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Sample records for class switch recombination

  1. Epigenetic Codes Programing Class Switch Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Bharat; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2015-01-01

    Class switch recombination imparts B cells with a fitness-associated adaptive ­advantage during a humoral immune response by using a precision-tailored DNA excision and ligation process to swap the default constant region gene of the antibody with a new one that has unique effector functions. This secondary diversification of the antibody repertoire is a hallmark of the adaptability of B cells when confronted with environmental and pathogenic challenges. Given that the nucleotide sequence of genes during class switching remains unchanged (genetic constraints), it is logical and necessary therefore, to integrate the adaptability of B cells to an epigenetic state, which is dynamic and can be heritably modulated before, after, or even during an antibody-dependent immune response. Epigenetic regulation encompasses heritable changes that affect function (phenotype) without altering the sequence information embedded in a gene, and include histone, DNA and RNA modifications. Here, we review current literature on how B cells use an epigenetic code language as a means to ensure antibody plasticity in light of pathogenic insults. PMID:26441954

  2. Class-switch recombination: after the dawn of AID

    PubMed Central

    Kenter, Amy L

    2015-01-01

    Isotype class switching is central to the humoral immune response. The discovery that mutations in the activation-induced deaminase (AID) gene inhibit class-switch recombination, somatic hypermutation and gene conversion is a major step forward in defining the underlying mechanisms of these gene modification events. The propensity of mutations to occur at dC/dG nucleotides during somatic hypermutation and the homology between AID and cytidine deaminase has resulted in studies demonstrating that AID has the properties of a cytidine-specific mutator and also that elements of the base-excision repair pathway play a central role in class switching and hypermutation. AID is not a promiscuous mutator in the B cell, suggesting that there are specific molecular targeting mechanisms that regulate the accessibility of DNA to AID and differentially regulate class-switch recombination and somatic hypermutation. During class switching, isotype-specific targeting occurs independently of AID and provides another level of specificity to this recombination event. PMID:12633669

  3. IgH chain class switch recombination: mechanism and regulation.

    PubMed

    Stavnezer, Janet; Schrader, Carol E

    2014-12-01

    IgH class switching occurs rapidly after activation of mature naive B cells, resulting in a switch from expression of IgM and IgD to expression of IgG, IgE, or IgA; this switch improves the ability of Abs to remove the pathogen that induces the humoral immune response. Class switching occurs by a deletional recombination between two switch regions, each of which is associated with a H chain constant region gene. Class switch recombination (CSR) is instigated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase, which converts cytosines in switch regions to uracils. The uracils are subsequently removed by two DNA-repair pathways, resulting in mutations, single-strand DNA breaks, and the double-strand breaks required for CSR. We discuss several aspects of CSR, including how CSR is induced, CSR in B cell progenitors, the roles of transcription and chromosomal looping in CSR, and the roles of certain DNA-repair enzymes in CSR. PMID:25411432

  4. Directed Ig class switch recombination in activated murine B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Winter, E; Krawinkel, U; Radbruch, A

    1987-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class switch recombination occurs at frequencies of up to 10%/cell/generation in activated murine B-lymphocytes. We analysed cH gene rearrangements and switch recombinations from active and inactive IgH loci of B-cells activated in various ways and immortalized by cell fusion. Although about half of the IgM+ cells show rearrangement of c mu genes, the deletion of c mu is a rare event. Half of the IgG3+ and IgG1+ cells show rearrangement of c mu genes on the inactive IgH locus and the other half of the IgG+ cells have deleted c mu from both IgH loci by switch recombination. This recombination is directed to the same switch regions on both IgH loci in 60-80% of all cases. Interleukin 4 may play a critical role in programming murine B-lymphocytes for specific switch recombination. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 6. PMID:3038529

  5. Parp3 negatively regulates immunoglobulin class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Robert, Isabelle; Gaudot, Léa; Rogier, Mélanie; Heyer, Vincent; Noll, Aurélia; Dantzer, Françoise; Reina-San-Martin, Bernardo

    2015-05-01

    To generate highly specific and adapted immune responses, B cells diversify their antibody repertoire through mechanisms involving the generation of programmed DNA damage. Somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) are initiated by the recruitment of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to immunoglobulin loci and by the subsequent generation of DNA lesions, which are differentially processed to mutations during SHM or to double-stranded DNA break intermediates during CSR. The latter activate the DNA damage response and mobilize multiple DNA repair factors, including Parp1 and Parp2, to promote DNA repair and long-range recombination. We examined the contribution of Parp3 in CSR and SHM. We find that deficiency in Parp3 results in enhanced CSR, while SHM remains unaffected. Mechanistically, this is due to increased occupancy of AID at the donor (Sμ) switch region. We also find evidence of increased levels of DNA damage at switch region junctions and a bias towards alternative end joining in the absence of Parp3. We propose that Parp3 plays a CSR-specific role by controlling AID levels at switch regions during CSR. PMID:26000965

  6. The histone methyltransferase MMSET regulates class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Pei, Huadong; Wu, Xiaosheng; Liu, Tongzheng; Yu, Kefei; Jelinek, Diane F; Lou, Zhenkun

    2013-01-15

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a genetic disease with characteristic facial features and developmental disorders. Of interest, loss of the MMSET gene (also known as WHSC1) is considered to be responsible for the core phenotypes of this disease. Patients with WHS also display Ab deficiency, although the underlying cause of this deficiency is unclear. Recent studies suggest that the histone methyltransferase activity of MMSET plays an important role in the DNA damage response by facilitating the recruitment of 53BP1 to sites of DNA damage. We hypothesize that MMSET also regulates class switch recombination (CSR) through its effect on 53BP1. In this study, we show that MMSET indeed plays an important role in CSR through its histone methyltransferase activity. Knocking down MMSET expression impaired 53BP1 recruitment as well as the germline transcription of the Igh switch regions, resulting in defective CSR but no effect on cell growth and viability. These results suggest that defective CSR caused by MMSET deficiency could be a cause of Ab deficiency in WHS patients. PMID:23241889

  7. Non-redundancy of cytidine deaminases in class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Fugmann, Sebastian D; Rush, James S; Schatz, David G

    2004-03-01

    Class switch recombination (CSR), somatic hypermutation, and gene conversion are immunoglobulin diversification mechanisms that are strictly dependent on the activity of the activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). The precise role and substrate(s) of AID in these processes remain to be well defined. The closest homologue of AID is APOBEC-1, a bona fide mRNA-editing enzyme, which shares with AID the ability to deaminate cytidines within single-stranded DNA in vitro and in prokaryotic cells. To determine whether APOBEC-1 can therefore substitute for AID in activated B cells, we expressed human AID, a catalytic mutant thereof, and rat APOBEC-1 in AID-deficient murine B cells. Whereas AID rescued CSR, neither the inactive mutant nor APOBEC-1 could complement AID deficiency. This indicates that cytidine deaminase activity is necessary but not sufficient to initiate CSR, and suggests that AID is specifically targeted to its cognate substrate, the immunoglobulin genes or a distinct mRNA, by an as-yet-unknown mechanism. PMID:14991614

  8. Related Mechanisms of Antibody Somatic Hypermutation and Class Switch Recombination

    PubMed Central

    HWANG, JOYCE K.; ALT, FREDERICK W.; YEAP, LENG-SIEW

    2015-01-01

    The primary antibody repertoire is generated by mechanisms involving the assembly of the exons that encode the antigen-binding variable regions of immunoglobulin heavy (IgH) and light (IgL) chains during the early development of B lymphocytes. After antigen-dependent activation, mature B lymphocytes can further alter their IgH and IgL variable region exons by the process of somatic hypermutation (SHM), which allows the selection of B cells in which SHMs resulted in the production of antibodies with increased antigen affinity. In addition, during antigen-dependent activation, B cells can also change the constant region of their IgH chain through a DNA double-strand-break (DSB) dependent process referred to as IgH class switch recombination (CSR), which generates B cell progeny that produce antibodies with different IgH constant region effector functions that are best suited for a elimination of a particular pathogen or in a particular setting. Both the mutations that underlie SHM and the DSBs that underlie CSR are initiated in target genes by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). This review describes in depth the processes of SHM and CSR with a focus on mechanisms that direct AID cytidine deamination in activated B cells and mechanisms that promote the differential outcomes of such cytidine deamination. PMID:26104555

  9. The role of G-density in switch region repeats for immunoglobulin class switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng Z.; Pannunzio, Nicholas R.; Hsieh, Chih-Lin; Yu, Kefei; Lieber, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    The boundaries of R-loops are well-documented at immunoglobulin heavy chain loci in mammalian B cells. Within primary B cells or B cell lines, the upstream boundaries of R-loops typically begin early in the repetitive portion of the switch regions. Most R-loops terminate within the switch repetitive zone, but the remainder can extend a few hundred base pairs further, where G-density on the non-template DNA strand gradually drops to the genome average. Whether the G-density determines how far the R-loops extend is an important question. We previously studied the role of G-clusters in initiating R-loop formation, but we did not examine the role of G-density in permitting the elongation of the R-loop, after it had initiated. Here, we vary the G-density of different portions of the switch region in a murine B cell line. We find that both class switch recombination (CSR) and R-loop formation decrease significantly when the overall G-density is reduced from 46% to 29%. Short 50 bp insertions with low G-density within switch regions do not appear to affect either CSR or R-loop elongation, whereas a longer (150 bp) insertion impairs both. These results demonstrate that G-density is an important determinant of the length over which mammalian genomic R-loops extend. PMID:25378327

  10. Switch Region Identity Plays an Important Role in Ig Class Switch Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Palash; Wuerffel, Robert; Kenter, Amy L.

    2016-01-01

    Ig class switch recombination (CSR) is regulated through long-range intrachromosomal interactions between germline transcript promoters and enhancers to initiate transcription and create chromatin accessible to activation-induced deaminase attack. CSR occurs between switch (S) regions that flank Cμ and downstream CH regions and functions via an intrachromosomal deletional event between the donor Sμ region and a downstream S region. It is unclear to what extent S region primary sequence influences differential targeting of CSR to specific isotypes. We address this issue in this study by generating mutant mice in which the endogenous Sγ3 region was replaced with size-matched Sγ1 sequence. B cell activation conditions are established that support robust γ3 and γ1 germline transcript expression and stimulate IgG1 switching but suppress IgG3 CSR. We found that the Sγ1 replacement allele engages in μ→γ3 CSR, whereas the intact allele is repressed. We conclude that S region identity makes a significant contribution to CSR. We propose that the Sγ1 region is selectively targeted for CSR following the induction of an isotype-specific factor that targets the S region and recruits CSR machinery. PMID:20427773

  11. Efficient AID targeting of switch regions is not sufficient for optimal class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Bonaud, Amélie; Lechouane, Fabien; Le Noir, Sandrine; Monestier, Olivier; Cogné, Michel; Sirac, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Antibody affinity maturation relies on activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)-dependent somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin (Ig) loci. Class switch recombination (CSR) can in parallel occur between AID-targeted, transcribed, spliced and repetitive switch (S) regions. AID thus initiates not only mutations but also double-strand breaks (DSBs). What governs the choice between those two outcomes remains uncertain. Here we explore whether insertion of transcribed intronic S regions in a locus (Igκ) strongly recruiting AID is sufficient for efficient CSR. Although strongly targeted by AID and carrying internal deletions, the knocked-in S regions only undergo rare CSR-like events. This model confirms S regions as exquisite SHM targets, extending AID activity far from transcription initiation sites, and shows that such spliced and repetitive AID targets are not sufficient by themselves for CSR. Beyond transcription and AID recruitment, additional IgH elements are thus needed for CSR, restricting this hazardous gene remodelling to IgH loci. PMID:26146363

  12. Regulating infidelity: RNA-mediated recruitment of AID to DNA during class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    DiMenna, Lauren J; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2016-03-01

    The mechanism by which the DNA deaminase activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is specifically recruited to repetitive switch region DNA during class switch recombination is still poorly understood. Work over the past decade has revealed a strong link between transcription and RNA polymerase-associated factors in AID recruitment, yet none of these processes satisfactorily explain how AID specificity is affected. Here, we review a recent finding wherein AID is guided to switch regions not by a protein factor but by an RNA moiety, and especially one associated with a noncoding RNA that has been long thought of as being inert. This work explains the long-standing requirement of splicing of noncoding transcripts during class switching, and has implications in both B cell-mediated immunity as well as the underlying pathological syndromes associated with the recombination reaction. PMID:26799454

  13. Constraints contributed by chromatin looping limit recombination targeting during immunoglobulin class switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Scott; Achour, Ikbel; Wuerffel, Robert; Kumar, Satyendra; Gerasimova, Tatiana; Sen, Ranjan; Kenter, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Engagement of promoters with distal elements in long range looping interactions has been implicated in regulation of Ig class switch recombination (CSR). The principles determining the spatial and regulatory relationships among Igh transcriptional elements remain poorly defined. We examined the chromosome conformation of constant region (CH) loci that are targeted for CSR in a cytokine dependent fashion in mature B lymphocytes. Germline transcription (GLT) of the γ1 and ε CH loci is controlled by two transcription factors, IL4 inducible STAT6 and LPS activated NFκB. We showed that although STAT6 deficiency triggered loss of GLT, deletion of NFκB p50 abolished both GLT and γ1 locus:enhancer looping. Thus, chromatin looping between CH loci and Igh enhancers is independent of GLT production and STAT6, whereas the establishment and maintenance of these chromatin contacts requires NFκB p50. Comparative analysis of the endogenous γ1 locus and a knock-in heterologous promoter in mice identified the promoter per se as the interactive looping element and showed that transcription elongation is dispensable for promoter/enhancer interactions. Interposition of the LPS responsive heterologous promoter between the LPS inducible γ3 and γ2b loci altered GLT expression and essentially abolished direct IgG2b switching while maintaining a sequential μ-> γ3-> γ2b format. Our study provides evidence that promoter/enhancer looping interactions can introduce negative constraints on distal promoters and affect their ability to engage in germline transcription and determine CSR targeting. PMID:25624452

  14. Constraints contributed by chromatin looping limit recombination targeting during Ig class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Scott; Achour, Ikbel; Wuerffel, Robert; Kumar, Satyendra; Gerasimova, Tatiana; Sen, Ranjan; Kenter, Amy L

    2015-03-01

    Engagement of promoters with distal elements in long-range looping interactions has been implicated in regulation of Ig class switch recombination (CSR). The principles determining the spatial and regulatory relationships among Igh transcriptional elements remain poorly defined. We examined the chromosome conformation of C region (CH) loci that are targeted for CSR in a cytokine-dependent fashion in mature B lymphocytes. Germline transcription (GLT) of the γ1 and ε CH loci is controlled by two transcription factors, IL-4-inducible STAT6 and LPS-activated NF-κB. We showed that although STAT6 deficiency triggered loss of GLT, deletion of NF-κB p50 abolished both GLT and γ1 locus:enhancer looping. Thus, chromatin looping between CH loci and Igh enhancers is independent of GLT production and STAT6, whereas the establishment and maintenance of these chromatin contacts requires NF-κB p50. Comparative analysis of the endogenous γ1 locus and a knock-in heterologous promoter in mice identified the promoter per se as the interactive looping element and showed that transcription elongation is dispensable for promoter/enhancer interactions. Interposition of the LPS-responsive heterologous promoter between the LPS-inducible γ3 and γ2b loci altered GLT expression and essentially abolished direct IgG2b switching while maintaining a sequential μ→γ3→γ2b format. Our study provides evidence that promoter/enhancer looping interactions can introduce negative constraints on distal promoters and affect their ability to engage in germline transcription and determine CSR targeting. PMID:25624452

  15. Role for Msh5 in the Regulation of Ig Class Switch Recombination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation serve to diversify antibody responses, and are orchestrated by the activity of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and a large number of proteins involved in DNA repair and genome surveillance. Here we show that ...

  16. ALKBH1 is dispensable for abasic site cleavage during base excision repair and class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Müller, Tina A; Yu, Kefei; Hausinger, Robert P; Meek, Katheryn

    2013-01-01

    Potential roles of the abasic site lyase activity associated with AlkB homolog 1 (ALKBH1) were assessed by studies focusing on the two cellular processes that create abasic sites as intermediates: base excision repair and class switch recombination. Alkbh1(-/-) pups (lacking exon 3) were born at a lower than expected frequency from heterozygous parents, suggesting a reduced survival rate and non-Mendelian inheritance, and they exhibited a gender bias in favor of males (70% males and 30% females). To study ALKBH1's potential involvement in DNA repair, fibroblasts were isolated from Alkbh1(-/-) mice, spontaneously immortalized and tested for resistance to DNA damaging agents. Alkbh1(-/-) and isogenic cells expressing hALKBH1 showed no difference in survival to the DNA damaging agents methyl-methionine sulfate or H2O2. This result indicates that ALKBH1 does not play a major role in the base excision repair pathway. To assess ALKBH1's role in class switch recombination, splenic B cells were isolated from Alkbh1(-/-) and Alkbh1(+/+) mice and subjected to switching from IgM to IgG1. No differences were found in IgG1 switching, suggesting that Alkbh1 is not involved in class switch recombination of the immunoglobulin heavy chain during B lymphocyte activation. PMID:23825659

  17. Aberrant recombination and repair during immunoglobulin class switching in BRCA1-deficient human B cells

    PubMed Central

    Björkman, Andrea; Qvist, Per; Du, Likun; Bartish, Margarita; Zaravinos, Apostolos; Georgiou, Konstantinos; Børglum, Anders D.; Gatti, Richard A.; Törngren, Therese; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein (BRCA1) has a multitude of functions that contribute to genome integrity and tumor suppression. Its participation in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during homologous recombination (HR) is well recognized, whereas its involvement in the second major DSB repair pathway, nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), remains controversial. Here we have studied the role of BRCA1 in the repair of DSBs in switch (S) regions during immunoglobulin class switch recombination, a physiological, deletion/recombination process that relies on the classical NHEJ machinery. A shift to the use of microhomology-based, alternative end-joining (A-EJ) and increased frequencies of intra-S region deletions as well as insertions of inverted S sequences were observed at the recombination junctions amplified from BRCA1-deficient human B cells. Furthermore, increased use of long microhomologies was found at recombination junctions derived from E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase RNF168-deficient, Fanconi anemia group J protein (FACJ, BRIP1)-deficient, or DNA endonuclease RBBP8 (CtIP)-compromised cells, whereas an increased frequency of S-region inversions was observed in breast cancer type 2 susceptibility protein (BRCA2)-deficient cells. Thus, BRCA1, together with its interaction partners, seems to play an important role in repairing DSBs generated during class switch recombination by promoting the classical NHEJ pathway. This may not only provide a general mechanism underlying BRCA1’s function in maintaining genome stability and tumor suppression but may also point to a previously unrecognized role of BRCA1 in B-cell lymphomagenesis. PMID:25646469

  18. Effect of CpG dinucleotides within IgH switch region repeats on immunoglobulin class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng Z; Hsieh, Chih-Lin; Okitsu, Cindy Yen; Han, Li; Yu, Kefei; Lieber, Michael R

    2015-08-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chains undergo class switch recombination (CSR) to change the heavy chain isotype from IgM to IgG, A or E. The switch regions are several kilobases long, repetitive, and G-rich on the nontemplate strand. They are also relatively depleted of CpG (also called CG) sites for unknown reasons. Here we use synthetic switch regions at the IgH switch alpha (Sα) locus to test the effect of CpG sites and to try to understand why the IgH switch sequences evolved to be relatively depleted of CpG. We find that even just two CpG sites within an 80 bp synthetic switch repeat iterated 15 times (total switch region length of 1200 bp containing 30 CpG sites) are sufficient to dramatically reduce both Ig CSR and transcription through the switch region from the upstream Iα sterile transcript promoter, which is the promoter that directs transcripts through the Sα region. De novo DNA methylation occurs at the four CpG sites in and around the Iα promoter when each 80 bp Iα switch repeat contains the two CpG sites. Thus, a relatively low density of CpG sites within the switch repeats can induce upstream CpG methylation at the IgH alpha locus, and cause a substantial decrease in transcription from the sterile transcript promoter. This effect is likely the reason that switch regions evolved to contain very few CpG sites. We discuss these findings as they relate to DNA methylation and to Ig CSR. PMID:25899867

  19. Roles of nonhomologous DNA end joining, V(D)J recombination, and class switch recombination in chromosomal translocations.

    PubMed

    Lieber, Michael R; Yu, Kefei; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2006-09-01

    When a single double-strand break arises in the genome, nonhomologous DNA end joining (NHEJ) is a major pathway for its repair. When double-strand breaks arise at two nonhomologous sites in the genome, NHEJ also appears to be a major pathway by which the translocated ends are joined. The mechanism of NHEJ is briefly summarized, and alternative enzymes are also discussed. V(D)J recombination and class switch recombination are specialized processes designed to create double-strand DNA breaks at specific locations in the genomes of lymphoid cells. Sporadic Burkitt's lymphoma and myelomas can arise due to translocation of the c-myc gene into the Ig heavy chain locus during class switch recombination. In other lymphoid neoplasms, the RAG complex can create double-strand breaks that result in a translocation. Such RAG-generated breaks occur at very specific nucleotides that are directly adjacent to sequences that resemble canonical heptamer/nonamer sequences characteristic of normal V(D)J recombination. This occurs in some T cell leukemias and lymphomas. The RAG complex also appears capable of recognizing regions for their altered DNA structure rather than their primary sequence, and this may account for the action by RAGs at some chromosomal translocation sites, such as at the bcl-2 major breakpoint region in the follicular lymphomas that arise in B lymphocytes. PMID:16793349

  20. DNA-PKcs Is Involved in Ig Class Switch Recombination in Human B Cells.

    PubMed

    Björkman, Andrea; Du, Likun; Felgentreff, Kerstin; Rosner, Cornelia; Pankaj Kamdar, Radhika; Kokaraki, Georgia; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa; Davies, E Graham; van der Burg, Mirjam; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Hammarström, Lennart; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang

    2015-12-15

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is one of the major DNA double-strand break repair pathways in mammalian cells and is required for both V(D)J recombination and class switch recombination (CSR), two Ig gene-diversification processes occurring during B cell development. DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is a component of the classical NHEJ machinery and has a critical function during V(D)J recombination. However, its role in CSR has been controversial. In this study, we examined the pattern of recombination junctions from in vivo-switched B cells from two DNA-PKcs-deficient patients. One of them harbored mutations that did not affect DNA-PKcs kinase activity but caused impaired Artemis activation; the second patient had mutations resulting in diminished DNA-PKcs protein expression and kinase activity. These results were compared with those from DNA-PKcs-deficient mouse B cells. A shift toward the microhomology-based alternative end-joining at the recombination junctions was observed in both human and mouse B cells, suggesting that the classical NHEJ pathway is impaired during CSR when DNA-PKcs is defective. Furthermore, cells from the second patient showed additional or more severe alterations in CSR and/or NHEJ, which may suggest that DNA-PKcs and/or its kinase activity have additional, Artemis-independent functions during these processes. PMID:26546606

  1. A DNA break- and phosphorylation-dependent positive feedback loop promotes immunoglobulin class-switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Bao Q; Herrick-Reynolds, Kayleigh; Vaidyanathan, Bharat; Pucella, Joseph N; Ucher, Anna J; Donghia, Nina M; Gu, Xiwen; Nicolas, Laura; Nowak, Urszula; Rahman, Numa; Strout, Matthew P; Mills, Kevin D; Stavnezer, Janet; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2013-11-01

    The ability of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to efficiently mediate class-switch recombination (CSR) is dependent on its phosphorylation at Ser38; however, the trigger that induces AID phosphorylation and the mechanism by which phosphorylated AID drives CSR have not been elucidated. Here we found that phosphorylation of AID at Ser38 was induced by DNA breaks. Conversely, in the absence of AID phosphorylation, DNA breaks were not efficiently generated at switch (S) regions in the immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus (Igh), consistent with a failure of AID to interact with the endonuclease APE1. Additionally, deficiency in the DNA-damage sensor ATM impaired the phosphorylation of AID at Ser38 and the interaction of AID with APE1. Our results identify a positive feedback loop for the amplification of DNA breaks at S regions through the phosphorylation- and ATM-dependent interaction of AID with APE1. PMID:24097111

  2. Interaction between HIV-1 Tat and DNA-PKcs modulates HIV transcription and class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shi-Meng; Zhang, He; Yang, Tian-Yi; Ying, Tian-Yi; Yang, Pei-Xiang; Liu, Xiao-Dan; Tang, Sheng-Jian; Zhou, Ping-Kun

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 tat targets a variety of host cell proteins to facilitate viral transcription and disrupts host cellular immunity by inducing lymphocyte apoptosis, but whether it influences humoral immunity remains unclear. Previously, our group demonstrated that tat depresses expression of DNA-PKcs, a critical component of the non-homologous end joining pathway (NHEJ) of DNA double-strand breaks repair, immunoglobulin class switch recombination (CSR) and V(D)J recombination, and sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation. In this study, we demonstrated that HIV-1 Tat down-regulates DNA-PKcs expression by directly binding to the core promoter sequence. In addition, Tat interacts with and activates the kinase activity of DNA-PKcs in a dose-dependent and DNA independent manner. Furthermore, Tat inhibits class switch recombination (CSR) at low concentrations (≤ 4 µg/ml) and stimulates CSR at high concentrations (≥ 8 µg/ml). On the other hand, low protein level and high kinase activity of DNA-PKcs promotes HIV-1 transcription, while high protein level and low kinase activity inhibit HIV-1 transcription. Co-immunoprecipitation results revealed that DNA-PKcs forms a large complex comprised of Cyclin T1, CDK9 and Tat via direct interacting with CDK9 and Tat but not Cyclin T1. Taken together, our results provide new clues that Tat regulates host humoral immunity via both transcriptional depression and kinase activation of DNA-PKcs. We also raise the possibility that inhibitors and interventions directed towards DNA-PKcs may inhibit HIV-1 transcription in AIDS patients. PMID:25332688

  3. Interaction between HIV-1 Tat and DNA-PKcs modulates HIV transcription and class switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shi-Meng; Zhang, He; Yang, Tian-Yi; Ying, Tian-Yi; Yang, Pei-Xiang; Liu, Xiao-Dan; Tang, Sheng-Jian; Zhou, Ping-Kun

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 tat targets a variety of host cell proteins to facilitate viral transcription and disrupts host cellular immunity by inducing lymphocyte apoptosis, but whether it influences humoral immunity remains unclear. Previously, our group demonstrated that tat depresses expression of DNA-PKcs, a critical component of the non-homologous end joining pathway (NHEJ) of DNA double-strand breaks repair, immunoglobulin class switch recombination (CSR) and V(D)J recombination, and sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation. In this study, we demonstrated that HIV-1 Tat down-regulates DNA-PKcs expression by directly binding to the core promoter sequence. In addition, Tat interacts with and activates the kinase activity of DNA-PKcs in a dose-dependent and DNA independent manner. Furthermore, Tat inhibits class switch recombination (CSR) at low concentrations (≤4 µg/ml) and stimulates CSR at high concentrations (≥8 µg/ml). On the other hand, low protein level and high kinase activity of DNA-PKcs promotes HIV-1 transcription, while high protein level and low kinase activity inhibit HIV-1 transcription. Co-immunoprecipitation results revealed that DNA-PKcs forms a large complex comprised of Cyclin T1, CDK9 and Tat via direct interacting with CDK9 and Tat but not Cyclin T1. Taken together, our results provide new clues that Tat regulates host humoral immunity via both transcriptional depression and kinase activation of DNA-PKcs. We also raise the possibility that inhibitors and interventions directed towards DNA-PKcs may inhibit HIV-1 transcription in AIDS patients. PMID:25332688

  4. Evaluation of the adverse effect of low concentration of cadmium on interleukin-4 induced class switch recombination in Burkett's lymphoma Raji cell line.

    PubMed

    Poltoratsky, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Affinity maturation of B lymphocytes, a process that includes somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination, initiates global DNA rearrangements. The interruption of this process has an adverse effect on human health and results in immunodeficiency and autoimmune disease. Class switch recombination is a fundamental factor of the human adaptive immunity. Evaluation of the class switch recombination efficiency is an important component of laboratory diagnostic of immunotoxic components. Here, we describe a method for testing the efficiency of the class switch recombination. Cultivation of Raji Burkett's lymphoma cell line with anti-CD40 antibodies and recombinant interleukin-4 (IL-4) triggers a cascade of signal transduction network events that lead to switching the immunoglobulin isotopes from IgM to IgE. This chapter describes the methodology of class switch recombination assay for assessment of the effect of the environmental pollutants in toxicological laboratory diagnostics. PMID:24908303

  5. Switch Transcripts in Immunoglobulin Class Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Matthias; Jung, Steffen; Radbruch, Andreas

    1995-03-01

    B cells can exchange gene segments for the constant region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain, altering the class and effector function of the antibodies that they produce. Class switching is directed to distinct classes by cytokines, which induce transcription of the targeted DNA sequences. These transcripts are processed, resulting in spliced "switch" transcripts. Switch recombination can be directed to immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) by the heterologous human metallothionein II_A promoter in mutant mice. Induction of the structurally conserved, spliced switch transcripts is sufficient to target switch recombination to IgG1, whereas transcription alone is not.

  6. Cernunnos influences human immunoglobulin class switch recombination and may be associated with B cell lymphomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Du, Likun; Peng, Roujun; Björkman, Andrea; Filipe de Miranda, Noel; Rosner, Cornelia; Kotnis, Ashwin; Berglund, Mattias; Liu, Chonghai; Rosenquist, Richard; Enblad, Gunilla; Sundström, Christer; Hojjat-Farsangi, Mohammad; Rabbani, Hodjattallah; Teixeira, Manuel R; Revy, Patrick; Durandy, Anne; Zeng, Yixin; Gennery, Andrew R; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang

    2012-02-13

    Cernunnos is involved in the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) process during DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Here, we studied immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination (CSR), a physiological process which relies on proper repair of the DSBs, in B cells from Cernunnos-deficient patients. The pattern of in vivo generated CSR junctions is altered in these cells, with unusually long microhomologies and a lack of direct end-joining. The CSR junctions from Cernunnos-deficient patients largely resemble those from patients lacking DNA ligase IV, Artemis, or ATM, suggesting that these factors are involved in the same end-joining pathway during CSR. By screening 269 mature B cell lymphoma biopsies, we also identified a somatic missense Cernunnos mutation in a diffuse large B cell lymphoma sample. This mutation has a dominant-negative effect on joining of a subset of DNA ends in an in vitro NHEJ assay. Translocations involving both Ig heavy chain loci and clonal-like, dynamic IgA switching activities were observed in this tumor. Collectively, our results suggest a link between defects in the Cernunnos-dependent NHEJ pathway and aberrant CSR or switch translocations during the development of B cell malignancies. PMID:22312109

  7. AIDing Chromatin and Transcription-Coupled Orchestration of Immunoglobulin Class-Switch Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Bharat; Yen, Wei-Feng; Pucella, Joseph N.; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2014-01-01

    Secondary diversification of the antibody repertoire upon antigenic challenge, in the form of immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) class-switch recombination (CSR) endows mature, naïve B cells in peripheral lymphoid organs with a limitless ability to mount an optimal humoral immune response, thus expediting pathogen elimination. CSR replaces the default constant (CH) region exons (Cμ) of IgH with any of the downstream CH exons (Cγ, Cε, or Cα), thereby altering effector functions of the antibody molecule. This process depends on, and is orchestrated by, activation-induced deaminase (AID), a DNA cytidine deaminase that acts on single-stranded DNA exposed during transcription of switch (S) region sequences at the IgH locus. DNA lesions thus generated are processed by components of several general DNA repair pathways to drive CSR. Given that AID can instigate DNA lesions and genomic instability, stringent checks are imposed that constrain and restrict its mutagenic potential. In this review, we will discuss how AID expression and substrate specificity and activity is rigorously enforced at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, post-translational, and epigenetic levels, and how the DNA-damage response is choreographed with precision to permit targeted activity while limiting bystander catastrophe. PMID:24734031

  8. Individual Substitution Mutations in the AID C Terminus That Ablate IgH Class Switch Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Kadungure, Tatenda; Ucher, Anna J.; Linehan, Erin K.; Schrader, Carol E.; Stavnezer, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential for class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of Ig genes. The C terminus of AID is required for CSR but not for SHM, but the reason for this is not entirely clear. By retroviral transduction of mutant AID proteins into aid-/- mouse splenic B cells, we show that 4 amino acids within the C terminus of mouse AID, when individually mutated to specific amino acids (R190K, A192K, L196S, F198S), reduce CSR about as much or more than deletion of the entire C terminal 10 amino acids. Similar to ΔAID, the substitutions reduce binding of UNG to Ig Sμ regions and some reduce binding of Msh2, both of which are important for introducing S region DNA breaks. Junctions between the IgH donor switch (S)μ and acceptor Sα regions from cells expressing ΔAID or the L196S mutant show increased microhomology compared to junctions in cells expressing wild-type AID, consistent with problems during CSR and the use of alternative end-joining, rather than non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Unlike deletion of the AID C terminus, 3 of the substitution mutants reduce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) detected within the Sμ region in splenic B cells undergoing CSR. Cells expressing these 3 substitution mutants also have greatly reduced mutations within unrearranged Sμ regions, and they decrease with time after activation. These results might be explained by increased error-free repair, but as the C terminus has been shown to be important for recruitment of NHEJ proteins, this appears unlikely. We hypothesize that Sμ DNA breaks in cells expressing these C terminus substitution mutants are poorly repaired, resulting in destruction of Sμ segments that are deaminated by these mutants. This could explain why these mutants cannot undergo CSR. PMID:26267846

  9. A Damage-Independent Role for 53BP1 that Impacts Break Order and Igh Architecture during Class Switch Recombination.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Pedro P; Raviram, Ramya; Fu, Yi; Kim, JungHyun; Luo, Vincent M; Aljoufi, Arafat; Swanzey, Emily; Pasquarella, Alessandra; Balestrini, Alessia; Miraldi, Emily R; Bonneau, Richard; Petrini, John; Schotta, Gunnar; Skok, Jane A

    2016-06-28

    During class switch recombination (CSR), B cells replace the Igh Cμ or δ exons with another downstream constant region exon (CH), altering the antibody isotype. CSR occurs through the introduction of AID-mediated double-strand breaks (DSBs) in switch regions and subsequent ligation of broken ends. Here, we developed an assay to investigate the dynamics of DSB formation in individual cells. We demonstrate that the upstream switch region Sμ is first targeted during recombination and that the mechanism underlying this control relies on 53BP1. Surprisingly, regulation of break order occurs through residual binding of 53BP1 to chromatin before the introduction of damage and independent of its established role in DNA repair. Using chromosome conformation capture, we show that 53BP1 mediates changes in chromatin architecture that affect break order. Finally, our results explain how changes in Igh architecture in the absence of 53BP1 could promote inversional rearrangements that compromise CSR. PMID:27320916

  10. Polyclonal hyper-IgE mouse model reveals mechanistic insights into antibody class switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Misaghi, Shahram; Senger, Kate; Sai, Tao; Qu, Yan; Sun, Yonglian; Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Nguyen, Allen; Jin, Zhaoyu; Zhou, Meijuan; Yan, Donghong; Lin, Wei Yu; Lin, Zhonghua; Lorenzo, Maria N.; Sebrell, Andrew; Ding, Jiabing; Xu, Min; Caplazi, Patrick; Austin, Cary D.; Balazs, Mercedesz; Roose-Girma, Merone; DeForge, Laura; Warming, Søren; Lee, Wyne P.; Dixit, Vishva M.; Zarrin, Ali A.

    2013-01-01

    Preceding antibody constant regions are switch (S) regions varying in length and repeat density that are targets of activation-induced cytidine deaminase. We asked how participating S regions influence each other to orchestrate rearrangements at the IgH locus by engineering mice in which the weakest S region, Sε, is replaced with prominent recombination hotspot Sμ. These mice produce copious polyclonal IgE upon challenge, providing a platform to study IgE biology and therapeutic interventions. The insertion enhances ε germ-line transcript levels, shows a preference for direct vs. sequential switching, and reduces intraswitch recombination events at native Sμ. These results suggest that the sufficiency of Sμ to mediate IgH rearrangements may be influenced by context-dependent cues. PMID:24019479

  11. Polyclonal hyper-IgE mouse model reveals mechanistic insights into antibody class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Misaghi, Shahram; Senger, Kate; Sai, Tao; Qu, Yan; Sun, Yonglian; Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Nguyen, Allen; Jin, Zhaoyu; Zhou, Meijuan; Yan, Donghong; Lin, Wei Yu; Lin, Zhonghua; Lorenzo, Maria N; Sebrell, Andrew; Ding, Jiabing; Xu, Min; Caplazi, Patrick; Austin, Cary D; Balazs, Mercedesz; Roose-Girma, Merone; DeForge, Laura; Warming, Søren; Lee, Wyne P; Dixit, Vishva M; Zarrin, Ali A

    2013-09-24

    Preceding antibody constant regions are switch (S) regions varying in length and repeat density that are targets of activation-induced cytidine deaminase. We asked how participating S regions influence each other to orchestrate rearrangements at the IgH locus by engineering mice in which the weakest S region, Sε, is replaced with prominent recombination hotspot Sμ. These mice produce copious polyclonal IgE upon challenge, providing a platform to study IgE biology and therapeutic interventions. The insertion enhances ε germ-line transcript levels, shows a preference for direct vs. sequential switching, and reduces intraswitch recombination events at native Sμ. These results suggest that the sufficiency of Sμ to mediate IgH rearrangements may be influenced by context-dependent cues. PMID:24019479

  12. Regulation of aicda expression and AID activity: Relevance to somatic hypermutation and class switch DNA recombination

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhenming; Pone, Egest J.; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed; Park, Seok-Rae; Zan, Hong; Casali, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Expression and activity of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) encoded by the aicda gene are essential for immunoglobulin (Ig) gene somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch DNA recombination (CSR). SHM and CSR unfold in general in germinal centers and are central to the maturation of effective antibody responses. AID expression is induced by activated B cell CD40 signaling, which is critical for the germinal center reaction, and is further enhanced by other stimuli, including interleukin-4 (IL-4) secreted from CD4+ T cells or Toll-like receptor (TLR)-activating bacterial and/or viral molecules. Integration of different intracellular signal transduction pathways, as activated by these stimuli, leads to a dynamic aicda-regulating program, which involves both positively acting trans-factors, such as Pax5, HoxC4, E47 and Irf8, and negative modulators, such as Blimp1 and Id2, to restrict aicda expression primarily to germinal center B cells. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-K), which functions downstream of activated B cell receptor (BCR) signaling, likely plays an important role in triggering the downregulation of aicda expression in post-germinal center B cells and throughout plasmacytoid differentiation. In B cells undergoing SHM and CSR, AID activity and, possibly, AID targeting to the Ig locus are regulated at a post-translational level, including AID dimerization/oligomerization, nuclear/cytoplasmic AID translocation and phosphorylation of the AID Ser38 residue by protein kinase A (PKA). Here, we will discuss the role of B cell activation signals, transcription regulation programs and post-translational modifications in controlling aicda expression and AID activity, thereby delineating an integrated model of modulation of SHM and CSR in the germinal center reaction. PMID:18197815

  13. The Interaction between AID and CIB1 Is Nonessential for Antibody Gene Diversification by Gene Conversion or Class Switch Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Demorest, Zachary L.; MacDuff, Donna A.; Brown, William L.; Morham, Scott G.; Parise, Leslie V.; Harris, Reuben S.

    2010-01-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates somatic hypermutation, gene conversion and class switch recombination by deaminating variable and switch region DNA cytidines to uridines. AID is predominantly cytoplasmic and must enter the nuclear compartment to initiate these distinct antibody gene diversification reactions. Nuclear AID is relatively short-lived, as it is efficiently exported by a CRM1-dependent mechanism and it is susceptible to proteasome-dependent degradation. To help shed light on mechanisms of post-translational regulation, a yeast-based screen was performed to identify AID-interacting proteins. The calcium and integrin binding protein CIB1 was identified by sequencing and the interaction was confirmed by immunoprecipitation experiments. The AID/CIB1 resisted DNase and RNase treatment, and it is therefore unlikely to be mediated by nucleic acid. The requirement for CIB1 in AID-mediated antibody gene diversification reactions was assessed in CIB1-deficient DT40 cells and in knockout mice, but immunoglobulin gene conversion and class switch recombination appeared normal. The DT40 system was also used to show that CIB1 over-expression has no effect on gene conversion and that AID-EGFP subcellular localization is normal. These combined data demonstrate that CIB1 is not required for AID to mediate antibody gene diversification processes. It remains possible that CIB1 has an alternative, a redundant or a subtle non-limiting regulatory role in AID biology. PMID:20652029

  14. AID expression increased by TNF-α is associated with class switch recombination of Igα gene in cancers.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhi; Zheng, Hui; Liu, Haidan; Li, Ming; Tang, Min; Weng, Xinxian; Yi, Wei; Bode, Ann M; Cao, Ya

    2016-07-01

    Recently, immunoglobulins (Igs) were unexpectedly found to be expressed in epithelial cancers. Immunoglobulin class switching or class switch recombination (CSR) is a natural biological process that alters a B cell's production of antibodies (immunoglobulins) from one class to another. However, the mechanism of CSR of Ig genes in cancer is still unknown. Here, we confirmed by detecting the hallmark of CSR that the Igα gene in cancer underwent CSR. Then we focused on activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a crucial factor for initiating CSR. Further studies using tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α stimulation and specific inhibitor of NF-κB revealed that TNF-α could increase AID expression through NF-κB signaling. Finally, we demonstrated that AID could co-localize with protein kinase A and bind to the switching (Sα) region of the Igα gene. Overexpression of AID obviously enhanced Igα heavy chain expression and its binding ability to the Sα region. These findings indicated that TNF-α-induced AID expression is involved with CSR in cancer. PMID:25849121

  15. AID expression increased by TNF-α is associated with class switch recombination of Igα gene in cancers

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhi; Zheng, Hui; Liu, Haidan; Li, Ming; Tang, Min; Weng, Xinxian; Yi, Wei; Bode, Ann M.; Cao, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Recently, immunoglobulins (Igs) were unexpectedly found to be expressed in epithelial cancers. Immunoglobulin class switching or class switch recombination (CSR) is a natural biological process that alters a B cell's production of antibodies (immunoglobulins) from one class to another. However, the mechanism of CSR of Ig genes in cancer is still unknown. Here, we confirmed by detecting the hallmark of CSR that the Igα gene in cancer underwent CSR. Then we focused on activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a crucial factor for initiating CSR. Further studies using tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α stimulation and specific inhibitor of NF-κB revealed that TNF-α could increase AID expression through NF-κB signaling. Finally, we demonstrated that AID could co-localize with protein kinase A and bind to the switching (Sα) region of the Igα gene. Overexpression of AID obviously enhanced Igα heavy chain expression and its binding ability to the Sα region. These findings indicated that TNF-α-induced AID expression is involved with CSR in cancer. PMID:25849121

  16. Redundant function of DNA ligase 1 and 3 in alternative end-joining during immunoglobulin class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Masani, Shahnaz; Han, Li; Meek, Katheryn; Yu, Kefei

    2016-02-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the major DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway in mammals and resolves the DSBs generated during both V(D)J recombination in developing lymphocytes and class switch recombination (CSR) in antigen-stimulated B cells. In contrast to the absolute requirement for NHEJ to resolve DSBs associated with V(D)J recombination, DSBs associated with CSR can be resolved in NHEJ-deficient cells (albeit at a reduced level) by a poorly defined alternative end-joining (A-EJ) pathway. Deletion of DNA ligase IV (Lig4), a core component of the NHEJ pathway, reduces CSR efficiency in a mouse B-cell line capable of robust cytokine-stimulated CSR in cell culture. Here, we report that CSR levels are not further reduced by deletion of either of the two remaining DNA ligases (Lig1 and nuclear Lig3) in Lig4(-/-) cells. We conclude that in the absence of Lig4, Lig1, and Lig3 function in a redundant manner in resolving switch region DSBs during CSR. PMID:26787901

  17. ATM increases activation-induced cytidine deaminase activity at downstream S regions during class-switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Khair, Lyne; Guikema, Jeroen E J; Linehan, Erin K; Ucher, Anna J; Leus, Niek G J; Ogilvie, Colin; Lou, Zhenkun; Schrader, Carol E; Stavnezer, Janet

    2014-05-15

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates Ab class-switch recombination (CSR) in activated B cells resulting in exchanging the IgH C region and improved Ab effector function. During CSR, AID instigates DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation in switch (S) regions located upstream of C region genes. DSBs are necessary for CSR, but improper regulation of DSBs can lead to chromosomal translocations that can result in B cell lymphoma. The protein kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is an important proximal regulator of the DNA damage response (DDR), and translocations involving S regions are increased in its absence. ATM phosphorylates H2AX, which recruits other DNA damage response (DDR) proteins, including mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (Mdc1) and p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1), to sites of DNA damage. As these DDR proteins all function to promote repair and recombination of DSBs during CSR, we examined whether mouse splenic B cells deficient in these proteins would show alterations in S region DSBs when undergoing CSR. We find that in atm(-/-) cells Sμ DSBs are increased, whereas DSBs in downstream Sγ regions are decreased. We also find that mutations in the unrearranged Sγ3 segment are reduced in atm(-/-) cells. Our data suggest that ATM increases AID targeting and activity at downstream acceptor S regions during CSR and that in atm(-/-) cells Sμ DSBs accumulate as they lack a recombination partner. PMID:24729610

  18. Opinion: uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG) plays distinct and non-canonical roles in somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Yousif, Ashraf S.; Stanlie, Andre; Begum, Nasim A.

    2014-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential to class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). Uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG), a member of the base excision repair complex, is required for CSR. The role of UNG in CSR and SHM is extremely controversial. AID deficiency in mice abolishes both CSR and SHM, while UNG-deficient mice have drastically reduced CSR but augmented SHM raising a possibility of differential functions of UNG in CSR and SHM. Interestingly, UNG has been associated with a CSR-specific repair adapter protein Brd4, which interacts with acetyl histone 4, γH2AX and 53BP1 to promote non-homologous end joining during CSR. A non-canonical scaffold function of UNG, but not the catalytic activity, can be attributed to the recruitment of essential repair proteins associated with the error-free repair during SHM, and the end joining during CSR. PMID:24994819

  19. Opinion: uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG) plays distinct and non-canonical roles in somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Ashraf S; Stanlie, Andre; Begum, Nasim A; Honjo, Tasuku

    2014-10-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential to class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). Uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG), a member of the base excision repair complex, is required for CSR. The role of UNG in CSR and SHM is extremely controversial. AID deficiency in mice abolishes both CSR and SHM, while UNG-deficient mice have drastically reduced CSR but augmented SHM raising a possibility of differential functions of UNG in CSR and SHM. Interestingly, UNG has been associated with a CSR-specific repair adapter protein Brd4, which interacts with acetyl histone 4, γH2AX and 53BP1 to promote non-homologous end joining during CSR. A non-canonical scaffold function of UNG, but not the catalytic activity, can be attributed to the recruitment of essential repair proteins associated with the error-free repair during SHM, and the end joining during CSR. PMID:24994819

  20. Mediator facilitates transcriptional activation and dynamic long-range contacts at the IgH locus during class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Claudepierre, Anne-Sophie; Robert, Isabelle; Rocha, Pedro P; Raviram, Ramya; Schiavo, Ebe; Heyer, Vincent; Bonneau, Richard; Luo, Vincent M; Reddy, Janardan K; Borggrefe, Tilman; Skok, Jane A; Reina-San-Martin, Bernardo

    2016-03-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination (CSR) is initiated by the transcription-coupled recruitment of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to Ig switch regions (S regions). During CSR, the IgH locus undergoes dynamic three-dimensional structural changes in which promoters, enhancers, and S regions are brought to close proximity. Nevertheless, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. In this study, we show that Med1 and Med12, two subunits of the mediator complex implicated in transcription initiation and long-range enhancer/promoter loop formation, are dynamically recruited to the IgH locus enhancers and the acceptor regions during CSR and that their knockdown in CH12 cells results in impaired CSR. Furthermore, we show that conditional inactivation of Med1 in B cells results in defective CSR and reduced acceptor S region transcription. Finally, we show that in B cells undergoing CSR, the dynamic long-range contacts between the IgH enhancers and the acceptor regions correlate with Med1 and Med12 binding and that they happen at a reduced frequency in Med1-deficient B cells. Our results implicate the mediator complex in the mechanism of CSR and are consistent with a model in which mediator facilitates the long-range contacts between S regions and the IgH locus enhancers during CSR and their transcriptional activation. PMID:26903242

  1. A regulatory role for the cohesin loader NIPBL in nonhomologous end joining during immunoglobulin class switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Enervald, Elin; Du, Likun; Visnes, Torkild; Björkman, Andrea; Lindgren, Emma; Wincent, Josephine; Borck, Guntram; Colleaux, Laurence; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; van Gent, Dik C.; Pie, Juan; Puisac, Beatriz; de Miranda, Noel FCC; Kracker, Sven; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Durandy, Anne; Schoumans, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are mainly repaired via homologous recombination (HR) or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). These breaks pose severe threats to genome integrity but can also be necessary intermediates of normal cellular processes such as immunoglobulin class switch recombination (CSR). During CSR, DSBs are produced in the G1 phase of the cell cycle and are repaired by the classical NHEJ machinery. By studying B lymphocytes derived from patients with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome, we observed a strong correlation between heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the cohesin loading protein NIPBL and a shift toward the use of an alternative, microhomology-based end joining during CSR. Furthermore, the early recruitment of 53BP1 to DSBs was reduced in the NIPBL-deficient patient cells. Association of NIPBL deficiency and impaired NHEJ was also observed in a plasmid-based end-joining assay and a yeast model system. Our results suggest that NIPBL plays an important and evolutionarily conserved role in NHEJ, in addition to its canonical function in sister chromatid cohesion and its recently suggested function in HR. PMID:24145515

  2. Fanca deficiency reduces A/T transitions in somatic hypermutation and alters class switch recombination junctions in mouse B cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thuy Vy; Riou, Lydia; Aoufouchi, Saïd; Rosselli, Filippo

    2014-06-01

    Fanconi anemia is a rare genetic disorder that can lead to bone marrow failure, congenital abnormalities, and increased risk for leukemia and cancer. Cells with loss-of-function mutations in the FANC pathway are characterized by chromosome fragility, altered mutability, and abnormal regulation of the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. Somatic hypermutation (SHM) and immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination (CSR) enable B cells to produce high-affinity antibodies of various isotypes. Both processes are initiated after the generation of dG:dU mismatches by activation-induced cytidine deaminase. Whereas SHM involves an error-prone repair process that introduces novel point mutations into the Ig gene, the mismatches generated during CSR are processed to create double-stranded breaks (DSBs) in DNA, which are then repaired by the NHEJ pathway. As several lines of evidence suggest a possible role for the FANC pathway in SHM and CSR, we analyzed both processes in B cells derived from Fanca(-/-) mice. Here we show that Fanca is required for the induction of transition mutations at A/T residues during SHM and that despite globally normal CSR function in splenic B cells, Fanca is required during CSR to stabilize duplexes between pairs of short microhomology regions, thereby impeding short-range recombination downstream of DSB formation. PMID:24799500

  3. APE1 is dispensable for S-region cleavage but required for its repair in class switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianliang; Husain, Afzal; Hu, Wenjun; Honjo, Tasuku; Kobayashi, Maki

    2014-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential for antibody diversification, namely somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR). The deficiency of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (Ape1) in CH12F3-2A B cells reduces CSR to ∼20% of wild-type cells, whereas the effect of APE1 loss on SHM has not been examined. Here we show that, although APE1’s endonuclease activity is important for CSR, it is dispensable for SHM as well as IgH/c-myc translocation. Importantly, APE1 deficiency did not show any defect in AID-induced S-region break formation, but blocked both the recruitment of repair protein Ku80 to the S region and the synapse formation between Sμ and Sα. Knockdown of end-processing factors such as meiotic recombination 11 homolog (MRE11) and carboxy-terminal binding protein (CtBP)-interacting protein (CtIP) further reduced the remaining CSR in Ape1-null CH12F3-2A cells. Together, our results show that APE1 is dispensable for SHM and AID-induced DNA breaks and may function as a DNA end-processing enzyme to facilitate the joining of broken ends during CSR. PMID:25404348

  4. Regulation of immunoglobulin class-switch recombination: choreography of noncoding transcription, targeted DNA deamination, and long-range DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Allysia J; Zheng, Simin; DiMenna, Lauren J; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2014-01-01

    Upon encountering antigens, mature IgM-positive B lymphocytes undergo class-switch recombination (CSR) wherein exons encoding the default Cμ constant coding gene segment of the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain (Igh) locus are excised and replaced with a new constant gene segment (referred to as "Ch genes", e.g., Cγ, Cɛ, or Cα). The B cell thereby changes from expressing IgM to one producing IgG, IgE, or IgA, with each antibody isotype having a different effector function during an immune reaction. CSR is a DNA deletional-recombination reaction that proceeds through the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in repetitive switch (S) sequences preceding each Ch gene and is completed by end-joining between donor Sμ and acceptor S regions. CSR is a multistep reaction requiring transcription through S regions, the DNA cytidine deaminase AID, and the participation of several general DNA repair pathways including base excision repair, mismatch repair, and classical nonhomologous end-joining. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how transcription through S regions generates substrates for AID-mediated deamination and how AID participates not only in the initiation of CSR but also in the conversion of deaminated residues into DSBs. Additionally, we review the multiple processes that regulate AID expression and facilitate its recruitment specifically to the Ig loci, and how deregulation of AID specificity leads to oncogenic translocations. Finally, we summarize recent data on the potential role of AID in the maintenance of the pluripotent stem cell state during epigenetic reprogramming. PMID:24507154

  5. Differential regulation of S-region hypermutation and class-switch recombination by noncanonical functions of uracil DNA glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Yousif, Ashraf S.; Stanlie, Andre; Mondal, Samiran; Honjo, Tasuku; Begum, Nasim A.

    2014-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential to class-switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) in both V region SHM and S region SHM (s-SHM). Uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG), a member of the base excision repair (BER) complex, is required for CSR. Strikingly, however, UNG deficiency causes augmentation of SHM, suggesting involvement of distinct functions of UNG in SHM and CSR. Here, we show that noncanonical scaffold functions of UNG regulate s-SHM negatively and CSR positively. The s-SHM suppressive function of UNG is attributed to the recruitment of faithful BER components at the cleaved DNA locus, with competition against error-prone polymerases. By contrast, the CSR-promoting function of UNG enhances AID-dependent S-S synapse formation by recruiting p53-binding protein 1 and DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit. Several loss-of-catalysis mutants of UNG discriminated CSR-promoting activity from s-SHM suppressive activity. Taken together, the noncanonical function of UNG regulates the steps after AID-induced DNA cleavage: error-prone repair suppression in s-SHM and end-joining promotion in CSR. PMID:24591630

  6. NF-κB binds to the immunoglobulin Sγ3 region in vivo during class switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; Wuerffel, Robert; Kenter, Amy L.

