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Sample records for class ii region

  1. Immunological Functions of the Membrane Proximal Region of MHC Class II Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Harton, Jonathan; Jin, Lei; Hahn, Amy; Drake, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules present exogenously derived antigen peptides to CD4 T cells, driving activation of naïve T cells and supporting CD4-driven immune functions. However, MHC class II molecules are not inert protein pedestals that simply bind and present peptides. These molecules also serve as multi-functional signaling molecules delivering activation, differentiation, or death signals (or a combination of these) to B cells, macrophages, as well as MHC class II-expressing T cells and tumor cells. Although multiple proteins are known to associate with MHC class II, interaction with STING (stimulator of interferon genes) and CD79 is essential for signaling. In addition, alternative transmembrane domain pairing between class II α and β chains influences association with membrane lipid sub-domains, impacting both signaling and antigen presentation. In contrast to the membrane-distal region of the class II molecule responsible for peptide binding and T-cell receptor engagement, the membrane-proximal region (composed of the connecting peptide, transmembrane domain, and cytoplasmic tail) mediates these “non-traditional” class II functions. Here, we review the literature on the function of the membrane-proximal region of the MHC class II molecule and discuss the impact of this aspect of class II immunobiology on immune regulation and human disease. PMID:27006762

  2. HLA class I and class II haplotypes in admixed families from several regions of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Barquera, Rodrigo; Zúñiga, Joaquín; Hernández-Díaz, Raquel; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Montoya-Gama, Karla; Moscoso, Juan; Torres-García, Diana; García-Salas, Claudia; Silva, Beatriz; Cruz-Robles, David; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Granados, Julio

    2008-02-01

    We studied HLA class I and class II alleles in 191 Mexican families (381 non-related individuals) to directly obtain the HLA-A/B/DRB1/DQB1 haplotypes and their linkage disequilibrium (LD). The most frequent HLA haplotypes observed were: A*02-B*39-DRB1*04-DQB1*0302, A*02-B*35-DRB1*04-DQB1*0302, A*68-B*39-DRB1*04-DQB1*0302, A*02-B*35-DRB1*08-DQB1*04, A*33-B*1402-DRB1*01-DQB1*05, and A*24-B*35-DRB1*04-DQB1*0302. The four most common haplotypes found by our study involve those previously reported in Amerindian populations. LD analysis of HLA-A-B and HLA-B-DRB1 loci showed significant associations between A29(19)-B44(12), A33(19)-B65(14), A1-B8, A26(19)-B44(12), A24(9)-B61(40), B65(14)-DR1, B8-DR17(3), B44(12)-DR7, B7-DR15(2), and B39(16)-DR4. Also, all DRB1-DQB1 associations showed significant LD values. Admixture estimations using a trihybrid model showed that Mexicans from the State of Sinaloa (Northern Mexico) have a greater proportion of European genetic component compared with Mexicans from the Central area of Mexico, who have a greater percentage of Amerindian genes. Our results are important for future comparative genetic studies of different Mexican ethnic groups with special relevance to disease association and transplantation studies. PMID:17904223

  3. A predominant role for the HLA class II region in the association of the MHC region with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lincoln, Matthew R; Montpetit, Alexandre; Cader, M Zameel; Saarela, Janna; Dyment, David A; Tiislar, Milvi; Ferretti, Vincent; Tienari, Pentti J; Sadovnick, A Dessa; Peltonen, Leena; Ebers, George C; Hudson, Thomas J

    2005-10-01

    Genetic susceptibility to multiple sclerosis is associated with genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), particularly HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 (ref. 1). Both locus and allelic heterogeneity have been reported in this genomic region. To clarify whether HLA-DRB1 itself, nearby genes in the region encoding the MHC or combinations of these loci underlie susceptibility to multiple sclerosis, we genotyped 1,185 Canadian and Finnish families with multiple sclerosis (n = 4,203 individuals) with a high-density SNP panel spanning the genes encoding the MHC and flanking genomic regions. Strong associations in Canadian and Finnish samples were observed with blocks in the HLA class II genomic region (P < 4.9 x 10(-13) and P < 2.0 x 10(-16), respectively), but the strongest association was with HLA-DRB1 (P < 4.4 x 10(-17)). Conditioning on either HLA-DRB1 or the most significant HLA class II haplotype block found no additional block or SNP association independent of the HLA class II genomic region. This study therefore indicates that MHC-associated susceptibility to multiple sclerosis is determined by HLA class II alleles, their interactions and closely neighboring variants. PMID:16186814

  4. Transcription activation at class II CRP-dependent promoters: the role of different activating regions.

    PubMed Central

    Rhodius, V A; West, D M; Webster, C L; Busby, S J; Savery, N J

    1997-01-01

    Transcription activation by the Escherichia coli cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) at Class II promoters is dependent on direct interactions between two surface-exposed activating regions (AR1 and AR2) and two contact sites in RNA polymerase. The effects on transcription activation of disrupting either AR1 or AR2 have been measured at different Class II promoters. AR2 but not AR1 is essential for activation at all the Class II promoters that were tested. The effects of single positive control substitutions in AR1 and AR2 vary from one promoter to another: the effects of the different substitutions are contingent on the -35 hexamer sequence. Abortive initiation assays have been used to quantify the effects of positive control substitutions in each activating region on the kinetics of transcription initiation at the Class II CRP- dependent promoter pmelRcon. At this promoter, the HL159 substitution in AR1 results in a defect in the initial binding of RNA polymerase whilst the KE101 substitution in AR2 reduces the rate of isomerization from the closed to the open complex. PMID:9016561

  5. Orientation of functional activating regions in the Escherichia coli CRP protein during transcription activation at class II promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, R M; Rhodius, V A; Bell, A I; Kolb, A; Busby, S J

    1996-01-01

    At class II CRP-dependent promoters the DNA site for CRP overlaps the DNA site for RNA polymerase, covering the -35 region. Transcription activation at class II CRP- dependent promoters requires a contact between an activating region in the upstream subunit of the bound CRP dimer and a contact site in the C-terminal domain of the alpha-subunit of RNA polymerase. Transcription activation is suppressed by amino acid substitutions in the activating region, but activation can be restored by second site substitutions at K52 or E96. These substitutions identify two separate regions on the surface of CRP that appear to be able to interact with RNA polymerase specifically at class II promoters. Using the method of 'oriented heterodimers' we show that these alternative activating regions are functional in the downstream subunit of the bound CRP dimer. PMID:8604346

  6. Alveolar and symphysis regions of patients with skeletal class II division 1 anomalies with different vertical growth patterns

    PubMed Central

    Esenlik, Elcin; Sabuncuoglu, Fidan Alakus

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the alveolar and symphysis region properties in hyper-, hypo-, and normodivergent Class II division 1 anomalies. Methods: Pretreatment lateral cephalograms of 111 young adult female patients with skeletal Class II division 1 anomalies were compared to those of 54 Class I normal subjects (control group). Class II cases were divided into hyperdivergent (n = 58), hypodivergent (n = 19), and normodivergent groups (n = 34). The heights and widths of the symphysis and alveolus and the depth of maxillary palate were measured on the lateral cephalograms. Results: Mean symphysis width was wider in the hypodivergent Class II group than in the other groups, while mean symphysis height was similar among all groups. Maxillary palatal depth, upper incisor angle, upper and lower molar alveolar heights, and Id–Id′ width were also similar among groups. Conclusion: Symphysis width is the main factor in the differential diagnosis of Class II division 1 anomaly rather than symphysis height and hypodivergent Class II Division 1 anomaly is more suitable for mandibular incisors movements. PMID:22509114

  7. Polymorphism, recombination, and linkage disequilibrium within the HLA class II region

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, A.B.; McClure, G.R.; Suraj, V.C.; Helmuth, R.C.; Fildes, N.; Bugawan, T.L.; Erlich, H.A. ); Klitz, W. )

    1992-01-01

    Thirty-nine CEPH families, comprised of 502 individuals, have been typed for the HLA class II genes DRB1, DQA1, DQB1, and DPB1 using nonradioactive sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes to analyze polymerase chain reaction amplified DNA. This population, which consists of 266 independent chromosomes, contains 27 DRB1, 7 DQA1, 12 DQB1, and 17 DPB1 alleles. Analysis of the distribution of allele frequencies using the homozygosity statistic, which gives an indication of past selection pressures, suggests that balancing selection has acted on the DRB1, DQA1, and DQB1 loci. The distribution of DPB1 alleles, however, suggests a different evolutionary past. Family data permits the estimation of recombination rates and the unambiguous assignment of haplotypes. No recombinants were found between DRB1, DQA1, and DQB1; however, recombinants were detected between DQB1 and DPB1, resulting in an estimated recombination fraction of [ge]0.008 [+-] 0.004. Only 33 distinct DRB1-DQA1-DQB1 haplotypes were found in this population which illustrates the extreme nonrandom haplotypic association of alleles at these loci. A few of these haplotypes are unusual (previously unreported) for a Caucasian population and most likely result from past recombination events between the DR and DQ subregions. Examination of disequilibrium across the HLA region using these data and the available serologic HLA-A and HLA-B types of these samples shows that global disequilibrium between these loci declines with the recombination fraction, approaching statistic nonsignificance at the most distant interval, HLA-A and HLA-DP. DR-DQ haplotypes in linkage disequilibrium with DPB1 and B are noted and, finally, the evolutionary origin of certain class II haplotypes is addressed. 63 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  8. New susceptibility variants to narcolepsy identified in HLA class II region.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Taku; Toyoda, Hiromi; Hirataka, Akane; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Imanishi, Aya; Sagawa, Yohei; Kotorii, Nozomu; Kotorii, Tatayu; Hashizume, Yuji; Ogi, Kimihiro; Hiejima, Hiroshi; Kamei, Yuichi; Hida, Akiko; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Imai, Makoto; Fujimura, Yota; Tamura, Yoshiyuki; Ikegami, Azusa; Wada, Yamato; Moriya, Shunpei; Furuya, Hirokazu; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Omata, Naoto; Kojima, Hiroto; Kashiwase, Koichi; Saji, Hiroh; Khor, Seik-Soon; Yamasaki, Maria; Wada, Yuji; Ishigooka, Jun; Kuroda, Kenji; Kume, Kazuhiko; Chiba, Shigeru; Yamada, Naoto; Okawa, Masako; Hirata, Koichi; Uchimura, Naohisa; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Inoue, Yuichi; Honda, Yutaka; Mishima, Kazuo; Honda, Makoto; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2015-02-01

    Narcolepsy, a sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy and rapid eye movement sleep abnormalities, is tightly associated with human leukocyte antigen HLA-DQB1*06:02. DQB1*06:02 is common in the general population (10-30%); therefore, additional genetic factors are needed for the development of narcolepsy. In the present study, HLA-DQB1 in 664 Japanese narcoleptic subjects and 3131 Japanese control subjects was examined to determine whether HLA-DQB1 alleles located in trans of DQB1*06:02 are associated with narcolepsy. The strongest association was with DQB1*06:01 (P = 1.4 × 10(-10), odds ratio, OR = 0.39), as reported in previous studies. Additional predisposing effects of DQB1*03:02 were also found (P = 2.5 × 10(-9), OR = 1.97). A comparison between DQB1*06:02 heterozygous cases and controls revealed dominant protective effects of DQB1*06:01 and DQB1*05:01. In addition, a single-nucleotide polymorphism-based conditional analysis controlling for the effect of HLA-DQB1 was performed to determine whether there were other independent HLA associations outside of HLA-DQB1. This analysis revealed associations at HLA-DPB1 in the HLA class II region (rs3117242, P = 4.1 × 10(-5), OR = 2.45; DPB1*05:01, P = 8.1 × 10(-3), OR = 1.39). These results indicate that complex HLA class II associations contribute to the genetic predisposition to narcolepsy. PMID:25256355

  9. Organization and characteristics of the major histocompatibility complex class II region in the Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis).

    PubMed

    Ruan, Rui; Ruan, Jue; Wan, Xiao-Ling; Zheng, Yang; Chen, Min-Min; Zheng, Jin-Song; Wang, Ding

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in the genome of Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis) (YFP) or other cetaceans. In this study, a high-quality YFP bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library was constructed. We then determined the organization and characterization of YFP MHC class II region by screening the BAC library, followed by sequencing and assembly of positive BAC clones. The YFP MHC class II region consists of two segregated contigs (218,725 bp and 328,435 bp respectively) that include only eight expressed MHC class II genes, three pseudo MHC genes and twelve non-MHC genes. The YFP has fewer MHC class II genes than ruminants, showing locus reduction in DRB, DQA, DQB, and loss of DY. In addition, phylogenic and evolutionary analyses indicated that the DRB, DQA and DQB genes might have undergone birth-and-death evolution, whereas the DQB gene might have evolved under positive selection in cetaceans. These findings provide an essential foundation for future work, such as estimating MHC genetic variation in the YFP or other cetaceans. This work is the first report on the MHC class II region in cetaceans and offers valuable information for understanding the evolution of MHC genome in cetaceans. PMID:26932528

  10. Organization and characteristics of the major histocompatibility complex class II region in the Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis)

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Rui; Ruan, Jue; Wan, Xiao-Ling; Zheng, Yang; Chen, Min-Min; Zheng, Jin-Song; Wang, Ding

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in the genome of Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis) (YFP) or other cetaceans. In this study, a high-quality YFP bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library was constructed. We then determined the organization and characterization of YFP MHC class II region by screening the BAC library, followed by sequencing and assembly of positive BAC clones. The YFP MHC class II region consists of two segregated contigs (218,725 bp and 328,435 bp respectively) that include only eight expressed MHC class II genes, three pseudo MHC genes and twelve non-MHC genes. The YFP has fewer MHC class II genes than ruminants, showing locus reduction in DRB, DQA, DQB, and loss of DY. In addition, phylogenic and evolutionary analyses indicated that the DRB, DQA and DQB genes might have undergone birth-and-death evolution, whereas the DQB gene might have evolved under positive selection in cetaceans. These findings provide an essential foundation for future work, such as estimating MHC genetic variation in the YFP or other cetaceans. This work is the first report on the MHC class II region in cetaceans and offers valuable information for understanding the evolution of MHC genome in cetaceans. PMID:26932528

  11. A Report on Dropout and Graduation Rates for the High School Class of 1985 in Region II Migrant Child Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duerr, Mark

    Lack of data on California high school graduation and dropout rates prompted the development of a research method for determining graduation and dropout rates for the Region II Migrant Education enrolled high school Class of 1985. The most accurate method of estimating these rates was to track individual students through their high school years.…

  12. Structure and Polymorphism of the Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Region in the Japanese Crested Ibis, Nipponia nippon

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Yukio; Matsumoto, Keisuke; Matsuda, Hirokazu; Yamada, Takahisa; Sugiyama, Toshie; Homma, Kosuke; Kaneko, Yoshinori; Yamagishi, Satoshi; Iwaisaki, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a highly polymorphic genomic region that plays a central role in the immune system. Despite its functional consistency, the genomic structure of the MHC differs substantially among organisms. In birds, the MHC-B structures of Galliformes, including chickens, have been well characterized, but information about other avian MHCs remains sparse. The Japanese Crested Ibis (Nipponia nippon, Pelecaniformes) is an internationally conserved, critically threatened species. The current Japanese population of N. nippon originates from only five founders; thus, understanding the genetic diversity among these founders is critical for effective population management. Because of its high polymorphism and importance for disease resistance and other functions, the MHC has been an important focus in the conservation of endangered species. Here, we report the structure and polymorphism of the Japanese Crested Ibis MHC class II region. Screening of genomic libraries allowed the construction of three contigs representing different haplotypes of MHC class II regions. Characterization of genomic clones revealed that the MHC class II genomic structure of N. nippon was largely different from that of chicken. A pair of MHC-IIA and -IIB genes was arranged head-to-head between the COL11A2 and BRD2 genes. Gene order in N. nippon was more similar to that in humans than to that in chicken. The three haplotypes contained one to three copies of MHC-IIA/IIB gene pairs. Genotyping of the MHC class II region detected only three haplotypes among the five founders, suggesting that the genetic diversity of the current Japanese Crested Ibis population is extremely low. The structure of the MHC class II region presented here provides valuable insight for future studies on the evolution of the avian MHC and for conservation of the Japanese Crested Ibis. PMID:25247679

  13. Discovery of periodic class II methanol masers associated with G339.986-0.425 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maswanganye, J. P.; van der Walt, D. J.; Goedhart, S.; Gaylard, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    10 new class II methanol masers from the 6.7-GHz Methanol Multibeam survey catalogues III and IV were selected for a monitoring programme at both 6.7 and 12.2 GHz with the 26-m Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory radio telescope for 2 yr and 9 months, from 2012 August to 2015 May. In the sample, only masers associated with G339.986-0.425 were found to show periodic variability at both 6.7 and 12.2 GHz. The existence of periodic variation was tested with four independent methods. The analytical method gave the best estimation of the period, which was 246 ± 1 d. The time series of G339.986-0.425 show strong correlations across velocity channels and between the 6.7- and 12.2-GHz masers. The time delay was also measured across channels and shows structure across the spectrum which is continuous between different maser components.

  14. Organizing MHC Class II Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Fooksman, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules are ligands for CD4+ T cells and are critical for initiating the adaptive immune response. This review is focused on what is currently known about MHC class II organization at the plasma membrane of antigen presenting cells and how this affects antigen presentation to T cells. The organization and diffusion of class II molecules have been measured by a variety of biochemical and microscopic techniques. Membrane lipids and other proteins have been implicated in MHC class II organization and function. However, when compared with the organization of MHC class I or TCR complexes, much less is known about MHC class II. Since clustering of T cell receptors occurs during activation, the organization of MHC molecules prior to recognition and during synapse formation may be critical for antigen presentation. PMID:24782863

  15. [Modified Class II tunnel preparation].

    PubMed

    Rimondini, L; Baroni, C

    1991-05-15

    Tunnel preparations for restoration of Class II carious lesions in primary molars preserve the marginal ridge and minimize sacrifice of healthy tooth substructure. Materials with improved bonding to tooth structure and increase potential for fluoride release allow Class II restorations without "extension for prevention". PMID:1864420

  16. Mg ii Lines Observed During the X-class Flare on 29 March 2014 by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Heinzel, P.; Kleint, L.; Kašparová, J.

    2015-12-01

    Mg ii lines represent one of the strongest emissions from the chromospheric plasma during solar flares. In this article, we studied the Mg ii lines observed during the X1 flare on 29 March 2014 (SOL2014-03-29T17:48) by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). IRIS detected large intensity enhancements of the Mg ii h and k lines, subordinate triplet lines, and several other metallic lines at the flare footpoints during this flare. We have used the advantage of the slit-scanning mode (rastering) of IRIS and performed, for the first time, a detailed analysis of spatial and temporal variations of the spectra. Moreover, we were also able to identify positions of strongest hard X-ray (HXR) emissions using the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations and to correlate them with the spatial and temporal evolution of IRIS Mg ii spectra. The light curves of the Mg ii lines increase and peak contemporarily with the HXR emissions but decay more gradually. There are large red asymmetries in the Mg ii h and k lines after the flare peak. We see two spatially well-separated groups of Mg ii line profiles, non-reversed and reversed. In some cases, the Mg ii footpoints with reversed profiles are correlated with HXR sources. We show the spatial and temporal behavior of several other line parameters (line metrics) and briefly discuss them. Finally, we have synthesized the Mg ii k line using our non-LTE code with the Multilevel Accelerated Lambda Iteration (MALI) technique. Two kinds of models are considered, the flare model F2 of Machado et al. ( Astrophys. J. 242, 336, 1980) and the models of Ricchiazzi and Canfield ( Astrophys. J. 272, 739, 1983, RC models). Model F2 reproduces the peak intensity of the non-reversed Mg ii k profile at flare maximum, but does not account for high wing intensities. On the other hand, the RC models show the sensitivity of Mg ii line intensities to various electron-beam parameters. Our simulations also show that

  17. A large-scale genetic analysis reveals a strong contribution of the HLA class II region to giant cell arteritis susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Carmona, F David; Mackie, Sarah L; Martín, Jose-Ezequiel; Taylor, John C; Vaglio, Augusto; Eyre, Stephen; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Castañeda, Santos; Cid, Maria C; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Prieto-González, Sergio; Solans, Roser; Ramentol-Sintas, Marc; González-Escribano, M Francisca; Ortiz-Fernández, Lourdes; Morado, Inmaculada C; Narváez, Javier; Miranda-Filloy, José A; Beretta, Lorenzo; Lunardi, Claudio; Cimmino, Marco A; Gianfreda, Davide; Santilli, Daniele; Ramirez, Giuseppe A; Soriano, Alessandra; Muratore, Francesco; Pazzola, Giulia; Addimanda, Olga; Wijmenga, Cisca; Witte, Torsten; Schirmer, Jan H; Moosig, Frank; Schönau, Verena; Franke, Andre; Palm, Øyvind; Molberg, Øyvind; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P; Carette, Simon; Cuthbertson, David; Forbess, Lindsy J; Hoffman, Gary S; Khalidi, Nader A; Koening, Curry L; Langford, Carol A; McAlear, Carol A; Moreland, Larry; Monach, Paul A; Pagnoux, Christian; Seo, Philip; Spiera, Robert; Sreih, Antoine G; Warrington, Kenneth J; Ytterberg, Steven R; Gregersen, Peter K; Pease, Colin T; Gough, Andrew; Green, Michael; Hordon, Lesley; Jarrett, Stephen; Watts, Richard; Levy, Sarah; Patel, Yusuf; Kamath, Sanjeet; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Worthington, Jane; Koeleman, Bobby P C; de Bakker, Paul I W; Barrett, Jennifer H; Salvarani, Carlo; Merkel, Peter A; González-Gay, Miguel A; Morgan, Ann W; Martín, Javier

    2015-04-01

    We conducted a large-scale genetic analysis on giant cell arteritis (GCA), a polygenic immune-mediated vasculitis. A case-control cohort, comprising 1,651 case subjects with GCA and 15,306 unrelated control subjects from six different countries of European ancestry, was genotyped by the Immunochip array. We also imputed HLA data with a previously validated imputation method to perform a more comprehensive analysis of this genomic region. The strongest association signals were observed in the HLA region, with rs477515 representing the highest peak (p = 4.05 × 10(-40), OR = 1.73). A multivariate model including class II amino acids of HLA-DRβ1 and HLA-DQα1 and one class I amino acid of HLA-B explained most of the HLA association with GCA, consistent with previously reported associations of classical HLA alleles like HLA-DRB1(∗)04. An omnibus test on polymorphic amino acid positions highlighted DRβ1 13 (p = 4.08 × 10(-43)) and HLA-DQα1 47 (p = 4.02 × 10(-46)), 56, and 76 (both p = 1.84 × 10(-45)) as relevant positions for disease susceptibility. Outside the HLA region, the most significant loci included PTPN22 (rs2476601, p = 1.73 × 10(-6), OR = 1.38), LRRC32 (rs10160518, p = 4.39 × 10(-6), OR = 1.20), and REL (rs115674477, p = 1.10 × 10(-5), OR = 1.63). Our study provides evidence of a strong contribution of HLA class I and II molecules to susceptibility to GCA. In the non-HLA region, we confirmed a key role for the functional PTPN22 rs2476601 variant and proposed other putative risk loci for GCA involved in Th1, Th17, and Treg cell function. PMID:25817017

  18. A Large-Scale Genetic Analysis Reveals a Strong Contribution of the HLA Class II Region to Giant Cell Arteritis Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, F. David; Mackie, Sarah L.; Martín, Jose-Ezequiel; Taylor, John C.; Vaglio, Augusto; Eyre, Stephen; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Castañeda, Santos; Cid, Maria C.; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Prieto-González, Sergio; Solans, Roser; Ramentol-Sintas, Marc; González-Escribano, M. Francisca; Ortiz-Fernández, Lourdes; Morado, Inmaculada C.; Narváez, Javier; Miranda-Filloy, José A.; Martínez-Berriochoa, Agustín; Unzurrunzaga, Ainhoa; Hidalgo-Conde, Ana; Madroñero-Vuelta, Ana B.; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Ordóñez-Cañizares, M. Carmen; Escalante, Begoña; Marí-Alfonso, Begoña; Sopeña, Bernardo; Magro, César; Raya, Enrique; Grau, Elena; Román, José A.; de Miguel, Eugenio; López-Longo, F. Javier; Martínez, Lina; Gómez-Vaquero, Carmen; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; Díaz-López, J. Bernardino; Caminal-Montero, Luis; Martínez-Zapico, Aleida; Monfort, Jordi; Tío, Laura; Sánchez-Martín, Julio; Alegre-Sancho, Juan J.; Sáez-Comet, Luis; Pérez-Conesa, Mercedes; Corbera-Bellalta, Marc; García-Villanueva, M. Jesús; Fernández-Contreras, M. Encarnación; Sanchez-Pernaute, Olga; Blanco, Ricardo; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Ríos-Fernández, Raquel; Callejas, José L.; Fanlo-Mateo, Patricia; Martínez-Taboada, Víctor M.; Beretta, Lorenzo; Lunardi, Claudio; Cimmino, Marco A.; Gianfreda, Davide; Santilli, Daniele; Ramirez, Giuseppe A.; Soriano, Alessandra; Muratore, Francesco; Pazzola, Giulia; Addimanda, Olga; Wijmenga, Cisca; Witte, Torsten; Schirmer, Jan H.; Moosig, Frank; Schönau, Verena; Franke, Andre; Palm, Øyvind; Molberg, Øyvind; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P.; Carette, Simon; Cuthbertson, David; Forbess, Lindsy J.; Hoffman, Gary S.; Khalidi, Nader A.; Koening, Curry L.; Langford, Carol A.; McAlear, Carol A.; Moreland, Larry; Monach, Paul A.; Pagnoux, Christian; Seo, Philip; Spiera, Robert; Sreih, Antoine G.; Warrington, Kenneth J.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Pease, Colin T.; Gough, Andrew; Green, Michael; Hordon, Lesley; Jarrett, Stephen; Watts, Richard; Levy, Sarah; Patel, Yusuf; Kamath, Sanjeet; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Worthington, Jane; Koeleman, Bobby P.C.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Barrett, Jennifer H.; Salvarani, Carlo; Merkel, Peter A.; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Morgan, Ann W.; Martín, Javier

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a large-scale genetic analysis on giant cell arteritis (GCA), a polygenic immune-mediated vasculitis. A case-control cohort, comprising 1,651 case subjects with GCA and 15,306 unrelated control subjects from six different countries of European ancestry, was genotyped by the Immunochip array. We also imputed HLA data with a previously validated imputation method to perform a more comprehensive analysis of this genomic region. The strongest association signals were observed in the HLA region, with rs477515 representing the highest peak (p = 4.05 × 10−40, OR = 1.73). A multivariate model including class II amino acids of HLA-DRβ1 and HLA-DQα1 and one class I amino acid of HLA-B explained most of the HLA association with GCA, consistent with previously reported associations of classical HLA alleles like HLA-DRB1∗04. An omnibus test on polymorphic amino acid positions highlighted DRβ1 13 (p = 4.08 × 10−43) and HLA-DQα1 47 (p = 4.02 × 10−46), 56, and 76 (both p = 1.84 × 10−45) as relevant positions for disease susceptibility. Outside the HLA region, the most significant loci included PTPN22 (rs2476601, p = 1.73 × 10−6, OR = 1.38), LRRC32 (rs10160518, p = 4.39 × 10−6, OR = 1.20), and REL (rs115674477, p = 1.10 × 10−5, OR = 1.63). Our study provides evidence of a strong contribution of HLA class I and II molecules to susceptibility to GCA. In the non-HLA region, we confirmed a key role for the functional PTPN22 rs2476601 variant and proposed other putative risk loci for GCA involved in Th1, Th17, and Treg cell function. PMID:25817017

  19. Archaebacterial class I and class II aldolases from extreme halophiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alterkar, Wijaya; Dhar, Nenoo M.

