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Sample records for classical low-mass x-ray

  1. Population synthesis of classical low-mass X-ray binaries in the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Haaften, L. M.; Nelemans, G.; Voss, R.; van der Sluys, M. V.; Toonen, S.

    2015-07-01

    Aims: We model the present-day population of classical low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) with neutron star accretors, which have hydrogen-rich donor stars. Their population is compared with that of hydrogen-deficient LMXBs, known as ultracompact X-ray binaries (UCXBs). We model the observable LMXB population and compare it to observations. We model the Galactic Bulge because it contains a well-observed population and it is the target of the Galactic Bulge Survey. Methods: We combine the binary population synthesis code SeBa with detailed LMXB evolutionary tracks to model the size and properties of the present-day LMXB population in the Galactic Bulge. Whether sources are persistent or transient, and what their instantaneous X-ray luminosities are, is predicted using the thermal-viscous disk instability model. Results: We find a population of ~2.1 × 103 LMXBs with neutron star accretors. Of these about 15-40 are expected to be persistent (depending on model assumptions), with luminosities higher than 1035 erg s-1. About 7-20 transient sources are expected to be in outburst at any given time. Within a factor of two these numbers are consistent with the observed population of bright LMXBs in the Bulge. This gives credence to our prediction of the existence of a population of ~1.6 × 103 LMXBs with low donor masses that have gone through the period minimum, and have present-day mass transfer rates below 10-11 M⊙ yr-1. Conclusions: Even though the observed population of hydrogen-rich LMXBs in the Bulge is larger than the observed population of (hydrogen-deficient) UCXBs, the latter have a higher formation rate. While UCXBs may dominate the total LMXB population at the present time, the majority would be very faint or may have become detached and produced millisecond radio pulsars. In that case UCXBs would contribute significantly more to the formation of millisecond radio pulsars than hydrogen-rich LMXBs.

  2. A Unified Model of Low Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balucinska-Church, M.; Church, M.

    2014-07-01

    We present a unified physical model of Low Mass X-ray Binaries explaining the basic Atoll and Z-track types of source. In all LMXB with luminosity above 1-2.10^{37} erg/s, we have a new fundamental result that the temperature of the Comptonizing ADC corona equals that of the neutron star, i.e. there is thermal equilibrium. This equilibrium explains the properties of the basic Banana State of Atoll sources. Below this luminosity, equilibrium breaks down, T_ADC rising towards 100 keV by an unknown heating mechanism, explaining the Island State. Above 5.10^{37} erg/s flaring begins in the GX-Atolls which we show is unstable nuclear burning. Above 1.10^{38} erg/s, LMXB are seen as Z-track sources. Flaring in these and the GX-Atolls occurs when the mass accretion rate to the neutron star falls to the critical value for unstable nuclear burning on the star. Below 2.10^{37} erg/s, a different unstable burning: X-ray bursting, takes over. We show that the Normal Branch of the Z-track consists simply of increasing mass accretion rate, as is the Banana State in Atolls. In the Horizontal Branch, a measured, strongly increasing radiation pressure of the neutron star disrupts the inner disk launching the relativistic jets seen on this branch.

  3. X-ray spectroscopy of low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juett, Adrienne Marie

    2004-10-01

    I present high-resolution X-ray grating spectroscopy of neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) using instruments onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission (XMM-Newton). The first part of this thesis concentrates on results from the subset of LMXBs with orbital periods less than an hour, known as ultracompact binaries. Previous low- resolution X-ray spectra of four systems (4U 0614+091, 2S 0918-549, 4U 1543-624, and 4U 1850-087) all contain a broad residual near 0.7 keV which had been attributed to unresolved line emission. I show that this residual is due to an incorrect model of the intervening photoelectric absorption and can be accounted for by allowing a non-standard Ne/O abundance ratio in the intervening material. I propose that there is neon-rich material local to each binary and that the mass donor is a low-mass, neon-rich degenerate dwarf in an ultracompact binary. Follow-up spectroscopy of 2S 0918-549 and 4U 1543-624 with the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) onboard Chandra and the Reflection Grating Spectrometer onboard XMM confirms the excess neutral neon absorption. Interestingly, the Ne/O ratio of 4U 1543-624 varies by a factor of three between the Chandra and XMM observations, supporting the suggestion that some of the absorption originates local to the binaries. I also present X-ray spectroscopy of another ultracompact binary, the accretion-powered millisecond pulsar XTE J0929-314. No emission or absorption features are found in the high-resolution spectrum of this source, and the neutral absorption edge depths are consistent with the estimated interstellar absorption. The second part of this thesis uses LMXBs as probes of the interstellar medium (ISM). High-resolution X-ray studies of ISM absorption features can provide measurements of the relative abundances and ionization fractions of all the elements from carbon through iron. X-ray studies also probe the ISM on larger scales than is

  4. WISE Detection of Low-Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongxiang

    2014-08-01

    I will report on the results from our search for the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer detection of the Galactic low-mass X-ray binaries. Among 187 catalogued binaries, we find 13 counterparts and two candidate counterparts. For the 13 counterparts, two (4 0614+091 and G 339-4) have already been confirmed by previous studies to have a jet and one (GR 1915+105) to have a candidate circumbinary disk, from which the detected infrared emission arose. Having collected the broad-band optical and near-infrared data in literature and constructed flux density spectra for the other 10 binaries, we identify that three (A0620-00, XTE J1118+480, and GX 1+4) are candidate circumbinary disk systems, four (Cen X-4, 4U 1700+24, 3A 1954+319, and Cyg X-2) had thermal emission from their companion stars, and three (Sco X-1, Her X-1, and Swift J1753.5-0127) are peculiar systems with the origin of their infrared emission rather uncertain. Discussion of the results and WISE counterparts' brightness distribution will be provided, which suggests that more than half of the LMXBs would have a jet, a circumbinary disk, or the both.

  5. High ionisation absorption in low mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponti, G.; Bianchi, S.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; De, K.; Fender, R.; Merloni, A.

    2016-05-01

    The advent of the new generation of X-ray telescopes yielded a significant step forward in our understanding of ionised absorption generated in the accretion discs of X-ray binaries. It has become evident that these relatively weak and narrow absorption features, sporadically present in the X-ray spectra of some systems, are actually the signature of equatorial outflows, which might carry away more matter than that being accreted. Therefore, they play a major role in the accretion phenomenon. These outflows (or ionised atmospheres) are ubiquitous during the softer states but absent during the power-law dominated, hard states, suggesting a strong link with the state of the inner accretion disc, presence of the radio-jet and the properties of the central source. Here, we discuss the current understanding of this field.

  6. Finding X-ray Coronal Cycles in Low Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Maurice; Guenther, Hans Moritz; Auchettl, Katie

    2015-01-01

    We seek to increase the number of stars known to have an X-ray coronal cycle. Four stars (including the Sun) are known to experience periodic long-term coronal flux variability but the statistics are not superb. In this analysis, we analyze four stellar sources that have been observed frequently by Chandra and XMM-Newton over the last ~11 years. These four sources were the brightest among numerous stellar point sources within the Chandra Deep Field South. Solar flares can dramatically increase the flux measured for our stars on short time intervals and, in observations with insufficient time coverage, can be confused for the maximum of the stars' magnetic cycles (if they have one). We have discarded times where solar proton flares are detected in the data. We utilize an APEC model, which represents the coronal plasma, to fit our stellar spectra. As our sources are very faint, we do not subtract the background, but instead we fit the background and source spectra simultaneously. We use the chi-squared statistic to evaluate the confidence of our fits. We present four light curves which suggest that a long-term X-ray flux variability similar to our Sun (the solar X-ray flux can vary by a factor of 10 over ~11 years) is not present in these stellar sources. None of our stars experienced a flux variability exceeding a factor of 3 over an 11 year time scale but one of the four stars in our sample exhibits short term variability over a one year period. However, our stellar sources are too faint to conclusively state that the flux remains constant throughout all epochs.This work is supported by the National Science Foundation REU and Department of Defense AS-SURE programs under NSF Grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  7. Low-mass X-ray Binaries with RXTE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Below are the publications which directly and indirectly evolved from this very successful program: 1) 'Search for millisecond periodicities in type I X-ray bursts of the Rapid Burster'; 2) 'High-Frequency QPOs in the 2000 Outburst of the Galactic Microquasar XTE J1550-564'; 3) 'Chandra and RXTE Spectroscopy of Galactic Microquasar XTE 51550-564 in Outburst'; 4) 'GX 339-4: back to life'; 5) 'Evidence for black hole spin in GX 339-4: XMM-Newton EPIC-PN and RXTE spectroscopy of the very high state'.

  8. STATE TRANSITIONS IN LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Charles K.; Frank, Juhan

    2009-10-10

    We investigate the model of disk/coronal accretion into a black hole. We show that the inner regions of an accretion disk in X-ray binaries can transform from a cool standard disk to an advection-dominated flow through the known properties of Coulomb interaction in a two-temperature plasma, viscous heating, radiative processes, and thermal conduction. A hot, diffuse corona covering the disk is powered by accretion, but it exchanges mass with the underlying cold disk. If the accretion rate in the system is low enough, we show that the corona evaporates the disk away, leaving an advective flow to continue toward the hole. In the soft/hard transition commonly seen in X-ray binaries, we show that this advective flow can recondense back onto the underlying disk if the change in the system's accretion rate is slow enough due to thermal conduction. Unabsorbed spectra are produced to test against observations as well as prediction of the location of truncation radii of the accretion disk.

  9. X-ray and Optical Studies of Low--Mass Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcalá, J. M.

    1994-02-01

    Weak--line T Tauri stars (WTTS) are low--mass pre--main sequence (PMS) stars which lack both the strong emission lines and the infra--red (IR) excesses typical of classical T Tauri stars (CTTS). Most of them have been discovered on the basis of their solar--like X--ray emission. In this work, X--ray data from the ROSAT all-sky survey in the Chamaeleon (Cha) and the Orion star forming regions (SFR's), and from one ROSAT pointed observation in the Cha I dark cloud, were used to determine the number of WTTS, to investigate their spatial distribution, and to study their physical properties and their X--ray emission. The total number of X-ray sources detected in the ROSAT survey is 820 in Orion (~450 square degrees), and 181 in Chamaeleon (~200 square degrees). Fifty four X--ray sources were detected in the ROSAT pointed observation in Cha I. Cross correlation of the X-ray positions with those of catalogued objects in the Simbad database gives about 30% of coincidences in the two SFR's. These counterparts are mainly extragalactic objects, HD, HR or SAO stars, CTTS, and a few WTTS known from previous EINSTEIN observations. For the remaining sources, a programme of spectroscopic observations has been conducted. These observations led to the identification of 85 and 58 new WTTS in the Chamaeleon and Orion SFR's respectively. For the Chamaeleon SFR, the spectroscopic identification of the survey sources is complete, while for the Orion SFR there are about 470 sources still to be investigated. Eighty percent of the sources from the pointed observation in Cha I have been identified. In addition, optical and near IR photometric observations of a sub--sample of the new WTTS were carried out. The spectral energy distributions of these stars are very similar to those of normal stars of the same spectral type. The effective temperature and the stellar luminosity were derived in order to place the sub--sample of WTTS in the H--R diagram. By comparison with the theoretical

  10. A study of low mass x-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catura, Richard C.

    1994-01-01

    The entire effort under this contract during the period through January 1992 was devoted to a study of the cost and schedule required to put an upgraded Aries payload on the ASTRO-SPAS carrier provided by the German space agency, DARA. The ASTRO-SPAS is flown on the Space Shuttle, deployed by the crew for 5 to 7 days of free-flying observations and then recovered and returned to Earth. The spectrograph was to be provided by a collaboration involving the Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory (LPARL), the Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy (CASA) at the U. of Colorado and the Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL) in England. The payload for the ASTRO-SPAS mission included our own spectrograph and an instrument provided by Dr. Joachim Trumper of the Max Planck Institute (MPI) in Garching, Germany. A meeting was held in late July, 1991 with German scientists, DARA representatives and MBB, the ASTRO-SPAS spacecraft contractor. Sufficient information was exchanged to allow us to complete the study and the name LEXSA (Low Energy X-ray Spectrograph on ASTRO-SPAS) was given to our instrument and HERTA (High Energy x-Ray Telescope on ASTR0-SPAS) to the German instrument. The combination was called SPECTRO-SPAS. On October 1, 1991 CASA and LPARL submitted a cost and brief technical proposal to NASA on results of the study. The total cost over 4 fiscal years was 6.16 M dollars including CASA costs. NASA Headquarters was briefed on 3 October on details of the proposal. They found our costs reasonable, but indicated that the NASA FY '92 budget is extremely tight, they could not readily identify where the -S2.3M for LEXSA could be found and it was not clear that FY '93 would improve.

  11. Constraining X-ray-Induced Photoevaporation of Protoplanetary Disks Orbiting Low-Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punzi, Kristina M.; Kastner, Joel H.; Rodriguez, David; Principe, David A.; Vican, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Low-mass, pre-main sequence stars possess intense high-energy radiation fields as a result of their strong stellar magnetic activity. This stellar UV and X-ray radiation may have a profound impact on the lifetimes of protoplanetary disks. We aim to constrain the X-ray-induced photoevaporation rates of protoplanetary disks orbiting low-mass stars by analyzing serendipitous XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations of candidate nearby (D < 100 pc), young (age < 100 Myr) M stars identified in the GALEX Nearby Young-Star Survey (GALNYSS).

  12. Sigma observations of the low mass X-ray binaries of the galactic bulge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldwurm, A.; Denis, M.; Paul, J.; Faisse, S.; Roques, J. P.; Bouchet, L.; Vedrenne, G.; Mandrou, P.; Sunyaev, R.; Churazov, E.

    1995-01-01

    The soft gamma-ray telescope (35-1300 keV) SIGMA aboard the high energy GRANAT space observatory has been monitoring the Galactic Bulge region for more than 2000 h of effective time since March 1990. In the resulting average 35-75 keV image we detected ten sources at a level of greater than 5 standard deviations, 6 of which can be identified with low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB). Among them, one is the 1993 X-ray nova in Ophiuchus (GRS 1726-249), one is an X-ray pulsar (GX 1+4), two are associated with X-ray bursters (GX 354-0 and A 1742-294) and two with bursting X-ray binaries in the globular clusters Terzan 2 and Terzan 1. Their spectral and long term variability behavior as measured by SIGMMA are presented and discussed.

  13. Accretion disc atmospheres and winds in low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Trigo, M.; Boirin, L.

    2016-05-01

    In the last decade, X-ray spectroscopy has enabled a wealth of discoveries of photoionised absorbers in X-ray binaries. Studies of such accretion disc atmospheres and winds are of fundamental importance to understand accretion processes and possible feedback mechanisms to the environment. In this work, we review the current observational state and theoretical understanding of accretion disc atmospheres and winds in low-mass X-ray binaries, focusing on the wind launching mechanisms and on the dependence on accretion state. We conclude with issues that deserve particular attention.

  14. Emission lines from X-ray-heated accretion disks in low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Kallman, Timothy R.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the structure of accretion disks illuminated by X-rays from a central compact object in a binary system. X-rays can photoionize the upper atmosphere of the disk and form an accretion disk corona (ADC) where emission lines can form. We construct a model to calculate the vertical structure and the emission spectrum of the ADC with parameters appropriate to low-mass X-ray binaries. These models are made by nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium calculations of ion and level populations and include a large number of atomic processes for 10 cosmically abundant elements. Transfer of radiation is treated by using the escape probability formalism. The vertical temperature profile of the ADC consists of a Compton-heated region and a mid-T zone where the temperature is approximately 10(exp 6) K. A thermal instability occurs close to the disk photosphere and causes the temperature of the ADC to drop abruptly from 10(exp 6) K to several times 10(exp 4) K. The emission spectrum in the optical, ultraviolet, extreme ultraviolet, and X-ray range is discussed and compared with the observations.

  15. Relativistic Astrophysics in Black Hole and Low-Mass Neutron Star X-ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    During the five-year period, our study of "Relativistic Astrophysics in Black Hole and Low-Mass Neutron Star X-ray Binaries" has been focused on the following aspects: observations, data analysis, Monte-Carlo simulations, numerical calculations, and theoretical modeling. Most of the results of our study have been published in refereed journals and conference presentations.

  16. Outburst from low-mass X-ray binary GRS 1747-312 in Terzan 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahramian, A.; Heinke, C. O.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Kennea, J. A.; Wijnands, R.; Altamirano, D.

    2016-05-01

    GRS 1747-312 is an eclipsing transient low-mass X-ray binary in the core of the globular cluster Terzan 6. This source shows regular outbursts ~ every 6 months and, due to its eclipsing behaviour, has an accurately-constrained orbital period (12.36 hrs, in't Zand et al. 2003, A & A, 406, 233).

  17. Spectroscopy of Low Mass X-Ray Binaries: New Insights into Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DilVrtilek, Saeqa; Mushotsky, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    This project is to observe two low mass X-ray binaries, chosen for their X-ray brightness, low column density, and diversity of accretion behavior. The high spectral resolution of the RGS, the broad energy range and tremendous collecting power of EPIC, and simultaneous optical monitoring with the OM are particularly well-suited to these studies. The second of two objects was observed on September of 2002. Data analysis for both observation has been completed: an investigation of the physical conditions of the emitting gas using emission and recombination line diagnostics to determine temperatures, densities, elemental abundances, and ionization structure. A study of behavior of the emission features as a function of binary orbit shows modulated behavior in one of the systems. A paper on "High-resolution observations of low-mass X-ray binaries" is near completion. The paper includes observations with the Chandra HETG that are not yet completed.

  18. Simultaneous radio and X-ray observations of Galactic Centre low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berendsen, Stephan G. H.; Fender, Robert; Kuulkers, Erik; Heise, J.; van der Klis, M.

    2000-10-01

    We have performed simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of 13 Galactic Centre low-mass X-ray binaries in 1998 April using the Wide Field Cameras on board BeppoSAX and the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the latter simultaneously at 4.8 and 8.64GHz. We detect two Z sources, GX 17+2 and GX 5-1, and the unusual `hybrid' source GX 13+1. Upper limits, which are significantly deeper than previous non-detections, are placed on the radio emission from two more Z sources and seven atoll sources. Hardness-intensity diagrams constructed from the Wide Field Camera data reveal GX 17+2 and GX 5-1 to have been on the lower part of the horizontal branch and/or the upper part of the normal branch at the time of the observations, and the two non-detected Z sources, GX 340+0 and GX 349+2, to have been on the lower part of the normal branch. This is consistent with the previous empirically determined relation between radio and X-ray emission from Z sources, in which radio emission is strongest on the horizontal branch and weakest on the flaring branch. For the first time we have information on the X-ray state of atoll sources, which are clearly radio-quiet relative to the Z sources, during periods of observed radio upper limits. We place limits on the linear polarization from the three detected sources, and use accurate radio astrometry of GX 17+2 to confirm that it is probably not associated with the optical star NP Ser. Additionally we place strong upper limits on the radio emission from the X-ray binary 2S 0921-630, disagreeing with suggestions that it is a Z-source viewed edge-on.

  19. Hydrodynamics of winds from irradiated companion stars in low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavani, Marco; London, Richard

    1993-01-01

    We study the hydrodynamics of evaporative winds driven by X-rays and/or soft gamma-rays irradiating the outer layers of companion stars in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). We consider several irradiating fluxes and spectra for LMXBs with white dwarf and main-sequence companion stars. The thermal structure of the base of the coronal region, the position of the sonic point, and the value of the mass-loss rate are calculated in the case of spherical geometry. We consider photospheric and coronal heating from both X-ray photoionization and Compton scattering of X-rays and soft gamma-rays with energy about 1 MeV possibly irradiating the companion star in LMXBs. Evaporative winds may play a relevant role for the evolution of a special class of radiation-driven LMXBs, and this study is a step toward a quantitative understanding of the mechanism driving LMXB evolution.

  20. Spectroscopy of Low Mass X-Ray Binaries: New Insights into Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrtilek, Saeqa Dil; Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This project is to observe two low mass X-ray binaries, chosen for their X-ray brightness, low column density, and diversity of accretion behavior. The high spectral resolution of the RGS, the broad energy range and tremendous collecting power of EPIC, and simultaneous optical monitoring with the OM are particularly well-suited to these studies. The second of two objects was not observed until September of 2002. Data analysis for the new observation is underway. over the next year we will: investigate the physical conditions of the emitting gas using emission and recombination line diagnostics to determine temperatures, densities, elemental abundances, and ionization structure; study the behavior of emission features as a function of binary orbit; and test and improve models of X-ray line emission developed by us over the past decade. We will gain insight on both the geometry of the accretion flow and on the evolutionary history of LMXBs.

  1. Spectroscopy of Low Mass X-Ray Binaries: New Insights into Accretion. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DilVrtilek, Saeqa; Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This project is to observe two low mass X-ray binaries, chosen for their X-ray brightness, low column density, and diversity of accretion behavior. The high spectral resolution of the RGS, the broad energy range and tremendous collecting power of EPIC, and simultaneous optical monitoring with the OM are particularly well-suited to these studies. observation of one of the two objects has taken place and the data were received in late November. The second object is yet to be observed. Over the next year we will: investigate the physical conditions of the emitting gas using emission and recombination line diagnostics to determine temperatures, densities, elemental abundances, and ionization structure; study the behavior of emission features as a function of binary orbit; and test and improve models of X-ray line emission developed by us over the past decade. We will gain insight on both the geometry of the accretion flow and on the evolutionary history of LMXBs.

  2. IGR J17451-3022: a dipping and eclipsing low mass X-ray binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzo, E.

    2016-06-01

    We report on the available X-ray data collected by INTEGRAL, Swift, and XMM-Newton during the first outburst of the INTEGRAL transient IGR J17451-3022, discovered in 2014 August. The emission of the source during the 9 months-long outburst was dominated by a thermal component (kT˜14;1.2 keV), most likely produced by an accretion disk. The XMM-Newton observation carried out during the outburst revealed the presence of multiple absorption features in the soft X-ray emission that could be associated to the presence of an ionized absorber lying above the accretion disk, as observed in many high-inclination low mass X-ray binaries. The XMM-Newton data also revealed the presence of partial and rectangular X-ray eclipses (lasting about 820 s), together with dips. The latter can be associated with increases in the overall absorption column density in the direction of the source. The detection of two consecutive X-ray eclipses in the XMM-Newton data allowed us to estimate the source orbital period at Porb=22620.5(-1.8,+2.0) s (1σ c.l.).

  3. IGR J17451–3022: a dipping and eclipsing low mass X-ray binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzo, E.

    2016-06-01

    We report on the available X-ray data collected by INTEGRAL, Swift, and XMM-Newton during the first outburst of the INTEGRAL transient IGR J17451-3022, discovered in 2014 August. The emission of the source during the 9 months-long outburst was dominated by a thermal component (kT˜1.2 keV), most likely produced by an accretion disk. The XMM-Newton observation carried out during the outburst revealed the presence of multiple absorption features in the soft X-ray emission that could be associated to the presence of an ionized absorber lying above the accretion disk, as observed in many high-inclination low mass X-ray binaries. The XMM-Newton data also revealed the presence of partial and rectangular X-ray eclipses (lasting about 820 s), together with dips. The latter can be associated with increases in the overall absorption column density in the direction of the source. The detection of two consecutive X-ray eclipses in the XMM-Newton data allowed us to estimate the source orbital period at Porb=22620.5(‑1.8,+2.0) s (1σ c.l.).

  4. Low-mass Active Galactic Nuclei with Rapid X-Ray Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Luis C.; Kim, Minjin

    2016-04-01

    We present a detailed study of the optical spectroscopic properties of 12 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with candidate low-mass black holes (BHs) selected by Kamizasa et al. through rapid X-ray variability. The high-quality, echellette Magellan spectra reveal broad Hα emission in all the sources, allowing us to estimate robust virial BH masses and Eddington ratios for this unique sample. We confirm that the sample contains low-mass BHs accreting at high rates: the median MBH = 1.2 × 106 M⊙ and median Lbol/LEdd = 0.44. The sample follows the MBH–σ* relation, within the considerable scatter typical of pseudobulges, the probable hosts of these low-mass AGNs. Various lines of evidence suggest that ongoing star formation is prevalent in these systems. We propose a new strategy to estimate star formation rates in AGNs hosted by low-mass, low-metallicity galaxies, based on modification of an existing method using the strength of [O ii] λ3727, [O iii] λ5007, and X-rays.

  5. X-ray sources in regions of star formation. 5: The low mass stars of the Upper Scorpius association

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Frederick M.; Vrba, Frederick J.; Mathieu, Robert D.; Brown, Alexander; Myers, Philip C.

    1994-01-01

    We report followup investigations of Einstein x-ray observations of the Upper Scorpius OB association. We identify 28 low mass pre-main sequence stars as counterparts of x-ray sources in the approximately = 7 square degrees of the OB association observed. Based on kinematics and lithium abundances, these stars are low mass members of the OB association. We use optical spectra and optical and near-IR photometry to determine the stellar luminosities, effective temperatures, masses, and ages. We show that the bolometric corrections and effective temperatures of the G and K stars are consistent with those of subgiants. The low mass stars have isochronal ages of 1-2 Myr, depending on the choice of evolutionary models, with very small dispersion (sigma approximately = 1 Myr). This age is significantly younger than the 5-6 Myr found for the more massive B stars. The small dispersion in stellar ages, less than 10% the sound-crossing time of the association, suggests that star formation was triggered. We present two scenarios for star formation in this association. In the two-episode scenario, formation of the low mass stars was triggered by a supernova explosion, and the low mass stars form quickly, with high efficiency. Alternatively, high and low mass star formation was all initiated at the same time, some 5-6 Myr ago, and the apparent systematic age difference is an artifact of how the isochrones are dated. The effect of the supernova is to terminate mass accretion and yield an apparently coeval population. We show that the incompleteness in the x-ray sampling is about 65%, and is strongly dependent on stellar mass. After correction for incompleteness, we estimate there are about 2000 low mass members (stellar mass less than 2 solar mass) of this association. The mass function in this association is indistinguishable from that of the field. The ratio of naked to classical T Tauri stars is much larger than in Tau-Aur, and may be attributable to the local environment. We

  6. UNVEILING A POPULATION OF GALAXIES HARBORING LOW-MASS BLACK HOLES WITH X-RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, M.; Silverman, J. D.; Greene, J. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Luo, B.; Xue, Y. Q.; Capak, P.; Kakazu, Y.; Kartaltepe, J.; Mainieri, V.

    2013-08-20

    We report the discovery of three low-mass black hole (BH) candidates residing in the centers of low-mass galaxies at z < 0.3 in the Chandra Deep Field-South Survey. These BHs are initially identified as candidate active galactic nuclei based on their X-ray emission in deep Chandra observations. Multi-wavelength observations are used to strengthen our claim that such emission is powered by an accreting supermassive BH. While the X-ray luminosities are low at L{sub X} {approx} 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} (and variable in one case), we argue that they are unlikely to be attributed to star formation based on H{alpha} or UV fluxes. Optical spectroscopy from Keck and the VLT allows us to (1) measure accurate redshifts, (2) confirm their low stellar host mass, (3) investigate the source(s) of photo-ionization, and (4) estimate extinction. With stellar masses of M{sub *} < 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} determined from Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging, the host galaxies are among the lowest mass systems known to host actively accreting BHs. We estimate BH masses M{sub BH} {approx} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} based on scaling relations between BH mass and host properties for more luminous systems. In one case, a broad component of the H{alpha} emission-line profile is detected, thus providing a virial mass estimate. BHs in such low-mass galaxies are of considerable interest as the low-redshift analogs to the seeds of the most massive BHs at high redshift which have remained largely elusive to date. Our study highlights the power of deep X-ray surveys to uncover such low-mass systems.

  7. Potential Gamma-Ray Emissions from Low-mass X-Ray Binary Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-Fu; Gu, Wei-Min; Liu, Tong; Xue, Li; Lu, Ju-Fu

    2015-06-01

    By proposing a pure leptonic radiation model, we study the potential gamma-ray emissions from the jets of low-mass X-ray binaries. In this model, the relativistic electrons that are accelerated in the jets are responsible for radiative outputs. Nevertheless, jet dynamics are dominated by magnetic and proton-matter kinetic energies. The model involves all kinds of related radiative processes and considers the evolution of relativistic electrons along the jet by numerically solving the kinetic equation. Numerical results show that the spectral energy distributions can extend up to TeV bands, in which synchrotron radiation and synchrotron self-Compton scattering are dominant components. As an example, we apply the model to the low-mass X-ray binary GX 339-4. The results not only can reproduce the currently available observations from GX 339-4, but also predict detectable radiation at GeV and TeV bands by the Fermi and CTA telescopes. Future observations with Fermi and CTA can be used to test our model, which could be employed to distinguish the origin of X-ray emissions.

  8. ORBITAL PERIOD AND OUTBURST LUMINOSITY OF TRANSIENT LOW MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y. X.; Yu, W.; Li, T. P.; Maccarone, T. J.; Li, X. D.

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate the relationship between the maximal luminosity of X-ray outburst and the orbital period in transient low mass X-ray binaries (or soft X-ray transients) observed by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in the past decade. We find that the maximal luminosity (3-200 keV) in Eddington units generally increases with increasing orbital period, which does not show a luminosity saturation but in general agrees with theoretical prediction. The peak luminosities in ultra-compact binaries might be higher than those with an orbital period of 2-4 hr, but more data are needed to make this claim. We also find that there is no significant difference in the 3-200 keV peak outburst luminosity between neutron star (NS) systems and black hole (BH) systems with orbital periods above 4 hr; however, there might be a significant difference at smaller orbital periods where only NS systems are observed and radiatively inefficient accretion flow is expected to work at low luminosities for BH accreters.

  9. On the formation of galactic black hole low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen; Jia, Kun; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2016-03-01

    Currently, there are 24 black hole (BH) X-ray binary systems that have been dynamically confirmed in the Galaxy. Most of them are low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) comprised of a stellar-mass BH and a low-mass donor star. Although the formation of these systems has been extensively investigated, some crucial issues remain unresolved. The most noticeable one is that, the low-mass companion has difficulties in ejecting the tightly bound envelope of the massive primary during the spiral-in process. While initially intermediate-mass binaries are more likely to survive the common envelope (CE) evolution, the resultant BH LMXBs mismatch the observations. In this paper, we use both stellar evolution and binary population synthesis to study the evolutionary history of BH LMXBs. We test various assumptions and prescriptions for the supernova mechanisms that produce BHs, the binding energy parameter, the CE efficiency and the initial mass distributions of the companion stars. We obtain the birthrate and the distributions of the donor mass, effective temperature and orbital period for the BH LMXBs in each case. By comparing the calculated results with the observations, we put useful constraints on the aforementioned parameters. In particular, we show that it is possible to form BH LMXBs with the standard CE scenario if most BHs are born through failed supernovae.

  10. Rapidly evolving light curves of Low Mass X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhli, P.; Hakala, P. J.; Hjalmarsdotter, L.; Hannikainen, D. C.; Schultz, J.

    2004-07-01

    A few Galactic Low Mass X-Ray Binaries (LMXBs) have shown drastically evolving X-ray and/or optical orbital light curves. In two short-period LMXBs, MS 1603+2600 (= UW CrB, P[orb] = 111 min) and 4U 1916-053 (see e.g. Homer et al. 2001), the variations in the light curve morphology seem to be repeating in a periodic manner. We present first results of a photometric monitoring campaign of MS 1603+2600, showing evidence of a 5-day superorbital period in this yet unclassified source. The observations also unraveled optical flares, reminiscent of type I bursts, suggesting a neutron star primary.

  11. V404 Cyg - an Interacting Black-Hole Low-Mass X-ray Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Ori; Mauerhan, Jon; Graham, Melissa

    2015-07-01

    This DDT proposal is prompted by the June 15, 2015 outburst of V404 Cyg, a black-hole (BH) low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB). This outburst stands out since it is the first black hole system with a measured parallax, lying at a distance of only 2.39+/-0.14 kpc. An extensive and loosely organized multi-wavelength campaign is already underway by the astronomical community. One of the missing pieces of the puzzle is the mid-infrared (IR). Combined with radio, optical, and X-ray data, the mid-IR will help to discriminate discriminate between an accretion disk, jet emission, or circumstellar dust scenarios. Spitzer offers a unique opportunity to observe at these wavelengths. Here we propose 4 very short (5-minutes at 3.6 and 4.5 micron) observations of IRAC hotometry to search for the presence of warm dust and, if present, constrain the heating mechanism.

  12. Optical and X-ray observations of the low-mass X-ray binary EXO 0748-676

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Brian; Corbet, Robin; Augusteijn, Thomas; Callanan, Paul; Smale, Alan P.

    1993-01-01

    Optical and X-ray observations of EXO-676 in late March 1989 are presented. Our optical observations provide some support for the previously observed correlation between the mean optical brightness and light curve morphology. Unexpectedly, the mean X-ray and optical flux levels during this period do not reflect similar system states. The optical counterpart is found to be in an intermediate to low state, while X-ray data imply a bright (high) state. The changed relationship between optical and X-ray fluxes is evidence showing that EXO 0748-676 has possibly evolved. We fail to find correlated variability in simultaneous X-ray and optical observations. The lack of covariability is attributed to the limited simultaneous coverage of the source and/or significant geometric modulation in the optical light curve.

  13. The evolution of cataclysmic and low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, J.

    1984-01-01

    The observational data for the 124 cataclysmic and low-mass X-ray binaries of known orbital period are compiled. It is found that the eruption properties are very well correlated with the orbital periods, in a manner that suggests that the mass transfer is the all-important determinant of evolution and of the eruptive behavior. Transfer rates of 10 to the -11th to 10 to the -7th solar mass/year are found, which are well correlated with orbital period. It is concluded that the mechanism which drives these systems is the magnetic braking of the secondary's rotation by its own stellar wind, coupled with the enforcement of synchronous rotation by tidal friction. This permits CVs to lose sufficient angular momentum to begin mass transfer in a reasonable time and drives the mass transfer at a high rate once it begins. An account of the long-lived phases of CV evolution is given.

  14. Fabrication of large-area and low mass critical-angle x-ray transmission gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilmann, Ralf K.; Bruccoleri, Alex R.; Guan, Dong; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2014-07-01

    Soft x-ray spectroscopy of celestial sources with high resolving power R = E/ΔE and large collecting area addresses important science listed in the Astro2010 Decadal Survey New Worlds New Horizons, such as the growth of the large scale structure of the universe and its interaction with active galactic nuclei, the kinematics of galactic outflows, as well as coronal emission from stars and other topics. Numerous studies have shown that a transmission grating spectrometer based on lightweight critical-angle transmission (CAT) gratings can deliver R = 3000-5000 and large collecting area with high efficiency and minimal resource requirements, providing spectroscopic figures of merit at least an order of magnitude better than grating spectrometers on Chandra and XMM-Newton, as well as future calorimeter-based missions. The recently developed CAT gratings combine the advantages of transmission gratings (low mass, relaxed figure and alignment tolerances) and blazed reflection gratings (high broad band diffraction efficiency, utilization of higher diffraction orders). Their working principle based on blazing through reflection off the smooth, ultra-high aspect ratio grating bar sidewalls has previously been demonstrated on small samples with x rays. For larger gratings (area greater than 1 inch square) we developed a fabrication process for grating membranes with a hierarchy of integrated low-obscuration supports. The fabrication involves a combination of advanced lithography and highly anisotropic dry and wet etching techniques. We report on the latest fabrication results of free-standing, large-area CAT gratings with polished sidewalls and preliminary x-ray tests.

  15. Quiescent thermal emission from neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turlione, A.; Aguilera, D. N.; Pons, J. A.

    2015-05-01

    Context. We monitored the quiescent thermal emission from neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries after active periods of intense activity in X-rays (outbursts). Aims: The theoretical modeling of the thermal relaxation of the neutron star crust may be used to establish constraints on the crust composition and transport properties, depending on the astrophysical scenarios assumed. Methods: We numerically simulated the thermal evolution of the neutron star crust and compared them with inferred surface temperatures for five sources: MXB 1659-29, KS 1731-260, XTE J1701-462, EXO 0748-676 and IGR J17480-2446. Results: We find that the evolution of MXB 1659-29, KS 1731-260 and EXO 0748-676 can be well described within a deep crustal cooling scenario. Conversely, we find that the other two sources can only be explained with models beyond crustal cooling. For the peculiar emission of XTE J1701-462 we propose alternative scenarios such as residual accretion during quiescence, additional heat sources in the outer crust, and/or thermal isolation of the inner crust due to a buried magnetic field. We also explain the very recent reported temperature of IGR J17480-2446 with an additional heat deposition in the outer crust from shallow sources.

  16. Searches for millisecond pulsations in low-mass X-ray binaries, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, B. A.; Van Der Klis, M.; Wood, K. S.; Norris, J. P.; Hertz, P.; Michelson, P. F.; Paradijs, J. Van; Lewin, W. H. G.; Mitsuda, K.; Penninx, W.

    1994-01-01

    Coherent millisecond X-ray pulsations are expected from low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), but remain undetected. Using the single-parameter Quadratic Coherence Recovery Technique (QCRT) to correct for unknown binary orbit motion, we have performed Fourier transform searches for coherent oscillations in all long, continuous segments of data obtained at 1 ms time resolution during Ginga observations of LMXB. We have searched the six known Z sources (GX 5-1, Cyg X-2, Sco X-1, GX 17+2, GX 340+0, and GX 349+2), seven of the 14 known atoll sources (GX 3+1. GX 9+1, GX 9+9, 1728-33. 1820-30, 1636-53 and 1608-52), the 'peculiar' source Cir X-1, and the high-mass binary Cyg X-3. We find no evidence for coherent pulsations in any of these sources, with 99% confidence limits on the pulsed fraction between 0.3% and 5.0% at frequencies below the Nyquist frequency of 512 Hz. A key assumption made in determining upper limits in previous searches is shown to be incorrect. We provide a recipe for correctly setting upper limits and detection thresholds. Finally we discuss and apply two strategies to improve sensitivity by utilizing multiple, independent, continuous segments of data with comparable count rates.

  17. The X-ray luminosity temperature relation of a complete sample of low mass galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, S.; Maughan, B. J.; Giles, P. A.; Vikhlinin, A.; Pacaud, F.; Burenin, R.; Hornstrup, A.

    2016-08-01

    We present Chandra observations of 23 galaxy groups and low-mass galaxy clusters at 0.03 < z < 0.15 with a median temperature of ˜2 KeV. The sample is a statistically complete flux-limited subset of the 400 deg2 survey. We investigated the scaling relation between X-ray luminosity (L) and temperature (T), taking selection biases fully into account. The logarithmic slope of the bolometric L - T relation was found to be 3.29 ± 0.33, consistent with values typically found for samples of more massive clusters. In combination with other recent studies of the L - T relation we show that there is no evidence for the slope, normalisation, or scatter of the L - T relation of galaxy groups being different than that of massive clusters. The exception to this is that in the special case of the most relaxed systems, the slope of the core-excised L - T relation appears to steepen from the self-similar value found for massive clusters to a steeper slope for the lower mass sample studied here. Thanks to our rigorous treatment of selection biases, these measurements provide a robust reference against which to compare predictions of models of the impact of feedback on the X-ray properties of galaxy groups.

  18. Ultraviolet and X-ray Activity and Flaring on Low-Mass Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Kevin; Parke Loyd, R. O.; Brown, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    The spectral and temporal behavior of exoplanet host stars is a critical input to models of the chemistry and evolution of planetary atmospheres. High-energy photons (X-ray to NUV) from these stars regulate the atmospheric temperature profiles and photochemistry on orbiting planets, influencing the production of potential “biomarker” gases. We present results from the MUSCLES Treasury Survey, an ongoing study of time-resolved UV and X-ray spectroscopy of nearby M and K dwarf exoplanet host stars. This program uses contemporaneous Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra (or XMM) observations to characterize the time variability of the energetic radiation field incident on the habitable zones planetary systems at d < 15 pc. We find that all exoplanet host stars observed to date exhibit significant levels of chromospheric and transition region UV emission. M dwarf exoplanet host stars display 30 - 2000% UV emission line amplitude variations on timescales of minutes-to-hours. The relative flare/quiescent UV flux amplitudes on old (age > 1 Gyr) planet-hosting M dwarfs are comparable to active flare stars (e.g., AD Leo), despite their lack of flare activity at visible wavelengths. We also detect similar UV flare behavior on a subset of our K dwarf exoplanet host stars. We conclude that strong flares and stochastic variability are common, even on “optically inactive” M dwarfs hosting planetary systems. These results argue that the traditional assumption of weak UV fields and low flare rates on older low-mass stars needs to be revised.

  19. Dip Spectroscopy of the Low Mass X-Ray Binary XB 1254-690

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smale, Alan P.; Church, M. J.; BalucinskaChurch, M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We observed the low mass X-ray binary XB 1254-690 with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer in 2001 May and December. During the first observation strong dipping on the 3.9-hr orbital period and a high degree of variability were observed, along with "shoulders" approx. 15% deep during extended intervals on each side of the main dips. The first observation also included pronounced flaring activity. The non-dip spectrum obtained using the PCA instrument was well-described by a two-component model consisting of a blackbody with kT = 1.30 +/- 0.10 keV plus a cut-off power law representation of Comptonized emission with power law photon index 1.10 +/- 0.46 and a cut-off energy of 5.9(sup +3.0, sub -1.4) keV. The intensity decrease in the shoulders of dipping is energy-independent, consistent with electron scattering in the outer ionized regions of the absorber. In deep dipping the depth of dipping reached 100%, in the energy band below 5 keV, indicating that all emitting regions were covered by absorber. Intensity-selected dip spectra were well-fit by a model in which the point-like blackbody is rapidly covered, while the extended Comptonized emission is progressively overlapped by the absorber, with the, covering fraction rising to 95% in the deepest portion of the dip. The intensity of this component in the dip spectra could be modeled by a combination of electron scattering and photoelectric absorption. Dipping did not occur during the 2001 December observation, but remarkably, both bursting and flaring were observed contemporaneously.

  20. Coordinated X-Ray, Ultraviolet, Optical, and Radio Observations of the PSR J1023+0038 System in a Low-mass X-Ray Binary State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Archibald, Anne M.; Bassa, Cees; Deller, Adam T.; Halpern, Jules P.; Heald, George; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Janssen, Gemma H.; Lyne, Andrew G.; Moldón, Javier; Paragi, Zsolt; Patruno, Alessandro; Perera, Benetge B. P.; Stappers, Ben W.; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; D'Angelo, Caroline R.; Wijnands, Rudy

    2015-06-01

    The PSR J1023+0038 binary system hosts a neutron star and a low-mass, main-sequence-like star. It switches on year timescales between states as an eclipsing radio millisecond pulsar and a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB). We present a multi-wavelength observational campaign of PSR J1023+0038 in its most recent LMXB state. Two long XMM-Newton observations reveal that the system spends ˜70% of the time in a ≈3 × 1033 erg s-1 X-ray luminosity mode, which, as shown in Archibald et al., exhibits coherent X-ray pulsations. This emission is interspersed with frequent lower flux mode intervals with ≈ 5× {10}32 erg s-1 and sporadic flares reaching up to ≈1034 erg s-1, with neither mode showing significant X-ray pulsations. The switches between the three flux modes occur on timescales of order 10 s. In the UV and optical, we observe occasional intense flares coincident with those observed in X-rays. Our radio timing observations reveal no pulsations at the pulsar period during any of the three X-ray modes, presumably due to complete quenching of the radio emission mechanism by the accretion flow. Radio imaging detects highly variable, flat-spectrum continuum radiation from PSR J1023+0038, consistent with an origin in a weak jet-like outflow. Our concurrent X-ray and radio continuum data sets do not exhibit any correlated behavior. The observational evidence we present bears qualitative resemblance to the behavior predicted by some existing “propeller” and “trapped” disk accretion models although none can account for key aspects of the rich phenomenology of this system.

  1. Formation of Black Hole Low-mass X-Ray Binaries in Hierarchical Triple Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoz, Smadar; Fragos, Tassos; Geller, Aaron; Stephan, Alexander P.; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2016-05-01

    The formation of black hole (BH) low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXB) poses a theoretical challenge, as low-mass companions are not expected to survive the common-envelope scenario with the BH progenitor. Here we propose a formation mechanism that skips the common-envelope scenario and relies on triple-body dynamics. We study the evolution of hierarchical triples following the secular dynamical evolution up to the octupole-level of approximation, including general relativity, tidal effects, and post-main-sequence evolution such as mass loss, changes to stellar radii, and supernovae. During the dynamical evolution of the triple system the “eccentric Kozai-Lidov” mechanism can cause large eccentricity excitations in the LMXB progenitor, resulting in three main BH-LMXB formation channels. Here we define BH-LMXB candidates as systems where the inner BH-companion star crosses its Roche limit. In the “eccentric” channel (∼81% of the LMXBs in our simulations) the donor star crosses its Roche limit during an extreme eccentricity excitation while still on a wide orbit. Second, we find a “giant” LMXB channel (∼11%), where a system undergoes only moderate eccentricity excitations but the donor star fills its Roche-lobe after evolving toward the giant branch. Third, we identify a “classical” channel (∼8%), where tidal forces and magnetic braking shrink and circularize the orbit to short periods, triggering mass-transfer. Finally, for the giant channel we predict an eccentric (∼0.3–0.6) preferably inclined (∼40°, ∼140°) tertiary, typically on a wide enough orbit (∼104 au) to potentially become unbound later in the triple evolution. While this initial study considers only one representative system and neglects BH natal kicks, we expect our scenario to apply across a broad region of parameter space for triple-star systems.

  2. WISE detection of the galactic low-mass X-ray binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuebing; Wang, Zhongxiang

    2014-06-20

    We report on the results from our search for the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) detection of the Galactic low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Among 187 binaries cataloged in Liu et al., we find 13 counterparts and 2 candidate counterparts. For the 13 counterparts, 2 (4U 0614+091 and GX 339–4) have already been confirmed by previous studies to have a jet and 1 (GRS 1915+105) to have a candidate circumbinary disk, from which the detected infrared emission arose. Having collected the broadband optical and near-infrared data in the literature and constructed flux density spectra for the other 10 binaries, we identify that 3 (A0620–00, XTE J1118+480, and GX 1+4) are candidate circumbinary disk systems, 4 (Cen X-4, 4U 1700+24, 3A 1954+319, and Cyg X-2) had thermal emission from their companion stars, and 3 (Sco X-1, Her X-1, and Swift J1753.5–0127) are peculiar systems with the origin of their infrared emission rather uncertain. We discuss the results and WISE counterparts' brightness distribution among the known LMXBs, and suggest that more than half of the LMXBs would have a jet, a circumbinary disk, or both.

  3. Low-mass X-Ray Binaries and Globular Clusters Streamers and Arcs in NGC 4278

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Abrusco, R.; Fabbiano, G.; Brassington, N. J.

    2014-03-01

    We report significant inhomogeneities in the projected two-dimensional spatial distributions of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and globular clusters (GCs) of the intermediate mass elliptical galaxy NGC 4278. In the inner region of NGC 4278, a significant arc-like excess of LMXBs extending south of the center at ~50'' in the western side of the galaxy can be associated with a similar overdensity of the spatial distribution of red GCs from Brassington et al. Using a recent catalog of GCs produced by Usher et al. and covering the whole field of the NGC 4278 galaxy, we have discovered two other significant density structures outside the D 25 isophote to the W and E of the center of NGC 4278, associated with an overdensity and an underdensity, respectively. We discuss the nature of these structures in the context of the similar spatial inhomogeneities discovered in the LMXBs and GCs populations of NGC 4649 and NGC 4261, respectively. These features suggest streamers from disrupted and accreted dwarf companions.

  4. A Dynamical Study of the Low Mass X-ray Binary GX 349+2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachter, S.

    1997-12-01

    We have obtained simultaneous optical photometry and spectroscopy of the low mass X-ray binary (and Z-source) GX 349+2 with the CTIO 0.9 m and 4 m telescopes in July 1997. The spectrum of GX 349+2 only shows strong, narrow Hα emission. The observed radial velocities indicate that our previously reported 22 hour photometric modulation is indeed the orbital period. We find gamma =-250+/-10 km s(-1) and K=65+/-6 km s(-1) for the systemic and semi-amplitude velocities respectively. The photometric light curve and radial velocity curve are offset by 0.25 in phase. Doppler tomography shows the Hα emission centered on the position of the neutron star. The relative phasing implies that the photometric variability is probably caused by the heated face of the companion star while the Hα emission may arise in an accretion disk and traces the motion of the neutron star. It also indicates that the emission region is symmetric around the neutron star. If the Hα emission does originate in the accretion disk, the narrowness of the line suggests a low inclination for the system.

  5. WISE Detection of the Galactic Low-mass X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuebing; Wang, Zhongxiang

    2014-06-01

    We report on the results from our search for the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) detection of the Galactic low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Among 187 binaries cataloged in Liu et al., we find 13 counterparts and 2 candidate counterparts. For the 13 counterparts, 2 (4U 0614+091 and GX 339-4) have already been confirmed by previous studies to have a jet and 1 (GRS 1915+105) to have a candidate circumbinary disk, from which the detected infrared emission arose. Having collected the broadband optical and near-infrared data in the literature and constructed flux density spectra for the other 10 binaries, we identify that 3 (A0620-00, XTE J1118+480, and GX 1+4) are candidate circumbinary disk systems, 4 (Cen X-4, 4U 1700+24, 3A 1954+319, and Cyg X-2) had thermal emission from their companion stars, and 3 (Sco X-1, Her X-1, and Swift J1753.5-0127) are peculiar systems with the origin of their infrared emission rather uncertain. We discuss the results and WISE counterparts' brightness distribution among the known LMXBs, and suggest that more than half of the LMXBs would have a jet, a circumbinary disk, or both.

  6. Collective Properties of Neutron-star X-Ray Binary Populations of Galaxies. II. Pre-low-mass X-Ray Binary Properties, Formation Rates, and Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadkamkar, H.; Ghosh, P.

    2014-04-01

    We continue our exploration of the collective properties of neutron-star X-ray binaries in the stellar fields (i.e., outside globular clusters) of normal galaxies. In Paper I of this series, we considered high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). In this paper (Paper II), we consider low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), whose evolutionary scenario is very different from that of HMXBs. We consider the evolution of primordial binaries up to the stage where the neutron star just formed in the supernova explosion of the primary is in a binary with its low-mass, unevolved companion, and this binary has circularized tidally, producing what we call a pre-low-mass X-ray binary (pre-LMXB). We study the constraints on the formation of such pre-LMXBs in detail (since these are low-probability events), and calculate their collective properties and formation rates. To this end, we first consider the changes in the binary parameters in the various steps involved, viz., the common-envelope phase, the supernova, and the tidal evolution. This naturally leads to a clarification of the constraints. We then describe our calculation of the evolution of the distributions of primordial binary parameters into those of pre-LMXB parameters, following the standard evolutionary scenario for individual binaries. We display the latter as both bivariate and monovariate distributions, discuss their essential properties, and indicate the influences of some essential factors on these. Finally, we calculate the formation rate of these pre-LMXBs. The results of this paper will be used in a subsequent one to compute the expected X-ray luminosity function of LMXBs.

  7. The Discovery of a Second Luminous Low Mass X-Ray Binary System in the Globular Cluster M15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.; Angelini, Lorella

    2001-01-01

    Using the Chandra X-ray Observatory we have discovered a second bright X-ray source in the globular cluster M15 that is 2.7" to the west of AC211, the previously known low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) in this system. Prior to the 0.5" imaging capability of Chandra this second source could not have been resolved from AC211. The luminosity and spectrum of this new source, which we call M15-X2, are consistent with it also being a LMXB system. This is the first time that two LMXBs have been seen to be simultaneously active in a globular cluster. The new source, M15-X2, is coincident with a 18th U magnitude very blue star. The discovery of a second LMXB in M15 clears up a long standing puzzle where the X-ray and optical properties of AC211 appear consistent with the central source being hidden behind an accretion disk corona, and yet also showed a luminous X-ray burst suggesting the neutron star is directly visible. This discovery suggests instead that the X-ray burst did not come from AC211, but rather from the newly discovered X-ray source. We discuss the implications of this discovery for X-ray observations of globular clusters in nearby galaxies.

  8. Low-mass X-ray binary MAXI J1421-613 observed by MAXI GSC and Swift XRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serino, Motoko; Shidatsu, Megumi; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Matsuoka, Masaru; Negoro, Hitoshi; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Kennea, Jamie A.; Fukushima, Kosuke; Nagayama, Takahiro

    2015-04-01

    Monitor of All sky X-ray Image (MAXI) discovered a new outburst of an X-ray transient source named MAXI J1421-613. Because of the detection of three X-ray bursts from the source, it was identified as a neutron star low-mass X-ray binary. The results of data analyses of the MAXI GSC (Gas Slit Camera) and the Swift XRT (X-Ray Telescope) follow-up observations suggest that the spectral hardness remained unchanged during the first two weeks of the outburst. All the XRT spectra in the 0.5-10 keV band can be well explained by thermal Comptonization of multi-color disk blackbody emission. The photon index of the Comptonized component is ≈ 2, which is typical of low-mass X-ray binaries in the low/hard state. Since X-ray bursts have a maximum peak luminosity, it is possible to estimate the (maximum) distance from its observed peak flux. The peak flux of the second X-ray burst, which was observed by the GSC, is about 5 photons cm-2 s-1. By assuming a blackbody spectrum of 2.5 keV, the maximum distance to the source is estimated as 7 kpc. The position of this source is contained by the large error regions of two bright X-ray sources detected with Orbiting Solar Observatory-7 (OSO-7) in the 1970s. Besides this, no past activities at the XRT position are reported in the literature. If MAXI J1421-613 is the same source as (one of) these, the outburst observed with MAXI may have occurred after a quiescence of 30-40 years.

  9. Results of ongoing Swift/XRT monitoring of the low mass X-ray binary IGR J17091-3624

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballhausen, Ralf; Grinberg, Victoria; Wilms, Joern; Fuerst, Felix; Eikmann, Wiebke; Bozzo, Enrico; Cadolle Bel, Marion; Egron, Elise; Favre, Thierry; Ferrigno, Carlo; Krauss, Felicia; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Nowak, Michael A.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Rodriguez, Jerome; Bachetti, Matteo

    2016-03-01

    The low mass X-ray binary IGR J17091-3624 has been reported to be in outburst by Miller et al. (ATel #8742) on 2016 February 26. Subsequent observations by Swift/XRT and INTEGRAL revealed the transient to be in the hard/low state (Grinberg et al., ATel #8761).

  10. Probing X-ray burst - accretion disk interaction in low mass X-ray binaries through kilohertz quasiperiodic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peille, P.; Olive, J.-F.; Barret, D.

    2014-07-01

    The intense radiation flux of Type I X-ray bursts is expected to interact with the accretion flow around neutron stars. High frequency quasiperiodic oscillations (kHz QPOs), observed at frequencies matching orbital frequencies at tens of gravitational radii, offer a unique probe of the innermost disk regions. In this paper, we follow the lower kHz QPOs, in response to Type I X-ray bursts, in two prototypical QPO sources, namely 4U 1636-536 and 4U 1608-522, as observed by the Proportional Counter Array of the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We have selected a sample of 15 bursts for which the kHz QPO frequency can be tracked on timescales commensurable with the burst durations (tens of seconds). We find evidence that the QPOs are affected for over ~200 s during one exceptionally long burst and ~100 s during two others (although at a less significant level), while the burst emission has already decayed to a level that would enable the pre-burst QPO to be detected. On the other hand, for most of our burst-kHz QPO sample, we show that the QPO is detected as soon as the statistics allow and in the best cases, we are able to set an upper limit of ~20 s on the recovery time of the QPO. This diversity of behavior cannot be related to differences in burst peak luminosity. We discuss these results in the framework of recent findings that accretion onto the neutron star may be enhanced during Type I X-ray bursts. The subsequent disk depletion could explain the disappearance of the QPO for ~100 s, as possibly observed in two events. However, alternative scenarios would have to be invoked for explaining the short recovery timescales inferred from most bursts. Heating of the innermost disk regions would be a possibility, although we cannot exclude that the burst does not affect the QPO emission at all. Clearly the combination of fast timing and spectral information of Type I X-ray bursts holds great potential in the study of the dynamics of the inner accretion flow around neutron

  11. ECLIPSE TIMINGS OF THE TRANSIENT LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY EXO 0748-676. IV. THE ROSSI X-RAY TIMING EXPLORER ECLIPSES

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, Michael T.; Ray, Paul S.; Wood, Kent S.; Hertz, Paul L. E-mail: Paul.Ray@nrl.navy.mil E-mail: Paul.Hertz@nasa.gov

    2009-07-01

    We report our complete database of X-ray eclipse timings of the low-mass X-ray binary EXO 0748-676 observed by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) satellite. As of this writing we have accumulated 443 full X-ray eclipses, 392 of which have been observed with the Proportional Counter Array on RXTE. These include both observations where an eclipse was specifically targeted and those eclipses found in the RXTE data archive. Eclipse cycle count has been maintained since the discovery of the EXO 0748-676 system in 1985 February. We describe our observing and analysis techniques for each eclipse and describe improvements we have made since the last compilation by Wolff et al. The principal result of this paper is the database containing the timing results from a seven-parameter fit to the X-ray light curve for each observed eclipse along with the associated errors in the fitted parameters. Based on the standard O - C analysis, EXO 0748-676 has undergone four distinct orbital period epochs since its discovery. In addition, EXO 0748-676 shows small-scale events in the O - C curve that are likely due to short-lived changes in the secondary star.

  12. Formation and Evolution of Galactic Intermediate/Low-Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yong; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the formation and evolutionary sequences of Galactic intermediate- and low-mass X-ray binaries (I/LMXBs) by combining binary population synthesis (BPS) and detailed stellar evolutionary calculations. Using an updated BPS code we compute the evolution of massive binaries that leads to the formation of incipient I/LMXBs and present their distribution in the initial donor mass versus initial orbital period diagram. We then follow the evolution of the I/LMXBs until the formation of binary millisecond pulsars (BMSPs). We find that the birthrate of the I/LMXB population is in the range of 9 × 10-6-3.4 × 10-5 yr-1, compatible with that of BMSPs that are thought to descend from I/LMXBs. We show that during the evolution of I/LMXBs they are likely to be observed as relatively compact binaries with orbital periods ≲1 day and donor masses ≲0.3M⊙. The resultant BMSPs have orbital periods ranging from less than 1 day to a few hundred days. These features are consistent with observations of LMXBs and BMSPs. We also confirm the discrepancies between theoretical predictions and observations mentioned in the literature, that is, the theoretical average mass transfer rates (˜10-10 M⊙ yr-1) of LMXBs are considerably lower than observed, and the number of BMSPs with orbital periods ˜0.1-10 days is severely underestimated. These discrepancies imply that something is missing in the modeling of LMXBs, which is likely to be related to the mechanisms of the orbital angular momentum loss.

  13. The distribution of kHz QPO frequencies in bright low mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloni, T.; Méndez, M.; Homan, J.

    2005-07-01

    We analyzed all published frequencies, ν1 and ν2, of the twin kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in bright neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries. The two frequencies are well correlated but, contrary to recent suggestions, the frequency-frequency correlation is significantly different from a ν2 = (3/2) ν1 relation. To check whether, although not following the the 3/2 relation, the QPO frequencies cluster around a region where ν2/ν1 ≈ 3/2, we re-analyzed the Sco X-1 data that were used to report that ratio and show that, because the distribution of ratios of linearly correlated measurements is intrinsically biased, although the significance of the clustering around ν2/ν1 ≈ 3/2 previously reported in the case of Sco X-1 is formally correct, it does not provide any useful information about a possible underlying resonance mechanism in this source. Using the same data, we then show that the (unbiased) distribution of QPO frequencies is consistent with a uniform distribution at a 2.4σ level. To investigate this further, we analyzed a larger data set of Sco X-1 and four other sources, 4U 1608-52, 4U 1636-53, 4U 1728-34 and 4U 1820-30. We find that for all five sources the distribution of the kHz QPO frequencies is not uniform and has multiple peaks, which have no analogy in the distribution of points in the spectral color-color diagrams of these sources. Finally, we demonstrate that a simple random walk of the QPO frequencies can reproduce qualitatively the observed distributions in frequency and frequency ratio. This result weakens the support for resonance models of kHz QPOs in neutron stars.