    2016-01-01

    Ig class switch recombination (CSR) is dependent upon the expression of activation-induced deaminase and targeted to specific isotypes by germ-line transcript expression and isotype-specific factors. NF-κB plays critical roles in multiple aspects of B cell biology and has been implicated in the mechanism of CSR by in vitro binding assays and altered S/S junctions derived from NF-κB p50-deficient mice. However, the pleiotropic contributions of NF-κB to gene expression in B cells has made discerning a direct role for NF-κB in CSR difficult. We now observe that binding of NF-κB components p50 and p65 is detected on Sγ3 in vivo following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation and repressed by LPS + IL–4, suggesting a direct role for this factor in CSR. In vivo footprinting confirms occupancy of a previously defined NF-κB recognition site in Sγ3 with the same temporal kinetics as found in the chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis. Binding of NF-κB components p50 and p65 was also detected on Sγ1 following B cell activation. H3 histone hyper acetylation at Sγ1 is strongly correlated with NF-κB binding, suggesting that NF-κB mediates chromatin remodeling in the Sγ3 and Sγ1 region. PMID:17109470

  7. S-S Synapsis during Class Switch Recombination Is Promoted by Distantly Located Transcriptional Elements and Activation-Induced Deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Wuerffel, Robert; Wang, Lili; Grigera, Fernando; Manis, John; Selsing, Erik; Perlot, Thomas; Alt, Frederick W.; Cogne, Michel; Pinaud, Eric; Kenter, Amy L.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Molecular mechanisms underlying synapsis of activation-induced deaminase (AID)-targeted S regions during class switch recombination (CSR) are poorly understood. By using chromosome conformation capture techniques, we found that in B cells, the Eμ and 3′Eα enhancers were in close spatial proximity, forming a unique chromosomal loop configuration. B cell activation led to recruitment of the germline transcript (GLT) promoters to the Eμ:3′Eα complex in a cytokine-dependent fashion. This structure facilitated S-S synapsis because Sμ was proximal to Eμ and a downstream S region was corecruited with the targeted GLT promoter to Eμ:3′Eα. We propose that GLT promoter association with the Eμ:3′Eα complex creates an architectural scaffolding that promotes S-S synapsis during CSR and that these interactions are stabilized by AID. Thus, the S-S synaptosome is formed as a result of the self-organizing transcription system that regulates GLT expression and may serve to guard against spurious chromosomal translocations. PMID:17980632

  8. Differential regulation of S-region hypermutation and class-switch recombination by noncanonical functions of uracil DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Ashraf S; Stanlie, Andre; Mondal, Samiran; Honjo, Tasuku; Begum, Nasim A

    2014-03-18

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential to class-switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) in both V region SHM and S region SHM (s-SHM). Uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG), a member of the base excision repair (BER) complex, is required for CSR. Strikingly, however, UNG deficiency causes augmentation of SHM, suggesting involvement of distinct functions of UNG in SHM and CSR. Here, we show that noncanonical scaffold functions of UNG regulate s-SHM negatively and CSR positively. The s-SHM suppressive function of UNG is attributed to the recruitment of faithful BER components at the cleaved DNA locus, with competition against error-prone polymerases. By contrast, the CSR-promoting function of UNG enhances AID-dependent S-S synapse formation by recruiting p53-binding protein 1 and DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit. Several loss-of-catalysis mutants of UNG discriminated CSR-promoting activity from s-SHM suppressive activity. Taken together, the noncanonical function of UNG regulates the steps after AID-induced DNA cleavage: error-prone repair suppression in s-SHM and end-joining promotion in CSR. PMID:24591630

  9. Exosomes Derived from Burkitt’s Lymphoma Cell Lines Induce Proliferation, Differentiation, and Class-Switch Recombination in B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gutzeit, Cindy; Nagy, Noemi; Gentile, Maurizio; Lyberg, Katarina; Gumz, Janine; Vallhov, Helen; Puga, Irene; Klein, Eva; Gabrielsson, Susanne; Cerutti, Andrea; Scheynius, Annika

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes, nano-sized membrane vesicles, are released by various cells and are found in many human body fluids. They are active players in intercellular communication and have immune-suppressive, immune-regulatory, and immune-stimulatory functions. EBV is a ubiquitous human herpesvirus that is associated with various lymphoid and epithelial malignancies. EBV infection of B cells in vitro induces the release of exosomes that harbor the viral latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1). LMP1 per se mimics CD40 signaling and induces proliferation of B lymphocytes and T cell–independent class-switch recombination. Constitutive LMP1 signaling within B cells is blunted through the shedding of LMP1 via exosomes. In this study, we investigated the functional effect of exosomes derived from the DG75 Burkitt’s lymphoma cell line and its sublines (LMP1 transfected and EBV infected), with the hypothesis that they might mimic exosomes released during EBV-associated diseases. We show that exosomes released during primary EBV infection of B cells harbored LMP1, and similar levels were detected in exosomes from LMP1-transfected DG75 cells. DG75 exosomes efficiently bound to human B cells within PBMCs and were internalized by isolated B cells. In turn, this led to proliferation, induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase, and the production of circle and germline transcripts for IgG1 in B cells. Finally, exosomes harboring LMP1 enhanced proliferation and drove B cell differentiation toward a plasmablast-like phenotype. In conclusion, our results suggest that exosomes released from EBV-infected B cells have a stimulatory capacity and interfere with the fate of human B cells. PMID:24829410

  10. Non-canonical uracil processing in DNA gives rise to double-strand breaks and deletions: relevance to class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Bregenhorn, Stephanie; Kallenberger, Lia; Artola-Borán, Mariela; Peña-Diaz, Javier; Jiricny, Josef

    2016-04-01

    During class switch recombination (CSR), antigen-stimulated B-cells rearrange their immunoglobulin constant heavy chain (CH) loci to generate antibodies with different effector functions. CSR is initiated by activation-induced deaminase (AID), which converts cytosines in switch (S) regions, repetitive sequences flanking the CH loci, to uracils. Although U/G mispairs arising in this way are generally efficiently repaired to C/Gs by uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG)-initiated base excision repair (BER), uracil processing in S-regions of activated B-cells occasionally gives rise to double strand breaks (DSBs), which trigger CSR. Surprisingly, genetic experiments revealed that CSR is dependent not only on AID and UNG, but also on mismatch repair (MMR). To elucidate the role of MMR in CSR, we studied the processing of uracil-containing DNA substrates in extracts of MMR-proficient and -deficient human cells, as well as in a system reconstituted from recombinant BER and MMR proteins. Here, we show that the interplay of these repair systems gives rise to DSBs in vitro and to genomic deletions and mutations in vivo, particularly in an S-region sequence. Our findings further suggest that MMR affects pathway choice in DSB repair. Given its amenability to manipulation, our system represents a powerful tool for the molecular dissection of CSR. PMID:26743004

  11. Non-canonical uracil processing in DNA gives rise to double-strand breaks and deletions: relevance to class switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Bregenhorn, Stephanie; Kallenberger, Lia; Artola-Borán, Mariela; Peña-Diaz, Javier; Jiricny, Josef

    2016-01-01

    During class switch recombination (CSR), antigen-stimulated B-cells rearrange their immunoglobulin constant heavy chain (CH) loci to generate antibodies with different effector functions. CSR is initiated by activation-induced deaminase (AID), which converts cytosines in switch (S) regions, repetitive sequences flanking the CH loci, to uracils. Although U/G mispairs arising in this way are generally efficiently repaired to C/Gs by uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG)-initiated base excision repair (BER), uracil processing in S-regions of activated B-cells occasionally gives rise to double strand breaks (DSBs), which trigger CSR. Surprisingly, genetic experiments revealed that CSR is dependent not only on AID and UNG, but also on mismatch repair (MMR). To elucidate the role of MMR in CSR, we studied the processing of uracil-containing DNA substrates in extracts of MMR-proficient and –deficient human cells, as well as in a system reconstituted from recombinant BER and MMR proteins. Here, we show that the interplay of these repair systems gives rise to DSBs in vitro and to genomic deletions and mutations in vivo, particularly in an S-region sequence. Our findings further suggest that MMR affects pathway choice in DSB repair. Given its amenability to manipulation, our system represents a powerful tool for the molecular dissection of CSR. PMID:26743004

  12. Microbiota regulate the ability of lung dendritic cells to induce IgA class-switch recombination and generate protective gastrointestinal immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Ruane, Darren; Chorny, Alejo; Lee, Haekyung; Faith, Jeremiah; Pandey, Gaurav; Shan, Meimei; Simchoni, Noa; Rahman, Adeeb; Garg, Aakash; Weinstein, Erica G.; Oropallo, Michael; Gaylord, Michelle; Ungaro, Ryan; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Alexandropoulos, Konstantina; Mucida, Daniel; Merad, Miriam; Cerutti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Protective immunoglobulin A (IgA) responses to oral antigens are usually orchestrated by gut dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we show that lung CD103+ and CD24+CD11b+ DCs induced IgA class-switch recombination (CSR) by activating B cells through T cell–dependent or –independent pathways. Compared with lung DCs (LDC), lung CD64+ macrophages had decreased expression of B cell activation genes and induced significantly less IgA production. Microbial stimuli, acting through Toll-like receptors, induced transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production by LDCs and exerted a profound influence on LDC-mediated IgA CSR. After intranasal immunization with inactive cholera toxin (CT), LDCs stimulated retinoic acid–dependent up-regulation of α4β7 and CCR9 gut-homing receptors on local IgA-expressing B cells. Migration of these B cells to the gut resulted in IgA-mediated protection against an oral challenge with active CT. However, in germ-free mice, the levels of LDC-induced, CT–specific IgA in the gut are significantly reduced. Herein, we demonstrate an unexpected role of the microbiota in modulating the protective efficacy of intranasal vaccination through their effect on the IgA class-switching function of LDCs. PMID:26712806

  13. Microbiota regulate the ability of lung dendritic cells to induce IgA class-switch recombination and generate protective gastrointestinal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ruane, Darren; Chorny, Alejo; Lee, Haekyung; Faith, Jeremiah; Pandey, Gaurav; Shan, Meimei; Simchoni, Noa; Rahman, Adeeb; Garg, Aakash; Weinstein, Erica G; Oropallo, Michael; Gaylord, Michelle; Ungaro, Ryan; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Alexandropoulos, Konstantina; Mucida, Daniel; Merad, Miriam; Cerutti, Andrea; Mehandru, Saurabh

    2016-01-11

    Protective immunoglobulin A (IgA) responses to oral antigens are usually orchestrated by gut dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we show that lung CD103(+) and CD24(+)CD11b(+) DCs induced IgA class-switch recombination (CSR) by activating B cells through T cell-dependent or -independent pathways. Compared with lung DCs (LDC), lung CD64(+) macrophages had decreased expression of B cell activation genes and induced significantly less IgA production. Microbial stimuli, acting through Toll-like receptors, induced transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production by LDCs and exerted a profound influence on LDC-mediated IgA CSR. After intranasal immunization with inactive cholera toxin (CT), LDCs stimulated retinoic acid-dependent up-regulation of α4β7 and CCR9 gut-homing receptors on local IgA-expressing B cells. Migration of these B cells to the gut resulted in IgA-mediated protection against an oral challenge with active CT. However, in germ-free mice, the levels of LDC-induced, CT-specific IgA in the gut are significantly reduced. Herein, we demonstrate an unexpected role of the microbiota in modulating the protective efficacy of intranasal vaccination through their effect on the IgA class-switching function of LDCs. PMID:26712806

  14. Murine germinal center B cells require functional Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 signaling for IgG1 class-switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Mattias N D; Andersson, Karin M E; Wasén, Caroline; Erlandsson, Malin C; Nurkkala-Karlsson, Merja; Jonsson, Ing-Marie; Brisslert, Mikael; Bemark, Mats; Bokarewa, Maria I

    2015-12-01

    Switched antibody classes are important for efficient immune responses. Aberrant antibody production to otherwise harmless antigens may result in autoimmunity. The protein kinase fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 receptor (Flt3) has an important role during early B-cell development, but the role of Flt3 in peripheral B cells has not been assessed before. Herein we describe a previously unappreciated role for Flt3 in IgG1 class-switch recombination (CSR) and production. We show that Flt3 is reexpressed on B-cell lymphoma 6(+) germinal center B cells in vivo and following LPS activation of peripheral B cells in vitro. Absence of Flt3 signaling in Flt3 ligand-deficient mice results in impaired IgG1 CSR and accumulation of IgM-secreting plasma cells. On activated B cells, Flt3 is coexpressed and functions in synergy with the common-gamma chain receptor family. B cells from Flt3 ligand-deficient mice have impaired IL-4R signaling, with reduced phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat) 6, and demonstrate a failure to initiate CSR to IgG1 with low expression of γ1 germ-line transcripts, resulting in impaired IgG1 production. Thus, functional synergy between Flt3 and IL-4R signaling is critical for Stat-mediated regulation of sterile γ1 germ-line transcripts and CSR to IgG1. PMID:26627255

  15. Staggered AID-dependent DNA double strand breaks are the predominant DNA lesions targeted to S mu in Ig class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Rush, James S; Fugmann, Sebastian D; Schatz, David G

    2004-04-01

    Class switch recombination (CSR) is the process whereby B cells alter the effector properties of their Ig molecules. Whilst much is known about the cellular regulation of this process, many of the molecular details remain elusive. Recent evidence suggests that CSR involves blunt DNA double strand breaks (dsbs), and that formation of these dsbs requires the function of the activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). We sought to characterize the structural properties and kinetics of induction of the DNA lesions associated with CSR. Using ligation-mediated PCR, we found that AID-dependent DNA dsbs were specifically induced in the S mu region of murine B cells stimulated to undergo CSR. While blunt dsbs were detected, they were only a minor species, with staggered breaks being more than an order of magnitude more abundant. In addition, these breaks could be detected at equal frequency at upstream and downstream portions of S mu, and were induced prior to expression of newly switched isotypes. Collectively, these results provide direct evidence that staggered, S mu-targeted AID-dependent dsbs are the predominant DNA lesion associated with CSR, with important implications for the mechanisms by which CSR DNA lesions are made and processed. PMID:15039385

  16. Elucidation of the enigmatic IgD class-switch recombination via germline deletion of the IgH 3′ regulatory region

    PubMed Central

    Rouaud, Pauline; Saintamand, Alexis; Saad, Faten; Carrion, Claire; Lecardeur, Sandrine; Cogné, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Classical class-switch recombination (cCSR) substitutes the Cμ gene with Cγ, Cε, or Cα, thereby generating IgG, IgE, or IgA classes, respectively. This activation-induced deaminase (AID)–driven process is controlled by the IgH 3′ regulatory region (3′RR). Regulation of rare IgD CSR events has been enigmatic. We show that μδCSR occurs in mouse mesenteric lymph node (MLN) B cells and is AID-dependent. AID attacks differ from those in cCSR because they are not accompanied by extensive somatic hypermutation (SHM) of targeted regions and because repaired junctions exhibit features of the alternative end-joining (A-EJ) pathway. In contrast to cCSR and SHM, μδCSR is 3′RR-independent, as its absence affects neither breakpoint locations in Sμ- and Sδ-like (σδ) nor mutation patterns at Sμ-σδ junctions. Although mutations occur in the immediate proximity of the μδ junctions, SHM is absent distal to the junctions within both Sμ and rearranged VDJ regions. In conclusion, μδCSR is active in MLNs, occurs independently of 3′RR-driven assembly, and is even dramatically increased in 3′RR-deficient mice, further showing that its regulation differs from cCSR. PMID:24752300

  17. Elucidation of the enigmatic IgD class-switch recombination via germline deletion of the IgH 3' regulatory region.

    PubMed

    Rouaud, Pauline; Saintamand, Alexis; Saad, Faten; Carrion, Claire; Lecardeur, Sandrine; Cogné, Michel; Denizot, Yves

    2014-05-01

    Classical class-switch recombination (cCSR) substitutes the Cμ gene with Cγ, Cε, or Cα, thereby generating IgG, IgE, or IgA classes, respectively. This activation-induced deaminase (AID)-driven process is controlled by the IgH 3' regulatory region (3'RR). Regulation of rare IgD CSR events has been enigmatic. We show that μδCSR occurs in mouse mesenteric lymph node (MLN) B cells and is AID-dependent. AID attacks differ from those in cCSR because they are not accompanied by extensive somatic hypermutation (SHM) of targeted regions and because repaired junctions exhibit features of the alternative end-joining (A-EJ) pathway. In contrast to cCSR and SHM, μδCSR is 3'RR-independent, as its absence affects neither breakpoint locations in Sμ- and Sδ-like (σ(δ)) nor mutation patterns at Sμ-σ(δ) junctions. Although mutations occur in the immediate proximity of the μδ junctions, SHM is absent distal to the junctions within both Sμ and rearranged VDJ regions. In conclusion, μδCSR is active in MLNs, occurs independently of 3'RR-driven assembly, and is even dramatically increased in 3'RR-deficient mice, further showing that its regulation differs from cCSR. PMID:24752300

  18. Hotspots for Vitamin-Steroid-Thyroid Hormone Response Elements Within Switch Regions of Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Loci Predict a Direct Influence of Vitamins and Hormones on B Cell Class Switch Recombination.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, Julia L; Penkert, Rhiannon R; Xu, Beisi; Fan, Yiping; Partridge, Janet F; Maul, Robert W; Gearhart, Patricia J

    2016-03-01

    Vitamin A deficiencies are common throughout the world and have a significant negative influence on immune protection against viral infections. Mouse models demonstrate that the production of IgA, a first line of defense against viruses at mucosal sites, is inhibited in the context of vitamin A deficiency. In vitro, the addition of vitamin A to activated B cells can enhance IgA expression, but downregulate IgE. Previous reports have demonstrated that vitamin A modifies cytokine patterns, and in so doing may influence antibody isotype expression by an indirect mechanism. However, we have now discovered hundreds of potential response elements among Sμ, Sɛ, and Sα switch sites within immunoglobulin heavy chain loci. These hotspots appear in both mouse and human loci and include targets for vitamin receptors and related proteins (e.g., estrogen receptors) in the nuclear receptor superfamily. Full response elements with direct repeats are relatively infrequent or absent in Sγ regions although half-sites are present. Based on these results, we pose a hypothesis that nuclear receptors have a direct effect on the immunoglobulin heavy chain class switch recombination event. We propose that vitamin A may alter S site accessibility to activation-induced deaminase and nonhomologous end-joining machinery, thereby influencing the isotype switch, antibody production, and protection against viral infections at mucosal sites. PMID:26741514

  19. Toll-like Receptors and B-cell Receptors Synergize to Induce Immunoglobulin Class Switch DNA Recombination: Relevance to Microbial Antibody Responses

    PubMed Central

    Pone, Egest J.; Zan, Hong; Zhang, Jinsong; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Differentiation of naïve B cells, including immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch DNA recombination (CSR), is critical for the immune response and depends on the extensive integration of signals from the B cell receptor (BCR), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family members, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and cytokine receptors. TLRs and BCR synergize to induce CSR in T cell-dependent and T cell-independent antibody responses to microbial pathogens. BCR triggering together with simultaneous endosomal TLR engagement leads to enhanced B cell differentiation and antibody responses. The requirement of both BCR and TLR engagement would ensure appropriate antigen-specific activation in an infection. Co-stimulation of TLRs and BCR likely plays a significant role in anti-microbial antibody responses to contain pathogen loads until the T cell-dependent antibody responses peak. Furthermore, the temporal sequence of different signals is also critical for optimal B cell responses, as exemplified by the activation of B cells by initial TLR engagement, leading to the upregulation of co-stimulatory CD80 and MHC-II receptors, which, in turn, result in more efficient interactions with T cells, thereby enhancing the germinal center (GC) reaction and antibody affinity maturation. Overall, BCR and TLR stimulation and the integration with signals from the pathogen or immune cells and their products, determine the ensuing B cell antibody response. PMID:20370617

  20. The SAGA Deubiquitination Module Promotes DNA Repair and Class Switch Recombination through ATM and DNAPK-Mediated γH2AX Formation.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Shaliny; Haddad, Dania; Li, Conglei; Le, Michael X; Ling, Alexanda K; So, Clare C; Nepal, Rajeev M; Gommerman, Jennifer L; Yu, Kefei; Ketela, Troy; Moffat, Jason; Martin, Alberto

    2016-05-17

    Class switch recombination (CSR) requires activation-induced deaminase (AID) to instigate double-stranded DNA breaks at the immunoglobulin locus. DNA breaks activate the DNA damage response (DDR) by inducing phosphorylation of histone H2AX followed by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair. We carried out a genome-wide screen to identify CSR factors. We found that Usp22, Eny2, and Atxn7, members of the Spt-Ada-Gcn5-acetyltransferase (SAGA) deubiquitination module, are required for deubiquitination of H2BK120ub following DNA damage, are critical for CSR, and function downstream of AID. The SAGA deubiquitinase activity was required for optimal irradiation-induced γH2AX formation, and failure to remove H2BK120ub inhibits ATM- and DNAPK-induced γH2AX formation. Consistent with this effect, these proteins were found to function upstream of various double-stranded DNA repair pathways. This report demonstrates that deubiquitination of histone H2B impacts the early stages of the DDR and is required for the DNA repair phase of CSR. PMID:27160905

  1. Class E/F switching power amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor); Rutledge, David B. (Inventor); Kee, Scott David (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention discloses a new family of switching amplifier classes called class E/F amplifiers. These amplifiers are generally characterized by their use of the zero-voltage-switching (ZVS) phase correction technique to eliminate of the loss normally associated with the inherent capacitance of the switching device as utilized in class-E amplifiers, together with a load network for improved voltage and current wave-shaping by presenting class-F.sup.-1 impedances at selected overtones and class-E impedances at the remaining overtones. The present invention discloses a several topologies and specific circuit implementations for achieving such performance.

  2. Lineage tracing of human B cells reveals the in vivo landscape of human antibody class switching.

    PubMed

    Horns, Felix; Vollmers, Christopher; Croote, Derek; Mackey, Sally F; Swan, Gary E; Dekker, Cornelia L; Davis, Mark M; Quake, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    Antibody class switching is a feature of the adaptive immune system which enables diversification of the effector properties of antibodies. Even though class switching is essential for mounting a protective response to pathogens, the in vivo patterns and lineage characteristics of antibody class switching have remained uncharacterized in living humans. Here we comprehensively measured the landscape of antibody class switching in human adult twins using antibody repertoire sequencing. The map identifies how antibodies of every class are created and delineates a two-tiered hierarchy of class switch pathways. Using somatic hypermutations as a molecular clock, we discovered that closely related B cells often switch to the same class, but lose coherence as somatic mutations accumulate. Such correlations between closely related cells exist when purified B cells class switch in vitro, suggesting that class switch recombination is directed toward specific isotypes by a cell-autonomous imprinted state. PMID:27481325

  3. B cell TLR1/2, TLR4, TLR7 and TLR9 interact in induction of class switch DNA recombination: modulation by BCR and CD40, and relevance to T-independent antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Pone, Egest J; Lou, Zheng; Lam, Tonika; Greenberg, Milton L; Wang, Rui; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2015-02-01

    Ig class switch DNA recombination (CSR) in B cells is crucial to the maturation of antibody responses. It requires IgH germline IH-CH transcription and expression of AID, both of which are induced by engagement of CD40 or dual engagement of a Toll-like receptor (TLR) and B cell receptor (BCR). Here, we have addressed cross-regulation between two different TLRs or between a TLR and CD40 in CSR induction by using a B cell stimulation system involving lipopolysaccharides (LPS). LPS-mediated long-term primary class-switched antibody responses and memory-like antibody responses in vivo and induced generation of class-switched B cells and plasma cells in vitro. Consistent with the requirement for dual TLR and BCR engagement in CSR induction, LPS, which engages TLR4 through its lipid A moiety, triggered cytosolic Ca2+ flux in B cells through its BCR-engaging polysaccharidic moiety. In the presence of BCR crosslinking, LPS synergized with a TLR1/2 ligand (Pam3CSK4) in CSR induction, but much less efficiently with a TLR7 (R-848) or TLR9 (CpG) ligand. In the absence of BCR crosslinking, R-848 and CpG, which per se induced marginal CSR, virtually abrogated CSR to IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, IgG3 and/or IgA, as induced by LPS or CD154 (CD40 ligand) plus IL-4, IFN-γ or TGF-β, and reduced secretion of class-switched Igs, without affecting B cell proliferation or IgM expression. The CSR inhibition by TLR9 was associated with the reduction in AID expression and/or IgH germline IH-S-CH transcription, and required co-stimulation of B cells by CpG with LPS or CD154. Unexpectedly, B cells also failed to undergo CSR or plasma cell differentiation when co-stimulated by LPS and CD154. Overall, by addressing the interaction of TLR1/2, TLR4, TLR7 and TLR9 in the induction of CSR and modulation of TLR-dependent CSR by BCR and CD40, our study suggests the complexity of how different stimuli cross-regulate an important B cell differentiation process and an important role of TLRs in inducing

  4. Homologous Elements hs3a and hs3b in the 3′ Regulatory Region of the Murine Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain (Igh) Locus Are Both Dispensable for Class-switch Recombination*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yi; Pieretti, Joyce; Ju, Zhongliang; Wei, Shiniu; Christin, John R.; Bah, Fatmata; Birshtein, Barbara K.; Eckhardt, Laurel A.

    2011-01-01

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) genes are formed, tested, and modified to yield diverse, specific, and high affinity antibody responses to antigen. The processes involved must be regulated, however, to avoid unintended damage to chromosomes. The 3′ regulatory region of the Igh locus plays a major role in regulating class-switch recombination (CSR), the process by which antibody effector functions are modified during an immune response. Loss of all known enhancer-like elements in this region dramatically impairs CSR, but individual element deletions have no effect on this process. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that an underlying functional redundancy in the homologous elements hs3a and hs3b was masking the importance of either element to CSR. Several transgenic mouse lines were generated, each carrying a bacterial artificial chromosome transgene that mimicked Igh locus structure but in which hs3a was missing and hs3b was flanked by loxP sites. Matings to Cyclization Recombination Enzyme-expressing mice established “pairs” of lines that differed only in the presence or absence of hs3b. Remarkably, CSR remained robust in the absence of both hs3a and hs3b, suggesting that the remaining two elements of the 3′ regulatory region, hs1.2 and hs4, although individually dispensable for CSR, are, together, sufficient to support CSR. PMID:21673112

  5. Combinatorial H3K9acS10ph histone modification in IgH locus S regions targets 14-3-3 adaptors and AID to specify antibody class-switch DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Li, Guideng; White, Clayton A; Lam, Tonika; Pone, Egest J; Tran, Daniel C; Hayama, Ken L; Zan, Hong; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2013-11-14

    Class-switch DNA recombination (CSR) is central to the antibody response, in that it changes the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) constant region, thereby diversifying biological effector functions of antibodies. The activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)-centered CSR machinery excises and rejoins DNA between an upstream (donor) and a downstream (acceptor) S region, which precede the respective constant region DNA. AID is stabilized on S regions by 14-3-3 adaptors. These adaptors display a high affinity for 5'-AGCT-3' repeats, which recur in all S regions. However, how 14-3-3, AID, and the CSR machinery target exclusively the donor and acceptor S regions is poorly understood. Here, we show that histone methyltransferases and acetyltransferases are induced by CD40 or Toll-like receptor signaling and catalyze H3K4me3 and H3K9ac/K14ac histone modifications, which are enriched in S regions but do not specify the S region targets of CSR. By contrast, the combinatorial H3K9acS10ph modification specifically marks the S regions set to recombine and directly recruits 14-3-3 adaptors for AID stabilization there. Inhibition of the enzymatic activity of GCN5 and PCAF histone acetyltransferases reduces H3K9acS10ph in S regions, 14-3-3 and AID stabilization, and CSR. Thus, H3K9acS10ph is a histone code that is "written" specifically in S regions and is "read" by 14-3-3 adaptors to target AID for CSR as an important biological outcome. PMID:24209747

  6. Estrogen receptors bind to and activate the HOXC4/HoxC4 promoter to potentiate HoxC4-mediated activation-induced cytosine deaminase induction, immunoglobulin class switch DNA recombination, and somatic hypermutation.

    PubMed

    Mai, Thach; Zan, Hong; Zhang, Jinsong; Hawkins, J Seth; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2010-11-26

    Estrogen enhances antibody and autoantibody responses through yet to be defined mechanisms. It has been suggested that estrogen up-regulates the expression of activation-induced cytosine deaminase (AID), which is critical for antibody class switch DNA recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM), through direct activation of this gene. AID, as we have shown, is induced by the HoxC4 homeodomain transcription factor, which binds to a conserved HoxC4/Oct site in the AICDA/Aicda promoter. Here we show that estrogen-estrogen receptor (ER) complexes do not directly activate the AID gene promoter in B cells undergoing CSR. Rather, they bind to three evolutionarily conserved and cooperative estrogen response elements (EREs) we identified in the HOXC4/HoxC4 promoter. By binding to these EREs, ERs synergized with CD154 or LPS and IL-4 signaling to up-regulate HoxC4 expression, thereby inducing AID and CSR without affecting B cell proliferation or plasmacytoid differentiation. Estrogen administration in vivo significantly potentiated CSR and SHM in the specific antibody response to the 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetyl hapten conjugated with chicken γ-globulin. Ablation of HoxC4 (HoxC4(-/-)) abrogated the estrogen-mediated enhancement of AID gene expression and decreased CSR and SHM. Thus, estrogen enhances AID expression by activating the HOXC4/HoxC4 promoter and inducing the critical AID gene activator, HoxC4. PMID:20855884

  7. Lineage tracing of human B cells reveals the in vivo landscape of human antibody class switching

    PubMed Central

    Horns, Felix; Vollmers, Christopher; Croote, Derek; Mackey, Sally F; Swan, Gary E; Dekker, Cornelia L; Davis, Mark M; Quake, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    Antibody class switching is a feature of the adaptive immune system which enables diversification of the effector properties of antibodies. Even though class switching is essential for mounting a protective response to pathogens, the in vivo patterns and lineage characteristics of antibody class switching have remained uncharacterized in living humans. Here we comprehensively measured the landscape of antibody class switching in human adult twins using antibody repertoire sequencing. The map identifies how antibodies of every class are created and delineates a two-tiered hierarchy of class switch pathways. Using somatic hypermutations as a molecular clock, we discovered that closely related B cells often switch to the same class, but lose coherence as somatic mutations accumulate. Such correlations between closely related cells exist when purified B cells class switch in vitro, suggesting that class switch recombination is directed toward specific isotypes by a cell-autonomous imprinted state. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16578.001 PMID:27481325

  8. Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals Selective Modulation of microRNAs and mRNAs by Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor in B Cells Induced to Undergo Class-Switch DNA Recombination and Plasma Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tian; Sanchez, Helia N.; Zan, Hong; Casali, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    As we have suggested, epigenetic factors, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), can interact with genetic programs to regulate B cell functions, thereby informing antibody and autoantibody responses. We have shown that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors (HDI) inhibit the differentiation events critical to the maturation of the antibody response: class-switch DNA recombination (CSR), somatic hypermutation (SHM), and plasma cell differentiation, by modulating intrinsic B cell mechanisms. HDI repress the expression of AID and Blimp-1, which are critical for CSR/SHM and plasma cell differentiation, respectively, in mouse and human B cells by upregulating selected miRNAs that silenced AICDA/Aicda and PRDM1/Prdm1 mRNAs, as demonstrated by multiple qRT-PCRs (J Immunol 193:5933–5950, 2014). To further define the selectivity of HDI-mediated modulation of miRNA and gene expression, we performed genome-wide miRNA-Seq and mRNA-Seq analysis in B cells stimulated by LPS plus IL-4 and treated with HDI or nil. Consistent with what we have shown using qRT-PCR, these HDI-treated B cells displayed reduced expression of Aicda and Prdm1, and increased expression of miR-155, miR-181b, and miR-361, which target Aicda, and miR-23b, miR-30a, and miR-125b, which target Prdm1. In B cells induced to undergo CSR and plasma cell differentiation, about 23% of over 22,000 mRNAs analyzed were expressed at a significantly high copy number (more than 20 copies/cell). Only 18 (0.36%) of these highly expressed mRNAs, including Aicda, Prdm1, and Xbp1, were downregulated by HDI by 50% or more. Further, only 16 (0.30%) of the highly expressed mRNAs were upregulated (more than twofold) by HDI. The selectivity of HDI-mediated modulation of gene expression was emphasized by unchanged expression of the genes that are involved in regulation, targeting, or DNA repair processes of CSR, as well as unchanged expression of the genes encoding epigenetic regulators and factors that are important for cell signaling or

  9. Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals Selective Modulation of microRNAs and mRNAs by Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor in B Cells Induced to Undergo Class-Switch DNA Recombination and Plasma Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tian; Sanchez, Helia N; Zan, Hong; Casali, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    As we have suggested, epigenetic factors, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), can interact with genetic programs to regulate B cell functions, thereby informing antibody and autoantibody responses. We have shown that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors (HDI) inhibit the differentiation events critical to the maturation of the antibody response: class-switch DNA recombination (CSR), somatic hypermutation (SHM), and plasma cell differentiation, by modulating intrinsic B cell mechanisms. HDI repress the expression of AID and Blimp-1, which are critical for CSR/SHM and plasma cell differentiation, respectively, in mouse and human B cells by upregulating selected miRNAs that silenced AICDA/Aicda and PRDM1/Prdm1 mRNAs, as demonstrated by multiple qRT-PCRs (J Immunol 193:5933-5950, 2014). To further define the selectivity of HDI-mediated modulation of miRNA and gene expression, we performed genome-wide miRNA-Seq and mRNA-Seq analysis in B cells stimulated by LPS plus IL-4 and treated with HDI or nil. Consistent with what we have shown using qRT-PCR, these HDI-treated B cells displayed reduced expression of Aicda and Prdm1, and increased expression of miR-155, miR-181b, and miR-361, which target Aicda, and miR-23b, miR-30a, and miR-125b, which target Prdm1. In B cells induced to undergo CSR and plasma cell differentiation, about 23% of over 22,000 mRNAs analyzed were expressed at a significantly high copy number (more than 20 copies/cell). Only 18 (0.36%) of these highly expressed mRNAs, including Aicda, Prdm1, and Xbp1, were downregulated by HDI by 50% or more. Further, only 16 (0.30%) of the highly expressed mRNAs were upregulated (more than twofold) by HDI. The selectivity of HDI-mediated modulation of gene expression was emphasized by unchanged expression of the genes that are involved in regulation, targeting, or DNA repair processes of CSR, as well as unchanged expression of the genes encoding epigenetic regulators and factors that are important for cell signaling or

  10. Molecular requirements for immunoglobulin heavy chain constant region gene switch-recombination revealed with switch-substrate retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Ott, D E; Marcu, K B

    1989-01-01

    We have employed a retroviral vector, ZN(Smu/S gamma 2b)tk1, as a means of introducing immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) switch (S) region sequences into B cell lines to directly measure their switch-recombinase activities. In an earlier study, we demonstrated that retrovector Smu-S gamma 2b recombination events occurred in two thymidine kinase (tk)-negative murine pre-B cell lines (18-8 and 38B9) upon selection in bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR) media for the loss of an Htk gene inserted in between the vector's Smu and S gamma 2b sequences. Here we have used this assay system to show that the 300-18 murine pre-B cell line possesses a very high level of switch-recombinase activity (greater than 1 event in 2500 cells/generation) while a terminally differentiated, antibody-secreting hybridoma line (A39R 1.1) has no detectable recombinase activity. Both S mu and S gamma 2b segments are required for switch region-mediated deletions. Retrovectors harboring only an Smu segment or an Smu segment and a portion of the murine c-myc gene in place of S gamma 2b sequences were both non-recombinagenic in this assay system. Nucleotide sequence analysis of six retrovector S segment recombinants, recovered from ZN(Smu/S gamma 2b) tk1-infected 18-8 and 39B9 pre-B lines, did not reveal homology at their sites of recombination. We conclude that: (1) S segment repetitive sequences play an essential but indirect role in IgCH gene switch-recombination, which occurs by an illegitimate, non-homologous mechanism; (2) the c-myc gene is not a significant target for switch-recombination; and (3) since endogenous Smu and S gamma 2b rearrangements were not observed in populations and clones of pre-B cells expressing a high level of switch-recombinase activity, multiple factors (presumably contributed in part by the degree of S segment accessibility) in addition to S recombinase activity are required for CH class switching. PMID:2489045

  11. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae recombination enhancer biases recombination during interchromosomal mating-type switching but not in interchromosomal homologous recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Peter; Simon, Peter J; Broach, James R

    2004-01-01

    Haploid Saccharomyces can change mating type through HO-endonuclease cleavage of an expressor locus, MAT, followed by gene conversion using one of two repository loci, HML or HMR, as donor. The mating type of a cell dictates which repository locus is used as donor, with a cells using HML and alpha cells using HMR. This preference is established in part by RE, a locus on the left arm of chromosome III that activates the surrounding region, including HML, for recombination in a cells, an activity suppressed by alpha 2 protein in alpha cells. We have examined the ability of RE to stimulate different forms of interchromosomal recombination. We found that RE exerted an effect on interchromosomal mating-type switching and on intrachromosomal homologous recombination but not on interchromosomal homologous recombination. Also, even in the absence of RE, MAT alpha still influenced donor preference in interchromosomal mating-type switching, supporting a role of alpha 2 in donor preference independent of RE. These results suggest a model in which RE affects competition between productive and nonproductive recombination outcomes. In interchromosome gene conversion, RE enhances both productive and nonproductive pathways, whereas in intrachromosomal gene conversion and mating-type switching, RE enhances only the productive pathway. PMID:15082540

  12. Regulation and targeting of recombination in extrachromosomal substrates carrying immunoglobulin switch region sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, H; Maizels, N

    1994-01-01

    We have used extrachromosomal substrates carrying immunoglobulin heavy-chain S mu and S gamma 3 switch region sequences to study activation and targeting of recombination by a transcriptional enhancer element. Substrates are transiently introduced into activated primary murine B cells, in which recombination involving S-region sequences deletes a conditionally lethal marker, and recombination is measured by transformation of Escherichia coli in the second step of the assay. Previously we found that as many as 25% of replicated substrates recombined during 40-h transfection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated primary cells and that efficient recombination was dependent on the presence of S-region sequences as well as a transcriptional activator region in the constructs (H. Leung and N. Maizels, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89:4154-4158, 1992). Here we show that recombination of the switch substrates is threefold more efficient in LPS-cultured primary B cells than in the T-cell line EL4; the activities responsible for switch substrate recombination thus appear to be more abundant or more active in cells which can carry out chromosomal switch recombination. We test the role of the transcriptional activator region and show that the immunoglobulin heavy-chain intron enhancer (E mu) alone stimulates recombination as well as E mu combined with a heavy-chain promoter and that mutations that diminish enhancer-dependent transcription 500-fold diminish recombinational activation less than 2-fold. These observations suggest that the enhancer stimulates recombination by a mechanism that does not depend on transcript production or that is insensitive to the level of transcript production over a very broad range. Furthermore, we find that E mu stimulates recombination when located either upstream or downstream of S mu but that the position of the recombinational activator does affect the targeting of recombination junctions, suggesting that the relatively imprecise targeting of

  13. Innate signals in mucosal immunoglobulin class switching.

    PubMed

    Puga, Irene; Cols, Montserrat; Cerutti, Andrea

    2010-11-01

    The intestinal mucosa contains large communities of commensal bacteria that process otherwise indigestible food components, synthesize essential vitamins, stimulate the maturation of the immune system, and form an ecologic niche that prevents the growth of pathogenic species. Conversely, the intestine provides the commensals with a stable habitat rich in energy derived from the ingested food. A delicate homeostatic balance maintains this mutualistic relationship without triggering a destructive inflammatory response. Commensals orchestrate intestinal homeostasis by entertaining an intimate dialogue with epithelial cells and immune cells lodged in the mucosa. Such a dialogue generates finely tuned signaling programs that ensure a state of hyporesponsiveness against noninvasive commensals and a state of active readiness against invasive pathogens. In this dialogue epithelial cells function as "interpreters" that continuously translate microbial messages to "instruct" immune cells as to the antigenic composition of the intestinal lumen. This education process initiates sophisticated defensive strategies that comprise massive production of IgA, a noninflammatory mucosal antibody class that generates immunity while preserving homeostasis. PMID:21050939

  14. Immature B cells preferentially switch to IgE with increased direct Sμ to Sε recombination

    PubMed Central

    Wesemann, Duane R.; Magee, Jennifer M.; Boboila, Cristian; Calado, Dinis Pedro; Gallagher, Michael P.; Portuguese, Andrew J.; Manis, John P.; Zhou, Xiaolong; Recher, Mike; Rajewsky, Klaus; Notarangelo, Luigi D.

    2011-01-01

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) class-switch recombination (CSR) replaces initially expressed Cμ (IgM) constant regions (CH) exons with downstream CH exons. Stimulation of B cells with anti-CD40 plus interleukin-4 induces CSR from Cμ to Cγ1 (IgG1) and Cε (IgE), the latter of which contributes to the pathogenesis of atopic diseases. Although Cε CSR can occur directly from Cμ, most mature peripheral B cells undergo CSR to Cε indirectly, namely from Cμ to Cγ1, and subsequently to Cε. Physiological mechanisms that influence CSR to Cγ1 versus Cε are incompletely understood. In this study, we report a role for B cell developmental maturity in IgE CSR. Based in part on a novel flow cytometric IgE CSR assay, we show that immature B cells preferentially switch to IgE versus IgG1 through a mechanism involving increased direct CSR from Cμ to Cε. Our findings suggest that IgE dysregulation in certain immunodeficiencies may be related to impaired B cell maturation. PMID:22143888

  15. Fission yeast switches mating type by a replication-recombination coupled process.

    PubMed

    Arcangioli, B; de Lahondès, R

    2000-03-15

    Fission yeast exhibits a homothallic life cycle, in which the mating type of the cell mitotically alternates in a highly regulated fashion. Pedigree analysis of dividing cells has shown that only one of the two sister cells switches mating type. It was shown recently that a site- and strand-specific DNA modification at the mat1 locus precedes mating-type switching. By tracking the fate of mat1 DNA throughout the cell cycle with a PCR assay, we identified a novel DNA intermediate of mating-type switching in S-phase. The time and rate of appearance and disappearance of this DNA intermediate are consistent with a model in which mating-type switching occurs through a replication-recombination coupled pathway. Such a process provides experimental evidence in support of a copy choice recombination model in Schizosaccharomyces pombe mating-type switching and is reminiscent of the sister chromatid recombination used to complete replication in the presence of certain types of DNA damage. PMID:10716938

  16. Bach2 represses plasma cell gene regulatory network in B cells to promote antibody class switch

    PubMed Central

    Muto, Akihiko; Ochiai, Kyoko; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Itoh-Nakadai, Ari; Calame, Kathryn L; Ikebe, Dai; Tashiro, Satoshi; Igarashi, Kazuhiko

    2010-01-01

    Two transcription factors, Pax5 and Blimp-1, form a gene regulatory network (GRN) with a double-negative loop, which defines either B-cell (Pax5 high) or plasma cell (Blimp-1 high) status as a binary switch. However, it is unclear how this B-cell GRN registers class switch DNA recombination (CSR), an event that takes place before the terminal differentiation to plasma cells. In the absence of Bach2 encoding a transcription factor required for CSR, mouse splenic B cells more frequently and rapidly expressed Blimp-1 and differentiated to IgM plasma cells as compared with wild-type cells. Genetic loss of Blimp-1 in Bach2−/− B cells was sufficient to restore CSR. These data with mathematical modelling of the GRN indicate that Bach2 achieves a time delay in Blimp-1 induction, which inhibits plasma cell differentiation and promotes CSR (Delay-Driven Diversity model for CSR). Reduction in mature B-cell numbers in Bach2−/− mice was not rescued by Blimp-1 ablation, indicating that Bach2 regulates B-cell differentiation and function through Blimp-1-dependent and -independent GRNs. PMID:20953163

  17. Stabilization for a Class of Switched Nonlinear Systems With Novel Average Dwell Time Switching by T-S Fuzzy Modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xudong; Yin, Yunfei; Niu, Ben; Zheng, Xiaolong

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the problem of switching stabilization for a class of switched nonlinear systems is studied by using average dwell time (ADT) switching, where the subsystems are possibly all unstable. First, a new concept of ADT is given, which is different from the traditional definition of ADT. Based on the new proposed switching signals, a sufficient condition of stabilization for switched nonlinear systems with unstable subsystems is derived. Then, the T-S fuzzy modeling approach is applied to represent the underlying nonlinear system to make the obtained condition easily verified. A novel multiple quadratic Lyapunov function approach is also proposed, by which some conditions are provided in terms of a set of linear matrix inequalities to guarantee the derived T-S fuzzy system to be asymptotically stable. Finally, a numerical example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of our developed results. PMID:26316288

  18. Orientation-Specific Joining of AID-initiated DNA Breaks Promotes Antibody Class Switching

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Hu, Jiazhi; Volpi, Sabrina A.; Meyers, Robin M.; Ho, Yu-Jui; Du, Zhou; Robbiani, Davide F.; Meng, Feilong; Gostissa, Monica; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Manis, John P.; Alt, Frederick W.

    2015-01-01

    During B cell development, RAG endonuclease cleaves immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) V, D, and J gene segments and orchestrates their fusion as deletional events that assemble a V(D)J exon in the same transcriptional orientation as adjacent Cμ constant region exons1,2. In mice, six additional sets of constant region exons (CHs) lie 100-200 kb downstream in the same transcriptional orientation as V(D)J and Cμ exons2. Long repetitive switch (S) regions precede Cμ and downstream CHs. In mature B cells, class switch recombination (CSR) generates different antibody classes by replacing Cμ with a downstream CH2. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID) initiates CSR by promoting deamination lesions within Sμ and a downstream acceptor S region2,3; these lesions are converted into DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by general DNA repair factors3. Productive CSR must occur in a deletional orientation by joining the upstream end of an Sμ DSB to the downstream end of an acceptor S region DSB (Fig. 1a). However, the relative frequency of deletional to inversional CSR junctions had not been measured. Thus, whether orientation-specific joining is a programmed mechanistic feature of CSR as it is for V(D)J recombination and, if so, how this is achieved was unknown. To address this question, we adapted high-throughput genome-wide translocation sequencing (HTGTS)4 into a highly sensitive DSB end-joining assay and applied it to endogenous AID-initiated S region DSBs. We find that CSR indeed is programmed to occur in a productive deletional orientation and does so via an unprecedented mechanism that involves in cis IgH organizational features in combination with frequent S region DSBs initiated by AID. We further implicate ATM-dependent DSB response (DSBR) factors in enforcing this mechanism and provide a solution to the enigma of why CSR is so reliant on the 53BP1 DSBR factor. PMID:26308889

  19. Investigation of a hybrid optical-electronic switch supporting different service classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoud, Wiem; Ware, Cédric; Lourdiane, Mounia

    2014-09-01

    Optical fiber is considered the most competitive wired transmission support thanks to its low attenuation, wide optical bandwidth, long reach, and low cost. However, optics do not yet perform higher functionalities such as switching. In fact, all-optical switches face a contention issue, due to the lack of practical optical buffers. Thus, the switching function is still performed electronically, which requires energetically costly optical-to-electronic conversions. The energy consumption is a critical issue within the growing data traffic. Thus, a proposition of hybrid switch architecture supplementing optical switch with an electronic buffer. In this paper, we propose to investigate the performance of hybrid switch that supports different priority classes where the priority is defined in terms of Packet Loss Ratio (PLR). We show that the hybrid switch is a good trade off since it allows significant performance improvements towards a buffer-less all optical switch in terms of PLR and sustainable load, for relatively few electronic ports of the buffer, which would reduce energy consumption compared to an electronic switch.

  20. Ectopic Lymphoid Structures Support Ongoing Production of Class-Switched Autoantibodies in Rheumatoid Synovium

    PubMed Central

    Manzo, Antonio; Kelly, Stephen; Blades, Mark C; Kirkham, Bruce; Spencer, Jo; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2009-01-01

    Background Follicular structures resembling germinal centres (GCs) that are characterized by follicular dendritic cell (FDC) networks have long been recognized in chronically inflamed tissues in autoimmune diseases, including the synovium of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, it is debated whether these ectopic structures promote autoimmunity and chronic inflammation driving the production of pathogenic autoantibodies. Anti-citrullinated protein/peptide antibodies (ACPA) are highly specific markers of RA, predict a poor prognosis, and have been suggested to be pathogenic. Therefore, the main study objectives were to determine whether ectopic lymphoid structures in RA synovium: (i) express activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the enzyme required for somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination (CSR) of Ig genes; (ii) support ongoing CSR and ACPA production; and (iii) remain functional in a RA/severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) chimera model devoid of new immune cell influx into the synovium. Methods and Findings Using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and quantitative Taqman real-time PCR (QT-PCR) in synovial tissue from 55 patients with RA, we demonstrated that FDC+ structures invariably expressed AID with a distribution resembling secondary lymphoid organs. Further, AID+/CD21+ follicular structures were surrounded by ACPA+/CD138+ plasma cells, as demonstrated by immune reactivity to citrullinated fibrinogen. Moreover, we identified a novel subset of synovial AID+/CD20+ B cells outside GCs resembling interfollicular large B cells. In order to gain direct functional evidence that AID+ structures support CSR and in situ manufacturing of class-switched ACPA, 34 SCID mice were transplanted with RA synovium and humanely killed at 4 wk for harvesting of transplants and sera. Persistent expression of AID and Iγ-Cμ circular transcripts (identifying ongoing IgM-IgG class-switching) was observed in synovial grafts expressing FDCs/CD21L. Furthermore, synovial

  1. Two classes of ODE models with switch-like behavior

    PubMed Central

    Just, Winfried; Korb, Mason; Elbert, Ben; Young, Todd

    2013-01-01

    In cases where the same real-world system can be modeled both by an ODE system ⅅ and a Boolean system 𝔹, it is of interest to identify conditions under which the two systems will be consistent, that is, will make qualitatively equivalent predictions. In this note we introduce two broad classes of relatively simple models that provide a convenient framework for studying such questions. In contrast to the widely known class of Glass networks, the right-hand sides of our ODEs are Lipschitz-continuous. We prove that if 𝔹 has certain structures, consistency between ⅅ and 𝔹 is implied by sufficient separation of time scales in one class of our models. Namely, if the trajectories of 𝔹 are “one-stepping” then we prove a strong form of consistency and if 𝔹 has a certain monotonicity property then there is a weaker consistency between ⅅ and 𝔹. These results appear to point to more general structure properties that favor consistency between ODE and Boolean models. PMID:24244061

  2. Whole-class interactions and code-switching in secondary mathematics teaching in Mauritius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehmohamed, Asifa; Rowland, Tim

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports a study of whole-class interactions in mathematics classrooms in a girls' secondary school in Mauritius. It focuses on three teachers and their instructional language practices. Analysis of audio-recordings of lessons showed that code-switching was commonly practised by all the teachers in the study. The teachers' comments on their use of language within the classroom show that although they are aware of the languages they use, they are not always conscious of their code-switching. Different functions of the teachers' code-switching practices were identified, indicating it can be an important support for learning mathematics, despite some related tensions that teachers face in using code-switch in their teaching. The paper concludes with some implications for national policy and for teacher education.

  3. Identity and Language Functions: High School Chinese Immigrant Students' Code-Switching Dilemmas in ESL Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Xiaoping

    2006-01-01

    This study examines classroom code-switching in relation to individual and group identity and to functional use of two languages. It investigates how high school Chinese immigrant students perceive the use of first language (L1) and second language (L2) in class, and how they use these languages during group activities. The interview data…

  4. Polymorphism, recombination, and linkage disequilibrium within the HLA class II region

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, A.B.; McClure, G.R.; Suraj, V.C.; Helmuth, R.C.; Fildes, N.; Bugawan, T.L.; Erlich, H.A. ); Klitz, W. )

    1992-01-01

    Thirty-nine CEPH families, comprised of 502 individuals, have been typed for the HLA class II genes DRB1, DQA1, DQB1, and DPB1 using nonradioactive sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes to analyze polymerase chain reaction amplified DNA. This population, which consists of 266 independent chromosomes, contains 27 DRB1, 7 DQA1, 12 DQB1, and 17 DPB1 alleles. Analysis of the distribution of allele frequencies using the homozygosity statistic, which gives an indication of past selection pressures, suggests that balancing selection has acted on the DRB1, DQA1, and DQB1 loci. The distribution of DPB1 alleles, however, suggests a different evolutionary past. Family data permits the estimation of recombination rates and the unambiguous assignment of haplotypes. No recombinants were found between DRB1, DQA1, and DQB1; however, recombinants were detected between DQB1 and DPB1, resulting in an estimated recombination fraction of [ge]0.008 [+-] 0.004. Only 33 distinct DRB1-DQA1-DQB1 haplotypes were found in this population which illustrates the extreme nonrandom haplotypic association of alleles at these loci. A few of these haplotypes are unusual (previously unreported) for a Caucasian population and most likely result from past recombination events between the DR and DQ subregions. Examination of disequilibrium across the HLA region using these data and the available serologic HLA-A and HLA-B types of these samples shows that global disequilibrium between these loci declines with the recombination fraction, approaching statistic nonsignificance at the most distant interval, HLA-A and HLA-DP. DR-DQ haplotypes in linkage disequilibrium with DPB1 and B are noted and, finally, the evolutionary origin of certain class II haplotypes is addressed. 63 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. Random parameter-switching synthesis of a class of hyperbolic attractors.

    PubMed

    Danca, Marius-F

    2008-09-01

    The parameter perturbation methods (the most known being the OGY method) apply small wisely chosen swift kicks to the system once per cycle, to maintain it near the desired unstable periodic orbit. Thus, one can consider that a new attractor is finally generated. Another class of methods which allow the attractors born, imply small perturbations of the state variable [see, e.g., J. Güémez and M. A. Matías, Phys. Lett. A 181, 29 (1993)]. Whatever technique is utilized, generating any targeted attractor starting from a set of two or more of any kind of attractors (stable or not) of a considered dissipative continuous-time system cannot be achieved with these techniques. This kind of attractor synthesis [introduced in M.-F. Danca, W. K. S. Tang, and G. Chen, Appl. Math. Comput. 201, 650 (2008) and proved analytically in Y. Mao, W. K. S. Tang, and M.-F. Danca, Appl. Math. Comput. (submitted)] which starts from a set of given attractors, allows us, via periodic parameter-switching, to generate any of the set of all possible attractors of a class of continuous-time dissipative dynamical systems, depending linearly on the control parameter. In this paper we extend this technique proving empirically that even random manners for switching can be utilized for this purpose. These parameter-switches schemes are very easy to implement and require only the mathematical model of the underlying dynamical system, a convergent numerical method to integrate the system, and the bifurcation diagram to choose specific attractors. Relatively large parameter switches are admitted. As a main result, these switching algorithms (deterministic or random) offer a new perspective on the set of all attractors of a class of dissipative continuous-time dynamical systems. PMID:19045449

  6. Random parameter-switching synthesis of a class of hyperbolic attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danca, Marius-F.

    2008-09-01

    The parameter perturbation methods (the most known being the OGY method) apply small wisely chosen swift kicks to the system once per cycle, to maintain it near the desired unstable periodic orbit. Thus, one can consider that a new attractor is finally generated. Another class of methods which allow the attractors born, imply small perturbations of the state variable [see, e.g., J. Güémez and M. A. Matías, Phys. Lett. A 181, 29 (1993)]. Whatever technique is utilized, generating any targeted attractor starting from a set of two or more of any kind of attractors (stable or not) of a considered dissipative continuous-time system cannot be achieved with these techniques. This kind of attractor synthesis [introduced in M.-F. Danca, W. K. S. Tang, and G. Chen, Appl. Math. Comput. 201, 650 (2008) and proved analytically in Y. Mao, W. K. S. Tang, and M.-F. Danca, Appl. Math. Comput. (submitted)] which starts from a set of given attractors, allows us, via periodic parameter-switching, to generate any of the set of all possible attractors of a class of continuous-time dissipative dynamical systems, depending linearly on the control parameter. In this paper we extend this technique proving empirically that even random manners for switching can be utilized for this purpose. These parameter-switches schemes are very easy to implement and require only the mathematical model of the underlying dynamical system, a convergent numerical method to integrate the system, and the bifurcation diagram to choose specific attractors. Relatively large parameter switches are admitted. As a main result, these switching algorithms (deterministic or random) offer a new perspective on the set of all attractors of a class of dissipative continuous-time dynamical systems.

  7. Swi6, a Gene Required for Mating-Type Switching, Prohibits Meiotic Recombination in the Mat2-Mat3 ``cold Spot'' of Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Klar, AJS.; Bonaduce, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    Mitotic interconversion of the mating-type locus (mat1) of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is initiated by a double-strand break at mat1. The mat2 and mat3 loci act as nonrandom donors of genetic information for mat1 switching such that switches occur primarily (or only) to the opposite mat1 allele. Location of the mat1 ``hot spot'' for transposition should be contrasted with the ``cold spot'' of meiotic recombination located within the adjoining mat2-mat3 interval. That is, meiotic interchromosomal recombination in mat2, mat3 and the intervening 15-kilobase region does not occur at all. swi2 and swi6 switching-deficient mutants possess the normal level of double-strand break at mat1, yet they fail to switch efficiently. By testing for meiotic recombination in the cold spot, we found the usual lack of recombination in a swi2 mutant but a significant level of recombination in a swi6 mutant. Therefore, the swi6 gene function is required to keep the donor loci inert for interchromosomal recombination. This finding, combined with the additional result that switching primarily occurs intrachromosomally, suggests that the donor loci are made accessible for switching by folding them onto mat1, thus causing the cold spot of recombination. PMID:1783290

  8. Identifying Effective Enzyme Activity Targets for Recombinant Class I and Class II Collagenase for Successful Human Islet Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Balamurugan, Appakalai N.; Green, Michael L.; Breite, Andrew G.; Loganathan, Gopalakrishnan; Wilhelm, Joshua J.; Tweed, Benjamin; Vargova, Lenka; Lockridge, Amber; Kuriti, Manikya; Hughes, Michael G.; Williams, Stuart K.; Hering, Bernhard J.; Dwulet, Francis E.; McCarthy, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Isolation following a good manufacturing practice-compliant, human islet product requires development of a robust islet isolation procedure where effective limits of key reagents are known. The enzymes used for islet isolation are critical but little is known about the doses of class I and class II collagenase required for successful islet isolation. Methods We used a factorial approach to evaluate the effect of high and low target activities of recombinant class I (rC1) and class II (rC2) collagenase on human islet yield. Consequently, 4 different enzyme formulations with divergent C1:C2 collagenase mass ratios were assessed, each supplemented with the same dose of neutral protease. Both split pancreas and whole pancreas models were used to test enzyme targets (n = 20). Islet yield/g pancreas was compared with historical enzymes (n = 42). Results Varying the Wunsch (rC2) and collagen degradation activity (CDA, rC1) target dose, and consequently the C1:C2 mass ratio, had no significant effect on tissue digestion. Digestions using higher doses of Wunsch and CDA resulted in comparable islet yields to those obtained with 60% and 50% of those activities, respectively. Factorial analysis revealed no significant main effect of Wunsch activity or CDA for any parameter measured. Aggregate results from 4 different collagenase formulations gave 44% higher islet yield (>5000 islet equivalents/g) in the body/tail of the pancreas (n = 12) when compared with those from the same segment using a standard natural collagenase/protease mixture (n = 6). Additionally, islet yields greater than 5000 islet equivalents/g pancreas were also obtained in whole human pancreas. Conclusions A broader C1:C2 ratio can be used for human islet isolation than has been used in the past. Recombinant collagenase is an effective replacement for the natural enzyme and we have determined that high islet yield can be obtained even with low doses of rC1:rC2, which is beneficial for the survival

  9. A combined nuclear and nucleolar localization motif in activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) controls immunoglobulin class switching.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yi; Ericsson, Ida; Torseth, Kathrin; Methot, Stephen P; Sundheim, Ottar; Liabakk, Nina B; Slupphaug, Geir; Di Noia, Javier M; Krokan, Hans E; Kavli, Bodil

    2013-01-23

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is a DNA mutator enzyme essential for adaptive immunity. AID initiates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination (CSR) by deaminating cytosine to uracil in specific immunoglobulin (Ig) gene regions. However, other loci, including cancer-related genes, are also targeted. Thus, tight regulation of AID is crucial to balance immunity versus disease such as cancer. AID is regulated by several mechanisms including nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. Here we have studied nuclear import kinetics and subnuclear trafficking of AID in live cells and characterized in detail its nuclear localization signal. Importantly, we find that the nuclear localization signal motif also directs AID to nucleoli where it colocalizes with its interaction partner, catenin-β-like 1 (CTNNBL1), and physically associates with nucleolin and nucleophosmin. Moreover, we demonstrate that release of AID from nucleoli is dependent on its C-terminal motif. Finally, we find that CSR efficiency correlates strongly with the arithmetic product of AID nuclear import rate and DNA deamination activity. Our findings suggest that directional nucleolar transit is important for the physiological function of AID and demonstrate that nuclear/nucleolar import and DNA cytosine deamination together define the biological activity of AID. This is the first study on subnuclear trafficking of AID and demonstrates a new level in its complex regulation. In addition, our results resolve the problem related to dissociation of deamination activity and CSR activity of AID mutants. PMID:23183374

  10. A Butter Aroma Recombinate Activates Human Class-I Odorant Receptors.

    PubMed

    Geithe, Christiane; Andersen, Gaby; Malki, Agne; Krautwurst, Dietmar

    2015-11-01

    With ∼400 olfactory G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), humans sensitively perceive ∼230 key aroma compounds as best natural agonists of ∼10000 food volatiles. An understanding of odorant coding, thus, critically depends on the knowledge about interactions of key food aroma chemicals and their mixtures with their cognate receptors. Genetically designed test cell systems enable the screening, deorphaning, and characterization of single odorant receptors (OR). This study shows for the food aroma-specific and quantitative butter aroma recombinate, and its single components, specific in vitro class-I OR activity patterns, as well as the activation of selected OR in a concentration-dependent manner. Recently, chemosensory receptors, especially class-I OR, were demonstrated to be expressed on blood leukocytes, which may encounter foodborne aroma compounds postprandially. This study shows that butter aroma recombinate induced chemotaxis of isolated human neutrophils in a defined gradient, and in a concentration-dependent and pertussis toxin-sensitive manner, suggesting at least a GPCR-mediated activation of blood leukocytes by key food odorants. PMID:26451762

  11. Stability and stabilization studies for a class of switched nonlinear systems via vector norms approach.

    PubMed

    Sakly, Anis; Kermani, Marwen

    2015-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the problems of stability analysis and stabilization with a state feedback controller through pole placement for a class of both continuous and discrete-time switched nonlinear systems. These systems are modeled by differential or difference equations. Then, a transformation under the arrow form is employed. Note that, the main contribution in this work is twofold: firstly, based on the construction of an appropriated common Lyapunov function, as well the use of the vector norms notion, the recourse to the Kotelyanski lemma, the M-matrix proprieties, the aggregation techniques and the application of the Borne-Gentina criterion, new sufficient stability conditions under arbitrary switching for the autonomous system are deduced. Secondly, this result is extended for designing a state feedback controller by using pole assignment control, which guarantee that the corresponding closed-loop system is globally asymptotically stable under arbitrary switching. The main novelties features of these obtained results are the explicitness and the simplicity in their application. Moreover, they allow us to avoid the search of a common Lyapunov function which is a difficult matter. Finally, as validation to stabilize a shunt DC motor under variable mechanical loads is performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed results. PMID:25701192

  12. Immunogenicity of recombinant class 1 protein from Neisseria meningitidis refolded into phospholipid vesicles and detergent.

