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Sample records for cladding incipient crack

  1. Incipient Crack Detection in Composite Wind Turbine Blades

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Stuart G.; Choi, Mijin; Jeong, Hyomi; Jang, Jae Kyeong; Park, Gyuhae; Farinholt, Kevin; Farrar, Charles R.; Ammerman, Curtt N.; Todd, Michael D.; Lee, Jung-Ryul

    2012-08-28

    This paper presents some analysis results for incipient crack detection in a 9-meter CX-100 wind turbine blade that underwent fatigue loading to failure. The blade was manufactured to standard specifications, and it underwent harmonic excitation at its first resonance using a hydraulically-actuated excitation system until reaching catastrophic failure. This work investigates the ability of an ultrasonic guided wave approach to detect incipient damage prior to the surfacing of a visible, catastrophic crack. The blade was instrumented with piezoelectric transducers, which were used in an active, pitchcatch mode with guided waves over a range of excitation frequencies. The performance results in detecting incipient crack formation in the fiberglass skin of the blade is assessed over the range of frequencies in order to determine the point at which the incipient crack became detectable. Higher excitation frequencies provide consistent results for paths along the rotor blade's carbon fiber spar cap, but performance falls off with increasing excitation frequencies for paths off of the spar cap. Lower excitation frequencies provide more consistent performance across all sensor paths.

  2. Fatigue crack growth testing of sub-clad defects

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.P.; Leax, T.R.

    1998-04-01

    Fatigue crack growth tests were performed on four point bend specimens with crack like defects intentionally placed in A302B low-alloy pressure vessel steel clad with 308/309L weld deposited stainless steel. The defects were placed in the base metal under the cladding by machining a cavity from the side opposite the cladding, electric-discharge machining a very sharp flaw, fatigue pre-cracking the flaw, and then filling up the cavity by a weld repair process. The specimens were stress relieved before fatigue testing. The specimens were fatigue cycled at positive load ratios until the defects broke through to the surface. The specimens were then fractured at liquid nitrogen temperatures to reveal the fracture surfaces. Seven different sub-clad flaw specimens were tested in room temperature air and each test provides a record of cycles to defect break-through. Changes in defect size and shape as a function of applied load cycles were obtained by benchmarking the crack at various stages of the load history. The results provide a set of embedded defect data which can be used for qualifying fatigue crack growth analysis procedures such as those in Section XI of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. A comparison between calculated and measured values shows that the ASME B and PV Section XI fatigue crack growth procedures conservatively predict cycles to defect break-through for small sub-clad defects.

  3. Crack resistance curves determination of tube cladding material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertsch, J.; Hoffelner, W.

    2006-06-01

    Zirconium based alloys have been in use as fuel cladding material in light water reactors since many years. As claddings change their mechanical properties during service, it is essential for the assessment of mechanical integrity to provide parameters for potential rupture behaviour. Usually, fracture mechanics parameters like the fracture toughness KIC or, for high plastic strains, the J-integral based elastic-plastic fracture toughness JIC are employed. In claddings with a very small wall thickness the determination of toughness needs the extension of the J-concept beyond limits of standards. In the paper a new method based on the traditional J approach is presented. Crack resistance curves (J-R curves) were created for unirradiated thin walled Zircaloy-4 and aluminium cladding tube pieces at room temperature using the single sample method. The procedure of creating sharp fatigue starter cracks with respect to optical recording was optimized. It is shown that the chosen test method is appropriate for the determination of complete J-R curves including the values J0.2 (J at 0.2 mm crack length), Jm (J corresponding to the maximum load) and the slope of the curve.

  4. Detection of small-sized near-surface under-clad cracks for reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, T.T.; Crawford, S.L.; Doctor, S.R.; Posakony, G.J.

    1983-02-01

    The analysis of pressurized thermal shock (PTS) shows it is necessary for nondestructive evaluation to demonstrate high probability of detecting evaluation to demonstrate high probability of detecting cracks 0.250 inches deep and deeper at the clad/base metal interface. Ultrasonic techniques developed and used in Europe are evaluated in this paper for their applicability to US reactor pressure vessels for detecting cracks of interest for PTS. Flaw detectability experiments were carried out by testing the inspection technique's ability to detect artificial flaws under several types of clad, including some Manual Metal Arc (MMA) clad. Both ground and unground clad surfaces were evaluated. Crack sizing tests of the inspection technique were made using a crack tip diffraction technique.

  5. Simulations of Failure via Three-Dimensional Cracking in Fuel Cladding for Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Hongbing; Bukkapatnam, Satish; Harimkar, Sandip; Singh, Raman; Bardenhagen, Scott

    2014-01-09

    Enhancing performance of fuel cladding and duct alloys is a key means of increasing fuel burnup. This project will address the failure of fuel cladding via three-dimensional cracking models. Researchers will develop a simulation code for the failure of the fuel cladding and validate the code through experiments. The objective is to develop an algorithm to determine the failure of fuel cladding in the form of three-dimensional cracking due to prolonged exposure under varying conditions of pressure, temperature, chemical environment, and irradiation. This project encompasses the following tasks: 1. Simulate 3D crack initiation and growth under instantaneous and/or fatigue loads using a new variant of the material point method (MPM); 2. Simulate debonding of the materials in the crack path using cohesive elements, considering normal and shear traction separation laws; 3. Determine the crack propagation path, considering damage of the materials incorporated in the cohesive elements to allow the energy release rate to be minimized; 4. Simulate the three-dimensional fatigue crack growth as a function of loading histories; 5. Verify the simulation code by comparing results to theoretical and numerical studies available in the literature; 6. Conduct experiments to observe the crack path and surface profile in unused fuel cladding and validate against simulation results; and 7. Expand the adaptive mesh refinement infrastructure parallel processing environment to allow adaptive mesh refinement at the 3D crack fronts and adaptive mesh merging in the wake of cracks. Fuel cladding is made of materials such as stainless steels and ferritic steels with added alloying elements, which increase stability and durability under irradiation. As fuel cladding is subjected to water, chemicals, fission gas, pressure, high temperatures, and irradiation while in service, understanding performance is essential. In the fast fuel used in advanced burner reactors, simulations of the nuclear

  6. Stress corrosion cracking of zirconium cladding tubes: I. Proximate local SCC testing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhnov, A. B.; Belov, V. A.; Nikulin, S. A.; Khanzhin, V. G.

    2010-10-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) methods of testing zirconium cladding tubes are analyzed. A proximate method is proposed for estimating SCC of fuel claddings claddings in a iodine-containing environment with a limited contact zone between a metal and corrosive medium and simultaneous measurement of acoustic emission (AE) from forming corrosion defects. Criteria of estimating the SCC resistance of the tubes are proposed from measured AE and corrosion damage of the tube material. The results of local SCC tests of cladding tubes of E110 and E635 zirconium alloys are presented.

  7. Propagation of stress corrosion cracks in Zr-1% Nb claddings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibilashvily, Yu. K.; Dolgov, Yu. N.; Nesterov, B. I.; Novikov, V. V.

    1995-09-01

    Experimental results on iodine induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) are analyzed. The studies were performed at 350°C using Zr-1% Nb tubular specimens. Fatigue crack at internal surface served as an initial defect. The relationship was derived between crack propagation rate and stress intensity factor; the threshold stress intensity factor of 4.8 MPa m{1}/{2} was determined.

  8. An overview of the HSST Full-Thickness Shallow-Crack Clad Beam Testing Program

    SciTech Connect

    Keeney, J.A.; Theiss, T.J.; McAfee, W.J.; Bass, B.R.

    1994-09-01

    A testing program is described that will utilize full-thickness clad beam specimens to quantify fracture toughness for shallow flaws in material for which metallurgical conditions are prototypic of those found in reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). The beam specimens are fabricated from a section of an RPV wall that includes weld, plate and clad material. Metallurgical factors potentially influencing fracture toughness for shallow flaws in the beam specimen include material gradients due to welding and cladding applications, as well as material inhomogeneities in welded regions due to reheating in multiple weld passes. Fracture toughness tests focusing on shallow flaws in plate and weld material will also provide data for evaluating the relative influence of absolute and normalized crack depth on constraint conditions. Pretest finite-element analyses are described that provide near-tip stress and strain fields for characterization of constraint in the shallow-crack specimens in terms of the Q-stress. Analysis results predict a constraint loss in the shallow-crack clad beam specimen similar to that determined for a previously tested shallow-crack single-edge notch homogeneous bend specimen with the same normalized crack depth.

  9. Fracture behavior of shallow cracks in full-thickness clad beams from an RPV wall section

    SciTech Connect

    Keeney, J.A.; Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.

    1995-04-01

    A testing program is described that utilizes full-thickness clad beam specimens to quantify fracture toughness for shallow cracks in weld material for which metallurgical conditions are prototypic of those found in reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). The beam specimens are fabricated from an RPV shell segment that includes weld, plate and clad material. Metallurgical factors potentially influencing fracture toughness for shallow cracks in the beam specimens include material gradients and material inhomogeneities in welded regions. The shallow-crack clad beam specimens showed a significant loss of constraint similar to that of other shallow-crack single-edge notch bend (SENB) specimens. The stress-based Dodds-Anderson scaling model appears to be effective in adjusting the test data to account for in-plane loss of constraint for uniaxially tested beams, but cannot predict the observed effects of out-of-plane biaxial loading on shallow-crack fracture toughness. A strain-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlation (based on plastic zone width) performed acceptably when applied to the uniaxial and biaxial shallow-crack fracture toughness data.

  10. A fractographic study of iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking in irradiated Zircaloy-2 cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Sachio; Nagai, Masayuki

    1983-02-01

    A fractographic interpretation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Zircaloy-2 was made through detailed scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination of cladding tubes irradiated and subjected to internal pressurization SCC tests in an iodine environment. The SEM examination of the fracture surface revealed that both intergranular and transgranular fracture appeared in the regions of crack initiation. The W-type voids were observed in the intergranular fracture. As the crack proceeded, transgranular fracture, or cleavage facet, became predominant. Cleavage facets were separated by tearing ridges as well as by fluting marks. The appearance of tearing ridges is consistent with the increase of slip systems in α-zirconium with increasing temperature.

  11. Residual stress and crack initiation in laser clad composite layer with Co-based alloy and WC + NiCr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changmin; Park, Hyungkwon; Yoo, Jaehong; Lee, Changhee; Woo, WanChuck; Park, Sunhong

    2015-08-01

    Although laser cladding process has been widely used to improve the wear and corrosion resistance, there are unwanted cracking issues during and/or after laser cladding. This study investigates the tendency of Co-based WC + NiCr composite layers to cracking during the laser cladding process. Residual stress distributions of the specimen are measured using neutron diffraction and elucidate the correlation between the residual stress and the cracking in three types of cylindrical specimens; (i) no cladding substrate only, (ii) cladding with 100% stellite#6, and (iii) cladding with 55% stellite#6 and 45% technolase40s. The microstructure of the clad layer was composed of Co-based dendrite and brittle eutectic phases at the dendritic boundaries. And WC particles were distributed on the matrix forming intermediate composition region by partial melting of the surface of particles. The overlaid specimen exhibited tensile residual stress, which was accumulated through the beads due to contraction of the coating layer generated by rapid solidification, while the non-clad specimen showed compressive. Also, the specimen overlaid with 55 wt% stellite#6 and 45 wt% technolase40s showed a tensile stress higher than the specimen overlaid with 100% stellite#6 possibly, due to the difference between thermal expansion coefficients of the matrix and WC particles. Such tensile stresses can be potential driving force to provide an easy crack path ways for large brittle fractures combined with the crack initiation sites such as the fractured WC particles, pores and solidification cracks. WC particles directly caused clad cracks by particle fracture under the tensile stress. The pores and solidification cracks also affected as initiation sites and provided an easy crack path ways for large brittle fractures.

  12. Evaluation of the resistance of irradiated zirconium-liner cladding to iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Sachio; Nagai, Masayuki

    1983-02-01

    An evaluation was made of irradiated zirconium-liner cladding for its resistance to iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Emphasis was put on irradiation-induced hardening in zirconium and SCC resistance in zirconium-liner cladding as compared with Zircaloy-2 cladding. The Vickers microhardness test revealed that crystal bar zirconium experienced less hardening than Zircaloy-2 during neutron exposure. The SCC resistance of zirconium-liner cladding was evaluated for failure strains under the tube pressurization SCC test, and compared with the results of Zircaloy-2 cladding. The failure strains of zirconium-liner cladding were significantly larger than those of Zircaloy-2 cladding over all neutron fluence ranges examined, e.g., more than ten times at 1.0 × 10 21n/ cm2 ( E > 1 MeV). Judging from our results on the Vickers microhardness and SCC tests, good SCC resistance of zirconium-liner cladding could be expected even at high fluences.

  13. BWR pipe crack and weld clad overlay studies

    SciTech Connect

    Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.; Maiya, P.S.; Park, J.Y.; Ruther, W.E.; Rybicki, E.F.

    1985-10-01

    This paper presents results on (a) the influence of simulated BWR environments and temperature on the intergranular-stress-corrosion cracking (IGSCC) susceptibility of sensitized stainless steels (SS), (b) the stress-corrosion susceptibility of alternative piping materials, (c) analysis of field components to assess the effectiveness of in-service inspection techniques and the in-reactor performance of weld overlay repairs, and (d) finite-element analyses and experimental measurement of residual stresses in weldments with weld overlays. Fracture-mechanics crack-growth data are presented to confirm correlations between the critical corrosion potentials required to inhibit IGSCC and the level of impurities in the environment. Slow-strain-rate tests show that very low levels of impurities (25 ppb of sulfate) can produce suseptibility to transgranular-stress-corrosion cracking (TGSCC) in Type 316NG SS and that nitrogen levels is SS above 0.1 wt. % appear to increase susceptibility to TGSCC. Preliminary results on a German Type 347NG SS suggest that it is at least as resistant to TGSCC in impurity environments as Type 316NG SS. Measurements on overlay weldments removed from the Hatch-2 reactor confirm that compressive residual stresses are produced on the inner surface of the weldments by the overlay.

  14. Influence of texture on iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, I.; Lemaignan, C.

    1992-07-01

    A specific study was carried out to measure the influence of texture on the behaviour of Zircaloy-4 under iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking. The aim was to determine the relative effects of various metallurgical parameters involved in fuel rod fracture by pellet-clad interaction (PCI). Cladding tubes of different geometries were manufactured from a given Zircaloy-4 ingot. In this way tubes with different textures were obtained. Rings from these tubes were then subjected to slow tensile tests in an inert atmosphere and in an iodine vapour atmosphere. The sensitivity of the tubes to stress corrosion cracking is quantified by the loss of ductility on fracture between the tests in each atmosphere. Combined with the findings of other studies, the results showed that: (a) texture has a strong effect on the stress corrosion cracking behaviour of Zircaloy-4, (b) the mechanical properties do not have any bearing on the material behaviour under stress corrosion cracking, and that the better behaviour of a recrystallized material — compared to the same material in a stress-relieved state — can be explained solely by the texture effect, (c) texture is a more important parameter than chemical composition of Zircaloy-4, on condition that this composition remains within the ASTM specification. The conflict between the various mechanisms involved in stress corrosion crack propagation may explain these observations. Preliminary extrapolation of these conclusions to the irradiated material shows that a more specific study is needed using appropriate parameters.

  15. Stress corrosion cracking of zirconium cladding tubes: IV. Effect of hydrogen saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhnov, A. B.; Nikulin, S. A.; Khanzhin, V. G.; Belov, V. A.

    2011-04-01

    The effect of hydrogen saturation on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of zirconium cladding tubes in an iodine-containing medium is studied. Comparative SCC tests are performed for tubes produced from E110 and E635 alloys with various hydrogen contents (up to 400 ppm). Hydrogen is shown to decrease the SCC resistance of the tubes predominantly because of the activation of pitting formation processes.

  16. Corrosion fatigue crack growth in clad low-alloy steels: Part 1, medium-sulfur forging steel

    SciTech Connect

    James, L.A.; Poskie, T.J.; Auten, T.A; Cullen, W.H.

    1996-04-01

    Corrosion fatigue crack propagation tests were conducted on a medium- sulfur ASTM A508-2 forging steel overlaid with weld-deposited Alloy EN82H cladding. The specimens featured semi-elliptical surface cracks penetrating approximately 6.3 mm of cladding into the underlying steel. The initial crack sizes were relatively large with surface lengths of 30.3--38.3 mm, and depths of 13.1--16.8 mm. The experiments were conducted in a quasi-stagnant low-oxygen (O{sub 2} < 10 ppb) aqueous environment at 243{degrees}C, under loading conditions ({Delta}K, R, and cyclic frequency) conductive to environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC) in higher-sulfur steels under quasi-stagnant conditions. Earlier experiments on unclad compact tension specimens of this heat of steel did not exhibit EAC, and the present experiments on semi-elliptical surface cracks penetrating cladding also did not exhibit EAC.

  17. Crack Free Tungsten Carbide Reinforced Ni(Cr) Layers obtained by Laser Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amado, J. M.; Tobar, M. J.; Yáñez, A.; Amigó, V.; Candel, J. J.

    The development of hardfacing coatings has become technologically significant in many industries A common approach is the production of metal matrix composites (MMC) layers. In this work NiCr-WC MMC hardfacing layers are deposited on C25 steel by means of laser cladding. Spheroidal fused tungsten carbides is used as reinforcement phase. Three different NiCr alloys with different Cr content were tested. Optimum conditions to obtain dense, uniform carbide distribution and hardness close to nominal values were defined. The effect of Cr content respect to the microstructure, susceptibility for cracking and the wear rate of the resulting coating will also be discussed.

  18. Microstructure Instability of Candidate Fuel Cladding Alloys: Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Yinan; Zheng, Wenyue; Guzonas, David; Kish, Joseph

    2016-02-01

    This paper addresses some of the overarching aspects of microstructure instability expected from both high temperature and radiation exposure that could affect the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of the candidate austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys being considered for the fuel cladding of the Canadian supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) concept. An overview of the microstructure instability expected by both exposures is presented prior to turning the focus onto the implications of such instability on the corrosion and SCC resistance. Results from testing conducted using pre-treated (thermally-aged) Type 310S stainless steel to shed some light on this important issue are included to help identify the outstanding corrosion resistance assessment needs.

  19. A simple computer model of pellet/cladding interaction including stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Yaung, J.Y.; Okrent, D.; Wazzan, A.R.

    1985-12-01

    Many unexpected failures, below design criteria, of light water reactor fuel cladding (Zircaloy) have been found during operational power ramps. Such a fuel rod failure can result from pellet/cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) assisted by fission product stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the Zircaloy tubing. A deterministic PCMI/SCC model has been coupled with the steady-state fuel behavior code, FRAPCON-2. The resulting code has been benchmarked (against few test cases but comprising many data points) but not fully verified. It is used to simulate two important occurrences: preramp (base) and power ramp irradiation. Because of the limitations of FRAPCON-2, the code is best suited to the simulation of mild power ramps with rates that do not exceed 0.02%/s. Computations with the code for greater power ramp rates, however, gave results which are not inconsistent with some overpower ramp experimental test results. Limited sensitivity studies are performed on the operational parameters and some fuel rod design parameters.

  20. Effect of crack length-to-width ratio on crack resistance of high Cr-ODS steels at high temperature for fuel cladding application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaouadi, R.; Ramesh, M.; Gavrilov, S.

    2013-11-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels with high Cr-content are extensively investigated in Europe, Japan and United States by the nuclear materials community for application to both advanced fission reactors and fusion systems. In comparison to standard high Cr-steels, the expected operation temperature range can be extended to 650 °C or more because of their improved creep resistance. However, their crack resistance behavior in the high temperature range was less investigated.The aim of the present paper is to provide some insight on their fracture behavior at high temperature and different crack configurations, in particular shallow crack. Crack resistance measurements were performed on a 12%Cr-ODS steel using compact tension specimens at 650 °C considering both shallow and deep crack configurations. Finite element calculations were performed on a typical fuel cladding tube geometry to assess the performances in terms of crack resistance. It is found that the temperature gradient across the wall should be maintained low enough to avoid cracking. After irradiation in corrosive environment, the boundary conditions might be further affected limiting therefore the lifetime of ODS cladding.

  1. Modelling pellet-clad mechanical interaction during extended reduced power operation in bonded nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, T. A.; Ball, J. A.; Shea, J. H.; Wenman, M. R.

    2015-10-01

    A 2D-rӨ model of pellet-clad mechanical interaction in advanced gas-cooled reactor fuel is presented. An incipient 5 μm crack is introduced into the inner surface of cladding bonded to a detachable sliver of fuel. Micro-cracking in the sliver is accounted for through a reduced elastic modulus. A test transient consisting of a hold at 70% power for 720 h was applied to the model. The competing effects of the closure of pellet cracks due to irradiation creep in inner regions of the pellet during extended low power operation, and that of thermal creep in the cladding whilst at reduced power alleviating this are investigated. In colder elements, the effect of irradiation creep dominates. In hotter elements, the effect of cladding creep at low power dominates. It was found that adjusting factors related to the pellet shape were unimportant; the sliver thickness, sliver shape and initial pellet crack width had only a small effect upon the extent of PCMI. Adjusting factors relating to the shape of the incipient crack such as the crack radius and depth had a significant effect; as did adjusting the elastic modulus reduction factor accounting for ladder cracking in the sliver and the coefficient of friction used throughout the model. The resulting model was able to predict the trend in average clad bore crack depth with axial position in the core observed in post irradiation examination.

  2. Initial Cladding Condition

    SciTech Connect

    E. Siegmann

    2000-08-22

    The purpose of this analysis is to describe the condition of commercial Zircaloy clad fuel as it is received at the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) site. Most commercial nuclear fuel is encased in Zircaloy cladding. This analysis is developed to describe cladding degradation from the expected failure modes. This includes reactor operation impacts including incipient failures, potential degradation after reactor operation during spent fuel storage in pool and dry storage and impacts due to transportation. Degradation modes include cladding creep, and delayed hydride cracking during dry storage and transportation. Mechanical stresses from fuel handling and transportation vibrations are also included. This Analysis and Model Report (AMR) does not address any potential damage to assemblies that might occur at the YMP surface facilities. Ranges and uncertainties have been defined. This analysis will be the initial boundary condition for the analysis of cladding degradation inside the repository. In accordance with AP-2.13Q, ''Technical Product Development Planning'', a work plan (CRWMS M&O 2000c) was developed, issued, and utilized in the preparation of this document. There are constraints, caveats and limitations to this analysis. This cladding degradation analysis is based on commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel with Zircaloy cladding but is applicable to Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel. Reactor operating experience for both PWRs and BWRs is used to establish fuel reliability from reactor operation. It is limited to fuel exposed to normal operation and anticipated operational occurrences (i.e. events which are anticipated to occur within a reactor lifetime), and not to fuel that has been exposed to severe accidents. Fuel burnup projections have been limited to the current commercial reactor licensing environment with restrictions on fuel enrichment, oxide coating thickness and rod plenum pressures. The information provided in this analysis will be used in

  3. Iodine-stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-2 cladding under near plane strain and localized stress-strain conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Nobrega, B.N.

    1984-01-01

    The segmented expanding mandrel test (SEMT) method is generally regarded as a good laboratory simulator of pellet-cladding interactions (PCI) in LWR fuel rods. Yet it does not reproduce the low strain failures in Zircaloy cladding typical of PCI-failed fuel elements and commonly observed in other types of laboratory specimens. This investigation addressed this apparent inconsistency. Iodine-stress corrosion cracking (I-SCC) of cold worked, unirradiated Zircaloy-2 cladding was induced in three different types of tubing specimens (known as regular, thin-wall, and chamfered) in a modified SEMT apparatus designed to test mechanical conditions that could lead to slow strain failures. Only the chamfered sample, which has been shown to be subjected to more nearly plane strain conditions than either of the other two specimen types, failed consistently at low (0.8%) total diametral strains in good agreement with in-reactor failure data. Such conditions were numerically and experimentally quantified by means of finite element calculational models and local strain measurements. The numerical analyses and strain measurements provide valuable insight into the PCI simulating power of the segmented expanding mandrel test and its experimental limitations. Failure-strain results for chamfered barrier claddings were obtained and compared with available literature data. The improved I-SCC resistance of this type of cladding was confirmed but the failure strains were significantly lower than reported for regular barrier tubes.

  4. Corrosion fatigue crack growth in clad low-alloy steel. Part 2, Water flow rate effects in high sulfur plate steel

    SciTech Connect

    James, L.A; Lee, H.B.; Wire, G.L.; Novak, S.R.; Cullen, W.H.

    1996-04-01

    Corrosion fatigue crack propagation tests were conducted on a high- sulfur ASTM A302-B plate steel overlaid with weld-deposited Alloy EN82H cladding. The specimens featured semi-elliptical surface cracks penetrating approximately 6.3 mm of cladding into the underlying steel. The initial crack sizes were relatively large with surface lengths of 22.8--27.3 mm, and depths of 10.5--14.1 mm. The experiments were initiated in a quasi-stagnant low-oxygen (O{sub 2} < 10 ppb) aqueous environment at 243{degrees}C, under loading conditions ({Delta}K, R, cyclic frequency) conducive to environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC) under quasi-stagnant conditions. Following fatigue testing under quasi-stagnant conditions where EAC was observed, the specimens were then fatigue tested under conditions where active water flow of either 1.7 m/sec. or 4.7 m/sec. was applied parallel to the crack. Earlier experiments on unclad surface-cracked specimens of the same steel exhibited EAC under quasi- stagnant conditions, but water flow rates at 1.7 m/sec. and 5.0 m/sec. parallel to the crack mitigated EAC. In the present experiments on clad specimens, water flow at approximately the same as the lower of these velocities did not mitigate EAC, and a free stream velocity approximately the same as the higher of these velocities resulted in sluggish mitigation of EAC. The lack of robust EAC mitigation was attributed to the greater crack surface roughness in the cladding interfering with flow induced within the crack cavity. An analysis employing the computational fluid dynamics code, FIDAP, confirmed that frictional forces associated with the cladding crack surface roughness reduced the interaction between the free stream and the crack cavity.

  5. Microstructural study of the interface in laser-clad Ni-Al bronze on Al alloy AA333 and its relation to cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Mazumder, J.; Shibata, K.

    1995-06-01

    The interface toughness between a laser clad and the substrate determines whether the cladding is useful for engineering application. The objective of this investigation is to correlate the interface properties of laser-clad Ni-AI bronze on Al alloy AA333 with the microstructure and crystal structure of the interface. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) are used to examine the interface. In a good clad track, the interface is an irregular curved zone with a varying width (occasionally keyholing structure) from 30 to 150 μm. A compositional transition from the Cu-rich clad (83 wt pct Cu) to the Al-rich substrate (3.2 wt pct Cu) occurs across this interface. Three phases in the interface are identified in TEM: Al solid solution, θ phase, and γ1 phase, as described in the Cu-Al binary phase diagram. In a good clad track, the θ and γ1 phases are distributed in the Al solid solution. In a clad track with cracks, the interface structure spreads to a much larger scale from 300 μm to the whole clad region. Large areas of θ and γ1 phases are observed. The mechanism of cracking at the interface is related to the formation of a twophase region of θ and γ1 phases. To understand the microstructure, a nonequilibrium quasibinary Cu-Al phase diagram is proposed and compared with the equilibrium binary Cu-Al phase diagram. It is found that the occurrence of many phases such as η1η2, ζ1, ζ2, ɛ1, ɛ2, γ0, β0, and β, as described in the equilibrium binary Cu-Al phase diagram, is suppressed by either the cladding process or by the alloying elements. The three identified phases (Al solid solution, θ phase, and γ1, phase) showed significant extension of solubility.

  6. Temperature dependences of the delayed hydride cracking rate of fuel claddings made of zirconium alloys of various compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markelov, V. A.; Gusev, A. Yu.; Kotov, P. V.; Novikov, V. V.; Saburov, N. S.

    2014-04-01

    The temperature dependences of the delayed hydride cracking (DHC) rate of Zr-1Nb and Zr-0.8Nb-0.8Sn-0.3Fe alloy claddings are studied in the range 127-300°C in comparison with the data obtained for Zr-2.5Nb and Zircaloy-4 alloys earlier. The samples are in the state of cold deformation and stress relief at 400°C for 24 h and in the state of preliminary hydrogen saturation to a hydrogen concentration of 0.02 wt %. As the strength of a zirconium alloy decreases and its ductility increases, the DHC rate and its high-temperature limit for a linear Arrhenius equation decreases, and the fractographic patterns of the fracture surfaces are different.

  7. Fracture behavior and microstructural characteristics of irradiated Zircaloy cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Yaggee, F.L.; Kassner, T.F.

    1985-06-01

    Zircaloy cladding tube specimens from commercial power reactor fuel assemblies (burnup >22 MWd/kgU) have been deformed to fracture at 325/sup 0/C by either the internal gas-pressurization or the expanding-mandrel technique in a helium or argon environment containing no fission product species (e.g., I, Cs, or Cd). The fracture surfaces of 11 irradiated specimens fractured by internal gas pressurization were examined by scanning electron microscopy, and 7 specimens were found to contain various degrees of the pseudocleavage feature that is characteristic of pellet-cladding interaction failures. Out of 10 test specimens fractured by expanding-mandrel loading, 5 were found to contain regions of pseudocleavage on the fracture surfaces. The specimens exhibited ''X-marks'' on the outer surface and brittle incipient cracks distributed on the inner surface, which are also characteristic of pellet-cladding interaction failures.

  8. Jets of incipient liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnikov, A. V.; Mazheiko, N. A.; Skripov, V. P.

    2000-05-01

    Jets of incipient water escaping into the atmosphere through a short channel are photographed. In some experiments. complete disintegration of the jet is observed. The relationship of this phenomenon with intense volume incipience is considered. The role of the Coanda effect upon complete opening of the jet is revealed. Measurement results of the recoil force R of the jets of incipient liquids are presented. Cases of negative thrust caused by the Coanda effect are noted. Generalization of experimental data is proposed.

  9. Laser Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepski, Dietrich; Brückner, Frank

    Laser cladding is a modern technology whose uses include, for example, the creation of protective coatings to reduce wear and corrosion on engine parts and tools. The aircraft and automotive industries are examples of industries in which it is much used. This account considers the theory of a number of aspects of the process in detail. The first to be studied is the interaction of the laser beam directly with the powder that is being deposited; the effects of gravity, beam shadowing, and particle heating are investigated. This is followed by a discussion of the mechanisms by which the particles adhere to the surface of the work piece and are absorbed into it. In order to understand the process, a study of the melt pool and the associated temperature distribution is necessary; it is then possible to infer the final bead geometry. An inevitable consequence of a thermal process such as laser cladding is the induced thermal stress and resulting distortion of the work piece. The fundamentals are discussed, a numerical model presented and in addition a simple heuristic model is given. The use of induction-assisted laser cladding as a means of preventing the formation of cracks is discussed.

  10. Crack

    MedlinePlus

    ... sound the drug makes as it heats up. Short-Term Effects Crack is a stimulant that is absorbed through ... quickly, after about 5 or 10 minutes. Other short-term effects include: higher heart rate, breathing rate, blood pressure , ...

  11. Progress in the Research Programs to Elucidate Axial Cracking Fuel Failure at High Burnup

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, Keizo; Aomi, Masaki; Baba, Toshikazu; Kamimura, Katsuichiro; Etoh, Yoshinori; Ito, Kunio; Kido, Toshiya; Teshima, Hideyuki

    2007-07-01

    A fuel failure with an axial crack starting outside the cladding and penetrating inwards was experienced by high burnup BWR fuel rods in power ramp test. On the other hand, no fuel failure caused by power ramp test has been currently reported on PWR fuel rods at burnups higher than 50 GWd/t. Extensive research programs regarding hydrogen behaviors and mechanical performances on irradiated BWR and PWR fuel claddings have been carried out to clarify the mechanism of the axial cracking and to quantify the conditions to cause fuel failure. Hydrogen solid solubility measurement on irradiated Zircaloy-2 materials showed almost comparable results to those on unirradiated ones. Hydride re-distribution and re-orientation behaviors were tested by heating irradiated BWR claddings with Zr-liner under the conditions of applied radial heat flux (temperature gradient) and circumferential stress. Mechanical performances of BWR claddings were evaluated mainly by the internal pressurizing tests. Internal pressurization tests applying various pressurizing sequences, e.g. stepwise increase in pressure with holding intervals, were also conducted to simulate crack propagation behaviors. Some specimens demonstrated characteristic fracture surfaces similar to those observed on the failed fuel rods after the power ramp. Mechanical performances of irradiated PWR claddings were tested at temperatures of 573 to 723 K. Metallographic examination after tensile tests revealed a large number of incipient cracks within the region of cladding outer rim where a concentrated hydride layer (hydride rim) has been formed during irradiation. Crack propagation test using an expanding mandrel device demonstrated the crack propagation at 573 K but no propagation at 658 K. (authors)

  12. Reactor vessel cladding separate effects studies

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    The existence of a layer of tough weld overlay cladding on the interior of a light-water reactor pressure vessel could mitigate damage caused during certain overcooling transients. The potential benefit of the cladding is that it could keep a short surface flaw, which would otherwise become long, from growing either by impeding crack initiation or by arresting a running crack. Two aspects critical to cladding behavior will be reported: irradiation effects on cladding toughness and the response of mechanically loaded, flawed structures in the presence of cladding. 15 refs., 24 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Incipient fire detection system

    DOEpatents

    Brooks, Jr., William K.