    1988-03-01

    Both, class I (Schiff-base forming) and class II (metal requiring) fructose biphosphate aldolases were found to be distributed among halophilic archaebacteria. The aldolase activity fromHalobacterium halobium, H. salinarium, H. cutirubrum, H. mediterranei andH. volcanii exhibited properties of a bacterial class II aldolase as it was metal-dependent for activity and therefore inhibited by EDTA. In contrast, aldolase fromH. saccharovorum, Halobacterium R-113, H. vallismortis andHalobacterium CH-1 formed a Schiff-base intermediate with the substrate and therefore resembled to eukaryotic class I type. The type of aldolase did not vary by changes in the growth medium.

  20. Archaebacterial class I and class II aldolases from extreme halophiles.

    PubMed

    Altekar, W; Dhar, N M

    1988-01-01

    Both, class I (Schiff-base forming) and class II (metal requiring) fructose biphosphate aldolases were found to be distributed among halophilic archaebacteria. The aldolase activity from Halobacteriium halobium, H. salinarium, H. cutirubrum, H. mediterranei and H. volcanii exhibited properties of a bacterial class II aldolase as it was metal-dependent for activity and therefore inhibited by EDTA. In contrast, aldolase from H. saccharovorum, Halobacterium R-113, H. vallismortis and Halobacterium CH-1 formed a Schiff-base intermediate with the substrate and therefore resembled to eukaryotic class I type. The type of aldolase did not vary by changes in the growth medium. PMID:11536602

  1. Effect of genetic variation in the MHC Class II DRB region on resistance and susceptibility to Johne's disease in endangered Indian Jamunapari goats.

    PubMed

    Singh, P K; Singh, S V; Singh, M K; Saxena, V K; Horin, P; Singh, A V; Sohal, J S

    2012-08-01

    The pathogenesis of Johne's disease (JD), caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), is complex and has not been completely understood yet. In the present study, we analysed the polymorphism in the exon-2 of the caprine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class II DRB region and its association with resistance or susceptibility to JD. A total of 203 Jamunapari goats, which is an Indian endangered breed highly susceptible to JD, kept at a single farm were studied. On the basis of clinical signs, microscopic examination, faecal culture, ELISA and diagnostic PCR, 60 and 143 goats were classified as resistant and susceptible to JD, respectively. PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) with two enzymes, PstI and TaqI, was used to assess variation in the DRB gene(s) in all 203 goats studied. Two di-allelic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), here referred as 'P' and 'T', were tested. In each of them, three genotypes were found in the group analysed. The minimum allele frequencies (MAFs) were 0.233 and 0.486 for the P and T SNPs, respectively. Statistically significant associations between alleles, individual genotypes and composed genotypes of both SNPs were found. The frequency of p and t alleles, of individual pp and tt and of composed pptt genotypes were significantly higher (P(corr) < 0.001) in the 'resistant' group as compared to the 'susceptible' group, while the P and T alleles were associated with susceptibility (P(corr) < 0.001). In heterozygous genotypes, susceptibility was dominant over resistance. The effects of both SNP on resistance and susceptibility were comparable and composed heterozygous genotypes showed intermediate levels of susceptibility in terms of the odds ratio and P-values calculated. PMID:22321606

  2. 49 CFR 238.317 - Class II brake test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class II brake test. 238.317 Section 238.317... Requirements for Tier I Passenger Equipment § 238.317 Class II brake test. (a) A Class II brake test shall be.... In these circumstances, a Class II brake test shall be performed prior to the train's departure...

  3. 49 CFR 238.317 - Class II brake test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Class II brake test. 238.317 Section 238.317... Requirements for Tier I Passenger Equipment § 238.317 Class II brake test. (a) A Class II brake test shall be.... In these circumstances, a Class II brake test shall be performed prior to the train's departure...

  4. 49 CFR 238.317 - Class II brake test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Class II brake test. 238.317 Section 238.317... Requirements for Tier I Passenger Equipment § 238.317 Class II brake test. (a) A Class II brake test shall be.... In these circumstances, a Class II brake test shall be performed prior to the train's departure...

  5. 49 CFR 238.317 - Class II brake test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Class II brake test. 238.317 Section 238.317... Requirements for Tier I Passenger Equipment § 238.317 Class II brake test. (a) A Class II brake test shall be.... In these circumstances, a Class II brake test shall be performed prior to the train's departure...

  6. Class I and Class II Lanthipeptides Produced by Bacillus spp.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Joana; Caetano, Tânia; Mendo, Sónia

    2015-11-25

    The increasing number of multidrug-resistant pathogens, along with the small number of new antimicrobials under development, leads to an increased need for novel alternatives. Class I and class II lanthipeptides (also known as lantibiotics) have been considered promising alternatives to classical antibiotics. In addition to their relevant medical applications, they are used as probiotics, prophylactics, preservatives, and additives in cosmetics and personal-care products. The genus Bacillus is a prolific source of bioactive compounds including ribosomally and nonribosomally synthesized antibacterial peptides. Accordingly, there is significant interest in the biotechnological potential of members of the genus Bacillus as producers of antimicrobial lanthipeptides. The present review focuses on aspects of the biosynthesis, gene cluster organization, structure, antibacterial spectrum, and bioengineering approaches of lanthipeptides produced by Bacillus strains. Their efficacy and potency against some clinically relevant strains, including MRSA and VRE, are also discussed. Although no lanthipeptides are currently in clinical use, the information herein highlights the potential of these compounds. PMID:26448102

  7. Hazardous pollutants in class II landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, J.A.; Porter, M.L.

    1987-05-01

    Class II landfills accept nontoxic municipal trash. Their gaseous emissions were originally assumed to be relatively free of hazardous substances. However, one Class II site in Southern California was found to be emitting enough vinyl chloride to exceed the California Air Quality Standard of 10 ppb for a 24-hour average in surrounding neighborhood. This paper presents a summary of the results of the analysis of landfill gas from over 20 additional Class II landfills. Ambient air surveys were conducted around five of the landfills. About 90% of the landfills contained measurable amounts of vinyl chloride and/or benzene. The concentrations exceeded 1 ppm in about half of the sites studied. Vinyl chloride is produced in situ by the action of bacteria on chlorinated solvents, and can be found in landfills that have been closed for over 30 years. The relative amounts of methane and vinyl chloride vary so much within a single landfill that methane measurements cannot be used as a surrogate for vinyl chloride.

  8. 40 CFR 147.300 - State-administered program-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Director of the OFR in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained at the... Colorado Assistant Attorney General to the Acting Regional Counsel, EPA Region VIII, “Re: Class II Well...: Class II Well Injection Control Program of Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission”, April 29,...

  9. 40 CFR 147.300 - State-administered program-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Director of the OFR in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained at the... Colorado Assistant Attorney General to the Acting Regional Counsel, EPA Region VIII, “Re: Class II Well...: Class II Well Injection Control Program of Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission”, April 29,...

  10. 40 CFR 147.300 - State-administered program-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Director of the OFR in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained at the... Colorado Assistant Attorney General to the Acting Regional Counsel, EPA Region VIII, “Re: Class II Well...: Class II Well Injection Control Program of Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission”, April 29,...

  11. 40 CFR 147.300 - State-administered program-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Director of the OFR in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained at the... Colorado Assistant Attorney General to the Acting Regional Counsel, EPA Region VIII, “Re: Class II Well...: Class II Well Injection Control Program of Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission”, April 29,...

  12. 46 CFR 50.30-15 - Class II pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Class II pressure vessels. 50.30-15 Section 50.30-15... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-15 Class II pressure vessels. (a) Class II pressure vessels shall be subject to... pressure vessels shall be performed during the welding of the longitudinal joint. At this time the...

  13. 46 CFR 50.30-15 - Class II pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Class II pressure vessels. 50.30-15 Section 50.30-15... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-15 Class II pressure vessels. (a) Class II pressure vessels shall be subject to... pressure vessels shall be performed during the welding of the longitudinal joint. At this time the...

  14. 46 CFR 50.30-15 - Class II pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Class II pressure vessels. 50.30-15 Section 50.30-15... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-15 Class II pressure vessels. (a) Class II pressure vessels shall be subject to... pressure vessels shall be performed during the welding of the longitudinal joint. At this time the...

  15. 46 CFR 50.30-15 - Class II pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class II pressure vessels. 50.30-15 Section 50.30-15... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-15 Class II pressure vessels. (a) Class II pressure vessels shall be subject to... pressure vessels shall be performed during the welding of the longitudinal joint. At this time the...

  16. 46 CFR 50.30-15 - Class II pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Class II pressure vessels. 50.30-15 Section 50.30-15... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-15 Class II pressure vessels. (a) Class II pressure vessels shall be subject to... pressure vessels shall be performed during the welding of the longitudinal joint. At this time the...

  17. Interactions between the Class II Transactivator and CREB Binding Protein Increase Transcription of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Genes

    PubMed Central

    Fontes, Joseph D.; Kanazawa, Satoshi; Jean, Dickson; Peterlin, B. Matija

    1999-01-01

    Class II major histocompatibility (class II) genes are regulated in a B-cell-specific and gamma interferon-inducible fashion. The master switch for the expression of these genes is the class II transactivator (CIITA). In this report, we demonstrate that one of the functions of CIITA is to recruit the CREB binding protein (CBP) to class II promoters. Not only functional but also specific binding interactions between CIITA and CBP were demonstrated. Moreover, a dominant negative form of CBP decreased the activity of class II promoters and levels of class II determinants on the surface of cells. Finally, the inhibition of class II gene expression by the glucocorticoid hormone could be attributed to the squelching of CBP by the glucocorticoid receptor. We conclude that CBP, a histone acetyltransferase, plays an important role in the transcription of class II genes. PMID:9858618

  18. Class II Resin Composites: Restorative Options.

    PubMed

    Patel, Minesh; Mehta, Shamir B; Banerji, Subir

    2015-10-01

    Tooth-coloured, resin composite restorations are amongst the most frequently prescribed forms of dental restoration to manage defects in posterior teeth. The attainment of a desirable outcome when placing posterior resin composite restorations requires the clinician to have a good understanding of the benefits (as well as the limitations) posed by this material, together with a sound knowledge of placement technique. Numerous protocols and materials have evolved to assist the dental operator with this type of demanding posterior restoration. With the use of case examples, four techniques available are reported here. CPD/Clinical Relevance: This article explores varying techniques for the restoration of Class II cavities using resin composite. PMID:26685471

  19. Class II virus membrane fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kielian, Margaret . E-mail: kielian@aecom.yu.edu

    2006-01-05

    Enveloped animal viruses fuse their membrane with a host cell membrane, thus delivering the virus genetic material into the cytoplasm and initiating infection. This critical membrane fusion reaction is mediated by a virus transmembrane protein known as the fusion protein, which inserts its hydrophobic fusion peptide into the cell membrane and refolds to drive the fusion reaction. This review describes recent advances in our understanding of the structure and function of the class II fusion proteins of the alphaviruses and flaviviruses. Inhibition of the fusion protein refolding reaction confirms its importance in fusion and suggests new antiviral strategies for these medically important viruses.

  20. Lateral cephalometric diagnosis of asymmetry in Angle Class II subdivision compared to Class I and II

    PubMed Central

    Meloti, Aparecida Fernanda; Gonçalves, Renata de Cássia; Silva, Ertty; Martins, Lídia Parsekian; dos Santos-Pinto, Ary

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Lateral cephalometric radiographs are traditionally required for orthodontic treatment, yet rarely used to assess asymmetries. Objective The objective of the present study was to use lateral cephalometric radiographs to identify existing skeletal and dentoalveolar morphological alterations in Class II subdivision and to compare them with the existing morphology in Class I and II relationship. Material and Methods Ninety initial lateral cephalometric radiographs of male and female Brazilian children aged between 12 to 15 years old were randomly and proportionally divided into three groups: Group 1 (Class I), Group 2 (Class II) and Group 3 (Class II subdivision). Analysis of lateral cephalometric radiographs included angular measurements, horizontal linear measurements and two indexes of asymmetry that were prepared for this study. Results In accordance with an Index of Dental Asymmetry (IDA), greater mandibular dental asymmetry was identified in Group 3. An Index of Mandibular Asymmetry (IMA) revealed less skeletal and dental mandibular asymmetry in Group 2, greater skeletal mandibular asymmetry in Group 1, and greater mandibular dental asymmetry in Group 3. Conclusion Both IDA and IMA revealed greater mandibular dental asymmetry for Group 3 in comparison to Groups 1 and 2. These results are in accordance with those found by other diagnostic methods, showing that lateral cephalometric radiography is an acceptable method to identify existing skeletal and dentoalveolar morphological alterations in malocclusions. PMID:25279525

  1. Condylar volume and condylar area in class I, class II and class III young adult subjects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim Aim of this study was to compare the volume and the shape of mandibular condyles in a Caucasian young adult population, with different skeletal pattern. Material and methods 200 Caucasian patients (15–30 years old, 95 male and 105 females) were classified in three groups on the base of ANB angle: skeletal class I (65 patients), skeletal class II (70 patients) and skeletal class III (65 patients). Left and right TMJs of each subject were evaluated independently with CBCT (Iluma). TMJ evaluation included: condylar volume; condylar area; morphological index (MI). Condylar volumes were calculated by using the Mimics software. The condylar volume, the area and the morphological index (MI) were compared among the three groups, by using non-parametric tests. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann Whitney test revealed that: no significant difference was observed in the whole sample between the right and the left condylar volume; subjects in skeletal class III showed a significantly higher condylar volume, respect to class I and class II subjects (p < 0.05); significantly lower condylar volume was observed in class II subjects, respect to class I and class III (p < 0.05). In the whole sample condylar volume (699.8 ± 63.07 mm3 in males and 663.5 ± 81.3 mm3 in females; p < 0.01) as well as condylar surface (423.24 ± 63.03 mm2 in males and 389.76 ± 61.15 mm2 in females; p < 0.01) were significantly higher in males than in females. Conclusion Skeletal class appeared to be associated to the mandibular condylar volume and to the mandibular condylar area in the Caucasian orthodontic population. PMID:23241136

  2. Engineering of chimeric class II polyhydroxyalkanoate synthases.

    PubMed

    Niamsiri, Nuttawee; Delamarre, Soazig C; Kim, Young-Rok; Batt, Carl A

    2004-11-01

    PHA synthase is a key enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). Using a combinatorial genetic strategy to create unique chimeric class II PHA synthases, we have obtained a number of novel chimeras which display improved catalytic properties. To engineer the chimeric PHA synthases, we constructed a synthetic phaC gene from Pseudomonas oleovorans (phaC1Po) that was devoid of an internal 540-bp fragment. Randomly amplified PCR products (created with primers based on conserved phaC sequences flanking the deleted internal fragment) were generated using genomic DNA isolated from soil and were substituted for the 540-bp internal region. The chimeric genes were expressed in a PHA-negative strain of Ralstonia eutropha, PHB(-)4 (DSM 541). Out of 1,478 recombinant clones screened for PHA production, we obtained five different chimeric phaC1Po genes that produced more PHA than the native phaC1Po. Chimeras S1-71, S4-8, S5-58, S3-69, and S3-44 exhibited 1.3-, 1.4-, 2.0-, 2.1-, and 3.0-fold-increased levels of in vivo activity, respectively. All of the mutants mediated the synthesis of PHAs with a slightly increased molar fraction of 3-hydroxyoctanoate; however, the weight-average molecular weights (Mw) of the PHAs in all cases remained almost the same. Based upon DNA sequence analyses, the various phaC fragments appear to have originated from Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas aureofaciens. The amino acid sequence analyses showed that the chimeric proteins had 17 to 20 amino acid differences from the wild-type phaC1Po, and these differences were clustered in the same positions in the five chimeric clones. A threading model of PhaC1Po, developed based on homology of the enzyme to the Burkholderia glumae lipase, suggested that the amino acid substitutions found in the active chimeras were located mostly on the protein model surface. Thus, our combinatorial genetic engineering strategy proved to be broadly useful for improving the catalytic

  3. Cohesin regulates major histocompatibility complex class II genes through interactions with MHC-II insulators1

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Parimal; Boss, Jeremy M.

    2011-01-01

    Cohesin is a multiprotein ringed complex that is most well known for its role in stabilizing the association of sister chromatids between S phase and M. More recently cohesin was found to be associated with transcriptional insulators, elements that are associated with the organization of chromatin into regulatory domains. The human major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) locuscontains ten intergenic elements, termed MHC-II insulators, which bind the transcriptional insulator protein CCCTC transcription factor (CTCF). MHC-II insulators interact with each other forming a base architecture of discrete loops and potential regulatory domains. When MHC-II genes are expressed, their proximal promoter regulatory regions reorganize to the foci established by the interacting MHC-II insulators. MHC-II insulators also bind cohesin, but the functional role of cohesin in regulating this system is not known. Here we show that the binding of cohesin to MHC-II insulators occurred irrespective of MHC-II expression but was required for optimal expression of the HLA-DR and HLA-DQ genes. In a DNA dependent manner, cohesin subunits interacted with CTCF and the MHC-II specific transcription factors RFX and CIITA. Intriguingly, cohesin subunits were important for DNA looping interactions between the HLA-DRA promoter region and a 5’ MHC-II insulator but were not required for interactions between the MHC-II insulators themselves. This latter observation introduces cohesin as a regulator of MHC-II expression by initiating or stabilizing MHC-II promoter regulatory element interactions with the MHC-II insulator elements; events which are required for maximal MHC-II transcription. PMID:21911605

  4. [Orthodontic failures in Class II cases].

    PubMed

    Boileau, Marie-José

    2016-03-01

    In Class II treatment, as with all malformations, therapeutic failure can impact some or all of our treatment aims, whether occlusal, functional or esthetic. Using clinical cases, we will first define the concept of failure and the limits of what is acceptable in these different areas. We will then attempt to determine the main causes underlying our failures in order to better avoid them. An analysis of the literature and of the clinical cases demonstrates that our failures are most often caused by a misevaluation of the amount and direction of residual growth, poor control of the vertical dimension, inadequate management of functional problems, an inadequate position of the maxillary and mandibular incisors. In addition to these major treatment errors, one also encounters insufficient patient cooperation, which needs to be assessed and maintained in order to limit the number of failures and treatment drop-outs. PMID:27083232

  5. A comparison of craniofacial Class I and Class II growth patterns.

    PubMed

    Riesmeijer, Arnold M; Prahl-Andersen, Birte; Mascarenhas, Anna K; Joo, Bert H; Vig, Katherine W L

    2004-04-01

    Longitudinal craniofacial databases, including the Fels Longitudinal Study, the Michigan Growth Study, and the Nijmegen (The Netherlands) Growth Study, were compared for a set of 12 craniofacial measurements on lateral skull cephalograms. The age ranges of the subjects were 7-14 years for females and 9-14 years for males. When we compared the normally distributed databases using multiple comparisons, a small sample test statistic t for differences between means of the databases showed few statistical differences. The databases were therefore pooled, and sex-specific Class I (ANB < 4 degrees), and Class II (ANB > or = 4 degrees) subsamples were analyzed with the same t test. The sizes of these subsamples ranged from 39 to 122 at the different ages. The findings showed that the Class II samples had greater SNA and SN-GoMe angles. Compared with the Class I group, shorter mandibles were found in the younger age groups of the Class II samples. No differences were found in mandibular length (Ar-Gn) and mandibular body length (Go-Gn) in the older Class II groups compared with the Class I groups. These findings indicate that the greater mandibular lengthening in the Class II groups might have contributed to successful Class II treatment in studies in which a Class I group was the control. Because of individual biological variability, the average Class I or Class II growth pattern might not be a realistic assumption or have clinical relevance for individual patients. PMID:15067263

  6. 25 CFR 522.10 - Individually owned class II and class III gaming operations other than those operating on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Individually owned class II and class III gaming... GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPROVAL OF CLASS II AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.10 Individually owned class II and class...

  7. 40 CFR 82.3 - Definitions for class I and class II controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Definitions for class I and class II controlled substances. 82.3 Section 82.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls § 82.3 Definitions for class I and class...

  8. 40 CFR 82.3 - Definitions for class I and class II controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Definitions for class I and class II controlled substances. 82.3 Section 82.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls § 82.3 Definitions for class I and class...

  9. Efficiency of Class I and Class II malocclusion treatment with four premolar extractions

    PubMed Central

    JANSON, Guilherme; NAKAMURA, Alexandre; BARROS, Sérgio Estelita; BOMBONATTI, Roberto; CHIQUETO, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Four premolar extractions is a successful protocol to treat Class I malocclusion, but it is a less efficient way when compared with other Class II treatment protocols. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of anteroposterior discrepancy on the success of four premolar extractions protocol. For that, treatment efficiency of Class I and complete Class II malocclusions, treated with four premolar extractions were compared. Methods: A sample of 107 records from 75 Class I (mean age of 13.98 years - group 1) and 32 Class II (mean age of 13.19 years - group 2) malocclusion patients treated with four premolar extractions was selected. The initial and final occlusal status of each patient was evaluated on dental casts with the PAR index. The treatment time was calculated based on the clinical charts, and the treatment efficiency was obtained by the ratio between the percentage of PAR reduction and treatment time. The PAR index and its components, the treatment time and the treatment efficiency of the groups were statistically compared with t tests and Mann-Whitney U-test. Results: The Class II malocclusion patients had a greater final PAR index than Class I malocclusion patients, and similar duration (Class I - 28.95 mo. and Class II - 28.10 mo.) and treatment efficiency. Conclusion: The treatment of the complete Class II malocclusion with four premolar extractions presented worse occlusal results than Class I malocclusion owing to incomplete molar relationship correction. PMID:24918660

  10. Data on HLA class I/II profile in Brazilian pemphigus patients.

    PubMed

    Franco Brochado, Maria José; Nascimento, Daniela Francisca; Saloum Deghaide, Neifi Hassan; Donadi, Eduardo Antonio; Roselino, Ana Maria

    2016-09-01

    Pemphigus are blistering autoimmune diseases related with genetic and environmental factors. Here we describe HLA genotyping in pemphigus patients. First, we review the HLA class I/II data on pemphigus reported in Brazilian samples and then present the HLA class I (-A, -B, -C) and class II (-DRB1, -DQA1, -DQB1) alleles related to susceptibility/resistance to pemphigus by comparing 86 patients with pemphigus foliaceus, 83 patients with pemphigus vulgaris, and 1592 controls from the northeastern region of the state of São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil. The data presented here are related to the manuscript "Differential HLA class I and class II associations in Pemphigus Foliaceus and Pemphigus Vulgaris patients from a prevalent Southeastern Brazilian region" Brochado et al. (2016) [1]. PMID:27331116

  11. 78 FR 37114 - Self-Regulation of Class II Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-20

    ... the issuance of a certificate for tribal self-regulation of Class II gaming. 78 FR 20236, April 4..., productivity, innovation, or the ability of U.S.-based enterprises to compete with foreign-based...

  12. Class II barodontalgia: review and report of a case.

    PubMed

    Woodmansey, Karl

    2008-01-01

    Barodontalgia is a rarely reported condition involving changes in ambient pressure resulting in tooth pain. According to Ferjentsik and Aker, Class II barodontalgia is observed in teeth that have pre-existing pulpal disease and an ultimate diagnosis of irreversible pulpitis.1 This article describes a case of Class II barodontalgia that was experienced on a commercial airline flight and reviews current knowledge regarding this phenomenon, including proposed etiologic mechanisms. PMID:21444271

  13. Evolution of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II genes in the brown bear

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins constitute an essential component of the vertebrate immune response, and are coded by the most polymorphic of the vertebrate genes. Here, we investigated sequence variation and evolution of MHC class I and class II DRB, DQA and DQB genes in the brown bear Ursus arctos to characterise the level of polymorphism, estimate the strength of positive selection acting on them, and assess the extent of gene orthology and trans-species polymorphism in Ursidae. Results We found 37 MHC class I, 16 MHC class II DRB, four DQB and two DQA alleles. We confirmed the expression of several loci: three MHC class I, two DRB, two DQB and one DQA. MHC class I also contained two clusters of non-expressed sequences. MHC class I and DRB allele frequencies differed between northern and southern populations of the Scandinavian brown bear. The rate of nonsynonymous substitutions (dN) exceeded the rate of synonymous substitutions (dS) at putative antigen binding sites of DRB and DQB loci and, marginally significantly, at MHC class I loci. Models of codon evolution supported positive selection at DRB and MHC class I loci. Both MHC class I and MHC class II sequences showed orthology to gene clusters found in the giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca. Conclusions Historical positive selection has acted on MHC class I, class II DRB and DQB, but not on the DQA locus. The signal of historical positive selection on the DRB locus was particularly strong, which may be a general feature of caniforms. The presence of MHC class I pseudogenes may indicate faster gene turnover in this class through the birth-and-death process. South–north population structure at MHC loci probably reflects origin of the populations from separate glacial refugia. PMID:23031405

  14. Evolution and Distribution of Class II-Related Endogenous Retroviruses†

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, Robert; Kabat, Peter; Martin, Joanne; Lynch, Clare; Tristem, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are widespread in vertebrate genomes and have been loosely grouped into “classes” on the basis of their phylogenetic relatedness to the established genera of exogenous retroviruses. Four of these genera—the lentiviruses, alpharetroviruses, betaretroviruses, and deltaretroviruses—form a well-supported clade in retroviral phylogenies, and ERVs that group with these genera have been termed class II ERVs. We used PCR amplification and sequencing of retroviral fragments from more than 130 vertebrate taxa to investigate the evolution of the class II retroviruses in detail. We confirm that class II retroviruses are largely confined to mammalian and avian hosts and provide evidence for a major novel group of avian retroviruses, and we identify additional members of both the alpha- and the betaretrovirus genera. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that the avian and mammalian viruses form distinct monophyletic groups, implying that interclass transmission has occurred only rarely during the evolution of the class II retroviruses. In contrast to previous reports, the lentiviruses clustered as sister taxa to several endogenous retroviruses derived from rodents and insectivores. This topology was further supported by the shared loss of both the class II PR-Pol frameshift site and the class II retrovirus G-patch domain. PMID:15858031

  15. Diagnostic features of Angle's Class II div 2 malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Dodda, Kiran Kumar; Prasad, Singamsetty E. R. V.; Kanuru, Ravi Krishna; Nalluri, Siddhartha; Mittapalli, Radhika; Raghavendra

    2015-01-01

    Statement of Problem: A thorough knowledge of the salient features of malocclusion makes the practitioner to come to a proper diagnosis and to formulate proper mechanotherapy. It also helps to predict the prognosis, prior to the onset of treatment process. Among the various malocclusions, Class II div 2 occurs the least often. The literature review does not clearly describe the classical skeletal and dental features of Angle's Class II div 2 malocclusion. Purpose of Study: The aim of this study is to describe the unique features of Angle's Class II division 2 malocclusion. Materials and Methods: A total of 612 pre-treatment records (study models and cephalograms), with age ranging from 14 to 25 years, were obtained from the hospital records of Drs Sudha and Nageswar Rao Siddhartha Institute of Dental Sciences. Among these samples, 317 were Class II div 1 and 295 were Class II div 2. The lateral cephalograms were analyzed by using Kodak software and the arch width analysis was calculated by using digital vernier calipers. Results: Student's t test was used for the study. On the cephalograms, the vertical skeletal measurements and few of the dental variables showed a significant difference. On the plaster models, the maxillary transverse measurements revealed a notable discrimination between the groups. Conclusion: Angle's Class II div 2 malocclusion has a marked horizontal growth pattern with decreased lower facial thirds, palatally inclined upper anteriors, and remarkably increased transverse maxillary arch dimensions. PMID:26759807

  16. FCRL6 is an MHC class II receptor1

    PubMed Central

    Schreeder, Daniel M.; Cannon, John P.; Wu, Jiongru; Li, Ran; Shakhmatov, Mikhail A.; Davis, Randall S.

    2016-01-01

    Receptors for the Fc portion (FCR) of Ig have been extensively characterized and are known to regulate humoral responses, but members of the closely related FCR-like (FCRL) family have not been found to bind Ig and to date no ligand has been identified for any FCRL. Using a cell-based GFP reporter system and a recombinant Fc chimeric protein, we show that human FCRL6, a receptor selectively expressed by cytotoxic T and NK cells, directly binds HLA-DR, a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecule. Given the similarity among constant regions of Ig and MHC molecules, these findings suggest that representatives of the FCR and FCRL multigene families may have independently evolved to engage two ancestral elements fundamental to adaptive immunity. This discovery may offer new insight into the interaction between cytotoxic lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells and may have important implications for better understanding HLA disease susceptibility and pathogenesis. PMID:20519654

  17. Features of target cell lysis by class I and class II MHC restricted cytolytic T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Maimone, M.M.; Morrison, L.A.; Braciale, V.L.; Braciale, T.J.