    PubMed

    Niebla, O; Alvarez, A; Martín, A; Rodríguez, A; Delgado, M; Falcón, V; Guillén, G

    2001-05-14

    The possibility of eliciting bactericidal antibodies against a recombinant class 1 protein (P1) from Neisseria meningitidis, joined to the first 45 amino acids of the neisserial LpdA protein (PM82), was examined. P1 was produced in Escherichia coli as intracellular inclusion bodies, from which it was purified and reconstituted by (a) inclusion into phospholipid vesicles and detergent and (b) refolding in 0.1% SDS. When Balb/c mice were immunised, high titres of subtype-specific bactericidal antibodies against P1 were obtained in both cases. These results suggest that in spite of being a denaturing agent, it is possible to use SDS to reconstitute the P1 protein in a conformation that exposes the immunodominat regions. PMID:11348724

  13. Saccharomyces forkhead protein Fkh1 regulates donor preference during mating-type switching through the recombination enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kaiming; Coïc, Eric; Zhou, Zhiqi; Durrens, Pascal; Haber, James E.

    2002-01-01

    Saccharomyces mating-type switching results from replacement by gene conversion of the MAT locus with sequences copied from one of two unexpressed donor loci, HML or HMR. MATa cells recombine with HMLα ∼90% of the time, whereas MATα cells choose HMRa 80%–90% of the time. HML preference in MATa is controlled by the cis-acting recombination enhancer (RE) that regulates recombination along the entire left arm of chromosome III. Comparison of RE sequences between S. cerevisiae, S. carlsbergensis, and S. bayanus defines four highly conserved regions (A, B, C, and D) within a 270-bp minimum RE. An adjacent E region enhances RE activity. Multimers of region A, D, or E are sufficient to promote selective use of HML. Regions A, D, and E each bind in vivo the transcription activator forkhead proteins Fkh1p and Fkh2p and their associated Ndd1p, although there are no adjacent open reading frames (ORFs). Deletion of FKH1 significantly reduces MATa's use of HML, as does mutation of the Fkh1/Fkh2-binding sites in a multimer of region A. We conclude that Fkh1p regulates MATa donor preference through direct interaction with RE. PMID:12183363

  14. Saccharomyces forkhead protein Fkh1 regulates donor preference during mating-type switching through the recombination enhancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kaiming; Coïc, Eric; Zhou, Zhiqi; Durrens, Pascal; Haber, James E

    2002-08-15

    Saccharomyces mating-type switching results from replacement by gene conversion of the MAT locus with sequences copied from one of two unexpressed donor loci, HML or HMR. MATa cells recombine with HMLalpha approximately 90% of the time, whereas MATalpha cells choose HMRa 80%-90% of the time. HML preference in MATa is controlled by the cis-acting recombination enhancer (RE) that regulates recombination along the entire left arm of chromosome III. Comparison of RE sequences between S. cerevisiae, S. carlsbergensis, and S. bayanus defines four highly conserved regions (A, B, C, and D) within a 270-bp minimum RE. An adjacent E region enhances RE activity. Multimers of region A, D, or E are sufficient to promote selective use of HML. Regions A, D, and E each bind in vivo the transcription activator forkhead proteins Fkh1p and Fkh2p and their associated Ndd1p, although there are no adjacent open reading frames (ORFs). Deletion of FKH1 significantly reduces MATa's use of HML, as does mutation of the Fkh1/Fkh2-binding sites in a multimer of region A. We conclude that Fkh1p regulates MATa donor preference through direct interaction with RE. PMID:12183363

  15. Genomic Investigation Reveals Highly Conserved, Mosaic, Recombination Events Associated with Capsular Switching among Invasive Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup W Sequence Type (ST)-11 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Mustapha, Mustapha M.; Marsh, Jane W.; Krauland, Mary G.; Fernandez, Jorge O.; de Lemos, Ana Paula S.; Hotopp, Julie C. Dunning; Wang, Xin; Mayer, Leonard W.; Lawrence, Jeffrey G.; Hiller, N. Luisa; Harrison, Lee H.

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is an important cause of meningococcal disease globally. Sequence type (ST)-11 clonal complex (cc11) is a hypervirulent meningococcal lineage historically associated with serogroup C capsule and is believed to have acquired the W capsule through a C to W capsular switching event. We studied the sequence of capsule gene cluster (cps) and adjoining genomic regions of 524 invasive W cc11 strains isolated globally. We identified recombination breakpoints corresponding to two distinct recombination events within W cc11: A 8.4-kb recombinant region likely acquired from W cc22 including the sialic acid/glycosyl-transferase gene, csw resulted in a C→W change in capsular phenotype and a 13.7-kb recombinant segment likely acquired from Y cc23 lineage includes 4.5 kb of cps genes and 8.2 kb downstream of the cps cluster resulting in allelic changes in capsule translocation genes. A vast majority of W cc11 strains (497/524, 94.8%) retain both recombination events as evidenced by sharing identical or very closely related capsular allelic profiles. These data suggest that the W cc11 capsular switch involved two separate recombination events and that current global W cc11 meningococcal disease is caused by strains bearing this mosaic capsular switch. PMID:27289093

  16. Identification properties of a recombinant class I hydrophobin rHGFI.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenfeng; Gong, Yanbo; Xu, Haijin; Qiao, Mingqiang; Niu, Baolong

    2015-01-01

    Hydrophobins fulfill various functions in fungal growth and morphology. These proteins can self-assemble at hydrophilic/hydrophobic interfaces and form amphipathic membranes. Based on their physical properties and hydropathy patterns, hydrophobins are divided into two classes (I and II). In order to identify the recombinant class I hydrophobin rHGFI, the different properties between rHGFI and the typical class II hydrophobin rHFBI were investigated. In contrast to rHGFI, no rodlet structure was observed on rHFBI coated mica surface, and the membranes formed on siliconized glass surfaces by rHFBI were not robust enough to resist treatment with 60% ethanol and 2% hot SDS. In contrast, the membranes formed by rHGFI on siliconized glass surfaces were so strong that could resist hot detergent and alcohol solution washing. Moreover, self-assembly of rHFBI at the water-air interface was not accompanied by a change in secondary structure. Meanwhile, β-sheet structures dramatically increased after rHGFI self-assembled at water-air interface, which could cause the fluorescence intensity of Thioflavin T increased and Congo Red and CD absorption spectra shift. Water-insoluble erythrosin B dispersion prepared with rHGFI and rHFBI were both stable for more than one month, which indicated that the interaction between erythrosin B and rHGFI/rHFBI was strong. This might promote rHGFI and rHFBI to be considered as potential dispersing agents to stabilize water-insoluble erythrosin B. PMID:25241920

  17. Expression, purification and characterization of recombinant Jerdonitin, a P-II class snake venom metalloproteinase comprising metalloproteinase and disintegrin domains.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lili; Yuan, Cai; Chen, Zhuo; Wang, Wanyu; Huang, Mingdong

    2010-01-01

    Jerdonitin is a P-II class snake venom metalloproteinase comprising metalloproteinase and disintegrin domains. In this study, we established a high-level expression system in Pichia pastoris and developed a purification strategy for the recombinant Jerdonitin. This recombinant Jerdonitin degraded fibrinogen at a level of activity comparable with its wild type. The effects of recombinant Jerdonitin on inhibiting ADP-induced human platelet aggregation were in a dose-dependent manner with an IC(50) of 248nM. In addition, we reported here that Jerdonitin can significantly inhibit the growth of several cell lines, including human liver cancer cells (Bel7402), human leukemia cells (K562) and human gastric carcinoma cells (BGC823). This study offers recombinant Jerdonitin that will be valuable for further functional and structural studies of Jerdonitin. PMID:19732785

  18. IL-4-induced transcription factor NFIL3/E4BP4 controls IgE class switching.

    PubMed

    Kashiwada, Masaki; Levy, Deborah M; McKeag, Lisa; Murray, Keri; Schröder, Andreas J; Canfield, Stephen M; Traver, Geri; Rothman, Paul B

    2010-01-12

    IL-4 signaling promotes IgE class switching through STAT6 activation and the induction of Ig germ-line epsilon (GLepsilon) transcription. Previously, we and others identified a transcription factor, Nfil3, as a gene induced by IL-4 stimulation in B cells. However, the precise roles of nuclear factor, IL-3-regulated (NFIL3) in IL-4 signaling are unknown. Here, we report that NFIL3 is important for IgE class switching. NFIL3-deficient mice show impaired IgE class switching, and this defect is B-cell intrinsic. The induction of GLepsilon transcripts after LPS and IL-4 stimulation is significantly reduced in NFIL3-deficient B cells. Expression of NFIL3 in NFIL3-deficient B cells restores the impairment of IgE production, and overexpression of NFIL3 in the presence of cycloheximide induces GLepsilon transcripts. Moreover, NFIL3 binds to Iepsilon promoter in vivo. Together, these results identify NFIL3 as a key regulator of IL-4-induced GLepsilon transcription in response to IL-4 and subsequent IgE class switching. PMID:20080759

  19. A Recombinationally Repressed Region between Mat2 and Mat3 Loci Shares Homology to Centromeric Repeats and Regulates Directionality of Mating-Type Switching in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, SIS.; Klar, AJS.

    1997-01-01

    Cells of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe switch mating type by replacing genetic information at the transcriptionally active mat1 locus with sequences copied from one of two closely linked silent loci, mat2-P or mat3-M. By a process referred to as directionality of switching, cells predominantly switch to the opposite mat1 allele; the mat1-P allele preferentially recombines with mat3, while mat1-M selects the mat2. In contrast to efficient recombination at mat1, recombination within the adjoining mat2-mat3 interval is undetectable. We defined the role of sequences between mat2 and mat3, designated the K-region, in directionality as well as recombinational suppression. Cloning and sequencing analysis revealed that a part of the K-region is homologous to repeat sequences present at centromeres, which also display transcriptional and recombinational suppression. Replacement of 7.5 kb of the K-region with the ura4(+) gene affected directionality in a variegated manner. Analysis of the swi6-mod locus, which was previously shown to affect directionality, in KΔ::ura4(+) strains suggested the existence of at least two overlapping directionality mechanisms. Our work furthers the model that directionality is regulated by cell-type-specific organization of the heterochromatin-like structure in the mating-type region and provides evidence that the K-region contributes to silencing of the mat2-mat3 interval. PMID:9258669

  20. Restoration of Retarded Influenza Virus-specific Immunoglobulin Class Switch in Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongxin; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Monica; Liu, Lin; Mbawuike, Innocent N

    2016-01-01

    Objective The declined immune response to infection causes significant higher morbidity and mortality in aging in spite of the coexisted hyperimmunoglobulinemia (HIG). This study is to reveal the cellular basis of HIG and mechanism of weakened HA-specific IgG response in aged mice and to test cell therapy in the treatment of age-related IgG antibody production deficiency with immunocyte adoptive transfer. Methods BALB/c mice was immunized with Influenza A/Taiwan vaccine and challenged with the same strain of virus. ELISA was used to assess the levels of total immunoglobulins and antigen specific antibody response. The flow cytometry and ELISPOT were used to evaluate the frequencies of total immunoglobulin- and specific antibody-producing and secreting B lymphocytes. In vitro expanded mononuclear cells, CD4+ T lymphocytes and CD20+ B lymphocytes from old and young mice were adoptively transferred into influenza virus-challenged aged mice, and HA-specific IgG responses were observed. Results It is found that old mice exhibited higher levels of total serum IgG, IgM and IgA, higher frequencies of IgG+, IgM+ and IgA+ cells, and greater antigen-specific IgM and IgA responses to influenza infection, in comparison to young mice. However, influenza antigen- specific IgG and its subclass responses in old mice were significantly lower. Conclusion The retarded specific IgG response could be attributed to an insufficiency of immunoglobulin class switch in aging. Correlation analysis indicated that HIG and deficient specific IgG production in aged mice could be independent to each other in their pathogenesis. Correction of deficient specific IgG production by adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded and unexpanded CD4+ cells from immunized young mice suggests the CD4+ cell dysfunction contributes to the insufficiency of immunoglobulin class switch in aged mice. The transfusion of in vitro expanded lymphocytes could be a potential effective therapy for the age

  1. Diversity of metalloproteinases in Bothrops neuwiedi snake venom transcripts: evidences for recombination between different classes of SVMPs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) are widely distributed in snake venoms and are versatile toxins, targeting many important elements involved in hemostasis, such as basement membrane proteins, clotting proteins, platelets, endothelial and inflammatory cells. The functional diversity of SVMPs is in part due to the structural organization of different combinations of catalytic, disintegrin, disintegrin-like and cysteine-rich domains, which categorizes SVMPs in 3 classes of precursor molecules (PI, PII and PIII) further divided in 11 subclasses, 6 of them belonging to PII group. This heterogeneity is currently correlated to genetic accelerated evolution and post-translational modifications. Results Thirty-one SVMP cDNAs were full length cloned from a single specimen of Bothrops neuwiedi snake, sequenced and grouped in eleven distinct sequences and further analyzed by cladistic analysis. Class P-I and class P-III sequences presented the expected tree topology for fibrinolytic and hemorrhagic SVMPs, respectively. In opposition, three distinct segregations were observed for class P-II sequences. P-IIb showed the typical segregation of class P-II SVMPs. However, P-IIa grouped with class P-I cDNAs presenting a 100% identity in the 365 bp at their 5' ends, suggesting post-transcription events for interclass recombination. In addition, catalytic domain of P-IIx sequences segregated with non-hemorrhagic class P-III SVMPs while their disintegrin domain grouped with other class P-II disintegrin domains suggesting independent evolution of catalytic and disintegrin domains. Complementary regions within cDNA sequences were noted and may participate in recombination either at DNA or RNA levels. Proteins predicted by these cDNAs show the main features of the correspondent classes of SVMP, but P-IIb and P-IIx included two additional cysteines cysteines at the C-termini of the disintegrin domains in positions not yet described. Conclusions In B. neuwiedi venom gland

  2. A DFT study of a new class of gold nanocluster-photochrome multi-functional switches.

    PubMed

    Fihey, Arnaud; Maurel, François; Perrier, Aurélie

    2014-12-21

    With the help of a computational scheme combining molecular dynamics, DFT and TD-DFT methods, the conformational, electronic and optical properties of a new class of hybrid compounds where a photochromic molecule belonging to the dithienylethene family (DTE) is covalently linked to a Au25 nanocluster (gold nanocluster or GNC) are investigated. We compare two types of hybrid GNC-DTE systems where the aromatic linker between the metallic and the DTE moieties is either a phenyl or a thiophene ring. By examining the perturbation of the DTE electronic structure after grafting upon the GNC, we show that the hybrid system with a phenyl linker should preserve its photochromic activity. For the latter system, we have then studied the possible energy and electron transfer between the GNC and the DTE units. The energy transfer between the two moieties can be a priori discarded while a uni-directional electron transfer should take place from the GNC to the excited DTE. We show that this transfer can be controlled by switching the state of the molecule. PMID:25363237

  3. An approach to mapping haplotype-specific recombination sites in human MHC class III

    SciTech Connect

    Levo, A.; Westman, P.; Partanen, J.

    1996-12-31

    Studies of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in mouse indicate that the recombination sites are not randomly distributed and their occurrence is haplotype-dependent. No data concerning haplotype-specific recombination sites in human are available due to the low number of informative families. To investigate haplotype-specific recombination sites in human MHC, we describe an approach based on identification of recombinant haplotypes derived from one conserved haplotype at the population level. The recombination sites were mapped by comparing polymorphic markers between the recombinant and assumed original haplotypes. We tested this approach on the extended haplotype HLA A3; B47; Bf{sup *}F; C4A{sup *}1; C4B{sup *}Q0; DR7, which is most suitable for this analysis. First, it carries a number of rare markers, and second, the haplotype, albeit rare in the general population, is frequent in patients with 21-hydroxylase (21OH) defect. We observed recombinants derived from this haplotype in patients with 21OH defect. All these haplotypes had the centromeric part (from Bf to DR) identical to the original haplotype, but they differed in HLA A and B. We therefore assumed that they underwent recombinations in the segment that separates the Bf and HLA B genes. Polymorphic markers indicated that all break points mapped to two segments near the TNF locus. This approach makes possible the mapping of preferential recombination sites in different haplotypes. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Substrate stiffness regulates B-cell activation, proliferation, class switch, and T-cell-independent antibody responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yingyue; Yi, Junyang; Wan, Zhengpeng; Liu, Kai; Song, Ping; Chau, Alicia; Wang, Fei; Chang, Zai; Han, Weidong; Zheng, Wenjie; Chen, Ying-Hua; Xiong, Chunyang; Liu, Wanli

    2015-06-01

    B cells use B-cell receptors (BCRs) to sense antigens that are usually presented on substrates with different stiffness. However, it is not known how substrate stiffness affects B-cell proliferation, class switch, and in vivo antibody responses. We addressed these questions using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates with different stiffness (20 or 1100 kPa). Live cell imaging experiments suggested that antigens on stiffer substrates more efficiently trigger the synaptic accumulation of BCR and phospho-Syk molecules compared with antigens on softer substrates. In vitro expansion of mouse primary B cells shows different preferences for substrate stiffness when stimulated by different expansion stimuli. LPS equally drives B-cell proliferation on stiffer or softer substrates. Anti-CD40 antibodies enhance B-cell proliferation on stiffer substrates, while antigens enhance B-cell proliferation on softer substrates through a mechanism involving the enhanced phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt, and FoxO1. In vitro class switch differentiation of B cells prefers softer substrates. Lastly, NP67-Ficoll on softer substrates accounted for an enhanced antibody response in vivo. Thus, substrate stiffness regulates B-cell activation, proliferation, class switch, and T cell independent antibody responses in vivo, suggesting its broad application in manipulating the fate of B cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25756957

  5. Classes in Translating and Interpreting Produce Differential Gains in Switching and Updating

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yanping; Liu, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    The present longitudinal study was intended to investigate whether the two bilingual experiences of written translation and consecutive interpreting (featured with similar language switching experience but different processing demands) would produce different cognitive control effects in young adults. Three groups of Chinese–English young adult bilinguals, who differed mainly in their half-year long bilingual experience: one for general L2 training, one for written translation and one for oral consecutive interpreting, were tested twice on the number Stroop, switching color-shape and N-back tasks. The results show that the interpreting experience produced significant cognitive advantages in switching (switch cost) and updating, while the translating experience produced marginally significant improvements in updating. The findings indicate that the experience of language switching under higher processing demands brings more domain-general advantages, suggesting that processing demand may be a decisive factor for the presence or absence of the hot-debated bilingual advantages. PMID:27625620

  6. Classes in Translating and Interpreting Produce Differential Gains in Switching and Updating.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yanping; Liu, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    The present longitudinal study was intended to investigate whether the two bilingual experiences of written translation and consecutive interpreting (featured with similar language switching experience but different processing demands) would produce different cognitive control effects in young adults. Three groups of Chinese-English young adult bilinguals, who differed mainly in their half-year long bilingual experience: one for general L2 training, one for written translation and one for oral consecutive interpreting, were tested twice on the number Stroop, switching color-shape and N-back tasks. The results show that the interpreting experience produced significant cognitive advantages in switching (switch cost) and updating, while the translating experience produced marginally significant improvements in updating. The findings indicate that the experience of language switching under higher processing demands brings more domain-general advantages, suggesting that processing demand may be a decisive factor for the presence or absence of the hot-debated bilingual advantages. PMID:27625620

  7. Laser triggering of water switches in terrawatt-class pulse power accelerators.

    SciTech Connect

    Woodworth, Joseph Ray; Johnson, David Lee (Titan Pulse Sciences, San Leandro, CA); Wilkins, Frank (Bechtel Nevada, Las Vegas, NV); Van De Valde, David (EG&G Technical Services, Albuquerque, NM); Sarkisov, Gennady Sergeevich; Zameroski, Nathan D.; Starbird, Robert L.

    2005-12-01

    Focused Beams from high-power lasers have been used to command trigger gas switches in pulse power accelerators for more than two decades. This Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project was aimed at determining whether high power lasers could also command trigger water switches on high-power accelerators. In initial work, we determined that focused light from three harmonics of a small pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm, 532 nm, and 355 nm could be used to form breakdown arcs in water, with the lowest breakdown thresholds of 110 J/cm{sup 2} or 14 GW/cm{sup 2} at 532 nm in the green. In laboratory-scale laser triggering experiments with a 170-kV pulse-charged water switch with a 3-mm anode-cathode gap, we demonstrated that {approx}90 mJ of green laser energy could trigger the gap with a 1-{sigma} jitter of less than 2ns, a factor of 10 improvement over the jitter of the switch in its self breaking mode. In the laboratory-scale experiments we developed optical techniques utilizing polarization rotation of a probe laser beam to measure current in switch channels and electric field enhancements near streamer heads. In the final year of the project, we constructed a pulse-power facility to allow us to test laser triggering of water switches from 0.6- MV to 2.0 MV. Triggering experiments on this facility using an axicon lens for focusing the laser and a switch with a 740 kV self-break voltage produced consistent laser triggering with a {+-} 16-ns 1-{sigma} jitter, a significant improvement over the {+-} 24-ns jitter in the self-breaking mode.

  8. Global tracking for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems with unknown sign-switching control direction by output feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux Oliveira, Tiago; Jacoud Peixoto, Alessandro; Hsu, Liu

    2015-09-01

    This paper addresses the design of a sliding mode controller for a class of high-order uncertain nonlinear plants with unmatched state-dependent nonlinearities and unknown sign of the high frequency gain, i.e., the control direction is assumed unknown. Differently from most previous studies, the control direction is allowed to switch its sign. We show that it is possible to obtain global exact tracking using only output-feedback by coupling a relay periodic switching function with a norm state observer. One significant advantage of the new scheme is its robustness and improved transient response under arbitrary changes of the control direction which have been theoretically demonstrated for jump variations and successfully tested by simulations. The proposed controller is also evaluated with a DC motor control experiment.

  9. NF-κB p50-Dependent In Vivo Footprints at Ig Sγ3 DNA Are Correlated with μ→γ3 Switch Recombination1

    PubMed Central

    Wuerffel, Robert A.; Ma, Limei; Kenter, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    NF-g=kB has been demonstrated to play critical roles in multiple aspects of immune responses including Ig H chain isotype switching. To better define the specific roles the p50 subunit of NF-κB plays in μ→γ3 switch recombination (SR), we systematically evaluated p50-deficient B cells for activities that are strongly correlated with SR. B cell activation with LPS plus anti-IgD-dextran plus IL-5 plus IL-4 plus TGF-β produced normal levels of proliferation and γ3 germline transcripts in p50-deficient B cells, but μ→γ3 SR was impaired. In vitro binding studies previously showed that NF-kB p50 homodimer binds the switch nuclear B-site protein (SNIP) of the Sγ3 tandem repeat. Ligation-mediated PCR in vivo footprint analysis demonstrates that the region spanning the SNIP and switch nuclear A-site protein (SNAP) binding sites of the Sγ3 region are contacted by protein in normal resting splenic B cells. B cells that are homozygous for the targeted disruption of the gene encoding p50 (–/–) show strong aberrant footprints, whereas heterozygous cells (+/–) reveal a partial effect in Sγ3 DNA. These studies provide evidence of nucleoprotein interactions at switch DNA in vivo and suggest a direct interaction of p50 with Sγ3 DNA that is strongly correlated with SR competence. PMID:11254712

  10. The Ets-1 transcription factor is required for Stat1-mediated T-bet expression and IgG2a class switching in mouse B cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hai Vu; Mouly, Enguerran; Chemin, Karine; Luinaud, Romain; Despres, Raymonde; Fermand, Jean-Paul; Arnulf, Bertrand; Bories, Jean-Christophe

    2012-05-01

    In response to antigens and cytokines, mouse B cells undergo class-switch recombination (CSR) and differentiate into Ig-secreting cells. T-bet, a T-box transcription factor that is up-regulated in lymphocytes by IFN-γ or IL-27, was shown to regulate CSR to IgG2a after T cell-independent B-cell stimulations. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling this process remain unclear. In the present study, we show that inactivation of the Ets-1 transcription factor results in a severe decrease in IgG2a secretion in vivo and in vitro. No T-bet expression was observed in Ets-1-deficient (Ets-1(-/-)) B cells stimulated with IFN-γ and lipopolysaccharide, and forced expression of T-bet in these cells rescued IgG2a secretion. Furthermore, we identified a transcriptional enhancer in the T-bet locus with an activity in B cells that relies on ETS-binding sites. After IFN-γ stimulation of Ets-1(-/-) B cells, activated Stat1, which forms a complex with Ets-1 in wild-type cells, no longer binds to the T-bet enhancer or promotes histone modifications at this site. These results demonstrate that Ets-1 is critical for IgG2a CSR and acts as an essential cofactor for Stat1 in the regulation of T-bet expression in B cells. PMID:22438254

  11. A PTIP-PA1 subcomplex promotes transcription for IgH class switching independently from the associated MLL3/MLL4 methyltransferase complex.

    PubMed

    Starnes, Linda M; Su, Dan; Pikkupeura, Laura M; Weinert, Brian T; Santos, Margarida A; Mund, Andreas; Soria, Rebeca; Cho, Young-Wook; Pozdnyakova, Irina; Kubec Højfeldt, Martina; Vala, Andrea; Yang, Wenjing; López-Méndez, Blanca; Lee, Ji-Eun; Peng, Weiqun; Yuan, Joan; Ge, Kai; Montoya, Guillermo; Nussenzweig, André; Choudhary, Chunaram; Daniel, Jeremy A

    2016-01-15

    Class switch recombination (CSR) diversifies antibodies for productive immune responses while maintaining stability of the B-cell genome. Transcription at the immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) locus targets CSR-associated DNA damage and is promoted by the BRCT domain-containing PTIP (Pax transactivation domain-interacting protein). Although PTIP is a unique component of the mixed-lineage leukemia 3 (MLL3)/MLL4 chromatin-modifying complex, the mechanisms for how PTIP promotes transcription remain unclear. Here we dissected the minimal structural requirements of PTIP and its different protein complexes using quantitative proteomics in primary lymphocytes. We found that PTIP functions in transcription and CSR separately from its association with the MLL3/MLL4 complex and from its localization to sites of DNA damage. We identified a tandem BRCT domain of PTIP that is sufficient for CSR and identified PA1 as its main functional protein partner. Collectively, we provide genetic and biochemical evidence that a PTIP-PA1 subcomplex functions independently from the MLL3/MLL4 complex to mediate transcription during CSR. These results further our understanding of how multifunctional chromatin-modifying complexes are organized by subcomplexes that harbor unique and distinct activities. PMID:26744420

  12. A PTIP–PA1 subcomplex promotes transcription for IgH class switching independently from the associated MLL3/MLL4 methyltransferase complex

    PubMed Central

    Starnes, Linda M.; Su, Dan; Pikkupeura, Laura M.; Weinert, Brian T.; Santos, Margarida A.; Mund, Andreas; Soria, Rebeca; Cho, Young-Wook; Pozdnyakova, Irina; Kubec Højfeldt, Martina; Vala, Andrea; Yang, Wenjing; López-Méndez, Blanca; Lee, Ji-Eun; Peng, Weiqun; Yuan, Joan; Ge, Kai; Montoya, Guillermo; Nussenzweig, André; Choudhary, Chunaram; Daniel, Jeremy A.

    2016-01-01

    Class switch recombination (CSR) diversifies antibodies for productive immune responses while maintaining stability of the B-cell genome. Transcription at the immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) locus targets CSR-associated DNA damage and is promoted by the BRCT domain-containing PTIP (Pax transactivation domain-interacting protein). Although PTIP is a unique component of the mixed-lineage leukemia 3 (MLL3)/MLL4 chromatin-modifying complex, the mechanisms for how PTIP promotes transcription remain unclear. Here we dissected the minimal structural requirements of PTIP and its different protein complexes using quantitative proteomics in primary lymphocytes. We found that PTIP functions in transcription and CSR separately from its association with the MLL3/MLL4 complex and from its localization to sites of DNA damage. We identified a tandem BRCT domain of PTIP that is sufficient for CSR and identified PA1 as its main functional protein partner. Collectively, we provide genetic and biochemical evidence that a PTIP–PA1 subcomplex functions independently from the MLL3/MLL4 complex to mediate transcription during CSR. These results further our understanding of how multifunctional chromatin-modifying complexes are organized by subcomplexes that harbor unique and distinct activities. PMID:26744420

  13. Addressing the Problem of Switched Class Labels in Latent Variable Mixture Model Simulation Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tueller, Stephen J.; Drotar, Scott; Lubke, Gitta H.

    2011-01-01

    The discrimination between alternative models and the detection of latent classes in the context of latent variable mixture modeling depends on sample size, class separation, and other aspects that are related to power. Prior to a mixture analysis it is useful to investigate model performance in a simulation study that reflects the research…

  14. B cell Rab7 mediates induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression and class-switching in T-dependent and T-independent antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Pone, Egest J; Lam, Tonika; Lou, Zheng; Wang, Rui; Chen, Yuhui; Liu, Dongfang; Edinger, Aimee L; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Class switch DNA recombination (CSR) is central to the maturation of the Ab response because it diversifies Ab effector functions. Like somatic hypermutation, CSR requires activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), whose expression is restricted to B cells, as induced by CD40 engagement or dual TLR-BCR engagement (primary CSR-inducing stimuli). By constructing conditional knockout Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) mice, we identified a B cell-intrinsic role for Rab7, a small GTPase involved in intracellular membrane functions, in mediating AID induction and CSR. Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) mice displayed normal B and T cell development and were deficient in Rab7 only in B cells undergoing Igh(C)γ(1-cre) Iγ1-Sγ1-Cγ1-cre transcription, as induced--like Igh germline Iγ1-Sγ1-Cγ1 and Iε-Sε-Cε transcription--by IL-4 in conjunction with a primary CSR-inducing stimulus. These mice could not mount T-independent or T-dependent class-switched IgG1 or IgE responses while maintaining normal IgM levels. Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) B cells showed, in vivo and in vitro, normal proliferation and survival, normal Blimp-1 expression and plasma cell differentiation, as well as intact activation of the noncanonical NF-κB, p38 kinase, and ERK1/2 kinase pathways. They, however, were defective in AID expression and CSR in vivo and in vitro, as induced by CD40 engagement or dual TLR1/2-, TLR4-, TLR7-, or TLR9-BCR engagement. In Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) B cells, CSR was rescued by enforced AID expression. These findings, together with our demonstration that Rab7-mediated canonical NF-κB activation, as critical to AID induction, outline a novel role of Rab7 in signaling pathways that lead to AID expression and CSR, likely by promoting assembly of signaling complexes along intracellular membranes. PMID:25740947

  15. MHC Class IIB Exon 2 Polymorphism in the Grey Partridge (Perdix perdix) Is Shaped by Selection, Recombination and Gene Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Bryjová, Anna; Albrecht, Tomáš; Bryja, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Among bird species, the most studied major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is the chicken MHC. Although the number of studies on MHC in free-ranging species is increasing, the knowledge on MHC variation in species closely related to chicken is required to understand the peculiarities of bird MHC evolution. Here we describe the variation of MHC class IIB (MHCIIB) exon 2 in a population of the Grey partridge (Perdix perdix), a species of high conservation concern throughout Europe and an emerging galliform model in studies of sexual selection. We found 12 alleles in 108 individuals, but in comparison to other birds surprisingly many sites show signatures of historical positive selection. Individuals displayed between two to four alleles both on genomic and complementary DNA, suggesting the presence of two functional MHCIIB loci. Recombination and gene conversion appear to be involved in generating MHCIIB diversity in the Grey partridge; two recombination breakpoints and several gene conversion events were detected. In phylogenetic analysis of galliform MHCIIB, the Grey partridge alleles do not cluster together, but are scattered through the tree instead. Thus, our results indicate that the Grey partridge MHCIIB is comparable to most other galliforms in terms of copy number and population polymorphism. PMID:23935938

  16. Oxazines: A New Class of Second-Order Nonlinear Optical Switches.

    PubMed

    Beaujean, Pierre; Bondu, Flavie; Plaquet, Aurélie; Garcia-Amorós, Jaume; Cusido, Janet; Raymo, Françisco M; Castet, Frédéric; Rodriguez, Vincent; Champagne, Benoît

    2016-04-20

    A combined experimental-theoretical investigation has revealed that oxazine-based compounds are multiaddressable, multistate, and multifunctional molecular switches exhibiting contrasts of both linear and second-order nonlinear optical properties. The switching properties are particularly large when the substituent is a donor group. In this study, the cleavage of the C-O bond at the junction of the indole and oxazine cycles (of the closed a forms) is acido-triggered, leading to an open form (b(+)) characterized by larger first hyperpolarizabilities (βHRS) and smaller excitation energies than in the closed form. These results are confirmed and interpreted utilizing ab initio calculations that have been carried out on a broad set of compounds to unravel the role of the substituent. With respect to acceptor groups, oxazines bearing donor groups are characterized not only by larger βHRS and βHRS contrast ratios but also by smaller excitation energies, larger opening-induced charge transfer, and reduction of the bond length alternation, as well as smaller Gibbs energies of the opening reaction. Compared to protonated open forms (b(+)), calculations on the zwitterionic open forms (b) have pointed out similarities in the long-wavelength UV/vis absorption spectra, whereas their βHRS values might differ strongly as a function of the substituent. Indeed, the open forms present two NLOphores, the indoleninium-substituent entity and the nitrophenol (present in the protonated open form, b(+)) or nitrophenolate (present in the zwitterionic open form, b) moiety. Then, nitrophenolate displays a larger first hyperpolarizability than nitrophenol and the β tensor of the two entities might reinforce or cancel each other. PMID:26996994

  17. Hierarchical multiobjective routing model in Multiprotocol Label Switching networks with two service classes - a Pareto archive strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girão-Silva, Rita; Craveirinha, José; Clímaco, João

    2012-05-01

    The article begins by reviewing a two-level hierarchical multicriteria routing model for Multiprotocol Label Switching networks with two service classes (QoS, i.e. with Quality of Service requirements, and Best Effort services) and alternative routing, as well as the foundations of a heuristic resolution approach, previously proposed by the authors. Afterwards a new variant of this heuristic approach, which includes a Pareto archive strategy, is described. In this archive, non-dominated solutions obtained throughout the heuristic are kept. At the end of the main procedure of the heuristic, these solutions are evaluated and a final solution for the routing problem is chosen using a reference point-based approach. The application of this procedure to two test networks will show, with analytic and discrete-event simulation models, that, in certain initial conditions, this approach provides improvements in the final results concerning the top-level objective functions, especially in more 'difficult' situations detected through sensitivity analysis.

  18. A recombinant, soluble, single-chain class I major histocompatibility complex molecule with biological activity.

    PubMed Central

    Mage, M G; Lee, L; Ribaudo, R K; Corr, M; Kozlowski, S; McHugh, L; Margulies, D H

    1992-01-01

    Heterodimeric class I major histocompatibility complex molecules, which consist of a 45-kDa heavy-chain and a 12-kDa beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) light chain, bind endogenously synthesized peptides for presentation to antigen-specific T cells. We have synthesized a gene encoding a single-chain, soluble class I molecule derived from mouse H-2Dd, in which the carboxyl terminus of beta 2m is linked via a peptide spacer to the amino terminus of the heavy chain. The chimeric protein is secreted efficiently from transfected L cells, is thermostable, and when loaded with an appropriate antigenic peptide, stimulates an H-2Dd-restricted antigen-specific T-cell hybridoma. Thus, functional binding of peptide does not require the complete dissociation of beta 2m, implying that a heavy chain/peptide complex is not an obligate intermediate in the assembly of the heavy-chain/beta 2m/peptide heterotrimer. Single-chain major histocompatibility complex molecules uniformly loaded with peptide have potential uses for structural studies, toxin or fluor conjugates, and vaccines. Images PMID:1438262

  19. Specific features of switch-on processes in high-voltage (18 kV class) optically triggered 4H-SiC thyristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mnatsakanov, T. T.; Yurkov, S. N.; Levinshtein, M. E.; Cheng, L.; Palmour, J. W.

    2014-05-01

    A computer simulation has been carried out to analyze and explain the specific features of the switch-on process in super-high-voltage (18 kV class) optically triggered 4H-SiC thyristors. It is shown that the previously experimentally observed two-stage character of the switch-on processes can be understood in a one-dimensional approach. The two-stage turn-on of the 18 kV structures is accounted for by the rather slow current rise in the structure with a very wide (160 µm) blocking base. In full agreement with the experimental results, a simulation in the frame of the same approximations demonstrated that, in the 12 kV class thyristor structures with a blocking base thickness of 90 µm, the current increases monotonically during the switch-on process.

  20. The Molecular Switching Mechanism at the Conserved D(E)RY Motif in Class-A GPCRs.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Angelica; Eichler, Stefanie; Madathil, Sineej; Reeves, Philip J; Fahmy, Karim; Böckmann, Rainer A

    2016-07-12

    The disruption of ionic and H-bond interactions between the cytosolic ends of transmembrane helices TM3 and TM6 of class-A (rhodopsin-like) G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is a hallmark for their activation by chemical or physical stimuli. In the bovine photoreceptor rhodopsin, this is accompanied by proton uptake at Glu(134) in the class-conserved D(E)RY motif. Studies on TM3 model peptides proposed a crucial role of the lipid bilayer in linking protonation to stabilization of an active state-like conformation. However, the molecular details of this linkage could not be resolved and have been addressed in this study by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on TM3 model peptides in a bilayer of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). We show that protonation of the conserved glutamic acid alters the peptide insertion depth in the membrane, its side-chain rotamer preferences, and stabilizes the C-terminal helical structure. These factors contribute to the rise of the side-chain pKa (> 6) and to reduced polarity around the TM3 C terminus as confirmed by fluorescence spectroscopy. Helix stabilization requires the protonated carboxyl group; unexpectedly, this stabilization could not be evoked with an amide in MD simulations. Additionally, time-resolved Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy of TM3 model peptides revealed a different kinetics for lipid ester carbonyl hydration, suggesting that the carboxyl is linked to more extended H-bond clusters than an amide. Remarkably, this was seen as well in DOPC-reconstituted Glu(134)- and Gln(134)-containing bovine opsin mutants and demonstrates that the D(E)RY motif is a hydrated microdomain. The function of the D(E)RY motif as a proton switch is suggested to be based on the reorganization of the H-bond network at the membrane interface. PMID:27410736

  1. Distinct class of DNA-binding domains is exemplified by a master regulator of phenotypic switching in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Lohse, Matthew B.; Zordan, Rebecca E.; Cain, Christopher W.; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2010-01-01

    Among the most important classes of regulatory proteins are the sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins that control transcription through the occupancy of discrete DNA sequences within genomes. Currently, this class of proteins encompasses at least 37 distinct structural superfamilies and more than 100 distinct structural motifs. In this paper, we examine the transcriptional regulator Wor1, a master regulator of white-opaque switching in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. As assessed by a variety of algorithms, this protein has no sequence or structural similarity to any known DNA-binding protein. It is, however, conserved across the vast fungal lineage, with a 300aa region of sequence conservation. Here, we show that this 300aa region of Wor1 exhibits sequence-specific DNA binding and therefore represents a new superfamily of DNA-binding proteins. We identify the 14-nucleotide-pair DNA sequence recognized by Wor1, characterize the site through mutational analysis, and demonstrate that this sequence is sufficient for the Wor1-dependent activation of transcription in vivo. Within the 300aa DNA-binding conserved region, which we have termed the WOPR box, are two domains (WOPRa and WOPRb), dissimilar to each other but especially well-conserved across the fungal lineage. We show that the WOPR box binds DNA as a monomer and that neither domain, when expressed and purified separately, exhibits sequence-specific binding. DNA binding is restored, however, when the two isolated domains are added together. These results indicate that the WOPR family of DNA-binding proteins involves an unusual coupling between two dissimilar, covalently linked domains. PMID:20660774

  2. C-type lectin-like receptor LOX-1 promotes dendritic cell-mediated class-switched B cell responses.

    PubMed

    Joo, HyeMee; Li, Dapeng; Dullaers, Melissa; Kim, Tae-Whan; Duluc, Dorothee; Upchurch, Katherine; Xue, Yaming; Zurawski, Sandy; Le Grand, Roger; Liu, Yong-Jun; Kuroda, Marcelo; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon

    2014-10-16

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a pattern-recognition receptor for a variety of endogenous and exogenous ligands. However, LOX-1 function in the host immune response is not fully understood. Here, we report that LOX-1 expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells promotes humoral responses. On B cells LOX-1 signaling upregulated CCR7, promoting cellular migration toward lymphoid tissues. LOX-1 signaling on DCs licensed the cells to promote B cell differentiation into class-switched plasmablasts and led to downregulation of chemokine receptor CXCR5 and upregulation of chemokine receptor CCR10 on plasmablasts, enabling their exit from germinal centers and migration toward local mucosa and skin. Finally, we found that targeting influenza hemagglutinin 1 (HA1) subunit to LOX-1 elicited HA1-specific protective antibody responses in rhesus macaques. Thus, LOX-1 expressed on B cells and DC cells has complementary functions to promote humoral immune responses. PMID:25308333

  3. Immunoglobulin class-switched B cells provide an active immune axis between CNS and periphery in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shengzhi; Pitts, Steven J.; Sundar, Purnima D.; Telman, Dilduz; Zhao, Lora Z.; Derstine, Mia; Abounasr, Aya; Hauser, Stephen L.; von Büdingen, H.-Christian

    2014-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), an exchange of lymphocytes, in particular B cells, between the central nervous system (CNS) and periphery is believed to be required for the maintenance of active disease. Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies that prevent lymphocytes from crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB) or induce near-complete peripheral B cell depletion rapidly mitigate MS disease activity. Using next-generation sequencing technology, we recently found that clonally related B cells exist in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and peripheral blood (PB) of MS patients, establishing the existence of an immune axis across the BBB. However, it remains unclear which subpopulations of the highly diverse peripheral B cell compartment share antigen-specificity with intrathecal B cell repertoires, and whether their antigen stimulation occurs on both sides of the BBB. To address these questions, we combined flow cytometry sorting of PB B cell subsets with deep immune repertoire sequencing of CSF and PB B cells. Immunoglobulin (IgM and IgG) heavy chain variable (VH) region repertoires of five PB B cell subsets from MS patients (n=8) were compared with their CSF Ig-VH transcriptomes. In 6 of 8 patients, we identified peripheral CD27+IgD−memory B cells, CD27hiCD38hi plasma cells/plasmablasts, or CD27−IgD− B cells providing an immune connection to the CNS compartment. Pinpointing Ig class-switched B cells as key component of the immune axis thought to contribute to ongoing MS disease activity strengthens the rationale of current therapeutic strategies and may lead to more targeted approaches. PMID:25100740

  4. Cytokine switch and bystander suppression of autoimmune responses to multiple antigens in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by a single recombinant T-cell receptor ligand.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sushmita; Subramanian, Sandhya; Miller, Lisa; Proctor, Thomas M; Roberts, Chris; Burrows, Gregory G; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Offner, Halina

    2009-03-25

    Recombinant T-cell receptor ligands (RTLs) can reverse clinical and histological signs of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in an antigen-specific manner, and are currently in clinical trials for treatment of subjects with multiple sclerosis (MS). Antigen specificity of RTL raises the question as to whether this treatment would be successful in MS patients where target antigens are unknown. Using spinal cord homogenate or combinations of two different peptides to induce disease, we found that treatment with single RTL could reverse EAE as long as targeted T-cells were present. Therapy with three different RTLs each caused a significant reduction in IL-17 and increases in IL-10 and IL-13 in peptide-activated splenocytes, reduced proliferation of both cognate and bystander specificities of lymph node cells, and reduced inflammatory lesions and secreted IL-17 and IL-2 from peptide-activated spinal cord cells. These results show that treatment with single RTLs can induce a cytokine switch in cognate T-cells that inhibits both the target and bystander T-cells, providing new evidence for the potential applicability of RTL therapy in MS. PMID:19321778

  5. Cytokine Switch and Bystander Suppression of Autoimmune Responses to Multiple Antigens in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis by a Single Recombinant T-Cell Receptor Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Sushmita; Subramanian, Sandhya; Miller, Lisa; Proctor, Thomas M.; Roberts, Chris; Burrows, Gregory G.; Vandenbark, Arthur A.; Offner, Halina

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant T-cell receptor ligands (RTLs) can reverse clinical and histological signs of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in an antigen-specific manner, and are currently in clinical trials for treatment of subjects with multiple sclerosis (MS). Antigen specificity of RTL raises the question as to whether this treatment would be successful in MS patients where target antigens are unknown. Using spinal cord homogenate or combinations of two different peptides to induce disease,we found that treatment with single RTL could reverse EAE as long as targeted T-cells were present. Therapy with three different RTLs each caused a significant reduction in IL-17 and increases in IL-10 and IL-13 in peptide-activated splenocytes, reduced proliferation of both cognate and bystander specificities of lymph node cells, and reduced inflammatory lesions and secreted IL-17 and IL-2 from peptide-activated spinal cord cells. These results show that treatment with single RTLs can induce a cytokine switch in cognate T-cells that inhibits both the target and bystander T-cells, providing new evidence for the potential applicability of RTL therapy in MS. PMID:19321778

  6. The Carboxy-Terminal αN Helix of the Archaeal XerA Tyrosine Recombinase Is a Molecular Switch to Control Site-Specific Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Serre, Marie-Claude; El Arnaout, Toufic; Brooks, Mark A.; Durand, Dominique; Lisboa, Johnny; Lazar, Noureddine; Raynal, Bertrand; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Quevillon-Cheruel, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine recombinases are conserved in the three kingdoms of life. Here we present the first crystal structure of a full-length archaeal tyrosine recombinase, XerA from Pyrococcus abyssi, at 3.0 Å resolution. In the absence of DNA substrate XerA crystallizes as a dimer where each monomer displays a tertiary structure similar to that of DNA-bound Tyr-recombinases. Active sites are assembled in the absence of dif except for the catalytic Tyr, which is extruded and located equidistant from each active site within the dimer. Using XerA active site mutants we demonstrate that XerA follows the classical cis-cleavage reaction, suggesting rearrangements of the C-terminal domain upon DNA binding. Surprisingly, XerA C-terminal αN helices dock in cis in a groove that, in bacterial tyrosine recombinases, accommodates in trans αN helices of neighbour monomers in the Holliday junction intermediates. Deletion of the XerA C-terminal αN helix does not impair cleavage of suicide substrates but prevents recombination catalysis. We propose that the enzymatic cycle of XerA involves the switch of the αN helix from cis to trans packing, leading to (i) repositioning of the catalytic Tyr in the active site in cis and (ii) dimer stabilisation via αN contacts in trans between monomers. PMID:23667562

  7. Spectrum Recombination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Describes several methods of executing lecture demonstrations involving the recombination of the spectrum. Groups the techniques into two general classes: bringing selected portions of the spectrum together using lenses or mirrors and blurring the colors by rapid movement or foreshortening. (JM)

  8. The Arabidopsis MutS homolog AtMSH4 functions at an early step in recombination: evidence for two classes of recombination in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, James D.; Armstrong, Susan J.; Franklin, F. Christopher H.; Jones, Gareth H.

    2004-01-01

    MSH4, a meiosis-specific member of the MutS-homolog family of genes, is required for normal levels of recombination and fertility in budding yeast, mouse, and Caenorhabditis elegans. In this paper, we report the identification and characterization of the Arabidopsis homolog of MSH4 (AtMSH4). We demonstrate that AtMSH4 expression can only be detected in floral tissues, consistent with a role in reproduction. Immunofluorescence studies indicate that its expression is limited to early meiotic prophase I, preceding the synapsis of homologous chromosomes. A T-DNA insertional mutant (Atmsh4) exhibited normal vegetative growth but a severe reduction in fertility, consistent with a meiotic defect; this was confirmed by cytological analysis of meiosis. RNAi-induced down-regulation of the MSH4 gene resulted in a similar fertility and meiotic phenotype. We demonstrate that prophase I chromosome synapsis is delayed and may be incomplete in Atmsh4, and metaphase I chiasma frequency is greatly reduced to ∼15% of wild type, leading to univalence and nondisjunction. We show that these residual chiasmata are randomly distributed among cells and chromosomes. These features of chiasma frequency and distribution in Atmsh4 show close parallels to MSH4-independent crossovers in budding yeast that have been proposed to originate by a separate pathway. Furthermore, the characteristics of the MSH4-independent chiasmata in the Atmsh4 mutant closely parallel those of second-pathway crossovers that have been postulated from Arabidopsis crossover analysis and mathematical modeling. Taken together, this evidence strongly indicates that Arabidopsis possesses two crossover pathways. PMID:15489296

  9. Markov-switching multifractal models as another class of random-energy-like models in one-dimensional space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saakian, David B.

    2012-03-01

    We map the Markov-switching multifractal model (MSM) onto the random energy model (REM). The MSM is, like the REM, an exactly solvable model in one-dimensional space with nontrivial correlation functions. According to our results, four different statistical physics phases are possible in random walks with multifractal behavior. We also introduce the continuous branching version of the model, calculate the moments, and prove multiscaling behavior. Different phases have different multiscaling properties.

  10. The diabetogenic mouse MHC class II molecule I-A[subscript g7] is endowed with a switch that modulates TCR affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Kenji; Corper, Adam L.; Herro, Rana; Jabri, Bana; Wilson, Ian A.; Teyton, Luc

    2011-11-16

    Genetic susceptibility to autoimmunity is frequently associated with specific MHC alleles. Diabetogenic MHC class II molecules, such as human HLA-DQ8 and mouse I-A{sub g7}, typically have a small, uncharged amino acid residue at position 57 of their {beta} chain ({beta}57); this results in the absence of a salt bridge between {beta}57 and Arg{alpha}76, which is adjacent to the P9 pocket of the peptide-binding groove. However, the influence of Arg{alpha}76 on the selection of the TCR repertoire remains unknown, particularly when the MHC molecule binds a peptide with a neutral amino acid residue at position P9. Here, we have shown that diabetogenic MHC class II molecules bound to a peptide with a neutral P9 residue primarily selected and expanded cells expressing TCRs bearing a negatively charged residue in the first segment of their complementarity determining region 3{beta}. The crystal structure of one such TCR in complex with I-A{sub g7} bound to a peptide containing a neutral P9 residue revealed that a network of favorable long-range (greater than 4 {angstrom}) electrostatic interactions existed among Arg{alpha}76, the neutral P9 residue, and TCR, which supported the substantially increased TCR/peptide-MHC affinity. This network could be modulated or switched to a lower affinity interaction by the introduction of a negative charge at position P9 of the peptide. Our results support the existence of a switch at residue {beta}57 of the I-Ag7 and HLA-DQ8 class II molecules and potentially link normal thymic TCR selection with abnormal peripheral behavior.

  11. The diabetogenic mouse MHC class II molecule I-A[superscript g7] is endowed with a switch that modulates TCR affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Kenji; Corper, Adam L.; Herro, Rana; Jabri, Bana; Wilson, Ian A.; Teyton, Luc

    2010-07-22

    Genetic susceptibility to autoimmunity is frequently associated with specific MHC alleles. Diabetogenic MHC class II molecules, such as human HLA-DQ8 and mouse I-A{sup g7}, typically have a small, uncharged amino acid residue at position 57 of their {beta} chain ({beta}57); this results in the absence of a salt bridge between {beta}57 and Arg{alpha}76, which is adjacent to the P9 pocket of the peptide-binding groove. However, the influence of Arg{alpha}76 on the selection of the TCR repertoire remains unknown, particularly when the MHC molecule binds a peptide with a neutral amino acid residue at position P9. Here, we have shown that diabetogenic MHC class II molecules bound to a peptide with a neutral P9 residue primarily selected and expanded cells expressing TCRs bearing a negatively charged residue in the first segment of their complementarity determining region 3{beta}. The crystal structure of one such TCR in complex with I-Ag7 bound to a peptide containing a neutral P9 residue revealed that a network of favorable long-range (greater than 4 {angstrom}) electrostatic interactions existed among Arg{alpha}76, the neutral P9 residue, and TCR, which supported the substantially increased TCR/peptide-MHC affinity. This network could be modulated or switched to a lower affinity interaction by the introduction of a negative charge at position P9 of the peptide. Our results support the existence of a switch at residue {beta}57 of the I-A{sup g7} and HLA-DQ8 class II molecules and potentially link normal thymic TCR selection with abnormal peripheral behavior.

  12. Polymorphism, recombination and alternative unscrambling in the DNA polymerase alpha gene of the ciliate Stylonychia lemnae (Alveolata; class Spirotrichea).