  14. THE ORIGIN OF BLACK HOLE SPIN IN GALACTIC LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Fragos, T.; McClintock, J. E.

    2015-02-10

    Galactic field black hole (BH) low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) are believed to form in situ via the evolution of isolated binaries. In the standard formation channel, these systems survived a common envelope phase, after which the remaining helium core of the primary star and the subsequently formed BH are not expected to be highly spinning. However, the measured spins of BHs in LMXBs cover the whole range of spin parameters. We propose here that the BH spin in LMXBs is acquired through accretion onto the BH after its formation. In order to test this hypothesis, we calculated extensive grids of detailed binary mass-transfer sequences. For each sequence, we examined whether, at any point in time, the calculated binary properties are in agreement with their observationally inferred counterparts of 16 Galactic LMXBs. The ''successful'' sequences give estimates of the mass that the BH has accreted since the onset of Roche-Lobe overflow. We find that in all Galactic LMXBs with measured BH spin, the origin of the spin can be accounted for by the accreted matter, and we make predictions about the maximum BH spin in LMXBs where no measurement is yet available. Furthermore, we derive limits on the maximum spin that any BH can have depending on current properties of the binary it resides in. Finally we discuss the implication that our findings have on the BH birth-mass distribution, which is shifted by ∼1.5 M {sub ☉} toward lower masses, compared to the currently observed one.

  15. Neutron star masses and radii from quiescent low-mass x-ray binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Lattimer, James M.; Steiner, Andrew W. E-mail: steiner3@uw.edu

    2014-04-01

    We perform a systematic analysis of neutron star radius constraints from five quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries and examine how they depend on measurements of their distances and amounts of intervening absorbing material, as well as their assumed atmospheric compositions. We construct and calibrate to published results a semi-analytic model of the neutron star atmosphere which approximates these effects for the predicted masses and radii. Starting from mass and radius probability distributions established from hydrogen-atmosphere spectral fits of quiescent sources, we apply this model to compute alternate sets of probability distributions. We perform Bayesian analyses to estimate neutron star mass-radius curves and equation of state (EOS) parameters that best-fit each set of distributions, assuming the existence of a known low-density neutron star crustal EOS, a simple model for the high-density EOS, causality, and the observation that the neutron star maximum mass exceeds 2 M {sub ☉}. We compute the posterior probabilities for each set of distance measurements and assumptions about absorption and composition. We find that, within the context of our assumptions and our parameterized EOS models, some absorption models are disfavored. We find that neutron stars composed of hadrons are favored relative to those with exotic matter with strong phase transitions. In addition, models in which all five stars have hydrogen atmospheres are found to be weakly disfavored. Our most likely models predict neutron star radii that are consistent with current experimental results concerning the nature of the nucleon-nucleon interaction near the nuclear saturation density.

  16. The nature of the Cygnus X-2 like Low Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibiec, Andrzej; Balucinska-Church, Monika; Church, Michael

    We propose a physical model of the Cygnus X-2 like Z-track sources: GX 340+0, GX 5-1 and Cygnus X-2 based on the results of applying a particular emission model for low mass X-ray binaries to high quality Rossi-XTE data on the sources. In this emission model the Comptonizing Accretion Disk Corona is very extended, and the evidence for this is now very secure. In our physical model, the Normal Branch is dominated by an increasing mass accretion rate between the soft and hard apex leading to a much increased neutron star temperature resulting in high radiation pressure of the neutron star. The radiation pressure continues to increase on the Horizontal Branch becoming several times super-Eddington. We propose that this disrupts the inner accretion disk and that part of the accretion flow is diverted vertically forming jets which are detected by their radio emission on this part of the Z-track. We thus propose that high radiation pressure is the main factor responsible for the launching of jets. On the Flaring Branch there is a large increase in the neutron star blackbody luminosity at constant mass accretion rate showing that there is an additional energy source on the neutron star. We find good agreement between the mass accretion rate per unit emitting area of the neutron star at the onset of flaring and the theoretical critical value at which burning becomes unstable and propose that flaring in the Cygnus X-2 like sources consists of unstable nuclear burning. Correlation of kilohertz QPO frequencies in all three sources with spectral fitting results leads to the proposal that the upper kHz QPO always takes place at the inner accretion disk edge, the radius of which increases due to disruption of the disk by the high radiation pressure.

  17. X ray and gamma ray emission from classical nova outbursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truran, James W.; Starrfield, Sumner; Sparks, Warren M.

    1992-01-01

    The outbursts of classical novae are now recognized to be consequences of thermonuclear runaways proceeding in accreted hydrogen-rich shells on white dwarfs in close binary systems. For the conditions that are known to exist in these environments, it is expected that soft x-rays can be emitted, and indeed x-rays were detected from a number of novae. The circumstances for which we expect novae to produce significant x-ray fluxes and provide estimates of the luminosities and effective temperatures are described. It is also known that at the high temperatures that are known to be achieved in this explosive hydrogen-burning environment, significant production of both Na-22 and Al-26 will occur. In this context, we identify the conditions for which gamma-ray emission may be expected to result from nova outbursts.

  18. The X-Ray Luminosity Functions of Field Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries in Early-Type Galaxies: Evidence for a Stellar Age Dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehmer, B. D.; Berkeley, M.; Zezas, A.; Alexander, D. M.; Basu-Zych, A.; Bauer, F. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Fragos, T.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Kalogera, V.; Ptak, A.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Tzanavaris, P.; Yukita, M.

    2014-01-01

    We present direct constraints on how the formation of low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) populations in galactic fields depends on stellar age. In this pilot study, we utilize Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data to detect and characterize the X-ray point source populations of three nearby early-type galaxies: NGC 3115, 3379, and 3384. The luminosity-weighted stellar ages of our sample span approximately equal to 3-10 Gyr. X-ray binary population synthesis models predict that the field LMXBs associated with younger stellar populations should be more numerous and luminous per unit stellar mass than older populations due to the evolution of LMXB donor star masses. Crucially, the combination of deep Chandra and HST observations allows us to test directly this prediction by identifying and removing counterparts to X-ray point sources that are unrelated to the field LMXB populations, including LMXBs that are formed dynamically in globular clusters, Galactic stars, and background AGN/galaxies. We find that the "young" early-type galaxy NGC 3384 (approximately equals 2-5 Gyr) has an excess of luminous field LMXBs (L(sub x) approximately greater than (5-10) × 10(exp 37) erg s(exp -1)) per unit K-band luminosity (L(sub K); a proxy for stellar mass) than the "old" early-type galaxies NGC 3115 and 3379 (approximately equals 8-10 Gyr), which results in a factor of 2-3 excess of L(sub X)/L(sub K) for NGC 3384. This result is consistent with the X-ray binary population synthesis model predictions; however, our small galaxy sample size does not allow us to draw definitive conclusions on the evolution field LMXBs in general. We discuss how future surveys of larger galaxy samples that combine deep Chandra and HST data could provide a powerful new benchmark for calibrating X-ray binary population synthesis models.

  19. The X-ray luminosity functions of field low-mass X-ray binaries in early-type galaxies: Evidence for a stellar age dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmer, B. D.; Tzanavaris, P.; Yukita, M.; Berkeley, M.; Basu-Zych, A.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Ptak, A.; Zezas, A.; Alexander, D. M.; Bauer, F. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Fragos, T.; Kalogera, V.; Sivakoff, G. R.

    2014-07-01

    We present direct constraints on how the formation of low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) populations in galactic fields depends on stellar age. In this pilot study, we utilize Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data to detect and characterize the X-ray point source populations of three nearby early-type galaxies: NGC 3115, 3379, and 3384. The luminosity-weighted stellar ages of our sample span ≈3-10 Gyr. X-ray binary population synthesis models predict that the field LMXBs associated with younger stellar populations should be more numerous and luminous per unit stellar mass than older populations due to the evolution of LMXB donor star masses. Crucially, the combination of deep Chandra and HST observations allows us to test directly this prediction by identifying and removing counterparts to X-ray point sources that are unrelated to the field LMXB populations, including LMXBs that are formed dynamically in globular clusters, Galactic stars, and background active galactic nuclei/galaxies. We find that the 'young' early-type galaxy NGC 3384 (≈2-5 Gyr) has an excess of luminous field LMXBs (L {sub X} ≳ (5-10) × 10{sup 37} erg s{sup –1}) per unit K-band luminosity (L{sub K} ; a proxy for stellar mass) than the 'old' early-type galaxies NGC 3115 and 3379 (≈8-10 Gyr), which results in a factor of ≈2-3 excess of L {sub X}/L{sub K} for NGC 3384. This result is consistent with the X-ray binary population synthesis model predictions; however, our small galaxy sample size does not allow us to draw definitive conclusions on the evolution field LMXBs in general. We discuss how future surveys of larger galaxy samples that combine deep Chandra and HST data could provide a powerful new benchmark for calibrating X-ray binary population synthesis models.

  20. Combining Fits of The Optical Photometry and X-ray Spectra of the Low Mass X-ray Binary V1408 Aquilae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Sebastian; Mason, Paul A.; Robinson, Edward L.

    2015-01-01

    V1408 Aquilae is a binary system with a black hole primary accreting matter from a low mass secondary. We observed the system at the McDonald Observatory and collected 126 hours of high speed optical photometry on the source. We modeled the optical light curve using the XRbinary light curve synthesis software. The best fits to the optical light curve seem to suggest that the primary is a low mass black hole, however we cannot exclude some high mass solutions. Our models slightly favor a 3 solar mass primary at an inclination of about 13 degrees. In order to further constrain these parameters, and verify their validity we compared the fits of the optical light curve to fits to the X-ray spectra of the source. Using data from the Chandra Transmission Grating Catalog and Archive and the ISIS software analysis package we modeled the spectra of the source with a multi-temperature blackbody for a relativistic accretion disk around a spinning black hole and an additional photon power law component. The fits to the optical lightcurve and X-ray spectra are in agreement, from this we conclude that the case for V1408 Aql to be at a low inclination and harbor a low mass black hole is plausible.

  1. Suzaku spectra of the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1608-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yajuan; Zhang, Haotong; zhang, Yanxia

    2015-08-01

    We present the spectral analysis of the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1608-52 using data from four Suzaku observations in 2010 March. 4U 1608-52 is a transient atoll source, and the analyzed observations contain the “island” and “banana” states, corresponding transitional, and soft states. The spectra are fitted with the hybrid model for the soft states, which consists of two thermal components (a multicolor accretion disk and a single-temperature blackbody) plus a broken power law. The fitting results show that the continuum spectra evolve during the different states. Fe emission line is often detected in low-mass X-ray binary, however, no obviously Fe line is detected in the four observations of 4U 1608-52.

  2. Extracting multipole moments of neutron stars from quasi-periodic oscillations in low mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boshkayev, Kuantay; Rueda, Jorge; Muccino, Marco

    2015-06-01

    We consider the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations of low-mass X-ray binaries within the Hartle-Thorne spacetime. We show that the interpretation of the epicyclic frequencies of this spacetime with the observed kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations, within the Relativistic Precession Model, allows us to extract the total mass M, angular momentum J, and quadrupole moment Q of the compact object in a low-mass X-ray binary. We exemplify this fact by analyzing the data of the Z-source GX 5-1. We show that the extracted multipole structure of the compact component of this source deviates from the one expected from a Kerr black hole and instead it points to a neutron star explanation.

  3. How young are the low-mass X-ray binaries? Conclusions from a flux-limited sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, T.; Podsiadlowski, Ph.

    1993-06-01

    Low-mass X-ray binaries fall into two classes on the basis of their X-ray properties. Using a flux-limited sample from the Ariel V Sky Survey, we show that the class sometimes referred to as the X-ray bursters is associated with the Galactic disk, and probably has an age of only 10 exp 7 to 10 exp 8 yr, much younger than was previously thought. The short lifetime of these 'disk sources' explains why there are so many millisecond pulsars, and how a system such as Her X-1 can have a relatively massive secondary. Conversely, the 'bright blue sources' seem to be associated with a highly flattened, old, metal-rich inner bulge population.

  4. Variable Doppler shifts of the thermal wind absorption lines in low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madej, O. K.; Jonker, P. G.; Díaz Trigo, M.; Miškovičová, I.

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we address the general applicability of the method pioneered by Zhang, Liao & Yao in which the motion of the compact object can be tracked using wind X-ray absorption lines. We present the velocity measurements of the thermal wind lines observed in the X-ray spectrum of a few low-mass X-ray binaries: GX 13+1, H 1743-322, GRO J1655-40 and GRS 1915+105. We find that the variability in the velocity of the wind lines in about all of the sources is larger than conceivable radial velocity variations of the compact object. GX 13+1 provides a potential exception, although it would require the red giant star to be massive with a mass of ≈5-6 M⊙. We conclude that the variability of the source luminosity occurring on a time-scale of days/months can affect the outflow properties making it difficult to track the orbital motion of the compact object using current observations. Given the intrinsic variability of the outflows we suggest that low-mass X-ray binaries showing stable coronae instead of an outflow (e.g. 4U 1254-69, MXB 1659-29, 4U 1624-49) could be more suitable targets for tracking the orbital motion of the compact object.

  5. The tormented quiescence of the low mass X-ray binaries Cen X-4 and V404 Cyg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, F.; Cackett, E.

    2014-07-01

    The majority of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) spend the bulk of their time in the quiescent state, where their X-ray emission is a tiny fraction of the Eddington luminosity. However, the physical mechanisms involved during quiescence are still debated. So far, a unifying scenario that can systematically match the spectral energy distribution from optical up to the X-ray emission of both NS and BH quiescent LMXBs, is still missing. Moreover, an increasing number of LMXBs display variability in quiescence, the origin of which is still unclear. Residual accretion at very low Eddington luminosity rates could play an important role, however, there has lacked clear observational constraints on such processes. With the main goal of unveiling the nature of the quiescent variability in LMXBs we planned a unique study of the two best targets: the NS Cen X-4 and the BH V404 Cyg. We conducted a multi-wavelength (optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray) long-term monitoring (months) of the two sources on a daily basis. This allowed us for the very first time to accurately characterize their variability properties, find strong evidence of UV/X-ray correlation in the emission from Cen X-4, and show that both sources are very likely accreting also in quiescence.

  6. The Discovery of a Second Luminous Low-Mass X-Ray Binary in the Globular Cluster M15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.; Angelini, Lorella

    2001-01-01

    We report an observation by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory of 4U 2127+119, the X-ray source identified with the globular cluster M15. The Chandra observation reveals that 4U 2127+119 is in fact two bright sources, separated by 2.7 arcsec. One source is associated with AC 211, the previously identified optical counterpart to 4U 2127+119, a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB). The second source, M15 X-2, is coincident with a 19th U magnitude blue star that is 3.3 arcsec from the cluster core. The Chandra count rate of M15 X-2 is 2.5 times higher than that of AC 211. Prior to the 0.5 arcsec imaging capability of Chandra, the presence of two so closely separated bright sources would not have been resolved. The optical counterpart, X-ray luminosity, and spectrum of M15 X-2 are consistent with it also being an LMXB system. This is the first time that two LMXBs have been seen to be simultaneously active in a globular cluster. The discovery of a second active LMXB in M15 solves a long-standing puzzle where the properties of AC 211 appear consistent with it being dominated by an extended accretion disk corona, and yet 4U 2127+119 also shows luminous X-ray bursts requiring that the neutron star be directly visible. The resolution of 4U 2127+119 into two sources suggests that the X-ray bursts did not come from AC 211 but rather from M15 X-2. We discuss the implications of this discovery for understanding the origin and evolution of LMXBs in globular clusters as well as X-ray observations of globular clusters in nearby galaxies.

  7. The Discovery of a Second Luminous Low Mass X-ray Binary in the Globular Cluster M15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.; Angelini, Lorella

    2001-01-01

    We report an observation by the Chandra X-ray Observatory of 4U2127+119, the X-ray source identified with the globular cluster M15. The Chandra observation reveals that 4U2127+119 is in fact two bright sources, separated by 2.7". One source is associated with AC21 1, the previously identified optical counterpart to 4U2127+119, a low mass X-ray binary (LMXB). The second source, M15-X2, is coincident with a 19th U magnitude blue star that is 3.3" from the cluster core. The Chandra count rate of M15-X2 is 2.5 times higher than that of AC211. Prior to the 0.5" imaging capability of Chandra the presence of two so closely separated bright sources would not have been resolved, The optical counterpart, X-ray luminosity and spectrum of M15-X2 are consistent with it also being an LMXB system. This is the first time that two LMXBS have been seen to be simultaneously active in a globular cluster. The discovery of a second active LMXB in M15 solves a long standing puzzle where the properties of AC211 appear consistent with it being dominated by an extended accretion disk corona, and yet 4U2127+119 also shows luminous X-ray bursts requiring that the neutron star be directly visible. The resolution of 4U2127+119 into two sources suggests that the X-ray bursts did not come from AC211, but rather from M15X2. We discuss the implications of this discovery for understanding the origin and evolution of LMXBs in GCs as well as X-ray observations of globular clusters in nearby galaxies.

  8. RXTE Observations of the Neutron Star Low-Mass X-Ray Binary GX 17+2: Correlated X-Ray Spectral and Timing Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homan, Jeroen; van der Klis, Michiel; Jonker, Peter G.; Wijnands, Rudy; Kuulkers, Erik; Méndez, Mariano; Lewin, Walter H. G.

    2002-04-01

    We have analyzed ~600 ks of Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer data of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary and Z source GX 17+2. A study was performed of the properties of the noise components and quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) as a function of the broadband spectral properties, with the main goal to study the relation between the frequencies of the horizontal branch (HBO) and upper kHz QPOs. It was found that when the upper kHz QPO frequency is below 1030 Hz these frequencies correlate, whereas above 1030 Hz they anticorrelate. GX 17+2 is the first source in which this is observed. We also found that the frequency difference of the high-frequency QPOs was not constant and that the quality factors (Q-values) of the HBO, its second harmonic, and the kHz QPOs are similar and vary almost hand in hand by a factor of more than 3. Observations of the normal branch oscillations during two type I X-ray bursts showed that their absolute amplitude decreased as the flux from the neutron star became stronger. We discuss these and other findings in terms of models that have been proposed for these phenomena. We also compare the behavior of GX 17+2 and other Z sources with that of black hole sources and consider the possibility that the mass accretion rate might not be the driving force behind all spectral and variability changes.

  9. Spectral and Temporal Behavior of Low Mass X-ray Binaries Observed by the Einstein SSS and MPC, and the Broad Band X-ray Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, D. J.; Swank, J. H.

    1992-12-01

    An extensive survey of 50 low mass X-ray binaries was carried out using the HEAO-2 Einstein Solid State Spectrometer data (0.5-4.5 keV) with the Monitor Proportional Counter data (1.2-20.0 keV) and the Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (BBXRT) (0.5-12 keV). Spectra were selected on the basis of intensity and fit with a set of simple and complex spectral models. For all the subclasses, including Eddington-limited bulge sources, bursters, dippers, the soft spectrum black hole candidates, and a few transients in decline, the spectra could be fit acceptably with combinations of thermal bremsstrahlung and blackbody spectra or a Comptonized spectrum and a blackbody. The results rule out optically thick disk models for the bright Z sources and power law models for bursters. There is a progression of spectra as a function of X-ray luminosity for the bursters, Atoll and Z sources. Interpretation is discussed in terms of separate emission regions, one due to radial accretion onto a neutron star and the optically thick component that appears for higher luminosity due to a boundary layer or to high optical depth to scattering in the flow. A lower temperature blackbody required in some cases could be an expected contribution from the accretion disk. The soft spectrum sources are dominated by blackbody spectra, but for two, low effective area is a problem for the black hole interpretation. The strongest of previously reported low energy X-ray lines due to OVIII or Fe L transitions are confirmed. Similar line emission is seen for several other sources, in particular X0614+091. The photoionized gas in the inner part of an accretion disk corona can give Fe K lines from Fe XXV. BBXRT obtained upper limits for X0614+091 and M15 which are consistent with the coronal model.

  10. X-Ray Point Sources in the Sombrero Galaxy: Very Soft Sources, the Globular Cluster/Low-Mass X-Ray Binary Connection, and an Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, R.; Kong, A. K. H.; VanDalfsen, M. L.; Harris, W. E.; Murray, S. S.; Delain, K. M.

    2003-12-01

    We report on the population of point sources discovered during an 18.5 ks Chandra ACIS-S observation of the Sombrero galaxy. We present the luminosity function and the spectra of the six brightest sources, consider correlations with globular clusters (GCs) and with planetary nebulae, and study the galaxy's population of very soft sources. We detected 122 sources. Twenty-two sources are identified as very soft; of these, five appear to be classical luminous supersoft X-ray sources (SSSs), while 17 may belong to the slightly harder class referred to as quasi-soft (QSSs). There is an overdensity of very soft sources within 2 kpc of the nucleus, which is itself the brightest X-ray source. Very soft sources are also found in the disk and halo, with one QSS in a globular cluster (GC). This source is somewhat harder than most SSSs; the energy distribution of its photons is consistent with what is expected from an accreting intermediate-mass black hole. Several sources in the Sombrero's halo are good candidates for SSS models in which the accretor is a nuclear-burning white dwarf. In total, 32 X-ray sources are associated with GCs. The majority of sources with luminosity greater than 1038 ergs s-1 are in GCs. These results for M104, an Sa galaxy, are similar to what has been found for elliptical galaxies and for the late-type spiral M31. We find that those optically bright GCs with X-ray sources house only the brightest X-ray sources. We find that, in common with other galaxies, there appears to be a positive connection between young (metal-rich) GCs and X-ray sources but that the brightest X-ray sources are equally likely to be in metal-poor GCs. The luminosity function of X-ray sources in GCs has a cut-off near the Eddington luminosity for a 1.4 Msolar object. We propose a model that can explain the trends seen in the data sets from the Sombrero and other galaxies. Thermal timescale mass transfer can occur in some of the younger clusters in which the turnoff mass is

  11. The Reverberation Lag in the Low-mass X-ray Binary H1743-322

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, Barbara; Ponti, Gabriele

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of the inner accretion flow of a black hole X-ray binary during an outburst is still a matter of active research. X-ray reverberation lags are powerful tools for constraining disk–corona geometry. We present a study of X-ray lags in the black hole transient H1743-322. We compared the results obtained from analysis of all the publicly available XMM-Newton observations. These observations were carried out during two different outbursts that occurred in 2008 and 2014. During all the observations the source was caught in the hard state and at similar luminosities ({L}3-10{keV}/{L}{Edd}˜ 0.004). We detected a soft X-ray lag of ˜60 ms, most likely due to thermal reverberation. We did not detect any significant change of the lag amplitude among the different observations, indicating a similar disk–corona geometry at the same luminosity in the hard state. On the other hand, we observe significant differences between the reverberation lag detected in H1743-322 and in GX 339-4 (at similar luminosities in the hard state), which might indicate variations of the geometry from source to source.

  12. The Ionized and Variable Outflow in the Low-Mass X-Ray Binary GX 13+1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Jessamyn; Schulz, Norbert S.; Homan, Jeroen; Chakrabarty, Deepto

    2016-04-01

    We present the analysis of 7 Chandra HETG and 16 simultaneous RXTE PCA observations of GX 13+1, a persistent neutron star low-mass X-ray binary. The observations cover activity between 2002 and 2011. The 0.5-10 keV continuum was consistent with a two component model, either a blackbody plus power law or multicolor disk and blackbody across luminosities of (5-7)x1037 erg sec-1, modified by a neutral absorption column requiring a silicon overabundance. We have identified significantly blue-shifted (voutflow > 500 km sec-1) Kα Fe, Ca, S, and Si hydrogen-like lines in all HETG observations, as well hydrogen-like Ar and Mg lines in the majority of observations. The significant outflow can be modeled as a photoionized plasma with an ionization parameter ≥ 3.5. For the first time we map the occurrence of these wind outflows onto the color-color diagram of GX 13+1 and compare their location with that of the jet outflows in this system. We will further present variable X-ray properties of the wind in GX 13+1 and discuss suggested launching mechanisms as well as how its properties relate to the wind-accretion state in low-mass X-ray binaries.

  13. DIAGNOSTIC LINE EMISSION FROM EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET AND X-RAY-ILLUMINATED DISKS AND SHOCKS AROUND LOW-MASS STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenbach, David; Gorti, U.

    2009-10-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV; 13.6 eV X-rays in the 0.1-2 keV band can heat the surfaces of disks around young, low-mass stars to thousands of degrees and ionize species with ionization potentials greater than 13.6 eV. Shocks generated by protostellar winds can also heat and ionize the same species close to the star/disk system. These processes produce diagnostic lines (e.g., [Ne II] 12.8 {mu}m and [O I] 6300 A) that we model as functions of key parameters such as EUV luminosity and spectral shape, X-ray luminosity and spectral shape, and wind mass loss rate and shock speed. Comparing our models with observations, we conclude that either internal shocks in the winds or X-rays incident on the disk surfaces often produce the observed [Ne II] line, although there are cases where EUV may dominate. Shocks created by the oblique interaction of winds with disks are unlikely [Ne II] sources because these shocks are too weak to ionize Ne. Even if [Ne II] is mainly produced by X-rays or internal wind shocks, the neon observations typically place upper limits of {approx}<10{sup 42} s{sup -1} on the EUV photon luminosity of these young low-mass stars. The observed [O I] 6300 A line has both a low velocity component (LVC) and a high velocity component. The latter likely arises in internal wind shocks. For the former we find that X-rays likely produce more [O I] luminosity than either the EUV layer, the transition layer between the EUV and X-ray layer, or the shear layer where the protostellar wind shocks and entrains disk material in a radial flow across the surface of the disk. Our soft X-ray models produce [O I] LVCs with luminosities up to 10{sup -4} L{sub sun}, but may not be able to explain the most luminous LVCs.

  14. Energy dependence of normal branch quasi-periodic intensity oscillations in low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Guy S.; Lamb, Frederick K.

    1992-04-01

    The properties of the approximately 6 Hz quasi-periodic X-ray intensity oscillations observed in the low-mass X-ray binary Cyg X-2 when it is on the normal spectral branch are shown to be consistent with a model in which photons from a central source with a fixed spectrum are Comptonized by an oscillating radial inflow. As the electron scattering optical depth of the flow varies, the spectrum of the escaping X-rays appears to rotate about a pivot energy that depends mainly on the electron temperature in the flow. The temperature derived from the observed energy dependence of the Cyg X-2 normal branch oscillations is approximately 1 keV, in good agreement with the estimated Compton temperature of its X-ray spectrum. The mean optical depth tau of the Comptonizing flow is inferred to be about 10, while the change in tau over an oscillation is estimated to be about 1; both values are in good agreement with radiation hydrodcode simulations of the radial flow.

  15. Energy dependence of normal branch quasi-periodic intensity oscillations in low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Guy S.; Lamb, Frederick K.

    1992-01-01

    The properties of the approximately 6 Hz quasi-periodic X-ray intensity oscillations observed in the low-mass X-ray binary Cyg X-2 when it is on the normal spectral branch are shown to be consistent with a model in which photons from a central source with a fixed spectrum are Comptonized by an oscillating radial inflow. As the electron scattering optical depth of the flow varies, the spectrum of the escaping X-rays appears to rotate about a pivot energy that depends mainly on the electron temperature in the flow. The temperature derived from the observed energy dependence of the Cyg X-2 normal branch oscillations is approximately 1 keV, in good agreement with the estimated Compton temperature of its X-ray spectrum. The mean optical depth tau of the Comptonizing flow is inferred to be about 10, while the change in tau over an oscillation is estimated to be about 1; both values are in good agreement with radiation hydrodcode simulations of the radial flow.

  16. Athena's Constraints on the Dense Matter Equation of State from Quiescent Low Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, Sebastien

    2016-07-01

    The study of neutron star quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries (qLMXBs) will address one of the science goals of the Athena X-ray observatory. The study of the soft X-ray thermal emission from the neutron star surface in qLMXBs is a crucial tool to place constrains on the dense matter equation of state and understand the interior structure of neutron stars. I will briefly review this method, its strengths and current weaknesses and limitations, as well as the current constraints on the equation of state from qLMXBs. The superior sensitivity of Athena will permit the acquisition of unprecedentedly high signal-to-noise spectra from these sources. It has been demonstrated that a single qLMXB, even with a high signal-to-noise spectrum, will not place useful constraints on the dense matter equation of state. However, a combination of qLMXB spectra has shown great promises of obtaining tight constraints on the equation of state. I will discuss the expected prospects for observations of qLMXBs and in particular, I will show that very tight constraints on the equation of state can be obtained from the observations of qLMXBs with the Athena X-ray observatory (even with a 10 % uncertainty on the flux calibration).

  17. Accretion turnoff and rapid evaporation of very light secondaries in low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruderman, M.; Shaham, J.; Tavani, M.

    1989-01-01

    The illumination of companion stars in very low mass X-ray binaries by various kinds of radiation from the neighborhood of the neutron star after accretion has terminated or during accretion is considered. If a neutron star's spun-up period approaches 0.001 s, pulsar kHz radiation can quench accretion by pushing surrounding plasma away from the neutron star, and may leave the companion to be evaporated by the high-energy radiation component expected from an 'isolated' millisecond radiopulsar. Expected accretion-powered MeV gamma-rays and e(+ or -) winds may also be effective in evaporating dwarf companions. Neutron star spin-down energy release may sustain the power in these radiation mechanisms even while accretion falls. Accretion-powered soft X-rays may speed the mass loss of highly evolved dwarf companions, particularly those with a large fraction of carbon and oxygen.

  18. The Infrared Variability of GX17+2 and Low-Mass X-ray Binary Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Bernard J.; Bornak, J.; Harrison, T.; Rupen, M.

    2007-12-01

    GX17+2 is a low-mass X-ray binary. It is also classified as a Z-source since it exhibits a distinctive Z-pattern in its X-ray color-color plot. GX17+2 is located in the direction of the galactic center and is not detectable at optical wavelengths. Its emission varies by over 4 magnitudes in the infrared. A number of explanations have been advanced to explain this variabilty. Based upon KPNO and Smarts IR observations, we suggest that it arises from a sychrotron jet which is periodically visible along our line of sight. This circumstance provides a rather unique opportunity to quantify a number of jet properties such as its opening angle, the sharpness of the jet boundaries, its variability, and the infrared emission uniformity across the jet.

  19. X-ray follow-ups of XSS J12270-4859: a low-mass X-ray binary with gamma-ray Fermi-LAT association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Martino, D.; Belloni, T.; Falanga, M.; Papitto, A.; Motta, S.; Pellizzoni, A.; Evangelista, Y.; Piano, G.; Masetti, N.; Bonnet-Bidaud, J.-M.; Mouchet, M.; Mukai, K.; Possenti, A.

    2013-02-01

    Context. XSS J1227.0-4859 is a peculiar, hard X-ray source recently positionally associated to the Fermi-LAT source 1FGL J1227.9-4852/2FGL J1227.7-4853. Multi-wavelength observations have added information on this source, indicating a low-luminosity low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB), but its nature is still unclear. Aims: To progress in our understanding, we present new X-ray data from a monitoring campaign performed in 2011 with the XMM-Newton, RXTE, and Swift satellites and combine them with new gamma-ray data from the Fermi and AGILE satellites. We complement the study with simultaneous near-UV photometry from XMM-Newton and with previous UV/optical and near-IR data. Methods: We analysed the temporal characteristics in the X-rays, near-UV, and gamma rays and studied the broad-band spectral energy distribution from radio to gamma rays. Results: The X-ray history of XSS J1227 over 7 yr shows a persistent and rather stable low-luminosity (6 × 1033 d1 kpc2 erg s-1) source, with flares and dips being peculiar and permanent characteristics. The associated Fermi-LAT source 2FGL J1227.7-4853 is also stable over an overlapping period of 4.7 yr. Searches for X-ray fast pulsations down to msec give upper limits to pulse fractional amplitudes of 15-25% that do not rule out a fast spinning pulsar. The combined UV/optical/near-IR spectrum reveals a hot component at ~13 kK and a cool one at ~4.6 kK. The latter would suggest a late-type K2-K5 companion star, a distance range of 1.4-3.6 kpc, and an orbital period of 7-9 h. A near-UV variability (≳6 h) also suggests a longer orbital period than previously estimated. Conclusions: The analysis shows that the X-ray and UV/optical/near-IR emissions are more compatible with an accretion-powered compact object than with a rotational powered pulsar. The X-ray to UV bolometric luminosity ratio could be consistent with a binary hosting a neutron star, but the uncertainties in the radio data may also allow an LMXB black hole with a compact

  20. Precise Localization of Transient Low-Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Deepto

    2014-09-01

    We propose to observe up to four neutron star or black hole transients in outburst to obtain accurate source positions, continuing a successful multi-year and multiwavelength program in place since Cycle 6. These positions and their prompt dissemination will allow re-observation of these sources in the X-ray, optical, IR, and radio bands in order to study their quiescent emission and to enable detailed follow-up (e.g., orbital radial velocity spectroscopy). This program will increase the number of accurately-positioned X-ray transients, providing a more uniform sample for future studies. We will only trigger our program for sources in crowded or highly obscured fields where a position from another mission (e.g., Swift) is insufficiently precise.

  1. The optical light curve of the low-mass X-ray binary GX 9 + 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    1990-01-01

    The detection of a small modulation in the light curve of the GX 9 + 9 optical counterpart at the same period as determined from the X-ray data is reported. The optical variability is roughly sinusoidal in shape with a period of 4.198 + or - 0.0094 hours and an average peak-to-peak amplitude in the B of 0.19 mag with comparable amplitudes in the V and R bandpasses, and has superposed flickering with a typical amplitude of six percent. The mass of the companion star is deduced to be 0.4 solar mass, which corresponds to an early M-type star. The bulk of the optical light arises in the accretion disk, while the variability arises from orbital modulation of the light reprocessed off the companion star and a bright spot. It is suggested that the X-ray modulation might be due to the asymmetries of X-rays reflected off the bright spot.

  2. The Behavior of Accretion Disks in Low Mass X-ray Binaries: Disk Winds and Alpha Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayless, Amanda J.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation presents research on two low mass X-ray binaries. The eclipsing low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1822-371 is the prototypical accretion disk corona (ADC) system. We have obtained new time-resolved UV spectroscopy with the ACS/SBC on the Hubble Space Telescope and new V- and J-band photometry with the 1.3-m SMARTS telescope at CTIO. We show that the accretion disk in the system has a strong wind with projected velocities up to 4000 km/s as determined from the Doppler width of the C IV emission line. The broad and shallow eclipse indicates that the disk has a vertically-extended, optically-thick component at optical wavelengths. This component extends almost to the edge of the disk and has a height equal to 50% of the disk radius. As it has a low brightness temperature, we identify it as the optically-thick base of the disk wind. V1408 Aql (=4U 1957+115) is a low mass X-ray binary which continues to be a black hole candidate. We have new photometric data of this system from the Otto Struve 2.1-m telescope's high speed CCD photometer at McDonald Observatory. The light curve is largely sinusoidal which we model with two components: a constant light source from the disk and a sinusoidal modulation at the orbital period from the irradiated face of the companion star. This is a radical re-interpretation of the orbital light curve. We do not require a large or asymmetric disk rim to account for the modulation in the light curve. Thus, the orbital inclination is unconstrained in our new model, removing the foundation for any claims of the compact object being a black hole.

  3. Estimates of black hole natal kick velocities from observations of low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandel, Ilya

    2016-02-01

    The birth kicks of black holes, arising from asymmetric mass ejection or neutrino emission during core-collapse supernovae, are of great interest for both observationally constraining supernova models and population-synthesis studies of binary evolution. Recently, several efforts were undertaken to estimate black hole birth kicks from observations of black hole low-mass X-ray binaries. We follow up on this work, specifically focusing on the highest estimated black hole kick velocities. We find that existing observations do not require black hole birth kicks in excess of approximately 80 km s-1, although higher kicks are not ruled out.

  4. X-Ray Outbursts of ESO 243-49 HLX-1: Comparison with Galactic Low-mass X-Ray Binary Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhen; Zhang, Wenda; Soria, Roberto; Altamirano, Diego; Yu, Wenfei

    2015-09-01

    We studied the outburst properties of the hyper-luminous X-ray source ESO 243-49 HLX-1, using the full set of Swift monitoring observations. We quantified the increase in the waiting time, recurrence time, and e-folding rise timescale along the outburst sequence, and the corresponding decrease in outburst duration, total radiated energy, and e-folding decay timescale, which confirms previous findings. HLX-1 spends less and less time in outburst and more and more time in quiescence, but its peak luminosity remains approximately constant. We compared the HLX-1 outburst properties with those of bright Galactic low-mass X-ray binary transients (LMXBTs). Our spectral analysis strengthens the similarity between state transitions in HLX-1 and those in Galactic LMXBTs. We also found that HLX-1 follows the nearly linear correlations between the hard-to-soft state transition luminosity and the peak luminosity, and between the rate of change of X-ray luminosity during the rise phase and the peak luminosity, which indicates that the occurrence of the hard-to-soft state transition of HLX-1 is similar to those of Galactic LMXBTs during outbursts. We found that HLX-1 does not follow the correlations between total radiated energy and peak luminosity, and between total radiated energy and e-folding rise/decay timescales we had previously identified in Galactic LMXBTs. HLX-1 would follow those correlations if the distance were several hundreds of kiloparsecs. However, invoking a much closer distance for HLX-1 is not a viable solution to this problem, as it introduces other, more serious inconsistencies with the observations.

  5. Long-duration X-Ray Flash and X-Ray-rich Gamma-Ray Bursts from Low-mass Population III Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakauchi, Daisuke; Suwa, Yudai; Sakamoto, Takanori; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2012-11-01

    Recent numerical simulations suggest that Population III (Pop III) stars were born with masses not larger than ~100 M ⊙ and typically ~40 M ⊙. By self-consistently considering the jet generation and propagation in the envelope of these low-mass Pop III stars, we find that a Pop III blue supergiant star has the possibility of giving rise to a gamma-ray burst (GRB) even though it keeps a massive hydrogen envelope. We evaluate observational characteristics of Pop III GRBs and predict that Pop III GRBs have a duration of ~105 s in the observer frame and a peak luminosity of ~5 × 1050 erg s-1. Assuming that the E p-L p (or E p-E γ, iso) correlation holds for Pop III GRBs, we find that the spectrum peak energy falls at approximately a few keV (or ~100 keV) in the observer frame. We discuss the detectability of Pop III GRBs by future satellite missions such as EXIST and Lobster. If the E p-E γ, iso correlation holds, we have the possibility to detect Pop III GRBs at z ~ 9 as long-duration X-ray-rich GRBs by EXIST. Conversely, if the E p-L p correlation holds, we have the possibility to detect Pop III GRBs up to z ~ 19 as long-duration X-ray flashes by Lobster.

  6. The X-ray dust-scattered rings of the black hole low-mass binary V404 Cyg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilopoulos, G.; Petropoulou, M.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the first detection of X-ray dust-scattered rings from the Galactic low-mass X-ray binary V404 Cyg. The observation of the system with Swift/XRT on 2015 June 30 revealed the presence of five concentric ring-like structures centred at the position of V404 Cyg. Follow-up Swift/XRT observations allowed a time-dependent study of the X-ray rings. Assuming that these are the result of small-angle, single X-ray scattering by dust grains along the line of sight, we find that their angular size scales as θ ∝ √{t} in agreement with theoretical predictions. The dust grains are concentrated in five dust layers located at about 2.12, 2.05, 1.63, 1.50 and 1.18 kpc from the observer. These coincide roughly with locations of enhanced extinction as determined by infrared photometry. Assuming that the grain size distribution is described by a generalized Mathis-Rumpl-Nordsieck model, we find that the power-law index of the most distant cloud is q ˜ 4.4, while q ˜ 3.5-3.7 in all other clouds. We constrain at a 3σ level the maximum grain size of the intermediate dust layers in the range 0.16-0.20 μm and set a lower limit of ˜ 0.2 μm in the other clouds. Hints of an exponential cutoff at the angular intensity profile of the outermost X-ray ring suggest that the smallest grains have sizes 0.01 ≤ αmin ≲ 0.03 μm. Based on the relative ratios of dust column densities we find the highest dust concentration at ˜1.6 kpc. Our results indicate a gradient in the dust properties within 1 kpc from V404 Cyg.

  7. Spectral and temporal behavior of low mass X ray binaries observed with the Einstein SSS and MPC, and the Broad Band X Ray Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Damian Joseph

    An extensive survey of 50 low mass X-ray binaries was carried out using the HEAO-2 Einstein Solid State Spectrometer data (0.5-4.5 keV) with the Monitor Proportional Counter data (1.2-20.0 keV). The SSS provided 160 eV resolution below 4.5 keV with about 200 sq cm of area, 100 times that of grating instruments on Einstein and EXOSAT. Additional observations were obtained with the Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (0.5-12 keV). Although LMXRB are some of the most luminous X-ray sources and include one of the first X-ray sources discovered, the nature of their emission regions has remained uncertain. Spectra were selected on the basis of intensity and fit with a set of simple and complex spectral models. For all the subclasses, including Eddington-limited bulge sources, bursters, dippers, the soft spectrum black hole candidates, and a few transients in decline, the spectra could be fit acceptably with combinations of thermal bremsstrahlung and blackbody spectra or a Comptonized spectrum and a blackbody. The results rule out optically thick disk models for the bright Z sources and power law models for bursters. The results suggest a progression of spectra as a function of X-ray luminosity for the bursters, Atoll, and Z sources, in which there are separate emission regions, one optically thin to scattering. The optically thick component that appears for higher luminosity may be due to a boundary layer or to high optical depth to scattering in the flow. A lower temperature blackbody indicated in some cases could be an expected contribution from the accretion disk. The soft spectrum sources are dominated by blackbody spectra, but for two, low effective area of emission is a problem for the black hole interpretation. There did not appear to be any clear selection between models for the sources with high binary orbit inclinations. Column densities for absorption by cold gas were determined simultaneously with the fits. They give distance estimates for the galactic bulge sources

  8. Radiation-driven evolution of low-mass x-ray binaries and the formation of millisecond pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Tavani, M. California Univ., Berkeley, CA . Dept. of Astronomy)

    1991-08-08

    Recent data on low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and millisecond pulsars (MSPs) pose a challenge to evolutionary theories which neglect the effects of disk and comparison irradiation. Here we discuss the main features of a radiation-driven (RD) evolutionary model that may be applicable to several LMXBs. According to this model, radiation from the accreting compact star in LMXBs vaporizes'' the accretion disk and the companion star by driving a self-sustained mass loss until a sudden accretion-turn off occurs. The main characteristics of the RD-evolution are: (1) lifetime of RD-LMXB's is of order 10{sup 7} years or less; (2) both the orbital period gap and the X-ray luminosity may be consequences of RD-evolution of LMXB's containing lower main sequence and degeneration companion stars; (3) the companion star may transfer mass to the primary even if it underfills its Roche lobe; (4) a class of recycled MSPs can continue to vaporize the low-mass companions by a strong pulsar wind even after the accretion turn-off; (5) the RD-evolutionary model resolves the apparent statistical descrepancy between the number of MSPs and their LMXB progenitors in the Galaxy. We discuss the implications of the discovery of single MSPs in low-density globular clusters and the recent measurements of short orbital timescales of four LMXBs. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. The orbital ephemeris and eclipse transitions of the low-mass X-ray binary EXO 0748 - 676

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, A. N.; Smale, A. P.; Verbunt, F.; Corbet, R. H. D.

    1991-01-01

    Using the eclipses as fiducial markers, an updated ephemeris for EXO 0748 - 676 is derived and evidence is found that between February 1985 and March 1989 the 3.82-h orbital period of EXO 0748 - 676 decreased with a time scale of -5 x 10 to the 6th yr. The sense of this change is the same as that predicted by simple models for the evolution of low-mass X-ray binaries containing main-sequence companions, but is a factor about 100 faster than expected. This rapid change in orbital period could result from the expansion of the companion due to the effects of X-ray heating. The eclipse transition durations are variable, with the shortest observed taking 1.5 s and the longest 40 s. This latter figure is about an order of magnitude too large to be due to absorption effects in the atmosphere of the secondary assuming a Roche geometry and likely stellar temperature. Either flaring activity or the presence of an X-ray heated evaporative wind or a corona may enhance the scale height of the companion's atmosphere producing the extended eclipse transitions.

  10. The orbital ephemeris and eclipse transitions of the low-mass X-ray binary EXO 0748 - 676

    SciTech Connect

    Parmar, A.N.; Smale, A.P.; Verbunt, F.; Corbet, R.H.D. NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD Utrecht Rijksuniversitet Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Sagamihara )

    1991-01-01

    Using the eclipses as fiducial markers, an updated ephemeris for EXO 0748 - 676 is derived and evidence is found that between February 1985 and March 1989 the 3.82-h orbital period of EXO 0748 - 676 decreased with a time scale of -5 x 10 to the 6th yr. The sense of this change is the same as that predicted by simple models for the evolution of low-mass X-ray binaries containing main-sequence companions, but is a factor about 100 faster than expected. This rapid change in orbital period could result from the expansion of the companion due to the effects of X-ray heating. The eclipse transition durations are variable, with the shortest observed taking 1.5 s and the longest 40 s. This latter figure is about an order of magnitude too large to be due to absorption effects in the atmosphere of the secondary assuming a Roche geometry and likely stellar temperature. Either flaring activity or the presence of an X-ray heated evaporative wind or a corona may enhance the scale height of the companion's atmosphere producing the extended eclipse transitions. 38 refs.

  11. Constraining the properties of neutron star crusts with the transient low-mass X-ray binary Aql X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waterhouse, A. C.; Degenaar, N.; Wijnands, R.; Brown, E. F.; Miller, J. M.; Altamirano, D.; Linares, M.

    2016-03-01

    Aql X-1 is a prolific transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary that exhibits an accretion outburst approximately once every year. Whether the thermal X-rays detected in intervening quiescent episodes are the result of cooling of the neutron star or due to continued low-level accretion remains unclear. In this work, we use Swift data obtained after the long and bright 2011 and 2013 outbursts, as well as the short and faint 2015 outburst, to investigate the hypothesis that cooling of the accretion-heated neutron star crust dominates the quiescent thermal emission in Aql X-1. We demonstrate that the X-ray light curves and measured neutron star surface temperatures are consistent with the expectations of the crust cooling paradigm. By using a thermal evolution code, we find that ≃1.2-3.2 MeV nucleon-1 of shallow heat release describes the observational data well, depending on the assumed mass-accretion rate and temperature of the stellar core. We find no evidence for varying strengths of this shallow heating after different outbursts, but this could be due to limitations of the data. We argue that monitoring Aql X-1 for up to ≃1 yr after future outbursts can be a powerful tool to break model degeneracies and solve open questions about the magnitude, depth, and origin of shallow heating in neutron star crusts.

  12. Common Patterns in the Evolution between the Luminous Neutron Star Low-Mass X-ray Binary Subclasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridriksson, Joel K.; Homan, Jeroen; Remillard, Ronald A.

    2015-08-01

    The X-ray transient XTE J1701-462 was the first source observed to evolve through all known subclasses of low-magnetic-field neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (NS-LMXBs), as a result of large changes in its mass accretion rate. To investigate to what extent similar evolution is seen in other NS-LMXBs we have performed a detailed study of the color-color and hardness-intensity diagrams (CDs and HIDs) of Cyg X-2, Cir X-1, and GX 13+1—three luminous X-ray binaries, containing weakly magnetized neutron stars, known to exhibit strong secular changes in their CD/HID tracks. Using the full set of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array data collected for the sources over the 16 year duration of the mission, we show that Cyg X-2 and Cir X-1 display CD/HID evolution with close similarities to XTE J1701-462. Although GX 13+1 shows behavior that is in some ways unique, it also exhibits similarities to XTE J1701-462, and we conclude that its overall CD/HID properties strongly indicate that it should be classified as a Z source, rather than as an atoll source. We conjecture that the secular evolution of Cyg X-2, Cir X-1, and GX 13+1—illustrated by sequences of CD/HID tracks we construct—arises from changes in the mass accretion rate. Our results strengthen previous suggestions that within single sources Cyg-like Z source behavior takes place at higher luminosities and mass accretion rates than Sco-like Z behavior, and lend support to the notion that the mass accretion rate is the primary physical parameter distinguishing the various NS-LMXB subclasses.

  13. LONG-DURATION X-RAY FLASH AND X-RAY-RICH GAMMA-RAY BURSTS FROM LOW-MASS POPULATION III STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Nakauchi, Daisuke; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Nakamura, Takashi; Suwa, Yudai; Sakamoto, Takanori

    2012-11-10

    Recent numerical simulations suggest that Population III (Pop III) stars were born with masses not larger than {approx}100 M {sub Sun} and typically {approx}40 M {sub Sun }. By self-consistently considering the jet generation and propagation in the envelope of these low-mass Pop III stars, we find that a Pop III blue supergiant star has the possibility of giving rise to a gamma-ray burst (GRB) even though it keeps a massive hydrogen envelope. We evaluate observational characteristics of Pop III GRBs and predict that Pop III GRBs have a duration of {approx}10{sup 5} s in the observer frame and a peak luminosity of {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 50} erg s{sup -1}. Assuming that the E {sub p}-L {sub p} (or E {sub p}-E {sub {gamma},iso}) correlation holds for Pop III GRBs, we find that the spectrum peak energy falls at approximately a few keV (or {approx}100 keV) in the observer frame. We discuss the detectability of Pop III GRBs by future satellite missions such as EXIST and Lobster. If the E {sub p}-E {sub {gamma},iso} correlation holds, we have the possibility to detect Pop III GRBs at z {approx} 9 as long-duration X-ray-rich GRBs by EXIST. Conversely, if the E {sub p}-L {sub p} correlation holds, we have the possibility to detect Pop III GRBs up to z {approx} 19 as long-duration X-ray flashes by Lobster.

  14. A CHANGE IN THE QUIESCENT X-RAY SPECTRUM OF THE NEUTRON STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY MXB 1659-29

    SciTech Connect

    Cackett, E. M.; Brown, E. F.; Cumming, A.; Degenaar, N.; Miller, J. M.; Fridriksson, J. K.; Wijnands, R.; Homan, J.

    2013-09-10

    The quasi-persistent neutron star low-mass X-ray binary MXB 1659-29 went into quiescence in 2001, and we have followed its quiescent X-ray evolution since. Observations over the first 4 yr showed a rapid drop in flux and temperature of the neutron star atmosphere, interpreted as cooling of the neutron star crust which had been heated during the 2.5 yr outburst. However, observations taken approximately 1400 and 2400 days into quiescence were consistent with each other, suggesting the crust had reached thermal equilibrium with the core. Here we present a new Chandra observation of MXB 1659-29 taken 11 yr into quiescence and 4 yr since the last Chandra observation. This new observation shows an unexpected factor of {approx}3 drop in count rate and change in spectral shape since the last observation, which cannot be explained simply by continued cooling. Two possible scenarios are that either the neutron star temperature has remained unchanged and there has been an increase in the column density, or, alternatively the neutron star temperature has dropped precipitously and the spectrum is now dominated by a power-law component. The first scenario may be possible given that MXB 1659-29 is a near edge-on system, and an increase in column density could be due to build-up of material in, and a thickening of, a truncated accretion disk during quiescence. But, a large change in disk height may not be plausible if standard accretion disk theory holds during quiescence. Alternatively, the disk may be precessing, leading to a higher column density during this latest observation.

  15. Long duration X-ray flash from low mass population III stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakauchi, Daisuke; Suwa, Yudai; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2012-09-01

    Recent numerical simulations suggest that the typical mass of a Population III (Pop III) star become ~ 40Msolar. We investigate if a Pop III star can raise a gamma ray burst (GRB) by considering the jet propagation in the stellar envelope for a 40Msolar Pop III model. We find that a relativistic jet launched from the central black hole pierces the stellar envelope, although a Pop III star has a large envelope since the mass loss is not expected for zero metallicity stars. Thus, a Pop III star can be the progenitor of a GRB. We predict that GRBs from 40Msolar Pop III progenitors have much longer duration ~ 105 sec, slightly lower luminosity ~6×1050 erg/sec and much softer spectrum peak energy ~ 5 keV than the local long GRBs. Therefore, observationally, we regard a Pop III GRB as a long duration X-ray flash. We can observe such Pop III GRBs using the future detector Lobster.

  16. Spectral variations in the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 0614+09

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, K. P.; Apparao, K. M. V.

    1994-01-01

    We report the X-ray spectra of a binary 4U 0614+09 observed with EXOSAT on five different occasions in 1984 and 1986. In four observations in 1984, the source intensity was 'low' compared to its intensity in the 1986 observation. The source was steady on timescales of 10 to 1000 s in each of the 1984 observations but highly variable during the 1986 variations. The best-fit spectral models for the continuum are a blackbody spectrum plus an emission from a Comptonized region. In addition, a component due to reflection from a cold disk around the source was needed as an absorbiton edge due to cold or ionized iron was seen near 7 keV with good significance in most of the spectra, particularly in the 'low' state. The relation of the hardness ratios with intensity follow the behavior seen in the 'Atoll' sources. We have studied the behavior of the hardness ratios with the variations in the parameters of the best-fit spectral models. Most of the variability is associated with the blackbody component thought to arise from the boundary layer on the surface of the neutron star. During the 'high' state in 1986, the blackbody temperature is higher, its size smaller, and its contribution significantly greater than in the 'low' state. The other notable difference between the two states is the lower opacity in the Comptonized region, and a significantly higher absorption in the 'high' state. A weak line emission (equivalent width = 10 to 40 eV) is detected during the 'high' state. The line energy lies between 6 and 7 keV wh ich implies its origin from ionized iron.

  17. A Variable Near-Infrared Counterpart to the Neutron-Star Low-Mass X-Ray Binary 4U 1705 - 440

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homan, Jeroen; Kaplan, David L.; van den Berg, Maureen; Young, Andrew J.

    2009-02-01

    We report the discovery of a near-infrared (NIR) counterpart to the persistent neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1705 - 440, at a location consistent with its recently determined Chandra X-ray position. The NIR source is highly variable, with Ks -band magnitudes varying between 15.2 and 17.3 and additional J- and H-band observations revealing color variations. A comparison with contemporaneous X-ray monitoring observations shows that the NIR brightness correlates well with X-ray flux and X-ray spectral state. We also find possible indications of a change in the slope of the NIR/X-ray flux relation among different X-ray states. We discuss and test various proposed mechanisms for the NIR emission from neutron-star low-mass X-ray binaries and conclude that the NIR emission in 4U 1705 - 440 is most likely dominated by X-ray heating of the outer accretion disk and the secondary star. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Baade Telescope, located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile, and the 4 m Blanco Telescope, located at CTIO, Chile.

  18. Constraining the formation of black holes in short-period black hole low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repetto, Serena; Nelemans, Gijs

    2015-11-01

    The formation of stellar-mass black holes (BHs) is still very uncertain. Two main uncertainties are the amount of mass ejected in the supernova (SN) event (if any) and the magnitude of the natal kick (NK) the BH receives at birth (if any). Repetto et al., studying the position of Galactic X-ray binaries containing BHs, found evidence for BHs receiving high NKs at birth. In this paper, we extend that study, taking into account the previous binary evolution of the sources as well. The seven short-period BH X-ray binaries that we use are compact binaries consisting of a low-mass star orbiting a BH in a period less than 1 d. We trace their binary evolution backwards in time, from the current observed state of mass transfer, to the moment the BH was formed, and we add the extra information on the kinematics of the binaries. We find that several systems could be explained by no NK, just mass ejection, while for two systems (and possibly more) a high kick is required. So unless the latter have an alternative formation, such as within a globular cluster, we conclude that at least some BHs get high kicks. This challenges the standard picture that BH kicks would be scaled down from neutron star kicks. Furthermore, we find that five systems could have formed with a non-zero NK but zero mass ejected (i.e. no SN) at formation, as predicted by neutrino-driven NKs.

  19. TRANSIENT LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY POPULATIONS IN ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES NGC 3379 AND NGC 4278

    SciTech Connect

    Fragos, T.; Kalogera, V.; Willems, B. E-mail: vicky@northwestern.edu

    2009-09-10

    We propose a physically motivated and self-consistent prescription for the modeling of transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) properties, such as duty cycle (DC), outburst duration, and recurrence time. We apply this prescription to the population synthesis models of field LMXBs presented by Fragos et al., and compare the transient LMXB population to the Chandra X-ray survey of the two elliptical galaxies NGC 3379 and NGC 4278, which revealed several transient sources. We are able to exclude models with a constant DC for all transient systems, while models with a variable DC based on the properties of each system are consistent with the observed transient populations. We predict that the majority of the observed transient sources in these two galaxies are LMXBs with red giant donors. Finally, our comparison suggests that transient LMXBs are very rare in globular clusters (GCs), and thus the number of identified transient LMXBs may be used as a tracer of the relative contribution of field and GC LMXB populations.

  20. A COMPARISON OF BROAD IRON EMISSION LINES IN ARCHIVAL DATA OF NEUTRON STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cackett, Edward M.; Miller, Jon M.; Reis, Rubens C.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Barret, Didier

    2012-08-10

    Relativistic X-ray disklines have been found in multiple neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries, in close analogy with black holes across the mass scale. These lines have tremendous diagnostic power and have been used to constrain stellar radii and magnetic fields, often finding values that are consistent with independent timing techniques. Here, we compare CCD-based data from Suzaku with Fe K line profiles from archival data taken with gas-based spectrometers. In general, we find good consistency between the gas-based line profiles from EXOSAT, BeppoSAX, and RXTE and the CCD data from Suzaku, demonstrating that the broad profiles seen are intrinsic to the line and not broad due to instrumental issues. However, we do find that when fitting with a Gaussian line profile, the width of the Gaussian can depend on the continuum model in instruments with low spectral resolution, though when the different models fit equally well the line widths generally agree. We also demonstrate that three BeppoSAX observations show evidence for asymmetric lines, with a relativistic diskline model providing a significantly better fit than a Gaussian. We test this by using the posterior predictive p-value method, and bootstrapping of the spectra to show that such deviations from a Gaussian are unlikely to be observed by chance.

  1. Big Game Hunting in the Andromeda Galaxy: identifiying and weighing black holes in low mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, R.

    2004-07-01

    We have devised a new technique for identifying stellar mass black holes in low mass X-ray binaries, and have applied it to XMM-Newton observations of two X-ray sources in M31. In particular we search for low accretion rate power density spectra; these are very similar for all LMXB, whether the primary is a black hole or a neutron star. Galactic neutron star LMXB exhibit these distinctive PDS at very low luminosities ( ˜ 1036 erg s-1) while black hole LMXB can exhibit them at luminosities > 1038 erg s-1! Following the work of van der Klis (1994), we assume a maximum accretion rate (as a fraction of the Eddington limit) for low accretion rate PDS that is constant for all LMXB, and obtain an empirical value of ˜ 10% Eddington. We have so far discovered two candidate black hole binaries in M31, exhibiting low accretion rate PDS at up to 3×1038 and 5×1037 erg s-1. If we assume that they are at <10% Eddington, they have minimum masses of 20 and 4 M⊙ respectively. Furthermore, any LMXB exhibiting a low accretion rate power density spectrum at a luminosity > 5×1037 erg s-1 is likely to have a black hole primary.

  2. Study of magnetic field effects for accretions with highly magnetized neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasano, Makoto; Enoto, Teruaki; Makishima, Kazuo; Sakurai, Soki

    Neutron stars (NSs) in high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), namely those with massive privary stars, generally have strong magnetic fields (˜10 (12) G). In contrast, those in typical low mass binary systems (LMXBs) are weakly magnetized (˜10 (9-10) G). This clear difference in the magnetic field strength is considered to be primarily responsible for the systematic differences in X-ray properties between NSs in HMXBs and those in LMXBs. However, these can also be possible contributions from their accretion-scheme differences, i.e., wind capture in HMXBs and disk accretion in LMXBs. To separate these two effects, we may utilize a few highly-magnetized NSs in LMXBs, including Her X-1, GX 1+4, 4U 1626-67, and a recently recognized object 4U 1822-37 (Sasano et al. PASJ in press, arXiv:1311.4618). In this study, we compare spectral and timing properties of these exceptional strong-field NSs, with those of more typical objects in LMXBs an HMXBs. Their properties that are common with typical HMXBs can be regarded as a signature of strong magnetic fields while those shared by typical LMXBs can be attributed to the disk-fed accretion geometry.