    1986-12-01

    The lytic activity of influenza virus-specific muvine cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones that are restricted by either H-2K/D (class I) or H-2I (class II) major histocompatibility (MHC) locus products was compared on an influenza virus-infected target cell expressing both K/D and I locus products. With the use of two in vitro measurements of cytotoxicity, conventional /sup 51/Cr release, and detergent-releasable radiolabeled DNA (as a measure of nuclear disintegration in the early post-lethal hit period), the authors found no difference between class I and class II MHC-restricted CTL in the kinetics of target cell destruction. In addition, class II MHC-restricted antiviral CTL failed to show any lysis of radiolabeled bystander cells. Killing of labeled specific targets by these class II MHC-restricted CTL was also efficiently inhibited by unlabeled specific competitor cells in a cold target inhibition assay. In sum, these data suggest that class I and class II MHC-restricted CTL mediate target cell destruction by an essentially similar direct mechanism.

  18. 47 CFR 73.26 - Regional channels; Class B and Class D stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Regional channels; Class B and Class D stations. 73.26 Section 73.26 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.26 Regional channels; Class B and Class D stations. (a) The following frequencies...

  19. 47 CFR 73.26 - Regional channels; Class B and Class D stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Regional channels; Class B and Class D stations. 73.26 Section 73.26 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.26 Regional channels; Class B and Class D stations. (a) The following frequencies...

  20. 47 CFR 73.26 - Regional channels; Class B and Class D stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Regional channels; Class B and Class D stations. 73.26 Section 73.26 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.26 Regional channels; Class B and Class D stations. (a) The following frequencies...

  1. 47 CFR 73.26 - Regional channels; Class B and Class D stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Regional channels; Class B and Class D stations. 73.26 Section 73.26 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.26 Regional channels; Class B and Class D stations. (a) The following frequencies...

  2. 47 CFR 73.26 - Regional channels; Class B and Class D stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Regional channels; Class B and Class D stations. 73.26 Section 73.26 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.26 Regional channels; Class B and Class D stations. (a) The following frequencies...

  3. Blocking MHC class II on human endothelium mitigates acute rejection

    PubMed Central

    Abrahimi, Parwiz; Qin, Lingfeng; Chang, William G.; Bothwell, Alfred L.M.; Tellides, George; Saltzman, W. Mark; Pober, Jordan S.

    2016-01-01

    Acute allograft rejection is mediated by host CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) targeting graft class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. In experimental rodent models, rejection requires differentiation of naive CD8+ T cells into alloreactive CTL within secondary lymphoid organs, whereas in humans, CTL may alternatively develop within the graft from circulating CD8+ effector memory T cells (TEM) that recognize class I MHC molecules on graft endothelial cells (EC). This latter pathway is poorly understood. Here, we show that host CD4+ TEM, activated by EC class II MHC molecules, provide critical help for this process. First, blocking HLA-DR on EC lining human artery grafts in immunodeficient mice reduces CD8+ CTL development within and acute rejection of the artery by adoptively transferred allogeneic human lymphocytes. Second, siRNA knockdown or CRISPR/Cas9 ablation of class II MHC molecules on EC prevents CD4+ TEM from helping CD8+ TEM to develop into CTL in vitro. Finally, implanted synthetic microvessels, formed from CRISPR/Cas9-modified EC lacking class II MHC molecules, are significantly protected from CD8+ T cell–mediated destruction in vivo. We conclude that human CD8+ TEM–mediated rejection targeting graft EC class I MHC molecules requires help from CD4+ TEM cells activated by recognition of class II MHC molecules. PMID:26900601

  4. 40 CFR 144.19 - Transitioning from Class II to Class VI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Increase in carbon dioxide injection rates; (3) Decrease in reservoir production rates; (4) Distance... Transitioning from Class II to Class VI. (a) Owners or operators that are injecting carbon dioxide for the... of carbon dioxide at the cessation of injection; (8) The source and properties of injected...

  5. 40 CFR 144.19 - Transitioning from Class II to Class VI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Increase in carbon dioxide injection rates; (3) Decrease in reservoir production rates; (4) Distance... Transitioning from Class II to Class VI. (a) Owners or operators that are injecting carbon dioxide for the... of carbon dioxide at the cessation of injection; (8) The source and properties of injected...

  6. 40 CFR 144.19 - Transitioning from Class II to Class VI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Increase in carbon dioxide injection rates; (3) Decrease in reservoir production rates; (4) Distance... Transitioning from Class II to Class VI. (a) Owners or operators that are injecting carbon dioxide for the... of carbon dioxide at the cessation of injection; (8) The source and properties of injected...

  7. Contrasting evolutionary histories of MHC class I and class II loci in grouse-effects of selection and gene conversion.

    PubMed

    Minias, P; Bateson, Z W; Whittingham, L A; Johnson, J A; Oyler-McCance, S; Dunn, P O

    2016-05-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encode receptor molecules that are responsible for recognition of intracellular and extracellular pathogens (class I and class II genes, respectively) in vertebrates. Given the different roles of class I and II MHC genes, one might expect the strength of selection to differ between these two classes. Different selective pressures may also promote different rates of gene conversion at each class. Despite these predictions, surprisingly few studies have looked at differences between class I and II genes in terms of both selection and gene conversion. Here, we investigated the molecular evolution of MHC class I and II genes in five closely related species of prairie grouse (Centrocercus and Tympanuchus) that possess one class I and two class II loci. We found striking differences in the strength of balancing selection acting on MHC class I versus class II genes. More than half of the putative antigen-binding sites (ABS) of class II were under positive or episodic diversifying selection, compared with only 10% at class I. We also found that gene conversion had a stronger role in shaping the evolution of MHC class II than class I. Overall, the combination of strong positive (balancing) selection and frequent gene conversion has maintained higher diversity of MHC class II than class I in prairie grouse. This is one of the first studies clearly demonstrating that macroevolutionary mechanisms can act differently on genes involved in the immune response against intracellular and extracellular pathogens. PMID:26860199

  8. Contrasting evolutionary histories of MHC class I and class II loci in grouse—Effects of selection and gene conversion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minias, Piotr; Bateson, Zachary W; Whittingham, Linda A; Johnson, Jeff A.; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Dunn, Peter O

    2016-01-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encode receptor molecules that are responsible for recognition of intracellular and extracellular pathogens (class I and class II genes, respectively) in vertebrates. Given the different roles of class I and II MHC genes, one might expect the strength of selection to differ between these two classes. Different selective pressures may also promote different rates of gene conversion at each class. Despite these predictions, surprisingly few studies have looked at differences between class I and II genes in terms of both selection and gene conversion. Here, we investigated the molecular evolution of MHC class I and II genes in five closely related species of prairie grouse (Centrocercus and Tympanuchus) that possess one class I and two class II loci. We found striking differences in the strength of balancing selection acting on MHC class I versus class II genes. More than half of the putative antigen-binding sites (ABS) of class II were under positive or episodic diversifying selection, compared with only 10% at class I. We also found that gene conversion had a stronger role in shaping the evolution of MHC class II than class I. Overall, the combination of strong positive (balancing) selection and frequent gene conversion has maintained higher diversity of MHC class II than class I in prairie grouse. This is one of the first studies clearly demonstrating that macroevolutionary mechanisms can act differently on genes involved in the immune response against intracellular and extracellular pathogens.

  9. Regulation of major histocompatibility complex class II genes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Nancy M.; Majumder, Parimal; Boss, Jeremy M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) genes are regulated at the level of transcription. Recent studies have shown that chromatin modification is critical for efficient transcription of these genes, and a number of chromatin modifying complexes recruited to MHC-II genes have been described. The MHC-II genes are segregated from each other by a series of chromatin elements, termed MHC-II insulators. Interactions between MHC-insulators and the promoters of MHC-II genes are mediated by the insulator factor CCCTC-binding protein and are critical for efficient expression. This regulatory mechanism provides a novel view of how the entire MHC-II locus is assembled architecturally and can be coordinately controlled. PMID:20970972

  10. A cephalometric evaluation of tongue from the rest position to centric occlusion in the subjects with class II division 1 malocclusion and class I normal occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sanjeev K.; Tandon, Pradeep; Agrawal, D. K.; Prabhat, K. C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: One of the common types of oro-dental morphopathologic relationship is the Class II Division 1 malocclusion. Therefore, the study of tongue position in Class II Division 1 may reveal a role of the tongue in the etiology or diagnosis of malocclusion. Aims: Present study was done with the aim to evaluate the tongue position radiographically in centric occlusion and rest position in the subjects with Angle's Class 1 normal occlusion and subjects with Angle's Class II Division 1 malocclusion and to find out any differences in tongue position between Angle's Class 1 normal occlusion and Angle's Class II Division 1 malocclusion group. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted on lateral cephalogram of 40 subjects between the age ranges of 16 to 22 years. The samples were divided into the Angle's Class 1 normal occlusion group (Group I) and the Angle's Class II Division 1 malocclusion group (Group II) with the 20 in each groups. The study involved the evaluation of tongue position at rest position and centric occlusion on the lateral head cephalogram. Results: This study for the evaluation of the tongue position from the rest position to the centric occlusion showed no statistically significant changes in both groups. However, there were greater changes in various parameters (From the rest position to the centric occlusion) in the subjects with Angle's Class II Division 1 malocclusion as compared to the subjects with the Angle's Class I normal occlusion group. Conclusion: From the present study following conclusion can be drawn: with the closure of mandible from the rest position to centric occlusion the tongue moved antero-superiorly in the tip region, superiorly in the dorsum region, and antero-superiorly in the posterior region in normal occlusion and postero-superiorly in Class II Division 1 malocclusion. PMID:24987623

  11. PowerScope a Class II corrector - A case report.

    PubMed

    Paulose, Joby; Antony, Palathottungal Joseph; Sureshkumar, Brijesh; George, Susha Mariam; Mathew, Manu Mundackal; Sebastian, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Managing mild to moderate Class II malocclusion is a one of the common and major challenges to orthodontists. Class II discrepancies with mandibular deficiency during active growth are usually treated by myofunctional appliances. Fixed functional appliances evolved due to the noncompliance with conventional myofunctional appliances. This case report illustrates the efficiency of PowerScope in correction of skeletal Class II with mandibular deficiency in a patient aged 13 years who has reported to the department with a chief complaint of forwardly placed upper front teeth. This case with functional jaw retrusion was treated initially with MBT 0.022" prescription followed by PowerScope. Pre-, mid- and post-treatment cephalograms were obtained, and cephalometric analysis was performed. Stable and successful results were obtained with a substantial improvement in facial profile, skeletal jaw relationship, and overall esthetic appearance of the patient. A significant forward displacement of the mandible was the principal element for successful correction of Class II malocclusion. PowerScope provides the best results for Class II management, thus enables us to treat such cases by a nonextraction approach rather than contemplating extractions. PMID:27307671

  12. MHC class II antigen presentation pathway in murine tumours: tumour evasion from immunosurveillance?

    PubMed Central

    Walter, W; Lingnau, K; Schmitt, E; Loos, M; Maeurer, M J

    2000-01-01

    Qualitative differences in the MHC class II antigen processing and presentation pathway may be instrumental in shaping the CD4+ T cell response directed against tumour cells. Efficient loading of many MHC class II alleles with peptides requires the assistance of H2-M, a heterodimeric MHC class II-like molecule. In contrast to the HLA-DM region in humans, the β-chain locus is duplicated in mouse, with the H2-Mb1 (Mb1β-chain distal to H2-Mb2 (Mb2) and the H2-Ma (Ma) α-chain gene). Here, we show that murine MHC class II and H2-M genes are coordinately regulated in murine tumour cell lines by T helper cell 1 (IFN-γ) and T helper cell 2 (IL-4 or IL-10) cytokines in the presence of the MHC class II-specific transactivator CIITA as determined by mRNA expression and Western blot analysis. Furthermore, Mαβ1 and Mαβ2 heterodimers are differentially expressed in murine tumour cell lines of different histology. Both H2-M isoforms promote equally processing and presentation of native protein antigens to H2-Ad- and H2-Ed-restricted CD4+ T cells. Murine tumour cell lines could be divided into three groups: constitutive MHC class II and CIITA expression; inducible MHC class II and CIITA expression upon IFN-γ-treatment; and lack of constitutive and IFN-γ-inducible MHC class II and CIITA expression. These differences may impact on CD4+ T cell recognition of cancer cells in murine tumour models. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11027433

  13. In vitro digestion with proteases producing MHC class II ligands.

    PubMed

    Tohmé, Mira; Maschalidi, Sophia; Manoury, Bénédicte

    2013-01-01

    Proteases generate peptides that bind to MHC class II molecules to interact with a wide diversity of CD4(+) T cells. They are expressed in dedicated organelles: endosomes and lysosomes of professional antigen presenting cells (pAPCs) such as B cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells. The identification of endosomal proteases which produce antigenic peptides is important, for example, for better vaccination and to prevent autoimmune diseases. Here, we describe a panel of technics (in vitro digestion assays of protein with recombinant proteases or purified endosomes/lysosomes, T cell stimulation) to monitor the production of MHC class II ligands. PMID:23329510

  14. Evaluation of Pharyngeal Space in Different Combinations of Class II Skeletal Malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Jay; Shyagali, Tarulatha R.; Bhayya, Deepak P.; Shah, Romil

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The study was aimed to evaluate the pharyngeal airway linear measurements of untreated skeletal class II subjects with normal facial vertical pattern in prognathic maxilla with orthognathic mandible and orthognathic maxilla with retrognathic mandible. Materials and method: the sample comprised of lateral Cephalograms of two groups (30 each) of class II malocclusion variants. Group 1 comprised of class II malocclusion with prognathic maxilla and orthognathic mandible, whereas group 2 comprised of class II malocclusion with orthognathic maxilla and retrognathic mandible. Each group was traced for the linear measurements of the pharyngeal airway like the oropharynx, nasopharynx and soft palate. The obtained data was subjected to independent t test and the Mann Whitney test to check the difference between the two groups and within the groups respectively. Results: there was significant difference between all the linear measurements at the soft palate region and the distance between the tip of soft palate to its counter point on the pharyngeal wall in oropharynx region (p-ppm). Conclusion: the pharyngeal airway for class II malocclusion with various combination in an average growth pattern adult showed significant difference. The present results suggested, that the pharyngeal airway space might be the etiological factor for different sagittal growth pattern of the jaws and probable usage of different growth modification appliance can influence the pharyngeal airway. PMID:26635436

  15. Towards a systems understanding of MHC class I and MHC class II antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Neefjes, Jacques; Jongsma, Marlieke L M; Paul, Petra; Bakke, Oddmund

    2011-12-01

    The molecular details of antigen processing and presentation by MHC class I and class II molecules have been studied extensively for almost three decades. Although the basic principles of these processes were laid out approximately 10 years ago, the recent years have revealed many details and provided new insights into their control and specificity. MHC molecules use various biochemical reactions to achieve successful presentation of antigenic fragments to the immune system. Here we present a timely evaluation of the biology of antigen presentation and a survey of issues that are considered unresolved. The continuing flow of new details into our understanding of the biology of MHC class I and class II antigen presentation builds a system involving several cell biological processes, which is discussed in this Review. PMID:22076556

  16. An engineered class I transfer RNA with a class II tertiary fold.

    PubMed Central

    Nissan, T A; Oliphant, B; Perona, J J

    1999-01-01

    Structure-based engineering of the tertiary fold of Escherichia coli tRNA(Gln)2 has enabled conversion of this transfer RNA to a class II structure while retaining recognition properties of a class I glutamine tRNA. The new tRNA possesses the 20-nt variable stem-loop of Thermus thermophilus tRNA(Ser). Enlargement of the D-loop appears essential to maintaining a stable tertiary structure in this species, while rearrangement of a base triple in the augmented D-stem is critical for efficient glutaminylation. These data provide new insight into structural determinants distinguishing the class I and class II tRNA folds, and demonstrate a marked sensitivity of glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase to alteration of tRNA tertiary structure. PMID:10094311

  17. 18 CFR 415.21 - Class II projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Class II projects. 415.21 Section 415.21 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION... flooded, would pollute the waters of the basin or threaten damage to off-site areas, including,...

  18. 18 CFR 415.21 - Class II projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Class II projects. 415.21 Section 415.21 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION... flooded, would pollute the waters of the basin or threaten damage to off-site areas, including,...

  19. 18 CFR 415.21 - Class II projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Class II projects. 415.21 Section 415.21 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION... flooded, would pollute the waters of the basin or threaten damage to off-site areas, including,...

  20. 18 CFR 415.21 - Class II projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Class II projects. 415.21 Section 415.21 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION... flooded, would pollute the waters of the basin or threaten damage to off-site areas, including,...

  1. 18 CFR 415.21 - Class II projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Class II projects. 415.21 Section 415.21 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION... flooded, would pollute the waters of the basin or threaten damage to off-site areas, including,...

  2. MHC class II DR allelic diversity in bighorn sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that decreased diversity and/or unique polymorphisms in MHC class II alleles of bighorn sheep (BHS, Ovis canadensis) are responsible for lower titer of antibodies against Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin, in comparison to domestic sheep (DS, Ovis aries). To test this hypothesis, DRA...

  3. 49 CFR 238.317 - Class II brake test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Class II brake test. 238.317 Section 238.317 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PASSENGER EQUIPMENT SAFETY STANDARDS Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance Requirements for Tier I Passenger Equipment...

  4. 14 CFR 21.223 - Class II provisional airworthiness certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Class II provisional airworthiness certificates. 21.223 Section 21.223 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... the aircraft has been issued to the manufacturer. (c) The applicant must submit a statement by...

  5. 77 FR 4714 - Self-Regulation of Class II Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-31

    ...This action proposes to amend the NIGC's self-regulation regulations to tailor the self-regulating qualifying criteria to a tribe's regulation of class II gaming activity and more clearly define and streamline the self-regulation certification process. By tailoring the self-regulating qualifying criteria to the capabilities of a tribe's regulatory body, and by clarifying and streamlining the......

  6. Far Outer Galaxy H II Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, A. L.; deGues, E. J.; Brand, J.; Wouterloot, J. G. A.; Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We have made a multifrequency (6, 3.6, and 2 cm), high-resolution (3"-6"), radio continuum survey of IRAS selected sources from the catalogue of Wouterloot & Brand (1989) to search for and study H II regions in the far outer Galaxy. We identified 31 sources in this catalog with well determined galactocentric distances, and with R approx.. greater than 15 kpc and L(sub FIR) approx.greater than 10(exp 4) solar luminosity, indicating the presence of high-mass star-formation. We have observed 11 of these sources with the Very Large Array (VLA). We observed the sources at 6 and 2 cm using "scaled arrays", making possible a direct and reliable comparison of the data at these two wavelengths for the determination of spectral indices. We detected a total of 12 radio sources, of which 10 have spectral indices consistent with optically-thin free-free emission from H II regions. Combined with previous VLA observations by other investigators, we have data on a total of 15 H II regions at galactocentric distances of 15 to 18.2kpc, among the most remote H II regions found in our Galaxy. The sizes of the H II regions range from approx. less than 0.10 to 2.3 pc. Using the measured fluxes and sizes, we determine the electron densities, emission measures, and excitation parameters of the H II regions, as well as the fluxes of Lyman continuum photons needed to keep the nebulae ionized. The sizes and electron densities are consistent with most of the sources detected in this survey being compact or ultracompact H II regions. Seven of the fifteen H II regions have sizes approx. less than 0.20 pc. Assuming simple pressure-driven expansion of the H II regions, these sizes indicate ages approx. less than 5 x 10(exp 4) yr, or only 1% of the lifetime of an O star, which implies an unlikely overabundance of O stars in the outer Galaxy. Thus, the large number of compact H II regions suggests that the time these regions spend in a compact phase must be much longer than their dynamical

  7. OGLE II Eclipsing Binaries In The LMC: Analysis With Class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devinney, Edward J.; Prsa, A.; Guinan, E. F.; DeGeorge, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Eclipsing Binaries (EBs) via Artificial Intelligence (EBAI) Project is applying machine learning techniques to elucidate the nature of EBs. Previously, Prsa, et al. applied artificial neural networks (ANNs) trained on physically-realistic Wilson-Devinney models to solve the light curves of the 1882 detached EBs in the LMC discovered by the OGLE II Project (Wyrzykowski, et al.) fully automatically, bypassing the need for manually-derived starting solutions. A curious result is the non-monotonic distribution of the temperature ratio parameter T2/T1, featuring a subsidiary peak noted previously by Mazeh, et al. in an independent analysis using the EBOP EB solution code (Tamuz, et al.). To explore this and to gain a fuller understanding of the multivariate EBAI LMC observational plus solutions data, we have employed automatic clustering and advanced visualization (CAV) techniques. Clustering the OGLE II data aggregates objects that are similar with respect to many parameter dimensions. Measures of similarity for example, could include the multidimensional Euclidean Distance between data objects, although other measures may be appropriate. Applying clustering, we find good evidence that the T2/T1 subsidiary peak is due to evolved binaries, in support of Mazeh et al.'s speculation. Further, clustering suggests that the LMC detached EBs occupying the main sequence region belong to two distinct classes. Also identified as a separate cluster in the multivariate data are stars having a Period-I band relation. Derekas et al. had previously found a Period-K band relation for LMC EBs discovered by the MACHO Project (Alcock, et al.). We suggest such CAV techniques will prove increasingly useful for understanding the large, multivariate datasets increasingly being produced in astronomy. We are grateful for the support of this research from NSF/RUI Grant AST-05-75042 f.

  8. Effect of HLA Class I and Class II Alleles on Progression From Autoantibody Positivity to Overt Type 1 Diabetes in Children With Risk-Associated Class II Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lipponen, Kati; Gombos, Zsofia; Kiviniemi, Minna; Siljander, Heli; Lempainen, Johanna; Hermann, Robert; Veijola, Riitta; Simell, Olli; Knip, Mikael; Ilonen, Jorma

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Class II alleles define the main HLA effect on type 1 diabetes, but there is an independent effect of certain class I alleles. Class II and class I molecules are differently involved in the initiation and effector phases of the immune response, suggesting that class I alleles would be important determinants in the rate of β-cell destruction. To test this hypothesis we analyzed the role of HLA class I and class II gene polymorphisms in the progression from diabetes-associated autoimmunity to clinical disease. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The effect of HLA-DR-DQ haplotypes and a panel of class I HLA-A and -B alleles on the progression from autoantibody seroconversion to clinical diabetes was studied in 249 children persistently positive for at least one biochemical diabetes-associated autoantibody in addition to islet cell autoantibody. RESULTS The progression to clinical disease was separately analyzed after the appearance of the first and the second persistent biochemical autoantibody using Cox regression. Multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant protective effect of the A*03 allele (odds ratio [OR] 0.61, P = 0.042 after the first and OR 0.55, P = 0.027 after the second autoantibody), whereas the B*39 allele had a promoting effect after seroconversion for the second autoantibody (OR 2.4, P = 0.014). When children with the DR3/DR4 genotype were separately analyzed, HLA-B*39 had a strong effect (OR 6.6, P = 0.004 and OR 7.5, P = 0.007, after the appearance of the first and the second autoantibody, respectively). The protective effect of A*03 was seen only among children without the DR3/DR4 combination. CONCLUSIONS These results confirm that class I alleles affect the progression of diabetes-associated autoimmunity and demonstrate interactions between class I and class II alleles. PMID:20739684

  9. 37 GHz Methanol Masers : Horsemen of the Apocalypse for the Class II Methanol Maser Phase?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellingsen, S. P.; Breen, S. L.; Sobolev, A. M.; Voronkov, M. A.; Caswell, J. L.; Lo, N.

    2011-12-01

    We report the results of a search for class II methanol masers at 37.7, 38.3, and 38.5 GHz toward a sample of 70 high-mass star formation regions. We primarily searched toward regions known to show emission either from the 107 GHz class II methanol maser transition, or from the 6.035 GHz excited OH transition. We detected maser emission from 13 sources in the 37.7 GHz transition, eight of these being new detections. We detected maser emission from three sources in the 38 GHz transitions, one of which is a new detection. We find that 37.7 GHz methanol masers are only associated with the most luminous 6.7 and 12.2 GHz methanol maser sources, which in turn are hypothesized to be the oldest class II methanol sources. We suggest that the 37.7 GHz methanol masers are associated with a brief evolutionary phase (of 1000-4000 years) prior to the cessation of class II methanol maser activity in the associated high-mass star formation region.

  10. Molecular characterization by high-resolution isoelectric focusing of the products encoded by the class II region loci of the major histocompatibility complex in humans. I. DR and DQ gene variants.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez de Cordoba, S; Nunez-Roldan, A; Winchester, R; Marshall, P; Carrier, C; Mollen, N; Walker, M; Ginsberg-Fellner, F; Rubinstein, P

    1987-09-01

    We describe a new approach to the analysis of the structural polymorphism of the DR beta, DQ alpha, and DQ beta polypeptide chains of human histocompatibility class II antigens. In comparison to conventional two-dimensional gel studies, this method provides sharper definition of the protein bands and side-by-side comparisons within the same gel, thereby permitting the detection of minor differences in the isoelectric points of the protein chains. Using this methodology we have analyzed the IEF polymorphism and the variability in the number of the DR beta chains encoded by different DR haplotypes. Twenty DR beta chain variants, which include the products of no less than two separate DR beta loci, have been thus far identified. Alleles at one of these loci are assumed to code for DR beta chains carrying the DR alloespecificities DR1, DR2, DR3, DR4, DR5, DRw6, DR7, and DR8. Alleles at a second DR beta locus encode DR beta chains that may be shared by serologically DR-different haplotypes and carry supertypic serologic specificities (i.e., DRw52 and DRw53). We also demonstrate here that the structural polymorphisms of the DQ alpha and DQ beta chains are more extensive than previously thought, report the characterization of 14 DQ beta variants, and define their relationship to the previously described DQw serologic specificities. In addition, we describe the class II haplotype associations observed for the different DR and DQ variants characterized. PMID:3679903

  11. In silico identification of supertypes for class II MHCs.

    PubMed

    Doytchinova, Irini A; Flower, Darren R

    2005-06-01

    The development of epitope-based vaccines, which have wide population coverage, is greatly complicated by MHC polymorphism. The grouping of alleles into supertypes, on the basis of common structural and functional features, addresses this problem directly. In the present study we applied a combined bioinformatics approach, based on analysis of both protein sequence and structure, to identify similarities in the peptide binding sites of 2225 human class II MHC molecules, and thus define supertypes and supertype fingerprints. Two chemometric techniques were used: hierarchical clustering using three-dimensional Comparative Similarity Indices Analysis fields and nonhierarchical k-means clustering using sequence-based z-descriptors. An average consensus of 84% was achieved, i.e., 1872 of 2225 class II molecules were classified in the same supertype by both techniques. Twelve class II supertypes were defined: five DRs, three DQs, and four DPs. The HLA class II supertypes and their fingerprints given in parenthesis are DR1 (Trp(9beta)), DR3 (Glu(9beta), Gln(70beta), and Gln/Arg(74beta)), DR4 (Glu(9beta), Gln/Arg(70beta), and Glu/Ala(74beta)), DR5 (Glu(9beta), Asp(70beta)), and DR9 (Lys/Gln(9beta)); DQ1 (Ala/Gly(86beta)), DQ2 (Glu(86beta), Lys(71beta)), and DQ3 (Glu(86beta), Thr/Asp(71beta)); DPw1 (Asp(84beta) and Lys(69beta)), DPw2 (Gly/Val(84beta) and Glu(69beta)), DPw4 (Gly/Val(84beta) and Lys(69beta)), and DPw6 (Asp(84beta) and Glu(69beta)). Apart from the good agreement between known binding motifs and our classification, several new supertypes, and corresponding thematic binding motifs, were also defined. PMID:15905552

  12. Cylindrical bubbles and blobs from a Class II Hydrophobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Paul; Pham, Michael; Blalock, Brad

    2012-02-01

    Cerato ulmin is a class II hydrophobin. In aqueous suspensions, it easily forms cylindrical air bubbles and cylindrical oil blobs. The conditions for formation of these unusual structures will be discussed, along with scattering and microscopic investigations of their remarkable stability. Possible applications in diverse fields including polymer synthesis and oil spill remediation will be considered. Acknowledgment is made to Dr. Wayne C. Richards of the Canadian Forest Service for the gift of Cerato ulmin.

