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Sample records for classifying coding dna

  1. DNA codes

    SciTech Connect

    Torney, D. C.

    2001-01-01

    We have begun to characterize a variety of codes, motivated by potential implementation as (quaternary) DNA n-sequences, with letters denoted A, C The first codes we studied are the most reminiscent of conventional group codes. For these codes, Hamming similarity was generalized so that the score for matched letters takes more than one value, depending upon which letters are matched [2]. These codes consist of n-sequences satisfying an upper bound on the similarities, summed over the letter positions, of distinct codewords. We chose similarity 2 for matches of letters A and T and 3 for matches of the letters C and G, providing a rough approximation to double-strand bond energies in DNA. An inherent novelty of DNA codes is 'reverse complementation'. The latter may be defined, as follows, not only for alphabets of size four, but, more generally, for any even-size alphabet. All that is required is a matching of the letters of the alphabet: a partition into pairs. Then, the reverse complement of a codeword is obtained by reversing the order of its letters and replacing each letter by its match. For DNA, the matching is AT/CG because these are the Watson-Crick bonding pairs. Reversal arises because two DNA sequences form a double strand with opposite relative orientations. Thus, as will be described in detail, because in vitro decoding involves the formation of double-stranded DNA from two codewords, it is reasonable to assume - for universal applicability - that the reverse complement of any codeword is also a codeword. In particular, self-reverse complementary codewords are expressly forbidden in reverse-complement codes. Thus, an appropriate distance between all pairs of codewords must, when large, effectively prohibit binding between the respective codewords: to form a double strand. Only reverse-complement pairs of codewords should be able to bind. For most applications, a DNA code is to be bi-partitioned, such that the reverse-complementary pairs are separated

  2. Using bar code technology to enhance classified document accountability

    SciTech Connect

    Mountain, P.J.; Wade, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a system of resources and procedures coordinated to improve a classified document inventorying process. The Bar Code Document Accountability System (BARDAS) was developed to demonstrate the feasibility of improving the management and reporting timeliness of secret document inventories by the accountable custodians. The paper discusses the reasons for the development method, the extensive error-checking, the degree of user-friendliness, and the use of bar code technology in accomplishing these goals. Finally, the reactions of users to the system and future plans for enhancement are discussed.

  3. Utilizing sequence intrinsic composition to classify protein-coding and long non-coding transcripts.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liang; Luo, Haitao; Bu, Dechao; Zhao, Guoguang; Yu, Kuntao; Zhang, Changhai; Liu, Yuanning; Chen, Runsheng; Zhao, Yi

    2013-09-01

    It is a challenge to classify protein-coding or non-coding transcripts, especially those re-constructed from high-throughput sequencing data of poorly annotated species. This study developed and evaluated a powerful signature tool, Coding-Non-Coding Index (CNCI), by profiling adjoining nucleotide triplets to effectively distinguish protein-coding and non-coding sequences independent of known annotations. CNCI is effective for classifying incomplete transcripts and sense-antisense pairs. The implementation of CNCI offered highly accurate classification of transcripts assembled from whole-transcriptome sequencing data in a cross-species manner, that demonstrated gene evolutionary divergence between vertebrates, and invertebrates, or between plants, and provided a long non-coding RNA catalog of orangutan. CNCI software is available at http://www.bioinfo.org/software/cnci. PMID:23892401

  4. DNA as a Binary Code: How the Physical Structure of Nucleotide Bases Carries Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCallister, Gary

    2005-01-01

    The DNA triplet code also functions as a binary code. Because double-ring compounds cannot bind to double-ring compounds in the DNA code, the sequence of bases classified simply as purines or pyrimidines can encode for smaller groups of possible amino acids. This is an intuitive approach to teaching the DNA code. (Contains 6 figures.)

  5. DNA: Polymer and molecular code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivashankar, G. V.

    1999-10-01

    The thesis work focusses upon two aspects of DNA, the polymer and the molecular code. Our approach was to bring single molecule micromanipulation methods to the study of DNA. It included a home built optical microscope combined with an atomic force microscope and an optical tweezer. This combined approach led to a novel method to graft a single DNA molecule onto a force cantilever using the optical tweezer and local heating. With this method, a force versus extension assay of double stranded DNA was realized. The resolution was about 10 picoN. To improve on this force measurement resolution, a simple light backscattering technique was developed and used to probe the DNA polymer flexibility and its fluctuations. It combined the optical tweezer to trap a DNA tethered bead and the laser backscattering to detect the beads Brownian fluctuations. With this technique the resolution was about 0.1 picoN with a millisecond access time, and the whole entropic part of the DNA force-extension was measured. With this experimental strategy, we measured the polymerization of the protein RecA on an isolated double stranded DNA. We observed the progressive decoration of RecA on the l DNA molecule, which results in the extension of l , due to unwinding of the double helix. The dynamics of polymerization, the resulting change in the DNA entropic elasticity and the role of ATP hydrolysis were the main parts of the study. A simple model for RecA assembly on DNA was proposed. This work presents a first step in the study of genetic recombination. Recently we have started a study of equilibrium binding which utilizes fluorescence polarization methods to probe the polymerization of RecA on single stranded DNA. In addition to the study of material properties of DNA and DNA-RecA, we have developed experiments for which the code of the DNA is central. We studied one aspect of DNA as a molecular code, using different techniques. In particular the programmatic use of template specificity makes

  6. IN-MACA-MCC: Integrated Multiple Attractor Cellular Automata with Modified Clonal Classifier for Human Protein Coding and Promoter Prediction.