  3. The Secret X-ray Lives of Cepheids: Presenting the First Unambiguous X-ray Detections of Classical Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Scott G.; Guinan, E.; Evans, N.; DePasquale, J.

    2009-01-01

    Chromospheric and transition region emissions have been found in certain Classical Cepheids by previous IUE studies and through our own much more recent FUSE study. However, X-ray emission has long been considered nonexistent in these cool supergiants. Here we report on the surprising discovery of X-ray emissions in three bright, nearby Classical Cepheids recently observed with the XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites - representing the first true detections of this class of variable star at X-ray wavelengths. Polaris (V = +1.98; F7 Ib-II; P = 3.97-d; d 130-pc), β Dor (V = +3.77; F6 Ia; P = 9.84-d; d 318-pc) and δ Cep (V = +4.07; F5 Iab; P = 5.37-d; d 273-pc) are currently the only three Cepheids to have been observed with modern X-ray satellites. However, only Polaris and β Dor have been observed with the FUSE satellite, and β Dor (which has multiple spectra) displays variability in the FUV emission strengths which appears to be correlated to its pulsation period. Unexpectedly, our early analyses of the X-ray data show that these Cepheids, despite their differences in spectral type and pulsation properties, all have log Lx values of 28.8-29 and similarly soft energy distributions. The initial results of our recent X-ray studies are presented along with our FUSE results to bring the high energy activity into better focus. Further FUV/X-ray observations have been proposed with HST/XMM to unambiguously determine the origin and nature of the observed high energy emissions from the targets, possibly arising from warm winds, shocks, or pulsationally induced magnetic activity. We gratefully acknowledge support for this project from NASA grants Chandra-GO6-7011A, 06-FUSE8-099 & XMM-AO7-55241 and NSF grant AST05-07542.

  4. X-Ray Properties of Low-mass Pre-main Sequence Stars in the Orion Trapezium Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Norbert S.; Huenemoerder, David P.; Günther, Moritz; Testa, Paola; Canizares, Claude R.

    2015-09-01

    The Chandra HETG Orion Legacy Project (HOLP) is the first comprehensive set of observations of a very young massive stellar cluster that provides high-resolution X-ray spectra of very young stars over a wide mass range (0.7–2.3 {M}ȯ ). In this paper, we focus on the six brightest X-ray sources with T Tauri stellar counterparts that are well-characterized at optical and infrared wavelengths. All stars show column densities which are substantially smaller than expected from optical extinction, indicating that the sources are located on the near side of the cluster with respect to the observer as well as that these stars are embedded in more dusty environments. Stellar X-ray luminosities are well above 1031 erg s‑1, in some cases exceeding 1032 erg s‑1 for a substantial amount of time. The stars during these observations show no flares but are persistently bright. The spectra can be well fit with two temperature plasma components of 10 MK and 40 MK, of which the latter dominates the flux by a ratio 6:1 on average. The total emission measures range between 3–8 × 1054 cm‑3 and are comparable to active coronal sources. The fits to the Ne ix He-Like K-shell lines indicate forbidden to inter-combination line ratios consistent with the low-density limit. Observed abundances compare well with active coronal sources underlying the coronal nature of these sources. The surface flux in this sample of 0.6–2.3 {M}ȯ classical T Tauri stars shows that coronal activity increases significantly between ages 0.1 and 10 Myr. The results demonstrate the power of X-ray line diagnostics to study coronal properties of T Tauri stars in young stellar clusters.

  5. A First Robust Measurement of the Aging of Field Low Mass X-ray Binary Populations from Hubble and Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmer, Bret

    Our understanding of X-ray binary (XRB) formation and evolution have been revolutionized by HST and Chandra by allowing us to study in detail XRBs in extragalactic environments. Theoretically, XRB formation is sensitive to parent stellar population properties like metallicity and stellar age. These dependencies not only make XRBs promising populations for aiding in the measurement of galaxy properties themselves, but also have important astrophysical implications. For example, due to the relatively young stellar ages and primordial metallicities in the early Universe (z > 3), it is predicted that XRBs were more luminous than today and played a significant role in the heating of the intergalactic medium. Unlocking the potential of XRBs as useful probes of galaxy properties and understanding in detail their evolutionary pathways critically requires empirical constraints using well-studied galaxies that span a variety of evolutionary stages. In this ADAP, we will use the combined power of archival observations from Hubble and Chandra data of 16 nearby early-type galaxies to study how low-mass XRBs (LMXBs) populations evolve with age. LMXBs are critically important since they are the most numerous XRBs in the MW and are expected to dominate the normal galaxy Xray emissivity of the Universe out to z ~ 2. Understanding separately LMXBs that form via dynamical interactions (e.g., in globular clusters; GCs) versus those that form in-situ in galactic fields is an important poorly constrained area of XRB astrophysics. We are guided by the following key questions: 1. How does the shape and normalization of the field LMXB X-ray luminosity function (XLF) evolve as parent stellar populations age? Using theoretical population synthesis models, what can we learn about the evolution of contributions from various LMXB donor stars (e.g., red-giant, main-sequence, and white dwarf donors)? 2. Is there any evidence that globular cluster (GC) LMXBs seeded field LMXB populations through

  6. DISCOVERY OF A SECOND TRANSIENT LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 6440

    SciTech Connect

    Heinke, C. O.; Budac, S. A.; Altamirano, D.; Linares, M.; Wijnands, R.; Cohn, H. N.; Lugger, P. M.; Servillat, M.; Grindlay, J. E.; Strohmayer, T. E.; Markwardt, C. B.; Swank, J. H.; Bailyn, C.

    2010-05-01

    We have discovered a new transient low-mass X-ray binary, NGC 6440 X-2, with Chandra/ACIS, RXTE/PCA, and Swift/XRT observations of the globular cluster NGC 6440. The discovery outburst (2009 July 28-31) peaked at L{sub X} {approx} 1.5 x 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1} and lasted for <4 days above L{sub X} = 10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1}. Four other outbursts (2009 May 29-June 4, August 29-September 1, October 1-3, and October 28-31) have been observed with RXTE/PCA (identifying millisecond pulsations) and Swift/XRT (confirming a positional association with NGC 6440 X-2), with similar peak luminosities and decay times. Optical and infrared imaging did not detect a clear counterpart, with best limits of V>21, B>22 in quiescence from archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging, g'>22 during the August outburst from Gemini-South GMOS imaging, and J {approx_gt} 18.5 and K {approx_gt} 17 during the July outburst from CTIO 4 m ISPI imaging. Archival Chandra X-ray images of the core do not detect the quiescent counterpart (L{sub X} < (1-2) x 10{sup 31} erg s{sup -1}) and place a bolometric luminosity limit of L{sub NS} < 6 x 10{sup 31} erg s{sup -1} (one of the lowest measured) for a hydrogen atmosphere neutron star. A short Chandra observation 10 days into quiescence found two photons at NGC 6440 X-2's position, suggesting enhanced quiescent emission at L{sub X} {approx} 6 x 10{sup 31} erg s{sup -1}. NGC 6440 X-2 currently shows the shortest recurrence time ({approx}31 days) of any known X-ray transient, although regular outbursts were not visible in the bulge scans before early 2009. Fast, low-luminosity transients like NGC 6440 X-2 may be easily missed by current X-ray monitoring.

  7. ASCA Observation of MS 1603.6+2600 (=UW Coronae Borealis): A Dipping Low-Mass X-ray Binary in the Outer Halo?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, Koji; Smale, Alan; Stahle, Caroline K.; Schlegel, Eric M.; Wijnands, Rudy; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    MS 1603.6+2600 is a high-latitude X-ray binary with a 111 min orbital period, thought to be either an unusual cataclysmic variable or an unusual low-mass X-ray binary. In an ASCA observation in 1997 August, we find a burst whose light curve suggests a Type 1 (thermonuclear flash) origin. We also find an orbital X-ray modulation in MS 1603.6+2600, which is likely to be periodic dips, presumably due to azimuthal structure in the accretion disk. Both are consistent with this system being a normal low-mass X-ray binary harboring a neutron star, but at a great distance. We tentatively suggest that MS 1603.6+2600 is located in the outer halo of the Milky Way, perhaps associated with the globular cluster Palomar 14, 11 deg away from MS 1603.6+2600 on the sky at an estimated distance of 73.8 kpc.

  8. XMM-Newton Results on the Ultracompact Low Mass X-Ray Binary 4U 1850-087 in the Globular Cluster NGC 6712

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidoli, L.; Parmar, A. N.; Oosterbroek, T.

    2004-10-01

    We report on preliminary results from our XMM- Newton observation of the Low Mass X-ray Binary 4U 1850-087, located in the galactic globular clus- ter NGC 6712. It is an ultracompact binary system, with an orbital period of 20.6 min. In previous low- resolution X-ray observations 4U 1850-087 displayed a soft excess residual around 0.7 keV, possibly indica- tive of the presence of a high Ne/O ratio, as already found in other three ultracompact LMXBs contain- ing a neutron star (4U 0614+091, 4U 0918-549, and 4U 1543-624). We discuss here our preliminary anal- ysis of high resolution X-ray spectra of 4U 1850-087, and timing results. Key words: X rays; X ray Binaries; individual: 4U 1850-087.

  9. UPPER BOUNDS ON r-MODE AMPLITUDES FROM OBSERVATIONS OF LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoodifar, Simin; Strohmayer, Tod

    2013-08-20

    We present upper limits on the amplitude of r-mode oscillations and gravitational-radiation-induced spin-down rates in low-mass X-ray binary neutron stars, under the assumption that the quiescent neutron star luminosity is powered by dissipation from a steady-state r-mode. For masses <2 M{sub Sun} we find dimensionless r-mode amplitudes in the range from about 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} to 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}. For the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar sources with known quiescent spin-down rates, these limits suggest that {approx}< 1% of the observed rate can be due to an unstable r-mode. Interestingly, the source with the highest amplitude limit, NGC 6440, could have an r-mode spin-down rate comparable to the observed, quiescent rate for SAX J1808-3658. Thus, quiescent spin-down measurements for this source would be particularly interesting. For all sources considered here, our amplitude limits suggest that gravitational wave signals are likely too weak for detection with Advanced LIGO. Our highest mass model (2.21 M{sub Sun }) can support enhanced, direct Urca neutrino emission in the core and thus can have higher r-mode amplitudes. Indeed, the inferred r-mode spin-down rates at these higher amplitudes are inconsistent with the observed spin-down rates for some of the sources, such as IGR J00291+5934 and XTE J1751-305. In the absence of other significant sources of internal heat, these results could be used to place an upper limit on the masses of these sources if they were made of hadronic matter, or alternatively it could be used to probe the existence of exotic matter in them if their masses were known.

  10. Upper Bounds on r-Mode Amplitudes from Observations of Low-Mass X-Ray Binary Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahmoodifar, Simin; Strohmayer, Tod

    2013-01-01

    We present upper limits on the amplitude of r-mode oscillations and gravitational-radiation-induced spin-down rates in low-mass X-ray binary neutron stars, under the assumption that the quiescent neutron star luminosity is powered by dissipation from a steady-state r-mode. For masses <2M solar mass we find dimensionless r-mode amplitudes in the range from about 1×10(exp-8) to 1.5×10(exp-6). For the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar sources with known quiescent spin-down rates, these limits suggest that approx. less than 1% of the observed rate can be due to an unstable r-mode. Interestingly, the source with the highest amplitude limit, NGC 6440, could have an r-mode spin-down rate comparable to the observed, quiescent rate for SAX J1808-3658. Thus, quiescent spin-down measurements for this source would be particularly interesting. For all sources considered here, our amplitude limits suggest that gravitational wave signals are likely too weak for detection with Advanced LIGO. Our highest mass model (2.21M solar mass) can support enhanced, direct Urca neutrino emission in the core and thus can have higher r-mode amplitudes. Indeed, the inferred r-mode spin-down rates at these higher amplitudes are inconsistent with the observed spin-down rates for some of the sources, such as IGR J00291+5934 and XTE J1751-305. In the absence of other significant sources of internal heat, these results could be used to place an upper limit on the masses of these sources if they were made of hadronic matter, or alternatively it could be used to probe the existence of exotic matter in them if their masses were known.

  11. Unveiling the environment surrounding low-mass X-ray binary SAX J1808.4-3658

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, C.; Costantini, E.; Fabian, A. C.; Kaastra, J. S.; in't Zand, J. J. M.

    2014-03-01

    Context. Low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) are a natural workbench to study accretion disk phenomena and optimal background sources to measure elemental abundances in the interstellar medium (ISM). In high-resolution XMM-Newton spectra, the LMXB SAX J1808.4-3658 in the past showed a neon column density significantly higher than expected given its small distance, presumably due to additional absorption from a neon-rich circumstellar medium (CSM). Aims: It is possible to detect intrinsic absorption from the CSM by evidence of Keplerian motions or outflows. For this purpose, we analyze a recent, deep (100 ks long), high-resolution Chandra/LETGS spectrum of SAX J1808.4-3658 in combination with archival data. Methods: We estimated the column densities of the different absorbers through the study of their absorption lines. We used both empirical and physical models involving photo- and collisional-ionization to determine the nature of the absorbers. Results: The abundances of the cold interstellar gas match the solar values as expected given the proximity of the X-ray source. For the first time in this source, we detected neon and oxygen blueshifted absorption lines, which can be well modeled with outflowing photoionized gas. The wind is neon rich (Ne/O ≳ 3) and may originate from processed, ionized gas near the accretion disk or its corona. The kinematics (v = 500-1000 km s-1) are indeed similar to those seen in other accretion disks. We also discovered a system of emission lines with very high Doppler velocities (v ~ 24 000 km s-1) originating presumably closer to the compact object. Additional observations and UV coverage are needed to accurately determine the abundances and the ionization structure of the wind.

  12. A Suzaku observation of the low-mass X-ray binary GS 1826-238 in the hard state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Ko; Sakurai, Soki; Zhang, Zhongli; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Makishima, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    The neutron star low-mass X-ray binary GS 1826-238 was observed with Suzaku on 2009 October 21, for a total exposure of 1030 ks. Except for the type I bursts, the source intensity was constant within ˜10%. Combining the Suzaku XIS, HXD-PIN, and HXD-GSO data, burst-removed persistent emission was detected over the 0.8-100 keV range, at an unabsorbed flux of 2.6 × 10-9 erg s-1 cm-2. Although the implied 0.8-100 keV luminosity, 1.5 × 1037 erg s-1 (assuming a distance of 7 kpc), is relatively high, the observed hard spectrum confirms that the source was in the hard state. The spectrum was successfully explained by an emission from a soft standard accretion disk partially Comptonized by a hot electron cloud, and a blackbody emission Comptonized by another hotter electron cloud. These results are compared with those from previous studies, including those on the same source by Thompson et al. (2005, ApJ, 634, 1261) and Cocchi, Farinelli, and Paizis (2011, A&A, 529, A155), as well as that of Aql X-1 in the hard state obtained with Suzaku (Sakurai et al. 2014, PASJ, 66, 10).

  13. The magnetohydrodynamical model of kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (II)

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Chang-Sheng; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2014-08-10

    We study the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) with a new magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model, in which the compressed magnetosphere is considered. The previous MHD model is reexamined and the relation between the frequencies of the kHz QPOs and the accretion rate in LMXBs is obtained. Our result agrees with the observations of six sources (4U 0614+09, 4U 1636-53, 4U 1608-52, 4U 1915-15, 4U 1728-34, and XTE 1807-294) with measured spins. In this model, the kHz QPOs originate from the MHD waves in the compressed magnetosphere. The single kHz QPOs and twin kHz QPOs are produced in two different parts of the accretion disk and the boundary is close to the corotation radius. The lower QPO frequency in a frequency-accretion rate diagram is cut off at a low accretion rate and the twin kHz QPOs encounter a top ceiling at a high accretion rate due to the restriction of the innermost stable circular orbit.

  14. CONTINUED COOLING OF THE CRUST IN THE NEUTRON STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY KS 1731-260

    SciTech Connect

    Cackett, Edward M.; Miller, Jon M.; Brown, Edward F.; Cumming, Andrew; Degenaar, Nathalie; Wijnands, Rudy

    2010-10-20

    Some neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries have very long outbursts (lasting several years) which can generate a significant amount of heat in the neutron star crust. After the system has returned to quiescence, the crust then thermally relaxes. This provides a rare opportunity to study the thermal properties of neutron star crusts, putting constraints on the thermal conductivity and hence the structure and composition of the crust. KS 1731-260 is one of only four systems where this crustal cooling has been observed. Here, we present a new Chandra observation of this source approximately eight years after the end of the last outburst and four years since the last observation. We find that the source has continued to cool, with the cooling curve displaying a simple power-law decay. This suggests that the crust has not fully thermally relaxed yet and may continue to cool further. A simple power-law decay is in contrast to theoretical cooling models of the crust, which predict that the crust should now have cooled to the same temperature as the neutron star core.

  15. The Magnetohydrodynamical Model of Kilohertz Quasi-periodic Oscillations in Neutron Star Low-mass X-Ray Binaries (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chang-Sheng; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2014-08-01

    We study the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) with a new magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model, in which the compressed magnetosphere is considered. The previous MHD model is reexamined and the relation between the frequencies of the kHz QPOs and the accretion rate in LMXBs is obtained. Our result agrees with the observations of six sources (4U 0614+09, 4U 1636-53, 4U 1608-52, 4U 1915-15, 4U 1728-34, and XTE 1807-294) with measured spins. In this model, the kHz QPOs originate from the MHD waves in the compressed magnetosphere. The single kHz QPOs and twin kHz QPOs are produced in two different parts of the accretion disk and the boundary is close to the corotation radius. The lower QPO frequency in a frequency-accretion rate diagram is cut off at a low accretion rate and the twin kHz QPOs encounter a top ceiling at a high accretion rate due to the restriction of the innermost stable circular orbit.

  16. Tidal capture formation of low-mass X-ray binaries from wide binaries in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaely, Erez; Perets, Hagai B.

    2016-06-01

    We present a dynamical formation scenario for low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) in the field, focusing on black hole (BH) LMXBs. In this formation channel, LMXBs are formed from wide binaries (>1000 au) with a BH component and a stellar companion. The wide binary is perturbed by fly-bys of field stars, its orbit random walks, until driven into a sufficiently eccentric orbit such that the binary components tidally interact and the binary evolves to become a short period binary, which eventually evolves into an LMXB. We consider several models for the formation and survival of such wide binaries, and calculate the LMXB formation rates for each model. We find that models where BHs form through direct collapse with no/little natal kicks can give rise to high formation rates comparable with those inferred from observations. This formation scenario had several observational signatures: (1) the number density of LMXBs generally follows the background stellar density, beside the densest regions, where the dependence is stronger, (2) the mass function of the BH stellar companion should be comparable to the mass function of the background stellar population, likely peaking at 0.4-0.6 M⊙, and (3) the LMXBs orbit should not correlate with the spin of the BH. These aspects generally differ from the expectations from previously suggested LMXB formation models following common envelope binary stellar evolution. We note that neutron star LMXBs can similarly form from wide binaries, but their formation rate through this channel is likely significantly smaller due to their much higher natal kicks.

  17. X-ray Follow-ups of XSS J12270-4859: A Low-mass X-ray Binary with Gamma-ray Fermi-LAT Association

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deMartino, D.; Belloni, T.; Falanga, M.; Papitto, A.; Motta, S.; Pellizzoni, A.; Evangelista, Y.; Piano, G.; Masetti, N.; Mouchet, M.; Mukai, K.; Possenti, A.

    2013-01-01

    Context. XSS J1227.0-4859 is a peculiar, hard X-ray source recently positionally associated to the Fermi-LAT source 1FGL J1227.9- 4852/2FGL J1227.7-4853. Multi-wavelength observations have added information on this source, indicating a low-luminosity lowmass X-ray binary (LMXB), but its nature is still unclear. Aims. To progress in our understanding, we present new X-ray data from a monitoring campaign performed in 2011 with the XMM-Newton, RXTE, and Swift satellites and combine them with new gamma-ray data from the Fermi and AGILE satellites. We complement the study with simultaneous near-UV photometry from XMM-Newton and with previous UV/optical and near-IR data. Methods. We analysed the temporal characteristics in the X-rays, near-UV, and gamma rays and studied the broad-band spectral energy distribution from radio to gamma rays. Results. The X-ray history of XSS J1227 over 7 yr shows a persistent and rather stable low-luminosity (6 × 1033 d2 1 kpcerg s-1) source, with flares and dips being peculiar and permanent characteristics. The associated Fermi-LAT source 2FGL J1227.7-4853 is also stable over an overlapping period of 4.7 yr. Searches for X-ray fast pulsations down to msec give upper limits to pulse fractional amplitudes of 15-25% that do not rule out a fast spinning pulsar. The combined UV/optical/near-IR spectrum reveals a hot component at approximately 13 kK and a cool one at approximately 4.6 kK. The latter would suggest a late-type K2-K5 companion star, a distance range of 1.4-3.6 kpc, and an orbital period of 7-9 h. A near-UV variability (6 h) also suggests a longer orbital period than previously estimated. Conclusions. The analysis shows that the X-ray and UV/optical/near-IR emissions are more compatible with an accretion-powered compact object than with a rotational powered pulsar. The X-ray to UV bolometric luminosity ratio could be consistent with a binary hosting a neutron star, but the uncertainties in the radio data may also allow an LMXB

  18. Sgr A* and Its Environment: Low-mass Star Formation, the Origin of X-Ray Gas and Collimated Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Wardle, M.; Schödel, R.; Roberts, D. A.; Cotton, W.; Bushouse, H.; Arendt, R.; Royster, M.

    2016-03-01

    We present high-resolution multiwavelength radio continuum images of the region within 150″ of Sgr A*, revealing a number of new extended features and stellar sources in this region. First, we detect a continuous 2″ east-west ridge of radio emission, linking Sgr A* and a cluster of stars associated with IRS 13 N and IRS 13E. The ridge suggests that an outflow of east-west blob-like structures is emerging from Sgr A*. In particular, we find arc-like radio structures within the ridge with morphologies suggestive of photoevaporative protoplanetary disks. We use infrared Ks and L‧ fluxes to show that the emission has similar characteristics to those of a protoplanetary disk irradiated by the intense radiation field at the Galactic center. This suggests that star formation has taken place within the S-cluster 2″ from Sgr A*. We suggest that the diffuse X-ray emission associated with Sgr A* is due to an expanding hot wind produced by the mass loss from B-type main sequence stars, and/or the disks of photoevaporation of low mass young stellar objects (YSOs) at a rate of ˜10-6 {M}⊙ yr-1. The proposed model naturally reduces the inferred accretion rate and is an alternative to the inflow-outflow style models to explain the underluminous nature of Sgr A*. Second, on a scale of 5″ from Sgr A*, we detect new cometary radio and infrared sources at a position angle PA ˜ 50° which is similar to that of two other cometary sources X3 and X7, all of which face Sgr A*. In addition, we detect a striking tower of radio emission at a PA ˜ 50°-60° along the major axis of the Sgr A East supernova remnant shell on a scale of 150″ from Sgr A*. We suggest that the cometary sources and the tower feature are tracing interaction sites of a mildly relativistic jet from Sgr A* with the atmosphere of stars and the nonthermal Sgr A East shell at a PA ˜ 50°-60° with \\dot{M}˜ 1× {10}-7 {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1, and opening angle 10°. Lastly, we suggest that the east-west ridge of

  19. X-ray emission at the low-mass end - Results from an extensive Einstein Observatory survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbera, M.; Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Rosner, R.

    1993-01-01

    We have used available IPC data and a critical compilation of cataloged optical data to measure the 0.16-3.5 keV X-ray emission from 88 K and 169 M stars of luminosity classes IV, V, and VI within 25 pc from the Sun. The IPC detected 54 out of the 88 K stars, 70 out of the 138 M stars with M(v) less than 13.4, and 15 out of the 31 fainter M stars. We have identified a subsample of surveyed stars that is statistically representative of the population of K and M stars in the solar neighborhood. On the basis of this subsample (1) we have shown the occurrence of a drop in the level of X-ray emission for M stars later than approximately M5; (2) we have built unbiased maximum likelihood X-ray luminosity functions for the K, early M, and late M stars; (3) we have confirmed, both for K and M stars, the decrease of X-ray luminosity with increasing stellar age in the range of ages of disk population stars: and (4) we have shown that no obvious correlation is present between X-ray and bolometric luminosities in the entire representative samples of K and M stars, but only within flare stars which also seem to mark a saturation in X-ray luminosity level.

  20. Evidence from Quasi-Periodic Oscillations for a Millisecond Pulsar in the Low Mass X-Ray Binary 4U 0614+091

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, E.; Kaaret, P.; Tavani, M.; Barret, D.; Bloser, P.; Grindlay, J.; Harmon, B. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Zhang, S. N.

    1997-01-01

    We have detected quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) near 1 kHz from the low mass X-ray binary 4U 0614+091 in observations with RXTE. The observations span several months and sample the source over a large range of X-ray luminosity. In every interval QPOs are present above 400 Hz with fractional RMS amplitudes from 3 to 12% over the full PCA band. At high count rates, two high frequency QPOs are detected simultaneously. The difference of their frequency centroids is consistent with a constant value of 323 Hz in all observations. During one interval a third signal is detected at 328 +/- 2 Hz. This suggests the system has a stable 'clock' which is most likely the neutron star with spin period 3.1 msec. Thus, our observations of 4U 0614+091 and those of 4U 1728-34 provide the first evidence for millisecond pulsars within low-mass X-ray binary systems and reveal the 'missing-link' between millisecond radiopulsars and the late stages of binary evolution in low mass X-ray binaries. The constant difference of the high frequency QPOs sug,,ests a beat-frequency interpretation. In this model, the high frequency QPO is associated with the Keplerian frequency of the inner accretion disk and the lower frequency QPO is a 'beat' between the differential rotation frequency of the inner disk and the spinning neutron star. Assuming the high frequency QPO is a Keplerian orbital frequency for the accretion disk, we find a maximum mass of 1.9 solar mass and a maximum radius of 17 km for the neutron star.

  1. Phase lags of quasi-periodic oscillations across source states in the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1636-53

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Avellar, Marcio G. B.; Méndez, Mariano; Altamirano, Diego; Sanna, Andrea; Zhang, Guobao

    2016-09-01

    While there are many dynamical mechanisms and models that try to explain the origin and phenomenology of the quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) seen in the X-ray light curves of low-mass X-ray binaries, few of them address how the radiative processes occurring in these extreme environments give rise to the rich set of variability features actually observed in these light curves. A step towards this end comes from the study of the energy and frequency dependence of the phase lags of these QPOs. Here we used a methodology that allowed us to study, for the first time, the dependence of the phase lags of all QPOs in the range of 1-1300 Hz detected in the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1636-53 upon energy and frequency as the source changes its states as it moves through the colour-colour diagram. Our results suggest that within the context of models of up-scattering Comptonization, the phase lags dependences upon frequency and energy can be used to extract size scales and physical conditions of the medium that produces the lags.

  2. XTE J1701-462 AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE NATURE OF SUBCLASSES IN LOW-MAGNETIC-FIELD NEUTRON STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, Jeroen; Fridriksson, Joel K.; Remillard, Ronald A.; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Van der Klis, Michiel; Wijnands, Rudy; Altamirano, Diego; Mendez, Mariano; Lin Dacheng; Casella, Piergiorgio; Belloni, Tomaso M.

    2010-08-10

    We report on an analysis of Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer data of the transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary (NS-LMXB) XTE J1701-462, obtained during its 2006-2007 outburst. The X-ray properties of the source changed between those of various types of NS-LMXB subclasses. At high luminosities, the source switched between two types of Z source behavior and at low luminosities we observed a transition from Z source to atoll source behavior. These transitions between subclasses primarily manifest themselves as changes in the shapes of the tracks in X-ray color-color (CD) and hardness-intensity diagrams (HID), but they are accompanied by changes in the kHz quasi-periodic oscillations, broadband variability, burst behavior, and/or X-ray spectra. We find that for most of the outburst the low-energy X-ray flux is a good parameter to track the gradual evolution of the tracks in CD and HID, allowing us to resolve the evolution of the source in greater detail than before and relate the observed properties to other NS-LMXBs. We further find that during the transition from Z to atoll, characteristic behavior known as the atoll upper banana can equivalently be described as the final stage of a weakening Z source flaring branch, thereby blurring the line between the two subclasses. Our findings strongly suggest that the wide variety in behavior observed in NS-LXMBs with different luminosities can be linked through changes in a single variable parameter, namely the mass accretion rate, without the need for additional differences in the neutron star parameters or viewing angle. We briefly discuss the implications of our findings for the spectral changes observed in NS-LMXBs and suggest that, contrary to what is often assumed, the position along the color-color tracks of Z sources is not determined by the instantaneous mass accretion rate.

  3. X-ray cross-correlation analysis of the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1636-53

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Ya-Juan

    2014-05-01

    We analyze the cross-correlation function of the soft and hard X-rays of the atoll source 4U 1636-53 with RXTE data. The results show that the cross-correlations evolve along the different branches of the color-color diagram. At the lower left banana states, we have both positive and ambiguous correlations, and positive correlations are dominant for the lower banana and the upper banana states. The anti-correlation is detected at the top of the upper banana states. The cross-correlations of two atoll sources 4U 1735-44 and 4U 1608-52 have been studied in previous work, and the anti-correlations are detected at the lower left banana or the top of the upper banana states. Our results show that, in the 4U 1636-53, the distribution of the cross-correlations in the color-color diagram is similar to those of 4U 1735-44 and 4U 1608-52, and confirm further that the distribution of cross-correlations in color-color diagram could be correlated with the luminosity of the source.

  4. ROSSI X-RAY TIMING EXPLORER OBSERVATIONS OF THE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY 4U 1608-522 IN THE UPPER-BANANA STATE

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Sakurai, Soki; Makishima, Kazuo

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the physics of mass accretion onto weakly magnetized neutron stars (NSs), 95 archival Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer data sets of an atoll source 4U 1608-522, acquired over 1996-2004 in the so-called upper-banana state, were analyzed. The object meantime exhibited 3-30 keV luminosity in the range of {approx}< 10{sup 35}-4 x 10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1}, assuming a distance of 3.6 kpc. The 3-30 keV Proportional Counter Array spectra, produced one from each data set, were represented successfully with a combination of a soft and a hard component, the presence of which was revealed in a model-independent manner by studying spectral variations among the observations. The soft component is expressed by the so-called multi-color disk model with a temperature of {approx}1.8 keV, and is attributed to the emission from an optically thick standard accretion disk. The hard component is a blackbody (BB) emission with a temperature of {approx}2.7 keV, thought to be emitted from the NS surface. As the total luminosity increases, a continuous decrease is observed in the ratio of the BB luminosity to that of the disk component. This property suggests that it gradually becomes difficult for the matter flowing through the accretion disk to reach the NS surface, presumably forming outflows driven by the increased radiation pressure. On timescales of hours to days, the overall source variability was found to be controlled by two independent variables: the mass accretion rate and the innermost disk radius, which changes both physically and artificially.

  5. Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Observations of the Low-mass X-ray Binary 4U 1608-522 in the Upper-banana State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Sakurai, Soki; Makishima, Kazuo

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the physics of mass accretion onto weakly magnetized neutron stars (NSs), 95 archival Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer data sets of an atoll source 4U 1608-522, acquired over 1996-2004 in the so-called upper-banana state, were analyzed. The object meantime exhibited 3-30 keV luminosity in the range of <~ 1035-4 × 1037 erg s-1, assuming a distance of 3.6 kpc. The 3-30 keV Proportional Counter Array spectra, produced one from each data set, were represented successfully with a combination of a soft and a hard component, the presence of which was revealed in a model-independent manner by studying spectral variations among the observations. The soft component is expressed by the so-called multi-color disk model with a temperature of ~1.8 keV, and is attributed to the emission from an optically thick standard accretion disk. The hard component is a blackbody (BB) emission with a temperature of ~2.7 keV, thought to be emitted from the NS surface. As the total luminosity increases, a continuous decrease is observed in the ratio of the BB luminosity to that of the disk component. This property suggests that it gradually becomes difficult for the matter flowing through the accretion disk to reach the NS surface, presumably forming outflows driven by the increased radiation pressure. On timescales of hours to days, the overall source variability was found to be controlled by two independent variables: the mass accretion rate and the innermost disk radius, which changes both physically and artificially.

  6. kHz Quasiperiodic Oscillations in Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries as Probes of General Relativity in the Strong-Field Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stella, Luigi; Vietri, Mario

    1999-01-01

    We consider the interpretation of a pair of kHz quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) in the Fourier spectra of two low-mass x-ray binaries, Sco X-1 and 4U1608-52, hosting an old accreting neutron star. The observed frequency difference of these QPOs decreases as their frequency increases, contrary to simple beat frequency models. We show that the behavior of these QPOs is instead well matched in terms of the fundamental frequencies for test particle motion in the gravitational field of the neutron star, for reasonable star masses, and nearly independent of the star spin. These results are not reproduced through the post-Newtonian approximation of general relativity. kHz QPOs from x-ray binaries likely provide an accurate laboratory for strong-field general relativity.

  7. KHz Quasi Periodic Oscillations in Low Mass X-ray Binaries as Probes of General Relativity in the Strong Field Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stella, Luigi; Vietri, Mario

    1998-12-01

    The pair of kHz Quasi Periodic Oscillations (QPOs) in the Fourier spectra of two low mass X-ray binaries, Sco X-1 and 4U1608-52, hosting an old accreting neutron star, display a frequency difference that decreaseas for increasing QPO frequency. This is contrary to simple beat frequency models, which predict a constant frequency difference. We show that the behaviour of these QPOs is well matched in terms of the fundamental (radial and azimuthal) frequencies for test particle motion in the vicinity the neutron star, for reasonable star masses, and nearly independent of the star spin. The radial frequency must be much smaller than the azimuthal one, testifying that kHz QPOs originate from close to the innermost stable orbit. These results are not reproduced through the post-Newtonian approximation of General Relativity (GR). kHz QPOs from X-ray binaries likely provide an accurate laboratory for strong field GR.

  8. On the Optical–X-Ray Correlation from Outburst to Quiescence in Low-mass X-Ray Binaries: The Representative Cases of V404 Cyg and Cen X-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, F.; Russell, D. M.; Kolojonen, K. I. I.; Stella, L.; Hynes, R. I.; Corbel, S.

    2016-08-01

    Low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) show evidence of a global correlation of debated origin between X-ray and optical luminosity. We study for the first time this correlation in two transient LMXBs, the black hole (BH) V404 Cyg and the neutron star Cen X-4, over six orders of magnitude in X-ray luminosity, from outburst to quiescence. After subtracting the contribution from the companion star, the Cen X-4 data can be described by a single power-law correlation of the form {L}{opt}\\propto {L}{{X}}0.44, consistent with disk reprocessing. We find a similar correlation slope for V404 Cyg in quiescence (0.46) and a steeper one (0.56) in the outburst hard state of 1989. However, V404 Cyg is about 160–280 times optically brighter, at a given 3–9 keV X-ray luminosity, compared to Cen X-4. This ratio is a factor of 10 smaller in quiescence, where the normalization of the V404 Cyg correlation also changes. Once the bolometric X-ray emission is considered and the known main differences between V404 Cyg and Cen X-4 are taken into account (a larger compact object mass, accretion disk size, and the presence of a strong jet contribution in the hard state for the BH system), the two systems lie on the same correlation. In V404 Cyg, the jet dominates spectrally at optical–infrared frequencies during the hard state but makes a negligible contribution in quiescence, which may account for the change in its correlation slope and normalization. These results provide a benchmark to compare with data from the 2015 outburst of V404 Cyg and, potentially, other transient LMXBs as well.

  9. The First Low-mass Black Hole X-Ray Binary Identified in Quiescence Outside of a Globular Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetarenko, B. E.; Bahramian, A.; Arnason, R. M.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Repetto, S.; Heinke, C. O.; Maccarone, T. J.; Chomiuk, L.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Strader, J.; Kirsten, F.; Vlemmings, W.

    2016-07-01

    The observed relation between the X-ray and radio properties of low-luminosity accreting black holes (BHs) has enabled the identification of multiple candidate black hole X-ray binaries (BHXBs) in globular clusters (GCs). Here, we report an identification of the radio source VLA J213002.08+120904 (aka M15 S2), recently reported in Kirsten et al., as a BHXB candidate. They showed that the parallax of this flat-spectrum variable radio source indicates a {2.2}-0.3+0.5 kpc distance, which identifies it as lying in the foreground of the GC M15. We determine the radio characteristics of this source and place a deep limit on the X-ray luminosity of ∼4 × 1029 erg s‑1. Furthermore, we astrometrically identify a faint red stellar counterpart in archival Hubble images with colors consistent with a foreground star; at 2.2 kpc, its inferred mass is 0.1–0.2 M ⊙. We rule out that this object is a pulsar, neutron star X-ray binary, cataclysmic variable, or planetary nebula, concluding that VLA J213002.08+120904 is the first accreting BHXB candidate discovered in quiescence outside of a GC. Given the relatively small area over which parallax studies of radio sources have been performed, this discovery suggests a much larger population of quiescent BHXBs in our Galaxy, 2.6 × 104–1.7 × 108 BHXBs at 3σ confidence, than has been previously estimated (∼102–104) through population synthesis.

  10. X-ray emission at low-mass end of the MS - Results from an extensive Einstein Observatory survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbera, M.; Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Vaiana, G. S.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Rosner, R.

    1992-01-01

    The 0.16-4.0 keV X-ray emission from K and M stars of luminosity classes IV, V, and VI within 25 parsec of the sun was measured using all available Einstein Observatory IPC data and a critical compilation of catalogued optical data. Fifty four of 88 stars were detected, 70 of 138 M stars with Mv less than 13.4 (corresponding to M6) and 15 or 31 fainter M stars. The surveyed stars were grouped, on the basis of U, V, W space velocity components, into old-disk, young-disk, and halo population stars. Then, a subsample was selected which is statistically representative of the population of K and M stars in the solar neighborhood, on the basis of which unbiased Maximum Likelihood X-ray luminosity functions were constructed for K, early M, and late M stars. The investigation revealed a decrease of X-ray luminosity with increasing stellar age in the range of ages of disk population stars.

  11. Time lags of the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations in the low-mass X-ray binaries 4U 1608-52 and 4U 1636-53

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Avellar, M. G. B.; Méndez, M.; Sanna, A.; Horvath, J. E.

    2014-10-01

    We studied the time lags and the coherence of the X-ray light curves of the neutron star low mass X-ray binaries 4U 1608-52 and 4U 1636-53. These quantities are frequency-dependent measures of the time or phase delay and of the degree of linear correlation between two X-ray light curves in two different energies bands; they encode information about the size and geometry of the medium that produces them.

  12. The X-Ray Luminosity Function of Low-mass X-Ray Binaries in Early-type Galaxies, Their Metal-rich, and Metal-poor Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, Mark B.; Zepf, Stephen E.

    2016-02-01

    We present the X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) in the globular clusters (GCs) and fields of seven early-type galaxies. These galaxies are selected to have both deep Chandra observations, which allow their LMXB populations to be observed to X-ray luminosities of 1037-1038 erg s-1, and Hubble Space Telescope optical mosaics that enable the X-ray sources to be separated into field LMXBs, GC LMXBs, and contaminating background and foreground sources. We find that at all luminosities the number of field LMXBs per stellar mass is similar in these galaxies. This suggests that the field LMXB populations in these galaxies are not effected by the GC specific frequency, and that properties such as binary fraction and the stellar initial mass function are either similar across the sample or change in a way that does not affect the number of LMXBs. We compare the XLF of the field LMXBs to that of the GC LMXBs and find that they are significantly different with a p-value of 3 × 10-6 (equivalent to 4.7σ for a normal distribution). The difference is such that the XLF of the GC LMXBs is flatter than that of the field LMXBs, with the GCs hosting relatively more bright sources and fewer faint sources. A comparison of the XLF of the metal-rich and metal-poor GCs hints that the metal-poor clusters may have more bright LMXBs, but the difference is not statistically significant.

  13. Taking into account the effects of component proximity on the spectral-line profiles of stars in low-mass X-ray binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, V. S.; Antokhina, E. A.; Cherepashchuk, A. M.

    2015-05-01

    An exact calculation of CaI λ6439 Å absorption profiles in the spectra of optical stars in low-mass X-ray binary systems is carried out. The calculations are used to revise a formula relating the rotational broadening of lines and the component-mass ratio. In the case of modest (substantial) X-ray heating, failure to take into account the tidal-rotational deformation of the figure of the star leads to overestimation (underestimation) of the mass of the relativistic object. The radial-velocity curves of optical stars are modeled for binary systems with various parameters and X-ray heating powers k x ; corresponding tables of K corrections are presented. Refined values for the component-mass ratio q = 23 ± 1, black-hole mass M x = 8.4 ± 0.5, and optical-star mass M v = 0.36 ± 0.07 for the GS 2023+338 (V404 Cyg) system are presented.

  14. The puzzling negative orbit-period derivative of the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1820-30 in NGC 6624

    SciTech Connect

    Peuten, M.; Brockamp, M.; Küpper, A. H. W.; Kroupa, P. E-mail: brockamp@astro.uni-bonn.de E-mail: pavel@astro.uni-bonn.de

    2014-11-10

    4U 1820-30 is a low-mass X-ray binary near the center of the globular cluster NGC 6624 consisting of, at least, one neutron star and one helium white dwarf. Analyzing 16 yr of data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) allows us to measure its orbital period and its time derivative with unprecedented accuracy to be P = 685.01197 ± 0.00003 s and P-dot / P=−5.3±0.3×10{sup −8} yr{sup −1}. Hence, we confirm that the period derivative is significantly negative at the >17σ level, contrary to theoretical expectations for an isolated X-ray binary. We discuss possible scenarios that could explain this discrepancy and conclude that the center of NGC 6624 most likely contains large amounts of nonluminous matter such as dark remnants. We also discuss the possibility of an IMBH inside NGC 6624, or that a dark remnant close to 4U 1820-30 causes the observed shift.

  15. AN Fe XXIV ABSORPTION LINE IN THE PERSISTENT SPECTRUM OF THE DIPPING LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY 1A 1744-361

    SciTech Connect

    Gavriil, Fotis P.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2012-07-01

    We report on Chandra X-ray Observatory (Chandra) High Energy Transmission Grating spectra of the dipping low-mass X-ray binary 1A 1744-361 during its 2008 July outburst. We find that its persistent emission is well modeled by a blackbody (kT {approx} 1.0 keV) plus power law ({Gamma} {approx} 1.7) with an absorption edge. In the residuals of the combined spectrum, we find a significant absorption line at 6.961 {+-} 0.002 keV, consistent with the Fe XXVI (hydrogen-like Fe) 2-1 transition. We place an upper limit on the velocity of a redshifted flow of v < 221 km s{sup -1}. We find an equivalent width for the line of 27{sup +2}{sub -3} eV, from which we determine a column density of (7 {+-} 1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} via a curve-of-growth analysis. Using XSTAR simulations, we place a lower limit on the ionization parameter of >10{sup 3.6} erg cm s{sup -1}. We discuss what implications the feature has on the system and its geometry. We also present Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer data accumulated during this latest outburst and, via an updated color-color diagram, clearly show that 1A 1744-361 is an 'atoll' source.

  16. Simplified Picture of Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries Based on Data from Aquila X-1 and 4U 1608-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Masaru; Asai, Kazumi

    2013-04-01

    We propose a simplified picture of low-mass X-ray binaries containing a neutron star (NS-LMXBs) based on data obtained from Aql X-1 and 4U 1608- 52, which often produce outbursts. In this picture we propose at least three states and three state transitions: i.e., the states: (1) soft state, (2) hard-high state, and (3) hard-low state, and the state transitions: (i) hard-high state to soft state, (ii) soft state to hard-high state, and (iii) hard-high state to hard-low state or vice versa. Gases from the accretion disc of an NS-LMXB penetrate almost the entire magnetic field and accrete onto the neutron star in cases (1) and (2), whereas in case (3) some gases accrete around the magnetic poles in a manner resembling the behavior of an X-ray pulsar, and considerable gas is dispersed or ejected by the propeller effect. Transition (iii) occurs when the Alfvén radius is equal to the co-rotation radius. Therefore, in this case it is possible to estimate the strength of the neutron star's magnetic field by detecting transition (iii). We also discuss the no-accretion X-ray state or the recycled pulsar state, in which the Alfvén radius is larger than the light cylinder radius.

  17. The effect of accretion on the measurement of neutron star mass and radius in the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1608-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poutanen, Juri; Nättilä, Joonas; Kajava, Jari J. E.; Latvala, Outi-Marja; Galloway, Duncan K.; Kuulkers, Erik; Suleimanov, Valery F.

    2014-08-01

    Spectral measurements of thermonuclear (type I) X-ray bursts from low-mass X-ray binaries have been used to measure neutron star (NS) masses and radii. A number of systematic issues affect such measurements and have raised concerns as to the robustness of the methods. We present analysis of the X-ray emission from bursts observed from 4U 1608-52 at various persistent fluxes. We find a strong dependence of the burst properties on the flux and spectral hardness of the persistent emission before burst. Bursts occurring during the low accretion rate (hard) state exhibit evolution of the blackbody normalization consistent with the theoretical predictions of NS atmosphere models. However, bursts occurring during the high accretion rate (soft) state show roughly constant normalization, which is inconsistent with the NS atmosphere models and therefore these bursts cannot be easily used to determine NS parameters. We analyse the hard-state burst to put the lower limit on the NS radius R in 4U 1608-52 of 12 km (for masses 1.0-2.4 M⊙). We constrain R to be between 13 and 16 km for masses 1.2-1.6 M⊙. The best agreement with the theoretical NS mass-radius relations is achieved for source distances in the range 3.1-3.7 kpc. We expect that the radius limit will be 10 per cent lower if spectral models including rapid rotation are used instead.

  18. A Test of the Nature of the Fe K Line in the Neutron Star Low-mass X-Ray Binary Serpens X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chia-Ying; Cackett, Edward M.; Miller, Jon M.; Barret, Didier; Fabian, Andy C.; D’Aì, Antonino; Parker, Michael L.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Burderi, Luciano; Di Salvo, Tiziana; Egron, Elise; Homan, Jeroen; Iaria, Rosario; Lin, Dacheng; Miller, M. Coleman

    2016-04-01

    Broad Fe K emission lines have been widely observed in the X-ray spectra of black hole systems as well as in neutron star systems. The intrinsically narrow Fe K fluorescent line is generally believed to be part of the reflection spectrum originating in an illuminated accretion disk which is broadened by strong relativistic effects. However, the nature of the lines in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) has been a matter of debate. We therefore obtained the longest, high-resolution X-ray spectrum of a neutron star LMXB to date with a 300 ks Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) observation of Serpens X-1. The observation was taken under the “continuous clocking” mode, and thus was free of photon pile-up effects. We carry out a systematic analysis and find that the blurred reflection model fits the Fe line of Serpens X-1 significantly better than a broad Gaussian component does, implying that the relativistic reflection scenario is much preferred. Chandra HETGS also provides a highest spectral resolution view of the Fe K region and we find no strong evidence for additional narrow lines.

  19. An Fe XXIV Absorption Line in the Persistent Spectrum of the Dipping Low-Mass X-Ray Binary 1A 1744-361

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gavriil, Fotis P.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2012-01-01

    We report on Chandra X-ray Observatory (Chandra) High Energy Transmission Grating spectra of the dipping low-mass X-ray binary 1A 1744-361 during its 2008 July outburst. We find that its persistent emission is well modeled by a blackbody (kT approx. 1.0 keV) plus power law (Gamma approx. 1.7) with an absorption edge. In the residuals of the combined spectrum, we find a significant absorption line at 6.961 +/- 0.002 keV, consistent with the Fe xxvi (hydrogen-like Fe) 2-1 transition.We place an upper limit on the velocity of a redshifted flow of nu < 221 km/s. We find an equivalent width for the line of 27+2/-3 eV, from which we determine a column density of (7 +/- 1)×10(exp 17) /sq. cm via a curve-of-growth analysis. Using XSTAR simulations, we place a lower limit on the ionization parameter of >103.6 erg cm/s. We discuss what implications the feature has on the system and its geometry. We also present Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer data accumulated during this latest outburst and, via an updated color-color diagram, clearly show that 1A 1744-361 is an "atoll" source

  20. QUARK-NOVAE IN LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES. II. APPLICATION TO G87-7 AND TO GRB 110328A

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyed, Rachid; Staff, Jan; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2011-12-20

    We propose a simple model explaining two outstanding astrophysical problems related to compact objects: (1) that of stars such as G87-7 (alias EG 50) that constitute a class of relatively low-mass white dwarfs (WDs) which nevertheless fall away from the C/O composition and (2) that of GRB 110328A/Swift J164449.3+57345 which showed spectacularly long-lived strong X-ray flaring, posing a challenge to standard gamma-ray burst models. We argue that both these observations may have an explanation within the unified framework of a quark-nova (QN) occurring in a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB; neutron star (NS)-WD). For LMXBs, where the binary separation is sufficiently tight, ejecta from the exploding NS triggers nuclear burning in the WD on impact, possibly leading to Fe-rich composition compact WDs with mass 0.43 M{sub Sun} < M{sub WD} < 0.72 M{sub Sun }, reminiscent of G87-7. Our results rely on the assumption, which ultimately needs to be tested by hydrodynamic and nucleosynthesis simulations, that under certain circumstances the WD can avoid the thermonuclear runaway. For heavier WDs (i.e., M{sub WD} > 0.72 M{sub Sun }) experiencing the QN shock, degeneracy will not be lifted when carbon burning begins, and a sub-Chandrasekhar Type Ia supernova may result in our model. Under slightly different conditions and for pure He WDs (i.e., M{sub WD} < 0.43 M{sub Sun }), the WD is ablated and its ashes raining down on the quark star (QS) leads to accretion-driven X-ray luminosity with energetics and duration reminiscent of GRB 110328A. We predict additional flaring activity toward the end of the accretion phase if the QS turns into a black hole.

  1. BANYAN. III. Radial velocity, rotation, and X-ray emission of low-mass star candidates in nearby young kinematic groups

    SciTech Connect

    Malo, Lison; Artigau, Étienne; Doyon, René; Lafrenière, David; Albert, Loïc; Gagné, Jonathan E-mail: doyon@astro.umontreal.ca

    2014-06-10

    Based on high-resolution spectra obtained with PHOENIX at Gemini-South, CRIRES at VLT-UT1, and ESPaDOnS at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, we present new measurements of the radial and projected rotational velocities of 219 low-mass stars. The target likely membership was initially established using the Bayesian analysis tool recently presented in Malo et al., taking into account only the position, proper motion, and photometry of the stars to assess their membership probability. In the present study, we include radial velocity as an additional input to our analysis, and in doing so we confirm the high membership probability for 130 candidates: 27 in β Pictoris, 22 in Tucana-Horologium, 25 in Columba, 7 in Carina, 18 in Argus and 18 in AB Doradus, and 13 with an ambiguous membership. Our analysis also confirms the membership of 57 stars proposed in the literature. A subsample of 16 candidates was observed at 3 or more epochs, allowing us to discover 6 new spectroscopic binaries. The fraction of binaries in our sample is 25%, consistent with values in the literature. Of the stars in our sample, 20% show projected rotational velocities (vsin i) higher than 30 km s{sup –1} and therefore are considered as fast rotators. A parallax and other youth indicators are still needed to fully confirm the 130 highly probable candidates identified here as new bona fide members. Finally, based on the X-ray emission of bona fide and highly probable group members, we show that for low-mass stars in the 12-120 Myr age range, the X-ray luminosity is an excellent indicator of youth and better than the more traditionally used R {sub X} parameter, the ratio of X-ray to bolometric luminosity.

  2. DISCOVERY OF X-RAY EMISSION IN THE OLD CLASSICAL NOVA DK LACERTAE

    SciTech Connect

    Takei, D.; Drake, J. J.; Sakamoto, T.

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of X-ray emission at the position of the old classical nova DK Lacertae using the Swift satellite. Three observations were conducted using the X-Ray Telescope 62 years after the discovery of the nova, yielding 46 source signals in an exposure time of 4.8 ks. A background-subtracted count rate was 9 {+-} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} counts s{sup -1}, corresponding to a detection significance level of 5{sigma}. The X-ray spectrum was characterized by a continuum extending up to about 7 keV, which can be modeled by a power-law component with a photon index of 1.4-5.6, or by a thermal bremsstrahlung component with a temperature of 0.7-13.3 keV, convolved with interstellar absorption with an equivalent hydrogen column density of 0.3-2.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}. Assuming a distance of 3900 pc to the source, the luminosity was 10{sup 32}-10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1} in the 0.3-10 keV energy band. The origin of X-rays is considered to be either mass accretion on the white dwarf or adiabatic shocks in nova ejecta, with the former appearing much more likely. In either case, DK Lacertae represents a rare addition to the exclusive club of X-ray emitting old novae.

  3. Lost in Secular Evolution: The Case of a Low-mass Classical Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Kanak

    2015-06-01

    The existence of a classical bulge in disk galaxies holds an important clue to the assembly history of galaxies. Finding observational evidence of very low mass classical bulges, particularly in barred galaxies, including our Milky Way, is a challenging task as the bar-driven secular evolution might bring significant dynamical change to these bulges alongside the stellar disk. Using high-resolution N-body simulation, we show that if a cool stellar disk is assembled around a non-rotating low-mass classical bulge, the disk rapidly grows a strong bar within a few rotation timescales. Later, the bar-driven secular process transforms the initial classical bulge into a flattened rotating stellar system whose central part also has grown a barlike component rotating in sync with the disk bar. During this time, a boxy/peanut (hereafter B/P) bulge is formed via the buckling instability of the disk bar, and the vertical extent of this B/P bulge being slightly higher than that of the classical bulge, it encompasses the whole classical bulge. The resulting composite bulge appears to be both photometrically and kinematically identical to a B/P bulge without any obvious signature of the classical component. Our analysis suggests that many barred galaxies in the local universe might be hiding such low-mass classical bulges. We suggest that stellar population and chemodynamical analysis might be required in establishing evidence for such low-mass classical bulges.

  4. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF BLACK HOLE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES: ASSESSING THE NON-STELLAR INFRARED COMPONENT

    SciTech Connect

    Gelino, Dawn M.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Harrison, Thomas E.

    2010-07-20

    We have combined ground-based optical and near-infrared data with Spitzer Space Telescope mid-infrared data for five black hole (BH) soft X-ray transients (SXTs) in order to determine the levels of near- and mid-infrared emission from sources other than the secondary star. Mid-infrared emission from an accretion disk, circumbinary dust, and/or a jet could act as sources of near-infrared contamination, thereby diluting ellipsoidal variations of the secondary star and affecting determined BH mass estimates. Based on optical to mid-infrared spectral energy distribution modeling of the five SXTs along with the prototype, V616 Mon, we detected mid-infrared excesses in half of the systems, and suggest that the excesses detected from these systems arise from non-thermal synchrotron jets rather than circumbinary dust disks.

  5. The Two-dimensional Spatial Distributions of the Globular Clusters and Low-mass X-Ray Binaries of NGC 4649

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Abrusco, R.; Fabbiano, G.; Mineo, S.; Strader, J.; Fragos, T.; Kim, D.-W.; Luo, B.; Zezas, A.

    2014-03-01

    We report significant anisotropies in the projected two-dimensional (2D) spatial distributions of globular clusters (GCs) of the giant Virgo elliptical galaxy NGC 4649 (M60). Similar features are found in the 2D distribution of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), both associated with GCs and in the stellar field. Deviations from azimuthal symmetry suggest an arc-like excess of GCs extending north at 4-15 kpc galactocentric radii in the eastern side of major axis of NGC 4649. This feature is more prominent for red GCs, but still persists in the 2D distribution of blue GCs. High- and low-luminosity GCs also show some segregation along this arc, with high-luminosity GCs preferentially located in the southern end and low-luminosity GCs in the northern section of the arc. GC-LMXBs follow the anisotropy of red GCs, where most of them reside; however, a significant overdensity of (high-luminosity) field LMXBs is present to the south of the GC arc. These results suggest that NGC 4649 has experienced mergers and/or multiple accretions of less massive satellite galaxies during its evolution, of which the GCs in the arc may be the fossil remnant. We speculate that the observed anisotropy in the field LMXB spatial distribution indicates that these X-ray binaries may be the remnants of a star formation event connected with the merger, or maybe be ejected from the parent red GCs, if the bulk motion of these clusters is significantly affected by dynamical friction. We also detect a luminosity enhancement in the X-ray source population of the companion spiral galaxy NGC 4647. We suggest that these may be younger high mass X-ray binaries formed as a result of the tidal interaction of this galaxy with NGC 4649.

  6. THE STELLAR MASS–HALO MASS RELATION FOR LOW-MASS X-RAY GROUPS AT 0.5< z< 1 IN THE CDFS WITH CSI

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Shannon G.; Kelson, Daniel D.; Williams, Rik J.; Mulchaey, John S.; Dressler, Alan; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Shectman, Stephen A.

    2015-01-30

    Since z∼1, the stellar mass density locked in low-mass groups and clusters has grown by a factor of ∼8. Here, we make the first statistical measurements of the stellar mass content of low-mass X-ray groups at 0.5X-ray observations in the Chandra Deep Field South. These ultra-deep observations allow us to identify bona fide low-mass groups at high redshift and enable measurements of their total halo masses. We compute aggregate stellar masses for these halos using galaxies from the Carnegie-Spitzer-IMACS (CSI) spectroscopic redshift survey. Stars comprise ∼3%–4% of the total mass of group halos with masses 10{sup 12.8}

  7. Theoretical investigation of the neutron star in low-mass X-ray binary X1822-371 (V691 CrA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monowar Hossein, Sk.; Farhad, Nur; Molla, Sajahan; Kalam, Mehedi

    2016-06-01

    We propose a model for the neutron star in low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) X1822-371 (V691 CrA) (Muñoz-Darius et al. in Astrophys. J. 635:502, 2005). Here we investigate the physical phenomena of the neutron star in LMXB X1822-371 (V691 CrA) by using the Tolman-IV solution (Tolman in Phys. Rev. 55:364, 1939). Using our model, we evaluate central density (ρ0), surface density (ρb), central pressure (p 0), surface redshift (Z s) and probable radius of the above mentioned neutron star, which is very much consistent with reported data. We also obtain a possible equation of state (EoS) of the star which is physically acceptable.

  8. A GENERAL RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC MODEL OF HIGH FREQUENCY QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS IN BLACK HOLE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Changsheng; Li Xiangdong E-mail: lixd@nju.edu.c

    2010-05-10

    We suggest a possible explanation for the high frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in black hole (BH) low-mass X-ray binaries. By solving the perturbation general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic equations, we find two stable modes of the Alfven wave in the accretion disks with toroidal magnetic fields. We suggest that these two modes may lead to the double high frequency QPOs if they are produced in the transition region between the inner advection-dominated accretion flow and the outer thin disk. This model naturally accounts for the 3:2 relation for the upper and lower frequencies of the QPOs, and the relation between the BH mass and QPO frequency.

  9. DISCOVERY OF PSR J1227−4853: A TRANSITION FROM A LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY TO A REDBACK MILLISECOND PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Jayanta; Bhattacharyya, Bhaswati; Stappers, Ben; Ray, Paul S.; Wolff, Michael; Wood, Kent S.; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Deneva, Julia; Camilo, Fernando; Johnson, Tyrel J.; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Bassa, Cees G.; Keane, Evan F.; Ferrara, Elizabeth C.; Harding, Alice K.