  13. THE ARECIBO H II REGION DISCOVERY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Bania, T. M.; Anderson, L. D.; Balser, Dana S.

    2012-11-10

    We report the detection of radio recombination line (RRL) emission using the Arecibo Observatory at X band (9 GHz, 3 cm) from 37 previously unknown H II regions in the Galactic zone 66 Degree-Sign {>=} l {>=} 31 Degree-Sign and | b | {<=} 1 Degree-Sign . This Arecibo H II Region Discovery Survey (Arecibo HRDS) is a continuation of the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) HRDS. The targets for the Arecibo HRDS have spatially coincident 24 {mu}m and 20 cm emission of a similar angular morphology and extent. To take advantage of Arecibo's sensitivity and small beam size, sources in this sample are fainter, smaller in angle, or in more crowded fields compared to those of the GBT HRDS. These Arecibo nebulae are some of the faintest H II regions ever detected in RRL emission. Our detection rate is 58%, which is low compared to the 95% detection rate for GBT HRDS targets. We derive kinematic distances to 23 of the Arecibo HRDS detections. Four nebulae have negative local standard of rest velocities and are thus unambiguously in the outer Galaxy. The remaining sources are at the tangent-point distance or farther. We identify a large, diffuse H II region complex that has an associated H I and {sup 13}CO shell. The {approx}90 pc diameter of the G52L nebula in this complex may be the largest Galactic H II region known, and yet it has escaped previous detection.

  14. HLA class II linkage disequilibrium and haplotype evolution in the Cayapa Indians of Ecuador

    SciTech Connect

    Trachtenberg, E.A.; Erlich, H.A.; Klitz, W.

    1995-08-01

    DNA-based typing of the HLA class II loci in a sample of the Cayapa Indians of Ecuador reveals several lines of evidence that selection has operated to maintain and to diversify the existing level of polymorphism in the class II region. As has been noticed for other Native American groups, the overall level of polymorphism at the DRB1, DQA1, DQB1, and DPB1 loci is reduced relative to that found in other human populations. Nonetheless, the relative eveness in the distribution of allele frequencies at each of the four loci points to the role of balancing selection in the maintenance of the polymorphism. The DQA1 and DQB1 loci, in particular, have near-maximum departures from the neutrality model, which suggests that balancing selection has been especially strong in these cases. Several novel DQA1-DQB1 haplotypes and the discovery of a new DRB1 allele demonstrate an evolutionary tendency favoring the diversification of class II alleles and haplotypes. The recombination interval between the centromeric DPB1 locus and the other class II loci will, in the absence of other forces such as selection, reduce disequilibrium across this region. However, nearly all common alleles were found to be part of DR-DP haplotypes in strong disequilibrium, consistent with the recent action of selection acting on these haplotypes in the Cayapa. 50 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. MHC Class II haplotypes of Colombian Amerindian tribes

    PubMed Central

    Yunis, Juan J.; Yunis, Edmond J.; Yunis, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed 1041 individuals belonging to 17 Amerindian tribes of Colombia, Chimila, Bari and Tunebo (Chibcha linguistic family), Embera, Waunana (Choco linguistic family), Puinave and Nukak (Maku-Puinave linguistic families), Cubeo, Guanano, Tucano, Desano and Piratapuyo (Tukano linguistic family), Guahibo and Guayabero (Guayabero Linguistic Family), Curripaco and Piapoco (Arawak linguistic family) and Yucpa (Karib linguistic family). for MHC class II haplotypes (HLA-DRB1, DQA1, DQB1). Approximately 90% of the MHC class II haplotypes found among these tribes are haplotypes frequently encountered in other Amerindian tribes. Nonetheless, striking differences were observed among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes. The DRB1*04:04, DRB1*04:11, DRB1*09:01 carrying haplotypes were frequently found among non-Chibcha speaking tribes, while the DRB1*04:07 haplotype showed significant frequencies among Chibcha speaking tribes, and only marginal frequencies among non-Chibcha speaking tribes. Our results suggest that the differences in MHC class II haplotype frequency found among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes could be due to genetic differentiation in Mesoamerica of the ancestral Amerindian population into Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking populations before they entered into South America. PMID:23885196

  16. MHC Class II Auto-Antigen Presentation is Unconventional

    PubMed Central

    Sadegh-Nasseri, Scheherazade; Kim, AeRyon

    2015-01-01

    Antigen presentation is highly critical in adoptive immunity. Only by interacting with antigens presented by major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, helper T cells can be stimulated to fight infections or diseases. The degradation of a full protein into small peptide fragments bound to class II molecules is a dynamic, lengthy process consisting of many steps and chaperons. Deregulation in any step of antigen processing could lead to the development of self-reactive T cells or defective immune response to pathogens. Indeed, human leukocyte antigens class II genes are the predominant contributors to susceptibility to autoimmune diseases. Conventional antigen-processing calls for internalization of extracellular antigens followed by processing and epitope selection within antigen-processing subcellular compartments, enriched with all necessary accessory molecules, processing enzymes, and proper pH and denaturing conditions. However, recent data examining the temporal relationship between antigen uptakes, processing, and epitope selection revealed unexpected characteristics for auto-antigenic epitopes, which were not shared with antigenic epitopes from pathogens. This review provides a discussion of the relevance of these findings to the mechanisms of autoimmunity. PMID:26257739

  17. Characterization of a class II pilin expression locus from Neisseria meningitidis: evidence for increased diversity among pilin genes in pathogenic Neisseria species.

    PubMed Central

    Aho, E L; Botten, J W; Hall, R J; Larson, M K; Ness, J K

    1997-01-01

    Strains of Neisseria meningitidis elaborate one of two classes of pili. Meningococcal class I pili have many features in common with pili produced by N. gonorrhoeae, including the ability to bind monoclonal antibody SM1 and a common gene and protein structure consisting of conserved, semivariable, and hypervariable regions. Class II pili are SM1 nonreactive and display smaller subunit molecular weights than do gonococcal or meningococcal class I pili. In this study, we have determined the N-terminal amino acid sequence for class II pilin and isolated the expression locus encoding class II pilin from N. meningitidis FAM18. Meningococcal class II pilin displays features typical of type IV pili and shares extensive amino acid identity with the N-terminal conserved regions of other neisserial pilin proteins. However, the deduced class II pilin sequence displays several unique features compared with previously reported meningococcal class I and gonococcal pilin sequences. Class II pilin lacks several conserved peptide regions found within the semivariable and hypervariable regions of other neisserial pilins and displays a large deletion in a hypervariable region of the protein believed to be exposed on the pilus face in gonococcal pili. DNA sequence comparisons within all three regions of the coding sequence also suggest that the meningococcal class II pilin gene is the most dissimilar of the three types of neisserial pilE loci. Additionally, the class II locus fails to display flanking-sequence homology to class I and gonococcal genes and lacks a downstream Sma/Cla repeat sequence, a feature present in all other neisserial pilin genes examined to date. These data indicate meningococcal class II pili represent a structurally distinct class of pili and suggest that relationships among pilin genes in pathogenic Neisseria do not necessarily follow species boundaries. PMID:9199428

  18. Molecular analysis of human leukocyte antigen class I and class II allele frequencies and haplotype distribution in Pakistani population

    PubMed Central

    Moatter, T.; Aban, M.; Tabassum, S.; Shaikh, U.; Pervez, S.

    2010-01-01

    AIM: Distribution of HLA class I and II alleles and haplotype was studied in Pakistani population and compared with the data reported for Caucasoid, Africans, Orientals and Arab populations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: HLA class I and II polymorphisms in 1000 unrelated Pakistani individuals was studied using sequence-specific primers and polymerase chain reaction and assay. RESULTS: The most frequent class I alleles observed were A*02, B*35 and CW*07, with frequencies of 19.2, 13.7 and 20%, respectively. Fifteen distinct HLA-DRB1 alleles and eight HLA-DQB1 alleles were recognized. The most frequently observed DRB1 alleles which represented more than 60% of the subjects were DRB1 *03, *07, *11 and *15. The rare DRB1 alleles detected in this study were HLADRB1 *08 and *09, having frequencies of 0.9 and 1.7%, respectively. In addition, at DRB1-DQB1 loci there were 179 different haplotypes and 285 unique genotypes and the most common haplotype was DRB1*15-DQB1*06 which represented 17% of the total DRB1-DQB1 haplotypes. In our population, haplotype A*33-B*58-Cw*03 comprised 2.8% of the total class I haplotypes observed. This haplotype was seen only in the oriental populations and has not been reported in the African or European Caucasoid. CONCLUSION: Our study showed a close similarity of HLA class I and II alleles with that of European Caucasoid and Orientals. In Pakistani population, two rare loci and three haplotypes were identified, whereas haplotypes characteristic of Caucasians, Africans and Orientals were also found, suggesting an admixture of different races due to migration to and from this region. PMID:21206703

  19. Spectral energy distribution analysis of class I and class II FU Orionis stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gramajo, Luciana V.; Gómez, Mercedes; Rodón, Javier A. E-mail: mercedes@oac.uncor.edu

    2014-06-01

    FU Orionis stars (FUors) are eruptive pre-main sequence objects thought to represent quasi-periodic or recurring stages of enhanced accretion during the low-mass star-forming process. We characterize the sample of known and candidate FUors in a homogeneous and consistent way, deriving stellar and circumstellar parameters for each object. We emphasize the analysis in those parameters that are supposed to vary during the FUor stage. We modeled the spectral energy distributions of 24 of the 26 currently known FUors, using the radiative transfer code of Whitney et al. We compare our models with those obtained by Robitaille et al. for Taurus class II and I sources in quiescence periods by calculating the cumulative distribution of the different parameters. FUors have more massive disks: we find that ∼80% of the disks in FUors are more massive than any Taurus class II and I sources in the sample. Median values for the disk mass accretion rates are ∼10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} versus ∼10{sup –5} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} for standard young stellar objects (YSOs) and FUors, respectively. While the distributions of envelope mass accretion rates for class I FUors and standard class I objects are similar, FUors, on average, have higher envelope mass accretion rates than standard class II and class I sources. Most FUors (∼70%) have envelope mass accretion rates above 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. In contrast, 60% of the classical YSO sample has an accretion rate below this value. Our results support the current scenario in which changes experimented by the circumstellar disk explain the observed properties of these stars. However, the increase in the disk mass accretion rate is smaller than theoretically predicted, although in good agreement with previous determinations.

  20. Medical devices; reclassification of three anesthesiology preamendments class III devices into class II. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2001-11-15

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is reclassifying three anesthesiology preamendments devices from class III (premarket approval) into class II (special controls). FDA is also identifying the special controls that the agency believes will reasonably ensure the safety and effectiveness of the devices. This reclassification is being undertaken on the agency's own initiative based on new information under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act), as amended by the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990 and the FDA Modernization Act of 1997. PMID:11776278

  1. Class II Division 1 in New Dimension: Role of Posterior Transverse Interarch Discrepancy in Class II Division 1 Malocclusion During the Mixed Dentition Period

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Deepanshu; Mahajan, Neeraj; Bansal, Samriti; Sawhney, Anshul; Kaur, Jasvir; Tripathi, Shashank; Malaviya, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Posterior transverse discrepancy as seen in some cases of Class II Division 1 malocclusion in mixed dentition period can be related to typical skeletofacial characteristics. These features when studied early in the mixed dentition period give a clear view of the desired appropriate treatment plan in a particular case. Aim The purpose of this study was to establish a simple method to determine the posterior (intermolar) transverse discrepancy and craniofacial skeletal features between the dental arches during the mixed dentition in a sample of Class II Division 1 patients to provide diagnostic and therapeutic guidance in the early approach. Materials and Methods A sample of 60 Class II Division 1 patients in mixed dention that were divided into 30 Class II Division 1 patients with posterior transverse interarch discrepancy {Class II (I) PTID group} and 30 Class II Division 1 patients without posterior transverse interarch discrepancy {Class II (I) NPTID group}. Thirty Class I subjects in mixed dentition were included as control. Results The skeletal features of the Class II group without PTID are those of the skeletal Class II associated with ‘anatomic’ mandibular retrusion (due to a micrognathic mandible) and those of the Class II group with PTID as skeletal Class II associated with only a ‘functional’ mandibular retrusion (due to a posteriorly displaced mandible of normal size). Conclusion This study confirmed the role of occlusion in the control of maxillomandibular skeletal relationships.The treatment strategies could be planned on the basis of the transverse component of Class II Division 1 groups in the mixed dentition period. PMID:26417555

  2. H II Regions in Interacting Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frattare, L. M.; Keel, W. C.; Laurikainen, E.

    1993-12-01

    We present a census of H II regions in 50 pairs of interacting galaxies, carried out on CCD and ISIT narrow-band images from Kitt Peak, Lowell, and La Palma. Objects were identified objectively using peak finding at multiple Gaussian smoothing levels to allow for the fact that the larger H II regions are marginally resolved, and measured using aperture photometry. We consider statistics of the space distribution, radial distribution, and luminosity functions. Preliminary analysis shows that the enhancement in star formation is strongest not only in the nuclear regions, but in preferred annuli as well. Interactions can produce significant asymmetries in the star-formation distribution. Some interacting galaxies show flatter luminosity functions for H II regions than seen in normal galaxies, either through an excess of very luminous star-forming complexes or a change in their clumping properties. We compare the statistics of both the location and luminosity of H II regions in interacting systems to results on isolated spirals. This work was supported by the NSF through REU grant AST-9300413 and EPSCoR grant EHR-9108761.

  3. Alternative designs for construction of the class II transfer RNA tertiary core.

    PubMed Central

    Nissan, T A; Perona, J J

    2000-01-01

    The structural requirements for assembly of functional class II transfer RNA core regions have been examined by sequence analysis and tested by reconstruction of alternative folds into the tertiary domain of Escherichia coli tRNA(2)Gln. At least four distinct designs have been identified that permit stable folding and efficient synthetase recognition, as assessed by thermal melting profiles and glutaminylation kinetics. Although most large variable-arm tRNAs found in nature possess an enlarged D-loop, lack of this feature can be compensated for by insertion of nucleotides either 3' to the variable loop or within the short acceptor/D-stem connector region. Rare pyrimidines at nt 9 in the core region can be accommodated in the class II framework, but only if specific nucleotides are present either in the D-loop or 3' to the variable arm. Glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase requires one or two unpaired uridines 3' to the variable arm to efficiently aminoacylate several of the class II frameworks. Because there are no specific enzyme contacts in the tRNAGln core region, these data suggest that tRNA discrimination by GlnRS depends in part on indirect readout of RNA sequence information. PMID:11105758

  4. Evaluation depth of the curve of Spee in class I, class II, and class III malocclusion: A cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Sanjna; Dinakarsamy, V.; Santhosh, S.

    2015-01-01

    Occlusal plane is an essential consideration when multiple long-span posterior restorations are designed. When restorations are added to an existing tooth arrangement characterized by rotated, tipped, or extruded teeth, excursive interferences may be incorporated, resulting in detrimental squeal. The curve of Spee, which exists in the ideal natural dentition, allows harmony to exist between the anterior tooth and condylar guidance. This curve exists in the sagittal plane and is the best viewed from a lateral aspect. It permits total posterior disclusion on mandibular protrusion, given proper anterior tooth guidance. It is unclear that whether the curve of Spee is a description of the occlusal surface of each arch separately or in maximal intercuspation. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in the depth of curve of Spee between the class I, class II, class III and to investigate the relationship of depth of curve of Spee with over jet, over-bite. PMID:26015764

  5. Class II HLA interactions modulate genetic risk for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Dilthey, Alexander T; Xifara, Dionysia K; Ban, Maria; Shah, Tejas S; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A; Alfredsson, Lars; Anderson, Carl A; Attfield, Katherine E; Baranzini, Sergio E; Barrett, Jeffrey; Binder, Thomas M C; Booth, David; Buck, Dorothea; Celius, Elisabeth G; Cotsapas, Chris; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Dendrou, Calliope A; Donnelly, Peter; Dubois, Bénédicte; Fontaine, Bertrand; Fugger, Lars; Goris, An; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Graetz, Christiane; Hemmer, Bernhard; Hillert, Jan; Kockum, Ingrid; Leslie, Stephen; Lill, Christina M; Martinelli-Boneschi, Filippo; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Olsson, Tomas; Oturai, Annette; Saarela, Janna; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Spurkland, Anne; Taylor, Bruce; Winkelmann, Juliane; Zipp, Frauke; Haines, Jonathan L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Spencer, Chris C A; Stewart, Graeme; Hafler, David A; Ivinson, Adrian J; Harbo, Hanne F; Hauser, Stephen L; De Jager, Philip L; Compston, Alastair; McCauley, Jacob L; Sawcer, Stephen; McVean, Gil

    2016-01-01

    Association studies have greatly refined the understanding of how variation within the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes influences risk of multiple sclerosis. However, the extent to which major effects are modulated by interactions is poorly characterized. We analyzed high-density SNP data on 17,465 cases and 30,385 controls from 11 cohorts of European ancestry, in combination with imputation of classical HLA alleles, to build a high-resolution map of HLA genetic risk and assess the evidence for interactions involving classical HLA alleles. Among new and previously identified class II risk alleles (HLA-DRB1*15:01, HLA-DRB1*13:03, HLA-DRB1*03:01, HLA-DRB1*08:01 and HLA-DQB1*03:02) and class I protective alleles (HLA-A*02:01, HLA-B*44:02, HLA-B*38:01 and HLA-B*55:01), we find evidence for two interactions involving pairs of class II alleles: HLA-DQA1*01:01–HLA-DRB1*15:01 and HLA-DQB1*03:01–HLA-DQB1*03:02. We find no evidence for interactions between classical HLA alleles and non-HLA risk-associated variants and estimate a minimal effect of polygenic epistasis in modulating major risk alleles. PMID:26343388

  6. HLA Class I and Class II Associations with ESRD in Saudi Arabian Population

    PubMed Central

    Hamdi, Nuha Mahmoud; Al-Hababi, Fadel Hassan; Eid, Amr Ekhlas

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic renal failure (CRF) leads in the majority of instances to end stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring renal replacement therapy. Our interest was to evaluate the possible associations of HLA class I and class II antigens with ESRD independent of other factors, in Saudi Arabia population. Methodology A retrospective study to determine the HLA class I and class II polymorphisms and their association with ESRD, was performed on 350 patients with ESRD, and 105 healthy unrelated control. Patients and control groups were typed by SSOP lumenix techniques. The alleles positively associated to the ESRD were: HLA-B*15, B*18, B*49 - DRB1*03, negatively associated alleles were A*26, HLA-B*39, B*50. The haplotypes positively associated with ESRD were: HLA-A*01-DRB1*13 and HLA-A*30-DRBI*03. The negatively associated haplotypes were: HLA-A*02-B*39, A*02-B*50, A*24-B*35, A*24-B*58, A*24-DRB1*16, A*68-DRB1*04, A*02-DQB1*03, A*29-DQB1*02, A*29-DOB1*05 and B*27-DRB1*07 and the last one is the most significant protective haplotypes. Conclusion The high Relative Risk (RR) observed and its statistical correlation reflect the strength of the described association between HLA antigens and ESRD. PMID:25380295

  7. 78 FR 24061 - Minimum Technical Standards for Class II Gaming Systems and Equipment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... ensuring the integrity of electronic Class II games and aids. 73 FR 60508, Oct. 10, 2008. The technical... Class II gaming system; and to clarify the term ``alternate standard.'' 77 FR 58473, Sept. 21, 2012. In... control standards (MICS) for Class II gaming. 77 FR 58708, Sept. 21, 2012. Similar to the part...

  8. Multiple sclerosis-associated CLEC16A controls HLA class II expression via late endosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    van Luijn, Marvin M.; Kreft, Karim L.; Jongsma, Marlieke L.; Mes, Steven W.; Wierenga-Wolf, Annet F.; van Meurs, Marjan; Melief, Marie-José; van der Kant, Rik; Janssen, Lennert; Janssen, Hans; Tan, Rusung; Priatel, John J.; Neefjes, Jacques; Laman, Jon D.

    2015-01-01

    C-type lectins are key players in immune regulation by driving distinct functions of antigen-presenting cells. The C-type lectin CLEC16A gene is located at 16p13, a susceptibility locus for several autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis. However, the function of this gene and its potential contribution to these diseases in humans are poorly understood. In this study, we found a strong upregulation of CLEC16A expression in the white matter of multiple sclerosis patients (n = 14) compared to non-demented controls (n = 11), mainly in perivascular leukocyte infiltrates. Moreover, CLEC16A levels were significantly enhanced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of multiple sclerosis patients (n = 69) versus healthy controls (n = 46). In peripheral blood mononuclear cells, CLEC16A was most abundant in monocyte-derived dendritic cells, in which it strongly co-localized with human leukocyte antigen class II. Treatment of these professional antigen-presenting cells with vitamin D, a key protective environmental factor in multiple sclerosis, downmodulated CLEC16A in parallel with human leukocyte antigen class II. Knockdown of CLEC16A in distinct types of model and primary antigen-presenting cells resulted in severely impaired cytoplasmic distribution and formation of human leucocyte antigen class II-positive late endosomes, as determined by immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Mechanistically, CLEC16A participated in the molecular machinery of human leukocyte antigen class II-positive late endosome formation and trafficking to perinuclear regions, involving the dynein motor complex. By performing co-immunoprecipitations, we found that CLEC16A directly binds to two critical members of this complex, RILP and the HOPS complex. CLEC16A silencing in antigen-presenting cells disturbed RILP-mediated recruitment of human leukocyte antigen class II-positive late endosomes to perinuclear regions. Together, we identify CLEC16A as a pivotal gene in multiple sclerosis

  9. Multiple sclerosis-associated CLEC16A controls HLA class II expression via late endosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    van Luijn, Marvin M; Kreft, Karim L; Jongsma, Marlieke L; Mes, Steven W; Wierenga-Wolf, Annet F; van Meurs, Marjan; Melief, Marie-José; der Kant, Rik van; Janssen, Lennert; Janssen, Hans; Tan, Rusung; Priatel, John J; Neefjes, Jacques; Laman, Jon D; Hintzen, Rogier Q

    2015-06-01

    C-type lectins are key players in immune regulation by driving distinct functions of antigen-presenting cells. The C-type lectin CLEC16A gene is located at 16p13, a susceptibility locus for several autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis. However, the function of this gene and its potential contribution to these diseases in humans are poorly understood. In this study, we found a strong upregulation of CLEC16A expression in the white matter of multiple sclerosis patients (n = 14) compared to non-demented controls (n = 11), mainly in perivascular leukocyte infiltrates. Moreover, CLEC16A levels were significantly enhanced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of multiple sclerosis patients (n = 69) versus healthy controls (n = 46). In peripheral blood mononuclear cells, CLEC16A was most abundant in monocyte-derived dendritic cells, in which it strongly co-localized with human leukocyte antigen class II. Treatment of these professional antigen-presenting cells with vitamin D, a key protective environmental factor in multiple sclerosis, downmodulated CLEC16A in parallel with human leukocyte antigen class II. Knockdown of CLEC16A in distinct types of model and primary antigen-presenting cells resulted in severely impaired cytoplasmic distribution and formation of human leucocyte antigen class II-positive late endosomes, as determined by immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Mechanistically, CLEC16A participated in the molecular machinery of human leukocyte antigen class II-positive late endosome formation and trafficking to perinuclear regions, involving the dynein motor complex. By performing co-immunoprecipitations, we found that CLEC16A directly binds to two critical members of this complex, RILP and the HOPS complex. CLEC16A silencing in antigen-presenting cells disturbed RILP-mediated recruitment of human leukocyte antigen class II-positive late endosomes to perinuclear regions. Together, we identify CLEC16A as a pivotal gene in multiple sclerosis

  10. 25 CFR 522.5 - Disapproval of a class II ordinance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disapproval of a class II ordinance. 522.5 Section 522.5 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPROVAL OF CLASS II AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.5 Disapproval of a class...

  11. Millimetric observations of southern H II regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbatini, L.; Cavaliere, F.; dall'Oglio, G.; Davies, R. D.; Martinis, L.; Miriametro, A.; Paladini, R.; Pizzo, L.; Russo, P. A.; Valenziano, L.

    2005-08-01

    We report on millimetric continuum observations of two bright compact H II regions, which have been observed for the first time in this frequency range. For the two observed regions (G291.6-0.5 and G291.3-0.7), we derive the flux densities at the two observed wavelengths (1.25 and 2 mm) as well as the spectral index and the temperature of the surrounding dust by fitting a modified blackbody curve to our results combined with IR values obtained from the literature. We also estimate the dust mass and the bolometric luminosity of the two regions.

  12. Characterization and expression of MHC class II alpha and II beta genes in mangrove red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus).

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianyan; Tan, Shangjin; Cai, Zhonghua

    2015-12-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II plays a key role in adaptive immunity by presenting foreign peptides to CD4(+) T cells and by triggering the adaptive immune response. While the structure and function of MHC class II have been well characterized in mammalian, limited research has been done on fishes. In this study, we characterized the gene structure and expression of MHC class II α (Lunar-DAA) and II β (Lunar-DAB) of mangrove red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus). Both genes shared, respectively, a high similarity and typical features with other vertebrate MHC class II α and II β. The phylogenetic analysis of the deduced peptides revealed that both Lunar-DAA and Lunar-DAB were located in the teleost subclass. Western blotting analyses indicated that both MHC class II α and II β were expressed ubiquitously in immune-related cells, tissues and organs, and that MHC class II α and II β chains existed mainly as heterodimers. While it was highly expressed in gills, thymus, head kidney (HK), spleen, head kidney macrophage and spleen leucocytes, MHC class II β chain was expressed with a low abundance in skin, intestine, stomach and heart. The highest expression of MHC class II β in thymus confirmed the conclusion that thymus is one of the primary lymphoid organs in fishes. The detection of MHC class II αβ dimers in HK macrophages and spleen leucocytes indicated that HK macrophages and spleen leucocytes play a critical role in the adaptive immunity in fishes. All these results provide valuable information for understanding the structure of MHC class II α and II β and their function in immune responses. PMID:26454477

  13. Characterization of microsatellite loci in the SLA class I region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was aimed to investigate genetic variation of repeat sequences in the Swine Leukocyte Antigen class I (SLA-1) region which is believed to be responsible for systematic immune responses. Microsatellite (MS) markers in the SLA-1 region were characterized via sequencing analysis with BAC clo...

