychotics but how to monitor their risk. PMID:23801358

  1. The refined shielding design for the cyclotron room of the Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Sheu, R D; Chen, C C; Sheu, R J; Kao, C H; Jiang, S H

    2005-01-01

    Full-scale Monte Carlo simulations of the cyclotron room of the Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital were carried out to improve the inadequate maze design. The double differential neutron source from the 18O(p,n)18F reaction was adopted for the calculation. The weight window variance reduction technique, where the weight window was set by applying the adjoint flux, has been implemented in the MCNP run to facilitate the calculation of the dose rates outside the cyclotron room. Dose rates including neutron and gamma-ray components were calculated for some maze shielding modifications. PMID:16381715

  2. When Suicide Is Not Suicide: Self-induced Morbidity and Mortality in the General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Bostwick, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Suicidal phenomena in the general hospital can take a variety of forms that can be parsed by taking into account whether or not the patient 1) intended to hasten death, and 2) included collaborators, including family and health care providers, in the decision to act. These two criteria can be used to distinguish entities as diverse as true suicide, non-compliance, euthanasia/physician-assisted suicide, and hospice/palliative care. Characterizing the nature of “suicide” events facilitates appropriate decision-making around management and disposition. PMID:25973265

  3. Risk Factors for Neonatal Sepsis in Public Hospitals of Mekelle City, North Ethiopia, 2015: Unmatched Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Gebremedhin, Destaalem

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Neonatal sepsis is a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality, particularly in the developing countries. Delays in the identification and treatment of neonatal sepsis are among the main contributors to the high mortality. The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors of neonatal sepsis in public hospitals of Mekelle City, Tigray Region, North Ethiopia, 2015. Methods A hospital based case control study was done in public hospitals of Mekelle City, Tigray region. Cases were neonates who had sepsis with their index mothers and controls were neonates who hadn’t had sepsis with their index mothers. Hematologic findings were used to diagnose sepsis once the neonates were being clinically suspected. Cases and controls were selected using the systematic sampling technique. Data were entered using Epi info version 7 and then analyzed using SPSS window 20. The binary logistic regression model was used to test the association between dependent and independent variables and multivariable logistic regression was used to identify the associated risk factors to neonatal sepsis. Findings A total of 78 cases and 156 controls were included in this study. More than three quarters (76.8%) of cases had early onset sepsis. The multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that the possible risk factors of neonatal sepsis in this study were; history of maternal urinary tract infection or sexually transmitted infection [AOR = 5. 23; 95% CI (1.82, 15.04)], prolonged rupture of membrane [AOR = 7. 43; 95% CI (2.04, 27.1)], Place of delivery; health center delivery [AOR = 5. 7; 95% CI (1.71, 19.03)], intrapartum fever [AOR = 6. 1 95% CI (1.29, 28.31)], APGAR score <7 at 5th minute [AOR = 68. 9; 95% CI (3.63, 1308)] and not crying immediately at birth [AOR = 124. 0; 95% CI (6.5, 2379)]. Conclusion Both maternal and neonatal factors had contributed to the risk of neonatal sepsis. Strengthening of the existing risk based prevention strategies as well as

  4. Outcome of major trauma patients in a Hong Kong general hospital.

    PubMed

    Kam, C W; Kitchell, A K; Yau, H H; Kan, C H

    1998-09-01

    This is a retrospective study on the outcome using the TRISS methodology of 94 significantly injured patients over a 24-month period, managed by the Hospital Trauma Team in a general hospital since the formation of the Team in August 1994. There were 37 deaths and nine (24.3%) of these were 'potentially preventable' according to TRISS methodology. Seven of these nine 'potentially preventable or unexpected deaths' were transferred from a nearby district hospital where there was no acute operative facilities. There was no significant difference between the sex, age, mode of injury or Injury Severity Score between the direct admission and transfer-in cases and the M-statistic values of the two groups were similar. Five of the nine deaths happened in the first 4 months after the formation of the Trauma Team and the other four were scattered in the subsequent 20 months. The rate of preventable deaths was 50% (five out of 10 deaths) in the first 4 months, and was 15% (four out of 26) in the subsequent period. The probable causes for the 'potentially preventable trauma deaths' were delay owing to interhospital transfer, delay in activation of the trauma team, unidentified intra-peritoneal haemorrhage, failure to control haemorrhage and delayed or inadequate definitive operation. The evident improvement in the reduction of unexpected trauma deaths were likely associated with the success factors of the improvement of the multi-disciplinary cooperation including mutual understanding, simultaneous patient assessment, higher readiness to use diagnostic peritoneal lavage or ultrasonography to evaluate blunt abdominal trauma, earlier senior participation in patient care, shortening in response time of supportive facilities and a gradual cultural change towards dedicated trauma patient care. Further reduction in unexpected deaths can be expected if better prehospital triage by ambulance staff is attained to transfer trauma patients to the most appropriate instead of the nearest

  5. Small can be beautiful: 10 years managing colorectal cancer in a rural general hospital.

    PubMed

    Grant, A J; Sedgwick, D M

    2011-02-01

    There has been much recent debate on the relationship between surgical volume and outcomes. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of a rural general hospital to provide care for patients with colorectal cancer in a small-volume practice. A retrospective review of patients treated in a rural general hospital, between January 1993 and December 2002, was undertaken. Patient demographics, disease characteristics, treatments and complications were all recorded. Ninety-eight patients had a final diagnosis of colorectal cancer. There was an equal male: female ratio and an average age of 69 years (40-88 years). Eighty-five percent underwent treatment with curative intent. The postoperative complication rate was low (2% wound infections, 2.3% anastomotic leak rate) and Dukes-specific five-year survival was satisfactory (A > 80%, B and C > 60%). In conclusion, this study adds weight to the argument that even with low-volume workload, satisfactory results can still be obtained. PMID:21515529

  6. Factors affecting disability in patients attending the internal medicine departments of general hospitals.

    PubMed

    Sata, M; Yoshitake, K; Utsunomiya, H; Hatada, K; Ohtsuka, T; Sugasaki, H; Nakane, Y

    1999-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sociodemographic factors, physical factors and mental factors on the physical and social disability of patients attending outpatient clinics of general hospitals. Physical and psychiatric morbidity in 1580 consecutive patients attending the internal medicine department of general hospitals was assessed using a stratified two-stage sampling design method. Of the total, 336 patients completed the second stage interview composed of Primary Care Version of Composite International Diagnostic Interview and Groningen Social Disability Schedule to assess sociodemographic, physical and mental factors. In this study, restricted activity days, disability days and Brief Disability Questionnaire were used for the assessment of physical disability, and Groningen Social Disability Schedule was used for social disability. Sociodemographic, physical and mental factors were all related to disability. Among sociodemographic factors, unemployment was associated with physical disability and social disability mildly. Among physical factors, the severity of physical disease was not associated with disability and medically explained somatic symptoms were associated with disability. Furthermore, the mental factor was more strongly associated with physical and social disability. It could be said that the mental factor is more strongly associated with physical and social disability than sociodemographic or physical factors. In addition, even mild mental symptoms not leading to ICD-10 mental disorders affected disability. From the viewpoint of the patients' burden, it is important to assess the mental symptoms as well as physical status in outpatient clinics of internal medicine or primary care. PMID:10687740

  7. Antimicrobial resistance of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in a British district general hospital: the international connection.

    PubMed

    Birtles, Andrew; Virgincar, Nilangi; Sheppard, Carmen L; Walker, Rachel A; Johnson, Alan P; Warner, Marina; Edwards-Jones, Valerie; George, Robert C

    2004-12-01

    Between January 2000 and March 2001, Streptococcus pneumoniae were isolated from the blood of 56 patients admitted to a single district general hospital in the South-East of England. The serotype and antibiotic susceptibility were determined for all isolates and, for those resistant to erythromycin, the presence or absence of the mef(A) and erm(B) genes was determined by PCR. Multi-locus sequence typing, along with PFGE, was undertaken on all isolates resistant to penicillin or erythromycin and a group of antibiotic-susceptible isolates, to identify whether globally distributed pneumococcal clones, as described by the Pneumococcal Molecular Epidemiology Network (PMEN), were present in the study population. Three serotype 9V penicillin-resistant isolates were identified as belonging to the Spain9V-3 clone, while 14 erythromycin-resistant isolates of serotype 14 belonged to the England14-9 clone. A single multi-resistant isolate of serotype 6B, was found to be a single-locus variant of the Spain6B-2 clone. All 14 erythromycin-resistant serotype 14 isolates possessed the mef(A) gene, while the single multi-resistant isolate possessed the erm(B) gene. These findings confirm the wide distribution and clinical impact of PMEN clones, which accounted for all of the penicillin and erythromycin resistance observed amongst invasive isolates in a district general hospital over a 15-month period. PMID:15585504

  8. Epidemiology of Orthopaedic Trauma Admissions Over One Year in a District General Hospital in England

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, A; Young, A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : Admission to district general hospitals in England has undergone change in recent years due to both an aging population and the reconfiguration of the major trauma network throughout the United Kingdom. Methods : We utilised a retrospective cohort study to analyse the epidemiology over a 12-month period at a district general hospital. Data was collected and divided into groups: upper limb, lower limb, vertebral disc disease, vertebral fracture, cellulitis without bone involvement and deep infection including metalwork. Results : 2817 patients were admitted over the 12-month period. There were 893 upper limb fractures, 1511 lower limb fractures, 126 vertebral disc disease, 55 vertebral fractures, 108 cellulitis without bone involvement and 124 deep infections with 19 admissions not specified due to coding. AN average of 242 patients were admitted each month with the majority admitted during the summer months. Conclusion : Although fractures make up the majority of the reason for which a person is admitted, there are also many other injuries/morbidities, which may necessitate admission. There is an increasing incidence of elderly osteoporotic fractures in females, which is balancing out the previously more common fractures seen in younger adults and adolescents. PMID:26069514

  9. Imported Malaria over Fifteen Years in an Inner City Teaching Hospital of Washington DC

    PubMed Central

    Yeruva, Sri Lakshmi Hyndavi; Sinha, Archana; Sarraf-Yazdy, Mariam; Gajjala, Jhansi

    2016-01-01

    As endemic malaria is not commonly seen in the United States, most of the cases diagnosed and reported are associated with travel to and from the endemic places of malaria. As the number of imported cases of malaria has been increasing since 1973, it is important to look into these cases to study the morbidity and mortality associated with this disease in the United States. In this study, we would like to share our experience in diagnosing and treating these patients at our institution. We did a retrospective chart review of 37 cases with a documented history of imported malaria from 1998 to 2012. Among them, 16 patients had complicated malaria during that study period, with a mean length of hospital stay of 3.5 days. Most common place of travel was Africa, and chemoprophylaxis was taken by only 11% of patients. Travel history plays a critical role in suspecting the diagnosis and in initiating prompt treatment. PMID:27417079

  10. Imported Malaria over Fifteen Years in an Inner City Teaching Hospital of Washington DC.

    PubMed

    Yeruva, Sri Lakshmi Hyndavi; Sinha, Archana; Sarraf-Yazdy, Mariam; Gajjala, Jhansi

    2016-06-01

    As endemic malaria is not commonly seen in the United States, most of the cases diagnosed and reported are associated with travel to and from the endemic places of malaria. As the number of imported cases of malaria has been increasing since 1973, it is important to look into these cases to study the morbidity and mortality associated with this disease in the United States. In this study, we would like to share our experience in diagnosing and treating these patients at our institution. We did a retrospective chart review of 37 cases with a documented history of imported malaria from 1998 to 2012. Among them, 16 patients had complicated malaria during that study period, with a mean length of hospital stay of 3.5 days. Most common place of travel was Africa, and chemoprophylaxis was taken by only 11% of patients. Travel history plays a critical role in suspecting the diagnosis and in initiating prompt treatment. PMID:27417079

  11. Risk Factors for 30-Day Hospital Readmission among General Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kassin, Michael T; Owen, Rachel M; Perez, Sebastian; Leeds, Ira; Cox, James C; Schnier, Kurt; Sadiraj, Vjollca; Sweeney, John F

    2012-01-01

    Background Hospital readmission within 30-days of an index hospitalization is receiving increased scrutiny as a marker of poor quality patient care. This study identifies factors associated with 30-day readmission following General Surgery procedures. Study Design Using standard National Surgical Quality Improvement Project (NSQIP) protocol, preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative outcomes were collected on patients undergoing inpatient General Surgery procedures at a single academic center between 2009 and 2011. Data were merged with our institutional clinical data warehouse to identify unplanned 30-day readmissions. Demographics, comorbidities, type of procedure, postoperative complications, and ICD-9 coding data were reviewed for patients who were readmitted. Univariate and multivariate analysis was utilized to identify risk factors associated with 30-day readmission. Results 1442 General Surgery patients were reviewed. 163 (11.3%) were readmitted within 30 days of discharge. The most common reasons for readmission were gastrointestinal complaint/complication (27.6%), surgical infection (22.1%), and failure to thrive/malnutrition (10.4%). Comorbidities associated with risk of readmission included disseminated cancer, dyspnea, and preoperative open wound (p<0.05 for all variables). Surgical procedures associated with higher rates of readmission included pancreatectomy, colectomy, and liver resection. Postoperative occurrences leading to increased risk of readmission were blood transfusion, postoperative pulmonary complication, wound complication, sepsis/shock, urinary tract infection, and vascular complications. Multivariable analysis demonstrates that the most significant independent risk factor for readmission is the occurrence of any postoperative complication (OR 4.20, 95% CI 2.89–6.13). Conclusions Risk factors for readmission after General Surgery procedures are multi-factorial; however, postoperative complications appear to drive readmissions in

  12. [Neurocysticercosis in a hospital of the city of Buenos Aires: study of 11 cases].

    PubMed

    Villa, A M; Monteverde, D A; Rodriguez, W; Boero, A; Sica, R E

    1993-09-01

    Eleven patients with diagnosis of possible neurocistycercosis were studied in our Department since 1986. All of them were adults. Eight were Bolivian citizens. The commonest neurological clinical manifestation were seizures and/or headache. Brain CT scans showed cystic lesions and calcifications in 5 patients, only calcifications in 3, enlarged ventricles in 2 and an isolated frontal cystic lesion in 1. Six out of 7 patients who were submitted to spinal fluid ELISA test showed positive response for cysticercosis. Patients were put on praziquantel (50 mg/Kg/d) or albendazol (15 mg/Kg/d) with good outcome for all them. Surgery was carried on for treatment of enlarged ventricles (2 patients) and for a like-expansive lesion (1 patient). The aim of this work is to underscore the fact that in Buenos Aires city, which previously was not within the endemic latin american area for cysticercosis, is now possible to find patients with the neurological manifestations of this parasitosis, most probably due to migration of people coming from the north provinces or from countries situated at its border where the disease is endemic. PMID:8297236

  13. [General practice consultation in a hospital emergency department. History, evaluation and prospects].