    PubMed

    Pokkuluri, Kiran Sree; Inampudi, Ramesh Babu; Nedunuri, S S S N Usha Devi

    2014-01-01

    Protein coding and promoter region predictions are very important challenges of bioinformatics (Attwood and Teresa, 2000). The identification of these regions plays a crucial role in understanding the genes. Many novel computational and mathematical methods are introduced as well as existing methods that are getting refined for predicting both of the regions separately; still there is a scope for improvement. We propose a classifier that is built with MACA (multiple attractor cellular automata) and MCC (modified clonal classifier) to predict both regions with a single classifier. The proposed classifier is trained and tested with Fickett and Tung (1992) datasets for protein coding region prediction for DNA sequences of lengths 54, 108, and 162. This classifier is trained and tested with MMCRI datasets for protein coding region prediction for DNA sequences of lengths 252 and 354. The proposed classifier is trained and tested with promoter sequences from DBTSS (Yamashita et al., 2006) dataset and nonpromoters from EID (Saxonov et al., 2000) and UTRdb (Pesole et al., 2002) datasets. The proposed model can predict both regions with an average accuracy of 90.5% for promoter and 89.6% for protein coding region predictions. The specificity and sensitivity values of promoter and protein coding region predictions are 0.89 and 0.92, respectively. PMID:25132849

  7. Classified-edge guided depth resampling for multi-view coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yu; Zhou, Yang; Chen, Hua-hua

    2016-01-01

    A new depth resampling for multi-view coding is proposed in this paper. At first, the depth video is downsampled by median filtering before encoding. After decoding, the classified edges, including credible edge and probable edge from the aligned texture image and the depth image, are interpolated by the selected diagonal pair, whose intensity difference is the minimum among four diagonal pairs around edge pixel. According to different category of edge, the intensity difference is measured by either real depth or percentage depth without any parameter setting. Finally, the resampled depth video and the decoded full-resolution texture video are synthesized into virtual views for the performance evaluation. Experiments on the platform of multi-view high efficiency video coding (HEVC) demonstrate that the proposed method is superior to the contrastive methods in terms of visual quality and rate distortion (RD) performance.

  8. Security authentication with a three-dimensional optical phase code using random forest classifier.

    PubMed

    Markman, Adam; Carnicer, Artur; Javidi, Bahram

    2016-06-01

    An object with a unique three-dimensional (3D) optical phase mask attached is analyzed for security and authentication. These 3D optical phase masks are more difficult to duplicate or to have a mathematical formulation compared with 2D masks and thus have improved security capabilities. A quick response code was modulated using a random 3D optical phase mask generating a 3D optical phase code (OPC). Due to the scattering of light through the 3D OPC, a unique speckle pattern based on the materials and structure in the 3D optical phase mask is generated and recorded on a CCD device. Feature extraction is performed by calculating the mean, variance, skewness, kurtosis, and entropy for each recorded speckle pattern. The random forest classifier is used for authentication. Optical experiments demonstrate the feasibility of the authentication scheme. PMID:27409445

  9. Classifying Force Spectroscopy of DNA Pulling Measurements Using Supervised and Unsupervised Machine Learning Methods.

    PubMed

    Karatay, Durmus U; Zhang, Jie; Harrison, Jeffrey S; Ginger, David S

    2016-04-25

    Dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) measurements on biomolecules typically require classifying thousands of repeated force spectra prior to data analysis. Here, we study classification of atomic force microscope-based DFS measurements using machine-learning algorithms in order to automate selection of successful force curves. Notably, we collect a data set that has a testable positive signal using photoswitch-modified DNA before and after illumination with UV (365 nm) light. We generate a feature set consisting of six properties of force-distance curves to train supervised models and use principal component analysis (PCA) for an unsupervised model. For supervised classification, we train random forest models for binary and multiclass classification of force-distance curves. Random forest models predict successful pulls with an accuracy of 94% and classify them into five classes with an accuracy of 90%. The unsupervised method using Gaussian mixture models (GMM) reaches an accuracy of approximately 80% for binary classification. PMID:27010122

  10. Using Huffman coding method to visualize and analyze DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhao-Hui; Li, Ling; Qi, Xiao-Qin

    2011-11-30

    On the basis of the Huffman coding method, we propose a new graphical representation of DNA sequence. The representation can avoid degeneracy and loss of information in the transfer of data from a DNA sequence to its graphical representation. Then a multicomponent vector from the representation is introduced to characterize quantitatively DNA sequences. The components of the vector are derived from the graphical representation of DNA primary sequence. The examination of similarities and dissimilarities among the complete coding sequences of β-globin gene of 11 species and six ND6 proteins shows the utility of the scheme. PMID:21953557

  11. DNA barcode goes two-dimensions: DNA QR code web server.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Shi, Linchun; Xu, Xiaolan; Li, Huan; Xing, Hang; Liang, Dong; Jiang, Kun; Pang, Xiaohui; Song, Jingyuan; Chen, Shilin

    2012-01-01

    The DNA barcoding technology uses a standard region of DNA sequence for species identification and discovery. At present, "DNA barcode" actually refers to DNA sequences, which are not amenable to information storage, recognition, and retrieval. Our aim is to identify the best symbology that can represent DNA barcode sequences in practical applications. A comprehensive set of sequences for five DNA barcode markers ITS2, rbcL, matK, psbA-trnH, and CO1 was used as the test data. Fifty-three different types of one-dimensional and ten two-dimensional barcode symbologies were compared based on different criteria, such as coding capacity, compression efficiency, and error detection ability. The quick response (QR) code was found to have the largest coding capacity and relatively high compression ratio. To facilitate the further usage of QR code-based DNA barcodes, a web server was developed and is accessible at http://qrfordna.dnsalias.org. The web server allows users to retrieve the QR code for a species of interests, convert a DNA sequence to and from a QR code, and perform species identification based on local and global sequence similarities. In summary, the first comprehensive evaluation of various barcode symbologies has been carried out. The QR code has been found to be the most appropriate symbology for DNA barcode sequences. A web server has also been constructed to allow biologists to utilize QR codes in practical DNA barcoding applications. PMID:22574113