  14. Medical devices; reclassification of six cardiovascular preamendments class III devices into class II. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2001-04-10

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is reclassifying six cardiovascular pre amendments devices from class III (pre market approval) into class II (special controls). FDA is also identifying the special controls that the agency believes will reasonably ensure the safety and effectiveness of the devices. This reclassification is being undertaken on the agency's own initiative based on new information under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act), as amended by the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990 and the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997. The agency is also revising the identification of one of the devices subject to this rule to simplify the classification regulation and is correcting a typographical error that was incorporated into the regulations. PMID:11721689

  15. Evaluation and Comparison of Intermaxillary Tooth Size Discrepancy among Class I, Class II Division 1, and Class III Subjects Using Bolton’s Analysis: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Prasanna, A Lakshmi; Venkatramana, V; Aryasri, A Srikanth; Katta, Anil Kumar; Santhanakrishnan, K; Maheshwari, Uma

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to evaluation and comparison of intermaxillary tooth size discrepancy among Class I, Class II division 1, and Class III subjects using Bolton’s analysis. Materials and Methods: The pre-treatment casts were selected from the records of patients attending the Department of Orthodontics of Meenakshi Ammal Dental College, Chennai. The sample consists of 180 pre-treatment casts with both sexes evenly distributed with 60 casts in each type of malocclusion, i.e., Class I, Class II div 1, and Class III malocclusion. The sample was selected according to angles classification. All patients were Indian nationals, between the age group of 12 to 20 years and Bolton’s analysis done on all the casts. Results: Statistically no significant difference in all types of malocclusion except anterior Bolton’s discrepancy in Class III. Conclusion: Mean Bolton’s anterior ratio for angles Class III subjects was significantly greater than for Class I and Class II subjects. When Bolton’s overall ratio was compared there was no statistically significant difference among Class I, Class II div 1, and Class III malocclusions. PMID:26435619

  16. MHC evolution in three salmonid species: a comparison between class II alpha and beta genes.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Daniela; Conejeros, Pablo; Marshall, Sergio H; Consuegra, Sofia

    2010-08-01

    The genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are amongst the most variable in vertebrates and represent some of the best candidates to study processes of adaptive evolution. However, despite the number of studies available, most of the information on the structure and function of these genes come from studies in mammals and birds in which the MHC class I and II genes are tightly linked and class II alpha exhibits low variability in many cases. Teleost fishes are among the most primitive vertebrates with MHC and represent good organisms for the study of MHC evolution because their class I and class II loci are not physically linked, allowing for independent evolution of both classes of genes. We have compared the diversity and molecular mechanisms of evolution of classical MH class II alpha and class II beta loci in farm populations of three salmonid species: Oncorhynchus kisutch, Oncorhynchus mykiss and Salmo salar. We found single classical class II loci and high polymorphism at both class II alpha and beta genes in the three species. Mechanisms of evolution were common for both class II genes, with recombination and point mutation involved in generating diversity and positive selection acting on the peptide-binding residues. These results suggest that the maintenance of variability at the class IIalpha gene could be a mechanism to increase diversity in the MHC class II in salmonids in order to compensate for the expression of one single classical locus and to respond to a wider array of parasites. PMID:20521040

  17. Rotation of the upper first molar in Class I, II, and III patients

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Viganó, Cristiane; da Rocha, Viviane Ekerman; Junior, Laerte Ribeiro Menezes; Paranhos, Luiz Renato; Ramos, Adilson Luiz

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the mean rotation of the upper first molar (U1st M) in cast models from nontreated patients presenting: Class I, skeletal Class II, dental Class II, and skeletal Class III, comparing with Class I orthodontically treated patients. Materials and Methods: One hundred cast models were evaluated with five groups, composed of nontreated Class I (n = 20), dental Class II (n = 20), skeletal Class II (n = 20), skeletal Class III (n = 20), and treated Class I (n = 20). Measurements were taken from photocopies of the upper arches. The angle formed between a line crossing the mesiopalatal and the distal-buccalcusps of the U1st M and a line traced on mid palatal junction were measured in all samples. Results: One-way variance analysis showed that dental Class II group presented great mean rotation of the 1st molar (x = 78.95°, SD = 6.19) (P < 0.05), and in 85% of the patients from this group this angle was higher than 73°. Conclusions: The skeletal Class II and skeletal Class III groups showed similar mean position of the 1st molar, presenting rotation in approximately 50% of the patients. It can be concluded that upper molar rotation occurs mainly in dental Class II patients and shows higher mesial rotation angle. PMID:27011741

  18. Removable functional appliances effective in patients with Class II malocclusions.

    PubMed

    Madurantakam, Parthasarathy

    2016-03-01

    Data sourcesMedline (Pubmed), Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Google Scholar, Web of Science, Evidence-based Medicine, Scopus, LILACS database, Ovid database, Bibliografia Brasileira de Odontolgogia, Bandolier, Atypon Link, African Journals Online, ProQuest, Conference Paper Index, German National Library of Medicine, metaRegister of Controlled Trials.Study selectionRandomised Controlled Trials (RCT) or prospective Controlled Clinical Trials (pCCT) in patients with Class II malocclusions that compared at least one removable functional appliance (RFA) with a non-intervention control. Primary outcomes were angular measurements of skeletal, dental and soft tissue changes as measured by lateral cephalographs.Data extraction and synthesisTwo reviewers independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias. A third author assessed bias across studies. Pooling of data was done if similar control groups were used and if the same angular cephalometric measurements were reported. A random-effects model was used to analyse pooled estimates and results were expressed as mean differences (MDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). The extent and impact of heterogeneity was assessed.ResultsData were pooled from seventeen studies (seven RCTs and ten pCCT) involving 1031 patients with a mean age of 10.6 years. Most of the RCTs were associated with high risk of bias while most of the pCCTs were without serious methodological limitations. RFA treatment in Class II malocclusions was shown to have a statistically significant short-term effect on skeletal, dental and soft tissue relationships when compared to untreated controls. There is a minimal reduction of SNA (MD=-0.26 degree/year, 95% CI=-0.44 to -0.12 degree/year), minimal increase of SNB (MD=0.62 degree/year, 95% CI=0.36 to 0.88 degree/year) and a small decrease in ANB (MD= -1.14degree/year, 95% CI=-1.52 to 0.77 degree/year). Maxillary incisors were significantly

  19. Comprehensive analysis of cooperative gene mutations between class I and class II in de novo acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Yuichi; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Tsujimura, Akane; Miyawaki, Shuichi; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Kuriyama, Kazutaka; Tomonaga, Masao; Naoe, Tomoki

    2009-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been thought to be the consequence of two broad complementation classes of mutations: class I and class II. However, overlap-mutations between them or within the same class and the position of TP53 mutation are not fully analyzed. We comprehensively analyzed the FLT3, cKIT, N-RAS, C/EBPA, AML1, MLL, NPM1, and TP53 mutations in 144 newly diagnosed de novo AML. We found 103 of 165 identified mutations were overlapped with other mutations, and most overlap-mutations consisted of class I and class II mutations. Although overlap-mutations within the same class were found in seven patients, five of them additionally had the other class mutation. These results suggest that most overlap-mutations within the same class might be the consequence of acquiring an additional mutation after the completion both of class I and class II mutations. However, mutated genes overlapped with the same class were limited in N-RAS, TP53, MLL-PTD, and NPM1, suggesting the possibility that these irregular overlap-mutations might cooperatively participate in the development of AML. Notably, TP53 mutation was overlapped with both class I and class II mutations, and associated with morphologic multilineage dysplasia and complex karyotype. The genotype consisting of complex karyotype and TP53 mutation was an unfavorable prognostic factor in entire AML patients, indicating this genotype generates a disease entity in de novo AML. These results collectively suggest that TP53 mutation might be a functionally distinguishable class of mutation. PMID:19309322

  20. Activated rat T cells synthesize and express functional major histocompatibility class II antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Broeren, C P; Wauben, M H; Lucassen, M A; Van Meurs, M; Van Kooten, P J; Boog, C J; Claassen, E; Van Eden, W

    1995-01-01

    In the present report, we studied the presence and functional significance of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen on rat T cells. Most rat T-cell lines cultured in vitro were found to be MHC class II+. Also, these T-cell lines were shown to synthesize MHC class II molecules. Immunohistochemical and flow cytometric double stainings for T-cell receptor (TCR) and MHC class II showed that in vivo as well a large proportion of T cells was MHC class II+. The immunohistochemical staining of spleen sections enabled us to characterize the MHC class II+ and MHC class II- T cells. It was shown that resting T cells in vivo were MHC class II-. In contrast, activated T cells, as determined by their localization in the marginal zone of the spleen, proved to be MHC class II+. Finally, T-cell clones were found to be able to present peptidic antigens, but could only poorly present more complex exogenous antigens, probably due to inefficient uptake of such antigens. These features would endow activated rat T cells with the capacity to present cell-specific self-proteins, such as TCR, to regulatory CD4+ MHC class II-restricted T cells, as was described by our group elsewhere. Images Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:7750994

  1. 25 CFR 522.11 - Individually owned class II gaming operations operating on September 1, 1986.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Individually owned class II gaming operations operating on September 1, 1986. 522.11 Section 522.11 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPROVAL OF CLASS II AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF...

  2. 40 CFR 82.70 - Nonessential Class II products and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... designated as class II in 40 CFR part 82, appendix B to subpart A) are identified as being nonessential and... 21 CFR 2.125(e); (ii) Lubricants, coatings or cleaning fluids for electrical or electronic equipment... aerosol product or other pressurized dispenser which contains a class II substance: (1) Including but...

  3. Comparison of Class II HLA antigen expression in normal and carcinomatous human breast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, D.J.; Maurizis, J.C.; Chassagne, J.; Chollet, P.; Plagne, R.

    1985-03-01

    Class II HLA antigen expression in breast carcinoma and normal breast gland cells was compared using a method more accurate than immunofluorescence. This new method involves labeling membrane proteins with /sup 131/I and the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody with /sup 125/I. The isolation and purification of the doubly labeled (/sup 125/I-/sup 131/I) immune complex was performed by affinity chromatography and chromatofocusing successively. When the specific activity of glycoproteins is known, the amount of glycoprotein which bind specifically to the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody can be deduced. In breast carcinoma cells, 1.5 to 2% of the purified glycoproteins bind specifically to the monoclonal antibody, whereas less than 0.3% of normal breast gland cells binds. In contrast, leukemic cells, of which 80 to 90% possess Class II HLA antigens, 2 to 3% of Class II HLA glycoproteins bind specifically with the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody.

  4. H II REGIONS: WITNESSES TO MASSIVE STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S.; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Galvan-Madrid, Roberto; Keto, Eric R.

    2010-03-10

    We describe the first three-dimensional simulation of the gravitational collapse of a massive, rotating molecular cloud that includes heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation. These models were performed with the FLASH code, incorporating a hybrid, long characteristic, ray-tracing technique. We find that as the first protostars gain sufficient mass to ionize the accretion flow, their H II regions are initially gravitationally trapped, but soon begin to rapidly fluctuate between trapped and extended states, in agreement with observations. Over time, the same ultracompact H II region can expand anisotropically, contract again, and take on any of the observed morphological classes. In their extended phases, expanding H II regions drive bipolar neutral outflows characteristic of high-mass star formation. The total lifetime of H II regions is given by the global accretion timescale, rather than their short internal sound-crossing time. This explains the observed number statistics. The pressure of the hot, ionized gas does not terminate accretion. Instead, the final stellar mass is set by fragmentation-induced starvation. Local gravitational instabilities in the accretion flow lead to the build-up of a small cluster of stars, all with relatively high masses due to heating from accretion radiation. These companions subsequently compete with the initial high-mass star for the same common gas reservoir and limit its mass growth. This is in contrast to the classical competitive accretion model, where the massive stars are never hindered in growth by the low-mass stars in the cluster. Our findings show that the most significant differences between the formation of low-mass and high-mass stars are all explained as the result of rapid accretion within a dense, gravitationally unstable, ionized flow.

  5. Antero-posterior lingual sliding retraction system for orthodontic correction of hyperdivergent Class II protrusion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This report introduces a lingual bonded retraction system (Kinematics of Lingual Bar on Non-Paralleling Technique, KILBON) for efficient sliding mechanics combined with vertical control of the anterior and posterior teeth, which is suitable for Class II hyperdivergent patients. Methods Design and biomechanics of the KILBON System were described. Two adults with hyperdivergent class II malocclusion were treated with the KILBON system and temporary skeletal anchorage devices (TSADs) on the palate. The first patient was treated with conventional KILBON system on the upper arch and detailed with lingual appliances. The second patient showed the modified design of the KILBON when applied to a low palatal vault. Results A large amount of intrusion and retraction of the anterior teeth and simultaneous intrusion of the posterior segment were achieved in short treatment time. Concomitant counterclockwise rotation of the mandible improved the esthetic profile. Periodontal support without dehiscence or bone loss was confirmed on anterior region in spite of large amount of retraction. Conclusions This report presented a lingual retraction system that provides simple and effective vertical and sagittal control of both anterior and posterior teeth. The biomechanics are dependable for correcting a dentoalveolar protrusion in a patient with Class II hyperdivergent skeletal pattern. PMID:24897979

  6. Sibling rivalry: competition between MHC class II family members inhibits immunity.

    PubMed

    Denzin, Lisa K; Cresswell, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Peptide loading of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules in the endosomes and lysosomes of antigen-presenting cells is catalyzed by human leukocyte antigen-DM (HLA-DM) and modulated by HLA-DO. In a structural study in this issue, Guce et al. show that HLA-DO is an MHC class II mimic and functions as a competitive and essentially irreversible inhibitor of HLA-DM activity, thereby inhibiting MHC class II antigen presentation. PMID:23288359

  7. A CLASS I AND CLASS II CH{sub 3}OH MASER SURVEY OF EGOs FROM THE GLIMPSE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Cyganowski, C. J.; Churchwell, E.; Brogan, C. L.; Hunter, T. R.

    2009-09-10

    We present the results of a high angular resolution Very Large Array (VLA) Class I 44 GHz and Class II 6.7 GHz CH{sub 3}OH maser survey of a sample of {approx}20 massive young stellar object (MYSO) outflow candidates selected on the basis of extended 4.5 {mu}m emission in Spitzer Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire images. These 4.5 {mu}m selected candidates are referred to as extended green objects (EGOs), for the common coding of this band as green in three-color Infrared Array Camera images. The detection rate of 6.7 GHz Class II CH{sub 3}OH masers, which are associated exclusively with massive YSOs, toward EGOs is {approx}>64%-nearly double the detection rate of surveys using other MYSO selection criteria. The detection rate of Class I 44 GHz CH{sub 3}OH masers, which trace molecular outflows, is {approx}89% toward EGOs associated with 6.7 GHz CH{sub 3}OH masers. The two types of CH{sub 3}OH masers exhibit different spatial distributions: 6.7 GHz masers are centrally concentrated and usually coincide with 24 {mu}m emission, while 44 GHz masers are widely distributed and generally trace diffuse 4.5 {mu}m features. We also present results of a complementary James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) single-pointing molecular line survey of EGOs in the outflow tracers HCO{sup +}(3-2) and SiO(5-4). The HCO{sup +} line profiles and high SiO detection rate (90%) are indicative of the presence of active outflows. No 44 GHz continuum emission is detected at the 5 mJy beam{sup -1} (5{sigma}) level toward 95% of EGOs surveyed, excluding bright ultracompact H II regions as powering sources for the 4.5 {mu}m outflows. The results of our surveys constitute strong evidence that EGOs are young, massive YSOs, with active outflows, presumably powered by ongoing accretion.

  8. HLA Class I and II study in a mestizo family with high incidence of autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    de Sorrentino, Alicia Habegger; Young, Marcela; Marinic, Karina; Motta, Patricia Fabiana; Baruzzo, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    There are many factors that influence the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease of which host genetic factors play an important role. The aim of this study was to investigate the HLA Class I and II genes in a family with a high incidence of AID to establish whether they contribute to the development of these disease. Four of them had been diagnosed with SLE and one with AHA. The patients with SLE showed the presence of HLA-A*02 B*40 DRB1*04:07 DQB1*03:02 haplotype with a high statistical significance. This haplotype was not present in the healthy individuals and in the patient with AHA, although the DRB1*04:07 DQB1*03:02 haplotype (carried by both parents) was found in the AHA patients and one of the healthy individuals. We must consider how HLA Class I in linkage disequilibrium with HLA Class II may be involved in susceptibility or in the development of SLE. An extensive study in this population should be conducted to establish the true participation of the HLA Class I region. PMID:23465840

  9. Active site nanospace of aminoacyl tRNA synthetase: difference between the class I and class II synthetases.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Saheb; Choudhury, Kaberi; Banik, Sindrila Dutta; Nandi, Nilashis

    2014-03-01

    The present work is aimed at understanding the origin of the difference in the molecular organization of the active site nanospaces of the class I and class II aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) which are tunnel-like structures. The active site encloses the cognate amino acid (AA) and the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to carry out aminoacylation reaction. Comparison of the structures of the active site of the class I and class II (aaRSs) shows that the nanodimensional tunnels are curved in opposite directions in the two classes. We investigated the origin of this difference using quantum mechanical computation of electrostatic potential (ESP) of substrates, surrounding residues and ions, using Atoms in Molecule (AIM) Theory and charge population analysis. We show that the difference is principally due to the variation in the spatial charge distribution of ATP in the two classes which correspond to extended and bent conformations of ATP. The present computation shows that the most feasible pathway for nucleophilic attack to alphaP is oppositely directed for class I and class II aaRSs. The available crystal structures show that the cognate AA is indeed located along the channel favorable for nucleophilic attack as predicted by the ESP analysis. It is also shown that the direction of the channel changes its orientation when the orientation of ATP is changed from extended to a bent like structure. We further used the AIM theory to confirm the direction of the approach of AA in each case and the results corroborate the results from the ESP analysis. The opposite curvatures of the active site nanospaces in class I and class II aaRSs are related with the influence of the charge distributions of the extended and bent conformations of ATP, respectively. The results of the computation of electrostatic potential by successive addition of active site residues show that their roles on the reaction are similar in both classes despite the difference in the organization of the

  10. MHC class II alleles and haplotypes in patients with pemphigus vulgaris from India.

    PubMed

    Delgado, J C; Yunis, D E; Bozón, M V; Salazar, M; Deulofeut, R; Turbay, D; Mehra, N K; Pasricha, J S; Raval, R S; Patel, H; Shah, B K; Bhol, K; Alper, C A; Ahmed, A R; Yunis, E J

    1996-12-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a blistering disease of the skin and mucous membranes characterized by an autoantibody response against a keratinocyte adhesion molecule, desmoglein 3, causing acantholysis and blister formation. We compared high resolution MHC class II alleles and haplotype frequencies (HLA-DRB, DQA1 and DQB1) in 37 patients with PV to 89 haplotypes of normal relatives from New Delhi and Ahmedabad. We found that PV patients had significantly increased frequencies of DRB1*1404 (P < 0.0001), DQA1*0101 (P = 0.001), and DQB1*0503 (P < 0.0001). These associations were due to the increased frequencies of the haplotype HLA-DRB1*1404, DRB3*0202, DQA1*0101, DQB1*0503 in patients compared to control haplotypes (p < 0.0001). Also, patients from Ahmedabad had a significant increase in HLA-DQB1*0302 (p = 0.03). An identical amino acid sequence (Leu-Leu-Glu-Arg-Arg-Arg-Ala-Glu), in positions 67-74 of the beta domain of DRB alleles is restricted to some DR14 alleles. Therefore, there are three possible explanations for class II allele involvement in autoantibody in PV patients with class II haplotypes marked by HLA-DR14. First, the class II alleles could be markers for an unidentified susceptibility gene in linkage disequilibrium with them. Second, the primary association could be with DQB1*0503 and the association with HLA-DR14 alleles would be the result of linkage disequilibrium. Third, the HLA-DRB1 locus susceptibility could involve a specific amino acid sequence in the third hypervariable region shared by several HLA-DR14 alleles. PMID:9008309

  11. Quantification of HLA class II-specific memory B cells in HLA-sensitized individuals.

    PubMed

    Karahan, Gonca E; de Vaal, Yvonne J H; Roelen, Dave L; Buchli, Rico; Claas, Frans H J; Heidt, Sebastiaan

    2015-03-01

    For the quantification of HLA-specific memory B cells from peripheral blood of sensitized individuals, a limited number of methods are available. However, none of these are capable of detecting memory B cells directed at HLA class II molecules. Since the majority of antibodies that occur after transplantation appear to be specific for HLA class II, our aim was to develop an assay to detect and quantify HLA class II-specific memory B cells from peripheral blood. By using biotinylated soluble HLA class II molecules as detection agent, we were able to develop an HLA class II-specific memory B cell ELISPOT assay. The assay was validated using B cell-derived hybridomas that produce human monoclonal antibodies directed at specific HLA class II molecules. In pregnancy-immunized females, we found memory B cell frequencies ranging from 25 to 756 spots per 10(6) B cells specific for the immunizing paternal HLA class II molecules, whereas in non-immunized males no significant spot formation was detected. Here, we present a novel ELISPOT assay for quantifying HLA class II-specific memory B cells from peripheral blood. This technique provides a unique tool for monitoring the HLA class II-specific memory B cell pool in sensitized transplant recipients. PMID:25636565

  12. Multi-wavelength study of triggered star formation around 25 H II regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jin-Long; Wang, Jun-Jie; Ning, Chang-Chun; Zhang, Chuan-Peng

    2014-01-01

    We investigate 25 H II regions that show bubble morphology in 13CO(1-0) and infrared data, to search for quantitative evidence of triggered star formation by processes described by the collect and collapse (CC) and radiatively driven implosion (RDI) models. These H II regions display the morphology of a complete or partial bubble at 8 μm, and are all associated with the molecular clouds that surround them. We found that the electron temperature ranges from 5627 K to 6839 K in these H II regions, and the average electron temperature is 6083 K. The age of these H II regions is from 3.0 × 105 yr to 1.7 × 106 yr, and the mean age is 7.7 × 105 yr. Based on the morphology of the associated molecular clouds, we divide these H II regions into three groups, which may support CC and RDI models. We select 23 young IRAS sources which have an infrared luminosity of > 103Lsolar in 19 H II regions. In addition, we identify some young stellar objects (including Class I sources), which are only concentrated in H II regions G29.007+0.076, G44.339-0.827 and G47.028+0.232. The poly-cyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions of the three H II regions all show a cometary globule. Comparing the age of each H II region with the characteristic timescales for star formation, we suggest that the three H II regions can trigger clustered star formation by an RDI process. In addition, we detect seven molecular outflows in the five H II regions for the first time. These outflow sources may be triggered by the corresponding H II regions.

  13. MHC class II allosteric site drugs: new immunotherapeutics for malignant, infectious and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, M; Li, J; Gulfo, J V; Von Hofe, E; Humphreys, R E

    2001-01-01

    The discovery of the interactions of the 'Ii-Key' segment of the Ii protein with the major histocmpatibility complex (MHC) Class II allosteric site, which is adjacent to the antigenic peptide-binding site, creates therapeutic opportunities by regulating the antigenic peptide binding to MHC class II molecules. The binding of Ii-Key to the MHC class II allosteric site loosens the hold of the MHC Class II 'clamshell' on antigenic peptides and leads to highly efficient antigenic peptide charging to or releasing from the MHC class II antigenic peptide-binding groove. Ii-Key peptide-induced spilling of bound antigenic peptide, or replacement with inert blockers, leads to 'inert immunosuppression'. Highly efficient replacement of ambient with vaccine peptides by Ii-Key permits 'active immunosuppression' for antigen-specific control of autoimmune diseases in the absence of cytokines or adjuvants. On the other hand, active immunization against cancer or infectious disease can result from epitope replacement mediated by Ii-Key and accompanied by cytokines or other adjuvants. Finally, linking the Ii-Key peptide through a simple polymethylene bridge to an antigenic sequence vastly increases the potency of MHC Class II peptide vaccines. In summary, the discovery of the MHC class II allosteric site allows one to increase the efficiency of MHC class II-related, antigenic epitope-specific therapy for malignant, infectious, and autoimmune diseases. The focus of this review is on the mechanism and potential clinical use of such novel allosteric site-directed, Ii-key drugs. PMID:11439146

  14. Selection and trans-species polymorphism of major histocompatibility complex class II genes in the order Crocodylia.

    PubMed

    Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Isberg, Sally R; Higgins, Damien P; Miles, Lee G; Gongora, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II genes encode for molecules that aid in the presentation of antigens to helper T cells. MHC characterisation within and between major vertebrate taxa has shed light on the evolutionary mechanisms shaping the diversity within this genomic region, though little characterisation has been performed within the Order Crocodylia. Here we investigate the extent and effect of selective pressures and trans-species polymorphism on MHC class II α and β evolution among 20 extant species of Crocodylia. Selection detection analyses showed that diversifying selection influenced MHC class II β diversity, whilst diversity within MHC class II α is the result of strong purifying selection. Comparison of translated sequences between species revealed the presence of twelve trans-species polymorphisms, some of which appear to be specific to the genera Crocodylus and Caiman. Phylogenetic reconstruction clustered MHC class II α sequences into two major clades representing the families Crocodilidae and Alligatoridae. However, no further subdivision within these clades was evident and, based on the observation that most MHC class II α sequences shared the same trans-species polymorphisms, it is possible that they correspond to the same gene lineage across species. In contrast, phylogenetic analyses of MHC class II β sequences showed a mixture of subclades containing sequences from Crocodilidae and/or Alligatoridae, illustrating orthologous relationships among those genes. Interestingly, two of the subclades containing sequences from both Crocodilidae and Alligatoridae shared specific trans-species polymorphisms, suggesting that they may belong to ancient lineages pre-dating the divergence of these two families from the common ancestor 85-90 million years ago. The results presented herein provide an immunogenetic resource that may be used to further assess MHC diversity and functionality in Crocodylia. PMID:24503938

  15. Selection and Trans-Species Polymorphism of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Genes in the Order Crocodylia

    PubMed Central

    Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Isberg, Sally R.; Higgins, Damien P.; Miles, Lee G.; Gongora, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II genes encode for molecules that aid in the presentation of antigens to helper T cells. MHC characterisation within and between major vertebrate taxa has shed light on the evolutionary mechanisms shaping the diversity within this genomic region, though little characterisation has been performed within the Order Crocodylia. Here we investigate the extent and effect of selective pressures and trans-species polymorphism on MHC class II α and β evolution among 20 extant species of Crocodylia. Selection detection analyses showed that diversifying selection influenced MHC class II β diversity, whilst diversity within MHC class II α is the result of strong purifying selection. Comparison of translated sequences between species revealed the presence of twelve trans-species polymorphisms, some of which appear to be specific to the genera Crocodylus and Caiman. Phylogenetic reconstruction clustered MHC class II α sequences into two major clades representing the families Crocodilidae and Alligatoridae. However, no further subdivision within these clades was evident and, based on the observation that most MHC class II α sequences shared the same trans-species polymorphisms, it is possible that they correspond to the same gene lineage across species. In contrast, phylogenetic analyses of MHC class II β sequences showed a mixture of subclades containing sequences from Crocodilidae and/or Alligatoridae, illustrating orthologous relationships among those genes. Interestingly, two of the subclades containing sequences from both Crocodilidae and Alligatoridae shared specific trans-species polymorphisms, suggesting that they may belong to ancient lineages pre-dating the divergence of these two families from the common ancestor 85–90 million years ago. The results presented herein provide an immunogenetic resource that may be used to further assess MHC diversity and functionality in Crocodylia. PMID:24503938

  16. Pseudomycoicidin, a Class II Lantibiotic from Bacillus pseudomycoides

    PubMed Central

    Basi-Chipalu, Shradha; Dischinger, Jasmin; Josten, Michaele; Szekat, Christiane; Zweynert, Annegret; Sahl, Hans-Georg

    2015-01-01

    Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptides with substantial posttranslational modifications. They are characterized by the unique amino acids lanthionine and methyllanthionine, which are introduced by dehydration of Ser/Thr residues and linkage of the resulting dehydrated amino acids with Cys residues. BLAST searches using the mersacidin biosynthetic enzyme (MrsM) in the NCBI database revealed a new class II lantibiotic gene cluster in Bacillus pseudomycoides DSM 12442. Production of an antimicrobial substance with activity against Gram-positive bacteria was detectable in a cell wash extract of this strain. The substance was partially purified, and mass spectrometric analysis predicted a peptide of 2,786 Da in the active fraction. In order to characterize the putative lantibiotic further, heterologous expression of the predicted biosynthetic genes was performed in Escherichia coli. Coexpression of the prepeptide (PseA) along with the corresponding modification enzyme (PseM) resulted in the production of a modified peptide with the corresponding mass, carrying four out of eight possible dehydrations and supporting the presence of four thioether and one disulfide bridge. After the proteolytic removal of the leader, the core peptide exhibited antimicrobial activity. In conclusion, pseudomycoicidin is a novel lantibiotic with antimicrobial activity that was heterologously produced in E. coli. PMID:25769830

  17. Structural hierarchy in molecular films of two class II hydrophobins.

    PubMed

    Paananen, Arja; Vuorimaa, Elina; Torkkeli, Mika; Penttilä, Merja; Kauranen, Martti; Ikkala, Olli; Lemmetyinen, Helge; Serimaa, Ritva; Linder, Markus B

    2003-05-13

    Hydrophobins are highly surface-active proteins that are specific to filamentous fungi. They function as coatings on various fungal structures, enable aerial growth of hyphae, and facilitate attachment to surfaces. Little is known about their structures and structure-function relationships. In this work we show highly organized surface layers of hydrophobins, representing the most detailed structural study of hydrophobin films so far. Langmuir-Blodgett films of class II hydrophobins HFBI and HFBII from Trichoderma reesei were prepared and analyzed by atomic force microscopy. The films showed highly ordered two-dimensional crystalline structures. By combining our recent results on small-angle X-ray scattering of hydrophobin solutions, we found that the unit cells in the films have dimensions similar to those of tetrameric aggregates found in solutions. Further analysis leads to a model in which the building blocks of the two-dimensional crystals are shape-persistent supramolecules consisting of four hydrophobin molecules. The results also indicate functional and structural differences between HFBI and HFBII that help to explain differences in their properties. The possibility that the highly organized surface assemblies of hydrophobins could allow a route for manufacturing functional surfaces is suggested. PMID:12731866

  18. Performance assessment for the class L-II disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    This draft radiological performance assessment (PA) for the proposed Class L-II Disposal Facility (CIIDF) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) has been prepared to demonstrate compliance with the requirements of the US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. This PA considers the disposal of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) over the operating life of the facility and the long-term performance of the facility in providing protection to public health and the environment. The performance objectives contained in the order require that the facility be managed to accomplish the following: (1) Protect public health and safety in accordance with standards specified in environmental health orders and other DOE orders. (2) Ensure that external exposure to the waste and concentrations of radioactive material that may be released into surface water, groundwater, soil, plants, and animals results in an effective dose equivalent (EDE) that does not exceed 25 mrem/year to a member of the public. Releases to the atmosphere shall meet the requirements of 40 CFR Pt. 61. Reasonable effort should be made to maintain releases of radioactivity in effluents to the general environment as low as reasonably achievable. (1) Ensure that the committed EDEs received by individual who inadvertently may intrude into the facility after the loss of active institutional control (100 years) will not exceed 100 mrem/year for continuous exposure of 500 mrem for a single acute exposure. (4) Protect groundwater resources, consistent with federal, state, and local requirements.