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for an incipient fire detection system that receives gaseous samples and measures the light absorption spectrum of the mixture of gases evolving from heated combustibles includes a detector for receiving gaseous samples and subjecting the samples to spectroscopy and determining wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples. The wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples are compared to predetermined absorption wavelengths. A warning signal is generated whenever the wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples correspond to the predetermined absorption wavelengths. The method includes receiving gaseous samples, subjecting the samples to light spectroscopy, determining wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples, comparing the wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples to predetermined absorption wavelengths and generating a warning signal whenever the wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples correspond to the predetermined absorption wavelengths. In an alternate embodiment, the apparatus includes a series of channels fluidically connected to a plurality of remote locations. A pump is connected to the channels for drawing gaseous samples into the channels. A detector is connected to the channels for receiving the drawn gaseous samples and subjecting the samples to spectroscopy. The wavelengths of absorption are determined and compared to predetermined absorption wavelengths is provided. A warning signal is generated whenever the wavelengths correspond.

  14. Computational model for residual stresses in a clad plate and clad fracture specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Rybicki, E.F.; Stonesifer, R.B.

    1986-10-01

    This report contains the results from computed residual stresses for three stainless steel clad plate configurations. Each simulates a condition of interest to a study on the effect of surface cracks in the clad layer of reactor pressure vessels. The configurations analyzed were the as-received 118-mm thick clad plate, a 32-mm thick specimen with a full-thickness of cladding weld metal, and a 32-mm thick specimen with a half-thickness of clad layer. The most accurate predictions of the available experimental results were made using the properties of 19Cr-9Ni-Mo-W material. The analytical model assumes that the stresses at the initial condition of 538/sup 0/C for the stress relief anneal are zero. Plastic strains develop during cooling and all subsequent conditions such as machining or temperature changes cause the cladding residual stresses to decrease. In parting-out of specimens from the initial 118-mm thick clad plate, the resulting residual stresses in the clad layer depend upon the sequence of metal removal. If excess base metal is removed first and then somes cladding subsequently removed, the residual stresses in the clad layer are significantly reduced. On the other hand, partial removal of cladding first results in additional plastic deformation in the clad layer and the retention of residual stresses near the material yield strength at the completion of the machining operation.

  15. Further Study of near Solidus Intergranular Cracking in Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    A series of tests, performed to determine the strain necessary to initiate intergranular cracking in Inconel 718 as a function of temperature, contained enough scatter near the melting temperature that questions remained as to the best curve of curves to fit to the data. Fracture surface analysis showed that the scatter was due to incipient melting in the grain boundary region. The melting contributed to low fracture strain but had only a small on the incipient cracking strain. Gleeble tests, which could be interrupted by water quenching, were used to study the incipient intergranular melting of Inconel 718. This modified weld simulation test provided a sufficiently rapid quench to preserve the intergranular microstructure created during incipient melting. This structure was studied both microscopically and with energy dispensive X-ray analysis. The implications of incipient melting and low-strain incipient cracking on the development of microfissuring envelopes are discussed.

  16. Rock strength reductions during incipient weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, P. J.; Anderson, S. P.; Blum, A.

    2012-12-01

    Patrick Kelly, Suzanne Anderson, Alex Blum In rock below the surface, temperature swings are damped, water flow is limited, and biota are few. Yet rock weathers, presumably driven by these environmental parameters. We use rock strength as an indicator of rock weathering in Gordon Gulch in the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory, a watershed at 2500 m underlain by Proterozoic gneiss intruded by the Boulder Creek granodiorite. Fresh rock is found at depths of 8-30 m in this area, and the thickness of the weathered rock zone imaged with shallow seismic refraction is greater on N-facing slopes than S-facing slopes (Befus et al., 2011, Vadose Zone J.). We use the Brazilian splitting test to determine tensile strength of cores collected with a portable drilling rig. Spatial variations in rock strength that we measure in the top 2 m of the weathered rock mantle can be connected to two specific environmental variables: slope aspect and the presence of a soil mantle. We find weaker rock on N-facing slopes and under soil. There is no clear correlation between rock strength and the degree of chemical alteration in these minimally weathered rocks. Denudation rates of 20-30 microns/yr imply residence times of 105-106 years within the weathered rock layers of the critical zone. Given these timescales, rock weathering is more likely to have occurred under glacial climate conditions, when periglacial processes prevailed in this non-glaciated watershed. Incipient weathering of rock appears to be controlled by water and frost cracking in Gordon Gulch. Water is more effectively delivered to the subsurface on N-facing slopes, and is more likely held against rock surfaces under soil than on outcrops. These moisture conditions, and the lower surface temperatures that prevail on N-facing slopes also favor frost cracking as an important weathering process.

  17. A Probabilistic-Micro-mechanical Methodology for Assessing Zirconium Alloy Cladding Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Y.M.; Chan, K.S.; Riha, D.S.

    2007-07-01

    Cladding failure of fuel rods caused by hydride-induced embrittlement is a reliability concern for spent nuclear fuel after extended burnup. Uncertainties in the cladding temperature, cladding stress, oxide layer thickness, and the critical stress value for hydride reorientation preclude an assessment of the cladding failure risk. A set of micro-mechanical models for treating oxide cracking, blister cracking, delayed hydride cracking, and cladding fracture was developed and incorporated in a computer model. Results obtained from the preliminary model calculations indicate that at temperatures below a critical temperature of 318.5 deg. C [605.3 deg. F], the time to failure by delayed hydride cracking in Zr-2.5%Nb decreased with increasing cladding temperature. The overall goal of this project is to develop a probabilistic-micro-mechanical methodology for assessing the probability of hydride-induced failure in Zircaloy cladding and thereby establish performance criteria. (authors)

  18. Nuclear fuel elements having a composite cladding

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Gerald M.; Cowan, II, Robert L.; Davies, John H.

    1983-09-20

    An improved nuclear fuel element is disclosed for use in the core of nuclear reactors. The improved nuclear fuel element has a composite cladding of an outer portion forming a substrate having on the inside surface a metal layer selected from the group consisting of copper, nickel, iron and alloys of the foregoing with a gap between the composite cladding and the core of nuclear fuel. The nuclear fuel element comprises a container of the elongated composite cladding, a central core of a body of nuclear fuel material disposed in and partially filling the container and forming an internal cavity in the container, an enclosure integrally secured and sealed at each end of said container and a nuclear fuel material retaining means positioned in the cavity. The metal layer of the composite cladding prevents perforations or failures in the cladding substrate from stress corrosion cracking or from fuel pellet-cladding interaction or both. The substrate of the composite cladding is selected from conventional cladding materials and preferably is a zirconium alloy.

  19. A specimen and method for evaluating the effect of cladding on the behavior of subclad flaws

    SciTech Connect

    McAfee, W.J.; Bryson, J.W.; Cheverton, R.D.; Robinson, G.C.

    1991-01-01

    A specimen that reveals important fracture-related properties of cladding in the presence of a subclad flaw is under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Information developed from testing these specimens, referred to as Jo-Blocks, is being used by the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program in evaluating the behavior of subclad flaws in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) pressure vessels during pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) loading conditions. The cladding can be idealized as a force that holds an otherwise surface flaw closed'' at the surface, reducing the stress intensity factor along the portion of the crack front in the base material. This closing force is approximately equal to the average stress in the cladding, which for postulated severe PTS transients is at yield, multiplied by the cladding thickness. There is a critical amount of stretching of the cladding that results in through-clad flaw propagation, i.e., cladding failure, thus converting the subclad flaw to a surface flaw. The Jo-Block specimen consists of two steel (base metal) blocks with ends butted together to form a crack'' and with opposite edges clad so that the crack terminates at the two fusion zones. Testing of Jo-Block specimens reveals as a minimum the effective yield point'' of the cladding, in the presence of a subclad crack, and the critical value of clad stretching (crack opening displacement). 15 refs., 10 figs.

  20. Weakening inside incipient thrust fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, B.; Tesei, T.; Collettini, C.; Oliot, E.

    2013-12-01

    In fold-and-thrust belts, shortening is mainly accommodated by thrust faults that nucleate along décollement levels. Geological and geophysical evidence suggests that these faults might be weak because of a combination of processes such as pressure-solution, phyllosilicates reorientation and delamination, and fluid pressurization. In this study we aim to decipher the processes and the kinetics responsible for weakening of tectonic décollements. We studied the Millaris thrust (Southern Pyrenees): a fault representative of a décollement in its incipient stage. This fault accommodated a total shortening of about 30 meters and is constituted by a 10m thick, intensively foliated phyllonite developed inside a homogeneous marly unit. Detailed chemical and mineralogical analyses have been carried out to characterize the mineralogical change, the chemical transfers and volume change in the fault zone compared to non-deformed parent sediments. We also carried out microstructural analysis on natural and experimentally deformed rocks. Illite and chlorite are the main hydrous minerals. Inside fault zone, illite minerals are oriented along the schistosity whereas chlorite coats the shear surfaces. Mass balance calculations demonstrated a volume loss of up to 50% for calcite inside fault zone (and therefore a relative increase of phyllosilicates contents) because of calcite pressure solution mechanisms. We performed friction experiments in a biaxial deformation apparatus using intact rocks sheared in the in-situ geometry from the Millaris fault and its host sediments. We imposed a range of normal stresses (10 to 50 MPa), sliding velocity steps (3-100 μm/s) and slide-hold slide sequences (3 to 1000 s hold) under saturated conditions. Mechanical results demonstrate that both fault rocks and parent sediments are weaker than average geological materials (friction μ<<0.6) and have velocity-strengthening behavior because of the presence of phyllosilicate horizons. Fault rocks are

  1. Predicting and Preventing Incipient Flameout in Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puster, Richard Lee

    2003-01-01

    A method of predicting and preventing incipient flameout in a combustor has been proposed. The method should be applicable to a variety of liquid- and gas-fueled combustors in furnaces and turbine engines. Until now, there have been methods of detecting flameouts after they have occurred, but there has been no way of predicting incipient flameouts and, hence, no way of acting in time to prevent them. Prevention of flameout could not only prevent damage to equipment but, in the case of aircraft turbine engines, could also save lives.

  2. HIP clad nickel base Alloy 625 for deep sour wells

    SciTech Connect

    Uhl, W.K.; Pendley, M.R.

    1984-05-01

    The hot isostatic pressing (HIP) process was used to clad nickel base Alloy 625 to AISI 4130 low alloy steel. The performance of the HIP clad material in the corrosive environment characteristic of deep, sour oil and gas wells was evaluated in laboratory tests. Included in the test program were NACE TM-01-77 sulfide stress cracking tests, chloride stress corrosion cracking tests in boiling MgCl /SUB 2'/ , and pitting and crevice corrosion tests. The HIP clad 625 performed excellently, displaying essentially the same corrosion resistance as wrought 625. Specifically the HIP clad 625 resisted sulfide stress cracking at applied stresses as high as 120% of yield strength and resisted chloride stress corrosion cracking at stresses exceeding 100% of yield. The HIP clad 625 also displayed immunity to pitting and crevice corrosion, with corrosion rates of <0.025 mm/y (1 mil/y). The 4130 base metal, however, was attacked severly in all tests. SEM/EDX analysis of the 625/4130 interface demonstrated that dilution of the cladding by the base metal was essentially eliminated.

  3. Fracture analysis of full-thickness clad beam specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Keeney, J.A.; Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.

    1997-12-01

    Finite-element analyses were performed on full-thickness clad beam specimens to quantify fracture toughness for shallow cracks in material for which metallurgical conditions are prototypic of those found in reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). The beam specimens are fabricated from a section of an RPV wall (removed from a canceled nuclear plant) that includes weld, plate, and clad material with metallurgical factors potentially influencing fracture toughness for shallow cracks. A summary of the testing program is provided and the analyses of the test data are discussed, including comparisons of measured displacements with finite-element analysis results, applications of toughness estimation techniques, and interpretations of constraint conditions implied by stress-based constraint methodologies. Fracture toughness estimates were obtained from displacement data using finite-element techniques and estimation schemes based on the {eta}-factor method. The J-Q methodology was used to assess crack-tip stress triaxiality in the clad beam specimens. The shallow-crack clad beam specimens showed a significant loss of constraint similar to that of other shallow-crack single-edge notch bend specimens. The stress-based Dodds-Anderson scaling model was also utilized to analyze constraint conditions in the clad beam specimens and appears to be effective in adjusting the test data to account for loss of in-plane constraint for uniaxially tested beams.

  4. Weld overlay cladding with iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, G.M.

    1995-08-01

    The hot and cold cracking tendencies of some early iron aluminide alloy compositions have limited their use in applications where good weldability is required. Using hot crack testing techniques invented at ORNL, and experimental determinations of preheat and postweld heat treatment needed to avoid cold cracking, we have developed iron aluminide filler metal compositions which can be successfully used to weld overlay clad various substrate materials, including 9Cr-1Mo steel, 2-1/4Cr-1Mo steel, and 300-series austenitic stainless steels. Dilution must be carefully controlled to avoid crack-sensitive deposit compositions. The technique used to produce the current filler metal compositions is aspiration-casting, i.e. drawing the liquid from the melt into glass rods. Future development efforts will involve fabrication of composite wires of similar compositions to permit mechanized gas tungsten arc (GTA) and/or gas metal arc (GMA) welding.

  5. HYDRIDE-RELATED DEGRADATION OF SNF CLADDING UNDER REPOSITORY CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    K. McCoy

    2000-12-12

    The purpose and scope of this analysis/model report is to analyze the degradation of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) cladding under repository conditions by the hydride-related metallurgical processes, such as delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride reorientation and hydrogen embrittlement, thereby providing a better understanding of the degradation process and clarifying which aspects of the process are known and which need further evaluation and investigation. The intended use is as an input to a more general analysis of cladding degradation.

  6. Electroslag Strip Cladding of Steam Generators With Alloy 690

    SciTech Connect

    Consonni, M.; Maggioni, F.; Brioschi, F.

    2006-07-01

    The present paper details the results of electroslag cladding and tube-to-tubesheet welding qualification tests conducted by Ansaldo-Camozzi ESC with Alloy 690 (Alloy 52 filler metal) on steel for nuclear power stations' steam generators shell, tubesheet and head; the possibility of submerged arc cladding on first layer was also considered. Test results, in terms of chemical analysis, mechanical properties and microstructure are reproducible and confidently applicable to production cladding and show that electroslag process can be used for Alloy 52 cladding with exceptionally stable and regular operation and high productivity. The application of submerged arc cladding process to the first layer leads to a higher base metal dilution, which should be avoided. Moreover, though the heat affected zone is deeper with electroslag cladding, in both cases no coarsened grain zone is found due to recrystallization effect of second cladding layer. Finally, the application of electroslag process to cladding of Alloy 52 with modified chemical composition, was proved to be highly beneficial as it strongly reduces hot cracking sensitivity, which is typical of submerged arc cladded Alloy 52, both during tube-to-tubesheet welding and first re-welding. (authors)

  7. Development and characterisations of WC–12Co microwave clad

    SciTech Connect

    Zafar, Sunny Sharma, Apurbba Kumar

    2014-10-15

    In the present work, WC–12Co based cermet clad was developed on AISI 304 stainless steel using microwave hybrid heating technique. The experimental trials were carried out in a 1.4 kW industrial multimode microwave applicator. The paper explains the major events occurring during microwave irradiation and formation of clad. The developed clads were subsequently characterised through field emission scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, assessment of porosity and microhardness. The WC–12Co clads developed with an approximate thickness of 1 mm, illustrated excellent metallurgical bonding with substrate. The microstructure of the WC–12Co clad mainly consists of skeleton structured carbides embedded in tough metallic phase. The phase analysis of the developed clads indicate the presence of various stable and complex carbides like Co{sub 6}W{sub 6}C, Co{sub 3}W{sub 3}C and Fe{sub 6}W{sub 6}C. The uniform distribution of such carbides with skeleton-like morphology in the microstructure is indicative of high hardness of the clad. The developed clads were free from visible interfacial cracking and the clad porosity was found in the order of approximately 0.98%. The average microhardness of the WC–12Co microwave clads was observed to be 1135 ± 88 HV. - Highlights: • Microwave cladding of WC–12Co on AISI 304 stainless steel is carried out. • Skeleton-like structures of W–Co based carbides are embedded in metallic matrix. • Clad–substrate interface is free from un-melted and un-dissolved carbide particles. • Hardness of clad (1135 ± 88 HV) is 3.5 times that of the substrate (325 ± 49 HV)

  8. Formation and interpretation of dilatant echelon cracks.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollard, D.D.; Segall, P.; Delaney, P.T.

    1982-01-01

    The relative displacements of the walls of many veins, joints, and dikes demonstrate that these structures are dilatant cracks. We infer that dilatant cracks propagate in a principal stress plane, normal to the maximum tensile or least compressive stress. Arrays of echelon crack segments appear to emerge from the peripheries of some dilatant cracks. Breakdown of a parent crack into an echelon array may be initiated by a spatial or temporal rotation of the remote principal stresses about an axis parallel to the crack propagation direction. Near the parent-crack tip, a rotation of the local principal stresses is induced in the same sense, but not necessarily through the same angle. Incipient echelon cracks form at the parent-crack tip normal to the local maximum tensile stress. Further longitudinal growth along surfaces that twist about axes parallel to the propagation direction realigns each echelon crack into a remote principal stress plane. The walls of these twisted cracks may be idealized as helicoidal surfaces. An array of helicoidal cracks sweeps out less surface area than one parent crack twisting through the same angle. Thus, many echelon cracks grow from a single parent because the work done in creating the array, as measured by its surface area decreases as the number of cracks increases. -from Authors

  9. Artificial water channels--incipient innovative developments.

    PubMed

    Barboiu, Mihail

    2016-04-28

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are biological water channels known for fast water transport (∼10(8)-10(9) water molecules per s per channel), with complete proton/ion exclusion. Few synthetic channels have been designed to mimic this high water permeability and to reject ions at a significant level. This Feature Article will discuss the incipient developments of the first artificial water channel systems. PMID:27046217

  10. Incipient motion of surf zone sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Donya; Foster, Diane; Sou, In Mei; Calantoni, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Incipient motion experiments were conducted with natural gravel, acetate beads, and coarse-gravel-sized electronic grains called Smart Sediment Grains in a Small-Oscillatory Flow Tunnel. Measurements of fluid velocity were made using Particle Image Velocimetry. The strength of the fluid shear stresses and the pressure gradients were examined for a range of oscillatory flow conditions at the onset of motion of the sediment particles to determine which mechanism had induced particle motion. The three sediment types utilized in these experiments facilitated an assessment of the effects of sediment grain size diameter, shape, and density on incipient motion. Results suggested that the onset of sediment motion was dominated by the pressure gradients for flows with small orbital excursion amplitudes, by the shear stresses for flows with large orbital excursion amplitudes and by the combined effects for intermediate flows. The denser, angular gravel required greater free-stream accelerations to trigger sediment motion than the spherical, less dense acetate beads, and Smart Sediment Grains. A combined parameter for incipient motion that accounts for the simultaneous effects of both shear stresses and pressure gradients while depending on the static coefficient of friction and the packing concentration of the mobile bed layer was evaluated for accuracy using a range of sediment types. The results suggested that the combined parameter may be a better indicator of sediment mobilization under oscillatory flows than the typically assumed shear stress criterion.

  11. Influence of irradiation on KISCC of Zr-1%Nb claddings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibilashvili, Yu. K.; Medvedev, A. V.; Nesterov, B. I.; Novikov, V. V.; Golovanov, V. N.; Eremin, S. G.; Yurtchenko, A. D.

    2000-06-01

    Experimental results on iodine induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in irradiated claddings from Zr-1%Nb alloy are analyzed. Fatigue cracks were grown at their inner surfaces. The irradiation was carried on in the liquid sodium cooled BOR-60 to the fluence not lower than 10 22 n/cm 2. The SCC-test was carried at 350°C, in argon gas at constant pressure and iodine surface concentration of 0.2 mg/cm 2. The threshold stress intensity factor for the irradiated Zr-1%Nb claddings was determined to be ˜2.0 MPa√m.

  12. On microstructure and flexural strength of metal-ceramic composite cladding developed through microwave heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Apurbba Kumar; Gupta, Dheeraj

    2012-05-01

    A domestic multimode microwave applicator was used to develop carbide reinforced (tungsten-based) metal-matrix composite cladding on austenitic stainless steel substrate. Cladding was developed through microwave irradiation of the preplaced clad materials at 2.45 GHz for 420 s. Clads show metallurgical bonding with substrate by partial dilution of materials. Back scattered images of clad section confirm uniformly distributed reinforced particles in the metallic matrix. Presence of WC, W2C, NiSi, NiW and Co3W3C phases was detected in the clad. Flexural characteristics show two distinct load transitions attributable to deformations of the matrix and the reinforced particles. Clads fail at the upper transition load; further load is taken by the SS-316 substrate. Clads exhibit good stiffness and good adhesion with the substrate. Multi directional cracks were observed at the clad surface; on further loading, cracks get propagated into the clad thickness without getting peeled-off. Mechanism of clad development has been introduced.

  13. Preparation of Plasma Cladding Gradient Wear-Resistant Layer and Study on Its Impact Fatigue Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dekun; Liu, Yuan; Yin, Yan

    2016-02-01

    Plasma cladding technology is used to prepare plasma cladding gradient wear-resistant specimens, and the performance of these specimens is analyzed and compared with those of single cladding specimens. The results indicate that plasma cladding gradient wear-resistant layers implement the gradient changes in microstructure and hardness from the surface of the outer cladding layer to the fusion line and that the outer and inner cladding layers are well combined, the inner cladding layer can improve rapid decreases in hardness of single wear-resistant samples from the cladding layer to the matrix, changes in hardness from the outer to inner cladding layer are buffered, and the inner cladding layer performs important functions in the transition between the outer cladding layer and substrate. The highest hardness of the outer layer, which reaches 735 HV0.1, is approximately 3.9 times that of the matrix. The impact fatigue resistance performance of the plasma gradient cladding specimens is superior to that of single cladding specimens, and fatigue cracks begin to form only after 1 × 105 cyclical impacts.

  14. Zircaloy-2 lined zirconium barrier fuel cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.D.; Marlowe, M.O.; Rand, R.A.; Armijo, J.S.; Adamson, R.B.; Wisner, S.B.

    1996-12-31

    The introduction of Zr-lined barrier fuel clad tubing by GE in the early 1980s to counter the pellet-clad interaction (PCI) failure mechanism in fuel for boiling water reactors provided a major improvement in fuel reliability and operational flexibility. While the frequency of fuel failures has been substantially reduced in the past decade, an increased tendency has been observed for failed fuel rods to exhibit post-failure degradation in the form of longer cracks that allow release of radioactive off-gas and contamination of the reactor coolant circuit with tramp fuel material. One factor involved in this degradation is hydriding of the cladding at a location remote from the initial perforation of the fuel rod. This local hydriding can lead to a secondary crack initiation in the cladding when stressed by the fuel expansion accompanying a power increase. A modification of Zr-lined barrier fuel clad tubing has been developed to retard post-failure local hydriding while retaining the proven PCI resistance of the high-purity sponge Zr barrier. By adding a thin inner layer of corrosion-resistant Zircaloy-2 bonded to the inner surface of the Zr-barrier tube, the resistance to internal corrosion and hydrogen generation in a perforated fuel cladding tube is made equivalent to that of an all-Zircaloy-2 tube. Tests show that the PCI mitigating capability of the Zr barrier. By adding a thin layer of corrosion-resistant Zircaloy-2 bonded to the inner surface of the Zr-barrier tube, the resistance to internal corrosion and hydrogen generation in a perforated fuel cladding tube is made equivalent to that of an all-Zircaloy-2 tube. Tests show that the PCI mitigating capability of the Zr barrier is not compromised by this inner Zircaloy-2 liner. Materials considerations and manufacturing technology used to integrate this optional inner liner with other Zr barrier tubing properties and performance requirements are discussed with a summary of testing experience.

  15. Boiling incipience in a reboiler tube

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, H.; Alam, S.S. )

    1991-03-01

    This heating surface and liquid temperature distributions were experimentally obtained to identify the boiling incipience conditions in a single vertical tube thermosiphon reboiler with water, acetone, ethanol, and ethylene glycol as test liquids. The test section was an electrically heated stainless steel tube of 25.56-mm i.d. and 1900 mm long. The uniform heat flux values were used in the range of 3800--40 000 W/m{sup 2}, while inlet liquid subcooling were varied from 0.2 to 45.5{degrees} C. The liquid submergence was maintained around 100, 75, 50 and 30%. All the data were generated at 1-atm pressure. The maximum superheats attained around boiling incipience were taken from the wall temperature distributions and correlated with heat flux and physical properties of liquids using the expression of Yin and Abdelmessih. The heated sections required for onset of fully developed boiling with net vapor generation were determined assuming a thermal equilibrium model. In this paper a dimensionless correlation relating these values with heat flux, liquid subcooling, and submergence is proposed.

  16. Fatigue cracking of coextruded 304L/CS tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Keiser, J.R.; Maziasz, P.J.; Singbeil, D.L.

    1998-03-01

    The mechanical and thermal fatigue of authentic stainless steels was examined for the maximum temperature range expected in coextruded floor tubes of recovery boilers to determine the likelihood that the cracking in the 304L stainless steel cladding could be fatigue related. The microstructures and cracking patterns of fatigue-tested specimens were compared to features observed in cracked cladding and significant differences were found which suggested that fatigue was not the most likely cause for failure. Biaxial thermal fatigue testing of coextruded tubes and panels was performed to gather more evidence of cracking patterns. Here, transient thermal stresses were imposed by rapidly heating the tubing surface with lamps. In spite of high surface temperatures, no cracks were produced in the 304L stainless steel cladding, and this observation was interpreted as evidence that cracking must be corrosion related.

  17. Preliminary Design Report for Modeling of Hydrogen Uptake in Fuel Rod Cladding During Severe Accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Siefken, Larry James

    1999-02-01

    Preliminary designs are described for models of hydrogen and oxygen uptake in fuel rod cladding during severe accidents. Calculation of the uptake involves the modeling of seven processes: (1) diffusion of oxygen from the bulk gas into the boundary layer at the external cladding surface, (2) diffusion from the boundary layer into the oxide layer, (3) diffusion from the inner surface of the oxide layer into the metallic part of the cladding, (4) uptake of hydrogen in the event that the clad-ding oxide layer is dissolved in a steam-starved region, (5) embrittlement of cladding due to hydrogen uptake, (6) cracking of cladding during quenching due to its embrittlement and (7) release of hydrogen from the cladding after cracking of the cladding. An integral diffusion method is described for calculating the diffusion processes in the cladding. Experimental results are presented that show a rapid uptake of hydrogen in the event of dissolution of the oxide layer and a rapid release of hydrogen in the event of cracking of the oxide layer. These experimental results are used as a basis for calculating the rate of hydrogen uptake and the rate of hydrogen release. The uptake of hydrogen is limited to the equilibrium solubility calculated by applying Sievert's law. The uptake of hydrogen is an exothermic reaction that accelerates the heatup of a fuel rod. An embrittlement criteria is described that accounts for hydrogen and oxygen concentration and the extent of oxidation. A design is described for implementing the models for hydrogen and oxygen uptake and cladding embrittlement into the programming framework of the SCDAP/RELAP5 code. A test matrix is described for assessing the impact of the proposed models on the calculated behavior of fuel rods in severe accident conditions. This report is a revision and reissue of the report entitled; "Preliminary Design Report for Modeling of Hydrogen Uptake in Fuel Rod Cladding During Severe Accidents."

  18. Chemical vapor deposition for silicon cladding on advanced ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goela, Jitendra S.; Taylor, Raymond L.

    1989-01-01

    Polycrystalline Si was used to clad several advanced ceramic materials such as SiC, Si3N4, sapphire Al2O3, pyrolytic BN, and Si by a CVD process. The thickness of Si cladding ranged from 0.025 to 3.0 mm. CVD Si adhered quite well to all the above materials except Al3O, where the Si cladding was highly stressed and cracked or delaminated. A detailed material characterization of Si-clad SiC samples showed that Si adherence to SiC does not depend much on the substrate surface preparation; that the thermal cycling and polishing of the samples do not cause delamination; and that, in four-point bend tests, the Si-SiC bond remains intact, with the failure occurring in the Si.

  19. The effect of chromium on the weldability and microstructure of Fe-Cr-Al weld cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Regina, J.R.; Dupont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    2007-06-15

    Iron-aluminum-based weld cladding is currently being considered as corrosion-resistant coatings for boiler tubes in coal-fired power plants. Although these alloys could potentially be good coating candidates due to their excellent high-temperature corrosion resistance, Fe-Al weld cladding is susceptible to cracking due to hydrogen embrittlement at elevated aluminum concentrations. Additions of chromium to these iron-aluminum alloys have been shown to improve the corrosion resistance of the alloys and could potentially increase the lifetimes of the coatings. The current study investigated the effect of chromium on the hydrogen cracking susceptibility of Fe-Al weld cladding.

  20. Explosive Welding and Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meuken, D.; Carton, E. P.

    2004-07-01

    Explosive welding or cladding is usually performed on relative thick plates by means of a large scale parallel plate set-up. At TNO-PML several of the explosive welding configurations that were developed mainly in the nineteen sixties and seventies are being investigated for their potential use in modern industrial applications. Configurations for explosive cladding of curved surfaces such as tubes and rods are also being examined. This can be used to make special bimetallic heat exchanger tubes, or for the protection of electrodes that are used in electrolysis. Explosive line and seam welding are important bonding techniques that allow the welding of both similar and dissimilar metal plates and sheets. Here, bonding occurs over a small overlapping fraction of the two surfaces. This requires only a small amount of explosive (e.g. 5 g/m for line welds in thin ductile sheets). Explosive foil cladding can be used as an alternative coating technique. Plates that are clad with a foil on one or both sides were fabricated in one process step. They can be further machined or deformed using conventional techniques, due to the ductility of the bond and clad material.

  1. Preliminary design report for modeling of hydrogen uptake in fuel rod cladding during severe accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Siefken, L.J.

    1998-08-01

    Preliminary designs are described for models of the interaction of Zircaloy and hydrogen and the consequences of this interaction on the behavior of fuel rod cladding during severe accidents. The modeling of this interaction and its consequences involves the modeling of seven processes: (1) diffusion of oxygen from the bulk gas into the boundary layer at the external cladding surface, (2) diffusion from the boundary layer into the oxide layer at the cladding external surface, (3) diffusion from the inner surface of the oxide layer into the metallic part of the cladding, (4) uptake of hydrogen in the event that the cladding oxide layer is dissolved in a steam-starved region, (5) embrittlement of cladding due to hydrogen uptake, (6) cracking of cladding during quenching due to its embrittlement and (7) release of hydrogen from the cladding after cracking of the cladding. An integral diffusion method is described for calculating the diffusion processes in the cladding. Experimental and theoretical results are presented that show the uptake of hydrogen in the event of dissolution of the oxide layer occurs rapidly and that show the release of hydrogen in the event of cracking of the cladding occurs rapidly. These experimental results are used as a basis for calculating the rate of hydrogen uptake and the rate of hydrogen release. The uptake of hydrogen is limited to the equilibrium solubility calculated by applying Sievert`s law. The uptake of hydrogen is an exothermic reaction that accelerates the heatup of a fuel rod. An embrittlement criteria is described that accounts for hydrogen and oxygen concentration and the extent of oxidation. A design is described for implementing the models for Zr-H interaction into the programming framework of the SCDAP/RELAP5 code. A test matrix is described for assessing the impact of the Zr-H interaction models on the calculated behavior of fuel rods in severe accident conditions.