  12. Classifier assessment and feature selection for recognizing short coding sequences of human genes.

    PubMed

    Song, Kai; Zhang, Ze; Tong, Tuo-Peng; Wu, Fang

    2012-03-01

    With the ever-increasing pace of genome sequencing, there is a great need for fast and accurate computational tools to automatically identify genes in these genomes. Although great progress has been made in the development of gene-finding algorithms during the past decades, there is still room for further improvement. In particular, the issue of recognizing short exons in eukaryotes is still not solved satisfactorily. This article is devoted to assessing various linear and kernel-based classification algorithms and selecting the best combination of Z-curve features for further improvement of the issue. Eight state-of-the-art linear and kernel-based supervised pattern recognition techniques were used to identify the short (21-192 bp) coding sequences of human genes. By measuring the prediction accuracy, the tradeoff between sensitivity and specificity and the time consumption, partial least squares (PLS) and kernel partial least squares (KPLS) algorithms were verified to be the most optimal linear and kernel-based classifiers, respectively. A surprising result was that, by making good use of the interpretability of the PLS and the Z-curve methods, 93 Z-curve features were proved to be the best selective combination. Using them, the average recognition accuracy was improved as high as 7.7% by means of KPLS when compared with what was obtained by the Fisher discriminant analysis using 189 Z-curve variables (Gao and Zhang, 2004 ). The used codes are freely available from the following approaches (implemented in MATLAB and supported on Linux and MS Windows): (1) SVM: http://www.support-vector-machines.org/SVM_soft.html. (2) GP: http://www.gaussianprocess.org. (3) KPLS and KFDA: Taylor, J.S., and Cristianini, N. 2004. Kernel Methods for Pattern Analysis. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK. (4) PLS: Wise, B.M., and Gallagher, N.B. 2011. PLS-Toolbox for use with MATLAB: ver 1.5.2. Eigenvector Technologies, Manson, WA. Supplementary Material for this article is

  13. BioCode: Two biologically compatible Algorithms for embedding data in non-coding and coding regions of DNA

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent times, the application of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has diversified with the emergence of fields such as DNA computing and DNA data embedding. DNA data embedding, also known as DNA watermarking or DNA steganography, aims to develop robust algorithms for encoding non-genetic information in DNA. Inherently DNA is a digital medium whereby the nucleotide bases act as digital symbols, a fact which underpins all bioinformatics techniques, and which also makes trivial information encoding using DNA straightforward. However, the situation is more complex in methods which aim at embedding information in the genomes of living organisms. DNA is susceptible to mutations, which act as a noisy channel from the point of view of information encoded using DNA. This means that the DNA data embedding field is closely related to digital communications. Moreover it is a particularly unique digital communications area, because important biological constraints must be observed by all methods. Many DNA data embedding algorithms have been presented to date, all of which operate in one of two regions: non-coding DNA (ncDNA) or protein-coding DNA (pcDNA). Results This paper proposes two novel DNA data embedding algorithms jointly called BioCode, which operate in ncDNA and pcDNA, respectively, and which comply fully with stricter biological restrictions. Existing methods comply with some elementary biological constraints, such as preserving protein translation in pcDNA. However there exist further biological restrictions which no DNA data embedding methods to date account for. Observing these constraints is key to increasing the biocompatibility and in turn, the robustness of information encoded in DNA. Conclusion The algorithms encode information in near optimal ways from a coding point of view, as we demonstrate by means of theoretical and empirical (in silico) analyses. Also, they are shown to encode information in a robust way, such that mutations have isolated

  14. Ancient DNA sequence revealed by error-correcting codes.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Marcelo M; Spoladore, Larissa; Faria, Luzinete C B; Rocha, Andréa S L; Silva-Filho, Marcio C; Palazzo, Reginaldo

    2015-01-01

    A previously described DNA sequence generator algorithm (DNA-SGA) using error-correcting codes has been employed as a computational tool to address the evolutionary pathway of the genetic code. The code-generated sequence alignment demonstrated that a residue mutation revealed by the code can be found in the same position in sequences of distantly related taxa. Furthermore, the code-generated sequences do not promote amino acid changes in the deviant genomes through codon reassignment. A Bayesian evolutionary analysis of both code-generated and homologous sequences of the Arabidopsis thaliana malate dehydrogenase gene indicates an approximately 1 MYA divergence time from the MDH code-generated sequence node to its paralogous sequences. The DNA-SGA helps to determine the plesiomorphic state of DNA sequences because a single nucleotide alteration often occurs in distantly related taxa and can be found in the alternative codon patterns of noncanonical genetic codes. As a consequence, the algorithm may reveal an earlier stage of the evolution of the standard code. PMID:26159228

  15. Ancient DNA sequence revealed by error-correcting codes

    PubMed Central

    Brandão, Marcelo M.; Spoladore, Larissa; Faria, Luzinete C. B.; Rocha, Andréa S. L.; Silva-Filho, Marcio C.; Palazzo, Reginaldo