  19. Turbulence in simulated H II regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, S.-N. X.; Arthur, S. J.; Henney, W. J.; Mellema, G.; Gazol, A.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the scale dependence of fluctuations inside a realistic model of an evolving turbulent H II region and to what extent these may be studied observationally. We find that the multiple scales of energy injection from champagne flows and the photoionization of clumps and filaments leads to a flatter spectrum of fluctuations than would be expected from top-down turbulence driven at the largest scales. The traditional structure function approach to the observational study of velocity fluctuations is shown to be incapable of reliably determining the velocity power spectrum of our simulation. We find that a more promising approach is the Velocity Channel Analysis technique of Lazarian & Pogosyan (2000), which, despite being intrinsically limited by thermal broadening, can successfully recover the logarithmic slope of the velocity power spectrum to a precision of ±0.1 from high-resolution optical emission-line spectroscopy.

  20. Distalization of maxillary arch and correction of Class II with mini-implants: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Tekale, Pawankumar Dnyandeo; Vakil, Ketan K.; Vakil, Jeegar K.; Gore, Ketan A.

    2015-01-01

    This article reports the successful use of mini-screws in the maxilla to treat two patients of age 21-year and 17-year-old girls. Both the patients had a skeletal Class II malocclusion with protrusive maxillary teeth and angels Class II mal-occlusion. Temporary anchorage devices (TADs) in the posterior dental region between maxillary second premolar and maxillary first molar teeth on both sides were used as anchorage for the retraction and intrusion of her maxillary anterior teeth. Those appliances, combined with a compensatory curved maxillary archwire, eliminated spacing, deep bite, forwardly placed and proclined upper front teeth and the protrusive profile, corrected the molar relationship from Class II to Class I. With no extra TADs in the anterior region for intrusion, the treatment was workable and simple. The patient received a satisfactory occlusion and an attractive smile. This technique requires minimal compliance and is particularly useful for correcting Class II patients with protrusive maxillary front teeth and dental deep bite. PMID:26097360

  1. Human HLA class I- and HLA class II-restricted cloned cytotoxic T lymphocytes identify a cluster of epitopes on the measles virus fusion protein.

    PubMed Central

    van Binnendijk, R S; Versteeg-van Oosten, J P; Poelen, M C; Brugghe, H F; Hoogerhout, P; Osterhaus, A D; Uytdehaag, F G

    1993-01-01

    The transmembrane fusion (F) glycoprotein of measles virus is an important target antigen of human HLA class I- and class II-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Genetically engineered F proteins and nested sets of synthetic peptides spanning the F protein were used to determine sequences of F recognized by a number of F-specific CTL clones. Combined N- and C-terminal deletions of the respective peptides revealed that human HLA class I and HLA class II-restricted CTL efficiently recognize nonapeptides or decapeptides representing epitopes of F. Three distinct sequences recognized by three different HLA class II (DQw1, DR2, and DR4/w53)-restricted CTL clones appear to cluster between amino acids 379 and 466 of F, thus defining an important T-cell epitope area of F. Within this same region, a nonamer peptide of F was found to be recognized by an HLA-B27-restricted CTL clone, as expected on the basis of the structural homology between this peptide and other known HLA-B27 binding peptides. PMID:7680390

  2. 40 CFR Figure C-2 to Subpart C of... - Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM2.5 Candidate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods C Figure C-2 to Subpart C of Part 53... of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM2.5 Candidate Equivalent...

  3. 46 CFR 128.220 - Class II non-vital systems-materials and pressure design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Class II non-vital systems-materials and pressure design. 128.220 Section 128.220 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Materials and Pressure Design § 128.220 Class II non-vital systems—materials and...

  4. 40 CFR 147.851 - State-administered program-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Kansas § 147.851 State-administered program—Class II wells. The UIC program for Class II wells in the State of Kansas, except those on Indian lands as described in § 147.860, is the program administered by the Kansas Corporation Commission and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, approved by...

  5. 38 CFR 17.162 - Eligibility for Class II dental treatment without rating action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... dental treatment without rating action. 17.162 Section 17.162 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.162 Eligibility for Class II dental treatment without rating action. When an application has been made for class II dental treatment under §...

  6. 38 CFR 17.162 - Eligibility for Class II dental treatment without rating action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... dental treatment without rating action. 17.162 Section 17.162 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.162 Eligibility for Class II dental treatment without rating action. When an application has been made for class II dental treatment under §...

  7. 14 CFR 21.331 - Issue of airworthiness approval tags for Class II products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Issue of airworthiness approval tags for Class II products. 21.331 Section 21.331 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Approvals § 21.331 Issue of airworthiness approval tags for Class II products. (a) An applicant is...

  8. 14 CFR 21.83 - Requirements for issue and amendment of Class II provisional type certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for issue and amendment of Class II provisional type certificates. 21.83 Section 21.83 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Type Certificates § 21.83 Requirements for issue and amendment of Class II provisional...

  9. 40 CFR 147.1851 - State-administered program-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Oklahoma § 147.1851 State-administered program—Class II wells. The UIC program for Class II wells in the State of Oklahoma, including the lands of the Five Civilized Tribes, but not including those on other Indian lands, is the program administered by the Oklahoma Corporation Commission approved by EPA...

  10. 40 CFR 147.1851 - State-administered program-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Oklahoma § 147.1851 State-administered program—Class II wells. The UIC program for Class II wells in the State of Oklahoma, including the lands of the Five Civilized Tribes, but not including those on other Indian lands, is the program administered by the Oklahoma Corporation Commission approved by EPA...

  11. 40 CFR 147.1851 - State-administered program-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Oklahoma § 147.1851 State-administered program—Class II wells. The UIC program for Class II wells in the State of Oklahoma, including the lands of the Five Civilized Tribes, but not including those on other Indian lands, is the program administered by the Oklahoma Corporation Commission approved by EPA...

  12. 40 CFR 147.1851 - State-administered program-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Oklahoma § 147.1851 State-administered program—Class II wells. The UIC program for Class II wells in the State of Oklahoma, including the lands of the Five Civilized Tribes, but not including those on other Indian lands, is the program administered by the Oklahoma Corporation Commission approved by EPA...

  13. 40 CFR 144.22 - Existing Class II enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and hydrocarbon storage wells. 144.22 Section 144.22 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... of Underground Injection by Rule § 144.22 Existing Class II enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage wells. (a) An existing Class II enhanced recovery or hydrocarbon storage injection well is authorized...

  14. 40 CFR 144.22 - Existing Class II enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and hydrocarbon storage wells. 144.22 Section 144.22 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... of Underground Injection by Rule § 144.22 Existing Class II enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage wells. (a) An existing Class II enhanced recovery or hydrocarbon storage injection well is authorized...

  15. 40 CFR 144.22 - Existing Class II enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and hydrocarbon storage wells. 144.22 Section 144.22 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... of Underground Injection by Rule § 144.22 Existing Class II enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage wells. (a) An existing Class II enhanced recovery or hydrocarbon storage injection well is authorized...

  16. 40 CFR 144.22 - Existing Class II enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and hydrocarbon storage wells. 144.22 Section 144.22 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... of Underground Injection by Rule § 144.22 Existing Class II enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage wells. (a) An existing Class II enhanced recovery or hydrocarbon storage injection well is authorized...

  17. 40 CFR 144.22 - Existing Class II enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and hydrocarbon storage wells. 144.22 Section 144.22 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... of Underground Injection by Rule § 144.22 Existing Class II enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage wells. (a) An existing Class II enhanced recovery or hydrocarbon storage injection well is authorized...

  18. 40 CFR 82.15 - Prohibitions for class II controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... person for that substance under the authority of this subpart at that time in that control period, unless... use production allowances to produce a quantity of class II controlled substance unless that person... class II controlled substance for which EPA has apportioned baseline production and...

  19. 40 CFR 82.15 - Prohibitions for class II controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Prohibitions for class II controlled substances. 82.15 Section 82.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls § 82.15 Prohibitions for class II...

  20. 40 CFR 82.15 - Prohibitions for class II controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Prohibitions for class II controlled substances. 82.15 Section 82.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls § 82.15 Prohibitions for class II...

  1. 40 CFR 82.16 - Phaseout schedule of class II controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phaseout schedule of class II controlled substances. 82.16 Section 82.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls § 82.16 Phaseout schedule of class II...

  2. 40 CFR 82.16 - Phaseout schedule of class II controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phaseout schedule of class II controlled substances. 82.16 Section 82.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls § 82.16 Phaseout schedule of class II...

  3. 46 CFR 128.220 - Class II non-vital systems-materials and pressure design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Materials and Pressure Design § 128.220 Class II non-vital systems—materials and pressure design. (a) Except as provided by §§ 128.230, 128.240, and... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Class II non-vital systems-materials and pressure...

  4. 40 CFR 82.16 - Phaseout schedule of class II controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phaseout schedule of class II controlled substances. 82.16 Section 82.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls § 82.16 Phaseout schedule of class II...

  5. 40 CFR 147.1600 - State-administered program-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... New Mexico § 147.1600 State-administered program—Class II wells. The UIC program for Class II wells in the State of New Mexico, except for those on Indian lands, is the program administered by the New... reference and made a part of the applicable UIC program under the SDWA for the State of New Mexico....

  6. 40 CFR 147.1600 - State-administered program-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... New Mexico § 147.1600 State-administered program—Class II wells. The UIC program for Class II wells in the State of New Mexico, except for those on Indian lands, is the program administered by the New... reference and made a part of the applicable UIC program under the SDWA for the State of New Mexico....

  7. 40 CFR 147.1600 - State-administered program-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... New Mexico § 147.1600 State-administered program—Class II wells. The UIC program for Class II wells in the State of New Mexico, except for those on Indian lands, is the program administered by the New... reference and made a part of the applicable UIC program under the SDWA for the State of New Mexico....

  8. 40 CFR 147.1600 - State-administered program-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... New Mexico § 147.1600 State-administered program—Class II wells. The UIC program for Class II wells in the State of New Mexico, except for those on Indian lands, is the program administered by the New... reference and made a part of the applicable UIC program under the SDWA for the State of New Mexico....

  9. 76 FR 53817 - Minimum Internal Control Standards for Class II Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... National Indian Gaming Commission 25 CFR Parts 542 and 543 Minimum Internal Control Standards for Class II... delay of the effective date on the final rule for Minimum Internal Control Standards for Class II Gaming... the final rule published October 10, 2008 (73 FR 60492), delayed October 9, 2009 (74 FR 52138)...

  10. 40 CFR 147.1600 - State-administered program-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... New Mexico § 147.1600 State-administered program—Class II wells. The UIC program for Class II wells in the State of New Mexico, except for those on Indian lands, is the program administered by the New Mexico Energy and Minerals Department, Oil Conservation Division, approved by EPA pursuant to...

  11. 40 CFR 82.23 - Transfers of allowances of class II controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... class II controlled substance being converted multiplied by the quotient of the ozone depletion potential of the first class II controlled substance divided by the ozone depletion potential of the second... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption...

  12. 40 CFR 82.23 - Transfers of allowances of class II controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... class II controlled substance being converted multiplied by the quotient of the ozone depletion potential of the first class II controlled substance divided by the ozone depletion potential of the second... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption...

  13. 40 CFR 147.2100 - State-administered program-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... South Dakota § 147.2100 State-administered program—Class II wells. The UIC program for Class II wells in the State of South Dakota, except those on Indian lands, is the program administered by the South... part of the applicable UIC program under the SDWA for the State of South Dakota. This incorporation...

  14. 40 CFR 147.2100 - State-administered program-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... South Dakota § 147.2100 State-administered program—Class II wells. The UIC program for Class II wells in the State of South Dakota, except those on Indian lands, is the program administered by the South... part of the applicable UIC program under the SDWA for the State of South Dakota. This incorporation...

  15. 40 CFR 147.2100 - State-administered program-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... South Dakota § 147.2100 State-administered program—Class II wells. The UIC program for Class II wells in the State of South Dakota, except those on Indian lands, is the program administered by the South... part of the applicable UIC program under the SDWA for the State of South Dakota. This incorporation...

  16. 40 CFR 147.2100 - State-administered program-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... South Dakota § 147.2100 State-administered program—Class II wells. The UIC program for Class II wells in the State of South Dakota, except those on Indian lands, is the program administered by the South... part of the applicable UIC program under the SDWA for the State of South Dakota. This incorporation...

  17. Endogenous Antigen Presentation of MHC Class II Epitopes through Non-Autophagic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Carol S. K.

    2015-01-01

    Antigenic peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules are generally derived from exogenous proteins acquired by antigen presenting cells. However, in some circumstances, MHC class II molecules can present intracellular proteins expressed within the antigen-presenting cells. There are several described pathways by which endogenous antigens are degraded and gain access to MHC class II molecules. These include autophagy and other non-autophagic pathways; the latter category includes the MHC class I-like pathways, heat shock protein 90-mediated pathways, and internalization from the plasma membrane. This review will summarize and discuss the non-autophagic pathways. PMID:26441969

  18. Prediction of peptides binding to MHC class I and II alleles by temporal motif mining

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MHC (Major Histocompatibility Complex) is a key player in the immune response of most vertebrates. The computational prediction of whether a given antigenic peptide will bind to a specific MHC allele is important in the development of vaccines for emerging pathogens, the creation of possibilities for controlling immune response, and for the applications of immunotherapy. One of the problems that make this computational prediction difficult is the detection of the binding core region in peptides, coupled with the presence of bulges and loops causing variations in the total sequence length. Most machine learning methods require the sequences to be of the same length to successfully discover the binding motifs, ignoring the length variance in both motif mining and prediction steps. In order to overcome this limitation, we propose the use of time-based motif mining methods that work position-independently. Results The prediction method was tested on a benchmark set of 28 different alleles for MHC class I and 27 different alleles for MHC class II. The obtained results are comparable to the state of the art methods for both MHC classes, surpassing the published results for some alleles. The average prediction AUC values are 0.897 for class I, and 0.858 for class II. Conclusions Temporal motif mining using partial periodic patterns can capture information about the sequences well enough to predict the binding of the peptides and is comparable to state of the art methods in the literature. Unlike neural networks or matrix based predictors, our proposed method does not depend on peptide length and can work with both short and long fragments. This advantage allows better use of the available training data and the prediction of peptides of uncommon lengths. PMID:23368521

  19. Comparison of occlusal contact areas of class I and class II molar relationships at finishing using three-dimensional digital models

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyejoon; Kim, Minji

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study compared occlusal contact areas of ideally planned set-up and accomplished final models against the initial in class I and II molar relationships at finishing. Methods Evaluations were performed for 41 post-orthodontic treatment cases, of which 22 were clinically diagnosed as class I and the remainder were diagnosed as full cusp class II. Class I cases had four first premolars extracted, while class II cases had maxillary first premolars extracted. Occlusal contact areas were measured using a three-dimensional scanner and RapidForm 2004. Independent t-tests were used to validate comparison values between class I and II finishings. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to compare initial, set up, and final models. Results Molars from cases in the class I finishing for the set-up model showed significantly greater contact areas than those from class II finishing (p < 0.05). The final model class I finishing showed significantly larger contact areas for the second molars (p < 0.05). The first molars of the class I finishing for the final model showed a tendency to have larger contact areas than those of class II finishing, although the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.078). Conclusions In set-up models, posterior occlusal contact was better in class I than in class II finishing. In final models, class I finishing tended to have larger occlusal contact areas than class II finishing. PMID:26023539

  20. 25 CFR 547.8 - What are the minimum technical software standards applicable to Class II gaming systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... OF CLASS II GAMES § 547.8 What are the minimum technical software standards applicable to Class II... of Class II games. (a) Player interface displays. (1) If not otherwise provided to the player, the player interface shall display the following: (i) The purchase or wager amount; (ii) Game results;...

  1. 25 CFR 547.8 - What are the minimum technical software standards applicable to Class II gaming systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... OF CLASS II GAMES § 547.8 What are the minimum technical software standards applicable to Class II... of Class II games. (a) Player interface displays. (1) If not otherwise provided to the player, the player interface shall display the following: (i) The purchase or wager amount; (ii) Game results;...

  2. 25 CFR 547.8 - What are the minimum technical software standards applicable to Class II gaming systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... OF CLASS II GAMES § 547.8 What are the minimum technical software standards applicable to Class II... of Class II games. (a) Player interface displays. (1) If not otherwise provided to the player, the player interface shall display the following: (i) The purchase or wager amount; (ii) Game results;...

  3. Phenotypic Diversity in Caucasian Adults with Moderate to Severe Class II Malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Moreno Uribe, Lina M.; Howe, Sara C.; Kummet, Colleen; Vela, Kaci C.; Dawson, Deborah V.; Southard, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Class II malocclusion affects about 15 % of the US population and is characterized by a convex profile and occlusion disharmonies. The specific etiological mechanisms resulting in the range of Class II dento-skeletal combinations observed is not yet understood. Most studies describing the class II phenotypic diversity have utilized moderate sample sizes or have focused on younger individuals that later in life may outgrow their class II discrepancies; such a focus may also preclude the visualization of adult class II features. The majority have utilized simple correlation methods resulting in phenotypes that may not be generalizable to different samples and thus may not be suitable for studies of malocclusion etiology. The purpose of this study is to address these knowledge gaps by capturing the maximum phenotypic variation present in a large Caucasian sample of class II individuals selected with strict eligibility criteria and rigorously standardized multivariate reduction analyses. METHODS Sixty-three lateral cephalometric variables were measured from pre-treatment records of 309 Class II Caucasian adults (82 males, 227 females; ages 16–60 years). Principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis were used to generate comprehensive phenotypes in an effort to identify the most homogeneous groups of individuals reducing heterogeneity and improving the power of future malocclusion etiology studies. RESULTS PCA resulted in 7 principal components that accounted for 81% of the variation. The first three components represented variation on mandibular rotation, upper incisor angulation and mandibular length, respectively. The cluster analysis identified 5 distinct Class II phenotypes. CONCLUSIONS A comprehensive spectrum of Class II phenotypic definitions was obtained that could be generalized to other samples advancing our efforts to the identification of etiological factors underlying Class II malocclusion. PMID:24582022

  4. HLA class II sequence variants influence tuberculosis risk in populations of European ancestry.

    PubMed

    Sveinbjornsson, Gardar; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Halldorsson, Bjarni V; Kristinsson, Karl G; Gottfredsson, Magnus; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Gudmundsson, Larus J; Blondal, Kai; Gylfason, Arnaldur; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon Axel; Helgadottir, Hafdis T; Jonasdottir, Adalbjorg; Jonasdottir, Aslaug; Karason, Ari; Kardum, Ljiljana Bulat; Knežević, Jelena; Kristjansson, Helgi; Kristjansson, Mar; Love, Arthur; Luo, Yang; Magnusson, Olafur T; Sulem, Patrick; Kong, Augustine; Masson, Gisli; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Dembic, Zlatko; Nejentsev, Sergey; Blondal, Thorsteinn; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Stefansson, Kari

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections cause 9 million new tuberculosis cases and 1.5 million deaths annually. To identify variants conferring risk of tuberculosis, we tested 28.3 million variants identified through whole-genome sequencing of 2,636 Icelanders for association with tuberculosis (8,162 cases and 277,643 controls), pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and M. tuberculosis infection. We found association of three variants in the region harboring genes encoding the class II human leukocyte antigens (HLAs): rs557011[T] (minor allele frequency (MAF) = 40.2%), associated with M. tuberculosis infection (odds ratio (OR) = 1.14, P = 3.1 × 10(-13)) and PTB (OR = 1.25, P = 5.8 × 10(-12)), and rs9271378[G] (MAF = 32.5%), associated with PTB (OR = 0.78, P = 2.5 × 10(-12))--both located between HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DRB1--and a missense variant encoding p.Ala210Thr in HLA-DQA1 (MAF = 19.1%, rs9272785), associated with M. tuberculosis infection (P = 9.3 × 10(-9), OR = 1.14). We replicated association of these variants with PTB in samples of European ancestry from Russia and Croatia (P < 5.9 × 10(-4)). These findings show that the HLA class II region contributes to genetic risk of tuberculosis, possibly through reduced presentation of protective M. tuberculosis antigens to T cells. PMID:26829749

  5. HLA non-class II genes may confer type I diabetes susceptibility in a Mapuche (Amerindian) affected family.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Bravo, Francisco; Martinez-Laso, Jorge; Martin-Villa, Jose M; Moscoso, Juan; Moreno, Almudena; Serrano-Vela, Juan I; Zamora, Jorge; Asenjo, Silvia; Gleisner, Andrea; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    A rare case of type I diabetes is studied in an Amerindian (Mapuche) family from Chile, analyzing glutamic acid decarboxylase, islet-cell autoantibodies and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes. The affected sib is the only one that has one specific HLA haplotype combination that differs from the other sibs only in the HLA class I genes. It is concluded that HLA diabetes susceptibility factors may be placed outside the class II region or even that susceptibility factors do not exist in the HLA region in this Amerindian family. PMID:16473308

  6. 77 FR 64396 - Order of Succession for HUD Region II

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Order of Succession for HUD Region II AGENCY: Office of Field Policy and Management, HUD. ACTION: Notice of Order of Succession. SUMMARY: In this notice, the Assistant Deputy Secretary... Succession for the New York Regional Office and its Field Offices (Region II). This Order of...

  7. Induction of class II major histocompatibility complex expression in human multiple myeloma cells by retinoid.

    PubMed

    Sanda, Takaomi; Iida, Shinsuke; Kayukawa, Satoshi; Ueda, Ryuzo

    2007-01-01

    Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC II) is normally silenced in plasma/multiple myeloma (MM) cells at the transcriptional level through downregulation of class II transactivator (CIITA), allowing MM cells to escape from immunological responses. Here we demonstrate that a retinoic acid receptor-alpha/beta-selective retinoid Am80 (tamibarotene) could induce the expression of functional MHC II molecules in human MM cell lines. Am80 upregulated expression of the interferon regulatory factor-1 gene, followed by enhancement of CIITA expression. This is the first report demonstrating that retinoid can induce the expression of MHC II in terminally-differentiated plasma/MM cells. PMID:17229644

  8. The ionization structure of helium in H II region complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, Miriam

    1986-10-01

    Ionization structure models of H II regions are constructed to analyze the behavior of the helium ionization correction factor, icf, for combinations of different stellar radiation fields as well as for mixtures of individual H II regions of different degrees of ionization. It is found that the amount of neutral He is less than 3 percent and that icf is between 0.98 and 1.00, for H II region coomplexes ionized by OB associations where the hottest stars are earlier than O6, if the ionizing stars are distributed according to a normal IMF. This result applies for a single H II region or for a mixture of unconnected H II regions. This result implies that the He(+)/H(+) ratio observed in extragalactic H II regions of high degree of ionization corresponds to the true He/H abundance ratios.

  9. New polymorphic microsatellite markers in the human MHC class III region.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaka, Y; Makino, S; Nakajima, K; Tomizawa, M; Oka, A; Bahram, S; Kulski, J K; Tamiya, G; Inoko, H

    2001-05-01

    The human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class III region spanning approximately 760 kb is characterized by a remarkably high gene density with 59 expressed genes (one gene every 12.9 kb). Recently, susceptibility loci to numerous diseases, such as Graves disease, Crohn disease, and SLE have been suggested to be localized to this region, as assessed by associations mainly with genetic polymorphisms of TNF and TNF-linked microsatellite loci. However, it has been difficult to precisely localize these susceptibility loci to a single gene due to a paucity to date of polymorphic markers in the HLA class III region. To facilitate disease mapping within this region, we have analyzed 2 approximately 5 bases short tandem repeats (microsatellites) in this region. A total of 297 microsatellites were identified from the genomic sequence, consisting of 69 di-, 62 tri-, 107 tetra-, and 59 penta-nucleotide repeats. It was noted that among them as many as 17 microsatellites were located within the coding sequence of expressed genes (NOTCH4, PBX2, RAGE, G16, LPAAT, PPT2, TNXB, P450-CYP21B, G9a, HSP70-2, HSP70-1, HSP-hom, MuTSH5 and BAT2). Eight microsatellite repeats were collected as polymorphic markers due to their high number of alleles (11.9 on average) as well as their high polymorphic content value (PIC) (0.63). By combining the 38 and the 22 polymorphic microsatellites we have previously collected in the HLA class I and class II regions, respectively, we have now established a total of 68 novel genetic markers which are uniformly interspersed with a high density of one every 63.3 kb throughout the HLA region. This collection of polymorphic microsatellites will enable us to search for the location of any disease susceptible loci within the HLA region by association analysis. PMID:11556964

  10. Class I and class II major histocompatibility molecules play a role in bone marrow-derived macrophage development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.; Simske, S. J.; Beharka, A. A.; Balch, S.; Luttges, M. W.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Class I and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules play significant roles in T cell development and immune function. We show that MHCI- and MHCII-deficient mice have low numbers of macrophage precursors and circulating monocytes, as well as abnormal bone marrow cell colony-stimulating factor type 1 secretion and bone composition. We suggest that MHCI and MHCII molecules play a significant role in macrophage development.

  11. The Oropharyngeal Airway in Young Adults with Skeletal Class II and Class III Deformities: A 3-D Morphometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jayaratne, Yasas Shri Nalaka; Zwahlen, Roger Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Objectives 1) To determine the accuracy and reliability of an automated anthropometric measurement software for the oropharyngeal airway and 2) To compare the anthropometric dimensions of the oropharyngeal airway in skeletal class II and III deformity patients. Methods Cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans of 62 patients with skeletal class II or III deformities were used for this study. Volumetric, linear and surface area measurements retroglossal (RG) and retropalatal (RP) compartments of the oropharyngeal airway was measured with the 3dMDVultus software. Accuracy of automated anthropometric pharyngeal airway measurements was assessed using an airway phantom. Results The software was found to be reasonably accurate for measuring dimensions of air passages. The total oropharyngeal volume was significantly greater in the skeletal class III deformity group (16.7 ± 9.04 mm3) compared with class II subjects (11.87 ± 4.01 mm3). The average surface area of both the RG and RP compartments were significantly larger in the class III deformity group. The most constricted area in the RG and RP airway was significantly larger in individuals with skeletal class III deformity. The anterior-posterior (AP) length of this constriction was significantly greater in skeletal class III individuals in both compartments, whereas the width of the constriction was not significantly different between the two groups in both compartments. The RP compartment was larger but less uniform than the RG compartment in both skeletal deformities. Conclusion Significant differences were observed in morphological characteristics of the oropharyngeal airway in individuals with skeletal class II and III deformities. This information may be valuable for surgeons in orthognathic treatment planning, especially for mandibular setback surgery that might compromise the oropharyngeal patency. PMID:26901313

  12. A multiwavelength investigation of the H II region S311: young stellar population and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Ram Kesh; Pandey, A. K.; Sharma, Saurabh; Ojha, D. K.; Samal, M. R.; Mallick, K. K.; Jose, J.; Ogura, K.; Richichi, Andrea; Irawati, Puji; Kobayashi, N.; Eswaraiah, C.