  2. Analysis and optimization of process parameters in Al-SiCp laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riquelme, Ainhoa; Rodrigo, Pilar; Escalera-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Rams, Joaquín

    2016-03-01

    The laser cladding process parameters have great effect on the clad geometry and on dilution in the single and multi-pass aluminum matrix composite reinforced with SiC particles (Al/SiCp) coatings on ZE41 magnesium alloys deposited using a high-power diode laser (HPLD). The influence of the laser power (500-700 W), scan speed (3-17 mm/s) and laser beam focal position (focus, positive and negative defocus) on the shape factor, cladding-bead geometry, cladding-bead microstructure (including the presence of pores and cracks), and hardness has been evaluated. The correlation of these process parameters and their influence on the properties and ultimately, on the feasibility of the cladding process, is demonstrated. The importance of focal position is demonstrated. The different energy distribution of the laser beam cross section in focus plane or in positive and negative defocus plane affect on the cladding-bead properties.

  3. Corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    Various papers on corrosion cracking are presented. The topics addressed include: unique case studies on hydrogen embrittlement failures in components used in aeronautical industry; analysis of subcritical cracking in a Ti-5Al-2.5Sn liquid hydrogen control valve; corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking of 7475-T7351 aluminum alloy; effects of salt water environment and loading frequency on crack initiation in 7075-T7651 aluminum alloy and Ti-6Al-4V; stress corrosion cracking of 4340 steel in aircraft ignition starter residues. Also discussed are: stress corrosion cracking of a titanium alloy in a hydrogen-free environment; automation in corrosion fatigue crack growth rate measurements; the breaking load method, a new approach for assessing resistance to growth of early stage stress corrosion cracks; stress corrosion cracking properties of 2090 Al-Li alloy; repair welding of cracked free machining Invar 36; radial bore cracks in rotating disks.

  4. Analysis of unclad and sub-clad semi-elliptical flaws in pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Irizarry-Quinones, H.; Macdonald, B.D.; McAfee, W.J.

    1996-06-01

    This study was conducted to support warm prestressing experiments on unclad and sub-clad flawed beams loaded in pure bending. Two cladding yield strengths were investigated: 0.6 Sy and 0.8 Sy, where Sy is the yield strength of the base metal. Cladding and base metal were assumed to be stress free at the stress relief temperature for the 3D elastic-plastic finite element analysis used to model the experiments. The model results indicated that when cooled from the stress relief temperature, the cladding was put in tension due to its greater coefficient of thermal expansion. When cooled, the cladding exhibited various amounts of tensile yielding. The degree of yielding depended on the amount of cooling and the strength of the cladding relative to that of the base metal. When subjected to tensile bending stress, the sub-clad flaw elastic-plastic stress intensity factor, K{sub I}(J), was at first dominated by crack closing force due to tensile yielding in the cladding. Thus, imposed loads initially caused no increase in K{sub I}(J) near the clad-base interface. However, K{sub I}(J) at the flaw depth was little affected. When the cladding residual stress was overcome, K{sub I}(J) gradually increased until the cladding began to flow. Thereafter, the rate at which K{sub I}(J) increased with load was the same as that of an unclad beam. A plastic zone corrected K{sub I} approximation for the unclad flaw was found by the superposition of standard Newman and Raju solutions with those due to a cladding crack closure force approximated by the Kaya and Erdogan solution. These elastic estimates of the effect of cladding in reducing the crack driving force were quite in keeping with the 3D elastic-plastic finite element solution for the sub-clad flaw. The results were also compared with the analysis of clad beam experiments by Keeney and the conclusions by Miyazaki, et al. A number of sub-clad flaw specimens not subjected to warm prestressing were thought to have suffered degraded

  5. LWR pellet-cladding interactions: Materials solutions to SCC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edsinger, Kurt; Murty, K. Linga

    2001-07-01

    Zirconium alloys are commonly used as fuel-cladding tubes in water reactors because of their inherent resistance to a variety of environmental conditions. One of the major fuel-reliability issues of the 1970s and early 1980s was pellet cladding interaction (PCI). The mechanism of PCI is one of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) by a combination of aggressive fission products and cladding stress from pellet expansion. The severity of the problem, in particular in boiling water reactors, led to the development of barrier cladding by co-extrusion of Zircaloy-2 with an inner iodide zirconium that essentially eliminated the PCI-related failures. However, the substantially lower corrosion resistance of the zirconium layer led to clad breach and failures by other mechanisms. The difference in corrosion resistance could lead to some dramatic differences in post-failure fuel operations. This article briefly summarizes how PCI-SCC factors led to the development of PCI-resistant fuel cladding and concludes with a note on future research needs.

  6. Laser induction hybrid rapid cladding of WC particles reinforced NiCrBSi composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shengfeng; Dai, Xiaoqin

    2010-05-01

    In order to investigate the microstructure characteristics and properties of Ni-based WC composite coatings containing a relatively large amount of WC particles by laser induction hybrid rapid cladding (LIHRC) and compare to the individual laser cladding without preheating, Ni60A + 35 wt.% WC composite coatings are deposited on A3 steel plates by LIHRC and the individual laser cladding without preheating. The composite coating produced by the individual laser cladding without preheating exhibits many cracks and pores, while the smooth composite coating without cracks and pores is obtained by LIHRC. Moreover, the cast WC particles take on the similar dissolution characteristics in Ni60A + 35 wt.% WC composite coatings by LIHRC and the individual laser cladding without preheating. Namely, the completely dissolved WC particles interact with Ni-based alloy solvent to precipitate the blocky and herringbone carbides, while the partially dissolved WC particles still preserve the primary lamellar eutectic structure. A few WC particles are split at the interface of WC and W 2C, and then interact with Ni-based alloy solvent to precipitate the lamellar carbides. Compared with the individual laser cladding without preheating, LIHRC has the relatively lower temperature gradient and the relatively higher laser scanning speed. Therefore, LIHRC can produce the crack-free composite coating with relatively higher microhardness and relatively more homogeneous distribution of WC particles and is successfully applied to strengthen the corrugated roller, showing that LIHRC process has a higher efficiency and good cladding quality.

  7. Weld overlay cladding with iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, G.M.

    1997-12-01

    The author has established a range of compositions for these alloys within which hot cracking resistance is very good, and within which cold cracking can be avoided in many instances by careful control of welding conditions, particularly preheat and postweld heat treatment. For example, crack-free butt welds have been produced for the first time in 12-mm thick wrought Fe{sub 3}Al plate. Cold cracking, however, still remains an issue in many cases. The author has developed a commercial source for composite weld filler metals spanning a wide range of achievable aluminum levels, and are pursuing the application of these filler metals in a variety of industrial environments. Welding techniques have been developed for both the gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc processes, and preliminary work has been done to utilize the wire arc process for coating of boiler tubes. Clad specimens have been prepared for environmental testing in-house, and a number of components have been modified and placed in service in operating kraft recovery boilers. In collaboration with a commercial producer of spiral weld overlay tubing, the author is attempting to utilize the new filler metals for this novel application.

  8. Eddy-Current Detection of Cracks in Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parent, R.; Kettering, D.

    1987-01-01

    Nondestructive device tests narrow, sharply-bent metal tubes. Eddycurrent probe detects incipient cracks inside small metal tubes. Tube-centering device consisting of pair of opposed bars ensures tube centered on eddy-current coil. Probe moves along length of bent tube to inspect repeatably for cracks. Compatible with tubes of different cross sections, oval, flattened, square, rectangular,or irregular. Adapts for inspecting formed tubes in petrochemical, automotive, nuclear, and medical equipment.

  9. EPRI fuel cladding integrity program

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, R.

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the EPRI fuel program is to supplement the fuel vendor research to assure that utility economic and operational interests are met. To accomplish such objectives, EPRI has conducted research and development efforts to (1) reduce fuel failure rates and mitigate the impact of fuel failures on plant operation, (2) provide technology to extend burnup and reduce fuel cycle cost. The scope of R&D includes fuel and cladding. In this paper, only R&D related to cladding integrity will be covered. Specific areas aimed at improving fuel cladding integrity include: (1) Fuel Reliability Data Base; (2) Operational Guidance for Defective Fuel; (3) Impact of Water Chemistry on Cladding Integrity; (4) Cladding Corrosion Data and Model; (5) Cladding Mechanical Properties; and (6) Transient Fuel Cladding Response.

  10. Morphology Changing at Incipient Crystallization Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toshima, Takeshi; Hamai, Ryo; Fujita, Saya; Takemura, Yuka; Takamatsu, Saori; Tafu, Masamoto

    2015-04-01

    Brushite (Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, (DCPD), CaHPO4·2H2O) is one of key components in calcium phosphate system due to wide attractive material not only as bioceramics but also environmental materials. Morphology of DCPD crystals is important factor when one uses its functionality with chemical reaction; because its surface crystal face, shape and size rule the chemical reactivity, responsiveness. Moreover, physical properties are also changed the morphology; such as cohesion, dispersiveness, permeability and so on. If one uses DCPD crystals as environmental renovation materials to catch the fluoride ions, their shape require 020 crystal surfaces; which usually restricts their shape as plate-like structure. After the chemical reaction, the shape of sludge is not good for handling due to their agglutinate property. Therefore searching an effective parameter and developing the method to control the morphology of DCPD crystals is required. In past, we reported that initial concentration and pH value of starting solution, prepared by dissolving calcium nitrate, Ca(NO3)2 and ammonium dihydrogen phosphate, NH4H2PO4, changes the morphology of DCPD crystals and phase diagram of morphology of DCPD crystal depend on those parameter. The DCPD crystallization shows unique behaviour; products obtained higher initial concentration form single crystal-like structure and under lower condition, they form agglomerate crystal-like structure. These results contradict usual crystallization. Here we report that the effect of mixing process of two solutions. The morphology of DCPD crystals is changed from plate structure to petal structure by the arrangement. Our result suggests that morphology of DCPD crystals strongly depends at incipient crystallization condition and growth form is controllable by setting initial crystallization condition.

  11. Analysis of unclad and sub-clad semi-elliptical flaws in pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Irizarry-Quinones, H.; Macdonald, B.D.; McAfee, W.J.

    1997-12-31

    This study was conducted to support warm prestress experiments on unclad and sub-clad flawed beams loaded in pure bending. Two cladding yield strengths were investigated: 0.6 Sy and 0.8 Sy, where Sy is the yield strength of the base metal. Cladding and base metal were assumed to be stress free at the stress relief temperature for the 3D elastic-plastic finite element analysis. The model results indicated that when cooled from the stress relief temperature tensile residual stresses were generated in the cladding due to its greater coefficient of thermal expansion. The magnitude of the residual stresses depended on the amount of cooling and the strength of the cladding relative to that of the base metal. During loading, the sub-clad flaw elastic-plastic stress intensity factor, K{sub I}(J), was at first dominated by crack closing force due to tensile residual stresses in the cladding. After the cladding residual stress were overcome by the applied bending stresses, K{sub I}(J) gradually increased as if it were an unclad beam. A combination of elastic stress intensity factor solutions was used to approximate the effect of cladding in reducing the crack driving force along the flaw. This approximation was quite in keeping with the 3D elastic-plastic finite element solution for the sub-clad flaw. Finally, a number of sub-clad flaw specimens not subjected to warm prestressing were thought to have suffered degraded toughness caused by locally intensified strain ageing embrittlement due to welding over the preexisting flaw.

  12. The Effect of Rare Earth on the Structure and Performance of Laser Clad Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Ruiliang; Yu, Huijun; Chen, Chuanzhong; Dong, Qing

    Laser cladding is one kind of advanced surface modification technology and has the abroad prospect in making the wear-resistant coating on metal substrates. However, the application of laser cladding technology does not achieve the people's expectation in the practical production because of many defects such as cracks, pores and so on. The addiction of rare earth can effectively reduce the number of cracks in the clad coating and enhance the coating wear-resistance. In the paper, the effects of rare earth on metallurgical quality, microstructure, phase structure and wear-resistance are analyzed in turns. The preliminary discussion is also carried out on the effect mechanism of rare earth. At last, the development tendency of rare earth in the laser cladding has been briefly elaborated.

  13. Fuel pin cladding

    DOEpatents

    Vaidyanathan, Swaminathan; Adamson, Martyn G.

    1986-01-01

    An improved fuel pin cladding, particularly adapted for use in breeder reactors, consisting of composite tubing with austenitic steel on the outer portion of the thickness of the tube wall and with nickel and/or ferritic material on the inner portion of the thickness of the tube wall. The nickel forms a sacrificial barrier as it reacts with certain fission products thereby reducing fission product activity at the austenitic steel interface. The ferritic material forms a preventive barrier for the austenitic steel as it is immune to liquid metal embrittlement. The improved cladding permits the use of high density fuel which in turn leads to a better breeding ratio in breeder reactors, and will increase the threshold at which failure occurs during temperature transients.

  14. Fuel pin cladding

    DOEpatents

    Vaidyanathan, S.; Adamson, M.G.

    1983-12-16

    An improved fuel pin cladding, particularly adapted for use in breeder reactors, is described which consist of composite tubing with austenitic steel on the outer portion of the thickness of the tube wall and with nickel an/or ferritic material on the inner portion of the thickness of the tube wall. The nickel forms a sacrificial barrier as it reacts with certain fission products thereby reducing fission product activity at the austenitic steel interface. The ferritic material forms a preventive barrier for the austenitic steel as it is immune to liquid metal embrittlement. The improved cladding permits the use of high density fuel which in turn leads to a better breeding ratio in breeder reactors, and will increase the threshold at which failure occurs during temperature transients.

  15. Fuel pin cladding

    DOEpatents

    Vaidyanathan, S.; Adamson, M.G.

    1986-01-28

    Disclosed is an improved fuel pin cladding, particularly adapted for use in breeder reactors, consisting of composite tubing with austenitic steel on the outer portion of the thickness of the tube wall and with nickel and/or ferritic material on the inner portion of the thickness of the tube wall. The nickel forms a sacrificial barrier as it reacts with certain fission products thereby reducing fission product activity at the austenitic steel interface. The ferritic material forms a preventive barrier for the austenitic steel as it is immune to liquid metal embrittlement. The improved cladding permits the use of high density fuel which in turn leads to a better breeding ratio in breeder reactors, and will increase the threshold at which failure occurs during temperature transients. 2 figs.

  16. Deformation and fracture characteristics of spent Zircaloy fuel cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Yaggee, F.L.

    1982-09-01

    For a better understanding of Zircaloy fuel-rod failure by the pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) phenomenon, a mechanistic study of deformation and fracture behavior of spent power reactor fuel cladding under simulated PCI conditions was conducted. Zircaloy-2 cladding specimens, obtained from fuel assemblies of operating power reactors, were deformed to fracture at 325/sup 0/C by internal gas pressurization in the absence of fission product simulants. Fracture characteristics and microstructures were examined via SEM, TEM, and HVEM. Numerous dislocation tangles and cell structures, observed in TEM specimens of cladding tubes that failed in a ductile manner, were consistent with SEM observations of a limited number of dimples characteristic of microvoid coalescence. A number of brittle-type failures were produced without the influence of fission product simulants. The brittle cracks occurred near the areas compressed by the Swagelok fittings of the internally pressurized tube and propagated from the outer to the inner surface. Since the outer surface was isolated and maintained under a flowing stream of pure helium, it is unlikely that the brittle-type failure was influenced by any fission product traces. SEM fractography of the brittle-type failure revealed a large area of transgranular pseudocleavage with limited areas of ductile fluting, which were similar in appearance to the surfaces produced by in-reactor PCI-type failures. A TEM evaluation of the cladding in the vicinity of the through-wall crack revealed numerous locations that contained an extensive amount of second-phase precipitate (Zr/sub 3/O). We believe that the brittle-type failures of the irradiated spent fuel cladding in the stress rupture experiments are associated with segregation of oxygen, which leads to the formation of the order structure, an immobilization of dislocations, and minimal plastic deformation in the material.

  17. Formation quality optimization of laser hot wire cladding for repairing martensite precipitation hardening stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Peng; Feng, Zhenhua; Zheng, Shiqing

    2015-01-01

    Laser cladding is an advantaged repairing technology due to its low heat input and high flexibility. With preheating wire by resistance heat, laser hot wire cladding shows better process stability and higher deposition efficiency compared to laser cold wire/powder cladding. Multi-pass layer were cladded on the surface of martensite precipitation hardening stainless steel FV520B by fiber laser with ER410NiMo wire. Wire feed rate and preheat current were optimized to obtain stable wire transfer, which guaranteed good formation quality of single pass cladding. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize processing parameters and predict formation quality of multi-pass cladding. Laser power P, scanning speed Vs, wire feed rate Vf and overlap ratio η were selected as the input variables, while flatness ratio, dilution and incomplete fusion value as the responses. Optimal clad layer with flat surface, low dilution and no incomplete fusion was obtained by appropriately reducing Vf, and increasing P, Vs and η. No defect like pore or crack was found. The tensile strength and impact toughness of the clad layer is respectively 96% and 86% of those of the substrate. The clad layer showed nonuniform microstructure and was divided into quenched areas with coarse lath martensite and tempered areas with tempered martensite due to different thermal cycles in adjacent areas. The tempered areas showed similar hardness to the substrate.

  18. Finite Element Analysis of Laser Engineered Net Shape (LENS™) Tungsten Clad Squeeze Pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhuja, Amit; Brevick, Jerald R.

    2004-06-01

    In the aluminum high-pressure die-casting and indirect squeeze casting processes, local "squeeze" pins are often used to minimize internal solidification shrinkage in heavy casting sections. Squeeze pins frequently fail in service due to molten aluminum adhering to the H13 tool steel pins ("soldering"). A wide variety of coating materials and methods have been developed to minimize soldering on H13. However, these coatings are typically very thin, and experience has shown their performance on squeeze pins is highly variable. The LENS™ process was employed in this research to deposit a relatively thick tungsten cladding on squeeze pins. An advantage of this process was that the process parameters could be precisely controlled in order to produce a satisfactory cladding. Two fixtures were designed and constructed to enable the end and outer diameter (OD) of the squeeze pins to be clad. Analyses were performed on the clad pins to evaluate the microstructure and chemical composition of the tungsten cladding and the cladding-H13 substrate interface. A thermo-mechanical finite element analysis (FEA) was performed to assess the stress distribution as a function of cladding thickness on the pins during a typical casting thermal cycle. FEA results were validated via a physical test, where the clad squeeze pins were immersed into molten aluminum. Pins subjected to the test were evaluated for thermally induced cracking and resistance to soldering of the tungsten cladding.

  19. Structure-property correlations in nanostructured WC-12Co microwave clad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, Sunny; Sharma, Apurbba Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Nanostructured materials are known for enhanced properties as compared to their conventional counterparts. In the present work, microwave cladding technique was explored for depositing nanostructured WC-12Co clads on stainless steel substrates. Phase analysis of the WC-12Co microwave clads revealed the presence of Co6W6C, Co7W6, Co3W9C4, W2C and WC phases. The microstructure of the WC-12Co clads confirmed uniform distribution of nano-carbides in the form of clusters enclosed in the carbide network. Mechanical characterisation of the nanostructured clads was carried in terms of microhardness assessment and flexural strength measurement. The microwave induced clads exhibited excellent metallurgical bonding with the substrate and were free from interfacial cracks. The average microhardness of the developed clads was found in the order of 1760 ± 128HV. The flexural strength of the developed clads was observed to be 671 ± 28 MPa. The nanostructured clads exhibited good adhesion with the substrate without getting peeled-off under a load of 3.75 kN and a displacement of 3.72 mm.

  20. Calculation of hydrogen and oxygen uptake in fuel rod cladding during severe accidents using the integral diffusion method -- Final Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Siefken, L.J.

    1999-05-01

    Final designs are described for models of hydrogen and oxygen uptake in fuel rod cladding during severe accidents. Calculation of the uptake involves the modeling of seven processes: (1) diffusion of oxygen from the bulk gas into the boundary layer at the external cladding surface, (2) diffusion from the boundary layer into the oxide layer, (3) diffusion from the inner surface of the oxide layer into the metallic part of the cladding, (4) uptake of hydrogen in the event that the cladding oxide layer is dissolved in a steam-starved region, (5) embrittlement of cladding due to hydrogen uptake, (6) cracking of cladding during quenching due to its embrittlement and (7) release of hydrogen from the cladding after cracking of the cladding. An integral diffusion method is described for calculating the diffusion processes in the cladding. Experimental results are presented that show a rapid uptake of hydrogen in the event of dissolution of the oxide layer and a rapid release of hydrogen in the event of cracking of the oxide layer. These experimental results are used as a basis for calculating the rate of hydrogen uptake and the rate of hydrogen release. A description is given of the implementation of the models for hydrogen and oxygen uptake and cladding embrittlement into the programming framework of the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.3 code.

  1. Calculation of Hydrogen and Oxygen Uptake in Fuel Rod Cladding During Severe Accidents Using the Integral Diffusion Method - Final Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Siefken, Larry James

    1999-06-01

    Final designs are described for models of hydrogen and oxygen uptake in fuel rod cladding during severe accidents. Calculation of the uptake involves the modeling of seven processes: (1) diffusion of oxygen from the bulk gas into the boundary layer at the external cladding surface, (2) diffusion from the boundary layer into the oxide layer, (3) diffusion from the inner surface of the oxide layer into the metallic part of the cladding, (4) uptake of hydrogen in the event that the cladding oxide layer is dissolved in a steam-starved region, (5) embrittlement of cladding due to hydrogen uptake, (6) cracking of cladding during quenching due to its embrittlement and (7) release of hydrogen from the cladding after cracking of the cladding. An integral diffusion method is described for calculating the diffusion processes in the cladding. Experimental results are presented that show a rapid uptake of hydrogen in the event of dissolution of the oxide layer and a rapid release of hydrogen in the event of cracking of the oxide layer. These experimental results are used as a basis for calculating the rate of hydrogen uptake and the rate of hydrogen release. A description is given of the implementation of the models for hydrogen and oxygen uptake and cladding embrittlement into the programming framework of the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.3 code.

  2. Fracture assessment of weld material from a full-thickness clad RPV shell segment

    SciTech Connect

    Keeney, J.A.; Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.

    1996-07-01

    Fracture analysis was applied to full-thickness clad beam specimens containing shallow cracks in material for which metallurgical conditions are prototypic of those found in reactor pressure vessels (RPV) at beginning of life. The beam specimens were fabricated from a section of an RPV wall (removed from a canceled nuclear plant) that includes weld, plate, and clad material. Metallurgical factors potentially influencing fracture toughness for shallow cracks in the beam specimens include gradients of material properties and residual stresses due to welding and cladding applications. Fracture toughness estimates were obtained from load vs load-line displacement and load vs crack-mouth-opening displacement data using finite-element methods and estimation schemes based on the {eta}-factor method. One of the beams experienced a significant amount of precleavage stable ductile tearing. Effects of precleavage tearing on estimates of fracture toughness were investigated using continuum damage models. Fracture toughness results from the clad beam specimens were compared with other deep- and shallow-crack single-edge notch bend (SENB) data generated previously from A533 Grade B plate material. Range of scatter for the clad beam data is consistent with that from the laboratory-scale SENB specimens tested at the same temperature.

  3. Microstructural examination of high temperature creep failure of Zircaloy-2 cladding in irradiated PHWR fuel pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Prerna; Sah, D. N.; Kumar, Sunil; Anantharaman, S.

    2012-10-01

    Cladding samples taken from the ballooned region of the irradiated Zircaloy-2 cladded PHWR fuel pins which failed during isothermal heating tests carried out at 800-900 °C were examined using optical and scanning electron microscopy. The examination of samples from the fuel pin tested at 900 °C showed an intergranular mode of failure in the cladding due to formation of cracks, cavities and zirconium hydride precipitates on the grain boundaries in the cladding material. A thin hard α-Zr(O) layer was observed on outer surface due to dissolution of the oxide layer formed during reactor operation. Grain boundary sliding was identified to be the main mode of creep deformation of Zircaloy-2 at 900 °C. Examination of the cladding tested at 800 °C showed absence of cracks or cavities in the deformed material and no localisation of hydrides was observed at the grain boundaries. The failure of the cladding occurred after necking followed by extensive wall thinning of the cladding tube.

  4. Boiling incipience and convective boiling of neon and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Forced convection and subcooled boiling heat transfer data for liquid nitrogen and liquid neon were obtained in support of a design study for a 30 tesla cryomagnet cooled by forced convection of liquid neon. This design precludes nucleate boiling in the flow channels as they are too small to handle vapor flow. Consequently, it was necessary to determine boiling incipience under the operating conditions of the magnet system. The cryogen data obtained over a range of system pressures, fluid flow rates, and applied heat fluxes were used to develop correlations for predicting boiling incipience and convective boiling heat transfer coefficients in uniformly heated flow channels. The accuracy of the correlating equations was then evaluated. A technique was also developed to calculate the position of boiling incipience in a uniformly heated flow channel. Comparisons made with the experimental data showed a prediction accuracy of plus or minus 15 percent

  5. Signal analysis techniques for incipient failure detection in turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffin, T.

    1985-01-01

    Signal analysis techniques for the detection and classification of incipient mechanical failures in turbomachinery were developed, implemented and evaluated. Signal analysis techniques available to describe dynamic measurement characteristics are reviewed. Time domain and spectral methods are described, and statistical classification in terms of moments is discussed. Several of these waveform analysis techniques were implemented on a computer and applied to dynamic signals. A laboratory evaluation of the methods with respect to signal detection capability is described. Plans for further technique evaluation and data base development to characterize turbopump incipient failure modes from Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) hot firing measurements are outlined.

  6. Boiling incipience and convective boiling of neon and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Forced convection and subcooled boiling heat transfer data for liquid nitrogen and liquid neon were obtained in support of a design study for a 30 tesla cryomagnet cooled by forced convection of liquid neon. The cryogen data obtained over a range of system pressures, fluid flow rates, and applied heat fluxes were used to develop correlations for predicting boiling incipience and convective boiling heat transfer coefficients in uniformly heated flow channels. The accuracy of the correlating equations was then evaluated. A technique was also developed to calculate the position of boiling incipience in a uniformly heated flow channel. Comparisons made with the experimental data showed a prediction accuracy of + or - 15 percent.

  7. Incipient Motion and Particle Transport in Gravel - Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matin, Habib

    The incipient motion of sediment particles in gravel-bed rivers is a very important process. It represents the difference between bed stability and bed mobility. A field study was conducted in Oak Creek, Oregon to investigate incipient motion of individual particles in gravel-bed streams. Investigation was also made of the incipient motion of individual gravel particles in the armor layer, using painted gravel placed on the bed of the stream and recovered after successive high flows. The effect of gravel particle shape was examined for a wide range of flow conditions to determine its significance on incipient motion. The result of analysis indicates a wide variation in particle shapes present. Incipient motion and general transport were found to be generally independent of particle shape regardless of particle sizes. A sample of bed material may contain a mixture of shapes such as well-rounded, oval, flat, disc-like, pencil-shaped, angular, and block-like. These are not likely to move in identical manners during transport nor to start motion at the same flow condition. This leads to questions about the role of shape in predicting incipient motion and equal mobility in gravel-bed streams. The study suggests that gravel particles initiate motion in a manner that is independent of particle shape. One explanation may be that for a natural bed surface many particles rest in orientations that give them the best protection against disturbance, probably a result of their coming to rest gradually during a period of decreasing flows, rather than being randomly dumped. But even when tracer particles were placed randomly in the bed surface there was no evident selectively for initiation of motion on the basis of particle shape. It can be concluded from analysis based on the methods of Parker et al. and Komar that there is room for both equal mobility and flow-competence evaluations. However, the equal mobility concept is best applied for conditions near incipient motion and

  8. Aerogel-clad optical fiber

    DOEpatents

    Sprehn, Gregory A.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Poco, John F.; Sandler, Pamela H.

    1997-01-01

    An optical fiber is surrounded by an aerogel cladding. For a low density aerogel, the index of refraction of the aerogel is close to that of air, which provides a high numerical aperture to the optical fiber. Due to the high numerical aperture, the aerogel clad optical fiber has improved light collection efficiency.

  9. Aerogel-clad optical fiber

    DOEpatents

    Sprehn, G.A.; Hrubesh, L.W.; Poco, J.F.; Sandler, P.H.

    1997-11-04

    An optical fiber is surrounded by an aerogel cladding. For a low density aerogel, the index of refraction of the aerogel is close to that of air, which provides a high numerical aperture to the optical fiber. Due to the high numerical aperture, the aerogel clad optical fiber has improved light collection efficiency. 4 figs.

  10. Oxidation resistant claddings for superalloys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedwill, M. A.; Grisaffe, S. J.

    1971-01-01

    The oxidation protection afforded IN-100 and WI-52 superalloys by thin claddings of NiCrAlSi and FeCrAlY alloys was examined primarily at 1090 C. Comparisons were made with commercial aluminide coatings using cyclic furnace and high velocity burner rig tests. In furnace tests, NiCrAlSi on IN-100 and FeCrAlY on WI-52 performed as well or better than two aluminide coatings. Burner rig performance of the FeCrAlY cladding was better than that of the NiCrAlSi cladding on IN-100 and the aluminide coating on WI-52, but less than the aluminide coating on IN-100. An aluminized NiCrAlSi cladding performed better than any coating or cladding.

  11. Oxidation resistant claddings for superalloys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedwill, M. A.; Grisaffe, S. J.

    1972-01-01

    The oxidation protection afforded IN-100 and WI-52 superalloys by thin claddings of NiCrAlSi and FeCrAlY alloys was examined primarily at 1090 C. Comparisons were made with commercial aluminide coatings, using cyclic furnace and high-velocity burner rig tests. In furnace tests, NiCrAlSi on IN-100 and FeCrAlY on WI-52 performed as well as or better than two aluminide coatings. Burner rig performance of the FeCrAlY cladding was better than that of the NiCrAlSi cladding on IN-100 and the aluminide coating on WI-52, but less than the aluminide coating on IN-100. An aluminized NiCrAlSi cladding performed better than any coating or cladding.

  12. Weld overlay cladding with iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, G.M.

    1996-11-01

    The hot and cold cracking tendencies of some early iron aluminide alloy compositions limited their use to applications where good weldability was not required. Considerable progress has been made toward improving this situation. Using hot crack testing techniques developed at ORNL and a systematic study of alloy compositional effects, we have established a range of compositions within which hot cracking resistance is very good, essentially equivalent to stainless steel. Cold cracking, however, remains an issue, and extensive efforts are continuing to optimize composition and welding parameters, especially preheat and postweld heat treatment, to minimize its occurrence. In terms of filler metal and process development, we have progressed from sheared strip through aspiration cast rod and shielded metal arc electrodes to the point where we can now produce composite wire with a steel sheath and aluminum core in coil form, which permits the use of both the gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc processes. This is a significant advancement in that the gas metal arc process lends itself well to automated welding, and is the process of choice for commercial weld overlay applications. Using the newly developed filler metals, we have prepared clad specimens for testing in a variety of environments both in-house and outside ORNL, including laboratory and commercial organizations. As a means of assessing the field performance of this new type of material, we have modified several non-pressure boundary boiler components, including fuel nozzles and port shrouds, by introducing areas of weld overlay in strategic locations, and have placed these components in service in operating boilers for a side-by-side comparison with conventional corrosion-resistant materials.