    2015-01-01

    A previously described DNA sequence generator algorithm (DNA-SGA) using error-correcting codes has been employed as a computational tool to address the evolutionary pathway of the genetic code. The code-generated sequence alignment demonstrated that a residue mutation revealed by the code can be found in the same position in sequences of distantly related taxa. Furthermore, the code-generated sequences do not promote amino acid changes in the deviant genomes through codon reassignment. A Bayesian evolutionary analysis of both code-generated and homologous sequences of the Arabidopsis thaliana malate dehydrogenase gene indicates an approximately 1 MYA divergence time from the MDH code-generated sequence node to its paralogous sequences. The DNA-SGA helps to determine the plesiomorphic state of DNA sequences because a single nucleotide alteration often occurs in distantly related taxa and can be found in the alternative codon patterns of noncanonical genetic codes. As a consequence, the algorithm may reveal an earlier stage of the evolution of the standard code. PMID:26159228

  16. DNA Barcoding through Quaternary LDPC Codes

    PubMed Central

    Tapia, Elizabeth; Spetale, Flavio; Krsticevic, Flavia; Angelone, Laura; Bulacio, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    For many parallel applications of Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies short barcodes able to accurately multiplex a large number of samples are demanded. To address these competitive requirements, the use of error-correcting codes is advised. Current barcoding systems are mostly built from short random error-correcting codes, a feature that strongly limits their multiplexing accuracy and experimental scalability. To overcome these problems on sequencing systems impaired by mismatch errors, the alternative use of binary BCH and pseudo-quaternary Hamming codes has been proposed. However, these codes either fail to provide a fine-scale with regard to size of barcodes (BCH) or have intrinsic poor error correcting abilities (Hamming). Here, the design of barcodes from shortened binary BCH codes and quaternary Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes is introduced. Simulation results show that although accurate barcoding systems of high multiplexing capacity can be obtained with any of these codes, using quaternary LDPC codes may be particularly advantageous due to the lower rates of read losses and undetected sample misidentification errors. Even at mismatch error rates of 10−2 per base, 24-nt LDPC barcodes can be used to multiplex roughly 2000 samples with a sample misidentification error rate in the order of 10−9 at the expense of a rate of read losses just in the order of 10−6. PMID:26492348

  17. On fuzzy semantic similarity measure for DNA coding.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Muneer; Jung, Low Tang; Bhuiyan, Md Al-Amin

    2016-02-01

    A coding measure scheme numerically translates the DNA sequence to a time domain signal for protein coding regions identification. A number of coding measure schemes based on numerology, geometry, fixed mapping, statistical characteristics and chemical attributes of nucleotides have been proposed in recent decades. Such coding measure schemes lack the biologically meaningful aspects of nucleotide data and hence do not significantly discriminate coding regions from non-coding regions. This paper presents a novel fuzzy semantic similarity measure (FSSM) coding scheme centering on FSSM codons׳ clustering and genetic code context of nucleotides. Certain natural characteristics of nucleotides i.e. appearance as a unique combination of triplets, preserving special structure and occurrence, and ability to own and share density distributions in codons have been exploited in FSSM. The nucleotides׳ fuzzy behaviors, semantic similarities and defuzzification based on the center of gravity of nucleotides revealed a strong correlation between nucleotides in codons. The proposed FSSM coding scheme attains a significant enhancement in coding regions identification i.e. 36-133% as compared to other existing coding measure schemes tested over more than 250 benchmarked and randomly taken DNA datasets of different organisms. PMID:26773936

  18. Synthesis of Amplified DNA That Codes for Ribosomal RNA

    PubMed Central

    Crippa, Marco; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P.

    1971-01-01

    During the amplification stage in ovaries, the complete repetitive unit of the DNA that codes for ribosomal RNA in Xenopus appears to be transcribed. This large RNA transcript is found in a complex with DNA. Substitution experiments with 5-bromodeoxyuridine do not show any evidence that a complete amplified cistron is used as a template for further amplification. A derivative of rifampicin, 2′,5′-dimethyl-N(4′)benzyl-N(4′)[desmethyl] rifampicin, preferentially inhibits the DNA synthesis responsible for ribosomal gene amplification. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that RNA-dependent DNA synthesis is involved in gene amplification. PMID:5288254

  19. Correlation approach to identify coding regions in DNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ossadnik, S. M.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Mantegna, R. N.; Peng, C. K.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1994-01-01

    Recently, it was observed that noncoding regions of DNA sequences possess long-range power-law correlations, whereas coding regions typically display only short-range correlations. We develop an algorithm based on this finding that enables investigators to perform a statistical analysis on long DNA sequences to locate possible coding regions. The algorithm is particularly successful in predicting the location of lengthy coding regions. For example, for the complete genome of yeast chromosome III (315,344 nucleotides), at least 82% of the predictions correspond to putative coding regions; the algorithm correctly identified all coding regions larger than 3000 nucleotides, 92% of coding regions between 2000 and 3000 nucleotides long, and 79% of coding regions between 1000 and 2000 nucleotides. The predictive ability of this new algorithm supports the claim that there is a fundamental difference in the correlation property between coding and noncoding sequences. This algorithm, which is not species-dependent, can be implemented with other techniques for rapidly and accurately locating relatively long coding regions in genomic sequences.