    PubMed Central

    Ardell, David H; Lozupone, Catherine A; Landweber, Laura F

    2003-01-01

    DNA polymerase alpha is the most highly scrambled gene known in stichotrichous ciliates. In its hereditary micronuclear form, it is broken into >40 pieces on two loci at least 3 kb apart. Scrambled genes must be reassembled through developmental DNA rearrangements to yield functioning macronuclear genes, but the mechanism and accuracy of this process are unknown. We describe the first analysis of DNA polymorphism in the macronuclear version of any scrambled gene. Six functional haplotypes obtained from five Eurasian strains of Stylonychia lemnae were highly polymorphic compared to Drosophila genes. Another incompletely unscrambled haplotype was interrupted by frameshift and nonsense mutations but contained more silent mutations than expected by allelic inactivation. In our sample, nucleotide diversity and recombination signals were unexpectedly high within a region encompassing the boundary of the two micronuclear loci. From this and other evidence we infer that both members of a long repeat at the ends of the loci provide alternative substrates for unscrambling in this region. Incongruent genealogies and recombination patterns were also consistent with separation of the two loci by a large genetic distance. Our results suggest that ciliate developmental DNA rearrangements may be more probabilistic and error prone than previously appreciated and constitute a potential source of macronuclear variation. From this perspective we introduce the nonsense-suppression hypothesis for the evolution of ciliate altered genetic codes. We also introduce methods and software to calculate the likelihood of hemizygosity in ciliate haplotype samples and to correct for multiple comparisons in sliding-window analyses of Tajima's D. PMID:14704164

  13. Introduction of protein or DNA delivered via recombinant Salmonella typhimurium into the major histocompatibility complex class I presentation pathway of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Catic, A; Dietrich, G; Gentschev, I; Goebel, W; Kaufmann, S H; Hess, J

    1999-02-01

    Recombinant (r) Salmonella typhimurium aroA strains which display the hen egg ovalbumin OVA(257-264) peptide SIINFEKL in secreted form were constructed. In addition, attenuated rS. typhimurium pcDNA-OVA constructs harbouring a eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding complete OVA were used to introduce the immunodominant OVA(257-264) epitope into the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I presentation pathway. Both modes of antigen delivery (DNA and protein) by Salmonella vaccine carriers stimulated OVA(257-264)-specific CD8 T-cell hybridomas. An in vitro infection system was established that allowed both rSalmonella carrier devices to facilitate MHC class I delivery of OVA(257-264) by coexpression of listeriolysin (Hly) or by coinfection with rS. typhimurium Hlys (Hess J., Gentschev I., Miko D., Welzel M., Ladel C., Goebel W., Kaufmann S.H.E., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93 (1996) 1458-1463). Coexpression of Hly and coinfection with rS. typhimurium Hlys slightly improved MHC class I processing of OVA. Our data provide further evidence for the feasibility of attenuated, Hly-expressing rS. typhimurium carriers secreting heterologous antigens or harbouring heterologous DNA as effective vaccines for stimulating CD8 T cells in addition to CD4 T cells. PMID:10594975

  14. Treatment with Recombinant Trichinella spiralis Cathepsin B-like Protein Ameliorates Intestinal Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Mice by Promoting a Switch from M1 to M2 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Feng; Wen, Shi-Hong; Zhan, Jian-Hua; Li, Yun-Sheng; Shen, Jian-Tong; Yang, Wen-Jing; Zhou, Xing-Wang; Liu, Ke-Xuan

    2015-07-01

    Intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, in which macrophages play a key role, can cause high morbidity and mortality. The switch from classically (M1) to alternatively (M2) activated macrophages, which is dependent on the activation of STAT6 signaling, has been shown to protect organs from I/R injuries. In the current study, the effects of recombinant Trichinella spiralis cathepsin B-like protein (rTsCPB) on intestinal I/R injury and the potential mechanism related to macrophage phenotypes switch were investigated. In a mouse I/R model undergoing 60-min intestinal ischemia followed by 2-h or 7-d reperfusion, we demonstrated that intestinal I/R caused significant intestinal injury and induced a switch from M2 to M1 macrophages, evidenced by a decrease in levels of M2 markers (arginase-1 and found in inflammatory zone protein), an increase in levels of M1 markers (inducible NO synthase and CCR7), and a decrease in the ratio of M2/M1 macrophages. RTsCPB reversed intestinal I/R-induced M2-M1 transition and promoted M1-M2 phenotype switch evidenced by a significant decrease in M1 markers, an increase in M2 markers, and the ratio of M2/M1 macrophages. Meanwhile, rTsCPB significantly ameliorated intestinal injury and improved intestinal function and survival rate of animals, accompanied by a decrease in neutrophil infiltration and an increase in cell proliferation in the intestine. However, a selective STAT6 inhibitor, AS1517499, reversed the protective effects of rTsCPB by inhibiting M1 to M2 transition. These findings suggest that intestinal I/R injury causes a switch from M2 to M1 macrophages and that rTsCPB ameliorates intestinal injury by promoting STAT6-dependent M1 to M2 transition. PMID:25987744

  15. Dissection of the role of MHC class II A and E genes in autoimmune susceptibility in murine lupus models with intragenic recombination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Danqing; Fujio, Keishi; Jiang, Yi; Zhao, Jingyuan; Tada, Norihiro; Sudo, Katsuko; Tsurui, Hiromichi; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Nishimura, Hiroyuki; Shira, Toshikazu; Hirose, Sachiko

    2004-09-21

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multigenic autoimmune disease, and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II polymorphism serves as a key genetic element. In SLE-prone (NZB x NZW)F(1) mice, the MHC H-2(d/z) heterozygosity (H-2(d) of NZB and H-2(z) of NZW) has a strong impact on disease; thus, congenic H-2(d/d) homozygous F(1) mice do not develop severe disease. In this study, we used Ea-deficient intra-H-2 recombination to establish A(d/d)-congenic (NZB x NZW)F(1) mice, with or without E molecule expression, and dissected the role of class II A and E molecules. Here we found that A(d/d) homozygous F(1) mice lacking E molecules developed severe SLE similar to that seen in wild-type F1 mice, including lupus nephritis, autoantibody production, and spontaneously occurring T cell activation. Additional evidence revealed that E molecules prevent the disease in a dose-dependent manner; however, the effect is greatly influenced by the haplotype of A molecules, because wild-type H-2(d/z) F(1) mice develop SLE, despite E molecule expression. Studies on the potential of dendritic cells to present a self-antigen chromatin indicated that dendritic cells from wild-type F(1) mice induced a greater response of chromatin-specific T cells than did those from A(d/d) F(1) mice, irrespective of the presence or absence of E molecules, suggesting that the self-antigen presentation is mediated by A, but not by E, molecules. Our mouse models are useful for analyzing the molecular mechanisms by which MHC class II regions regulate the process of autoimmune responses. PMID:15361580

  16. The GPS Motif Is a Molecular Switch for Bimodal Activities of Adhesion Class G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Prömel, Simone; Frickenhaus, Marie; Hughes, Samantha; Mestek, Lamia; Staunton, David; Woollard, Alison; Vakonakis, Ioannis; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schnabel, Ralf; Russ, Andreas P.; Langenhan, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Summary Adhesion class G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCR) form the second largest group of seven-transmembrane-spanning (7TM) receptors whose molecular layout and function differ from canonical 7TM receptors. Despite their essential roles in immunity, tumorigenesis, and development, the mechanisms of aGPCR activation and signal transduction have remained obscure to date. Here, we use a transgenic assay to define the protein domains required in vivo for the activity of the prototypical aGPCR LAT-1/Latrophilin in Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that the GPCR proteolytic site (GPS) motif, the molecular hallmark feature of the entire aGPCR class, is essential for LAT-1 signaling serving in two different activity modes of the receptor. Surprisingly, neither mode requires cleavage but presence of the GPS, which relays interactions with at least two different partners. Our work thus uncovers the versatile nature of aGPCR activity in molecular detail and places the GPS motif in a central position for diverse protein-protein interactions. PMID:22938866

  17. Biochemical characterization of a recombinant plant class III chitinase from the pitcher of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes alata.

    PubMed

    Ishisaki, Kana; Arai, Sachiko; Hamada, Tatsuro; Honda, Yuji

    2012-11-01

    A class III chitinase belonging to the GH18 family from Nepenthes alata (NaCHIT3) was expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme exhibited hydrolytic activity toward colloidal chitin, ethylene glycol chitin, and (GlcNAc)(n) (n=5 and 6). The enzyme hydrolyzed the fourth glycosidic linkage from the non-reducing end of (GlcNAc)(6). The anomeric form of the products indicated it was a retaining enzyme. The colloidal chitin hydrolytic reaction displayed high activity between pH 3.9 and 6.9, but the pH optimum of the (GlcNAc)(6) hydrolytic reaction was 3.9 at 37 °C. The optimal temperature for activity was 65 °C in 50 mM sodium acetate buffer (pH 3.9). The pH optima of NaCHIT3 and NaCHIT1 might be related to their roles in chitin degradation in the pitcher fluid. PMID:23026711

  18. New Class of Leukemogenic Ecotropic Recombinant Murine Leukemia Virus Isolated from Radiation-Induced Thymomas of C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rassart, E.; Sankar-Mistry, P.; Lemay, G.; DesGroseillers, L.; Jolicoeur, P.

    1983-01-01

    We previously reported the establishment of several lymphoid cell lines from X-ray-induced thymomas of C57BL/Ka mice, and all, except one, produce retroviruses (P. Sankar-Mistry and P. Jolicoeur, J. Virol.35:270-275, 1980). Biological characterization of five of these new primary radiation leukemia viruses (RadLVs) indicated that they had a B-tropic, fibrotropic, and ecotropic host range and were leukemogenic when reinjected into C57BL/Ka newborn mice. The leukemogenic potential of one isolate (G6T2) was further assessed and shown to be retained after prolonged passaging on fibroblasts in vitro. Restriction endonuclease analysis of the DNA of four of our new RadLV isolates (G6T2, Ti-7, Ti-8, and Ti-9) revealed that G6T2 and Ti-7 murine leukemia virus (MuLV) genomes had identical restriction maps, whereas Ti-8 and Ti-9 genomes were different from each other and from the G6T2 and Ti-7 genomes. The physical maps of these genomes were similar to that of known ecotropic MuLV genomes (including the C57BL/Ka endogenous ecotropic MuLV) within their long terminal repeats, env, the right portion of pol, and the left portion of gag. However, a region covering the end of gag and the beginning of pol was different and showed several similarities with xenotropic MuLV genomes of BALB/c, AKR, and C58 mice previously mapped. Our results suggest that these primary RadLV genomes are recombinants between the parental ecotropic MuLV genome and a nonecotropic (xenotropic) sequence. This nonecotropic gag-pol region might be important in conferring the leukemogenic potential to these isolates. Therefore, these RadLVs appear to form a new class of leukemogenic recombinant MuLVs recovered from leukemic tissues of mice. They appear to be distinct from the recombinant AKR mink cell focus-inducing MuLVs which have a dual-tropic host range and harbor xenotropic env sequences. To further study the leukemogenic potential of these RadLVs, the genome of one of them (G6T2) was cloned in Charon 21A

  19. Increased Immunogenicity and Induction of Class Switching by Conjugation of Complement C3d to Pneumococcal Serotype 14 Capsular Polysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Test, Samuel T.; Mitsuyoshi, Joyce; Connolly, Charles C.; Lucas, Alexander H.

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated an adjuvant effect for the C3d fragment of complement C3 when coupled to T-dependent protein antigens. In this study, we examined the antibody response to covalent conjugates of C3d and a T-independent antigen, the capsular polysaccharide of serotype 14 Streptococcus pneumoniae (PPS14). We prepared a conjugate of mouse C3d and PPS14 and compared its immunogenicity with that of a conjugate of PPS14 and ovalbumin (OVA). When BALB/c mice were immunized with PPS14-C3d, there was a significant increase in serum anti-PPS14 concentrations compared with either native PPS14 or control PPS14-glycine conjugates. This was accompanied by a switch in anti-PPS14 from predominantly immunoglobulin M (IgM) to IgG1 by day 25 following primary immunization. Following secondary immunization with PPS14-C3d, there was a marked booster response and a further increase in the ratio of IgG1 to IgM anti-PPS14. Although the primary antibody response to the PPS14-OVA conjugate exceeded that induced by immunization with PPS14-C3d, serum anti-PPS14 concentrations after a second injection of PPS14-C3d were nearly identical to those induced by secondary immunization with PPS14-OVA. Experiments with athymic nude mice suggested that T cells were not required for the adjuvant effect of C3d on the primary immune response to PPS14 but were necessary for enhancement of the memory response after a second injection of PPS14-C3d. These studies show that the adjuvant effects of C3d extend to T-independent antigens as well as T-dependent antigens. As a means of harnessing the adjuvant potential of the innate immune system, C3d conjugates may prove useful as a component of vaccines against encapsulated bacteria. PMID:11292721

  20. Increased immunogenicity and induction of class switching by conjugation of complement C3d to pneumococcal serotype 14 capsular polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Test, S T; Mitsuyoshi, J; Connolly, C C; Lucas, A H

    2001-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated an adjuvant effect for the C3d fragment of complement C3 when coupled to T-dependent protein antigens. In this study, we examined the antibody response to covalent conjugates of C3d and a T-independent antigen, the capsular polysaccharide of serotype 14 Streptococcus pneumoniae (PPS14). We prepared a conjugate of mouse C3d and PPS14 and compared its immunogenicity with that of a conjugate of PPS14 and ovalbumin (OVA). When BALB/c mice were immunized with PPS14-C3d, there was a significant increase in serum anti-PPS14 concentrations compared with either native PPS14 or control PPS14-glycine conjugates. This was accompanied by a switch in anti-PPS14 from predominantly immunoglobulin M (IgM) to IgG1 by day 25 following primary immunization. Following secondary immunization with PPS14-C3d, there was a marked booster response and a further increase in the ratio of IgG1 to IgM anti-PPS14. Although the primary antibody response to the PPS14-OVA conjugate exceeded that induced by immunization with PPS14-C3d, serum anti-PPS14 concentrations after a second injection of PPS14-C3d were nearly identical to those induced by secondary immunization with PPS14-OVA. Experiments with athymic nude mice suggested that T cells were not required for the adjuvant effect of C3d on the primary immune response to PPS14 but were necessary for enhancement of the memory response after a second injection of PPS14-C3d. These studies show that the adjuvant effects of C3d extend to T-independent antigens as well as T-dependent antigens. As a means of harnessing the adjuvant potential of the innate immune system, C3d conjugates may prove useful as a component of vaccines against encapsulated bacteria. PMID:11292721

  1. Evolutionary genetics and vector adaptation of recombinant viruses of the western equine encephalitis antigenic complex provides new insights into alphavirus diversity and host switching

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Andrew B.; Stallknecht, David E.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), Highlands J virus (HJV), and Fort Morgan virus (FMV) are the sole representatives of the WEE antigenic complex of the genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae, that are endemic to North America. All three viruses have their ancestry in a recombination event involving eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) and a Sindbis (SIN)-like virus that gave rise to a chimeric alphavirus that subsequently diversified into the present-day WEEV, HJV, and FMV. Here, we present a comparative analysis of the genetic, ecological, and evolutionary relationships among these recombinant-origin viruses, including the description of a nsP4 polymerase mutation in FMV that allows it to circumvent the host range barrier to Asian tiger mosquito cells, a vector species that is normally refractory to infection. Notably, we also provide evidence that the recombination event that gave rise to these three WEEV antigenic complex viruses may have occurred in North America. PMID:25463613

  2. MHC class II derived recombinant T cell receptor ligands protect DBA/1LacJ mice from collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Huan, Jianya; Kaler, Laurie J; Mooney, Jeffery L; Subramanian, Sandhya; Hopke, Corwyn; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Rosloniec, Edward F; Burrows, Gregory G; Offner, Halina

    2008-01-15

    We previously demonstrated the therapeutic effects of MHC class II derived recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTL), single-chain two domain complexes of the alpha1 and beta1 domains of MHC class II molecules genetically linked with an immunodominant peptide, in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In the current study, we produced a monomeric murine I-Aq-derived RTL construct covalently linked with bovine collagen type II peptide (bCII257-270) suitable for use in DBA/1LacJ mice that develop collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), an animal model of human rheumatoid arthritis, after immunization with bCII protein in CFA. In this study, we demonstrate that the I-Aq-derived RTLs reduced the incidence of the disease, suppressed the clinical and histological signs of CIA and induced long-term modulation of T cells specific for arthritogenic Ags. Our results showed that the I-Aq/bCII257-270 molecule could systemically reduce proinflammatory IL-17 and IFN-gamma production and significantly increase anti-inflammatory IL-10, IL-13, and FoxP3 gene expression in splenocytes. Moreover, I-Aq/bCII257-270 molecule could also selectively inhibit IL-1beta, IL-6, and IL-23 expression in local joint tissue. This is the first report demonstrating effective prevention of joint inflammation and clinical signs of CIA with an I-Aq-derived RTL, thus supporting the possible clinical use of this approach for treating rheumatoid arthritis in humans. PMID:18178865

  3. MHC Class II Derived Recombinant T Cell Receptor Ligands Protect DBA/1LacJ Mice from Collagen-Induced Arthritis1

    PubMed Central

    Huan, Jianya; Kaler, Laurie J.; Mooney, Jeffery L.; Subramanian, Sandhya; Hopke, Corwyn; Vandenbark, Arthur A.; Rosloniec, Edward F.; Burrows, Gregory G.; Offner, Halina

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the therapeutic effects of MHC class II derived recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTL), single-chain two domain complexes of the α1 and β1 domains of MHC class II molecules genetically linked with an immunodominant peptide, in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In the current study, we produced a monomeric murine I-Aq-derived RTL construct covalently linked with bovine collagen type II peptide (bCII257–270) suitable for use in DBA/1LacJ mice that develop collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), an animal model of human rheumatoid arthritis, after immunization with bCII protein in CFA. In this study, we demonstrate that the I-Aq-derived RTLs reduced the incidence of the disease, suppressed the clinical and histological signs of CIA and induced long-term modulation of T cells specific for arthritogenic Ags. Our results showed that the I-Aq/bCII257–270 molecule could systemically reduce proinflammatory IL-17 and IFN-γ production and significantly increase anti-inflammatory IL-10, IL-13, and FoxP3 gene expression in splenocytes. Moreover, I-Aq/bCII257–270 molecule could also selectively inhibit IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-23 expression in local joint tissue. This is the first report demonstrating effective prevention of joint inflammation and clinical signs of CIA with an I-Aq-derived RTL, thus supporting the possible clinical use of this approach for treating rheumatoid arthritis in humans. PMID:18178865

  4. Integration-dependent bacteriophage immunity provides insights into the evolution of genetic switches

    PubMed Central

    Broussard, Gregory W.; Oldfield, Lauren M.; Villanueva, Valerie M.; Lunt, Bryce L.; Shine, Emilee E.; Hatfull, Graham F.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Genetic switches are critical components of developmental circuits. Because temperate bacteriophages are vastly abundant and greatly diverse, they are rich resources for understanding the mechanisms and evolution of switches and the molecular control of genetic circuitry. Here, we describe a new class of small, compact, and simple switches that use site-specific recombination as the key decision point. The phage attachment site attP is located within the phage repressor gene such that chromosomal integration results in removal of a C-terminal tag that destabilizes the virally-encoded form of the repressor. Integration thus not only confers prophage stability, but also is a requirement for lysogenic establishment. The variety of these self-contained integration-dependent immunity systems in different genomic contexts suggests that these represent ancestral states in switch evolution from which more complex switches have evolved. They also provide a powerful toolkit for building synthetic biological circuits. PMID:23246436

  5. Integration-dependent bacteriophage immunity provides insights into the evolution of genetic switches.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Gregory W; Oldfield, Lauren M; Villanueva, Valerie M; Lunt, Bryce L; Shine, Emilee E; Hatfull, Graham F

    2013-01-24

    Genetic switches are critical components of developmental circuits. Because temperate bacteriophages are vastly abundant and greatly diverse, they are rich resources for understanding the mechanisms and evolution of switches and the molecular control of genetic circuitry. Here, we describe a new class of small, compact, and simple switches that use site-specific recombination as the key decision point. The phage attachment site attP is located within the phage repressor gene such that chromosomal integration results in removal of a C-terminal tag that destabilizes the virally encoded form of the repressor. Integration thus not only confers prophage stability but also is a requirement for lysogenic establishment. The variety of these self-contained integration-dependent immunity systems in different genomic contexts suggests that these represent ancestral states in switch evolution from which more-complex switches have evolved. They also provide a powerful toolkit for building synthetic biological circuits. PMID:23246436

  6. New Switches for Utility-Scale Inverters: First In-Class Demonstration of a Completely New Type of SiC Bipolar Switch (15kV-20kV) for Utility-Scale Inverters

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-31

    Solar ADEPT Project: The SiCLAB is developing a new power switch for utility-scale PV inverters that would improve the performance and significantly reduce the size, weight, and energy loss of PV systems. A power switch controls the electrical energy flowing through an inverter, which takes the electrical current from a PV solar panel and converts it into the type and amount of electricity that is compatible with the electric grid. SiCLAB is using silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductors in its new power switches, which are more efficient than the silicon semiconductors used to conduct electricity in most conventional power switches today. Switches with SiC semiconductors can operate at much higher temperatures, as well as higher voltage and power levels than silicon switches. SiC-based power switches are also smaller than those made with silicon alone, so they result in much smaller and lighter electrical devices. In addition to their use in utility-scale PV inverters, SiCLAB’s new power switches can also be used in wind turbines, railways, and other smart grid applications.

  7. λ Recombination and Recombineering.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kenan C

    2016-05-01

    The bacteriophage λ Red homologous recombination system has been studied over the past 50 years as a model system to define the mechanistic details of how organisms exchange DNA segments that share extended regions of homology. The λ Red system proved useful as a system to study because recombinants could be easily generated by co-infection of genetically marked phages. What emerged from these studies was the recognition that replication of phage DNA was required for substantial Red-promoted recombination in vivo, and the critical role that double-stranded DNA ends play in allowing the Red proteins access to the phage DNA chromosomes. In the past 16 years, however, the λ Red recombination system has gained a new notoriety. When expressed independently of other λ functions, the Red system is able to promote recombination of linear DNA containing limited regions of homology (∼50 bp) with the Escherichia coli chromosome, a process known as recombineering. This review explains how the Red system works during a phage infection, and how it is utilized to make chromosomal modifications of E. coli with such efficiency that it changed the nature and number of genetic manipulations possible, leading to advances in bacterial genomics, metabolic engineering, and eukaryotic genetics. PMID:27223821

  8. Scintigraphic detection of overexpressed c-erbB-2 protooncogene products by a class-switched murine anti-c-erbB-2 protein monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Saga, T.; Endo, K.; Akiyama, T.; Sakahara, H.; Koizumi, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Nakai, T.; Hosono, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Toyoshima, K. )

    1991-02-01

    Class-switched monoclonal antibody SV2-61r recognized the extracellular domain of c-erbB-2 protooncogene products separate from the epidermal growth factor receptor. We studied the potential of SV2-61r for evaluating the amplification of c-erbB-2 protooncogene on cancer cells, which has been reported to have prognostic value in adenocarcinoma patients. Radiolabeled SV2-61r specifically bound to various adenocarcinoma cells in addition to c-erbB-2-transfected NIH-3T3 cells (A4) with the affinity constant of 4.4 x 10(8) M-1. SV2-61r injected i.v. localized well to A4 cells xenografted in nude mice. Tumor uptake and localization index of radioiodinated SV2-61r were lower than those of 111In-labeled SV2-61r, probably due to the internalization and dehalogenation of formed antibody-antigen complexes. Biodistribution and specificity of targeting were assessed by comparison among three cells, A4, lung cancer SBC-3 (c-erbB-2 weakly positive) and B-lymphoblastoid Manca cells (c-erbB-2 negative). Tumor:blood ratios, obtained 48 h after injection, were 5.63, 1.45, and 0.68, respectively, indicating the potential of 111In-labeled SV2-61r for evaluating the amplification of c-erbB-2 protooncogene on cancer cells. Because of its close relationship with carcinogenesis and the uniform expression, c-erbB-2 protooncogene products seem to be the optimal target of imaging and therapy of adenocarcinoma patients.

  9. Plasmonic enhanced ultrafast switch.

    SciTech Connect

    Subramania,Ganapathi Subramanian; Reno, John Louis; Passmore, Brandon Scott; Harris, Tom.; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Barrick, Todd A.

    2009-09-01

    Ultrafast electronic switches fabricated from defective material have been used for several decades in order to produce picosecond electrical transients and TeraHertz radiation. Due to the ultrashort recombination time in the photoconductor materials used, these switches are inefficient and are ultimately limited by the amount of optical power that can be applied to the switch before self-destruction. The goal of this work is to create ultrafast (sub-picosecond response) photoconductive switches on GaAs that are enhanced through plasmonic coupling structures. Here, the plasmonic coupler primarily plays the role of being a radiation condenser which will cause carriers to be generated adjacent to metallic electrodes where they can more efficiently be collected.

  10. Effect of gamma radiation on retroviral recombination.

    PubMed

    Hu, W S; Temin, H M

    1992-07-01

    To elucidate the mechanism(s) of retroviral recombination, we exposed virions to gamma radiation prior to infecting target cells. By using previously described spleen necrosis virus-based vectors containing multiple markers, recombinant proviruses were studied after a single round of retrovirus replication. The current models of retroviral recombination predict that breaking virion RNA should promote minus-strand recombination (forced copy-choice model), decrease or not affect plus-strand recombination (strand displacement/assimilation model), and shift plus-strand recombination towards the 3' end of the genome. However, we found that while gamma irradiation of virions reduced the amount of recoverable viral RNA, it did not primarily cause breaks. Thus, the frequency of selected recombinants was not significantly altered with greater doses of radiation. In spite of this, the irradiation did decrease the number of recombinants with only one internal template switch. As a result, the average number of additional internal template switches in the recombinant proviruses increased from 0.7 to 1.4 as infectivity decreased to 6%. The unselected internal template switches tended to be 5' of the selected crossover even in the recombinants from irradiated viruses, inconsistent with a plus-strand recombination mechanism. PMID:1602553

  11. Integrated network analysis identifies fight-club nodes as a class of hubs encompassing key putative switch genes that induce major transcriptome reprogramming during grapevine development.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Maria Concetta; Zenoni, Sara; Fasoli, Marianna; Massonnet, Mélanie; Farina, Lorenzo; Castiglione, Filippo; Pezzotti, Mario; Paci, Paola

    2014-12-01

    We developed an approach that integrates different network-based methods to analyze the correlation network arising from large-scale gene expression data. By studying grapevine (Vitis vinifera) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) gene expression atlases and a grapevine berry transcriptomic data set during the transition from immature to mature growth, we identified a category named "fight-club hubs" characterized by a marked negative correlation with the expression profiles of neighboring genes in the network. A special subset named "switch genes" was identified, with the additional property of many significant negative correlations outside their own group in the network. Switch genes are involved in multiple processes and include transcription factors that may be considered master regulators of the previously reported transcriptome remodeling that marks the developmental shift from immature to mature growth. All switch genes, expressed at low levels in vegetative/green tissues, showed a significant increase in mature/woody organs, suggesting a potential regulatory role during the developmental transition. Finally, our analysis of tomato gene expression data sets showed that wild-type switch genes are downregulated in ripening-deficient mutants. The identification of known master regulators of tomato fruit maturation suggests our method is suitable for the detection of key regulators of organ development in different fleshy fruit crops. PMID:25490918

  12. Evolution of genetic switch complexity

    PubMed Central

    Broussard, Gregory W.; Hatfull, Graham F.

    2013-01-01

    The circuitry of the phage λ genetic switch determining the outcome of lytic or lysogenic growth is well-integrated and complex, raising the question as to how it evolved. It is plausible that it arose from a simpler ancestral switch with fewer components that underwent various additions and refinements, as it adapted to vast numbers of different hosts and conditions. We have recently identified a new class of genetic switches found in mycobacteriophages and other prophages, in which immunity is dependent on integration. These switches contain only three genes (integrase, repressor and cro) and represent a major departure from the λ-like circuitry, lacking many features such as xis, cII and cIII. These small self-contained switches represent an unrealized, elegant circuitry for controlling infection outcome. In this addendum, we propose a model of possible events in the evolution of a complex λ-like switch from a simpler integration-dependent switch. PMID:23819104

  13. Polymorphisms in HLA Class I Genes Associated with both Favorable Prognosis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Type 1 Infection and Positive Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Responses to ALVAC-HIV Recombinant Canarypox Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Kaslow, Richard A.; Rivers, Charles; Tang, Jianming; Bender, Thomas J.; Goepfert, Paul A.; El Habib, Raphaelle; Weinhold, Kent; Mulligan, Mark J.

    2001-01-01

    Carriers of certain human leukocyte antigen class I alleles show favorable prognosis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, presumably due to effective CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses, but close relationships between class I variants mediating such responses to natural and to vaccine HIV-1 antigen have not been established. During 6 to 30 months of administration and follow-up in trials of ALVAC-HIV recombinant canarypox vaccines, cells from 42% of 291 HIV-1-negative vaccinated subjects typed at class I loci responded to an HIV-1 protein in a lytic bulk CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte assay. By 2 weeks after the second dose, higher proportions of vaccinees carrying one of two alleles consistently associated with slower progression of natural HIV-1 infection reacted at least once: B∗27 carriers reacted to Gag (64%; odds ratio [OR] = 10.3, P = 0.001) and Env (36%; OR = 4.6, P = 0.04), and B∗57 carriers reacted to Env (44%; OR = 6.6, P < 0.05). By 2 weeks after the third or fourth dose, B∗27 carriers had responded (two or more reactions) to Gag (33%; OR = 4.4, P < 0.05) and B∗57 carriers had responded to both Gag (39%; OR = 5.3, P = 0.013) and Env (39%; OR = 9.5, P = 0.002). Homozygosity at class I loci, although conferring an unfavorable prognosis following natural infection, showed no such disadvantage for vaccine response. Individual class I alleles have not previously demonstrated such clear and consistent relationship with both the clinical course of an infection and cellular immunity to a vaccine against the infectious agent. This proof of principle that class I an alleles modulate both processes has implications for development of HIV-1 and presumably other vaccines. PMID:11507213

  14. DNA secondary structures are associated with recombination in major Plasmodium falciparum variable surface antigen gene families

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Adam F.; Lavstsen, Thomas; Rask, Thomas S.; Lisby, Michael; Salanti, Ali; Fordyce, Sarah L.; Jespersen, Jakob S.; Carter, Richard; Deitsch, Kirk W.; Theander, Thor G.; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Arnot, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Many bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens undergo antigenic variation to counter host immune defense mechanisms. In Plasmodium falciparum, the most lethal of human malaria parasites, switching of var gene expression results in alternating expression of the adhesion proteins of the Plasmodium falciparum-erythrocyte membrane protein 1 class on the infected erythrocyte surface. Recombination clearly generates var diversity, but the nature and control of the genetic exchanges involved remain unclear. By experimental and bioinformatic identification of recombination events and genome-wide recombination hotspots in var genes, we show that during the parasite’s sexual stages, ectopic recombination between isogenous var paralogs occurs near low folding free energy DNA 50-mers and that these sequences are heavily concentrated at the boundaries of regions encoding individual Plasmodium falciparum-erythrocyte membrane protein 1 structural domains. The recombinogenic potential of these 50-mers is not parasite-specific because these sequences also induce recombination when transferred to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetic cross data suggest that DNA secondary structures (DSS) act as inducers of recombination during DNA replication in P. falciparum sexual stages, and that these DSS-regulated genetic exchanges generate functional and diverse P. falciparum adhesion antigens. DSS-induced recombination may represent a common mechanism for optimizing the evolvability of virulence gene families in pathogens. PMID:24253306

  15. Gain of function mutation in tobacco MADS box promoter switch on the expression of flowering class B genes converting sepals to petals.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Monika; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2014-02-01

    One mutant transgenic line displaying homeotic conversion of sepals to petals with other phenotypic aberrations was selected and characterized at molecular level. The increased transcript level of gene encoding anthocyanidin synthase and petal specific class B genes, GLOBOSA and DEFECIENS in sepals of mutant line may be responsible for its homeotic conversion to petaloid organs. While characterizing this mutant line for locus identification, T-DNA was found to be inserted in 3' untranslated region of promoter of class B MADS box gene, GLOBOSA. Here, CaMV 35S promoter of T-DNA might be deriving the expression of class B genes. PMID:24362510

  16. Switch wear leveling

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hunter; Sealy, Kylee; Gilchrist, Aaron

    2015-09-01

    An apparatus for switch wear leveling includes a switching module that controls switching for two or more pairs of switches in a switching power converter. The switching module controls switches based on a duty cycle control technique and closes and opens each switch in a switching sequence. The pairs of switches connect to a positive and negative terminal of a DC voltage source. For a first switching sequence a first switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than a second switch of the pair of switches. The apparatus includes a switch rotation module that changes the switching sequence of the two or more pairs of switches from the first switching sequence to a second switching sequence. The second switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than the first switch of the pair of switches during the second switching sequence.

  17. Condition known to be sufficient for rearrangeability of the benes class of interconnection networks with 2*2 switches is also necessary

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, S.C.; Lakshmivarahan, S.

    1983-01-01

    An n*n (n inputs and outputs) multistage interconnection network is said to be rearrangeable if it can realise all the possible connections of the n input terminals to the n output terminals in a one-to-one fashion. Starting with the pioneering works of Clos (1953) and Benes (1968) to this date a variety of sufficient conditions for rearrangeability are known in the literature. It is shown that the well known sufficient condition due to Benes on the link permutation is also necessary for rearrangeability if the network is made up of 2*2 switches. 15 references.

  18. Independent Roles of Switching and Hypermutation in the Development and Persistence of B Lymphocyte Memory.

    PubMed

    Gitlin, Alexander D; von Boehmer, Lotta; Gazumyan, Anna; Shulman, Ziv; Oliveira, Thiago Y; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2016-04-19

    Somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) increase the affinity and diversify the effector functions of antibodies during immune responses. Although SHM and CSR are fundamentally different, their independent roles in regulating B cell fate have been difficult to uncouple because a single enzyme, activation-induced cytidine deaminase (encoded by Aicda), initiates both reactions. Here, we used a combination of Aicda and antibody mutant alleles that separate the effects of CSR and SHM on polyclonal immune responses. We found that class-switching to IgG1 biased the fate choice made by B cells, favoring the plasma cell over memory cell fate without significantly affecting clonal expansion in the germinal center (GC). In contrast, SHM reduced the longevity of memory B cells by creating polyreactive specificities that were selected against over time. Our data define the independent contributions of SHM and CSR to the generation and persistence of memory in the antibody system. PMID:26944202

  19. Classifications and comparisons of multilocus recombination distributions

    PubMed Central

    Karlin, Samuel; Liberman, Uri

    1978-01-01

    Various classifications and representations of multilocus recombination structures are delineated based on generalized notions of linkage values and recombination rates. An important class of recombination distributions (called the count-location chiasma process) is parameterized by a distribution of the number of crossover events and, for each such crossover count, by a conditional distribution of crossover locations. A number of properties of this recombination structure are developed. A multilocus definition of a “natural” recombination range is set forth. Orderings among recombination distributions in the multilocus setting are also discussed. Comparisons are made in terms of complete linkage, free assortment and noninterference schemes serving as standards. PMID:16592601

  20. Genetic Recombination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, H. L. K.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the mechanisms of genetic recombination with particular emphasis on the study of the fungus Sordaria brevicollis. The study of recombination is facilitated by the use of mutants of this fungus in which the color of the ascospores is affected. (JR)

  1. Optical switches and switching methods

    DOEpatents

    Doty, Michael

    2008-03-04

    A device and method for collecting subject responses, particularly during magnetic imaging experiments and testing using a method such as functional MRI. The device comprises a non-metallic input device which is coupled via fiber optic cables to a computer or other data collection device. One or more optical switches transmit the subject's responses. The input device keeps the subject's fingers comfortably aligned with the switches by partially immobilizing the forearm, wrist, and/or hand of the subject. Also a robust nonmetallic switch, particularly for use with the input device and methods for optical switching.

  2. 47 CFR 32.2210 - Central office-switching.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Central office—switching. This account shall be used by Class B companies to record the original cost of switching assets of the type and character required of Class A companies in Accounts 2211 through 2212. ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Central office-switching. 32.2210 Section...

  3. New class of leukemogenic ecotropic recombinant murine leukemia virus isolated from radiation-induced thymomas of C57BL/6 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Rassart, E.; Sankar-Mistry, P.; Lemay, G.; DesGroseillers, L.; Jalicoeur, P.

    1983-02-01

    We previously reported the establishment of several lymphoid cell lines from X-ray-induced thymomas of C57BL/Ka mice, and all, except one, produce retroviruses. Biological characterization of five of these new primary radiation leukemia viruses (RadLVs) indicated that they had a B-tropic, fibrotropic, and ecotropic host range and were leukemogenic when reinjected into C57BL/Ka newborn mice. The leukemogenic potential of one isolate (G/sub 6/T/sub 2/) was further assessed and shown to be retained after prolonged passaging on fibroblasts in vitro. Restriction endonuclease analysis of the DNA of four of our new RadLV isolates (G/sub 6/T/sub 2/, Ti-7, Ti-8, and Ti-9) revealed that G/sub 6/T/sub 2/ and Ti-7 murine leukemia virus (MuLV) genomes had identical restriction maps, whereas Ti-8 and Ti-9 genomes were different from each other and from the G/sub 6/T/sub 2/ and Ti-7 genomes. The physical maps of these genomes were similar to that of known ecotropic MuLV genomes (including the C57BL/Ka endogenous ecotropic MuLV) within their long terminal repeats, env, the right portion of pol, and the left portion of gag. However, a region covering the end of gag and the beginning of pol was different and showed several similarities with xenotropic MuLV genomes of BALB/c, AKR, and C58 mice previously mapped. Our results suggest that these primary RadLV genomes are recombinants between the parental ecotropic MuLV genome and a nonecotropic (xenotropic) sequence. To further study the leukemic potential of these RadLVs, the genome of one of them (G/sub 6/T/sub 2/) was cloned in Charon 21A as an infectious molecule.

  4. Nondisjunction of chromosome 15: Origin and recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, W.P.; Bernasconi, F.; Schinzel, A.A.; Mutirangura, A.; Ledbetter, D.H. ); Langlois, S. ); Morris, M.A.; Malcolm, S.

    1993-09-01

    Thirty-two cases of uniparental disomy (UPD), ascertained from Prader-Willi syndrome patients (N=27) and Angelman syndrome patients (N-5), are used to investigate the pattern of recombination associated with nondisjunction of chromosome 15. In addition, the meiotic stage of nondisjunction is inferred by using markers mapping near the centromere. Two basic approaches to the analysis of recombination in specific pairwise intervals along the chromosome. This method shows a significant reduction in recombination for two of five intervals examined. Second, the observed frequency of each recombinant class (i.e., zero, one, two, three, or more observable crossovers) is compared with expected values. This is useful for testing whether the reduction in recombination can be attributed solely to a proportion of cases with no recombination at all (because of asynapsis), with the remaining groups showing normal recombination (or even excess recombination), or whether recombination is uniformly reduced. Analysis of maternal UPD(15) data shows a slight reduction in the multiple-recombinant classes, with a corresponding increase in both the zero- and one-recombinant classes over expected values. The majority, more than 82%, of the extra chromosomes in maternal UPD(15) cases are due to meiotic I nondisjunction events. In contrast, more paternal UPD(15) cases so far examined appear to have a postzygotic origin of the extra paternal chromosome. 33 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  5. ION SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Cook, B.

    1959-02-10

    An ion switch capable of transferring large magnitudes of power is described. An ion switch constructed in accordance with the invention includes a pair of spaced control electrodes disposed in a highly evacuated region for connection in a conventional circuit to control the passing of power therethrough. A controllable ionic conduction path is provided directiy between the control electrodes by a source unit to close the ion switch. Conventional power supply means are provided to trigger the source unit and control the magnitude, durations and pulse repetition rate of the aforementioned ionic conduction path.

  6. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  7. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  8. Cosmological Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wan Yan

    2008-11-01

    In this thesis we focus on studying the physics of cosmological recombination and how the details of recombination affect the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies. We present a detailed calculation of the spectral line distortions on the CMB spectrum arising from the Lyman-alpha and the lowest two-photon transitions in the recombination of hydrogen (H), and the corresponding lines from helium (He). The peak of these distortions mainly comes from the Lyman-alpha transition and occurs at about 170 microns, which is the Wien part of the CMB. The major theoretical limitation for extracting cosmological parameters from the CMB sky lies in the precision with which we can calculate the cosmological recombination process. With this motivation, we perform a multi-level calculation of the recombination of H and He with the addition of the spin-forbidden transition for neutral helium (He I), plus the higher order two-photon transitions for H and among singlet states of He I. We find that the inclusion of the spin-forbidden transition results in more than a percent change in the ionization fraction, while the other transitions give much smaller effects. Last we modify RECFAST by introducing one more parameter to reproduce recent numerical results for the speed-up of helium recombination. Together with the existing hydrogen `fudge factor', we vary these two parameters to account for the remaining dominant uncertainties in cosmological recombination. By using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method with Planck forecast data, we find that we need to determine the parameters to better than 10% for He I and 1% for H, in order to obtain negligible effects on the cosmological parameters.

  9. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Does Not Impact Murine Meiotic Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Cortesao, Catarina S.; Freitas, Raquel F.; Barreto, Vasco M.

    2013-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) was first described as the triggering enzyme of the B-cell−specific reactions that edit the immunoglobulin genes, namely somatic hypermutation, gene conversion, and class switch recombination. Over the years, AID was also detected in cells other than lymphocytes, and it has been assigned additional roles in the innate defense against transforming retroviruses, in retrotransposition restriction and in DNA demethylation. Notably, AID expression was found in germline tissues, and in heterologous systems it can induce the double-strand breaks required for the initiation of meiotic recombination and proper gamete formation. However, because AID-deficient mice are fully fertile, the molecule is not essential for meiosis. Thus, the remaining question that we addressed here is whether AID influences the frequency of meiotic recombination in mice. We measured the recombination events in the meiosis of male and female mice F1 hybrids of C57BL/6J and BALB/c, in Aicda+/+ and Aicda−/− background by using a panel of single-nucleotide polymorphisms that distinguishes C57BL/6J from BALB/c genome across the 19 autosomes. In agreement with the literature, we found that the frequency of recombination in the female germline was greater than in male germline, both in the Aicda+/+ and Aicda−/− backgrounds. No statistical difference was found in the average recombination events between Aicda+/+ and Aidca−/− animals, either in females or males. In addition, the recombination frequencies between single-nucleotide polymorphisms flanking the immunoglobulin heavy and immunoglobulin kappa loci was also not different. We conclude that AID has a minor impact, if any, on the overall frequency of meiotic recombination. PMID:23550130

  10. Switched steerable multiple beam antenna system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Richard S.

    1988-09-01

    A steerable multibeam five element cross-feed cluster antenna system is described. The feed power is divided into five branches. Each branch includes a switching network comprised of a plurality of time delay elements each individually controlled by a respective electromagnetic latching switch. Frequency independent individual two-dimensional beam steering at intermediate (IF) scanning frequencies is thereby provided wherein discrete incremental time delays are introduced by the switching networks into each branch and the signals recombined thereafter to form each beam. The electromagnetic latched switching reduces power consumption and permits higher power switching and reciprocal coincident tranmsit and receive operation. Frequency independence due to incremental time delay switching permits coincident reciprocal operation and steering for transmit-receive signal paths carrying different transmit-receive frequencies. Diagonal quarter wave plates in the waveguides alter polarization from the circular to orthogonal linear to provide transmitter-receiver isolation.

  11. Optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    An optical switching device (10) is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber (16) or a second glass fiber (14) may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber (18). Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system (26, 28, 30). In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber (16) is reflected by a planar mirror (36) into the third glass fiber (18). In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber (14) passes directly into the third glass fiber (18). The planar mirror (36) is attached to a rotatable table (32) which is rotated to provide the optical switching.

  12. Learner Code-Switching versus English Only

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a study into the functions of code-switching in EFL classes at a Colombian language school. It was undertaken to decide whether the official "English-only" policy in place in this and other classrooms is pedagogically justified. The results suggest that code-switching may not necessarily be connected to ability level and…

  13. Controlled Release from Recombinant Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant polymers provide a high degree of molecular definition for correlating structure with function in controlled release. The wide array of amino acids available as building blocks for these materials lend many advantages including biorecognition, biodegradability, potential biocompatibility, and control over mechanical properties among other attributes. Genetic engineering and DNA manipulation techniques enable the optimization of structure for precise control over spatial and temporal release. Unlike the majority of chemical synthetic strategies used, recombinant DNA technology has allowed for the production of monodisperse polymers with specifically defined sequences. Several classes of recombinant polymers have been used for controlled drug delivery. These include, but are not limited to, elastin-like, silk-like, and silk-elastinlike proteins, as well as emerging cationic polymers for gene delivery. In this article, progress and prospects of recombinant polymers used in controlled release will be reviewed. PMID:24956486

  14. Switching Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation's D60T transistors are used primarily as switching devices for controlling high power in electrical circuits. It enables reduction in the number and size of circuit components and promotes more efficient use of energy. Wide range of application from a popcorn popper to a radio frequency generator for solar cell production.

  15. State-dependent switching control of switched positive fractional-order systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xudong; Yin, Yunfei; Zheng, Xiaolong

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the problem of switching stabilization for a class of continuous-time switched positive fractional-order systems is studied by using state-dependent switching. First, the asymptotic stability condition of switched positive fractional-order systems with state-dependent switching is given, which is based on the fractional co-positive Lyapunov method. Moreover, by the sliding sector method, the stability condition of switched positive fractional-order systems whose subsystems are possibly all unstable is obtained. A variable structure (VS) switching law with sliding sector is also proposed to guarantee the switched positive fractional-order system to be asymptotically stable. Finally, two numerical examples are given to demonstrate the advantages and effectiveness of our developed results. PMID:26922493

  16. The Strength of an Ig Switch Region is Determined by its Ability to Drive R-loop Formation and its Number of WGCW Sites

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng Z.; Pannunzio, Nicholas R.; Han, Li; Hsieh, Chih-Lin; Yu, Kefei; Lieber, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY R-loops exist at the murine IgH switch regions and possibly other locations, but their functional importance is unclear. In biochemical systems, R-loop initiation requires DNA sequence regions containing clusters of G nucleotides, but cellular studies have not been done. Here, we vary the G-clustering, total switch region length, and the number of target sites (WGCW sites for the activation-induced deaminase) at synthetic switch regions in a murine B cell line to determine the effect on class switch recombination (CSR). G-clusters increase CSR, regardless of their immediate proximity to the WGCW sites. This increase is accompanied by an increase in R-loop formation. CSR efficiency correlates better with the absolute number of WGCW sites in the switch region rather than the total switch region length or density of WGCW sites. Thus, the overall strength of the switch region depends on G-clusters, which initiate R-loop formation, and on the number of WGCW sites. PMID:25017067

  17. Ligand-responsive RNA mechanical switches.

    PubMed

    Boerneke, Mark A; Hermann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Ligand-responsive RNA mechanical switches represent a new class of simple switching modules that adopt well-defined ligand-free and bound conformational states, distinguishing them from metabolite-sensing riboswitches. Initially discovered in the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) of hepatitis C virus (HCV), these RNA switch motifs were found in the genome of diverse other viruses. Although large variations are seen in sequence and local secondary structure of the switches, their function in viral translation initiation that requires selective ligand recognition is conserved. We recently determined the crystal structure of an RNA switch from Seneca Valley virus (SVV) which is able to functionally replace the switch of HCV. The switches from both viruses recognize identical cognate ligands despite their sequence dissimilarity. Here, we describe the discovery of 7 new switches in addition to the previously established 5 examples. We highlight structural and functional features unique to this class of ligand-responsive RNA mechanical switches and discuss implications for therapeutic development and the construction of RNA nanostructures. PMID:26158858

  18. Molecular Switches and Motors on Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathem, Bala Krishna; Claridge, Shelley A.; Zheng, Yue Bing; Weiss, Paul S.

    2013-04-01

    Molecular switches and motors respond structurally, electronically, optically, and/or mechanically to external stimuli, testing and potentially enabling extreme miniaturization of optoelectronic devices, nanoelectromechanical systems, and medical devices. The assembly of motors and switches on surfaces makes it possible both to measure the properties of individual molecules as they relate to their environment and to couple function between assembled molecules. In this review, we discuss recent progress in assembling molecular switches and motors on surfaces, measuring static and dynamic structures, understanding switching mechanisms, and constructing functional molecular materials and devices. As demonstrative examples, we choose a representative molecule from three commonly studied classes including molecular switches, photochromic molecules, and mechanically interlocked molecules. We conclude by offering perspectives on the future of molecular switches and motors on surfaces.

  19. Wide Bandgap Extrinsic Photoconductive Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, James Stephen

    Wide Bandgap Extrinsic Photoconductive Switches Semi-insulating Gallium Nitride, 4H and 6H Silicon Carbide are attractive materials for compact, high voltage, extrinsic, photoconductive switches due to their wide bandgap, high dark resistance, high critical electric field strength and high electron saturation velocity. These wide bandgap semiconductors are made semi-insulating by the addition of vanadium (4H and 6H-SiC) and iron (2H-GaN) impurities that form deep acceptors. These deep acceptors trap electrons donated from shallow donor impurities. The electrons can be optically excited from these deep acceptor levels into the conduction band to transition the wide bandgap semiconductor materials from a semi-insulating to a conducting state. Extrinsic photoconductive switches with opposing electrodes have been constructed using vanadium compensated 6H-SiC and iron compensated 2H-GaN. These extrinsic photoconductive switches were tested at high voltage and high power to determine if they could be successfully used as the closing switch in compact medical accelerators. The successful development of a vanadium compensated, 6H-SiC extrinsic photoconductive switch for use as a closing switch for compact accelerator applications was realized by improvements made to the vanadium, nitrogen and boron impurity densities. The changes made to the impurity densities were based on the physical intuition outlined and simple rate equation models. The final 6H-SiC impurity 'recipe' calls for vanadium, nitrogen and boron densities of 2.5 e17 cm-3, 1.25e17 cm-3 and ≤ 1e16 cm-3, respectively. This recipe was originally developed to maximize the quantum efficiency of the vanadium compensated 6H-SiC, while maintaining a thermally stable semi-insulating material. The rate equation models indicate that, besides increasing the quantum efficiency, the impurity recipe should be expected to also increase the carrier recombination time. Three generations of 6H-SiC materials were tested. The

  20. Lymphocyte-specific compensation for XLF/cernunnos end-joining functions in V(D)J recombination.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Alt, Frederick W; Cheng, Hwei-Ling; Brush, James W; Goff, Peter H; Murphy, Mike M; Franco, Sonia; Zhang, Yu; Zha, Shan

    2008-09-01

    Mutations in XLF/Cernunnos (XLF) cause lymphocytopenia in humans, and various studies suggest an XLF role in classical nonhomologous end joining (C-NHEJ). We now find that XLF-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts are ionizing radiation (IR) sensitive and severely impaired for ability to support V(D)J recombination. Yet mature lymphocyte numbers in XLF-deficient mice are only modestly decreased. Moreover, XLF-deficient pro-B lines, while IR-sensitive, perform V(D)J recombination at nearly wild-type levels. Correspondingly, XLF/p53-double-deficient mice are not markedly prone to the pro-B lymphomas that occur in previously characterized C-NHEJ/p53-deficient mice; however, like other C-NHEJ/p53-deficient mice, they still develop medulloblastomas. Despite nearly normal V(D)J recombination in developing B cells, XLF-deficient mature B cells are moderately defective for immunoglobulin heavy-chain class switch recombination. Together, our results implicate XLF as a C-NHEJ factor but also indicate that developing mouse lymphocytes harbor cell-type-specific factors/pathways that compensate for the absence of XLF function during V(D)J recombination. PMID:18775323

  1. Attenuating homologous recombination stimulates an AID-induced antileukemic effect

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, Kristin R.; Hasham, Muneer G.; Donghia, Nina M.; Branca, Jane; Chavaree, Margaret; Chase, Betsy; Breggia, Anne; Hedlund, Jacquelyn; Emery, Ivette; Cavallo, Francesca; Jasin, Maria; Rüter, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is critical in normal B cells to initiate somatic hypermutation and immunoglobulin class switch recombination. Accumulating evidence suggests that AID is also prooncogenic, inducing cancer-promoting mutations or chromosome rearrangements. In this context, we find that AID is expressed in >40% of primary human chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cases, consistent with other reports. Using a combination of human B lymphoid leukemia cells and mouse models, we now show that AID expression can be harnessed for antileukemic effect, after inhibition of the RAD51 homologous recombination (HR) factor with 4,4′-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2-2′-disulfonic acid (DIDS). As a proof of principle, we show that DIDS treatment inhibits repair of AID-initiated DNA breaks, induces apoptosis, and promotes cytotoxicity preferentially in AID-expressing human CLL. This reveals a novel antineoplastic role of AID that can be triggered by inhibition of HR, suggesting a potential new paradigm to treat AID-expressing tumors. Given the growing list of tumor types with aberrant AID expression, this novel therapeutic approach has potential to impact a significant patient population. PMID:23589568

  2. Nanoelectromechanical contact switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Owen Y.; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2012-05-01

    Nanoelectromechanical (NEM) switches are similar to conventional semiconductor switches in that they can be used as relays, transistors, logic devices and sensors. However, the operating principles of NEM switches and semiconductor switches are fundamentally different. These differences give NEM switches an advantage over semiconductor switches in some applications -- for example, NEM switches perform much better in extreme environments -- but semiconductor switches benefit from a much superior manufacturing infrastructure. Here we review the potential of NEM-switch technologies to complement or selectively replace conventional complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology, and identify the challenges involved in the large-scale manufacture of a representative set of NEM-based devices.

  3. An evaluation of Access Tier local area network switches.

    SciTech Connect

    Eldridge, John M.; Olsberg, Ronald R.

    2004-06-01

    This reports tabulates the Test and Evaluation results of the Access Class Switch tests conducted by members of Department 9336. About 15 switches were reviewed for use in the enterprise network as access tier switches as defined in a three tier architecture. The Access Switch Tier has several functions including: aggregate customer desktop ports, preserve and apply QoS tags, provide switched LAN access, provide VLAN assignment, as well as others. The typical switch size is 48 or less user ports. The evaluation team reviewed network switch evaluation reports from the Tolly Group as well as other sources. We then used these reports as a starting point to identify particular switches for evaluation. In general we reviewed the products of dominant equipment manufacturers. Also, based on architectural design requirements, the majority of the switches tested were of relatively small monolithic unit variety.

  4. Mechanisms and Factors that Influence High Frequency Retroviral Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Delviks-Frankenberry, Krista; Galli, Andrea; Nikolaitchik, Olga; Mens, Helene; Pathak, Vinay K.; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2011-01-01

    With constantly changing environmental selection pressures, retroviruses rely upon recombination to reassort polymorphisms in their genomes and increase genetic diversity, which improves the chances for the survival of their population. Recombination occurs during DNA synthesis, whereby reverse transcriptase undergoes template switching events between the two copackaged RNAs, resulting in a viral recombinant with portions of the genetic information from each parental RNA. This review summarizes our current understanding of the factors and mechanisms influencing retroviral recombination, fidelity of the recombination process, and evaluates the subsequent viral diversity and fitness of the progeny recombinant. Specifically, the high mutation rates and high recombination frequencies of HIV-1 will be analyzed for their roles in influencing HIV-1 global diversity, as well as HIV-1 diagnosis, drug treatment, and vaccine development. PMID:21994801

  5. Optical switching technologies and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciminelli, Caterina; Meli, F.; Grasso, Giorgio

    2001-05-01

    In this paper system applications, geometry, physical effects and materials of optical switching devices are reviewed. Main system scenarios are presented and some key features such as size, loss, speed, scalability and granularity are highlighted. Two principal categories of optical switches are considered, i.e. guided-wave switches and free-space switches. In the first category some sub- classes have been identified according to their geometrical configuration, principle of operation and, then physical mechanism and materials. As for the geometry, the most frequently used configurations are briefly described together with their advantages and disadvantages. Different physical effects suitable to obtain the index change, which the switching function is based on, are also described with reference to the material substrates. Switches based on semiconductor optical amplifier gate are also analyzed. In the free-space category the main sub-classes are represented by the opto-mechanical devices and micro-opto-electro- mechanical systems switches. The last technology combines the free-space interconnecting with the integration capability on a single silica chip. The main advantages such as the ability to scaling up to large switch fabric and some issues such as packaging and reliability are analyzed. Finally, devices based on polarization change, acousto- optics interaction, total internal reflection and holography are illustrated.

  6. THYRATRON SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Creveling, R.; Bourgeois, N.A. Jr.

    1959-04-21

    An arrangement for utilizing a thyratron as a noise free switch is described. It has been discovered that the voltage between plate and cathode of a thyratron will oscillate, producing voltage spikes, if the tube carries only a fraction of its maximum rated current. These voltage spikes can produce detrimental effects where the thyratron is used in critical timing circuits. To alleviate this problem the disclosed circuit provides a charged capacitor and a resistor in parallel with the tube and of such value that the maximum current will flow from the capacitor through the thyratron when it is triggered. During this time the signal current is conducted through the tube, before the thyratron voltage starts to oscillate, and the signal current output is free of noise spikes.

  7. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with “human-like” post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications. PMID:23908655

  8. Exponential stability and robust H∞ control of a class of discrete-time switched non-linear systems with time-varying delays via T-S fuzzy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yanbing; Zhang, Hongbin

    2014-05-01

    This paper deals with stability and robust H∞ control of discrete-time switched non-linear systems with time-varying delays. The T-S fuzzy models are utilised to represent each sub-non-linear system. Thus, with two level functions, namely, crisp switching functions and local fuzzy weighting functions, we introduce a discrete-time switched fuzzy systems, which inherently contain the features of the switched hybrid systems and T-S fuzzy systems. Piecewise fuzzy weighting-dependent Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals (PFLKFs) and average dwell-time approach are utilised in this paper for the exponentially stability analysis and controller design, and with free fuzzy weighting matrix scheme, switching control laws are obtained such that H∞ performance is satisfied. The conditions of stability and the control laws are given in the form of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) that are numerically feasible. The state decay estimate is explicitly given. A numerical example and the control of delayed single link robot arm with uncertain part are given to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method.

  9. Passivity of switched recurrent neural networks with time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jie; Wang, Jun

    2015-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the passivity analysis for switched neural networks subject to stochastic disturbances and time-varying delays. First, using the multiple Lyapunov functions method, a state-dependent switching law is designed to present a stochastic passivity condition. Second, a hysteresis switching law involving both the current state and the previous value of the switching signal are presented to avoid chattering resulted from the state-dependent switching. Third, based on the average dwell-time approach, a class of switching signals is determined to guarantee the switched neural network stochastically passive. Finally, three numerical examples are provided to illustrate the characteristics of three proposed switching laws. PMID:25576577

  10. Phenotypic switching in bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrin, Jack

    genetic networks that would implement a more general theoretical model of phenotypic switching. We will use a new cloning strategy in order to systematically assemble a large number of genetic features, such as site-specific recombination components from the R64 plasmid, which invert several coexisting DNA segments. The inversion of these segments would lead to discrete phenotypic transitions inside a living cell. These artificial phenotypic switches can be controlled precisely in experiments and may serve as a benchmark for their natural counterparts.

  11. Integrated Network Analysis Identifies Fight-Club Nodes as a Class of Hubs Encompassing Key Putative Switch Genes That Induce Major Transcriptome Reprogramming during Grapevine Development[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Maria Concetta; Zenoni, Sara; Fasoli, Marianna; Massonnet, Mélanie; Farina, Lorenzo; Castiglione, Filippo; Pezzotti, Mario; Paci, Paola

    2014-01-01

    We developed an approach that integrates different network-based methods to analyze the correlation network arising from large-scale gene expression data. By studying grapevine (Vitis vinifera) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) gene expression atlases and a grapevine berry transcriptomic data set during the transition from immature to mature growth, we identified a category named “fight-club hubs” characterized by a marked negative correlation with the expression profiles of neighboring genes in the network. A special subset named “switch genes” was identified, with the additional property of many significant negative correlations outside their own group in the network. Switch genes are involved in multiple processes and include transcription factors that may be considered master regulators of the previously reported transcriptome remodeling that marks the developmental shift from immature to mature growth. All switch genes, expressed at low levels in vegetative/green tissues, showed a significant increase in mature/woody organs, suggesting a potential regulatory role during the developmental transition. Finally, our analysis of tomato gene expression data sets showed that wild-type switch genes are downregulated in ripening-deficient mutants. The identification of known master regulators of tomato fruit maturation suggests our method is suitable for the detection of key regulators of organ development in different fleshy fruit crops. PMID:25490918

  12. Miniature intermittent contact switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sword, A.

    1972-01-01

    Design of electric switch for providing intermittent contact is presented. Switch consists of flexible conductor surrounding, but separated from, fixed conductor. Flexing of outside conductor to contact fixed conductor completes circuit. Advantage is small size of switch compared to standard switches.

  13. Latching relay switch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Duimstra, Frederick A.

    1991-01-01

    A latching relay switch assembly which includes a coil section and a switch or contact section. The coil section includes at least one permanent magnet and at least one electromagnet. The respective sections are, generally, arranged in separate locations or cavities in the assembly. The switch is latched by a permanent magnet assembly and selectively switched by an overriding electromagnetic assembly.

  14. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-03-06

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  15. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-01-01

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  16. Characteristics of current filamentation in high gain photoconductive semiconductor switching

    SciTech Connect

    Zutavern, F J; Loubriel, G M; O'Malley, M W; Helgeson, W D; McLaughlin, D L; Denison, G J

    1992-01-01

    Characteristics of current filamentation are reported for high gain photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS). Infrared photoluminescence is used to monitor carrier recombination radiation during fast initiation of high gain switching in large (1.5 cm gap) lateral GaAs PCSS. Spatial modulation of the optical trigger, a 200--300 ps pulse width laser, is examined. Effects on the location and number of current filaments, rise time, and delay to high gain switching, minimum trigger energy, and degradation of switch contacts are presented. Implications of these measurements for the theoretical understanding and practical development of these switches are discussed. Efforts to increase current density and reduce switch size and optical trigger energy requirements are described. Results from contact development and device lifetime testing are presented and the impact of these results on practical device applications is discussed.