    2015-02-10

    XSS J12270−4859 is an X-ray binary associated with the Fermi Large Area Telescope gamma-ray source 1FGL J1227.9−4852. In 2012 December, this source underwent a transition where the X-ray and optical luminosity dropped and the spectral signatures of an accretion disk disappeared. We report the discovery of a 1.69 millisecond pulsar (MSP), PSR J1227−4853, at a dispersion measure of 43.4 pc cm{sup −3} associated with this source, using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) at 607 MHz. This demonstrates that, post-transition, the system hosts an active radio MSP. This is the third system after PSR J1023+0038 and PSR J1824−2452I showing evidence of state switching between radio MSP and low-mass X-ray binary states. We report timing observations of PSR J1227−4853 with the GMRT and Parkes, which give a precise determination of the rotational and orbital parameters of the system. The companion mass measurement of 0.17–0.46 M{sub ⊙} suggests that this is a redback system. PSR J1227−4853 is eclipsed for about 40% of its orbit at 607 MHz with additional short-duration eclipses at all orbital phases. We also find that the pulsar is very energetic, with a spin-down luminosity of ∼10{sup 35} erg s{sup −1}. We report simultaneous imaging and timing observations with the GMRT, which suggests that eclipses are caused by absorption rather than dispersion smearing or scattering.

  10. An Fe XXVI Absorption Line in the Persistent Spectrum of the Dipping Low Mass X-ray Binary 1A 1744-361

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gavriil, Fotis P.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2009-01-01

    We report on Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) High-Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) spectra of the dipping Low Mass X-ray Binary (LMXB) 1A 1744-361 during its July 2008 outburst. We find that its persistent emission is well modeled by a blackbody (kT approx. 1.0 keV) plus power-law (Gamma approx. 1.7) with an absorption edge at 7.6 keV. In the residuals of the combined spectrum we find a significant absorption line at 6.961+/-0.002 keV, consistent with the Fe XXVI (hydrogen-like Fe) 2 - 1 transition. We place an upper limit on the velocity of a redshifted flow of v < 221 km/s. We find an equivalent width for the line of 27+2/-3 eV, from which we determine a column density of 7+/-1 x 10(exp 17)/sq cm via a curve-of-growth analysis. Using XSTAR simulations, we place a lower limit on the ionization parameter of > 10(exp 3.6) erg cm/s. The properties of this line are consistent with those observed in other dipping LMXBs. Using Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data accumulated during this latest outburst we present an updated color-color diagram which clearly shows that IA 1744-361 is an "atoll" source. Finally, using additional dips found in the RXTE and CXO data we provide an updated orbital period estimate of 52+/-5 minutes.

  11. ON THE FORMATION OF THE PECULIAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY IGR J17480-2446 IN TERZAN 5

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Long; Li Xiangdong

    2013-07-20

    IGR J17480-2446 is an accreting X-ray pulsar in a low-mass X-ray binary harbored in the Galactic globular cluster Terzan 5. Compared with other accreting millisecond pulsars, IGR J17480-2446 is peculiar for its low spin frequency (11 Hz), which suggests that it might be a mildly recycled neutron star at the very early phase of mass transfer. However, this model seems to be in contrast with the low field strength deduced from the kilo-Hertz quasi-periodic oscillations observed in IGR J17480-2446. Here, we suggest an alternative interpretation, assuming that the current binary system was formed during an exchange encounter either between a binary (which contains a recycled neutron star) and the current donor, or between a binary and an isolated, recycled neutron star. In the resulting binary, the spin axis of the neutron star could be parallel or anti-parallel with the orbital axis. In the latter case, the abnormally low frequency of IGR J17480-2446 may result from the spin-down to spin-up evolution of the neutron star. We also briefly discuss the possible observational implications of the pulsar in this scenario.

  12. Peculiar lapse of periodic eclipsing event at low-mass X-ray binary GRS 1747-312 during Suzaku observation in 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saji, Shigetaka; Mori, Hideyuki; Matsumoto, Hironori; Dotani, Tadayasu; Iwai, Masachika; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Ozaki, Masanobu; Tawara, Yuzuru

    2016-03-01

    GRS 1747-312 is a neutron star low-mass X-ray binary in the globular cluster Terzan 6, located at a distance of 9.5 kpc from the Earth. During its outbursts, periodic eclipses were known to occur. Observations for the outbursts were performed with Chandra in 2004 and Swift in 2013. XMM-Newton observed its quiescent state in 2004. In addition, when Suzaku observed it in 2009 as a part of Galactic center mapping observations, GRS 1747-312 was found to be in a low-luminosity state with Lx ˜ 1.2 × 1035 erg s-1. All of the observations except for XMM-Newton included the time of the eclipses predicted. We analyzed archival data of these observations. During the Chandra and Swift observations, we found clear flux decreases at the expected time of the eclipses. During the Suzaku observation, however, there were no clear signs for the predicted eclipses. The lapse of the predicted eclipses during the Suzaku observation can be explained by a contaminant source quite close to GRS 1747-312. When GRS 1747-312 is in the quiescent state, we observe X-rays from the contaminant source rather than from GRS 1747-312. However, we have no clear evidence for the contaminant source in our data. The lapse might also be explained by thick material (NH > 1024 cm-2) between the neutron star and the companion star, though the origin of the thick material is not clear.

  13. Peculiar lapse of periodic eclipsing event at low-mass X-ray binary GRS 1747-312 during Suzaku observation in 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saji, Shigetaka; Mori, Hideyuki; Matsumoto, Hironori; Dotani, Tadayasu; Iwai, Masachika; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Ozaki, Masanobu; Tawara, Yuzuru

    2016-06-01

    GRS 1747-312 is a neutron star low-mass X-ray binary in the globular cluster Terzan 6, located at a distance of 9.5 kpc from the Earth. During its outbursts, periodic eclipses were known to occur. Observations for the outbursts were performed with Chandra in 2004 and Swift in 2013. XMM-Newton observed its quiescent state in 2004. In addition, when Suzaku observed it in 2009 as a part of Galactic center mapping observations, GRS 1747-312 was found to be in a low-luminosity state with Lx ˜ 1.2 × 1035 erg s-1. All of the observations except for XMM-Newton included the time of the eclipses predicted. We analyzed archival data of these observations. During the Chandra and Swift observations, we found clear flux decreases at the expected time of the eclipses. During the Suzaku observation, however, there were no clear signs for the predicted eclipses. The lapse of the predicted eclipses during the Suzaku observation can be explained by a contaminant source quite close to GRS 1747-312. When GRS 1747-312 is in the quiescent state, we observe X-rays from the contaminant source rather than from GRS 1747-312. However, we have no clear evidence for the contaminant source in our data. The lapse might also be explained by thick material (NH > 1024 cm-2) between the neutron star and the companion star, though the origin of the thick material is not clear.

  14. The Low-Mass X-Ray Binary X1832-330 in the Globular Cluster NGC 6652: A Serendipitous ASCA Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, Koji; Smale, Alan P.

    1999-01-01

    The Low Mass X-ray Binary (LMXB) X1832-330 in NGC 6652 is one of about 10 bright X-ray sources to have been discovered in Globular Clusters. We report on a serendipitous ASCA observation of this Globular Cluster LMXB, during which a Type I burst was detected and the persistent, non-burst emission of the source was at its brightest level recorded to date. No orbital modulation was detected, which argues against a high inclination for the X1832-330 system. The spectrum of the persistent emission can be fit with a power law plus a partial covering absorber, although other models are not ruled out. Our time-resolved spectral analysis through the burst shows, for the first time, clear evidence for spectral cooling from kT = 2.4 +/- 0.6 keV to kT = 1.0 +/- 0.1 keV during the decay. The measured peak flux during the burst is approximately 10% of the Eddington luminosity for a 1.4 Solar Mass neutron star. These are characteristic of a Type I burst, in the context of the relatively low quiescent luminosity of X1832-330.

  15. A NuSTAR Observation of the Reflection Spectrum of the Low-mass X-Ray Binary 4U 1728-34

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleator, Clio C.; Tomsick, John A.; King, Ashley L.; Miller, Jon M.; Boggs, Steven E.; Bachetti, Matteo; Barret, Didier; Chenevez, Jérôme; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Rahoui, Farid; Stern, Daniel K.; Walton, Dominic J.; Zhang, William W.

    2016-08-01

    We report on a simultaneous NuSTAR and Swift observation of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1728-34. We identified and removed four Type I X-ray bursts during the observation in order to study the persistent emission. The continuum spectrum is hard and described well by a blackbody with kT = 1.5 keV and a cutoff power law with Γ = 1.5, and a cutoff temperature of 25 keV. Residuals between 6 and 8 keV provide strong evidence of a broad Fe Kα line. By modeling the spectrum with a relativistically blurred reflection model, we find an upper limit for the inner disk radius of {R}{{in}}≤slant 2{R}{{ISCO}}. Consequently, we find that R NS ≤ 23 km, assuming M = 1.4 M ⊙ and a = 0.15. We also find an upper limit on the magnetic field of B ≤ 2 × 108 G.

  16. X-ray emission from an adolescent classical T Tauri star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggio, Antonio

    2005-10-01

    We propose to perform high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of MP Muscae, a classical T Tauri star with an age of about 10 Myr, and hence quite old for its class. In fact, MP Mus is the only known star of this age with evidence of an accretion disk, found in a survey of the Lower Centaurus-Crux subgroup in the Scorpius- Centaurus association. Moreover, this star also shows evidence of a cold dusty disk, as indicated by excess emission at IR and mm wavelengths. The proposed observation will allow us to address several issues concerning the evolution of the X-ray emission in pre-main-sequence stars, the mechanism(s) of such emission, the element abundances of the emitting plasma, and the influence of high-energy radiation on the surrounding medium where planetary formation is likely occurring.

  17. The MUSCLES Treasury Survey: Intrinsic Lyα Profile Reconstructions and UV, X-ray, and Optical Correlations of Low-mass Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngblood, Allison; France, Kevin; Parke Loyd, R. O.

    2016-01-01

    UV stellar radiation can significantly impact planetary atmospheres through heating and photochemistry, even regulating production of potential biomarkers. Cool stars emit the majority of their UV radiation in the form of emission lines, and the incident UV radiation on close-in habitable-zone planets is significant. Lyα (1215.67 Å) dominates the 912 - 3200 Å spectrum of cool stars, but strong absorption from the interstellar medium (ISM) makes direct observations of the intrinsic Lyα emission of even nearby stars challenging. The MUSCLES Hubble Space Telescope Treasury Survey (Measurements of the Ultraviolet Spectral Characteristics of Low-mass Exoplanetary Systems) has completed observations of 7 M and 4 K stars hosting exoplanets (d < 22 pc) with simultaneous X-ray and ground-based optical spectroscopy for many of the targets. We have reconstructed the intrinsic Lyα profiles using an MCMC technique and used the results to estimate the extreme ultraviolet (100 - 911 Å) spectrum. We also present empirical relations between chromospheric UV and optical lines, e.g., Lyα, Mg II, Ca II H & K, and Hα, for use when direct UV observations of low-mass exoplanet host stars are not possible. The spectra presented here will be made publicly available through MAST to support exoplanet atmosphere modeling.

  18. Classical novae and type I X-ray bursts: Challenges for the 21st century

    SciTech Connect

    Parikh, A. José, J. Sala, G.

    2014-04-15

    Classical nova explosions and type I X-ray bursts are the most frequent types of thermonuclear stellar explosions in the Galaxy. Both phenomena arise from thermonuclear ignition in the envelopes of accreting compact objects in close binary star systems. Detailed observations of these events have stimulated numerous studies in theoretical astrophysics and experimental nuclear physics. We discuss observational features of these phenomena and theoretical efforts to better understand the energy production and nucleosynthesis in these explosions. We also examine and summarize studies directed at identifying nuclear physics quantities with uncertainties that significantly affect model predictions.

  19. Hard-tail emission in the soft state of low-mass X-ray binaries and their relation to the neutron star magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Kazumi; Mihara, Tatehiro; Mastuoka, Masaru; Sugizaki, Mutsumi

    2016-08-01

    Average hard-tail X-ray emission in the soft state of nine bright Atoll low-mass X-ray binaries containing a neutron star (NS-LMXBs) are investigated by using the light curves of MAXI/GSC (Gas Slit Camera) and Swift/BAT (Burst Alert Telescope). Two sources (4U 1820-30 and 4U 1735-44) exhibit a large hardness ratio (15-50 keV/2-10 keV: HR >0.1), while the other sources distribute at HR ≲ 0.1. In either case, HR does not depend on the 2-10 keV luminosity. Therefore the difference of HR is due to the 15-50 keV luminosity, which is Comptonized emission. The Compton cloud is assumed to be around the neutron star. The size of the Compton cloud would affect the value of HR. Although the magnetic field of an NS-LMXB is weak, we could expect a larger Alfvén radius than the innermost stable circular orbit or the neutron star radius in some sources. In such cases, the accretion inflow is stopped at the Alfvén radius and would create a relatively large Compton cloud. This would result in the observed larger Comptonized emission. By attributing the difference of the size of Compton cloud to the Alfvén radius, we can estimate the magnetic fields of neutron stars. The obtained lower/upper limits are consistent with the previous results.

  20. Hard-tail emission in the soft state of low-mass X-ray binaries and their relation to the neutron star magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Kazumi; Mihara, Tatehiro; Mastuoka, Masaru; Sugizaki, Mutsumi

    2016-06-01

    Average hard-tail X-ray emission in the soft state of nine bright Atoll low-mass X-ray binaries containing a neutron star (NS-LMXBs) are investigated by using the light curves of MAXI/GSC (Gas Slit Camera) and Swift/BAT (Burst Alert Telescope). Two sources (4U 1820-30 and 4U 1735-44) exhibit a large hardness ratio (15-50 keV/2-10 keV: HR >0.1), while the other sources distribute at HR ≲ 0.1. In either case, HR does not depend on the 2-10 keV luminosity. Therefore the difference of HR is due to the 15-50 keV luminosity, which is Comptonized emission. The Compton cloud is assumed to be around the neutron star. The size of the Compton cloud would affect the value of HR. Although the magnetic field of an NS-LMXB is weak, we could expect a larger Alfvén radius than the innermost stable circular orbit or the neutron star radius in some sources. In such cases, the accretion inflow is stopped at the Alfvén radius and would create a relatively large Compton cloud. This would result in the observed larger Comptonized emission. By attributing the difference of the size of Compton cloud to the Alfvén radius, we can estimate the magnetic fields of neutron stars. The obtained lower/upper limits are consistent with the previous results.

  1. Stellar mass to halo mass scaling relation for X-ray-selected low-mass galaxy clusters and groups out to redshift z ≈ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, I.; Saro, A.; Mohr, J.; Desai, S.; Bocquet, S.; Capasso, R.; Gangkofner, C.; Gupta, N.; Liu, J.

    2016-05-01

    We present the stellar mass-halo mass scaling relation for 46 X-ray-selected low-mass clusters or groups detected in the XMM-Newton-Blanco Cosmology Survey (XMM-BCS) survey with masses 2 × 1013 M⊙ ≲ M500 ≲ 2.5 × 1014 M⊙ (median mass 8 × 1013 M⊙) at redshift 0.1 ≤ z ≤ 1.02 (median redshift 0.47). The cluster binding masses M500 are inferred from the measured X-ray luminosities LX, while the stellar masses M⋆ of the galaxy populations are estimated using near-infrared (NIR) imaging from the South Pole Telescope Deep Field survey and optical imaging from the BCS survey. With the measured LX and stellar mass M⋆, we determine the best-fitting stellar mass-halo mass relation, accounting for selection effects, measurement uncertainties and the intrinsic scatter in the scaling relation. The resulting mass trend is M_{star }∝ M_{500}^{0.69± 0.15}, the intrinsic (lognormal) scatter is σ _{ln M_{star }|M_{500}}=0.36^{+0.07}_{-0.06}, and there is no significant redshift trend M⋆ ∝ (1 + z)-0.04 ± 0.47, although the uncertainties are still large. We also examine M⋆ within a fixed projected radius of 0.5 Mpc, showing that it provides a cluster binding mass proxy with intrinsic scatter of ≈93 per cent (1σ in M500). We compare our M⋆ = M⋆(M500, z) scaling relation from the XMM-BCS clusters with samples of massive, Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect selected clusters (M500 ≈ 6 × 1014 M⊙) and low-mass NIR-selected clusters (M500 ≈ 1014 M⊙) at redshift 0.6 ≲ z ≲ 1.3. After correcting for the known mass measurement systematics in the compared samples, we find that the scaling relation is in good agreement with the high-redshift samples, suggesting that for both groups and clusters the stellar content of the galaxy populations within R500 depends strongly on mass but only weakly on redshift out to z ≈ 1.

  2. A Prediction Formula of Supersoft X-ray Phase of Classical Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachisu, Izumi; Kato, Mariko

    2010-02-01

    On the basis of the recently developed universal decline law of classical novae, we propose prediction formulae for supersoft X-ray on and off times, i.e., t X-on = (10 ± 1.8)t 3 days and t X-off = (5.3 ± 1.4)(t 3)1.5 days for 8 lsim t 3 lsim 80 days. Here t 3 is the newly proposed "intrinsic" decay time during which the brightness drops by 3 mag from optical maximum along our universal decline law fitted with observation. We have determined the absolute magnitude of our free-free emission model light curves and derived maximum magnitude versus rate of decline (MMRD) relations. Our theoretical MMRD relations are governed by two parameters, one is the white dwarf (WD) mass and the other is the initial envelope mass at a nova outburst; this second parameter explains the scatter of MMRD points of individual novae. Our theoretical MMRD relations are also in good agreement with the well-known empirical formulae. We also show another empirical relation of MV (15) ~ -5.7 ± 0.3 based on the absolute magnitude of our model light curves, i.e., the absolute magnitude at 15 days after optical maximum is almost common among various novae. We analyzed 10 nova light curves, in which a supersoft X-ray phase was detected, and estimated their WD masses. The models best simultaneously reproducing the optical and supersoft X-ray observations are ONeMg WDs with 1.28 ± 0.04 M sun (V598 Pup), 1.23 ± 0.05 M sun (V382 Vel), 1.15 ± 0.06 M sun (V4743 Sgr), 1.13 ± 0.06 M sun (V1281 Sco), 1.2 ± 0.05 M sun (V597 Pup), 1.06 ± 0.07 M sun (V1494 Aql), 1.04 ± 0.07 M sun (V2467 Cyg), 1.07 ± 0.07 M sun (V5116 Sgr), 1.05 ± 0.05 M sun (V574 Pup), and a CO WD with 0.93 ± 0.08 M sun (V458 Vul). The newly proposed relationships are consistent with the emergence or decay epoch of the supersoft X-ray phase of these 10 novae. Finally, we discuss the mechanism of shock-origin hard X-ray component in relation to the emergence of companion star from the WD envelope.

  3. A 2.15 hr ORBITAL PERIOD FOR THE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY XB 1832-330 IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 6652

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, M. C.; Heinke, C. O.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Elshamouty, K. G.; Edmonds, P. D. E-mail: heinke@ualberta.ca

    2012-03-10

    We present a candidate orbital period for the low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) XB 1832-330 in the globular cluster NGC 6652 using a 6.5 hr Gemini South observation of the optical counterpart of the system. Light curves in g' and r' for two LMXBs in the cluster, sources A and B in previous literature, were extracted and analyzed for periodicity using the ISIS image subtraction package. A clear sinusoidal modulation is evident in both of A's curves, of amplitude {approx}0.11 mag in g' and {approx}0.065 mag in r', while B's curves exhibit rapid flickering, of amplitude {approx}1 mag in g' and {approx}0.5 mag in r'. A Lomb-Scargle test revealed a 2.15 hr periodic variation in the magnitude of A with a false alarm probability less than 10{sup -11}, and no significant periodicity in the light curve for B. Though it is possible that saturated stars in the vicinity of our sources partially contaminated our signal, the identification of A's binary period is nonetheless robust.

  4. A Peculiar Lapse of Periodic Eclipsing Event at Low Mass X-ray Binary GRS 1747-312 during Suzaku Observation in 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saji, Shigetaka; Mori, Hideyuki; Matsumoto, Hironori; Dotani, Tadayasu; Iwai, Masachika; Maeda, Yoshitomo

    2015-08-01

    The Low Mass X-ray Binary (LMXB) GRS 1747-312 is a part of the globular cluster Terzan 6, located at a distance of 9.5 kpc from the Earth. Based on previous observations performed with BeppoSAX and RXTE, recurrent outbursts are known to occur with an interval of about 130-142 days. During the outbursts, periodic eclipses were discovered. During an eclipsing event, its flux declined precipitously by two orders of magnitude compared to its pre-eclipsing state. The periodic nature and its characteristic decline imply that this is likely a bona fide eclipsing event by an orbiting star. The duration (d) and orbital period (P) were estimated to be d = 2596 sec and P = 0.514980303 days.To investigate further, observations for outbursts were performed with Chandra (2004) and Swift (2013). In addition, XMM-Newton (2004) and Suzaku (2009) caught it at the quiescent state. All of the observations except for XMM-Newton included the time of the eclipses predicted. We analyzed archival data of these observations. The measured 0.5-10 keV flux were 5.7 × 10-10 erg cm-2 s-1 (Chandra), 2.0 × 10-13 (XMM), 1.1 × 10-11 (Suzaku) and 4.4 × 10-10 (Swift). During the Chandra and Swift observations, we found a sudden declining in the observed flux at the expected time of the eclipses. During the Suzaku observation, however, there were no signs for the predicted eclipses.Except for the Suzaku observation, the spectra were well described with a combination of blackbody and Comptonized emission models, commonly used for fitting on the spectra of LMXBs. The Suzaku spectrum, on the other hand, could be described with a Comptonized component covered partially by an absorber with NH ˜ 1023 cm-2 and covering fraction of ˜ 0.9. The spectrum had been becoming softer during the Suzaku observation. The softening may be explained by gradual decrease in the column density and covering fraction of the absorber. The spectral interpretation was consistent with the vanishing of the eclipses: the heavy

  5. MEASUREMENT OF THE RADIUS OF NEUTRON STARS WITH HIGH SIGNAL-TO-NOISE QUIESCENT LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Guillot, Sebastien; Rutledge, Robert E.; Servillat, Mathieu; Webb, Natalie A. E-mail: rutledge@physics.mcgill.ca

    2013-07-20

    This paper presents the measurement of the neutron star (NS) radius using the thermal spectra from quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries (qLMXBs) inside globular clusters (GCs). Recent observations of NSs have presented evidence that cold ultra dense matter-present in the core of NSs-is best described by ''normal matter'' equations of state (EoSs). Such EoSs predict that the radii of NSs, R{sub NS}, are quasi-constant (within measurement errors, of {approx}10%) for astrophysically relevant masses (M{sub NS}>0.5 M{sub Sun }). The present work adopts this theoretical prediction as an assumption, and uses it to constrain a single R{sub NS} value from five qLMXB targets with available high signal-to-noise X-ray spectroscopic data. Employing a Markov chain Monte-Carlo approach, we produce the marginalized posterior distribution for R{sub NS}, constrained to be the same value for all five NSs in the sample. An effort was made to include all quantifiable sources of uncertainty into the uncertainty of the quoted radius measurement. These include the uncertainties in the distances to the GCs, the uncertainties due to the Galactic absorption in the direction of the GCs, and the possibility of a hard power-law spectral component for count excesses at high photon energy, which are observed in some qLMXBs in the Galactic plane. Using conservative assumptions, we found that the radius, common to the five qLMXBs and constant for a wide range of masses, lies in the low range of possible NS radii, R{sub NS}=9.1{sup +1.3}{sub -1.5} km (90%-confidence). Such a value is consistent with low-R{sub NS} equations of state. We compare this result with previous radius measurements of NSs from various analyses of different types of systems. In addition, we compare the spectral analyses of individual qLMXBs to previous works.

  6. The nature of the island and banana states in atoll sources and a unified model for low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, M. J.; Gibiec, A.; Bałucińska-Church, M.

    2014-03-01

    We propose an explanation of the island and banana states and the relation between atoll and Z-track sources, constituting a unified model for low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXB). We find a dramatic transition at a luminosity of 1-2 × 1037 erg s-1 above which the high-energy cut-off ECO of the Comptonized emission in all sources is low at a few keV. There is thermal equilibrium between the neutron star at ˜2 keV and the Comptonizing accretion disc corona (ADC) causing the low ECO in the banana state of atolls and all states of the Z-track sources. Below this luminosity, ECO increases towards 100 keV causing the hardness of the island state. Thermal equilibrium is lost, the ADC becoming much hotter than the neutron star via an additional coronal heating mechanism. This suggests a unified model of LMXB: the banana state is a basic state with the mass accretion rate dot{M} increasing, corresponding to the normal branch of Z-track sources. The island state has high ADC temperature, this state not existing in the Z-sources with luminosities much greater than the critical value. The Z-track sources have an additional flaring branch consistent with unstable nuclear burning on the neutron star at high dot{M}. This burning regime does not exist at low dot{M} so this branch is not seen in atolls (except GX atolls). The horizontal branch in Z-track sources has a strong increase in radiation pressure disrupting the inner disc and launching relativistic jets.

  7. A PREDICTION FORMULA OF SUPERSOFT X-RAY PHASE OF CLASSICAL NOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Hachisu, Izumi; Kato, Mariko E-mail: mariko@educ.cc.keio.ac.j

    2010-02-01

    On the basis of the recently developed universal decline law of classical novae, we propose prediction formulae for supersoft X-ray on and off times, i.e., t{sub X-on} = (10 +- 1.8)t{sub 3} days and t{sub X-off} = (5.3 +- 1.4)(t{sub 3}){sup 1.5} days for 8 approx< t{sub 3} approx< 80 days. Here t{sub 3} is the newly proposed 'intrinsic' decay time during which the brightness drops by 3 mag from optical maximum along our universal decline law fitted with observation. We have determined the absolute magnitude of our free-free emission model light curves and derived maximum magnitude versus rate of decline (MMRD) relations. Our theoretical MMRD relations are governed by two parameters, one is the white dwarf (WD) mass and the other is the initial envelope mass at a nova outburst; this second parameter explains the scatter of MMRD points of individual novae. Our theoretical MMRD relations are also in good agreement with the well-known empirical formulae. We also show another empirical relation of M{sub V} (15) approx -5.7 +- 0.3 based on the absolute magnitude of our model light curves, i.e., the absolute magnitude at 15 days after optical maximum is almost common among various novae. We analyzed 10 nova light curves, in which a supersoft X-ray phase was detected, and estimated their WD masses. The models best simultaneously reproducing the optical and supersoft X-ray observations are ONeMg WDs with 1.28 +- 0.04 M{sub sun} (V598 Pup), 1.23 +- 0.05 M{sub sun} (V382 Vel), 1.15 +- 0.06 M{sub sun} (V4743 Sgr), 1.13 +- 0.06 M{sub sun} (V1281 Sco), 1.2 +- 0.05 M{sub sun} (V597 Pup), 1.06 +- 0.07 M{sub sun} (V1494 Aql), 1.04 +- 0.07 M{sub sun} (V2467 Cyg), 1.07 +- 0.07 M{sub sun} (V5116 Sgr), 1.05 +- 0.05 M{sub sun} (V574 Pup), and a CO WD with 0.93 +- 0.08 M{sub sun} (V458 Vul). The newly proposed relationships are consistent with the emergence or decay epoch of the supersoft X-ray phase of these 10 novae. Finally, we discuss the mechanism of shock-origin hard X-ray

  8. THE MASS AND THE RADIUS OF THE NEUTRON STAR IN THE TRANSIENT LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY SAX J1748.9-2021

    SciTech Connect

    Guever, Tolga; Oezel, Feryal

    2013-03-01

    We use time-resolved spectroscopy of thermonuclear X-ray bursts observed from SAX J1748.9-2021 to infer the mass and the radius of the neutron star in the binary. Four X-ray bursts observed from the source with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer enable us to measure the angular size and the Eddington limit on the neutron star surface. Combined with a distance measurement to the globular cluster NGC 6440, in which SAX J1748.9-2021 resides, we obtain two solutions for the neutron star radius and mass, R = 8.18 {+-} 1.62 km and M = 1.78 {+-} 0.3 M{sub Sun} or R = 10.93 {+-} 2.09 km and M = 1.33 {+-} 0.33 M{sub Sun }.

  9. Search for a correlation between kHz quasi-periodic oscillation frequencies and accretion-related parameters in the ensemble of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çatmabacak, Önder; Hakan Erkut, M.; Catmabacak, Onur; Duran, Sivan

    2016-07-01

    The distribution of neutron star sources in the ensemble of low-mass X-ray binaries shows no evidence for a correlation between kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequencies and X-ray luminosity. Sources differing by orders of magnitude in luminosity can exhibit similar range of QPO frequencies. We study the possibility for the existence of a correlation between kHz QPO frequencies and accretion related parameters. The parameters such as the mass accretion rate and the size of the boundary region in the innermost disk are expected to be related to X-ray luminosity. Using the up-to-date data of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries, we search for a possible correlation between lower kHz QPO frequencies and mass accretion rate through the mass and radius values predicted by different equations of state for the neutron star. The range of mass accretion rate for each source can be estimated if the accretion luminosity is assumed to be represented well by the X-ray luminosity of the source. Although we find no correlation between mass accretion rate and QPO frequencies, the source distribution seems to be in accordance with a correlation between kHz QPO frequencies and the parameter combining the neutron star magnetic field and the mas accretion rate. The model function we employ to descibe the correlation is able to account for the scattering of individual sources around a simple power law. The correlation argues disk-magnetosphere interaction as the origin of these millisecond oscillations.

  10. A POSSIBLE SIGNATURE OF LENSE-THIRRING PRECESSION IN DIPPING AND ECLIPSING NEUTRON-STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, Jeroen

    2012-12-01

    Relativistic Lense-Thirring precession of a tilted inner accretion disk around a compact object has been proposed as a mechanism for low-frequency ({approx}0.01-70 Hz) quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the light curves of X-ray binaries. A substantial misalignment angle ({approx}15 Degree-Sign -20 Degree-Sign ) between the inner-disk rotation axis and the compact-object spin axis is required for the effects of this precession to produce observable modulations in the X-ray light curve. A consequence of this misalignment is that in high-inclination X-ray binaries the precessing inner disk will quasi-periodically intercept our line of sight to the compact object. In the case of neutron-star systems, this should have a significant observational effect, since a large fraction of the accretion energy is released on or near the neutron-star surface. In this Letter, I suggest that this specific effect of Lense-Thirring precession may already have been observed as {approx}1 Hz QPOs in several dipping/eclipsing neutron-star X-ray binaries.

  11. Cyclotron absorption of X rays by a classical plasma in the strong magnetic fields of neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Zhelezniakov, V.V.

    1981-01-01

    The cyclotron absorption of electromagnetic waves in an equilibrium classical plasma in a strong magnetic field is investigated on the basis of a kinetic equation and by means of Kirchhoff's law. A study is carried out of the influence of vacuum polarization by the magnetic field on the polarization of the ordinary and extraordinary waves and on the coefficients of cyclotron absorption of these waves in the plasma. The results obtained are of interest for the theory of the emission of X-ray sources associated with neutron stars in binary systems and above all for the theory of the origin of the X rays in the spectrum of the source Her X-1.

  12. Discovery of the Near-infrared Counterpart to the Luminous Neutron-star Low-mass X-Ray Binary GX 3+1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Maureen; Homan, Jeroen; Fridriksson, Joel K.; Linares, Manuel

    2014-10-01

    Using the High Resolution Camera on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory, we have measured an accurate position for the bright persistent neutron star X-ray binary and atoll source GX 3+1. At a location that is consistent with this new position, we have discovered the near-infrared (NIR) counterpart to GX 3+1 in images taken with the PANIC and FourStar cameras on the Magellan Baade Telescope. The identification of this Ks = 15.8 ± 0.1 mag star as the counterpart is based on the presence of a Br γ emission line in an NIR spectrum taken with the Folded-port InfraRed Echelette spectrograph on the Baade Telescope. The absolute magnitude derived from the best available distance estimate to GX 3+1 indicates that the mass donor in the system is not a late-type giant. We find that the NIR light in GX 3+1 is likely dominated by the contribution from a heated outer accretion disk. This is similar to what has been found for the NIR flux from the brighter class of Z sources, but unlike the behavior of atolls fainter (LX ≈ 1036-1037 erg s-1) than GX 3+1, where optically thin synchrotron emission from a jet probably dominates the NIR flux. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  13. A test of the nature of the Fe K Line in the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary Serpens X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chia-Ying; Cackett, Edward; Miller, Jon M.; Barret, Didier; Fabian, Andrew C.; D'Ai, Antonino; Parker, Michael; Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Burderi, Luciano; Salvo, Tiziana; Egron, Elise; Homan, Jeroen; Iaria, Rosario; Lin, Dacheng; Miller, M. Coleman

    2016-04-01

    Broad Fe K emission lines have been widely observed in the X-ray spectra of black hole systems, and in neutron star systems as well. The intrinsically narrow Fe K fluorescent line is generally believed to be part of the reflection spectrum originating in an illuminated accretion disk, and broadened by strong relativistic effects. However, the nature of the lines in neutron star LMXBs has been under debate. We therefore obtained the longest, high-resolution X-ray spectrum of a neutron star LMXB to date with a 300 ks Chandra HETGS observation of Serpens X-1. The observation was taken under the "continuous clocking" mode and thus free of photon pile-up effects. We carry out a systematic analysis and find that the blurred reflection model fits the Fe line of Serpens X-1 significantly better than a broad Gaussian component does, implying that the relativistic reflection scenario is much preferred. Chandra HETGS also provides highest spectral resolution view of the Fe K region and we find no strong evidence for additional narrow lines.

  14. Discovery of the near-infrared counterpart to the luminous neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary GX 3+1

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Berg, Maureen; Fridriksson, Joel K.; Homan, Jeroen; Linares, Manuel

    2014-10-01

    Using the High Resolution Camera on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory, we have measured an accurate position for the bright persistent neutron star X-ray binary and atoll source GX 3+1. At a location that is consistent with this new position, we have discovered the near-infrared (NIR) counterpart to GX 3+1 in images taken with the PANIC and FourStar cameras on the Magellan Baade Telescope. The identification of this K{sub s} = 15.8 ± 0.1 mag star as the counterpart is based on the presence of a Br γ emission line in an NIR spectrum taken with the Folded-port InfraRed Echelette spectrograph on the Baade Telescope. The absolute magnitude derived from the best available distance estimate to GX 3+1 indicates that the mass donor in the system is not a late-type giant. We find that the NIR light in GX 3+1 is likely dominated by the contribution from a heated outer accretion disk. This is similar to what has been found for the NIR flux from the brighter class of Z sources, but unlike the behavior of atolls fainter (L{sub X} ≈ 10{sup 36}-10{sup 37} erg s{sup –1}) than GX 3+1, where optically thin synchrotron emission from a jet probably dominates the NIR flux.

  15. Analysis of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect mass-observable relations using South Pole Telescope observations of an X-ray selected sample of low-mass galaxy clusters and groups

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Mohr, J.; Saro, A.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Bayliss, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Chiu, I.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; de Haan, T.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Foley, R. J.; Gangkofner, D.; George, E. M.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; Hennig, C.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hrubes, J. D.; Jones, C.; Keisler, R.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Lueker, M.; Luong-Van, D.; McDonald, M.; McMahon, J. J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L.; Murray, S. S.; Padin, S.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruel, J.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shirokoff, E.; Spieler, H. G.; Stalder, B.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K.;  uhada, R.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikhlinin, A.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.; Zenteno, A.

    2015-02-25

    We use microwave observations from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) to examine the Sunyaev–Zel'dovich effect (SZE) signatures of a sample of 46 X-ray selected groups and clusters drawn from ~6 deg2 of the XMM–Newton Blanco Cosmology Survey. These systems extend to redshift z = 1.02 and probe the SZE signal to the lowest X-ray luminosities (≥1042 erg s-1) yet; these sample characteristics make this analysis complementary to previous studies. We develop an analysis tool, using X-ray luminosity as a mass proxy, to extract selection-bias-corrected constraints on the SZE significance and Y_500 mass relations. The former is in good agreement with an extrapolation of the relation obtained from high-mass clusters. However, the latter, at low masses, while in good agreement with the extrapolation from the high-mass SPT clusters, is in tension at 2.8σ with the Planck constraints, indicating the low-mass systems exhibit lower SZE signatures in the SPT data. We also present an analysis of potential sources of contamination. For the radio galaxy point source population, we find 18 of our systems have 843 MHz Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey sources within 2 arcmin of the X-ray centre, and three of these are also detected at significance >4 by SPT. Of these three, two are associated with the group brightest cluster galaxies, and the third is likely an unassociated quasar candidate. We examine the impact of these point sources on our SZE scaling relation analyses and find no evidence of biases. We also examine the impact of dusty galaxies using constraints from the 220 GHz data. The stacked sample provides 2.8σ significant evidence of dusty galaxy flux, which would correspond to an average underestimate of the SPT Y_500 signal that is (17 ± 9)per cent in this sample of low-mass systems. Finally, we explore the impact of future data from SPTpol and XMM-XXL, showing that it will lead to a factor of 4 to 5 tighter constraints on

  16. Analysis of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect mass-observable relations using South Pole Telescope observations of an X-ray selected sample of low-mass galaxy clusters and groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Mohr, J.; Saro, A.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Bayliss, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Chiu, I.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; de Haan, T.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Foley, R. J.; Gangkofner, D.; George, E. M.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; Hennig, C.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hrubes, J. D.; Jones, C.; Keisler, R.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Lueker, M.; Luong-Van, D.; McDonald, M.; McMahon, J. J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L.; Murray, S. S.; Padin, S.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruel, J.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shirokoff, E.; Spieler, H. G.; Stalder, B.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K.; Šuhada, R.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikhlinin, A.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.; Zenteno, A.

    2015-04-01

    We use microwave observations from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) to examine the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) signatures of a sample of 46 X-ray selected groups and clusters drawn from ˜6 deg2 of the XMM-Newton Blanco Cosmology Survey. These systems extend to redshift z = 1.02 and probe the SZE signal to the lowest X-ray luminosities (≥1042 erg s-1) yet; these sample characteristics make this analysis complementary to previous studies. We develop an analysis tool, using X-ray luminosity as a mass proxy, to extract selection-bias-corrected constraints on the SZE significance and Y500 mass relations. The former is in good agreement with an extrapolation of the relation obtained from high-mass clusters. However, the latter, at low masses, while in good agreement with the extrapolation from the high-mass SPT clusters, is in tension at 2.8σ with the Planck constraints, indicating the low-mass systems exhibit lower SZE signatures in the SPT data. We also present an analysis of potential sources of contamination. For the radio galaxy point source population, we find 18 of our systems have 843 MHz Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey sources within 2 arcmin of the X-ray centre, and three of these are also detected at significance >4 by SPT. Of these three, two are associated with the group brightest cluster galaxies, and the third is likely an unassociated quasar candidate. We examine the impact of these point sources on our SZE scaling relation analyses and find no evidence of biases. We also examine the impact of dusty galaxies using constraints from the 220 GHz data. The stacked sample provides 2.8σ significant evidence of dusty galaxy flux, which would correspond to an average underestimate of the SPT Y500 signal that is (17 ± 9) per cent in this sample of low-mass systems. Finally, we explore the impact of future data from SPTpol and XMM-XXL, showing that it will lead to a factor of 4 to 5 tighter constraints on these SZE mass-observable relations.

  17. The properties of cross-correlation and spectra of the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1608-52

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Ya-Juan; Yuan, Hai-Long; Dong, Yi-Qiao; Zhang, Hao-Tong; Zhang, Cheng-Min; Zhao, Yong-Heng; Zhang, Shu; Qu, Jin-Lu; Wang, Ya-Nan; Li, Zhi-Bing

    2014-03-01

    With RXTE data, we analyzed the cross-correlation function between the soft and hard X-rays of the transient atoll source 4U 1608-52. We found anti-correlations in three outbursts occurred in 1998, 2002, and 2010, and we found significant time lags of several hundreds of seconds in the latter two outbursts. Our results show no correlation between the soft and hard X-rays in the extreme island state and a dominated positive correlation in the lower banana state. Anti-correlations are presented at the upper banana state for the outburst of 2010 and at the island and the lower left banana states for the other two outbursts. So far for atoll sources, the cross-correlation has been studied statistically only for 4U 1735-44, where anti-correlations showed up in the upper banana state. Here our investigation on 4U 1608-52 provides a similar result in its 2010 outburst. In addition, we notice that the luminosities in the upper banana of the 1998 and 2002 outbursts are about 1.5 times that of the 2010 outburst whose luminosity in the upper banana is close to that of 4U 1735-44. The results suggest that the states in the color-color diagram of a source could be correlated with the luminosity of the source. A further spectral analysis during the 2010 outburst is also shown, which suggests that the disk can be a little truncated in the upper banana. The feature on the upper banana is similar to the previous results of the flaring branch in Z sources.

  18. The Properties of Cross-correlation and Spectra of the Low-mass X-Ray Binary 4U 1608-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Ya-Juan; Zhang, Shu; Qu, Jin-Lu; Yuan, Hai-Long; Wang, Ya-Nan; Dong, Yi-Qiao; Zhang, Hao-Tong; Li, Zhi-Bing; Zhang, Cheng-Min; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2014-03-01

    With RXTE data, we analyzed the cross-correlation function between the soft and hard X-rays of the transient atoll source 4U 1608-52. We found anti-correlations in three outbursts occurred in 1998, 2002, and 2010, and we found significant time lags of several hundreds of seconds in the latter two outbursts. Our results show no correlation between the soft and hard X-rays in the extreme island state and a dominated positive correlation in the lower banana state. Anti-correlations are presented at the upper banana state for the outburst of 2010 and at the island and the lower left banana states for the other two outbursts. So far for atoll sources, the cross-correlation has been studied statistically only for 4U 1735-44, where anti-correlations showed up in the upper banana state. Here our investigation on 4U 1608-52 provides a similar result in its 2010 outburst. In addition, we notice that the luminosities in the upper banana of the 1998 and 2002 outbursts are about 1.5 times that of the 2010 outburst whose luminosity in the upper banana is close to that of 4U 1735-44. The results suggest that the states in the color-color diagram of a source could be correlated with the luminosity of the source. A further spectral analysis during the 2010 outburst is also shown, which suggests that the disk can be a little truncated in the upper banana. The feature on the upper banana is similar to the previous results of the flaring branch in Z sources.

  19. X-rays from intermediate mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robrade, Jan

    I will review the X-ray properties of intermediate mass stars and discuss possible X-ray generating mechanisms. Main-sequence stars of spectral type mid B to mid A neither drive sufficiently strong winds to produce shock generated X-rays, nor possess an outer convection zone to generate dynamo driven magnetic activity and coronae. Consequently they should be virtually X-ray dark and occasionally detected X-ray emission was usually attributed to undetected low-mass companions. However, in magnetic intermediate mass stars, the Ap/Bp stars, a different X-ray production mechanism may operate. It is termed the magnetically channeled wind-shock model, where the stellar wind from both hemispheres is channelled towards the equatorial plane, collides and forms a rigidly rotating disk around the star. The strong shocks of the nearly head-on wind collision as well as the existence of magnetically confined plasma in a dynamic circumstellar disk can lead to diverse X-ray phenomena. In this sense Ap/Bp stars bridge the 'classical' X-ray regimes of cool and hot stars.

  20. X-ray Evolution of Classical Novae: Timescales for the SSS Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stringfellow, Guy

    2005-10-01

    The outbursts of novae are driven by a thermonuclear runaway at the base of an accreted shell. Soft X-ray emission resulting from high surface temperatures on the WD after outburst are expected, but seldom observed (SSS phase). Some novae enter the SSS phase within the first year after outburst, and quickly turn off thereafter (the very fast ONeMg novae). Others (e.g., slow novae) are delayed years after outburst before entering the SSS stage, which then lasts many years. ROSAT detected only 3 novae in their SSS state; XMM has observed 5, 3 which have SSS spectrums. Insight into the diversity and evolution of novae can be gained by determining when (or if) the SSS stage begins, when turnoff occurs, and how this relates to composition and the mass of the WD.

  1. BeppoSAX and RXTE Spectral Study of the Low-mass X-Ray Binary 4U 1705-44: Spectral Hardening during the Banana Branch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifina, Elena; Titarchuk, Lev; Shrader, Chris; Shaposhnikov, Nikolai

    2015-08-01

    We analyze the X-ray spectra of the atoll 4U 1705-44 when the source undergoes the island-banana state transition. We use the RXTE and BeppoSAX observations for this analysis. We demonstrate that the broadband energy spectral distributions for all evolutinary states can be fitted by a model consisting of two Comptonized components. One arises from the seed photons coming from a neutron star (NS) atmosphere at a temperature {{kT}}{{s}1}≲ 1.5 keV (herein Comptb1), and a second results from the seed photons of {T}{{s}2} ˜ 1.1-1.3 keV coming from the disk (herein Comptb2). We found that we needed to add a low-temperature blackbody and an iron-line (Gaussian) component to the model in order to obtain high-quality fits. The data analysis using this model indicates that the power-law photon index {{{Γ }}}1 of our model is always about 2, independently of the spectral state. Another parameter, {{{Γ }}}2, demonstrates a two-phase behavior depending on the spectral state. {{{Γ }}}2 is quasi-constant at {{{Γ }}}2˜ 2 when the electron temperature {{kT}}{{e}}(2)\\lt 80 keV, and {{{Γ }}}2 is less than 2, in the range of 1.3\\lt {{{Γ }}}2\\lt 2, when {{kT}}{{e}}(2)\\gt 80 keV. This phase is similar to that previously found in the Z-source Sco X-1. We interpret the decreasing index phase using a model in which a super-Eddington radiation pressure from the NS causes an expansion of the Compton cloud similar to that found previously in Sco X-1 during the Flaring branch.

  2. Modelling the Soft X-Ray and EUV Emission in Classical Novae: EUVE and ROSAT Observations of V1974 Cygni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stringfellow, Guy S.; Bowyer, Stuart

    1996-01-01

    We have conducted an extensive analysis of the observability of Classical Novae with the EUVE Lex/B and Al/Ti/C detectors. Predicted count rates have been computed using optically thin, isothermal plasma models for solar and metal-rich compositions, and hot ONeMg white dwarf model atmospheres. We find EUVE to be quite sensitive to both the EUV and soft X-ray emission emitted by the underlying hot white dwarf during novae outbursts, except for the coolest temperatures with very high intervening hydrogen column density. These results are used to interpret the emission detected during the EUVE all-sky survey of Nova Cygni 1992 (approx. = V1974 Cyg), 279-290 days after visual maximum. We find the best fit to the observed emission from V1974 Cyg arises from a hot ONeMg white dwarf with surface temperature approx. 4 x l0(exp 5) K and a mas of approx. 1.2 solar mass, and derive an interstellar hydrogen column density of approx. 3 x 10(exp 21)/sq cm. Virtually all this emission arises from supersoft X-rays rather than the EUV. We also report the detection of V1974 Cyg with the EUVE Deep Survey detector at 549 days after visual maximum. This observation is compatible with the above properties, indicating that the mechanism responsible for the soft X-ray emission, connected with the underlying white dwarf, had not yet entirely turned off. We also present analysis of a ROSAT PSPC observation which is contemporaneous with the EUVE survey observations; this independently confirms the high column density we derived from the EUVE survey observation. Light curves for the EUVE and ROSAT observations are presented. Statistical tests for variability show that all of these observations are indeed highly variable over various time scales. The EUVE survey data shows one day variations, the EUVE DS data show approx. 30 minute fluctuations, while the ROSAT data vary rapidly on time scales of seconds. The EUVE data shows no periodic variability on any time scale. The implications of the

  3. The low-mass classic Algol-type binary UU Leo revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuan-Gui

    2013-12-01

    New multi-color photometry of the eclipsing binary UU Leo, acquired from 2010 to 2013, was carried out by using the 60-cm and 85-cm telescopes at the Xinglong station, which is administered by National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. With the updated Wilson-Devinney code, the photometric solution was derived from BVR light curves. The results imply that UU Leo is a semi-detached Algol-type binary, with a mass ratio of q = 0.100(±0.002). The change in orbital period was reanalyzed based on all available eclipsing times. The O - C curve could be described by an upward parabola superimposed on a quasi-sinusoidal curve. The period and semi-amplitudes are Pmod = 54.5(±1.1) yr and A = 0.0273d(±0.0015d), which may be attributed to the light-time effect via the presence of an invisible third body. The long-term period increases at a rate of dP/dt = +4.64(±0.14) × 10-7d yr-1, which may be interpreted by the conserved mass being transferred from the secondary to the primary. With mass being transferred, the low-mass Algol-type binary UU Leo may evolve into a binary system with a main sequence star and a helium white dwarf.

  4. Hard X-Ray Emission of X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, P.

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of this proposal was to perform an accurate measurement of the broadband x-ray spectrum of a neutron-star low-mass x-ray binary found in a hard x-ray state. This goal was accomplished using data obtained under another proposal, which has provided exciting new information on the hard x-ray emission of neutron-star low-mass x-ray binaries. In "BeppoSAX Observations of the Atoll X-Ray Binary 4U0614+091", we present our analysis of the spectrum of 4U0614+091 over the energy band from 0.3-150 keV. Our data confirm the presence of a hard x-ray tail that can be modeled as thermal Comptonization of low-energy photons on electrons having a very high temperature, greater than 220 keV, or as a non-thermal powerlaw. Such a very hard x-ray spectrum has not been previously seen from neutron-star low-mass x-ray binaries. We also detected a spectral feature that can be interpreted as reprocessing, via Compton reflection, of the direct emission by an optically-thick disk and found a correlation between the photon index of the power-law tail and the fraction of radiation reflected which is similar to the correlation found for black hole candidate x-ray binaries and Seyfert galaxies. A secondary goal was to measure the timing properties of the x-ray emission from neutronstar low-mass x-ray binaries in their low/hard states.

  5. Time lags of the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations in the low-mass X-ray binaries 4U 1608-52 and 4U 1636-53

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Avellar, Marcio G. B.; Méndez, Mariano; Sanna, Andrea; Horvath, Jorge E.

    2013-08-01

    We studied the energy and frequency dependence of the Fourier time lags and intrinsic coherence of the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binaries 4U 1608-52 and 4U 1636-53, using a large data set obtained with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We confirmed that, in both sources, the time lags of the lower kHz QPO are soft and their magnitude increases with energy. We also found that: (i) In 4U 1636-53, the soft lags of the lower kHz QPO remain constant at ˜ 30 μs in the QPO frequency range 500-850 Hz, and decrease to ˜ 10 μs when the QPO frequency increases further. In 4U 1608-52, the soft lags of the lower kHz QPO remain constant at 40 μs up to 800 Hz, the highest frequency reached by this QPO in our data. (ii) In both sources, the time lags of the upper kHz QPO are hard, independent of energy or frequency and inconsistent with the soft lags of the lower kHz QPO. (iii) In both sources the intrinsic coherence of the lower kHz QPO remains constant at ˜0.6 between 5 and 12 keV, and drops to zero above that energy. The intrinsic coherence of the upper kHz QPO is consistent with being zero across the full energy range. (iv) In 4U 1636-53, the intrinsic coherence of the lower kHz QPO increases from ˜0 at ˜600 Hz to ˜1, and it decreases to ˜0.5 at 920 Hz; in 4U 1608-52, the intrinsic coherence is consistent with the same trend. (v) In both sources the intrinsic coherence of the upper kHz QPO is consistent with zero over the full frequency range of the QPO, except in 4U 1636-53 between 700 and 900 Hz where the intrinsic coherence marginally increases. We discuss our results in the context of scenarios in which the soft lags are either due to reflection off the accretion disc or up-/down-scattering in a hot medium close to the neutron star. We finally explore the connection between, on one hand the time lags and the intrinsic coherence of the kHz QPOs, and on the other the QPOs' amplitude and quality factor in

  6. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC MODELING OF THE ACCRETION SHOCKS IN CLASSICAL T TAURI STARS: THE ROLE OF LOCAL ABSORPTION IN THE X-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Bonito, R.; Argiroffi, C.; Peres, G.; Orlando, S.; Miceli, M.; Ibgui, L.; Matsakos, T.; Stehle, C.

    2014-11-10

    We investigate the properties of X-ray emission from accretion shocks in classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs), generated where the infalling material impacts the stellar surface. Both observations and models of the accretion process reveal several aspects that are still unclear: the observed X-ray luminosity in accretion shocks is below the predicted value, and the density versus temperature structure of the shocked plasma, with increasing densities at higher temperature, deduced from the observations, is at odds with that proposed in the current picture of accretion shocks. To address these open issues, we investigate whether a correct treatment of the local absorption by the surrounding medium is crucial to explain the observations. To this end, we describe the impact of an accretion stream on a CTTS by considering a magnetohydrodynamic model. From the model results, we synthesize the X-ray emission from the accretion shock by producing maps and spectra. We perform density and temperature diagnostics on the synthetic spectra, and we directly compare the results with observations. Our model shows that the X-ray fluxes inferred from the emerging spectra are lower than expected because of the complex local absorption by the optically thick material of the chromosphere and of the unperturbed stream. Moreover, our model, including the effects of local absorption, explains in a natural way the apparently puzzling pattern of density versus temperature observed in the X-ray emission from accretion shocks.

  7. Measuring the stellar wind parameters in IGR J17544-2619 and Vela X-1 constrains the accretion physics in supergiant fast X-ray transient and classical supergiant X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giménez-García, A.; Shenar, T.; Torrejón, J. M.; Oskinova, L.; Martínez-Núñez, S.; Hamann, W.-R.; Rodes-Roca, J. J.; González-Galán, A.; Alonso-Santiago, J.; González-Fernández, C.; Bernabeu, G.; Sander, A.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Classical supergiant X-ray binaries (SGXBs) and supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) are two types of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) that present similar donors but, at the same time, show very different behavior in the X-rays. The reason for this dichotomy of wind-fed HMXBs is still a matter of debate. Among the several explanations that have been proposed, some of them invoke specific stellar wind properties of the donor stars. Only dedicated empiric analysis of the donors' stellar wind can provide the required information to accomplish an adequate test of these theories. However, such analyses are scarce. Aims: To close this gap, we perform a comparative analysis of the optical companion in two important systems: IGR J17544-2619 (SFXT) and Vela X-1 (SGXB). We analyze the spectra of each star in detail and derive their stellar and wind properties. As a next step, we compare the wind parameters, giving us an excellent chance of recognizing key differences between donor winds in SFXTs and SGXBs. Methods: We use archival infrared, optical and ultraviolet observations, and analyze them with the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) Potsdam Wolf-Rayet model atmosphere code. We derive the physical properties of the stars and their stellar winds, accounting for the influence of X-rays on the stellar winds. Results: We find that the stellar parameters derived from the analysis generally agree well with the spectral types of the two donors: O9I (IGR J17544-2619) and B0.5Iae (Vela X-1). The distance to the sources have been revised and also agree well with the estimations already available in the literature. In IGR J17544-2619 we are able to narrow the uncertainty to d = 3.0 ± 0.2 kpc. From the stellar radius of the donor and its X-ray behavior, the eccentricity of IGR J17544-2619 is constrained to e< 0.25. The derived chemical abundances point to certain mixing during the lifetime of the donors. An important difference between the stellar winds of the

  8. SWIFT X-RAY AND ULTRAVIOLET MONITORING OF THE CLASSICAL NOVA V458 VUL (NOVA VUL 2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, J.-U.; Drake, J. J.; Beardmore, A. P.; Evans, P. A.; Osborne, J. P.; Page, K. L.; Boyd, D.; Bode, M. F.; Brady, S.; Gaensicke, B. T.; Steeghs, D.; Kitamoto, S.; Takei, D.; Knigge, C.; Miller, I.; Rodriguez-Gil, P.; Schwarz, G.; Staels, B.; Tsujimoto, M.; Wesson, R.

    2009-05-15

    We describe the highly variable X-ray and UV emission of V458 Vul (Nova Vul 2007), observed by Swift between 1 and 422 days after outburst. Initially bright only in the UV, V458 Vul became a variable hard X-ray source due to optically thin thermal emission at kT = 0.64 keV with an X-ray band unabsorbed luminosity of 2.3 x 10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1} during days 71-140. The X-ray spectrum at this time requires a low Fe abundance (0.2{sup +0.3} {sub -0.1} solar), consistent with a Suzaku measurement around the same time. On day 315 we find a new X-ray spectral component which can be described by a blackbody with temperature of kT = 23{sup +9} {sub -5} eV, while the previous hard X-ray component has declined by a factor of 3.8. The spectrum of this soft X-ray component resembles those typically seen in the class of supersoft sources (SSS) which suggests that the nova ejecta were starting to clear and/or that the white dwarf photosphere is shrinking to the point at which its thermal emission reaches into the X-ray band. We find a high degree of variability in the soft component with a flare rising by an order of magnitude in count rate in 0.2 days. In the following observations on days 342.4-383.6, the soft component was not seen, only to emerge again on day 397. The hard component continued to evolve, and we found an anticorrelation between the hard X-ray emission and the UV emission, yielding a Spearman rank probability of 97%. After day 397, the hard component was still present, was variable, and continued to fade at an extremely slow rate but could not be analyzed owing to pile-up contamination from the bright SSS component.

  9. The panchromatic spectroscopic evolution of the classical CO nova V339 Delphini (Nova Del 2013) until X-ray turnoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shore, S. N.; Mason, E.; Schwarz, G. J.; Teyssier, F. M.; Buil, C.; De Gennaro Aquino, I.; Page, K. L.; Osborne, J. P.; Scaringi, S.; Starrfield, S.; van Winckel, H.; Williams, R. E.; Woodward, C. E.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Classical novae are the product of thermonuclear runaway-initiated explosions occurring on accreting white dwarfs. Aims: V339 Del (Nova Delphinus 2013) was one of the brightest classical novae of the last hundred years. Spectroscopy and photometry are available from γ-rays through infrared at stages that have frequently not been observed well. The complete data set is intended to provide a benchmark for comparison with modeling and for understanding more sparsely monitored historical classical and recurrent novae. This paper is the first in the series of reports on the development of the nova. We report here on the early stages of the outburst, through the X-ray active stage. Methods: A time sequence of optical, flux calibrated high resolution spectra was obtained with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) using FIES simultaneously, or contemporaneously, with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope during the early stages of the outburst. These were supplemented with Mercator/HERMES optical spectra. High resolution IUE ultraviolet spectra of OS And 1986, taken during the Fe curtain phase, served as a template for the distance determination. We used standard plasma diagnostics (e.g., [O III] and [N II] line ratios, and the Hβ line flux) to constrain electron densities and temperatures of the ejecta. Using Monte Carlo modeling of the ejecta, we derived the structure, filling factor, and mass from comparisons of the optical and ultraviolet line profiles. Results: We derive an extinction of E(B - V) = 0.23 ± 0.05 from the spectral energy distribution, the interstellar absorption, and H I emission lines. The distance, about 4-4.5 kpc, is in agreement with the inferred distance from near infrared interferometry. The maximum velocity was about 2500 km s-1, measured from the UV resonance and optical profiles. The ejecta showed considerable fine structure in all transitions, much of which persisted as emission knots. The

  10. Photospheric Fluorescence and Resonance Scattering: Non Classical Diagnostics and the Future of X-ray Stellar Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Jeremy

    1998-01-01

    High resolution AXAF and XMM observations of stellar coronae will yield a wealth of X-ray plasma line diagnostics that will provide a giant leap forward in our understanding of coronal densities, abundance anomalies and emission measure distributions. Unfortunately, there is one very basic unanswered question in the physics of active stellar coronae that the usual plasma diagnostics cannot address directly: What are the spatial characteristics of stellar coronae-the scale height and filling factor? What do other stellar coronae actually look like? I will discuss two novel diagnostics of coronal geometry and their application to future X-ray spectra: photospheric fluorescence and resonance line optical depths.