    2016-09-01

    We present a multiwavelength investigation of the young stellar population and star formation activities around the H II region Sharpless 311. Using our deep near-infrared observations and archival Spitzer-IRAC observations, we have detected a total of 125 young stellar objects (YSOs) in an area of ˜86 arcmin2. The YSO sample includes eight Class I and 117 Class II candidate YSOs. The mass completeness of the identified YSO sample is estimated to be 1.0 M⊙. The ages and masses of the majority of the candidate YSOs are estimated to be in the range ˜0.1-5 Myr and ˜0.3-6 M⊙, respectively. The 8-μm image of S311 displays an approximately spherical cavity around the ionizing source, which was possibly created by the expansion of the H II region. The spatial distribution of the candidate YSOs reveals that a significant number of them are distributed systematically along the 8-μm emission with a majority clustered around the eastern border of the H II region. Four clumps/compact H II regions are detected in the radio continuum observations at 1280 MHz, which may have been formed during the expansion of the H II region. The estimated dynamical age of the region, main-sequence lifetime of the ionizing source, the spatial distribution and ages of the candidate YSOs indicate triggered star formation in the complex.

  13. A novel high-wear-resistant glass-ionomer cement for class I and class II restorations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun; Weng, Yiming; Xie, Dong

    2009-02-01

    This study reports the results of an evaluation on the in vitro wear of a newly developed experimental light-cured glass-ionomer cement composed of the synthesized six-arm star-shape poly(acrylic acid) and Fuji II LC glass fillers. The resin composite P-60, as well as glass-ionomer cements Fuji II and Fuji II LC, were used for comparison. All specimens were conditioned in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 1 d prior to testing. The experimental cement exhibited statistically the same wear-resistance to abrasion as P-60, but the wear-resistance was 14 times higher for the experimental cement than for Fuji II and Fuji II LC. Furthermore, the experimental cement showed a degree of wear-resistance to attrition that was 1.4 times higher than both Fuji II and Fuji II LC but six times lower than that of P-60. Impressively, after 1 month of aging the experimental cement was able to compete with P-60 in wear-resistance to attrition, showing a degree of wear depth that was only 1.3 times more than that of P-60. It appears that this novel cement is a clinically attractive dental restorative that can be potentially used for high-wear sites such as class I and class II restorations. PMID:19196323

  14. Expressed MHC class II genes in sea otters (Enhydra lutris) from geographically disparate populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowen, L.; Aldridge, B.M.; Miles, A.K.; Stott, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is central to maintaining the immunologic vigor of individuals and populations. Classical MHC class II genes were targeted for partial sequencing in sea otters (Enhydra lutris) from populations in California, Washington, and Alaska. Sequences derived from sea otter peripheral blood leukocyte mRNAs were similar to those classified as DQA, DQB, DRA, and DRB in other species. Comparisons of the derived amino acid compositions supported the classification of these as functional molecules from at least one DQA, DQB, and DRA locus and at least two DRB loci. While limited in scope, phylogenetic analysis of the DRB peptide-binding region suggested the possible existence of distinct clades demarcated by geographic region. These preliminary findings support the need for additional MHC gene sequencing and expansion to a comprehensive study targeting additional otters. ?? 2006 Blackwell Munksgaard.

  15. Class II Analphoid Chromosome in a Child with Aberrant Chromosome 7: A Rare Cytogenetic Association.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Madhavan Jeevan; Kumar, Rangasamy Ashok; Subhashree, Venugopal; Jayasudha, Thanikachalam; Hemagowri, Venkatasubramanian; Koshy, Teena; Gowrishankar, Kalpana

    2015-01-01

    A neocentromere is a functional centromere that has arisen within a region not known to have a centromere. We present a case with a very rarely reported class II neocentromere formation in an aberrant chromosome 7. A 22-month-old male was referred because of dysmorphic features. Banding cytogenetics was performed, and a ring 7 and a supernumerary marker chromosome along with a normal chromosome 7 were found. In situ hybridization using a centromeric probe revealed 46 signals, of which 2 signals for chromosome 7 were observed, one on the normal and one on the ring chromosome. Further analysis using FISH revealed that the linear acentric fragment was part of the 7q region, which suggests that there could be a possible McClintock mechanism. PMID:26226839

  16. Characterization of MHC class I and II genes in a subantarctic seabird, the blue petrel, Halobaena caerulea (Procellariiformes).

    PubMed

    Strandh, Maria; Lannefors, Mimi; Bonadonna, Francesco; Westerdahl, Helena

    2011-10-01

    The great polymorphism observed in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes is thought to be maintained by pathogen-mediated selection possibly combined with MHC-disassortative mating, guided by MHC-determined olfactory cues. Here, we partly characterize the MHC class I and II B of the blue petrel, Halobaena caerulea (Procellariiformes), a bird with significant olfactory abilities that lives under presumably low pathogen burdens in Subantarctica. Blue petrels are long-lived, monogamous birds which suggest the necessity of an accurate mate choice process. The species is ancestral to songbirds (Passeriformes; many MHC loci), although not to gamefowls (Galliformes; few MHC loci). Considering the phylogenetic relationships and the low subantarctic pathogen burden, we expected few rather than many MHC loci in the blue petrel. However, when we analysed partial MHC class I and class II B cDNA and gDNA sequences we found evidence for as many as at least eight MHC class I loci and at least two class II B loci. These class I and II B sequences showed classical MHC characteristics, e.g. high nucleotide diversity, especially in putative peptide-binding regions where signatures of positive selection was detected. Trans-species polymorphism was found between MHC class II B sequences of the blue petrel and those of thin-billed prion, Pachyptila belcheri, two species that diverged ∼25 MYA. The observed MHC allele richness in the blue petrel may well serve as a basis for mate choice, especially since olfactory discrimination of MHC types may be possible in this species. PMID:21607694

  17. Correction of Class II malocclusion and soft tissue profile in an adult patient

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Aditi; Maheshwari, Sandhya; Verma, Sanjeev Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of Class II malocclusion in nongrowing individuals is a challenging situation for the clinician. Class II malocclusion with bialveolar protrusion often dictates premolar extractions with maximum anchorage. The present article describes the case of an adult female with skeletal Class II malocclusion, bimaxillary protrusion, increased overjet, deep bite, lip protrusion, everted lower lip, deep mentolabial sulcus, and lip incompetence. To correct the malocclusion, all four first premolars were extracted. Direct anchorage from miniscrews was used for retraction of the anterior segment. The mandibular buccal segment was protracted into the extraction space using Class II mechanics. Ideal Class I canine and molar relation were achieved in 24 months. There was a significant improvement in facial profile and smile esthetics of the patient.

  18. Inflammatory bowel disease associations with HLA Class II genes

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, R.; Yang, H.; Targan, S.

    1994-09-01

    A PCR-SSOP assay has been used to analyze HLA-Class II DRB1 and DQB1 alleles in 378 Caucasians from a population in Southern California. The data has been analyzed separately for the Ashkenasi Jews and non-Jewish patients (n=286) and controls (n=92). Two common clinical forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been studied: ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn`s disease (CD). In CD, we observed a susceptible effect with the rare DR1 allele - DRB*0103 [O.R.=4.56; 95% CI (0.96, 42.97); p=0.03]; a trend for an increase in DRB1*0103 was also observed in UC patients. A susceptible effect with DRB1*1502 [O.R.=5.20; 95% CI (1.10, 48.99); p=0.02] was observed in non-Jewish UC patients. This susceptible effect was restricted to UC ANCA-positive (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) patients. In addition, a significant association with DRB1*1101-DQB1*0301 [O.R.=9.46; 95% CI (1.30, 413.87); p=0.01] was seen with UC among non-Jewish patients: this haplotype was increased with CD among non-Jewish patients. Two protective haplotypes were detected among CD non-Jewish patients: DRB1*1301-DQB1*0603 [O.R.=0.34; 95% CI (0.09, 1.09); p=0.04], and DRB*0404-DQB1*0302 [O.R.=<0.08; 95% CI (0.0, 0.84); p=0.01]. When the same data were analyzed at the serology level, we observed a positive association in UC with DR2 [O.R.6.77; 95% CI (2.47, 22.95); p=2 x 10{sup -4}], and a positive association in CD with DR1 [O.R.=2.63; 95% CI (1.14, 6.62); p=0.01] consistent with previous reports. Thus, some IBD disease associations appear to be common to both UC and CD, while some are unique to one disease.

  19. Fixed or removable function appliances for Class II malocclusions.

    PubMed

    Madurantakam, Parthasarathy

    2016-06-01

    Data sourcesEmbase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Medline (Pubmed), Web of Science, Google Scholar, Scopus, LILACS database and bibliographies of clinical trials encountered during search. There was no restriction on language or date during search.Study selectionRandomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) and Controlled Clinical Trials (CCT) in patients with Class II malocclusions that compared at least one fixed functional appliance with at least one removable functional appliance (RFA) in children below 16 years of age. Primary outcomes were clinical and lateral cephalometric measurements and the duration of treatment. Secondary outcomes included patient experiences of treatment, quality of life measures and harms arising during treatment as well as costs of both treatments.Data extraction and synthesisThe titles and abstracts of all studies identified through the search were assessed independently and in duplicate by two review authors. Disagreements about included studies were resolved through discussion with the third author. Heterogeneity was assessed using customised forms and risk of bias using a Cochrane Collaboration tool. A meta-analysis was planned for studies at low risk of bias with similar comparisons reporting the same outcome.ResultsTwo RCTs and two CCTs that met the inclusion/exclusion criteria were included in the final analysis. Risk of bias assessment indicated three trials were at high risk while one was unclear. Consequently, the included trials were deemed to be inappropriate for meta-analysis (MA).Two studies with 282 participants evaluated Twin Block with fixed Herbst appliance and reported significant improvements in anterior-posterior skeletal discrepancy, mandibular length and reduction of overjet with both appliances. While one study reported significantly shorter treatment duration in Herbst appliance, the other study did not find any difference. Herbst appliance had better compliance, less dropouts but more emergency visits

  20. HLA Class II Antigen Expression in Colorectal Carcinoma Tumors as a Favorable Prognostic Marker12

    PubMed Central

    Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Eppenberger-Castori, Serenella; Zlobec, Inti; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Arriga, Roberto; Coppola, Andrea; Caratelli, Sara; Spagnoli, Giulio Cesare; Lauro, Davide; Lugli, Alessandro; Han, Junyi; Iezzi, Giandomenica; Ferrone, Cristina; Ferlosio, Amedeo; Tornillo, Luigi; Droeser, Raoul; Rossi, Piero; Attanasio, Antonio; Ferrone, Soldano; Terracciano, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the frequency of HLA class II antigen expression in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) tumors, its association with the clinical course of the disease, and the underlying mechanism(s). Two tissue microarrays constructed with 220 and 778 CRC tumors were stained with HLA-DR, DQ, and DP antigen-specific monoclonal antibody LGII-612.14, using the immunoperoxidase staining technique. The immunohistochemical staining results were correlated with the clinical course of the disease. The functional role of HLA class II antigens expressed on CRC cells was analyzed by investigating their in vitro interactions with immune cells. HLA class II antigens were expressed in about 25% of the 220 and 21% of the 778 tumors analyzed with an overall frequency of 23%. HLA class II antigens were detected in 19% of colorectal adenomas. Importantly, the percentage of stained cells and the staining intensity were significantly lower than those detected in CRC tumors. However, HLA class II antigen staining was weakly detected only in 5.4% of 37 normal mucosa tissues. HLA class II antigen expression was associated with a favorable clinical course of the disease. In vitro stimulation with interferon gamma (IFNγ) induced HLA class II antigen expression on two of the four CRC cell lines tested. HLA class II antigen expression on CRC cells triggered interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production by resting monocytes. HLA class II antigen expression in CRC tumors is a favorable prognostic marker. This association may reflect stimulation of IL-1β production by monocytes. PMID:24563618

  1. Searching for the Right Way to Begin Class: Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawry, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Part I, "Searching for the Right Way to Begin Class," described the various iterations of beginning class rituals the author used over the years. Those rituals began with a prayer to the Holy Spirit as was required at the Catholic women's college Marymount in Tarrytown, New York, where he first taught out of graduate school in 1965. That was…

  2. Investigation of X-class Flare-Associated Coronal Mass Ejections with and without DH Type II Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrance, M. Bendict; Shanmugaraju, A.; Vršnak, Bojan

    2015-11-01

    A statistical analysis of 135 out of 141 X-class flares observed during 1997 - 2012 with and without deca-hectometric (DH) type II radio bursts has been performed. It was found that 79 events (X-class flares and coronal mass ejections - Group I) were associated with DH type II radio bursts and 62 X-class flare events were not. Out of these 62 events without DH type IIs, 56 events (Group II) have location information, and they were selected for this study. Of these 56 events, only 32 were associated with CMEs. Most of the DH-associated X-class events ({˜} 79 %) were halo CMEs, in contrast to 14 % in Group II. The average CME speed of the X-class flares associated with DH type IIs is 1555 km s-1, which is nearly twice that of the X-class flare-associated CMEs without DH event (744 km s-1). The X-class flares associated with DH radio bursts have a mean flare intensity (3.63 × 10^{-4} W m^{-2}) that is 38 % greater than that of X-class flares without DH radio bursts (2.23 × 10^{-4} W m^{-2}). In addition to the greater intensity, it is also found that the the duration and rise time of flares associated with DH radio emission (DH flares) is more than twice than that of the flares without DH radio emission. When the events were further divided into two categories with respect to their source locations in eastern and western regions, 65 % of the events in the radio-loud category (with DH radio bursts) are from the western hemisphere and the remaining 35 % are from the eastern hemisphere. On the other hand, in the radio-quiet category (without DH radio bursts), nearly 60 % of the events are from the eastern hemisphere in contrast to those of the radio-loud category. It is found that 81 % of the events from eastern regions have flare durations > 30 min in the DH-flare category, in contrast to a nearly equal number from the western side for flare durations longer/shorter than 30 min. Similarly, the eastern events in the DH-flare category have a longer average rise-time of

  3. HLA class II genes in chronic hepatitis C virus-infection and associated immunological disorders.

    PubMed

    Congia, M; Clemente, M G; Dessi, C; Cucca, F; Mazzoleni, A P; Frau, F; Lampis, R; Cao, A; Lai, M E; De Virgiliis, S

    1996-12-01

    To investigate the factors that may confer susceptibility or protection to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and to HCV-associated immunological disorders, we designed two studies on 420 Sardinian transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients followed in our department in Cagliari since 1974. The first one was an epidemiological survey aimed to evaluate the prevalence of HCV infection and HCV-associated immunological disorders. In the second study, the distribution of different HLA class II genes was examined by DNA analysis in 116 HCV positive patients, 30 HCV negative patients, and 606 healthy controls. Three hundred fourteen patients became infected with HCV (74.7%) after 5.6 +/- 2.8 years of regular transfusion program. Mixed cryoglobulinemia, purpura, arthritis, proteinuria, decreased complement levels, rheumatoid factor and anti-GOR, smooth muscle antibody (SMA), anti-nuclear antibody (ANA), and liver, kidney microsome (LKM) autoantibodies were significantly more represented in HCV positive patients than in negative ones (P < .05). A significant increase of HLA class II DR2 subtype (DRB1*1601,DQB1*0502) was observed in a group of 30 HCV negative patients who despite 10.3 +/- 2.2 years in a regular blood transfusion program did not show any evidence of HCV infection (Pc < .0092). Our results represent clear evidence for a relationship between HCV infection and immune extrahepatic abnormalities. A gene(s) located in the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region may play an important role in conferring protection against HCV infection. PMID:8938157

  4. Dual MHC class I and class II restriction of a single T cell receptor: distinct modes of tolerance induction by two classes of autoantigens.

    PubMed

    Arsov, I; Vukmanović, S

    1999-02-15

    In the final stages of thymic development, immature T cells undergo three distinct processes (positive selection, negative selection, and lineage commitment) that all depend on interactions of thymocyte TCRs with MHC molecules. It is currently thought that TCRs are preferentially restricted by either MHC class I or class II molecules. In this report, we present direct evidence that the TCR previously described as H-Y/H-2Db specific cross-reacts with H-2IAb if expressed in CD4+ cells. We also demonstrate an increase in thymocyte numbers in H-Y TCR-trangenic mice deficient in MHC class II, suggesting a relatively discrete form of negative selection by MHC class II compared with that induced by H-Y/H-2Db. We propose that inability to generate CD4+ T cells expressing H-Y TCR in different experimental settings may be due to tolerance to self-MHC class II. These results, therefore, support an intriguing possibility that tolerance to self may influence and/or interfere with the outcome of the lineage commitment. PMID:9973472

  5. McIntosh active-region class similarities and suggestions for mergers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bornmann, P. L.; Kalmbach, D.; Kulhanek, D.

    1994-01-01

    McIntosh active-region classifications reported during a five-year period were examined to determine similarities among the classes. Two methods were used extensively to determine these similarities. The number of transitions among classes were used to determine the most frequent transitions out of each class, and the alternative classes reported for the same region by different sites were used to establish which classes were neighboring classes. These transition frequencies and neighboring classes were used to identify classes that could be eliminated or merged with other classes. Class similarities were used to investigate the relative importance of several pairs of decisions that occur within a single McIntosh parameter. In particular, the redundancy of parameters in some classes was examined, and the class similarities were used to identify which of these parameters could be eliminated. Infrequently reported classes were also considered, and suggestions for mergers were made when similarities between classes could be identified.

  6. A Case of Probable MHC Class II Deficiency with Disseminated BCGitis.

    PubMed

    Alyasin, Soheyla; Abolnezhadian, Farhad; Khoshkhui, Maryam

    2015-09-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II deficiency is a primary immunodeficiency disease characterized by abnormality of MHC class II molecules surface expression on peripheral blood lymphocytes and monocytes. Clinical manifestations include extreme susceptibility to viral, bacterial, and fungal infections but the immunodeficiency is not as severe as SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency), as evidenced by failure to develop disseminated infection after BCG vaccination. Therefore, MHC II deficiency with BCGosis, that is disseminated BCGitis, is not reported commonly. We report an interesting case of BCGosis after vaccination that was diagnosed to have probable MHC II deficiency. PMID:26412640

  7. 25 CFR 547.10 - What are the minimum standards for Class II gaming system critical events?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What are the minimum standards for Class II gaming system... are the minimum standards for Class II gaming system critical events? (a) Fault events. (1) The following are fault events that must be capable of being recorded by the Class II gaming system:...

  8. 25 CFR 547.10 - What are the minimum standards for Class II gaming system critical events?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What are the minimum standards for Class II gaming system... are the minimum standards for Class II gaming system critical events? (a) Fault events. (1) The following are fault events that must be capable of being recorded by the Class II gaming system:...

  9. 25 CFR 547.6 - What are the minimum technical standards for enrolling and enabling Class II gaming system...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and enabling Class II gaming system components? 547.6 Section 547.6 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES MINIMUM TECHNICAL STANDARDS FOR GAMING EQUIPMENT USED... enabling Class II gaming system components? (a) General requirements. Class II gaming systems shall...

  10. Immunogenicity of HLA Class I and II Double Restricted Influenza A-Derived Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Sara Ram; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Buus, Søren; Rasmussen, Michael; Korsholm, Karen Smith; Nielsen, Morten; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify influenza A-derived peptides which bind to both HLA class I and -II molecules and by immunization lead to both HLA class I and class II restricted immune responses. Eight influenza A-derived 9-11mer peptides with simultaneous binding to both HLA-A*02:01 and HLA-DRB1*01:01 molecules were identified by bioinformatics and biochemical technology. Immunization of transgenic HLA-A*02:01/HLA-DRB1*01:01 mice with four of these double binding peptides gave rise to both HLA class I and class II restricted responses by CD8 and CD4 T cells, respectively, whereas four of the double binding peptides did result in HLA-A*02:01 restricted responses only. According to their cytokine profile, the CD4 T cell responses were of the Th2 type. In influenza infected mice, we were unable to detect natural processing in vivo of the double restricted peptides and in line with this, peptide vaccination did not decrease virus titres in the lungs of intranasally influenza challenged mice. Our data show that HLA class I and class II double binding peptides can be identified by bioinformatics and biochemical technology. By immunization, double binding peptides can give rise to both HLA class I and class I restricted responses, a quality which might be of potential interest for peptide-based vaccine development. PMID:26731261

  11. 40 CFR 82.23 - Transfers of allowances of class II controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls... quantity of the transferor's class II consumption allowances, production allowances, export production... EPA; and (G) For trades of consumption allowances, production allowances, export production...

  12. 46 CFR 128.220 - Class II non-vital systems-materials and pressure design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Materials and Pressure Design § 128.220 Class II... a corrosion-resistant material and, if ferrous, be hot-dip galvanized or be at least of...

  13. An adult with a severe Class II division 1 malocclusion: Frances' case.

    PubMed

    Clark, J D; Kerr, W J; Davis, M H

    1998-04-01

    This article describes treatment options for an adult with a severe Class II division 1 malocclusion. The opinions of British orthodontists, as obtained through the CASES project, are summarized and the patient's actual treatment is discussed. PMID:9791204

  14. Correction of an adult Class II division 2 individual using fixed functional appliance: A noncompliance approach

    PubMed Central

    Basavaraddi, Shrinivas; Gandedkar, Narayan H.; Belludi, Anup; Patil, Anand

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes the application of fixed functional appliance in the treatment of an adult female having Class II division 2 malocclusion with retroclination of upper incisors. Fixed functional appliance was used to correct the overjet after the uprighting of upper incisors. Fixed functional appliance was fitted on a rigid rectangular arch wire. Application of fixed functional appliance achieved a good Class I molar relationship along with Class I canine relationship with normal overjet and overbite. Fixed functional appliance is effective in the treatment of Class II malocclusions, even in adult patients, and can serve as an alternate choice of treatment instead of orthognathic surgery. This is a case; wherein, fixed functional appliance was successfully used to relieve deep bite and overjet that was ensued after leveling and aligning. We demonstrate that fixed functional appliance can act as a “noncompliant corrector” and use of Class II elastics can be avoided. PMID:27041908

  15. Quantification of the configuration factor in Class I and II cavities and simulated cervical erosions.

    PubMed

    de la Macorra, J C; Gomez-Fernandez, S

    1996-03-01

    The configuration factor of adhesive cavities is defined as the ratio of the restoration's bonded to unbonded (free) surfaces. Such a configuration factor was described, on ideal cavities, as having a potential value in predicting the behaviour of the restorations, because it is related to the restoration's capacity for relieving stress by flow. The aim of this study was to measure the configuration factor value for real Class I and II cavities and simulated cervical erosions prepared in molars. Ten Class I, five Class II cavities and seven cervical erosions were analysed using a computerised digitising system. The configuration factor values found were 4.03 +/- 0.33 for Class I cavities, 1.85 +/- 0.59 for Class II cavities and 1.10 +/- 0.09 for simulated cervical erosions (P < 0.01). PMID:9171011

  16. Class II Division 1 Malocclusion Treated with a Cervical-Pull Headgear: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ankit H

    2016-01-01

    Orthodontic treatment for skeletal Class II malocclusion was undertaken with the aim ofachieving orthopedic correction by modifying the growth pattern. A case of Class II, Division 1 malocclusion in the late mixed dentition was corrected to a Class I molar relationship by primarily using cervical-pull headgear. Cephalometric analysis indicated a reduction in the maxillo-mandibular discrepancy (ANB°) due to the correction of a skeletal Class II malocclusion to a Class I occlusion. The superimposition demonstrated that this was achieved by favorable growth of the mandible, control of maxillary first molars in an antero-posterior direction and retraction of maxillary incisors. Proclination of mandibular incisors was reduced. Significant improvement in the soft-tissue profile was noted. PMID:27319037

  17. Correction of an adult Class II division 2 individual using fixed functional appliance: A noncompliance approach.

    PubMed

    Basavaraddi, Shrinivas; Gandedkar, Narayan H; Belludi, Anup; Patil, Anand

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes the application of fixed functional appliance in the treatment of an adult female having Class II division 2 malocclusion with retroclination of upper incisors. Fixed functional appliance was used to correct the overjet after the uprighting of upper incisors. Fixed functional appliance was fitted on a rigid rectangular arch wire. Application of fixed functional appliance achieved a good Class I molar relationship along with Class I canine relationship with normal overjet and overbite. Fixed functional appliance is effective in the treatment of Class II malocclusions, even in adult patients, and can serve as an alternate choice of treatment instead of orthognathic surgery. This is a case; wherein, fixed functional appliance was successfully used to relieve deep bite and overjet that was ensued after leveling and aligning. We demonstrate that fixed functional appliance can act as a "noncompliant corrector" and use of Class II elastics can be avoided. PMID:27041908

  18. 46 CFR 128.210 - Class II vital systems-materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Class II vital systems-materials. 128.210 Section 128.210 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Materials and Pressure Design § 128.210 Class II vital systems—materials. Except as provided by §§ 128.230...

  19. Total distalization of the maxillary arch in a patient with skeletal Class II malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon Jeong; Lee, Jong-Suk; Cha, Jung-Yul; Park, Young-Chel

    2011-06-01

    In nongrowing patients with skeletal Class II malocclusion, premolar extraction or maxillary molar distalization can be used as camouflage treatment. Orthodontic miniscrew implants are widely used for this purpose because they do not produce undesirable reciprocal effects and do not depend on the patient's cooperation. This article reports on maxillary molar distalization by using miniscrew implants to correct a Class II problem. The main considerations of molar distalization treatment with miniscrew implants are discussed. PMID:21640890

  20. Wide tissue distribution of axolotl class II molecules occurs independently of thyroxin.

    PubMed

    Völk, H; Charlemagne, J; Tournefier, A; Ferrone, S; Jost, R; Parisot, R; Kaufman, J

    1998-04-01

    Unlike most salamanders, the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) fails to produce enough thyroxin to undergo anatomical metamorphosis, although a "cryptic metamorphosis" involving a change from fetal to adult hemoglobins has been described. To understand to what extent the development of the axolotl hemopoietic system is linked to anatomical metamorphosis, we examined the appearance and thyroxin dependence of class II molecules on thymus, blood, and spleen cells, using both flow cytometry and biosynthetic labeling followed by immunoprecipitation. Class II molecules are present on B cells as early as 7 weeks after hatching, the first time analyzed. At this time, most thymocytes, all T cells, and all erythrocytes lack class II molecules, but first thymocytes at 17 weeks, then T cells at 22 weeks, and finally erythrocytes at 26-27 weeks virtually all bear class II molecules. Class II molecules and adult hemoglobin appear at roughly the same time in erythrocytes. These data are most easily explained by populations of class II-negative cells being replaced by populations of class II-positive cells, and they show that the hemopoietic system matures at a variety of times unrelated to the increase of thyroxin that drives anatomical metamorphosis. We found that administration of thyroxin during axolotl ontogeny does not accelerate or otherwise affect the acquisition of class II molecules, nor does administration of drugs that inhibit thyroxin (sodium perchlorate, thiourea, methimazole, and 1-methyl imidazole) retard or abolish this acquisition, suggesting that the programs for anatomical metamorphosis and some aspects of hemopoietic development are entirely separate. PMID:9510551

  1. 49 CFR 1150.35 - Procedures and relevant dates-transactions that involve creation of Class I or Class II carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Procedures and relevant dates-transactions that involve creation of Class I or Class II carriers. 1150.35 Section 1150.35 Transportation Other Regulations.... 10901 § 1150.35 Procedures and relevant dates—transactions that involve creation of Class I or Class...