    PubMed

    Lafay, Vincent; Giraud, Christiane; Bel, Corinne; Giovannetti, Olivier

    2002-10-26

    INSTALLATION OF A GENERAL MEDICINE CONSULTATION: In 1995, in reaction to an increase of more than 35% over three years, related essentially to out-patient consultations, the installation of a general medicine consultation (GMC) near the emergency unit reception area (EUR) was envisaged. The project, developed over 5 years and based on an epidemiological study, was finally set-up in January 2000. The aims of the GMC are to supply information to the patients, help them in their administrative rights, and their subsequent follow-up by an external physician; the benefits expected by the EUR is the re-concentration on heavier and more urgent pathologies. THE FUNCTION OF THE GMC: Exclusively reserved for CCMU 1 patients (level 1 of the clinical classification of emergency unit patients), the GMC relies on general practice, with the presence of general practitioners installed in the SAU (emergency unit) sector, a double admission method (either via the emergency unit, or directly), a means of payment for the consultation and the absence of priority access to the technical network of the hospital. A social services worker is present. RECRUITMENT: After 18 months of activity, the GMC had managed more than 4500 patients and the method of referral via the SAU, almost exclusive at the beginning, has been reduced to a minority. The patients are generally young; socially close to the underprivileged population surrounding the SAU, but not in a situation of precariousness. The four principle motives for consultation are benign traumas, ENT infections, dermatological affections and pain. A DYNAMIC STRUCTURE: The rapid progress in the context of general medicine, and the observations of the physicians and non-physicians participating in this experience, has progressively modified the aim and mission of this GMC, which is gradually becoming a real structure of permanent care. Its originality is its close link between the town and the hospital, whilst permitting the various actors to

  14. Composition and production rate of pharmaceutical and chemical waste from Xanthi General Hospital in Greece

    SciTech Connect

    Voudrias, Evangelos; Goudakou, Lambrini; Kermenidou, Marianthi; Softa, Aikaterini

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied pharmaceutical and chemical waste production in a Greek hospital. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pharmaceutical waste comprised 3.9% w/w of total hazardous medical waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit production rate for total pharmaceutical waste was 12.4 {+-} 3.90 g/patient/d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical waste comprised 1.8% w/w of total hazardous medical waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit production rate for total chemical waste was 5.8 {+-} 2.2 g/patient/d. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to determine the composition and production rates of pharmaceutical and chemical waste produced by Xanthi General Hospital in Greece (XGH). This information is important to design and cost management systems for pharmaceutical and chemical waste, for safety and health considerations and for assessing environmental impact. A total of 233 kg pharmaceutical and 110 kg chemical waste was collected, manually separated and weighed over a period of five working weeks. The total production of pharmaceutical waste comprised 3.9% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. Total pharmaceutical waste was classified in three categories, vial waste comprising 51.1%, syringe waste with 11.4% and intravenous therapy (IV) waste with 37.5% w/w of the total. Vial pharmaceutical waste only was further classified in six major categories: antibiotics, digestive system drugs, analgesics, hormones, circulatory system drugs and 'other'. Production data below are presented as average (standard deviation in parenthesis). The unit production rates for total pharmaceutical waste for the hospital were 12.4 (3.90) g/patient/d and 24.6 (7.48) g/bed/d. The respective unit production rates were: (1) for vial waste 6.4 (1.6) g/patient/d and 13 (2.6) g/bed/d, (2) for syringe waste 1.4 (0.4) g/patient/d and 2.8 (0.8) g/bed/d and (3) for IV waste 4.6 (3.0) g/patient/d and 9.2 (5.9) g/bed/d. Total chemical waste

  15. Improving the management of sepsis in a district general hospital by implementing the 'Sepsis Six' recommendations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prashant; Jordan, Mark; Caesar, Jenny; Miller, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a common condition with a major global impact on healthcare resources and expenditure. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign has been vigorous in promoting internationally recognised pathways to improve the management of septic patients and decrease mortality. However, translating recommendations into practice is a challenging and complex task that requires a multi-faceted approach with sustained engagement from local stakeholders. Whilst working at a district general hospital in New Zealand, we were concerned by the seemingly inconsistent management of septic patients, often leading to long delays in the initiation of life-saving measures such as antibiotic, fluid, and oxygen administration. In our hospital there were no clear systems, protocols or guidelines in place for identifying and managing septic patients. We therefore launched the Sepsis Six resuscitation bundle of care in our hospital in an attempt to raise awareness amongst staff and improve the management of septic patients. We introduced a number of simple low-cost interventions that included educational sessions for junior doctors and nursing staff, as well as posters and modifications to phlebotomy trolleys that acted as visual reminders to implement the Sepsis Six bundle. Overall, we found there to a be a steady improvement in the delivery of the Sepsis Six bundle in septic patients with 63% of patients receiving appropriate care within one hour, compared to 29% prior to our interventions. However this did not translate to an improvement in patient mortality. This project forms part of an on going process to instigate a fundamental culture change among local healthcare professionals regarding the management of sepsis. Whilst we have demonstrated improved implementation of the Sepsis Six bundle, the key challenge remains to ensure that momentum of this project continues and forms a platform for sustainable clinical improvement in the long term. PMID:26734403

  16. Non-Invasive Continuous Respiratory Monitoring on General Hospital Wards: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    van Loon, Kim; van Zaane, Bas; Bosch, Els J.; Kalkman, Cor J.; Peelen, Linda M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Failure to recognize acute deterioration in hospitalized patients may contribute to cardiopulmonary arrest, unscheduled intensive care unit admission and increased mortality. Purpose In this systematic review we aimed to determine whether continuous non-invasive respiratory monitoring improves early diagnosis of patient deterioration and reduces critical incidents on hospital wards. Data Sources Studies were retrieved from Medline, Embase, CINAHL, and the Cochrane library, searched from 1970 till October 25, 2014. Study Selection Electronic databases were searched using keywords and corresponding synonyms ‘ward’, ‘continuous’, ‘monitoring’ and ‘respiration’. Pediatric, fetal and animal studies were excluded. Data Extraction Since no validated tool is currently available for diagnostic or intervention studies with continuous monitoring, methodological quality was assessed with a modified tool based on modified STARD, CONSORT, and TREND statements. Data Synthesis Six intervention and five diagnostic studies were included, evaluating the use of eight different devices for continuous respiratory monitoring. Quantitative data synthesis was not possible because intervention, study design and outcomes differed considerably between studies. Outcomes estimates for the intervention studies ranged from RR 0.14 (0.03, 0.64) for cardiopulmonary resuscitation to RR 1.00 (0.41, 2.35) for unplanned ICU admission after introduction of continuous respiratory monitoring, Limitations The methodological quality of most studies was moderate, e.g. ‘before-after’ designs, incomplete reporting of primary outcomes, and incomplete clinical implementation of the monitoring system. Conclusions Based on the findings of this systematic review, implementation of routine continuous non-invasive respiratory monitoring on general hospital wards cannot yet be advocated as results are inconclusive, and methodological quality of the studies needs improvement. Future

  17. [Tetanus in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam: epidemiological, clinical and outcome features of 389 cases at the Hospital for Tropical Diseases].

    PubMed

    An, V T; Khue, P M; Yen, L M; Phong, N D; Strobel, M

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the different aspects of tetanus during the past recent years in southern Vietnam: epidemiology, clinical picture, management, and death risk factors. It is a retrospective study concerning 389 cases admitted in 2007 and 2008 at the reference Hospital for Tropical Diseases in Ho Chi Minh City. 93% of all cases were generalized tetanus, and 50% were severe cases. A majority of patients were adult males (medium age 43, M/ F sex-ratio 2.9). Half of them underwent tracheotomy and 39% assisted ventilation. Case fatality rate was 6.4%, the lowest reported rate worldwide in the last ten years. Fatalities resulted mainly from neuro-vegetative disorders, essentially cardiogenic shock (28% of all deaths) [OR = 16.95; p < 0.001], sepsis (24%) [OR = 3.25; (p < 0,114], and acute renal failure (16%) [OR = 7,22; p < 0.004]. Age over 60-year [OR = 4.53; p < 0.0001] and a leukocyte count>12.000/mm(3) [OR = 2.32; p < 0.020] were significantly associated with fatal outcome, contrarily to incubation and extension phase durations, or delayed serum administration. Systematic extension of vaccination to all adult males, and improved access to post exposure sero-immunization at all levels of health centres throughout the country may further reduce tetanus burden in Vietnam. PMID:26608271

  18. Risky locations for out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest in a typical urban city

    PubMed Central

    Moriwaki, Yoshihiro; Tahara, Yoshio; Iwashita, Masayuki; Kosuge, Takayuki; Suzuki, Noriyuki

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to clarify the circumstances including the locations where critical events resulting in out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest (OHCPA) occur. Materials and Methods: Subjects of this population-based observational case series study were the clinical records of patients with nontraumatic and nonneck-hanging OHCPA. Results: Of all 1546 cases, 10.3% occurred in a public place (shop, restaurant, workplace, stations, public house, sports venue, and bus), 8.3% on the street, 73.4% in a private location (victim's home, the homes of the victims’ relatives or friends or cheap bedrooms, where poor homeless people live), and 4.1% in residential institutions. In OHCPA occurring in private locations, the frequency of asystole was higher and the outcome was poorer than in other locations. A total of 181 OHCPA cases (11.7%) took place in the lavatory and 166 (10.7%) in the bathroom; of these, only 7 (3.9% of OHCPA in the lavatory) and none in the bath room achieved good outcomes. The frequencies of shockable initial rhythm occurring in the lavatory and in bath room were 3.7% and 1.1% (lower than in other locations, P = 0.011 and 0.002), and cardiac etiology in OHCPA occurring in these locations were 46.7% and 78.4% (the latter higher than in other locations, P < 0.001). Conclusions: An unignorable population suffered from OHCPA in private locations, particularly in the lavatory and bathroom; their initial rhythm was usually asystole and their outcomes were poor, despite the high frequency of cardiac etiology in the bathroom. We should try to treat OHCPA victims and to prevent occurrence of OHCPA in these risky spaces by considering their specific conditions. PMID:25400390

  19. Impact of Tactile Stimulation on Neurobehavioral Development of Premature Infants in Assiut City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayed, Atyat Mohammed Hassan; Youssef, Magda Mohamed E.; Hassanein, Farouk El-Sayed; Mobarak, Amal Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess impact of tactile stimulation on neurobehavioral development of premature infants in Assiut City. Design: Quasi-experimental research design. Setting: The study was conducted in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Assiut University Children Hospital, Assiut General Hospital, Health Insurance Hospital (ElMabarah Hospital) and…

  20. Large-eddy simulation of airflow and heat transfer in a general ward of hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Md. Farhad; Himika, Taasnim Ahmed; Molla, Md. Mamun

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a very popular alternative computational technique, the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) has been used for Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) of airflow and heat transfer in general ward of hospital. Different Reynolds numbers have been used to study the airflow pattern. In LES, Smagorinsky turbulence model has been considered and a discussion has been conducted in brief. A code validation has been performed comparing the present results with benchmark results for lid-driven cavity problem and the results are found to agree very well. LBM is demonstrated through simulation in forced convection inside hospital ward with six beds with a partition in the middle, which acted like a wall. Changes in average rate of heat transfer in terms of average Nusselt numbers have also been recorded in tabular format and necessary comparison has been showed. It was found that partition narrowed the path for airflow and once the air overcame this barrier, it got free space and turbulence appeared. For higher turbulence, the average rate of heat transfer increased and patients near the turbulence zone released maximum heat and felt more comfortable.

  1. Child abuse and neglect as seen in General Hospital, Kuala Lumpur--a two year study.

    PubMed

    Kassim, M S; George, R; Kassim, K; Begum, M; Cherian, M P; Tajudin, A K; Chandran, V; Anan, A; Reddy, R; Singh, J

    1989-06-01

    Eighty-six children diagnosed as child abuse and/or neglect were admitted to the Paediatric wards of the General Hospital, Kuala Lumpur during 1985 and 1986. Of these cases, 62 were of physical abuse, six of sexual abuse, one case of both physical and sexual abuse and 17 of neglect. There were 25 boys and 61 girls. Thirty-four of these children were Malays, 16 Chinese, 26 Indians, three mixed and seven illegal immigrants. Twenty-one were below the age of one year, 24 from one to four years, 25 from five to nine years and 16 were ten years and above. The abusers were mainly close members of the family. Of these children, 24 were sent back to their parents and 11 to their relatives home. Twenty-seven were taken into care by the Ministry of Social Welfare and the remaining seven children who were illegal immigrants, were deported with their parents. Only one child was successfully fostered. Eleven children were taken away from the hospital by their parents or guardians without the knowledge of the health staff. There were five deaths in the series. PMID:2626119

  2. Alcohol screening for older adults in an acute general hospital: FAST v. MAST-G assessments.

    PubMed

    Knightly, Rachel; Tadros, George; Sharma, Juhi; Duffield, Peter; Carnall, Emma; Fisher, Jacqui; Salman, Shaza

    2016-04-01

    Aims and method Documented prevalence of alcohol misuse among older adult patients at Birmingham Heartlands Hospital is significantly lower than the national prevalence. We aimed to evaluate our alcohol misuse screening protocol for older adults to identify possible shortcomings. Hospital protocol is to screen all adults for alcohol misuse in the accident and emergency (A&E) department using the Fast Alcohol Screening Test (FAST). One hundred consecutive consenting in-patients aged 65-94 admitted via A&E subsequently undertook an additional alcohol screening test (Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test-Geriatric version; MAST-G). Results of the two tests were compared. Results FAST screening was completed for 71 patients and none were FAST-positive for alcohol misuse, yet using MAST-G, 18 patients scored positively for alcohol misuse. FAST screening failed to identify 8 patients with a documented history of alcohol misuse. Clinical implications Older adult alcohol misuse prevalence is significantly underreported using FAST. Screening older adults for alcohol problems requires a different approach to screening the general population. PMID:27087989

  3. Alcohol screening for older adults in an acute general hospital: FAST v. MAST-G assessments

    PubMed Central

    Knightly, Rachel; Tadros, George; Sharma, Juhi; Duffield, Peter; Carnall, Emma; Fisher, Jacqui; Salman, Shaza

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method Documented prevalence of alcohol misuse among older adult patients at Birmingham Heartlands Hospital is significantly lower than the national prevalence. We aimed to evaluate our alcohol misuse screening protocol for older adults to identify possible shortcomings. Hospital protocol is to screen all adults for alcohol misuse in the accident and emergency (A&E) department using the Fast Alcohol Screening Test (FAST). One hundred consecutive consenting in-patients aged 65-94 admitted via A&E subsequently undertook an additional alcohol screening test (Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test-Geriatric version; MAST-G). Results of the two tests were compared. Results FAST screening was completed for 71 patients and none were FAST-positive for alcohol misuse, yet using MAST-G, 18 patients scored positively for alcohol misuse. FAST screening failed to identify 8 patients with a documented history of alcohol misuse. Clinical implications Older adult alcohol misuse prevalence is significantly underreported using FAST. Screening older adults for alcohol problems requires a different approach to screening the general population. PMID:27087989

  4. Comparison Patients and Staffs Satisfaction in General Versus Special Wards of Hospitals of Jahrom

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Leila; Jahromi, Marzieh Kargar; Hojat, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Aims: Patient satisfaction is the most important indicator of high-quality health care and is used for the assessment and planning of health care. Also, Job satisfaction is an important factor on prediction and perception of organizational manner. The aim of this study is to identify and compare patient and staff satisfaction in general versus special wards. Material and Method: In order to identify the various indicators of satisfaction and dissatisfaction, a descriptive study (cross sectional) was done to assess patients’ satisfaction with in-patient care at Jahrom University of Medical Science hospitals. The sample size was 600 patients that selected by sequential random sampling technique and are close to their discharge from the hospital. Patients were asked to indicate the scale point which best reflected their level of satisfaction with the treatment or service. Also we assess the staff satisfaction (sample size was 408 staffs) in general ward using a researcher made questionnaire. It should be noted that the participants were anonymous and there was no obligation to participation. We tried to set a secure and comfortable environment for filling out the questionnaire. Results: Among 600 patients, 239 (n = 38.67%) were men and 368 (61.33%) were female. Number of nurses was 408, of which 135 (33.08%) were men and 273 (66.92%) female. There was a significant correlation between working experience and professional factors of personnel. The mean total patient satisfaction in general and special wards is (2.75 ± .35, 3.03 ± .53) respectively. Differences of patient satisfaction in domains such respect, care and confidence in general wards versus special ward were statistically significant, but there was no difference in expect time of patients in these wards. Differences Between the mean patient and staff satisfaction in the general wards versus special wards were statistically significant using independent t-tests (p = .018, p = .029

  5. Automatic coding of reasons for hospital referral from general medicine free-text reports.

    PubMed Central

    Letrilliart, L.; Viboud, C.; Boëlle, P. Y.; Flahault, A.