  11. X-ray reprocessing in binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Biswajit

    2016-07-01

    We will discuss several aspects of X-ray reprocessing into X-rays or longer wavelength radiation in different kinds of binary systems. In high mass X-ray binaries, reprocessing of hard X-rays into emission lines or lower temperature black body emission is a useful tool to investigate the reprocessing media like the stellar wind, clumpy structures in the wind, accretion disk or accretion stream. In low mass X-ray binaries, reprocessing from the surface of the companion star, the accretion disk, warps and other structures in the accretion disk produce signatures in longer wavelength radiation. X-ray sources with temporal structures like the X-ray pulsars and thermonuclear burst sources are key in such studies. We will discuss results from several new investigations of X-ray reprocessing phenomena in X-ray binaries.

  12. X-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewin, W. H. G.

    1986-01-01

    There are about 100 bright X-ray sources in the Galaxy that are accretion-driven systems composed of a neutron star and a low mass companion that fills its critical Roche lobe. Many of these systems generate recurring X-ray bursts that are the result of thermonuclear flashes in the neutron star's surface layers, and are accompanied by a somewhat delayed optical burst due to X-ray heating of accretion disk. The Rapid Burster discovered in 1976 exhibits an interval between bursts that is strongly correlated with the energy in the preceding burst. There is no optical identification for this object.

  13. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... Images Aortic rupture, chest x-ray Lung cancer, frontal chest x-ray Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray Coal ... cancer - chest x-ray Lung nodule, right middle lobe - chest x-ray Lung mass, right upper lung - ...

  14. Search for soft X-ray flashes at the fireball phase of classical/recurrent novae using MAXI/GSC data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morii, Mikio; Yamaoka, Hitoshi; Mihara, Tatehiro; Matsuoka, Masaru; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2016-06-01

    We searched for precursive soft X-ray flashes (SXFs) associated with optically discovered classical or recurrent novae in the data of five years' all-sky observations with the Gas Slit Camera (GSC) of the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI). We first developed a tool to measure the fluxes of point sources by fitting the event distribution with a model that incorporates the point-spread function (PSF-fit) to minimize the potential contamination from nearby sources. Then we applied the PSF-fit tool to 40 classical/recurrent novae that were discovered in optical observations from 2009 August to 2014 August. We found no precursive SXFs with significance above the 3 σ level in the energy range of 2-4 keV between td - 10 d and td, where td is the date when each nova was discovered. We obtained the upper limits for the bolometric luminosity of SXFs, and compared them with the theoretical prediction and that observed for MAXI J0158-744. This result could constrain the population of massive white dwarfs with a mass of roughly 1.40 solar mass, or larger, in binary systems.

  15. Collective acoustic modes as renormalized damped oscillators: Unified description of neutron and x-ray scattering data from classical fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bafile, Ubaldo; Guarini, Eleonora; Barocchi, Fabrizio

    2006-06-01

    In the Q range where inelastic x-ray and neutron scattering are applied to the study of acoustic collective excitations in fluids, various models of the dynamic structure factor S(Q,ω) generalize in different ways the results obtained from linearized-hydrodynamics theory in the Q→0 limit. Here we show that the models most commonly fitted to experimental S(Q,ω) spectra can be given a unified formulation. In this way, direct comparisons among the results obtained by fitting different models become now possible to a much larger extent than ever. We also show that a consistent determination of the dispersion curve and of the propagation Q range of the excitations is possible, whichever model is used. We derive an exact formula which describes in all cases the dispersion curve and allows for the first quantitative understanding of its shape, by assigning specific and distinct roles to the various structural, thermal, and damping effects that determine the Q dependence of the mode frequencies. The emerging picture describes the acoustic modes as Q -dependent harmonic oscillators whose characteristic frequency is explicitly renormalized in an exact way by the relaxation processes, which also determine, through the widths of both the inelastic and the elastic lines, the whole shape of collective-excitation spectra.

  16. Collective acoustic modes as renormalized damped oscillators: unified description of neutron and x-ray scattering data from classical fluids.

    PubMed

    Bafile, Ubaldo; Guarini, Eleonora; Barocchi, Fabrizio

    2006-06-01

    In the Q range where inelastic x-ray and neutron scattering are applied to the study of acoustic collective excitations in fluids, various models of the dynamic structure factor S(Q, omega) generalize in different ways the results obtained from linearized-hydrodynamics theory in the Q-->0 limit. Here we show that the models most commonly fitted to experimental S(Q, omega) spectra can be given a unified formulation. In this way, direct comparisons among the results obtained by fitting different models become now possible to a much larger extent than ever. We also show that a consistent determination of the dispersion curve and of the propagation Q range of the excitations is possible, whichever model is used. We derive an exact formula which describes in all cases the dispersion curve and allows for the first quantitative understanding of its shape, by assigning specific and distinct roles to the various structural, thermal, and damping effects that determine the Q dependence of the mode frequencies. The emerging picture describes the acoustic modes as Q-dependent harmonic oscillators whose characteristic frequency is explicitly renormalized in an exact way by the relaxation processes, which also determine, through the widths of both the inelastic and the elastic lines, the whole shape of collective-excitation spectra. PMID:16906814

  17. Collective acoustic modes as renormalized damped oscillators: Unified description of neutron and x-ray scattering data from classical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Bafile, Ubaldo; Guarini, Eleonora

    2006-06-15

    In the Q range where inelastic x-ray and neutron scattering are applied to the study of acoustic collective excitations in fluids, various models of the dynamic structure factor S(Q,{omega}) generalize in different ways the results obtained from linearized-hydrodynamics theory in the Q{yields}0 limit. Here we show that the models most commonly fitted to experimental S(Q,{omega}) spectra can be given a unified formulation. In this way, direct comparisons among the results obtained by fitting different models become now possible to a much larger extent than ever. We also show that a consistent determination of the dispersion curve and of the propagation Q range of the excitations is possible, whichever model is used. We derive an exact formula which describes in all cases the dispersion curve and allows for the first quantitative understanding of its shape, by assigning specific and distinct roles to the various structural, thermal, and damping effects that determine the Q dependence of the mode frequencies. The emerging picture describes the acoustic modes as Q-dependent harmonic oscillators whose characteristic frequency is explicitly renormalized in an exact way by the relaxation processes, which also determine, through the widths of both the inelastic and the elastic lines, the whole shape of collective-excitation spectra.

  18. THE 7.1 HR X-RAY-ULTRAVIOLET-NEAR-INFRARED PERIOD OF THE {gamma}-RAY CLASSICAL NOVA MONOCEROTIS 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Page, K. L.; Osborne, J. P.; Beardmore, A. P.; Wagner, R. M.; Shore, S. N.; Starrfield, S.; Woodward, C. E.

    2013-05-10

    Nova Monocerotis 2012 is the third {gamma}-ray transient identified with a thermonuclear runaway on a white dwarf, that is, a nova event. Swift monitoring has revealed the distinct evolution of the harder and super-soft X-ray spectral components, while Swift-UV and V- and I-band photometry show a gradual decline with subtle changes of slope. During the super-soft emission phase, a coherent 7.1 hr modulation was found in the soft X-ray, UV, optical, and near-IR data, varying in phase across all wavebands. Assuming this period to be orbital, the system has a near-main-sequence secondary, with little appreciable stellar wind. This distinguishes it from the first GeV nova, V407 Cyg, where the {gamma}-rays were proposed to form through shock-accelerated particles as the ejecta interacted with the red giant wind. We favor a model in which the {gamma}-rays arise from the shock of the ejecta with material close to the white dwarf in the orbital plane. This suggests that classical novae may commonly be GeV sources. We ascribe the orbital modulation to a raised section of an accretion disk passing through the line of sight, periodically blocking and reflecting much of the emission. The disk must therefore have reformed by day 150 after outburst.

  19. Simulations of the quart (101-bar1)/water interface: A comparison of classical force fields, ab initi molecular dynamics, and x-ray reflectivity experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Skelton, Adam; Fenter, Paul; Kubicki, James D.; Wesolowski, David J; Cummings, Peter T

    2011-01-01

    Classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations of the (1011) surface of quartz interacting with bulk liquid water are performed using three different classical force fields, Lopes et al., ClayFF, and CHARMM water contact angle (CWCA), and compared to ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) and X-ray reflectivity (XR) results. The axial densities of the water and surface atoms normal to the surface are calculated and compared to previous XR experiments. Favorable agreement is shown for all the force fields with respect to the position of the water atoms. Analyses such as the radial distribution functions between water and hydroxyl atoms and the average cosine of the angle between the water dipole vector and the normal of the surface are also calculated for each force field. Significant differences are found between the different force fields from such analyses, indicating differing descriptions of the structured water in the near vicinity of the surface. AIMD simulations are also performed to obtain the water and hydroxyl structure for comparison among the predictions of the three classical force fields to better understand which force field is most accurate. It is shown that ClayFF exhibits the best agreement with the AIMD simulations for water hydroxyl radial distribution functions, suggesting that ClayFF treats the hydrogen bonding more accurately.

  20. The Secret Lives of Cepheids: The prototype Classical Cepheid δ Cephei is a Pulsed Variable X-ray and FUV Source - Implications for achieving a high precision Hubble Constant (Ho)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward F.; Engle, Scott G.; Neilson, Hilding; Harper, Graham M.; Remage Evans, Nancy

    2016-06-01

    As part of our “Secret Lives of Cepheids” program, we report that the prototype Classical Cepheid – δ Cep is an X-ray source with pulsation-modulated X-ray & FUV emissions. Recent Chandra X-ray observations, when combined with our previous Chandra & XMM-Newton data, confirm a periodic sharp ~ 5 fold increase in X-ray flux at ~ 0.5φ. The X-ray emission phases with the star's pulsation P = 5.366-d, confirms that the X-ray emissions arise from the Cepheid itself and not from a companion. The X-ray variation is “spike-like” with an Lx (max) ~ 2.1 x1029 erg/s, with plasma temperatures of ~ 2 - 6 MK. The HST-COS FUV fluxes increase ~10-20 times and reach maximum strengths during ~0.88-0.97φ - prior to maximum brightness. The FUV emissions arise from ionized plasmas with T ~10 - 300 x103 K. The FUV emission lines show turbulent broadening near the maximum fluxes. The FUV emissions are best explained by pulsation-induced collisional shocks originating from the star’s pulsating atmosphere. However, the X-ray emissions occur 0.5 - 0.6 φ (~3 days) later than the FUV emission line maxima. Thus, it appears that the X-ray emissions arise further out from the star. We suggests that to produce the observed high temperature X-ray emitting plasmas, that the X-rays most likely arise from pulsation-shock induced turbulent-magnetic heated plasmas. If this behavior is extended to other Cepheids, the presence of pulsation induced X-ray and FUV emissions could play major roles in the dynamics and heating of Cepheid atmospheres and could have consequences affecting the Cepheid Period-Luminosity (P-L) law. For example, the additional energy and shock-heating could produce enhanced mass loss leading to the formation of circumstellar shells. For example, the presence of circumstellar matter could bias the P-L relation if not accounted for. Similar X-ray - UV behavior is indicated by at least one other Cepheid, β Doradus.This research is supported from grants from NASA for

  1. The naked T Tauri stars - The low-mass pre-main sequence unveiled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Frederick M.

    1987-01-01

    The search for low-mass premain-sequence (PMS) stars associated with X-ray sources in regions of star formation is discussed. The survey to date has revealed at least 30 low-mass PMS stars in the Tau-Aur region, and a comparable number in Oph. These stars are the naked T Tau stars, unveiled versions of the well-known classical T Tau stars. The properties of these newly discovered PMS stars and their relation to the classical T Tau stars are discussed, and it is concluded that the naked T Tau stars are the true low-mass PMS stars, and that the observable characteristics defining the classical T Tau stars are due to the interaction of an underlying, fairly normal star with a dominant circumstellar environment. The impact the naked T Tau stars are likely to have on models of the PMS evolution of low-mass stars is considered.

  2. A model of an X-ray-illuminated accretion disk and corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, John C.

    1993-01-01

    The X-ray-illuminated surface of the accretion disk in a low-mass X-ray Binary (LMXRB) and the X-ray-heated corona above the disk produce optical, UV, and soft X-ray emission lines. This paper presents 1D models of the emission line spectra and the vertical temperature and density structures at different radii. The models include a detailed treatment of the important atomic processes and an escape probability treatment of radiative transfer. Soker and Raymond (1993) use the density structure predicted by these models for a 2D Monte Carlo simulation of the photon scattering in the accretion disk corona (ADC) to examine the effects of the ADC on the angular distribution of X-rays and the flux of X-rays incident on the outer disk. This paper concentrates on the emission line fluxes for various elemental abundances and disk parameters. The UV lines of the classic LMXRBs are consistent with the model predictions. Some CNO processing is necessary to account for the nitrogen and helium abundances in Sco X-1 and other LMXRBs. Comparison of the models with observed spectra also points to a soft X-ray component with luminosity comparable to the hard X-rays. The models predict a substantial luminosity in the group of highly ionized iron lines near 100 A.

  3. The Shocking Truth about Cepheids: The Secret X-ray Lives of Classical Cepheids: Origin of Pulsed FUV and X-Ray Emissions of delta Cep and beta Dor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruby, John; Engle, Scott G.; Guinan, Edward F.

    2016-01-01

    The Cepheid variable stars (delta Cep) and (beta Dor) have shown FUV spectral emission features from hot (10,000- 300,000 K) plasma that correlate with the phasing of their pulsations.(see Engle et al. 2014). These FUV spectral emissions that include NV 1240, OI 1305,C II 1335A, Si IV 1400A, and He II 1640 show peaks prior to the maximum optical brightness (during the "piston" phase of the pulsation that is observed to be in phase with the stellar pulsations, but the observed X-ray emission occurs near minimum light (near 0.4-0.5P) during the maximum radius and coolest phase of the star. Cepheid stars are an integral part of the cosmic distance ladder, due to their Period-Luminosity relationship (the Leavitt Law). Understanding the dynamics of Cepheid stars, especially with respect to FUV and X-ray emissions, is necessary to be confident in assertions derived from the cosmic distance ladder, including establishing the Hubble Constant to more accurate values.Presented here is a possible explanation for the pulsation period-related observed UV and X-ray emissions of these Cepheids. Using stellar interior and atmosphere models, conditions found in the ionization zone and outer atmosphere of these stars may be conducive to shocks being formed that are capable of temperatures great enough to produce x-ray emission. The mechanics of these shocks and their propagation in the atmosphere of the stars can potentially explain both the apparent pulsation-phased peaks for the FUV, as well as the pulsation-phase dependent (currently unexplained) X-ray emissions.This research was supported by NASA Grants: HST grant HST-GO-13019-A, XMM-Newton grant NNX14AAF12G, andChandra Grant GO-15202X. We are very thankful for this support.

  4. X-ray sources in regions of star formation. I - The naked T Tauri stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, F. M.

    1986-01-01

    Einstein X-ray observations of regions of active star formation in Taurus, Ophiuchus, and Corona Australis show a greatly enhanced surface density of stellar X-ray sources over that seen in other parts of the sky. Many of the X-ray sources are identified with low-mass, pre-main-sequence stars which are not classical T Tauri stars. The X-ray, photometric, and spectroscopic data for these stars are discussed. Seven early K stars in Oph and CrA are likely to be 1-solar-mass post-T Tauri stars with ages of 10-million yr. The late K stars in Taurus are not post-T Tauri, but 'naked' T Tauri stars, which are coeval with the T Tauri stars, differing mainly in the lack of a circumstellar envelope.

  5. The physics of black hole x ray novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, J. C.; Kim, S.-W.; Moscoso, M. D.; Mineshige, S.

    1994-01-01

    X-ray transients that are established or plausible black hole candidates have been discovered at a rate of about one per year in the galaxy for the last five years. There are now well over a dozen black hole candidates, most being in the category of X-ray novae with low-mass companions. There may be hundreds of such transient systems in the galaxy yet to be discovered. Classic black hole candidates like Cygnus X-1 with massive companions are in the minority, and their census in the galaxy and magellanic clouds is likely to be complete. The black hole X-ray novae (BHXN) do not represent only the most common environment in which to discover black holes. Their time dependence gives a major new probe with which to study the physics of accretion into black holes. The BHXN show both a soft X-ray flux from an optically thick disk and a hard power law tail that is reminiscent of AGN spectra. The result may be new insight into the classical systems like Cyg X-1 and LMC X-1 that show similar power law tails, but also to accretion into supermassive black holes and AGN.

  6. X-Rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat ...

  7. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1990-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics is presented. Topics studied include: the soft x ray background, proportional counter and filter calibrations, the new sounding rocket payload: X Ray Calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  8. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics for the period 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1990 is presented. Topics studied include: soft x ray background, new sounding rocket payload: x ray calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  9. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  10. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  11. The Unusual X-Ray Spectrum of FU Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Briggs, Kevin R.; Güdel, Manuel

    2006-06-01

    FU Orionis objects (FUors) have undergone strong optical outbursts and are thought to be young low-mass stars accreting at high rates of up to M˙acc~10-4 Msolar yr-1. FUors have been extensively studied at optical and infrared wavelengths, but little is known about their X-ray properties. We have thus initiated a program aimed at searching for and characterizing their X-ray emission. First results are presented here for the prototype star FU Orionis based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton. Its CCD X-ray spectrum is unusual compared to those of accreting classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs). The cool and hot plasma components typically detected in CTTSs are present but are seen through different absorption column densities. The absorption of the cool component is consistent with AV~2.4 mag anticipated from optical studies, but the absorption of the hot component is at least 10 times larger. The origin of the excess absorption is uncertain, but cold accreting gas or a strong near-neutral wind are likely candidates. The hot plasma component accounts for most of the observed X-ray flux, and thermal models give very high temperatures kT>=5 keV. The most prominent feature in the X-ray spectrum is an exceptionally strong Fe K emission line at 6.67 keV, and weak emission from fluorescent Fe I at ~6.4 keV may also be present. The high plasma temperature clearly demonstrates that the emission is dominated by magnetic processes. We discuss possible origins of the unusual X-ray spectrum in the context of a complex physical environment that likely includes disk accretion, a strong wind, magnetic activity, and close binarity.

  12. DN Tauri - coronal activity and accretion in a young low-mass CTTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robrade, J.; Güdel, M.; Günther, H. M.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs) are young, accreting low-mass stars; their X-ray emission differs from that of their main-sequence counterparts in a number of aspects. Aims: We study the specific case of DN Tau, a young M0-type accreting CTTS, to extend the range of young CTTSs studied with high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy at lower masses and to compare its high-energy properties with those of similar objects. Methods: We use a deep XMM-Newton observation of DN Tau to investigate its X-ray properties and X-ray generating mechanisms. Specifically, we examine the presence of X-ray emission from magnetic activity and accretion shocks. We also compare our new X-ray data with UV data taken simultaneously and with X-ray/UV observations performed before. Results: We find that the X-ray emission from DN Tau is dominated by coronal plasma generated via magnetic activity, but also clearly detect a contribution of the accretion shocks to the cool plasma component at ≲2 MK as consistently inferred from density and temperature analysis. Typical phenomena of active coronae, such as flaring, the presence of very hot plasma at 30 MK, and an abundance pattern showing the inverse FIP effect, are seen on DN Tau. Strong variations in the emission measure of the cooler plasma components between the 2005 and 2010 data point to accretion related changes; in contrast, the hotter coronal plasma component is virtually unchanged. The UV light curve taken simultaneously is in general not related to the X-ray brightness, but exhibits clear counterparts during the observed X-ray flares. Conclusions: The X-ray properties of DN Tau are similar to those of more massive CTTSs, but its low mass and large radius associated with its youth shift the accretion shocks to lower temperatures, reducing their imprint in the X-ray regime. DN Tau's overall X-ray properties are dominated by strong magnetic activity.

  13. X-rays from hot subdwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mereghetti, Sandro; La Palombara, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    Thanks to the high sensitivity of the instruments on board the XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites, it has become possible to explore the properties of the X-ray emission from hot subdwarfs. The small but growing sample of hot subdwarfs detected in X-rays includes binary systems, in which the X-rays result from wind accretion onto a compact companion (white dwarf or neutron star), as well as isolated sdO stars in which X-rays are probably due to shock instabilities in the wind. X-ray observations of these low mass stars provide information which can be useful also for our understanding of the winds of more luminous and massive early-type stars and can lead to the discovery of particularly interesting binary systems.

  14. X-ray microlaminography with polycapillary optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dąbrowski, K. M.; Dul, D. T.; Wróbel, A.; Korecki, P.

    2013-06-01

    We demonstrate layer-by-layer x-ray microimaging using polycapillary optics. The depth resolution is achieved without sample or source rotation and in a way similar to classical tomography or laminography. The method takes advantage from large angular apertures of polycapillary optics and from their specific microstructure, which is treated as a coded aperture. The imaging geometry is compatible with polychromatic x-ray sources and with scanning and confocal x-ray fluorescence setups.

  15. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some are: Bitewing Periapical Palatal (also called occlusal) ...

  16. X-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a form of ionizing radiation that can penetrate the body to form an image on ... will be shades of gray depending on density. X-rays can provide information about obstructions, tumors, and other ...

  17. X-Ray Lasers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapline, George; Wood, Lowell

    1975-01-01

    Outlines the prospects of generating coherent x rays using high-power lasers and indentifies problem areas in their development. Indicates possible applications for coherent x rays in the fields of chemistry, biology, and crystallography. (GS)

  18. X Ray Topography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balchin, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses some aspects in X-ray topography, including formation of dislocations, characteristics of stacking faults, x-ray contrast in defect inspection, Berg-Barrett technique, and Lang traversing crystal and Borrmann's methods. (CC)

  19. Extremity x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... degenerative) Bone tumor Broken bone (fracture) Dislocated bone Osteomyelitis (infection) Other conditions for which the test may ... Bone tumor Bone x-ray Broken bone Clubfoot Osteomyelitis X-ray Update Date 10/22/2014 Updated ...

  20. X-rays from the youngest stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.

    1994-01-01

    The X-ray properties of classical and weak-lined T Tauri stars are briefly reviewed, emphasizing recent results from the ROSAT satellite and prospects for ASCA. The interpretation of the high level of T Tauri X-rays as enhanced solar-type magnetic activity is discussed and criticized. The census of X-ray emitters is significantly increasing estimates of galactic star formation efficiency, and X-ray emission may be important for self-regulation of star formation. ASCA images will detect star formation regions out to several kiloparsecs and will study the magnetically heated plasma around T Tauri stars. However, images will often suffer from crowding effects.

  1. X-Ray Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brain Surgery Imaging Clinical Trials Basics Patient Information X-Ray Imaging Print This Page X-ray imaging is perhaps the most familiar type of imaging. Images produced by X-rays are due to the different absorption rates of ...

  2. X-Rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of your ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat and ...

  3. Hand x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - hand ... A hand x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department or your health care provider's office by an ... technician. You will be asked to place your hand on the x-ray table, and keep it ...

  4. Sinus x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Paranasal sinus radiography; X-ray - sinuses ... sinus x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department. Or the x-ray may be taken ... Brown J, Rout J. ENT, neck, and dental radiology. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH Schaefer- ...

  5. Globular cluster x-ray sources

    PubMed Central

    Pooley, David

    2010-01-01

    Globular clusters and x-ray astronomy have a long and fruitful history. Uhuru and OSO-7 revealed highly luminous (> 1036 ergs-1) x-ray sources in globular clusters, and Einstein and ROSAT revealed a larger population of low-luminosity (< 1033 ergs-1) x-ray sources. It was realized early on that the high-luminosity sources were low-mass x-ray binaries in outburst and that they were orders of magnitude more abundant per unit mass in globular clusters than in the rest of the galaxy. However, the low-luminosity sources proved difficult to classify. Many ideas were put forth—low-mass x-ray binaries in quiescence (qLMXBs), cataclysmic variables (CVs), active main-sequence binaries (ABs), and millisecond pulsars (MSPs)—but secure identifications were scarce. In ROSAT observations of 55 clusters, about 25 low-luminosity sources were found. Chandra has now observed over 80 Galactic globular clusters, and these observations have revealed over 1,500 x-ray sources. The superb angular resolution has allowed for many counterpart identifications, providing clues to the nature of this population. It is a heterogeneous mix of qLMXBs, CVs, ABs, and MSPs, and it has been shown that the qLMXBs and CVs are both, in part, overabundant like the luminous LMXBs. The number of x-ray sources in a cluster correlates very well with its encounter frequency. This points to dynamical formation scenarios for the x-ray sources and shows them to be excellent tracers of the complicated internal dynamics. The relation between the encounter frequency and the number of x-ray sources has been used to suggest that we have misunderstood the dynamical states of globular clusters. PMID:20404204

  6. The Integrated X-Ray Spectrum of Galactic Populations of Luminous Supersoft X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiStefano, R.; Becker, C. M.; Fabbiano, G.

    1996-01-01

    We compute the composite X-ray spectrum of a population of unresolved SSS's in a spiral galaxy such as our own or M31. The sources are meant to represent the total underlying population corresponding to all sources which have bolometric luminosities in the range of 10(exp 37) - 10(exp 38) ergs/s and kT on the order of tens of eV. These include close-binary supersoft sources, symbiotic novae, and planetary nebulae, for example. In order to determine whether the associated X-ray signal would be detectable, we also 'seed' the galaxy with other types of X-ray sources, specifically low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXB's) and high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXB's). We find that the total spectrum due to SSS's, LMXB's, and HMXB's exhibits a soft peak which owes its presence to the SSS population. Preliminary indications are that this soft peak may be observable.

  7. X-ray bursters and the X-ray sources of the galactic bulge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewin, W. H. G.; Joss, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    Type 1 X-ray bursts, optical, infrared, and radio properties of the galactic bulge sources, are discussed. It was proven that these burst sources are neutron stars in low mass, close binary stellar systems. Several burst sources are found in globular clusters with high central densities. Optical type 1 X-ray bursts were observed from three sources. Type 2 X-ray bursts, observed from the Rapid Burster, are due to an accretion instability which converts gravitational potential energy into heat and radiation, which makes them of a fundamentally different nature from Type 1 bursts.

  8. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... X-ray? What is Panoramic X-ray? Panoramic radiography , also called panoramic x-ray , is a two- ... Exams Dental Cone Beam CT X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety About this Site ...

  9. INTEGRAL finds renewed X-ray activity of the Neutron star X-ray transient SAX J1750.8-2900

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Fernandez, Celia; Chenevez, Jerome; Kuulkers, Erik; Bazzano, Angela; Beckmann, Volker; Bird, Tony; Bodaghee, Arash; Del Santo, Melania; Domingo, Albert; Jonker, Peter; Kretschmar, Peter; Markwardt, Craig; Paizis, Ada; Pottschmidt, Katja; Wijnands, Rudy

    2015-09-01

    INTEGRAL Galactic bulge monitoring observations (ATel #438) on UT 13 September 2015 18:50-22:32 reveal renewed X-ray activity from the low-mass X-ray binary transient and Type I X-ray burster SAX J1750.8-2900 (IAU Circ. #6597). The last outburst from this source was reported in 2011 (ATels #3170, 3181).

  10. X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Satellite X-ray experiments and ground-based programs aimed at observation of X-ray binaries are discussed. Experiments aboard OAO-3, OSO-8, Ariel 5, Uhuru, and Skylab are included along with rocket and ground-based observations. Major topics covered are: Her X-1, Cyg X-3, Cen X-3, Cyg X-1, the transient source A0620-00, other possible X-ray binaries, and plans and prospects for future observational programs.

  11. X-Ray Data from the X-Ray Data Booklet Online

    DOE Data Explorer

    Thompson, Albert C.; Attwood, David T.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Howells, Malcolm R.; Kortright, Jeffrey B.; Robinson, Arthur L.; Underwood, James H.; Kim, Kwang-Je; Kirz, Janos; Lindau, Ingolf; Pianetta, Piero; Winick, Herman; Williams, Gwyn P.; Scofield, James H.

    The original X-Ray Data Booklet, published in 1985, became a classic reference source. The online version has been significantly revised and updated to reflect today's science. Hundreds of pages of authoritative data provide the x-ray properties of elements, information on synchrotron radiation, scattering processes, optics and detectors, and other related calculations, formulas, and data tables.

  12. Optical and Supersoft X-Ray Light-Curve Models of Classical Nova V2491 Cygni: A New Clue to the Secondary Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachisu, Izumi; Kato, Mariko

    2009-04-01

    V2491 Cygni (Nova Cygni 2008 No. 2) was detected as a transient supersoft X-ray source with the Swift XRT as early as 40 days after the outburst, suggesting a very massive white dwarf (WD) close to the Chandrasekhar limit. We present a unified model of near infrared, optical, and X-ray light curves for V2491 Cyg, and have estimated, from our best-fit model, the WD mass to be 1.3 ± 0.02 M sun with an assumed chemical composition of the envelope, X = 0.20, Y = 0.48, X CNO = 0.20, X Ne = 0.10, and Z = 0.02 by mass weight. We strongly recommend detailed composition analysis of the ejecta because some enrichment of the WD matter suggests that the WD mass does not increase like in RS Oph, which is a candidate of Type Ia supernova progenitors. V2491 Cyg shows a peculiar secondary maximum in the optical light curve as well as V1493 Aql and V2362 Cyg. Introducing magnetic activity as an adding energy source to nuclear burning, we propose a physical mechanism of the secondary maxima.

  13. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, Natale M.; Stearns, Daniel S.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    1989-01-01

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5-50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20-250 A. The support membrane is 10-200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window.

  14. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, N.M.; Stearns, D.G.; Hawryluk, A.M.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1987-08-07

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5--50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20--250 A. The support membrane is 10--200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window. 6 figs.

  15. X-ray - skeleton

    MedlinePlus

    A skeletal x-ray is an imaging test used to look at the bones. It is used to detect fractures , tumors, or ... in the health care provider's office by an x-ray technologist. You will lie on a table or ...

  16. Extremity x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    An extremity x-ray is an image of the hands, wrist, feet, ankle, leg, thigh, forearm humerus or upper arm, hip, shoulder ... term "extremity" often refers to a human limb. X-rays are a form of radiation that passes through ...

  17. X-ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowicz, Andrzej A.; Van Grieken, Rene E.

    1984-01-01

    Provided is a selective literature survey of X-ray spectrometry from late 1981 to late 1983. Literature examined focuses on: excitation (photon and electron excitation and particle-induced X-ray emission; detection (wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive spectrometry); instrumentation and techniques; and on such quantitative analytical…

  18. X-ray monochromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An x-ray monochromator is described, wherin a housing supports a plurality of mirrors forming a plurality of opposed mirror faces in parallel with each other and having thereon multilayer coatings, with each of said pairs of mirror faces being provided with identical coatings which are different from the coatings on the other pairs of mirror faces such that each pair of mirror faces has a peak x-ray reflection at a different wavelength regime. The housing is moveable to bring into a polychromatic x-ray beam that pair of mirror faces having the best x-ray reflection for the desired wavelength, with the mirrors being pivotable to move the mirror faces to that angle of incidence at which the peak reflectivity of the desired wavelength x-rays occurs.

  19. X-ray generator

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, John M.

    1976-01-01

    Apparatus and method for producing coherent secondary x-rays that are controlled as to direction by illuminating a mixture of high z and low z gases with an intense burst of primary x-rays. The primary x-rays are produced with a laser activated plasma, and these x-rays strip off the electrons of the high z atoms in the lasing medium, while the low z atoms retain their electrons. The neutral atoms transfer electrons to highly excited states of the highly striped high z ions giving an inverted population which produces the desired coherent x-rays. In one embodiment, a laser, light beam provides a laser spark that produces the intense burst of coherent x-rays that illuminates the mixture of high z and low z gases, whereby the high z atoms are stripped while the low z ones are not, giving the desired mixture of highly ionized and neutral atoms. To this end, the laser spark is produced by injecting a laser light beam, or a plurality of beams, into a first gas in a cylindrical container having an adjacent second gas layer co-axial therewith, the laser producing a plasma and the intense primary x-rays in the first gas, and the second gas containing the high and low atomic number elements for receiving the primary x-rays, whereupon the secondary x-rays are produced therein by stripping desired ions in a neutral gas and transfer of electrons to highly excited states of the stripped ions from the unionized atoms. Means for magnetically confining and stabilizing the plasma are disclosed for controlling the direction of the x-rays.

  20. X-ray emission from normal stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Robert

    1990-01-01

    The paper addresses the potential for future X-ray missions to determine the fundamental cause of stellar X-ray emissions based on available results and existing analyses. The determinants of stellar X-ray emission are listed, and the relation of stellar X-ray emissions to the 'universal' activity-rotation connection is discussed. The specific rotation-activity connection for evolved stars is mentioned, and the 'decay' of stellar activity at the low-mass end of the main sequence is related to observational data. The data from Einstein and EXOSAT missions that correspond to these issues are found to be sparse, and more observational work is found to be necessary. Also, it is concluded that some issues need to be addressed, such as the X-ray dividing line in evolved stars and the absence of X-ray emission from dA stars. The related observational requirements and instrumental capabilities are given for each significant research focus.

  1. X-ray crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  2. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... The test is done in a hospital x-ray department or your health care provider's office by an x-ray technician. You will be asked to lie on the x-ray table ...

  3. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... The test is done in a hospital radiology department or in the health care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  4. X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  5. Medical X-Rays

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnostic X-Ray Equipment Compliance Program Guidance Manual CP 7386.003 Field Compliance Testing of Diagnostic (Medical) ... and Exporting Electronic Products Compliance Program Guidance Manual CP 7386.003 Field Compliance Testing of Diagnostic (Medical) ...

  6. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    ... or impacted teeth The presence and extent of dental caries (cavities) Bone damage (such as from periodontitis ) Abscessed ... Dental x-rays can reveal dental cavities (tooth decay) before they ... take yearly bitewings for the early development of cavities.

  7. X-ray - skeleton

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to look for: Fractures or broken bone Cancer that has spread to other areas of the ... 2014:chap 8. Read More Bone tumor Broken bone Cancer Metastasis Osteomyelitis X-ray Update Date 5/9/ ...

  8. X-Ray Diffraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, D. K.; Smith, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews applications in research and analytical characterization of compounds and materials in the field of X-ray diffraction, emphasizing new developments in applications and instrumentation in both single crystal and powder diffraction. Cites 414 references. (CS)

  9. Abdominal x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    An abdominal x-ray is an imaging test to look at organs and structures in the abdomen. Organs include the spleen, stomach, and intestines. When the test is done to look at the bladder and kidney structures, ...

  10. X-Ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonald, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews instrumental developments and technique improvements in X-ray spectrometry, grouped into major topic areas of excitation, dispersion and detection, instrumentation and techniques, and quantitative analyses. Cites 162 references. (CS)

  11. Bone x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... or broken bone Bone tumors Degenerative bone conditions Osteomyelitis (inflammation of the bone caused by an infection) ... Multiple myeloma Osgood-Schlatter disease Osteogenesis imperfecta Osteomalacia Osteomyelitis Paget disease of the bone Rickets X-ray ...

  12. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1992-01-01

    This final report covers the period 1 January 1985 - 31 March 1992. It is divided into the following sections: the soft x-ray background; proportional counter and filter calibrations; sounding rocket flight preparations; new sounding rocket payload: x-ray calorimeter; and theoretical studies. Staff, publications, conference proceedings, invited talks, contributed talks, colloquia and seminars, public service lectures, and Ph. D. theses are listed.

  13. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. New ...

  14. Oscillations During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    High amplitude, nearly coherent X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts were discovered with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in early 1996. Spectral and timing evidence strongly supports the conclusion that these oscillations are caused by rotational modulation of the burst emission and that they reveal the spin frequency of neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries, a long sought goal of X-ray astronomy. Studies carried out over the past year have led to the discovery of burst oscillations in four new sources, bringing to ten the number with confirmed burst oscillations. I review the status of our knowledge of these oscillations and indicate how they can be used to probe the physics of neutron stars. For a few burst oscillation sources it has been proposed that the strongest and most ubiquitous frequency is actually the first overtone of the spin frequency and hence that two nearly antipodal hot spots are present on the neutron star. This inference has important implications for both the physics of thermonuclear burning as well as the mass - radius relation for neutron stars, so its confirmation is crucial. I discuss recent attempts to confirm this hypothesis for 4U 1636-53, the source for which a signal at the putative fundamental (290Hz) has, been claimed.

  15. Recurrent X-ray behaviour of the Z-source Cygnus X-2.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuulkers, E.; van der Klis, M.

    1996-02-01

    The authors analyzed the X-ray spectral variations of the low-mass X-ray binary Cyg X-2 on time scales longer than one day using EXOSAT data. They find evidence for the occurrence of three different types of behaviour which as their basic distinction have different X-ray brightness levels. Previously reported data from other X-ray satellites also show this behaviour.

  16. X-ray nanotomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasov, Alexander

    2004-10-01

    A compact laboratory x-ray "nano-CT" scanner has been created for 3D non-invasive imaging with 150-200 nanometers 3D spatial resolution, using advanced x-ray technologies and specific physical phenomena for signal detection. This spatial resolution in volume terms is 3 orders better than can be achieved in synchrotron tomography, 5 orders better then in existing laboratory micro-CT instruments and 10-12 orders better in comparison to clinical CT. The instrument employs an x-ray source with a 300-400nm x-ray spot size and uses small-angle scattering to attain a detail detectability of 150-200nm. An object manipulator allows positioning and rotation with an accuracy of 150nm. The x-ray detector is based on an intensified CCD with single-photon sensitivity. A typical acquisition cycle for 3D reconstruction of the full object volume takes from 10 to 60 minutes, with the collection of several hundred angular views. Subsequent volumetric reconstruction produces results as a set of cross sections with isotropic voxel size down to 140 x 140 x 140nm, or as a 3D-model, which can be virtually manipulated and measured. This unique spatial resolution in non-invasive investigations gives previously unattainable 3D images in several application areas, such as composite materials, paper and wood microstructure, biomedical applications and others.

  17. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... be placed over the lower part of your spine. You will be asked to hold your breath ... x-ray. The most common reason for lumbosacral spine x-ray is to look for the cause ...

  18. THIRTY NEW LOW-MASS SPECTROSCOPIC BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Hebb, Leslie; Cameron, Andrew C.; Liu, Michael C.; Neill Reid, I. E-mail: Andrew.Cameron@st-and.ac.u E-mail: mliu@ifa.hawaii.ed

    2010-06-20

    As part of our search for young M dwarfs within 25 pc, we acquired high-resolution spectra of 185 low-mass stars compiled by the NStars project that have strong X-ray emission. By cross-correlating these spectra with radial velocity standard stars, we are sensitive to finding multi-lined spectroscopic binaries. We find a low-mass spectroscopic binary fraction of 16% consisting of 27 SB2s, 2 SB3s, and 1 SB4, increasing the number of known low-mass spectroscopic binaries (SBs) by 50% and proving that strong X-ray emission is an extremely efficient way to find M-dwarf SBs. WASP photometry of 23 of these systems revealed two low-mass eclipsing binaries (EBs), bringing the count of known M-dwarf EBs to 15. BD-22 5866, the ESB4, was fully described in 2008 by Shkolnik et al. and CCDM J04404+3127 B consists of two mid-M stars orbiting each other every 2.048 days. WASP also provided rotation periods for 12 systems, and in the cases where the synchronization time scales are short, we used P{sub rot} to determine the true orbital parameters. For those with no P{sub rot}, we used differential radial velocities to set upper limits on orbital periods and semimajor axes. More than half of our sample has near-equal-mass components (q > 0.8). This is expected since our sample is biased toward tight orbits where saturated X-ray emission is due to tidal spin-up rather than stellar youth. Increasing the samples of M-dwarf SBs and EBs is extremely valuable in setting constraints on current theories of stellar multiplicity and evolution scenarios for low-mass multiple systems.

  19. X-ray beam finder

    DOEpatents

    Gilbert, H.W.

    1983-06-16

    An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

  20. X-ray astronomical spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Stephen S.

    1987-01-01

    The contributions of the Goddard group to the history of X-ray astronomy are numerous and varied. One role that the group has continued to play involves the pursuit of techniques for the measurement and interpretation of the X-ray spectra of cosmic sources. The latest development is the selection of the X-ray microcalorimeter for the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) study payload. This technology is likely to revolutionize the study of cosmic X-ray spectra.

  1. X-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... Most experts feel that the benefits of appropriate x-ray imaging greatly outweigh any risks. Young children and babies ... be pregnant. Alternative Names ... CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2014: ...

  2. Optical Spectroscopy of X-Ray-selected Young Stars in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, Kaushar; Chen, Wen-Ping; Lee, Hsu-Tai

    2015-12-01

    We present low-resolution optical spectra for 29 X-ray sources identified as either massive star candidates or low-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) star candidates in the clusters Trumpler 16 and Trumpler 14 of the Carina Nebula. Spectra of two more objects (one with an X-ray counterpart, and one with no X-ray counterpart), not originally our targets, but found close (˜3″) to two of our targets, are presented as well. Twenty early-type stars, including an O8 star, seven B1-B2 stars, two B3 stars, a B5 star, and nine emission-line stars, are identified. Eleven T Tauri stars, including eight classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs) and three weak-lined T Tauri stars, are identified. The early-type stars in our sample are more reddened compared to the previously known OB stars of the region. The Chandra hardness ratios of our T Tauri stars are found to be consistent with the Chandra hardness ratios of T Tauri stars of the Orion Nebula Cluster. Most early-type stars are found to be nonvariable in X-ray emission, except the B2 star J104518.81-594217.9, the B3 star J104507.84-594134.0, and the Ae star J104424.76-594555.0, which are possible X-ray variables. J104452.20-594155.1, a CTTS, is among the brightest and the hardest X-ray sources in our sample, appears to be a variable, and shows a strong X-ray flare. The mean optical and near-infrared photometric variability in the V and Ks bands, of all sources, is found to be ˜0.04 and 0.05 mag, respectively. The T Tauri stars show significantly larger mean variation, ˜0.1 mag, in the Ks band. The addition of one O star and seven B1-B2 stars reported here contributes to an 11% increase of the known OB population in the observed field. The 11 T Tauri stars are the first ever confirmed low-mass PMS stars in the Carina Nebula region.

  3. Simultaneous X-ray and optical observations of GX 339-4 in an X-ray high state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makishima, K.; Mitsuda, K.; Maejima, Y.; Bradt, H. V.; Remillard, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Optical emission, soft X-rays, and hard X-rays have been observed simultaneously from the black hole candidate GX 3339-4 in a typical high state. Each of these components is interpreted as arising from a characteristic region of the accretion disk. Considered as a black hole, GX 339-4 lacks the variable 2 keV blackbody component that would be emitted from the 'solid' surface of a neutron star in the low-mass neutron star binaries. The X-ray emission in the high state is therefore extremely soft and stable in time. The intermediate disk region is optically thick and geometrically thin. The observed soft X-ray component with a 'disk blackbody' spectrum comes from this region. The innermost disk region is dynamically unstable due to the effect of general relativity and possibly due to radiation pressure. This region is responsible for the generation of the hard X-ray tail through Comptonization.

  4. Global Properties of X-Ray Flashes and X-Ray-Rich GRBs Observed by Swift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, T.; Yamazaki, R.; Cummings, J.; Krimm, H.; Parsons, A.; Hullinger, D.; Barbier, L.; Fenimore, E.; Markwardt, C.; Tueller, J.; Sato, G.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Palmer, D.

    2007-01-01

    We describe and discuss the spectral and temporal characteristics of the prompt emission and X-ray afterglow emission of X-ray flashes (XRFs) detected and observed by Swift between December 2005 and September 2006. We compare these characteristics to a sample of X-ray rich gamma-ray bursts (XRRs) and conventional classical gamma-ray bursts (C-GRBs)observed during the same period. We confirm the correlation between Epeak and fluence noted by others and find further evidence that XRFs and C-GRBs form a continuum. We also confirmed that our known redshift samples are consistent with the correlation between the peak energy (Epeak) and the isotropic radiated energy (Eiso), so called the Epeak-Eiso relation. The spectral properties of X-ray afterglows are similar to those of gamma-ray burst afterglows, but the temporal properties of the two classes are quite different. We found that the light curves of C-GRBs afterglow show a break to steeper indices (shallow-to-steep break) at much earlier times than do XRF afterglows. Moreover, the overall luminosity of X-ray afterglows of XRFs are systematically smaller by a factor of two or more compared with that of C-GRBs. These distinct differences in the X-ray afterglow between XRFs and C-GRBs are key to understanding not only a mysterious shallow-to-steep phase in the X-ray afterglow but also the unique nature of XRFs.

  5. X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    Dr. S. N. Zhang has lead a seven member group (Dr. Yuxin Feng, Mr. XuejunSun, Mr. Yongzhong Chen, Mr. Jun Lin, Mr. Yangsen Yao, and Ms. Xiaoling Zhang). This group has carried out the following activities: continued data analysis from space astrophysical missions CGRO, RXTE, ASCA and Chandra. Significant scientific results have been produced as results of their work. They discovered the three-layered accretion disk structure around black holes in X-ray binaries; their paper on this discovery is to appear in the prestigious Science magazine. They have also developed a new method for energy spectral analysis of black hole X-ray binaries; four papers on this topics were presented at the most recent Atlanta AAS meeting. They have also carried Monte-Carlo simulations of X-ray detectors, in support to the hardware development efforts at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). These computation-intensive simulations have been carried out entirely on the computers at UAH. They have also carried out extensive simulations for astrophysical applications, taking advantage of the Monte-Carlo simulation codes developed previously at MSFC and further improved at UAH for detector simulations. One refereed paper and one contribution to conference proceedings have been resulted from this effort.

  6. X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument is a revolutionary non-dispersive spectrometer that will form the basis for the Astro-E2 observatory to be launched in 2005. We have recently installed a flight spare X R S microcalorimeter spectrometer at the EBIT-I facility at LLNL replacing the XRS from the earlier Astro-E mission and providing twice the resolution. The X R S microcalorimeter is an x-ray detector that senses the heat deposited by the incident photon. It achieves a high energy resolution by operating at 0.06K and by carefully controlling the heat capacity and thermal conductance. The XRS/EBIT instrument has 32 pixels in a square geometry and achieves an energy resolution of 6 eV at 6 keV, with a bandpass from 0.1 to 12 keV (or more at higher operating temperature). The instrument allows detailed studies of the x-ray line emission of laboratory plasmas. The XRS/EBIT also provides an extensive calibration "library" for the Astro-E2 observatory.

  7. Monitoring X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to use the All-Sky Monitor on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in combination with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory to simultaneously measure the x-ray (2-12 keV) and hard x-ray (20-100 keV) emission from x-ray bursters. The investigation was successful. We made the first simultaneous measurement of hard and soft x-ray emission and found a strong anticorrelation of hard and soft x-ray emission from the X-Ray Burster 4U 0614+091. The monitoring performed under this investigation was also important in triggering target of opportunity observations of x-ray bursters made under the investigation hard x-ray emission of x-ray bursters approved for RXTE cycles 1 and 2. These observations lead to a number of papers on high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations and on hard x-ray emission from the x-ray bursters 4U 0614+091 and 4U 1705-44.

  8. Fluctuation X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, PI: D. K.; Co-I's: J. C. H. Spence and P. Fromme

    2013-01-25

    The work supported by the grant was aimed at developing novel methods of finding the structures of biomolecules using x-rays from novel sources such as the x-ray free electron laser and modern synchrotrons

  9. SZ/X-ray scaling relations using X-ray data and Planck Nominal maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Martino, I.; Atrio-Barandela, F.

    2016-09-01

    We determine the relation between the Comptonization parameter predicted using X-ray data YC, Xray and the X-ray luminosity LX, both magnitudes derived from ROSAT data, with the Comptonization parameter YC, SZ measured on Planck 2013 foreground cleaned Nominal maps. The 560 clusters of our sample includes clusters with masses M ≥ 1013 M⊙, one order of magnitude smaller than those used by the Planck Collaboration in a similar analysis. It also contains eight times more clusters in the redshift interval z ≤ 0.3. The prediction of the β = 2/3 model convolved with the Planck antenna beam agrees with the anisotropies measured in foreground cleaned Planck Nominal maps within the X-ray emitting region, confirming the results of an earlier analysis. The universal pressure profile overestimates the signal by a 15-21 per cent depending on the angular aperture. We show that the discrepancy is not due to the presence of cool-core systems but it is an indication of a brake in the LX - M relation towards low mass systems. We show that relation of the Comptonization parameter averaged over the region that emits 99 per cent of the X-ray flux and and the X-ray luminosity is consistent with the predictions of the self-similar model. We confirm previous findings that the scaling relations studied here do not evolve with redshift within the range probed by our catalogue.

  10. X-ray atlas of rheumatic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Dihlmann, W.

    1986-01-01

    This atlas comprises instructive X-rays of the various inflammatory rheumatic joint diseases in all stages at the extremities and the spinal column. In addition, the complex pattern of the wide range of arthroses, also known as degenerative rheumatic disease is included. Besides the instructive pointers to X-ray diagnosis, the book is also a guide to differential diagnosis. Hence, this book is actually an X-ray atlas of joint diseases in general. Selected Contents: Introduction: What Does ''Rheumatism'' Actually Mean./Radiographic Methodology in Rheumatic Diseases of the Locomotor System/The Mosaic of Arthritis/Adult Rheumatoid Arthritis/Seronegative Spondylarthritis/Classic Collagen Diseases/Enthesiopathies/Gout-Pseudogout

  11. X-Ray Emission from the Soft X-Ray Transient Aquila X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavani, Marco

    1998-01-01

    Aquila X-1 is the most prolific of soft X-ray transients. It is believed to contain a rapidly spinning neutron star sporadically accreting near the Eddington limit from a low-mass companion star. The interest in studying the repeated X-ray outbursts from Aquila X-1 is twofold: (1) studying the relation between optical, soft and hard X-ray emission during the outburst onset, development and decay; (2) relating the spectral component to thermal and non-thermal processes occurring near the magnetosphere and in the boundary layer of a time-variable accretion disk. Our investigation is based on the BATSE monitoring of Aquila X-1 performed by our group. We observed Aquila X-1 in 1997 and re-analyzed archival information obtained in April 1994 during a period of extraordinary outbursting activity of the source in the hard X-ray range. Our results allow, for the first time for this important source, to obtain simultaneous spectral information from 2 keV to 200 keV. A black body (T = 0.8 keV) plus a broken power-law spectrum describe accurately the 1994 spectrum. Substantial hard X-ray emission is evident in the data, confirming that the accretion phase during sub-Eddington limit episodes is capable of producing energetic hard emission near 5 x 10(exp 35) ergs(exp -1). A preliminary paper summarizes our results, and a more comprehensive account is being written. We performed a theoretical analysis of possible emission mechanisms, and confirmed that a non-thermal emission mechanism triggered in a highly sheared magnetosphere at the accretion disk inner boundary can explain the hard X-ray emission. An anticorrelation between soft and hard X-ray emission is indeed prominently observed as predicted by this model.

  12. X-ray Crystallography Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Edward Snell, a National Research Council research fellow at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), prepares a protein crystal for analysis by x-ray crystallography as part of NASA's structural biology program. The small, individual crystals are bombarded with x-rays to produce diffraction patterns, a map of the intensity of the x-rays as they reflect through the crystal.

  13. Tunable X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Boyce, James R.

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  14. Design, synthesis, biological evaluation and X-ray crystal structure of novel classical 6,5,6-tricyclic benzo[4,5]thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidines as dual thymidylate synthase and dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Zhou, Xilin; L.Kisliuk, Roy; Piraino, Jennifer; Cody, Vivian

    2011-01-01

    Classical antifolates (4-7) with a tricyclic benzo[4,5]thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidine scaffold and a flexible and rigid benzoylglutamate were synthesized as dual thymidylate synthase (TS) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) inhibitors. Oxidative aromatization of ethyl 2-amino-4-methyl-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1-benzothiophene-3-carboxylate (±)-9 to ethyl 2-amino-4-methyl-1-benzothiophene-3-carboxylate 10 with 10% Pd/C was a key synthetic step. Compounds with 2-CH3 substituents inhibited human (h) TS (IC50 = 0.26-0.8 μM), but not hDHFR. Substitution of the 2-CH3 with a 2-NH2 increases hTS inhibition by more than 10-fold and also affords excellent hDHFR inhibition (IC50 = 0.09-0.1 μM). This study shows that the tricyclic benzo[4,5]thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidine scaffold is highly conducive to single hTS or dual hTS-hDHFR inhibition depending on the 2-position substituents. The X-ray crystal structures of 6 and 7 with hDHFR reveal, for the first time, that tricyclics 6 and 7 bind with the benzo[4,5]thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidine ring in the folate binding mode with the thieno S mimicking the 4-amino of methotrexate. PMID:21550809

  15. X-ray satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An overview of the second quarter 1985 development of the X-ray satellite project is presented. It is shown that the project is proceeding according to plan and that the projected launch date of September 9, 1987 is on schedule. An overview of the work completed and underway on the systems, subsystems, payload, assembly, ground equipment and interfaces is presented. Problem areas shown include cost increases in the area of focal instrumentation, the star sensor light scattering requirements, and postponements in the data transmission subsystems.

  16. SMM x ray polychromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, J. L. R.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) experiment was to study the physical properties of solar flare plasma and its relation to the parent active region to understand better the flare mechanism and related solar activity. Observations were made to determine the temperature, density, and dynamic structure of the pre-flare and flare plasma as a function of wavelength, space and time, the extent to which the flare plasma departs from thermal equilibrium, and the variation of this departure with time. The experiment also determines the temperature and density structure of active regions and flare-induced changes in the regions.

  17. Soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, D.L.; Rosen, M.D.

    1988-12-01

    One of the elusive dreams of laser physicists has been the development of an x-ray laser. After 25 years of waiting, the x-ray laser has at last entered the scientific scene, although those now in operation are still laboratory prototypes. They produce soft x rays down to about five nanometers. X-ray lasers retain the usual characteristics of their optical counterparts: a very tight beam, spatial and temporal coherence, and extreme brightness. Present x-ray lasers are nearly 100 times brighter that the next most powerful x-ray source in the world: the electron synchrotron. Although Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is widely known for its hard-x-ray laser program which has potential applications in the Strategic Defense Initiative, the soft x-ray lasers have no direct military applications. These lasers, and the scientific tools that result from their development, may one day have a place in the design and diagnosis of both laser fusion and hard x-ray lasers. The soft x-ray lasers now in operation at the LLNL have shown great promise but are still in the primitive state. Once x-ray lasers become reliable, efficient, and economical, they will have several important applications. Chief among them might be the creation of holograms of microscopic biological structures too small to be investigated with visible light. 5 figs.

  18. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  19. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  20. Monitoring X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Kaaret, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The scientific goal of this project was to monitor a selected sample of x-ray bursters using data from the All-Sky Monitor (ASM) on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer together with data from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory to study the long-term temporal evolution of these sources in the x-ray and hard x-ray bands. The project was closely related to "Long-Term Hard X-Ray Monitoring of X-Ray Bursters", NASA project NAG5-3891, and and "Hard x-ray emission of x-ray bursters", NASA project NAG5-4633, and shares publications in common with both of these. The project involved preparation of software for use in monitoring and then the actual monitoring itself. These efforts have lead to results directly from the ASM data and also from Target of Opportunity Observations (TOO) made with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer based on detection of transient hard x-ray outbursts with the ASM and BATSE.

  1. X-Ray Sources in the Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Draco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonbas, E.; Rangelov, B.; Kargaltsev, O.; Dhuga, K. S.; Hare, J.; Volkov, I.

    2016-04-01

    We present the spectral analysis of an 87 ks XMM-Newton observation of Draco, a nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Of the approximately 35 robust X-ray source detections, we focus our attention on the brightest of these sources, for which we report X-ray and multiwavelength parameters. While most of the sources exhibit properties consistent with active galactic nuclei, few of them possess the characteristics of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and cataclysmic variable (CVs). Our analysis places constraints on the population of X-ray sources with LX > 3 × 1033 erg s‑1 in Draco, suggesting that there are no actively accreting black hole and neutron star binaries. However, we find four sources that could be quiescent state LMXBs/CVs associated with Draco. We also place constraints on the central black hole luminosity and on a dark matter decay signal around 3.5 keV.

  2. Hard X-ray emission from X-ray bursters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, M.; Liang, E.

    1996-11-01

    Hard X-ray emission from compact objects has been considered a spectral signature of black hole candidates. However, SIGMA and BATSE recently detected transient emission in the energy range 30-200keV from several X-ray bursters (XRBs) believed to contain weakly magnetized neutron stars. At least seven XRBs (including Aquila X-1 and 4U 1608-52) are currently known to produce erratic hard X-ray outbursts with typical durations of several weeks. These results lead us to reconsider theoretical models of high-energy emission from compact objects, and in particular thermal Comptonization models vs. non-thermal models of particle energization and X-ray emission from weakly magnetized neutron stars. We summarize here recent results for magnetic field reconnection models of non-thermal particle acceleration and high-energy emission of accretion disks. For intermediate soft X-ray luminosities below the Eddington limit, non-thermal hard X-ray emission is predicted to have a (broken) power-law spectrum with intensity anticorrelated with the soft X-ray luminosity. Recent GINGA/BATSE data for the XRB 4U 1608-52 are in agreement with the mechanism of emission proposed here: transient hard X-ray emission consistent with a broken power-law spectrum was detected for a sub-Eddington soft X-ray luminosity.

  3. Thirty New Low-mass Spectroscopic Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Hebb, Leslie; Liu, Michael C.; Reid, I. Neill; Collier Cameron, Andrew

    2010-06-01

    As part of our search for young M dwarfs within 25 pc, we acquired high-resolution spectra of 185 low-mass stars compiled by the NStars project that have strong X-ray emission. By cross-correlating these spectra with radial velocity standard stars, we are sensitive to finding multi-lined spectroscopic binaries. We find a low-mass spectroscopic binary fraction of 16% consisting of 27 SB2s, 2 SB3s, and 1 SB4, increasing the number of known low-mass spectroscopic binaries (SBs) by 50% and proving that strong X-ray emission is an extremely efficient way to find M-dwarf SBs. WASP photometry of 23 of these systems revealed two low-mass eclipsing binaries (EBs), bringing the count of known M-dwarf EBs to 15. BD-22 5866, the ESB4, was fully described in 2008 by Shkolnik et al. and CCDM J04404+3127 B consists of two mid-M stars orbiting each other every 2.048 days. WASP also provided rotation periods for 12 systems, and in the cases where the synchronization time scales are short, we used P rot to determine the true orbital parameters. For those with no P rot, we used differential radial velocities to set upper limits on orbital periods and semimajor axes. More than half of our sample has near-equal-mass components (q > 0.8). This is expected since our sample is biased toward tight orbits where saturated X-ray emission is due to tidal spin-up rather than stellar youth. Increasing the samples of M-dwarf SBs and EBs is extremely valuable in setting constraints on current theories of stellar multiplicity and evolution scenarios for low-mass multiple systems. Based on observations collected at the W. M. Keck Observatory, the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and by the WASP Consortium. The Keck Observatory is operated as a scientific partnership between the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA, and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. The CFHT is operated by the National Research Council of Canada

  4. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Stone, Gary F.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.; Chornenky, Victor I.

    2002-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  5. Solar X-ray physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bornmann, P.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Research on solar X-ray phenomena performed by American scientists during 1987-1990 is reviewed. Major topics discussed include solar images observed during quiescent times, the processes observed during solar flares, and the coronal, interplanetary, and terrestrial phenomena associated with solar X-ray flares. Particular attention is given to the hard X-ray emission observed at the start of the flare, the energy transfer to the soft X-ray emitting plasma, the late resolution of the flare as observed in soft X-ray, and the rate of occurrence of solar flares as a function of time and latitude. Pertinent aspects of nonflaring, coronal X-ray emission and stellar flares are also discussed. 175 refs.

  6. Topological X-Rays Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We continue our study of topological X-rays begun in Lynch ["Topological X-rays and MRI's," iJMEST 33(3) (2002), pp. 389-392]. We modify our definition of a topological magnetic resonance imaging and give an affirmative answer to the question posed there: Can we identify a closed set in a box by defining X-rays to probe the interior and without…

  7. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  8. Spectral Analysis of X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridriksson, Joel K.