  2. 49 CFR 1150.35 - Procedures and relevant dates-transactions that involve creation of Class I or Class II carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Procedures and relevant dates-transactions that involve creation of Class I or Class II carriers. 1150.35 Section 1150.35 Transportation Other Regulations.... 10901 § 1150.35 Procedures and relevant dates—transactions that involve creation of Class I or Class...

  3. 49 CFR 1150.35 - Procedures and relevant dates-transactions that involve creation of Class I or Class II carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedures and relevant dates-transactions that involve creation of Class I or Class II carriers. 1150.35 Section 1150.35 Transportation Other Regulations.... 10901 § 1150.35 Procedures and relevant dates—transactions that involve creation of Class I or Class...

  4. 49 CFR 1150.35 - Procedures and relevant dates-transactions that involve creation of Class I or Class II carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Procedures and relevant dates-transactions that involve creation of Class I or Class II carriers. 1150.35 Section 1150.35 Transportation Other Regulations.... 10901 § 1150.35 Procedures and relevant dates—transactions that involve creation of Class I or Class...

  5. 49 CFR 1150.35 - Procedures and relevant dates-transactions that involve creation of Class I or Class II carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures and relevant dates-transactions that involve creation of Class I or Class II carriers. 1150.35 Section 1150.35 Transportation Other Regulations.... 10901 § 1150.35 Procedures and relevant dates—transactions that involve creation of Class I or Class...

  6. The Atlantic Salmon MHC class II alpha and beta promoters are active in mammalian cell lines.

    PubMed

    Vestrheim, O; Lundin, M; Syed, M

    2007-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) genes are only constitutively expressed in certain immune response cells such as B cells, macrophages, dendritic cells and other antigen presenting cells. This cell specific expression pattern and the presence of conserved regions such as the X-, X2-, Y-, and W-boxes make the MHCII promoters especially interesting as vector constructs. We tested whether the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) MHCII promoters can function in cell lines from other organisms. We found that the salmon MHCII alpha and MHCII beta promoters could drive expression of a LacZ reporter gene in adherent lymphoblast cell lines from dog (DH82) and rabbit (HybL-L). This paper shows that the promoters of Atlantic salmon MHCII alpha and beta genes can function in mammalian cell lines. PMID:17934904

  7. Agenesis of maxillary lateral incisor in an Angle Class II, Division 1 malocclusion patient

    PubMed Central

    Thiesen, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    The present case report describes the orthodontic treatment of a patient with agenesis of maxillary left lateral incisor and Angle Class II, Division 1 malocclusion. The patient also presented with maxillary midline deviation and inclination of the occlusal plane in the anterior region. Treatment objectives were: correction of sagittal relationship between the maxilla and the mandible; correction of midline deviation, so as to cause maxillary and mandibular midlines to coincide; correction of overbite and leveling of the occlusal plane, so as to create ideal conditions for esthetic rehabilitation of anterior teeth. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (BBO) as a requirement for the title of certified by the BBO. PMID:26560829

  8. 46 CFR 128.220 - Class II non-vital systems-materials and pressure design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Class II non-vital systems-materials and pressure design. 128.220 Section 128.220 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Materials and Pressure Design § 128.220 Class...

  9. 25 CFR 522.4 - Approval requirements for class II ordinances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Section 522.4 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPROVAL OF CLASS II AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.4 Approval... in and responsibility for the conduct of any gaming operation unless it elects to allow...

  10. STELLAR POPULATIONS AND THE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES. II. H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Schombert, James; McGaugh, Stacy; Maciel, Tamela E-mail: stacy.mcgaugh@case.edu

    2013-08-01

    The luminosities, colors, and H{alpha} emission for 429 H II regions in 54 low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies are presented. While the number of H II regions per galaxy is lower in LSB galaxies compared to star-forming irregulars and spirals, there is no indication that the size or luminosity function of H II regions differs from other galaxy types. The lower number of H II regions per galaxy is consistent with their lower total star formation rates. The fraction of the total L{sub H{alpha}} contributed by H II regions varies from 10% to 90% in LSB galaxies (the rest of the H{alpha} emission being associated with a diffuse component) with no correlation with galaxy stellar or gas mass. Bright H II regions have bluer colors, similar to the trend in spirals; their number and luminosities are consistent with the hypothesis that they are produced by the same H II luminosity function as spirals. Comparison with stellar population models indicates that the brightest H II regions in LSB galaxies range in cluster mass from a few 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} (e.g., {rho} Oph) to globular-cluster-sized systems (e.g., 30 Dor) and that their ages are consistent with clusters from 2 to 15 Myr old. The faintest H II regions are comparable to those in the LMC powered by a single O or B star. Thus, star formation in LSB galaxies covers the full range of stellar cluster mass.

  11. Alveolar bone thickness and lower incisor position in skeletal Class I and Class II malocclusions assessed with cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ucar, Faruk Izzet; Buyuk, Suleyman Kutalmis; Ozer, Torun; Uysal, Tancan

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate lower incisor position and bony support between patients with Class II average- and high-angle malocclusions and compare with the patients presenting Class I malocclusions. Methods CBCT records of 79 patients were divided into 2 groups according to sagittal jaw relationships: Class I and II. Each group was further divided into average- and high-angle subgroups. Six angular and 6 linear measurements were performed. Independent samples t-test, Kruskal-Wallis, and Dunn post-hoc tests were performed for statistical comparisons. Results Labial alveolar bone thickness was significantly higher in Class I group compared to Class II group (p = 0.003). Lingual alveolar bone angle (p = 0.004), lower incisor protrusion (p = 0.007) and proclination (p = 0.046) were greatest in Class II average-angle patients. Spongious bone was thinner (p = 0.016) and root apex was closer to the labial cortex in high-angle subgroups when compared to the Class II average-angle subgroup (p = 0.004). Conclusions Mandibular anterior bony support and lower incisor position were different between average- and high-angle Class II patients. Clinicians should be aware that the range of lower incisor movement in high-angle Class II patients is limited compared to average- angle Class II patients. PMID:23814708

  12. Operating Systems. Curriculum Improvement Project. Region II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagstaff, Charlene

    This course curriculum is intended for community college instructors and administrators to use in implementing an operating systems course. A student's course syllabus provides this information: credit hours, catalog description, prerequisites, required texts, instructional process, objectives, student evaluation, and class schedule. A student…

  13. 40 CFR 82.70 - Nonessential Class II products and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... designated as class II in 40 CFR part 82, appendix B to subpart A) are identified as being nonessential and... 21 CFR 2.125(e); (ii) Lubricants, coatings or cleaning fluids for electrical or electronic equipment... equipment used for non-residential applications; and (viii) Wasp and hornet sprays for use near...

  14. 40 CFR 82.70 - Nonessential Class II products and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... designated as class II in 40 CFR part 82, appendix B to subpart A) are identified as being nonessential and... 21 CFR 2.125(e); (ii) Lubricants, coatings or cleaning fluids for electrical or electronic equipment... equipment used for non-residential applications; and (viii) Wasp and hornet sprays for use near...

  15. 40 CFR 82.70 - Nonessential Class II products and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... designated as class II in 40 CFR part 82, appendix B to subpart A) are identified as being nonessential and... 21 CFR 2.125(e); (ii) Lubricants, coatings or cleaning fluids for electrical or electronic equipment... equipment used for non-residential applications; and (viii) Wasp and hornet sprays for use near...

  16. 40 CFR 82.70 - Nonessential Class II products and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... designated as class II in 40 CFR part 82, appendix B to subpart A) are identified as being nonessential and... 21 CFR 2.125(e); (ii) Lubricants, coatings or cleaning fluids for electrical or electronic equipment... equipment used for non-residential applications; and (viii) Wasp and hornet sprays for use near...

  17. Pathognomonic features of Angle's Class II division 2 malocclusion: A comparative cephalometric and arch width study

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Singamsetty E.R.V.; Indukuri, Ravikishore Reddy; Singh, Rupesh; Nooney, Anitha; Palagiri, Firoz Babu; Narayana, Veera

    2014-01-01

    Background: A thorough knowledge of the salient features of malocclusion helps the clinician in arriving at a proper diagnosis and treatment plan, and also to predict the prognosis, prior to the onset of treatment process. Among the four classes of Angle's classification of malocclusion, Class II division 2 occurs with the least frequency. There is still continuing debate in the literature whether the Class II division 2 patients ascribe the pathognomonic skeletal and dental features. Aim of the study: The aim of this study is to describe the unique features of Angle's Class II division 2 malocclusion to differentiate it from Angle's Class II division 1 malocclusion. Materials and Methods: A total of 582 pre-treatment records (study models and cephalograms), with the age of patients ranging from 15 to 22 years, were obtained from the hospital records of Vishnu Dental College, Bhimavaram and Geetam's Dental College, Visakhapatnam. Out of these, 11 pre-treatment records were excluded because of lack of clarity. In the rest of the sample, 283 were Class II division 1 and 288 were Class II division 2. The lateral cephalograms were analyzed by using digiceph and the arch width analysis was done based on the anatomical points described by Staley et al. and Sergl et al. Results: An intergroup evaluation was done by using unpaired Student's “t” test. The skeletal vertical parameters, dental parameters, and the maxillary arch width parameters revealed a statistically significant difference between the two groups of malocclusion. Conclusion: Angle's Class II division 2 malocclusion has a pronounced horizontal growth pattern with decreased lower anterior facial height, retroclined upper anteriors, and significantly increased maxillary arch width parameters. PMID:25558449

  18. THE GREEN BANK TELESCOPE GALACTIC H II REGION DISCOVERY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Bania, T. M.; Anderson, L. D.; Balser, Dana S.; Rood, R. T.

    2010-08-01

    We discovered a large population of previously unknown Galactic H II regions by using the Green Bank Telescope to detect their hydrogen radio recombination line emission. Since recombination lines are optically thin at 3 cm wavelength, we can detect H II regions across the entire Galactic disk. Our targets were selected based on spatially coincident 24 {mu}m and 21 cm continuum emission. For the Galactic zone -16 {sup 0} {<=} l {<=} 67{sup 0} and |b| {<=} 1{sup 0}, we detected 602 discrete recombination line components from 448 lines of sight, 95% of the sample targets, which more than doubles the number of known H II regions in this part of the Milky Way. We found 25 new first quadrant nebulae with negative LSR velocities, placing them beyond the solar orbit. Because we can detect all nebulae inside the solar orbit that are ionized by O-stars, the Discovery Survey targets, when combined with existing H II region catalogs, give a more accurate census of Galactic H II regions and their properties. The distribution of H II regions across the Galactic disk shows strong, narrow ({approx}1 kpc wide) peaks at Galactic radii of 4.3 and 6.0 kpc. The longitude-velocity distribution of H II regions now gives unambiguous evidence for Galactic structure, including the kinematic signatures of the radial peaks in the spatial distribution, a concentration of nebulae at the end of the Galactic Bar, and nebulae located on the kinematic locus of the 3 Kpc Arm.

  19. Class II HDAC Inhibition Hampers Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation by Induction of MicroRNA-29

    PubMed Central

    Mannaerts, Inge; Eysackers, Nathalie; Onyema, Oscar O.; Van Beneden, Katrien; Valente, Sergio; Mai, Antonello; Odenthal, Margarete; van Grunsven, Leo A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The conversion of a quiescent vitamin A storing hepatic stellate cell (HSC) to a matrix producing, contractile myofibroblast-like activated HSC is a key event in the onset of liver disease following injury of any aetiology. Previous studies have shown that class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) are involved in the phenotypical changes occurring during stellate cell activation in liver and pancreas. Aims In the current study we investigate the role of class II HDACs during HSC activation. Methods We characterized the expression of the class II HDACs freshly isolated mouse HSCs. We inhibited HDAC activity by selective pharmacological inhibition with MC1568, and by repressing class II HDAC gene expression using specific siRNAs. Results Inhibition of HDAC activity leads to a strong reduction of HSC activation markers α-SMA, lysyl oxidase and collagens as well as an inhibition of cell proliferation. Knock down experiments showed that HDAC4 contributes to HSC activation by regulating lysyl oxidase expression. In addition, we observed a strong up regulation of miR-29, a well-known anti-fibrotic miR, upon treatment with MC1568. Our in vivo work suggests that a successful inhibition of class II HDACs could be promising for development of future anti-fibrotic compounds. Conclusions In conclusion, the use of MC1568 has enabled us to identify a role for class II HDACs regulating miR-29 during HSC activation. PMID:23383282

  20. Donor MHC class II antigen is essential for induction of transplantation tolerance by bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Umemura, A; Monaco, A P; Maki, T

    2000-05-01

    Posttransplant infusion of donor bone marrow cells (BMC) induces tolerance to allografts in adult mice, dogs, nonhuman primates, and probably humans. Here we used a mouse skin allograft model and an allogeneic radiation chimera model to examine the role of MHC Ags in tolerance induction. Infusion of MHC class II Ag-deficient (CIID) BMC failed to prolong C57BL/6 (B6) skin grafts in ALS- and rapamycin-treated B10.A mice, whereas wild-type B6 or MHC class I Ag-deficient BMC induced prolongation. Removal of class II Ag-bearing cells from donor BMC markedly reduced the tolerogenic effect compared with untreated BMC, although graft survival was significantly longer in mice given depleted BMC than that in control mice given no BMC. Infusion of CIID BMC into irradiated syngeneic B6 or allogeneic B10.A mice produced normal lymphoid cell reconstitution including CD4+ T cells except for the absence of class II Ag-positive cells. However, irradiated B10.A mice reconstituted with CIID BMC rejected all B6 and a majority of CIID skin grafts despite continued maintenance of high degree chimerism. B10.A mice reconstituted with B6 BMC maintained chimerism and accepted both B6 and CIID skin grafts. Thus, expression of MHC class II Ag on BMC is essential for allograft tolerance induction and peripheral chimerism with cells deficient in class II Ag does not guarantee allograft acceptance. PMID:10779744

  1. BIITE: A Tool to Determine HLA Class II Epitopes from T Cell ELISpot Data

    PubMed Central

    Boelen, Lies; O’Neill, Patrick K.; Quigley, Kathryn J.; Reynolds, Catherine J.; Maillere, Bernard; Robinson, John H.; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Altmann, Daniel M.; Boyton, Rosemary J.; Asquith, Becca

    2016-01-01

    Activation of CD4+ T cells requires the recognition of peptides that are presented by HLA class II molecules and can be assessed experimentally using the ELISpot assay. However, even given an individual’s HLA class II genotype, identifying which class II molecule is responsible for a positive ELISpot response to a given peptide is not trivial. The two main difficulties are the number of HLA class II molecules that can potentially be formed in a single individual (3–14) and the lack of clear peptide binding motifs for class II molecules. Here, we present a Bayesian framework to interpret ELISpot data (BIITE: Bayesian Immunogenicity Inference Tool for ELISpot); specifically BIITE identifies which HLA-II:peptide combination(s) are immunogenic based on cohort ELISpot data. We apply BIITE to two ELISpot datasets and explore the expected performance using simulations. We show this method can reach high accuracies, depending on the cohort size and the success rate of the ELISpot assay within the cohort. PMID:26953935

  2. Successful treatment of Class II malocclusion with bidental protrusion using standard edgewise prescription.

    PubMed

    Ayaz, Mohd; Kharbanda, Om Prakash

    2016-01-01

    This case report deals with the successful orthodontic treatment of a 14-year-old female patient having Class II malocclusion with bidental protrusion using standard edgewise prescription. She reported with forwardly placed upper front teeth and difficulty in closing lips. She had prognathic maxilla, retrognathic mandible, and full cusp Class II molar and canine relation bilaterally with overjet of 7 mm. She was in cervical vertebrae maturation indicator Stage IV. The case was treated by fixed extraction mechanotherapy. Interarch Class II mechanics was used to retract the upper incisor and to mesialize the lower molars. Simultaneously, Class I mechanics was used to upright lower incisors. Tip back bend, curve of Spee, and extra palatal root torque were incorporated in upper archwire to maintain molars in upright position and prevent extrusion and deepening of bite, respectively. There was satisfactory improvement in facial profile at the end of 24 months. After a follow-up of 6 months, occlusion was stable. PMID:27041906

  3. Successful treatment of Class II malocclusion with bidental protrusion using standard edgewise prescription

    PubMed Central

    Ayaz, Mohd; Kharbanda, Om Prakash

    2016-01-01

    This case report deals with the successful orthodontic treatment of a 14-year-old female patient having Class II malocclusion with bidental protrusion using standard edgewise prescription. She reported with forwardly placed upper front teeth and difficulty in closing lips. She had prognathic maxilla, retrognathic mandible, and full cusp Class II molar and canine relation bilaterally with overjet of 7 mm. She was in cervical vertebrae maturation indicator Stage IV. The case was treated by fixed extraction mechanotherapy. Interarch Class II mechanics was used to retract the upper incisor and to mesialize the lower molars. Simultaneously, Class I mechanics was used to upright lower incisors. Tip back bend, curve of Spee, and extra palatal root torque were incorporated in upper archwire to maintain molars in upright position and prevent extrusion and deepening of bite, respectively. There was satisfactory improvement in facial profile at the end of 24 months. After a follow-up of 6 months, occlusion was stable. PMID:27041906

  4. HLA-G and MHC Class II Protein Expression in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jesionek-Kupnicka, Dorota; Bojo, Marcin; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Szumera-Ciećkiewicz, Anna; Jabłońska, Joanna; Kalinka-Warzocha, Ewa; Kordek, Radzisław; Młynarski, Wojciech; Robak, Tadeusz; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Lech-Maranda, Ewa

    2016-06-01

    The expression of human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) and HLA class II protein was studied by immunohistochemical staining of lymph nodes from 148 patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and related to the clinical course of the disease. Negative HLA-G expression was associated with a lower probability of achieving a complete remission (p = 0.04). Patients with negative HLA-G expression tended towards a lower 3-year overall survival (OS) rate compared to those with positive expression of HLA-G (p = 0.08). When restricting the analysis to patients receiving chemotherapy with rituximab, the estimated 3-year OS rate of patients with positive HLA-G expression was 73.3 % compared with 47.5 % (p = 0.03) in those with negative expression. Patients with negative HLA class II expression presented a lower 3-year OS rate compared to subjects with positive expression (p = 0.04). The loss of HLA class II expression (p = 0.05) and belonging to the intermediate high/high IPI risk group (p = 0.001) independently increased the risk of death. HLA class II expression also retained its prognostic value in patients receiving rituximab; the 3-year OS rate was 65.3 % in patients with positive HLA class II expression versus 29.6 % (p = 0.04) in subjects that had loss of HLA class II expression. To our knowledge, for the first time, the expression of HLA-G protein in DLBCL and its association with the clinical course of the disease was demonstrated. Moreover, the link between losing HLA class II protein expression and poor survival of patients treated with immunochemotherapy was confirmed. PMID:26667793

  5. Assessment of upper airways measurements in patients with mandibular skeletal Class II malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Nayanna Nadja e; Lacerda, Rosa Helena Wanderley; Silva, Alexandre Wellos Cunha; Ramos, Tania Braga

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Mandibular Class II malocclusions seem to interfere in upper airways measurements. The aim of this study was to assess the upper airways measurements of patients with skeletal Class II malocclusion in order to investigate the association between these measurements and the position and length of the mandible as well as mandibular growth trend, comparing the Class II group with a Class I one. Methods: A total of 80 lateral cephalograms from 80 individuals aged between 10 and 17 years old were assessed. Forty radiographs of Class I malocclusion individuals were matched by age with forty radiographs of individuals with mandibular Class II malocclusion. McNamara Jr., Ricketts, Downs and Jarabak's measurements were used for cephalometric evaluation. Data were submitted to descriptive and inferential statistical analysis by means of SPSS 20.0 statistical package. Student's t-test, Pearson correlation and intraclass correlation coefficient were used. A 95% confidence interval and 5% significance level were adopted to interpret the results. Results: There were differences between groups. Oropharynx and nasopharynx sizes as well as mandibular position and length were found to be reduced in Class II individuals. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between the size of the oropharynx and Xi-Pm, Co-Gn and SNB measurements. In addition, the size of the nasopharynx was found to be correlated with Xi-Pm, Co-Gn, facial depth, SNB, facial axis and FMA. Conclusion: Individuals with mandibular Class II malocclusion were shown to have upper airways measurements diminished. There was a correlation between mandibular length and position and the size of oropharynx and nasopharynx. PMID:26560826

  6. The Forgotten: Identification and Functional Characterization of MHC Class II Molecules H2-Eb2 and RT1-Db2.

    PubMed

    Monzón-Casanova, Elisa; Rudolf, Ronald; Starick, Lisa; Müller, Ingrid; Söllner, Christian; Müller, Nora; Westphal, Nico; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Uchiyama, Takehiko; Berberich, Ingolf; Walter, Lutz; Herrmann, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    In this article, we report the complete coding sequence and to our knowledge, the first functional analysis of two homologous nonclassical MHC class II genes: RT1-Db2 of rat and H2-Eb2 of mouse. They differ in important aspects compared with the classical class II β1 molecules: their mRNA expression by APCs is much lower, they show minimal polymorphism in the Ag-binding domain, and they lack N-glycosylation and the highly conserved histidine 81. Also, their cytoplasmic region is completely different and longer. To study and compare them with their classical counterparts, we transduced them in different cell lines. These studies show that they can pair with the classical α-chains (RT1-Da and H2-Ea) and are expressed at the cell surface where they can present superantigens. Interestingly, compared with the classical molecules, they have an extraordinary capacity to present the superantigen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis mitogen. Taken together, our findings suggest that the b2 genes, together with the respective α-chain genes, encode for H2-E2 or RT1-D2 molecules, which could function as Ag-presenting molecules for a particular class of Ags, as modulators of Ag presentation like nonclassical nonpolymorphic class II molecules DM and DO do, or even as players outside the immune system. PMID:26740108

  7. On Radiation Pressure in Static, Dusty H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draine, B. T.

    2011-05-01

    Radiation pressure acting on gas and dust causes H II regions to have central densities that are lower than the density near the ionized boundary. H II regions in static equilibrium comprise a family of similarity solutions with three parameters: β, γ, and the product Q 0 n rms; β characterizes the stellar spectrum, γ characterizes the dust/gas ratio, Q 0 is the stellar ionizing output (photons/s), and n rms is the rms density within the ionized region. Adopting standard values for β and γ, varying Q 0 n rms generates a one-parameter family of density profiles, ranging from nearly uniform density (small Q 0 n rms) to shell-like (large Q 0 n rms). When Q 0 n rms >~ 1052 cm-3 s-1, dusty H II regions have conspicuous central cavities, even if no stellar wind is present. For given β, γ, and Q 0 n rms, a fourth quantity, which can be Q 0, determines the overall size and density of the H II region. Examples of density and emissivity profiles are given. We show how quantities of interest—such as the peak-to-central emission measure ratio, the rms-to-mean density ratio, the edge-to-rms density ratio, and the fraction of the ionizing photons absorbed by the gas—depend on β, γ, and Q 0 n rms. For dusty H II regions, compression of the gas and dust into an ionized shell results in a substantial increase in the fraction of the stellar photons that actually ionize H (relative to a uniform-density H II region with the same dust/gas ratio and density n = n rms). We discuss the extent to which radial drift of dust grains in H II regions can alter the dust-to-gas ratio. The applicability of these solutions to real H II regions is discussed.

  8. Understanding Spatial and Spectral Morphologies of Ultracompact H II Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S.; Dullemond, Cornelis P.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2010-08-25

    The spatial morphology, spectral characteristics, and time variability of ultracompact H II regions provide strong constraints on the process of massive star formation. We have performed simulations of the gravitational collapse of rotating molecular cloud cores, including treatments of the propagation of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. We here present synthetic radio continuum observations of H II regions from our collapse simulations, to investigate how well they agree with observation, and what we can learn about how massive star formation proceeds. We find that intermittent shielding by dense filaments in the gravitationally unstable accretion flow around the massive star leads to highly variable H II regions that do not grow monotonically, but rather flicker, growing and shrinking repeatedly. This behavior appears able to resolve the well-known lifetime problem. We find that multiple ionizing sources generally form, resulting in groups of ultracompact H II regions, consistent with observations. We confirm that our model reproduces the qualitative H II region morphologies found in surveys, with generally consistent relative frequencies. We also find that simulated spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from our model are consistent with the range of observed H II region SEDs, including both regions showing a normal transition from optically thick to optically thin emission, and those with intermediate spectral slopes. In our models, anomalous slopes are solely produced by inhomogeneities in the H II region, with no contribution from dust emission at millimeter or submillimeter wavelengths. We conclude that many observed characteristics of ultracompact H II regions appear consistent with massive star formation in fast, gravitationally unstable, accretion flows.

  9. UNDERSTANDING SPATIAL AND SPECTRAL MORPHOLOGIES OF ULTRACOMPACT H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S.; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Dullemond, Cornelis P.

    2010-08-10

    The spatial morphology, spectral characteristics, and time variability of ultracompact (UC) H II regions provide strong constraints on the process of massive star formation. We have performed simulations of the gravitational collapse of rotating molecular cloud cores, including treatments of the propagation of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. We here present synthetic radio continuum observations of H II regions from our collapse simulations, to investigate how well they agree with observation, and what we can learn about how massive star formation proceeds. We find that intermittent shielding by dense filaments in the gravitationally unstable accretion flow around the massive star leads to highly variable H II regions that do not grow monotonically, but rather flicker, growing and shrinking repeatedly. This behavior appears to be able to resolve the well-known lifetime problem. We find that multiple ionizing sources generally form, resulting in groups of UC H II regions, consistent with observations. We confirm that our model reproduces the qualitative H II region morphologies found in surveys, with generally consistent relative frequencies. We also find that simulated spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from our model are consistent with the range of observed H II region SEDs, including both regions showing a normal transition from optically thick to optically thin emission, and those with intermediate spectral slopes. In our models, anomalous slopes are solely produced by inhomogeneities in the H II region, with no contribution from dust emission at millimeter or submillimeter wavelengths. We conclude that many observed characteristics of UC H II regions appear consistent with massive star formation in fast, gravitationally unstable, accretion flows.

  10. Water in the warm inner regions of Class 0 protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutens, Audrey; Jørgensen, Jes K.; Persson, Magnus V.; van Dishoeck, Ewine; vastel, charlotte; Taquet, Vianney; Bottinelli, Sandrine; Caux, Emmanuel; Harsono, Daniel; Lykke, Julie M.

    2015-08-01

    Water plays a key role in many astrophysical environments (star-forming regions, outflows, prestellar cores, comets, asteroids, …) as well as for the emergence of life as we know it. Its detection in the inner regions of low-mass protostars raises the question whether this is similar to the water that is incorporated into comets and asteroids that may deliver it to Earth-like planets. The water deuterium fractionation is very helpful to understand how it forms and evolves. For example, Cleeves et al. (2014) showed that a contribution of water formed in the primordial cloud is necessary to explain the HDO/H2O ratio of the terrestrial oceans. Observations of the deuterated and non-deuterated forms of water at an early stage of star formation may therefore potentially be an important tool to describe the origin of water on Earth.We here present recent interferometric measurements of the distribution and deuteration of water on Solar System scales. During the last few years, a few HDO and H218O lines were observed in the inner regions of Class 0 protostars with interferometers (Jørgensen & van Dishoeck 2010, Codella+2010, Persson+ 2012, 2013, 2014, Taquet+ 2013), which enables estimates of the HDO/H2O ratios. Our recent detection of D2O with the Plateau de Bure interferometer towards the low-mass protostar NGC1333 IRAS2A leads to a surprisingly high D2O/HDO ratio compared with the HDO/H2O ratio (Coutens+ 2014). These results contradict the predictions of current grain surface chemical models and indicate that either an ingredient is missing in our understanding of the surface deuteration process or that both sublimation of grain mantles and water formation at high temperature (T > 230K) take place in the inner regions of protostars. We also present the first results of an ALMA Cycle 2 program (PI: A. Coutens) to target several HDO, H218O and D2O lines at a spatial resolution of ~0.3" (40 AU) toward the nearby protostellar binary IRAS16293-2422. These observations