    2000-01-01

    Although the coding of medical data is expected to benefit both patients and the health care system, its implementation as a manual process often represents a poorly attractive workload for the physician. For epidemiological purpose, we developed a simple automatic coding system based on string matching, which was designed to process free-text sentences stating reasons for hospital referral, as collected from general practitioners (GPs). This system relied on a look-up table, built up from 2590 reports giving a single reason for referral, which were coded manually according to the International Classification of Primary Care (ICPC). We tested the system by entering 797 new reasons for referral. The match rate was estimated at 77%, and the accuracy rate, at 80% at code level and 92% at chapter level. This simple system is now routinely used by a national epidemiological network of sentinel physicians. PMID:11079931

  6. [Professional practice of nurses who care for cancer patients in general hospitals].

    PubMed

    da Silva, Josiane Travençolo; Matheus, Maria Clara Cassuli; Fustinoni, Suzete Maria; de Gutiérrez, Maria Gaby Rivero

    2012-01-01

    The present article discusses a qualitative study which aimed to understand the typical of nurses' professional practice caring for patient with cancer in general hospitals. In order to find out the reasons that motivate nurse's action, and to put in evidence what is original, significant, specific and typical about this phenomenon, we have taken into consideration the premises of the philosopher Alfred Schütz, which provide us with subsidies to unveil them. The data collected through semi-structured interviews reported that nurses admit not having the required theoretical knowledge and experience or enough practice to take care of a cancer patient. Thus, they don't feel capable of developing actions which may positively influence care on patients and their family members. PMID:23032337

  7. Recruiting and retaining competent clinical nurses. The Clinical Promotion Project Victoria General Hospital, Halifax, Nova Scotia.

    PubMed

    Grantham, M; Ross, S E; MacKay, R; Banfield, V; Brown, J; Beanlands, H

    1989-06-01

    A career advancement program for nurses has been developed and implemented at the Victoria General Hospital, Halifax, as part of a manpower planning strategy for recruitment and retention of clinical nurses. A competency based performance appraisal system was developed and implemented as part of the program. This system identifies four levels of clinical expertise. Progression through each level indicates that a nurse has achieved a certain level of skill, knowledge and abilities. Demonstrated competence in one level is a prerequisite to promotion to the next level of practice. Implementation of this system provides clinical career opportunities for nurses in direct patient care. This article will provide the nurse administrator with an insight into the development and implementation of a clinical career advancement program. Future articles will described the research evaluation of the Clinical Performance Appraisal System and clinical nurses' reactions to the new system. PMID:2486680

  8. An audit of paediatric day care surgery in a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Jolliffe, D M

    1997-01-01

    At a 620 bed District General Hospital, questionnaires were issued to the patients of 142 consecutive paediatric day surgery cases and the nurses involved in the care of these children. Most of the children were not upset by day case surgery, although nearly a quarter were distressed by changing into a theatre gown. Postoperatively, pain was more of a problem than nausea and vomiting. Relatively minor problems occurred at home. The majority of the 93 parents who replied were happy with the overall care of their child. They valued being present for induction of anaesthesia and would have liked to be present in recovery when their child was awake, although the nurses felt this would not have been helpful. Nonclinical matters also influenced their assessment of the quality of care. PMID:9243690

  9. [Anxiety and depression in the general population: normal values in the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale].

    PubMed

    Hinz, A; Schwarz, R

    2001-05-01

    For the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) psychometric properties were tested and standardised values were calculated on the basis of a representative sample of the German adult population with 2037 persons. The main result was the evidence of age and gender differences for anxiety and depression. Females were more anxious than males. For both dimensions of the HADS a nearly linear age dependency was found which was more pronounced for depression (r = 0.36) than for anxiety (r = 0.14). Standardised values are given for different age and gender groups, and the results of regression analyses are presented. The psychometric properties were satisfying or good, the two-dimensional factorial structure could be replicated. By means of the standardised values and regression coefficients it is now possible to compare patient groups of different age and gender distributions with the general population. PMID:11417357

  10. The burden of bone, native joint and soft tissue infections on orthopaedic emergency referrals in a city hospital.

    PubMed

    Howell, A; Parker, S; Tsitskaris, K; Oddy, M J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bone, native joint and soft tissue infections are frequently referred to orthopaedic units although their volume as a proportion of the total emergency workload has not been reported previously. Geographic and socioeconomic variation may influence their presentation. The aim of this study was to quantify the burden of such infections on the orthopaedic department in an inner city hospital, determine patient demographics and associated risk factors, and review our current utilisation of specialist services. Methods All cases involving bone, native joint and soft tissue infections admitted under or referred to the orthopaedic team throughout 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. Prosthetic joint infections were excluded. Results Almost 15% of emergency admissions and referrals were associated with bone, native joint or soft tissue infection or suspected infection. The cohort consisted of 169 patients with a mean age of 43 years (range: 1-91 years). The most common diagnosis was cellulitis/other soft tissue infection and the mean length of stay was 13 days. Two-thirds of patients (n=112, 66%) underwent an operation. Fifteen per cent of patients were carrying at least one blood borne virus, eleven per cent were alcohol dependent, fifteen per cent were using or had been using intravenous drugs and nine per cent were homeless or vulnerably housed. Conclusions This study has shown that a significant number of patients are admitted for orthopaedic care as a result of infection. These patients are relatively young, with multiple complex medical and social co-morbidities, and a long length of stay. PMID:26688397

  11. Intestinal helminth infections amongst HIV-infected adults in Mthatha General Hospital, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Yogeswaran, Parimalaranie; Wright, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Background In South Africa, studies on the prevalence of intestinal helminth co-infection amongst HIV-infected patients as well as possible interactions between these two infections are limited. Aim To investigate the prevalence of intestinal helminth infestation amongst adults living with HIV or AIDS at Mthatha General Hospital. Setting Study participants were recruited at the outpatient department of Mthatha General Hospital, Mthatha, South Africa. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted between October and December 2013 amongst consecutive consenting HIV-positive adult patients. Socio-demographic and clinical information were obtained using data collection forms and structured interviews. Stool samples were collected to investigate the presence of helminths whilst blood samples were obtained for the measurement of CD4+ T-cell count and viral load. Results Data were obtained on 231 participants, with a mean age of 34.9 years, a mean CD4 count of 348 cells/µL and a mean viral load of 4.8 log10 copies/mL. Intestinal helminth prevalence was 24.7%, with Ascaris Lumbricoides (42.1%) the most prevalent identified species. Statistically significant association was found between CD4 count of less than 200 cells/µL and helminth infection (p = 0.05). No statistically significant association was found between intestinal helminth infection and the mean CD4 count (p = 0.79) or the mean viral load (p = 0.98). Conclusion A high prevalence of intestinal helminth infections was observed amongst the study population. Therefore, screening and treatment of helminths should be considered as part of the management of HIV and AIDS in primary health care. PMID:26842519

  12. Complex cardiac pacing in the setting of a district general hospital: procedural success and complications

    PubMed Central

    Rahbi, Hazim; El-din, Mohammed; Salloum, Mohammad; Shaukat, Naeem; Farooq, Mohsin

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Complex cardiac pacing with either an implantable cardiovertor defibrillator (ICD) or a biventricular pacemaker with pacing only (CRT-P) or biventricular pacemaker with implantable cardiovertor defibrillator (CRT-D) plays an important role in the management of patients with heart failure. However, device implantation is associated with rare but significant complications which may limit the number of centres offering this treatment. The aim of this study is to define procedural success and complication rates associated with implantation of complex implantable cardiac devices in a district general hospital. Methods and subjects The pacing records of all the patients who underwent complex cardiac pacing (ICD, CRT-P and CRT-D) between January 2010 and December 2011 were reviewed. Information on clinical characteristics, pacing indications, venous access, implantation data, lead stability at follow-up, and procedure-related complications were obtained. Results A total of 151 devices (60 CRT-Ds, 55 CRT-Ps and 36 ICDs), were implanted between January 2010 and December 2011 with a median follow-up of 12 months. Overall transvenous procedural success rate was 99.3%. 14 (9.3%) out of the 151 patients suffered a complication. There were no procedure-related deaths, and lead displacement (5.3%) was the most common complication. Other complications included pocket haematoma and phrenic nerve stimulation (1.3% and 3.4%, respectively). There were no cases of pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade, device-related infection, symptomatic venous thrombosis and stroke. Lead thresholds, in particular that of the left ventricular lead, remained stable during the follow-up period indicating persistent delivery of cardiac resynchronisation therapy in the group receiving CRT systems. Conclusions In the presence of necessary clinical expertise, complex cardiac devices can be implanted successfully and with a high degree of safety in the setting of a district general

  13. Medical psychology services in dutch general hospitals: state of the art developments and recommendations for the future.

    PubMed

    Soons, Paul; Denollet, Johan

    2009-06-01

    In this article an overview is presented of the emergence of medical psychology in the care of somatically ill patients. The situation in the Netherlands can be considered as prototypical. For 60 years, clinical psychologists have been working in general, teaching and academic hospitals. Nowadays, they are an integrated non-medical specialism working in the medical setting of hospitals in the Netherlands, and are a full-member of the medical board. This paper discusses several topics: the position of the general hospital in the health care system in the Netherlands, the emergence of medical psychology in Dutch hospitals, the role of the professional association of medical psychologists, and the characteristics of patients seen by clinical psychologists. Following the discussion about the situation of medical psychology in other countries, recommendations are formulated for the further development of medical psychology in the Netherlands as well as in other countries. PMID:19266269

  14. Effect of the Iranian hospital grading system on patients' and general practitioners' behaviour: an examination of awareness, belief and choice.

    PubMed

    Aryankhesal, Aidin; Sheldon, Trevor

    2010-08-01

    There is considerable international interest in the use of performance measurement and their public release in order to improve the quality of care. However, few studies have assessed stakeholders' awareness and use of performance data. Iranian hospitals have been graded annually since 1998 and hospital hotel charges vary by grade, but this system has never been evaluated. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 104 outpatients at eight Teheran hospitals and 103 general practitioners (GPs) to assess the awareness of and attitudes towards hospital grading system. Only 5.8% of patients (95% CI: 1.3-10.3%) and 11.7% of GPs (95% CI: 5.5-17.9%) were aware of grading results. Patients' awareness was positively associated with their education level (P = 0.016). No patient used the grading results for choosing a hospital and only one GP (1%, 95% CI: 0-2%) reported using hospital grade to influence referral decisions. Patients were more influenced by hospitals' public reputation and that of their specialists. GPs believed that the grading system did not reflect the quality of care in hospitals. When developing performance measurement systems, public release of data should be accompanied by evaluation of its impact on awareness and health-care choices. PMID:20702891

  15. The Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa in a General Hospital: A Case Vignette of a Multi-Disciplinary General Hospital-Based Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronenberg, J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes anorexia nervosa as condition variable in etiology and resistant to treatment, which may lead to mortality in 5% of treated cases. Notes that efforts have been made for treating disorder in nonstigmatizing medical units outside psychiatric hospitals. Describes, through presentation of short case vignette, advantages of treating…

  16. Effects of short-term exposure to air pollution on hospital admissions of young children for acute lower respiratory infections in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Le, Truong Giang; Ngo, Long; Mehta, Sumi; Do, Van Dzung; Thach, T Q; Vu, Xuan Dan; Nguyen, Dinh Tuan; Cohen, Aaron

    2012-06-01

    There is emerging evidence, largely from studies in Europe and North America, that economic deprivation increases the magnitude of morbidity and mortality related to air pollution. Two major reasons why this may be true are that the poor experience higher levels of exposure to air pollution, and they are more vulnerable to its effects--in other words, due to poorer nutrition, less access to medical care, and other factors, they experience more health impact per unit of exposure. The relations among health, air pollution, and poverty are likely to have important implications for public health and social policy, especially in areas such as the developing countries of Asia where air pollution levels are high and many live in poverty. The aims of this study were to estimate the effect of exposure to air pollution on hospital admissions of young children for acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI*) and to explore whether such effects differed between poor children and other children. ALRI, which comprises pneumonia and bronchiolitis, is the largest single cause of mortality among young children worldwide and is responsible for a substantial burden of disease among young children in developing countries. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study of the health effects of air pollution in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Vietnam. For these reasons, the results of this study have the potential to make an important contribution to the growing literature on the health effects of air pollution in Asia. The study focused on the short-term effects of daily average exposure to air pollutants on hospital admissions of children less than 5 years of age for ALRI, defined as pneumonia or bronchiolitis, in HCMC during 2003, 2004, and 2005. Admissions data were obtained from computerized records of Children's Hospital 1 and Children's Hospital 2 (CH1 and CH2) in HCMC. Nearly all children hospitalized for respiratory illnesses in the city are admitted to one of these two pediatric

  17. Current Status of Management in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus at General Hospitals in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jin-Hee; Lee, Jung-Hwa; Noh, Jin-Won; Park, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Hee-Sook; Yoo, Joo-Wha; Song, Bok-Rye; Lee, Jeong-rim; Hong, Myeong-Hee; Jang, Hyang-Mi; Na, Young; Lee, Hyun-Joo; Lee, Jeong-Mi; Kang, Yang-Gyo; Kim, Sun-Young