  20. Diversity and Recombination of Dispersed Ribosomal DNA and Protein Coding Genes in Microsporidia

    PubMed Central

    Ironside, Joseph Edward

    2013-01-01

    Microsporidian strains are usually classified on the basis of their ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences. Although rDNA occurs as multiple copies, in most non-microsporidian species copies within a genome occur as tandem arrays and are homogenised by concerted evolution. In contrast, microsporidian rDNA units are dispersed throughout the genome in some species, and on this basis are predicted to undergo reduced concerted evolution. Furthermore many microsporidian species appear to be asexual and should therefore exhibit reduced genetic diversity due to a lack of recombination. Here, DNA sequences are compared between microsporidia with different life cycles in order to determine the effects of concerted evolution and sexual reproduction upon the diversity of rDNA and protein coding genes. Comparisons of cloned rDNA sequences between microsporidia of the genus Nosema with different life cycles provide evidence of intragenomic variability coupled with strong purifying selection. This suggests a birth and death process of evolution. However, some concerted evolution is suggested by clustering of rDNA sequences within species. Variability of protein-coding sequences indicates that considerable intergenomic variation also occurs between microsporidian cells within a single host. Patterns of variation in microsporidian DNA sequences indicate that additional diversity is generated by intragenomic and/or intergenomic recombination between sequence variants. The discovery of intragenomic variability coupled with strong purifying selection in microsporidian rRNA sequences supports the hypothesis that concerted evolution is reduced when copies of a gene are dispersed rather than repeated tandemly. The presence of intragenomic variability also renders the use of rDNA sequences for barcoding microsporidia questionable. Evidence of recombination in the single-copy genes of putatively asexual microsporidia suggests that these species may undergo cryptic sexual reproduction, a

  1. Parallelizing a DNA simulation code for the Cray MTA-2.

    PubMed

    Bokhari, Shahid H; Glaser, Matthew A; Jordan, Harry F; Lansac, Yves; Sauer, Jon R; Van Zeghbroeck, Bart

    2002-01-01

    The Cray MTA-2 (Multithreaded Architecture) is an unusual parallel supercomputer that promises ease of use and high performance. We describe our experience on the MTA-2 with a molecular dynamics code, SIMU-MD, that we are using to simulate the translocation of DNA through a nanopore in a silicon based ultrafast sequencer. Our sequencer is constructed using standard VLSI technology and consists of a nanopore surrounded by Field Effect Transistors (FETs). We propose to use the FETs to sense variations in charge as a DNA molecule translocates through the pore and thus differentiate between the four building block nucleotides of DNA. We were able to port SIMU-MD, a serial C code, to the MTA with only a modest effort and with good performance. Our porting process needed neither a parallelism support platform nor attention to the intimate details of parallel programming and interprocessor communication, as would have been the case with more conventional supercomputers. PMID:15838145

  2. Coding-complete sequencing classifies parrot bornavirus 5 into a novel virus species.

    PubMed

    Marton, Szilvia; Bányai, Krisztián; Gál, János; Ihász, Katalin; Kugler, Renáta; Lengyel, György; Jakab, Ferenc; Bakonyi, Tamás; Farkas, Szilvia L

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we determined the sequence of the coding region of an avian bornavirus detected in a blue-and-yellow macaw (Ara ararauna) with pathological/histopathological changes characteristic of proventricular dilatation disease. The genomic organization of the macaw bornavirus is similar to that of other bornaviruses, and its nucleotide sequence is nearly identical to the available partial parrot bornavirus 5 (PaBV-5) sequences. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these strains formed a monophyletic group distinct from other mammalian and avian bornaviruses and in calculations performed with matrix protein coding sequences, the PaBV-5 and PaBV-6 genotypes formed a common cluster, suggesting that according to the recently accepted classification system for bornaviruses, these two genotypes may belong to a new species, provisionally named Psittaciform 2 bornavirus. PMID:26282234

  3. Quantitative Profiling of Peptides from RNAs classified as non-coding

    PubMed Central

    Prabakaran, Sudhakaran; Hemberg, Martin; Chauhan, Ruchi; Winter, Dominic; Tweedie-Cullen, Ry Y.; Dittrich, Christian; Hong, Elizabeth; Gunawardena, Jeremy; Steen, Hanno; Kreiman, Gabriel; Steen, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the mammalian genome codes for messenger RNAs destined to be translated into proteins, and it is generally assumed that a large portion of transcribed sequences - including introns and several classes of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) do not give rise to peptide products. A systematic examination of translation and physiological regulation of ncRNAs has not been conducted. Here, we use computational methods to identify the products of non-canonical translation in mouse neurons by analyzing unannotated transcripts in combination with proteomic data. This study supports the existence of non-canonical translation products from both intragenic and extragenic genomic regions, including peptides derived from anti-sense transcripts and introns. Moreover, the studied novel translation products exhibit temporal regulation similar to that of proteins known to be involved in neuronal activity processes. These observations highlight a potentially large and complex set of biologically regulated translational events from transcripts formerly thought to lack coding potential. PMID:25403355

  4. Combination of protein coding and noncoding gene expression as a robust prognostic classifier in stage I lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Ichiro; Okayama, Hirokazu; Schetter, Aaron J; Robles, Ana I; Kohno, Takashi; Bowman, Elise D; Kazandjian, Dickran; Welsh, Judith A; Oue, Naohide; Saito, Motonobu; Miyashita, Masao; Uchida, Eiji; Takizawa, Toshihiro; Takenoshita, Seiichi; Skaug, Vidar; Mollerup, Steen; Haugen, Aage; Yokota, Jun; Harris, Curtis C