  13. Three feasible strategies to minimize kidney injury in 'incipient AKI'.

    PubMed

    Perazella, Mark A; Coca, Steven G

    2013-08-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common and increasing in hospitalized patients. The earlier recognition of renal injury, at a stage described as 'incipient AKI', may allow renoprotective strategies to be initiated at a time when more kidney tissue is salvageable. 'Incipient AKI' represents renal injury as manifested by new-onset proteinuria, cellular activity on urine microscopy, or elevated novel biomarkers of kidney injury in the absence of clinical data that meet current diagnostic criteria for AKI. We propose three strategies to preserve kidney function and minimize further kidney injury in patients with 'incipient AKI'. These include--when appropriate for the prevailing cause of 'incipient AKI'--use of low-chloride-containing intravenous solutions, continued use of renin-angiotensin system antagonists, and use of diuretics to achieve adequate control of intravascular volume. The combined approach of the early diagnosis of AKI and early employment of feasible therapeutic strategies may slow the growth of clinical AKI, AKI requiring renal replacement therapy and chronic kidney disease, and might reduce AKI-associated mortality. PMID:23649020

  14. Results of NDE Technique Evaluation of Clad Hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis C. Kunerth

    2014-09-01

    This report fulfills the M4 milestone, M4FT-14IN0805023, Results of NDE Technique Evaluation of Clad Hydrides, under Work Package Number FT-14IN080502. During service, zirconium alloy fuel cladding will degrade via corrosion/oxidation. Hydrogen, a byproduct of the oxidation process, will be absorbed into the cladding and eventually form hydrides due to low hydrogen solubility limits. The hydride phase is detrimental to the mechanical properties of the cladding and therefore it is important to be able to detect and characterize the presence of this constituent within the cladding. Presently, hydrides are evaluated using destructive examination. If nondestructive evaluation techniques can be used to detect and characterize the hydrides, the potential exists to significantly increase test sample coverage while reducing evaluation time and cost. To demonstrate the viability this approach, an initial evaluation of eddy current and ultrasonic techniques were performed to demonstrate the basic ability to these techniques to detect hydrides or their effects on the microstructure. Conventional continuous wave eddy current techniques were applied to zirconium based cladding test samples thermally processed with hydrogen gas to promote the absorption of hydrogen and subsequent formation of hydrides. The results of the evaluation demonstrate that eddy current inspection approaches have the potential to detect both the physical damage induced by hydrides, e.g. blisters and cracking, as well as the combined effects of absorbed hydrogen and hydride precipitates on the electrical properties of the zirconium alloy. Similarly, measurements of ultrasonic wave velocities indicate changes in the elastic properties resulting from the combined effects of absorbed hydrogen and hydride precipitates as well as changes in geometry in regions of severe degradation. However, for both approaches, the signal responses intended to make the desired measurement incorporate a number of contributing

  15. Relating climate and sand transport to incipient dune development.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Puijenbroek, Marinka; Limpens, Juul; Gleichman, Maurits; Berendse, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Sea levels are continuously rising, increasing the risk of flooding and coastal erosion in low-elevation countries, such as the Netherlands. Coastal dunes are seen as a flexible and natural type of coastal defence, that is able to keep pace with rising water levels. Until now most research has focussed on dynamics and maintenance of established dunes, largely ignoring two critical transitions in early dune development: the transition from bare beach to vegetated incipient dune and that from incipient dune to established foredune. This knowledge is essential to enable more accurate prediction and even stimulation of new dune formation through sand nourishment. We explored the relative contributions of climate and sand transport to incipient dune development combining a 30 year time-series of aerial photographs (1979 - 2010) of the natural Wadden Island coast with high-resolution monitoring data of sand volume changes and climatic parameters. We selected 20 strips of 2.5 km in length along the coast of the Wadden Islands, with a 2 km buffer between them to avoid autocorrelation. For each of these strips of coast we assessed the changes in presence and area of incipient dunes over periods of 5-6 years. Change in fore dune volume and beach width were derived from high resolution beach elevation data. Seawater level and climate data were derived from a nearby meteorological station Preliminary analysis of the first half of the dataset showed that incipient dune area was positively related to beach width, but negatively to storm intensity. In our poster we will present the whole dataset and discuss the implications of our results for future dune development and anthropogenic sand nourishment schemes.

  16. Experimental Study on Surface Characteristics of Laser Cladding Layer Regulated by High-Frequency Microforging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiang Fang; Zhou, Ju; Qiu, Chang Jun; He, Bin; Ye, Jiang; Yuan, Bo; Pi, Zhengqing

    2011-03-01

    High-frequency microforging technology is used to produce micrometer-scale plastic deformation on the surface of material out of the vibration impact of a forging punch, and the cumulative effect of its various frequencies on micrometer-scale plastic deformation can cause changes of surface microstructure and mechanical properties. This study used (1) a self-made machine to treat NiCrBSi alloy, (2) a mechanical comparator and optical microscopy (OM) to study the geometric characteristics of plastic deformation, (3) OM and scanning electric microscopy (SEM) to observe influence on surface microstructure and cracking behavior of the laser cladding layer under microforging, (4) x-ray diffractometer (XRD) to measure the surface residual stress of laser cladding layer before and after forging, and (5) microhardness tester and wearing experimental machine to study changes of microhardness, friction coefficient, and wear characteristics of laser cladding layer after microforging. The results have shown that high-frequency microforging could produce plastic deformation about 150 μm deep on the surface of NiCrBSi alloy clad by laser. Regular dendrite and eutectic crystallization microstructure, which is a peculiar characteristic of the laser cladding layer, was broken into pieces and formed residual compression residual stress on the surface. Resistance to cracking of laser cladding layer improved greatly, microhardness and wearability increased, and the friction coefficient did not under go a noticeable change.

  17. Effects of hydride morphology on the embrittlement of Zircaloy-4 cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ju-Seong; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Kook, Dong-Hak; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel claddings discharged from water reactors contain hydrogen up to 800 wppm depending on the burn-up and power history. During long-term dry storage, the cladding temperature slowly decreases with diminishing decay heat and absorbed hydrogen atoms are precipitated in Zr-matrix according to the terminal solid solubility of hydrogen. Under these conditions, hydrides can significantly reduce cladding ductility and impact resistance, especially when the radial hydrides are massively present in the material. In this study, the effects of hydride morphology on the embrittlement of Zircaloy-4 cladding were investigated using a ring compression test. The results show that circumferentially hydrided Zircaloy-4 cladding is brittle at room temperature but its ductility is regained substantially as the temperature goes above 150 °C. On the other hand, radially hydrided cladding remains brittle at 150 °C and micro-cracks developed in the radial hydrides can act as crack propagation paths. Fracture energy analysis shows that ductile to brittle transition temperature is low in between 25 °C and 100 °C in the former case, whereas it lies in between 200 °C and 250 °C in the latter case.

  18. Modeling incipient creep damage effects on Barkhausen noise and magnetoacoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sablik, M. J.; Augustyniak, B.; Piotrowski, L.

    2004-05-01

    A model is presented for magnetoacoustic emission (MAE) and magnetic Barkhausen emission (HBN) during incipient creep damage stages in Cr-Mo steel. The model qualitatively reproduces the peak in HBN intensity as one goes through the early incipient stages, and also qualitatively reproduces the strong decrease in MAE intensity through all the incipient stages, leading to over a 50% decrease.

  19. 3D analysis of thermal and stress evolution during laser cladding of bioactive glass coatings.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanowski, Michal; Bajda, Szymon; Liu, Yijun; Triantaphyllou, Andrew; Mark Rainforth, W; Glendenning, Malcolm

    2016-06-01

    Thermal and strain-stress transient fields during laser cladding of bioactive glass coatings on the Ti6Al4V alloy basement were numerically calculated and analysed. Conditions leading to micro-cracking susceptibility of the coating have been investigated using the finite element based modelling supported by experimental results of microscopic investigation of the sample coatings. Consecutive temperature and stress peaks are developed within the cladded material as a result of the laser beam moving along the complex trajectory, which can lead to micro-cracking. The preheated to 500°C base plate allowed for decrease of the laser power and lowering of the cooling speed between the consecutive temperature peaks contributing in such way to achievement of lower cracking susceptibility. The cooling rate during cladding of the second and the third layer was lower than during cladding of the first one, in such way, contributing towards improvement of cracking resistance of the subsequent layers due to progressive accumulation of heat over the process. PMID:26953962

  20. Radiographic Inspection of Fueled Clads

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy J. Roney; Karen M. Wendt

    2005-04-01

    Five general purpose heat source (GPHS) fueled clads were radiographically inspected at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The girth weld region of each clad had previously passed visual examination, ring gauge test, and leak test but showed “positive” indications on the ultrasonic (UT) test. Positive ultrasonic indications are allowable under certain weld conditions; radiographic inspection provides a secondary nonintrusive means of clad inspection and may confirm allowable anomalies from the UT inspection. All the positive UT indications were found to exhibit allowable weld shield fusion or mismatch conditions. No indication of void defects was found. One additional clad (FCO371) was deemed unacceptable for radiographic inspection due to an unknown black substance that obscured the angular origin on the weld so that the angular offset to the UT indication could not be found.

  1. Cracking of Composite Modified Alloy 825 Primary Air Port Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Kish, Joseph R.; Keiser, James R; Singbeil, Douglas; Willoughby, Adam W; Longmire, Hu Foster

    2007-04-01

    Twenty primary air ports fabricated from modified Alloy 825-based composite tubes underwent a metallurgical examination to document the mode and extent of cracking on the external fireside surface of a kraft recovery boiler. Collectively, the crack features found are most consistent with thermal fatigue, but corrosion fatigue cannot be ruled out. Regardless of the true cracking mechanism, temperature cycling is implicated as a critical factor for crack propagation. on the basis of the relative crack lengths observed, membrane welds and tube weld repairs, and their adjacent heat-affected zones, appear to be more susceptible to cracking than the cladding itself. This work suggests that mills should avoid boiler operating conditions that promote large temperature fluctuations, which can cause Alloy 825-based composite tubes to crack.

  2. Process improvement in laser hot wire cladding for martensitic stainless steel based on the Taguchi method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zilin; Wang, Gang; Wei, Shaopeng; Li, Changhong; Rong, Yiming

    2016-07-01

    Laser hot wire cladding, with the prominent features of low heat input, high energy efficiency, and high precision, is widely used for remanufacturing metal parts. The cladding process, however, needs to be improved by using a quantitative method. In this work, volumetric defect ratio was proposed as the criterion to describe the integrity of forming quality for cladding layers. Laser deposition experiments with FV520B, one of martensitic stainless steels, were designed by using the Taguchi method. Four process variables, namely, laser power (P), scanning speed (V s), wire feed rate (V f), and wire current (I), were optimized based on the analysis of signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. Metallurgic observation of cladding layer was conducted to compare the forming quality and to validate the analysis method. A stable and continuous process with the optimum parameter combination produced uniform microstructure with minimal defects and cracks, which resulted in a good metallurgical bonding interface.

  3. Cladding corrosion and hydriding in irradiated defected zircaloy fuel rods (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, J.C.

    1985-08-01

    Twenty-one LWBR irradiation test rods containing ThO/sub 2/-UO/sub 2/ fuel and Zircaloy cladding with holes or cracks operated successfully. Zircaloy cladding corrosion on the inside and outside diameter surfaces and hydrogen pickup in the cladding were measured. The observed outer surface Zircaloy cladding corrosion oxide thicknesses of the test rods were similar to thicknesses measured for nondefected irradiation test rods. An analysis model, which was developed to calculate outer surface oxide thickness of non-defected rods, gave results which were in reasonable agreement with the outer surface oxide thicknesses of defected rods. When the analysis procedure was modified to account for additional corrosion proportional to fission rate and to time, the calculated values agreed well with measured inner oxide corrosion film values. Hydrogen pickup in the defected rods was not directly proportional to local corrosion oxide weight gain as was the case for non-defected rods. 16 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  4. High power cladding light strippers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetter, Alexandre; Faucher, Mathieu; Sévigny, Benoit

    2008-02-01

    The ability to strip cladding light from double clad fiber (DCF) fibers is required for many different reasons, one example is to strip unwanted cladding light in fiber lasers and amplifiers. When removing residual pump light for example, this light is characterized by a large numerical aperture distribution and can reach power levels into the hundreds of watts. By locally changing the numerical aperture (N.A.) of the light to be stripped, it is possible to achieve significant attenuation even for the low N.A. rays such as escaped core modes in the same device. In order to test the power-handling capability of this device, one hundred watts of pump and signal light is launched from a tapered fusedbundle (TFB) 6+1x1 combiner into a high power-cladding stripper. In this case, the fiber used in the cladding stripper and the output fiber of the TFB was a 20/400 0.06/0.46 N.A. double clad fiber. Attenuation of over 20dB in the cladding was measured without signal loss. By spreading out the heat load generated by the unwanted light that is stripped, the package remained safely below the maximum operating temperature internally and externally. This is achieved by uniformly stripping the energy along the length of the fiber within the stripper. Different adhesive and heat sinking techniques are used to achieve this uniform removal of the light. This suggests that these cladding strippers can be used to strip hundreds of watts of light in high power fiber lasers and amplifiers.

  5. Preliminary assessment of the fracture behavior of weld material in full-thickness clad beams

    SciTech Connect

    Keeney, J.A.; Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.; Iskander, S.K.

    1994-10-01

    This report describes a testing program that utilizes full-thickness clad beam specimens to quantify fracture toughness for shallow cracks in material for which metallurgical conditions are prototypic of those found in reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). The beam specimens are fabricated from a section of an RPV wall (removed from a canceled nuclear plant) that includes weld, plate, and clad material. Metallurgical factors potentially influencing fracture toughness for shallow cracks in the beam specimens include material gradients due to welding and cladding applications, as well as material inhomogeneities in welded regions due to reheating in multiple weld passes. A summary of the testing program includes a description of the specimen geometry, material properties, the testing procedure, and the experimental results form three specimens. The yield strength of the weld material was determined to be 36% higher than the yield strength of the base material. An irradiation-induced increase in yield strength of the weld material could result in a yield stress that exceeds the upper limit where code curves are valid. The high yield strength for prototypic weld material may have implications for RPV structural integrity assessments. Analyses of the test data are discussed, including comparisons of measured displacements with finite-element analysis results, applications of toughness estimation techniques, and interpretations of constraint conditions implied by stress-based constraint methodologies. Metallurgical conditions in the region of the cladding heat-affected zone are proposed as a possible explanation for the lower-bound fracture toughness measured with one of the shallow-crack clad beam specimens. Fracture toughness data from the three clad beam specimens are compared with other shallow- and deep-crack uniaxial beam and cruciform data generated previously from A 533 Grade B plate material.

  6. Knuckle Cracking

    MedlinePlus

    ... older obese people. Question: Can cracking knuckles / joints lead to arthritis? Answer: There is no evidence of ... or damaged joints due to arthritis could potentially lead more easily to ligament injury or acute trauma ...

  7. Potential corrosion and degradation mechanisms of Zircaloy cladding on spent nuclear fuel in a tuff repository

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, A.J.

    1984-09-01

    A literature review and analysis were made of corrosion and degradation processes applicable to Zircaloy cladding on spent nuclear fuel in a tuff repository. In particular, lifetime sought for the Zircaloy is 10,000 years. Among the potential failure mechanisms examined were: oxidation by steam, air, and water, including the effects of ions whose presence is anticipated in the water; mechanical overload; stress (creep) rupture; stress-corrosion cracking (SCC); and delayed failure due to hydride cracking. The conclusion is that failure due to oxidation is not credible, although a few experiments are suggested to confirm the effect of aqueous fluoride on the Zircaloy cladding. Mechanical overload is not a problem, and failure from stress-rupture does not appear likely based on a modified Larson-Miller analysis. Analysis shows that delayed hydride cracking is not anticipated for the bulk of spent fuel pins. However, for a minority of pins under high stress, there is some uncertainty in the analysis as a result of: (1) uncertainty about crack depths in spent fuel claddings and (2) the effect of slow cooling on the formation of radially oriented hydride precipitates. Experimental resolution is called for. Finally, insufficient information is currently available on stress-corrosion cracking. While evidence is presented that SCC failure is not likely to occur, it is difficult to demonstrate this conclusively because the process is not clearly understood and data are limited. Further experimental work on SCC susceptibility is especially needed.

  8. Vanadium diffusion coating on HT-9 cladding for mitigating the fuel cladding chemical interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Wei-Yang; Yang, Yong

    2014-08-01

    Fuel cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) has been identified as one of the crucial issues for developing Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) stainless steel claddings for metallic fuels in a fast reactor. The anticipated elevated temperature and high neutron flux can significantly aggravate the FCCI, in terms of formation of inter-diffusion and lower melting point eutectic phases. To mitigate the FCCI, vanadium carbide coating as a diffusion barrier was deposited on the HT-9 substrate using a pack cementation diffusion coating (PCDC) method, and the processing temperature was optimized down to 730 °C. A solid metallurgical bonding between the coating layer and substrate was achieved, and the coating is free from through depth cracks. The microstructural characterizations using SEM and TEM show a nanostructured grain structure. EDS/WDS and XRD analysis confirm the phase of coating layer as V2C. Diffusion couple tests at 660 °C for 100 h demonstrate that V2C layer with a thickness of less than 5 μm can effectively eliminate the inter-diffusion between the lanthanide cerium and HT-9 steel.

  9. Interfacial microstructure and properties of copper clad steel produced using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Z.; Chen, Y.; Haghshenas, M.; Nguyen, T.; Galloway, J.; Gerlich, A.P.

    2015-06-15

    A preliminary study compares the feasibility and microstructures of pure copper claddings produced on a pressure vessel A516 Gr. 70 steel plate, using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding. A combination of optical and scanning electron microscopy is used to characterize the grain structures in both the copper cladding and heat affected zone in the steel near the fusion line. The friction stir welding technique produces copper cladding with a grain size of around 25 μm, and no evidence of liquid copper penetration into the steel. The gas metal arc welding of copper cladding exhibits grain sizes over 1 mm, and with surface microcracks as well as penetration of liquid copper up to 50 μm into the steel substrate. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that metallurgical bonding is produced in both processes. Increased diffusion of Mn and Si into the copper cladding occurs when using gas metal arc welding, although some nano-pores were detected in the FSW joint interface. - Highlights: • Cladding of steel with pure copper is possible using either FSW or GMAW. • The FSW yielded a finer grain structure in the copper, with no evidence of cracking. • The FSW joint contains some evidence of nano-pores at the interface of the steel/copper. • Copper cladding by GMAW contained surface cracks attributed to high thermal stresses. • The steel adjacent to the fusion line maintained a hardness value below 248 HV.

  10. Small-crack effects in high-strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Wu, X. R.; Venneri, S. L.; Li, C. G.

    1994-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Chinese Aeronautical Establishment participated in a Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics Cooperative Program. The program objectives were to identify and characterize crack initiation and growth of small cracks (10 microns to 2 mm long) in commonly used US and PRC aluminum alloys, to improve fracture mechanics analyses of surface- and corner-crack configurations, and to develop improved life-prediction methods. Fatigue and small-crack tests were performed on single-edgenotch tension (SENT) specimens and large-crack tests were conducted on center-crack tension specimens for constant-amplitude (stress ratios of -1, 0, and 0.5) and Mini-TWIST spectrum loading. The plastic replica method was used to monitor the initiation and growth of small fatigue cracks at the semicircular notch. Crack growth results from each laboratory on 7075-T6 bare and LC9cs clad aluminum alloys agreed well and showed that fatigue life was mostly crack propagation from a material defect (inclusion particles or void) or from the cladding layer. Finite-element and weight-function methods were used to determine stress intensity factors for surface and corner cracks in the SENT specimens. Equations were then developed and used in a crack growth and crack-closure model to correlate small- and large-crack data and to make life predictions for various load histories. The cooperative program produced useful experimental data and efficient analysis methods for improving life predictions. The results should ultimately improve aircraft structural reliability and safety.

  11. Calculation of hydrogen and oxygen uptake in fuel rod cladding during severe accidents using the integral diffusion method -- Preliminary design report

    SciTech Connect

    Siefken, L.J.

    1999-02-01

    Preliminary designs are described for models of hydrogen and oxygen uptake in fuel rod cladding during severe accidents. Calculation of the uptake involves the modeling of seven processes: (1) diffusion of oxygen from the bulk gas into the boundary layer at the external cladding surface, (2) diffusion from the boundary layer into the oxide layer, (3) diffusion from the inner surface of the oxide layer into the metallic part of the cladding, (4) uptake of hydrogen in the event that the cladding oxide layer is dissolved in a steam-starved region, (5) embrittlement of cladding due to hydrogen uptake, (6) cracking of cladding during quenching due to its embrittlement and (7) release of hydrogen from the cladding after cracking of the cladding. An integral diffusion method is described for calculating the diffusion processes in the cladding. Experimental results are presented that show a rapid uptake of hydrogen in the event of dissolution of the oxide layer and a rapid release of hydrogen in the event of cracking of the oxide layer. These experimental results are used as a basis for calculating the rate of hydrogen uptake and the rate of hydrogen release. The uptake of hydrogen is limited to the equilibrium solubility calculated by applying Sievert's law. The uptake of hydrogen is an exothermic reaction that accelerates the heatup of a fuel rod. An embrittlement criteria is described that accounts for hydrogen and oxygen concentration and the extent of oxidation. A design is described for implementing the models for hydrogen and oxygen uptake and cladding embrittlement into the programming framework of the SCDAP/RELAP5 code. A test matrix is described for assessing the impact of the proposed models on the calculated behavior of fuel rods in severe accident conditions. This report is a revision and reissue of the report entitled; ``Preliminary Design Report for Modeling of Hydrogen Uptake in Fuel Rod Cladding During Severe Accidents.''

  12. Weld cladding of hard surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habrekke, T.

    1993-02-01

    A literature study about clad welding of hard surfaces on steel is performed. The purpose was to see what kind of methods are mainly used, and particular attention is paid to clad welding of rolls. The main impression from this study is that several methods are in use. Some of these must be considered as 'too exotic' for the aim of the program, such as laser build-up welding. However, clad welding of hard surfaces to rolls is widely used around the world, and there is no need for particularly advanced welding methods to perform the work. The welding consumables and the way the welding is carried out is of more important character. The report will give some comments to this, and hopefully will give a short review of the current technology in this field.

  13. Clad Degradation - FEPs Screening Arguments

    SciTech Connect

    E. Siegmann

    2004-03-17

    The purpose of this report is to document the screening of the cladding degradation features, events, and processes (FEPs) for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF). This report also addresses the effect of some FEPs on both the cladding and the CSNF, DSNF, and HLW waste forms where it was considered appropriate to address the effects on both materials together. This report summarizes the work of others to screen clad degradation FEPs in a manner consistent with, and used in, the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA). This document was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Modeling, Testing, and Analyses in Support of LA'' (BSC 2004a [DIRS 167796]).

  14. Silicon cladding for mirror substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duston, Christopher J.; Gunda, Nilesh; Schwartz, Jay R.; Robichaud, Joseph L.

    2009-08-01

    To reduce the finishing costs of silicon carbide mirror substrates, silicon claddings are applied allowing the surfaces to be more easily diamond turned and polished than the bare chemical vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide or bimodal reaction bonded SiC (RB-SiC). The benefits of using silicon as the optical face will be reviewed as will the process for applying plasma enhanced chemical vapor (PE-CVD) deposited amorphous silicon cladding on substrates. Using one mirror as an example, the successful finishing results will be shared.

  15. EPRI-NASA Cooperative Project on Stress Corrosion Cracking of Zircaloys. [nuclear fuel failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cubicciotti, D.; Jones, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Examinations of the inside surface of irradiated fuel cladding from two reactors show the Zircaloy cladding is exposed to a number of aggressive substances, among them iodine, cadmium, and iron-contaminated cesium. Iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of well characterized samples of Zircaloy sheet and tubing was studied. Results indicate that a threshold stress must be exceeded for iodine SCC to occur. The existence of a threshold stress indicates that crack formation probably is the key step in iodine SCC. Investigation of the crack formation process showed that the cracks responsible for SCC failure nucleated at locations in the metal surface that contained higher than average concentrations of alloying elements and impurities. A four-stage model of iodine SCC is proposed based on the experimental results and the relevance of the observations to pellet cladding interaction failures is discussed.

  16. Optimizing electroslag cladding with finite element modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.V.; Atteridge, D.G.; Meekisho, L.

    1996-12-31

    Electroslag cladding of nickel alloys onto carbon steel propeller shafts was optimized in terms of interpass temperatures. A two dimensional finite element model was used in this study to analyze the heat transfer induced by multipass electroslag cladding. Changes of interpass temperatures during a cladding experiment with uniform initial temperature distribution on a section of shaft were first simulated. It was concluded that uniform initial temperature distribution would lead to interpass temperatures out of the optimal range if continuous cladding is expected. The difference in the cooling conditions among experimental and full size shafts and its impact on interpass temperatures during the cladding were discussed. Electroslag cladding onto a much longer shaft, virtually an semi infinite long shaft, was analyzed with specific reference to the practical applications of electroslag cladding. Optimal initial preheating temperature distribution was obtained for continuous cladding on full size shafts which would keep the interpass temperatures within the required range.

  17. Multi-clad black display panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.; Biscardi, Cyrus; Brewster, Calvin

    2002-01-01

    A multi-clad black display panel, and a method of making a multi-clad black display panel, are disclosed, wherein a plurality of waveguides, each of which includes a light-transmissive core placed between an opposing pair of transparent cladding layers and a black layer disposed between transparent cladding layers, are stacked together and sawed at an angle to produce a wedge-shaped optical panel having an inlet face and an outlet face.

  18. ZIRCONIUM-CLADDING OF THORIUM

    DOEpatents

    Beaver, R.J.

    1961-11-21

    A method of cladding thorium with zirconium is described. The quality of the bond achieved between thorium and zirconium by hot-rolling is improved by inserting and melting a thorium-zirconium alloy foil between the two materials prior to rolling. (AEC)

  19. Toughening of Fe-based laser-clad alloy coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Chengwu; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Peilei; Li, Zhuguo; Wu, Yixiong

    2011-01-01

    An investigation is reported on crack-free laser clad Fe-based alloy by use of biaxial powder feeding shielded with argon gas. The microstructure and phase structure of the coating were studied, and mechanical properties were analyzed through hardness, tension strength and wear resistance of the coating. Microstructure analysis showed that there was retained austenite with spherical particles distributed therein in the interdendritic and nearby grain boundary regions. The mechanical test results showed that net-like distributed retained austenite in the interdendritic region had certain toughening effect through blunting crack-tip. Under wear condition of high sliding speed and high loading, the wear resistance of the coating with net-like retained austenite was much higher than that of the coating with some discontinuous carbide network or carbide blocks. The results showed that toughening of laser clad Fe-based alloy with high hardness over 850 HV could be achieved by modifying interdendritic phases from net-like carbide to net-like austenite with spherical particles.

  20. Kinetics of Elementary Processes Relevant to Incipient Soot Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M C; Heaven, M C

    2008-04-30

    Soot formation and abatement processes are some of the most important and challenging problems in hydrocarbon combustion. The key reactions involved in the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's), the precursors to soot, remain elusive. Small aromatic species such as C5H5, C6H6 and their derivatives are believed to play a pivotal role in incipient soot formation. The goal of this project is to establish a kinetic database for elementary reactions relevant to soot formation in its incipient stages. In the past year, we have completed by CRDS the kinetics for the formation and decomposition of C6H5C2H2O2 in the C6H5C2H2 +O2 reaction and the formation of C10H7O2 in the C10H7 + O2 reaction by directly monitoring C6H5C2H2O2 and C10H7O2 radicals in the visible region; their mechanisms have been elucidated computationally by quantum-chemical calculations. The O + C2H5OH reaction has been studied experimentally and computationally and the OH + HNCN reaction has been investigated by ab initio molecular orbital calculation. In addition, a new pulsed slit molecular beam system has been constructed and tested for spectroscopic studies of aromatic radicals and their derivatives by the cavity ringdown technique (CRDS).

  1. Controlling incipient oxidation of pyrite for improved rejection. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Richardson, P.E.; Tao, D.P.

    1996-04-01

    It is well known that superficial oxidation of pyrite produces a hydrophobic sulfur-rich surface and creates problems in separating the mineral from coal using surface-based processes such as flotation and agglomeration. Numerous studies of pyrite oxidation have been conducted but most of them were concerned with the advanced stages of oxidation, and as a result it was not possible to establish a relationship between oxidation and flotation behavior. A better understanding of the mechanisms and kinetics of the incipient oxidation reactions, which may vary with the origin, morphology, texture, and solid state properties of pyrite, can lead to the development of new processes that can improve pyrite rejection from coal. This project is aimed at better understanding of the mechanisms involved during the initial stages of pyrite oxidation to foster the development of advanced coal cleaning technologies. Studies were conducted by fracturing pyrite electrodes in-situ in an electrochemical cell to create virgin surfaces. Electrochemical and photoelectrochemical techniques were employed to characterize the incipient oxidation of pyrite in aqueous solutions. Microflotation tests were conducted to obtain information on the hydrophobicity of pyrite under controlled E{sub h} and pH conditions, and the results were correlated with electrochemical studies.

  2. Miller City levee break and incipient meander cutoff

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberg, K.A.; Jacobson, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    On July 15, 1993, the flooding Mississippi River broke through a levee near Miller City, Ill., at the head of the Mississippi Embayment, approximately 55 km upstream from Cairo, Ill. Flow through the break crossed a high-amplitude meander bend and reentered the main channel approximately 24 km upstream from Cairo, bypassing 31 km of the river channel. The incipient meander cutoff is one of the more dramatic examples of geomorphic change accompanying the 1993 flood. Discharge and bathymetry data were collected in the incipient cutoff channel every other day during the 2 weeks before and after the flood peak. During the peak on August 7, as much as 8,100 m3/s, or approximately 25 percent of the Mississippi flood discharge, was bypassing the meander bend. The flow excavated an irregular channel in the flood plain up to 25 m deep. This irregular channel extends as far as 2 km downstream from the levee break. By August 25, as much as 2,900 m3/s was still flowing through the levee break; with recession of the flood, extensive sand deposits were exposed on the margins and downstream from the scoured areas. Preliminary data indicate that local relief, such as relict channels and preexisting county roads, affected the extent of new channel formation.

  3. Strain-compensated AlGaN /GaN/InGaN cladding layers in homoepitaxial nitride devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernecki, R.; Krukowski, S.; Targowski, G.; Prystawko, P.; Sarzynski, M.; Krysko, M.; Kamler, G.; Grzegory, I.; Leszczynski, M.; Porowski, S.

    2007-12-01

    One of the most important problems in III-nitride violet laser diode technology is the lattice mismatch between the AlGaN cladding layers and the rest of the epitaxial structure. For efficiently working devices, it is necessary to have both a high Al content and thick claddings. This leads, however, to severe sample bowing and even cracking of the upper layer. In this work, we propose a cladding structure of strain-compensated AlGaN /GaN/InGaN superlattice grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy on bulk GaN substrates. Various thicknesses and compositions of the layers were employed. We measured the radius of bowing, lattice mismatches, aluminum and indium contents, and densities of threading dislocations. The proposed cladding structures suppress bowing and cracking, which are the two parasitic effects commonly experienced in laser diodes with bulk AlGaN claddings. The suppression of cracking and bowing is shown to occur due to modified strain energy distribution of the superlattices structure.

  4. Crack tip deformation and fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H.-W.

    1981-01-01

    Recent research on fatigue crack growth is summarized. Topics discussed include the use of the differential stress intensity factor to characterize crack tip deformation, the use of the unzipping model to study the growth of microcracks and the fatigue crack growth in a ferritic-martensitic steel, and the development of a model of fatige crack growth threshold. It is shown that in the case of small yielding, the differential stress intensity factor provides an adequate description of cyclic plastic deformation at the crack tip and correlates well with the crack growth rate. The unzipping model based on crack tip shear decohesion process is found to be in good agreement with the measured crack growth and striation spacing measurements. The proposed model of crack growth threshold gives correct predictions of the crack growth behavior in the near-threshold region.

  5. Effect of hydride orientation on fracture toughness of Zircaloy-4 cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Hung; Tsay, Leu-Wen

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement is one of the major degradation mechanisms for high burnup fuel cladding during reactor service and spent fuel dry storage, which is related to the hydrogen concentration, morphology and orientation of zirconium hydrides. In this work, the J-integral values for X-specimens with different hydride orientations are measured to evaluate the fracture toughness of Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) cladding. The toughness values for Zry-4 cladding with various percentages of radial hydrides are much smaller than those with circumferential hydrides only in the same hydrogen content level at 25 °C. The fractograghic features reveal that the crack path is influenced by the orientation of zirconium hydride. Moreover, the fracture toughness measurements for X-specimens at 300 °C are not sensitive to a variation in hydride orientation but to hydrogen concentration.

  6. Effect of zirconium oxide on the stress-corrosion susceptibility of irradiated Zircaloy cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Mattas, R.F.; Yaggee, F.L.; Neimark, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    Cladding specimens were obtained from two fuel rods irradiated in the Big Rock Point Reactor to a burnup of approximately 8 gigawatt days per ton. Both claddings had a uniform, thick (approximately 4/mu/m) zirconium oxide layer on the inner surface. The significant difference between the two rods was the degree of fission-gas release (0.2 versus 14.3 percent). The cladding specimens, with the fuel removed, were subjected to stress-rupture tests to evaluate their stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility at an initial iodine concentration of 0.6 mg/cm/sup 2/ and a temperature of 325 degree C. Specimens from the high-gas-release rod exhibited significantly increased susceptibility to iodine SCC. The results suggest that the inner-surface oxide provides a barrier to iodine penetration. 10 refs.

  7. Glass-clad semiconductor core optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Stephanie Lynn

    Glass-clad optical fibers comprising a crystalline semiconductor core have garnered considerable recent attention for their potential utility as novel waveguides for applications in nonlinear optics, sensing, power delivery, and biomedicine. As research into these fibers has progressed, it has become evident that excessive losses are limiting performance and so greater understanding of the underlying materials science, coupled with advances in fiber processing, is needed. More specifically, the semiconductor core fibers possess three performance-limiting characteristics that need to be addressed: (a) thermal expansion mismatches between crystalline core and glass cladding that lead to cracks, (b) the precipitation of oxide species in the core upon fiber cooling, which results from partial dissolution of the cladding glass by the core melt, and (c) polycrystallinity; all of which lead to scattering and increased transmission losses. This dissertation systematically studies each of these effects and develops both a fundamental scientific understanding of and practical engineering methods for reducing their impact. With respect to the thermal expansion mismatch and, in part, the dissolution of oxides, for the first time to our knowledge, oxide and non-oxide glass compositions are developed for a series of semiconductor cores based on two main design criteria: (1) matching the thermal expansion coefficient between semiconductor core and glass cladding to minimize cracking and (2) matching the viscosity-temperature dependences, such that the cladding glass draws into fiber at a temperature slightly above the melting point of the semiconductor in order to minimize dissolution and improve the fiber draw process. The x[Na 2O:Al2O3] + (100 - 2x)SiO2 glass compositional family was selected due to the ability to tailor the glass properties to match the aforementioned targets through slight variations in composition and adjusting the ratios of bridging and non-bridging oxygen

  8. Investigation of stainless steel clad fuel rod failures and fuel performance in the Connecticut Yankee Reactor. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pasupathi, V.; Klingensmith, R. W.