  17. Isotype-switched follicular lymphoma displays dissociation between activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression and somatic hypermutation.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Florian; Navarrete, Marcelo A; Bertinetti-Lapatki, Cristina; Boehm, Joachim; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Veelken, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    In B-cells, activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is required for somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) of immunoglobulin genes. AID introduces mutations in immunoglobulin variable regions (IGV) during B-cell receptor affinity maturation, but may also introduce aberrant mutations into non-immunoglobulin genes, most commonly BCL6. Follicular lymphoma (FL) B-cells constitutively express AID and undergo CSR, SHM and aberrant SHM. We have studied AID expression, the presence of SHM mutations, CSR, and aberrant SHM in BCL6 in a cohort of 75 FL patients. Whereas IgM-expressing (non-switched) FL were characterized by an expected positive correlation between AID and IGV and BCL6 mutations, isotype-switched FL showed dissociation between AID expression and aberrant SHM, and inverse correlation between SHM and AID expression. Our results unveil two manifest biological subgroups of FL and indicate that the specific dissociation between AID and SHM after isotype switch may correlate with the clinical outcome of this heterogeneous disease. PMID:25860234

  18. "Racializing" Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatt-Echeverria, Beth; Urrieta, Luis, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    In an effort to explore how racial and class oppressions intersect, the authors use their autobiographical narratives to depict cultural and experiential continuity and discontinuity in growing up white working class versus Chicano working class. They specifically focus on "racializing class" due to the ways class is often used as a copout by…

  19. Dysregulation of CD30+ T cells by leukemia impairs isotype switching in normal B cells

    PubMed Central

    Cerutti, Andrea; Kim, Edmund C.; Shah, Shefali; Schattner, Elaine J.; Zan, Hong; Schaffer, András; Casali, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is associated with impaired immunoglobulin (Ig) class-switching from IgM to IgG and IgA, a defect that leads to recurrent infections. When activated in the presence of leukemic CLL B cells, T cells rapidly up-regulate CD30 through an OX40 ligand and interleukin 4 (IL-4)–dependent mechanism. These leukemia-induced CD30+ T cells inhibit CD40 ligand (CD40L)-mediated Sµ→Sγ and Sµ→Sα class-switch DNA recombination (CSR) by engaging CD30 ligand (CD30L), a molecule that interferes with the assembly of the CD40–tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated factor (TRAF) complex in nonmalignant IgD+ B cells. In addition, engagement of T cell CD30 by CD30L on neoplastic CLL B cells down-regulates the CD3-induced expression of CD40L. These findings indicate that, in CLL, abnormal CD30-CD30L interaction impairs IgG and IgA production by interfering with the CD40-mediated differentiation of nonmalignant B cells. PMID:11175813

  20. Switching-on quantum size effects in silicon nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Qian, Chenxi; Wang, Liwei; Wei, Muan; Mastronardi, Melanie L; Casillas, Gilberto; Breu, Josef; Ozin, Geoffrey A

    2015-01-27

    The size-dependence of the absolute luminescence quantum yield of size-separated silicon nanocrystals reveals a "volcano" behavior, which switches on around 5 nm, peaks at near 3.7-3.9 nm, and decreases thereafter. These three regions respectively define: i) the transition from bulk to strongly quantum confined emissive silicon, ii) increasing confinement enhancing radiative recombination, and iii) increasing contributions favoring non-radiative recombination. PMID:25472530

  1. Latching micro optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J; Polosky, Marc A

    2013-05-21

    An optical switch reliably maintains its on or off state even when subjected to environments where the switch is bumped or otherwise moved. In addition, the optical switch maintains its on or off state indefinitely without requiring external power. External power is used only to transition the switch from one state to the other. The optical switch is configured with a fixed optical fiber and a movable optical fiber. The movable optical fiber is guided by various actuators in conjunction with a latching mechanism that configure the switch in one position that corresponds to the on state and in another position that corresponds to the off state.

  2. Recombinant protein production technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant protein production is an important technology for antibody production, biochemical activity study, and structural determination during the post-genomic era. Limiting factors in recombinant protein production include low-level protein expression, protein precipitation, and loss of protein...

  3. Comprehensive analysis of sequences of a protein switch.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-Hua; Meller, Jaroslaw; Elber, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Switches form a special class of proteins that dramatically change their three-dimensional structures upon a small perturbation. One possible perturbation that we explore is that of a single point mutation. Building on the pioneering experimental work of Alexander et al. (Alexander et al. PNAS, 2007; 104,11963-11968) that determines switch sequences between α and α+β folds we conduct a comprehensive sequence sampling by a Markov Chain with multiple fitness criteria to identify new switches given the experimental folds. We screen for switch sequences using a combination of contact potential, secondary structure prediction, and finally molecular dynamics simulations. Statistical properties of switch sequences are discussed and illustrated to be most sensitive to mutation at the N- and C- termini of the switch protein. Based on this analysis, a particularly stable putative switch pair is identified and proposed for further experimental analysis. PMID:26073558

  4. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  5. Recombineering homologous recombination constructs in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Carreira-Rosario, Arnaldo; Scoggin, Shane; Shalaby, Nevine A; Williams, Nathan David; Hiesinger, P Robin; Buszczak, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The continued development of techniques for fast, large-scale manipulation of endogenous gene loci will broaden the use of Drosophila melanogaster as a genetic model organism for human-disease related research. Recent years have seen technical advancements like homologous recombination and recombineering. However, generating unequivocal null mutations or tagging endogenous proteins remains a substantial effort for most genes. Here, we describe and demonstrate techniques for using recombineering-based cloning methods to generate vectors that can be used to target and manipulate endogenous loci in vivo. Specifically, we have established a combination of three technologies: (1) BAC transgenesis/recombineering, (2) ends-out homologous recombination and (3) Gateway technology to provide a robust, efficient and flexible method for manipulating endogenous genomic loci. In this protocol, we provide step-by-step details about how to (1) design individual vectors, (2) how to clone large fragments of genomic DNA into the homologous recombination vector using gap repair, and (3) how to replace or tag genes of interest within these vectors using a second round of recombineering. Finally, we will also provide a protocol for how to mobilize these cassettes in vivo to generate a knockout, or a tagged gene via knock-in. These methods can easily be adopted for multiple targets in parallel and provide a means for manipulating the Drosophila genome in a timely and efficient manner. PMID:23893070

  6. Heat Switches for ADRs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiPirro, M. J.; Shirron, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Heat switches are key elements in the cyclic operation of Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADRs). Several of the types of heat switches that have been used for ADRs are described in this paper. Key elements in selection and design of these switches include not only ON/OFF switching ratio, but also method of actuation, size, weight, and structural soundness. Some of the trade-off are detailed in this paper.

  7. Heat switches for ADRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiPirro, M. J.; Shirron, P. J.

    2014-07-01

    Heat switches are key elements in the cyclic operation of Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADRs). Several of the types of heat switches that have been used for ADRs are described in this paper. Key elements in selection and design of these switches include not only ON/OFF switching ratio, but also method of actuation, size, weight, and structural soundness. Some of the trade-off are detailed in this paper.

  8. Robust stabilisation and L2 -gain analysis for switched systems with actuator saturation under asynchronous switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juan; Zhao, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Robust stabilisation and L2-gain analysis for a class of switched systems with actuator saturation are studied in this paper. The switching signal of the controllers lags behind that of the system modes, which leads to the asynchronous switching between the candidate controllers and the subsystems. By combining the piecewise Lyapunov function method with the convex hull technique, sufficient conditions in terms of LMIs for the solvability of the robust stabilisation and weighted L2-gain problems are presented respectively under the dwell time scheme. Finally, a numerical example is given to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed results.

  9. On Input-to-State Stability of Switched Stochastic Nonlinear Systems Under Extended Asynchronous Switching.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yu; Zhai, Di-Hua; Liu, Guo-Ping; Zhao, Yun-Bo

    2016-05-01

    An extended asynchronous switching model is investigated for a class of switched stochastic nonlinear retarded systems in the presence of both detection delay and false alarm, where the extended asynchronous switching is described by two independent and exponentially distributed stochastic processes, and further simplified as Markovian. Based on the Razumikhin-type theorem incorporated with average dwell-time approach, the sufficient criteria for global asymptotic stability in probability and stochastic input-to-state stability are given, whose importance and effectiveness are finally verified by numerical examples. PMID:26068932

  10. Multilingual Switch in Peer Classroom Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unamuno, Virginia

    2008-01-01

    Focusing on code-switching from conversation analysis and sociolinguistic perspectives, this paper examines interactions between 10-12-year-old language learners of immigrant origin and locally born students as they are engaging in verbal pair work. All are students attending language classes in state primary schools in Barcelona in which Catalan…

  11. Design of microwave beam-switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, M. L.

    1983-12-01

    An investigation of RF beam-switching networks for creating, with a multiple-beam antenna (MBA), a set of electronically steerable antenna beams, shows that there are three main classes of network. Taking the case of a 61-beam MBA with 8 simultaneously steered beams as an example, we can describe these classes as: (1) networks which can connect any one of the 8 output ports to any one of the 61 beam feeds, (2) networks which can connect the 8 output ports to any set of 8 beam feeds selected from the 61, but with a constraint imposed on the order in which the 8 ports are connected to the 8 selected feeds, and (3) networks in which the set of 8 beam feeds cannot be selected arbitrarily - some fraction of the total number of conceivable interconnections cannot be completed. Networks exist in each of the three classes having very similar traffic handling performance and yet requiring a total number of switches which is very different from one class to the next. Their number is 907, 387, and 175 for the unconstrained, order-constrained and selection-constrained networks, respectively, needed to do the 61-to-8 switching job described above. The report examines the design, performance and complexity of such networks for general N and M. Included are two further measures of complexity, as well as the switching algorithm and the effect of non-uniform traffic. The results are presented as graphs, tables and formulas.

  12. Switching from Computer to Microcomputer Architecture Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolanakis, Dimosthenis E.; Kotsis, Konstantinos T.; Laopoulos, Theodore

    2010-01-01

    In the last decades, the technological and scientific evolution of the computing discipline has been widely affecting research in software engineering education, which nowadays advocates more enlightened and liberal ideas. This article reviews cross-disciplinary research on a computer architecture class in consideration of its switching to…

  13. Q-Switching in a Neodymium Laser

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holgado, Warein; Sola, Inigo J.; Jarque, Enrique Conejero; Jarabo, Sebastian; Roso, Luis

    2012-01-01

    We present a laboratory experiment for advanced undergraduate or graduate laser-related classes to study the performance of a neodymium laser. In the experiment, the student has to build the neodymium laser using an open cavity. After that, the cavity losses are modulated with an optical chopper located inside, so the Q-switching regime is…

  14. Opc expression, LPS immunotype switch and pilin conversion contribute to serum resistance of unencapsulated meningococci.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Kerstin; Pawlik, Marie-Christin; Claus, Heike; Jarva, Hanna; Meri, Seppo; Vogel, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis employs polysaccharides and outer membrane proteins to cope with human serum complement attack. To screen for factors influencing serum resistance, an assay was developed based on a colorimetric serum bactericidal assay. The screening used a genetically modified sequence type (ST)-41/44 clonal complex (cc) strain lacking LPS sialylation, polysaccharide capsule, the factor H binding protein (fHbp) and MutS, a protein of the DNA repair mechanism. After killing of >99.9% of the bacterial cells by serum treatment, the colorimetric assay was used to screen 1000 colonies, of which 35 showed enhanced serum resistance. Three mutant classes were identified. In the first class of mutants, enhanced expression of Opc was identified. Opc expression was associated with vitronectin binding and reduced membrane attack complex deposition confirming recent observations. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) immunotype switch from immunotype L3 to L8/L1 by lgtA and lgtC phase variation represented the second class. Isogenic mutant analysis demonstrated that in ST-41/44 cc strains the L8/L1 immunotype was more serum resistant than the L3 immunotype. Consecutive analysis revealed that the immunotypes L8 and L1 were frequently observed in ST-41/44 cc isolates from both carriage and disease. Immunotype switch to L8/L1 is therefore suggested to contribute to the adaptive capacity of this meningococcal lineage. The third mutant class displayed a pilE allelic exchange associated with enhanced autoaggregation. The mutation of the C terminal hypervariable region D of PilE included a residue previously associated with increased pilus bundle formation. We suggest that autoaggregation reduced the surface area accessible to serum complement and protected from killing. The study highlights the ability of meningococci to adapt to environmental stress by phase variation and intrachromosomal recombination affecting subcapsular antigens. PMID:23028802

  15. Apollo Ring Optical Switch

    SciTech Connect

    Maestas, J.H.

    1987-03-01

    An optical switch was designed, built, and installed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to facilitate the integration of two Apollo computer networks into a single network. This report presents an overview of the optical switch as well as its layout, switch testing procedure and test data, and installation.

  16. Triggered plasma opening switch

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, C W

    1988-02-23

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  17. Triggered plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mendel, Clifford W.

    1988-01-01

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  18. Photoionization and Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2000-01-01

    Theoretically self-consistent calculations for photoionization and (e + ion) recombination are described. The same eigenfunction expansion for the ion is employed in coupled channel calculations for both processes, thus ensuring consistency between cross sections and rates. The theoretical treatment of (e + ion) recombination subsumes both the non-resonant recombination ("radiative recombination"), and the resonant recombination ("di-electronic recombination") processes in a unified scheme. In addition to the total, unified recombination rates, level-specific recombination rates and photoionization cross sections are obtained for a large number of atomic levels. Both relativistic Breit-Pauli, and non-relativistic LS coupling, calculations are carried out in the close coupling approximation using the R-matrix method. Although the calculations are computationally intensive, they yield nearly all photoionization and recombination parameters needed for astrophysical photoionization models with higher precision than hitherto possible, estimated at about 10-20% from comparison with experimentally available data (including experimentally derived DR rates). Results are electronically available for over 40 atoms and ions. Photoionization and recombination of He-, and Li-like C and Fe are described for X-ray modeling. The unified method yields total and complete (e+ion) recombination rate coefficients, that can not otherwise be obtained theoretically or experimentally.

  19. Genetically encoded optical activation of DNA recombination in human cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Arbely, E; Zhang, J; Chou, C; Uprety, R; Chin, J W; Deiters, A

    2016-06-30

    We developed two tightly regulated, light-activated Cre recombinase enzymes through site-specific incorporation of two genetically-encoded photocaged amino acids in human cells. Excellent optical off to on switching of DNA recombination was achieved. Furthermore, we demonstrated precise spatial control of Cre recombinase through patterned illumination. PMID:27277957

  20. REMOTE CONTROLLED SWITCHING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, J.C.

    1959-02-01

    An electrical switching device which can be remotely controlled and in which one or more switches may be accurately operated at predetermined times or with predetermined intervening time intervals is described. The switching device consists essentially of a deck, a post projecting from the deck at right angles thereto, cam means mounted for rotation around said posts and a switch connected to said deck and actuated by said cam means. Means is provided for rotating the cam means at a constant speed and the switching apparatus is enclosed in a sealed container with external adjusting means and electrical connection elements.

  1. Serial Recombination during Circulation of Type 1 Wild-Vaccine Recombinant Polioviruses in China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-Mei; Zheng, Du-Ping; Zhang, Li-Bi; Oberste, M. Steven; Kew, Olen M.; Pallansch, Mark A.

    2003-01-01

    Type 1 wild-vaccine recombinant polioviruses sharing a 367-nucleotide (nt) block of Sabin 1-derived sequence spanning the VP1 and 2A genes circulated widely in China from 1991 to 1993. We surveyed the sequence relationships among 34 wild-vaccine recombinants by comparing six genomic intervals: the conserved 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) (nt 186 to 639), the hypervariable portion of the 5′-UTR (nt 640 to 742), the VP4 and partial VP2 genes (nt 743 to 1176), the VP1 gene (nt 2480 to 3385), the 2A gene (nt 3386 to 3832), and the partial 3D gene (nt 6011 to 6544). The 5′-UTR, capsid (VP4-VP2 and VP1), and 2A sequence intervals had similar phylogenies. By contrast, the partial 3D sequences could be distributed into five divergent genetic classes. Most (25 of 34) of the wild-vaccine recombinant isolates showed no evidence of additional recombination beyond the initial wild-Sabin recombination event. Eight isolates from 1992 to 1993, however, appear to be derived from three independent additional recombination events, and one 1993 isolate was derived from two consecutive events. Complete genomic sequences of a representative isolate for each 3D sequence class demonstrated that these exchanges had occurred in the 2B, 2C, and 3D genes. The 3D gene sequences were not closely related to those of the Sabin strains or 53 diverse contemporary wild poliovirus isolates from China, but all were related to the 3D genes of species C enteroviruses. The appearance within approximately 2.5 years of five recombinant classes derived from a single ancestral infection illustrates the rapid emergence of new recombinants among circulating wild polioviruses. PMID:14512548

  2. Class Size.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Siobhan; Lumsden, Linda S.

    1994-01-01

    The items featured in this annotated bibliography touch on several aspects of the multifaceted class-size debate. Allen Odden reviews the literature and contends that class-size reduction should be used "sparingly and strategically." C. M. Achilles and colleagues examines two different class-size situations and find student test performance in the…

  3. Class Size.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Holly R.

    Exploring the class-size issue, this paper focuses on the primary grades and asks questions such as "does a reduction in class size promote an increase in academic achievement?" and "how substantial does the reduction in numbers have to be in order for a significant increase to occur?" The paper surveys debates on class size and the social factors…

  4. Class Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdata, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Ever since George Washington opted for the title of president rather than king, Americans have been uncomfortable with the idea of class distinctions. This article presents an interview with Dr. Janet Galligani Casey regarding the idea of class distinctions. Galligani Casey, who grew up in a working-class neighborhood in Somerville, Massachusetts,…

  5. Recombination of cluster ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsen, Rainer

    1993-01-01

    Some of our recent work on molecular band emissions from recombination of molecular dimer ions (N4(+) and CO(+) CO) is discussed. Much of the experimental work was done by Y. S. Cao; the results on N4(+) recombination have been published. A brief progress report is given on our ongoing measurements of neutral products of recombination using the flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe technique in conjunction with laser-induced fluorescence.

  6. Recombination in electron coolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, A.; Gwinner, G.; Linkemann, J.; Saghiri, A. A.; Schmitt, M.; Schwalm, D.; Grieser, M.; Beutelspacher, M.; Bartsch, T.; Brandau, C.; Hoffknecht, A.; Müller, A.; Schippers, S.; Uwira, O.; Savin, D. W.

    2000-02-01

    An introduction to electron-ion recombination processes is given and recent measurements are described as examples, focusing on low collision energies. Discussed in particular are fine-structure-mediated dielectronic recombination of fluorine-like ions, the moderate recombination enhancement by factors of typically 1.5-4 found for most ion species at relative electron-ion energies below about 10 meV, and the much larger enhancement occurring for specific highly charged ions of complex electronic structure, apparently caused by low-energy dielectronic recombination resonances. Recent experiments revealing dielectronic resonances with very large natural width are also described.

  7. Effective switching frequency multiplier inverter

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Gui-Jia; Peng, Fang Z.

    2007-08-07

    A switching frequency multiplier inverter for low inductance machines that uses parallel connection of switches and each switch is independently controlled according to a pulse width modulation scheme. The effective switching frequency is multiplied by the number of switches connected in parallel while each individual switch operates within its limit of switching frequency. This technique can also be used for other power converters such as DC/DC, AC/DC converters.

  8. Thermally actuated thermionic switch

    DOEpatents

    Barrus, D.M.; Shires, C.D.

    1982-09-30

    A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

  9. Thermally actuated thermionic switch

    DOEpatents

    Barrus, Donald M.; Shires, Charles D.

    1988-01-01

    A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

  10. AC magnetohydrodynamic microfluidic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoff, A V; Lee, A P

    2000-03-02

    A microfluidic switch has been demonstrated using an AC Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumping mechanism in which the Lorentz force is used to pump an electrolytic solution. By integrating two AC MHD pumps into different arms of a Y-shaped fluidic circuit, flow can be switched between the two arms. This type of switch can be used to produce complex fluidic routing, which may have multiple applications in {micro}TAS.

  11. Solid state switch

    DOEpatents

    Merritt, Bernard T.; Dreifuerst, Gary R.

    1994-01-01

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1500 A peak, 1.0 .mu.s pulsewidth, and 4500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry.

  12. Molecular Characterization of IgA- and/or IgG-Switched Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Matolcsy, András; Casali, Paolo; Nádor, Roland G.; Liu, Yi-Fang; Knowles, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    The immunoglobulin (Ig) variable region (V) genes expressed by IgM chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B cells display little or no somatic mutations. However, preliminary findings have shown that Ig V genes of IgA and IgG CLLs may be somatically mutated, suggesting that isotype-switched CLLs may represent a “subtype” of the disease. To investigate the degree and nature of somatic mutations and the role of antigen (Ag) in the clonal selection and expansion of isotype-switched CLLs, and to determine whether specific oncogene or tumor suppressor gene mutations are associated with isotype-switched CLLs, we analyzed the expressed Ig VH gene, bcl-1 and bcl-2 proto-oncogene, and p53 tumor suppressor gene configurations of 3 IgA-, 1 IgG-, and 1 IgA/IgG-expressing CLLs. These isotype-switched CLL B cells expressed surface HLA-DR, CD19, CD23, and CD5, and dis played no alterations of the bcl-1 and bcl-2 oncogenes and the p53 tumor-suppressor gene. The cDNA VH-D-JH gene sequence was joined with that of the Cα gene in the B cells of the three IgA CLLs, and with that of the Cγ gene in the IgG CLL B cells. In the IgA/IgG-coexpressing CLL B cells, identical VH-D-JH cDNA sequences were spliced to either Cα or Cγ genes. In all five CLLs, the pattern of Cμ DNA probe hybridization to the digested genomic DNAs was consistent with deletion of the Cm exon from the rearranged Ig gene locus, suggesting that these CLL B cells had undergone DNA switch recombination. In one IgA CLL, the expressed VH gene was unmutated. In all other class-switched CLLs, the Ig VH segment gene was mutated, but the point mutations were not associated with intraclonal diversification. In one IgA and in the IgA/IgG-coexpressing CLL, the nature and distribution of the mutations were consistent with Ag selection. These findings suggest that IgA- and/or IgG-expressing CLLs represent, in their VH gene structure, transformants of B cells at different stages of ontogeny. They also suggest that Ag may play a

  13. In vitro analysis of a primary, major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response to avian leukosis virus (ALV), using target cells expressing MHC class I cDNA inserted into a recombinant ALV vector.

    PubMed

    Thacker, E L; Fulton, J E; Hunt, H D

    1995-10-01

    The interaction between the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) is an important component of the host's resistance to viral infections and tumor formation. In this study, an avian leukosis virus (ALV) vector system, RCASBP, expressing MHC chicken class I (B-F) cDNA was used to develop target cells expressing the chicken class I glycoproteins complexed with ALV antigens on the cell surface. Peripheral blood from chickens inoculated with ALV was shown to contain antigen-specific, MHC-restricted, CD8+ effector CTLs, using a 51Cr release assay utilizing the RCASBP B-F target cells. The stimulated effector cells were also predominantly alpha beta T-cell receptor-positive (TCR2) T cells. The CTL response varied between two haplotypes of chickens which differed in their response to Rous sarcoma virus (RSV)-induced tumors. Chickens with the B21 haplotype which regress RSV-induced tumors showed maximal cytolytic activity, while chickens with the B13 haplotype which do not regress RSV-induced tumors had minimal to no cytolytic activity. In addition to assessing the CTL response to ALV, the creation of MHC-specific immortal target cell lines will be extremely useful in evaluating CTL responses to other viral disease in chickens. PMID:7666545

  14. Reusable fast opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Van Devender, J.P.; Emin, D.

    1983-12-21

    A reusable fast opening switch for transferring energy, in the form of a high power pulse, from an electromagnetic storage device such as an inductor into a load. The switch is efficient, compact, fast and reusable. The switch comprises a ferromagnetic semiconductor which undergoes a fast transition between conductive and metallic states at a critical temperature and which undergoes the transition without a phase change in its crystal structure. A semiconductor such as europium rich europhous oxide, which undergoes a conductor to insulator transition when it is joule heated from its conductor state, can be used to form the switch.

  15. Alarm toe switch

    DOEpatents

    Ganyard, Floyd P.

    1982-01-01

    An alarm toe switch inserted within a shoe for energizing an alarm circuit n a covert manner includes an insole mounting pad into which a miniature reed switch is fixedly molded. An elongated slot perpendicular to the reed switch is formed in the bottom surface of the mounting pad. A permanent cylindrical magnet positioned in the forward portion of the slot with a diameter greater than the pad thickness causes a bump above the pad. A foam rubber block is also positioned in the slot rearwardly of the magnet and holds the magnet in normal inoperative relation. A non-magnetic support plate covers the slot and holds the magnet and foam rubber in the slot. The plate minimizes bending and frictional forces to improve movement of the magnet for reliable switch activation. The bump occupies the knuckle space beneath the big toe. When the big toe is scrunched rearwardly the magnet is moved within the slot relative to the reed switch, thus magnetically activating the switch. When toe pressure is released the foam rubber block forces the magnet back into normal inoperative position to deactivate the reed switch. The reed switch is hermetically sealed with the magnet acting through the wall so the switch assembly S is capable of reliable operation even in wet and corrosive environments.

  16. Simplified Design Equations for Class-E Neural Prosthesis Transmitters

    PubMed Central

    Troyk, Philip; Hu, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    Extreme miniaturization of implantable electronic devices is recognized as essential for the next generation of neural prostheses, owing to the need for minimizing the damage and disruption of the surrounding neural tissue. Transcutaneous power and data transmission via a magnetic link remains the most effective means of powering and controlling implanted neural prostheses. Reduction in the size of the coil, within the neural prosthesis, demands the generation of a high-intensity radio frequency magnetic field from the extracoporeal transmitter. The Class-E power amplifier circuit topology has been recognized as a highly effective means of producing large radio frequency currents within the transmitter coil. Unfortunately, design of a Class-E circuit is most often fraught by the need to solve a complex set of equations so as to implement both the zero-voltage-switching and zero-voltage-derivative-switching conditions that are required for efficient operation. This paper presents simple explicit design equations for designing the Class-E circuit topology. Numerical design examples are presented to illustrate the design procedure. PMID:23292784

  17. Recombination between bacteriophage lambda and plasmid pBR322 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Pogue-Geile, K L; Dassarma, S; King, S R; Jaskunas, S R

    1980-01-01

    Recombinant lambda phages were isolated that resulted from recombination between the lambda genome and plasmid pBR322 in Escherichia coli, even though these deoxyribonucleic acids (DNAs) did not share extensive regions of homology. The characterization of these recombinant DNAs by heteroduplex analysis and restriction endonucleases is described. All but one of the recombinants appeared to have resulted from reciprocal recombination between a site on lambda DNA and a site on the plasmid. In general, there were two classes of recombinants. One class appeared to have resulted from recombination at the phage attachment site that probably resulted from lambda integration into secondary attachment sites on the plasmid. Seven different secondary attachment sites on pBR322 were found. The other class resulted from plasmid integration at other sites that were widely scattered on the lambda genome. For this second class of recombinants, more than one site on the plasmid could recombine with lambda DNA. Thus, the recombination did not appear to be site specific with respect to lambda or the plasmid. Possible mechanisms for generating these recombinants are discussed. Images PMID:6247334

  18. The mismatch repair system reduces meiotic homeologous recombination and stimulates recombination-dependent chromosome loss.

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, S R; Hunter, N; Louis, E J; Borts, R H

    1996-01-01

    Efficient genetic recombination requires near-perfect homology between participating molecules. Sequence divergence reduces the frequency of recombination, a process that is dependent on the activity of the mismatch repair system. The effects of chromosomal divergence in diploids of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which one copy of chromosome III is derived from a closely related species, Saccharomyces paradoxus, have been examined. Meiotic recombination between the diverged chromosomes is decreased by 25-fold. Spore viability is reduced with an observable increase in the number of tetrads with only two or three viable spores. Asci with only two viable spores are disomic for chromosome III, consistent with meiosis I nondisjunction of the homeologs. Asci with three viable spores are highly enriched for recombinants relative to tetrads with four viable spores. In 96% of the class with three viable spores, only one spore possesses a recombinant chromosome III, suggesting that the recombination process itself contributes to meiotic death. This phenomenon is dependent on the activities of the mismatch repair genes PMS1 and MSH2. A model of mismatch-stimulated chromosome loss is proposed to account for this observation. As expected, crossing over is increased in pms1 and msh2 mutants. Furthermore, genetic exchange in pms1 msh2 double mutants is affected to a greater extent than in either mutant alone, suggesting that the two proteins act independently to inhibit homeologous recombination. All mismatch repair-deficient strains exhibited reductions in the rate of chromosome III nondisjunction. PMID:8887641

  19. Design and characterization of the Pegasus I plasma flow switch

    SciTech Connect

    Wysocki, F.J.; Bartsch, R.R.; Bowers, R.L.; Cochrane, J.C.; Greene, A.E.; Ladish, J.S.; Lee, P.H.Y.; Parker, J.V.; Peterson, D.L.; Benage, J.F.; Gribble, R.F.; Shlachter, J.S.; Scudder, D.W. ); Roderick, N.F. ); Turchi, P.J. )

    1992-01-01

    A plasma flow switch (PFS) based on an experimental design utilized at the Air Force Weapons Laboratory (AFWL) has been fielded on the Pegasus I system. Currents of as much as 5.8 MA have been switched on a time scale (10--90%) of 200 ns into a static load. Tests with a foil load have resulted in a less than ideal current transfer because of interaction between the dynamic load and the plasma flow switch. Two-dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) calculations have been used to characterize the behavior of the PFS and to aid in the design. These calculations have also been used to investigate several classes of perturbations in the switch-plasma, the interaction of the switch-plasma with the coaxial electrodes, and their effect on switching efficiency. The Pegasus I PFS experiments reproduce the results obtained at AFWL throughout the switch initiation and switching phases. However, early in the foil implosion the switched current drops significantly. We believe this current drop results from a small amount of residual plasma left behind in the PFS region that impedes the magnetic-flux transport, thereby preventing efficient foil implosion. The experimental results suggest that the method of PFS initiation (viz. chordal wire arrays) may be an important factor in switch operation.

  20. Control discrete-time switched singular systems with state delays under asynchronous switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jinxing; Fei, Shumin; Gao, Zhifeng

    2013-06-01

    This article is concerned with the problem of state feedback control for a class of discrete-time switched singular systems with time-varying state delays under asynchronous switching. The asynchronous switching considered here means that the switching instants of the candidate controllers lag behind those of the system modes. The concept of mismatched control rate is introduced. By using the multiple Lyapunov function approach and the average dwell time technique, a sufficient condition for the existence a stabilising switching law is first derived to guarantee the regularity, causality and exponential stability of the closed-loop system in the presence of asynchronous switching. The stabilising switching law is characterised by a upper bound on the mismatched control rate and a lower bound on the average dwell time. Then, the corresponding solvability condition for a set of mode-dependent state feedback controllers is established by using the linear matrix inequality (LMI) technique. Finally, a numerical example is provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. Genetic recombination. [Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, F.W.

    1987-02-01

    The molecular pathways of gene recombination are explored and compared in studies of the model organisms, Escherichia coli and phase lambda. In the discussion of data from these studies it seems that recombination varies with the genetic idiosyncrasies of the organism and may also vary within a single organism.

  2. Asymmetrical Switch Costs in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellefson, Michelle R.; Shapiron, Laura R.; Chater, Nick

    2006-01-01

    Switching between tasks produces decreases in performance as compared to repeating the same task. Asymmetrical switch costs occur when switching between two tasks of unequal difficulty. This asymmetry occurs because the cost is greater when switching to the less difficult task than when switching to the more difficult task. Various theories about…

  3. [Switching and combining strategies of antidepressant medications].

    PubMed

    Charpeaud, Thomas; Moliere, Fanny; Bubrovszky, Maxime; Haesebaert, Frédéric; Allaïli, Najib; Bation, Rémy; Nieto, Isabel; Richieri, Raphaëlle; Saba, Ghassen; Bellivier, Frank; Bennabi, Djamila; Holtzmann, Jérôme; Camus, Vincent; Courtet, Philippe; Courvoisier, Pierre; d'Amato, Thierry; Doumy, Olivier; Garnier, Marion; Bougerol, Thierry; Lançon, Christophe; Haffen, Emmanuel; Leboyer, Marion; Llorca, Pierre-Michel; Vaiva, Guillaume; El-Hage, Wissam; Aouizerate, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    Switching antidepressant medication may be helpful in depressed patients having no benefit from the initial antidepressant treatment. Before considering switching strategy, the initial antidepressant treatment should produce no therapeutic effect after at least 4 weeks of administration at adequate dosage. Choosing an antidepressant of pharmacologically distinct profile fails to consistently demonstrate a significant superiority in terms of effectiveness over the switching to another antidepressant within the same pharmacological class. Augmenting SSRI/SNRIs with mirtazapine/mianserin has become the most recommended strategy of antidepressant combinations. Augmenting SSRI with tricyclic drugs is now a less recommended strategy of antidepressant combinations given the increased risk for the occurrence of pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions and adverse effects. PMID:26995511

  4. Manually operated coded switch

    DOEpatents

    Barnette, Jon H.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a manually operated recodable coded switch in which a code may be inserted, tried and used to actuate a lever controlling an external device. After attempting a code, the switch's code wheels must be returned to their zero positions before another try is made.

  5. Multidimensional set switching.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Sowon; Andersen, George J; Kramer, Arthur F

    2003-06-01

    The present study examined the organization of preparatory processes that underlie set switching and, more specifically, switch costs. On each trial, subjects performed one of two perceptual judgment tasks, color or shape discrimination. Subjects also responded with one of two different response sets. The task set and/or the response set switched from one to the other after 2-6 repeated trials. Response set, task set, and double set switches were performed in both blocked and randomized conditions. Subjects performed with short (100-msec) and long (800-msec) preparatory intervals. Task and response set switches had an additive effect on reaction times (RTs) in the blocked condition. Such a pattern of results suggests a serial organization of preparatory processes when the nature of switches is predictable. However, task and response set switches had an underadditive effect on RTs in the random condition when subjects performed with a brief cue-to-target interval. This pattern of results suggests overlapping task and response set preparation. These findings are discussed in terms of strategic control of preparatory processes in set switching. PMID:12921431

  6. Reflective HTS switch

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1994-01-01

    A HTS switch includes a HTS conductor for providing a superconducting path for an electrical signal and an serpentine wire actuator for controllably heating a portion of the conductor sufficiently to cause that portion to have normal, and not superconducting, resistivity. Mass of the portion is reduced to decrease switching time.

  7. Reflective HTS switch

    DOEpatents

    Martens, J.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Hohenwarter, G.K.G.

    1994-09-27

    A HTS (High Temperature Superconductor) switch includes a HTS conductor for providing a superconducting path for an electrical signal and an serpentine wire actuator for controllably heating a portion of the conductor sufficiently to cause that portion to have normal, and not superconducting, resistivity. Mass of the portion is reduced to decrease switching time. 6 figs.

  8. A Novel Molecular Switch

    PubMed Central

    Daber, Robert; Lewis, Mitchell

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is a fundamental process for regulating the flux of all metabolic pathways. For the last several decades, the lac operon has served as a valuable model for studying transcription. More recently, the switch that controls the operon has also been successfully adapted to function in mammalian cells. Here we describe how, using directed evolution, we have created a novel switch that recognizes an asymmetric operator sequence. The new switch has a repressor with altered headpiece domains for operator recognition, and a redesigned dimer interface to create a heterodimeric repressor. Quite unexpectedly, the heterodimeric switch functions better than the natural system. It can repress more tightly than the naturally occurring switch of the lac operon; it is less leaky and can be induced more efficiently. Ultimately these novel repressors could be evolved to recognize eukaryotic promoters and used to regulate gene expression in mammalian systems. PMID:19540845

  9. Nanoscale memristive radiofrequency switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Shuang; Ghadiri-Sadrabadi, Mohammad; Bardin, Joseph C.; Xia, Qiangfei

    2015-06-01

    Radiofrequency switches are critical components in wireless communication systems and consumer electronics. Emerging devices include switches based on microelectromechanical systems and phase-change materials. However, these devices suffer from disadvantages such as large physical dimensions and high actuation voltages. Here we propose and demonstrate a nanoscale radiofrequency switch based on a memristive device. The device can be programmed with a voltage as low as 0.4 V and has an ON/OFF conductance ratio up to 1012 with long state retention. We measure the radiofrequency performance of the switch up to 110 GHz and demonstrate low insertion loss (0.3 dB at 40 GHz), high isolation (30 dB at 40 GHz), an average cutoff frequency of 35 THz and competitive linearity and power-handling capability. Our results suggest that, in addition to their application in memory and computing, memristive devices are also a leading contender for radiofrequency switch applications.

  10. Erected mirror optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Allen, James J.

    2005-06-07

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) optical switching apparatus is disclosed that is based on an erectable mirror which is formed on a rotatable stage using surface micromachining. An electrostatic actuator is also formed on the substrate to rotate the stage and mirror with a high angular precision. The mirror can be erected manually after fabrication of the device and used to redirect an incident light beam at an arbitrary angel and to maintain this state in the absence of any applied electrical power. A 1.times.N optical switch can be formed using a single rotatable mirror. In some embodiments of the present invention, a plurality of rotatable mirrors can be configured so that the stages and mirrors rotate in unison when driven by a single micromotor thereby forming a 2.times.2 optical switch which can be used to switch a pair of incident light beams, or as a building block to form a higher-order optical switch.

  11. Switch on, switch off: stiction in nanoelectromechanical switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Till J. W.; Vella, Dominic

    2013-07-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of stiction in nanoscale electromechanical contact switches. We develop a mathematical model to describe the deflection of a cantilever beam in response to both electrostatic and van der Waals forces. Particular focus is given to the question of whether adhesive van der Waals forces cause the cantilever to remain in the ‘ON’ state even when the electrostatic forces are removed. In contrast to previous studies, our theory accounts for deflections with large slopes (i.e. geometrically nonlinear). We solve the resulting equations numerically to study how a cantilever beam adheres to a rigid electrode: transitions between ‘free’, ‘pinned’ and ‘clamped’ states are shown to be discontinuous and to exhibit significant hysteresis. Our findings are compared to previous results from linearized models and the implications for nanoelectromechanical cantilever switch design are discussed.

  12. Switch on, switch off: stiction in nanoelectromechanical switches.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Till J W; Vella, Dominic

    2013-07-12

    We present a theoretical investigation of stiction in nanoscale electromechanical contact switches. We develop a mathematical model to describe the deflection of a cantilever beam in response to both electrostatic and van der Waals forces. Particular focus is given to the question of whether adhesive van der Waals forces cause the cantilever to remain in the 'ON' state even when the electrostatic forces are removed. In contrast to previous studies, our theory accounts for deflections with large slopes (i.e. geometrically nonlinear). We solve the resulting equations numerically to study how a cantilever beam adheres to a rigid electrode: transitions between 'free', 'pinned' and 'clamped' states are shown to be discontinuous and to exhibit significant hysteresis. Our findings are compared to previous results from linearized models and the implications for nanoelectromechanical cantilever switch design are discussed. PMID:23759938

  13. Towards single molecule switches.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia Lin; Zhong, Jian Qiang; Lin, Jia Dan; Hu, Wen Ping; Wu, Kai; Xu, Guo Qin; Wee, Andrew T S; Chen, Wei

    2015-05-21

    The concept of using single molecules as key building blocks for logic gates, diodes and transistors to perform basic functions of digital electronic devices at the molecular scale has been explored over the past decades. However, in addition to mimicking the basic functions of current silicon devices, molecules often possess unique properties that have no parallel in conventional materials and promise new hybrid devices with novel functions that cannot be achieved with equivalent solid-state devices. The most appealing example is the molecular switch. Over the past decade, molecular switches on surfaces have been intensely investigated. A variety of external stimuli such as light, electric field, temperature, tunneling electrons and even chemical stimulus have been used to activate these molecular switches between bistable or even multiple states by manipulating molecular conformations, dipole orientations, spin states, charge states and even chemical bond formation. The switching event can occur either on surfaces or in break junctions. The aim of this review is to highlight recent advances in molecular switches triggered by various external stimuli, as investigated by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM) and the break junction technique. We begin by presenting the molecular switches triggered by various external stimuli that do not provide single molecule selectivity, referred to as non-selective switching. Special focus is then given to selective single molecule switching realized using the LT-STM tip on surfaces. Single molecule switches operated by different mechanisms are reviewed and discussed. Finally, molecular switches embedded in self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and single molecule junctions are addressed. PMID:25757483

  14. Intrachromosomal recombination between well-separated, homologous sequences in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, M D; Read, L R; Ng, P; Beatty, B G

    1999-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated intrachromosomal homologous recombination in a murine hybridoma in which the recipient for recombination, the haploid, endogenous chromosomal immunoglobulin mu-gene bearing a mutation in the constant (Cmu) region, was separated from the integrated single copy wild-type donor Cmu region by approximately 1 Mb along the hybridoma chromosome. Homologous recombination between the donor and recipient Cmu region occurred with high frequency, correcting the mutant chromosomal mu-gene in the hybridoma. This enabled recombinant hybridomas to synthesize normal IgM and to be detected as plaque-forming cells (PFC). Characterization of the recombinants revealed that they could be placed into three distinct classes. The generation of the class I recombinants was consistent with a simple unequal sister chromatid exchange (USCE) between the donor and recipient Cmu region, as they contained the three Cmu-bearing fragments expected from this recombination, the original donor Cmu region along with both products of the single reciprocal crossover. However, a simple mechanism of homologous recombination was not sufficient in explaining the more complex Cmu region structures characterizing the class II and class III recombinants. To explain these recombinants, a model is proposed in which unequal pairing between the donor and recipient Cmu regions located on sister chromatids resulted in two crossover events. One crossover resulted in the deletion of sequences from one chromatid forming a DNA circle, which then integrated into the sister chromatid by a second reciprocal crossover. PMID:10353910

  15. Optical Circuit Switched Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monacos, Steve P. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a system and method embodied in an optical circuit switched protocol for the transmission of data through a network. The optical circuit switched protocol is an all-optical circuit switched network and includes novel optical switching nodes for transmitting optical data packets within a network. Each optical switching node comprises a detector for receiving the header, header detection logic for translating the header into routing information and eliminating the header, and a controller for receiving the routing information and configuring an all optical path within the node. The all optical path located within the node is solely an optical path without having electronic storage of the data and without having optical delay of the data. Since electronic storage of the header is not necessary and the initial header is eliminated by the first detector of the first switching node. multiple identical headers are sent throughout the network so that subsequent switching nodes can receive and read the header for setting up an optical data path.

  16. Optical packet switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekel, Eyal; Ruschin, Shlomo; Majer, Daniel; Levy, Jeff; Matmon, Guy; Koenigsberg, Lisa; Vecht, Jacob; Geron, Amir; Harlavan, Rotem; Shfaram, Harel; Arbel, Arnon; McDermott, Tom; Brewer, Tony

    2005-02-01

    We report here a scalable, multichassis, 6.3 terabit core router, which utilizes our proprietary optical switch. The router is commercially available and deployed in several customer sites. Our solution combines optical switching with electronic routing. An internal optical packet switching network interconnects the router"s electronic line cards, where routing and buffering functions take place electronically. The system architecture and performance will be described. The optical switch is based on Optical Phased Array (OPA) technology. It is a 64 x 64, fully non-blocking, optical crossbar switch, capable of switching in a fraction of a nanosecond. The basic principles of operation will be explained. Loss and crosstalk results will be presented, as well as the results of BER measurements of a 160 Gbps transmission through one channel. Basic principles of operation and measured results will be presented for the burst-mode-receivers, arbitration algorithm and synchronization. Finally, we will present some of our current research work on a next-generation optical switch. The technological issues we have solved in our internal optical packet network can have broad applicability to any global optical packet network.

  17. [Recombinant antibodies against bioweapons].

    PubMed

    Thullier, Philippe; Pelat, Thibaut; Vidal, Dominique

    2009-12-01

    The threat posed by bioweapons (BW) could lead to the re-emergence of such deadly diseases as plague or smallpox, now eradicated from industrialized countries. The development of recombinant antibodies allows tackling this risk because these recombinant molecules are generally well tolerated in human medicine, may be utilized for prophylaxis and treatment, and because antibodies neutralize many BW. Recombinant antibodies neutralizing the lethal toxin of anthrax, botulinum toxins and the smallpox virus have in particular been isolated recently, with different technologies. Our approach, which uses phage-displayed immune libraries built from non-human primates (M. fascicularis) to obtain recombinant antibodies, which may later be super-humanized (germlinized), has allowed us to obtain such BWs-neutralizing antibodies. PMID:20035695

  18. Solid state switch

    DOEpatents

    Merritt, B.T.; Dreifuerst, G.R.

    1994-07-19

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1,500 A peak, 1.0 [mu]s pulsewidth, and 4,500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry. 6 figs.

  19. SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Neal, R.B.

    1957-12-17

    An improved triggered spark gap switch is described, capable of precisely controllable firing time while switching very large amounts of power. The invention in general comprises three electrodes adjustably spaced and adapted to have a large potential impressed between the outer electrodes. The central electrode includes two separate elements electrically connected togetaer and spaced apart to define a pair of spark gaps between the end electrodes. Means are provided to cause the gas flow in the switch to pass towards the central electrode, through a passage in each separate element, and out an exit disposed between the two separate central electrode elements in order to withdraw ions from the spark gap.

  20. Photoconductive switch package

    DOEpatents

    Ca[rasp, George J

    2013-10-22

    A photoconductive switch is formed of a substrate that has a central portion of SiC or other photoconductive material and an outer portion of cvd-diamond or other suitable material surrounding the central portion. Conducting electrodes are formed on opposed sides of the substrate, with the electrodes extending beyond the central portion and the edges of the electrodes lying over the outer portion. Thus any high electric fields produced at the edges of the electrodes lie outside of and do not affect the central portion, which is the active switching element. Light is transmitted through the outer portion to the central portion to actuate the switch.

  1. Photoconductive switch package

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, George J.

    2015-10-27

    A photoconductive switch is formed of a substrate that has a central portion of SiC or other photoconductive material and an outer portion of cvd-diamond or other suitable material surrounding the central portion. Conducting electrodes are formed on opposed sides of the substrate, with the electrodes extending beyond the central portion and the edges of the electrodes lying over the outer portion. Thus any high electric fields produced at the edges of the electrodes lie outside of and do not affect the central portion, which is the active switching element. Light is transmitted through the outer portion to the central portion to actuate the switch.

  2. Electromechanical magnetization switching

    SciTech Connect

    Chudnovsky, Eugene M.; Jaafar, Reem

    2015-03-14

    We show that the magnetization of a torsional oscillator that, in addition to the magnetic moment also possesses an electrical polarization, can be switched by the electric field that ignites mechanical oscillations at the frequency comparable to the frequency of the ferromagnetic resonance. The 180° switching arises from the spin-rotation coupling and is not prohibited by the different symmetry of the magnetic moment and the electric field as in the case of a stationary magnet. Analytical equations describing the system have been derived and investigated numerically. Phase diagrams showing the range of parameters required for the switching have been obtained.

  3. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  4. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  5. A novel design of a fully programmable switched current filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhfakh, Mourad; Loulou, Mourad

    2010-06-01

    In this study, the design of a programmable infinite impulse response switched current (SI) filter is presented. The characteristics of the filter are fully programmable by simply varying the values of out-of-chip DC current sources. The programmable switched current filter mainly consists of SI delay cells and SI multipliers. A high-performance class AB grounded gate SI memory cell is used as a basic building block. Spice simulation results are presented to show the functionality of the programmable filter.

  6. Electron dynamics in the process of mode switching in gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Dumbrajs, O.; Kominis, Y.; Nusinovich, G. S.

    2009-01-15

    The present paper is devoted to the analysis of electron interaction process in the course of gyrotron switching from one mode to another. This analysis is based on the use of the Hamiltonian formalism that allows one to construct Poincare plots for different instants of switching time. The study is carried out for a 170 GHz, MW-class gyrotron for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [ITER web site: http://www.iter.org].

  7. Toehold Switches: De-Novo-Designed Regulators of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Green, Alexander A.; Silver, Pamela A.; Collins, James J.; Yin, Peng

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Efforts to construct synthetic networks in living cells have been hindered by the limited number of regulatory components that provide wide dynamic range and low crosstalk. Here, we report a new class of de-novo-designed prokaryotic riboregulators called toehold switches that activate gene expression in response to cognate RNAs with arbitrary sequences. Toehold switches provide a high level of orthogonality and can be forward-engineered to provide average dynamic range above 400. We show that switches can be integrated into the genome to regulate endogenous genes and use them as sensors that respond to endogenous RNAs. We exploit the orthogonality of toehold switches to regulate 12 genes independently and to construct a genetic circuit that evaluates 4-input AND logic. Toehold switches, with their wide dynamic range, orthogonality, and programmability, represent a versatile and powerful platform for regulation of translation, offering diverse applications in molecular biology, synthetic biology, and biotechnology. PMID:25417166

  8. Miniature Intermittent Contact Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sword, Antony

    1972-01-01

    This tech brief concerns work to provide a shock-resistant switch capable of being actuated by forces of varying magnitude and direction, primarily for use as a sensor on remote control (tele-operator) and prosthetic devices.

  9. An optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; Hunter, S.R.

    1987-04-30

    The invention is a gas mixture for a diffuse discharge switch having an electron attaching gas wherein electron attachment is brought about by indirect excitation of molecules to long live states by exposure to laser light. 3 figs.

  10. Switching and stopping antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Keks, Nicholas; Hope, Judy; Keogh, Simone

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Switching from one antidepressant to another is frequently indicated due to an inadequate treatment response or unacceptable adverse effects. All antidepressant switches must be carried out cautiously and under close observation. Conservative switching strategies involve gradually tapering the first antidepressant followed by an adequate washout period before the new antidepressant is started. This can take a long time and include periods of no treatment with the risk of potentially life-threatening exacerbations of illness. Clinical expertise is needed for more rapid or cross-taper switching as drug toxicity, including serotonin syndrome, may result from inappropriate co-administration of antidepressants. Some antidepressants must not be combined. Antidepressants can cause withdrawal syndromes if discontinued abruptly after prolonged use. Relapse and exacerbation of depression can also occur. Gradual dose reduction over days to weeks reduces the risk and severity of complications. PMID:27346915

  11. Micro-Ball-Lens Optical Switch Driven by SMA Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2003-01-01

    The figure is a simplified cross section of a microscopic optical switch that was partially developed at the time of reporting the information for this article. In a fully developed version, light would be coupled from an input optical fiber to one of two side-by-side output optical fibers. The optical connection between the input and the selected output fiber would be made via a microscopic ball lens. Switching of the optical connection from one output fiber to another would be effected by using a pair of thin-film shape-memory-alloy (SMA) actuators to toggle the lens between two resting switch positions. There are many optical switches some made of macroscopic parts by conventional fabrication techniques and some that are microfabricated and, hence, belong to the class of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Conventionally fabricated optical switches tend to be expensive. MEMS switches can be mass-produced at relatively low cost, but their attractiveness has been diminished by the fact that, heretofore, MEMS switches have usually been found to exhibit high insertion losses. The present switch is intended to serve as a prototype of low-loss MEMS switches. In addition, this is the first reported SMA-based optical switch. The optical fibers would be held in V grooves in a silicon frame. The lens would have a diameter of 1 m; it would be held by, and positioned between, the SMA actuators, which would be made of thin films of TiNi alloy. Although the SMA actuators are depicted here as having simple shapes for the sake of clarity of illustration, the real actuators would have complex, partly net-like shapes. With the exception of the lens and the optical fibers, the SMA actuators and other components of the switch would be made by microfabrication techniques. The components would be assembled into a sandwich structure to complete the fabrication of the switch. To effect switching, an electric current would be passed through one of the SMA actuators to heat it above

  12. Printed Antennas Made Reconfigurable by Use of MEMS Switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    2005-01-01

    A class of reconfigurable microwave antennas now undergoing development comprise fairly conventional printed-circuit feed elements and radiating patches integrated with novel switches containing actuators of the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) type. In comparison with solid-state electronic control devices incorporated into some prior printed microwave antennas, the MEMS-based switches in these antennas impose lower insertion losses and consume less power. Because the radio-frequency responses of the MEMS switches are more nearly linear, they introduce less signal distortion. In addition, construction and operation are simplified because only a single DC bias line is needed to control each MEMS actuator.

  13. Switching power supply filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Prithvi R. (Inventor); Abare, Wayne (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A filter for a switching power supply. The filter includes a common mode inductor with coil configurations allowing differential mode current from a dc source to pass through but attenuating common mode noise from the power supply so that the noise does not reach the dc source. The invention also includes the use of feed through capacitors at the switching power supply input terminals to provide further high-frequency noise attenuation.

  14. Cygnus Water Switch Jitter

    SciTech Connect

    Charles V. Mitton, George D. Corrow, Mark D. Hansen, David J. Henderson, et al.

    2008-03-01

    The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources - Cygnus 1 and Cygnus 2. Each source has the following x-ray output: 1-mm diameter spot size, 4 rad at 1 m, 50-ns Full Width Half Max. The diode pulse has the following electrical specifications: 2.25 MV, 60 kA, 60 ns. This Radiographic Facility is located in an underground tunnel test area at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The sources were developed to produce high-resolution images on subcritical tests which are performed at NTS. Subcritical tests are single-shot, high-value events. For this application, it is desirable to maintain a high level of reproducibility in source output. The major components of the Cygnus machines are: Marx generator, water-filled pulse–forming line (PFL), water-filled coaxial transmission line, three-cell inductive voltage adder, and rod-pinch diode. A primary source of fluctuation in Cygnus shot-to-shot performance is jitter in breakdown of the main PFL switch, which is a “self-break” switch. The PFL switch breakdown time determines the peak PFL charging voltage, which ultimately affects the diode pulse. Therefore, PFL switch jitter contributes to shot-to-shot variation in source endpoint energy and dose. In this paper we will present PFL switch jitter analysis for both Cygnus machines and give the correlation with diode performance. For this analysis the PFL switch on each machine was maintained at a single gap setting which has been used for the majority of shots at NTS. In addition to this analysis, PFL switch performance for different switch gap settings taken recently will be examined. Lastly, implications of source jitter for radiographic diagnosis of subcritical shots will be discussed.

  15. Irreversible magnetic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Karnowsky, M.M.; Yost, F.G.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of an irreversible magnetic switch containing a ferromagnetic amorphous metal having a predetermined crystallization temperature in its inductor magnetic path. With the incorporation of such material, the magnetic properties after cooling from a high temperature excursion above its crystallization temperature are only a fraction of the original value. The difference is used to provide a safety feature in the magnetic switch.

  16. Cygnus PFL Switch Jitter

    SciTech Connect

    C. Mitton, G. Corrow, M. Hansen, D. Henderson, et al.

    2007-07-21

    The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources: Cygnus 1 and Cygnus 2. Each source has the following X-ray output: 1-mm diameter spot size, 4 rads at 1 m, 50-ns full-widthhalf-maximum. The diode pulse has the following electrical specifications: 2.25 MV, 60 kA, 60 ns. This Radiographic Facility is located in an underground tunnel test area at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The sources were developed to produce high-resolution images on subcritical tests performed at NTS. Subcritical tests are single-shot, high-value events. For this application, it is desirable to maintain a high level of reproducibility in source output. The major components of the Cygnus machines are Marx generator, water-filled pulse forming line (PFL), water-filled coaxial transmission line, threecell inductive voltage adder, and rod-pinch diode. A primary source of fluctuation in Cygnus shot-to-shot performance may be jitter in breakdown of the main PFL switch, which is a “self-break” switch. The PFL switch breakdown time determines the peak PFL charging voltage, which ultimately affects the source X-ray spectrum and dose. Therefore, PFL switch jitter may contribute to shot-to-shot variation in these parameters, which are crucial to radiographic quality. In this paper we will present PFL switch jitter analysis for both Cygnus machines and present the correlation with dose. For this analysis, the PFL switch on each machine was maintained at a single gap setting, which has been used for the majority of shots at NTS. In addition the PFL switch performance for one larger switch gap setting will be examined.

  17. uv preilluminated gas switches

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, L.P.; Orham, E.L.; Stowers, I.F.; Braucht, J.R.

    1980-06-03

    We have designed, built, and characterized uv preilluminated gas switches for a trigger circuit and a low inductance discharge circuit. These switches have been incorporated into a 54 x 76 x 150 cm pulser module to produce a 1 Ma output current rising at 5 x 10/sup 12/ amps/sec with 1 ns jitter. Twenty such modules will be used on the Nova Inertial Confinement Fusion Laser System for plasma retropulse shutters.

  18. Response switching and self-efficacy in Peer Instruction classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kelly; Schell, Julie; Ho, Andrew; Lukoff, Brian; Mazur, Eric

    2015-06-01

    Peer Instruction, a well-known student-centered teaching method, engages students during class through structured, frequent questioning and is often facilitated by classroom response systems. The central feature of any Peer Instruction class is a conceptual question designed to help resolve student misconceptions about subject matter. We provide students two opportunities to answer each question—once after a round of individual reflection and then again after a discussion round with a peer. The second round provides students the choice to "switch" their original response to a different answer. The percentage of right answers typically increases after peer discussion: most students who answer incorrectly in the individual round switch to the correct answer after the peer discussion. However, for any given question there are also students who switch their initially right answer to a wrong answer and students who switch their initially wrong answer to a different wrong answer. In this study, we analyze response switching over one semester of an introductory electricity and magnetism course taught using Peer Instruction at Harvard University. Two key features emerge from our analysis: First, response switching correlates with academic self-efficacy. Students with low self-efficacy switch their responses more than students with high self-efficacy. Second, switching also correlates with the difficulty of the question; students switch to incorrect responses more often when the question is difficult. These findings indicate that instructors may need to provide greater support for difficult questions, such as supplying cues during lectures, increasing times for discussions, or ensuring effective pairing (such as having a student with one right answer in the pair). Additionally, the connection between response switching and self-efficacy motivates interventions to increase student self-efficacy at the beginning of the semester by helping students develop early mastery or

  19. Finding a stabilising switching law for switching nonlinear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendek, Zs.; Raica, P.; Lauber, J.; Guerra, T. M.