    2013-07-01

    Prognostic tests for patients with early-stage lung cancer may provide needed guidance on postoperative surveillance and therapeutic decisions. We used a novel strategy to develop and validate a prognostic classifier for early-stage lung cancer. Specifically, we focused on 42 genes with roles in lung cancer or cancer prognosis. Expression of these biologically relevant genes and their association with relapse-free survival (RFS) were evaluated using microarray data from 148 patients with stage I lung adenocarcinoma. Seven genes associated with RFS were further examined by quantitative reverse transcription PCR in 291 lung adenocarcinoma tissues from Japan, the United States, and Norway. Only BRCA1, HIF1A, DLC1, and XPO1 were each significantly associated with prognosis in the Japan and US/Norway cohorts. A Cox regression-based classifier was developed using these four genes on the Japan cohort and validated in stage I lung adenocarcinoma from the US/Norway cohort and three publicly available lung adenocarcinoma expression profiling datasets. The results suggest that the classifier is robust across ethnically and geographically diverse populations regardless of the technology used to measure gene expression. We evaluated the combination of the four-gene classifier with miRNA miR-21 (MIR21) expression and found that the combination improved associations with prognosis, which were significant in stratified analyses on stage IA and stage IB patients. Thus, the four coding gene classifier, alone or with miR-21 expression, may provide a clinically useful tool to identify high-risk patients and guide recommendations regarding adjuvant therapy and postoperative surveillance of patients with stage I lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:23639940

  5. Structural Code for DNA Recognition Revealed in Crystal Structures of Papillomavirus E2-DNA Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenberg, Haim; Rabinovich, Dov; Frolow, Felix; Hegde, Rashmi S.; Shakked, Zippora

    1998-12-01

    Transcriptional regulation in papillomaviruses depends on sequence-specific binding of the regulatory protein E2 to several sites in the viral genome. Crystal structures of bovine papillomavirus E2 DNA targets reveal a conformational variant of B-DNA characterized by a roll-induced writhe and helical repeat of 10.5 bp per turn. A comparison between the free and the protein-bound DNA demonstrates that the intrinsic structure of the DNA regions contacted directly by the protein and the deformability of the DNA region that is not contacted by the protein are critical for sequence-specific protein/DNA recognition and hence for gene-regulatory signals in the viral system. We show that the selection of dinucleotide or longer segments with appropriate conformational characteristics, when positioned at correct intervals along the DNA helix, can constitute a structural code for DNA recognition by regulatory proteins. This structural code facilitates the formation of a complementary protein-DNA interface that can be further specified by hydrogen bonds and nonpolar interactions between the protein amino acids and the DNA bases.

  6. Short prokaryotic DNA fragment binning using a hierarchical classifier based on linear discriminant analysis and principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hao; Wu, Hongwei

    2010-12-01

    Metagenomics is an emerging field in which the power of genomic analysis is applied to an entire microbial community, bypassing the need to isolate and culture individual microbial species. Assembling of metagenomic DNA fragments is very much like the overlap-layout-consensus procedure for assembling isolated genomes, but is augmented by an additional binning step to differentiate scaffolds, contigs and unassembled reads into various taxonomic groups. In this paper, we employed n-mer oligonucleotide frequencies as the features and developed a hierarchical classifier (PCAHIER) for binning short (≤ 1,000 bps) metagenomic fragments. The principal component analysis was used to reduce the high dimensionality of the feature space. The hierarchical classifier consists of four layers of local classifiers that are implemented based on the linear discriminant analysis. These local classifiers are responsible for binning prokaryotic DNA fragments into superkingdoms, of the same superkingdom into phyla, of the same phylum into genera, and of the same genus into species, respectively. We evaluated the performance of the PCAHIER by using our own simulated data sets as well as the widely used simHC synthetic metagenome data set from the IMG/M system. The effectiveness of the PCAHIER was demonstrated through comparisons against a non-hierarchical classifier, and two existing binning algorithms (TETRA and Phylopythia). PMID:21121023

  7. Non-coding RNAs in DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yunhua; Lu, Xiongbin

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide studies have revealed that human and other mammalian genomes are pervasively transcribed and produce thousands of regulatory non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), including miRNAs, siRNAs, piRNAs and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Emerging evidences suggest that these ncRNAs also play a pivotal role in genome integrity and stability via the regulation of DNA damage response (DDR). In this review, we discuss the recent finding on the interplay of ncRNAs with the canonical DDR signaling pathway, with a particular emphasis on miRNAs and lncRNAs. While the expression of ncRNAs is regulated in the DDR, the DDR is also subjected to regulation by those DNA damage-responsive ncRNAs. In addition, the roles of those Dicer- and Drosha-dependent small RNAs produced in the vicinity of double-strand breaks sites are also described. PMID:23226613

  8. Extra-coding RNAs regulate neuronal DNA methylation dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Savell, Katherine E.; Gallus, Nancy V. N.; Simon, Rhiana C.; Brown, Jordan A.; Revanna, Jasmin S.; Osborn, Mary Katherine; Song, Esther Y.; O'Malley, John J.; Stackhouse, Christian T.; Norvil, Allison; Gowher, Humaira; Sweatt, J. David; Day, Jeremy J.

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation are essential regulators of the function and information storage capacity of neurons. DNA methylation is highly dynamic in the developing and adult brain, and is actively regulated by neuronal activity and behavioural experiences. However, it is presently unclear how methylation status at individual genes is targeted for modification. Here, we report that extra-coding RNAs (ecRNAs) interact with DNA methyltransferases and regulate neuronal DNA methylation. Expression of ecRNA species is associated with gene promoter hypomethylation, is altered by neuronal activity, and is overrepresented at genes involved in neuronal function. Knockdown of the Fos ecRNA locus results in gene hypermethylation and mRNA silencing, and hippocampal expression of Fos ecRNA is required for long-term fear memory formation in rats. These results suggest that ecRNAs are fundamental regulators of DNA methylation patterns in neuronal systems, and reveal a promising avenue for therapeutic targeting in neuropsychiatric disease states. PMID:27384705