    1981-11-01

    Significant levels of fuel rod failures were observed in the batch 8 fuel assemblies of the Connecticut Yankee reactor. Failure of 304 stainless steel cladding in a PWR environment was not expected. Therefore a detailed poolside and hot cell examination program was conducted to determine the cause of failure and identify differences between batch 8 fuel and previous batches which had operated without failures. Hot cell work conducted consisted of detailed nondestructive and destructive examination of fuel rods from batches 7 and 8. The results indicate that the batch 8 failure mechanism was stress corrosion cracking initiating on the clad outer surface. The sources of cladding stresses are believed to be (a) fuel pellet chips wedged in the cladding gap, (b) swelling of highly nondensifying batch 8 fuel and (c) potentially harmful effects of a power change event that occurred near the end of the second cycle of irradiation for batch 8.

  9. NUCLEAR REACTOR COMPENENT CLADDING MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Draley, J.E.; Ruther, W.E.

    1959-01-27

    Fuel elements and coolant tubes used in nuclear reactors of the heterogeneous, water-cooled type are described, wherein the coolant tubes extend through the moderator and are adapted to contain the fuel elements. The invention comprises forming the coolant tubes and the fuel element cladding material from an alloy of aluminum and nickel, or an alloy of aluminum, nickel, alloys are selected to prevent intergranular corrosion of these components by water at temperatures up to 35O deg C.

  10. CLAD DEGRADATION - FEPS SCREENING ARGUMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    R. Schreiner

    2004-10-21

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the screening of the clad degradation features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA). This report also addresses the effect of certain FEPs on both the cladding and the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (DSNF), and defense high-level waste (DHLW) waste forms, as appropriate to address the effects on multiple materials and both components (FEPs 2.1.09.09.0A, 2.1.09.11.0A, 2.1.11.05.0A, 2.1.12.02.0A, and 2.1.12.03.0A). These FEPs are expected to affect the repository performance during the postclosure regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. Table 1-1 provides the list of cladding FEPs, including their screening decisions (include or exclude). The primary purpose of this report is to identify and document the analysis, screening decision, and TSPA-LA disposition (for included FEPs) or screening argument (for excluded FEPs) for these FEPs related to clad degradation. In some cases, where a FEP covers multiple technical areas and is shared with other FEP reports, this report may provide only a partial technical basis for the screening of the FEP. The full technical basis for shared FEPs is addressed collectively by the sharing FEP reports. The screening decisions and associated TSPA-LA dispositions or screening arguments from all of the FEP reports are cataloged in a project-specific FEPs database.

  11. Flaw density examinations of a clad boiling water reactor pressure vessel segment

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, K.V.; McClung, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Flaw density is the greatest uncertainty involved in probabilistic analyses of reactor pressure vessel failure. As part of the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program, studies have been conducted to determine flaw density in a section of reactor pressure vessel cut from the Hope Creek Unit 2 vessel (nominally 0.7 by 3 m (2 by 10 ft)). This section (removed from the scrapped vessel that was never in service) was evaluated nondestructively to determine the as-fabricated status. We had four primary objectives: (1) evaluate longitudinal and girth welds for flaws with manual ultrasonics, (2) evaluate the zone under the nominal 6.3-mm (0.25-in.) clad for cracking (again with manual ultrasonics), (3) evaluate the cladding for cracks with a high-sensitivity fluorescent penetrant method, and (4) determine the source of indications detected.

  12. Incipient seafloor spreading segments: Insights from the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almalki, K. A.; Betts, P. G.; Ailleres, L.

    2016-03-01

    Crustal-scale forward models of marine satellite potential field data suggest that the Red Sea comprises a single segment of ocean crust, which extends along ~60% of the Red Sea. The segment "tips" are bounded by continental crust, and there is no evidence for transforms at the segment terminations at the south. These observations indicate that ocean crust formation does not necessarily occur in response to wholesale tearing or "unzipping" of continental lithosphere nor is it necessarily controlled by preexisting transform faults. Ocean crust initiation occurs as a series of isolated segments that coalesce as the basin evolves. The recognition of this process in an orthogonal extension setting is comparable to spreading segmentation in modern ocean systems generated at a highly oblique convergent margin, suggesting that oceanic crust segmentation is not controlled by kinematic boundary conditions. The Red Sea may represent a combination of incipient type I and type II passive margins development.

  13. Incipient fluidization condition for a centrifugal fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, L.T.; Chang, C.C.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, Z.; Yu, Y.S.

    1985-06-01

    A model has been proposed for the condition of incipient fluidization in a centrifugal fluidized bed. The model is based on the balance between the overall forces, including the centrifugal and fluid frictional forces, exerted on the fluidized particles and the overall effective weight of the particles. Equations have been derived from the model for predicting the critical fluidizing velocity and the maximum pressure differential (or pressure drop) through the centrifugal bed. A series of experiments was carried out with different solid particles, bed rotational speeds, and bed heights. The resultant data for the critical fluidizing velocity and the maximum pressure drop of the bed indicate that the proposed model is valid and the derived equations are of practical use.

  14. Incipient failure detection (IFD) of SSME ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Because of the immense noise background during the operation of a large engine such as the SSME, the relatively low level unique ball bearing signatures were often buried by the overall machine signal. As a result, the most commonly used bearing failure detection technique, pattern recognition using power spectral density (PSD) constructed from the extracted bearing signals, is rendered useless. Data enhancement techniques were carried out by using a HP5451C Fourier Analyzer. The signal was preprocessed by a Digital Audio Crop. DAC-1024I noise cancelling filter in order to estimate the desired signal corrupted by the backgound noise. Reference levels of good bearings were established. Any deviation of bearing signals from these reference levels indicate the incipient bearing failures.

  15. Incipient radiation within the dominant Hawaiian tree Metrosideros polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Stacy, E A; Johansen, J B; Sakishima, T; Price, D K; Pillon, Y

    2014-10-01

    Although trees comprise a primary component of terrestrial species richness, the drivers and temporal scale of divergence in trees remain poorly understood. We examined the landscape-dominant tree, Metrosideros polymorpha, for variation at nine microsatellite loci across 23 populations on young Hawai'i Island, sampling each of the island's five varieties throughout its full geographic range. For four varieties, principal coordinate analysis revealed strong clustering of populations by variety across the 10 430 km(2) island, indicating partitioning of the species into multiple evolutionarily significant units. The single island-endemic form, riparian var. newellii, showed especially strong differentiation from other varieties despite occurring in sympatry with other varieties and likely evolved from a bog form on the oldest volcano, Kohala, within the past 500 000 years. Along with comparable riparian forms on other Pacific Islands, var. newellii appears to represent parallel incipient ecological speciation within Metrosideros. Greater genetic distance among the more common varieties on the oldest volcano and an inverse relationship between allelic diversity and substrate age appear consistent with colonization of Hawai'i Island by older, partially diverged varieties followed by increased hybridization among varieties on younger volcanoes. This study demonstrates that broad population-level sampling is required to uncover patterns of diversification within a ubiquitous and long-lived tree species. Hawaiian Metrosideros appears to be a case of incipient radiation in trees and thus should be useful for studies of divergence and the evolution of reproductive isolating barriers at the early stages of speciation. PMID:24824285

  16. Incipient radiation within the dominant Hawaiian tree Metrosideros polymorpha

    PubMed Central

    Stacy, E A; Johansen, J B; Sakishima, T; Price, D K; Pillon, Y

    2014-01-01

    Although trees comprise a primary component of terrestrial species richness, the drivers and temporal scale of divergence in trees remain poorly understood. We examined the landscape-dominant tree, Metrosideros polymorpha, for variation at nine microsatellite loci across 23 populations on young Hawai'i Island, sampling each of the island's five varieties throughout its full geographic range. For four varieties, principal coordinate analysis revealed strong clustering of populations by variety across the 10 430 km2 island, indicating partitioning of the species into multiple evolutionarily significant units. The single island-endemic form, riparian var. newellii, showed especially strong differentiation from other varieties despite occurring in sympatry with other varieties and likely evolved from a bog form on the oldest volcano, Kohala, within the past 500 000 years. Along with comparable riparian forms on other Pacific Islands, var. newellii appears to represent parallel incipient ecological speciation within Metrosideros. Greater genetic distance among the more common varieties on the oldest volcano and an inverse relationship between allelic diversity and substrate age appear consistent with colonization of Hawai'i Island by older, partially diverged varieties followed by increased hybridization among varieties on younger volcanoes. This study demonstrates that broad population-level sampling is required to uncover patterns of diversification within a ubiquitous and long-lived tree species. Hawaiian Metrosideros appears to be a case of incipient radiation in trees and thus should be useful for studies of divergence and the evolution of reproductive isolating barriers at the early stages of speciation. PMID:24824285

  17. Cladding stress during extended storage of high burnup spent nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raynaud, Patrick A. C.; Einziger, Robert E.

    2015-09-01

    In an effort to assess the potential for low temperature creep and delayed hydride cracking failures in high burnup spent fuel cladding during extended dry storage, the U.S. NRC analytical fuel performance tools were used to predict cladding stress during a 300 year dry storage period for UO2 fuel burned up to 65 GWd/MTU. Fuel swelling correlations were developed and used along with decay gas production and release fractions to produce circumferential average cladding stress predictions with the FRAPCON-3.5 fuel performance code. The resulting stresses did not result in cladding creep failures. The maximum creep strains accumulated were on the order of 0.54-1.04%, but creep failures are not expected below at least 2% strain. The potential for delayed hydride cracking was assessed by calculating the critical flaw size required to trigger this failure mechanism. The critical flaw size far exceeded any realistic flaw expected in spent fuel at end of reactor life.

  18. Process development for cladding APT tungsten targets

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, M H; Barber, R; Dalder, E

    2000-11-27

    This report describes development of processes for cladding APT Target tungsten components with a thin layer (0.127-mm) of Alloy 718, Alloy 600 or 316L stainless steel alloy. The application requires that the cladding be thermally bonded to the tungsten in order to transfer heat generated in the tungsten volume to a surrounding coolant. High temperature diffusion bonding using the hot isostatic processing (HIP) technique was selected as the method for creating a metallurgical bond between pure tungsten tubes and rods and the cladding materials. Bonding studies using a uniaxially loaded vacuum hot press were conducted in preliminary experiments to determine acceptable time-temperature conditions for diffusion bonding. The results were successfully applied in cladding tungsten rods and tubes with these alloys. Temperatures 800-810 C were suitable for cladding tungsten with Alloy 600 and 316L stainless steel alloy, whereas tungsten was clad with Alloy 718 at 1020 C.

  19. Research on mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking in Zircaloy

    SciTech Connect

    Knorr, D.B.; Pelloux, R.M.

    1981-06-01

    The results of internal gas pressurization tests, primarily at 320/sup 0/C, on cladding tubes from two suppliers, Supplier A and Supplier B, are presented. The two lots show a substantial difference in iodine SCC susceptibility so a test matrix is used to resolve the relative contributions of surface condition, residual stress, and texture. Additional tests with constant deflection split-ring specimens and with unstressed cladding segments are used to understand crack initiation and the early crack growth stages of SCC. The difference in SCC susceptibility is due to crystallographic texture. Other variables such as surface finish, stress relief temperature, and residual stress have little or no effect. Mechanical properties, crack initiation, and crack propagation all depend on texture. Both initiation and propagation features are analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. A mechanism for crack initiation consistent with most observations in this study and with the work of other investigators is proposed. At 320/sup 0/C, lifetime is crack initiation limited while several tests at 390/sup 0/C indicate that lifetime is less initiation limited at higher temperature. 31 figures, 9 tables.

  20. Modeling and simulation of hydrogen behavior in Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courty, Olivier; Motta, Arthur T.; Hales, Jason D.

    2014-09-01

    As a result of corrosion during normal operation in nuclear reactors, hydrogen can enter the zirconium-alloy fuel cladding and precipitate as brittle hydride platelets, which can severely degrade the cladding ductility. Under a heterogeneous temperature distribution, hydrides tend to accumulate in the colder areas, creating local spots of degraded cladding that can favor crack initiation. Therefore, an estimation of the local hydride distribution is necessary to help predict the risk of cladding failure. The hydride distribution is governed by three competing phenomena. Hydrogen in solid solution diffuses under a concentration gradient due to Fick's law and under a temperature gradient due to the Soret effect. Precipitation of the hydride platelets occurs once the hydrogen solubility limit is reached. A model of these phenomena was implemented in the 3D fuel performance code BISON in order to calculate the hydrogen distribution for arbitrary geometries, such as a nuclear fuel rod, and is now available for BISON users. Simulations have been performed on simple geometries to validate the model and its implementation. The simulations predict that before precipitation occurs, hydrogen tends to accumulate in the colder spots due to the Soret effect. Once the solubility limit is reached, hydrogen precipitates and forms a rim close to the outer edge of the cladding. The simulations also predict that the reactor shut down has little effect on already precipitated hydrides but causes the remaining hydrogen to precipitate homogeneously into hydrides.

  1. Modeling and simulation of hydrogen behavior in Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Jason D. Hales; Various

    2014-09-01

    As a result of corrosion during normal operation in nuclear reactors, hydrogen can enter the zirconium-alloy fuel cladding and precipitate as brittle hydride platelets, which can severely degrade the cladding ductility. Under a heterogeneous temperature distribution, hydrides tend to accumulate in the colder areas, creating local spots of degraded cladding that can favor crack initiation. Therefore, an estimation of the local hydride distribution is necessary to help predict the risk of cladding failure. The hydride distribution is governed by three competing phenomena. Hydrogen in solid solution diffuses under a concentration gradient due to Fick’s law and under a temperature gradient due to the Soret effect. Precipitation of the hydride platelets occurs once the hydrogen solubility limit is reached. A model of these phenomena was implemented in the 3D fuel performance code BISON in order to calculate the hydrogen distribution for arbitrary geometries, such as a nuclear fuel rod, and is now available for BISON users. Simulations have been performed on simple geometries to validate the model and its implementation. The simulations predict that before precipitation occurs, hydrogen tends to accumulate in the colder spots due to the Soret effect. Once the solubility limit is reached, hydrogen precipitates and forms a rim close to the outer edge of the cladding. The simulations also predict that the reactor shut down has little effect on already precipitated hydrides but causes the remaining hydrogen to precipitate homogeneously into hydrides.

  2. Advanced Fuels Campaign Cladding & Coatings Meeting Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Listed

    2013-03-01

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) organized a Cladding and Coatings operational meeting February 12-13, 2013, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Representatives from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), national laboratories, industry, and universities attended the two-day meeting. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss advanced cladding and cladding coating research and development (R&D); review experimental testing capabilities for assessing accident tolerant fuels; and review industry/university plans and experience in light water reactor (LWR) cladding and coating R&D.

  3. Protective claddings for high strength chromium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    The application of a Cr-Y-Hf-Th alloy as a protective cladding for a high strength chromium alloy was investigated for its effectiveness in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of a core alloy. Cladding was accomplished by a combination of hot gas pressure bonding and roll cladding techniques. Based on bend DBTT, the cladding alloy was effective in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of the chromium core alloy for up to 720 ks (200hours) in air at 1422 K (2100 F). A significant increase in the bend DBTT occurred with longer time exposures at 1422 K or short time exposures at 1589 K (2400 F).

  4. Brazilian and Mexican experiences in the study of incipient domestication

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    analyses of contrasting and diverse cultural and ecological contexts for a better understanding of evolution under incipient processes of domestication. Conclusion Higher research effort is particularly required in Brazil, where studies on this topic are scarcer than in Mexico but where diversity of human cultures managing their also high plant resources diversity offer high potential for documenting the diversity of mechanisms of artificial selection and evolutionary trends. Comparisons and evaluations of incipient domestication in the regions studied as well as the Andean area would significantly contribute to understanding origins and diffusion of the experience of managing and domesticating plants. PMID:24694009

  5. Boulder transport by tsunamis: A laboratory experiment on incipient motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressan, Lidia; Antonini, Alessandro; Gaeta, Maria Gabriella; Guerrero, Massimo; Miani, Marco; Petruzzelli, Valentina; Samaras, Achilleas

    2015-04-01

    Coastal boulders transported inland by high-energy events, such as tsunamis or storms, have been found along several coastal areas worldwide. The importance of these deposits relies on their implications on coastal hazard assessment, since they contribute to the identification of past events and to the study of their magnitude and characteristics. However, the identification of the event responsible of the dislocation of the boulder (tsunami or storm) is not trivial given the complexities of the tsunami and storm phenomena, the coastal environment, the initial boulder conditions, the uncertainties of the problem, etc. The hydrodynamics methods usually adopted are 1) the use of simple hydrodynamics formulae to estimate the minimum flow velocity and height required to move a boulder, and 2) numerical simulations that model the boulder transport together with the specific tsunami (or storm) event. The main shortcomings of the first method are the simplifications adopted, while the second approach implies the simulation of the transport event, which might not be practical because of the amount of uncertainties involved. To contribute to this study field, a laboratory experiment on the flow conditions for boulder transport was carried out at the Hydraulic Engineering Laboratory (LIDR) of the University of Bologna, Italy, in a 11 m long and 0.5 m wide flume. The main objective of this experiment is to provide experimental data for the conditions of the incipient motion for boulders, i.e. to relate the threshold flow velocity and depth for transport with the characteristics of the boulders, i.e. weight and geometry. The experimental channel is divided in three parts: on one end of the channel, a water tank is closed by a gate, followed by a central flat bed and a 1:10 slope, where the boulder is located. A bore, generated by quickly opening the gate (simulating a dam-break), flows in the channel, climbs up the slope and hits the boulder. The impact of the flow on the

  6. Fatigue crack growth behavior of Al-Li alloy 1441

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, R.V.; Parida, B.K.

    1995-12-31

    Fatigue crack growth behavior of Al-Li alloy 1441 having a marginally lower lithium content, compared to 80xx and 20xx series Al-Li alloys is presented in this paper. This investigation was conducted on single edge tension--SE(T)--specimens, under constant amplitude as well as under MiniLCA flight spectrum loading with the specific objective of determining the effects of stress ratio, orientation, thickness and cladding. Three thicknesses were considered: 1.2 mm(clad and unclad), 2.0 mm(clad and unclad) and 8.0 mm unclad. Constant amplitude fatigue tests were conducted at stress ratios of {minus}0.3, 0.1 and 0.7. Testing was performed under ambient conditions and along three orientations, namely L-T, T-L and L+45 degrees. Crack growth characteristics of this alloy are compared with that of BS:L73 (2014-T4 equivalent) for assessing the possibility of replacing BS:L73. Significant effect of stress ratio on crack growth rate was observed in all thicknesses. However, in case of 1.2 and 2.0 mm thick sheets, the effect was minimal at intermediate-crack growth regime. The orientation of the specimen does not adversely affect the fatigue crack growth behavior of 8.0 mm and 2.0 mm thick specimens. However, for 1.2 mm unclad sheet crack growth resistance in L-T direction was found to be superior to that along T-L direction. In majority of test cases considered, no significant effect was observed on crack growth rate due to thickness or cladding. Crack growth characteristics of Al-Li alloy 1441 and Al-Cu alloy BS:L73 under constant amplitude as well as MiniLCA spectrum loading are similar in the low and intermediate-crack growth rate regime. Based on these observations, it is felt that this Al-Li alloy has the potential for future aerospace applications.

  7. Effects of texture and microstructure on the propagation of iodine stress corrosion cracks in Zircaloy

    SciTech Connect

    Knorr, D.B.; Pelloux, R.M.

    1982-01-01

    Failure of some fuel elements in light water nuclear reactors has been attributed to stress corrosion cracking of the fuel cladding. Mechanical interaction between the fuel pellets and cladding tube generates a tensile hoop stress. Release of volatile fission products, most likely iodine, provides a corrosive environment. An investigation of stress corrosion crack propagation is performed at 300/degree/C in four Pa flowing iodine environment. By varying the orientation of fracture mechanics specimens, the effect of crystallographic texture, heat treatment, and microstructure on K/sub I/(SCC) is studied. 27 refs.

  8. Electron pairing in the presence of incipient bands in iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao; Maiti, S.; Linscheid, A.; Hirschfeld, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Recent experiments on certain Fe-based superconductors have hinted at a role for paired electrons in "incipient" bands that are close to, but do not cross, the Fermi level. Related theoretical works disagree on whether or not strong-coupling superconductivity is required to explain such effects, and whether a critical interaction strength exists. In this work, we consider various versions of the model problem of pairing of electrons in the presence of an incipient band, within a simple multiband weak-coupling BCS approximation. We categorize the problem into two cases: case (i), where superconductivity arises from the "incipient band pairing" alone, and case (ii), where it is induced on an incipient band by pairing due to Fermi-surface-based interactions. Negative conclusions regarding the importance of incipient bands have been drawn so far largely based on case (i), but we show explicitly that models under case (ii) are qualitatively different, and can explain the nonexponential suppression of Tc, as well as robust large gaps on an incipient band. In the latter situation, large gaps on the incipient band do not require a critical interaction strength. We also model the interplay between phonon and spin fluctuation driven superconductivity and describe situations in which they can enhance each other rather than compete. Finally, we discuss the effect of the dimensionality of the incipient band on our results. We argue that pairing on incipient bands may be significant and important in several Fe-based materials, including LiFeAs, FeSe intercalates, and FeSe monolayers on strontium titanate, and indeed may contribute to high critical temperatures in some cases.

  9. Small Crack Growth and Fatigue Life Predictions for High-Strength Aluminium Alloys. Part 1; Experimental and Fracture Mechanics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, X. R.; Newman, J. C.; Zhao, W.; Swain, M. H.; Ding, C. F.; Phillips, E. P.

    1998-01-01

    The small crack effect was investigated in two high-strength aluminium alloys: 7075-T6 bare and LC9cs clad alloy. Both experimental and analytical investigations were conducted to study crack initiation and growth of small cracks. In the experimental program, fatigue tests, small crack and large crack tests A,ere conducted under constant amplitude and Mini-TWIST spectrum loading conditions. A pronounced small crack effect was observed in both materials, especially for the negative stress ratios. For all loading conditions, most of the fatigue life of the SENT specimens was shown to be crack propagation from initial material defects or from the cladding layer. In the analysis program, three-dimensional finite element and A weight function methods were used to determine stress intensity factors and to develop SIF equations for surface and corner cracks at the notch in the SENT specimens. A plastisity-induced crack-closure model was used to correlate small and large crack data, and to make fatigue life predictions, Predicted crack-growth rates and fatigue lives agreed well with experiments. A total fatigue life prediction method for the aluminum alloys was developed and demonstrated using the crack-closure model.

  10. Genomics of Rapid Incipient Speciation in Sympatric Threespine Stickleback

    PubMed Central

    Marques, David A.; Lucek, Kay; Meier, Joana I.; Mwaiko, Salome; Wagner, Catherine E.; Excoffier, Laurent; Seehausen, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Ecological speciation is the process by which reproductively isolated populations emerge as a consequence of divergent natural or ecologically-mediated sexual selection. Most genomic studies of ecological speciation have investigated allopatric populations, making it difficult to infer reproductive isolation. The few studies on sympatric ecotypes have focused on advanced stages of the speciation process after thousands of generations of divergence. As a consequence, we still do not know what genomic signatures of the early onset of ecological speciation look like. Here, we examined genomic differentiation among migratory lake and resident stream ecotypes of threespine stickleback reproducing in sympatry in one stream, and in parapatry in another stream. Importantly, these ecotypes started diverging less than 150 years ago. We obtained 34,756 SNPs with restriction-site associated DNA sequencing and identified genomic islands of differentiation using a Hidden Markov Model approach. Consistent with incipient ecological speciation, we found significant genomic differentiation between ecotypes both in sympatry and parapatry. Of 19 islands of differentiation resisting gene flow in sympatry, all were also differentiated in parapatry and were thus likely driven by divergent selection among habitats. These islands clustered in quantitative trait loci controlling divergent traits among the ecotypes, many of them concentrated in one region with low to intermediate recombination. Our findings suggest that adaptive genomic differentiation at many genetic loci can arise and persist in sympatry at the very early stage of ecotype divergence, and that the genomic architecture of adaptation may facilitate this. PMID:26925837

  11. CDC42 inhibition suppresses progression of incipient intestinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sakamori, Ryotaro; Yu, Shiyan; Zhang, Xiao; Hoffman, Andrew; Sun, Jiaxin; Das, Soumyashree; Vedula, Pavan; Li, Guangxun; Fu, Jiang; Walker, Francesca; Yang, Chung S.; Yi, Zheng; Hsu, Wei; Yu, Da-Hai; Shen, Lanlan; Rodriguez, Alexis J.; Taketo, Makoto M.; Bonder, Edward M.; Verzi, Michael P.; Gao, Nan

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the APC or β-catenin genes are well established initiators of colorectal cancer (CRC), yet modifiers that facilitate the survival and progression of nascent tumor cells are not well defined. Using genetic and pharmacological approaches in mouse CRC and human CRC xenograft models, we show that incipient intestinal tumor cells activate CDC42, an APC-interacting small GTPase, as a crucial step in malignant progression. In the mouse, Cdc42 ablation attenuated the tumorigenicity of mutant intestinal cells carrying single APC or β-catenin mutations. Similarly, human CRC with relatively higher levels of CDC42 activity were particularly sensitive to CDC42 blockade. Mechanistic studies suggested that Cdc42 may be activated at different levels, including at the level of transcriptional activation of the stem-cell-enriched Rho family exchange factor Arhgef4. Our results suggest that early-stage mutant intestinal epithelial cells must recruit the pleiotropic functions of Cdc42 for malignant progression, suggesting its relevance as a biomarker and therapeutic target for selective CRC intervention. PMID:25113996

  12. The origin of incipient ferroelectricity in lead telluride

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, M. P.; Trigo, M.; Savić, I.; Fahy, S.; Murray, É. D.; Bray, C.; Clark, J.; Henighan, T.; Kozina, M.; Chollet, M.; Glownia, J. M.; Hoffmann, M. C.; Zhu, D.; Delaire, O.; May, A. F.; Sales, B. C.; Lindenberg, A. M.; Zalden, P.; Sato, T.; Merlin, R.; Reis, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between electrons and lattice vibrations are fundamental to materials behaviour. In the case of group IV–VI, V and related materials, these interactions are strong, and the materials exist near electronic and structural phase transitions. The prototypical example is PbTe whose incipient ferroelectric behaviour has been recently associated with large phonon anharmonicity and thermoelectricity. Here we show that it is primarily electron-phonon coupling involving electron states near the band edges that leads to the ferroelectric instability in PbTe. Using a combination of nonequilibrium lattice dynamics measurements and first principles calculations, we find that photoexcitation reduces the Peierls-like electronic instability and reinforces the paraelectric state. This weakens the long-range forces along the cubic direction tied to resonant bonding and low lattice thermal conductivity. Our results demonstrate how free-electron-laser-based ultrafast X-ray scattering can be utilized to shed light on the microscopic mechanisms that determine materials properties. PMID:27447688

  13. Probability of incipient spanning clusters in critical square bond percolation

    SciTech Connect

    Shchur, L.N.; Kosyakov, S.S.

    1997-06-01

    The probability of simultaneous occurrence of at least k spanning clusters has been studied by Monte Carlo simulations on the 2D square lattice with free boundaries at the bond percolation threshold p{sub c} = {1/2}. It is found that the probability of k and more Incipient Spanning Clusters (ISC) have the values P(k > 1) {approx} 0.00658(3) and P(k > 2) {approx} 0.00000148(21) provided that the limit of these probabilities for infinite lattice exists. The probability P(k > 3) of more than three ISC could be estimated to be of the order of 10{sup -11} and is beyond the possibility to compute such a value by nowadays computers. So, it is impossible to check in simulations the Aizenman law for the probabilities when k {much_gt} 1. We have detected a single sample with four ISC in a total number of about 10{sup 10} samples investigated. The probability of this single event is 1/10 for the number of samples. The influence of boundary conditions is discussed in the last section.

  14. Stress transmission and incipient yield flow in dense granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenfeld, Raphael

    2010-05-01

    Jammed granular matter transmits stresses non-uniformly like no conventional solid, especially when it is on the verge of failure. Jamming is caused by self-organization of granular matter under external loads, often giving rise to networks of force chains that support the loads non-uniformly. An ongoing debate in the literature concerns the correct way to model the static stress field in such media: good old elasticity theory or newcomer isostaticity theory. The two differ significantly and, in particular in 2D, isostaticity theory leads naturally to force chain solutions. More recently, it has been proposed that real granular materials are made of mixtures of regions, some behaving elastically and some isostatically. The theory to describe these systems has been named stato-elasticity. In this paper, I first present the rationale for stato-elasticity theory. An important step towards the construction of this theory is a good understanding of stress transmission in the regions of pure isostatic states. A brief description is given of recently derived general solutions for 2D isostatic regions with nonuniform structures, which go well beyond the over-simplistic picture of force chains. I then show how the static stress equations are related directly to incipient yield flow and derive the equations that govern yield and creep rheology of dense granular matter at the initial stages of failure. These equations are general and describe strains in granular materials of both rigid and compliant particles.

  15. The origin of incipient ferroelectricity in lead telluride.

    PubMed

    Jiang, M P; Trigo, M; Savić, I; Fahy, S; Murray, É D; Bray, C; Clark, J; Henighan, T; Kozina, M; Chollet, M; Glownia, J M; Hoffmann, M C; Zhu, D; Delaire, O; May, A F; Sales, B C; Lindenberg, A M; Zalden, P; Sato, T; Merlin, R; Reis, D A

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between electrons and lattice vibrations are fundamental to materials behaviour. In the case of group IV-VI, V and related materials, these interactions are strong, and the materials exist near electronic and structural phase transitions. The prototypical example is PbTe whose incipient ferroelectric behaviour has been recently associated with large phonon anharmonicity and thermoelectricity. Here we show that it is primarily electron-phonon coupling involving electron states near the band edges that leads to the ferroelectric instability in PbTe. Using a combination of nonequilibrium lattice dynamics measurements and first principles calculations, we find that photoexcitation reduces the Peierls-like electronic instability and reinforces the paraelectric state. This weakens the long-range forces along the cubic direction tied to resonant bonding and low lattice thermal conductivity. Our results demonstrate how free-electron-laser-based ultrafast X-ray scattering can be utilized to shed light on the microscopic mechanisms that determine materials properties. PMID:27447688

  16. Mechanics of fatigue crack closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr. (Editor); Elber, Wolf (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Papers are presented on plasticity induced crack closure, crack closure in fatigue crack growth, the dependence of crack closure on fatigue loading variables, and a procedure for standardizing crack closure levels. Also considered are a statistical approach to crack closure determination, the crack closure behavior of surface cracks under pure bending, closure measurements on short fatigue cracks, and crack closure under plane strain conditions. Other topics include fatigue crack closure behavior at high stress ratios, the use of acoustic waves for the characterization of closed fatigue cracks, and the influence of fatigue crack wake length and state of stress on crack closure.

  17. Cladding Alloys for Fluoride Salt Compatibility

    SciTech Connect

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F; Walker, Larry R; Santella, Michael L; Holcomb, David Eugene

    2011-06-01

    This report provides an overview of several candidate technologies for cladding nickel-based corrosion protection layers onto high-temperature structural alloys. The report also provides a brief overview of the welding and weld performance issues associated with joining nickel-clad nickel-based alloys. From the available techniques, two cladding technologies were selected for initial evaluation. The first technique is a line-of-sight method that would be useful for cladding large structures such as vessel interiors or large piping. The line-of-sight method is a laser-based surface cladding technique in which a high-purity nickel powder mixed into a polymer binder is first sprayed onto the surface, baked, and then rapidly melted using a high-power laser. The second technique is a vapor phase technique based on the nickel-carbonyl process that is suitable for cladding inaccessible surfaces such as the interior surfaces of heat exchangers. An initial evaluation for performed on the quality of nickel claddings processed using the two selected cladding techniques.