    2015-01-01

    Background In Korea, the prevalence, complications, and mortality rate of diabetes are rapidly increasing. However, investigations on the actual condition of diabetes management are very limited due to lack of nation-wide research or multicenter study. Hence, we have minutely inquired the current status of diabetes management and achievement of glucose target goal in general hospital offering education program. That way, we are able to furnish data for policy making of diabetes education and draw up guideline which may allow us to reduce the morbidity and mortality of diabetes. Methods The subjects consisted of 2,610 patients with type 2 diabetes who visited the 13 general hospital in Seoul or Gyeonggi region from March 19 to May 29, 2013. General characteristics, associated diseases, complications, and management status were investigated. Results The mean age was 61.0±11.6 years, body mass index was 25.0±3.3 kg/m2, and family history of diabetes was 50.5%. The mean duration of diabetes was 10.7±7.9 years and 53% received education about diabetes. The prevalence of hypertension and dyslipidemia were 59.2% and 65.5%, respectively, and 18.3% of the subjects were accompanied by liver disease. Diabetic retinopathy appeared in 31.6%, nephropathy in 28.1%, and neuropathy in 19.9% of the subjects. The mean glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level was 7.3%±1.3% and the achieving rate based on Korean Diabetes Association guideline (HbA1c <6.5%) was 24.8%, blood pressure (130/80 mm Hg or less) was 49.4%, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (<100 mg/dL) was 63.6%. The reaching rate to the target level in four parameters (blood glucose, blood pressure, lipids, and body weight) was 7.8%. Conclusion The blood glucose control rate was lower than other parameters, and the implementation rate of diabetes education was only 53%. Thus more appropriate glucose control and systematic diabetes education are imperative. PMID:26301192

  18. Nurses' experiences of caring for South Asian minority ethnic patients in a general hospital in England.

    PubMed

    Vydelingum, Vasso

    2006-03-01

    Healthcare provision for minority ethnic groups in the UK has generally revealed inequalities in access and differential service provision. British healthcare policy has started to address such issues. However, very few studies have specifically examined the experiences of nurses caring for minority ethnic patients. This paper focuses on the focus group interviews of a broader ethnographic study, aimed at describing nurses' experiences of caring for South Asian minority ethnic patients, in a general hospital in the south of England. A sample of 43 nurses of all grades from six medical wards took part in the focus groups: three ward sisters, 22 staff nurses and 18 care assistants; 40 participants were white, one was African-Caribbean and two were South Asian. Data analysis revealed eight themes: changes in service provision; false consciousness of equity; limited cultural knowledge; victim blaming; valuing of the relatives; denial of racism; ethnocentrism, and self-disclosure. The study revealed a good local service response to government policies in addressing inequality. However, there was a tendency to treat all minority ethnic patients the same, with evidence of ethnocentric practices, victim-blaming approaches and poor cultural competence in nursing staff, which raise questions about the quality of service provision. The study indicates that ongoing training and development in the area of cultural competence is necessary. PMID:16494664

  19. Pattern of traumatic brain injury treated by general surgeons in a tertiary referral hospital.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Shankar Das; Karmakar, Nisith Chandra; Sengupta, Ritankar; SenGupta, Tamal Kanti; Ray, Debasis; Basus, Shibaji

    2013-09-01

    The number of polytrauma patient with associated brain injury or commonly referred as 'head injury' has increased tremendously in recent times courtesy to road traffic accident or other causes. This prospective observational study was conducted in patients of head injury admitted through emergency in the department of general surgery in NRS Medical College, Kolkata during the year 2011 to determine the pattern of head injury patients admitted and nature of intervention. A total number of 3861 patients were admitted in a single year. Obviously this represents the tip of the iceburg. Traumatic brain injury was the highest in the age group of 31-40 years (33.5%) followed by 21-30 years (29.1%) in the most fruitful phase of life. The traumatic brain injury death was more common in males. The maximum number of cases was from rural areas ie, farmers and labours. To minimise the morbidity and mortality resulting from head injury there is need for better maintenance of roads, improvement of road visibility and lighting, rigid enforcement of traffic rules and imparting road safety education to school children. Despite valiant efforts and advancement in medical sciences and infrastructure in the form of neurosurgery departments and trauma care units to cope with the changing world of trauma, there still remains a huge responsibility and a definite part to be played by the general surgeons to manage head injury patient even in tertiary hospitals. PMID:24968524

  20. Correlates of psychiatric morbidity in typhoid fever in a Nigerian general hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Aghanwa, H S; Morakinyo, O

    2001-01-01

    This study explored factors associated with psychiatric morbidity in typhoid fever in a Nigerian general hospital. Information such as sociodemographic characteristics, symptom manifestations, results of investigations, neuropsychiatric symptoms, outcome and disposal were obtained from the case files of patients admitted for typhoid fever over a period of six years. The patients with psychiatric morbidity conspicuous enough to be documented by the attending physicians-mostly internists-were compared with those with no documented psychiatric morbidity on sociodemographic and clinical indices. Of the 136 cases, 26 (19.1%) had psychiatric morbidity. This included delirium (73.1%), generalized anxiety disorder (3.8%), depressive episode (3.8%), schizophrenia like disorder (3.8%) and monosymptomatic neuropychiatric manifestations such as apathy, hallucinations and irrelevant talking (15.5%). The clinical and sociodemographic indices that were significantly associated with psychiatric morbidity were diarrhea, blood biochemical imbalance and age (P<.05). Adolescents and young adults were more predisposed to developing psychiatric complications. Some factors potentially associated with psychiatric morbidity in typhoid fever have been identified. There is the need to prospectively assess the burden from psychiatric morbidity and identify interventions that may reduce it. PMID:11427249

  1. Correlates of Stillbirths at Nyeri Provincial General Hospital, Kenya, 2009-2013: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Cheptum, Joyce J.; Muiruri, Nelly; Mutua, Ernest; Gitonga, Moses; Juma, Mwangi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Death of a baby in-utero is a very devastating event to the mother and the family. Most stillbirths occur during labor and birth with other deaths occurring during the antenatal period. Millions of families experience stillbirths, yet these deaths remain uncounted, and policies have not been clearly stipulated to address this issue. The aim of the study was to identify the possible causes of stillbirths as recorded in the medical records. Methods: A retrospective study looking at medical records of women who experienced stillbirths between 1st January 2009 and 31st December 2013 at Nyeri Provincial General Hospital, Kenya. The hospital records containing cases of stillbirths were retrieved and data abstraction forms were used to collect data and information. Results: Both fresh and macerated stillbirths were equally common. The stillbirth rate was 12.2 per 1,000 births. There was significant association between stillbirths and the clients who were referred and reason for referral, (p=0.029) and (p=0.005), respectively. The number of ANC visits during pregnancy was also significant (p=0.05). Mode of delivery and the reason for cesarean section were significantly associated with stillbirths, (p=0.003) and (p=0.032), respectively. The type of labor and delivery complications experienced was associated with stillbirths (p= 0.022). Conclusion and Global Health Implications: There were several factors associated with stillbirths thus efforts should be made to establish approaches aimed at prevention. Addressing the causes of stillbirths will contribute to reduction of perinatal mortality. PMID:27622009

  2. Trauma patterns in patients attending the Emergency Department of Jazan General Hospital, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Hokkam, Emad; Gonna, Abdelaziz; Zakaria, Ossama; El-shemally, Amany

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Modern civilization and the sharp rise in living standards have led to dramatic changes in trauma pattern in Saudi Arabia. This study aimed to describe the different patterns of injuries of patients attending the Emergency Department of Jazan General Hospital (JGH) in the southwest corner of Saudi Arabia. METHODS: A total number of 1 050 patients were enrolled in the study. A pre-organized data sheet was prepared for each patient attended the Emergency Department of JGH from February 2012 to January 2013. It contains data about socio-demographics, trauma data, clinical evaluation results, investigations as well as treatment strategies. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 25.3±16.8 years. Most (45.1%) of the patients were at age of 18–30 years. Males (64.3%) were affected by trauma more common than females. More than half (60.6%) of the patients were from urban areas. The commonest kind of injury was minor injury (60%), followed by blunt trauma (30.9%) and then penetrating trauma (9.1%). The mean time from the incident to arrival at hospital was 41.3±79.8 minutes. The majority (48.2%) of the patients were discharged after management of trivial trauma, whereas 2.3% were admitted to ICU, 7.7% transferred to inpatient wards, and 17.7% observed and subsequently discharged. The mortality rate of the patients was 2.6%. CONCLUSION: Trauma is a major health problem, especially in the young population in Saudi Arabia. Blunt trauma is more frequent than penetrating trauma, with road traffic accidents accounting for the majority. PMID:25802567

  3. Motivation and job satisfaction among medical and nursing staff in a Cyprus public general hospital

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to investigate how medical and nursing staff of the Nicosia General Hospital is affected by specific motivation factors, and the association between job satisfaction and motivation. Furthermore, to determine the motivational drive of socio-demographic and job related factors in terms of improving work performance. Methods A previously developed and validated instrument addressing four work-related motivators (job attributes, remuneration, co-workers and achievements) was used. Two categories of health care professionals, medical doctors and dentists (N = 67) and nurses (N = 219) participated and motivation and job satisfaction was compared across socio-demographic and occupational variables. Results The survey revealed that achievements was ranked first among the four main motivators, followed by remuneration, co-workers and job attributes. The factor remuneration revealed statistically significant differences according to gender, and hospital sector, with female doctors and nurses and accident and emergency (A+E) outpatient doctors reporting greater mean scores (p < 0.005). The medical staff showed statistically significantly lower job satisfaction compared to the nursing staff. Surgical sector nurses and those >55 years of age reported higher job satisfaction when compared to the other groups. Conclusions The results are in agreement with the literature which focuses attention to management approaches employing both monetary and non-monetary incentives to motivate health care professionals. Health care professionals tend to be motivated more by intrinsic factors, implying that this should be a target for effective employee motivation. Strategies based on the survey's results to enhance employee motivation are suggested. PMID:21080954

  4. Client perception of service quality at the outpatient clinics of a General hospital in Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ogunnowo, Babatunde Enitan; Olufunlayo, Tolulope Florence; Sule, Salami Suberu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Service quality assessments have assumed increasing importance in the last two decades. They are useful in identifying gaps in services been provided with the ultimate aim of guaranteeing quality assurance. The objective of this study was to assess the client perception of service quality at the outpatient clinics of Randle General hospital, Lagos. Methods A descriptive cross sectional study was conducted from March to May 2013. A multistage sampling technique was used to select respondents and data was collected with the aid of modified SERVQUAL questionnaires. The data was analysed with aid of EPI-INFO 2002 and statistical significance was set at a P value 0.05 for statistical significance. Results Total of 400 respondents were interviewed. The mean age was 40 years with a standard deviation of 15.2 yrs. The highest mean score of 4.35 out of a possible maximum of 5 was recorded in assurance domain while the lowest mean score of 4.00 was recorded in the responsiveness domain. The overall mean score of all the domains was 4.20 with standard deviation of 0.51. Overall majority (80.8%) of respondents rated the overall service quality as good/ very good. After linear regression, the assurance domain was the most important predictor of the overall perceived service quality (p< 0.001). Conclusion The overall perceived service quality was good. The major deficiencies were in the responsiveness domain and especially the waiting time. The hospital management should implement measures to improve the responsiveness of services by ensuring prompt delivery of services. PMID:26834921

  5. Perceptions of Organizational Justice Among Nurses Working in University Hospitals of Shiraz: A Comparison Between General and Specialty Settings

    PubMed Central

    Hatam, Nahid; Fardid, Mozhgan; Kavosi, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Background: Justice has gained much attention in social and human studies and has many consequences on employees and the organizations, especially on health system workers such as nurses who are among the key factors in health care systems. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate perception of organizational justice among nurses in educational hospitals of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS), and to compare the results of general and specialty hospitals. Materials and Methods: In this research, 400 nurses at SUMS hospitals were selected by random sampling method. A 19-item questionnaire was applied to measure distributive, procedural and interactional justice. Data analysis was performed using descriptive statistics, including percentage, frequency, mean, and standard deviation. Also, the t-test and one way ANOVA were used to measure the differences between different hospitals and wards. Results: Of 400 nurses, 66% perceived a high level of organizational justice. In this study the mean scores of total perceived organizational justice (P = 0.035), procedural justice (P = 0.031), and interactional justice (P = 0.046) in specialty hospitals were higher than general ones. Furthermore, the mean score of interactional justice was higher than the other components of organizational justice, respectively 3.58 ± 1.02 for general and 3.76 ± 0.86 for specialty hospitals. Significant differences were observed between overall perceived justice (P = 0.013) and its components (P = 0.024, P = 0.013, and P = 0.036) in different wards. Conclusions: Most nurses who participated in this study had a high perception of organizational justice. The mean score of organizational justice was higher in specialty hospitals. Health care policy makers and hospital managers should support their employees, especially nurses through fairness in distributions, procedures, and interactions. PMID:25414883

  6. Morbidity and mortality of infective endocarditis in a hospital system in New York City serving a diverse urban population.

    PubMed

    Alkhawam, Hassan; Sogomonian, Robert; Zaiem, Feras; Vyas, Neil; El-Hunjul, Mohammed; Jolly, JoshPaul; Al-Khazraji, Ahmed; Ashraf, Amar

    2016-08-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a severe illness associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate morbidity and mortality of IE in a hospital serving the most diverse area in New York City. An analysis of 209 patients admitted to the hospital from 2000 to 2012 who were found to have IE based on modified Duke criteria. Among the 209 patients with IE, 188 (88.8%) had native heart valves and 21 (11.2%) had prosthetic valves. Of the patients with native heart valves, 3.7% had coronary artery bypass graft, 4.3% were active drug users, 6.3% had permanent pacemakers, 12.2% had a history of IE, 25.7% were diabetic, 17% had end-stage renal disease (ESRD), 9% had congestive heart failure, 8% had abnormal heart valves, and 13.8% had an unknown etiology. Mortality rates of the patients with prosthetic heart valves were 27.7% compared to 8.11% in patients with native heart valves (OR 3, p<0.0001). Since we identified diabetes mellitus and ESRD to be significant risk factors in our population, we isolated and compared characteristics of patients with and without IE. IE among patients with diabetes mellitus was 23% compared with 13.8% in the control group (p=0.016). Cases of IE in patients with ESRD were 15.3%, compared with 4% in the control group (p<0.0001). We identified an overall mortality rate of 20.1% in patients with IE, a readmission rate within 30 days of discharge of 21.5%, and an average age of 59 years. Among 209 patients, 107 were males and 102 females. The most common organisms identified were Staphylococcus aureus (43.7%), viridans streptococci (17%) followed by Enterococcus (14.7%). Despite appropriate treatment, high rates of morbidity and mortality remained, with a higher impact in patients greater than 50 years of age. Such discoveries raise the importance of controlling and monitoring risk factors for IE. PMID:27206447

  7. The Warrens and other pioneering clinician pathologists of the Massachusetts General Hospital during its early years: an appreciation on the 200th anniversary of the hospital founding.