    2016-09-01

    This paper considers the stabilisation of switching nonlinear models by switching between the subsystems. We assume that arbitrary switching between two subsystems is possible once a subsystem has been active for a predefined number of samples. We use a Takagi-Sugeno representation of the models and a switching Lyapunov function is employed to develop sufficient stability conditions. If the conditions are satisfied, we construct a switching law that stabilises the system. The application of the conditions is illustrated in several examples.

  20. The study in sub E class converter with saturating cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.; Usami, K.; Yamanaka, S.

    1985-09-01

    Recently, for switching power supplies it is best to be smaller in size, with electronic equipments' miniaturization by IC technology. Sub E class dc-to-dc converter with a saturating core has the properties of high efficiency, small size, light weight and high reliability. Hence, the applications of switching regulater power supply to this technique are studied by many investigators. The results of an experiment in sub E class dc-to-dc converter with magnetic amplifier is presented.

  1. Regulation of Meiotic Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory p. Copenhaver

    2011-11-09

    Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system

  2. Integration of photonic nanojets and semiconductor nanoparticles for enhanced all-optical switching

    PubMed Central

    Born, Brandon; Krupa, Jeffrey D. A.; Geoffroy-Gagnon, Simon; Holzman, Jonathan F.

    2015-01-01

    All-optical switching is the foundation of emerging all-optical (terabit-per-second) networks and processors. All-optical switching has attracted considerable attention, but it must ultimately support operation with femtojoule switching energies and femtosecond switching times to be effective. Here we introduce an all-optical switch architecture in the form of a dielectric sphere that focuses a high-intensity photonic nanojet into a peripheral coating of semiconductor nanoparticles. Milli-scale spheres coated with Si and SiC nanoparticles yield switching energies of 200 and 100 fJ with switching times of 10 ps and 350 fs, respectively. Micro-scale spheres coated with Si and SiC nanoparticles yield switching energies of 1 pJ and 20 fJ with switching times of 2 ps and 270 fs, respectively. We show that femtojoule switching energies are enabled by localized photoinjection from the photonic nanojets and that femtosecond switching times are enabled by localized recombination within the semiconductor nanoparticles. PMID:26314911

  3. Low inductance gas switching.

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, Ray; Harjes, Henry Charles III; Wallace, Zachariah; Elizondo, Juan E.

    2007-10-01

    The laser trigger switch (LTS) is a key component in ZR-type pulsed power systems. In ZR, the pulse rise time through the LTS is > 200 ns and additional stages of pulse compression are required to achieve the desired <100 ns rise time. The inductance of the LTS ({approx}500nH) in large part determines the energy transfer time through the switch and there is much to be gained in improving system performance and reducing system costs by reducing this inductance. The current path through the cascade section of the ZR LTS is at a diameter of {approx} 6-inches which is certainly not optimal from an inductance point of view. The LTS connects components of much greater diameter (typically 4-5 feet). In this LDRD the viability of switch concepts in which the diameter of cascade section is greatly increased have been investigated. The key technical question to be answered was, will the desired multi-channel behavior be maintained in a cascade section of larger diameter. This LDRD proceeded in 2 distinct phases. The original plan for the LDRD was to develop a promising switch concept and then design, build, and test a moderate scale switch which would demonstrate the key features of the concept. In phase I, a switch concept which meet all electrical design criteria and had a calculated inductance of 150 nH was developed. A 1.5 MV test switch was designed and fabrication was initiated. The LDRD was then redirected due to budgetary concerns. The fabrication of the switch was halted and the focus of the LDRD was shifted to small scale experiments designed to answer the key technical question concerning multi-channel behavior. In phase II, the Multi-channel switch test bed (MCST) was designed and constructed. The purpose of MCST was to provide a versatile, fast turn around facility for the study the multi-channel electrical breakdown behavior of a ZR type cascade switch gap in a parameter space near that of a ZR LTS. Parameter scans on source impedance, gap tilt, gap spacing and

  4. Intravenous to oral antibiotic switch therapy.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A.

    2001-05-01

    I.v.-to-p.o. switch therapy has become the mainstay of antibiotic therapy for the majority of patients. I.v.-to-p.o. switch therapy is inappropriate for critically ill patients who require i.v. antibiotic therapy and should not be considered in patients who have the inability to absorb drugs. These exceptions constitute a very small percentage of hospitalized patients for which i.v.-to-p.o. switch therapy is ideal. I.v.-to-p.o. switch therapy is best achieved with antibiotics that have high bioavailability that result in the same blood and tissue concentrations of antibiotic as their intravenous counterpart and have few gastrointestinal side effects. Antibiotics ideal for i.v.-to-p.o. switch programs include chloramphenicol, clindamycin, metronidazole, TMP-SMX, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, doxycycline, minocycline, levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin and linezolid. Antibiotics that may be used in i.v.-to-p.o. switch programs that have lower bioavailability but are effective include beta-lactams and macrolides. For antibiotics with no oral formulation, e.g., carbapenems, equivalent coverage must be provided with an oral antibiotic from an unrelated class. Excluding gastrointestinal malabsorptive disorders, disease state is not a determinant of suitability for i.v.-to-p.o. switch programs. I.v.-to-p.o. switch programs should be used in patients with any infectious disease disorder for which there is effective oral therapy and is not limited to certain infectious diseases. Oral absorption of antibiotics is near normal in all but the most critically ill patients. Therefore, even in sick, hospitalized individuals, p.o. therapy is appropriate. I.v-to-p.o. switch therapy has several important advantages including decreasing drug cost (i.v. vs. p.o.), decreasing length of stay permitting earlier discharge and optimal reimbursement and decreasing or eliminating i.v. line phlebitis and sepsis with its cost implications. Clinicians should consider all

  5. A radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1988-07-19

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction. 3 figs.

  6. The fox and the cabra: an ERP analysis of reading code switched nouns and verbs in bilingual short stories.

    PubMed

    Ng, Shukhan; Gonzalez, Christian; Wicha, Nicole Y Y

    2014-04-01

    Comprehending a language (or code) switch within a sentence context triggers 2 electrophysiological signatures: an early left anterior negativity post code switch onset - a LAN - followed by a Late Positive Component (LPC). Word class and word position modulate lexico-semantic processes in the monolingual brain, e.g., larger N400 amplitude for nouns than verbs and for earlier than later words in the sentence. Here we test whether the bilingual brain is affected by word class and word position when code switching, or if the cost of switching overrides these lexico-semantic and sentence context factors. Adult bilinguals read short stories in English containing 8 target words. Targets were nouns or verbs, occurred early or late in a story and were presented alternately in English (non-switch) or Spanish (switch) across different story versions. Overall, switched words elicited larger LAN and LPC amplitude than non-switched words. The N400 amplitude was larger for nouns than verbs, more focal for switches than non-switches, and for early than late nouns but not for early than late verbs. Moreover, an early LPC effect was observed only for switched nouns, but not verbs. Together, this indicates that referential elements (nouns) may be harder to process and integrate than relational elements (verbs) in discourse, and when switched, nouns incur higher integration cost. Word position did not modulate the code switching effects, implying that switching between languages may invoke discourse independent processes. PMID:24530431

  7. Energy losses in switches

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T.H.; Seamen, J.F.; Jobe, D.O.

    1993-07-01

    The authors experiments show energy losses between 2 and 10 times that of the resistive time predictions. The experiments used hydrogen, helium, air, nitrogen, SF{sub 6} polyethylene, and water for the switching dielectric. Previously underestimated switch losses have caused over predicting the accelerator outputs. Accurate estimation of these losses is now necessary for new high-efficiency pulsed power devices where the switching losses constitute the major portion of the total energy loss. They found that the switch energy losses scale as (V{sub peak}I{sub peak}){sup 1.1846}. When using this scaling, the energy losses in any of the tested dielectrics are almost the same. This relationship is valid for several orders of magnitude and suggested a theoretical basis for these results. Currents up to .65 MA, with voltages to 3 MV were applied to various gaps during these experiments. The authors data and the developed theory indicates that the switch power loss continues for a much longer time than the resistive time, with peak power loss generally occurring at peak current in a ranging discharge instead of the early current time. All of the experiments were circuit code modeled after developing a new switch loss version based on the theory. The circuit code predicts switch energy loss and peak currents as a function of time. During analysis of the data they noticed slight constant offsets between the theory and data that depended on the dielectric. They modified the plasma conductivity for each tested dielectric to lessen this offset.

  8. Switching Power Universality in Unipolar Resistive Switching Memories

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jongmin; Jung, Kyooho; Kim, Yongmin; Jo, Yongcheol; Cho, Sangeun; Woo, Hyeonseok; Lee, Seongwoo; Inamdar, A. I.; Hong, Jinpyo; Lee, Jeon-Kook; Kim, Hyungsang; Im, Hyunsik

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the resistive switching power from unipolar resistive switching current-voltage characteristics in various binary metal oxide films sandwiched by different metal electrodes, and find a universal feature (the so-called universality) in the switching power among these devices. To experimentally derive the switching power universality, systematic measurements of the switching voltage and current are performed, and neither of these correlate with one another. As the switching resistance (R) increases, the switching power (P) decreases following a power law P ∝ R−β, regardless of the device configurations. The observed switching power universality is indicative of the existence of a commonly applicable switching mechanism. The origin of the power universality is discussed based on a metallic filament model and thermo-chemical reaction. PMID:27033695

  9. Switching Power Universality in Unipolar Resistive Switching Memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongmin; Jung, Kyooho; Kim, Yongmin; Jo, Yongcheol; Cho, Sangeun; Woo, Hyeonseok; Lee, Seongwoo; Inamdar, A. I.; Hong, Jinpyo; Lee, Jeon-Kook; Kim, Hyungsang; Im, Hyunsik

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the resistive switching power from unipolar resistive switching current-voltage characteristics in various binary metal oxide films sandwiched by different metal electrodes, and find a universal feature (the so-called universality) in the switching power among these devices. To experimentally derive the switching power universality, systematic measurements of the switching voltage and current are performed, and neither of these correlate with one another. As the switching resistance (R) increases, the switching power (P) decreases following a power law P ∝ R‑β, regardless of the device configurations. The observed switching power universality is indicative of the existence of a commonly applicable switching mechanism. The origin of the power universality is discussed based on a metallic filament model and thermo-chemical reaction.

  10. Switching Power Universality in Unipolar Resistive Switching Memories.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongmin; Jung, Kyooho; Kim, Yongmin; Jo, Yongcheol; Cho, Sangeun; Woo, Hyeonseok; Lee, Seongwoo; Inamdar, A I; Hong, Jinpyo; Lee, Jeon-Kook; Kim, Hyungsang; Im, Hyunsik

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the resistive switching power from unipolar resistive switching current-voltage characteristics in various binary metal oxide films sandwiched by different metal electrodes, and find a universal feature (the so-called universality) in the switching power among these devices. To experimentally derive the switching power universality, systematic measurements of the switching voltage and current are performed, and neither of these correlate with one another. As the switching resistance (R) increases, the switching power (P) decreases following a power law P ∝ R(-β), regardless of the device configurations. The observed switching power universality is indicative of the existence of a commonly applicable switching mechanism. The origin of the power universality is discussed based on a metallic filament model and thermo-chemical reaction. PMID:27033695

  11. Mating-type Gene Switching in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Sheng; Haber, James E

    2015-04-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has two alternative mating types designated MATa and MATα. These are distinguished by about 700 bp of unique sequences, Ya or Yα, including divergent promoter sequences and part of the open reading frames of genes that regulate mating phenotype. Homothallic budding yeast, carrying an active HO endonuclease gene, HO, can switch mating type through a recombination process known as gene conversion, in which a site-specific double-strand break (DSB) created immediately adjacent to the Y region results in replacement of the Y sequences with a copy of the opposite mating type information, which is harbored in one of two heterochromatic donor loci, HMLα or HMRa. HO gene expression is tightly regulated to ensure that only half of the cells in a lineage switch to the opposite MAT allele, thus promoting conjugation and diploid formation. Study of the silencing of these loci has provided a great deal of information about the role of the Sir2 histone deacetylase and its associated Sir3 and Sir4 proteins in creating heterochromatic regions. MAT switching has been examined in great detail to learn about the steps in homologous recombination. MAT switching is remarkably directional, with MATa recombining preferentially with HMLα and MATα using HMRa. Donor preference is controlled by a cis-acting recombination enhancer located near HML. RE is turned off in MATα cells but in MATa binds multiple copies of the Fkh1 transcription factor whose forkhead-associated phosphothreonine binding domain localizes at the DSB, bringing HML into conjunction with MATa. PMID:26104712

  12. Meiotic recombination mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Grelon, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis is a specialized cell division at the origin of the haploid cells that eventually develop into the gametes. It therefore lies at the heart of Mendelian heredity. Recombination and redistribution of the homologous chromosomes arising during meiosis constitute an important source of genetic diversity, conferring to meiosis a particularly important place in the evolution and the diversification of the species. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing meiotic recombination has considerably progressed these last decades, benefiting from complementary approaches led on various model species. An overview of these mechanisms will be provided as well as a discussion on the implications of these recent discoveries. PMID:27180110

  13. Immunoglobulin/Myc recombinations in murine Peyer's patch follicles.

    PubMed

    Müller, J R; Mushinski, E B; Williams, J A; Hausner, P F

    1997-09-01

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh)/Myc recombinations are a hallmark of pristane-induced mouse plasmacytomas but are also frequently found in non-tumorous tissues. Here we describe for the first time a PCR-based technique for detecting fusions between Igh mu or Igh alpha and Myc in situ. Igh/Myc recombinations were found in transplanted and primary plasmacytomas. In addition, the gut-associated lymphoid tissues of plasmacytoma-free BALB/c mice were investigated for the presence of Igh/Myc fusions. Igh/Myc rearrangements were detected in Peyer's patch follicles and in the intestinal lamina propria both in normal mice and in mice shortly after pristane treatment. The sequence analysis showed that i) three to five different Igh/Myc hybrid sequences were present in individual follicles, ii) Igh/Myc recombinations can be subjected to additional switch recombinations as shown by related sequences in neighboring cells, and iii) cells harboring these rearrangements migrate into the adjacent lamina propria. The results indicate that Peyer's patches are a hyper-recombinogenic tissue. Myc recombination-positive cells are present in at least 100-fold more frequently than expected if recombinations were random, which suggests that this kind of trans-chromosomal rearrangement may be targeted. PMID:9290947

  14. Atomic Scale Plasmonic Switch.

    PubMed

    Emboras, Alexandros; Niegemann, Jens; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Pedersen, Andreas; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2016-01-13

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moore's law in the electronics industry. While electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling, similar to electronics, is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled plasmonic switch operating at the atomic scale. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or, at most, a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ratio of 9.2 dB and operation at room temperature up to MHz with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of an integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the atomic level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully integrated and highly scalable chip platform, a platform where optics, electronics, and memory may be controlled at the single-atom level. PMID:26670551

  15. Thermionic gas switch

    DOEpatents

    Hatch, G.L.; Brummond, W.A.; Barrus, D.M.

    1984-04-05

    The present invention is directed to an improved temperature responsive thermionic gas switch utilizing a hollow cathode and a folded emitter surface area. The folded emitter surface area of the thermionic switch substantially increases the on/off ratio by changing the conduction surface area involved in the two modes thereof. The improved switch of this invention provides an on/off ratio of 450:1 compared to the 10:1 ratio of the prior known thermionic switch, while providing for adjusting the on current. In the improved switch of this invention the conduction area is made small in the off mode, while in the on mode the conduction area is made large. This is achieved by utilizing a folded hollow cathode configuration and utilizing a folded emitter surface area, and by making the dimensions of the folds small enough so that a space charge will develop in the convolutions of the folds and suppress unignited current, thus limiting the current carrying surface in the off mode.

  16. Switching power pulse system

    DOEpatents

    Aaland, K.

    1983-08-09

    A switching system for delivering pulses of power from a source to a load using a storage capacitor charged through a rectifier, and maintained charged to a reference voltage level by a transistor switch and voltage comparator. A thyristor is triggered to discharge the storage capacitor through a saturable reactor and fractional turn saturable transformer having a secondary to primary turn ratio N of n:l/n = n[sup 2]. The saturable reactor functions as a soaker'' while the thyristor reaches saturation, and then switches to a low impedance state. The saturable transformer functions as a switching transformer with high impedance while a load coupling capacitor charges, and then switches to a low impedance state to dump the charge of the storage capacitor into the load through the coupling capacitor. The transformer is comprised of a multilayer core having two secondary windings tightly wound and connected in parallel to add their output voltage and reduce output inductance, and a number of single turn windings connected in parallel at nodes for the primary winding, each single turn winding linking a different one of the layers of the multilayer core. The load may be comprised of a resistive beampipe for a linear particle accelerator and capacitance of a pulse forming network. To hold off discharge of the capacitance until it is fully charged, a saturable core is provided around the resistive beampipe to isolate the beampipe from the capacitance until it is fully charged. 5 figs.

  17. Nanoscale memristive radiofrequency switches.

    PubMed

    Pi, Shuang; Ghadiri-Sadrabadi, Mohammad; Bardin, Joseph C; Xia, Qiangfei

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency switches are critical components in wireless communication systems and consumer electronics. Emerging devices include switches based on microelectromechanical systems and phase-change materials. However, these devices suffer from disadvantages such as large physical dimensions and high actuation voltages. Here we propose and demonstrate a nanoscale radiofrequency switch based on a memristive device. The device can be programmed with a voltage as low as 0.4 V and has an ON/OFF conductance ratio up to 10(12) with long state retention. We measure the radiofrequency performance of the switch up to 110 GHz and demonstrate low insertion loss (0.3 dB at 40 GHz), high isolation (30 dB at 40 GHz), an average cutoff frequency of 35 THz and competitive linearity and power-handling capability. Our results suggest that, in addition to their application in memory and computing, memristive devices are also a leading contender for radiofrequency switch applications. PMID:26108890

  18. Multiple switch actuator

    DOEpatents

    Beyer, Edward T.

    1976-01-06

    The present invention relates to switches and switch actuating devices to be operated for purposes of arming a bomb or other missile as it is dropped or released from an aircraft. The particular bomb or missile in which this invention is applied is one in which there is a plurality of circuits which are to be armed by the closing of switches upon dropping or releasing of the bomb. The operation of the switches to closed position is normally accomplished by means of a pull-out wire; that is, a wire which is withdrawn from the bomb or missile at the time of release of the bomb, one end of the wire being attached to the aircraft. The conditions to be met are that the arming switches must be positively and surely maintained in open position until the bomb is released and the arming action is effected. The action of the pull-out wire in achieving the arming action must be sure and positive with minimum danger of malfunctioning, jamming or binding.

  19. Project CLASS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBain, Susan L.; And Others

    Project CLASS (Competency-Based Live-Ability Skills) uses a series of 60 modules to teach life survival skills to adults with low-level reading ability--especially Adult Basic Education/English as a Second Language students. Two versions of the modules have been developed: one for use with teacher-directed instruction and another for independent…

  20. Class Trash.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemecology, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Presents a classroom activity in which students calculate the amount and types of trash thrown out by their class at school to investigate how much trash is generated, where it goes, and speculate about alternatives. Students need to be familiar with the concepts of weight, volume, and numbers. (MCO)

  1. Switching power supply

    DOEpatents

    Mihalka, A.M.

    1984-06-05

    The invention is a repratable capacitor charging, switching power supply. A ferrite transformer steps up a dc input. The transformer primary is in a full bridge configuration utilizing power MOSFETs as the bridge switches. The transformer secondary is fed into a high voltage, full wave rectifier whose output is connected directly to the energy storage capacitor. The transformer is designed to provide adequate leakage inductance to limit capacitor current. The MOSFETs are switched to the variable frequency from 20 to 50 kHz to charge a capacitor from 0.6 kV. The peak current in a transformer primary and secondary is controlled by increasing the pulse width as the capacitor charges. A digital ripple counter counts pulses and after a preselected desired number is reached an up-counter is clocked.

  2. SWITCH user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The planning program, SWITCH, and its surrounding changed-goal-replanning program, Runaround, are described. The evolution of SWITCH and Runaround from an earlier planner, DEVISER, is recounted. SWITCH's plan representation, and its process of building a plan by backward chaining with strict chronological backtracking, are described. A guide for writing knowledge base files is provided, as are narrative guides for installing the program, running it, and interacting with it while it is running. Some utility functions are documented. For the sake of completeness, a narrative guide to the experimental discrepancy-replanning feature is provided. Appendices contain knowledge base files for a blocksworld domain, and a DRIBBLE file illustrating the output from, and user interaction with, the program in that domain.

  3. FAST ACTING CURRENT SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.; Cummings, D.B.; Ryan, J.F.

    1962-05-22

    A high-current, fast-acting switch is designed for utilization as a crowbar switch in a high-current circuit such as used to generate the magnetic confinement field of a plasma-confining and heat device, e.g., Pyrotron. The device particularly comprises a cylindrical housing containing two stationary, cylindrical contacts between which a movable contact is bridged to close the switch. The movable contact is actuated by a differential-pressure, airdriven piston assembly also within the housing. To absorb the acceleration (and the shock imparted to the device by the rapidly driven, movable contact), an adjustable air buffer assembly is provided, integrally connected to the movable contact and piston assembly. Various safety locks and circuit-synchronizing means are also provided to permit proper cooperation of the invention and the high-current circuit in which it is installed. (AEC)

  4. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Schare, Joshua M.; Bunch, Kyle

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  5. Optical computer switching network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clymer, B.; Collins, S. A., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The design for an optical switching system for minicomputers that uses an optical spatial light modulator such as a Hughes liquid crystal light valve is presented. The switching system is designed to connect 80 minicomputers coupled to the switching system by optical fibers. The system has two major parts: the connection system that connects the data lines by which the computers communicate via a two-dimensional optical matrix array and the control system that controls which computers are connected. The basic system, the matrix-based connecting system, and some of the optical components to be used are described. Finally, the details of the control system are given and illustrated with a discussion of timing.

  6. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D’Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew RM

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products. PMID:25530082

  7. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  8. Recombineering Pseudomonas syringae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we report the identification of functions that promote genomic recombination of linear DNA introduced into Pseudomonas cells by electroporation. The genes encoding these functions were identified in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a based on similarity to the lambda Red Exo/Beta and RecE...

  9. Oligonucleotide recombination in bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Today, there are more than 1,500 completed or draft bacterial genome sequences available for public access. To functionally analyze these genomes and to test the hypotheses that are generated from the sequence information we require new and generically useful tools. Recombineering (genetic engineer...

  10. Bearingless switched reluctance motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A switched reluctance motor has a stator with a first set of poles directed toward levitating a rotor horizontally within the stator. A disc shaped portion of a hybrid rotor is affected by the change in flux relative to the current provided at these levitation poles. A processor senses the position of the rotor and changes the flux to move the rotor toward center of the stator. A second set of poles of the stator are utilized to impart torque upon a second portion of the rotor. These second set of poles are driven in a traditional switched reluctance manner by the processor.

  11. SHOCKPROOF MAGNETIC REED SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Medal, E.

    1962-03-13

    A shockproof magnetic reed switch is described which comprises essentially a plurality of pairs of reed contacts of magnetic, electrical conducting material which are arranged generally in circumferential spaced relationship. At least two of the pairs are disposed to operate at a predetermined angle with respect to each other, and the contacts are wired in the circuit, so that the continuity, or discontinuity, of the circuit is not affected by a shock imposed on the switch. The contacts are hermetically sealed within an outer tubular jacket. (AEC)

  12. Assessment of Recombination in the S-segment Genome of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Chinikar, Sadegh; Shah-Hosseini, Nariman; Bouzari, Saeid; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Jalali, Tahmineh; Khakifirouz, Sahar; Groschup, Martin H; Niedrig, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Background: Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus (CCHFV) belongs to genus Nairovirus and family Bunyaviridae. The main aim of this study was to investigate the extent of recombination in S-segment genome of CCHFV in Iran. Methods: Samples were isolated from Iranian patients and those available in GenBank, and analyzed by phylogenetic and bootscan methods. Results: Through comparison of the phylogenetic trees based on full length sequences and partial fragments in the S-segment genome of CCHFV, genetic switch was evident, due to recombination event. Moreover, evidence of multiple recombination events was detected in query isolates when bootscan analysis was used by SimPlot software. Conclusion: Switch of different genomic regions between different strains by recombination could contribute to CCHFV diversification and evolution. The occurrence of recombination in CCHFV has a critical impact on epidemiological investigations and vaccine design. PMID:27047968

  13. 35. END VIEW, INTERIOR, SHOWING SWITCHING LEVERS, BERK SWITCH TOWER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. END VIEW, INTERIOR, SHOWING SWITCHING LEVERS, BERK SWITCH TOWER, SOUTH NORWALK - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  14. 36. INTERIOR VIEW, BERK SWITCH TOWER, SOUTH NORWALK, SHOWING SWITCHING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. INTERIOR VIEW, BERK SWITCH TOWER, SOUTH NORWALK, SHOWING SWITCHING LEVERS FROM OPERATOR'S POSITION - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  15. 43. OBLIQUE VIEW, GREEN SWITCH TOWER, COS COB, SHOWING SWITCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. OBLIQUE VIEW, GREEN SWITCH TOWER, COS COB, SHOWING SWITCH LEVER ASSEMBLAGE AND DISPLAY BOARD - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  16. 41. INTERIOR VIEW, GREEN SWITCH TOWER, COS COB, SHOWING SWITCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. INTERIOR VIEW, GREEN SWITCH TOWER, COS COB, SHOWING SWITCH LEVER ASSEMBLAGE AND DISPLAY BOARD - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  17. Main electrical switch banks, plant switch house, looking to the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Main electrical switch banks, plant switch house, looking to the North - Bureau of Mines Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Original Building, Date Street north of U.S. Highway 93, Boulder City, Clark County, NV

  18. Genomic homologous recombination in planta.

    PubMed Central

    Gal, S; Pisan, B; Hohn, T; Grimsley, N; Hohn, B

    1991-01-01

    A system for monitoring intrachromosomal homologous recombination in whole plants is described. A multimer of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) sequences, arranged such that CaMV could only be produced by recombination, was integrated into Brassica napus nuclear DNA. This set-up allowed scoring of recombination events by the appearance of viral symptoms. The repeated homologous regions were derived from two different strains of CaMV so that different recombinant viruses (i.e. different recombination events) could be distinguished. In most of the transgenic plants, a single major virus species was detected. About half of the transgenic plants contained viruses of the same type, suggesting a hotspot for recombination. The remainder of the plants contained viruses with cross-over sites distributed throughout the rest of the homologous sequence. Sequence analysis of two recombinant molecules suggest that mismatch repair is linked to the recombination process. Images PMID:2026150

  19. High-speed switching characteristics of integrated optoelectronic crossbar switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouin, Francois L.; Almeida, Carlos; Callender, Claire L.; Robitaille, Lucie; Noad, Julian P.

    1999-04-01

    Optoelectronic (OE) switching is a promising approach for routing signals in fiber optic networks. Recently, the integration of a 4 X 4 MSM array with optical surface waveguides has been reported. This technique greatly simplifies the packaging of an OE switch. The on-chip polyimide optical waveguides perform the optical signal distribution to a matrix of MSMs which are responsible for the switching operation itself. Photoresponse bandwidths exceeding 4 GHz have been demonstrated. Another important characteristic of a switch is the switching speed since it determines the reconfiguration time. Mechanical and thermal optical waveguide switches offer switching speeds of the order of milliseconds which is sufficient for network traffic management but too slow for packet switching. We report measurements on the switching characteristics of a 4 X 4 optoelectronic switch performed in both the frequency and time domain. In the time domain, the individual crosspoints exhibit a rise time of 3 ns. However, a sizeable overshoot and ringing settles only after 35 ns. This constitutes the reconfiguration time at present. This is confirmed by measurements in the frequency domain of the electrical transmission from control line to output line. The 3-dB switching bandwidth is a few hundred megahertz. The 35 ns reconfiguration time indicates that it is already suitable for packet switching in a 10 Mb/s network. Switching speed measurements on individual MSMs suggests that modifications to the switch circuit could improve the switching time. The switch could also find application as a component in the wavelength conversion circuit of a WDM fiber optic network.

  20. The fox and the cabra: An ERP analysis of reading code switched nouns and verbs in bilingual short stories

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Shukhan; Gonzalez, Christian; Wicha, Nicole Y. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Comprehending a language (or code) switch within a sentence context triggers 2 electrophysiological signatures: an early left anterior negativity post code switch onset – a LAN – followed by a Late Positive Component (LPC). Word class and word position modulate lexico-semantic processes in the monolingual brain, e.g., larger N400 amplitude for nouns than verbs and for earlier than later words in the sentence. Here we test whether the bilingual brain is affected by word class and word position when code switching, or if the cost of switching overrides these lexico-semantic and sentence context factors. Adult bilinguals read short stories in English containing 8 target words. Targets were nouns or verbs, occurred early or late in a story and were presented alternately in English (non-switch) or Spanish (switch) across different story versions. Overall, switched words elicited larger LAN and LPC amplitude than nonswitched words. The N400 amplitude was larger for nouns than verbs, more focal for switches than non-switches, and for early than late nouns but not for early than late verbs. Moreover, an early LPC effect was observed only for switched nouns, but not verbs. Together, this indicates that referential elements (nouns) may be harder to process and integrate than relational elements (verbs) in discourse, and when switched, nouns incur higher integration cost. Word position did not modulate the code switching effects, implying that switching between languages may invoke discourse independent processes. PMID:24530431

  1. True ferroelectric switching in thin films of trialkylbenzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide (BTA).

    PubMed

    Gorbunov, A V; Putzeys, T; Urbanavičiūtė, I; Janssen, R A J; Wübbenhorst, M; Sijbesma, R P; Kemerink, M

    2016-08-24

    We have investigated the ferroelectric polarization switching properties of trialkylbenzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide (BTA), which is a model system for a large class of novel organic ferroelectric materials. In the solid state BTAs form a liquid crystalline columnar hexagonal phase that provides long range order that was previously shown to give rise to hysteretic dipolar switching. In this work the nature of the polar switching process is investigated by a combination of dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, depth-resolved pyroelectric response measurements, and classical frequency- and time-dependent electrical switching. We show that BTAs, when brought in a homeotropically aligned hexagonal liquid crystalline phase, are truly ferroelectric. Analysis of the transient switching behavior suggests that the ferroelectric switching is limited by a highly dispersive nucleation process, giving rise to a wide distribution of switching times. PMID:27510767

  2. Purification of a Recombinant Glutathione Transferase from the Causative Agent of Hydatidosis, "Echinococcus granulosus"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleitas, Andrea L.; Randall, Lía M.; Möller, Matías N.; Denicola, Ana

    2016-01-01

    This practical class activity was designed to introduce students to recombinant protein expression and purification. The principal goal is to shed light on basic aspects concerning recombinant protein production, in particular protein expression, chromatography methods for protein purification, and enzyme activity as a tool to evaluate purity and…

  3. Phospholipase A2 regulates eicosanoid class switching during inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Norris, Paul C; Gosselin, David; Reichart, Donna; Glass, Christopher K; Dennis, Edward A

    2014-09-01

    Initiation and resolution of inflammation are considered to be tightly connected processes. Lipoxins (LX) are proresolution lipid mediators that inhibit phlogistic neutrophil recruitment and promote wound-healing macrophage recruitment in humans via potent and specific signaling through the LXA4 receptor (ALX). One model of lipoxin biosynthesis involves sequential metabolism of arachidonic acid by two cell types expressing a combined transcellular metabolon. It is currently unclear how lipoxins are efficiently formed from precursors or if they are directly generated after receptor-mediated inflammatory commitment. Here, we provide evidence for a pathway by which lipoxins are generated in macrophages as a consequence of sequential activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a receptor for endotoxin, and P2X7, a purinergic receptor for extracellular ATP. Initial activation of TLR4 results in accumulation of the cyclooxygenase-2-derived lipoxin precursor 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) in esterified form within membrane phospholipids, which can be enhanced by aspirin (ASA) treatment. Subsequent activation of P2X7 results in efficient hydrolysis of 15-HETE from membrane phospholipids by group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2, and its conversion to bioactive lipoxins by 5-lipoxygenase. Our results demonstrate how a single immune cell can store a proresolving lipid precursor and then release it for bioactive maturation and secretion, conceptually similar to the production and inflammasome-dependent maturation of the proinflammatory IL-1 family cytokines. These findings provide evidence for receptor-specific and combinatorial control of pro- and anti-inflammatory eicosanoid biosynthesis, and potential avenues to modulate inflammatory indices without inhibiting downstream eicosanoid pathways. PMID:25139986

  4. Kiowa Creek Switching Station

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to construct, operate, and maintain a new Kiowa Creek Switching Station near Orchard in Morgan County, Colorado. Kiowa Creek Switching Station would consist of a fenced area of approximately 300 by 300 feet and contain various electrical equipment typical for a switching station. As part of this new construction, approximately one mile of an existing 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line will be removed and replaced with a double circuit overhead line. The project will also include a short (one-third mile) realignment of an existing line to permit connection with the new switching station. In accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations for implementing the procedural provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 40 CFR Parts 1500--1508, the Department of Energy (DOE) has determined that an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required for the proposed project. This determination is based on the information contained in this environmental assessment (EA) prepared by Western. The EA identifies and evaluates the environmental and socioeconomic effects of the proposed action, and concludes that the advance impacts on the human environment resulting from the proposed project would not be significant. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Multipath star switch controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, T. O.

    1980-01-01

    Device concept permits parallel computers to scan several commonnetwork-connected data stations at maximum rate. Sequencers leap-frog to bypass ports already being serviced by another computer. Two-path system for 16-port star switch controller is cost effective if added bandwidth or increased reliability is desired. Triple-path system would be cost effective for 32-port controller.

  6. Oscillating Thermal Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrick, S. Walter

    1991-01-01

    Proposed heat switch transfers heat from source to sink in regular cycles. Self-sustaining; actuated by transferred heat, contains no moving parts, and needs no external heaters or electronic circuitry to synchronize heat-transfer periods or control heat-transfer rates. Intended for use in gas-sorption refrigerator.

  7. Waveguide switch protector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolbly, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    Device for detecting excessive operation of electric motors used to drive waveguide switches is described. Purpose of device is to prevent burnout of electric motor in event of waveguide stoppage at some point other than extreme limits of travel. Operation of equipment, components used to sense motor performance, and schematic diagram are included.

  8. Photonic MEMS switch applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Anis

    2001-07-01

    As carriers and service providers continue their quest for profitable network solutions, they have shifted their focus from raw bandwidth to rapid provisioning, delivery and management of revenue generating services. Inherently transparent to data rate the transmission wavelength and data format, MEMS add scalability, reliability, low power and compact size providing flexible solutions to the management and/or fiber channels in long haul, metro, and access networks. MEMS based photonic switches have gone from the lab to commercial availability and are now currently in carrier trials and volume production. 2D MEMS switches offer low up-front deployment costs while remaining scalable to large arrays. They allow for transparent, native protocol transmission. 2D switches enable rapid service turn-up and management for many existing and emerging revenue rich services such as storage connectivity, optical Ethernet, wavelength leasing and optical VPN. As the network services evolve, the larger 3D MEMS switches, which provide greater scalability and flexibility, will become economically viable to serve the ever-increasing needs.

  9. Molecular Rotors as Switches

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Mei; Wang, Kang L.

    2012-01-01

    The use of a functional molecular unit acting as a state variable provides an attractive alternative for the next generations of nanoscale electronics. It may help overcome the limits of conventional MOSFETd due to their potential scalability, low-cost, low variability, and highly integratable characteristics as well as the capability to exploit bottom-up self-assembly processes. This bottom-up construction and the operation of nanoscale machines/devices, in which the molecular motion can be controlled to perform functions, have been studied for their functionalities. Being triggered by external stimuli such as light, electricity or chemical reagents, these devices have shown various functions including those of diodes, rectifiers, memories, resonant tunnel junctions and single settable molecular switches that can be electronically configured for logic gates. Molecule-specific electronic switching has also been reported for several of these device structures, including nanopores containing oligo(phenylene ethynylene) monolayers, and planar junctions incorporating rotaxane and catenane monolayers for the construction and operation of complex molecular machines. A specific electrically driven surface mounted molecular rotor is described in detail in this review. The rotor is comprised of a monolayer of redox-active ligated copper compounds sandwiched between a gold electrode and a highly-doped P+ Si. This electrically driven sandwich-type monolayer molecular rotor device showed an on/off ratio of approximately 104, a read window of about 2.5 V, and a retention time of greater than 104 s. The rotation speed of this type of molecular rotor has been reported to be in the picosecond timescale, which provides a potential of high switching speed applications. Current-voltage spectroscopy (I-V) revealed a temperature-dependent negative differential resistance (NDR) associated with the device. The analysis of the device I–V characteristics suggests the source of the

  10. Heat-transfer thermal switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedell, M. V.; Anderson, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Thermal switch maintains temperature of planetary lander, within definite range, by transferring heat. Switch produces relatively large stroke and force, uses minimum electrical power, is lightweight, is vapor pressure actuated, and withstands sterilization temperatures without damage.

  11. Automatic thermal switch. [spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, J. W.; Wing, L. D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An automatic thermal switch to control heat flow includes two thermally conductive plates and a thermally conductive switch saddle pivotally mounted to the first plate. A flexible heat carrier is connected between the switch saddle and the second plate. A phase-change power unit, including a piston coupled to the switch saddle, is in thermal contact with the first thermally conductive plate. A biasing element biases the switch saddle in a predetermined position with respect to the first plate. When the phase-change power unit is actuated by an increase in heat transmitted through the first place, the piston extends and causes the switch saddle to pivot, thereby varying the thermal conduction between the two plates through the switch saddle and flexible heat carrier. The biasing element, switch saddle, and piston can be arranged to provide either a normally closed or normally opened thermally conductive path between the two plates.

  12. Switching power pulse system

    DOEpatents

    Aaland, Kristian

    1983-01-01

    A switching system for delivering pulses of power from a source (10) to a load (20) using a storage capacitor (C3) charged through a rectifier (D1, D2), and maintained charged to a reference voltage level by a transistor switch (Q1) and voltage comparator (12). A thyristor (22) is triggered to discharge the storage capacitor through a saturable reactor (18) and fractional turn saturable transformer (16) having a secondary to primary turn ratio N of n:l/n=n.sup.2. The saturable reactor (18) functions as a "soaker" while the thyristor reaches saturation, and then switches to a low impedance state. The saturable transformer functions as a switching transformer with high impedance while a load coupling capacitor (C4) charges, and then switches to a low impedance state to dump the charge of the storage capacitor (C3) into the load through the coupling capacitor (C4). The transformer is comprised of a multilayer core (26) having two secondary windings (28, 30) tightly wound and connected in parallel to add their output voltage and reduce output inductance, and a number of single turn windings connected in parallel at nodes (32, 34) for the primary winding, each single turn winding linking a different one of the layers of the multilayer core. The load may be comprised of a resistive beampipe (40) for a linear particle accelerator and capacitance of a pulse forming network (42). To hold off discharge of the capacitance until it is fully charged, a saturable core (44) is provided around the resistive beampipe (40) to isolate the beampipe from the capacitance (42) until it is fully charged.

  13. A Collaborative, Investigative Recombinant DNA Technology Course with Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pezzementi, Leo; Johnson, Joy F.

    2002-01-01

    A recombinant DNA technology course was designed to promote contextual, collaborative, inquiry-based learning of science where students learn from one another and have a sense of ownership of their education. The class stressed group presentations and critical reading and discussion of scientific articles. The laboratory consisted of two research…

  14. Noise-induced switching and extinction in systems with delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Ira B.; Billings, Lora; Carr, Thomas W.; Dykman, M. I.

    2015-01-01

    We consider the rates of noise-induced switching between the stable states of dissipative dynamical systems with delay and also the rates of noise-induced extinction, where such systems model population dynamics. We study a class of systems where the evolution depends on the dynamical variables at a preceding time with a fixed time delay, which we call hard delay. For weak noise, the rates of interattractor switching and extinction are exponentially small. Finding these rates to logarithmic accuracy is reduced to variational problems. The solutions of the variational problems give the most probable paths followed in switching or extinction. We show that the equations for the most probable paths are acausal and formulate the appropriate boundary conditions. Explicit results are obtained for small delay compared to the relaxation rate. We also develop a direct variational method to find the rates. We find that the analytical results agree well with the numerical simulations for both switching and extinction rates.

  15. Easily-wired toggle switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, W. T.; Stringer, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    Crimp-type connectors reduce assembly and disassembly time. With design, no switch preparation is necessary and socket contracts are crimped to wires inserted in module attached to back of toggle switch engaging pins inside module to make electrical connections. Wires are easily removed with standard detachment tool. Design can accommodate wires of any gage and as many terminals can be placed on switch as wire gage and switch dimensions will allow.

  16. Transparent electrode for optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Goldhar, J.; Henesian, M.A.

    1984-10-19

    The invention relates generally to optical switches and techniques for applying a voltage to an electro-optical crystal, and more particularly, to transparent electodes for an optical switch. System architectures for very large inertial confinement fusion (ICF) lasers require active optical elements with apertures on the order of one meter. Large aperture optical switches are needed for isolation of stages, switch-out from regenerative amplifier cavities and protection from target retroreflections.

  17. Radiation sensitive solid state switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutto, R. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A mechanically operable solid state switch suited for use in achieving a variable circuit-switching function is described. This switch is characterized by an annular array of photoresponsive switching devices, disposed in communication with an included source of radiation, and a plurality of interchangeable, mechanically operable interrupter disks. Each disk has a predetermined pattern of transparent and opaque portions. Operative displacement of each disk serves to make and break selected electrical circuits through the photo responsive devices of said array.

  18. High speed switching in gases

    SciTech Connect

    Cassell, R.E.; Villa, F.

    1989-02-01

    A fast, efficient and reliable switch is the basic ingredient of a pulse power accelerator. Two switches have been proposed so far: the solid state switch, and the vacuum photodiode switch. The solid state version has been tested to some extent, albeit at low (few kilovolts) level, with risetime around 10 ps in the radial line transformer configuration. The vacuum photodiode is being investigated by Fisher and Rao at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Common to both switches is the need of a short laser pulse; near infrared for the solid state switch, and ultraviolet for the vacuum photodiode switch. Another common feature is the poor energy gain of these switches: the gain being the ratio between the electrical energy switched and the laser energy needed to drive the switch. For the solid state switch, calculations and experimental data show that the energy gain cannot exceed a value between 5 and 10. For the vacuum photodiode, the situation is somewhat similar, unless very high quantum efficiency, rugged photocathodes can be found. A closing switch also can be used to produce short pulses of rf at frequencies related to its closing time, using a well-known device called the frozen wave generator. For a risetime of the order of 30 ps, one could produce several Gigawatts of rf at Xband at very low cost. 12 refs., 12 figs.

  19. Illuminated push-button switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwagiri, T.

    1983-01-01

    An illuminated push-button switch is described. It is characterized by the fact that is consists of a switch group, an operator button opening and closing the switch group, and a light-emitting element which illuminates the face of the operator button.

  20. Organic Materials For Optical Switching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    1993-01-01

    Equations predict properties of candidate materials. Report presents results of theoretical study of nonlinear optical properties of organic materials. Such materials used in optical switching devices for computers and telecommunications, replacing electronic switches. Optical switching potentially offers extremely high information throughout in compact hardware.

  1. Semiconductor ac static power switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrancik, J.

    1968-01-01

    Semiconductor ac static power switch has long life and high reliability, contains no moving parts, and operates satisfactorily in severe environments, including high vibration and shock conditions. Due to their resistance to shock and vibration, static switches are used where accidental switching caused by mechanical vibration or shock cannot be tolerated.

  2. Language Switching and Language Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macizo, Pedro; Bajo, Teresa; Paolieri, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the asymmetrical language switching cost in a word reading task (Experiment 1) and in a categorization task (Experiment 2 and 3). In Experiment 1, Spanish-English bilinguals named words in first language (L1) and second language (L2) in a switching paradigm. They were slower to switch from their weaker L2 to their more dominant…

  3. Engineering thermoacidophilic archaea using linear DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Maezato, Yukari; Dana, Karl; Blum, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Thermoacidophilic archaea comprise one of the major classes of extremophiles. Most belong to the family Sulfolobales within the phylum Crenarchaeota. They are of applied interest as sources of hyperstable enzymes, for biomining of base and precious metals, and for evolutionary studies because of their use of eukaryotic-like subcellular mechanisms. Genetic methods are available for several species particularly Sulfolobus solfataricus. This organism has a considerable number of methods available for the construction of novel cell lines with unique functions. This chapter presents recent developments in the use of homologous recombination and linear DNA for the engineering of site-specific changes in the genome of S. solfataricus. PMID:21815108

  4. Recombinant vaccines against leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Dellagostin, Odir A; Grassmann, André A; Hartwig, Daiane D; Félix, Samuel R; da Silva, Éverton F; McBride, Alan J A

    2011-11-01

    Leptospirosis is an important neglected infectious disease that occurs in urban environments, as well as in rural regions worldwide. Rodents, the principal reservoir hosts of pathogenic Leptospira spp., and other infected animals shed the bacteria in their urine. During occupational or even recreational activities, humans that come into direct contact with infected animals or with a contaminated environment, particularly water, are at risk of infection. Prevention of urban leptospirosis is largely dependent on sanitation measures that are often difficult to implement, especially in developing countries. Vaccination with inactivated whole-cell preparations (bacterins) has limited efficacy due to the wide antigenic variation of the pathogen. Intensive efforts towards developing improved recombinant vaccines are ongoing. During the last decade, many reports on the evaluation of recombinant vaccines have been published. Partial success has been obtained with some surface-exposed protein antigens. The combination of protective antigens and new adjuvants or delivery systems may result in the much-needed effective vaccine. PMID:22048111

  5. Recombinant influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Sedova, E S; Shcherbinin, D N; Migunov, A I; Smirnov, Iu A; Logunov, D Iu; Shmarov, M M; Tsybalova, L M; Naroditskiĭ, B S; Kiselev, O I; Gintsburg, A L

    2012-10-01

    This review covers the problems encountered in the construction and production of new recombinant influenza vaccines. New approaches to the development of influenza vaccines are investigated; they include reverse genetics methods, production of virus-like particles, and DNA- and viral vector-based vaccines. Such approaches as the delivery of foreign genes by DNA- and viral vector-based vaccines can preserve the native structure of antigens. Adenoviral vectors are a promising gene-delivery platform for a variety of genetic vaccines. Adenoviruses can efficiently penetrate the human organism through mucosal epithelium, thus providing long-term antigen persistence and induction of the innate immune response. This review provides an overview of the practicability of the production of new recombinant influenza cross-protective vaccines on the basis of adenoviral vectors expressing hemagglutinin genes of different influenza strains. PMID:23346377

  6. Site directed recombination

    DOEpatents

    Jurka, Jerzy W.

    1997-01-01

    Enhanced homologous recombination is obtained by employing a consensus sequence which has been found to be associated with integration of repeat sequences, such as Alu and ID. The consensus sequence or sequence having a single transition mutation determines one site of a double break which allows for high efficiency of integration at the site. By introducing single or double stranded DNA having the consensus sequence flanking region joined to a sequence of interest, one can reproducibly direct integration of the sequence of interest at one or a limited number of sites. In this way, specific sites can be identified and homologous recombination achieved at the site by employing a second flanking sequence associated with a sequence proximal to the 3'-nick.

  7. Active Learning with Monty Hall in a Game Theory Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brokaw, Alan J.; Merz, Thomas E.

    2004-01-01

    The authors describe a game that students can play on the first day of a game theory class. The game introduces the 4 essential elements of any game and is designed so that its sequel, also played on the first day of class, has students playing the well-known Monty Hall game, which raises the question: Should you switch doors? By implementing a…

  8. Abacus switch: a new scalable multicast ATM switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, H. Jonathan; Park, Jin-Soo; Choe, Byeong-Seog

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes a new architecture for a scalable multicast ATM switch from a few tens to thousands of input ports. The switch, called Abacus switch, has a nonblocking memoryless switch fabric followed by small switch modules at the output ports; the switch has input and output buffers. Cell replication, cell routing, output contention resolution, and cell addressing are all performed distributedly in the Abacus switch so that it can be scaled up to thousnads input and output ports. A novel algorithm has been proposed to resolve output port contention while achieving input and output ports. A novel algorithm has been proposed to reolve output port contention while achieving input buffers sharing, fairness among the input ports, and multicast call splitting. The channel grouping concept is also adopted in the switch to reduce the hardware complexity and improve the switch's throughput. The Abacus switch has a regular structure and thus has the advantages of: 1) easy expansion, 2) relaxed synchronization for data and clock signals, and 3) building the switch fabric using existing CMOS technology.

  9. Class distinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, M. Catherine

    Typical 101 courses discourage many students from pursuing higher level science and math courses. Introductory classes in science and math serve largely as a filter, screening out all but the most promising students, and leaving the majority of college graduates—including most prospective teachers—with little understanding of how science works, according to a study conducted for the National Science Foundation. Because few teachers, particularly at the elementary level, experience any collegiate science teaching that stresses skills of inquiry and investigation, they simply never learn to use those methods in their teaching, the report states.

  10. The recombination epoch revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies of cosmological recombination have shown that this process produces as a by-product a highly superthermal population of Ly-alpha photons which retard completion of recombination. Cosmological redshifting was thought to determine the frequency distribution of the photons, while two-photon decay of hydrogen's 2s state was thought to control their numbers. It is shown here that frequency diffusion due to photon scattering dominate the cosmological redshift in the frequency range near line center which fixes the ratio of ground state to excited state population, while incoherent scattering into the far-red damping wing effectively destroys Ly-alpha photons as a rate which is competitive with two-photon decay. The former effect tends to hold back recombination, while the latter tends to accelerate it; the net results depends on cosmological parameters, particularly the combination Omega(b) h/sq rt (2q0), where Omega(b) is the fraction of the critical density provided by baryons.

  11. Biochemical switching device: how to turn on (off) the switch.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, M; Sakai, T; Hayashi, K

    1989-01-01

    We previously showed with computer simulations that cyclic enzyme systems have the reliability of ON-OFF types of operation (McCulloch-Pitts' neuronic equation) and the applicability for a switching circuit in a biocomputer. The switching time was inevitably determined in accordance with the difference in amount between two inputs of the system. This characteristic is, however, a disadvantage for practical use of a switching device; we need to improve the system in order for the switching time to optionally be changed. We shall present here how to turn on (off) the switch independently of the modes of two inputs. By introducing pulse perturbation, we could optionally set up the switching time of a cyclic enzyme system (biochemical switching device). PMID:2720139

  12. High gain GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switches: Switch longevity

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, G.M.; Zutavern, F.J.; Mar, A.

    1998-07-01

    Optically activated, high gain GaAs switches are being tested for many different pulsed power applications that require long lifetime (longevity). The switches have p and n contact metallization (with intentional or unintentional dopants) configured in such a way as to produce p-i-n or n-i-n switches. The longevity of the switches is determined by circuit parameters and by the ability of the contacts to resist erosion. This paper will describe how the switches performed in test-beds designed to measure switch longevity. The best longevity was achieved with switches made with diffused contacts, achieving over 50 million pulses at 10 A and over 2 million pulses at 80 A.

  13. Replication-Associated Recombinational Repair: Lessons from Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Jaclyn N.; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2016-01-01

    Recombinational repair processes multiple types of DNA lesions. Though best understood in the repair of DNA breaks, recombinational repair is intimately linked to other situations encountered during replication. As DNA strands are decorated with many types of blocks that impede the replication machinery, a great number of genomic regions cannot be duplicated without the help of recombinational repair. This replication-associated recombinational repair employs both the core recombination proteins used for DNA break repair and the specialized factors that couple replication with repair. Studies from multiple organisms have provided insights into the roles of these specialized factors, with the findings in budding yeast being advanced through use of powerful genetics and methods for detecting DNA replication and repair intermediates. In this review, we summarize recent progress made in this organism, ranging from our understanding of the classical template switch mechanisms to gap filling and replication fork regression pathways. As many of the protein factors and biological principles uncovered in budding yeast are conserved in higher eukaryotes, these findings are crucial for stimulating studies in more complex organisms. PMID:27548223

  14. Selective and Genetic Constraints on Pneumococcal Serotype Switching

    PubMed Central

    Croucher, Nicholas J.; Kagedan, Lisa; Thompson, Claudette M.; Parkhill, Julian; Bentley, Stephen D.; Finkelstein, Jonathan A.; Lipsitch, Marc; Hanage, William P.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates typically express one of over 90 immunologically distinguishable polysaccharide capsules (serotypes), which can be classified into “serogroups” based on cross-reactivity with certain antibodies. Pneumococci can alter their serotype through recombinations affecting the capsule polysaccharide synthesis (cps) locus. Twenty such “serotype switching” events were fully characterised using a collection of 616 whole genome sequences from systematic surveys of pneumococcal carriage. Eleven of these were within-serogroup switches, representing a highly significant (p < 0.0001) enrichment based on the observed serotype distribution. Whereas the recombinations resulting in between-serogroup switches all spanned the entire cps locus, some of those that caused within-serogroup switches did not. However, higher rates of within-serogroup switching could not be fully explained by either more frequent, shorter recombinations, nor by genetic linkage to genes involved in β–lactam resistance. This suggested the observed pattern was a consequence of selection for preserving serogroup. Phenotyping of strains constructed to express different serotypes in common genetic backgrounds was used to test whether genotypes were physiologically adapted to particular serogroups. These data were consistent with epistatic interactions between the cps locus and the rest of the genome that were specific to serotype, but not serogroup, meaning they were unlikely to account for the observed distribution of capsule types. Exclusion of these genetic and physiological hypotheses suggested future work should focus on alternative mechanisms, such as host immunity spanning multiple serotypes within the same serogroup, which might explain the observed pattern. PMID:25826208

  15. Optical fiber switch

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2002-01-01

    Optical fiber switches operated by electrical activation of at least one laser light modulator through which laser light is directed into at least one polarizer are used for the sequential transport of laser light from a single laser into a plurality of optical fibers. In one embodiment of the invention, laser light from a single excitation laser is sequentially transported to a plurality of optical fibers which in turn transport the laser light to separate individual remotely located laser fuel ignitors. The invention can be operated electro-optically with no need for any mechanical or moving parts, or, alternatively, can be operated electro-mechanically. The invention can be used to switch either pulsed or continuous wave laser light.

  16. Neurotransmitter Switching? No Surprise

    PubMed Central

    Spitzer, Nicholas C.

    2015-01-01

    Among the many forms of brain plasticity, changes in synaptic strength and changes in synapse number are particularly prominent. However, evidence for neurotransmitter respecification or switching has been accumulating steadily, both in the developing nervous system and in the adult brain, with observations of transmitter addition, loss, or replacement of one transmitter with another. Natural stimuli can drive these changes in transmitter identity, with matching changes in postsynaptic transmitter receptors. Strikingly, they often convert the synapse from excitatory to inhibitory or vice versa, providing a basis for changes in behavior in those cases in which it has been examined. Progress has been made in identifying the factors that induce transmitter switching and in understanding the molecular mechanisms by which it is achieved. There are many intriguing questions to be addressed. PMID:26050033

  17. A plasmonic Fano switch.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Shun; Lassiter, J Britt; Swanglap, Pattanawit; Sobhani, Heidar; Khatua, Saumyakanti; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J; Link, Stephan

    2012-09-12

    Plasmonic clusters can support Fano resonances, where the line shape characteristics are controlled by cluster geometry. Here we show that clusters with a hemicircular central disk surrounded by a circular ring of closely spaced, coupled nanodisks yield Fano-like and non-Fano-like spectra for orthogonal incident polarization orientations. When this structure is incorporated into an uniquely broadband, liquid crystal device geometry, the entire Fano resonance spectrum can be switched on and off in a voltage-dependent manner. A reversible transition between the Fano-like and non-Fano-like spectra is induced by relatively low (∼6 V) applied voltages, resulting in a complete on/off switching of the transparency window. PMID:22924610

  18. Plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Savage, Mark E.; Mendel, Jr., Clifford W.

    2001-01-01

    A command triggered plasma opening switch assembly using an amplification stage. The assembly surrounds a coaxial transmission line and has a main plasma opening switch (POS) close to the load and a trigger POS upstream from the main POS. The trigger POS establishes two different current pathways through the assembly depended on whether it has received a trigger current pulse. The initial pathway has both POS's with plasma between their anodes and cathodes to form a short across the transmission line and isolating the load. The final current pathway is formed when the trigger POS receives a trigger current pulse which energizes its fast coil to push the conductive plasma out from between its anode and cathode, allowing the main transmission line current to pass to the fast coil of the main POS, thus pushing its plasma out the way so as to establish a direct current pathway to the load.

  19. The quantum cryptographic switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinatha, N.; Omkar, S.; Srikanth, R.; Banerjee, Subhashish; Pathak, Anirban

    2014-01-01

    We illustrate the principle of a cryptographic switch for a quantum scenario, in which a third party (Charlie) can control to a continuously varying degree the amount of information the receiver (Bob) receives, after the sender (Alice) has sent her information through a quantum channel. Suppose Charlie transmits a Bell state to Alice and Bob. Alice uses dense coding to transmit two bits to Bob. Only if the 2-bit information corresponding to the choice of the Bell state is made available by Charlie to Bob can the latter recover Alice's information. By varying the amount of information Charlie gives, he can continuously alter the information recovered by Bob. The performance of the protocol as subjected to the squeezed generalized amplitude damping channel is considered. We also present a number of practical situations where a cryptographic switch would be of use.

  20. MULTIPLE SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Schofield, A.E.

    1958-07-22

    A multiple spark gap switch of unique construction is described which will permit controlled, simultaneous discharge of several capacitors into a load. The switch construction includes a disc electrode with a plurality of protuberances of generally convex shape on one surface. A firing electrode is insulatingly supponted In each of the electrode protuberances and extends substantially to the apex thereof. Individual electrodes are disposed on an insulating plate parallel with the disc electrode to form a number of spark gaps with the protuberances. These electrodes are each connected to a separate charged capacitor and when a voltage ls applied simultaneously between the trigger electrodes and the dlsc electrode, each spark gap fires to connect its capacitor to the disc electrode and a subsequent load.