  9. Extra-coding RNAs regulate neuronal DNA methylation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Savell, Katherine E; Gallus, Nancy V N; Simon, Rhiana C; Brown, Jordan A; Revanna, Jasmin S; Osborn, Mary Katherine; Song, Esther Y; O'Malley, John J; Stackhouse, Christian T; Norvil, Allison; Gowher, Humaira; Sweatt, J David; Day, Jeremy J

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation are essential regulators of the function and information storage capacity of neurons. DNA methylation is highly dynamic in the developing and adult brain, and is actively regulated by neuronal activity and behavioural experiences. However, it is presently unclear how methylation status at individual genes is targeted for modification. Here, we report that extra-coding RNAs (ecRNAs) interact with DNA methyltransferases and regulate neuronal DNA methylation. Expression of ecRNA species is associated with gene promoter hypomethylation, is altered by neuronal activity, and is overrepresented at genes involved in neuronal function. Knockdown of the Fos ecRNA locus results in gene hypermethylation and mRNA silencing, and hippocampal expression of Fos ecRNA is required for long-term fear memory formation in rats. These results suggest that ecRNAs are fundamental regulators of DNA methylation patterns in neuronal systems, and reveal a promising avenue for therapeutic targeting in neuropsychiatric disease states. PMID:27384705

  10. DNA information: from digital code to analogue structure.

    PubMed

    Travers, A A; Muskhelishvili, G; Thompson, J M T

    2012-06-28

    The digital linear coding carried by the base pairs in the DNA double helix is now known to have an important component that acts by altering, along its length, the natural shape and stiffness of the molecule. In this way, one region of DNA is structurally distinguished from another, constituting an additional form of encoded information manifest in three-dimensional space. These shape and stiffness variations help in guiding and facilitating the DNA during its three-dimensional spatial interactions. Such interactions with itself allow communication between genes and enhanced wrapping and histone-octamer binding within the nucleosome core particle. Meanwhile, interactions with proteins can have a reduced entropic binding penalty owing to advantageous sequence-dependent bending anisotropy. Sequence periodicity within the DNA, giving a corresponding structural periodicity of shape and stiffness, also influences the supercoiling of the molecule, which, in turn, plays an important facilitating role. In effect, the super-helical density acts as an analogue regulatory mode in contrast to the more commonly acknowledged purely digital mode. Many of these ideas are still poorly understood, and represent a fundamental and outstanding biological question. This review gives an overview of very recent developments, and hopefully identifies promising future lines of enquiry. PMID:22615471

  11. Coding DNA repeated throughout intergenic regions of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome: Evolutionary footprints of RNA silencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyknons are non-random sequence patterns significantly repeated throughout non-coding genomic DNA that also appear at least once among genes. They are interesting because they portend an unforeseen connection between coding and non-coding DNA. Pyknons have only been discovered in the human genome,...

  12. Multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis of coding and non-coding DNA sequences through chaos-game representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Mayukha; Satish, B.; Srinivas, K.; Rao, P. Madhusudana; Manimaran, P.

    2015-10-01

    We propose a new approach combining the chaos game representation and the two dimensional multifractal detrended cross correlation analysis methods to examine multifractal behavior in power law cross correlation between any pair of nucleotide sequences of unequal lengths. In this work, we analyzed the characteristic behavior of coding and non-coding DNA sequences of eight prokaryotes. The results show the presence of strong multifractal nature between coding and non-coding sequences of all data sets. We found that this integrative approach helps us to consider complete DNA sequences for characterization, and further it may be useful for classification, clustering, identification of class affiliation of nucleotide sequences etc. with high precision.

  13. Validation of a DNA methylation HPV triage classifier in a screening sample.

    PubMed

    Lorincz, Attila T; Brentnall, Adam R; Scibior-Bentkowska, Dorota; Reuter, Caroline; Banwait, Rawinder; Cadman, Louise; Austin, Janet; Cuzick, Jack; Vasiljević, Natasa

    2016-06-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) DNA tests have excellent sensitivity for detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2 or higher (CIN2+). A drawback of hrHPV screening, however, is modest specificity. Therefore, hrHPV-positive women might need triage to reduce adverse events and costs associated with unnecessary colposcopy. We compared the performance of HPV16/18 genotyping with a predefined DNA methylation triage test (S5) based on target regions of the human gene EPB41L3, and viral late gene regions of HPV16, HPV18, HPV31 and HPV33. Assays were run using exfoliated cervical specimens from 710 women attending routine screening, of whom 38 were diagnosed with CIN2+ within a year after triage to colposcopy based on cytology and 341 were hrHPV positive. Sensitivity and specificity of the investigated triage methods were compared by McNemar's test. At the predefined cutoff, S5 showed better sensitivity than HPV16/18 genotyping (74% vs 54%, P = 0.04) in identifying CIN2+ in hrHPV-positive women, and similar specificity (65% vs 71%, P = 0.07). When the S5 cutoff was altered to allow equal sensitivity to that of genotyping, a significantly higher specificity of 91% was reached (P < 0.0001). Thus, a DNA methylation test for the triage of hrHPV-positive women on original screening specimens might be a valid approach with better performance than genotyping. PMID:26790008

  14. Validation of a DNA methylation HPV triage classifier in a screening sample

    PubMed Central

    Brentnall, Adam R.; Scibior‐Bentkowska, Dorota; Reuter, Caroline; Banwait, Rawinder; Cadman, Louise; Austin, Janet; Cuzick, Jack; Vasiljević, Natasa