    PubMed

    Young, Robert H; Louis, David N

    2011-10-01

    To celebrate the bicentennial of the 1811 charter to establish the Massachusetts General Hospital, we tell the stories of the physicians and surgeons of the hospital who practiced pathology until the discipline was more firmly established with the recruitment of James Homer Wright who became the first full-time pathologist at the hospital in 1896. One of the two co-founders of the hospital, John Collins Warren (famed primarily for being the surgeon at the first public demonstration of ether anesthesia) had a major interest in pathology; he published a book focused on gross pathology (1837) and began the important specimen collection subsequently known as the Warren Anatomical Museum at Harvard Medical School (HMS). An early physician, John Barnard Swett Jackson, became the first professor of pathology in the United States (1847) and was a noted collector whose specimens were added to the Warren Museum. Dr Jackson showed no interest in microscopy when it became available, but microscopy was promoted from circa the late 1840s at Harvard and likely at the hospital by Oliver Wendell Holmes, the famed essayist who was on the staff of the hospital and faculty at the medical school. Microscopy was probably first used at the Hospital with any frequency on examination of fluids by the first officially designated 'Microscopist,' John Bacon Jr, in 1851, and after the mid-1850s by Calvin Ellis on anatomic specimens; Ellis went on to pioneering reform of the HMS curriculum. Reginald Heber Fitz succeeded Ellis in 1871 and was the first to be officially designated as 'Pathologist' at the hospital. Fitz is remembered for two major contributions: his paper showing the nature of, and potential surgical cure for, the disease that he termed 'appendicitis'; and his description of acute pancreatitis. With the microscope now firmly entrenched and with the increase in surgery after Fitz's work on appendicitis, surgical pathology grew quickly. J Collins Warren, the grandson of the co

  8. Infection control in general practices in Buffalo City and OR Tambo District Municipalities, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Good infection control practices are effective in reducing rates of infection in health care settings. Studies in primary care in developed countries indicate that many general practitioners (GPs) do not comply with optimal infection control practices. There are no published studies from developing countries in Southern Africa. Objectives The aim of this study was to describe infection control practices in private GP surgeries in the Buffalo City and OR Tambo District Municipalities in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. Method A literature review was conducted to appraise current best practice with respect to Standard Infection Control and Transmission Based Precautions. A questionnaire, inquiring into GPs’ actual practices, was posted to each surgery. Results The valid response rate was 34% (47/140). Methods used to sterilise instruments in 40 practices were: ultraviolet sterilisation (23), chemical disinfection (14), boiling water (7), and steam autoclave (2). Compounds used for chemical disinfection included organotin quaternary, chlorhexidine and benzyl ammonium chloride with a quaternary complex. Twenty-two (47%) used a hand rub. Sixteen (35%) GPs stated that they had a policy to promptly triage patients who are coughing, and 23 (50%) had a policy for airflow movement in the surgery. All practices appropriately disposed of sharps. Thirty-seven (80%) expressed interest in a seminar on infection control. Conclusions Overall, GPs were aware of infection control precautions. Ultraviolet sterilisers and chlorhexidine are not recommended, however, for sterilisation or high level disinfection of medical instruments, and their use should be discontinued. Hand rubs are underutilised. GPs should implement Transmission Based Precautions to prevent airborne and droplet infections.

  9. [The founding of Zemun Hospital].

    PubMed

    Milanović, Jasmina; Milenković, Sanja; Pavlović, Momcilo; Stojanović, Dragos

    2014-01-01

    This year Zemun Hospital--Clinical Hospital Center Zemun celebrates 230th anniversary of continuous work, thus becoming the oldest medical facility in Serbia.The exact date of the hospital founding has been often questioned in history. Various dates appeared in the literature, but the most frequent one was 25th of February 1784. Until now, the document which confirms this has never been published. This article represents the first official publication of the document which confirms that Zemun Hospital was indeed founded on this date. The first hospitals started emerging in Zemun when the town became a part of the Habsburg Monarchy. The first sanitary facility ever formed was the"Kontumac"--a quarantine established in 1730. Soon after, two more confessional hospitals were opened.The Serbian (Orthodox) Hospital was founded before 1769, whereas the German (Catholic) Hospital started working in 1758. Both hospitals were financed, amongst others, by the Town Hall--the Magistrate. In order to improve efficiency of these hospitals, a decision was made to merge them into a single City Hospital. It was founded on 25th February 1784, when the General Command ordered the Magistrate of Zemun to merge the financess of all existing hospitals and initiate the construction of a new building. Although financially united, the hospitals continued working in separate buildings over a certain period of time.The final, physical merging of these hospitals was completed in 1795. PMID:25233701

  10. The decomposition of cost efficiency: an empirical application of the shadow cost function model to Dutch general hospitals.

    PubMed

    Blank, Jos L T; Eggink, Evelien

    2004-05-01

    This paper investigates the performance of the Dutch general hospital industry by a parametric method. In general, the parametric approaches find more difficulties in distinguishing between technical and allocative efficiencies than DEA. Only recently a class of models is developed based on shadow prices which have possibilities to distinguish between technical and allocative efficiency. However, these models cause some serious computational problems. This paper recommends an approach to overcome these problems by using an iterative two-stage estimation procedure. The estimation is conducted on a panel data set of Dutch general hospitals. Estimation shows that this method is effective. The parameter estimates are plausible, reliable and satisfy all theoretical requirements. In particular we find some reliable estimates for the individual hospitals' shadow prices. According to these shadow prices hospitals should reallocate their resources in favor of material supplies at the cost of other personnel and nursing personnel. The mean technical efficiency is about 86%, whereas the allocative efficiency is about 92%. The outcomes also show that technical progress is very small. Economies of scale are present only for small hospitals. PMID:15152972

  11. Seasonality of Admissions for Mania: Results From a General Hospital Psychiatric Unit in Pondicherry, India

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Siddharth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Bipolar disorder is affected by variables that modulate circadian rhythm, including seasonal variations. There is evidence of a seasonal pattern of admissions of mania in various geographical settings, though its timing varies by region and climate. Variables such as age and gender have been shown to affect seasonality in some studies. Methodology: Data on monthly admission patterns for mania at a general hospital psychiatry unit in Pondicherry, India, were collected for 4 years (2010–2013) and analyzed for seasonality and seasonal peaks. The effects of age and gender were analyzed separately. Results: There was overall evidence of a seasonal pattern of admissions for mania (P < .01, Friedman test for seasonality), with a peak beginning during the rainy season and ending before summer (P < .0.1, Ratchet circular scan test). Male sex (P < .005, Ratchet circular scan test) and age > 25 years (P < .005, Ratchet circular scan test) were specifically associated with this seasonal peak. Discussion: The effect of seasons on mania is complex and is modulated by a variety of variables. Our study is consistent with earlier research findings: a greater degree of seasonality for mania in men. It is possible that climatic and individual variables interact to determine seasonal patterns in bipolar disorder in a given setting. PMID:26644962

  12. Hypertension among Outpatients at a General Hospital in South Angola: Prevalence, Awareness, Treatment, and Control

    PubMed Central

    Paquissi, Feliciano C.; Cuvinje, Arminda B.P.; Cuvinje, Almeida B.; Paquissi, Arlindo M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study aimed to assess the prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in patients attending an outpatient clinic at a general hospital in Huambo, South Angola. METHODS A total of 265 subjects aged 18 years and older were included. Evaluation included complete interview and blood pressure measurement using a validated automatic device. RESULTS The prevalence rates of hypertension and prehypertension were 38.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 32.83%–44.90%) and 30.20% (95% CI: 24.52%–36.22%), respectively. Hypertension was associated with age (>35 years; odds ratio [OR] = 10.09, 95% CI: 5.46–18.66, P < 0.01) and female gender (OR = 1.81, 95% CI: 1.08–3.05, P = 0.02). Among total hypertensive patients, 54.9% were aware of their diagnosis, 28.43% were in treatment, and 7.84% had controlled blood pressure. Lack of awareness was significantly higher in younger (age ≤ 37 years; OR = 3.28, 95% CI: 1.13–9.49, P = 0.02). CONCLUSION This study revealed a high prevalence of hypertension, with low awareness, treatment, and control rates. Greater efforts are necessary to overcome these challenges. PMID:27398036

  13. Birthing experience of adolescents at the Ottawa General Hospital Perinatal Centre.

    PubMed Central

    Lena, S M; Marko, E; Nimrod, C; Merritt, L; Poirier, G; Shein, E

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the experiences of prenatal care, prenatal classes and birthing among adolescents. DESIGN: Anonymous self-report questionnaire survey. SETTING: Ottawa General Hospital Perinatal Centre. PATIENTS: A total of 100 adolescents (aged less than 20 years) and 100 control subjects (aged over 19 years) who gave birth at the Perinatal Centre from June 1989 to August 1990. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prenatal experiences, attendance at prenatal classes, experiences in labour and delivery, postpartum care. RESULTS: Only 26% of the adolescent patients sought prenatal care in the first trimester, and only 27% attended prenatal classes, as compared with 87% and 91% of the control subjects (p < 0.001). Most of the adolescents felt uncomfortable in the same waiting room as adult women. During labour and delivery 50% of the adolescents had their mothers with them for support, whereas 83% of the adults had their husbands with them (p < 0.001). Over half (59%) of the adolescents stated that they were not prepared for labour and delivery, as compared with 26% of the adults (p < 0.001). Of the adolescents 85% opted to care for their babies after birth. CONCLUSION: Pregnant adolescents do not avail themselves adequately of the medical and psychosocial services available to them through the health care system. Our findings suggest features of prenatal clinics that would make them attractive and accessible to such patients. PMID:8324689

  14. Factors Affecting the Agreement Between Emergency Psychiatrists and General Practitioners Regarding Involuntary Psychiatric Hospitalizations.

    PubMed

    Geoffroy, Pierre Alexis; Duhamel, Alain; Behal, Hélène; Zouitina-Lietaert, Nadia; Duthilleul, Julie; Marquette, Louise; Ducrocq, François; Vaiva, Guillaume; Rolland, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Important discrepancies exist between physicians in deciding when to perform involuntary hospitalization measures (IHMs). The factors underlying these differences are poorly known.We conducted a two-year single-center retrospective study in France on patients who were referred to the emergency department (ED) with an IHM certificate written by a private-practice General Practitioner (GP). For each consultation, the official IHM motive was categorized into four groups: Suicide; Psychosis, Mania, or Melancholia (PMM); Agitation; and Other. The alcohol status of the patient was also noted. The factors underlying the ED psychiatrists' confirmation of the use of IHMs were determined using a logistic regression model. One hundred eighty-nine cases were found (165 patients; 44.2 ± 16 years, 41.3% women). The ED psychiatrists confirmed the use of IHMs in 123 instances (65.1% agreement rate). Multivariate analyses found that IHM disagreement was significantly associated with patient alcohol status and the reason for referral. Specifically, there was an increased risk of IHM disagreement when the patient had an alcohol-positive status (OR = 15.80; 95% CI [6.45-38.67]; p < 0.0001) and when the motive for IHM was "agitation" compared with "suicide" (OR = 11.44; 95% CI[3.38-38.78]; p < 0.0001). These findings reflect significant disparities between GPs and ED psychiatrists regarding the decision to proceed to an IHM. PMID:27324574

  15. Clinical and echocardiographic profile and outcomes of peripartum cardiomyopathy: the Philippine General Hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Samonte, Vim I; Ngalob, Queenie G; Mata, Ghea Divina B; Aherrera, Jaime Alfonso M; Reyes, Eugene; Punzalan, Felix Eduardo R

    2013-01-01

    Background Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a rare disease entity of unknown aetiology. High rates of mortality or poor overall clinical outcome are reported in women with this condition. Certain characteristics are risk factors for this disease. In Asia, there are limited data, especially in the Southeast Asian region. In the Philippines, no data exist regarding the prevalence or risk factors. Objectives To determine the prevalence, profile and outcomes of PPCM in Philippine General Hospital and to describe their echocardiographic findings. Methods All patients diagnosed with PPCM in the period of 1 January 2009–31 December 2010 were seen and examined. Demographic data and echocardiogram of the patients were reviewed. Results 9 were diagnosed with PPCM during the study period. The prevalence is 1 in 1270 live births. Mean age was 29. 78% presented with moderate to severe heart failure symptoms in the prepartum period. Among purported risk factors for PPCM, obesity, multiparity and pre-eclampsia were seen in most. Conversely, only one patient admitted to having more than a single sexual partner. Only one patient had multifetal pregnancy. None were smokers. 44% underwent caesarean section for maternal indication. No mortality was seen. Fetal outcomes were good with all resulting in live births and most were appropriate for gestational age. Echocardiographic findings showed global wall motion abnormalities in the majority, mean ejection fraction of 34% and mean fractional shortening of 20%. Conclusions PPCM is rare in the Philippines. Compared with international data, our patients are younger with low percentages of promiscuity, multifetal pregnancy, smoking history and tocolytic use. Similar to previous studies, obesity, multiparity and pre-eclampsia were also present in our PPCM patients. Immediate maternal and fetal outcomes were generally good. Adherence to standard heart failure management is high.

  16. An Investigation of Nursing Staff Attitudes and Emotional Reactions towards Patients with Intellectual Disability in a General Hospital Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Sharna; Stenfert-Kroese, Biza

    2010-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that inequalities in health care for people with intellectual disabilities may be partly explained by negative attitudes of health professionals. This study aimed to investigate the attitudes and emotional reactions reported by nursing staff working in general hospitals towards caring for patients with…

  17. Library Services to Hospital Patients and Handicapped Readers Section. Libraries Serving the General Public Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on library services to hospital personnel, hospital patients, and housebound or handicapped persons, which were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference, include: (1) "Education and Training for Health Care Librarianship," in which Antonia J. Bunch (United Kingdom) discusses the scope of and…

  18. [Practice and experience about construction of pharmacy automation at general hospital].

    PubMed

    Chen, Minya; Xia, Yong; Shi, Jiayi

    2011-03-01

    This paper introduce how to combining the whole package automatic dispensing machine with intelligent storage cabinets at outpatient pharmacy. Furthermore, this paper introduce how to integrated this system with hospital information systems which can provide references for the construction of automatic hospital pharmacy in our country. PMID:21706808

  19. Redistribution of Emergency Department Patients After Disaster-Related Closures of a Public Versus Private Hospital in New York City.

    PubMed

    Lee, David C; Smith, Silas W; Carr, Brendan G; Goldfrank, Lewis R; Polsky, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Sudden hospital closures displace patients from usual sources of care and force them to access facilities that lack their prior medical records. For patients with complex needs and for nearby hospitals already strained by high volume, disaster-related hospital closures induce a public health emergency. Our objective was to analyze responses of patients from public versus private emergency departments after closure of their usual hospital after Hurricane Sandy. Using a statewide database of emergency visits, we followed patients with an established pattern of accessing 1 of 2 hospitals that closed after Hurricane Sandy: Bellevue Hospital Center and NYU Langone Medical Center. We determined how these patients redistributed for emergency care after the storm. We found that proximity strongly predicted patient redistribution to nearby open hospitals. However, for patients from the closed public hospital, this redistribution was also influenced by hospital ownership, because patients redistributed to other public hospitals at rates higher than expected by proximity alone. This differential response to hospital closures demonstrates significant differences in how public and private patients respond to changes in health care access during disasters. Public health response must consider these differences to meet the needs of all patients affected by disasters and other public health emergencies. PMID:25777992

  20. The introduction of deaconess nurses at the German hospital of the city of Philadelphia in the 1880s.

    PubMed

    Schweikardt, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    In 1884, seven deaconesses from Iserlohn, Germany, came to the Philadelphia German Hospital to take over nursing care and hospital administration. This article deals with the preparation and implementation of deaconess rule at the German Hospital and conflicts during the tenure of the first two Sisters Superior, Marie Krueger (1826-1887) and Wanda von Oertzen (1845-1897). Recruitment of the deaconesses took place within a network of relations between German and American motherhouses. Before their arrival in Philadelphia, the benefactor of the German Hospital, John D. Lankenau (1817-1901), had committed himself to hospital rule by the Sister Superior. A Deaconess Committee was created to deal with the opposition of the Medical Board. Introducing deaconesses to the Philadelphia German Hospital led to a major change of medical personnel and allowed the hospital to develop a new corporate identity. PMID:20067089

  1. Borderline Personality Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder at Psychiatric Discharge Predict General Hospital Admission for Self-Harm.