  18. Novel Accident-Tolerant Fuel Meat and Cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Robert D. Mariani; Pavel G Medvedev; Douglas L Porter; Steven L Hayes; James I. Cole; Xian-Ming Bai

    2013-09-01

    A novel accident-tolerant fuel meat and cladding are here proposed. The fuel meat design incorporates annular fuel with inserts and discs that are fabricated from a material having high thermal conductivity, for example niobium. The inserts are rods or tubes. Discs separate the fuel pellets. Using the BISON fuel performance code it was found that the peak fuel temperature can be lowered by more than 600 degrees C for one set of conditions with niobium metal as the thermal conductor. In addition to improved safety margin, several advantages are expected from the lower temperature such as decreased fission gas release and fuel cracking. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed. An enrichment of only 7.5% fully compensates the lost reactivity of the displaced UO2. Slightly higher enrichments, such as 9%, allow uprates and increased burnups to offset the initial costs for retooling. The design has applications for fast reactors and transuranic burning, which may accelerate its development. A zirconium silicide coating is also described for accident tolerant applications. A self-limiting degradation behavior for this coating is expected to produce a glassy, self-healing layer that becomes more protective at elevated temperature, with some similarities to MoSi2 and other silicides. Both the fuel and coating may benefit from the existing technology infrastructure and the associated wide expertise for a more rapid development in comparison to other, more novel fuels and cladding.

  19. Crack, crack house sex, and HIV risk.

    PubMed

    Inciardi, J A

    1995-06-01

    Limited attention has been focused on HIV risk behaviors of crack smokers and their sex partners, yet there is evidence that the crack house and the crack-using life-style may be playing significant roles in the transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. The purposes of this research were to study the attributes and patterns of "sex for crack" exchanges, particularly those that occurred in crack houses, and to assess their potential impact on the spread of HIV. Structured interviews were conducted with 17 men and 35 women in Miami, Florida, who were regular users of crack and who had exchanged sex for crack (or for money to buy crack) during the past 30 days. In addition, participant observation was conducted in 8 Miami crack houses. Interview and observational data suggest that individuals who exchange sex for crack do so with considerable frequency, and through a variety of sexual activities. Systematic data indicated that almost a third of the men and 89% of the women had had 100 or more sex partners during the 30-day period prior to study recruitment. Not only were sexual activities anonymous, extremely frequent, varied, uninhibited (often undertaken in public areas of crack houses), and with multiple partners but, in addition, condoms were not used during the majority of contacts. Of the 37 subjects who were tested for HIV and received their test results 31% of the men and 21% of the women were HIV seropositive. PMID:7611845

  20. Stress-intensity-factor influence coefficients for semielliptical inner-surface flaws in clad pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Keeney, J.A.; Bryson, J.W.

    1995-12-31

    A problem of particular interest in pressure vessel technology is the calculation of accurate stress-intensity factors for semielliptical surface cracks in cylinders. Computing costs for direct solution techniques can be prohibitive when applied to three-dimensional (3-D) geometries with time-varying boundary conditions such as those associated with pressurized thermal shock. An alternative superposition technique requires the calculation of a set of influence coefficients for a given 3-D crack model that can be superimposed to obtain mode-I stress-intensity factors. This paper presents stress-intensity-factor influence coefficients (SIFICs) for axially and circumferentially oriented finite-length semielliptical inner-surface flaws with aspect ratios (total crack length (2c) to crack depth (a)) of 2, 6, and 10 for clad cylinders having an internal radius to wall thickness (t) ratio of 10. SIFICs are computed for flaw depths in the range of 0.01 {le} a/t {le} 0.5 and two cladding thicknesses. The incorporate of this SIFIC data base in fracture mechanics codes will facilitate the generation of fracture mechanics solutions for a wide range of flaw geometries as may be required in structural integrity assessments of pressurized-water and boiling-water reactors.

  1. Ion beam mixed oxidation protective coating on Zry-4 cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae-Won; Kim, Jae-Un; Park, Jeong-Yong

    2016-06-01

    In this study, SiC was coated on the surface of Zry-4 cladding to improve the oxidation protectiveness. In the coating of SiC onto Zry-4, the prime concern was adhesion at an elevated temperature. Here, a 70 keV N ion beam was irradiated onto a SiC coating layer of ∼100 nm in thickness; this was deposited via the e-beam evaporation method. Additional coating to a target thickness was then carried out. The films deposited without ion-beam mixing (IBM) often peeled-off at an elevated temperature, while the IBM SiC film always adhered to Zry-4, even after heating to ∼1000 °C; at such a temperature, however, cracks formed in the film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis showed that the deposited SiC film contained about 20 at.% of O, while after annealing in air, 76 at.% of O was found on the surface layer. This implied that both the surface of SiC film and Zry-4 in the crack lines were oxidized. Comparing the Zr3d peak positions across the interface, a shift of binding energy by ∼1 eV was detected, representing that, in view of favorable thermodynamics, SiC/Zry-4 seems to be an acceptable system to apply IBM. To heal the crack, the process of IBM for a 1 μm thick coating and annealing was repeated. High-resolution field emission secondary electron microscopy (FE-SEM) showed that the crack lines, the main places at which oxidation occurred, were gradually covered as the process was repeated, ensuring enhanced oxidation protectiveness.

  2. Microstructure and properties of Fe-based composite coating by laser cladding Fe-Ti-V-Cr-C-CeO2 powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Zou, Yong; Zou, Zengda; Wu, Dongting

    2015-01-01

    In situ TiC-VC reinforced Fe-based cladding layer was obtained on low carbon steel surface by laser cladding with Fe-Ti-V-Cr-C-CeO2 alloy powder. The microstructure, phases and properties of the cladding layer were investigated by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), potentio-dynamic polarization and electro-chemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Results showed Fe-Ti-V-Cr-C-CeO2 alloy powder formed a good cladding layer without defects such as cracks and pores. The phases of the cladding layer were α-Fe, γ-Fe, TiC, VC and TiVC2. The microstructures of the cladding layer matrix were lath martensite and retained austenite. The carbides were polygonal blocks with a size of 0.5-2 μm and distributed uniformly in the cladding layer. High resolution transmission electron microscopy showed the carbide was a complex matter composed of nano TiC, VC and TiVC2. The cladding layer with a hardness of 1030 HV0.2 possessed good wear and corrosion resistance, which was about 16.85 and 9.06 times than that of the substrate respectively.

  3. Review of environmental effects on fatigue crack growth of austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.

    1994-05-01

    Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking of piping, pressure vessel cladding, and core components in light water reactors are potential concerns to the nuclear industry and regulatory agencies. The degradation processes include intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel (SS) piping in boiling water reactors (BWRs), and propagation of fatigue or stress corrosion cracks (which initiate in sensitized SS cladding) into low-alloy ferritic steels in BWR pressure vessels. Crack growth data for wrought and cast austenitic SSs in simulated BWR water, developed at Argonne National Laboratory under US Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsorship over the past 10 years, have been compiled into a data base along with similar data obtained from the open literature. The data were analyzed to develop corrosion-fatigue curves for austenitic SSs in aqueous environments corresponding to normal BWR water chemistries, for BWRs that add hydrogen to the feedwater, and for pressurized water reactor primary-system-coolant chemistry.

  4. Incipient corrosion behavior of Haynes 230 under a controlled reducing atmosphere at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Hsiao-Ming; Stubbins, James F.

    2012-08-01

    In situ thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) was used to investigate the incipient corrosion behavior of alloy 230 exposed under a reducing environment in a temperature range of 850-1000 °C. Both oxidation and loss of alloying elements of alloy 230 were observed to occur concurrently in these conditions. The surface oxide which formed on the substrate does not appear to be as effective in providing a protective layer during the incipient corrosion period.

  5. Hypersonic incipient separation on delta wing with trailing-edge flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. M.

    1975-01-01

    The paper reviews the experimental data on the incipient separation characteristics of planar delta wings of 75 degree sharp leading edges, with full-span trailing edge flap deflected into the windward flow. The local Reynolds number range for these investigations covered laminar, transitional and turbulent conditions. It is shown that, while turbulent boundary layer data correlates with two dimensional results, in the laminar and transitional cases, there is a nearly parallel shift to higher flap angles for incipient separation.

  6. Effect of tip radius on the incipient plasticity of chromium studied by nanoindentation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Dong; Morris, James R; Nieh, T. G.

    2015-01-01

    The onset of plasticity in Cr was investigated by nanoindentation using indenters with tip radii ranging from 60 to 759 nm. The stress for incipient plasticity was found to increase with decreasing tip radius. The cumulative pop-in probability on load could be described successfully by a combined model over the full range of tip radius, indicating that the incipient plasticity might be triggered either by the homogeneous nucleation of dislocation or by the activation of existing dislocations underneath the indenter.

  7. Electron pairing in the presence of incipient bands in iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linscheid, Andy; Chen, Xiao; Maiti, Saurabh; Hirschfeld, Peter

    Recent experiments on certain Fe-based superconductors (SC) have hinted at a role for paired electrons in ``incipient'' bands that are close to, but do not cross the Fermi level. Within a simple multiband weak-coupling BCS approximation, we categorize the problem into two cases: case(I) where SC arises from the incipient band pairing alone, and case(II) where it is induced on an incipient band by pairing due to Fermi-surface based interactions. Negative conclusions regarding the importance of incipient bands are largely based on case(I). However, we show explicitly that models under case(II) can explain the mild suppression of Tc, as well as robust large gaps on an incipient band. We also model the interplay between phonon and spin fluctuation (SF) driven SC and describe the bootstrap of electron-phonon SC by SF coupling the incipient and the regular bands. We argue that pairing on incipient bands may be important in several Fe-based materials, including LiFeAs, FeSe intercalates and FeSe monolayers on SrTiO3, and indeed may contribute to high Tc in some cases. In addition, we address the question whether this conclusion holds if the SF interaction is derived explicitly in the incipient band scenario and retardation effects are included on the level of the Eliashberg equations. SM was supported by NHMFL through NSF-DMR-1157490, AL and PJH were supported in part by DOE DE-FG02-05ER46236.

  8. Thermal perturbations beneath the incipient Okavango Rift Zone, northwest Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leseane, Khumo; Atekwana, Estella A.; Mickus, Kevin L.; Abdelsalam, Mohamed G.; Shemang, Elisha M.; Atekwana, Eliot A.

    2015-02-01

    We used aeromagnetic and gravity data to investigate the thermal structure beneath the incipient Okavango Rift Zone (ORZ) in northwestern Botswana in order to understand its role in strain localization during rift initiation. We used three-dimensional (3-D) inversion of aeromagnetic data to estimate the Curie Point Depth (CPD) and heat flow under the rift and surrounding basement. We also used two-dimensional (2-D) power-density spectrum analysis of gravity data to estimate the Moho depth. Our results reveal shallow CPD values (8-15 km) and high heat flow (60-90 mW m-2) beneath a ~60 km wide NE-trending zone coincident with major rift-related border faults and the boundary between Proterozoic orogenic belts. This is accompanied by thin crust (<30 km) in the northeastern and southwestern parts of the ORZ. Within the Precambrian basement areas, the CPD values are deeper (16-30 km) and the heat flow estimates are lower (30-50 mW m-2), corresponding to thicker crust (~40-50 km). We interpret the thermal structure under the ORZ as due to upward migration of hot mantle fluids through the lithospheric column that utilized the presence of Precambrian lithospheric shear zones as conduits. These fluids weaken the crust, enhancing rift nucleation. Our interpretation is supported by 2-D forward modeling of gravity data suggesting the presence of a wedge of altered lithospheric mantle centered beneath the ORZ. If our interpretation is correct, it may result in a potential paradigm shift in which strain localization at continental rift initiation could be achieved through fluid-assisted lithospheric weakening without asthenospheric involvement.

  9. Evidence of incipient forest transition in Southern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vaca, Raúl Abel; Golicher, Duncan John; Cayuela, Luis; Hewson, Jenny; Steininger, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Case studies of land use change have suggested that deforestation across Southern Mexico is accelerating. However, forest transition theory predicts that trajectories of change can be modified by economic factors, leading to spatial and temporal heterogeneity in rates of change that may take the form of the Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC). This study aimed to assess the evidence regarding potential forest transition in Southern Mexico by classifying regional forest cover change using Landsat imagery from 1990 through to 2006. Patterns of forest cover change were found to be complex and non-linear. When rates of forest loss were averaged over 342 municipalities using mixed-effects modelling the results showed a significant (p<0.001) overall reduction of the mean rate of forest loss from 0.85% per year in the 1990-2000 period to 0.67% in the 2000-2006 period. The overall regional annual rate of deforestation has fallen from 0.33% to 0.28% from the 1990s to 2000s. A high proportion of the spatial variability in forest cover change cannot be explained statistically. However analysis using spline based general additive models detected underlying relationships between forest cover and income or population density of a form consistent with the EKC. The incipient forest transition has not, as yet, resulted in widespread reforestation. Forest recovery remains below 0.20% per year. Reforestation is mostly the result of passive processes associated with reductions in the intensity of land use. Deforestation continues to occur at high rates in some focal areas. A transition could be accelerated if there were a broader recognition among policy makers that the regional rate of forest loss has now begun to fall. The changing trajectory provides an opportunity to actively restore forest cover through stimulating afforestation and stimulating more sustainable land use practices. The results have clear implications for policy aimed at carbon sequestration through reducing

  10. Evaluation of three electronic noses for detecting incipient wood decay.

    PubMed

    Baietto, Manuela; Wilson, Alphus D; Bassi, Daniele; Ferrini, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Tree assessment methodologies, currently used to evaluate the structural stability of individual urban trees, usually involve a visual analysis followed by measurements of the internal soundness of wood using various instruments that are often invasive, expensive, or inadequate for use within the urban environment. Moreover, most conventional instruments do not provide an adequate evaluation of decay that occurs in the root system. The intent of this research was to evaluate the possibility of integrating conventional tools, currently used for assessments of decay in urban trees, with the electronic nose-a new innovative tool used in diverse fields and industries for various applications such as quality control in manufacturing, environmental monitoring, medical diagnoses, and perfumery. Electronic-nose (e-nose) technologies were tested for the capability of detecting differences in volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by wood decay fungi and wood from healthy and decayed trees. Three e-noses, based on different types of operational technologies and analytical methods, were evaluated independently (not directly compared) to determine the feasibility of detecting incipient decays in artificially-inoculated wood. All three e-nose devices were capable of discriminating between healthy and artificially-inoculated, decayed wood with high levels of precision and confidence. The LibraNose quartz microbalance (QMB) e-nose generally provided higher levels of discrimination of sample unknowns, but not necessarily more accurate or effective detection than the AromaScan A32S conducting polymer and PEN3 metal-oxide (MOS) gas sensor e-noses for identifying and distinguishing woody samples containing different agents of wood decay. However, the conducting polymer e-nose had the greater advantage for identifying unknowns from diverse woody sample types due to the associated software capability of utilizing prior-developed, application-specific reference libraries with aroma

  11. Evaluation of Three Electronic Noses for Detecting Incipient Wood Decay

    PubMed Central

    Baietto, Manuela; Wilson, Alphus D.; Bassi, Daniele; Ferrini, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Tree assessment methodologies, currently used to evaluate the structural stability of individual urban trees, usually involve a visual analysis followed by measurements of the internal soundness of wood using various instruments that are often invasive, expensive, or inadequate for use within the urban environment. Moreover, most conventional instruments do not provide an adequate evaluation of decay that occurs in the root system. The intent of this research was to evaluate the possibility of integrating conventional tools, currently used for assessments of decay in urban trees, with the electronic nose–a new innovative tool used in diverse fields and industries for various applications such as quality control in manufacturing, environmental monitoring, medical diagnoses, and perfumery. Electronic-nose (e-nose) technologies were tested for the capability of detecting differences in volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by wood decay fungi and wood from healthy and decayed trees. Three e-noses, based on different types of operational technologies and analytical methods, were evaluated independently (not directly compared) to determine the feasibility of detecting incipient decays in artificially-inoculated wood. All three e-nose devices were capable of discriminating between healthy and artificially-inoculated, decayed wood with high levels of precision and confidence. The LibraNose quartz microbalance (QMB) e-nose generally provided higher levels of discrimination of sample unknowns, but not necessarily more accurate or effective detection than the AromaScan A32S conducting polymer and PEN3 metal-oxide (MOS) gas sensor e-noses for identifying and distinguishing woody samples containing different agents of wood decay. However, the conducting polymer e-nose had the greater advantage for identifying unknowns from diverse woody sample types due to the associated software capability of utilizing prior-developed, application-specific reference libraries with

  12. Choice matters: incipient speciation in Gyrodactylus corydori (Monogenoidea: Gyrodactylidae).

    PubMed

    Bueno-Silva, Marlus; Boeger, Walter A; Pie, Marcio R

    2011-05-01

    We investigated how Gyrodactylus corydoriBueno-Silva and Boeger, 2009 exploits two sympatric host species, Corydoras paleatus (Jenyns, 1842) and Corydoras ehrhardti Steindachner, 1910. Specimens of G. corydori were collected from the Piraquara and Miringuava Rivers, State of Paraná, Brazil, between 2005 and 2006. A total of 167 parasites was measured from both host species. Nine morphometric features of the haptoral sclerites were measured and analyzed by discriminant analysis, cluster analysis and multivariate analysis of variance. A fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene (COI) (∼740 bp) and the rDNA internal transcribed spacers (ITS) (∼1200 bp) of G. corydori were sequenced. Bayesian and parsimony analyses of COI recognized two genetically structured clades of G. corydori, which corresponded closely with the two species of Corydoras. Twenty-eight haplotypes were detected (18 were exclusive to C. ehrhardti and seven were exclusive to C. paleatus). The same general pattern between parasites and host species was observed in the morphometric analyses. Nevertheless, poor correlation of genetic and morphometric variation strongly supports the plastic nature of the morphological variation of haptoral sclerites. The existence of two clades with limited gene flow would suggest that G. corydori already represents two cryptic species. However, the morphometric and molecular data showed that there is insufficient evidence to support two valid species. The low COI (0.1-6.2%) and ITS (0.09-3.5%) divergence within G. corydori suggest a recent separation of the lineages between distinct host species (less than 1 million years). As the hypothesis of secondary contact of the parasite demographic history was rejected, our results point to the possibility of sympatric incipient ongoing speciation of G. corydori to form distinct parasite lineages adapted to C. ehrhardti and C. paleatus. This may be a common event within the Gyrodactylidae, adding a yet

  13. Evidence of Incipient Forest Transition in Southern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Vaca, Raúl Abel; Golicher, Duncan John; Cayuela, Luis; Hewson, Jenny; Steininger, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Case studies of land use change have suggested that deforestation across Southern Mexico is accelerating. However, forest transition theory predicts that trajectories of change can be modified by economic factors, leading to spatial and temporal heterogeneity in rates of change that may take the form of the Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC). This study aimed to assess the evidence regarding potential forest transition in Southern Mexico by classifying regional forest cover change using Landsat imagery from 1990 through to 2006. Patterns of forest cover change were found to be complex and non-linear. When rates of forest loss were averaged over 342 municipalities using mixed-effects modelling the results showed a significant (p<0.001) overall reduction of the mean rate of forest loss from 0.85% per year in the 1990–2000 period to 0.67% in the 2000–2006 period. The overall regional annual rate of deforestation has fallen from 0.33% to 0.28% from the 1990s to 2000s. A high proportion of the spatial variability in forest cover change cannot be explained statistically. However analysis using spline based general additive models detected underlying relationships between forest cover and income or population density of a form consistent with the EKC. The incipient forest transition has not, as yet, resulted in widespread reforestation. Forest recovery remains below 0.20% per year. Reforestation is mostly the result of passive processes associated with reductions in the intensity of land use. Deforestation continues to occur at high rates in some focal areas. A transition could be accelerated if there were a broader recognition among policy makers that the regional rate of forest loss has now begun to fall. The changing trajectory provides an opportunity to actively restore forest cover through stimulating afforestation and stimulating more sustainable land use practices. The results have clear implications for policy aimed at carbon sequestration through reducing

  14. Breakdown in the Process of Incipient Speciation in Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Nwakanma, Davis C.; Neafsey, Daniel E.; Jawara, Musa; Adiamoh, Majidah; Lund, Emily; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Loua, Kovana M.; Konate, Lassana; Sy, Ngayo; Dia, Ibrahima; Awolola, T. Samson; Muskavitch, Marc A. T.; Conway, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding genetic causes and effects of speciation in sympatric populations of sexually reproducing eukaryotes is challenging, controversial, and of practical importance for controlling rapidly evolving pests and pathogens. The major African malaria vector mosquito Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto (s.s.) is considered to contain two incipient species with strong reproductive isolation, hybrids between the M and S molecular forms being very rare. Following recent observations of higher proportions of hybrid forms at a few sites in West Africa, we conducted new surveys of 12 sites in four contiguous countries (The Gambia, Senegal, Guinea-Bissau, and Republic of Guinea). Identification and genotyping of 3499 A. gambiae s.s. revealed high frequencies of M/S hybrid forms at each site, ranging from 5 to 42%, and a large spectrum of inbreeding coefficient values from 0.11 to 0.76, spanning most of the range expected between the alternative extremes of panmixia and assortative mating. Year-round sampling over 2 years at one of the sites in The Gambia showed that M/S hybrid forms had similar relative frequencies throughout periods of marked seasonal variation in mosquito breeding and abundance. Genome-wide scans with an Affymetrix high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray enabled replicate comparisons of pools of different molecular forms, in three separate populations. These showed strong differentiation between M and S forms only in the pericentromeric region of the X chromosome that contains the molecular form-specific marker locus, with only a few other loci showing minor differences. In the X chromosome, the M/S hybrid forms were more differentiated from M than from S forms, supporting a hypothesis of asymmetric introgression and backcrossing. PMID:23335339

  15. Corrosion Resistant Cladding by YAG Laser Welding in Underwater Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutomi Kochi; Toshio Kojima; Suemi Hirata; Ichiro Morita; Katsura Ohwaki

    2002-07-01

    It is known that stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) will occur in nickel-base alloys used in Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) and Internals of nuclear power plants. A SCC sensitivity has been evaluated by IHI in each part of RPV and Internals. There are several water level instrumentation nozzles installed in domestic BWR RPV. In water level instrumentation nozzles, 182 type nickel-base alloys were used for the welding joint to RPV. It is estimated the SCC potential is high in this joint because of a higher residual stress than the yield strength (about 400 MPa). This report will describe a preventive maintenance method to these nozzles Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and welds by a corrosion resistant cladding (CRC) by YAG Laser in underwater environment (without draining a reactor water). There are many kinds of countermeasures for SCC, for example, Induction Heating Stress Improvement (IHSI), Mechanical Stress Improvement Process (MSIP) and so on. A YAG laser CRC is one of them. In this technology a laser beam is used for heat source and irradiated through an optical fiber to a base metal and SCC resistant material is used for welding wires. After cladding the HAZ and welds are coated by the corrosion resistant materials so their surfaces are improved. A CRC by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) in an air environment had been developed and already applied to a couple of operating plants (16 Nozzles). This method was of course good but it spent much time to perform because of an installation of some water-proof working boxes to make a TIG-weldability environment. CRC by YAG laser welding in underwater environment has superior features comparing to this conventional TIG method as follows. At the viewpoint of underwater environment, (1) an outage term reduction (no drainage water). (2) a radioactive exposure dose reduction for personnel. At that of YAG laser welding, (1) A narrower HAZ. (2) A smaller distortion. (3) A few cladding layers. A YAG laser CRC test in underwater

  16. SiC-CMC-Zircaloy-4 Nuclear Fuel Cladding Performance during 4-Point Tubular Bend Testing

    SciTech Connect

    IJ van Rooyen; WR Lloyd; TL Trowbridge; SR Novascone; KM Wendt; SM Bragg-Sitton

    2013-09-01

    and clad configurations. The 2-ply sleeve samples show a higher bend momentum compared to those of the 1-ply sleeve samples. This is applicable to both the hybrid mock-up and bare SiC-CMC sleeve samples. Comparatively both the 1- and 2-ply hybrid mock-up samples showed a higher bend stiffness and strength compared with the standard Zr-4 mock-up sample. The characterization of the hybrid mock-up samples showed signs of distress and preliminary signs of fraying at the protective Zr-4 sleeve areas for the 1-ply SiC-CMC sleeve. In addition, the microstructure of the SiC matrix near the cracks at the region of highest compressive bending strain shows significant cracking and flaking. The 2-ply SiC-CMC sleeve samples showed a more bonded, cohesive SiC matrix structure. This cracking and fraying causes concern for increased fretting during the actual use of the design. Tomography was proven as a successful tool to identify open porosity during pre-test characterization. Although there is currently insufficient data to make conclusive statements regarding the overall merit of the hybrid cladding design, preliminary characterization of this novel design has been demonstrated.

  17. Stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloys. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cubicciotti, D.; Jones, R.L.; Syrett, B.C.

    1980-03-01

    The overall aim has been to develop an improved understanding of the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) mechanism considered to be responsible for pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) failures of nuclear fuel rods. The objective of the present phase of the project was to investigate the potential for improving the resistance of Zircaloy to iodine-induced SCC by modifying the manufacturing techniques used in the commercial production of fuel cladding. Several aspects of iodine SCC behavior of potential relevance to cladding performance were experimentally investigated. It was found that the SCC susceptibility of Zircaloy tubing is sensitive to crystallographic texture, surface condition, and residual stress distribution and that current specifications for Zircaloy tubing provide no assurance of an optimum resistance to SCC. Additional evidence was found that iodine-induced cracks initiate at local chemical inhomogeneities in the Zircaloy surface, but laser melting to produce a homogenized surface layer did not improve the SCC resistance. Several results were obtained that should be considered in models of PCI failure. The ratio of axial to hoop stress and the temperature were both shown to affect the SCC resistance whereas the difference in composition between Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 had no detectable effect. Damage accumulation during iodine SCC was found to be nonlinear: generally, a given life fraction at low stress was more damaging than the same life fraction at higher stress. Studies of the thermochemistry of the zirconium-iodine system (performed under US Department of Energy sponsorship) revealed many errors in the literature and provided important new insights into the mechanism of iodine SCC of Zircaloys.

  18. Gear Crack Propagation Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Reduced weight is a major design goal in aircraft power transmissions. Some gear designs incorporate thin rims to help meet this goal. Thin rims, however, may lead to bending fatigue cracks. These cracks may propagate through a gear tooth or into the gear rim. A crack that propagates through a tooth would probably not be catastrophic, and ample warning of a failure could be possible. On the other hand, a crack that propagates through the rim would be catastrophic. Such cracks could lead to disengagement of a rotor or propeller from an engine, loss of an aircraft, and fatalities. To help create and validate tools for the gear designer, the NASA Lewis Research Center performed in-house analytical and experimental studies to investigate the effect of rim thickness on gear-tooth crack propagation. Our goal was to determine whether cracks grew through gear teeth (benign failure mode) or through gear rims (catastrophic failure mode) for various rim thicknesses. In addition, we investigated the effect of rim thickness on crack propagation life. A finite-element-based computer program simulated gear-tooth crack propagation. The analysis used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, and quarter-point, triangular elements were used at the crack tip to represent the stress singularity. The program had an automated crack propagation option in which cracks were grown numerically via an automated remeshing scheme. Crack-tip stress-intensity factors were estimated to determine crack-propagation direction. Also, various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack-propagation life. Experiments were performed in Lewis' Spur Gear Fatigue Rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Gears with various backup ratios were tested to validate crack-path predictions. Also, test gears were installed with special crack-propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending-fatigue crack growth. From both predictions and tests, gears with backup ratios

  19. Testing of uranium nitride fuel in T-111 cladding at 1200 K cladding temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohal, R. G.; Tambling, T. N.; Smith, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Two groups of six fuel pins each were assembled, encapsulated, and irradiated in the Plum Brook Reactor. The fuel pins employed uranium mononitride (UN) in a tantalum alloy clad. The first group of fuel pins was irradiated for 1500 hours to a maximum burnup of 0.7-atom-percent uranium. The second group of fuel pins was irradiated for about 3000 hours to a maximum burnup of 1.0-atom-percent uranium. The average clad surface temperature during irradiation of both groups of fuel pins was approximately 1200 K. The postirradiation examination revealed the following: no clad failures or fuel swelling occurred; less than 1 percent of the fission gases escaped from the fuel; and the clad of the first group of fuel pins experienced clad embrittlement whereas the second group, which had modified assembly and fabrication procedures to minimize contamination, had a ductile clad after irradiation.

  20. Pellet-clad interaction (PCI) failures of zirconium alloy fuel cladding — A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, B.

    1990-08-01

    This review summarizes the history of the appearance and cure of pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) failures during the operation of Zircaloy clad UO 2 fuel in a number of reactors. The work carried out to permit unrestricted operation of reactors without causing PCI failures has led to the universal adoption of the CANLUB-graphite coated cladding in CANDU reactors, and to the wide adoption of Zr-liner cladding in BWRs. There has only been a low incidence of PCI failures in PWR cladding, and the problem has not loomed large enough to require the adoption of either of the above protective methods in these reactors, although experimental liner cladding has been tested. The extensive work on the mechanism of PCI failures (leading to the conclusion that an SCC process induced by fission product iodine is the most probable cause) is summarised.

  1. Characterization of Cassini GPHS Fueled-Clad Production Girth Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Ferreira, E.A.

    2000-03-23

    Fueled clads for radioisotope power systems are produced by encapsulating {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} in iridium alloy cups, which are joined at their equators by gas tungsten arc welding. Cracking problems at the girth weld tie-in area during production of the Galileo/Ulysses GPHS capsules led to the development of a first-generation ultrasonic test for girth weld inspection at the Savannah River Plant. A second-generation test and equipment with significantly improved sensitivity and accuracy were jointly developed by the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and Westinghouse Savannah River Company for use during the production of Cassini GPHS capsules by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The test consisted of Lamb wave ultrasonic scanning of the entire girth weld from each end of the capsule combined with a time-of-flight evaluation to aid in characterizing nonrelevant indications. Tangential radiography was also used as a supplementary test for further evaluation of reflector geometry. Each of the 317 fueled GPHS capsules, which were girth welded for the Cassini Program, was subjected to a series of nondestructive tests that included visual, dimensional, helium leak rate, and ultrasonic testing. Thirty-three capsules were rejected prior to ultrasonic testing. Of the 44 capsules rejected by the standard ultrasonic test, 22 were upgraded to flight quality through supplementary testing for an overall process acceptance rate of 82.6%. No confirmed instances of weld cracking were found.

  2. Use of plasma arc welding process to combat hydrogen metallic disbonding of austenitic stainless steel claddings

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, O.A. ); Steklov, O.I.; Alexeev, A.V. )

    1993-11-01

    A separation type crack, metallic disbonding, occurred between austenitic stainless steel weld metal cladding and 2 1/4Cr-1Mo base metal in the hydrodesulfurizing reactor of an oil refining plant. For stainless steel cladding, the submerged arc welding (SAW) process with a strip electrode is usually applied, but the authors experimented with the plasma arc welding (PAW) process with hot wire electrode for the cladding. The metallic disbonding is considered to be attributed to hydrogen accumulation at the transition zone and has been generally studied on a laboratory scale using an autoclave. The authors used a electrolytic hydrogen charging technique for the sake of experimental simplicity and made a comparison with the results for gaseous hydrogen charging. The main conclusions obtained were follows: The PAW stainless steel weld metal cladding is more resistant to metallic disbonding with the PAW process is explained by the desirable microstructure and properties of the first layer of weld metal at the transition zone. Electrolytic hydrogen charging pretty well reproduces the results of autoclave gas phase charging.

  3. Cascaded-cladding-pumped cascaded Raman fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huawei; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Yan

    2015-06-01

    The conversion efficiency of double-clad Raman fiber laser is limited by the cladding-to-core area ratio. To get high conversion efficiency, the inner-cladding-to-core area ratio has to be less than about 8, which limits the brightness enhancement. To overcome the problem, a cascaded-cladding-pumped cascaded Raman fiber laser with multiple-clad fiber as the Raman gain medium is proposed. A theoretical model of Raman fiber amplifier with multiple-clad fiber is developed, and numerical simulation proves that the proposed scheme can improve the conversion efficiency and brightness enhancement of cladding pumped Raman fiber laser. PMID:26072764

  4. Crack spectra analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiernan, M.

    1980-09-01

    Crack spectra derived from velocity data have been shown to exhibit systematics which reflect microstructural and textural differences between samples (Warren and Tiernan, 1980). Further research into both properties and information content of crack spectra have yielded the following: Spectral features are reproducible even at low pressures; certain observed spectral features may correspond to non-in-situ crack populations created during sample retrieval; the functional form of a crack spectra may be diagnostic of the sample's grain texture; hysteresis is observed in crack spectra between up and down pressure runs - it may be due to friction between the faces of closed crack populations.

  5. Evaluation of tantalum-alloy-clad uranium mononitride fuel specimens from 7500-hour, 1040 C pumped-lithium-loop test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, G. K.