    2011-09-01

    In this thesis, I present work from three separate research projects associated with observations of X-ray binaries. Two of those revolve around spectral characteristics of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (NS-LMXBs), with a particular source, XTE J1701-462, playing a central role. First, I construct and study color-color and hardness-intensity diagrams (CDs and HIDs) for a large sample of NS-LMXBs using Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data spanning ~15 years. I study in particular detail three sources whose complicated CDs/HIDs are strongly affected by secular motion -- Cyg X-2, Cir X-1, and GX 13+1 -- and show that Cyg X-2 and Cir X-1 display CD/HID evolution with strong similarities to the transient Z source XTE J1701-462, which was previously shown to have evolved through all subclasses of NS-LMXBs as a result of changes in mass accretion rate. I build on the results for XTE J1701-462, Cyg X-2, and Cir X-1 and rank all the sources in the sample based only on their CD/HID morphology. I speculate that this represents a rough ranking in terms of the relative ranges in mass accretion rate experienced by the sources. Next, I use data from RXTE, Swift, Chandra, and XMM-Newton to study the transition to quiescence and the first ~1200 days of the quiescent phase of XTE J1701-462 following the end of its extraordinarily luminous 19 month outburst in 2006-2007. I find that the crust of the neutron star cooled rapidly during the first ~200 days of quiescence, after having been heated out of thermal equilibrium with the core during the outburst; the source has subsequently shown slower cooling along with sporadic low-level accretion activity. I discuss the implications of the observed cooling behavior and low-level accretion, the former of which yields information on the internal properties of the neutron star. Finally, I use multiple Chandra observations to study the X-ray source populations in the late-type galaxies NGC 6946 and NGC 4485/4490. A particular

  9. X-Ray States of Redback Millisecond Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linares, M.

    2014-11-01

    Compact binary millisecond pulsars with main-sequence donors, often referred to as "redbacks," constitute the long-sought link between low-mass X-ray binaries and millisecond radio pulsars and offer a unique probe of the interaction between pulsar winds and accretion flows. We present a systematic study of eight nearby redbacks, using more than 100 observations obtained with Swift's X-ray Telescope. We distinguish between three main states: pulsar, disk, and outburst states. We find X-ray mode switching in the disk state of PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859, similar to what was found in the other redback that showed evidence for accretion: rapid, recurrent changes in X-ray luminosity (0.5-10 keV, L X), between (6-9) × 1032 erg s-1 (disk-passive state) and (3-5) × 1033 erg s-1 (disk-active state). This strongly suggests that mode switching—which has not been observed in quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries—is universal among redback millisecond pulsars in the disk state. We briefly explore the implications for accretion disk truncation and find that the inferred magnetospheric radius in the disk state of PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859 lies outside the light cylinder. Finally, we note that all three redbacks that have developed accretion disks have relatively high L X in the pulsar state (>1032 erg s-1).

  10. GBS-discovered quiescent X-ray binaries: XMM eclipse duration and VLT spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonker, Peter

    2013-10-01

    We propose to use XMM to observe eclipsing probable quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries selected from the Galactic Bulge Survey. The XMM data are crucial to determine the eclipsing duration, one cannot do this as accurately from optical light curves as from X-ray light curves as the X-ray emission region is small compared to the mass donor star. Using the XMM eclipse duration and the VLT spectroscopy we can determine virtually model independent masses of the compact objects. Furthermore, we may select different mass ratio systems favoring low-mass black holes.

  11. Observations and Models of X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubus, Guillaume

    1998-06-01

    This PhD thesis presents X-ray observations of the nearby galaxy M33 and an X-ray irradiated accretion disk model. X-ray observations of nearby galaxies allow direct access to the underlying high energy populations, amongst which are X-ray binaries where a compact object (black hole, neutron star) accretes matter from its normal star companion. I present a catalogue and a variability analysis of the sources in M33 detected by the X-ray satellite ROSAT. I discuss X-7 which is shown to be an X-ray binary pulsar. Some 70% of the X-ray flux from M33 comes from the nucleus source X-8. I show that the luminosity from this object is modulated on a 106 day period. Additional observations obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope show a bright stellar-like UV source in the center of the nucleus. These observations significantly constrain models of the bright (Lx~1e39 ergs/s) nucleus source which we believe to be a 10 solar mass black hole X-ray binary. Illumination of the accretion disk surrounding the compact object plays a crucial role in such a system. An accretion disk is thermally and viscously unstable around the hydrogen ionisation temperature. This instability is thought to power the outbursts of dwarf novae and soft X-ray transients. I present a numerical code that can follow the evolution of the instability in a disk with high precision. This model is modified to account for illumination. Contrary to observations of low mass X-ray binaries, illumination by a point source does not modify the properties of a planar disk. However, if the illumination source is not in the disk plane, as is the case for instance if the disk is warped or if the source is above the disk, illumination can stabilise the disk. It is concluded that the physical processes and the geometry of illumination in low mass X-ray binaries is still ill-understood.

  12. X-ray beam pointer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, C. W.

    1980-01-01

    Inexpensive, readily assembled pointer aims X-ray machine for welded assembly radiographs. Plumb bob used for vertical alinement and yardstick used to visualize X-ray paths were inconvenient and inaccurate. Pointer cuts alinement time by one-half and eliminates necessity of retakes. For 3,000 weld radiographs, pointer will save 300 worker-hours and significant materials costs.

  13. Plug Would Collimate X Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Jeffrey E.; Adams, James F.

    1989-01-01

    Device creates narrow, well-defined beam for radiographic measurements of thickness. Cylindrical plug collimates and aligns X rays with respect to through holes in parts. Helps in determination of wall thickness by radiography. Lead absorbs X rays that do not pass axially through central hole. Lead/vinyl seals prevent off-axis rays from passing along periphery of plug.

  14. X-ray based extensometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.; Pease, D. M.

    1988-01-01

    A totally new method of extensometry using an X-ray beam was proposed. The intent of the method is to provide a non-contacting technique that is immune to problems associated with density variations in gaseous environments that plague optical methods. X-rays are virtually unrefractable even by solids. The new method utilizes X-ray induced X-ray fluorescence or X-ray induced optical fluorescence of targets that have melting temperatures of over 3000 F. Many different variations of the basic approaches are possible. In the year completed, preliminary experiments were completed which strongly suggest that the method is feasible. The X-ray induced optical fluorescence method appears to be limited to temperatures below roughly 1600 F because of the overwhelming thermal optical radiation. The X-ray induced X-ray fluorescence scheme appears feasible up to very high temperatures. In this system there will be an unknown tradeoff between frequency response, cost, and accuracy. The exact tradeoff can only be estimated. It appears that for thermomechanical tests with cycle times on the order of minutes a very reasonable system may be feasible. The intended applications involve very high temperatures in both materials testing and monitoring component testing. Gas turbine engines, rocket engines, and hypersonic vehicles (NASP) all involve measurement needs that could partially be met by the proposed technology.

  15. X-ray astronomy in the EXOSAT era; Proceedings of the Eighteenth ESLAB Symposium, The Hague, Netherlands, November 5-9, 1984. Parts 1 & 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, A.

    1985-04-01

    Among topics discussed are: X-ray observations of stellar coronae and isolated white dwarfs; cataclysmic variables; and low/mass and high/mass X-ray binary sources. Consideration is also given to: supernova remnants and X-ray emission in the interstellar medium; active galactic nuclei; galaxy clusters; and X-ray scattering by intergalactic dust. Among additional topics discussed are: the capabilities of the broadband X-ray telescope; the study of X-ray sources by analysis of archival plates; and Tenma observations of bright binary X-ray sources.

  16. X-ray shearing interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Jeffrey A.

    2003-07-08

    An x-ray interferometer for analyzing high density plasmas and optically opaque materials includes a point-like x-ray source for providing a broadband x-ray source. The x-rays are directed through a target material and then are reflected by a high-quality ellipsoidally-bent imaging crystal to a diffraction grating disposed at 1.times. magnification. A spherically-bent imaging crystal is employed when the x-rays that are incident on the crystal surface are normal to that surface. The diffraction grating produces multiple beams which interfere with one another to produce an interference pattern which contains information about the target. A detector is disposed at the position of the image of the target produced by the interfering beams.

  17. X-Ray Diffraction Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F. (Inventor); Bryson, Charles (Inventor); Freund, Friedmann (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An x-ray diffraction apparatus for use in analyzing the x-ray diffraction pattern of a sample is introduced. The apparatus includes a beam source for generating a collimated x-ray beam having one or more discrete x-ray energies, a holder for holding the sample to be analyzed in the path of the beam, and a charge-coupled device having an array of pixels for detecting, in one or more selected photon energy ranges, x-ray diffraction photons produced by irradiating such a sample with said beam. The CCD is coupled to an output unit which receives input information relating to the energies of photons striking each pixel in the CCD, and constructs the diffraction pattern of photons within a selected energy range striking the CCD.

  18. X-Ray Tomographic Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnie Schmittberger

    2010-08-25

    Tomographic scans have revolutionized imaging techniques used in medical and biological research by resolving individual sample slices instead of several superimposed images that are obtained from regular x-ray scans. X-Ray fluorescence computed tomography, a more specific tomography technique, bombards the sample with synchrotron x-rays and detects the fluorescent photons emitted from the sample. However, since x-rays are attenuated as they pass through the sample, tomographic scans often produce images with erroneous low densities in areas where the x-rays have already passed through most of the sample. To correct for this and correctly reconstruct the data in order to obtain the most accurate images, a program employing iterative methods based on the inverse Radon transform was written. Applying this reconstruction method to a tomographic image recovered some of the lost densities, providing a more accurate image from which element concentrations and internal structure can be determined.

  19. Focusing X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen; Brissenden, Roger; Davis, William; Elsner, Ronald; Elvis, Martin; Freeman, Mark; Gaetz, Terrance; Gorenstein, Paul; Gubarev, Mikhall; Jerlus, Diab; Juda, Michael; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey; Murray, Stephen; Petre, Robert; Podgorski, William; Ramsey, Brian; Reid, Paul; Saha, Timo; Wolk, Scott; Troller-McKinstry, Susan; Weisskopf, Martin; Wilke, Rudeger; Zhang, William

    2010-01-01

    During the half-century history of x-ray astronomy, focusing x-ray telescopes, through increased effective area and finer angular resolution, have improved sensitivity by 8 orders of magnitude. Here, we review previous and current x-ray-telescope missions. Next, we describe the planned next-generation x-ray-astronomy facility, the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). We conclude with an overview of a concept for the next next-generation facility, Generation X. Its scientific objectives will require very large areas (about 10,000 sq m) of highly-nested, lightweight grazing-incidence mirrors, with exceptional (about 0.1-arcsec) resolution. Achieving this angular resolution with lightweight mirrors will likely require on-orbit adjustment of alignment and figure.

  20. Coordinated Optical/X-ray observations of the CTTS V2129 Oph The Chandra View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaccomio, E.; Argiroffi, C.; Alencar, S. H. P.; Bouvier, J.; Donati, J.-F.; Getman, K.; Gregory, S. G.; Hussain, G.; Ibrahimov, M.; Jardine, M. M.; Skelly, M.; Walter, F.

    2011-12-01

    Young low-mass accreting stars (classical T Tauri stars; CTTSs) possess strong magnetic fields that are responsible for the regulation of the accretion and outflow processes, and the confinement and heating of coronal plasma. Understanding the physics of CTTS magnetospheres and of their interaction with circumstellar disks can elucidate the history and evolution of our own Sun and Solar System, at the stage when planets were being formed. In June 2009 we have conducted an extensive multi-wavelength observing campaign of V2129 Oph, a K5 CTTS in the ρ Ophiuchi molecular cloud, with the goal of obtaining a synoptic view of its photosphere, magnetic field, coronal plasma, and of its accretion spot(s) and funnel flow(s). We here report on the X-ray emission, as observed by the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG). High-density plasma, presumably from the accretion shock, is responsible for the soft X-ray emission, at least during the first half of the observation. The X-ray emission from both the coronal plasma (T˜20MK) and the cooler and denser material from the accretion spot (T˜3MK) is observed to vary between the first and second half of the observation. From the high-resolution X-ray spectra we constrain the emission measure of the two components and the density of the cool plasma. Finally we interpret the time variability of the cool plasma component in terms of stellar rotation and the time-changing viewing angle of the accretion stream, as constrained by simultaneous optical observations.

  1. Measuring the X-ray luminosities of SDSS DR7 clusters from ROSAT All Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Xiaohu; Shen, Shiyin; Mo, H. J.; van den Bosch, Frank C.; Luo, Wentao; Wang, Yu; Lau, Erwin T.; Wang, Q. D.; Kang, Xi; Li, Ran

    2014-03-01

    We use ROSAT All Sky Survey broad-band X-ray images and the optical clusters identified from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 to estimate the X-ray luminosities around ˜65 000 candidate clusters with masses ≳ 1013 h- 1 M⊙ based on an optical to X-ray (OTX) code we develop. We obtain a catalogue with X-ray luminosity for each cluster. This catalogue contains 817 clusters (473 at redshift z ≤ 0.12) with signal-to-noise ratio >3 in X-ray detection. We find about 65 per cent of these X-ray clusters have their most massive member located near the X-ray flux peak; for the rest 35 per cent, the most massive galaxy is separated from the X-ray peak, with the separation following a distribution expected from a Navarro-Frenk-White profile. We investigate a number of correlations between the optical and X-ray properties of these X-ray clusters, and find that the cluster X-ray luminosity is correlated with the stellar mass (luminosity) of the clusters, as well as with the stellar mass (luminosity) of the central galaxy and the mass of the halo, but the scatter in these correlations is large. Comparing the properties of X-ray clusters of similar halo masses but having different X-ray luminosities, we find that massive haloes with masses ≳ 1014 h- 1 M⊙ contain a larger fraction of red satellite galaxies when they are brighter in X-ray. An opposite trend is found in central galaxies in relative low-mass haloes with masses ≲ 1014 h- 1 M⊙ where X-ray brighter clusters have smaller fraction of red central galaxies. Clusters with masses ≳ 1014 h- 1 M⊙ that are strong X-ray emitters contain many more low-mass satellite galaxies than weak X-ray emitters. These results are also confirmed by checking X-ray clusters of similar X-ray luminosities but having different characteristic stellar masses. A cluster catalogue containing the optical properties of member galaxies and the X-ray luminosity is available at http://gax.shao.ac.cn/data/Group.html.

  2. Measuring The Distances, Masses, and Radii of Neutron Stars In X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guver, Tolga; Ozel, F.; Cabrera-Lavers, A.

    2010-03-01

    Low mass X-ray binaries that have independent distance measurements and show thermonuclear X-ray bursts are ideal sources for constraining the equation of state of neutron star matter. I will introduce our program to systematically measure the distances, masses, and radii of neutron stars in such binaries. We utilize high energy resolution X-ray spectra to measure the ISM column densities to these sources as well as time resolved, high count rate X-ray spectra to study their bursts. I will discuss in detail how the combination of these observations have led to the measurement of the masses and radii of the neutron stars in the low mass X-ray binaries EXO 1745-248, 4U 1608-52, and 4U 1820-30.

  3. COMPACT OPTICAL COUNTERPARTS OF ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Lian; Feng Hua; Grise, Fabien; Kaaret, Philip

    2011-08-20

    Using archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging data, we report the multiband photometric properties of 13 ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) that have a unique compact optical counterpart. Both magnitude and color variation are detected at timescales of days to years. The optical color, variability, and X-ray to optical flux ratio indicate that the optical emission of most ULXs is dominated by X-ray reprocessing on the disk, similar to that of low-mass X-ray binaries. For most sources, the optical spectrum is a power law, F{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup {alpha}} with {alpha} in the range 1.0-2.0 and the optically emitting region has a size on the order of 10{sup 12} cm. Exceptions are NGC 2403 X-1 and M83 IXO 82, which show optical spectra consistent with direct emission from a standard thin disk, M101 ULX-1 and M81 ULS1, which have X-ray to optical flux ratios more similar to high-mass X-ray binaries, and IC 342 X-1, in which the optical light may be dominated by the companion star. Inconsistent extinction between the optical counterpart of NGC 5204 X-1 and the nearby optical nebulae suggests that they may be unrelated.

  4. X-ray Observations of Novae with Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Kim

    2016-07-01

    The rapid response capabilities of the Swift satellite, together with the daily planning of its observing schedule, make it an ideal mission for following novae in the X-ray and UV bands, particularly during their early phases of rapid evolution. A number of both classical and recurrent novae have been extensively monitored by Swift throughout their super-soft phase and later decline. We report results from these observations, including the high-amplitude flux variation often see at the start of the super-soft emission, the differing relationships between the X-ray and UV variability, and the spectral evolution seen in the X-ray band.

  5. The Swift X-ray Telescope Cluster Survey. II. X-ray spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozzi, P.; Moretti, A.; Tundo, E.; Liu, T.; Rosati, P.; Borgani, S.; Tagliaferri, G.; Campana, S.; Fugazza, D.; D'Avanzo, P.

    2014-07-01

    Aims: We present a spectral analysis of a new, flux-limited sample of 72 X-ray selected clusters of galaxies identified with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on board the Swift satellite down to a flux limit of ~10-14 erg s-1 cm-2 (SWXCS). We carry out a detailed X-ray spectral analysis with the twofold aim of measuring redshifts and characterizing the properties of the intracluster medium (ICM) for the majority of the SWXCS sources. Methods: Optical counterparts and spectroscopic or photometric redshifts for some of the sources are obtained with a cross-correlation with the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database. Additional photometric redshifts are computed with a dedicated follow-up program with the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo and a cross-correlation with the SDSS. In addition, we also blindly search for the Hydrogen-like and He-like iron Kα emission line complex in the X-ray spectrum. We detect the iron emission lines in 35% of the sample, and hence obtain a robust measure of the X-ray redshift zX with typical rms error 1-5%. We use zX whenever the optical redshift is not available. Finally, for all the sources with measured redshift, background-subtracted spectra are fitted with a single-temperature mekal model to measure global temperature, X-ray luminosity and iron abundance of the ICM. We perform extensive spectral simulations to accounts for fitting bias, and to assess the robustness of our results. We derive a criterion to select reliable best-fit models and an empirical formula to account for fitting bias. The bias-corrected values are then used to investigate the scaling properties of the X-ray observables. Results: Overall, we are able to characterize the ICM of 46 sources with redshifts (64% of the sample). The sample is mostly constituted by clusters with temperatures between 3 and 10 keV, plus 14 low-mass clusters and groups with temperatures below 3 keV. The redshift distribution peaks around z ~ 0.25 and extends up to z ~ 1, with 60% of the sample at 0.1 < z

  6. X-Ray Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-01-01

    The FluoroScan Imaging System is a high resolution, low radiation device for viewing stationary or moving objects. It resulted from NASA technology developed for x-ray astronomy and Goddard application to a low intensity x-ray imaging scope. FlouroScan Imaging Systems, Inc, (formerly HealthMate, Inc.), a NASA licensee, further refined the FluoroScan System. It is used for examining fractures, placement of catheters, and in veterinary medicine. Its major components include an x-ray generator, scintillator, visible light image intensifier and video display. It is small, light and maneuverable.

  7. Black Hole X Ray Nova Outburst with XTE and HST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph; Haswell, Carole

    1998-01-01

    We obtained multiwavelength coverage of the soft X-ray transient. GRO J1655-40 during its 1996 outburst, using HST (Hubble Space Telescope), RXTE (Rossi X Ray Timing Explorer), CGRO (Compton Gamma Ray Observatory), and ground-based facilities. This outburst was qualitatively different from other SXT (Soft X Ray Telescope) outbursts and from previous outbursts of this source. The onset of hard X-ray activity occurred very slowly, over several months, and was delayed relative to the soft X-ray rise. During this period, the optical fluxes declined steadily. This apparent anticorrelation is not consistent with with the standard disk instability model of SXT outbursts, nor is it expected if the optical output is dominated by reprocessed X-rays, as in persistent low-mass X-ray binaries. Based on the strength of the 2175-A interstellar absorption feature, we constrain the reddening to be E(B - V) = 1.2 plus or minus 0.1, a result which is consistent with the known properties of the source and with the strength of other interstellar absorption lines. After this dereddening we find that the spectra are dominated by a component peaking in the optical, with the expected v (sup l/3) disk spectrum seen only in the ultraviolet. Bowen fluorescence lines of NIII and OIII are also seen, as well as possible P Cyg profiles in the ultraviolet resonance lines. These features suggest an accretion-disk wind. The X-ray spectra broadly resemble the high/soft state commonly seen in black hole candidates, but evolve through two substates.

  8. Supergiant fast X-ray transients as an under-luminous class of supergiant X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzo, E.; Romano, P.; Ducci, L.; Bernardini, F.; Falanga, M.

    2015-02-01

    The usage of cumulative luminosity distributions, constructed thanks to the long-term observations available through wide field hard X-ray imagers, has been recently exploited to study the averaged high energy emission (>17 keV) from supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) and classical Supergiant High Mass X-ray Binaries (SgXBs). Here, we take advantage of the long term monitorings now available with Swift/XRT to construct for the first time the cumulative luminosity distributions of a number of SFXTs and the classical SgXB IGR J18027-2016 in the soft X-ray domain with a high sensitivity focusing X-ray telescope (0.3-10 keV). By complementing previous results obtained in the hard X-rays, we found that classical SgXBs are characterized by cumulative distributions with a single knee around ∼ 1036-1037 erg s-1, while SFXTs are found to be systematically sub-luminous and their distributions are shifted at significantly lower luminosities (a factor of ∼ 10-100). As the luminosity states in which these sources spend most of their time are typically below the sensitivity limit of large field of view hard X-ray imagers, we conclude that soft X-ray monitorings carried out with high sensitivity telescopes are particularly crucial to reconstruct the complete profile of the SFXT cumulative luminosity distributions. The difference between the cumulative luminosity distributions of classical SgXBs and SFXTs is interpreted in terms of accretion from a structured wind in the former sources and the presence of magnetic/centrifugal gates or a quasi-spherical settling accretion regime in the latter.

  9. Microspectroscopic soft X-ray analysis of keratin based biofibers.

    PubMed

    Späth, Andreas; Meyer, Markus; Semmler, Sonja; Fink, Rainer H

    2015-03-01

    Scanning soft X-ray transmission microspectroscopy (STXM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been employed for a high-resolution morphological and chemical analysis of hair fibers from human, sheep and alpaca. STXM allows optimum contrast imaging of the main hair building blocks due to tuneable photon energy. Chemical similarities and deviations for the human hair building blocks as well as for the three investigated species are discussed on the basis of the local near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). The spectra of melanosomes corroborate the state-of-the-art model for the chemical structure of eumelanin. Complementary TEM micrographs reveal the occurrence of cortex sectioning in alpaca hair to some extent. A spectroscopic analysis for human hair cortex indicates low mass loss upon soft X-ray irradiation, but transformation of chemical species with decreasing amount of peptide bonds and increasing NEXAFS signal for unsaturated carbon-carbon bonds. PMID:25553413

  10. X-ray emitting T Tauri stars in the L1551 cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koyama, Katsuji; Reid, I. Neill; Carkner, Lee; Feigelson, Eric D.; Montmerle, Thierry

    1995-01-01

    Low mass pre-main sequence stars in the nearby Lynds 1551 star forming cloud are studied with the ROSAT and ASCA X-ray satellites. An 8 ksec ROSAT image reveals 38 sources including 7 well-known T Tauri stars, 2 likely new weak-lined T Tauri stars, 5 potential new weak-lined T Tauri stars, one is a young B9 star, and the remaining sources are unrelated to the cloud or poorly identified. A 40 ksec ASCA image of the cloud detects seven of the ROSAT sources. Spectral fitting of the brighter X-ray emitting stars suggests the emission is produced in either a multi-temperature plasma, with temperatures near 0.2 and 1 keV, or a single-temperature plasma with low metal abundances. XZ Tau, a young classical T Tauri star, is much stronger in ASCA than ROSAT observations showing a harder (1.5-2.0 kev) component. Timing analysis reveals all but one of the T Tauri stars are variable on timescales ranging from one hour to a year. A powerful flare, emitting 3 x 10(exp 34) ergs within a 40 minute rise and fall, was observed by ASCA on the weak-lined T Tauri star V826 Tau. The event was preceded and followed by constant quiescent X-ray emission. The extreme classical T Tauri star XZ Tau was also caught during both high and low states, varying by a factor of 15 between the ASCA and ROSAT observations. Neither of the luminous infrared embedded protostars L1551-IRS 5 or L1551NE were detected by ROSAT or ASCA.

  11. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.

    2000-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

  12. Imaging X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, P. A.; Jackson, J. W., Jr.; Alcorn, G. E.; Marshall, F. E.

    1984-09-01

    An X-ray spectrometer for providing imaging and energy resolution of an X-ray source is described. This spectrometer is comprised of a thick silicon wafer having an embedded matrix or grid of aluminum completely through the wafer fabricated, for example, by thermal migration. The aluminum matrix defines the walls of a rectangular array of silicon X-ray detector cells or pixels. A thermally diffused aluminum electrode is also formed centrally through each of the silicon cells with biasing means being connected to the aluminum cell walls and causes lateral charge carrier depletion between the cell walls so that incident X-ray energy causes a photoelectric reaction within the silicon producing collectible charge carriers in the form of electrons which are collected and used for imaging.

  13. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that those parts of a patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation exposure. top ...

  14. Picosecond x-ray science.

    SciTech Connect

    Landahl, E.; Reis, D.; Wang, J.; Young, L.

    2006-01-01

    The report discusses the exciting times for short pulse X-rays and the current users of the technology in the United States. Tracking nuclear motions with X-rays transcends scientific disciplines and includes Biology, Materials Science, Condensed Matter and Chemistry. 1 picosecond accesses many phenomena previously hidden at 100ps. Synchrotron advantage over laser plasma and LCLS is that it's easily tunable. There is a large and diverse user community of this technology that is growing rapidly. A working group is being formed to implement 'fast track' Phases 1 and 2 which includes tunable, polarized, monochromatic, focused X-rays; variable pulse length (1 to 100ps) and 1 kHz, 10{sup 9} X-rays/s with 1% bandwidth. ERL would be a major advance for ultrafast time-resolved studies.

  15. X-ray microtomographic scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Syryamkin, V. I. Klestov, S. A.

    2015-11-17

    The article studies the operating procedures of an X-ray microtomographic scanner and the module of reconstruction and analysis 3D-image of a test sample in particular. An algorithm for 3D-image reconstruction based on image shadow projections and mathematical methods of the processing are described. Chapter 1 describes the basic principles of X-ray tomography and general procedures of the device developed. Chapters 2 and 3 are devoted to the problem of resources saving by the system during the X-ray tomography procedure, which is achieved by preprocessing of the initial shadow projections. Preprocessing includes background noise removing from the images, which reduces the amount of shadow projections in general and increases the efficiency of the group shadow projections compression. In conclusion, the main applications of X-ray tomography are presented.

  16. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... Results A radiologist, a doctor specially trained in reading and interpreting X-ray images, will look at ...

  17. X-Ray Exam: Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of keeping still while the X-ray is ...

  18. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of staying still while the X-ray is ...

  19. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of staying still while the X-ray is ...

  20. X-Ray Exam: Pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of keeping still while the X-ray is ...

  1. X-Ray Exam: Forearm

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of staying still while the X-ray is ...

  2. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of staying still while the X-ray is ...

  3. Imaging X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, P. A.; Jackson, J. W., Jr.; Alcorn, G. E.; Marshall, F. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An X-ray spectrometer for providing imaging and energy resolution of an X-ray source is described. This spectrometer is comprised of a thick silicon wafer having an embedded matrix or grid of aluminum completely through the wafer fabricated, for example, by thermal migration. The aluminum matrix defines the walls of a rectangular array of silicon X-ray detector cells or pixels. A thermally diffused aluminum electrode is also formed centrally through each of the silicon cells with biasing means being connected to the aluminum cell walls and causes lateral charge carrier depletion between the cell walls so that incident X-ray energy causes a photoelectric reaction within the silicon producing collectible charge carriers in the form of electrons which are collected and used for imaging.

  4. X-RAY BINARY EVOLUTION ACROSS COSMIC TIME

    SciTech Connect

    Fragos, T.; Zezas, A.; Lehmer, B.; Tzanavaris, P.; Tremmel, M.; Basu-Zych, A.; Hornschemeier, A.; Jenkins, L.; Ptak, A.; Belczynski, K.; Kalogera, V.

    2013-02-10

    High-redshift galaxies permit the study of the formation and evolution of X-ray binary (XRB) populations on cosmological timescales, probing a wide range of metallicities and star formation rates (SFRs). In this paper, we present results from a large-scale population synthesis study that models the XRB populations from the first galaxies of the universe until today. We use as input to our modeling the Millennium II cosmological simulation and the updated semi-analytic galaxy catalog by Guo et al. to self-consistently account for the star formation history and metallicity evolution of the universe. Our modeling, which is constrained by the observed X-ray properties of local galaxies, gives predictions about the global scaling of emission from XRB populations with properties such as SFR and stellar mass, and the evolution of these relations with redshift. Our simulations show that the X-ray luminosity density (X-ray luminosity per unit volume) from XRBs in our universe today is dominated by low-mass XRBs, and it is only at z {approx}> 2.5 that high-mass XRBs become dominant. We also find that there is a delay of {approx}1.1 Gyr between the peak of X-ray emissivity from low-mass XRBs (at z {approx} 2.1) and the peak of SFR density (at z {approx} 3.1). The peak of the X-ray luminosity from high-mass XRBs (at z {approx} 3.9) happens {approx}0.8 Gyr before the peak of the SFR density, which is due to the metallicity evolution of the universe.

  5. X-ray astronomical spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of the X-ray spectroscopy of celestial X-ray sources, ranging from nearby stars to distant quasars, is reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of such spectroscopy as a useful and unique tool in the elucidation of the physical parameters of the sources. The spectroscopic analysis of degenerate and nondegenerate stellar systems, galactic clusters and active galactic nuclei, and supernova remnants is discussed.

  6. Electromechanical x-ray generator

    DOEpatents

    Watson, Scott A; Platts, David; Sorensen, Eric B

    2016-05-03

    An electro-mechanical x-ray generator configured to obtain high-energy operation with favorable energy-weight scaling. The electro-mechanical x-ray generator may include a pair of capacitor plates. The capacitor plates may be charged to a predefined voltage and may be separated to generate higher voltages on the order of hundreds of kV in the AK gap. The high voltage may be generated in a vacuum tube.

  7. X-Rays, Pregnancy and You

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging Medical X-ray Imaging X-Rays, Pregnancy and You Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... the decision with your doctor. What Kind of X-Rays Can Affect the Unborn Child? During most x- ...

  8. Why Do I Need X-Rays?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to your desktop! more... Why Do I Need X-Rays? Article Chapters Why Do I Need X-Rays? ... of tooth decay. Updated: January 2012 Related Articles: X-Rays The Academy of General Dentistry (AGD) Sets the ...

  9. Nanometer x-ray lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, Frank T.; Khan Malek, Chantal G.

    1999-10-01

    New developments for x-ray nanomachining include pattern transfer onto non-planar surfaces coated with electrodeposited resists using synchrotron radiation x-rays through extremely high-resolution mask made by chemically assisted focused ion beam lithography. Standard UV photolithographic processes cannot maintain sub-micron definitions over large variation in feature topography. The ability of x-ray printing to pattern thin or thick layers of photoresist with high resolution on non-planar surfaces of large and complex topographies with limited diffraction and scattering effects and no substrate reflection is known and can be exploited for patterning microsystems with non-planar 3D geometries as well as multisided and multilayered substrates. Thin conformal coatings of electro-deposited positive and negative tone photoresist have been shown to be x-ray sensitive and accommodate sub-micro pattern transfer over surface of extreme topographical variations. Chemically assisted focused ion beam selective anisotropic erosion was used to fabricate x-ray masks directly. Masks with feature sizes less than 20 nm through 7 microns of gold were made on bulk silicon substrates and x-ray mask membranes. The technique is also applicable to other high density materials. Such masks enable the primary and secondary patterning and/or 3D machining of Nano-Electro-Mechanical Systems over large depths or complex relief and the patterning of large surface areas with sub-optically dimensioned features.

  10. Universal x-ray unit

    SciTech Connect

    Charrier, P.

    1988-04-26

    An X-ray apparatus capable of X-ray beaming in a multiplicity of directions around and through the body of a horizontally lying stationary patient is described comprising: a horizontal patient's table; a ring in circumscribing position around the table; a X-ray equipment fixedly mounted on the ring for X-ray beaming through the table and through the body of a patient when lying thereon, the X-ray equipment comprising a source of X-rays; support means for holding the ring in the circumscribing position and first drive means on the support means and on the ring for rotating the ring about a first axis perpendicular to the general plane of the ring through the ring center; a suspension member having downwardly extending side legs, second drive means for oscillating the ring support means and the ring together in unison about the second axis; a frame having a top structure above the table, the ring and the suspension member; and a carrier assembly mounted on the top structure and at the center of the suspension member.

  11. Cosmic X-ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, D.; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    A progress report of research activities carried out in the area of cosmic X-ray physics is presented. The Diffuse X-ray Spectrometer DXS which has been flown twice as a rocket payload is described. The observation times proved to be too small for meaningful X-ray data to be obtained. Data collection and reduction activities from the Ultra-Soft X-ray background (UXT) instrument are described. UXT consists of three mechanically-collimated X-ray gas proportional counters with window/filter combinations which allow measurements in three energy bands, Be (80-110 eV), B (90-187 eV), and O (e84-532 eV). The Be band measurements provide an important constraint on local absorption of X-rays from the hot component of the local interstellar medium. Work has also continued on the development of a calorimetric detector for high-resolution spectroscopy in the 0.1 keV - 8keV energy range.

  12. New x-ray telescope design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassova, Martina; Harvey, James E.

    2003-11-01

    The Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) is a complimentary, add-on instrument designed for use on the next generation of Geostationary Orbiting Environmental Satellites (GOES). Its primary mission is to continuously observe the full solar disc at X-ray wavelengths; including coronal holes, active regions, flares, and coronal mass ejections. For wide-field imaging applications, there is little merit in an optical design exhibiting stigmatic imaging on-axis; we therefore departed from the classical Wolter Type I design in favor of a hyperboloid-hyperboloid design that balances not only defocus with field curvature but also third-order spherical aberration and astigmatism with oblique spherical aberration. A detailed system engineering analysis including the substantial surface scattering and detector effects indicates that the resulting hyperboloid-hyperboloid design will achieve an 80% increase (over the baseline design) in the number of spatial resolution elements (and hence in total information content in the image) over an 18 arc min radius field-of-view. A comparison of performance predictions with X-ray test data for the SXI Engineering Model is included.

  13. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Center for X-Ray Optics; Soft X-Ray Imaging wit Zone Plate Lenses; Biological X-Ray microscopy; Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography for Nanoelectronic Pattern Transfer; Multilayer Reflective Optics; EUV/Soft X-ray Reflectometer; Photoemission Microscopy with Reflective Optics; Spectroscopy with Soft X-Rays; Hard X-Ray Microprobe; Coronary Angiography; and Atomic Scattering Factors.

  14. New X-ray detections of Herbig stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, B.; Robrade, J.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Bouvier, J.

    2009-01-01

    Context: The interpretation of X-ray detections from Herbig Ae/Be stars is disputed as it is not clear whether these intermediate-mass pre-main sequence stars are able to drive a dynamo and ensuing phenomena of magnetic activity. Alternative X-ray production mechanisms, related to stellar winds, star-disk magnetospheres, or unresolved late-type T Tauri star companions have been proposed. Aims: The companion hypothesis can be tested by resolving Herbig stars in X-rays from their known visual secondaries. Furthermore, their global X-ray properties (such as detection rate, luminosity, temperature, variability) may give clues to the emission mechanism by comparison to other types of stars, e.g. similar-age but lower-mass T Tauri stars, similar-mass but more evolved main-sequence A- and B-type stars, and with respect to model predictions. Methods: In a series of papers we have been investigating high-resolution X-ray Chandra images of Herbig Ae/Be and main-sequence B-type stars where known close visual companions are spatially separated from the primaries. Results: Here we report on six as yet unpublished Chandra exposures from our X-ray survey of Herbig stars. The target list comprises six Herbig stars with known cool companions, and three other A/B-type stars that are serendipitously in the Chandra field-of-view. In this sample we record a detection rate of 100%; i.e. all A/B-type stars display X-ray emission at levels of log(L_x/L_bol) ~ -5...-7. The analysis of hardness ratios confirms that HAeBes have hotter and/or more absorbed X-ray emitting plasma than more evolved B-type stars. Conclusions: Radiative winds are ruled out as an exclusive emission mechanism on the basis of the high X-ray temperatures. Confirming earlier results, the X-ray properties of Herbig Ae/Be stars are not vastly different from those of their late-type companion stars (if such are known). The diagnostics provided by the presently available data leave it open whether the hard X-ray emission

  15. The Soft X-ray Spectrum of the High Mass X-Ray Binary V0332+53 in Quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshamouty, Khaled G.; Heinke, Craig O.; Chouinard, Rhys

    2016-08-01

    The behaviour of neutron stars in high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) during periods of low mass transfer is of great interest. Indications of spectral softening in systems at low mass transfer rates suggest that some HMXBs are undergoing fundamental changes in their accretion regime, but the nature of the quiescent X-ray emission is not clear. We performed a 39 ks XMM-Newton observation of the transient HMXB V0332+53, finding it at a very low X-ray luminosity (Lx ˜ 4 × 1032 erg s-1). A power-law spectral fit requires an unusually soft spectral index (4.4^{+0.9}_{-0.6}), while a magnetized neutron star atmosphere model, with temperature LogTeff 6.7±0.2 K and inferred emitting radius of ˜0.2 - 0.3 km, gives a good fit. We suggest that the quiescent X-ray emission from V0332+53 is mainly from a hot spot on the surface of the neutron star. No conclusions on the presence of pulsations could be drawn due to the low count rate. Due to the high absorption column, thermal emission from the rest of the neutron star could be only weakly constrained, to LogTeff <6.14^{+0.05}_{-6.14} K, or <3 × 1033 erg s-1.

  16. The X-ray Halo of GX5-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Randall K.; Dame, T. M.; Costantini, Elisa; Predehl, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Using Chandra observations we have measured the energy-resolved dust-scattered X-ray halo around the low-mass X-ray binary GX5-1, detecting for the first time multiply scattered X-rays from interstellar dust. % e compared the observed X-ray halo at various energies to predictions from a range of dust models. These fits used both smoothly-distributed dust as well as dust in clumped clouds, with CO and 21 cm observations helping to determine the position of the clouds along the line of sight. We found that the BARE-GR-B model of Zubko, Dwek & Arendt (2004) generally led to the best results, although inadequacies in both the overall model and the data limit our conclusions. We did find that the composite dust models of Zubko, Dwek & Arendt (2004), especially the "no carbon" models, gave uniformly poor results. Although models using cloud positions and densities derived naively from CO and 21 cm data gave generally poor results, plausible adjustments to the distance of the largest cloud and the mass of a cloud in the expanding 3 kpc Arm lead to significantly improved fits. We suggest that combining X-ray halo, CO, and 21 cm observations will be a fruitful method to improve our understanding of both the gas and dust phases of the interstellar medium.

  17. Simultaneous Hubble Space Telescope/Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer Observations of Scorpius X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallman, T.; Boroson, B.; Vrtilek, S. D.

    1998-07-01

    Scorpius X-1 is the brightest extrasolar point source of X-rays and may serve as a prototype for low-mass X-ray binaries as a class. It has been suggested that the UV and optical emission arise as a result of reprocessing of X-rays and that a likely site for such reprocessing is an accretion disk around the X-ray source. If UV and optical emission are enhanced by the reprocessing of X-rays, the X-ray variability may be manifest in UV emission. We test this by using high temporal resolution UV data obtained simultaneously with high temporal resolution X-ray data collected by the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) on the Hubble Space Telescope and by the X-Ray Timing Explorer. We analyze the variability behavior of the UV spectrum and of the X-rays, and we also measure the properties of the emission-line profiles as viewed at high resolution (resolving power ~= 25,000) with the echelle gratings. The variability behavior does not provide direct support for the reprocessing scenario, although the correlated variability between UV and X-rays does not conflict with this hypothesis. Furthermore, the emission-line profiles do not fit with simple models for disk emission lines.

  18. Location of the Norma transient with the HEAO 1 scanning modulation collimator. [X ray source in Norma Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabbiano, G.; Gursky, H.; Schwartz, D. A.; Schwarz, J.; Bradt, H. V.; Doxsey, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    A precise position has been obtained for an X-ray transient source in Norma. The location uncertainty includes a variable star previously suggested to be the optical counterpart. This transient is associated with the steady X-ray source MX 1608-52 and probably with an X-ray burst source. A binary system containing a low-mass primary and a neutron-star or black-hole secondary of a few solar masses is consistent with the observations.

  19. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-26

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >10^{8}) with broadband ≃5-13  meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 10^{3} signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains. PMID:26967404

  20. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >108 ) with broadband ≃5 - 13 meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 103 signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  1. The Search for Low-mass Companions of B Stars in the Carina Nebula Cluster Trumpler 16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Nancy Remage; DeGioia-Eastwood, Kathleen; Gagné, Marc; Townsley, Leisa; Broos, Patrick; Wolk, Scott; Nazé, Yaël; Corcoran, Michael; Oskinova, Lida; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Wang, Junfeng; Walborn, Nolan R.

    2011-05-01

    We have developed lists of likely B3-A0 stars (called "late B" stars) in the young cluster Trumpler 16. The following criteria were used: location within 3' of η Car, an appropriate V and B - V combination, and proper motion (where available). Color and magnitude cuts have been made assuming an E(B - V) = 0.55 mag ± 0.1, which is a good approximation close to the center of Trumpler 16. These lists have been cross-correlated with X-ray sources found in the Chandra Carina Complex Project. Previous studies have shown that only very rarely (if at all) do late main-sequence B stars produce X-rays. We present evidence that the X-ray-detected sources are binaries with low-mass companions, since stars less massive than 1.4 M sun are strong X-ray sources at the age of the cluster. Both the median X-ray energies and X-ray luminosities of these sources are in good agreement with values for typical low-mass coronal X-ray sources. We find that 39% of the late B stars based on a list with proper motions have low-mass companions. Similarly, 32% of a sample without proper motions have low-mass companions. We discuss the X-ray detection completeness. These results on low-mass companions of intermediate-mass stars are complementary to spectroscopic and interferometric results and probe new parameter space of low-mass companions at all separations. They do not support a steeply rising distribution of mass ratios to low masses for intermediate-mass (5 M sun) primaries, such as would be found by random pairing from the initial mass function. Based on observations made with the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

  2. The Swift Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients outburst factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Patrizia; Kennea, Jamie; Barthelmy, Scott Douglas; Bozzo, Enrico; Burrows, David N.; Ducci, Lorenzo; Esposito, Paolo; Evans, Phil; Gehrels, Neil; Krimm, Hans A.; Vercellone, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    We present the Swift Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients project, which has been exploiting Swift's capabilities in a systematic study of SFXTs and classical supergiant X-ray binaries (SGXBs) since 2007. We performed an efficient long-term monitoring of 16 sources including both SFXTs and classical SGXBs and followed source activity across more than 4 orders of magnitude in X-ray luminosity, sampling the light curves on timescales spanning from few hundred seconds to years. We use our measurements of dynamic ranges, duty cycles as a function of luminosity, and luminosity distributions to highlight systematic differences that help discriminate between different theoretical models proposed to explain the differences between the wind accretion processes in SFXTs and classical SGXBs. Our follow-ups of the SFXT outbursts provide a steady advancement in the comprehension of the mechanisms triggering the high X-ray level emission of these sources. In particular, the recent observations of the outburst of the SFXT prototype IGR J17544-2619 on 2014 October 10, when the source reached a peak luminosity of 3x1038 erg s-1, challenged, for the first time, the maximum theoretical luminosity achievable by a wind-fed neutron star high mass X-ray binary. We propose that this giant outburst was due to the formation of a transient accretion disc around the compact object.

  3. X-ray tensor tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malecki, A.; Potdevin, G.; Biernath, T.; Eggl, E.; Willer, K.; Lasser, T.; Maisenbacher, J.; Gibmeier, J.; Wanner, A.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-02-01

    Here we introduce a new concept for x-ray computed tomography that yields information about the local micro-morphology and its orientation in each voxel of the reconstructed 3D tomogram. Contrary to conventional x-ray CT, which only reconstructs a single scalar value for each point in the 3D image, our approach provides a full scattering tensor with multiple independent structural parameters in each volume element. In the application example shown in this study, we highlight that our method can visualize sub-pixel fiber orientations in a carbon composite sample, hence demonstrating its value for non-destructive testing applications. Moreover, as the method is based on the use of a conventional x-ray tube, we believe that it will also have a great impact in the wider range of material science investigations and in future medical diagnostics. The authors declare no competing financial interests.

  4. X-ray Timing Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, T.

    2008-01-01

    We present new, extended X-ray timing measurements of the ultra-compact binary candidates V407 Vul and RX J0806.3+1527 (J0806), as well as a summary of the first high resolution X-ray spectra of 50806 obtained with the Chandra/LETG. The temporal baseline for both objects is approximately 12 years, and our measurements confirm the secular spin-up in their X-ray periods. The spin-up rate in 50806 is remarkably uniform at 3.55x10(exp -16)Hz/s, with a measurement precision of 0.2%. We place a limit (90% confidence) on 1 d dot nu < 4x10(exp -26)Hz/sq s. Interestingly, for V407 Vul we find the first evidence that the spin-up rate is slowing, with d dot\

  5. X-ray Crystallography Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    University of Alabama engineer Stacey Giles briefs NASA astronaut Dr. Bornie Dunbar about the design and capabilities of the X-ray Crystallography Facility under development at the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, April 21, 1999. The X-ray Crystallography Facility is designed to speed the collection of protein structure information from crystals grown aboard the International Space Station. By measuring and mapping the protein crystal structure in space, researchers will avoid exposing the delicate crystals to the rigors of space travel and make important research data available to scientists much faster. The X-ray Crystallography facility is being designed and developed by the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, a NASA Commercial Space Center.

  6. X-ray Crystallography Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    University of Alabama engineer Lance Weiss briefs NASA astronaut Dr. Bornie Dunbar about the design and capabilities of the X-ray Crystallography Facility under development at the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, April 21, 1999. The X-ray Crystallography Facility is designed to speed the collection of protein structure information from crystals grown aboard the International Space Station. By measuring and mapping the protein crystal structure in space, researchers will avoid exposing the delicate crystals to the rigors of space travel and make important research data available to scientists much faster. The X-ray Crystallography facility is being designed and developed by the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, a NASA Commercial Space Center.

  7. X-ray fluorescence holography.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kouichi; Happo, Naohisa; Hosokawa, Shinya; Hu, Wen; Matsushita, Tomohiro

    2012-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a method of atomic resolution holography which utilizes fluorescing atoms as a wave source or a monitor of the interference field within a crystal sample. It provides three-dimensional atomic images around a specified element and has a range of up to a few nm in real space. Because of this feature, XFH is expected to be used for medium-range local structural analysis, which cannot be performed by x-ray diffraction or x-ray absorption fine structure analysis. In this article, we explain the theory of XFH including solutions to the twin-image problem, an advanced measuring system, and data processing for the reconstruction of atomic images. Then, we briefly introduce our recent applications of this technique to the analysis of local lattice distortions in mixed crystals and nanometer-size clusters appearing in the low-temperature phase of a shape-memory alloy. PMID:22318258

  8. X-ray imaging: Perovskites target X-ray detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiss, Wolfgang; Brabec, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Single crystals of perovskites are currently of interest to help fathom fundamental physical parameters limiting the performance of perovskite-based polycrystalline solar cells. Now, such perovskites offer a technology platform for optoelectronic devices, such as cheap and sensitive X-ray detectors.

  9. Cosmic X-ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, D.; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of the beryllium-filtered data from Flight 17.020 was completed. The data base provided by the Wisconsin diffuse X-ray sky survey is being analyzed by correlating the B and C band emission with individual velocity components of neutral hydrogen. Work on a solid state detector to be used in high resolution spectroscopy of diffuse or extend X-ray sources is continuing. A series of 21 cm observations was completed. A paper on the effects of process parameter variation on the reflectivity of sputter-deposited tungsten-carvon multilayers was published.

  10. Portable X-Ray Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Portable x-ray instrument developed by NASA now being produced commercially as an industrial tool may soon find further utility as a medical system. The instrument is Lixiscope - Low Intensity X-Ray Imaging Scope -- a self-contained, battery-powered fluoroscope that produces an instant image through use of a small amount of radioactive isotope. Originally developed by Goddard Space Flight Center, Lixiscope is now being produced by Lixi, Inc. which has an exclusive NASA license for one version of the device.

  11. X-ray states of redback millisecond pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Linares, M.

    2014-11-01

    Compact binary millisecond pulsars with main-sequence donors, often referred to as 'redbacks', constitute the long-sought link between low-mass X-ray binaries and millisecond radio pulsars and offer a unique probe of the interaction between pulsar winds and accretion flows. We present a systematic study of eight nearby redbacks, using more than 100 observations obtained with Swift's X-ray Telescope. We distinguish between three main states: pulsar, disk, and outburst states. We find X-ray mode switching in the disk state of PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859, similar to what was found in the other redback that showed evidence for accretion: rapid, recurrent changes in X-ray luminosity (0.5-10 keV, L {sub X}), between (6-9) × 10{sup 32} erg s{sup –1} (disk-passive state) and (3-5) × 10{sup 33} erg s{sup –1} (disk-active state). This strongly suggests that mode switching—which has not been observed in quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries—is universal among redback millisecond pulsars in the disk state. We briefly explore the implications for accretion disk truncation and find that the inferred magnetospheric radius in the disk state of PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859 lies outside the light cylinder. Finally, we note that all three redbacks that have developed accretion disks have relatively high L {sub X} in the pulsar state (>10{sup 32} erg s{sup –1}).

  12. Spectroscopic Observations of Nearby Low Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vican, Laura; Zuckerman, B. M.; Rodriguez, D.

    2014-01-01

    Young low-mass stars are known to be bright in X-ray and UV due to a high level of magnetic activity. By cross-correlating the GALEX Catalog with the WISE and 2MASS Point Source Catalogs, we have identified more than 2,000 stars whose UV excesses suggest ages in the 10-100 Myr range. We used the Shane 3-m telescope at Lick Observatory on Mount Hamilton, California to observe some of these 2,000 stars spectroscopically. We measured the equivalent width of lithium at 6708 A absorption and H-alpha emission lines. Out of a total of 122 stars observed with the Kast grating spectrometer, we find that roughly 10% have strong lithium absorption features. The high percentage of stars with lithium present is further evidence of the importance of UV emission as a youth indicator for low-mass stars. In addition, we used high-resolution spectra obtained with the Hamilton echelle spectrograph to determine radial velocities for several UV-bright stars. These radial velocities will be useful for the calculation of Galactic UVW space velocities for determination of possible moving group membership. This work is supported by NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program award NNX12AH37G to RIT and UCLA and Chilean FONDECYT grant 3130520 to Universidad de Chile. This submission presents work for the GALNYSS project and should be linked to abstracts submitted by David Rodriguez, Laura Vican, and Joel Kastner.

  13. An X-Ray Survey of the Open Cluster NGC 6475 (M7) with ROSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, Charles F.; Stauffer, John R.; Caillault, J.-P.; Balachandran, Suchitra; Stern, Robert A.; Randich, Sofia

    1995-01-01

    A ROSAT x-ray survey, with complimentary optical photometry, of the open cluster NGC 6475 has enabled the detection of approx. 50 late-F to K0 and approx. 70 K/M dwarf new candidate members, providing the first reliable detection of low-mass stars in this low. galactic latitude, 220 Myr old cluster. The x-ray observations reported here have a typical limiting sensitivity of L(sub x) approx. equal to 10(exp 29) erg/s. The detection frequency of early type cluster members is consistent with the hypothesis that the x-ray emitting early type stars are binary systems with an unseen, low-mass secondary producing the x rays. The ratio between x-ray and bolometric luminosity among NGC 6475 members saturates at a spectral-type/color which is intermediate between that in much younger and in much older clusters, consistent with rotational spindown of solar-type stars upon their arrival on the ZAMS. The upper envelope of x-ray luminosity as a function of spectral type is comparable to that of the Pleiades, with the observed spread in x-ray luminosity among low-mass members being likely due to the presence of binaries and relatively rapid rotators. However, the list of x-ray selected candidate members is likely biased against low-mass, slowly rotating single stars. While some preliminary spectroscopic information is given in an appendix, further spectroscopic observations of the new candidate members will aid in interpreting the coronal activity among solar-type NGC 6475 members and their relation to similar stars in older and younger open clusters.

  14. Compact x-ray source and panel

    DOEpatents

    Sampayon, Stephen E.

    2008-02-12

    A compact, self-contained x-ray source, and a compact x-ray source panel having a plurality of such x-ray sources arranged in a preferably broad-area pixelized array. Each x-ray source includes an electron source for producing an electron beam, an x-ray conversion target, and a multilayer insulator separating the electron source and the x-ray conversion target from each other. The multi-layer insulator preferably has a cylindrical configuration with a plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers surrounding an acceleration channel leading from the electron source to the x-ray conversion target. A power source is connected to each x-ray source of the array to produce an accelerating gradient between the electron source and x-ray conversion target in any one or more of the x-ray sources independent of other x-ray sources in the array, so as to accelerate an electron beam towards the x-ray conversion target. The multilayer insulator enables relatively short separation distances between the electron source and the x-ray conversion target so that a thin panel is possible for compactness. This is due to the ability of the plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers of the multilayer insulators to resist surface flashover when sufficiently high acceleration energies necessary for x-ray generation are supplied by the power source to the x-ray sources.

  15. Focused X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.I.; Maccagno, P.

    1990-08-21

    Disclosed is an intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator. 8 figs.

  16. X-ray backscatter imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinca, Dan-Cristian; Schubert, Jeffrey R.; Callerame, J.

    2008-04-01

    In contrast to transmission X-ray imaging systems where inspected objects must pass between source and detector, Compton backscatter imaging allows both the illuminating source as well as the X-ray detector to be on the same side of the target object, enabling the inspection to occur rapidly and in a wide variety of space-constrained situations. A Compton backscatter image is similar to a photograph of the contents of a closed container, taken through the container walls, and highlights low atomic number materials such as explosives, drugs, and alcohol, which appear as especially bright objects by virtue of their scattering characteristics. Techniques for producing X-ray images based on Compton scattering will be discussed, along with examples of how these systems are used for both novel security applications and for the detection of contraband materials at ports and borders. Differences between transmission and backscatter images will also be highlighted. In addition, tradeoffs between Compton backscatter image quality and scan speed, effective penetration, and X-ray source specifications will be discussed.

  17. X-rays and magnetism.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Peter; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    Magnetism is among the most active and attractive areas in modern solid state physics because of intriguing phenomena interesting to fundamental research and a manifold of technological applications. State-of-the-art synthesis of advanced magnetic materials, e.g. in hybrid structures paves the way to new functionalities. To characterize modern magnetic materials and the associated magnetic phenomena, polarized x-rays have emerged as unique probes due to their specific interaction with magnetic materials. A large variety of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques have been developed to quantify in an element, valence and site-sensitive way properties of ferro-, ferri-, and antiferromagnetic systems, such as spin and orbital moments, and to image nanoscale spin textures and their dynamics with sub-ns time and almost 10 nm spatial resolution. The enormous intensity of x-rays and their degree of coherence at next generation x-ray facilities will open the fsec time window to magnetic studies addressing fundamental time scales in magnetism with nanometer spatial resolution. This review will give an introduction into contemporary topics of nanoscale magnetic materials and provide an overview of analytical spectroscopy and microscopy tools based on x-ray dichroism effects. Selected examples of current research will demonstrate the potential and future directions of these techniques. PMID:26288956

  18. Alpha proton x ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieder, Rudi; Waeke, H.; Economou, T.

    1994-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder will carry an alpha-proton x ray spectrometer (APX) for the determination of the elemental chemical composition of Martian rocks and soils. The instrument will measure the concentration of all major and some minor elements, including C, N, and O at levels above typically 1 percent.

  19. Focused X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary I.; Maccagno, Pierre

    1990-01-01

    An intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator.

  20. X-Ray Diffractive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian; Li, Mary; Skinner, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    X-ray optics were fabricated with the capability of imaging solar x-ray sources with better than 0.1 arcsecond angular resolution, over an order of magnitude finer than is currently possible. Such images would provide a new window into the little-understood energy release and particle acceleration regions in solar flares. They constitute one of the most promising ways to probe these regions in the solar atmosphere with the sensitivity and angular resolution needed to better understand the physical processes involved. A circular slit structure with widths as fine as 0.85 micron etched in a silicon wafer 8 microns thick forms a phase zone plate version of a Fresnel lens capable of focusing approx. =.6 keV x-rays. The focal length of the 3-cm diameter lenses is 100 microns, and the angular resolution capability is better than 0.1 arcsecond. Such phase zone plates were fabricated in Goddard fs Detector Development Lab. (DDL) and tested at the Goddard 600-microns x-ray test facility. The test data verified that the desired angular resolution and throughput efficiency were achieved.

  1. X-ray phase laminography with Talbot interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harasse, Sebastien; Hirayama, Nozomi; Yashiro, Wataru; Momose, Atsushi

    2010-09-01

    Laminography is a technique for 3D volume reconstruction, extending the classical tomography to the estimation of local areas in lamellar objects. We demonstrate X-ray phase laminography by using an X-ray Talbot interferometer consisting of two transmission gratings, which has been used only for X-ray phase tomography. In this presentation, experiments using 17.7 keV synchrotron radiation through a double-crystal monochromator are reported. The X-rays passed through the sample placed in front of the first phase grating. The rotation axis of the sample was set almost parallel to the sample plane normal, and inclined from the X-ray beam. Behind the second amplitude grating, moiré fringe patterns were measured by displacing one of the gratings in the direction parallel to its diffraction vector. Differential phase information were extracted through the fringe-scanning method. For the reconstruction of the three-dimensional volume from the differential phase information, the filtered back projection method was used with a specific filtering function. Promising results of phase laminography reconstruction are obtained for simulation data as well as weakly absorbing lamellar objects such as a polymer meshes and other samples. This advancement extends experiments with X-ray Talbot volume reconstruction to a larger variety of samples.

  2. The Peculiar Galactic Center Neutron Star X-Ray Binary XMM J174457-2850.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degenaar, N.; Wijnands, R.; Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M.; Altamirano, D.; Kennea, J.; Gehrels, N.; Haggard, D.; Ponti, G.

    2014-01-01

    The recent discovery of a milli-second radio pulsar experiencing an accretion outburst similar to those seen in low mass X-ray binaries, has opened up a new opportunity to investigate the evolutionary link between these two different neutron star manifestations. The remarkable X-ray variability and hard X-ray spectrum of this object can potentially serve as a template to search for other X-ray binary radio pulsar transitional objects. Here we demonstrate that the transient X-ray source XMM J174457-2850.3 near the Galactic center displays similar X-ray properties. We report on the detection of an energetic thermonuclear burst with an estimated duration of 2 hr and a radiated energy output of 5E40 erg, which unambiguously demonstrates that the source harbors an accreting neutron star. It has a quiescent X-ray luminosity of Lx5E32 ergs and exhibits occasional accretion outbursts during which it brightens to Lx1E35-1E36 ergs for a few weeks (2-10 keV). However, the source often lingers in between outburst and quiescence at Lx1E33-1E34 ergs. This unusual X-ray flux behavior and its relatively hard X-ray spectrum, a power law with an index of 1.4, could possibly be explained in terms of the interaction between the accretion flow and the magnetic field of the neutron star.