  1. Cryogenic switched MOSFET characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Both p channel and n channel enhancement mode MOSFETs can be readily switched on and off at temperatures as low as 2.8 K so that switch sampled readout of a VLWIR Ge:Ga focal plane is electronically possible. Noise levels as low as 100 rms electrons per sample (independent of sample rate) can be achieved using existing p channel MOSFETs, at overall rates up to 30,000 samples/second per multiplexed channel (e.g., 32 detectors at a rate of almost 1,000 frames/second). Run of the mill devices, including very low power dissipation n channel FETs would still permit noise levels of the order of 500 electrons/sample.

  2. CREE: Making the Switch

    SciTech Connect

    Grider, David; Palmer, John

    2014-03-06

    CREE, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has developed a Silicon Carbide (SIC) transistor which can be used to create solid state transformers capable of meeting the unique needs of the emerging smart grid. SIC transistors are different from common silicon computer chips in that they handle grid scale voltages with ease and their high frequency switching is well suited to the intermittent nature of renewable energy generation.

  3. CREE: Making the Switch

    ScienceCinema

    Grider, David; Palmer, John

    2014-04-09

    CREE, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has developed a Silicon Carbide (SIC) transistor which can be used to create solid state transformers capable of meeting the unique needs of the emerging smart grid. SIC transistors are different from common silicon computer chips in that they handle grid scale voltages with ease and their high frequency switching is well suited to the intermittent nature of renewable energy generation.

  4. Composite Material Switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javadi, Hamid (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A device to protect electronic circuitry from high voltage transients is constructed from a relatively thin piece of conductive composite sandwiched between two conductors so that conduction is through the thickness of the composite piece. The device is based on the discovery that conduction through conductive composite materials in this configuration switches to a high resistance mode when exposed to voltages above a threshold voltage.

  5. Automatic switching matrix

    DOEpatents

    Schlecht, Martin F.; Kassakian, John G.; Caloggero, Anthony J.; Rhodes, Bruce; Otten, David; Rasmussen, Neil

    1982-01-01

    An automatic switching matrix that includes an apertured matrix board containing a matrix of wires that can be interconnected at each aperture. Each aperture has associated therewith a conductive pin which, when fully inserted into the associated aperture, effects electrical connection between the wires within that particular aperture. Means is provided for automatically inserting the pins in a determined pattern and for removing all the pins to permit other interconnecting patterns.

  6. MCT/MOSFET Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippel, Wally E.

    1990-01-01

    Metal-oxide/semiconductor-controlled thyristor (MCT) and metal-oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) connected in switching circuit to obtain better performance. Offers high utilization of silicon, low forward voltage drop during "on" period of operating cycle, fast turnon and turnoff, and large turnoff safe operating area. Includes ability to operate at high temperatures, high static blocking voltage, and ease of drive.

  7. Ad 2.0: a novel recombineering platform for high-throughput generation of tailored adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Mück-Häusl, Martin; Solanki, Manish; Zhang, Wenli; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2015-04-30

    Recombinant adenoviruses containing a double-stranded DNA genome of 26-45 kb were broadly explored in basic virology, for vaccination purposes, for treatment of tumors based on oncolytic virotherapy, or simply as a tool for efficient gene transfer. However, the majority of recombinant adenoviral vectors (AdVs) is based on a small fraction of adenovirus types and their genetic modification. Recombineering techniques provide powerful tools for arbitrary engineering of recombinant DNA. Here, we adopted a seamless recombineering technology for high-throughput and arbitrary genetic engineering of recombinant adenoviral DNA molecules. Our cloning platform which also includes a novel recombination pipeline is based on bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). It enables generation of novel recombinant adenoviruses from different sources and switching between commonly used early generation AdVs and the last generation high-capacity AdVs lacking all viral coding sequences making them attractive candidates for clinical use. In combination with a novel recombination pipeline allowing cloning of AdVs containing large and complex transgenes and the possibility to generate arbitrary chimeric capsid-modified adenoviruses, these techniques allow generation of tailored AdVs with distinct features. Our technologies will pave the way toward broader applications of AdVs in molecular medicine including gene therapy and vaccination studies. PMID:25609697

  8. Extended lifetime railgap switch

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, D.B.; Mendoza, P.J.

    1988-02-02

    In a railgap switch of the type having an elongate blade electrode made of conductive material, an elongate housing made of insulating material for supporting the blade electrode and plate electrode in opposed relation extending in the same direction with the blade centered over the plate and separated therefrom by a gap, and a gas filling the housing and the gap, the gas being selected to breakdown and switch from a highly insulative state to a highly conductive state upon application of a high voltage across the blade and plate electrodes, the improvement is described comprising: forming the blade with laterally extending transverse wing portions at the edge of the blade and adjacent the gap so as to extend in spaced parallel relation to the surface of the plate, the blade generally following the contour thereof to form an inverted T-shape structure with the wing portions extending transversely of the elongate dimension of the blade. The wing portions terminating in a pair of spaced parallel edges extending along the elongate direction of the blade to thereby create two spaced elongate edges along which arcs form serving to divide the erosion effects of discharge between them, the current through each edge being one-half of that in single-edge devices with ablation wear reduced accordingly to give significantly larger switch lifetime. The blade and wing portions limiting ablation erosion of the edges in a direction generally align with the plate contour so that the edge-to-plate separation remains substantially constant.

  9. Ferroelectric switching of elastin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuanming; Cai, Hong-Ling; Zelisko, Matthew; Wang, Yunjie; Sun, Jinglan; Yan, Fei; Ma, Feiyue; Wang, Peiqi; Chen, Qian Nataly; Zheng, Hairong; Meng, Xiangjian; Sharma, Pradeep; Zhang, Yanhang; Li, Jiangyu

    2014-01-01

    Ferroelectricity has long been speculated to have important biological functions, although its very existence in biology has never been firmly established. Here, we present compelling evidence that elastin, the key ECM protein found in connective tissues, is ferroelectric, and we elucidate the molecular mechanism of its switching. Nanoscale piezoresponse force microscopy and macroscopic pyroelectric measurements both show that elastin retains ferroelectricity at 473 K, with polarization on the order of 1 μC/cm2, whereas coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations predict similar polarization with a Curie temperature of 580 K, which is higher than most synthetic molecular ferroelectrics. The polarization of elastin is found to be intrinsic in tropoelastin at the monomer level, analogous to the unit cell level polarization in classical perovskite ferroelectrics, and it switches via thermally activated cooperative rotation of dipoles. Our study sheds light onto a long-standing question on ferroelectric switching in biology and establishes ferroelectricity as an important biophysical property of proteins. This is a critical first step toward resolving its physiological significance and pathological implications. PMID:24958890

  10. Ultrafast gas switching experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, C.A.; Martin, T.H.; Patterson, P.E.; Rinehart, L.F.; Rohwein, G.J.; Roose, L.D.; Aurand, J.F.; Buttram, M.T.

    1996-11-01

    We describe recent experiments which studied the physics of ultrafast gas breakdown under the extreme overvoltages which occur when a high pressure gas switch is pulse charged to hundreds of kV in 1 ns or less. The highly overvolted peaking gaps produce powerful electromagnetic pulses with risetimes < 100 ps which can be used for ultrawideband radar systems, particle accelerators, laser drivers, bioelectromagnetic studies, electromagnetic effects testing, and for basic studies of gas breakdown physics. We have produced and accurately measured pulses with 50 to 100 ps risetimes to peak levels of 75 to 160 kV at pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) to I kHz. A unique gas switch was developed to hold off hundreds of kV with parasitic inductance less than I nH. An advanced diagnostic system using Fourier compensation was developed to measure single-shot risetimes below 35 ps. The complete apparatus is described and wave forms are presented. The measured data are compared with a theoretical model which predicts key features including dependence on gas species and pressure. We have applied this technology to practical systems driving ultrawideband radiating antennas and bounded wave simulators. For example, we have developed a thyristor/pulse transformer based system using a highly overvolted cable switch. This pulser driving a Sandia- designed TEM cell, provides an ultra wideband impulse with < 200 ps risetime to the test object at a PRF > 1 kHz at > 100 kV/m E field.

  11. Ultrafast gas switching experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, C.A.; Martin, T.H.; Patterson, P.E.; Rinehart, L.F.; Rohwein, G.J.; Roose, L.D.; Aurand, J.F.; Buttram, M.T.

    1993-08-01

    We describe recent experiments which studied the physics of ultrafast gas breakdown under the extreme overvoltages which occur when a high pressure gas switch is pulse charged to hundreds of kV in 1 ns or less. The highly overvolted peaking gaps produce powerful electromagnetic pulses with risetimes < 100 ps which can be used for ultrawideband radar systems, particle accelerators, laser drivers, bioelectromagnetic studies, electromagnetic effects testing, and for basic studies of gas breakdown physics. We have produced and accurately measured pulses with 50 to 100 ps risetimes to peak levels of 75 to 160 kV at pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) to 1 kHz. A unique gas switch was developed to hold off hundreds of kV with parasitic inductance less than 1 nH. An advanced diagnostic system using Fourier compensation was developed to measure single-shot risetimes below 35 ps. The complete apparatus is described and waveforms are presented. The measured data are compared with a theoretical model which predicts key features including dependence on gas species and technology to practical systems antennas and bounded wave developed a thyristor/pulse transformer based system using a highly overvolted cable switch. This pulser driving a Sandia-designed TEM cell, provides an ultra wideband impulse with < 200 ps risetime to the test object at a PRF > Khz at > 100 kV/m E field.

  12. "Platform switching": serendipity.

    PubMed

    Kalavathy, N; Sridevi, J; Gehlot, Roshni; Kumar, Santosh

    2014-01-01

    Implant dentistry is the latest developing field in terms of clinical techniques, research, material science and oral rehabilitation. Extensive work is being done to improve the designing of implants in order to achieve better esthetics and function. The main drawback with respect to implant restoration is achieving good osseointegration along with satisfactory stress distribution, which in turn will improve the prognosis of implant prosthesis by reducing the crestal bone loss. Many concepts have been developed with reference to surface coating of implants, surgical techniques for implant placement, immediate and delayed loading, platform switching concept, etc. This article has made an attempt to review the concept of platform switching was in fact revealed accidentally due to the nonavailability of the abutment appropriate to the size of the implant placed. A few aspect of platform switching, an upcoming idea to reduce crestal bone loss have been covered. The various methods used for locating and preparing the data were done through textbooks, Google search and related articles. PMID:24992863

  13. Cygnus Diverter Switch Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    G. Corrow, M. Hansen, D. Henderson, C. Mitton et al.

    2008-02-01

    The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two 2.25-MV, 60-kA, 50-ns x-ray sources fielded in an underground laboratory at the Nevada Test Site. The tests performed in this laboratory involve study of the dynamic properties of plutonium and are called subcritical experiments. From end-to-end, the Cygnus machines utilize the following components: Marx generator, water-filled pulse-forming line (PFL), waterfilled coaxial transmission line (WTL), 3-cell inductive voltage adder (IVA), and rod-pinch diode. The upstream WTL interface to the PFL is via a radial insulator with coaxial geometry. The downstream WTL terminates in a manifold where the center conductor splits into three lines which individually connect to each of the IVA cell inputs. There is an impedance mismatch at this juncture. It is a concern that a reflected pulse due to anomalous behavior in the IVA or diode might initiate breakdown upon arrival at the upstream PFL/WTL insulator. Therefore near the beginning of the WTL a radial diverter switch is installed to protect the insulator from over voltage and breakdown. The diverter has adjustable gap spacing, and an in-line aqueous-solution (sodium thiosulfate) resistor array for energy dissipation. There are capacitive voltage probes at both ends of the WTL and on the diverter switch. These voltage signals will be analyzed to determine diverter performance. Using this analysis the usefulness of the diverter switch will be evaluated.

  14. Organic optical bistable switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jiangeng; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate an organic optical bistable switch by integrating an efficient organic photodetector on top of a transparent electrophosphorescent organic light-emitting diode (TOLED). The bistability is achieved with an external field-effect transistor providing positive feedback. In the "LOW" state, the TOLED is off and the current in the photodetector is solely its dark current. In the "HIGH" state, the TOLED emits light that is directly coupled into the integrated photodetector through the transparent cathode. The photocurrent then is fed back to the TOLED, maintaining it in the HIGH state. The green electrophosphorescent material, fac tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium [Ir(ppy)3] doped into a 4,4'-N,N'-dicarbazole-biphenyl host was used as the luminescent material in the TOLED, while alternating thin layers of copper phthalocyanine and 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic bis-benzimidazole were used as the active region of the organic photodetector. The circuit has a 3 dB bandwidth of 25 kHz, and can be switched between HIGH and LOW using pulses as narrow as 60 ns. The bistable switch can be both electrically and optically reset, making it a candidate for image-retaining displays (e.g., electronic paper) and other photonic logic applications. The integrated organic device also has broad use as a linear circuit element in applications such as automatic brightness control.

  15. Broadband packet switches based on dilated interconnection networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tony T.; Liew, Soung C.

    1994-02-01

    A theoretical foundation for evaluation and comparison of a very broad spectrum of fast packet-switching techniques is developed in this paper. Based on this framework, we investigate the complexity of various packet switch designs, and demonstrate the advantage of dilation as a switch-design technique. Packet switches are classified either as loss systems or waiting systems, according to whether packets losing contention are dropped or queued. In a loss system, the packet loss probability can be made arbitrary small by providing enough paths between inputs and outputs. We focus on the question: How does the switch complexity grow as a function of switch size for a given loss probability requirement? A uniform approach to this problem is developed here. We show that for an N x N switch, the required number of switch elements for both the parallel-banyan network and the tandem-banyan network is of order N(log N)(sup 2), whereas the complexity of a dilated-banyan network is of order N log N(log log N). Within the class of waiting systems, we show that the parallel banyan networks in a Batcher-parallel-banyan network can be replaced by a dilated-banyan network without sacrificing the nonblocking property. Thus, as with parallelization, dilation can also be used to increase the throughput of a waiting system. In addition, we also explore the application of dilation in a large modular switch design which is realized by an interconnection structure consisting of Batcher-dilated-banyan networks and statistical multiplexers.

  16. Bacterial Recombineering: Genome Engineering via Phage-Based Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Pines, Gur; Freed, Emily F; Winkler, James D; Gill, Ryan T

    2015-11-20

    The ability to specifically modify bacterial genomes in a precise and efficient manner is highly desired in various fields, ranging from molecular genetics to metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. Much has changed from the initial realization that phage-derived genes may be employed for such tasks to today, where recombineering enables complex genetic edits within a genome or a population. Here, we review the major developments leading to recombineering becoming the method of choice for in situ bacterial genome editing while highlighting the various applications of recombineering in pushing the boundaries of synthetic biology. We also present the current understanding of the mechanism of recombineering. Finally, we discuss in detail issues surrounding recombineering efficiency and future directions for recombineering-based genome editing. PMID:25856528

  17. Dielectronic recombination theory

    SciTech Connect

    LaGattuta, K.J.

    1991-12-31

    A theory now in wide use for the calculation of dielectronic recombination cross sections ({sigma}{sup DR}) and rate coefficients ({alpha}{sup DR}) was one introduced originally by Feshbach for nuclear physics applications, and then later adapted for atomic scattering problems by Hahn. In the following, we briefly review this theory in a very general form, which allows one to account for the effects of overlapping and interacting resonances, as well as continuum-continuum coupling. An extension of our notation will then also allow for the inclusion of the effects of direct radiative recombination, along with a treatment of the interference between radiative and dielectronic recombination. Other approaches to the calculation of {sigma}{sup DR} have been described by Fano and by Seaton. We will not consider those theories here. Calculations of {alpha}{sup DR} have progressed considerably over the last 25 years, since the early work of Burgess. Advances in the reliability of theoretical predictions have also been promoted recently b a variety of direct laboratory measurements of {sigma}{sup DR}. While the measurements of {sigma}{sup DR} for {delta}n {ne} 0 excitations have tended to agree very well with calculations, the case of {delta}n = 0 has been much problematic. However, by invoking a mechanism originally proposed by Jacobs, which takes into account the effect of stray electric fields on high Rydberg states (HRS) participating in the DR process, new calculations have improved the agreement between theory and experiment for these cases. Nevertheless, certain discrepancies still remain.

  18. Recombinant Collagenlike Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fertala, Andzej

    2007-01-01

    A group of collagenlike recombinant proteins containing high densities of biologically active sites has been invented. The method used to express these proteins is similar to a method of expressing recombinant procollagens and collagens described in U. S. Patent 5,593,859, "Synthesis of human procollagens and collagens in recombinant DNA systems." Customized collagenous proteins are needed for biomedical applications. In particular, fibrillar collagens are attractive for production of matrices needed for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Prior to this invention, there was no way of producing customized collagenous proteins for these and other applications. Heretofore, collagenous proteins have been produced by use of such biological systems as yeasts, bacteria, and transgenic animals and plants. These products are normal collagens that can also be extracted from such sources as tendons, bones, and hides. These products cannot be made to consist only of biologically active, specific amino acid sequences that may be needed for specific applications. Prior to this invention, it had been established that fibrillar collagens consist of domains that are responsible for such processes as interaction with cells, binding of growth factors, and interaction with a number of structural proteins present in the extracellular matrix. A normal collagen consists of a sequence of domains that can be represented by a corresponding sequence of labels, e.g., D1D2D3D4. A collagenlike protein of the present invention contains regions of collagen II that contain multiples of a single domain (e.g., D1D1D1D1 or D4D4D4D4) chosen for its specific biological activity. By virtue of the multiplicity of the chosen domain, the density of sites having that specific biological activity is greater than it is in a normal collagen. A collagenlike protein according to this invention can thus be made to have properties that are necessary for tissue engineering.

  19. Fast optical switch having reduced light loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Bruce N. (Inventor); Cooper, Ronald F. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An electrically controlled optical switch uses an electro-optic crystal of the type having at least one set of fast and slow optical axes. The crystal exhibits electric field induced birefringence such that a plane of polarization oriented along a first direction of a light beam passing through the crystal may be switched to a plane of polarization oriented along a second direction. A beam splitting polarizer means is disposed at one end of the crystal and directs a light beam passing through the crystal whose plane of polarization is oriented along the first direction differently from a light beam having a plane of polarization oriented along the second direction. The electro-optic crystal may be chosen from the crystal classes 43m, 42m, and 23. In a preferred embodiment, the electro-optic crystal is a bismuth germanium oxide crystal or a bismuth silicon oxide crystal. In another embodiment of the invention, polarization control optics are provided which transmit substantially all of the incident light to the electro-optic crystal, substantially reducing the insertion loss of the switch.

  20. Did the universe recombine?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, James G.; Stebbins, Albert

    1991-01-01

    The Zel'dovich-Sunyaev model-independent arguments for the existence of a neutral hydrogen phase is reviewed in light of new limits on the Compton y parameter from COBE. It is concluded that with baryon densities compatible with standard cosmological nucleosynthesis, the universe could have remained fully ionized throughout its history without producing a detectable spectral distortion. It is argued that it is unlikely that spectral observations of the cosmic microwave background will ever require the universe to have recombined for flat cosmologies.

  1. Genetic control of recombination partner preference in yeast meiosis. Isolation and characterization of mutants elevated for meiotic unequal sister-chromatid recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, D A; Stahl, F W

    1999-01-01

    Meiotic exchange occurs preferentially between homologous chromatids, in contrast to mitotic recombination, which occurs primarily between sister chromatids. To identify functions that direct meiotic recombination events to homologues, we screened for mutants exhibiting an increase in meiotic unequal sister-chromatid recombination (SCR). The msc (meiotic sister-chromatid recombination) mutants were quantified in spo13 meiosis with respect to meiotic unequal SCR frequency, disome segregation pattern, sporulation frequency, and spore viability. Analysis of the msc mutants according to these criteria defines three classes. Mutants with a class I phenotype identified new alleles of the meiosis-specific genes RED1 and MEK1, the DNA damage checkpoint genes RAD24 and MEC3, and a previously unknown gene, MSC6. The genes RED1, MEK1, RAD24, RAD17, and MEC1 are required for meiotic prophase arrest induced by a dmc1 mutation, which defines a meiotic recombination checkpoint. Meiotic unequal SCR was also elevated in a rad17 mutant. Our observation that meiotic unequal SCR is elevated in meiotic recombination checkpoint mutants suggests that, in addition to their proposed monitoring function, these checkpoint genes function to direct meiotic recombination events to homologues. The mutants in class II, including a dmc1 mutant, confer a dominant meiotic lethal phenotype in diploid SPO13 meiosis in our strain background, and they identify alleles of UBR1, INP52, BUD3, PET122, ELA1, and MSC1-MSC3. These results suggest that DMC1 functions to bias the repair of meiosis-specific double-strand breaks to homologues. We hypothesize that the genes identified by the class II mutants function in or are regulators of the DMC1-promoted interhomologue recombination pathway. Class III mutants may be elevated for rates of both SCR and homologue exchange. PMID:10511544

  2. Photoconductive semiconductor switches: Laser Q-switch trigger and switch-trigger laser integration

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, G.M.; Mar, A.; Hamil, R.A.; Zutavern, F.J.; Helgeson, W.D.

    1997-12-01

    This report provides a summary of the Pulser In a Chip 9000-Discretionary LDRD. The program began in January of 1997 and concluded in September of 1997. The over-arching goal of this LDRD is to study whether laser diode triggered photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) can be used to activate electro-optic devices such as Q-switches and Pockels cells and to study possible laser diode/switch integration. The PCSS switches we used were high gain GaAs switches because they can be triggered with small amounts of laser light. The specific goals of the LDRD were to demonstrate: (1) that small laser diode arrays that are potential candidates for laser-switch integration will indeed trigger the PCSS switch, and (2) that high gain GaAs switches can be used to trigger optical Q-switches in lasers such as the lasers to be used in the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source and the laser used for direct optical initiation (DOI) of explosives. The technology developed with this LDRD is now the prime candidate for triggering the Q switch in the multiple lasers in the laser trigger system of the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source and may be utilized in other accelerators. As part of the LDRD we developed a commercial supplier. To study laser/switch integration we tested triggering the high gain GaAs switches with: edge emitting laser diodes, vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs), and transverse junction stripe (TJS) lasers. The first two types of lasers (edge emitting and VCSELs) did activate the PCSS but are harder to integrate with the PCSS for a compact package. The US lasers, while easier to integrate with the switch, did not trigger the PCSS at the US laser power levels we used. The PCSS was used to activate the Q-switch of the compact laser to be used in the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source.

  3. Mating-Type Genes and MAT Switching in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Haber, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Mating type in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is determined by two nonhomologous alleles, MATa and MATα. These sequences encode regulators of the two different haploid mating types and of the diploids formed by their conjugation. Analysis of the MATa1, MATα1, and MATα2 alleles provided one of the earliest models of cell-type specification by transcriptional activators and repressors. Remarkably, homothallic yeast cells can switch their mating type as often as every generation by a highly choreographed, site-specific homologous recombination event that replaces one MAT allele with different DNA sequences encoding the opposite MAT allele. This replacement process involves the participation of two intact but unexpressed copies of mating-type information at the heterochromatic loci, HMLα and HMRa, which are located at opposite ends of the same chromosome-encoding MAT. The study of MAT switching has yielded important insights into the control of cell lineage, the silencing of gene expression, the formation of heterochromatin, and the regulation of accessibility of the donor sequences. Real-time analysis of MAT switching has provided the most detailed description of the molecular events that occur during the homologous recombinational repair of a programmed double-strand chromosome break. PMID:22555442

  4. Recombinant factor VIIa.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Michael G

    2004-01-01

    Human coagulation factor (F) VII is a single chain protease that circulates in the blood as a weakly active zymogen at concentrations of approximately 10 nmol/L. When converted to the active 2 chain form (FVIIa), it is a powerful initiator of haemostasis. Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa, eptacog alfa, NovoSeven) is a genetically engineered product that was first introduced in 1988 for the treatment of patients with haemophilia A and B with high inhibitory antibody titres to factors VIII and IX. Recent reports in the form of case studies and series, and early trial data, have suggested a role for rFVIIa across a diverse range of indications including bleeding associated with trauma, surgery, thrombocytopaenia, liver disease and oral anticoagulant toxicity. This review describes the physiology of the coagulation pathway and in particular the role of recombinant factor VIIa. It will also focus on the emerging role of rFVIIa in both trauma and non-trauma bleeding and its potential use in the ED. PMID:15537408

  5. Ferroelectric domain switching of individual nanoscale grains in polycrystalline lead zirconate titanate thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Yuanyuan

    2011-12-01

    This thesis will focus on the switching behavior of nanoscale ferroelectric domains in polycrystalline thin films. Ferroelectrics are a class of dielectric materials that demonstrate spontaneous polarizations under zero applied electric field. A region with the same polarization is called a ferroelectric domain. One important attribute of ferroelectrics is the domain switching from one thermodynamically stable state to another by application of an external electric field. Ferroelectric domain switching has been intensively investigated in epitaxial thin films. However, little is known about the domain switching in polycrystalline thin films. The main reason is that each grain is differently orientated and each is in a unique local stress and electric field determined by neighboring grains. To understand and deterministically control the nanoscale domain switching in polycrystalline thin films, it's critical to experimentally identify the effect of local microstructure (grain orientation and grain boundary misorientation) on the individual grain switching behavior. In this thesis, the effect of local microstructure on domain switching has been quantitatively analyzed in a 100 nm thick polycrystalline PbZr 0.2Ti0.8O3 thin film. The ferroelectric domains are characterized by Piezoresponse Force Microscopy (PFM), with their switching behavior analyzed by Polarization Difference Maps (PDMs, an analytical technique developed in this work). The local microstructure is determined by Electron Back Scattering Diffraction (EBSD). The results are discussed in chapter 3 to 6. Chapter 3 introduces the PDMs technique that enables the rapid identification of 0o, 90o switching and 180o switching in polycrystalline thin films. By assigning different colors to different types of switching, the full nature of polarization switching can be visualized simultaneously for large number of domains or grains in one map. In chapter 4, an external electric field reversal experiment has been

  6. Quasi-optical MEMS switching array technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weikang

    During this Ph.D. dissertation research, both experimental and theoretical investigations have been conducted to develop new micro-elecro-mechancical systems (MEMS) based technologies and new device concepts for the microwave and millimeter wave frequency range. A proof-of-principle E-band (60GHz˜90GHz) MEMS switching array has been successful designed and constructed, where 400 MEMS switches form a two dimensional array on a 2inch x 2inch quartz substrate. The E-band MEMS grid array switch has demonstrated >6 dB maximum isolation at 76 GHz and >10 dB on/off contrast ratio at 70˜85 GHz. Extensive work has been carried out with the aim of developing a compact impedance matching method for quasi-optic grid arrays. A new device concept is presented, where bulk micro-machining techniques are utilized to create a new class of artificial materials with continuously variable dielectric constant for use in millimeter wave quasi-optical systems. Based on this bulk micro-machined material, two novel quasi-optical impedance transformers have been modeled, designed, and characterized, which provide ideal impedance matching for quasi-optical systems. Photonic bandgap (PBG) RF circuit models also have been studied for microwave and millimeter wave applications. During the course of this development activity, materials characteristics have been analyzed for their suitability in quasi-optical grid array circuit and RF MEMS device applications. Air bridge MEMS switches have been designed, fabricated and characterized for microwave and millimeter wave applications.

  7. Delay-decomposing approach to robust stability for switched interval networks with state-dependent switching.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Cao, Jinde; Hayat, Tasawar

    2014-08-01

    This paper is concerned with a class of nonlinear uncertain switched networks with discrete time-varying delays . Based on the strictly complete property of the matrices system and the delay-decomposing approach, exploiting a new Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional decomposing the delays in integral terms, the switching rule depending on the state of the network is designed. Moreover, by piecewise delay method, discussing the Lyapunov functional in every different subintervals, some new delay-dependent robust stability criteria are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities, which lead to much less conservative results than those in the existing references and improve previous results. Finally, an illustrative example is given to demonstrate the validity of the theoretical results. PMID:25009673

  8. Power transistor switching characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    The switching properties of power transistors are investigated. The devices studied were housed in IO-3 cases and were of an n(+)-p-n(-)-n(+) vertical dopant structure. The effects of the magnitude of the reverse-base current and temperature on the reverse-bias second breakdown characteristics are discussed. Brief discussions of device degradation due to second breakdown and of a constant voltage turn-off circuit are included. A description of a vacuum tube voltage clamp circuit which reduces clamped collector voltage overshoot is given.

  9. Biological switches and clocks

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, John J.; Albert, Reka; Goldbeter, Albert; Ruoff, Peter; Sible, Jill

    2008-01-01

    To introduce this special issue on biological switches and clocks, we review the historical development of mathematical models of bistability and oscillations in chemical reaction networks. In the 1960s and 1970s, these models were limited to well-studied biochemical examples, such as glycolytic oscillations and cyclic AMP signalling. After the molecular genetics revolution of the 1980s, the field of molecular cell biology was thrown wide open to mathematical modellers. We review recent advances in modelling the gene–protein interaction networks that control circadian rhythms, cell cycle progression, signal processing and the design of synthetic gene networks. PMID:18522926

  10. Composite Thermal Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, Robert; Brawn, Shelly; Harrison, Katherine; O'Toole, Shannon; Moeller, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Lithium primary and lithium ion secondary batteries provide high specific energy and energy density. The use of these batteries also helps to reduce launch weight. Both primary and secondary cells can be packaged as high-rate cells, which can present a threat to crew and equipment in the event of external or internal short circuits. Overheating of the cell interior from high current flows induced by short circuits can result in exothermic reactions in lithium primary cells and fully charged lithium ion secondary cells. Venting of the cell case, ejection of cell components, and fire have been reported in both types of cells, resulting from abuse, cell imperfections, or faulty electronic control design. A switch has been developed that consists of a thin layer of composite material made from nanoscale particles of nickel and Teflon that conducts electrons at room temperature and switches to an insulator at an elevated temperature, thus interrupting current flow to prevent thermal runaway caused by internal short circuits. The material is placed within the cell, as a thin layer incorporated within the anode and/or the cathode, to control excess currents from metal-to-metal or metal-to-carbon shorts that might result from cell crush or a manufacturing defect. The safety of high-rate cells is thus improved, preventing serious injury to personnel and sensitive equipment located near the battery. The use of recently available nanoscale particles of nickel and Teflon permits an improved, homogeneous material with the potential to be fine-tuned to a unique switch temperature, sufficiently below the onset of a catastrophic chemical reaction. The smaller particles also permit the formation of a thinner control film layer (<50 m), which can be incorporated into commercial high-rate lithium primary and secondary cells. The innovation permits incorporation in current lithium and lithium-ion cell designs with a minimal impact on cell weight and volume. The composite thermal

  11. Compound semiconductor optical waveguide switch

    DOEpatents

    Spahn, Olga B.; Sullivan, Charles T.; Garcia, Ernest J.

    2003-06-10

    An optical waveguide switch is disclosed which is formed from III-V compound semiconductors and which has a moveable optical waveguide with a cantilevered portion that can be bent laterally by an integral electrostatic actuator to route an optical signal (i.e. light) between the moveable optical waveguide and one of a plurality of fixed optical waveguides. A plurality of optical waveguide switches can be formed on a common substrate and interconnected to form an optical switching network.

  12. A strand-specific switch in noncoding transcription switches the function of a Polycomb/Trithorax response element

    PubMed Central

    Trupke, Johanna; Okulski, Helena; Altmutter, Christina; Ruge, Frank; Boidol, Bernd; Kubicek, Stefan; Schmauss, Gerald; Aumayr, Karin; Ruf, Marius; Pospisilik, Andrew; Dimond, Andrew; Senergin, Hasene Basak; Vargas, Marcus L.; Simon, Jeffrey A.; Ringrose, Leonie

    2014-01-01

    Polycomb/Trithorax response elements (PRE/TREs) can switch their function reversibly between silencing and activation, by mechanisms that are poorly understood. Here we show that a switch in forward and reverse noncoding transcription from the Drosophila vestigial (vg) PRE/TRE switches the status of the element between silencing (induced by the forward strand) and activation (induced by the reverse strand). In vitro, both ncRNAs inhibit PRC2 histone methyltransferase activity, but in vivo only the reverse strand binds PRC2. Over-expression of the reverse strand evicts PRC2 from chromatin and inhibits its enzymatic activity. We propose that interactions of RNAs with PRC2 are differentially regulated in vivo, allowing regulated inhibition of local PRC2 activity. Genome-wide analysis shows that strand switching of ncRNAs occurs at several hundred PcG binding sites in fly and vertebrate genomes. This work identifies a novel and potentially widespread class of PRE/TREs that switch function by switching the direction of ncRNA transcription. PMID:25108384

  13. Harnessing Deformation to Switch On and Off the Propagation of Sound.

    PubMed

    Babaee, Sahab; Viard, Nicolas; Wang, Pai; Fang, Nicholas X; Bertoldi, Katia

    2016-02-24

    A new class of architected materials is designed to control the propagation of sound. The proposed system comprises an array of elastomeric helices in background air and is characterized by frequency ranges of strong wave attenuation (bandgaps) in the undeformed configuration. Upon axially stretching the helices, such bandgaps are suppressed, enabling the design of a new class of acoustic switch. PMID:26663556

  14. Unraveling recombination rate evolution using ancestral recombination maps

    PubMed Central

    Munch, Kasper; Schierup, Mikkel H; Mailund, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Recombination maps of ancestral species can be constructed from comparative analyses of genomes from closely related species, exemplified by a recently published map of the human-chimpanzee ancestor. Such maps resolve differences in recombination rate between species into changes along individual branches in the speciation tree, and allow identification of associated changes in the genomic sequences. We describe how coalescent hidden Markov models are able to call individual recombination events in ancestral species through inference of incomplete lineage sorting along a genomic alignment. In the great apes, speciation events are sufficiently close in time that a map can be inferred for the ancestral species at each internal branch - allowing evolution of recombination rate to be tracked over evolutionary time scales from speciation event to speciation event. We see this approach as a way of characterizing the evolution of recombination rate and the genomic properties that influence it. PMID:25043668

  15. Algebraic theory of recombination spaces.

    PubMed

    Stadler, P F; Wagner, G P

    1997-01-01

    A new mathematical representation is proposed for the configuration space structure induced by recombination, which we call "P-structure." It consists of a mapping of pairs of objects to the power set of all objects in the search space. The mapping assigns to each pair of parental "genotypes" the set of all recombinant genotypes obtainable from the parental ones. It is shown that this construction allows a Fourier decomposition of fitness landscapes into a superposition of "elementary landscapes." This decomposition is analogous to the Fourier decomposition of fitness landscapes on mutation spaces. The elementary landscapes are obtained as eigenfunctions of a Laplacian operator defined for P-structures. For binary string recombination, the elementary landscapes are exactly the p-spin functions (Walsh functions), that is, the same as the elementary landscapes of the string point mutation spaces (i.e., the hypercube). This supports the notion of a strong homomorphism between string mutation and recombination spaces. However, the effective nearest neighbor correlations on these elementary landscapes differ between mutation and recombination and among different recombination operators. On average, the nearest neighbor correlation is higher for one-point recombination than for uniform recombination. For one-point recombination, the correlations are higher for elementary landscapes with fewer interacting sites as well as for sites that have closer linkage, confirming the qualitative predictions of the Schema Theorem. We conclude that the algebraic approach to fitness landscape analysis can be extended to recombination spaces and provides an effective way to analyze the relative hardness of a landscape for a given recombination operator. PMID:10021760

  16. Heat pipe thermal switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, D. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A thermal switch for controlling the dissipation of heat between a body is described. The thermal switch is comprised of a flexible bellows defining an expansible vapor chamber for a working fluid located between an evaporation and condensation chamber. Inside the bellows is located a coiled retaining spring and four axial metal mesh wicks, two of which have their central portions located inside of the spring while the other two have their central portions located between the spring and the side wall of the bellows. The wicks are terminated and are attached to the inner surfaces of the outer end walls of evaporation and condensation chambers respectively located adjacent to the heat source and heat sink. The inner surfaces of the end walls furthermore include grooves to provide flow channels of the working fluid to and from the wick ends. The evaporation and condensation chambers are connected by turnbuckles and tension springs to provide a set point adjustment for setting the gap between an interface plate on the condensation chamber and the heat sink.

  17. Neuromorphic Atomic Switch Networks

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Olmos, Cristina; Shieh, Hsien Hang; Aono, Masakazu; Stieg, Adam Z.; Gimzewski, James K.

    2012-01-01

    Efforts to emulate the formidable information processing capabilities of the brain through neuromorphic engineering have been bolstered by recent progress in the fabrication of nonlinear, nanoscale circuit elements that exhibit synapse-like operational characteristics. However, conventional fabrication techniques are unable to efficiently generate structures with the highly complex interconnectivity found in biological neuronal networks. Here we demonstrate the physical realization of a self-assembled neuromorphic device which implements basic concepts of systems neuroscience through a hardware-based platform comprised of over a billion interconnected atomic-switch inorganic synapses embedded in a complex network of silver nanowires. Observations of network activation and passive harmonic generation demonstrate a collective response to input stimulus in agreement with recent theoretical predictions. Further, emergent behaviors unique to the complex network of atomic switches and akin to brain function are observed, namely spatially distributed memory, recurrent dynamics and the activation of feedforward subnetworks. These devices display the functional characteristics required for implementing unconventional, biologically and neurally inspired computational methodologies in a synthetic experimental system. PMID:22880101

  18. Data center coolant switch

    SciTech Connect

    Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.

    2015-10-06

    A data center cooling system is operated in a first mode; it has an indoor portion wherein heat is absorbed from components in the data center, and an outdoor heat exchanger portion wherein outside air is used to cool a first heat transfer fluid (e.g., water) present in at least the outdoor heat exchanger portion of the cooling system during the first mode. The first heat transfer fluid is a relatively high performance heat transfer fluid (as compared to the second fluid), and has a first heat transfer fluid freezing point. A determination is made that an appropriate time has been reached to switch from the first mode to a second mode. Based on this determination, the outdoor heat exchanger portion of the data cooling system is switched to a second heat transfer fluid, which is a relatively low performance heat transfer fluid, as compared to the first heat transfer fluid. It has a second heat transfer fluid freezing point lower than the first heat transfer fluid freezing point, and the second heat transfer fluid freezing point is sufficiently low to operate without freezing when the outdoor air temperature drops below a first predetermined relationship with the first heat transfer fluid freezing point.

  19. Recombinant Human Erythropoietin

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Claudia; Späte, Kira; Krampe, Henning

    2008-01-01

    Treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) is still unsatisfactory and essentially non-existing for the progressive course of the disease. Recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) may be a promising neuroprotective/neuroregenerative treatment of MS. In the nervous system, EPO acts anti-apoptotic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, neurotrophic and plasticity-modulating. Beneficial effects have been shown in animal models of various neurological and psychiatric diseases, including different models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. EPO is also effective in human brain disease, as shown in double-blind placebo-controlled clinical studies on ischemic stroke and chronic schizophrenia. An exploratory study on chronic progressive MS yielded lasting improvement in motor and cognitive performance upon high-dose long-term EPO treatment. PMID:21180577

  20. Recombinant glucose uptake system

    DOEpatents

    Ingrahm, Lonnie O.; Snoep, Jacob L.; Arfman, Nico

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant organisms are disclosed that contain a pathway for glucose uptake other than the pathway normally utilized by the host cell. In particular, the host cell is one in which glucose transport into the cell normally is coupled to PEP production. This host cell is transformed so that it uses an alternative pathway for glucose transport that is not coupled to PEP production. In a preferred embodiment, the host cell is a bacterium other than Z. mobilis that has been transformed to contain the glf and glk genes of Z. mobilis. By uncoupling glucose transport into the cell from PEP utilization, more PEP is produced for synthesis of products of commercial importance from a given quantity of biomass supplied to the host cells.

  1. Remarkably high rate of DNA amplification promoted by the mating-type switching mechanism in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuanhe; Bonaduce, Michael J; Klar, Amar J S

    2012-05-01

    A novel mating-type switching-defective mutant showed a highly unstable rearrangement at the mating-type locus (mat1) in fission yeast. The mutation resulted from local amplification of a 134-bp DNA fragment by the mat1-switching phenomenon. We speculate that the rolling-circle-like replication and homologous recombination might be the general mechanisms for local genome region expansion. PMID:22377633

  2. The recombination of genetic material

    SciTech Connect

    Low, K.B.

    1988-01-01

    Genetic recombination is the major mechanism by which new arrangements of genetic elements are produced in all living organisms, from the simplest bacterial viruses to humans. This volume presents an overview of the types of recombination found in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  3. Hybrid switch for resonant power converters

    DOEpatents

    Lai, Jih-Sheng; Yu, Wensong

    2014-09-09

    A hybrid switch comprising two semiconductor switches connected in parallel but having different voltage drop characteristics as a function of current facilitates attainment of zero voltage switching and reduces conduction losses to complement reduction of switching losses achieved through zero voltage switching in power converters such as high-current inverters.

  4. A high capacity satellite switched TDMA microwave switch matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cory, B. J.; Berkowitz, M.

    1981-01-01

    A description is given of the conceptual design of a high-capacity satellite switched-time division multiple access (SS-TDMA) microwave switch matrix fabricated with GaAs monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs), including integration of both microwave and control logic circuits into the monolithic design. The technology required for a 30/20 GHz communications system includes an on-board SS-TDMA switch matrix. A conceptual design study that has been completed for a wideband, high-capacity (typically 100 x 100) channel switch matrix using technology anticipated for 1987 is described, noting that the study resulted in a switch matrix design concept using a coupled crossbar architecture implemented with MMIC. The design involves basic building block MMIC, permitting flexible growth and efficient wraparound redundancy to increase reliability.

  5. Convertible resistive switching characteristics between memory switching and threshold switching in a single ferritin-based memristor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chaochao; Shang, Jie; Xue, Wuhong; Tan, Hongwei; Pan, Liang; Yang, Xi; Guo, Shanshan; Hao, Jian; Liu, Gang; Li, Run-Wei

    2016-04-01

    A bio-memristor fabricated with ferritin exhibits novel resistive switching characteristics wherein memory switching and threshold switching are made steadily coexistent and inter-convertible through controlling the magnitude of compliance current presets. PMID:26967024

  6. Study of optoelectronic switch for satellite-switched time-division multiple access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Shing-Fong; Jou, Liz; Lenart, Joe

    1987-01-01

    The use of optoelectronic switching for satellite switched time division multiple access will improve the isolation and reduce the crosstalk of an IF switch matrix. The results are presented of a study on optoelectronic switching. Tasks include literature search, system requirements study, candidate switching architecture analysis, and switch model optimization. The results show that the power divided and crossbar switching architectures are good candidates for an IF switch matrix.

  7. Coalescent Simulation of Intracodon Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Arenas, Miguel; Posada, David

    2010-01-01

    The coalescent with recombination is a very useful tool in molecular population genetics. Under this framework, genealogies often represent the evolution of the substitution unit, and because of this, the few coalescent algorithms implemented for the simulation of coding sequences force recombination to occur only between codons. However, it is clear that recombination is expected to occur most often within codons. Here we have developed an algorithm that can evolve coding sequences under an ancestral recombination graph that represents the genealogies at each nucleotide site, thereby allowing for intracodon recombination. The algorithm is a modification of Hudson's coalescent in which, in addition to keeping track of events occurring in the ancestral material that reaches the sample, we need to keep track of events occurring in ancestral material that does not reach the sample but that is produced by intracodon recombination. We are able to show that at typical substitution rates the number of nonsynonymous changes induced by intracodon recombination is small and that intracodon recombination does not generally result in inflated estimates of the overall nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution ratio (ω). On the other hand, recombination can bias the estimation of ω at particular codons, resulting in apparent rate variation among sites and in the spurious identification of positively selected sites. Importantly, in this case, allowing for variable synonymous rates across sites greatly reduces the false-positive rate and recovers statistical power. Finally, coalescent simulations with intracodon recombination could be used to better represent the evolution of nuclear coding genes or fast-evolving pathogens such as HIV-1.We have implemented this algorithm in a computer program called NetRecodon, freely available at http://darwin.uvigo.es. PMID:19933876

  8. EDITORIAL: Molecular switches at surfaces Molecular switches at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinelt, Martin; von Oppen, Felix

    2012-10-01

    In nature, molecules exploit interaction with their environment to realize complex functionalities on the nanometer length scale. Physical, chemical and/or biological specificity is frequently achieved by the switching of molecules between microscopically different states. Paradigmatic examples are the energy production in proton pumps of bacteria or the signal conversion in human vision, which rely on switching molecules between different configurations or conformations by external stimuli. The remarkable reproducibility and unparalleled fatigue resistance of these natural processes makes it highly desirable to emulate nature and develop artificial systems with molecular functionalities. A promising avenue towards this goal is to anchor the molecular switches at surfaces, offering new pathways to control their functional properties, to apply electrical contacts, or to integrate switches into larger systems. Anchoring at surfaces allows one to access the full range from individual molecular switches to self-assembled monolayers of well-defined geometry and to customize the coupling between molecules and substrate or between adsorbed molecules. Progress in this field requires both synthesis and preparation of appropriate molecular systems and control over suitable external stimuli, such as light, heat, or electrical currents. To optimize switching and generate function, it is essential to unravel the geometric structure, the electronic properties and the dynamic interactions of the molecular switches on surfaces. This special section, Molecular Switches at Surfaces, collects 17 contributions describing different aspects of this research field. They analyze elementary processes, both in single molecules and in ensembles of molecules, which involve molecular switching and concomitant changes of optical, electronic, or magnetic properties. Two topical reviews summarize the current status, including both challenges and achievements in the field of molecular switches on

  9. New results on switched linear systems with actuator saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Chang; Wu, Fen

    2016-04-01

    This paper further studies the analysis and control problems of continuous-time switched linear systems subject to actuator saturation. Using the norm-bounded differential inclusion description of the saturated systems and the minimal switching rule, a set of switched output feedback controllers is designed to minimise the disturbance attenuation level defined by the regional ? gain over a class of energy-bounded disturbances. The synthesis conditions are expressed as bilinear matrix inequalities, and can be solved by numerical search coupled with linear matrix inequality optimisation. Compared to the previous method based on polytopic differential inclusion, the proposed approach has good scalability and potentially renders better performance. Numerical examples are provided to verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  10. Development and fabrication of improved power transistor switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hower, P. L.; Chu, C. K.

    1979-01-01

    A new class of high-voltage power transistors was achieved by adapting present interdigitated thyristor processing techniques to the fabrication of npn Si transistors. Present devices are 2.3 cm in diameter and have V sub CEO (sus) in the range of 400 to 600V. V sub CEO (sus) = 450V devices were made with an (h sub FE)(I sub C) product of 900A at V sub CE = 2.5V. The electrical performance obtained was consistent with the predictions of an optimum design theory specifically developed for power switching transistors. The device design, wafer processing, and assembly techniques are described. Experimental measurements of the dc characteristics, forward SOA, and switching times are included. A new method of characterizing the switching performance of power transistors is proposed.

  11. Partial synchronization in stochastic dynamical networks with switching communication channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chi; Ho, Daniel W. C.; Lu, Jianquan; Kurths, Jürgen

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, the partial synchronization problem of stochastic dynamical networks (SDNs) is investigated. Unlike the existing models, the SDN considered in this paper suffers from a class of communication constraint—only part of nodes' states can be transmitted. Thus, less nodes' states can be used to synchronize the SDN, which makes the analysis of the synchronization problem much harder. A set of channel matrices are introduced to reflect such kind of constraint. Furthermore, due to unpredictable environmental changes, the channel matrices can switch among some communication modes. The switching considered here is governed by a Markov process. To overcome the difficulty, a regrouping method is employed to derive our main results. The obtained conditions guarantee that partial synchronization can be achieved for SDNs under switching communication constraint. Finally, numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results and how the communication constraint influences synchronization result.

  12. Task Switching: A PDP Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Sam J.; Shallice, Tim

    2002-01-01

    When subjects switch between a pair of stimulus-response tasks, reaction time is slower on trial N if a different task was performed on trial N--1. We present a parallel distributed processing (PDP) model that simulates this effect when subjects switch between word reading and color naming in response to Stroop stimuli. Reaction time on "switch…

  13. Battery switch for downhole tools

    DOEpatents

    Boling, Brian E.

    2010-02-23

    An electrical circuit for a downhole tool may include a battery, a load electrically connected to the battery, and at least one switch electrically connected in series with the battery and to the load. The at least one switch may be configured to close when a tool temperature exceeds a selected temperature.

  14. Component Processes in Task Switching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meiran, Nachshon; Chorev, Ziv; Sapir, Ayelet

    2000-01-01

    Studied task switching in 4 experiments involving 111 Israeli undergraduates. Results show the preparation for a task switch is not a by-product of general preparation by phasic alertness or predicting target onset and establish reconfiguration as a separate preparatory process. Suggests that there are at least three components of task switching…

  15. Biomimetic production of silk-like recombinant squid sucker ring teeth proteins.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dawei; Guerette, Paul A; Hoon, Shawn; Kong, Kiat Whye; Cornvik, Tobias; Nilsson, Martina; Kumar, Akshita; Lescar, Julien; Miserez, Ali

    2014-09-01

    The sucker ring teeth (SRT) of Humboldt squid exhibit mechanical properties that rival those of robust engineered synthetic polymers. Remarkably, these properties are achieved without a mineral phase or covalent cross-links. Instead, SRT are exclusively made of silk-like proteins called "suckerins", which assemble into nanoconfined β-sheet reinforced supramolecular networks. In this study, three streamlined strategies for full-length recombinant suckerin protein production and purification were developed. Recombinant suckerin exhibited high solubility and colloidal stability in aqueous-based solvents. In addition, the colloidal suspensions exhibited a concentration-dependent conformational switch, from random coil to β-sheet enriched structures. Our results demonstrate that recombinant suckerin can be produced in a facile manner in E. coli and processed from mild aqueous solutions into materials enriched in β-sheets. We suggest that recombinant suckerin-based materials offer potential for a range of biomedical and engineering applications. PMID:25068184

  16. 49 CFR 236.6 - Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit..., AND APPLIANCES Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.6 Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller. Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller connected to...

  17. 49 CFR 236.6 - Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit..., AND APPLIANCES Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.6 Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller. Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller connected to...

  18. 49 CFR 236.6 - Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit..., AND APPLIANCES Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.6 Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller. Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller connected to...

  19. 49 CFR 236.6 - Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit..., AND APPLIANCES Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.6 Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller. Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller connected to...

  20. 49 CFR 236.6 - Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit..., AND APPLIANCES Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.6 Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller. Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller connected to...

  1. FAST OPENING SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Bender, M.; Bennett, F.K.; Kuckes, A.F.

    1963-09-17

    A fast-acting electric switch is described for rapidly opening a circuit carrying large amounts of electrical power. A thin, conducting foil bridges a gap in this circuit and means are provided for producing a magnetic field and eddy currents in the foil, whereby the foil is rapidly broken to open the circuit across the gap. Advantageously the foil has a hole forming two narrow portions in the foil and the means producing the magnetic field and eddy currents comprises an annular coil having its annulus coaxial with the hole in the foil and turns adjacent the narrow portions of the foil. An electrical current flows through the coil to produce the magnetic field and eddy currents in the foil. (AEC)

  2. Optimized scalable network switch

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.

    2010-02-23

    In a massively parallel computing system having a plurality of nodes configured in m multi-dimensions, each node including a computing device, a method for routing packets towards their destination nodes is provided which includes generating at least one of a 2m plurality of compact bit vectors containing information derived from downstream nodes. A multilevel arbitration process in which downstream information stored in the compact vectors, such as link status information and fullness of downstream buffers, is used to determine a preferred direction and virtual channel for packet transmission. Preferred direction ranges are encoded and virtual channels are selected by examining the plurality of compact bit vectors. This dynamic routing method eliminates the necessity of routing tables, thus enhancing scalability of the switch.

  3. ''Smart'' watchdog safety switch

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-10-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring a process having a periodic output so that the process equipment is not damaged in the event of a controller failure, comprising a low-pass and peak clipping filter, an event detector that generates an event pulse for each valid change in magnitude of the filtered periodic output, a timing pulse generator, a counter that increments upon receipt of any timing pulse and resets to zero on receipt of any event pulse, an alarm that alerts when the count reaches some preselected total count, and a set of relays that opens to stop power to process equipment. An interface module can be added to allow the switch to accept a variety of periodic output signals. 21 figures.

  4. "Smart" watchdog safety switch

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring a process having a periodic output so that the process equipment is not damaged in the event of a controller failure, comprising a low-pass and peak clipping filter, an event detector that generates an event pulse for each valid change in magnitude of the filtered periodic output, a timing pulse generator, a counter that increments upon receipt of any timing pulse and resets to zero on receipt of any event pulse, an alarm that alerts when the count reaches some preselected total count, and a set of relays that opens to stop power to process equipment. An interface module can be added to allow the switch to accept a variety of periodic output signals.

  5. Smart watchdog safety switch

    SciTech Connect

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1989-05-12

    A method and apparatus for monitoring a process having a periodic output so that the process equipment is not damaged in the event of a controller failure, comprising a low-pass and peak clipping filter, an event detector that generates an event pulse for each valid change in magnitude of the filtered periodic output, a timing pulse generator, a counter that increments upon receipt of any timing pulse and resets to zero on receipt of any event pulse, an alarm that alerts when the count reaches some preselected total count, and a set of relays that open to stop power to process equipment. An interface module can be added to allow the switch to accept a variety of periodic output signals. 6 figs.

  6. Automatic thermal switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, L. D.; Cunningham, J. W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An automatic thermal switch to control heat flow includes a first thermally conductive plate, a second thermally conductive plate and a thermal transfer plate pivotally mounted between the first and second plates. A phase change power unit, including a plunger connected to the transfer plate, is in thermal contact with the first thermally conductive plate. A biasing element, connected to the transfer plate, biases the transfer plate in a predetermined position with respect to the first and second plates. When the phase change power unit is actuated by an increase in heat transmitted through the first plate, the plunger extends and pivots the transfer plate to vary the thermal conduction between the first and second plates through the transfer plate. The biasing element, transfer plate and piston can be arranged to provide either a normally closed or normally open thermally conductive path between the first and second plates.

  7. Optimized scalable network switch

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Takken, Todd E.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2007-12-04

    In a massively parallel computing system having a plurality of nodes configured in m multi-dimensions, each node including a computing device, a method for routing packets towards their destination nodes is provided which includes generating at least one of a 2m plurality of compact bit vectors containing information derived from downstream nodes. A multilevel arbitration process in which downstream information stored in the compact vectors, such as link status information and fullness of downstream buffers, is used to determine a preferred direction and virtual channel for packet transmission. Preferred direction ranges are encoded and virtual channels are selected by examining the plurality of compact bit vectors. This dynamic routing method eliminates the necessity of routing tables, thus enhancing scalability of the switch.

  8. Isolation and Analysis of Rare Norovirus Recombinants from Coinfected Mice Using Drop-Based Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huidan; Cockrell, Shelley K.; Kolawole, Abimbola O.; Rotem, Assaf; Serohijos, Adrian W. R.; Chang, Connie B.; Tao, Ye; Mehoke, Thomas S.; Han, Yulong; Lin, Jeffrey S.; Giacobbi, Nicholas S.; Feldman, Andrew B.; Shakhnovich, Eugene; Weitz, David A.; Wobus, Christiane E.

    2015-01-01

    switching by the virus-encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP). However, factors that govern the frequency and positions of recombination in an infected organism remain largely unknown. This work leverages advances in the applied physics of drop-based microfluidics to isolate and sequence rare recombinants arising from the coinfection of mice with two distinct strains of murine norovirus. This study is the first to detect and analyze norovirus recombination in an animal model. PMID:25972549

  9. Interactions between the Class II Transactivator and CREB Binding Protein Increase Transcription of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Genes

    PubMed Central

    Fontes, Joseph D.; Kanazawa, Satoshi; Jean, Dickson; Peterlin, B. Matija

    1999-01-01

    Class II major histocompatibility (class II) genes are regulated in a B-cell-specific and gamma interferon-inducible fashion. The master switch for the expression of these genes is the class II transactivator (CIITA). In this report, we demonstrate that one of the functions of CIITA is to recruit the CREB binding protein (CBP) to class II promoters. Not only functional but also specific binding interactions between CIITA and CBP were demonstrated. Moreover, a dominant negative form of CBP decreased the activity of class II promoters and levels of class II determinants on the surface of cells. Finally, the inhibition of class II gene expression by the glucocorticoid hormone could be attributed to the squelching of CBP by the glucocorticoid receptor. We conclude that CBP, a histone acetyltransferase, plays an important role in the transcription of class II genes. PMID:9858618

  10. Switched power workshop: Introduction and summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, R. B.

    This paper discusses the design of a switched power electron gun. Particular topics discussed are: vacuum photodiode switch; laser switched solid state diodes; gun performance; charging supply; and laser requirements.

  11. Delayed recombination and standard rulers

    SciTech Connect

    De Bernardis, Francesco; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Galli, Silvia; Silk, Joseph I.; Verde, Licia

    2009-02-15

    Measurements of baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAOs) in galaxy surveys have been recognized as a powerful tool for constraining dark energy. However, this method relies on the knowledge of the size of the acoustic horizon at recombination derived from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy measurements. This estimate is typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme; additional radiation sources can delay recombination altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from CMB and BAO data. In this paper we quantify the effect of delayed recombination on the determination of dark energy parameters from future BAO surveys such as the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and the Wide-Field Multi-Object Spectrograph. We find the impact to be small but still not negligible. In particular, if recombination is nonstandard (to a level still allowed by CMB data), but this is ignored, future surveys may incorrectly suggest the presence of a redshift-dependent dark energy component. On the other hand, in the case of delayed recombination, adding to the analysis one extra parameter describing deviations from standard recombination does not significantly degrade the error bars on dark energy parameters and yields unbiased estimates. This is due to the CMB-BAO complementarity.