    PubMed

    Mellesdal, Liv; Gjestad, Rolf; Johnsen, Erik; Jørgensen, Hugo A; Oedegaard, Ketil J; Kroken, Rune A; Mehlum, Lars

    2015-12-01

    We investigated whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was predictor of suicidal behavior even when adjusting for comorbid borderline personality disorder (BPD) and other salient risk factors. To study this, we randomly selected 308 patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital because of suicide risk. Baseline interviews were performed within the first days of the stay. Information concerning the number of self-harm admissions to general hospitals over the subsequent 6 months was retrieved through linkage with the regional hospital registers. A censored regression analysis of hospital admissions for self-harm indicated significant associations with both PTSD (β = .21, p < .001) and BPD (β = .27, p < .001). A structural model comprising two latent BPD factors, dysregulation and relationship problems, as well as PTSD and several other variables, demonstrated that PTSD was an important correlate of the number of self-harm admissions to general hospitals (B = 1.52, p < .01). Dysregulation was associated directly with self-harm (B = 0.28, p < .05), and also through PTSD. These results suggested that PTSD and related dysregulation problems could be important treatment targets for a reduction in the risk of severe self-harm in high-risk psychiatric patients. PMID:26581019

  2. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations in dialysis patients in a London district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Wilmore, Stephanie M.S.; Philip, Keir E.; Cambiano, Valentina; Bretherton, Christopher P.; Harborne, Josephine E.; Sharma, Aditi; Jayasena, Shyama D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients on dialysis mount reduced immune responses compared with the general population. The Department of Health advises that these patients receive influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations at regular intervals—once yearly and every five years, respectively. This article investigates the uptake of these vaccinations in this patient population and seeks to examine factors that may influence vaccination status such as patient's language and presence of a general practitioner (GP) electronic vaccination reminder system. It also explores preferred site of vaccination for patients and GPs as these are primary care vaccinations yet patients have more frequent contact with their dialysis unit than their GP, blurring the boundaries between primary and specialized care. Methods This is a retrospective study of all patients registered as dialysing at the North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust (NMUH) in September 2011. Information was obtained through GP letters, GP and patient questionnaires. Results Of 154 patients, 133 were included in the data analysis. Nineteen per cent were up-to-date with both vaccinations and 67% with their influenza vaccination. Fifty per cent had received the influenza vaccination in the last two consecutive years. Thirty per cent were not up-to-date with either vaccination. There was no evidence of a difference in uptake in 2009 (P = 0.7564) and in 2010 (P = 0.7435) among those who could and could not speak English. Twenty-five per cent of GPs and 58.6% of patients preferred vaccination to occur in the dialysis unit. Unfortunately a high number of GPs did not provide information on whether they used an electronic vaccination reminder but the analysis from the information provided by the few respondents did not reveal any correlation between the presence of an electronic reminder and vaccination status. Conclusion Most dialysis patients were not up-to-date with both vaccinations. They were, however, more up-to-date with their

  3. A cure for the soul? The benefit of live music in the general hospital.

    PubMed

    Moss, H; Nolan, E; O'Neill, D

    2007-01-01

    From 2005 to 2006 a professional orchestra (the Irish Chamber Orchestra) performed in a university teaching hospital with the aims of bringing live music to patients who could not access traditional concert venues and of improving quality of life for patients and staff. This was the first time an orchestra was resident in a hospital in the Republic of Ireland. An independent contemporaneous evaluation was carried out to assess the benefit of live music for patients. Live music in hospital was found to enhance the quality of the aesthetic environment of the hospital, with both patients and staff stating that listening to live music helped them to relax, feel happier and more positive. Patients' perception of the hospital was affected positively by live music in waiting areas. Music was found to have strong emotional effect and the individual preferences and experiences of patients need to be carefully taken into account when programming music in hospital. Listening to live music while in hospital has positive benefits with few negative effects. PMID:18277736

  4. The profile of patients with obstructive uropathy in Cameroon: case of the Douala General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Halle, Marie Patrice; Toukep, Linda Njonkam; Nzuobontane, Samuel Ekane; Ebana, Hermine Fouda; Ekane, Gregory Halle; Priso, Eugene Belley

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive uropathy can lead to irreversible kidney damage. The etiology largely determined by the patient's age can be benign or malignant. This study aimed at determining the profile and outcome of patients with obstructive uropathy in Cameroon. Methods A cross sectional study carried out in the urology unit of the Douala General Hospital, including patients with a diagnosis of obstructive uropathy seen from January 2004 to December 2013. Clinical profile, treatment and outcome data were obtained from patients records. Results Of the 229 patients included 69% were men, mean age 50 ±18 years. Associated comorbidities were hypertension, diabetes, and HIV. Mean haemoglobin 8,40±2,4g/dl, mean GFR 10,3 ±10ml/min, 94 (41%) patients needed emergency dialysis. Symptoms at presentation: asthenia (57%), anorexia (55%), loin pain (37%), vomiting (28%), oedema (20%), and anuria (15%). Urinary tract infection was present in 33 patients. Main aetiologies of obstruction: urolithiasis (35%), begnin prostatic hypertrophy (27%), prostatic cancer (12%), cervical cancer (16%), and congenital malformations (5%). Drainage was effective in 102 (45%) patients, 63 (28%) recovered completely, 91 (41%) were loss to follow up, 49 (22%) died and more women (p = 0.02). Mortality was associated with prostatic cancer (p = 0.000), cervical cancer (p = 0.004) and radiotherapy (p = 0.03). Conclusion Patients with obstructive uropathy presented with significant impaired renal function. Main causes were urinary stones, prostatic hypertrophy, prostatic and cervical cancers. Renal recovery was poor, loss to follow up and mortality high. Specific strategies to target improvement in renal recovery and patient's survival are needed in this patient's group. PMID:27217891

  5. Factors Affecting the Agreement Between Emergency Psychiatrists and General Practitioners Regarding Involuntary Psychiatric Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Geoffroy, Pierre Alexis; Duhamel, Alain; Behal, Hélène; Zouitina-Lietaert, Nadia; Duthilleul, Julie; Marquette, Louise; Ducrocq, François; Vaiva, Guillaume; Rolland, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Important discrepancies exist between physicians in deciding when to perform involuntary hospitalization measures (IHMs). The factors underlying these differences are poorly known. We conducted a two-year single-center retrospective study in France on patients who were referred to the emergency department (ED) with an IHM certificate written by a private-practice General Practitioner (GP). For each consultation, the official IHM motive was categorized into four groups: Suicide; Psychosis, Mania, or Melancholia (PMM); Agitation; and Other. The alcohol status of the patient was also noted. The factors underlying the ED psychiatrists’ confirmation of the use of IHMs were determined using a logistic regression model. One hundred eighty-nine cases were found (165 patients; 44.2 ± 16 years, 41.3% women). The ED psychiatrists confirmed the use of IHMs in 123 instances (65.1% agreement rate). Multivariate analyses found that IHM disagreement was significantly associated with patient alcohol status and the reason for referral. Specifically, there was an increased risk of IHM disagreement when the patient had an alcohol-positive status (OR = 15.80; 95% CI [6.45–38.67]; p < 0.0001) and when the motive for IHM was “agitation” compared with “suicide” (OR = 11.44; 95% CI[3.38–38.78]; p < 0.0001). These findings reflect significant disparities between GPs and ED psychiatrists regarding the decision to proceed to an IHM. PMID:27324574

  6. Optical detection of breast cancer: a pilot clinical trial at the Massachusetts General Hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xuefeng; Mao, Jian M.; Zhu, Wen; Bush, Robin; Kopans, Daniel B.; Moore, Richard H.; Chorlton, Maryann

    2003-06-01

    X-ray mammography has been the major imaging modality in breast cancer detection for years, despite its high false diagnosis rate for malignant tumors and harmful radiation. In the last decade, optical imaging has been emerging as a promising method for breast cancer detection. Using near infrared (NIR) light ranging from 690 nm to 900 nm, an optical device can measure functional properties of breast tissue, such as total hemoglobin concentration (HbT) and oxygen saturation (SO2). Cancers tend to have higher levels of HbT because of their greater vascularization, and lower SO2 because of greater oxygen consumption, than normal tissue. Thus the NIR technology could be useful in breast cancer detection. In addition, optical detection is totally noninvasive and safe, and can be low cost. Photonify Technologies Inc. has developed an optical device for real-time two-dimensional mapping of HbT and SO2 in breast tissue. The device has been tested in a pilot clinical study for a group of 50 patients at the Department of Radiology of the Masachusetts General Hospital at Harvard Medical School. Preliminary results suggest that contrast-normalized standard deviations in HbT and SO2 might be good indicators for breast cancer detection. A patient may have a higher risk to have cancer in a breast portion where the normalized standard deviation in either HbT or SO2 is greater than 0.3. We demonstrate 92% diagnostic sensitivity and 66% specificity in detecting ductal carcinoma, either invasive or in situ. The device may potentially be used as an adjunctive tool with mammography to reduce unnecessary biopsies.

  7. Colonoscopy at a combined district general hospital and specialist endoscopy unit: lessons from 505 consecutive examinations

    PubMed Central

    Thomas-Gibson, Siwan; Thapar, Catherine; Shah, Syed G; Saunders, Brian P

    2002-01-01

    Provisional reports from the Intercollegiate British Society of Gastroenterology National Colonoscopy audit show completion rates of 57-77% for the procedure and poor levels of training and supervision. We prospectively audited all aspects of colonoscopy performed at a combined district general hospital and specialist endoscopy unit. Details of referral, examination, endoscopist, complications and follow-up were recorded and patients were sent questionnaires for long-term follow-up. 505 patients (246 male) underwent colonoscopy by 27 different endoscopists. Their median age was 57 years (range 13-92) and 93% were outpatients. 64% patients were symptomatic and 36% were having surveillance or follow-up colonoscopy. The overall caecal intubation rate was 93%, with little difference between surgeons, physicians and experienced trainees (89%, 92%, 94%) and specialist endoscopists (98%). In only one case was an inexperienced trainee (<100 procedures) unsupervised. Pain scores estimated by the endoscopist were well matched with those given by the patient—medians 29 and 26 (maximum 100) respectively. Median satisfaction score was 96 (maximum 100). Polyp pick-up rate was 26.9% and there were 11 new cancers. 16 (3%) minor immediate complications were recorded—5 oversedation, 6 vasovagal attacks, 3 polypectomy haemorrhages and 2 mucosal injuries (neither requiring treatment). 3 patients died within 6 months of follow-up but no death was colonoscopy related. Completion rates in this setting were adequate for all endoscopists studied. Patient satisfaction with the procedure was high and very few immediate or long-term complications were encountered. PMID:11934910

  8. Improving e-discharge letters for Permanent pacemaker insertions at Wansbeck General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    670 patients attend Wansbeck General Hospital each year for elective and emergency permanent pacemaker insertion or modification. Elective patients for new devices attend the cardiology department on the day of procedure and are clerked onto the cardiology ward after insertion. Patients are discharged home the following day with a letter typed by a junior doctor. Prior to October 2011, junior doctors were unaware of any guidelines regarding content of discharge letters due to poor accessibility. Vital information such as pacemaker model and indication for implantation were frequently absent from the typed summaries. In October 2011, the cardiology department reviewed the guidelines establishing the information required in all discharge summaries for pacemaker implantation and these guidelines were published on the ward in an easy to follow proforma for any junior doctor typing letters. Eight essential criteria should be included in each letter; date and indication for insertion, pacemaker type, make and model, access route, complications, chest x-ray and device check results, and follow-up details. Finally, a copy of the letter was to be sent to the cardiology department for clinic follow-up. Ten letters were audited prior to the proforma being issued. 0 letters contained 100% of the required information. Main criteria missing in most letters included indication for insertion (50%), make of device (0%), the route of access (10%) and cc to cardiology department (0%). 70 letters were audited in October 2012, one year following introduction of the discharge proforma.100% of letters contained all of the eight essential criteria required by the departmental guidelines. 53% of the letters were also received by the cardiology department. In conclusion, a set of easy to follow guidelines in the form of a published document on the cardiology ward has produced dramatic improvement in the quality of e-discharge letters for patients undergoing permanent pacemaker implantation

  9. Meteorological Integration for the Biological Warning and Incident Characterization (BWIC) System: General Guidance for BWIC Cities

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, William J.; Wang, Weiguo; Rutz, Frederick C.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Xie, YuLong; Seiple, Timothy E.; Allwine, K Jerry

    2007-02-16

    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is responsible for developing systems to detect the release of aerosolized bioagents in urban environments. The system that accomplishes this, known as BioWatch, is a robust first-generation monitoring system. In conjunction with the BioWatch detection network, DHS has also developed a software tool for cities to use to assist in their response when a bioagent is detected. This tool, the Biological Warning and Incident Characterization (BWIC) System, will eventually be deployed to all BioWatch cities to aid in the interpretation of the public health significance of indicators from the BioWatch networks. BWIC consists of a set of integrated modules, including meteorological models, that estimate the effect of a biological agent on a city’s population once it has been detected. For the meteorological models in BWIC to successfully calculate the distribution of biological material, they must have as input accurate meteorological data, and wind fields in particular. The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for cities to use in identifying sources of good-quality local meteorological data that BWIC needs to function properly. This process of finding sources of local meteorological data, evaluating the data quality and gaps in coverage, and getting the data into BWIC, referred to as meteorological integration, is described. The good news for many cities is that meteorological measurement networks are becoming increasingly common. Most of these networks allow their data to be distributed in real time via the internet. Thus, cities will often only need to evaluate the quality of available measurements and perhaps add a modest number of stations where coverage is poor.