  3. V1647 Orionis: The X-Ray Evolution of a Pre-Main-Sequence Accretion Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastner, Joel H.; Richmond, Michael; Grosso, Nicolas; Weintraub, David A.; Simon, Theodore; Henden, Arne; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Frank, Adam; Ozawa, Hideki

    2006-09-01

    We present Chandra X-Ray Observatory monitoring observations of the recent accretion outburst displayed by the pre-main-sequence (pre-MS) star V1647 Ori. The X-ray observations were obtained over a period beginning prior to outburst onset in late 2003 and continuing through its apparent cessation in late 2005, and demonstrate that the mean flux of the spatially coincident X-ray source closely tracked the near-infrared luminosity of V1647 Ori throughout its eruption. We find negligible likelihood that the correspondence between X-ray and infrared light curves over this period was the result of multiple X-ray flares unrelated to the accretion burst. The recent Chandra data confirm that the X-ray spectrum of V1647 Ori hardened during outburst, relative both to its preoutburst state and to the X-ray spectra of nearby pre-MS stars in the L1630 cloud. We conclude that the observed changes in the X-ray emission from V1647 Ori over the course of its 2003-2005 eruption were generated by a sudden increase and subsequent decline in its accretion rate. These results for V1647 Ori indicate that the flux of hard X-ray emission from erupting low-mass, pre-MS stars, and the duration and intensity of such eruptions, reflect the degree to which star-disk magnetic fields are reorganized before and during major accretion events.

  4. Oscillations During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts: A New Probe of Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Observations of thermonuclear (also called Type 1) X-ray bursts from neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB) with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) have revealed large amplitude, high coherence X-ray brightness oscillations with frequencies in the 300 - 600 Hz range. Substantial spectral and timing evidence point to rotational modulation of the X-ray burst flux as the cause of these oscillations, and it is likely that they reveal the spin frequencies of neutron stars in LMXB from which they are detected. Here we review the status of our knowledge of these oscillations and describe how they can be used to constrain the masses and radii of neutron stars as well as the physics of thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars.

  5. Multifrequency observations of CYG X-2: X ray observations with GINGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasinger, Guenther; van der Klis, M.; Ebisawa, K.; Dotani, T.; Mitsuda, K.

    1989-10-01

    The observations of the bright low-mass x ray binary and Z-source Cyg X-2, carried out with the Japanese x ray satellite Ginga, are reported. The observations were effectuated for six days in 1988 June and October at x ray, ultraviolet, optical and radio wavelengths. On both occasions all three spectral states, the horizontal, normal and flaring branch, showing up as a Z-shaped correlation curve in an x ray color-color diagram, were observed. Quasi-Periodic Oscillations (QPO) and noise are detected. The sudden disappearance of the radio flares, hand in hand with the decrease of QPO and noise power and the softening of the x ray spectra at the transition from horizontal branch to normal branch can be interpreted in terms of a sudden inflation of the inner disk, which engulfs the entire magnetosphere in the normal branch.

  6. Black Hole X-Ray Nova Outburst with XTE and HST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph; Haswell, Carole

    1999-01-01

    We obtained multiwavelength coverage of the soft X-ray transient GRO J1655-40 during its 1996 outburst, using HST, RXTE, CGRO, and ground-based facilities. This outburst was qualitatively different from other SXT outbursts and from previous outbursts of this source. The onset of hard X-ray activity occurred very slowly, over several months, and was delayed relative to the soft X-ray rise. During this period, the optical fluxes declined steadily. This apparent anticorrelation is not consistent with with the standard disk instability model of SXT outbursts, nor is it expected if the optical output is dominated by reprocessed X-rays, as in persistent low-mass X-ray binaries. .

  7. Search for x ray emitting young stars outside of massive molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.

    1991-01-01

    This project is intended to determine whether X-ray surveys of the sky can uncover previously unrecognized populations of pre-main sequence stars outside of large well-known star forming regions. X-ray observations of large regions such as the Taurus-Auriga complex, Orion molecular cloud, Ophiuchi and Chamaeleon clouds had revealed that low mass pre-main sequence emit X-rays 10(exp 2)-10(exp 4) above main sequence levels, and that X-ray surveys select a large population of 'weak' T Tauri stars that are not easily found in traditional optical and infrared surveys. The present project sought to find 'weak' T Tauri stars around smaller and more distant molecular clouds. X-ray surveys potentially could elucidate the star forming capabilities of small clouds, which are not well understood.

  8. X-ray emission from cataclysmic variables with accretion disks. I - Hard X-rays. II - EUV/soft X-ray radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, J.; Raymond, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Theoretical models explaining the hard-X-ray, soft-X-ray, and EUV emission of accretion-disk cataclysmic variables in terms of the disk boundary layer (DBL) are developed on the basis of a survey of the published observational data. The data are compared with model predictions in graphs for systems with high or low (greater than or less than 10-Pg/s) accretion rates. Good agreement is obtained both at low accretion rates, where an optically thin rarefied hot (Te = 10 to the 8th K) DBL radiates most of its energy as hard X-rays, and at high accretion rates, where an optically thick 100,000-K DBL radiates most of its energy in the EUV and as soft X-rays. Detailed analysis of the old nova V603 Aql suggests that previous models predicting more detections of soft-X-ray/EUV emissions from thick-DBL objects (Ferland et al., 1982) used inappropriate dwarf masses, interstellar column densities, or classical-nova space densities.

  9. X-ray Bursts and Oscillations: Prospects with NICER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Mahmoodifar, Simin

    2016-04-01

    X-ray bursts (Type I) are produced by thermonuclear flashes in the accreted surface layers of some neutron stars in Low Mass X-ray Binaries (LMXBs). High frequency oscillations are observed during some of these bursts. These "burst oscillations" result from rotational modulation of an inhomogeneous temperature distribution on the neutron star surface induced by ignition and subsequent spreading of the thermonuclear flash. They provide a means to measure the spin rates of accreting neutron stars and since the burst emission arises from the neutron star surface, a unique probe of neutron star structure. To date, virtually all observations of such oscillations have been made with NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). We have developed a burst model employing the Schwarzschild + Doppler approximation for surface emission coupled with realistic flame spreading geometries and burst cooling to compute light curves and oscillation amplitudes for both the rising and cooling phases of X-ray bursts. We use this model to explore the capabilities for the Neutron star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) to detect and study burst oscillations, particularly in the energy band below 3 keV. NICER is an International Space Station attached payload (X-ray telescope) with capabilities optimized for fast timing of neutron stars in the 0.2-10 keV band. It has large collecting area (twice that of the XMM-Newton EPIC-pn camera), CCD-quality spectral resolution, and high-precision time tagging referenced to UTC through an onboard GPS receiver. NICER will begin its 18-month prime mission around the end of 2016. We will present results of simulated X-ray bursts with NICER that explore its burst oscillation detection capabilities and prospects for inferring neutron star properties from phase-resolved spectra.

  10. X-ray observations of black widow pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, P. A.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Camilo, F.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Kerr, M.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Stairs, I. H.

    2014-03-10

    We describe the first X-ray observations of five short orbital period (P{sub B} < 1 day), γ-ray emitting, binary millisecond pulsars (MSPs). Four of these—PSRs J0023+0923, J1124–3653, J1810+1744, and J2256–1024—are 'black-widow' pulsars, with degenerate companions of mass <<0.1 M {sub ☉}, three of which exhibit radio eclipses. The fifth source, PSR J2215+5135, is an eclipsing 'redback' with a near Roche-lobe filling ∼0.2 solar mass non-degenerate companion. Data were taken using the Chandra X-Ray Observatory and covered a full binary orbit for each pulsar. Two pulsars, PSRs J2215+5135 and J2256–1024, show significant orbital variability while PSR J1124–3653 shows marginal orbital variability. The lightcurves for these three pulsars have X-ray flux minima coinciding with the phases of the radio eclipses. This phenomenon is consistent with an intrabinary shock emission interpretation for the X-rays. The other two pulsars, PSRs J0023+0923 and J1810+1744, are fainter and do not demonstrate variability at a level we can detect in these data. All five spectra are fit with three separate models: a power-law model, a blackbody model, and a combined model with both power-law and blackbody components. The preferred spectral fits yield power-law indices that range from 1.3 to 3.2 and blackbody temperatures in the hundreds of eV. The spectrum for PSR J2215+5135 shows a significant hard X-ray component, with a large number of counts above 2 keV, which is additional evidence for the presence of intrabinary shock emission. This is similar to what has been detected in the low-mass X-ray binary to MSP transition object PSR J1023+0038.

  11. Deterministic retrieval of complex Green's functions using hard X rays.

    PubMed

    Vine, D J; Paganin, D M; Pavlov, K M; Uesugi, K; Takeuchi, A; Suzuki, Y; Yagi, N; Kämpfe, T; Kley, E-B; Förster, E

    2009-01-30

    A massively parallel deterministic method is described for reconstructing shift-invariant complex Green's functions. As a first experimental implementation, we use a single phase contrast x-ray image to reconstruct the complex Green's function associated with Bragg reflection from a thick perfect crystal. The reconstruction is in excellent agreement with a classic prediction of dynamical diffraction theory. PMID:19257417

  12. The SWIRE/Chandra Survey: The X-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Kilgard, Roy; Kim, Dong-Woo; Kim, Minsun; Polletta, Mari; Lonsdale, Carol; Smith, Harding E.; Surace, Jason; Owen, Frazer N.; Franceschini, A.; Siana, Brian; Shupe, David

    2009-12-01

    We report a moderate-depth (70 ks), contiguous 0.7 deg2 Chandra survey in the Lockman Hole Field of the Spitzer/SWIRE Legacy Survey coincident with a completed, ultra-deep VLA survey with deep optical and near-infrared imaging in-hand. The primary motivation is to distinguish starburst galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGNs), including the significant, highly obscured (log N H > 23) subset. Chandra has detected 775 X-ray sources to a limiting broadband (0.3-8 keV) flux ~4 × 10-16 erg cm-2 s-1. We present the X-ray catalog, fluxes, hardness ratios, and multi-wavelength fluxes. The log N versus log S agrees with those of previous surveys covering similar flux ranges. The Chandra and Spitzer flux limits are well matched: 771 (99%) of the X-ray sources have infrared (IR) or optical counterparts, and 333 have MIPS 24 μm detections. There are four optical-only X-ray sources and four with no visible optical/IR counterpart. The very deep (~2.7 μJy rms) VLA data yield 251 (>4σ) radio counterparts, 44% of the X-ray sources in the field. We confirm that the tendency for lower X-ray flux sources to be harder is primarily due to absorption. As expected, there is no correlation between observed IR and X-ray fluxes. Optically bright, type 1, and red AGNs lie in distinct regions of the IR versus X-ray flux plots, demonstrating the wide range of spectral energy distributions in this sample and providing the potential for classification/source selection. Many optically bright sources, which lie outside the AGN region in the optical versus X-ray plots (fr /fx >10), lie inside the region predicted for red AGNs in IR versus X-ray plots, consistent with the presence of an active nucleus. More than 40% of the X-ray sources in the VLA field are radio-loud using the classical definition, RL . The majority of these are red and relatively faint in the optical so that the use of RL to select those AGNs with the strongest radio emission becomes questionable. Using the 24 μm to radio

  13. The coronal temperatures of low-mass main-sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, C. P.; Güdel, M.

    2015-06-01

    Aims: We study the X-ray emission of low-mass main-sequence stars to derive a reliable general scaling law between coronal temperature and the level of X-ray activity. Methods: We collect ROSAT measurements of hardness ratios and X-ray luminosities for a large sample of stars to derive which stellar X-ray emission parameter is most closely correlated with coronal temperature. We calculate average coronal temperatures for a sample of 24 low-mass main-sequence stars with measured emission measure distributions (EMDs) collected from the literature. These EMDs are based on high-resolution X-ray spectra measured by XMM-Newton and Chandra. Results: We confirm that there is one universal scaling relation between coronal average temperature and surface X-ray flux, FX, that applies to all low-mass main-sequence stars. We find that coronal temperature is related to FX by T̅cor = 0.11 FX0.26, where T̅cor is in MK and FX is in erg s-1 cm-2.

  14. An extended galactic population of low-luminosity x-ray sources (CVs?) and the diffuse x-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maoz, Eyal; Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    1995-01-01

    possible nature of these soures, including their being subdwarfs, low mass x-ray binaries (LMXBs), massive black holes, and old neutron stars. We argue that the inferred X-ray and optical luminosities of these sources, the slope of their energy spectrum, and the derived local number density and spatial distribution are all consistent with their being intrinsically faint cataclysmic variables with low accretion rates. We suggest a few possibilities for the origin of such population, including an origin from disrupted globular clusters or dark clusters. We make predictions and suggest tests that could either confirm or rule out our proposal in the near future.

  15. The X-Ray Spectral Changes of Scorpius X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, C. F.; Geldzahler, B. J.; Fomalont, E. B.

    2003-07-01

    Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of Sco X-1 during 1997-1999 have been analyzed for spectral characteristics. All the X-ray branches of Sco X-1 were observed during these epochs. On the basis of our observations, we present a simple model for the behavior of Sco X-1 as a function of accretion rate and angle of the observer's line of sight that explains quantitatively the results of VLBA and RXTE observations. Our model presents a unified view of bright low-mass X-ray binaries as an accretion-driven system in which, at the Eddington accretion rate, material overflows the magnetosphere of the neutron star and quenches the jets of Sco X-1. We present supporting evidence of absorption as a function of X-ray branch. The model explains the two distinct color diagrams of observed Z source horizontal branches as variations in the observed line of sight to the accretion disk. The model also applies to the recently discovered Z traces in atoll sources.

  16. Observations with NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Over the past decade our understanding of accreting neutron stars has been revolutionized. Observations with NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) have resulted in the discovery of fast, coherent X-ray intensity oscillations (hereafter, "burst oscillations") during thermonuclear X-ray bursts from 13 low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Although many of their detailed properties remain to be fully understood, it is now beyond doubt that these oscillations result from spin modulation of the thermonuclear burst flux from the neutron star surface. In addition, RXTE observations led to the discovery of the first accreting millisecond pulsars, the sample of which now includes six systems, several of which are in extremely compact binary systems with essentially massive planet companions. These millisecond timing phenomena are providing powerful new probes of the formation, evolution and structure of neutron stars. I will describe recent efforts to constrain neutron star structure using detailed modelling of their properties. I will also discuss what the observed distribution of neutron star spin frequencies is telling us about the torques which may act to limit the ultimate spin up of accreting neutron stars.

  17. A Comprehensive Archival Chandra Search for X-Ray Emission from Ultracompact Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Viraj; Mulchaey, John; Greene, Jenny E.

    2016-03-01

    We present the first comprehensive archival study of the X-ray properties of ultracompact dwarf (UCD) galaxies, with the goal of identifying weakly accreting central black holes in UCDs. Our study spans 578 UCDs distributed across 13 different host systems, including clusters, groups, fossil groups, and isolated galaxies. Of the 336 spectroscopically confirmed UCDs with usable archival Chandra imaging observations, 21 are X-ray-detected. Imposing a completeness limit of {L}X\\gt 2× {10}38 erg s-1, the global X-ray detection fraction for the UCD population is ˜ 3%. Of the 21 X-ray-detected UCDs, seven show evidence of long-term X-ray time variability on the order of months to years. X-ray-detected UCDs tend to be more compact than non-X-ray-detected UCDs, and we find tentative evidence that the X-ray detection fraction increases with surface luminosity density and global stellar velocity dispersion. The X-ray emission of UCDs is fully consistent with arising from a population of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). In fact, there are fewer X-ray sources than expected using a naive extrapolation from globular clusters. Invoking the fundamental plane of black hole activity for SUCD1 near the Sombrero galaxy, for which archival Jansky Very Large Array imaging at 5 GHz is publicly available, we set an upper limit on the mass of a hypothetical central black hole in that UCD to be ≲ {10}5{M}⊙ . While the majority of our sources are likely LMXBs, we cannot rule out central black holes in some UCDs based on X-rays alone, and so we address the utility of follow-up radio observations to find weakly accreting central black holes.

  18. X-ray microdiffraction of biominerals.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Nobumichi; Gilbert, Pupa U P A

    2013-01-01

    Biominerals have complex and heterogeneous architectures, hence diffraction experiments with spatial resolutions between 500 nm and 10 μm are extremely useful to characterize them. X-ray beams in this size range are now routinely produced at many synchrotrons. This chapter provides a review of the different hard X-ray diffraction and scattering techniques, used in conjunction with efficient, state-of-the-art X-ray focusing optics. These include monochromatic X-ray microdiffraction, polychromatic (Laue) X-ray microdiffraction, and microbeam small-angle X-ray scattering. We present some of the most relevant discoveries made in the field of biomineralization using these approaches. PMID:24188780

  19. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    The Center for X-Ray Optics has made substantial progress during the past year on the development of very high resolution x-ray technologies, the generation of coherent radiation at x-ray wavelengths, and, based on these new developments, had embarked on several scientific investigations that would not otherwise have been possible. The investigations covered in this report are topics on x-ray sources, x-ray imaging and applications, soft x-ray spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation, advanced light source and magnet structures for undulators and wigglers. (LSP)

  20. Microgap x-ray detector

    SciTech Connect

    Wuest, Craig R.; Bionta, Richard M.; Ables, Elden

    1994-01-01

    An x-ray detector which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope.

  1. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.; Bionta, R.M.; Ables, E.

    1994-05-03

    An x-ray detector is disclosed which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope. 3 figures.

  2. Hard X-ray astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Past hard X-ray and lower energy satellite instruments are reviewed and it is shown that observation above 20 keV and up to hundreds of keV can provide much valuable information on the astrophysics of cosmic sources. To calculate possible sensitivities of future arrays, the efficiencies of a one-atmosphere inch gas counter (the HEAO-1 A-2 xenon filled HED3) and a 3 mm phoswich scintillator (the HEAO-1 A-4 Na1 LED1) were compared. Above 15 keV, the scintillator was more efficient. In a similar comparison, the sensitivity of germanium detectors did not differ much from that of the scintillators, except at high energies where the sensitivity would remain flat and not rise with loss of efficiency. Questions to be addressed concerning the physics of active galaxies and the diffuse radiation background, black holes, radio pulsars, X-ray pulsars, and galactic clusters are examined.

  3. Long-term cycles in cosmic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priedhorsky, W. C.; Holt, S. S.

    1987-01-01

    Data on long-term cycles in galactic X-ray sources are reviewed, and classes of variations are identified including precessional activity, recurrent outbursts in Population II sources, and Be/neutron star flare cycles. Cycles of 30-300 days have been found in LMC X-4, Her X-1, SS433, and Cyg X-1 which represent cyclic variations in both the inner and outer parts of the accretion disk. Quasi-periodic cycles with periods ranging from 1/2 to 2 years have been noted in several low-mass X-ray binaries. It is suggested that periodic outbursts in the Be/neutron star systems may result from variable mass transfer in a wide eccentric orbit.

  4. Soft x-ray tomoholography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guehrs, Erik; Stadler, Andreas M.; Flewett, Sam; Frömmel, Stefanie; Geilhufe, Jan; Pfau, Bastian; Rander, Torbjörn; Schaffert, Stefan; Büldt, Georg; Eisebitt, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate an x-ray imaging method that combines Fourier transform holography with tomography (‘tomoholography’) for three-dimensional (3D) microscopic imaging. A 3D image of a diatom shell with a spatial resolution of 140 nm is presented. The experiment is realized by using a small gold sphere as the reference wave source for holographic imaging. This setup allows us to rotate the sample and to collect a number of 2D projections for tomography.

  5. X-ray Diode Preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, D J; Good, D E; Hogge, K W; Molina, I; Howe, R A; Lutz, S S; Flores, P A; McGillivray, K D; Skarda, W M; Nelson, D S; Ormond, E S; Cordova, S R

    2011-06-16

    A rod pinch x-ray diode assembly culminates in a coaxial anode cathode arrangement where a small anode rod extends through the aperture of a cathode plate. Shotto- shot repeatability in rod placement, and thus x-ray source spot position, has potential to positively affect radiographic image quality. Thus, how to both control and measure, according to a Cartesian coordinate system, anode rod tip displacement (x, y) (off the beam line-of-sight retical) and also anode rod tip extension (z) (along the line-of-sight center line) become salient issues relative to radiographic image set utility. To address these issues both hardware fabrication and x-ray diode assembly methods were reviewed, and additional controls were introduced. A photogrammetric procedure was developed to quantify anode rod tip position in situ. Computer models and mock-up assemblies with precision fiducials were produced to validate this procedure. Therefore, both anode rod tip displacement and anode rod tip extension parameters were successfully controlled. Rod position was measured and met the required specifications: (1) radial displacement <0.25 mm and (2) axial placement of ±0.25 mm. We demonstrated that precision control and measurement of large scale components is achievable in a pulse power system (i.e., hardware and operations). Correlations with diode performance and radiography are presented.

  6. X-Ray Crystallography Reagent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Microcapsules prepared by encapsulating an aqueous solution of a protein, drug or other bioactive substance inside a semi-permeable membrane by are disclosed. The microcapsules are formed by interfacial coacervation under conditions where the shear forces are limited to 0-100 dynes per square centimeter at the interface. By placing the microcapsules in a high osmotic dewatering solution. the protein solution is gradually made saturated and then supersaturated. and the controlled nucleation and crystallization of the protein is achieved. The crystal-filled microcapsules prepared by this method can be conveniently harvested and stored while keeping the encapsulated crystals in essentially pristine condition due to the rugged. protective membrane. Because the membrane components themselves are x-ray transparent, large crystal-containing microcapsules can be individually selected, mounted in x-ray capillary tubes and subjected to high energy x-ray diffraction studies to determine the 3-D smucture of the protein molecules. Certain embodiments of the microcapsules of the invention have composite polymeric outer membranes which are somewhat elastic, water insoluble, permeable only to water, salts, and low molecular weight molecules and are structurally stable in fluid shear forces typically encountered in the human vascular system.

  7. X-Ray-powered Macronovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisaka, Shota; Ioka, Kunihito; Nakar, Ehud

    2016-02-01

    A macronova (or kilonova) was observed as an infrared excess several days after the short gamma-ray burst GRB 130603B. Although the r-process radioactivity is widely discussed as an energy source, it requires a huge mass of ejecta from a neutron star (NS) binary merger. We propose a new model in which the X-ray excess gives rise to the simultaneously observed infrared excess via thermal re-emission, and explore what constraints this would place on the mass and velocity of the ejecta. This X-ray-powered model explains both the X-ray and infrared excesses with a single energy source such as the central engine like a black hole, and allows for a broader parameter region than the previous models, in particular a smaller ejecta mass ˜ {10}-3{--}{10}-2{M}⊙ and higher iron abundance mixed as suggested by general relativistic simulations for typical NS-NS mergers. We also discuss the other macronova candidates in GRB 060614 and GRB 080503, and the implications for the search of electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves.

  8. Optical Observation of Low Mass X-Ray Binary V1727 Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Alex; Mason, Paul; Robinson, Edward L.

    2011-10-01

    This research is based upon optical observations of the neutron star V1727 Cygni (=4U 2129+47). A total of 19 nights of data were collected from September 2010 through August 2011 at the McDonald Observatory via the 82 inch (2.1 m) Otto Struve Telescope. The Interactive Reduction and Analysis Facility (IRAF) was used to reduce the data collected. We present the resulting light curves. We will describe our analytical methodology, which makes use of a phase dispersion minimization program in order to identify periodicity. Preliminary results seem to support previous research by Bothwell, Torres, Garcia, and Charles that V1727 Cygni is part of a three-body system. Preliminary results also suggest that this system exhibits ellipsoidal variations. This research is supported by a National Science Foundation Partnership in Astronomy and Astrophysics Research and Education (PAARE) grant to the University of Texas at El Paso.

  9. Searching for gravitational waves from low mass x-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messenger, Christopher; Vecchio, Alberto

    2004-03-01

    Accreting neutron stars in binary systems, and Sco X-1 in particular, are considered one of the prime astrophysical targets for Earth-based gravitational wave laser interferometers. Here we discuss a data analysis strategy that we have developed for this class of systems which is now being applied to the science data collected by GEO600 and LIGO.

  10. THE GALACTIC BULGE SURVEY: OUTLINE AND X-RAY OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Jonker, P. G.; Bassa, C. G.; Torres, M. A. P.; In't Zand, J. J. M.; Ratti, E. M.; Nelemans, G.; Steeghs, D.; Maccarone, T. J.; Dieball, A.; Hynes, R. I.; Clem, J.; Mikles, V. J.; Britt, C. T.; Gossen, L.; Collazzi, A. C.; Greiss, S.; Wijnands, R.; Mendez, M.; Rea, N.; Kuulkers, E.

    2011-06-01

    We introduce the Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) and we provide the Chandra source list for the region that has been observed to date. Among the goals of the GBS are constraining the neutron star (NS) equation of state and the black hole (BH) mass distribution via the identification of eclipsing NS and BH low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). The latter goal will, in addition, be obtained by significantly enlarging the number of BH systems for which a BH mass can be derived. Further goals include constraining X-ray binary formation scenarios, in particular the common envelope phase and the occurrence of kicks, via source-type number counts and an investigation of the spatial distribution of X-ray binaries, respectively. The GBS targets two strips of 6{sup 0} x 1{sup 0} (12 deg{sup 2} in total), one above (1{sup 0} < b < 2{sup 0}) and one below (-2{sup 0} < b < -1{sup 0}) the Galactic plane in the direction of the Galactic center at both X-ray and optical wavelengths. By avoiding the Galactic plane (-1{sup 0} < b < 1{sup 0}) we limit the influence of extinction on the X-ray and optical emission but still sample relatively large number densities of sources. The survey is designed such that a large fraction of the X-ray sources can be identified from their optical spectra. The X-ray survey, by design, covers a large area on the sky while the depth is shallow using 2 ks per Chandra pointing. In this way we maximize the predicted number ratio of (quiescent) LMXBs to cataclysmic variables. The survey is approximately homogeneous in depth to a 0.5-10 keV flux of 7.7 x 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. So far, we have covered about two-thirds (8.3 deg{sup 2}) of the projected survey area with Chandra providing over 1200 unique X-ray sources. We discuss the characteristics and the variability of the brightest of these sources.

  11. An X-ray outburst from the rapidly accreting young star that illuminates McNeil's nebula.

    PubMed

    Kastner, J H; Richmond, M; Grosso, N; Weintraub, D A; Simon, T; Frank, A; Hamaguchi, K; Ozawa, H; Henden, A

    2004-07-22

    Young, low-mass stars are luminous X-ray sources whose powerful X-ray flares may exert a profound influence over the process of planet formation. The origin of the X-ray emission is uncertain. Although many (or perhaps most) recently formed, low-mass stars emit X-rays as a consequence of solar-like coronal activity, it has also been suggested that X-ray emission may be a direct result of mass accretion onto the forming star. Here we report X-ray imaging spectroscopy observations which reveal a factor approximately 50 increase in the X-ray flux from a young star that is at present undergoing a spectacular optical/infrared outburst (this star illuminates McNeil's nebula). The outburst seems to be due to the sudden onset of a phase of rapid accretion. The coincidence of a surge in X-ray brightness with the optical/infrared eruption demonstrates that strongly enhanced high-energy emission from young stars can occur as a consequence of high accretion rates. We suggest that such accretion-enhanced X-ray emission from erupting young stars may be short-lived, because intense star-disk magnetospheric interactions are quenched rapidly by the subsequent flood of new material onto the star. PMID:15269761

  12. Aspergillosis - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually occurs in immunocompromised individuals. Here, a chest x-ray shows that the fungus has invaded the lung ... are usually seen as black areas on an x-ray. The cloudiness on the left side of this ...

  13. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tissue, and can cause tissue death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light ... location of cavities within these light areas. The x-ray on the left clearly shows that the opacities ...

  14. Advances in transmission x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect

    Ceglio, N.M.

    1983-01-01

    Recent developments in x-ray optics are reviewed. Specific advances in coded aperture imaging, zone plate lens fabrication, time and space resolved spectroscopy, and CCD x-ray detection are discussed.

  15. Producing X-rays at the APS

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-04-19

    An introduction and overview of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the technology that produces the brightest X-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those X-rays.

  16. Producing X-rays at the APS

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    An introduction and overview of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the technology that produces the brightest X-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those X-rays.

  17. Phase-sensitive X-ray imager

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Kevin Louis

    2013-01-08

    X-ray phase sensitive wave-front sensor techniques are detailed that are capable of measuring the entire two-dimensional x-ray electric field, both the amplitude and phase, with a single measurement. These Hartmann sensing and 2-D Shear interferometry wave-front sensors do not require a temporally coherent source and are therefore compatible with x-ray tubes and also with laser-produced or x-pinch x-ray sources.

  18. Advanced x-ray imaging spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callas, John L. (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An x-ray spectrometer that also provides images of an x-ray source. Coded aperture imaging techniques are used to provide high resolution images. Imaging position-sensitive x-ray sensors with good energy resolution are utilized to provide excellent spectroscopic performance. The system produces high resolution spectral images of the x-ray source which can be viewed in any one of a number of specific energy bands.

  19. Photometric Variability of X-ray Sources in the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britt, Christopher T.

    2013-07-01

    The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) undertakes to find and classify X-ray sources in the Galactic Bulge. Of these X-ray sources, there is likely a significant minority which are Low Mass X-ray Binaries: systems containing either a neutron star or black hole that is accreting matter from a roughly stellar mass companion via Roche-Lobe overflow. I use optical time-series photometry from the Mosaic-II instrument on the Blanco 4m telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory to identify counterparts to new X-ray sources in the GBS. Of those that are variable in brightness, I use the morphology of the changes and the relative proportion of optical and X-ray light, to identify high inclination systems through eclipses, to determine what periodicity, if any, is present in the optical light, and use these properties to partially or fully classify X-ray sources. The GBS contains a variety of X-ray sources, including Low Mass X-ray Binaries, Cataclysmic Variables Intermediate Polars, Active Galactic Nuclei, W Ursa Ma joris stars, RS Canum Venaticorum stars, active stars, and flare stars. Spectroscopy greatly aids the classification of the X-ray source and is used, where available, to distinguish between source types and identify promising objects for further study. Only a handful of sources are identified as potential new Low Mass X-ray Binaries in quiescence, which places limits on the number of such systems in the Galaxy and on their outburst duty cycle. In addition to the GBS, I have done work on echo-tomography of Scorpius X-1, the brightest extra-solar X-ray source in the sky. I have found that reprocessing is dominated by the accretion disk in all observations, and that the companion is not reliably distinguishable in reprocessing of continuum light. I also found that reprocessing mainly occurs in the Flaring Branch of the Z-diagram, turning off in other X-ray states.

  20. Chandra Observation of Polaris: Census of Low-Mass Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Nancy Remage; Wolk, Scott; Guinan, Edward; Engle, Scott; Schlegel, Eric; Mason, Brian; Karovska, Margarita; Spitzbart, Bradley

    2009-09-01

    We have observed Polaris = HD 8890 with Chandra ACIS-I for 10 ksec and found an X-ray source at the location of the Cepheid Polaris A = Aa + Ab with log L_X = 28.89 ergs s^{-1} and a kT = 0.6 keV. Either the F7 Ib supergiant or the F6 V spectroscopic companion could produce a spectrum this soft. Polaris B is not an X-ray source, which is consistent with its early F spectral type. However, this shows that it does not itself have a lower mass companion. Two resolved low mass stars ``C and D" are not physical companions based on the lack of X-rays (indicating an older age than the Cepheid) and inconsistent motion. In addition, a possible more distant companion is identified, and also less plausible one. Thus, this observation provides a complete census of companions down to masses as small as an order of magnitude less than the Cepheid and nearly 15 mag fainter within the surrounding 0.1 pc.Funding for this work was provided by Chandra grant GO6-7011A Chandra X-ray Center NASA Contract NAS8-39073

  1. X-rays from magnetic intermediate mass Ap/Bp stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robrade, Jan

    2016-09-01

    The X-ray emission of magnetic intermediate mass Ap/Bp stars is reviewed and put into context of intrinsic as well as extrinsic hypotheses for its origin. New X-ray observations of Ap/Bp stars are presented and combined with an updated analysis of the available datasets, providing the largest sample of its type that is currently available. In the studied stars the X-ray detections are found predominantly among the more massive, hotter and more luminous targets. Their X-ray properties are quite diverse and beside strong soft X-ray emission significant magnetic activity is frequently present. While a connection between more powerful winds and brighter X-ray emission is expected in intrinsic models, the scatter in X-ray luminosity at given bolometric luminosity is so far unexplained and several observational features like X-ray light curves and flaring, luminosity distributions and spectral properties are often similar to those of low-mass stars. It remains to be seen if these features can be fully reproduced by magnetospheres of intermediate mass stars. The article discusses implications for magnetically confined wind-shock models (MCWS) and stellar magnetospheres under the assumption that the intrinsic model is applicable, but also examines the role of possible companions. Further, related magnetospheric phenomena are presented and an outlook on future perspectives is given.

  2. Magnetic fields in X-ray emitting A-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, C.; Hubrig, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2008-04-01

    A common explanation for the observed X-ray emission of A-type stars is the presence of a hidden late-type companion. While this hypothesis can be shown to be correct in some cases, there is also evidence suggesting that low-mass companions cannot be the proper cause for the observed X-ray activity in all cases. Babel and Montmerle (1997) presented a theoretical framework to explain the X-ray emission from magnetic Ap/Bp stars, focusing on the A0p star IQ Aur. We test whether this theoretical model is capable of explaining the observed X-ray emissions. We present observations of 13 A-type stars that have been associated with X-ray emission detected by ROSAT. To determine the mean longitudinal magnetic field strength we measured the circular polarization in the wings of the Balmer lines using FORS 1. Although the emission of those objects with magnetic fields does fit the prediction of the Babel & Montmerle model, not all X-ray detections are related to the presence of a magnetic field. Additionally, the strengths of magnetic fields do not correlate with the X-ray luminosity and thus the magnetically-confined wind shock model cannot explain the X-ray emission from all investigated stars.

  3. Center for X-ray Optics, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    This report briefly reviews the following topics: soft-x-ray imaging; reflective optics for hard x-rays; coherent XUV sources; spectroscopy with x-rays; detectors for coronary artery imaging; synchrotron-radiation optics; and support for the advanced light source.

  4. Student X-Ray Fluorescence Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fetzer, Homer D.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes the experimental arrangement for x-ray analysis of samples which involves the following: the radioisotopic x-ray disk source; a student-built fluorescence chamber; the energy dispersive x-ray detector, linear amplifier and bias supply; and a multichannel pulse height analyzer. (GS)

  5. Cryotomography x-ray microscopy state

    DOEpatents

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-10-26

    An x-ray microscope stage enables alignment of a sample about a rotation axis to enable three dimensional tomographic imaging of the sample using an x-ray microscope. A heat exchanger assembly provides cooled gas to a sample during x-ray microscopic imaging.

  6. Optical observations of X-ray systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudets, R.

    The significance of optical observations of X-ray sources is discussed. A short review of X-ray and optical observations of X-ray stars in socialist countries, carried out by the Intercosmos program and by multilateral cooperation of the Academies of Sciences of Socialist Countries is given. Some examples and results of observations are presented.

  7. Electron beam parallel X-ray generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, P.

    1967-01-01

    Broad X ray source produces a highly collimated beam of low energy X rays - a beam with 2 to 5 arc minutes of divergence at energies between 1 and 6 keV in less than 5 feet. The X ray beam is generated by electron bombardment of a target from a large area electron gun.

  8. The complementarity of x-rays and neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Axe, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    Nature is subtle and grudgingly reveals her secrets. In such an uneven contest scientists need to exploit every possible advantage. Just as high energy and nuclear physicists use hadrons, leptons and photons as scattering probes, so the modern condensed matter scientists relies upon NMR, ESR, {mu}SR, infrared, optical and UV spectroscopy as well as classical transport and thermal measurements, to understand material properties. For structural studies electron and x-ray diffraction are commonly used. Traditionally neutrons, because of the expense and the potential for greater environmental impact associated with their production, are reserved for studies where their unique properties mandate their use. The emergence throughout the world of major user facilities for both synchrotron x-rays and neutrons has recently underlined the degree to which x-ray and neutron scattering studies complement one another. Let us quickly review some of the advantages of neutrons. Neutrons are more penetrating, more precise (to the extent that they scatter from the nucleus rather than the extended electron cloud), more uniform in scattering power, more magnetic'' and more massive (and thus less energetic) than x-rays of comparable wavelength. Indeed, if expense and ease of access were not a factor, neutrons would very often be the probe of choice. This report discusses some of these properties of neutrons and how they complement x-ray diffraction in condensed matter studies. (LSP)

  9. Zernike x-ray ptychography.

    PubMed

    Vartiainen, Ismo; Mohacsi, Istvan; Stachnik, Karolina; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; David, Christian; Meents, Alke

    2016-02-15

    We present an imaging technique combining Zernike phase-contrast imaging and ptychography. The contrast formation is explained by following the theory of Zernike phase-contrast imaging. The method is demonstrated with x-rays at a photon energy of 6.2 keV, showing how ptychographic reconstruction of a phase sample leads to a Zernike phase-contrast image appearing in the amplitude reconstruction. In addition, the results presented in this Letter indicate an improvement of the resolution of the reconstructed object in the case of Zernike ptychography compared with the conventional one. PMID:26872172

  10. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, Rick B.

    1996-01-01

    An X-ray debris shield for use in X-ray lithography that is comprised of an X-ray window having a layer of low density foam exhibits increased longevity without a substantial increase in exposure time. The low density foam layer serves to absorb the debris emitted from the X-ray source and attenuate the shock to the window so as to reduce the chance of breakage. Because the foam is low density, the X-rays are hardly attenuated by the foam and thus the exposure time is not substantially increased.

  11. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, R.B.

    1996-05-21

    An X-ray debris shield for use in X-ray lithography that is comprised of an X-ray window having a layer of low density foam exhibits increased longevity without a substantial increase in exposure time. The low density foam layer serves to absorb the debris emitted from the X-ray source and attenuate the shock to the window so as to reduce the chance of breakage. Because the foam is low density, the X-rays are hardly attenuated by the foam and thus the exposure time is not substantially increased.

  12. Three-dimensional x-ray microtomography

    SciTech Connect

    Flannery, B.P.; Deckman, H.W.; Roberge, W.G.; D'Amico, K.L.

    1987-09-18

    The new technique of x-ray microtomography nondestructively generates three-dimensional maps of the x-ray attenuation coefficient inside small samples with approximately 1 percent accuracy and with resolution approaching 1 micrometer. Spatially resolved elemental maps can be produced with synchrotron x-ray sources by scanning samples at energies just above and below characteristic atomic absorption edges. The system consists of a high-resolution imaging x-ray detector and high-speed algorithms for tomographic image reconstruction. The design and operation of the microtomography device are described, and tomographic images that illustrate it performance with both synchrotron and laboratory x-ray sources are presented.

  13. Comets: mechanisms of x-ray activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibadov, Subhon

    2016-07-01

    Basic mechanisms of X-ray activity of comets are considered, including D-D mechanism corresponding to generation of X-rays due to production of hot short-living plasma clumps at high-velocity collisions between cometary and interplanetary dust particles as well as M-M one corresponding to production of X-rays due to recombination of multicharge ions of solar wind plasma via charge exchange process at their collisions with molecules/atoms of the cometary atmospheres. Peculiarities of the variation of the comet X-ray spectrum and X-ray luminosity with variation of its heliocentric distance are revealed.

  14. Atmospheric electron x-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Jason E. (Inventor); George, Thomas (Inventor); Wilcox, Jaroslava Z. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention comprises an apparatus for performing in-situ elemental analyses of surfaces. The invention comprises an atmospheric electron x-ray spectrometer with an electron column which generates, accelerates, and focuses electrons in a column which is isolated from ambient pressure by a:thin, electron transparent membrane. After passing through the membrane, the electrons impinge on the sample in atmosphere to generate characteristic x-rays. An x-ray detector, shaping amplifier, and multi-channel analyzer are used for x-ray detection and signal analysis. By comparing the resultant data to known x-ray spectral signatures, the elemental composition of the surface can be determined.

  15. X-ray Spectroscopy of Cooling Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.R.; Fabian, A.C.; /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron.

    2006-01-17

    We review the X-ray spectra of the cores of clusters of galaxies. Recent high resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations have demonstrated a severe deficit of emission at the lowest X-ray temperatures as compared to that expected from simple radiative cooling models. The same observations have provided compelling evidence that the gas in the cores is cooling below half the maximum temperature. We review these results, discuss physical models of cooling clusters, and describe the X-ray instrumentation and analysis techniques used to make these observations. We discuss several viable mechanisms designed to cancel or distort the expected process of X-ray cluster cooling.

  16. Ionospheric effects of solar x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danskin, Donald

    2016-07-01

    The ionospheric absorption of radio waves caused by solar x-ray bursts is measured directly by Riometers from the Canada Riometer Array. The absorption is found to be proportional to the square root of the flux intensity of the X-ray burst with time delays of 18-20 seconds between the peak X-ray emission and absorption in the ionosphere. A detailed analysis showed that some X-ray flares during 2011-2014 are more effective at producing absorption than others. Solar longitude of X-ray burst for several X-class flares shows no consistent pattern of enhancement in the absorption.

  17. X-ray induced dimerization of cinnamic acid: Time-resolved inelastic X-ray scattering study

    PubMed Central

    Inkinen, Juho; Niskanen, Johannes; Talka, Tuomas; Sahle, Christoph J.; Müller, Harald; Khriachtchev, Leonid; Hashemi, Javad; Akbari, Ali; Hakala, Mikko; Huotari, Simo

    2015-01-01

    A classic example of solid-state topochemical reactions is the ultraviolet-light induced photodimerization of α-trans-cinnamic acid (CA). Here, we report the first observation of an X-ray-induced dimerization of CA and monitor it in situ using nonresonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy (NRIXS). The time-evolution of the carbon core-electron excitation spectra shows the effects of two X-ray induced reactions: dimerization on a short time-scale and disintegration on a long time-scale. We used spectrum simulations of CA and its dimerization product, α-truxillic acid (TA), to gain insight into the dimerization effects. From the time-resolved spectra, we extracted component spectra and time-dependent weights corresponding to CA and TA. The results suggest that the X-ray induced dimerization proceeds homogeneously in contrast to the dimerization induced by ultraviolet light. We also utilized the ability of NRIXS for direct tomography with chemical-bond contrast to image the spatial progress of the reactions in the sample crystal. Our work paves the way for other time-resolved studies on chemical reactions using inelastic X-ray scattering. PMID:26568420

  18. Stellar X-ray Emission From Magnetically Funneled Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, Hans

    Stars and planets form in giant molecular clouds, so they are deeply embedded in their early stages. When they become optically visible, the young stars are still surrounded by a proto-planetary disk, where planets evolve. These stars are called classical T Tauri stars (CTTS). A key, yet poorly constrained, parameter for the disk evolution is the stellar high-energy emission. It can ionize the outer layers of the disk, change its chemistry and even drive photoevaporation of the disk. Thus the spectral shape and the temporal variability of the stellar X-ray and UV emission shapes the gas and dust properties in some regions of the disk. It sets the photoevaporation timescale which provides an upper limit for planet formation. CTTS still actively accrete mass from their disk. The infalling matter is funneled by the stellar magnetic field and impacts on the star close to free fall velocity. A hot accretion shock develops, which emits X-rays which are distinct from any coronal X-rays. Eventually the disk disperses and bulk planet formation comes to an end. X-ray emitting shocks can still occur at a later stage in stellar evolution, if e.g. the magnetic field is strong enough to funnel the stellar wind to collide in the disk midplane. This so-called magnetically confined wind shock model was originally developed for the A0p star IQ Aur. The magnetically funneled accretion model has been successfully tested for CTTS in a small mass range only; the magnetically confined wind shock model lacks a comparison for high-resolution X-ray grating spectra for all but the most massive stars. In this proposal we request funding to analyze three XMM-Newton observations, which will probe X-ray emitting shocks in stars with magnetic fields: DN Tau (observed as category C target in cycle 8), a CTTS with much lower mass than previous CTTS with X- ray grating spectroscopy; MN Lup (to be observed in cycle 9), a prime candidate for simultaneous X-ray/Doppler-imaging studies; and IQ Aur (to

  19. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOEpatents

    Howells, Malcolm R.; Jacobsen, Chris

    1995-01-01

    A non-contact X-ray projection lithography method for producing a desired X-ray image on a selected surface of an X-ray-sensitive material, such as photoresist material on a wafer, the desired X-ray image having image minimum linewidths as small as 0.063 .mu.m, or even smaller. A hologram and its position are determined that will produce the desired image on the selected surface when the hologram is irradiated with X-rays from a suitably monochromatic X-ray source of a selected wavelength .lambda.. On-axis X-ray transmission through, or off-axis X-ray reflection from, a hologram may be used here, with very different requirements for monochromaticity, flux and brightness of the X-ray source. For reasonable penetration of photoresist materials by X-rays produced by the X-ray source, the wavelength X, is preferably chosen to be no more than 13.5 nm in one embodiment and more preferably is chosen in the range 1-5 nm in the other embodiment. A lower limit on linewidth is set by the linewidth of available microstructure writing devices, such as an electron beam.

  20. Evolution of X-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossj, B.

    1981-01-01

    The evolution of X-ray astronomy up to the launching of the Einstein observatory is presented. The evaluation proceeded through the following major steps: (1) discovery of an extrasolar X-ray source, Sco X-1, orders of magnitude stronger than astronomers believed might exist; (2) identification of a strong X-ray source with the Crab Nebula; (3) identification of Sco X-1 with a faint, peculiar optical object; (4) demonstration that X-ray stars are binary systems, each consisting of a collapsed object accreting matter from an ordinary star; (5) discovery of X-ray bursts; (6) discovery of exceedingly strong X-ray emission from active galaxies, quasars and clusters of galaxies; (7) demonstration that the principal X-ray source is a hot gas filling the space between galaxies.

  1. X ray imaging microscope for cancer research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Shealy, David L.; Brinkley, B. R.; Baker, Phillip C.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA technology employed during the Stanford MSFC LLNL Rocket X Ray Spectroheliograph flight established that doubly reflecting, normal incidence multilayer optics can be designed, fabricated, and used for high resolution x ray imaging of the Sun. Technology developed as part of the MSFC X Ray Microscope program, showed that high quality, high resolution multilayer x ray imaging microscopes are feasible. Using technology developed at Stanford University and at the DOE Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Troy W. Barbee, Jr. has fabricated multilayer coatings with near theoretical reflectivities and perfect bandpass matching for a new rocket borne solar observatory, the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array (MSSTA). Advanced Flow Polishing has provided multilayer mirror substrates with sub-angstrom (rms) smoothnesss for the astronomical x ray telescopes and x ray microscopes. The combination of these important technological advancements has paved the way for the development of a Water Window Imaging X Ray Microscope for cancer research.

  2. Extended range X-ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, R. B. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An X-ray telescope system is described which is comprised of a tubular mount having a collecting region remote from the one axial end. A soft X-ray/XUV subsystem associated with the collecting region directs only relatively soft, near on-axis X-rays/XUV radiation incident on a first portion of the collecting region into a first detector sensitive to relatively soft X-rays/XUV radiation. A hard X-ray subsystem associated with the collecting region directs only relatively hard near on-axis X-rays incident on a second portion of the collecting region into a second detector sensitive to relatively hard X-rays.

  3. X-ray deconvolution microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ehn, Sebastian; Epple, Franz Michael; Fehringer, Andreas; Pennicard, David; Graafsma, Heinz; Noël, Peter; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in single-photon-counting detectors are enabling the development of novel approaches to reach micrometer-scale resolution in x-ray imaging. One example of such a technology are the MEDIPIX3RX-based detectors, such as the LAMBDA which can be operated with a small pixel size in combination with real-time on-chip charge-sharing correction. This characteristic results in a close to ideal, box-like point spread function which we made use of in this study. The proposed method is based on raster-scanning the sample with sub-pixel sized steps in front of the detector. Subsequently, a deconvolution algorithm is employed to compensate for blurring introduced by the overlap of pixels with a well defined point spread function during the raster-scanning. The presented approach utilizes standard laboratory x-ray equipment while we report resolutions close to 10 μm. The achieved resolution is shown to follow the relationship pn with the pixel-size p of the detector and the number of raster-scanning steps n. PMID:27446649

  4. Submicron X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    MacDowell, Alastair; Celestre, Richard; Tamura, Nobumichi; Spolenak, Ralph; Valek, Bryan; Brown, Walter; Bravman, John; Padmore, Howard; Batterman, Boris; Patel, Jamshed

    2000-08-17

    At the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley the authors have instrumented a beam line that is devoted exclusively to x-ray micro diffraction problems. By micro diffraction they mean those classes of problems in Physics and Materials Science that require x-ray beam sizes in the sub-micron range. The instrument is for instance, capable of probing a sub-micron size volume inside micron sized aluminum metal grains buried under a silicon dioxide insulating layer. The resulting Laue pattern is collected on a large area CCD detector and automatically indexed to yield the grain orientation and deviatoric (distortional) strain tensor of this sub-micron volume. A four-crystal monochromator is then inserted into the beam, which allows monochromatic light to illuminate the same part of the sample. Measurement of diffracted photon energy allows for the determination of d spacings. The combination of white and monochromatic beam measurements allow for the determination of the total strain/stress tensor (6 components) inside each sub-micron sized illuminated volume of the sample.

  5. Parametric X-Ray Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchagin, Alexander

    1997-10-01

    The main PXR properties [1,2] are considered in the paper: energy, width, smooth tuning of monochromatic PXR spectral line; fine structure and absolute differential yields of PXR in the vicinity of and at angular distances from Brag directions; angular spread of the PXR beam; the influence of incident electron energy and of the density effect on the PXR properties; linear polarization of PXR; background in PXR spectra. Experimental setups for linacs and the results of measurements are discussed. Experimental data are compared to theoretical calculations at PXR energies between 5 and 400 keV for incident electron energies ranging from 15 to 1200 MeV. Possible applications of PXR as a new source of a bright, tunable X-ray beam in science and industry are discussed. [1] A.V. Shchagin and N.A. Khizhnyak, NIM B119, 115-122 (1996). [2] A.V. Shchagin and X.K. Maruyama, "Parametric X-rays", a chapter in the book "Accelerator-based Atomic Physics Techniques and Applications", edited by S.M. Shafroth and J.C. Austin, AIP Press, 1997, pp 279-307.

  6. Transportable X-ray cart

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    The main body of the report summarizes the project scope, project milestones, highlights any unresolved problems encountered during the project and includes a summary of the financial information. The purpose of this CRADA was to assist Digiray Corporation in the development and evaluation of a Transportable Reverse Geometry X-Ray 0 (RGX-T) cart for aircraft inspection Scope: LLNL was to provide a review of the RGX-T engineering drawing package supplied by Digiray, suggest and incorporate design modifications, fabricate, assemble and provide performance evaluation testing of the RGX-T prototype. Major deliverables were (a) engineering design analysis and evaluation (b) cart prototype hardware, and (c) performance evaluation. Schedule: Procurement and technical delays extended the project twelve months past than the original four month project duration estimate. LLNL reviewed engineering drawings of the RGX-T prototype provided by Digiray, performed a engineering design analysis and evaluation, suggested and incorporated modifications to improve design safety factors, fabricated and assembled the prototype system, and evaluated the motion and positioning capabilities of the assembled system. The RGX-T provides a limited set of positioning orientations for the Digiray x-ray tube head that do not meet the overall Digiray requirements for aircraft inspection. In addition, mechanical stability concerns remain for positioning the tube head with the mechanical arm and for rolling the assembly with arbitrary orientation of the mechanical arm.

  7. X-ray lasing - Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-11-01

    The theoretical basis of lasing at very short wavelengths is discussed, and lasing at soft-x-ray (4-50 nm) wavelengths using the electron-collisional excitation scheme is successfully demonstrated. In research at LLNL, thin foils of selenium and yttrium are irradiated with laser light to generate a roughly cylindrical plasma containing neon-like ions. Excitation of ground state 2p electrons to the 3p state in the lasant medium is followed by very fast radioactive decay out of the 3s state, creating a population inversion between the 3s and 3p states. Stimulated x-ray emission is initiated by slower spontaneous decay from a 3p to 3s state. Design goals are to produce a plasma with a flat electron density of approximately 5 x 10 to the 20th/cu cm, a flat temperature profile, a scale length of at least 100 microns, and a population inversion lasting at least the 100 ps necessary to produce a significant gain. Good correlation is seen between experimental data and LANEX and XRASER theoretical modeling predictions over large variations in intensity, pulse length, and probing times. No explanation is found for the weakness of the J = 0 to J = 1 lasing transition line at 18.3 nm. 13 references.

  8. X-ray lasing - Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-11-01

    The theoretical basis of lasing at very short wavelengths is discussed, and lasing at soft-X-ray (4-50 nm) wavelengths using the electron-collisional excitation scheme is successfully demonstrated. In research at LLNL, thin foils of selenium and yttrium are irradiated with laser light to generate a roughly cylindrical plasma containing neon-like ions. Excitation of ground state 2p electrons to the 3p state in the lasant medium is followed by very fast radioactive decay out of the 3s state, creating a population inversion between the 3s and 3p states. Stimulated X-ray emission is initiated by slower spontaneous decay from a 3p to 3s state. Design goals are to produce a plasma with a flat electron density of approximately 5 x 10 to the 20th/cu cm, a flat temperature profile, a scale length of at least 100 microns, and a population inversion lasting at least the 100 ps necessary to produce a significant gain. Good correlation is seen between experimental data and LANEX and XRASER theoretical modeling predictions over large variations in intensity, pulse length, and probing times. No explanation is found for the weakness of the J = 0 to J = 1 lasing transition line at 18.3 nm.

  9. Outer Atmospheres of Low Mass Stars — Flare Characteristics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalitha, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2013-04-01

    We compare the coronal properties during flares on active low mass stars CN Leonis, AB Doradus A and Proxima Centauri observed with XMM-Newton. From the X-ray data we analyze the temporal evolution of temperature, emission measure and coronal abundance. The nature of these flares are with secondary events following the first flare peak in the light curve, raising the question regarding the involved magnetic structure. We infer from the plasma properties and the geometry of the flaring structure that the flare originates from a compact arcade rather than in a single loop.

  10. X-Ray Activity in the Open Cluster IC 4665

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giamapapa, Mark S.; Prosser, Charles F.; Fleming, Thomas A.

    1997-01-01

    We present the results of a joint ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI) and optical investigation of the open cluster IC 4665. The ROSAT data contains detections for 28 stellar sources in the field, including 22 cluster members and candidate members spanning the color range -0.18 less than or equal to (B - V(sub o)) less than or equal to +1.63 (approx. B3 - M3). Upper limits are given for the remaining members (or candidate members) in the HRI field. Keck HIRES spectra have been obtained that yield radial and rotational velocity measures, respectively, for faint, low mass candidate members located within the field of the ROSAT HRI observation. In addition, photometry of possible optical counterparts to previously uncatalogued X-ray sources in the HRI field is presented. The trends in X-ray properties with (B - V) color in IC 4665 are found to be quite similar to that for other, more nearby young clusters such as the Pleiades and alpha Persei. In particular, a maximum in normalized X-ray luminosity of log (L(sub x)/L(sub bol)) approx. equal 3 is observed, beginning in the color range of (B - V)(sub o) = 0.7 - 0.8. This is similar to the corresponding color range among Pleiades members, in agreement with the earlier estimate, that the age of IC 4665 is similar to the age of the Pleiades. The correlation of rotation and X-ray emission levels is consistent with that in other young clusters. Among the high mass stars in IC 4665, five B stars are detected as X-ray sources. Of these, one is a spectroscopic binary while the remaining objects are apparently single staxs. The level of intrinsic X-ray emission observed in the rapidly rotating (v sini greater than 200 km/ s), single B stars is consistent with an origin due to shock heating of the ambient medium by radiatively driven, rotationally enhanced winds. On the basis of these observations and the results for other clusters, we argue that observed levels of X-ray emission in high mass stars of log (L(sub x)/L(sub bol

  11. X-Rays Found From a Lightweight Brown Dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-04-01

    Using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, scientists have detected X-rays from a low mass brown dwarf in a multiple star system, which is as young as 12 million years old. This discovery is an important piece in an increasingly complex picture of how brown dwarfs - and perhaps the very massive planets around other stars - evolve. Chandra's observations of the brown dwarf, known as TWA 5B, clearly resolve it from a pair of Sun-like stars known as TWA 5A. The system is about 180 light years from the Sun and a member of a group of about a dozen young stars in the southern constellation Hydra. The brown dwarf orbits the binary stars at a distance about 2.75 times that of Pluto's orbit around the Sun. This is first time that a brown dwarf this close to its parent star(s) has been resolved in X-rays. "Our Chandra data show that the X-rays originate from the brown dwarf's coronal plasma which is some 3 million degrees Celsius," said Yohko Tsuboi of Chuo University in Tokyo and lead author of the April 10th issue of Astrophysical Journal Letters paper describing these results. "The brown dwarf is sufficiently far from the primary stars that the reflection of X-rays is unimportant, so the X-rays must come the brown dwarf itself." TWA 5B is estimated to be only between 15 and 40 times the mass of Jupiter, making it one of the least massive brown dwarfs known. Its mass is rather near the currently accepted boundary (about 12 Jupiter masses) between planets and brown dwarfs. Therefore, these results may also have implications for very massive planets, including those that have been discovered as extrasolar planets in recent years. Brown Dwarf size comparison schematic Brown Dwarf size comparison schematic "This brown dwarf is as bright as the Sun today in X-ray light, while it is fifty times less massive than the Sun," said Tsuboi. "This observation, thus, raises the possibility that even massive planets might emit X-rays by themselves during their youth!" This research on TWA 5

  12. X-ray emission of young solar type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casanova, Sophie

    1994-12-01

    T Tauri Stars (TTS) are young (<= 107 yrs) low mass (<= 2 Modot) stars. They have been originally characterized by strong emission lines (CTTS), and by IR excesses interpreted in terms of circumstellar disks. Ten years ago, the ``Einstein" satellite discovered the extraordinary X-ray activity of young low-mass stars. This activity, presumably magnetic in origin, is interpreted in terms of solar type flares, but up to 105 times more powerful than on the Sun. It also allowed to discover a new class of T Tauri stars called ``Weak line T Tauri Stars", without emission lines or IR excess and presumably without disk, which are 3 to 10 times more numerous than the CTTS. The ROSAT satellite, launched in 1990, has a much better resolution and sensitivity than ``Einstein". This work is based on the first ROSAT observations of molecular clouds, which are the stellar nurseries. 1) ROSAT X-ray study of the Chamaeleon cloud (see also Feigelson et al. 1993, ApJ, 416, 623). Using an important sample of young stars (60) in the Chamaeleon I star forming region, we have studied the influence of various stellar parameters on the X-ray emission. We find unexpected correlations of the X-ray luminosity with the stellar mass, radius and luminosity, but we could not detect any effect of rotation or age. These results are still unexplained by the standard dynamo theory of generation of a magnetic field. We show that the X-ray luminosity fonctions are the same for CTTS and WTTS which indicates that the X-ray emission mecanism is independent of the circumstellar disk, and that the X-rays can be used as a homogeneous tracer of all TTS. 2) ROSAT X-ray study of the ρ Oph Cloud (see also Casanova et al., 1995, ApJ, 439, 752). We show that the X-rays do also detect sources deeeply embedded in molecular clouds which are certainly very young. In fact it seems that even protostars (age ~105 yrs) are detected. For the embedded sources we estimate the bolometric luminosity from the dereddened J (1

  13. X-RAY DETECTION OF THE CLUSTER CONTAINING THE CEPHEID S MUS

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Nancy Remage; Pillitteri, Ignazio; Wolk, Scott; Karovska, Margarita; DePasquale, Joseph; Tingle, Evan; Guinan, Edward; Engle, Scott; Bond, Howard E.; Schaefer, Gail H.

    2014-04-20

    The galactic Cepheid S Muscae has recently been added to the important list of Cepheids linked to open clusters, in this case the sparse young cluster ASCC 69. Low-mass members of a young cluster are expected to have rapid rotation and X-ray activity, making X-ray emission an excellent way to discriminate them from old field stars. We have made an XMM-Newton observation centered on S Mus and identified a population of X-ray sources whose near-IR Two Micron All Sky Survey counterparts lie at locations in the J, (J – K) color-magnitude diagram consistent with cluster membership at the distance of S Mus. Their median energy and X-ray luminosity are consistent with young cluster members as distinct from field stars. These strengthen the association of S Mus with the young cluster, making it a potential Leavitt law (period-luminosity relation) calibrator.