    1974-01-01

    Simulated nuclear fuel element specimens, consisting of uranium mononitride (UN) fuel cylinders clad with tungsten-lined T-111, were exposed for up to 7500 hr at 1040 C (1900 F) in a pumped-lithium loop. The lithium flow velocity was 1.5 m/sec (5 ft/sec) in the specimen test section. No evidence of any compatibility problems between the specimens and the flowing lithium was found based on appearance, weight change, chemistry, and metallography. Direct exposure of the UN to the lithium through a simulated cladding crack resulted in some erosion of the UN in the area of the defect. The T-111 cladding was ductile after lithium exposure, but it was sensitive to hydrogen embrittlement during post-test handling.

  6. Incipient flocculation molding: A new ceramic-forming technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrasmith, Steven Reade

    Incipient Flocculation Molding (IFM) was conceived as a new near-net-shape forming technique for ceramic components. It was hypothesized that the development of a temperature-dependent deflocculant would result in a forming technique that is flexible, efficient, and capable of producing a superior microstructure with improved mechanical properties from highly reactive, submicron ceramic powders. IFM utilizes a concentrated, nonaqueous, sterically stabilized ceramic powder and/or colloidal suspension which is injected into a non-porous mold. The suspension is then flocculated by destabilizing the suspension by lowering the temperature. Flocculation is both rapid and reversible. Cooling to -20°C produces a green body with sufficient strength for removal from the mold. The solvent is removed from the green body by evaporation. The dried green body is subsequently sintered to form a dense ceramic monolith. This is the first ceramic forming method based upon the manipulation of a sterically-stabilized suspension. To demonstrate IFM, the process of grafting polyethylene glycol (PEG), with molecular weights from 600 to 8000, to alumina powders was investigated. The maximum grafted amounts were achieved by the technique of dispersing the alumina powders in molten polymer at 195°C. The ungrafted PEG was then removed by repeated centrifuging and redispersion in fresh distilled water. The rheological behavior of suspensions of the PEG-grafted powders in water, 2-propanol and 2-butanol were characterized. All of the aqueous suspensions were shear thinning. The PEG 4600-grafted alumina powder aqueous suspensions were the most fluid. Sample rods and bars were molded from 52 vol% PEG-grafted alumina suspensions in 2-butanol. The best results were obtained with a preheated aluminum mold lubricated with a fluorinated oil mold-release. The samples were dried, sintered, and their microstructure and density were compared with sintered samples dry pressed from the same alumina powder

  7. Gear crack propagation investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Ballarini, Roberto

    1996-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to investigate the effect of gear rim thickness on crack propagation life. The FRANC (FRacture ANalysis Code) computer program was used to simulate crack propagation. The FRANC program used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, finite element modeling, and a unique re-meshing scheme to determine crack tip stress distributions, estimate stress intensity factors, and model crack propagation. Various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack propagation life based on the calculated stress intensity factors. Experimental tests were performed in a gear fatigue rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Test gears were installed with special crack propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending fatigue crack growth. Good correlation between predicted and measured crack growth was achieved when the fatigue crack closure concept was introduced into the analysis. As the gear rim thickness decreased, the compressive cyclic stress in the gear tooth fillet region increased. This retarded crack growth and increased the number of crack propagation cycles to failure.

  8. Double-clad nuclear fuel safety rod

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, William H.; Atcheson, Donald B.; Vaidyanathan, Swaminathan

    1984-01-01

    A device for shutting down a nuclear reactor during an undercooling or overpower event, whether or not the reactor's scram system operates properly. This is accomplished by double-clad fuel safety rods positioned at various locations throughout the reactor core, wherein melting of a secondary internal cladding of the rod allows the fuel column therein to shift from the reactor core to place the reactor in a subcritical condition.

  9. Profile of cocaine and crack users in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Duailibi, Lígia Bonacim; Ribeiro, Marcelo; Laranjeira, Ronaldo

    2008-01-01

    This article aims to systematize the profile of cocaine and crack users in Brazil. The study adopted a literature review of the MEDLINE, LILACS, Cochrane Library databases and CAPES thesis/dissertation database. Data were grouped in thematic categories: national household surveys, surveys of specific population groups, profile of patients that seek treatment, and mortality and morbidity. Within each category the principal findings from the Brazilian literature were described and then discussed. The article concludes that the information on cocaine and crack consumption in Brazil is still incipient, but that the scientific community can already draw on a relevant theoretical corpus that can be used to update current public policies on this issue. PMID:18797730

  10. Analysis of microstructure and properties of multilayer coatings produced by laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykovskiy, D. P.; Petrovskiy, V. N.; Dzhumaev, P. S.; Polskiy, V. I.; Yermachenko, V. M.

    2016-02-01

    Purpose of the work is to prepare multilayer coatings corresponding to specified requirements to recovery and improvement of surface details. Requirements to coatings: providing durable and reliable adhesion base and filler materials, absence of pores, cracks, delaminations, reducing mixing metal base and cladding. We used iron-based PR-10R6M5 and tungsten carbide Hoganas 44712 powders. Experimental determination of the optimal technological mode of application of the single track, the coefficient of overlapping tracks to create a full layer, the angle of the second cladding layer, relative to the first one and, finally, the determination of the optimal additive tungsten carbide to achieve increased durability were produced to fulfill these requirements.

  11. Chemical aspects of pellet-cladding interaction in light water reactor fuel elements

    SciTech Connect

    Olander, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    In contrast to the extensive literature on the mechanical aspects of pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) in light water reactor fuel elements, the chemical features of this phenomenon are so poorly understood that there is still disagreement concerning the chemical agent responsible. Since the earliest work by Rosenbaum, Davies and Pon, laboratory and in-reactor experiments designed to elucidate the mechanism of PCI fuel rod failures have concentrated almost exclusively on iodine. The assumption that this is the reponsible chemical agent is contained in models of PCI which have been constructed for incorporation into fuel performance codes. The evidence implicating iodine is circumstantial, being based primarily upon the volatility and significant fission yield of this element and on the microstructural similarity of the failed Zircaloy specimens exposed to iodine in laboratory stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests to cladding failures by PCI.

  12. Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... That People Abuse » Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Listen Cocaine is a white ... Version Download "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." Stacey is recovering from her ...

  13. Crack propagation in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budarapu, P. R.; Javvaji, B.; Sutrakar, V. K.; Roy Mahapatra, D.; Zi, G.; Rabczuk, T.

    2015-08-01

    The crack initiation and growth mechanisms in an 2D graphene lattice structure are studied based on molecular dynamics simulations. Crack growth in an initial edge crack model in the arm-chair and the zig-zag lattice configurations of graphene are considered. Influence of the time steps on the post yielding behaviour of graphene is studied. Based on the results, a time step of 0.1 fs is recommended for consistent and accurate simulation of crack propagation. Effect of temperature on the crack propagation in graphene is also studied, considering adiabatic and isothermal conditions. Total energy and stress fields are analyzed. A systematic study of the bond stretching and bond reorientation phenomena is performed, which shows that the crack propagates after significant bond elongation and rotation in graphene. Variation of the crack speed with the change in crack length is estimated.

  14. The wolf in sheep’s clothing: Microtomographic aspects of clinically incipient radiation-related caries

    PubMed Central

    Morais-Faria, Karina; Neves-Silva, Rodrigo; Lopes, Marcio-Ajudarte; Ribeiro, Ana-Carolina-Prado; de Castro Jr, Gilberto; da Conceição-Vasconcelos, Karina-Gondim-Moutinho; Brandão, Thais-Bianca; Santos-Silva, Alan-Roger

    2016-01-01

    Background Radiation-related caries (RRC) can cause rapid progression, with a high potential for dental destruction affecting mainly cervical and incisal areas. Unlike the injuries that occur in the conventional caries, incipient RRC present in unusual surfaces have difficult diagnosis and classification stages of cavitation. Material and Methods Evaluate the radiographic patterns of demineralization of RRC by using micro-CT. Ten teeth with incipient RRC and 10 teeth with incipient conventional caries (control group) matched by anatomic teeth group and caries affected surfaces were evaluated by X-ray microtomography (micro-CT) Skyscan 1174V2 (50Kv, 1.3 megapixel, Kontich, Belgium). Teeth were placed in a standard position for micro-CT (coronal, transaxial and sagittal sections) during images acquisition. Lesions were classified according to the depth of invasion and relationship with enamel, dentin and pulp. Results RRC samples presented deeper lesions with higher involvement of enamel and dentin. Control group presented focal and superficial lesions with lower involvement of enamel and dentin. Conclusions Incipient RRC present aggressive microtomographic patterns of demineralization when compared to conventional caries, as indicated by deep lesions, regardless of its clinically incipient aspects. Key words:Head and neck cancer, radiotherapy, microtomography, radiation caries. PMID:26946198

  15. Indenter size effect on the reversible incipient plasticity of Al (001) surface: Quasicontinuum study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Dan; Shao, Yu-Fei; Li, Jiu-Hui; Zhao, Xing; Qi, Yang

    2015-08-01

    Indenter size effect on the reversible incipient plasticity of Al (001) surface is studied by quasicontinuum simulations. Results show that the incipient plasticity under small indenter, the radius of which is less than ten nanometers, is dominated by a simple planar fault defect that can be fully removed after withdrawal of the indenter; otherwise, irreversible incipient plastic deformation driven by a complex dislocation activity is preferred, and the debris of deformation twins, dislocations, and stacking fault ribbons still remain beneath the surface when the indenter has been completely retracted. Based on stress distributions calculated at an atomic level, the reason why the dislocation burst instead of a simple fault ribbon is observed under a large indenter is the release of the intensely accumulated shear stress. Finally, the critical load analysis implies that there exists a reversible-irreversible transition of incipient plasticity induced by indenter size. Our findings provide a further insight into the incipient surface plasticity of face-centered-cubic metals in nano-sized contact issues. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51172040), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB606403), and the General Project of Scientific Research from Liaoning Educational Committee, China (Grant No. L2014135).

  16. Short crack growth behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Sadananda, K.; Vasudevan, A.K.

    1997-12-01

    The authors have re-evaluated short crack growth behavior using concepts developed recently, and they show that these concepts provide a unified framework that can explain both short and long crack growth behavior without resorting to the crack closure effect. They consider that the behavior of long cracks, including the effects of load ratio, R, is fundamental. they had shown previously that, since fatigue is at least a two-parameter problem in that at least two load parameters are required for an unambiguous description, there are two critical driving forces required simultaneously for fatigue cracks to grow. In extending this analysis to the growth of short cracks, they reject the current notion of the lack of similitude for short cracks and express the similitude as a fundamental postulate that, for a given crack growth mechanism, equal crack tip driving forces result in equal crack growth rates. Short crack growth behavior confirms the concept that two parameters are required to define fatigue; consequently, for fatigue cracks to grow, two thresholds need to be satisfied simultaneously. The authors present examples from the literature to illustrate the concepts discussed.

  17. Clad Degradation- Summary and Abstraction for LA

    SciTech Connect

    D. Stahl

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this model report is to develop the summary cladding degradation abstraction that will be used in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). Most civilian commercial nuclear fuel is encased in Zircaloy cladding. The model addressed in this report is intended to describe the postulated condition of commercial Zircaloy-clad fuel as a function of postclosure time after it is placed in the repository. Earlier total system performance assessments analyzed the waste form as exposed UO{sub 2}, which was available for degradation at the intrinsic dissolution rate. Water in the waste package quickly became saturated with many of the radionuclides, limiting their release rate. In the total system performance assessments for the Viability Assessment and the Site Recommendation, cladding was analyzed as part of the waste form, limiting the amount of fuel available at any time for degradation. The current model is divided into two stages. The first considers predisposal rod failures (most of which occur during reactor operation and associated activities) and postdisposal mechanical failure (from static loading of rocks) as mechanisms for perforating the cladding. Other fuel failure mechanisms including those caused by handling or transportation have been screened out (excluded) or are treated elsewhere. All stainless-steel-clad fuel, which makes up a small percentage of the overall amount of fuel to be stored, is modeled as failed upon placement in the waste packages. The second stage of the degradation model is the splitting of the cladding from the reaction of water or moist air and UO{sub 2}. The splitting has been observed to be rapid in comparison to the total system performance assessment time steps and is modeled to be instantaneous. After the cladding splits, the rind buildup inside the cladding widens the split, increasing the diffusion area from the fuel rind to the waste package interior. This model report summarizes

  18. Localization of incipient tip vortex cavitation using ray based matched field inversion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongho; Seong, Woojae; Choo, Youngmin; Lee, Jeunghoon

    2015-10-01

    Cavitation of marine propeller is one of the main contributing factors of broadband radiated ship noise. In this research, an algorithm for the source localization of incipient vortex cavitation is suggested. Incipient cavitation is modeled as monopole type source and matched-field inversion method is applied to find the source position by comparing the spatial correlation between measured and replicated pressure fields at the receiver array. The accuracy of source localization is improved by broadband matched-field inversion technique that enhances correlation by incoherently averaging correlations of individual frequencies. Suggested localization algorithm is verified through known virtual source and model test conducted in Samsung ship model basin cavitation tunnel. It is found that suggested localization algorithm enables efficient localization of incipient tip vortex cavitation using a few pressure data measured on the outer hull above the propeller and practically applicable to the typically performed model scale experiment in a cavitation tunnel at the early design stage.

  19. Fuel cladding behavior under rapid loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yueh, K.; Karlsson, J.; Stjärnsäter, J.; Schrire, D.; Ledergerber, G.; Munoz-Reja, C.; Hallstadius, L.

    2016-02-01

    A modified burst test (MBT) was used in an extensive test program to characterize fuel cladding failure behavior under rapid loading conditions. The MBT differs from a normal burst test with the use of a driver tube to simulate the expansion of a fuel pellet, thereby producing a partial strain driven deformation condition similar to that of a fuel pellet expansion in a reactivity insertion accident (RIA). A piston/cylinder assembly was used to pressurize the driver tube. By controlling the speed and distance the piston travels the loading rate and degree of sample deformation could be controlled. The use of a driver tube with a machined gauge section localizes deformation and allows for continuous monitoring of the test sample diameter change at the location of maximum hoop strain, during each test. Cladding samples from five irradiated fuel rods were tested between 296 and 553 K and loading rates from 1.5 to 3.5/s. The test rods included variations of Zircaloy-2 with different liners and ZIRLO, ranging in burn-up from 41 to 74 GWd/MTU. The test results show cladding ductility is strongly temperature and loading rate dependent. Zircaloy-2 cladding ductility degradation due to operational hydrogen pickup started to recover at approximately 358 K for test condition used in the study. This recovery temperature is strongly loading rate dependent. At 373 K, ductility recovery was small for loading rates less than 8 ms equivalent RIA pulse width, but longer than 8 ms the ductility recovery increased exponentially with increasing pulse width, consistent with literature observations of loading rate dependent brittle-to-ductile (BTD) transition temperature. The cladding ductility was also observed to be strongly loading rate/pulse width dependent for BWR cladding below the BTD temperature and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) cladding at both 296 and 553 K.

  20. The Corrosion and Corrosion Fatigue Behavior of Nickel Based Alloy Weld Overlay and Coextruded Claddings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockdale, Andrew

    The use of low NOx boilers in coal fired power plants has resulted in sulfidizing corrosive conditions within the boilers and a reduction in the service lifetime of the waterwall tubes. As a solution to this problem, Ni-based weld overlays are used to provide the necessary corrosion resistance however; they are susceptible to corrosion fatigue. There are several metallurgical factors which give rise to corrosion fatigue that are associated with the localized melting and solidification of the weld overlay process. Coextruded coatings offer the potential for improved corrosion fatigue resistance since coextrusion is a solid state coating process. The corrosion and corrosion fatigue behavior of alloy 622 weld overlays and coextruded claddings was investigated using a Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulator retrofitted with a retort. The experiments were conducted at a constant temperature of 600°C using a simulated combustion gas of N2-10%CO-5%CO2-0.12%H 2S. An alternating stress profile was used with a minimum tensile stress of 0 MPa and a maximum tensile stress of 300 MPa (ten minute fatigue cycles). The results have demonstrated that the Gleeble can be used to successfully simulate the known corrosion fatigue cracking mechanism of Ni-based weld overlays in service. Multilayer corrosion scales developed on each of the claddings that consisted of inner and outer corrosion layers. The scales formed by the outward diffusion of cations and the inward diffusion of sulfur and oxygen anions. The corrosion fatigue behavior was influenced by the surface finish and the crack interactions. The initiation of a large number of corrosion fatigue cracks was not necessarily detrimental to the corrosion fatigue resistance. Finally, the as-received coextruded cladding exhibited the best corrosion fatigue resistance.

  1. The electrical conductivity during incipient melting in the oceanic low velocity zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, Fabrice; Sifre, David; Gardes, Emmanuel; Massuyeau, Malcolm; Hashim, Leila; Hier Majumder, Saswata

    2014-05-01

    A low viscosity layer at the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary (LAB) is certainly a requirement for plate tectonics but the nature of the rocks presents in this boundary remains controversial. The seismic low velocities and the high electrical conductivities of the LAB are attributed either to sub-solidus water-related defects in olivine minerals or to a few volume percents of partial melt but these two interpretations have shortcomings: (1) The amount of H2O stored in olivine is not expected to be high enough due to several mineralogical processes that have been sometimes ignored; (2) elevated melt volume fractions are impeded by the too cold temperatures prevailing in the LAB and by the high melt mobility that can lead to gravitational segregation. All this has in fact been partly settled 30 years ago, when a petrological LAB has been defined as a region of the upper mantle impregnated by incipient melts; that is small amounts of melt caused by small amount of CO2 and H2O. We show here that incipient melting is a melting regime that is allowed in the entire P-T-fO2 region of the LVZ. The top of the oceanic LVZ (LAB) is then best explained by a melt freezing layer due to a decarbonation reaction, whereas the bottom of the LVZ matches the depth at which redox melting defines the lower boundary of stability of incipient melts. Based on new laboratory measurements, we show here that incipient melts must be the cause of the high electrical conductivities in the oceanic LVZ. Considering relevant mantle abundances of H2O and CO2 and their effect on the petrology of incipient melting, we calculated conductivity profiles across the LAB for various ages. Several electrical discontinuities are predicted and match geophysical observations in a consistent petrological and geochemical framework. We conclude that incipient melts prevail in the LAB, what else?

  2. Effect of tip radius on the incipient plasticity of chromium studied by nanoindentation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wu, Dong; Morris, James R.; Nieh, T. G.

    2014-10-01

    The onset of plasticity in Cr was investigated by nanoindentation using indenters with tip radii ranging from 60 to 759 nm. The stress for incipient plasticity was found to increase with decreasing tip radius. We find that the cumulative pop-in probability on load could be described successfully by a combined model over the full range of tip radius, indicating that the incipient plasticity might be triggered either by the homogeneous nucleation of dislocation or by the activation of existing dislocations underneath the indenter.

  3. Bonding Interface and Bending Deformation of Al/316LSS Clad Metal Prepared by Explosive Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xunzhong; Fan, Minyu; Wang, Liuan; Ma, Fuye

    2016-06-01

    The morphology, elemental distribution, and phase analysis of the bonding interface were investigated by means of SEM, EDS, and XRD to evaluate the interface bonding properties of Al/316LSS clad metal prepared by explosive welding method. Furthermore, the micro-hardness and bending properties were also investigated. The results indicated that the linear and wavy bonding interfaces coexisted and intermetallic phases were present in the local interfacial zone. Moreover, the micro-hardness value at the bonding interface with intermetallic phases was higher than that at the interface without any intermetallic phases. In addition, bulk metal compounds could easily lead to the generation of micro-cracks during the bending forming process.

  4. Bonding Interface and Bending Deformation of Al/316LSS Clad Metal Prepared by Explosive Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xunzhong; Fan, Minyu; Wang, Liuan; Ma, Fuye

    2016-04-01

    The morphology, elemental distribution, and phase analysis of the bonding interface were investigated by means of SEM, EDS, and XRD to evaluate the interface bonding properties of Al/316LSS clad metal prepared by explosive welding method. Furthermore, the micro-hardness and bending properties were also investigated. The results indicated that the linear and wavy bonding interfaces coexisted and intermetallic phases were present in the local interfacial zone. Moreover, the micro-hardness value at the bonding interface with intermetallic phases was higher than that at the interface without any intermetallic phases. In addition, bulk metal compounds could easily lead to the generation of micro-cracks during the bending forming process.

  5. Incipient and Progressive Damage in Polyethylene Under Extreme Tensile Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Furmanski, Jevan; Brown, Eric; Trujillo, Carl P.; Martinez, Daniel Tito; Gray, George T. III

    2012-06-07

    The Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) test was developed at LANL by Gray and coworkers to probe the tensile response of materials at large strains (>1) and high strain-rates (>1000/s) by firing projectiles through a conical die at 300-700 m/s. This technique has recently been applied to various polymers, such as the fluoropolymers PTFE (Teflon) and the chemically similar PCTFE, which respectively exhibited catastrophic fragmentation and distributed dynamic necking. This work details investigations of the Dyn-Ten-Ext response of high density polyethylene, both to failure and sub-critical conditions. At large extrusion ratios ({approx}7.4) and high velocities, such as those previously employed, HDPE catastrophically fragmented in a craze-like manner in the extruded jet. At more modest extrusion ratios and high velocities the specimen extruded a stable jet that ruptured cleanly, and at lower velocities was recovered intact after sustaining substantial internal damage. Thermomechanical finite element simulations showed that the damage corresponded to a locus of shear stress in the presence of hydrostatic tension. X-ray computed tomography corroborated the prediction of a shear damage mechanism by finding the region of partially damaged material to consist of macroscopic shear-mode cracks nearly aligned with the extrusion axis, originating from the location of damage inception.

  6. Grain boundary melting and hot cracking in weld HAZ of a two-phase Ni{sub 3}Al alloy containing Zr

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Chaki, T.K.

    1995-08-01

    Grain boundary melting and its effect on hot cracking in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) have been investigated in the investment cast billet of a two-phase ({gamma} + {gamma}{prime}) nickel aluminide alloy (Ni{sub 74.48}Al{sub 16.98}Cr{sub 8.02}Zr{sub 0.51}B{sub 0.10}), designated as IC-218. Due to enrichment of Zr, which can form eutectic alloys with Ni, the dendritic boundaries melted incipiently at 1,150 C. Under thermal stresses during welding the molten layers often opened up producing liquation cracks at the boundaries in the HAZ. Annealing at 1,100 C in argon for 23 h prior to welding reduced the incipient melting temperature to 1,125 C and increased the propensity of liquation cracking in the HAZ.

  7. Ductile-to-brittle transition temperature for high-burnup cladding alloys exposed to simulated drying-storage conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billone, M. C.; Burtseva, T. A.; Einziger, R. E.

    2013-02-01

    Structural analyses of dry casks containing high-burnup fuel require cladding mechanical properties and failure limits to assess fuel behavior. Pre-storage drying-transfer operations and early stage storage subject cladding to higher temperatures and much higher pressure-induced tensile hoop stresses relative to in-reactor operation and pool storage. Under these conditions, radial hydrides may precipitate during slow cooling and provide an additional embrittlement mechanism as the cladding temperature decreases below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). A test procedure was developed to simulate the effects of drying-storage temperature histories. Following drying-storage simulation, samples were subjected to ring-compression test (RCT) loading, which was used as a ductility screening test and to simulate pinch-type loading that may occur during cask transport. RCT samples with <2% offset strain prior to >50% wall cracking were assessed as brittle. Prior to testing high-burnup cladding, many tests were conducted with pre-hydrided Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) and ZIRLO™ to determine target 400 °C hoop stresses for high-burnup rodlets. Zry-4 cladding segments, from a 67-GWd/MTU fuel rod, with 520-620 wppm hydrogen and ZIRLO™ cladding segments from a 70-GWd/MTU fuel rod, with 350-650 wppm hydrogen were defueled and tested. Following drying-storage simulation, the extent of radial-hydride precipitation was characterized by the radial-hydride continuity factor. It was found that the DBTT was dependent on: cladding material, irradiation conditions, and drying-storage histories (stress at maximum temperature). High-burnup ZIRLO™ exhibited higher susceptible to radial-hydride formation and embrittlement than high-burnup Zry-4. It was also observed that uniformly pre-hydrided, non-irradiated cladding was not a good surrogate for high-burnup cladding because of the high density of circumferential hydrides across the wall and the high metal-matrix ductility for

  8. Investigation of Helicopter Longeron Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Baughman, James; Wallace, Terryl A.

    2009-01-01

    Four cracked longerons, containing a total of eight cracks, were provided for study. Cracked regions were cut from the longerons. Load was applied to open the cracks, enabling crack surface examination. Examination revealed that crack propagation was driven by fatigue loading in all eight cases. Fatigue crack initiation appears to have occurred on the top edge of the longerons near geometric changes that affect component bending stiffness. Additionally, metallurgical analysis has revealed a local depletion in alloying elements in the crack initiation regions that may be a contributing factor. Fatigue crack propagation appeared to be initially driven by opening-mode loading, but at a crack length of approximately 0.5 inches (12.7 mm), there is evidence of mixed-mode crack loading. For the longest cracks studied, shear-mode displacements destroyed crack-surface features of interest over significant portions of the crack surfaces.

  9. Roll Casting of Aluminum Alloy Clad Strip

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, R.; Tsuge, H.; Haga, T.; Watari, H.; Kumai, S.

    2011-01-17

    Casting of aluminum alloy three layers of clad strip was tried using the two sets of twin roll casters, and effects of the casting parameters on the cladding conditions were investigated. One twin roll caster was mounted on the other twin roll caster. Base strip was 8079 aluminum alloy and overlay strips were 6022 aluminum alloy. Effects of roll-load of upper and lower casters and melt temperature of the lower caster were investigated. When the roll-load of the upper and lower caster was large enough, the overlay strip could be solidified and be connected. The overlay strip could be connected when the melt of the overlay strip cast by the lower caster was low enough. Sound three layers of clad strip could be cast by proper conditions.

  10. Potential effects of gallium on cladding materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Besmann, T.M.; DeVan, J.H.; DiStefano, J.R.; Gat, U.; Greene, S.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Worley, B.A.

    1997-10-01

    This paper identifies and examines issues concerning the incorporation of gallium in weapons derived plutonium in light water reactor (LWR) MOX fuels. Particular attention is given to the more likely effects of the gallium on the behavior of the cladding material. The chemistry of weapons grade (WG) MOX, including possible consequences of gallium within plutonium agglomerates, was assessed. Based on the calculated oxidation potentials of MOX fuel, the effect that gallium may have on reactions involving fission products and possible impact on cladding performance were postulated. Gallium transport mechanisms are discussed. With an understanding of oxidation potentials and assumptions of mechanisms for gallium transport, possible effects of gallium on corrosion of cladding were evaluated. Potential and unresolved issues and suggested research and development (R and D) required to provide missing information are presented.

  11. Capturing reflected cladding modes from a fiber Bragg grating with a double-clad fiber coupler.

    PubMed

    Baiad, Mohamad Diaa; Gagné, Mathieu; Lemire-Renaud, Simon; De Montigny, Etienne; Madore, Wendy-Julie; Godbout, Nicolas; Boudoux, Caroline; Kashyap, Raman

    2013-03-25

    We present a novel measurement scheme using a double-clad fiber coupler (DCFC) and a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) to resolve cladding modes. Direct measurement of the optical spectra and power in the cladding modes is obtained through the use of a specially designed DCFC spliced to a highly reflective FBG written into slightly etched standard photosensitive single mode fiber to match the inner cladding diameter of the DCFC. The DCFC is made by tapering and fusing two double-clad fibers (DCF) together. The device is capable of capturing backward propagating low and high order cladding modes simply and efficiently. Also, we demonstrate the capability of such a device to measure the surrounding refractive index (SRI) with an extremely high sensitivity of 69.769 ± 0.035 μW/RIU and a resolution of 1.433 × 10(-5) ± 8 × 10(-9) RIU between 1.37 and 1.45 RIU. The device provides a large SRI operating range from 1.30 to 1.45 RIU with sufficient discrimination for all individual captured cladding modes. The proposed scheme can be adapted to many different types of bend, temperature, refractive index and other evanescent wave based sensors. PMID:23546069

  12. Acoustic Emission Detection and Prediction of Fatigue Crack Propagation in Composite Patch Repairs Using Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Okafor, A. Chukwujekwu; Singh, Navdeep; Singh, Navrag

    2007-03-21

    An aircraft is subjected to severe structural and aerodynamic loads during its service life. These loads can cause damage or weakening of the structure especially for aging military and civilian aircraft, thereby affecting its load carrying capabilities. Hence composite patch repairs are increasingly used to repair damaged aircraft metallic structures to restore its structural efficiency. This paper presents the results of Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring of crack propagation in 2024-T3 Clad aluminum panels repaired with adhesively bonded octagonal, single sided boron/epoxy composite patch under tension-tension fatigue loading. Crack propagation gages were used to monitor crack initiation. The identified AE sensor features were used to train neural networks for predicting crack length. The results show that AE events are correlated with crack propagation. AE system was able to detect crack propagation even at high noise condition of 10 Hz loading; that crack propagation signals can be differentiated from matrix cracking signals that take place due to fiber breakage in the composite patch. Three back-propagation cascade feed forward networks were trained to predict crack length based on the number of fatigue cycles, AE event number, and both the Fatigue Cycles and AE events, as inputs respectively. Network using both fatigue cycles and AE event number as inputs to predict crack length gave the best results, followed by Network with fatigue cycles as input, while network with just AE events as input had a greater error.

  13. Transformer Incipient Fault Prediction Using Combined Artificial Neural Network and Various Particle Swarm Optimisation Techniques.

    PubMed

    Illias, Hazlee Azil; Chai, Xin Rui; Abu Bakar, Ab Halim; Mokhlis, Hazlie

    2015-01-01

    It is important to predict the incipient fault in transformer oil accurately so that the maintenance of transformer oil can be performed correctly, reducing the cost of maintenance and minimise the error. Dissolved gas analysis (DGA) has been widely used to predict the incipient fault in power transformers. However, sometimes the existing DGA methods yield inaccurate prediction of the incipient fault in transformer oil because each method is only suitable for certain conditions. Many previous works have reported on the use of intelligence methods to predict the transformer faults. However, it is believed that the accuracy of the previously proposed methods can still be improved. Since artificial neural network (ANN) and particle swarm optimisation (PSO) techniques have never been used in the previously reported work, this work proposes a combination of ANN and various PSO techniques to predict the transformer incipient fault. The advantages of PSO are simplicity and easy implementation. The effectiveness of various PSO techniques in combination with ANN is validated by comparison with the results from the actual fault diagnosis, an existing diagnosis method and ANN alone. Comparison of the results from the proposed methods with the previously reported work was also performed to show the improvement of the proposed methods. It was found that the proposed ANN-Evolutionary PSO method yields the highest percentage of correct identification for transformer fault type than the existing diagnosis method and previously reported works. PMID:26103634

  14. Transformer Incipient Fault Prediction Using Combined Artificial Neural Network and Various Particle Swarm Optimisation Techniques

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    It is important to predict the incipient fault in transformer oil accurately so that the maintenance of transformer oil can be performed correctly, reducing the cost of maintenance and minimise the error. Dissolved gas analysis (DGA) has been widely used to predict the incipient fault in power transformers. However, sometimes the existing DGA methods yield inaccurate prediction of the incipient fault in transformer oil because each method is only suitable for certain conditions. Many previous works have reported on the use of intelligence methods to predict the transformer faults. However, it is believed that the accuracy of the previously proposed methods can still be improved. Since artificial neural network (ANN) and particle swarm optimisation (PSO) techniques have never been used in the previously reported work, this work proposes a combination of ANN and various PSO techniques to predict the transformer incipient fault. The advantages of PSO are simplicity and easy implementation. The effectiveness of various PSO techniques in combination with ANN is validated by comparison with the results from the actual fault diagnosis, an existing diagnosis method and ANN alone. Comparison of the results from the proposed methods with the previously reported work was also performed to show the improvement of the proposed methods. It was found that the proposed ANN-Evolutionary PSO method yields the highest percentage of correct identification for transformer fault type than the existing diagnosis method and previously reported works. PMID:26103634

  15. A Feature Extraction Method for Vibration Signal of Bearing Incipient Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haifeng; Ouyang, Huajiang; Gao, Hongli; Guo, Liang; Li, Dan; Wen, Juan

    2016-06-01

    Detection of incipient degradation demands extracting sensitive features accurately when signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is very poor, which appears in most industrial environments. Vibration signals of rolling bearings are widely used for bearing fault diagnosis. In this paper, we propose a feature extraction method that combines Blind Source Separation (BSS) and Spectral Kurtosis (SK) to separate independent noise sources. Normal, and incipient fault signals from vibration tests of rolling bearings are processed. We studied 16 groups of vibration signals (which all display an increase in kurtosis) of incipient degradation after they are processed by a BSS filter. Compared with conventional kurtosis, theoretical studies of SK trends show that the SK levels vary with frequencies and some experimental studies show that SK trends of measured vibration signals of bearings vary with the amount and level of impulses in both vibration and noise signals due to bearing faults. It is found that the peak values of SK increase when vibration signals of incipient faults are processed by a BSS filter. This pre-processing by a BSS filter makes SK more sensitive to impulses caused by performance degradation of bearings.