  10. Lower respiratory tract infection hospitalizations among American Indian/Alaska Native children and the general United States child population

    PubMed Central

    Foote, Eric M.; Singleton, Rosalyn J.; Holman, Robert C.; Seeman, Sara M.; Steiner, Claudia A.; Bartholomew, Michael; Hennessy, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Background The lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI)-associated hospitalization rate in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children aged <5 years declined during 1998–2008, yet remained 1.6 times higher than the general US child population in 2006–2008. Purpose Describe the change in LRTI-associated hospitalization rates for AI/AN children and for the general US child population aged <5 years. Methods A retrospective analysis of hospitalizations with discharge ICD-9-CM codes for LRTI for AI/AN children and for the general US child population <5 years during 2009–2011 was conducted using Indian Health Service direct and contract care inpatient data and the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, respectively. We calculated hospitalization rates and made comparisons to previously published 1998–1999 rates prior to pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduction. Results The average annual LRTI-associated hospitalization rate declined from 1998–1999 to 2009–2011 in AI/AN (35%, p<0.01) and the general US child population (19%, SE: 4.5%, p<0.01). The 2009–2011 AI/AN child average annual LRTI-associated hospitalization rate was 20.7 per 1,000, 1.5 times higher than the US child rate (13.7 95% CI: 12.6–14.8). The Alaska (38.9) and Southwest regions (27.3) had the highest rates. The disparity was greatest for infant (<1 year) pneumonia-associated and 2009–2010 H1N1 influenza-associated hospitalizations. Conclusions Although the LRTI-associated hospitalization rate declined, the 2009–2011 AI/AN child rate remained higher than the US child rate, especially in the Alaska and Southwest regions. The residual disparity is likely multi-factorial and partly related to household crowding, indoor smoke exposure, lack of piped water and poverty. Implementation of interventions proven to reduce LRTI is needed among AI/AN children. PMID:26547082

  11. Consultation-liaison service in the general hospital: effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy in patients with physical nonspecific symptoms.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, U; Wagner, D; Lupke, U

    1999-11-01

    Nearly 15% of patients referred to a general hospital psychological medicine consultation service met DSM criteria for somatoform disorders or showed psychological factors affecting physical conditions. In a case-control control study of patients meeting these diagnostic criteria. outcomes were compared of 21 consecutively referred patients who received a course of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in addition to standard hospital treatment (SHT) and another 21 patients who received SHT alone. Compared with the SHT group, those who received CBT treatment showed significantly decreased bodily complaints and negative mood, better insight into the psychosomatic causes of their complaints, and a high motivation for subsequent psychotherapy. PMID:10624839

  12. The epidemiology of fungemia in an infectious diseases hospital in Mexico city: A 10-year retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Gaona-Flores, Verónica Alejandra; Campos-Navarro, Luz Arcelia; Cervantes-Tovar, Rosa María; Alcalá-Martínez, Enrique

    2016-08-01

    The epidemiology of invasive fungal infections has recently changed in immunosuppressed populations as a result of HIV infection, organ transplant, chemotherapy and in elderly patients. The diagnosis of invasive fungal infections by culture is prolonged since fungi grow slowly in vitro. we wanted to estimate the frequency of fungemia diagnoses established through the Clinical Mycology Laboratory over the past 10 years; through a retrospective study; data was obtained from the laboratory patient registry in the Infectious Disease Hospital's laboratory registry of patients with a systemic fungal isolate between 2005 and 2014. One hundred and thirty two (132) systemic fungal infections were identified. They were more prevalent in males, in the age group between 20 and 59 years and in patients with a diagnosis of AIDS. The most frequently isolated agents belonged to the genus Candida and others such as Histoplasma sp., Cryptococcus sp., Aspergillus sp., and Coccidioides sp. Of all blood and bone marrow cultures received 17.9% had fungal development; of these, in 70% of cases it was through blood cultures. In general, fungal agents were not diagnostically suspected. We identified that Sixty percent (60%) of fungemias developed in AIDS patients, followed by patients with sepsis. The most common agents belonged to the genus Candida, predominantly the albicans species. They were more frequently identified by blood culture than by bone marrow culture. Invasive fungal infections have not followed a usual clinical pattern and are not easily recognizable. PMID:27118806

  13. Update on the spectrum of histoplasmosis among hispanic patients presenting to a New York City municipal hospital: A contemporary case series

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Viral; Ulyanovskiy, Phillip; Epelbaum, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum is the most common endemic mycosis worldwide. Although most of the globe's largest urban hubs fall outside this organism's regions of endemicity, clinicians practicing in a metropolis like New York City or Los Angeles must nevertheless remain vigilant for histoplasmosis because of the large immigrant population that is served by its hospitals. H. capsulatum infection ranges from asymptomatic pulmonary infection to life-threatening diffuse pneumonia with dissemination. The early years of the AIDS epidemic first introduced U.S. clinicians working in areas previously unfamiliar with histoplasmosis to newly immunocompromised patients from endemic regions presenting with disseminated H. capsulatum originally acquired in their home countries. Improvement in HIV prevention and therapeutics has reduced the frequency of such cases. Herein we report three cases of histoplasmosis encountered in our New York City institution over the last three years to emphasize that awareness of this infection remains mandatory for the frontline urban clinician. PMID:26744657

  14. Predictors of hip fracture mortality at a general hospital in South Brazil: an unacceptable surgical delay

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Tiango Aguiar; Premaor, Melissa Orlandin; Larangeira, João Alberto; Brito, Luiz Giulian; Luft, Michel; Guterres, Leonardo Waihrich; Monticielo, Odirlei André

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Hip fractures have been associated with increased mortality in the elderly. Several risk factors such as the time between the insult and the surgical repair have been associated with hip fracture mortality. Nevertheless, the risk of delayed surgical repair remains controversial. Few studies have examined this issue in Brazil. The aim of this study was to study the risk factors for death one year after hip fracture and in-hospital stay at a tertiary hospital in South Brazil. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was carried out from April 2005 to April 2011 at a tertiary university hospital at Santa Maria, Brazil. Subjects admitted for hip fracture who were 65 years of age or older were followed for one year. Information about fracture type, age, gender, clinical comorbidities, time to surgery, discharge, and American Society of Anesthesiologists score were recorded. Death was evaluated during the hospital stay and at one year. RESULTS: Four hundred and eighteen subjects were included in the final analysis. Of these, 4.3% died in-hospital and 15.3% were dead at one year. Time to surgery, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, Ischemic Heart Disease, and in-hospital stay were associated with death at one year in the univariate analysis. The American Society of Anesthesiologists score and time to surgery were one-year mortality predictors in the final regression model. In-hospital death was associated with American Society of Anesthesiologists score and age. CONCLUSION: Time to surgery is worryingly high at the South Brazil tertiary public health center studied here. Surgical delay is a risk factor that has the potential to be modified to improve mortality. PMID:24714833

  15. The founding of Walter Reed General Hospital and the beginning of modern institutional army medical care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Adler, Jessica L

    2014-10-01

    When Walter Reed United States Army General Hospital opened its doors in 1909, the Spanish-American War had been over for a decade, World War I was in the unforeseeable future, and army hospital admission rates were steadily decreasing. The story of the founding of Walter Reed, which remained one of the flagship military health institutions in the United States until its 2011 closure, is a story about the complexities of the turn of the twentieth century. Broad historical factors-heightened imperial ambitions, a drive to modernize the army and its medical services, and a growing acceptance of hospitals as ideal places for treatment-explain why the institution was so urgently fought for and ultimately won funding at the particular moment it did. The justifications put forth for the establishment of Walter Reed indicate that the provision of publicly funded medical care for soldiers has been predicated not only on a sense of humanitarian commitment to those who serve, but on principles of military efficiency, thrift, pragmatism, and international competition. On a more general level, the story of Walter Reed's founding demonstrates a Progressive Era shift in health services for U.S. soldiers-from temporary, makeshift hospitals to permanent institutions with expansive goals. PMID:23839016

  16. Ischemic Heart Disease Hospitalization among Older People in a Subtropical City — Hong Kong: Does Winter Have a Greater Impact than Summer?

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Pui Hing; Wong, Moses; Woo, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Globally, excess winter morbidity from ischemic heart disease (IHD) is reported. In subtropical regions, there is a need to quantify the difference in the adverse effect of cold winters compared with hot summers, particularly among the older people. Our objectives were to: (i) compare the effect of winter on IHD hospitalizations with that of summer; (ii) examine temporal trends in the excess winter hospitalizations; and (iii) investigate the effect of age, gender, and meteorological factors on predicting such excess. Inpatient admissions due to IHD as principal cause during June 2000 to February 2009 in public hospitals of Hong Kong were extracted for the population aged ≥65. An Excess Hospitalization in Winter vs. Summer (EHWS) Index was used to contrast the adverse effect of weather on hospitalizations in winter vs. summer. Multiple linear regressions were used to investigate the trend and the predictors of such index. It was found that in a subtropical city, greater effect of winter on IHD hospitalizations than summer was observed, particularly among the oldest old (an index of 61.5% (95% CI: 49.5%–74.4%) for men aged ≥85 and 32.3% (95% CI: 25.5%–39.5%) for women aged ≥85). There was significant increasing trend in the index among those aged ≥85 but the age difference was less prominent among the women. Absolute level of coldness was not a significant factor, whereas the change in temperature was a significant factor, which implies that great fluctuation in temperature within a winter day had greater impact on occurrence of circulatory disease than an absolute temperature threshold. PMID:24714058

  17. Ischemic heart disease hospitalization among older people in a subtropical city--Hong Kong: does winter have a greater impact than summer?

    PubMed

    Chau, Pui Hing; Wong, Moses; Woo, Jean

    2014-04-01

    Globally, excess winter morbidity from ischemic heart disease (IHD) is reported. In subtropical regions, there is a need to quantify the difference in the adverse effect of cold winters compared with hot summers, particularly among the older people. Our objectives were to: (i) compare the effect of winter on IHD hospitalizations with that of summer; (ii) examine temporal trends in the excess winter hospitalizations; and (iii) investigate the effect of age, gender, and meteorological factors on predicting such excess. Inpatient admissions due to IHD as principal cause during June 2000 to February 2009 in public hospitals of Hong Kong were extracted for the population aged ≥65. An Excess Hospitalization in Winter vs. Summer (EHWS) Index was used to contrast the adverse effect of weather on hospitalizations in winter vs. summer. Multiple linear regressions were used to investigate the trend and the predictors of such index. It was found that in a subtropical city, greater effect of winter on IHD hospitalizations than summer was observed, particularly among the oldest old (an index of 61.5% (95% CI: 49.5%-74.4%) for men aged ≥85 and 32.3% (95% CI: 25.5%-39.5%) for women aged ≥85). There was significant increasing trend in the index among those aged ≥85 but the age difference was less prominent among the women. Absolute level of coldness was not a significant factor, whereas the change in temperature was a significant factor, which implies that great fluctuation in temperature within a winter day had greater impact on occurrence of circulatory disease than an absolute temperature threshold. PMID:24714058

  18. A strategy for enhancing financial performance: a study of general acute care hospitals in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mankyu; Lee, Keon-Hyung

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the determinants of hospital profitability were evaluated using a sample of 142 hospitals that had undergone hospital standardization inspections by the South Korea Hospital Association over the 4-year period from 1998 to 2001. The measures of profitability used as dependent variables in this study were pretax return on assets, after-tax return on assets, basic earning power, pretax operating margin, and after-tax operating margin. Among those determinants, it was found that ownership type, teaching status, inventory turnover, and the average charge per adjusted inpatient day positively and statistically significantly affected all 5 of these profitability measures. However, the labor expenses per adjusted inpatient day and administrative expenses per adjusted inpatient day negatively and statistically significantly affected all 5 profitability measures. The debt ratio negatively and statistically significantly affected all 5 profitability measures, with the exception of basic earning power. None of the market factors assessed were shown to significantly affect profitability. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that the profitability of hospitals can be improved despite deteriorating external environmental conditions by facilitating the formation of sound financial structures with optimal capital supplies, optimizing the management of total assets with special emphasis placed on inventory management, and introducing efficient control of fixed costs including labor and administrative expenses. PMID:19011410

  19. Matronized nursing service at Mobile City Hospital in the mid-19th century: a paradigm of altruism and indigent patient care.

    PubMed

    Salley, R K; Rodning, C B

    1989-08-01

    Influences upon the development and evolution of nursing groups and the profession have been multifactorial: cultural, economic, political, and social. Although monastic and chivalric orders throughout antiquity provided the beginnings with hierarchical organizations and a sense of voluntarism and vocation, it was not until the mid-19th century that the concept of a nursing service became codified and more hospital-oriented. The inception of a matronized nursing service in the Mobile City Hospital under the tutelage of the Superintendent, Dr. Willis Roberts, antedated the rapid expansion of nursing education and service recommended and instituted by Florence Nightingale. The former served as a paradigm of altruism as "women attendants" became formally associated with a hospital-based "nursing service," initially under the directorship of a lay matron, Mrs. Sarah Dubois, and subsequently under a succession of Sisters of the Roman Catholic Order of the Sisters of Charity (America). Although ostensibly instituted to render care to "female paupers," the matronized nursing service was readily expanded, and subsequently delivered care to the entire, predominantly indigent patient population. The paradigm was worthily perpetuated during the latter half of the 19th century in vitually all hospitals as nursing education and services continued to become more secularized and technologically sophisticated. PMID:2669152

  20. Rates of self-harm presenting to general hospitals: a comparison of data from the Multicentre Study of Self-Harm in England and Hospital Episode Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Pauline; Hawton, Keith; Geulayov, Galit; Waters, Keith; Ness, Jennifer; Townsend, Ellen; Khundakar, Kazem; Kapur, Nav

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rates of hospital presentation for self-harm in England were compared using different national and local data sources. Design The study was descriptive and compared bespoke data collection methods for recording self-harm presentations to hospital with routinely collected hospital data. Setting Local area data on self-harm from the 3 centres of the Multicentre Study of Self-harm in England (Oxford, Manchester and Derby) were used along with national and local routinely collected data on self-harm admissions and emergency department attendances from Hospital Episode Statistics (HES). Primary outcome Rate ratios were calculated to compare rates of self-harm generated using different data sources nationally and locally (between 2010 and 2012) and rates of hospital presentations for self-harm were plotted over time (between 2003 and 2012), based on different data sources. Results The total number of self-harm episodes between 2010 and 2012 was 13 547 based on Multicentre Study data, 9600 based on HES emergency department data and 8096 based on HES admission data. Nationally, routine HES data underestimated overall rates of self-harm by approximately 60% compared with rates based on Multicentre Study data (rate ratio for HES emergency department data, 0.41 (95% CI 0.35 to 0.49); rate ratio for HES admission data, 0.42 (95% CI 0.36 to 0.49)). Direct local area comparisons confirmed an overall underascertainment in the HES data, although the difference varied between centres. There was a general increase in self-harm over time according to HES data which contrasted with a fall and then a rise in the Multicentre Study data. Conclusions There was a consistent underestimation of presentations for self-harm recorded by HES emergency department data, and fluctuations in year-on-year figures. HES admission data appeared more reliable but missed non-admitted episodes. Routinely collected data may miss important trends in self-harm and cannot be used in isolation as

  1. Etiology of Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Patients with Epilepsy: Experience of Tertiary Referral Hospital in Sapporo City, Japan.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Kei; Ochi, Satoko; Enatsu, Rei; Wanibuchi, Masahiko; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Uemura, Shuji; Tanno, Katsuhiko; Narimatsu, Eichi; Maekawa, Kunihiko; Usui, Keiko; Mizobuchi, Masahiro