  14. Effect of an electron scattering cloud on X-ray oscillations produced by beaming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, J.; Lamb, F. K.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of a scattering cloud on the amplitude of oscillations produced by a rotating beam of X-rays is investigated using analytical and Monte Carlo methods. The scattering cloud was modeled as a uniform density sphere, and the source was represented as an anistropic distribution of radiation emerging from a point at the center of the scattering cloud. The intensity distribution produced by the source beam is examined as a function of optical depth. The relation between electron scattering optical depth and the forward-backward ratio is studied. It is observed that the scattering in a central corona of various optical depths reduces the amplitude of the oscillation. The data suggest that the quasi-periodic oscillations observed in the X-ray intensities of some luminous low-mass X-ray binaries are caused by oscillations in the luminosity of the X-ray star.

  15. Masses And Radii Of Neutron Stars Measured From Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guver, Tolga; Ozel, F.

    2011-09-01

    Low mass X-ray binaries that show thermonuclear bursts are ideal targets for constraining the equation of state of neutron star matter. The analysis of the time resolved, high count rate X-ray spectra allow a measurement of the Eddington limits and the apparent radii of neutron stars. Combined with an independent distance estimate, these spectroscopic quantities lead to the measurement of neutron star masses and radii. I will discuss the results of the application of this method to a number of X-ray binaries including EXO 1745-248, 4U 1820-30, 4U 1608-52,KS 1731-260, and SAX J1748.9-2021. I will also present the results from a comprehensive analysis of the entire RXTE archive of X-ray burst observations, which allows for a better quantification of the systematic uncertainties in these measurements.

  16. Chandra Detection of X-Ray Emission from Ultracompact Dwarf Galaxies and Extended Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Meicun; Li, Zhiyuan

    2016-03-01

    We have conducted a systematic study of X-ray emission from ultracompact dwarf (UCD) galaxies and extended star clusters (ESCs), based on archival Chandra observations. Among a sample of 511 UCDs and ESCs complied from the literature, 17 X-ray counterparts with 0.5-8 keV luminosities above ˜5 × 1036 erg s-1 are identified, which are distributed in eight early-type host galaxies. To facilitate comparison, we also identify X-ray counterparts of 360 globular clusters (GCs) distributed in four of the eight galaxies. The X-ray properties of the UCDs and ESCs are found to be broadly similar to those of the GCs. The incidence rate of X-ray-detected UCDs and ESCs, 3.3% ± 0.8%, while lower than that of the X-ray-detected GCs (7.0% ± 0.4%), is substantially higher than expected from the field populations of external galaxies. A stacking analysis of the individually undetected UCDs/ESCs further reveals significant X-ray signals, which corresponds to an equivalent 0.5-8 keV luminosity of ˜4 × 1035 erg s-1 per source. Taken together, these provide strong evidence that the X-ray emission from UCDs and ESCs is dominated by low-mass X-ray binaries having formed from stellar dynamical interactions, consistent with the stellar populations in these dense systems being predominantly old. For the most massive UCDs, there remains the possibility that a putative central massive black hole gives rise to the observed X-ray emission.

  17. High Mass X-ray Binary Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Sachindra

    2016-07-01

    High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs) are interesting objects that provide a wide range of observational probes to the nature of the two stellar components, accretion process, stellar wind and orbital parameters of the systems. Most of the transient HMXBs are found to Be/X-ray binaries (~67%), consisting of a compact object (neutron star) in orbit around the companion Be star. The orbit of the compact object around the Be star is wide and highly eccentric. Be/X-ray binaries are generally quiescent in X-ray emission. The transient X-ray outbursts seen in these objects are known to be due to interaction between the compact object and the circumstellar disk surrounding the Be star. In the recent years, another class of transient HMXBs have been found which have supergiant companions and show shorter X-ray outbursts. X-ray, infrared and optical observations of these HMXBs provide vital information regarding these systems. The timing and broad-band X-ray spectral properties of a few HMXB pulsars, mainly Be/X-ray binary pulsars during regular X-ray outbursts will be discussed.

  18. Controlling X-rays With Light

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, Ernie; Hertlein, Marcus; Southworth, Steve; Allison, Tom; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Kanter, Elliot; Krassig, B.; Varma, H.; Rude, Bruce; Santra, Robin; Belkacem, Ali; Young, Linda

    2010-08-02

    Ultrafast x-ray science is an exciting frontier that promises the visualization of electronic, atomic and molecular dynamics on atomic time and length scales. A largelyunexplored area of ultrafast x-ray science is the use of light to control how x-rays interact with matter. In order to extend control concepts established for long wavelengthprobes to the x-ray regime, the optical control field must drive a coherent electronic response on a timescale comparable to femtosecond core-hole lifetimes. An intense field is required to achieve this rapid response. Here an intense optical control pulse isobserved to efficiently modulate photoelectric absorption for x-rays and to create an ultrafast transparency window. We demonstrate an application of x-ray transparencyrelevant to ultrafast x-ray sources: an all-photonic temporal cross-correlation measurement of a femtosecond x-ray pulse. The ability to control x-ray/matterinteractions with light will create new opportunities at current and next-generation x-ray light sources.

  19. Controlling x-rays with light.

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, T. E.; Hertlein, M. P.; Southworth, S. H.; Allison, T. K.; van Tilborg, J.; Kanter, E. P.; Krassig, B.; Varma, H. R.; Rude, B.; Santra, R.; Belkacem, A.; Young, L.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; LBNL; Univ. of California at Berkley; Univ. of Chicago

    2010-01-01

    Ultrafast X-ray science is an exciting frontier that promises the visualization of electronic, atomic and molecular dynamics on atomic time and length scales. A largely unexplored area of ultrafast X-ray science is the use of light to control how X-rays interact with matter. To extend control concepts established for long-wavelength probes to the X-ray regime, the optical control field must drive a coherent electronic response on a timescale comparable to femtosecond core-hole lifetimes. An intense field is required to achieve this rapid response. Here, an intense optical control pulse is observed to efficiently modulate photoelectric absorption for X-rays and to create an ultrafast transparency window. We demonstrate an application of X-ray transparency relevant to ultrafast X-ray sources: an all-photonic temporal cross-correlation measurement of a femtosecond X-ray pulse. The ability to control X-ray-matter interactions with light will create new opportunities for present and next-generation X-ray light sources.

  20. Deciphering the X-ray Emission of the Nearest Herbig Ae Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.

    2004-01-01

    In this research program, we obtained and analyzed an X-ray observation of the young nearby intermediate mass pre-main sequence star HD 104237 using the XMM-Newton space-based observatory. The observation was obtained on 17 Feb. 2002. This observation yielded high-quality X-ray images, spectra, and timing data which provided valuable information on the physical processes responsible for the X-ray emission. This star is a member of the group of so-called Herbig Ae/Be stars, which are young intermediate mass (approx. 2 - 4 solar masses) pre-main sequence (PMS) stars a few million years old that have not yet begun core hydrogen burning. The objective of the XMM-Newton observation was to obtain higher quality data than previously available in order to constrain possible X-ray emission mechanisms. The origin of the X-ray emission from Herbig Ae/Be stars is not yet known. These intermediate mass PMS stars lie on radiative tracks and are not expected to emit X-rays via solar-like magnetic processes, nor are their winds powerful enough to produce X-rays by radiative wind shocks as in more massive O-type stars. The emission could originate in unseen low-mass companions, or it may be intrinsic to the Herbig stars themselves if they still have primordial magnetic fields or can sustain magnetic activity via a nonsolar dynamo.

  1. Magnetic fields in A-type stars associated with X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, C.; Hubrig, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2008-06-01

    A common explanation for the observed X-ray emission of A-type stars is the presence of a hidden late-type companion. While this assumption can be shown to be correct in some cases, a number of lines of evidence suggests that low-mass companions cannot be the correct cause for the observed activity in all cases. A model explains the X-ray emission for magnetic Ap/Bp stars, focusing on the A0p star IQ Aur. In this paper we test whether this theoretical model is able to explain the observed X-ray emission. We present the observations of 13 A-type stars that have been associated with X-ray emission detected by ROSAT. To determine the mean longitudinal magnetic field strength we measured the circular polarization in the wings of the Balmer lines using FORS1. Although the emission of those objects that possess magnetic fields fits the prediction of the Babel and Montmerle model, not all X-ray detections are connected to the presence of a magnetic field. Additionally, the measured magnetic fields do not correlate with the X-ray luminosity. Accordingly, the magnetically confined wind shock model cannot explain the X-ray emission from all the presented stars.

  2. IQ Aur: A new mode of X-ray generation in magnetic stars ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Jurgen

    2007-10-01

    We propose to obtain the first high-resolution X-ray spectrum of the peculiar magnetic A-type star IQ Aur. From previous X-ray observations IQ Aur is known as a strong (LX ~ 4 10**29 erg/s), but very soft (TX ~ 0.29 keV) X-ray source. An attribution of IQ~Aur's X-ray emission to a low-mass companion would imply totally unusual properties of such an hypothesized object, thus IQ Aur is a good candidate for an A-type star with intrinsic X-ray emission.The XMM-Newton RGS spectrum will constrain the location of the X-ray emission site from a measurement or upper limit to the strength of the OVII f line, the overall RGS spectrum will determine the elemental abundances, which may be far away from solar,and the phase coverage will allow a search for rotational modulation of IQ Aur's X-ray flux.

  3. Diffractive X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Gerald K.

    2010-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray telescopes, using zone plates, phase Fresnel lenses, or related optical elements have the potential to provide astronomers with true imaging capability with resolution many orders of magnitude better than available in any other waveband. Lenses that would be relatively easy to fabricate could have an angular resolution of the order of micro-arc-seconds or even better, that would allow, for example, imaging of the distorted spacetime in the immediate vicinity of the super-massive black holes in the center of active galaxies. What then is precluding their immediate adoption? Extremely long focal lengths, very limited bandwidth, and difficulty stabilizing the image are the main problems. The history, and status of the development of such lenses is reviewed here and the prospects for managing the challenges that they present are discussed.

  4. Industrial X-Ray Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In 1990, Lewis Research Center jointly sponsored a conference with the U.S. Air Force Wright Laboratory focused on high speed imaging. This conference, and early funding by Lewis Research Center, helped to spur work by Silicon Mountain Design, Inc. to break the performance barriers of imaging speed, resolution, and sensitivity through innovative technology. Later, under a Small Business Innovation Research contract with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the company designed a real-time image enhancing camera that yields superb, high quality images in 1/30th of a second while limiting distortion. The result is a rapidly available, enhanced image showing significantly greater detail compared to image processing executed on digital computers. Current applications include radiographic and pathology-based medicine, industrial imaging, x-ray inspection devices, and automated semiconductor inspection equipment.

  5. Soft x-ray interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of the soft x-ray interferometry workshop held at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory was to discuss with the scientific community the proposed technical design of the soft x-ray Fourier-transform spectrometer being developed at the ALS. Different design strategies for the instrument`s components were discussed, as well as detection methods, signal processing issues, and how to meet the manufacturing tolerances that are necessary for the instrument to achieve the desired levels of performance. Workshop participants were encouraged to report on their experiences in the field of Fourier transform spectroscopy. The ALS is developing a Fourier transform spectrometer that is intended to operate up to 100 eV. The motivation is solely improved resolution and not the throughput (Jaquinot) or multiplex (Fellgett) advantage, neither of which apply for the sources and detectors used in this spectral range. The proposed implementation of this is via a Mach-Zehnder geometry that has been (1) distorted from a square to a rhombus to get grazing incidence of a suitable angle for 100 eV and (2) provided with a mirror-motion system to make the path difference between the interfering beams tunable. The experiment consists of measuring the emergent light intensity (I(x)) as a function of the path difference (x). The resolving power of the system is limited by the amount of path difference obtainable that is 1 cm (one million half-waves at 200{angstrom} wavelength) in the design thus allowing a resolving power of one million. The free spectral range of the system is limited by the closeness with which the function I(x) is sampled. It is proposed to illuminate a helium absorption cell with roughly 1%-band-width light from a monochromator thus allowing one hundred aliases without spectral overlap even for sampling of I(x) at one hundredth of the Nyquist frequency.

  6. Late B Star X-Ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Frederick M.

    The most basic conclusion to be drawn from the EINSTEIN stellar X-ray observations was that all stars are X-ray sources - except the late-B and early- to mid-A stars. While this is still true in general, observations with the ROSAT X-ray observatory have shown that young late-B/early-A stars, those in and near regions of star formation, are often bright X-ray sources. It is not yet clear why (or, indeed, whether) young B-A stars are often X-ray sources. We request time on the IUE to observe a sample of these stars. We will compare the line profiles against B star models against archival spectra, looking for evidence of mass loss or mass inflows, as well as evidence of transition region gas. Detection of the latter will prove that the B stars are indeed X-ray sources.

  7. Stimulated Electronic X-Ray Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weninger, Clemens; Purvis, Michael; Ryan, Duncan; London, Richard A.; Bozek, John D.; Bostedt, Christoph; Graf, Alexander; Brown, Gregory; Rocca, Jorge J.; Rohringer, Nina

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate strong stimulated inelastic x-ray scattering by resonantly exciting a dense gas target of neon with femtosecond, high-intensity x-ray pulses from an x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL). A small number of lower energy XFEL seed photons drive an avalanche of stimulated resonant inelastic x-ray scattering processes that amplify the Raman scattering signal by several orders of magnitude until it reaches saturation. Despite the large overall spectral width, the internal spiky structure of the XFEL spectrum determines the energy resolution of the scattering process in a statistical sense. This is demonstrated by observing a stochastic line shift of the inelastically scattered x-ray radiation. In conjunction with statistical methods, XFELs can be used for stimulated resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, with spectral resolution smaller than the natural width of the core-excited, intermediate state.

  8. Deep Extragalactic X-Ray Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, W. N.; Hasinger, G.

    2005-09-01

    Deep surveys of the cosmic X-ray background are reviewed in the context of observational progress enabled by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory and the X-Ray Multi-Mirror Mission-Newton. The sources found by deep surveys are described along with their redshift and luminosity distributions, and the effectiveness of such surveys at selecting active galactic nuclei (AGN) is assessed. Some key results from deep surveys are highlighted, including (a) measurements of AGN evolution and the growth of supermassive black holes, (b) constraints on the demography and physics of high-redshift AGN, (c) the X-ray AGN content of infrared and submillimeter galaxies, and (d) X-ray emission from distant starburst and normal galaxies. We also describe some outstanding problems and future prospects for deep extragalactic X-ray surveys.

  9. Soft x-ray polarimeter laboratory tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Kendrah D.; Marshall, Herman L.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Jenks, Kevin; Sommer, Sophie J. B.; Marshall, Eric A.

    2010-07-01

    Multilayer-coated optics can strongly polarize X-rays and are central to a new design of a broad-band, soft X-ray polarimeter. We have begun laboratory work to verify the performance of components that could be used in future soft X-ray polarimetric instrumentation. We have reconfigured a 17 meter beamline facility, originally developed for testing transmission gratings for Chandra, to include a polarized X-ray source, an X-ray-dispersing transmission grating, and a multilayer-coated optic that illuminates a CCD detector. The X-rays produced from a Manson Model 5, multi-anode source are polarized by a multilayer-coated flat mirror. The current configuration allows for a 180 degree rotation of the source in order to rotate the direction of polarization. We will present progress in source characterization and system modulation measurements as well as null and robustness tests.

  10. Time resolved x-ray detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rentzepis, Peter M.

    1994-04-01

    The goal of the project was to design, develop and construct an x-ray detector with high sensitivity and picosecond time resolution. This was achieved. A Ford Aerospace Charged Coupled Device, CCD, was utilized as the x-ray sensitive material around which the design and construction of the picosecond x-ray detector was built. This device has now become a commercial product sold, among other companies, by Photometrics Inc., and Princeton Research Inc. In addition we designed and built the first picosecond x-ray system. This system was utilized for the first ever picosecond x-ray diffraction experiments. The picosecond x-ray system was utilized in the oxidative fuel cell project to measure the decomposition of methanol and the change of the structure of its platinum catalyst. Another direct product of the work is the publication of 36 papers, in major scientific journals, and two patents.

  11. X-rays for medical use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessenbruch, A.

    1995-11-01

    1995 is the centenary of the discovery of X-rays by the German physicist Wilhelm C Rontgen. In the past hundred years, the new rays have developed from being unknown to finding application in many walks of life, not least in medicine. This is so much so that in common speech the word `x-ray` refers not to a form of radiation but to an X-ray photograph taken for the purposes of diagnosis (as in: `I had an X-ray done to see if my leg was broken`). X-rays are now used routinely, and they are used both for diagnosis and for therapy. This paper will give an outline of the use of X-rays in medicine throughout our present century.

  12. Hard X-ray imaging from Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J. E.; Murray, S. S.

    1981-01-01

    Coded aperture X-ray detectors were applied to obtain large increases in sensitivity as well as angular resolution. A hard X-ray coded aperture detector concept is described which enables very high sensitivity studies persistent hard X-ray sources and gamma ray bursts. Coded aperture imaging is employed so that approx. 2 min source locations can be derived within a 3 deg field of view. Gamma bursts were located initially to within approx. 2 deg and X-ray/hard X-ray spectra and timing, as well as precise locations, derived for possible burst afterglow emission. It is suggested that hard X-ray imaging should be conducted from an Explorer mission where long exposure times are possible.

  13. X-RAY EMISSION AND ABSORPTION FEATURES DURING AN ENERGETIC THERMONUCLEAR X-RAY BURST FROM IGR J17062-6143

    SciTech Connect

    Degenaar, N.; Miller, J. M.; Wijnands, R.; Altamirano, D.; Fabian, A. C.

    2013-04-20

    Type-I X-ray bursts are thermonuclear explosions occurring in the surface layers of accreting neutron stars. These events are powerful probes of the physics of neutron stars and their surrounding accretion flow. We analyze a very energetic type-I X-ray burst from the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary IGR J17062-6143 that was detected with Swift on 2012 June 25. The light curve of the {approx_equal}18 minute long X-ray burst tail shows an episode of {approx_equal}10 minutes during which the intensity is strongly fluctuating by a factor of {approx_equal}3 above and below the underlying decay trend on a timescale of seconds. The X-ray spectrum reveals a highly significant emission line around {approx_equal}1 keV, which can be interpreted as an Fe-L shell line caused by the irradiation of cold gas. We also detect significant absorption lines and edges in the Fe-K band, which are strongly suggestive of the presence of hot, highly ionized gas along the line of sight. None of these features are present in the persistent X-ray spectrum of the source. The timescale of the strong intensity variations, the velocity width of the Fe-L emission line (assuming Keplerian motion), and photoionization modeling of the Fe-K absorption features each independently point to gas at a radius of {approx_equal} 10{sup 3} km as the source of these features. The unusual X-ray light curve and spectral properties could have plausibly been caused by a disruption of the accretion disk due to the super-Eddington fluxes reached during the X-ray burst.

  14. Topological X-Rays and MRIs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Let K be a compact subset of the interior of the unit disk D in the plane and suppose one can't see through the boundary of D and identify K. However, assume that one can take "topological X-rays" of D which measure the "density" of K along the lines of the X-rays. By taking these X-rays from all directions, a "topological MRI" is generated for…

  15. X ray microcalorimeters: Principles and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, S. H.; Juda, M.; Kelley, R. L.; Mccammon, D.; Stahle, C. K.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Zhang, J.

    1992-01-01

    Microcalorimeters operating at cryogenic temperatures can be excellent X-ray spectrometers. They simultaneously offer very high spectral resolving power and high efficiency. These attributes are important for X-ray astronomy where most sources have low fluxes and where high spectral resolution is essential for understanding the physics of the emitting regions. The principles of operation of these detectors, limits to their sensitivity, design considerations, techniques of fabrication, and their performance as X-ray spectrometers, are reviewed.

  16. High speed x-ray beam chopper

    DOEpatents

    McPherson, Armon; Mills, Dennis M.

    2002-01-01

    A fast, economical, and compact x-ray beam chopper with a small mass and a small moment of inertia whose rotation can be synchronized and phase locked to an electronic signal from an x-ray source and be monitored by a light beam is disclosed. X-ray bursts shorter than 2.5 microseconds have been produced with a jitter time of less than 3 ns.

  17. X-ray data booklet. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, D.

    1986-04-01

    A compilation of data is presented. Included are properties of the elements, electron binding energies, characteristic x-ray energies, fluorescence yields for K and L shells, Auger energies, energy levels for hydrogen-, helium-, and neonlike ions, scattering factors and mass absorption coefficients, and transmission bands of selected filters. Also included are selected reprints on scattering processes, x-ray sources, optics, x-ray detectors, and synchrotron radiation facilities. (WRF)

  18. Lobster-Eye X-Ray Astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Hudec, R.; Pina, L.; Marsikova, V.; Inneman, A.

    2010-07-15

    We report on technical and astrophysical aspects of Lobster-Eye wide-field X-ray telescopes expected to monitor the sky with high sensitivity and angular resolution of order of 1 arcmin. They will contribute essentially to study of various astrophysical objects such as AGN, SNe, Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), X-ray flashes (XRFs), galactic binary sources, stars, CVs, X-ray novae, various transient sources, etc.

  19. Applications of soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C.H.

    1993-08-01

    The high brightness and short pulse duration of soft x-ray lasers provide unique advantages for novel applications. Imaging of biological specimens using x-ray lasers has been demonstrated by several groups. Other applications to fields such as chemistry, material science, plasma diagnostics, and lithography are beginning to emerge. We review the current status of soft x-ray lasers from the perspective of applications, and present an overview of the applications currently being developed.

  20. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, Rick B.

    1994-01-01

    A composite window structure is described for transmitting x-ray radiation and for shielding radiation generated debris. In particular, separate layers of different x-ray transmissive materials are laminated together to form a high strength, x-ray transmissive debris shield which is particularly suited for use in high energy fluences. In one embodiment, the composite window comprises alternating layers of beryllium and a thermoset polymer.

  1. Spontaneous emission effects in optically pumped x-ray FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Smetanin, I.V.; Grigor`ev, S.V.

    1995-12-31

    An effect of spontaneous emission in both quantum and classical regimes of the optically pumped X-ray free electron laser (FEL) in investigated. The quantum properties of an FEL are determined by the ratio of the separation {h_bar} between the absorption and emission lines (i.e. the quanta emitted) and their effective width {Delta}{epsilon} {eta}={h_bar}/{Delta}{epsilon}. In the conventional classical regime {eta} {much_lt} 1 an electron emits and absorbes a great number of shortwavelength photons over the interaction region, the gain in FEL being the result of these competitive processes. In the quantum limit {eta} {much_gt} 1 the emission and absorption lines are completely separated and thus the FEL becomes a two-level quantum oscillator with a completely inverted active medium. Spontaneous emission causes the electron to leave the range of energies where resonant interaction with the laser field occurs, thus effectively reducing the number of particles that take part in generating the induced X-ray signal. This effect is found to be crucial for lasing in optically pumped X-ray FEL. The characteristic relaxation times are calculated for both classical and quantum FEL regimes. It is shown that spontaneous emission results in FEL electron beam threshold current, which is of rather high value. An optimal range of pumping laser intensities is determined.

  2. Observation of femtosecond X-ray interactions with matter using an X-ray-X-ray pump-probe scheme.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ichiro; Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Kameshima, Takashi; Ogawa, Kanade; Togashi, Tadashi; Owada, Shigeki; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Takashi; Hara, Toru; Yabashi, Makina

    2016-02-01

    Resolution in the X-ray structure determination of noncrystalline samples has been limited to several tens of nanometers, because deep X-ray irradiation required for enhanced resolution causes radiation damage to samples. However, theoretical studies predict that the femtosecond (fs) durations of X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses make it possible to record scattering signals before the initiation of X-ray damage processes; thus, an ultraintense X-ray beam can be used beyond the conventional limit of radiation dose. Here, we verify this scenario by directly observing femtosecond X-ray damage processes in diamond irradiated with extraordinarily intense (∼10(19) W/cm(2)) XFEL pulses. An X-ray pump-probe diffraction scheme was developed in this study; tightly focused double-5-fs XFEL pulses with time separations ranging from sub-fs to 80 fs were used to excite (i.e., pump) the diamond and characterize (i.e., probe) the temporal changes of the crystalline structures through Bragg reflection. It was found that the pump and probe diffraction intensities remain almost constant for shorter time separations of the double pulse, whereas the probe diffraction intensities decreased after 20 fs following pump pulse irradiation due to the X-ray-induced atomic displacement. This result indicates that sub-10-fs XFEL pulses enable conductions of damageless structural determinations and supports the validity of the theoretical predictions of ultraintense X-ray-matter interactions. The X-ray pump-probe scheme demonstrated here would be effective for understanding ultraintense X-ray-matter interactions, which will greatly stimulate advanced XFEL applications, such as atomic structure determination of a single molecule and generation of exotic matters with high energy densities. PMID:26811449

  3. Compound refractive X-ray lens

    DOEpatents

    Nygren, David R.; Cahn, Robert; Cederstrom, Bjorn; Danielsson, Mats; Vestlund, Jonas

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for focusing X-rays. In one embodiment, his invention is a commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens. The commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a volume of low-Z material. The volume of low-Z material has a first surface which is adapted to receive X-rays of commercially-applicable power emitted from a commercial-grade X-ray source. The volume of low-Z material also has a second surface from which emerge the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which were received at the first surface. Additionally, the commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a plurality of openings which are disposed between the first surface and the second surface. The plurality of openings are oriented such that the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which are received at the first surface, pass through the volume of low-Z material and through the plurality openings. In so doing, the X-rays which emerge from the second surface are refracted to a focal point.

  4. Bent crystal X-ray topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    A television X-ray topographic camera system was constructed. The system differs from the previous system in that it incorporates the X-ray TV imaging system and has a semi-automatic wafer loading system. Also the X-ray diffraction is in a vertical plane. This feature makes wafer loading easier and makes the system compatible with any commercial X-ray generating system. Topographs and results obtained from a study of the diffraction contrast variation with impurity concentration for both boron implanted and boron diffused silicon are included.

  5. Symbiotic stars in X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K.; Nelson, T.

    2013-11-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of nine white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that had previously been detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The nine new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbiotic stars known to be X-ray sources by approximately 30%. The Swift/XRT telescope detected all of the new X-ray sources at energies greater than 2 keV. Their X-ray spectra are consistent with thermal emission and fall naturally into three distinct groups. The first group contains those sources with a single, highly absorbed hard component that we identify as probably coming from an accretion-disk boundary layer. The second group is composed of those sources with a single, soft X-ray spectral component that probably originates in a region where low-velocity shocks produce X-ray emission, i.e., a colliding-wind region. The third group consists of those sources with both hard and soft X-ray spectral components. We also find that unlike in the optical, where rapid, stochastic brightness variations from the accretion disk typically are not seen, detectable UV flickering is a common property of symbiotic stars. Supporting our physical interpretation of the two X-ray spectral components, simultaneous Swift UV photometry shows that symbiotic stars with harder X-ray emission tend to have stronger UV flickering, which is usually associated with accretion through a disk. To place these new observations in the context of previous work on X-ray emission from symbiotic stars, we modified and extended the α/β/γ classification scheme for symbiotic-star X-ray spectra that was introduced by Muerset et al. based upon observations with the ROSAT satellite, to include a new δ classification

  6. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K.; Nelson, T.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of 9 white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that was previously detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The 9 new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbiotic stars known to be X-ray sources by approximately 30%. Swift/XRT detected all of the new X-ray sources at energies greater than 2 keV. Their X-ray spectra are consistent with thermal emission and fall naturally into three distinct groups. The first group contains those sources with a single, highly absorbed hard component, which we identify as probably coming from an accretion-disk boundary layer. The second group is composed of those sources with a single, soft X-ray spectral component, which likely arises in a region where low-velocity shocks produce X-ray emission, i.e. a colliding-wind region. The third group consists of those sources with both hard and soft X-ray spectral components. We also find that unlike in the optical, where rapid, stochastic brightness variations from the accretion disk typically are not seen, detectable UV flickering is a common property of symbiotic stars. Supporting our physical interpretation of the two X-ray spectral components, simultaneous Swift UV photometry shows that symbiotic stars with harder X-ray emission tend to have stronger UV flickering, which is usually associated with accretion through a disk. To place these new observations in the context of previous work on X-ray emission from symbiotic stars, we modified and extended the alpha/beta/gamma classification scheme for symbiotic-star X-ray spectra that was introduced by Muerset et al. based upon observations with the ROSAT satellite, to include a new sigma classification for sources with

  7. Models for galactic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    Attention is given to those compact galactic X-ray sources whose X-ray luminosities are considerably in excess of the solar luminosity. It is pointed out that the key breakthrough in the development of an understanding of compact galactic X-ray sources was the discovery of X-ray pulsars with the UHURU satellite. There is now overwhelming evidence that these objects are neutron stars in close binary stellar systems. The X-ray pulsations are thought to be thermal emission from the magnetic polar caps of a neutron star that is accreting matter from a companion star and whose magnetic field is misaligned with its rotation axis. Among the compact galactic X-ray sources that are not X-ray pulsars, some still show direct evidence of binary membership, such as X-ray eclipses. There is evidence that the galactic-bulge sources are, in fact, close binary stellar systems. It is concluded, that the great majority of bright galactic X-ray sources, with only a tiny handful of exceptions (such as the Crab and Vela pulsars), are likely to be binaries.

  8. The Lunar X-ray Observatory (LXO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2008-01-01

    X-ray emission from charge exchange recombination between the highly ionized solar wind and neutral material i n Earth's magnetosheath has complicated x-ray observations of celestial objects with x-ray observatories including ROSAT, Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku. However, the charge-exchange emission can also be used as an important diagnostic of the solar-wind interacting with the magnetosheath. Soft x-ray observations from low-earth orbit or even the highly eccentric orbits of Chandra and XMM-Newton are likely superpositions of the celestial object of interest, the true extra-solar soft x-ray background, geospheric charge exchange, and heliospheric charge exchange. We show that with a small x-ray telescope placed either on the moon, in a similar vein as the Apollo ALSOP instruments, or at a stable orbit near L1, we can begin t o disentangle the complicated emission structure in the soft x-ray band. Here we present initial results of a feasibility study recently funded by NASA t o place a small x-ray telescope on the lunar surface. The telescope operates during lunar night to observe charge exchange interactions between the solar wind and magnetospheric neutrals, between the solar wind and the lunar atmosphere, and an unobstructed view of the soft x-ray background without the geospheric component.

  9. The efficacy of x-ray pelvimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.J.; Garbaciak, J.A. Jr.; Ryan, G.M., Jr.

    1982-06-01

    Comparison is made of x-ray pelvimetry use on a public and private service in 1974 with experience in 1979, when the clinic service did no x-ray pelvimetry while the private service continued as before. It is concluded that the use of x-ray pelvimetry is inadequate as a predictor of cesarean section because of cephalopelvic disproportion, does not improve neonatal mortality, and poses potential hazards to the mother and fetus. Its use in the management of breech presentations is not currently established by our data. Guidelines are presented for the management of patients in labor without using x-ray pelvimetry.

  10. Tenma - Japan's X-ray satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, C.

    1984-06-01

    Japan's second X-ray satellite, designated 'Tenma', has temporal and spectral sensitivity superior to that of its predecessor, Hakucho. It is a spin-stabilized satellite whose attitude maneuvers are performed through the activation of a magnetic torquing coil, by means of which a typical, 20-deg transfer occupies several orbits. Tenma carries as its instrument set scintillation proportional counters for spectral and temporal studies, an X-ray focusing collector for the study of very soft X-ray sources, a transient source monitor for wide-field sky monitoring, and a radiation belt monitor/gamma-ray burst detector for monitoring the non-X-ray background.

  11. Colloid Coalescence with Focused X Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Weon, B. M.; Kim, J. T.; Je, J. H.; Yi, J. M.; Wang, S.; Lee, W.-K.

    2011-07-01

    We show direct evidence that focused x rays enable us to merge polymer colloidal particles at room temperature. This phenomenon is ascribed to the photochemical scission of colloids with x rays, reducing the molecular weight, glass transition temperature, surface tension, and viscosity of colloids. The observation of the neck bridge growth with time shows that the x-ray-induced colloid coalescence is analogous to viscoelastic coalescence. This finding suggests a feasible protocol of photonic nanofabrication by sintering or welding of polymers, without thermal damage, using x-ray photonics.

  12. The Diffuse X-ray Spectrometer Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, W. T.; Edgar, R. J.; Juda, M.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Mccammon, D.; Snowden, S. L.; Zhang, J.; Skinner, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Diffuse X-ray Spectrometer Experiment, or 'DXS', is designed to measure the spectrum of the low-energy diffuse X-ray background with about 10 eV energy resolution and 15-deg spatial resolution. During a 5-day Space Shuttle mission, DXS is to measure the spectrum of ten 15 x 15 deg regions lying along a single 150-deg-long great circle arc on the sky. DXS carries two large-area X-ray Bragg spectrometers for the 44-84 A wavelength range; these permit measurement of the wavelength spectrum of the cosmic low-energy diffuse X-ray background with good spectral resolution.

  13. Ultrashort X-ray pulse science

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Alan Hap

    1998-05-01

    A variety of phenomena involves atomic motion on the femtosecond time-scale. These phenomena have been studied using ultrashort optical pulses, which indirectly probe atomic positions through changes in optical properties. Because x-rays can more directly probe atomic positions, ultrashort x-ray pulses are better suited for the study of ultrafast structural dynamics. One approach towards generating ultrashort x-ray pulses is by 90{sup o} Thomson scattering between terawatt laser pulses and relativistic electrons. Using this technique, the author generated {approx} 300 fs, 30 keV (0.4 {angstrom}) x-ray pulses. These x-ray pulses are absolutely synchronized with ultrashort laser pulses, allowing femtosecond optical pump/x-ray probe experiments to be performed. Using the right-angle Thomson scattering x-ray source, the author performed time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies of laser-perturbated InSb. These experiments revealed a delayed onset of lattice expansion. This delay is due to the energy relaxation from a dense electron-hole plasma to the lattice. The dense electron-hole plasma first undergoes Auger recombination, which reduces the carrier concentration while maintaining energy content. Longitudinal-optic (LO) phonon emission then couples energy to the lattice. LO phonon decay into acoustic phonons, and acoustic phonon propagation then causes the growth of a thermally expanded layer. Source characterization is instrumental in utilizing ultrashort x-ray pulses in time-resolved x-ray spectroscopies. By measurement of the electron beam diameter at the generation point, the pulse duration of the Thomson scattered x-rays is determined. Analysis of the Thomson scattered x-ray beam properties also provides a novel means of electron bunch characterization. Although the pulse duration is inferred for the Thomson scattering x-ray source, direct measurement is required for other x-ray pulse sources. A method based on the laser-assisted photoelectric effect (LAPE) has

  14. Microscopic x-ray luminescence computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Zhang, Kun; Li, Changqing

    2015-03-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) was emerged as a new hybrid imaging modality, in which the x-rays are used to excite phosphors emitting optical photons to be measured for imaging. In this paper, we reported a microscopic x-ray luminescence computed tomography (microXLCT) with a spatial resolution up to hundreds of micrometers for deep targets. We use a superfine x-ray pencil beam to scan the phosphor targets. The superfine x-ray pencil beam is generated by a small collimator mounted in front of a powerful x-ray tube (93212, Oxford Instrument). A CT detector is used to image the x-ray beam. We have generated an x-ray beam with a diameter of 192 micrometers with a collimator of 100 micrometers in diameter. The emitted optical photons on the top surface of phantom are reflected by a mirror and acquired by an electron multiplier charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera (C9100-13, Hamamatsu Photonics). The microXLCT imaging system is built inside an x-ray shielding and light tight cabinet. The EMCCD camera is placed in a lead box. All the imaging components are controlled by a VC++ program. The optical photon propagation is modeled with the diffusion equation solved by the finite element method. We have applied different regularization methods including L2 and L1 in the microXLCT reconstruction algorithms. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments are used to validate the microXLCT imaging system.

  15. An Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Bellazini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Ramsey, Brian; O'Dell, Steve; Tennant, Allyn; Elsner, Ronald; Pavlov, George; Matt, Girogio; Kaspi, Vicky; Coppi, Paolo; Wu, Kinwah; Siegmund, Oswald

    2008-01-01

    Technical progress both in x-ray optics and in polarization-sensitive x-ray detectors, which our groups have pioneered, enables a scientifically powerful - yet inexpensive - dedicated mission for imaging x-ray polarimetry. Such a mission is sufficiently sensitive to measure x-ray (linear) polarization for a broad range of cosmic sources --- particularly those involving neutron stars, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes (active galactic nuclei). We describe the technical elements, discuss a mission concept, and synopsiz:e the important physical and astrophysical questions such as mission would address.

  16. An Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Bellazini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Ramsey, Brian; O'Dell, Steve; Elsner, Ronald; Pavlov, George; Matt, Giorgio; Kaspi, Victoria; Tennant, Allyn; Coppi, Paolo; Wu, Kinwah; Siegmund, Oswald

    2008-01-01

    Technical progress both in x-ray optics and in polarization-sensitive x-ray detectors, which our groups have pioneered, enables a scientifically powerful---yet inexpensive---dedicated mission for imaging x-ray polarimetry. Such a mission is sufficiently sensitive to measure x-ray (linear) polarization for a broad range of cosmic sources --particularly those involving neutron stars, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes (active galactic nuclei). We describe the technical elements, discuss a mission concept, and synopsize the important physical and astrophysical questions such a mission would address.

  17. Imaging with x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, L.B.; Cauble, B.; Frieders, G.; Koch, J.A.; MacGowan, B.J.; Matthews, D.L.; Mrowka, S.; Ress, D.; Trebes, J.E.; Weiland, T.L.

    1993-11-01

    Collisionally pumped soft x-ray lasers now operate over a wavelength range extending from 35--300 {Angstrom}. These sources have high peak brightness and are now being utilized for x-ray imaging and plasma interferometry. In this paper we will describe our efforts to probe long scalelength plasmas using Moire deflectrometry and soft x-ray imaging. The progress in the development of short pulse x-ray lasers using a double pulse irradiation technique which incorporates a travelling wave pump will also be presented.

  18. X-ray laser microscope apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Suckewer, Szymon; DiCicco, Darrell S.; Hirschberg, Joseph G.; Meixler, Lewis D.; Sathre, Robert; Skinner, Charles H.

    1990-01-01

    A microscope consisting of an x-ray contact microscope and an optical microscope. The optical, phase contrast, microscope is used to align a target with respect to a source of soft x-rays. The source of soft x-rays preferably comprises an x-ray laser but could comprise a synchrotron or other pulse source of x-rays. Transparent resist material is used to support the target. The optical microscope is located on the opposite side of the transparent resist material from the target and is employed to align the target with respect to the anticipated soft x-ray laser beam. After alignment with the use of the optical microscope, the target is exposed to the soft x-ray laser beam. The x-ray sensitive transparent resist material whose chemical bonds are altered by the x-ray beam passing through the target mater GOVERNMENT LICENSE RIGHTS This invention was made with government support under Contract No. De-FG02-86ER13609 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  19. Novae as a Class of Transient X-ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, K.; Orio, M.; Valle, M. Della

    2007-01-01

    Motivated by the recently discovered class of faint (10(exp 34)-10(exp 35) ergs/s) X-ray transients in the Galactic Center region, we investigate the 2-10 keV properties of classical and recurrent novae. Existing data are consistent with the idea that all classical novae are transient X-ray sources with durations of months to years and peak luminosities in the 10(exp 34)-10(exp 35)ergs/s range. This makes classical novae a viable candidate class for the faint Galactic Center transients. We estimate the rate of classical novae within a 15 arcmin radius region centered on the Galactic Center (roughly the field of view of XMM-Newton observations centered on Sgr A*) to be approx.0.1 per year. Therefore, it is plausible that some of the Galactic Center transients that have been announced to date are unrecognized classical novae. The continuing monitoring of the Galactic Center region carried out by Chandra and XMM-Newton may therefore provide a new method to detect classical novae in this crowded and obscured region, an

  20. The 1979 X-ray outburst of Cen X-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaluzienski, L. J.; Holt, S. S.; Swank, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    X-ray observations of the first major outburst (since its initial discovery in 1969) of the "classical" transient X-ray source Cen X-4 were obtained with the Ariel 5 All-Sky Monitor. The flare light curve exhibits a double-peaked maximum at a level of approximately 4 times the Crab nebula, and its duration and characteristic decay time scale are the shortest yet observed from the class of "soft" X-ray transients. A total X-ray output of approximately 3 x 10 to the 43rd power ergs, a factor of approximately 20 less than that of the 1969 outburst is estimated. In addition, evidence is found for a regular modulation of the flux during the decline phase at a period of 8.2 plus or minus 0.2 hours. The existing data are consistent with a source model involving episodic mass exchange from a late-type dwarf onto a neutron star comparison in a relatively close binary system.

  1. The soft X-ray turnoff of Nova Muscae 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanley, L.; Ogelman, H.; Gallagher, J. S.; Orio, M.; Krautter, J.

    1995-01-01

    Nova GQ Muscae 1983 was detected by ROSAT as a luminous 'supersoft' X-ray source in 1992, nearly a decade after outburst. Further, this is the only classical postnova known to have maintained constant luminosity on a timescale predicted by theoretical models. Follow-up observations were made with the ROSAT position-sensitive proportional counter in 1993 January and September, and complemented with B-band photometry taken in 1993 January. By 1993 January, the X-ray count rate had declined by a factor of 17, while there was neither an appreciable decrease in the optical magnitude nor a change in the amplitude of modulation. In 1993 September the soft X-ray flux was below the ROSAT threshold limit, implying a decrease of a factor greater than or equal to 30 in the count rate. This decline can be interpreted by the turnoff of nuclear processes due to the complete consumption of the residual hydrogen-rich envelope. However, the optical luminosity of the system is not simply coupled to the X-ray luminosity (e.g., through reprocessing).

  2. High energy, high resolution X-ray optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Joy, Marshall; Kahn, Steven

    1990-01-01

    The scientific goals of X-ray astronomy are considered to evaluate the relative advantages of using classical Wolter-1 optics or using a different approach. The portion of the X-ray band over 10 keV is unexploited in the present X-ray optics technology, and focussing in this portion of the band is crucial because nonfocussed experiments are background limited. The basic design of 'hard' X-ray optics is described theoretically emphasizing the very small angles of incidence in the grazing-incidence optics. Optimization of the signal-to-noise ratio is found to occur at a finite angular resolution. In real applications, the effective area reduced by the efficiency of the two reflections is 80 percent at energies up to 40 keV, and the quality of the reflecting surface can be monitored to minimize scattering. Focussing optics are found to offer improvements in signal-to-noise as well as more effective scientific return because microelectronic focal-plane technology is employed.

  3. Winds from Low Mass Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Frank H.; Lizano, Susana; Adams, Fred C.; Ruden, Steven P.

    In its last stages, star formation in molecular clouds includes the onset of a stellar wind that helps to clear away the surrounding placenta of gas and dust, thereby making the young stellar object optically visible. The authors discuss new observational evidence that the emerging wind is largely neutral and atomic in low-mass protostars. They then suggest a simple theoretical mechanism for the generation of such powerful neutral winds.

  4. X-Ray Imaging Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, Susan K.; Workman, Gary L.

    1996-01-01

    The space environment in which the Space Station Freedom and other space platforms will orbit is truly a hostile environment. For example, the currently estimated integral fluence for electrons above 1 Mev at 2000 nautical miles is above 2 x 1O(exp 10) electrons/sq cm/day and the proton integral fluence is above 1 x 10(exp 9) protons/sq cm/day. At the 200 - 400 nautical miles, which is more representative of the altitude which will provide the environment for the Space Station, each of these fluences will be proportionally less; however, the data indicates that the radiation environment will obviously have an effect on structural materials exposed to the environment for long durations. The effects of this combined environment is the issue which needs to be understood for the long term exposure of structures in space. At the same time, there will be substantial potential for collisions between the space platforms and space debris. The current NASA catalogue contains over 4500 objects floating in space which are not considered payloads. This debris can have significant effects on collision with orbiting spacecraft. In order to better understand the effect of these hostile phenomena on spacecraft, several types of studies are being performed to simulate at some level the effect of the environment. In particular the study of debris clouds produced by hypervelocity impact on the various surfaces anticipated on the Space Station is very important at this point in time. The need to assess the threat of such debris clouds on space structures is an on-going activity. The Space Debris Impact facility in Building 4612 provides a test facility to monitor the types of damage produced with hypervelocity impact. These facilities are used to simulate space environmental effects from energetic particles. Flash radiography or x-ray imaging has traditionally provided such information and as such has been an important tool for recording damage in situ with the event. The proper

  5. The correlation timescale of the X-ray flux during the outbursts of soft X-ray transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuxiang; Yu, Wenfei; Li, Tipei

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies of black hole and neutron star low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) show a positive correlation between the X-ray flux at which the low/hard(LH)-to-high/soft(HS) state transition occurs and the peak flux of the following HS state. By analyzing the data from the All Sky Monitor (ASM) onboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), we show that the HS state flux after the source reaches its HS flux peak still correlates with the transition flux during soft X-ray transient (SXT) outbursts. By studying large outbursts or flares of GX 339-4, Aql X-1 and 4U 1705-44, we have found that the correlation holds up to 250, 40, and 50 d after the LH-to-HS state transition, respectively. These time scales correspond to the viscous time scale in a standard accretion disk around a stellar mass black hole or a neutron star at a radius of ˜104-5 R g, indicating that the mass accretion rates in the accretion flow either correlate over a large range of radii at a given time or correlate over a long period of time at a given radius. If the accretion geometry is a two-flow geometry composed of a sub-Keplerian inflow or outflow and a disk flow in the LH state, the disk flow with a radius up to ˜105 R g would have contributed to the nearly instantaneous non-thermal radiation directly or indirectly, and therefore affects the time when the state transition occurs.

  6. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This is an artist's concept of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO), formerly Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), fully developed in orbit in a star field with Earth. In 1999, the AXAF was renamed the CXO in honor of the late Indian-American Novel Laureate Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar. The CXO is the most sophisticated and the world's most powerful x-ray telescope ever built. It is designed to observe x-rays from high energy regions of the Universe, such as hot gas in the renmants of exploded stars. It produces picture-like images of x-ray emissions analogous to those made in visible light, as well as gathers data on the chemical composition of x-ray radiating objects. The CXO helps astronomers world-wide better understand the structure and evolution of the universe by studying powerful sources of x-ray such as exploding stars, matter falling into black holes, and other exotic celestial objects. The Observatory has three major parts: (1) the x-ray telescope, whose mirrors will focus x-rays from celestial objects; (2) the science instruments that record the x-rays so that x-ray images can be produced and analyzed; and (3) the spacecraft, which provides the environment necessary for the telescope and the instruments to work. TRW, Inc. was the prime contractor for the development the CXO and NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center was responsible for its project management. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations of the CXO for NASA from Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Observatory was launched July 22, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, STS-93 mission. (Image courtesy of TRW).

  7. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is a computer rendering of the fully developed Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO), formerly Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), in orbit in a star field. In 1999, the AXAF was renamed the CXO in honor of the late Indian-American Novel Laureate Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar. The CXO is the most sophisticated and the world's most powerful x-ray telescope ever built. It is designed to observe x-rays from high energy regions of the Universe, such as hot gas in the renmants of exploded stars. It produces picture-like images of x-ray emissions analogous to those made in visible light, as well as gathers data on the chemical composition of x-ray radiating objects. The CXO helps astronomers world-wide better understand the structure and evolution of the universe by studying powerful sources of x-rays such as exploding stars, matter falling into black holes, and other exotic celestial objects. The Observatory has three major parts: (1) the x-ray telescope, whose mirrors will focus x-rays from celestial objects; (2) the science instruments that record the x-rays so that x-ray images can be produced and analyzed; and (3) the spacecraft, which provides the environment necessary for the telescope and the instruments to work. TRW, Inc. was the prime contractor for the development of the CXO and NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center was responsible for its project management. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations of the CXO for NASA from Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Observatory was launched July 22, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, STS-93 mission. (Image courtesy of TRW).

  8. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Computer Rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This is a computer rendering of the fully developed Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO), formerly Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). In 1999, the AXAF was renamed the CXO in honor of the late Indian-American Novel Laureate Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar. The CXO is the most sophisticated and the world's most powerful x-ray telescope ever built. It is designed to observe x-rays from high energy regions of the Universe, such as hot gas in the renmants of exploded stars. It produces picture-like images of x-ray emissions analogous to those made in visible light, as well as gathers data on the chemical composition of x-ray radiating objects. The CXO helps astronomers world-wide better understand the structure and evolution of the universe by studying powerful sources of x-ray such as exploding stars, matter falling into black holes, and other exotic celestial objects. The Observatory has three major parts: (1) the x-ray telescope, whose mirrors will focus x-rays from celestial objects; (2) the science instruments that record the x-rays so that x-ray images can be produced and analyzed; and (3) the spacecraft, which provides the environment necessary for the telescope and the instruments to work. TRW, Inc. was the prime contractor for the development of the CXO and NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center was responsible for its project management. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations of the CXO for NASA from Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Observatory was launched July 22, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, STS-93 mission. (Image courtesy of TRW).

  9. Chandra Detection of X-ray Emission from Ultra-compact Dwarf Galaxies and Extended Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Meicun; Li, Zhiyuan

    2016-04-01

    We have conducted a systematic study of X-ray emission from ultra-compact dwarf (UCD) galaxies and extended star clusters (ESCs), based on archival Chandra observa- tions. Among a sample of 511 UCDs and ESCs complied from the literature, 17 X-ray counterparts with 0.5-8 keV luminosities above ˜5 × 1036 erg s-1 are identified, which are distributed in eight early-type host galaxies. To facilitate comparison, we also identify X-ray counterparts of 360 globular clusters (GCs) distributed in four of the eight galaxies. The X-ray properties of the UCDs and ESCs are found to be broadly similar to those of the GCs. The incidence rate of X-ray-detected UCDs and ESCs, (3.3±0.8)%, while lower than that of the X-ray-detected GCs [(7.0±0.4)%], is substan- tially higher than expected from the field populations of external galaxies. A stacking analysis of the individually undetected UCDs/ESCs further reveals significant X-ray signals, which corresponds to an equivalent 0.5-8 keV luminosity of ˜4 × 1035 erg s-1 per source. Taken together, these provide strong evidence that the X-ray emission from UCDs and ESCs is dominated by low-mass X-ray binaries having formed from stellar dynamical interactions, consistent with the stellar populations in these dense systems being predominantly old.

  10. Wide field x-ray telescopes: Detecting x-ray transients/afterglows related to GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Hudec, Rene; Pina, Ladislav; Inneman, Adolf; Gorenstein, Paul

    1998-05-16

    The recent discovery of X-ray afterglows of GRBs opens the possibility of analyses of GRBs by their X-ray detections. However, imaging X-ray telescopes in current use mostly have limited fields of view. Alternative X-ray optics geometries achieving very large fields of view have been theoretically suggested in the 70's but not constructed and used so far. We review the geometries and basic properties of the wide-field X-ray optical systems based on one- and two-dimensional lobster-eye geometry and suggest technologies for their development and construction. First results of the development of double replicated X-ray reflecting flats for use in one-dimensional X-ray optics of lobster-eye type are presented and discussed. The optimum strategy for locating GRBs upon their X-ray counterparts is also presented and discussed.

  11. The X-ray optics for X-ray pulsar navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Dongdong; Li, Wenbin; Lian, Jian; Shi, Yufeng; Song, Juan; Wang, Wencong; Sun, Shukun

    2016-01-01

    The effective X-ray optics is a key premise for X-ray pulsar detection and navigation. However, it is very difficult to focus the X-ray photons through refraction for the reason that the X-ray photon is very easy to be absorbed by the materials. The most effective ways for the X-ray focusing is reflection. In this paper, we will give a brief introduction of the theory of the grazing incidence and the corresponding optical systems. By comparing the design parameters of main X-ray astronomical telescope in NASA and ESA, we will give the development trend of the X-ray optics for X-ray pulsar navigation and introduce several new technology for the manufacture of the micro-pore optics (MPO).

  12. The peculiar galactic center neutron star X-ray binary XMM J174457-2850.3

    SciTech Connect

    Degenaar, N.; Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M.; Wijnands, R.; Altamirano, D.; Kennea, J.; Gehrels, N.; Haggard, D.; Ponti, G.

    2014-09-10

    The recent discovery of a millisecond radio pulsar experiencing an accretion outburst similar to those seen in low mass X-ray binaries, has opened up a new opportunity to investigate the evolutionary link between these two different neutron star manifestations. The remarkable X-ray variability and hard X-ray spectrum of this object can potentially serve as a template to search for other X-ray binary/radio pulsar transitional objects. Here we demonstrate that the transient X-ray source XMM J174457-2850.3 near the Galactic center displays similar X-ray properties. We report on the detection of an energetic thermonuclear burst with an estimated duration of ≅2 hr and a radiated energy output of ≅ 5 × 10{sup 40} erg, which unambiguously demonstrates that the source harbors an accreting neutron star. It has a quiescent X-ray luminosity of L {sub X} ≅ 5 × 10{sup 32}(D/6.5 kpc){sup 2} erg s{sup –1} and exhibits occasional accretion outbursts during which it brightens to L {sub X} ≅ 10{sup 35}-10{sup 36}(D/6.5 kpc){sup 2} erg s{sup –1} for a few weeks (2-10 keV). However, the source often lingers in between outburst and quiescence at L {sub X} ≅ 10{sup 33}-10{sup 34}(D/6.5 kpc){sup 2} erg s{sup –1}. This peculiar X-ray flux behavior and its relatively hard X-ray spectrum, a power law with an index of Γ ≅ 1.4, could possibly be explained in terms of the interaction between the accretion flow and the magnetic field of the neutron star.

  13. SN X-ray Progenitor?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Identifying stars that explode, right before they explode, is a tricky proposition since the end of starlife comes swiftly: in thermonuclear deflagrations, in nuclear exhaustion, or maybe in a rapid swirling merger of two dead stellar cores. On the right in the image above is an image of the galaxy NGC 1404 taken by the UV/optical Telescope (UVOT) on the Swift observatory. The circle surrounds SN 2007on, a supernova of Type Ia produced by the explosion of a white dwarf star in a binary system. These types of supernovae are important since they are believed to be 'standard candles', events which have the same intrinsic brightness which can serve as an important yardstick to measure cosmic distances. On the left is an image of the same galaxy taken by the Chandra X-ray observatory four years before the supernova. Conspicuous in the SN source circle is a bright source in the Chandra image, believed to be emission from a compact object+normal star companion: a similar system to the supposed precursor of SN 2007on. If true this would be the first time a Type Ia supernova precursor has ever been seen. But astronomers are still debating whether the Chandra source really is the precursor or not; it seems there's a slight but significant difference in the location of the Chandra source and the supernova. Stay tuned for more developments.

  14. SMM X-ray polychromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Keith T.; Haisch, Bernhard M. (Compiler); Lemen, James R. (Compiler); Acton, L. W.; Bawa, H. S.; Claflin, E. S.; Freeland, S. L.; Slater, G. L.; Kemp, D. L.; Linford, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    The range of observing and analysis programs accomplished with the X-Ray Polychromator (XRP) instruments during the decline of solar cycle 21 and the rise of the solar cycle 22 is summarized. Section 2 describes XRP operations and current status. This is meant as a guide on how the instrument is used to obtain data and what its capabilities are for potential users. The science section contains a series of representative abstracts from recently published papers on major XRP science topics. It is not meant to be a complete list but illustrates the type of science that can come from the analysis of the XRP data. There then follows a series of appendixes that summarize the major data bases that are available. Appendix A is a complete bibliography of papers and presentations produced using XRP data. Appendix B lists all the spectroscopic data accumulated by the Flat Crystal Spectrometer (FCS). Appendix C is a compilation of the XRP flare catalogue for events equivalent to a GOES C-level flare or greater. It lists the start, peak and end times as well as the peak Ca XIX flux.

  15. X-ray satellite (Rosat)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the current status of the ROSAT X-Ray satellite project is given. Areas discussed include an overview of problem areas, systems and mechanical subsystems, the electrical subsystem, power supply, data processing and transmission, the wide field camera, ground support equipment and the production scheduling. It is shown that the project is proceeding according to schedule, including the hardware production and costs. However, it is stated that estimated additional costs will exceed the plan. The previous schedule for production of the flight model will no longer be met. A modified milestone plan has been worked out with Dornier Systems. The current working schedule calls for a launch data of December 21, 1987; however, this does not take into account a 4-week buffer prior to transporting the flight model to the launch site. As of the date of this report, milestone M5 has been met. Previous problems with the gold vapor deposition on the flight model mirror due to contamination have been eliminated.

  16. Nonthermal X-ray Microflares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christe, S.; Rauscher, E.; Krucker, S.; Lin, R. P.

    2004-12-01

    The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) provides unique sensitivity in the 3-15 keV energy range, with an effective area ˜100 times larger than similar past instruments. Along with its high spectral resolution (1 keV) RHESSI is uniquely suited to study small events. Microflares have been observed by Benz & Grigis (2002) and Krucker et al. (2002) to have anomalously steep spectra ( spectral index between -5 and -8) extending down to ˜ 7 keV. Thermal emission is found to dominate below ˜ 7 keV. In many other respects, microflares show properties similar to larger flares. We present single event studies of different types of x-ray microflares. RHESSI observations during quiet times (04-May 10-14; GOES level low B class) reveal a set 5 microflares (>=A Class). These microflares show power law spectra (spectral index of ˜4-8) with little or no thermal emission in the 3- ˜7 keV energy range above the nonthermal part of the spectrum. Other microflares in the same GOES class range, however, have been found which show extremely hard spectra with emission up to 50 keV (power law index ˜2). At lower energies, emission is dominated by a hot thermal component (20 MK). This work was supported by NASA contract NAS5-98033.

  17. Diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MEMS-based X-ray optics

    DOEpatents

    Lopez, Daniel; Shenoy, Gopal; Wang, Jin; Walko, Donald A.; Jung, Il-Woong; Mukhopadhyay, Deepkishore

    2016-08-09

    A method and apparatus are provided for implementing Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MicroElectroMechanical systems (MEMS) based diffractive optics. An oscillating crystalline MEMS device generates a controllable time-window for diffraction of the incident X-ray radiation. The Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses includes isolating a particular pulse, spatially separating individual pulses, and spreading a single pulse from an X-ray pulse-train.

  18. X-ray Attenuation and Absorption Calculations.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1988-02-25

    This point-source, polychromatic, discrete energy X-ray transport and energy deposition code system calculates first-order spectral estimates of X-ray energy transmission through slab materials and the associated spectrum of energy absorbed by the material.

  19. Accelerator-driven X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong

    2015-11-09

    After an introduction which mentions x-ray tubes and storage rings and gives a brief review of special relativity, the subject is treated under the following topics and subtopics: synchrotron radiation (bending magnet radiation, wiggler radiation, undulator radiation, brightness and brilliance definition, synchrotron radiation facilities), x-ray free-electron lasers (linac-driven X-ray FEL, FEL interactions, self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), SASE self-seeding, fourth-generation light source facilities), and other X-ray sources (energy recovery linacs, Inverse Compton scattering, laser wakefield accelerator driven X-ray sources. In summary, accelerator-based light sources cover the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Synchrotron radiation (bending magnet, wiggler and undulator radiation) has unique properties that can be tailored to the users’ needs: bending magnet and wiggler radiation is broadband, undulator radiation has narrow spectral lines. X-ray FELs are the brightest coherent X-ray sources with high photon flux, femtosecond pulses, full transverse coherence, partial temporal coherence (SASE), and narrow spectral lines with seeding techniques. New developments in electron accelerators and radiation production can potentially lead to more compact sources of coherent X-rays.

  20. X-ray determination of parts alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    A method for determining the alignment of adjoining metal objects is provided. The method comprises producing an X-ray image of adjoining surfaces of the two metal objects. The X-ray beam is tangential to the point the surfaces are joined. The method is particularly applicable where the alignment of the two metal objects is not readily susceptible to visual inspection.