  16. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to extend the work performed in the base program (CR 182247) into the regime of time-dependent crack growth under isothermal and thermal mechanical fatigue (TMF) loading, where creep deformation also influences the crack growth behavior. The investigation was performed in a two-year, six-task, combined experimental and analytical program. The path-independent integrals for application to time-dependent crack growth were critically reviewed. The crack growth was simulated using a finite element method. The path-independent integrals were computed from the results of finite-element analyses. The ability of these integrals to correlate experimental crack growth data were evaluated under various loading and temperature conditions. The results indicate that some of these integrals are viable parameters for crack growth prediction at elevated temperatures.

  17. CRACK MODELLING FOR RADIOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    Chady, T.; Napierala, L.

    2010-02-22

    In this paper, possibility of creation of three-dimensional crack models, both random type and based on real-life radiographic images is discussed. Method for storing cracks in a number of two-dimensional matrices, as well algorithm for their reconstruction into three-dimensional objects is presented. Also the possibility of using iterative algorithm for matching simulated images of cracks to real-life radiographic images is discussed.

  18. Thermal cracking of butadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Duisters, H.A.M. )

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents experimental data on the thermal cracking of butadiene in a pilot plant, under conditions representative of industrial operation. The product distribution of pure-butadiene cracking is shown. Results from cocracking experiments in naphtha and C[sub 4]-raffinate are also presented. It is shown that butadiene cracking can be an interesting outlet for the increasing butadiene overcapacity in steam crackers. Some aspects of coke formation during butadiene pyrolysis are addressed as well.

  19. Crack Modelling for Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chady, T.; Napierała, L.

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, possibility of creation of three-dimensional crack models, both random type and based on real-life radiographic images is discussed. Method for storing cracks in a number of two-dimensional matrices, as well algorithm for their reconstruction into three-dimensional objects is presented. Also the possibility of using iterative algorithm for matching simulated images of cracks to real-life radiographic images is discussed.

  20. Cracking of a layered medium on an elastic foundation under thermal shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, Abd El-Fattah A.; Erdogan, Fazil

    1988-01-01

    The cladded pressure vessel under thermal shock conditions which is simulated by using two simpler models was studied. The first model (Model 1) assumes that, if the crack size is very small compared to the vessel thickness, the problem can be treated as a semi-infinite elastic medium bonded to a very thin layer of different material. However, if the crack size is of the same order as the vessel thickness, the curvature effects may not be negligible. In this case it is assumed that the relatively thin walled hollow cylinder with cladding can be treated as a composite beam on an elastic foundation (Model 2). In both models, the effect of surface cooling rate is studied by assuming the temperature boundary condition to be a ramp function. The calculated results include the transient temperature, thermal stresses in the uncracked medium and stress intensity factors which are presented as a function of time, and the duration of cooling ramp. The stress intensity factors are also presented as a function of the size and the location of the crack. The problem is solved for two bonded materials of different thermal and mechanical properties. The mathematical formulation results in two singular integral equations which are solved numerically. The results are given for two material pairs, namely an austenitic steel layer welded on a ferritic steel substrate, and a ceramic coating on ferritic steel. In the case of the yielded clad, the stress intensity factors for a crack under the clad are determined by using a plastic strip model and are compared with elastic clad results.

  1. Automatic crack propagation tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, M. S.; Weidner, T. J.; Yehia, N. A. B.; Burd, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    A finite element based approach to fully automatic crack propagation tracking is presented. The procedure presented combines fully automatic mesh generation with linear fracture mechanics techniques in a geometrically based finite element code capable of automatically tracking cracks in two-dimensional domains. The automatic mesh generator employs the modified-quadtree technique. Crack propagation increment and direction are predicted using a modified maximum dilatational strain energy density criterion employing the numerical results obtained by meshes of quadratic displacement and singular crack tip finite elements. Example problems are included to demonstrate the procedure.

  2. Mechanical and substructural response of incipiently spalled 316L stainless steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, G. T. , III; Bourne, N. K.

    2004-01-01

    316L SS samples were shock prestrained to a peak stress of 6.6 GPa using a 0.75 {mu}sec pulse duration square-topped shock profile and 'soft' recovered while a second sample was similarly shock loaded, without spall momentum trapping, leading to incipient spall damage. Shock prestraining and 'soft' shock recovery to 6.6 GPa led to an increase in the post-shock flow strength of 316L SS by {approx}100 MPa over the starting material while the reload yield strength of the incipiently spall damaged sample increased by {approx}200 MPa. In this paper the sequential processes of defect generation and damage operative during the shock prestraining, spallation, and reloading of incipiently spalled 316L SS is presented. The influence of shock prestraining, using both triangular-wave loading, via both direct HE and triangular-wave pulses on a gas launcher, as well as 'square-topped' shock prestaining via conventional flyer-plate impact, is crucial to understanding the shock hardening and spallation responses of materials(Gray III, et al. [2003]). The development of predictive constitutive models to describe the mechanical response of incipiently damaged metals and alloys requires an understanding of the defect generation and storage due to shock hardening as well as the additional plasticity and damage evolution during spallation. In this paper the influence of shock-wave prestraining on the process of shock hardening and thereafterthe hardeningand damage evolution accompanying incipient spallation in 316L stainless steel (316L SS) on post-shock constitutive behavior is examined using 'soft' recovery techniques and mechanical behavior measurements.

  3. Laser cladding of nickel-based alloy coatings on copper substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balu, Prabu; Rea, Edward; Deng, Justin

    2015-07-01

    The wear resistance of high-value copper components used in the metal casting, automotive, aerospace and electrical equipment industries can be improved by applying nickel (Ni)-based coatings through laser cladding. A high-power diode laser array providing continuous power levels up to 10 kilowatts with beam-shaping optics providing a rectangular focal region of various dimensions was used to deposit Ni-based alloy coatings with controlled thickness ranging from 0.3 mm to 1.6 mm in a single pass on copper (Cu) substrates. Slotted powder feeding plates with various discrete widths delivered uniform streams of powdered metal particles entrained in a carrier gas, matching the selected focal spot dimensions. To enhance laser beam coupling with the substrate and to avoid defects such as cracks, delamination and porosity, Cu substrates were preheated to a temperature of 300°C. The effect of heat input on microstructure of the cladding and extent of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) was evaluated using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Excessive heat input with longer interaction time increased dilution, porosity and expanded HAZ that significantly reduced the hardness of both the clad and the Cu substrates. Average microhardness of the Ni-C-B-Si-W alloy coating was 572 HV, which was almost 7 times greater than the hardness of the Cu substrate (84 HV).

  4. Cladding For Transversely-Pumped Laser Rod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.; Fan, Tso Yee

    1989-01-01

    Combination of suitable dimensioning and cladding of neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet of similar solid-state laser provides for more efficient utilization of transversely-incident pump light from diode lasers. New design overcomes some of limitations of longitudinal- and older transverse-pumping concepts and promotes operation at higher output powers in TEM00 mode.

  5. Advanced ceramic cladding for water reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Feinroth, H.

    2000-07-01

    Under the US Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiatives (NERI) program, continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs) are being developed as cladding for water reactor fuel elements. The purpose is to substantially increase the passive safety of water reactors. A development effort was initiated in 1991 to fabricate CFCC-clad tubes using commercially available fibers and a sol-gel process developed by McDermott Technologies. Two small-diameter CFCC tubes were fabricated using pure alumina and alumina-zirconia fibers in an alumina matrix. Densities of {approximately}60% of theoretical were achieved. Higher densities are required to guarantee fission gas containment. This NERI work has just begun, and only preliminary results are presented herein. Should the work prove successful, further development is required to evaluate CFCC cladding and performance, including in-pile tests containing fuel and exploring a marriage of CFCC cladding materials with suitable advanced fuel and core designs. The possibility of much higher temperature core designs, possibly cooled with supercritical water, and achievement of plant efficiencies {ge}50% would be examined.

  6. Pellet cladding mechanical interactions of ceramic claddings fuels under light water reactor conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo-Shiuan

    Ceramic materials such as silicon carbide (SiC) are promising candidate materials for nuclear fuel cladding and are of interest as part of a potential accident tolerant fuel design due to its high temperature strength, dimensional stability under irradiation, corrosion resistance, and lower neutron absorption cross-section. It also offers drastically lower hydrogen generation in loss of coolant accidents such as that experienced at Fukushima. With the implementation of SiC material properties to the fuel performance code, FRAPCON, performances of the SiC-clad fuel are compared with the conventional Zircaloy-clad fuel. Due to negligible creep and high stiffness, SiC-clad fuel allows gap closure at higher burnup and insignificant cladding dimensional change. However, severe degradation of SiC thermal conductivity with neutron irradiation will lead to higher fuel temperature with larger fission gas release. High stiffness of SiC has a drawback of accumulating large interfacial pressure upon pellet-cladding mechanical interactions (PCMI). This large stress will eventually reach the flexural strength of SiC, causing failure of SiC cladding instantly in a brittle manner instead of the graceful failure of ductile metallic cladding. The large interfacial pressure causes phenomena that were previously of only marginal significance and thus ignored (such as creep of the fuel) to now have an important role in PCMI. Consideration of the fuel pellet creep and elastic deformation in PCMI models in FRAPCON provide for an improved understanding of the magnitude of accumulated interfacial pressure. Outward swelling of the pellet is retarded by the inward irradiation-induced creep, which then reduces the rate of interfacial pressure buildup. Effect of PCMI can also be reduced and by increasing gap width and cladding thickness. However, increasing gap width and cladding thickness also increases the overall thermal resistance which leads to higher fuel temperature and larger fission

  7. Microstructure characteristics of Ni/WC composite cladding coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Gui-rong; Huang, Chao-peng; Song, Wen-ming; Li, Jian; Lu, Jin-jun; Ma, Ying; Hao, Yuan

    2016-02-01

    A multilayer tungsten carbide particle (WCp)-reinforced Ni-based alloy coating was fabricated on a steel substrate using vacuum cladding technology. The morphology, microstructure, and formation mechanism of the coating were studied and discussed in different zones. The microstructure morphology and phase composition were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. In the results, the coating presents a dense and homogeneous microstructure with few pores and is free from cracks. The whole coating shows a multilayer structure, including composite, transition, fusion, and diffusion-affected layers. Metallurgical bonding was achieved between the coating and substrate because of the formation of the fusion and diffusion-affected layers. The Ni-based alloy is mainly composed of γ-Ni solid solution with finely dispersed Cr7C3/Cr23C6, CrB, and Ni+Ni3Si. WC particles in the composite layer distribute evenly in areas among initial Ni-based alloying particles, forming a special three-dimensional reticular microstructure. The macrohardness of the coating is HRC 55, which is remarkably improved compared to that of the substrate. The microhardness increases gradually from the substrate to the composite zone, whereas the microhardness remains almost unchanged in the transition and composite zones.

  8. Fracture of Hydrided Zircaloy-4 Sheet under Through-Thickness Crack Growth Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Raynaud, P.A.; Koss, D.A.; Motta, A.T.; Chan, K.S.

    2007-07-01

    The failure of thin-wall components such as fuel cladding may be caused by crack initiation on the component surface and subsequent crack growth through its thickness. This study has determined the fracture toughness of hydrided cold-worked stress relieved Zircaloy-4 sheet subject to through-thickness crack growth at 25 deg. C. The experimental approach utilizes a novel procedure in which a narrow linear strip of brittle hydride blister across the specimen width creates a well-defined pre-crack upon initial loading. The subsequent crack growth resistance is then characterized by four-point bending of the specimen and an elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis. At room temperature, the through-thickness fracture toughness (K{sub Q}) is sensitive to the orientation of the hydride platelets, and K{sub Q} {approx_equal} 25 MPavm for crack growth through a mixed in-plane/out-of-plane hydride field. In contrast, K{sub Q} is much higher ({approx_equal} 75 MPavm) when the hydride platelets are oriented predominantly in the plane of the sheet (and therefore normal to both the crack plane and the crack growth direction). The implication of these fracture toughness values to the fracture strain behavior of hydrided Zircaloy-4 under through-thickness crack growth conditions is illustrated. (authors)

  9. Crack layer theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1987-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  10. Crack layer theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1984-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  11. Study of formation mechanism of incipient melting in thixo-cast Al–Si–Cu–Mg alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Kang Zhu, Qiang Li, Daquan Zhang, Fan

    2015-08-15

    Mechanical properties of thixo-cast Al–Si–Cu–Mg alloys can be enhanced by T61 heat treatment. Copper and magnesium atoms in aluminum matrix can form homogeneously distributed precipitations after solution and aging treatment which harden the alloys. However, microsegregation of these alloying elements could form numerous tiny multi-compound phases during solidification. These phases could cause incipient melting defects in subsequent heat treatment process and degrade the macro-mechanical properties of productions. This study is to present heterogeneous distribution of Cu, Si, and Mg elements and formation of incipient melting defects (pores). In this study, incipient melting pores that occurred during solution treatment at various temperatures, even lower than common melting points of various intermetallic phases, were identified, in terms of a method of investigating the same surface area in the samples before and after solution treatment in a vacuum environment. The results also show that the incipient melting mostly originates at the clusters with fine intermetallic particles while also some at the edge of block-like Al{sub 2}Cu. The fine particles were determined being Al{sub 2}Cu, Al{sub 5}Cu{sub 2}Mg{sub 8}Si{sub 6} and Al{sub 8}Mg{sub 3}FeSi{sub 2}. Tendency of the incipient melting decreases with decreases of the width of the clusters. The formation mechanism of incipient melting pores in solution treatment process was discussed using both the Fick law and the LSW theory. Finally, a criterion of solution treatment to avoid incipient melting pores for the thixo-cast alloys is proposed. - Highlights: • In-situ comparison technique was used to analysis the change of eutectic phases. • The ralationship between eutectic phase size and incipient melting was studied. • Teat treatment criterion for higher incipient melting resistance was proposed.

  12. Small-crack test methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, James M.; Allison, John E.

    This book contains chapters on fracture mechanics parameters for small fatigue cracks, monitoring small-crack growth by the replication method, measurement of small cracks by photomicroscopy (experiments and analysis), and experimental mechanics of microcracks. Other topics discussed are the real-time measurement of small-crack-opening behavior using an interferometric strain/displacement gage; direct current electrical potential measurement of the growth of small cracks; an ultrasonic method for the measurement of the size and opening behavior of small fatigue cracks; and the simulation of short crack and other low closure loading conditions, utilizing constant K(max) Delta-K-decreasing fatigue crack growth procedures.

  13. Effect of crack surface geometry on fatigue crack closure

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, W.J.; Gokhale, A.M.; Antolovich, S.D.

    1995-10-01

    The geometry of crack faces often plays a critical role in reducing crack extension forces when crack closure occurs during fatigue crack growth. Most previous studies of fatigue crack closure are concerned with mechanical measure of closure as related to the crack growth rate; very little attention has been given to the geometry of the crack surfaces. The objective is to identify those aspects of crack surface geometry that are important in the closure process, to develop quantitative fractographic techniques to estimate such attributes in a statistically significant and robust manner, and to correlate them to the physical process of crack closure. For this purpose, fatigue crack propagation experiments were performed on a Ni-base superalloy and crack growth rates and crack closure loads were measured. Digital image profilometry and software-based analysis techniques were used for statistically reliable and detailed quantitative characterization of fatigue crack profiles. It is shown that the dimensionless, scale-independent attributes, such a height-to-width ratio of asperities, fractal dimensions, dimensionless roughness parameters, etc., do not represent the aspects of crack geometry that are of primary importance in the crack closure phenomena. Furthermore, it is shown that the scale-dependent characteristics, such as average asperity height, do represent the aspects of crack geometry that play an interactive role in the closure process. These observations have implications concerning the validity of geometry-dependent, closure-based models for fatigue crack growth.

  14. Effect of crack surface geometry on fatigue crack closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drury, W. J.; Gokhale, Arun M.; Antolovich, S. D.

    1995-10-01

    The geometry of crack faces often plays a critical role in reducing crack extension forces when crack closure occurs during fatigue crack growth. Most previous studies of fatigue crack closure are concerned with mechanical measures of closure as related to the crack growth rate; very little attention has been given to the geometry of the crack surfaces. Our objective is to identify those aspects of crack surface geometry that are important in the closure process, to develop quantitative fractographic techniques to estimate such attributes in a statistically significant and robust manner, and to correlate them to the physical process of crack closure. For this purpose, fatigue crack propagation experiments were performed on a Ni-base superalloy and crack growth rates and crack closure loads were measured. Digital image profilometry and software-based analysis techniques were used for statistically reliable and detailed quantitative characterization of fatigue crack profiles. It is shown that the dimensionless, scale-independent attributes, such as height-to-width ratio of asperities, fractal dimensions, dimensionless roughness parameters, etc., do not represent the aspects of crack geometry that are of primary importance in the crack closure phenomena. Furthermore, it is shown that the scaledependent characteristics, such as average asperity height, do represent the aspects of crack geometry that play an interactive role in the closure process. These observations have implications concerning the validity of geometry-dependent, closure-based models for fatigue crack growth.

  15. Deformation-corrosion interactions for Zr alloys during I-SCC crack initiation. Part I: Chemical contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Patrick; Lefebvre, Florence; Lemaignan, Clément

    1999-01-01

    For a better understanding of the initiation step of iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking in Zr alloys, responsible for pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) fuel rod failures, an analytical study has been undertaken, the aim of which being focused on the respective roles of local chemistry and stress/strain state on the crack nucleation. This first part is mostly related to the chemical environment. From the tensile tests performed under iodine rich and inert environments, it was concluded that no crack initiation could be detected following the tests in an inert atmosphere. The iodine induced stress corrosion initiation mechanism must therefore be analysed as a corrosion-strain interaction.

  16. Early diagnosis of incipient caries based on non-invasive lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velescu, A.; Todea, C.; Vitez, B.

    2016-03-01

    AIM: The aim of this study is to detect incipient caries and enamel demineralization using laser fluorescence.This serves only as an auxilary aid to identify and to monitor the development of these lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 6 patients were involved in this study, three females and three male. Each patient underwent a professional cleaning, visual examination of the oral cavity, and then direct inspection using DiagnoCam and DIAGNOdent. After data recording each patient was submitted to retro-alveolar X-ray on teeth that were detected with enamel lesions. All data was collected and analyzed statistically. RESULTS: Of 36 areas considered in clinically healthy, 24 carious surfaces were found using laser fluorescence, a totally non-invasive method for detecting incipient carious lesions compared with the radiographic examination. CONCLUSIONS: This method has good applicability for patients because it improves treatment plan by early detection of caries and involves less fear for anxious patients and children.

  17. Numerical Analysis of Incipient Separation on 53 Deg Swept Diamond Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.

    2015-01-01

    A systematic analysis of incipient separation and subsequent vortex formation from moderately swept blunt leading edges is presented for a 53 deg swept diamond wing. This work contributes to a collective body of knowledge generated within the NATO/STO AVT-183 Task Group titled 'Reliable Prediction of Separated Flow Onset and Progression for Air and Sea Vehicles'. The objective is to extract insights from the experimentally measured and numerically computed flow fields that might enable turbulence experts to further improve their models for predicting swept blunt leading-edge flow separation. Details of vortex formation are inferred from numerical solutions after establishing a good correlation of the global flow field and surface pressure distributions between wind tunnel measurements and computed flow solutions. From this, significant and sometimes surprising insights into the nature of incipient separation and part-span vortex formation are derived from the wealth of information available in the computational solutions.

  18. Method and system for early detection of incipient faults in electric motors

    DOEpatents

    Parlos, Alexander G; Kim, Kyusung

    2003-07-08

    A method and system for early detection of incipient faults in an electric motor are disclosed. First, current and voltage values for one or more phases of the electric motor are measured during motor operations. A set of current predictions is then determined via a neural network-based current predictor based on the measured voltage values and an estimate of motor speed values of the electric motor. Next, a set of residuals is generated by combining the set of current predictions with the measured current values. A set of fault indicators is subsequently computed from the set of residuals and the measured current values. Finally, a determination is made as to whether or not there is an incipient electrical, mechanical, and/or electromechanical fault occurring based on the comparison result of the set of fault indicators and a set of predetermined baseline values.

  19. Catalytic cracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Gladrow, E.M.; Winter, W.E.

    1980-04-29

    The octane number of a cracked naphtha can be significantly improved in a catalytic cracking unit, without significant decrease in naphtha yield, by maintaining certain critical concentrations of metals on the catalyst, suitably by blending or adding a heavy metals-containing component to the gas oil feed. Suitably, in a catalytic cracking process unit wherein a gas oil feed is cracked in a cracking reactor (Zone) at an elevated temperature in the presence of a cracking catalyst, the cracking catalyst is regenerated in a regenerator (Regeneration zone) by burning coke off the catalyst, and catalyst is circulated between the reactor and regenerator, sufficient of a metals-containing heavy feedstock is admixed, intermittantly or continuously, with the gas oil feed to deposit metals on said catalyst and raise the metals-content of said catalyst to a level of from about 1500 to about 6000 parts per million, preferably from about 2500 to about 4000 parts per million expressed as equivalent nickel, base the weight of the catalyst, and said metals level is maintained on the catalyst throughout the operation by withdrawing high metals-containing catalyst and adding low metals-containing catalyst to the regenerator.

  20. Modelling of hydride cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, X.J.; Metzger, D.R.; Glinka, G.; Dubey, R.N.

    1996-12-01

    Zirconium alloys may be susceptible to hydride formation under certain service conditions, due to hydrogen diffusion and precipitation in the presence of stress concentrations and temperature gradients. The inhomogeneous brittle hydride platelets that form are modeled as plane defects of zero thickness, with fracture toughness less than that of the matrix. A fracture criterion based on sufficient energy and stress is proposed for either delayed hydride cracking (DHC) under constant loading conditions, or hydride cracking at rising loads, such as in a fracture toughness test. The fracture criterion is validated against available experimental data concerning initiation of hydride fracture in smooth specimens, and DHC in cracked specimens under various loading and temperature conditions.

  1. The Midas cichlid species complex: incipient sympatric speciation in Nicaraguan cichlid fishes?

    PubMed

    Barluenga, Marta; Meyer, Axel

    2004-07-01

    Abstract Sympatric speciation is a contentious concept, although theoretical models as well as empirical evidence support its relevance in evolutionary biology. The Midas cichlid species complex (Amphilophus citrinellus, labiatus, zaliosus) from several crater lakes in Nicaragua fits several of the key characteristics of a sympatric speciation model. In particular, in A. citrinellus (i) strong assortative mating on the basis of colour polymorphism and (ii) ecological differentiation based on morphological polymorphisms involving the feeding apparatus and body shape might both be mechanisms of incipient speciation. Seven microsatellite markers and mtDNA control region sequences [836 base pairs (bp)] were used to study the population genetic structure of 519 specimens of Midas cichlid populations from the two Great Lakes Managua and Nicaragua, and three crater lakes in Nicaragua, Central America. The three named species of the species complex occupy different ecological niches, are morphologically distinct and can be distinguished genetically. We uncovered allopatric genetic differentiation of populations of A. citrinellus from different lakes and distant locations within Lake Managua and, more interestingly, incipient genetic differentiation of several sympatric populations based on colouration (in A. citrinellus and A. labiatus) but not on the morphology of the pharyngeal jaws (in A. citrinellus). Sexual selection and assortative mating might be the driven forces of diversification within named species. The Midas cichlid species complex in Nicaragua is an excellent model system for the study of the incipient stages of adaptation, speciation and the formation of species flocks. PMID:15189226

  2. Incipient multiple fault diagnosis in real time with applications to large-scale systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.Y.; Bien, Z.; Park, J.H.; Seon, P.H. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1994-08-01

    By using a modified signed directed graph (SDG) together with the distributed artificial neutral networks and a knowledge-based system, a method of incipient multi-fault diagnosis is presented for large-scale physical systems with complex pipes and instrumentations such as valves, actuators, sensors, and controllers. The proposed method is designed so as to (1) make a real-time incipient fault diagnosis possible for large-scale systems, (2) perform the fault diagnosis not only in the steady-state case but also in the transient case as well by using a concept of fault propagation time, which is newly adopted in the SDG model, (3) provide with highly reliable diagnosis results and explanation capability of faults diagnosed as in an expert system, and (4) diagnose the pipe damage such as leaking, break, or throttling. This method is applied for diagnosis of a pressurizer in the Kori Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) unit 2 in Korea under a transient condition, and its result is reported to show satisfactory performance of the method for the incipient multi-fault diagnosis of such a large-scale system in a real-time manner.

  3. Diagnostic methodology for incipient system disturbance based on a neural wavelet approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, In-Ho

    Since incipient system disturbances are easily mixed up with other events or noise sources, the signal from the system disturbance can be neglected or identified as noise. Thus, as available knowledge and information is obtained incompletely or inexactly from the measurements; an exploration into the use of artificial intelligence (AI) tools to overcome these uncertainties and limitations was done. A methodology integrating the feature extraction efficiency of the wavelet transform with the classification capabilities of neural networks is developed for signal classification in the context of detecting incipient system disturbances. The synergistic effects of wavelets and neural networks present more strength and less weakness than either technique taken alone. A wavelet feature extractor is developed to form concise feature vectors for neural network inputs. The feature vectors are calculated from wavelet coefficients to reduce redundancy and computational expense. During this procedure, the statistical features based on the fractal concept to the wavelet coefficients play a role as crucial key in the wavelet feature extractor. To verify the proposed methodology, two applications are investigated and successfully tested. The first involves pump cavitation detection using dynamic pressure sensor. The second pertains to incipient pump cavitation detection using signals obtained from a current sensor. Also, through comparisons between three proposed feature vectors and with statistical techniques, it is shown that the variance feature extractor provides a better approach in the performed applications.

  4. Incipient toxicity of lithium to freshwater organisms representing a salmonid habitat

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, R.; Klopfer, D.C.; Skalski, J.R.

    1981-07-01

    Because the eventual development of fusion power reactors could increase the mining, use and disposal of lithium five-fold by the year 2000, potential effects from unusual amounts of lithium in aquatic environments were investigated. Freshwater oganisms representing a Pacific Northwest salmonid habitat were exposed to elevated conentrations of lithium. Nine parameters were used to determine the incipient toxicity of lithium to rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), insect larvae (Chironomus sp.), and Columbia River periphyton. All three groups of biota were incipiently sensitive to lithium at concentrations ranging between 0.1 and 1 mg/L. These results correspond with the incipient toxicity of beryllium, a chemically similar component of fusion reactor cores. A maximum lithium concentration of 0.01 mg/L occurs naturally in most freshwater environments (beryllium is rarer). Therefore, a concentration range of 0.01 to 0.1 mg/L may be regarded as approaching toxic concentrations when assessing the hazards of lithium in freshwaters.

  5. Investigation of semiconductor clad optical waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchman, T. E.; Carson, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    A variety of techniques have been proposed for fabricating integrated optical devices using semiconductors, lithium niobate, and glasses as waveguides and substrates. The use of glass waveguides and their interaction with thin semiconductor cladding layers was studied. Though the interactions of these multilayer waveguide structures have been analyzed here using glass, they may be applicable to other types of materials as well. The primary reason for using glass is that it provides a simple, inexpensive way to construct waveguides and devices.

  6. NUTRITIONAL ECOLOGY OF THE FORMOSAN SUBTERRANEAN TERMITE ISOPTERA RHINOTERMITIDAE)GROWTH AND SURVIVAL OF INCIPIENT COLONIES FEEDING ONPREFERRED WOOD SPECIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wood species as food source significantly impacted growth and survival of incipient colonies of Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae). Colonies of C. formosanus feeding on pecan (Carya illinoensis (Wangenh.)) and red gum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) produced significantly more p...

  7. Sliding mode observer based incipient sensor fault detection with application to high-speed railway traction device.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kangkang; Jiang, Bin; Yan, Xing-Gang; Mao, Zehui

    2016-07-01

    This paper considers incipient sensor fault detection issue for a class of nonlinear systems with "observer unmatched" uncertainties. A particular fault detection sliding mode observer is designed for the augmented system formed by the original system and incipient sensor faults. The designed parameters are obtained using LMI and line filter techniques to guarantee that the generated residuals are robust to uncertainties and that sliding motion is not destroyed by faults. Then, three levels of novel adaptive thresholds are proposed based on the reduced order sliding mode dynamics, which effectively improve incipient sensor faults detectability. Case study of on the traction system in China Railway High-speed is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed incipient senor faults detection schemes. PMID:27156675

  8. Stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloys in unirradiated and irradiated CsI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, B.; Surette, B. A.; Wood, J. C.

    1986-03-01

    Unirradiated split-ring specimens of Zircaloy fuel cladding, coated with CsI, cracked when stressed at elevated temperatures. The specimens have been reexamined fractographically and metallographically in order to confirm that the cause of cracking was stress corrosion (SCC) and not delayed hydride cracking (DHC). Further specimens have been cracked at 350°C by a solution of CsI in a fused mixture of nitrates of rubidium, cesium, strontium and barium, by a similar mechanism. CsI dissolved in a fused molybdate melt was not stable at 400°C, and rapidly evolved iodine, leaving a melt that was incapable of causing SCC. Irradiation of stressed split-ring specimens of Zircaloy fuel cladding in a γ-irradiator of 10 6 R/h and in the U-5 loop in the NRU reactor at an estimated 10 9 R/h caused SCC when the specimens were packed in dry CsI powder. Care had to be taken to dry the CsI, otherwise cracking occurred by a DHC mechanism from hydrogen absorbed from residual moisture in the CsI. Fractography showed that the crack surfaces obtained with dry CsI were typical of iodine-induced SCC rather than cesium-induced metal vapour embrittlement. Thus, if a transport process is provided for the iodide to obtain access to the zirconium surface, CsI is capable of causing SCC of Zircaloy. This transport process might be ionic diffusion in a fission product oxide melt in the fuel-clad gap, however, radiolysis of CsI to form a volatile iodine species in a radiation field is the more probable explanation of PCI failures.

  9. PWR cores with silicon carbide cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Dobisesky, J. P.; Carpenter, D.; Pilat, E.; Kazimi, M. S.

    2012-07-01

    The feasibility of using silicon carbide rather than Zircaloy cladding, to reach higher power levels and higher discharge burnups in PWRs has been evaluated. A preliminary fuel design using fuel rods with the same dimensions as in the Westinghouse Robust Fuel Assembly but with fuel pellets having 10 vol% central void has been adopted to mitigate the higher fuel temperatures that occur due to the lower thermal conductivity of the silicon carbide and to the persistence of the open clad-pellet gap over most of the fuel life. With this modified fuel design, it is possible to achieve 18 month cycles that meet present-day operating constraints on peaking factor, boron concentration, reactivity coefficients and shutdown margin, while allowing batch average discharge burnups up to 80 MWD/kgU and peak rod burnups up to 100 MWD/kgU. Power uprates of 10% and possibly 20% also appear feasible. For non-uprated cores, the silicon carbide-clad fuel has a clear advantage that increases with increasing discharge burnup. Even for comparable discharge burnups, there is a savings in enriched uranium. Control rod configuration modifications may be required to meet the shutdown margin criterion for the 20% up-rate. Silicon carbide's ability to sustain higher burnups than Zircaloy also allows the design of a licensable two year cycle with only 96 fresh assemblies, avoiding the enriched uranium penalty incurred with use of larger batch sizes due to their excessive leakage. (authors)

  10. Microstructure, Wear, and Corrosion Characteristics of TiC-Laser Surface Cladding on Low-Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Labban, Hashem F.; Mahmoud, Essam Rabea Ibrahim; Algahtani, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Laser cladding was used to produce surface composite layer reinforced with TiC particles on low-carbon steel alloy for improving the wear and corrosion resistances. The cladding process was carried out at powers of 2800, 2000, 1500, and 1000 W, and a fixed traveling speed of 4 mm/s. The produced layers are free from any cracks. Some of the TiC particles were melted and then re-solidified in the form of fine acicular dendrites. The amount of the melted TiC was increased by increasing the laser power. The hardness of the produced layers was improved by about 19 times of the base metal. Decreasing laser power led to hardness increment at the free surface. The improvement in wear resistance was reached to about 25 times (in case of 1500 W) of the base metal. Moreover, the corrosion resistance shows remarkable improvement after the laser treatment.