    2016-05-15

    It has been reported that epilepsy patients had higher risk of sudden death than that of the general population. However, in Japan, there is very little literature on the observational research conducted on sudden fatal events in epilepsy. We performed a single-center, retrospective study on all the out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients treated in our emergency department between 2007 and 2013. Among the OHCA patients, we extracted those with a history of epilepsy and then analyzed the characteristics of the fatal events and the background of epilepsy. From 1,823 OHCA patients, a total of 10 cases were enrolled in our study. The median age was 34 years at the time of the incident [9-52 years; interquartile range (IQR), 24-45]. We determined that half of our cases resulted from external causes of death such as drowning and suffocation and the other half were classified as sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). In addition, asphyxia was implicated as the cause in eight cases. Only the two near-drowning patients were immediately resuscitated, but the remaining eight patients died. The median age of first onset of epilepsy was 12 years (0.5-30; IQR, 3-21), and the median disease duration was 25 years (4-38; IQR, 6-32). Patients with active epilepsy accounted for half of our series and they were undergoing poly anti-epileptic drug therapy. The fatal events related to epilepsy tended to occur in the younger adult by external causes. An appropriate therapeutic intervention and a thorough observation were needed for its prevention. PMID:26948699

  2. Etiology of Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Patients with Epilepsy: Experience of Tertiary Referral Hospital in Sapporo City, Japan

    PubMed Central

    MIYATA, Kei; OCHI, Satoko; ENATSU, Rei; WANIBUCHI, Masahiko; MIKUNI, Nobuhiro; INOUE, Hiroyuki; UEMURA, Shuji; TANNO, Katsuhiko; NARIMATSU, Eichi; MAEKAWA, Kunihiko; USUI, Keiko; MIZOBUCHI, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that epilepsy patients had higher risk of sudden death than that of the general population. However, in Japan, there is very little literature on the observational research conducted on sudden fatal events in epilepsy. We performed a single-center, retrospective study on all the out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients treated in our emergency department between 2007 and 2013. Among the OHCA patients, we extracted those with a history of epilepsy and then analyzed the characteristics of the fatal events and the background of epilepsy. From 1,823 OHCA patients, a total of 10 cases were enrolled in our study. The median age was 34 years at the time of the incident [9–52 years; interquartile range (IQR), 24–45]. We determined that half of our cases resulted from external causes of death such as drowning and suffocation and the other half were classified as sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). In addition, asphyxia was implicated as the cause in eight cases. Only the two near-drowning patients were immediately resuscitated, but the remaining eight patients died. The median age of first onset of epilepsy was 12 years (0.5–30; IQR, 3–21), and the median disease duration was 25 years (4–38; IQR, 6–32). Patients with active epilepsy accounted for half of our series and they were undergoing poly anti-epileptic drug therapy. The fatal events related to epilepsy tended to occur in the younger adult by external causes. An appropriate therapeutic intervention and a thorough observation were needed for its prevention. PMID:26948699

  3. A tale of two cities: effects of air pollution on hospital admissions in Hong Kong and London compared.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chit-Ming; Atkinson, Richard W; Anderson, H Ross; Hedley, Anthony Johnson; Ma, Stefan; Chau, Patsy Yuen-Kwan; Lam, Tai-Hing

    2002-01-01

    The causal interpretation of reported associations between daily air pollution and daily admissions requires consideration of residual confounding, correlation between pollutants, and effect modification. If results obtained in Hong Kong and London--which differ in climate, lifestyle, and many other respects--were similar, a causal association would be supported. We used identical statistical methods for the analysis in each city. Associations between daily admissions and pollutant levels were estimated using Poisson regression. Nonparametric smoothing methods were used to model seasonality and the nonlinear dependence of admissions on temperature, humidity, and influenza admissions. For respiratory admissions (> or = 65 years of age), significant positive associations were observed with particulate matter < 10 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM(10), nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and ozone in both cities. These associations tended to be stronger at shorter lags in Hong Kong and at longer lags in London. Associations were stronger in the cool season in Hong Kong and in the warm season in London, periods during which levels of humidity are at their lowest in each city. For cardiac admissions (all ages) in both cities, significant positive associations were observed for PM(10), NO(2), and SO(2) with similar lag patterns. Associations tended to be stronger in the cool season. The associations with NO(2) and SO(2) were the most robust in two-pollutant models. Patterns of association for pollutants with ischemic heart disease were similar in the two cities. The associations between O(3) and cardiac admissions were negative in London but positive in Hong Kong. We conclude that air pollution has remarkably similar associations with daily cardiorespiratory admissions in both cities, in spite of considerable differences between cities in social, lifestyle, and environmental factors. The results strengthen the argument that air pollution causes detrimental short

  4. Development of Peer-Group-Classification Criteria for the Comparison of Cost Efficiency among General Hospitals under the Korean NHI Program

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hee-Chung; Hong, Jae-Seok; Park, Heon-Jin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To classify general hospitals into homogeneous systematic-risk groups in order to compare cost efficiency and propose peer-group-classification criteria. Data Sources Health care institution registration data and inpatient-episode-based claims data submitted by the Korea National Health Insurance system to the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service from July 2007 to December 2009. Study Design Cluster analysis was performed to classify general hospitals into peer groups based on similarities in hospital characteristics, case mix complexity, and service-distribution characteristics. Classification criteria reflecting clustering were developed. To test whether the new peer groups better adjusted for differences in systematic risks among peer groups, we compared the R2 statistics of the current and proposed peer groups according to total variations in medical costs per episode and case mix indices influencing the cost efficiency. Data Collection A total of 1,236,471 inpatient episodes were constructed for 222 general hospitals in 2008. Principal Findings New criteria were developed to classify general hospitals into three peer groups (large general hospitals, small and medium general hospitals treating severe cases, and small and medium general hospitals) according to size and case mix index. Conclusions This study provides information about using peer grouping to enhance fairness in the performance assessment of health care providers. PMID:22356558

  5. Development of a Likelihood of Survival Scoring System for Hospitalized Equine Neonates Using Generalized Boosted Regression Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Dembek, Katarzyna A.; Hurcombe, Samuel D.; Frazer, Michele L.; Morresey, Peter R.; Toribio, Ramiro E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Medical management of critically ill equine neonates (foals) can be expensive and labor intensive. Predicting the odds of foal survival using clinical information could facilitate the decision-making process for owners and clinicians. Numerous prognostic indicators and mathematical models to predict outcome in foals have been published; however, a validated scoring method to predict survival in sick foals has not been reported. The goal of this study was to develop and validate a scoring system that can be used by clinicians to predict likelihood of survival of equine neonates based on clinical data obtained on admission. Methods and Results Data from 339 hospitalized foals of less than four days of age admitted to three equine hospitals were included to develop the model. Thirty seven variables including historical information, physical examination and laboratory findings were analyzed by generalized boosted regression modeling (GBM) to determine which ones would be included in the survival score. Of these, six variables were retained in the final model. The weight for each variable was calculated using a generalized linear model and the probability of survival for each total score was determined. The highest (7) and the lowest (0) scores represented 97% and 3% probability of survival, respectively. Accuracy of this survival score was validated in a prospective study on data from 283 hospitalized foals from the same three hospitals. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for the survival score in the prospective population were 96%, 71%, 91%, and 85%, respectively. Conclusions The survival score developed in our study was validated in a large number of foals with a wide range of diseases and can be easily implemented using data available in most equine hospitals. GBM was a useful tool to develop the survival score. Further evaluations of this scoring system in field conditions are needed. PMID:25295600

  6. The impact of environmental and climatic variation on the spatiotemporal trends of hospitalized pediatric diarrhea in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Corinne N; Zelner, Jonathan L; Nhu, Tran Do Hoang; Phan, My Vt; Hoang Le, Phuc; Nguyen Thanh, Hung; Vu Thuy, Duong; Minh Nguyen, Ngoc; Ha Manh, Tuan; Van Hoang Minh, Tu; Lu Lan, Vi; Nguyen Van Vinh, Chau; Tran Tinh, Hien; von Clemm, Emmiliese; Storch, Harry; Thwaites, Guy; Grenfell, Bryan T; Baker, Stephen

    2015-09-01

    It is predicted that the integration of climate-based early warning systems into existing action plans will facilitate the timely provision of interventions to diarrheal disease epidemics in resource-poor settings. Diarrhea remains a considerable public health problem in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Vietnam and we aimed to quantify variation in the impact of environmental conditions on diarrheal disease risk across the city. Using all inpatient diarrheal admissions data from three large hospitals within HCMC, we developed a mixed effects regression model to differentiate district-level variation in risk due to environmental conditions from the overarching seasonality of diarrheal disease hospitalization in HCMC. We identified considerable spatial heterogeneity in the risk of all-cause diarrhea across districts of HCMC with low elevation and differential responses to flooding, air temperature, and humidity driving further spatial heterogeneity in diarrheal disease risk. The incorporation of these results into predictive forecasting algorithms will provide a powerful resource to aid diarrheal disease prevention and control practices in HCMC and other similar settings. PMID:26402922

  7. The impact of environmental and climatic variation on the spatiotemporal trends of hospitalized pediatric diarrhea in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Corinne N.; Zelner, Jonathan L.; Nhu, Tran Do Hoang; Phan, My VT; Hoang Le, Phuc; Nguyen Thanh, Hung; Vu Thuy, Duong; Minh Nguyen, Ngoc; Ha Manh, Tuan; Van Hoang Minh, Tu; Lu Lan, Vi; Nguyen Van Vinh, Chau; Tran Tinh, Hien; von Clemm, Emmiliese; Storch, Harry; Thwaites, Guy; Grenfell, Bryan T.; Baker, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    It is predicted that the integration of climate-based early warning systems into existing action plans will facilitate the timely provision of interventions to diarrheal disease epidemics in resource-poor settings. Diarrhea remains a considerable public health problem in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Vietnam and we aimed to quantify variation in the impact of environmental conditions on diarrheal disease risk across the city. Using all inpatient diarrheal admissions data from three large hospitals within HCMC, we developed a mixed effects regression model to differentiate district-level variation in risk due to environmental conditions from the overarching seasonality of diarrheal disease hospitalization in HCMC. We identified considerable spatial heterogeneity in the risk of all-cause diarrhea across districts of HCMC with low elevation and differential responses to flooding, air temperature, and humidity driving further spatial heterogeneity in diarrheal disease risk. The incorporation of these results into predictive forecasting algorithms will provide a powerful resource to aid diarrheal disease prevention and control practices in HCMC and other similar settings. PMID:26402922

  8. Frequency of cancer in children residing in Mexico City and treated in the hospitals of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (1996–2001)

    PubMed Central

    Juárez-Ocaña, Servando; González-Miranda, Guadalupe; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel; Rendón-Macías, Mario Enrique; Martínez-García, María del Carmen; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo

    2004-01-01

    Background The objective of this article is to present the frequency of cancer in Mexican children who were treated in the hospitals of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social in Mexico City (IMSS-MC) in the period 1996–2001. Methods The Registry of Cancer in Children, started in 1996 in the IMSS-MC, is an on-going, prospective register. The data from 1996 through 2001 were analyzed and the different types of cancer were grouped according to the International Classification for Cancer in Children (ICCC). From this analysis, the general and specific frequencies by age and by sex were obtained for the different groups of neoplasms. Also, the frequency of the stage of the disease that had been diagnosed in cases of children with solid tumors was obtained. Results A total of 1,702 new cases of children with cancer were registered, with the male/female ratio at 1.1/1. Leukemias had the highest frequency with 784 cases (46.1%) and, of these, acute lymphoblastic leukemias were the most prevalent with 614 cases (78.3%). Thereafter, in descending order of frequency, were tumors of the central nervous system (CNST) with 197 cases (11.6%), lymphomas with 194 cases (11.4%), germinal cell tumors with 110 cases (6.5%), and bone tumors with 97 cases (5.7%). The highest frequency of cancer was found in the group of one to four year-olds that had 627 cases (36.8%). In all the age groups, leukemias were the most frequent. In the present work, the frequency of Hodgkin's disease (~4%) was found to be lower than that (~10%) in previous studies and the frequency of tumors of the sympathetic nervous system was low (2.3%). Of those cases of solid tumors for which the stage of the disease had been determined, 66.9% were diagnosed as being Stage III or IV. Conclusions The principal cancers in the children treated in the IMSS-MC were leukemias, CNST, and lymphomas, consistent with those reported by developed countries. A 2.5-fold reduction in the frequency of Hodgkin's disease was found

  9. Statistical Analysis Aiming at Predicting Respiratory Tract Disease Hospital Admissions from Environmental Variables in the City of São Paulo

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa Zanotti Stagliorio Coêlho, Micheline; Luiz Teixeira Gonçalves, Fabio; do Rosário Dias de Oliveira Latorre, Maria

    2010-01-01

    This study is aimed at creating a stochastic model, named Brazilian Climate and Health Model (BCHM), through Poisson regression, in order to predict the occurrence of hospital respiratory admissions (for children under thirteen years of age) as a function of air pollutants, meteorological variables, and thermal comfort indices (effective temperatures, ET). The data used in this study were obtained from the city of São Paulo, Brazil, between 1997 and 2000. The respiratory tract diseases were divided into three categories: URI (Upper Respiratory tract diseases), LRI (Lower Respiratory tract diseases), and IP (Influenza and Pneumonia). The overall results of URI, LRI, and IP show clear correlation with SO2 and CO, PM10 and O3, and PM10, respectively, and the ETw4 (Effective Temperature) for all the three disease groups. It is extremely important to warn the government of the most populated city in Brazil about the outcome of this study, providing it with valuable information in order to help it better manage its resources on behalf of the whole population of the city of Sao Paulo, especially those with low incomes. PMID:20706674

  10. Negative illness perceptions associated with low mental and physical health status in general hospital outpatients in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Heng; Zhao, Xudong; Fritzsche, Kurt; Salm, Florian; Leonhart, Rainer; Jing, Wei; Yang, Jianzhong; Schaefert, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    In western countries, negative illness perceptions are associated with poor health status and affect health outcomes in primary care populations. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between illness perception and mental and physical health status in general hospital outpatients in China. This multicentre, cross-sectional study analysed a total of 281 consecutive patients from four general hospital outpatient departments of internal medicine and traditional Chinese medicine in Beijing and Kunming. The patients answered questionnaires concerning illness perception (Brief-IPQ), somatic symptom severity (Patient Health Questionnaire-15), illness behaviour (Scale for the Assessment of Illness Behaviour), emotional distress (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and health-related quality of life (Twelve-Item Short Form Health Survey). Negative illness perception, especially negative emotional reactions, perceived illness consequences, encumbering illness concerns, and strong illness identity were significantly associated with high emotional distress, impairing illness consequences, and a low mental and physical quality of life. Using a multiple linear regression model, five strongest correlates of negative illness perception were high anxiety, seeking diagnosis verification, low mental and physical quality of life and high somatic symptom severity. The variance explained by this model was 35%. Chinese general hospital outpatients showed associations between negative illness perceptions and poor mental and physical health status that were similar to those of primary care patients in western countries. The main difference was that no association with perceived illness control was found in Chinese patients. Chinese physicians should be sensitised to their patients' negative illness perceptions and should focus on helping patients cope with uncertainty and anxiety by providing an understandable illness model and increasing control beliefs. PMID:23721418