  12. Switching Phenomena in a System with No Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preis, Tobias; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2010-02-01

    It is widely believed that switching phenomena require switches, but this is actually not true. For an intriguing variety of switching phenomena in nature, the underlying complex system abruptly changes from one state to another in a highly discontinuous fashion. For example, financial market fluctuations are characterized by many abrupt switchings creating increasing trends ("bubble formation") and decreasing trends ("financial collapse"). Such switching occurs on time scales ranging from macroscopic bubbles persisting for hundreds of days to microscopic bubbles persisting only for a few seconds. We analyze a database containing 13,991,275 German DAX Future transactions recorded with a time resolution of 10 msec. For comparison, a database providing 2,592,531 of all S&P500 daily closing prices is used. We ask whether these ubiquitous switching phenomena have quantifiable features independent of the time horizon studied. We find striking scale-free behavior of the volatility after each switching occurs. We interpret our findings as being consistent with time-dependent collective behavior of financial market participants. We test the possible universality of our result by performing a parallel analysis of fluctuations in transaction volume and time intervals between trades. We show that these financial market switching processes have properties similar to those of phase transitions. We suggest that the well-known catastrophic bubbles that occur on large time scales—such as the most recent financial crisis—are no outliers but single dramatic representatives caused by the switching between upward and downward trends on time scales varying over nine orders of magnitude from very large (≈102 days) down to very small (≈10 ms).

  13. Channelized coplanar waveguide pin-diode switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, G. E.; Simons, R. N.

    1989-01-01

    Three different types of p-i-n diode, reflective CPW switches are presented. The first two switches are the series and the shunt mounted diode switches. Each has achieved greater than 15 dB of isolation over a broad bandwidth. The third switch is a narrow band, high isolation switched filter which has achieved 19 dB of isolation. Equivalent circuits and measured performance for each switch is presented.

  14. Liquid metal switches for electromagnetic railgun systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mitcham, A.J.; Prothero, D.H.; Brooks, J.C. )

    1991-01-01

    The need for a reliable and effective commutating switch is essential to the operation of an HPG-driven railgun system. This switch must offer the lowest possible resistance during the current build up time and then must commutate the current quickly and efficiently into the railgun barrel. This paper considers the essential requirements for such a switch and, after briefly reviewing the available switch technologies, describes a new type of switch based on a liquid metal switching medium.

  15. Teachers in Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Galen, Jane

    2008-01-01

    In this article, I argue for a closer read of the daily "class work" of teachers, as posited by Reay, 1998. In developing exploratory class portraits of four teachers who occupy distinctive social positions (two from working-class homes now teaching upper-middle-class children and two from upper-middle-class homes now teaching poor children), I…

  16. Ways to suppress click and pop for class D amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haishi, Wang; Bo, Zhang; Jiang, Sun

    2012-08-01

    Undesirable audio click and pop may be generated in a speaker or headphone. Compared to linear (class A/B/AB) amplifiers, class D amplifiers that comprise of an input stage and a modulation stage are more prone to producing click and pop. This article analyzes sources that generate click and pop in class D amplifiers, and corresponding ways to suppress them. For a class D amplifier with a single-ended input, click and pop is likely to be due to two factors. One is from a voltage difference (VDIF) between the voltage of an input capacitance (VCIN) and a reference voltage (VREF) of the input stage, and the other one is from the non-linear switching during the setting up of the bias and feedback voltages/currents (BFVC) of the modulation stage. In this article, a fast charging loop is introduced into the input stage to charge VCIN to roughly near VREF. Then a correction loop further charges or discharges VCIN, substantially equalizing it with VREF. Dummy switches are introduced into the modulation stage to provide switching signals for setting up BFVC, and the power switches are disabled until the BFVC are set up successfully. A two channel single-ended class D amplifier with the above features is fabricated with 0.5 μm Bi-CMOS process. Road test and fast Fourier transform analysis indicate that there is no noticeable click and pop.

  17. Ultrashort soliton switching based on coherent energy hiding.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, M; Wabnitz, S; Zoccolotti, L

    1991-08-15

    Coherent coupling between light and atoms may be exploited for conceiving a novel class of all-optical signalprocessing devices without a direct counterpart in the continuous-wave regime. We show that the self-switching of ultrashort soliton pulses on resonance with a transition of doping centers in a slab waveguide directional coupler is based on nonlinear group-velocity (instead of the usual phase-velocity) changes. PMID:19776934

  18. Alarm toe switch. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Ganyard, F.P.

    1980-11-18

    An alarm toe switch inserted within a shoe for energizing an alarm circuit in a covert manner includes an insole mounting pad into which a miniature reed switch is fixedly molded. An elongated slot perpendicular to the reed switch is formed in the bottom surface of the mounting pad. A permanent cylindrical magnet positioned in the forward portion of the slot with a diameter greater than the pad thickness causes a bump above the pad. A foam rubber block is also positioned in the slot rearwardly of the magnet and holds the magnet in normal inoperative relation. A non-magnetic support plate covers the slot and holds the magnet and foam rubber in the slot. The plate minimizes bending and frictional forces to improve movement of the magnet for reliable switch activation. The bump occupies the knuckle space beneath the big toe. When the big toe is scrunched rearwardly the magnet is moved within the slot relative to the reed switch, thus magnetically activating the switch. When toe pressure is released the foam rubber block forces the magnet back into normal inoperative position to deactivate the reed switch.

  19. Delay analysis of networked control systems based on 100 M switched Ethernet.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming

    2014-01-01

    For the delay may degrade the performance of networked control systems, networked control systems based on 100 M switched Ethernet are proposed in this paper. According to the working principle of Ethernet switch, the formulas of the upper bound delay of the single-level switched Ethernet and the multiple-level switched Ethernet are deduced by the timing diagram method, and the values of the upper bound delay are also given. The key factors that influence the upper bound delay of switched Ethernet are analyzed; then, the characteristics of the upper bound delay are presented, which show that the delay induced by the single-level 100 M switched Ethernet has little effect on the performance of control systems, while the delay induced by the multiple-level 100 M switched Ethernet may meet the time requirements of all classes of control systems if the numbers of levels and the numbers of nodes connecting to switches are set properly. Finally, the performance of networked control systems is simulated by TrueTime, and the results further show the feasibility and superiority of 100 M switched Ethernet based networked control systems without modification of the network protocols. PMID:25003152

  20. Generation of Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies from Immunised Mice and Rabbits via Flow Cytometry and Sorting of Antigen-Specific IgG+ Memory B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Starkie, Dale. O; Compson, Joanne E.; Rapecki, Stephen; Lightwood, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Single B cell screening strategies, which avoid both hybridoma fusion and combinatorial display, have emerged as important technologies for efficiently sampling the natural antibody repertoire of immunized animals and humans. Having access to a range of methods to interrogate different B cell subsets provides an attractive option to ensure large and diverse panels of high quality antibody are produced. The generation of multiple antibodies and having the ability to find rare B cell clones producing IgG with unique and desirable characteristics facilitates the identification of fit-for-purpose molecules that can be developed into therapeutic agents or research reagents. Here, we describe a multi-parameter flow cytometry single-cell sorting technique for the generation of antigen-specific recombinant monoclonal antibodies from single IgG+ memory B cells. Both mouse splenocytes and rabbit PBMC from immunised animals were used as a source of B cells. Reagents staining both B cells and other unwanted cell types enabled efficient identification of class-switched IgG+ memory B cells. Concurrent staining with antigen labelled separately with two spectrally-distinct fluorophores enabled antigen-specific B cells to be identified, i.e. those which bind to both antigen conjugates (double-positive). These cells were then typically sorted at one cell per well using FACS directly into a 96-well plate containing reverse transcriptase reaction mix. Following production of cDNA, PCR was performed to amplify cognate heavy and light chain variable region genes and generate transcriptionally-active PCR (TAP) fragments. These linear expression cassettes were then used directly in a mammalian cell transfection to generate recombinant antibody for further testing. We were able to successfully generate antigen-specific recombinant antibodies from both the rabbit and mouse IgG+ memory B cell subset within one week. This included the generation of an anti-TNFR2 blocking antibody from mice

  1. Generation of Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies from Immunised Mice and Rabbits via Flow Cytometry and Sorting of Antigen-Specific IgG+ Memory B Cells.

    PubMed

    Starkie, Dale O; Compson, Joanne E; Rapecki, Stephen; Lightwood, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Single B cell screening strategies, which avoid both hybridoma fusion and combinatorial display, have emerged as important technologies for efficiently sampling the natural antibody repertoire of immunized animals and humans. Having access to a range of methods to interrogate different B cell subsets provides an attractive option to ensure large and diverse panels of high quality antibody are produced. The generation of multiple antibodies and having the ability to find rare B cell clones producing IgG with unique and desirable characteristics facilitates the identification of fit-for-purpose molecules that can be developed into therapeutic agents or research reagents. Here, we describe a multi-parameter flow cytometry single-cell sorting technique for the generation of antigen-specific recombinant monoclonal antibodies from single IgG+ memory B cells. Both mouse splenocytes and rabbit PBMC from immunised animals were used as a source of B cells. Reagents staining both B cells and other unwanted cell types enabled efficient identification of class-switched IgG+ memory B cells. Concurrent staining with antigen labelled separately with two spectrally-distinct fluorophores enabled antigen-specific B cells to be identified, i.e. those which bind to both antigen conjugates (double-positive). These cells were then typically sorted at one cell per well using FACS directly into a 96-well plate containing reverse transcriptase reaction mix. Following production of cDNA, PCR was performed to amplify cognate heavy and light chain variable region genes and generate transcriptionally-active PCR (TAP) fragments. These linear expression cassettes were then used directly in a mammalian cell transfection to generate recombinant antibody for further testing. We were able to successfully generate antigen-specific recombinant antibodies from both the rabbit and mouse IgG+ memory B cell subset within one week. This included the generation of an anti-TNFR2 blocking antibody from mice

  2. Observed-Based Adaptive Fuzzy Tracking Control for Switched Nonlinear Systems With Dead-Zone.

    PubMed

    Tong, Shaocheng; Sui, Shuai; Li, Yongming

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the problem of adaptive fuzzy output-feedback control is investigated for a class of uncertain switched nonlinear systems in strict-feedback form. The considered switched systems contain unknown nonlinearities, dead-zone, and immeasurable states. Fuzzy logic systems are utilized to approximate the unknown nonlinear functions, a switched fuzzy state observer is designed and thus the immeasurable states are obtained by it. By applying the adaptive backstepping design principle and the average dwell time method, an adaptive fuzzy output-feedback tracking control approach is developed. It is proved that the proposed control approach can guarantee that all the variables in the closed-loop system are bounded under a class of switching signals with average dwell time, and also that the system output can track a given reference signal as closely as possible. The simulation results are given to check the effectiveness of the proposed approach. PMID:25594991

  3. H∞ Adaptive tracking control for switched systems based on an average dwell-time method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Caiyun; Zhao, Jun

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigates the H∞ state tracking model reference adaptive control (MRAC) problem for a class of switched systems using an average dwell-time method. First, a stability criterion is established for a switched reference model. Then, an adaptive controller is designed and the state tracking control problem is converted into the stability analysis. The global practical stability of the error switched system can be guaranteed under a class of switching signals characterised by an average dwell time. Consequently, sufficient conditions for the solvability of the H∞ state tracking MRAC problem are derived. An example of highly manoeuvrable aircraft technology vehicle is given to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed design method.

  4. Two Mutually Exclusive Local Chromatin States Drive Efficient V(D)J Recombination.

    PubMed

    Bolland, Daniel J; Koohy, Hashem; Wood, Andrew L; Matheson, Louise S; Krueger, Felix; Stubbington, Michael J T; Baizan-Edge, Amanda; Chovanec, Peter; Stubbs, Bryony A; Tabbada, Kristina; Andrews, Simon R; Spivakov, Mikhail; Corcoran, Anne E

    2016-06-14

    Variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) (V(D)J) recombination is the first determinant of antigen receptor diversity. Understanding how recombination is regulated requires a comprehensive, unbiased readout of V gene usage. We have developed VDJ sequencing (VDJ-seq), a DNA-based next-generation-sequencing technique that quantitatively profiles recombination products. We reveal a 200-fold range of recombination efficiency among recombining V genes in the primary mouse Igh repertoire. We used machine learning to integrate these data with local chromatin profiles to identify combinatorial patterns of epigenetic features that associate with active VH gene recombination. These features localize downstream of VH genes and are excised by recombination, revealing a class of cis-regulatory element that governs recombination, distinct from expression. We detect two mutually exclusive chromatin signatures at these elements, characterized by CTCF/RAD21 and PAX5/IRF4, which segregate with the evolutionary history of associated VH genes. Thus, local chromatin signatures downstream of VH genes provide an essential layer of regulation that determines recombination efficiency. PMID:27264181

  5. Three Decades of Recombinant DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Jackie

    1985-01-01

    Discusses highlights in the development of genetic engineering, examining techniques with recombinant DNA, legal and ethical issues, GenBank (a national database of nucleic acid sequences), and other topics. (JN)

  6. Recombinant DNA means and method

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, B.L.; Mao, J.I.; Moir, D.T.; Taunton-Rigby, A.; Vovis, G.F.

    1987-05-19

    This patent describes a transformed living cell selected from the group consisting of fungi, yeast and bacteria, and containing genetic material derived from recombinant DNA material and coding for bovine rennin.

  7. Stable recombination hotspots in birds.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Sonal; Leffler, Ellen M; Sannareddy, Keerthi; Turner, Isaac; Venn, Oliver; Hooper, Daniel M; Strand, Alva I; Li, Qiye; Raney, Brian; Balakrishnan, Christopher N; Griffith, Simon C; McVean, Gil; Przeworski, Molly

    2015-11-20

    The DNA-binding protein PRDM9 has a critical role in specifying meiotic recombination hotspots in mice and apes, but it appears to be absent from other vertebrate species, including birds. To study the evolution and determinants of recombination in species lacking the gene that encodes PRDM9, we inferred fine-scale genetic maps from population resequencing data for two bird species: the zebra finch, Taeniopygia guttata, and the long-tailed finch, Poephila acuticauda. We found that both species have recombination hotspots, which are enriched near functional genomic elements. Unlike in mice and apes, most hotspots are shared between the two species, and their conservation seems to extend over tens of millions of years. These observations suggest that in the absence of PRDM9, recombination targets functional features that both enable access to the genome and constrain its evolution. PMID:26586757

  8. Recombination device for storage batteries

    DOEpatents

    Kraft, H.; Ledjeff, K.

    1984-01-01

    A recombination device including a gas-tight enclosure connected to receive the discharge gases from a rechargeable storage battery. Catalytic material for the recombination of hydrogen and oxygen to form water is supported within the enclosure. The enclosure is sealed from the atmosphere by a liquid seal including two vertical chambers interconnected with an inverted U-shaped overflow tube. The first chamber is connected at its upper portion to the enclosure and the second chamber communicates at its upper portion with the atmosphere. If the pressure within the enclosure differs as overpressure or vacuum by more than the liquid level, the liquid is forced into one of the two chambers and the overpressure is vented or the vacuum is relieved. The recombination device also includes means for returning recombined liquid to the battery and for absorbing metal hydrides.

  9. Recombination device for storage batteries

    DOEpatents

    Kraft, Helmut; Ledjeff, Konstantin

    1985-01-01

    A recombination device including a gas-tight enclosure connected to receive he discharge gases from a rechargeable storage battery. Catalytic material for the recombination of hydrogen and oxygen to form water is supported within the enclosure. The enclosure is sealed from the atmosphere by a liquid seal including two vertical chambers interconnected with an inverted U-shaped overflow tube. The first chamber is connected at its upper portion to the enclosure and the second chamber communicates at its upper portion with the atmosphere. If the pressure within the enclosure differs as overpressure or vacuum by more than the liquid level, the liquid is forced into one of the two chambers and the overpressure is vented or the vacuum is relieved. The recombination device also includes means for returning recombined liquid to the battery and for absorbing metal hydrides.

  10. Does Class Size Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; Brewer, Dominic J.; Gamoran, Adam; Willms, J. Douglas

    2001-01-01

    Reports on the significance of class size to student learning. Includes an overview of class size in various countries, the importance of teacher adaptability, and the Asian paradox of large classes allied to high test scores. (MM)

  11. A yeast-endonuclease-generated DNA break induces antigenic switching in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Boothroyd, Catharine E; Dreesen, Oliver; Leonova, Tatyana; Ly, K Ina; Figueiredo, Luisa M; Cross, George A M; Papavasiliou, F Nina

    2009-05-14

    Trypanosoma brucei is the causative agent of African sleeping sickness in humans and one of the causes of nagana in cattle. This protozoan parasite evades the host immune system by antigenic variation, a periodic switching of its variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat. VSG switching is spontaneous and occurs at a rate of about 10(-2)-10(-3) per population doubling in recent isolates from nature, but at a markedly reduced rate (10(-5)-10(-6)) in laboratory-adapted strains. VSG switching is thought to occur predominantly through gene conversion, a form of homologous recombination initiated by a DNA lesion that is used by other pathogens (for example, Candida albicans, Borrelia sp. and Neisseria gonorrhoeae) to generate surface protein diversity, and by B lymphocytes of the vertebrate immune system to generate antibody diversity. Very little is known about the molecular mechanism of VSG switching in T. brucei. Here we demonstrate that the introduction of a DNA double-stranded break (DSB) adjacent to the approximately 70-base-pair (bp) repeats upstream of the transcribed VSG gene increases switching in vitro approximately 250-fold, producing switched clones with a frequency and features similar to those generated early in an infection. We were also able to detect spontaneous DSBs within the 70-bp repeats upstream of the actively transcribed VSG gene, indicating that a DSB is a natural intermediate of VSG gene conversion and that VSG switching is the result of the resolution of this DSB by break-induced replication. PMID:19369939

  12. Characteristics of switching plasma in an inverse-pinch switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ja H.; Choi, Sang H.; Venable, Demetrius D.; Han, Kwang S.; Nam, Sang H.

    1993-01-01

    Characteristics of the plasma that switches on tens of giga volt-ampere in an inverse-pinch plasma switch (INPIStron) have been made. Through optical and spectroscopic diagnostics of the current carrying plasma, the current density, the motion of current paths, dominant ionic species have been determined in order to access their effects on circuit parameters and material erosion. Also the optimum operational condition of the plasma-puff triggering method required for azimuthally uniform conduction in the INPIStron has been determined.

  13. Experimental investigation of ion-ion recombination at atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franchin, A.; Ehrhart, S.; Leppä, J.; Nieminen, T.; Gagné, S.; Schobesberger, S.; Wimmer, D.; Duplissy, J.; Riccobono, F.; Dunne, E.; Rondo, L.; Downard, A.; Bianchi, F.; Kupc, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Lehtipalo, K.; Manninen, H. E.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Wagner, P. E.; Hansel, A.; Kirkby, J.; Kürten, A.; Donahue, N. M.; Makhmutov, V.; Mathot, S.; Metzger, A.; Petäjä, T.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Sipilä, M.; Stozhkov, Y.; Tomé, A.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Carslaw, K.; Curtius, J.; Baltensperger, U.; Kulmala, M.

    2015-02-01

    We present the results of laboratory measurements of the ion-ion recombination coefficient at different temperatures, relative humidities and concentrations of ozone and sulfur dioxide. The experiments were carried out using the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) chamber at CERN, the walls of which are made of conductive material, making it possible to measure small ions. We produced ions in the chamber using a 3.5 GeV c-1 beam of positively-charged pions (π+) from the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) and with galactic cosmic rays, when the PS was switched off. The range of the ion production rate varied from 2 to 100 cm-3s-1, covering the typical range of ionization throughout the troposphere. The temperature ranged from -55 to 20 °C, the relative humidity from 0 to 70%, the SO2 concentration from 0 to 40 ppb, and the ozone concentration from 200 to 700 ppb. At 20 °C and 40% RH, the retrieved ion-ion recombination coefficient was (2.3 ± 0.7) × 10-6cm3s-1. We observed no dependency of the ion-ion recombination coefficient on ozone concentration and a weak variation with sulfur dioxide concentration. However, we found a strong dependency of the ion-ion recombination coefficient on temperature. We compared our results with three different models and found an overall agreement for temperatures above 0 °C, but a disagreement at lower temperatures. We observed a strong dependency of the recombination coefficient on relative humidity, which has not been reported previously.

  14. [Antithrombotic recombinant antibodies].

    PubMed

    Muzard, Julien; Loyau, Stéphane; Ajzenberg, Nadine; Billiald, Philippe; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine

    2006-01-01

    Coronary syndromes, stroke and other ischaemic arterial diseases are the leading cause of death in the world and will probably remain it at least until 2020. Cardiovascular diseases kill 17 million people each year with an expected increase to 20 million in 2020 and 24 million in 2030. The global impact of recurrence and death during the 6 months following an acute coronary syndrome remains at 8-15% in the present state of medical practice. Acute ischaemic syndromes have a common aetiology that is the formation of a platelet-rich clot at the site of severe coronary stenosis and of eroded atherosclerotic plaques. Therapy consists of medical treatments associating thrombolysis, antiplatelet drugs, and the re-opening of the coronary artery by angioplasty. But these treatments do not prevent morbidity and mortality reaching 15% at 6 months. Finally the treatment of stroke is very limited. There is thus a real clinical need to improve existing treatments and to discover new molecules. Platelet activation is a critical step in ischaemic cardiovascular diseases. This is the reason why antiplatelet drugs are most often prescribed in these cases. Currently, only one recombinant antithrombotic antibody is used in therapy. This is a chimeric Fab, c7E3 or abciximab, which inhibits the final phase of platelet aggregation. Abciximab is prescribed in acute coronary syndromes treated by angioplasty. However, treatment by abciximab can induce severe complications, principally, hemorrages and thrombopenia. Other platelet receptors involved in the earlier steps of platelet activation, such as the phases of contact with and of activation by the subendothelium matrix, have been identified as potential targets for the development of antithrombotic antibodies and are described in this revue. PMID:17652972

  15. Genetic recombination in Streptomyces griseus.

    PubMed Central

    Parag, Y

    1978-01-01

    Low-frequency (10(-6)) genetic recombination was observed in a cephamycin-producing strain of Streptomyces griseus. The recombinants were predominantly heteroclones. Heteroclone analysis was performed involving four heteroclones of one cross. In 100 mutants correlation was found between the type of auxotrophy and the level of antibiotic activity. A cross of this strain with a streptomycin-producing strain of S. griesus is described. PMID:415037

  16. [Vaccine application of recombinant herpesviruses].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, N; Xuan, X; Mikami, T

    2000-04-01

    Recently, genetic engineering using recombinant DNA techniques has been applied to design new viral vaccines in order to reduce some problems which the present viral vaccines have. Up to now, many viruses have been investigated for development of recombinant attenuated vaccines or live viral vectors for delivery of foreign genes coding immunogenic antigens. In this article, we introduced the new vaccine strategy using genetically engineered herpesviruses. PMID:10774221

  17. Combinatorics in Recombinational Population Genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parida, Laxmi

    The work that I will discuss is motivated by the need for understanding, and processing, the manifestations of recombination events in chromosome sequences. In this talk, we focus on two related problems. First, we explore the very general problem of reconstructability of pedigree history. How plausible is it to unravel the history of a complete unit (chromosome) of inheritance? The second problem deals with reconstructing the recombinational history of a collection of chromosomes.

  18. Switching kinetics in nanoferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, D. J.; Kim, Kinam; Scott, J. F.

    2005-08-01

    We have measured the switching in ferroelectric capacitors of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) over three orders of magnitude in lateral area, from A = 166 to 0.19 µm2 (the latter being the size of the smallest ferroelectric random access memory (FRAM) cells in production), and over three orders of magnitude in ramp rate of applied voltage (d E(t)/d t = 107-1010 V cm-1 s-1). In accord with the model of Scott (1998 Ferroelectr. Rev. 1 1), the submicron cells follow a different dependence to the larger cells: for A\\gg 1~\\micmu {\\mathrm {m}}^{2} , the data fit a theory due to Landauer et al (the LYD model), which neglects nucleation; whereas the nanoscale devices satisfy the functional dependence predicted by Pulvari and Kuebler (the PK model), albeit with a modified coefficient. This crossover behaviour has implications for Gbit FRAM device performance at high speed. Fringing field effects measured agree with a simple model from Feynman.

  19. Low impedance switch

    DOEpatents

    Hornig, Donald F.

    1976-01-01

    1. A low inductance switch comprising a pair of spaced apart, annularly shaped, plate members of conducting material supported in substantially parallel, insulated relationship, said plate members being provided with a plurality of radially extending, spoke-like extensions whereby said members may be connected into a plurality of electrical circuits, and an electrical discharge means connected across said spaced plate members for effecting the simultaneous closing of the electrical circuits connected thereto, said electrical discharge means including an elongated, sealed envelope which contains an ionizable gas and which is supported on one of said plate members with the major axis of said envelope extending generally perpendicular to the plane of said plate members, a pair of elongated, spaced apart, insulated electrodes supported within said envelope and extending axially thereof, one of said electrodes being connected to each of said plate members, and a third, firing or trigger electrode supported within said envelope intermediate said main electrodes and being insulated from said main electrodes.

  20. Regenerative switching CMOS system

    DOEpatents

    Welch, J.D.

    1998-06-02

    Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Schottky barrier Field Effect Transistor systems, which are a series combination of N and P-Channel MOSFETS, in which Source Schottky barrier junctions of the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS are electrically interconnected, (rather than the Drains as in conventional diffused junction CMOS), which Schottky barrier MOSFET system demonstrates Regenerative Inverting Switching Characteristics in use are disclosed. Both the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFET devices are unique in that they provide operational Drain Current vs. Drain to Source voltage as a function of Gate voltage only where the polarities of the Drain voltage and Gate voltage are opposite, referenced to the Source as a common terminal, and where the polarity of the voltage applied to the Gate is appropriate to cause Channel inversion. Experimentally derived results which demonstrate and verify the operation of N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS actually fabricated on P and N-type Silicon respectively, by a common procedure using vacuum deposited Chromium as a Schottky barrier forming metal, are also provided. 14 figs.

  1. Regenerative switching CMOS system

    DOEpatents

    Welch, James D.

    1998-01-01

    Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Schottky barrier Field Effect Transistor systems, which are a seriesed combination of N and P-Channel MOSFETS, in which Source Schottky barrier junctions of the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS are electically interconnected, (rather than the Drains as in conventional diffused junction CMOS), which Schottky barrier MOSFET system demonstrates Regenerative Inverting Switching Characteristics in use are disclosed. Both the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFET devices are unique in that they provide operational Drain Current vs. Drain to Source voltage as a function of Gate voltage only where the polarities of the Drain voltage and Gate voltage are opposite, referenced to the Source as a common terminal, and where the polarity of the voltage applied to the Gate is appropriate to cause Channel inversion. Experimentally derived results which demonstrate and verify the operation of N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS actually fabricated on P and N-type Silicon respectively, by a common procedure using vacuum deposited Chromium as a Schottky barrier forming metal, are also provided.

  2. The magnetoelectrochemical switch

    PubMed Central

    Lunca Popa, Petru; Kemp, Neil T.; Majjad, Hicham; Dalmas, Guillaume; Faramarzi, Vina; Andreas, Christian; Hertel, Riccardo; Doudin, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    In the field of spintronics, the archetype solid-state two-terminal device is the spin valve, where the resistance is controlled by the magnetization configuration. We show here how this concept of spin-dependent switch can be extended to magnetic electrodes in solution, by magnetic control of their chemical environment. Appropriate nanoscale design allows a huge enhancement of the magnetic force field experienced by paramagnetic molecular species in solutions, which changes between repulsive and attractive on changing the electrodes’ magnetic orientations. Specifically, the field gradient force created within a sub-100-nm-sized nanogap separating two magnetic electrodes can be reversed by changing the orientation of the electrodes’ magnetization relative to the current flowing between the electrodes. This can result in a breaking or making of an electric nanocontact, with a change of resistance by a factor of up to 103. The results reveal how an external field can impact chemical equilibrium in the vicinity of nanoscale magnetic circuits. PMID:25009179

  3. Electrically switched ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Lilga, M.A.; Schwartz, D.T.; Genders, D.

    1997-10-01

    A variety of waste types containing radioactive {sup 137}Cs are found throughout the DOE complex. These waste types include water in reactor cooling basins, radioactive high-level waste (HLW) in underground storage tanks, and groundwater. Safety and regulatory requirements and economics require the removal of radiocesium before these wastes can be permanently disposed of. Electrically Switched Ion Exchange (ESIX) is an approach for radioactive cesium separation that combines IX and electrochemistry to provide a selective, reversible, and economic separation method that also produces little or no secondary waste. In the ESIX process, an electroactive IX film is deposited electrochemically onto a high-surface area electrode, and ion uptake and elution are controlled directly by modulating the potential of the film. For cesium, the electroactive films under investigation are ferrocyanides, which are well known to have high selectivities for cesium in concentrated sodium solutions. When a cathode potential is applied to the film, Fe{sup +3} is reduced to the Fe{sup +2} state, and a cation must be intercalated into the film to maintain charge neutrality (i.e., Cs{sup +} is loaded). Conversely, if an anodic potential is applied, a cation must be released from the film (i.e., Cs{sup +} is unloaded). Therefore, to load the film with cesium, the film is simply reduced; to unload cesium, the film is oxidized.

  4. The magnetoelectrochemical switch.

    PubMed

    Popa, Petru Lunca; Kemp, Neil T; Majjad, Hicham; Dalmas, Guillaume; Faramarzi, Vina; Andreas, Christian; Hertel, Riccardo; Doudin, Bernard

    2014-07-22

    In the field of spintronics, the archetype solid-state two-terminal device is the spin valve, where the resistance is controlled by the magnetization configuration. We show here how this concept of spin-dependent switch can be extended to magnetic electrodes in solution, by magnetic control of their chemical environment. Appropriate nanoscale design allows a huge enhancement of the magnetic force field experienced by paramagnetic molecular species in solutions, which changes between repulsive and attractive on changing the electrodes' magnetic orientations. Specifically, the field gradient force created within a sub-100-nm-sized nanogap separating two magnetic electrodes can be reversed by changing the orientation of the electrodes' magnetization relative to the current flowing between the electrodes. This can result in a breaking or making of an electric nanocontact, with a change of resistance by a factor of up to 10(3). The results reveal how an external field can impact chemical equilibrium in the vicinity of nanoscale magnetic circuits. PMID:25009179

  5. Delayed recombination and cosmic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Silvia; Bean, Rachel; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Silk, Joseph

    2008-09-01

    Current cosmological constraints from cosmic microwave background anisotropies are typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme, however additional resonance and ionizing radiation sources can delay recombination, altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from the cosmic microwave background data. We show that for recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe satellite mission (WMAP) 5-year survey and from the arcminute cosmology bolometer array receiver experiment, additional resonance radiation is nearly degenerate with variations in the spectral index, ns, and has a marked effect on uncertainties in constraints on the Hubble constant, age of the universe, curvature and the upper bound on the neutrino mass. When a modified recombination scheme is considered, the redshift of recombination is constrained to z*=1078±11, with uncertainties in the measurement weaker by 1 order of magnitude than those obtained under the assumption of standard recombination while constraints on the shift parameter are shifted by 1σ to R=1.734±0.028. From the WMAP5 data we obtain the following constraints on the resonance and ionization sources parameters: γα<0.39 and γi<0.058 at 95% c.l.. Although delayed recombination limits the precision of parameter estimation from the WMAP satellite, we demonstrate that this should not be the case for future, smaller angular scales measurements, such as those by the Planck satellite mission.

  6. Ethanol production by recombinant hosts

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Beall, David S.; Burchhardt, Gerhard F. H.; Guimaraes, Walter V.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T.

    1995-01-01

    Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

  7. Ethanol production by recombinant hosts

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, David E.; Horton, Philip G.; Ben-Bassat, Arie

    1996-01-01

    Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

  8. Delayed recombination and cosmic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Silk, Joseph

    2008-09-15

    Current cosmological constraints from cosmic microwave background anisotropies are typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme, however additional resonance and ionizing radiation sources can delay recombination, altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from the cosmic microwave background data. We show that for recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe satellite mission (WMAP) 5-year survey and from the arcminute cosmology bolometer array receiver experiment, additional resonance radiation is nearly degenerate with variations in the spectral index, n{sub s}, and has a marked effect on uncertainties in constraints on the Hubble constant, age of the universe, curvature and the upper bound on the neutrino mass. When a modified recombination scheme is considered, the redshift of recombination is constrained to z{sub *}=1078{+-}11, with uncertainties in the measurement weaker by 1 order of magnitude than those obtained under the assumption of standard recombination while constraints on the shift parameter are shifted by 1{sigma} to R=1.734{+-}0.028. From the WMAP5 data we obtain the following constraints on the resonance and ionization sources parameters: {epsilon}{sub {alpha}}<0.39 and {epsilon}{sub i}<0.058 at 95% c.l.. Although delayed recombination limits the precision of parameter estimation from the WMAP satellite, we demonstrate that this should not be the case for future, smaller angular scales measurements, such as those by the Planck satellite mission.

  9. Task Switching versus Cue Switching: Using Transition Cuing to Disentangle Sequential Effects in Task-Switching Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Darryl W.; Logan, Gordon D.

    2007-01-01

    Recent methodological advances have allowed researchers to address confounds in the measurement of task-switch costs in task-switching performance by dissociating cue switching from task switching. For example, in the transition-cuing procedure, which involves presenting cues for task transitions rather than for tasks, cue transitions (cue…

  10. Switching Oxide Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldham, Timothy R.

    2003-01-01

    We consider radiation-induced charge trapping in SiO2 dielectric layers, primarily from the point of view of CMOS devices. However, SiO2 insulators are used in many other ways, and the same defects occur in other contexts. The key studies, which determined the nature of the oxide charge traps, were done primarily on gate oxides in CMOS devices, because that was the main radiation problem in CMOS at one time. There are two major reviews of radiation-induced oxide charge trapping already in the literature, which discuss the subject in far greater detail than is possible here. The first of these was by McLean et al. in 1989, and the second, ten years later, was intended as an update, because of additional, new work that had been reported. Basically, the picture that has emerged is that ionizing radiation creates electron-hole pairs in the oxide, and the electrons have much higher mobility than the holes. Therefore, the electrons are swept out of the oxide very rapidly by any field that is present, leaving behind any holes that escape the initial recombination process. These holes then undergo a polaron hopping transport toward the Si/SiO2 interface (under positive bias). Near the interface, some fraction of them fall into deep, relatively stable, long-lived hole traps. The nature and annealing behavior of these hole traps is the main focus of this paper.

  11. Vanadium Dioxide Phase Change Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Mark; Hillman, Christopher; Stupar, Philip; Hacker, Jonathan; Griffith, Zachary; Lee, Kang-Jin

    2015-03-01

    We have built RF switches using vanadium dioxide thin films fabricated within a section of inverted transmission line with integrated on chip heaters to provide local thermal control. On heating the films above the metal insulator transition we obtain record low switch insertion loss of -0.13 dB at 50 GHz and -0.5 dB at 110 GHz. We investigate the device physics of these switches including the effect of a deposited insulator on the VO2 switching characteristics, the self-latching of the devices under high RF powers and the effect of resistance change with temperature on the device linearity. Finally we show how these devices can be integrated with silicon germanium RF circuits to produce a field programmable device where the RF signal routing can be selected under external control. Supported under the DARPA RF-FPGA Program, Contract HR0011-12-C-0092.

  12. Hobetron current regulating switch tube

    SciTech Connect

    True, R.B.; Hansen, R.J.; Deb, D.N.; Good, G.R.; Reass, W.A.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes a novel high power electron tube that can hold off voltages up to hundreds of kilovolts, and switch hundreds of amps of current. They call the divide the Hobertron since it utilizes a hollow electron beam. Unlike magnetron injection gun (MIG) switch tubes, it does not require a magnet. Further, it uses nonintercepting control laments, and a dispenser cathode for long life and reliability. Finally, it features a double walled Faraday cage collector for high power dissipation capability. Current is very tightly controlled against changes in voltage across the switch (it is an almost perfect pentode), thus this tube is ideally suited for direct series switching applications. In the paper, various Hobertron designs, and the computer codes and methods used to create them, will be described.

  13. Wide Bandgap Extrinsic Photoconductive Switches

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, James S.

    2012-01-20

    Photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) have been investigated since the late 1970s. Some devices have been developed that withstand tens of kilovolts and others that switch hundreds of amperes. However, no single device has been developed that can reliably withstand both high voltage and switch high current. Yet, photoconductive switches still hold the promise of reliable high voltage and high current operation with subnanosecond risetimes. Particularly since good quality, bulk, single crystal, wide bandgap semiconductor materials have recently become available. In this chapter we will review the basic operation of PCSS devices, status of PCSS devices and properties of the wide bandgap semiconductors 4H-SiC, 6H-SiC and 2H-GaN.

  14. High PRF high current switch

    DOEpatents

    Moran, Stuart L.; Hutcherson, R. Kenneth

    1990-03-27

    A triggerable, high voltage, high current, spark gap switch for use in pu power systems. The device comprises a pair of electrodes in a high pressure hydrogen environment that is triggered by introducing an arc between one electrode and a trigger pin. Unusually high repetition rates may be obtained by undervolting the switch, i.e., operating the trigger at voltages much below the self-breakdown voltage of the device.

  15. A Piezoelectric Cryogenic Heat Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahromi, Amir E.; Sullivan, Dan F.

    2014-01-01

    We have measured the thermal conductance of a mechanical heat switch actuated by a piezoelectric positioner, the PZHS (PieZo electric Heat Switch), at cryogenic temperatures. The thermal conductance of the PZHS was measured between 4 K and 10 K, and on/off conductance ratios greater than 100 were achieved when the positioner applied its maximum force of 8 N. We discuss the advantages of using this system in cryogenic applications, and estimate the ultimate performance of an optimized PZHS.

  16. K-Band Latching Switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piotrowski, W. S.; Raue, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    Design, development, and tests are described for two single-pole-double-throw latching waveguide ferrite switches: a K-band switch in WR-42 waveguide and a Ka-band switch in WR-28 waveguide. Both switches have structurally simple junctions, mechanically interlocked without the use of bonding materials; they are impervious to the effects of thermal, shock, and vibration stresses. Ferrite material for the Ka-band switch with a proper combination of magnetic and dielectric properties was available and resulted in excellent low loss, wideband performance. The high power handling requirement of the K-band switch limited the choice of ferrite to nickel-zinc compositions with adequate magnetic properties, but with too low relative dielectric constant. The relative dielectric constant determines the junction dimensions for given frequency responses. In this case the too low value unavoidably leads to a larger than optimum junction volume, increasing the insertion loss and restricting the operating bandwidth. Efforts to overcome the materials-related difficulties through the design of a composite junction with increased effective dielectric properties efforts to modify the relative dielectric constant of nickel-zinc ferrite are examined.

  17. Sealed reed relay limit switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, I. P.; Svintsov, G. P.; Yefimova, M. A.; Lebedev, A. V.; Samsonov, Y. P.

    1986-01-01

    Sealed reed relay limit switches are described which overcome the inherent deficiencies traditionally present in these devices: high material, labor consumption, and difficult operation. Series VSG limit switches developed at the All-Union Scientific Research and Technological Planning Institute for Relay Engineering (Cheboksary) for use in buildings are described. The VSG1 has a single switching contact, the VSG2 a single normally open contact, and the VSG3 a single normally closed contact. The VSG1 employs type MKS-27103 sealed reed relays, while the VSG2 and VSG3 employ KEM-1 reed relays. The magnet system, which consists of magnets and a plate, and the sealed reed relay are contained in a nonmagnetic casing with a slit in it. The mathematical expression defining the geometric dimensions of the magnet system is given. The basic parameteres of all three types of switches are tabulated. The VSG series switches can be used to replace VBK and BVK switches, thus saving electricity, labor, and materials, including silver.

  18. On the Grammar of Code-Switching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatt, Rakesh M.

    1996-01-01

    Explores an Optimality-Theoretic approach to account for observed cross-linguistic patterns of code switching that assumes that code switching strives for well-formedness. Optimization of well-formedness in code switching is shown to follow from (violable) ranked constraints. An argument is advanced that code-switching patterns emerge from…

  19. Working Memory Costs of Task Switching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liefooghe, Baptist; Barrouillet, Pierre; Vandierendonck, Andre; Camos, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    Although many accounts of task switching emphasize the importance of working memory as a substantial source of the switch cost, there is a lack of evidence demonstrating that task switching actually places additional demands on working memory. The present study addressed this issue by implementing task switching in continuous complex span tasks…

  20. Contrasting roles of interallelic recombination at the HLA-A and HLA-B loci

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, A.L.; Hughes, M.K. ); Watkins, D.I. )

    1993-03-01

    A statistical study of DNA sequences of alleles at the highly polymorphic class I MHC loci of humans, HLA-A and HLA-B, showed evidence of both large-scale recombination events(involving recombination of exons 1-2 of one allele with exons 3-8 of another) and small scale recombination events (involving apparent exchange of short DNA segments). The latter events occurred disproportionately in the region of the gene encoding the antigen recognition site (ARS) of the class I molecule. Furthermore, they involved the ARS codons which are under the strongest selection favoring allelic diversity at the amino acid level. Thus, the frequency of recombinant alleles appears to have been increased by some form of balancing selection (such as overdominant selection) favoring heterozygosity in the ARS. These analyses also revealed a striking difference between the A and B loci. Recombination events appear to have occurred about twice as frequently at the B locus, and recombinants at the B locus were significantly more likely to affect polymorphic sites in the ARS. At the A locus, there are well-defined allelic lineages that have persisted since prior to the human-chimpanzee divergence; but at the B locus, there is no evidence for such long-lasting allelic lineages. Thus, relatively frequent interallelic recombination has apparently been a feature of the long-term evolution of the B locus but not of the A locus. 45 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Emergence of distinct brome mosaic virus recombinants is determined by the polarity of the inoculum RNA.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sun-Jung; Rao, A L N

    2012-05-01

    Despite overwhelming interest in the impact exerted by recombination during evolution of RNA viruses, the relative contribution of the polarity of inoculum templates remains poorly understood. Here, by agroinfiltrating Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, we show that brome mosaic virus (BMV) replicase is competent to initiate positive-strand [(+)-strand] synthesis on an ectopically expressed RNA3 negative strand [(-) strand] and faithfully complete the replication cycle. Consequently, we sought to examine the role of RNA polarity in BMV recombination by expressing a series of replication-defective mutants of BMV RNA3 in (+) or (-) polarity. Temporal analysis of progeny sequences revealed that the genetic makeup of the primary recombinant pool is determined by the polarity of the inoculum template. When the polarity of the inoculum template was (+), the recombinant pool that accumulated during early phases of replication was a mixture of nonhomologous recombinants. These are longer than the inoculum template length, and a nascent 3' untranslated region (UTR) of wild-type (WT) RNA1 or RNA2 was added to the input mutant RNA3 3' UTR due to end-to-end template switching by BMV replicase during (-)-strand synthesis. In contrast, when the polarity of the inoculum was (-), the progeny contained a pool of native-length homologous recombinants generated by template switching of BMV replicase with a nascent UTR from WT RNA1 or RNA2 during (+)-strand synthesis. Repair of a point mutation caused by polymerase error occurred only when the polarity of the inoculum template was (+). These results contribute to the explanation of the functional role of RNA polarity in recombination mediated by copy choice mechanisms. PMID:22357282

  2. Recombination Drives Vertebrate Genome Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Kiwoong; Ellegren, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Selective and/or neutral processes may govern variation in DNA content and, ultimately, genome size. The observation in several organisms of a negative correlation between recombination rate and intron size could be compatible with a neutral model in which recombination is mutagenic for length changes. We used whole-genome data on small insertions and deletions within transposable elements from chicken and zebra finch to demonstrate clear links between recombination rate and a number of attributes of reduced DNA content. Recombination rate was negatively correlated with the length of introns, transposable elements, and intergenic spacer and with the rate of short insertions. Importantly, it was positively correlated with gene density, the rate of short deletions, the deletion bias, and the net change in sequence length. All these observations point at a pattern of more condensed genome structure in regions of high recombination. Based on the observed rates of small insertions and deletions and assuming that these rates are representative for the whole genome, we estimate that the genome of the most recent common ancestor of birds and lizards has lost nearly 20% of its DNA content up until the present. Expansion of transposable elements can counteract the effect of deletions in an equilibrium mutation model; however, since the activity of transposable elements has been low in the avian lineage, the deletion bias is likely to have had a significant effect on genome size evolution in dinosaurs and birds, contributing to the maintenance of a small genome. We also demonstrate that most of the observed correlations between recombination rate and genome contraction parameters are seen in the human genome, including for segregating indel polymorphisms. Our data are compatible with a neutral model in which recombination drives vertebrate genome size evolution and gives no direct support for a role of natural selection in this process. PMID:22570634

  3. Recombination processes in ionised plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastin, Robert

    The observational analysis of astrophysical plasmas relies on accurate calculations of the atomic processes involved. The recombination spectra of singly ionised oxygen (O il) and carbon (C il) present excellent tools for investigating regions such as planetary nebulae and H II regions. In this thesis, detailed treatments of the recombination processes of both O II and C II are presented. Using the R-matrix solution to the close coupling equations, I present the results of accurate photoionisation calculations. Bound state energy levels are determined and oscillator strengths calculated for both species. Recombination coefficients were evalu ated for low n and 1, for C II in LS-coupling, and 0 II in intermediate coupling, taking particular care to treat resonances effectively. Sample photoionisation cross-sections are presented for both species, and compared to previous work. A complete radiative-cascade model is treated for both species, in order to determine line emissivities under nebular conditions at a wide range of temperatures and densities. Collisional effects are treated for C II, along with, for the first time, the effects of high temperature dielectronic recombination, allowing the modelling of regions of much higher electron temperature than previous work. The O II calculations were performed under intermediate coupling for the first time, allowing the effects of non-statistical popula tions of the parent ion fine-structure levels and dielectronic recombination onto bound states within this fine-structure to be taken into account in line emissivities. Detailed comparison with previous theoretical work was made for both species. The application of the C II and 0 n recombination spectra to determining tempera ture and densities from the observed spectra of a number of ionised nebulae is considered. The potential for using the new recombination spectra as diagnostic tools to solve some of the key problems in the study of ionised nebulae is demonstrated.

  4. Recombination at the DNA level. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Abstracts of papers in the following areas are presented: (1) chromosome mechanics; (2) yeast systems; (3) mammalian homologous recombination; (4) transposons; (5) Mu; (6) plant transposons/T4 recombination; (7) topoisomerase, resolvase, and gyrase; (8) Escherichia coli general recombination; (9) recA; (10) repair; (11) eucaryotic enzymes; (12) integration and excision of bacteriophage; (13) site-specific recombination; and (14) recombination in vitro. (ACR)

  5. Electronic logic for enhanced switch reliability

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, J.A.

    1984-01-20

    A logic circuit is used to enhance redundant switch reliability. Two or more switches are monitored for logical high or low output. The output for the logic circuit produces a redundant and fail-safe representation of the switch outputs. When both switch outputs are high, the output is high. Similarly, when both switch outputs are low, the logic circuit's output is low. When the output states of the two switches do not agree, the circuit resolves the conflict by memorizing the last output state which both switches were simultaneously in and produces the logical complement of this output state. Thus, the logic circuit of the present invention allows the redundant switches to be treated as if they were in parallel when the switches are open and as if they were in series when the switches are closed. A failsafe system having maximum reliability is thereby produced.

  6. 49 CFR 218.103 - Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hand-operated switches, including crossover... Equipment, Switches, and Fixed Derails § 218.103 Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches. (a)(1...) General. Employees operating or verifying the position of a hand-operated switch shall: (1) Conduct...

  7. 49 CFR 218.103 - Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hand-operated switches, including crossover... Equipment, Switches, and Fixed Derails § 218.103 Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches. (a)(1...) General. Employees operating or verifying the position of a hand-operated switch shall: (1) Conduct...

  8. 49 CFR 218.103 - Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hand-operated switches, including crossover... Equipment, Switches, and Fixed Derails § 218.103 Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches. (a)(1...) General. Employees operating or verifying the position of a hand-operated switch shall: (1) Conduct...

  9. 49 CFR 218.103 - Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hand-operated switches, including crossover... Equipment, Switches, and Fixed Derails § 218.103 Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches. (a)(1...) General. Employees operating or verifying the position of a hand-operated switch shall: (1) Conduct...

  10. 49 CFR 218.103 - Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hand-operated switches, including crossover... Equipment, Switches, and Fixed Derails § 218.103 Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches. (a)(1...) General. Employees operating or verifying the position of a hand-operated switch shall: (1) Conduct...

  11. Non-latching relay switch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Duimstra, Frederick A.

    1991-01-01

    A non-latching relay switch assembly which includes a coil section and a switch or contact section. The coil section includes a permanent magnet and an electromagnet. The respective sections are arranged in separate locations or cavities in the assembly. The switch has a "normal" position and is selectively switched by an overriding electromagnetic assembly. The switch returns to the "normal" position when the overriding electromagnetic assembly is inactive.

  12. PROGENITORS OF RECOMBINING SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Takashi J.

    2012-05-01

    Usual supernova remnants have either ionizing plasma or plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium, i.e., the ionization temperature is lower than or equal to the electron temperature. However, the existence of recombining supernova remnants, i.e., supernova remnants with ionization temperature higher than the electron temperature, has been recently confirmed. One suggested way to have recombining plasma in a supernova remnant is to have a dense circumstellar medium at the time of the supernova explosion. If the circumstellar medium is dense enough, collisional ionization equilibrium can be established in the early stage of the evolution of the supernova remnant and subsequent adiabatic cooling, which occurs after the shock wave gets out of the dense circumstellar medium, makes the electron temperature lower than the ionization temperature. We study the circumstellar medium around several supernova progenitors and show which supernova progenitors can have a circumstellar medium dense enough to establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion. We find that the circumstellar medium around red supergiants (especially massive ones) and the circumstellar medium dense enough to make Type IIn supernovae can establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion and can evolve to become recombining supernova remnants. Wolf-Rayet stars and white dwarfs have the possibility to be recombining supernova remnants but the fraction is expected to be very small. As the occurrence rate of the explosions of red supergiants is much higher than that of Type IIn supernovae, the major progenitors of recombining supernova remnants are likely to be red supergiants.

  13. Recombinant allergens for specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cromwell, Oliver; Häfner, Dietrich; Nandy, Andreas

    2011-04-01

    Recombinant DNA technology provides the means for producing allergens that are equivalent to their natural counterparts and also genetically engineered variants with reduced IgE-binding activity. The proteins are produced as chemically defined molecules with consistent structural and immunologic properties. Several hundred allergens have been cloned and expressed as recombinant proteins, and these provide the means for making a very detailed diagnosis of a patient's sensitization profile. Clinical development programs are now in progress to assess the suitability of recombinant allergens for both subcutaneous and sublingual immunotherapy. Recombinant hypoallergenic variants, which are developed with the aim of increasing the doses that can be administered while at the same time reducing the risks for therapy-associated side effects, are also in clinical trials for subcutaneous immunotherapy. Grass and birch pollen preparations have been shown to be clinically effective, and studies with various other allergens are in progress. Personalized or patient-tailored immunotherapy is still a very distant prospect, but the first recombinant products based on single allergens or defined mixtures could reach the market within the next 5 years. PMID:21377719

  14. Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis by angiostatin: from recombinant protein to gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Dell'Eva, Raffaella; Pfeffer, Ulrich; Indraccolo, S; Albini, Adriana; Noonan, Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Tumor growth, local invasion, and metastatic dissemination are dependent on the formation of new microvessels. The process of angiogenesis is regulated by a balance between pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors, and the shift to an angiogenic phenotype (the "angiogenic switch") is a key event in tumor progression. The use of anti-angiogenic agents to restore this balance represents a promising approach to cancer treatment. Known physiological inhibitors include trombospondin, several interleukins, and the proteolytic break-down products of several proteins. Angiostatin, an internal fragment of plasminogen, is one of the more potent of this latter class of angiogenesis inhibitors. Like endostatin, another anti-angiogenic peptide derived from collagen XVIII, angiostatin can induce tumor vasculature regression, leading to a complete cessation of tumor growth. Inhibitors of angiogenesis target normal endothelial cells, therefore the development of resistance to these drugs is unlikely. The efficacy of angiostatin has been demonstrated in animal models for many different types of solid tumors. Anti-angiogenic cancer therapy with angiostatin requires prolonged administration of the peptide. The production of the functional polypeptides is expensive and technical problems related to physical properties and purity are frequently encountered. Gene transfer represents an alternative method to deliver angiostatin. Gene therapy has the potential to produce the therapeutic agent in high concentrations in a local area for a sustained period, thereby avoiding the problems encountered with long-term administration of recombinant proteins, monoclonal antibodies, or anti-angiogenic drugs. In this review we compare the different gene therapy strategies that have been applied to angiostatin, with special regard to their ability to provide sufficient angiostatin at the target site. PMID:12901356

  15. Electrodeposited polymer encapsulated nickel sulphide thin films: frequency switching material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Sumanta; Mukherjee, Nillohit; Chakraborty, Biswajit; Mitra, Bibhas Chandra; Mondal, Anup

    2014-05-01

    Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) encapsulated nickel sulfide (NiS) thin films have been synthesized electrochemically from aqueous solution of hydrated nickel chloride (NiCl2, 6H2O), thioacetamide (CH3C(S) NH2) (TAA) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Surface modification of nickel sulfide (NiS) thin films was achieved by this polymer encapsulation. X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and Energy dispersive X-radiation (EDAX) techniques were used for the characterization of thin films. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) confirmed the formation of polymer encapsulated semiconductor. Frequency switching generation study shows that the encapsulated material could be used as a frequency switching device that generates a frequency ∼ 50 Hz under 1 Sun illumination. Encapsulation with PVP causes surface modification that reduces the surface states and barrier height. As a result, the width of the depletion region decreases. So the number of electron-hole pairs increases. Consequently, the number of excitons and exciton related emission increases and this leads to reduction of recombination process and shows photo induced frequency switching phenomenon.

  16. High speed packet switching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This document constitutes the final report prepared by Proteon, Inc. of Westborough, Massachusetts under contract NAS 5-30629 entitled High-Speed Packet Switching (SBIR 87-1, Phase 2) prepared for NASA-Greenbelt, Maryland. The primary goal of this research project is to use the results of the SBIR Phase 1 effort to develop a sound, expandable hardware and software router architecture capable of forwarding 25,000 packets per second through the router and passing 300 megabits per second on the router's internal busses. The work being delivered under this contract received its funding from three different sources: the SNIPE/RIG contract (Contract Number F30602-89-C-0014, CDRL Sequence Number A002), the SBIR contract, and Proteon. The SNIPE/RIG and SBIR contracts had many overlapping requirements, which allowed the research done under SNIPE/RIG to be applied to SBIR. Proteon funded all of the work to develop new router interfaces other than FDDI, in addition to funding the productization of the router itself. The router being delivered under SBIR will be a fully product-quality machine. The work done during this contract produced many significant findings and results, summarized here and explained in detail in later sections of this report. The SNIPE/RIG contract was completed. That contract had many overlapping requirements with the SBIR contract, and resulted in the successful demonstration and delivery of a high speed router. The development that took place during the SNIPE/RIG contract produced findings that included the choice of processor and an understanding of the issues surrounding inter processor communications in a multiprocessor environment. Many significant speed enhancements to the router software were made during that time. Under the SBIR contract (and with help from Proteon-funded work), it was found that a single processor router achieved a throughput significantly higher than originally anticipated. For this reason, a single processor router was

  17. Stable recombination hotspots in birds

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Sonal; Leffler, Ellen M.; Sannareddy, Keerthi; Turner, Isaac; Venn, Oliver; Hooper, Daniel M.; Strand, Alva I.; Li, Qiye; Raney, Brian; Balakrishnan, Christopher N.; Griffith, Simon C.; McVean, Gil; Przeworski, Molly

    2016-01-01

    The DNA-binding protein PRDM9 has a critical role in specifying meiotic recombination hotspots in mice and apes, but appears to be absent from other vertebrate species, including birds. To study the evolution and determinants of recombination in species lacking PRDM9, we inferred fine-scale genetic maps from population resequencing data for two bird species, the zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata and the long-tailed finch Poephila acuticauda. We find that both species have hotspots, which are enriched near functional genomic elements. Unlike in mice and apes, the two species share most hotspots, with conservation seemingly extending over tens of millions of years. These observations suggest that in the absence of PRDM9, recombination targets functional features that both enable access to the genome and constrain its evolution. PMID:26586757

  18. Recombinant snake venom prothrombin activators.

    PubMed

    Lövgren, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Three prothrombin activators; ecarin, which was originally isolated from the venom of the saw-scaled viper Echis carinatus, trocarin from the rough-scaled snake Tropidechis carinatus, and oscutarin from the Taipan snake Oxyuranus scutellatus, were expressed in mammalian cells with the purpose to obtain recombinant prothrombin activators that could be used to convert prothrombin to thrombin. We have previously reported that recombinant ecarin can efficiently generate thrombin without the need for additional cofactors, but does not discriminate non-carboxylated prothrombin from biologically active γ-carboxylated prothrombin. Here we report that recombinant trocarin and oscutarin could not efficiently generate thrombin without additional protein co-factors. We confirm that both trocarin and oscutarin are similar to human coagulation Factor X (FX), explaining the need for additional cofactors. Sequencing of a genomic fragment containing 7 out of the 8 exons coding for oscutarin further confirmed the similarity to human FX. PMID:23111318

  19. The Dissociative Recombination of OH(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    1995-01-01

    Theoretical quantum chemical calculations of the cross sections and rates for the dissociative recombination of the upsilon = 0 level of the ground state of OH(+) show that recombination occurs primarily along the 2 (2)Pi diabatic route. The products are 0((1)D) and a hot H atom with 6.1 eV kinetic energy. The coupling to the resonances is very small and the indirect recombination mechanism plays only a minor role. The recommended value for the rate coefficient is (6.3 +/- 0.7) x 10(exp -9)x (T(e)/1300)(exp -0.48) cu.cm/s for 10 less than T(e) less than 1000 K.

  20. Current Drive in Recombining Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    P.F. Schmit and N.J. Fisch

    2012-05-15

    The Langevin equations describing the average collisional dynamics of suprathermal particles in nonstationary plasma remarkably admit an exact analytical solution in the case of recombining plasma. The current density produced by arbitrary particle fluxes is derived including the effect of charge recombination. Since recombination has the effect of lowering the charge density of the plasma, thus reducing the charged particle collisional frequencies, the evolution of the current density can be modified substantially compared to plasma with fixed charge density. The current drive efficiency is derived and optimized for discrete and continuous pulses of current, leading to the discovery of a nonzero "residual" current density that persists indefinitely under certain conditions, a feature not present in stationary plasmas.