    2016-01-01

    High‐risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) DNA tests have excellent sensitivity for detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2 or higher (CIN2+). A drawback of hrHPV screening, however, is modest specificity. Therefore, hrHPV‐positive women might need triage to reduce adverse events and costs associated with unnecessary colposcopy. We compared the performance of HPV16/18 genotyping with a predefined DNA methylation triage test (S5) based on target regions of the human gene EPB41L3, and viral late gene regions of HPV16, HPV18, HPV31 and HPV33. Assays were run using exfoliated cervical specimens from 710 women attending routine screening, of whom 38 were diagnosed with CIN2+ within a year after triage to colposcopy based on cytology and 341 were hrHPV positive. Sensitivity and specificity of the investigated triage methods were compared by McNemar's test. At the predefined cutoff, S5 showed better sensitivity than HPV16/18 genotyping (74% vs 54%, P = 0.04) in identifying CIN2+ in hrHPV‐positive women, and similar specificity (65% vs 71%, P = 0.07). When the S5 cutoff was altered to allow equal sensitivity to that of genotyping, a significantly higher specificity of 91% was reached (P < 0.0001). Thus, a DNA methylation test for the triage of hrHPV‐positive women on original screening specimens might be a valid approach with better performance than genotyping. PMID:26790008

  15. An Integrated Prognostic Classifier for Stage I Lung Adenocarcinoma based on mRNA, microRNA and DNA Methylation Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Ana I.; Arai, Eri; Mathé, Ewy A.; Okayama, Hirokazu; Schetter, Aaron J.; Brown, Derek; Petersen, David; Bowman, Elise D.; Noro, Rintaro; Welsh, Judith A.; Edelman, Daniel C.; Stevenson, Holly S.; Wang, Yonghong; Tsuchiya, Naoto; Kohno, Takashi; Skaug, Vidar; Mollerup, Steen; Haugen, Aage; Meltzer, Paul S.; Yokota, Jun; Kanai, Yae

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Up to 30% Stage I lung cancer patients suffer recurrence within 5 years of curative surgery. We sought to improve existing protein-coding gene and microRNA expression prognostic classifiers by incorporating epigenetic biomarkers. Methods Genome-wide screening of DNA methylation and pyrosequencing analysis of HOXA9 promoter methylation were performed in two independently collected cohorts of Stage I lung adenocarcinoma. The prognostic value of HOXA9 promoter methylation alone and in combination with mRNA and miRNA biomarkers was assessed by Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis in both cohorts. Results Promoters of genes marked by Polycomb in Embryonic Stem Cells were methylated de novo in tumors and identified patients with poor prognosis. The HOXA9 locus was methylated de novo in Stage I tumors (P < 0.0005). High HOXA9 promoter methylation was associated with worse cancer-specific survival (Hazard Ratio [HR], 2.6; P = 0.02) and recurrence-free survival (HR, 3.0; P = 0.01), and identified high-risk patients in stratified analysis of Stage IA and IB. Four protein-coding gene (XPO1, BRCA1, HIF1α, DLC1), miR-21 expression and HOXA9 promoter methylation were each independently associated with outcome (HR, 2.8; P = 0.002; HR, 2.3; P = 0.01; and HR, 2.4; P = 0.005, respectively), and, when combined, identified high-risk, therapy naïve, Stage I patients (HR, 10.2; P = 3x10−5). All associations were confirmed in two independently collected cohorts. Conclusion A prognostic classifier comprising three types of genomic and epigenomic data may help guide the postoperative management of Stage I lung cancer patients at high risk of recurrence. PMID:26134223

  16. Sequence analysis of a non-classified, non-occluded DNA virus that causes salivary gland hypertrophy of Musca domestica, MdSGHV

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Maruniak, Alejandra; Maruniak, James E.; Farmerie, William; Boucias, Drion G.

    2008-01-01

    The genome of the virus that causes salivary gland hypertrophy in Musca domestica (MdSGHV) was sequenced. This non-classified, enveloped, double stranded, circular DNA virus had a 124,279 bp genome. The G+C content was 43.5% with 108 putative methionine-initiated open reading frames (ORFs). Thirty ORFs had homology to database proteins: eleven to proteins coded by both baculoviruses and nudiviruses (p74, pif-1, pif-2, pif-3, odv-e66, rr1, rr2, iap, dUTPase, MMP, and Ac81-like), seven to nudiviruses (mcp, dhfr, ts, tk and three unknown proteins), one to baculovirus (Ac150-like), one to herpesvirus (dna pol), and ten to cellular proteins. Mass spectrum analysis of the viral particles’ protein components identified 29 structural ORFs, with only p74 and odv-e66 previously characterized as baculovirus structural proteins. Although most of the homology observed was to nudiviruses, phylogenetic analysis showed that MdSGHV was not closely related to them or to the baculoviruses. PMID:18495197

  17. Yeast phenotype classifies mammalian protein kinase C cDNA mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, H; Su, L; Hansen, H

    1993-01-01

    The phorbol ester receptor protein kinase C (PKC) gene family encodes essential mediators of eukaryotic cellular signals. Molecular dissection of their mechanisms of action has been limited in part by the lack of random mutagenesis approaches and by the complexity of signaling pathways in mammalian cells which involve multiple PKC isoforms. Here we present a rapid screen which permits the quantification of mammalian PKC activity phenotypically in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Bovine PKC alpha cDNA is functionally expressed in S. cerevisiae. This results in a phorbol ester response: a fourfold increase in the cell doubling time and a substantial decrease in yeast colony size on agar plates. We have expressed pools of bovine PKC alpha cDNAs mutagenized by Bal 31 deletion of internal, amino-terminal, or carboxyl-terminal sequences and have identified three classes of mutants on the basis of their distinct yeast phenotypes. Representatives of each class were analyzed. An internal deletion of amino acids (aa) 172 to 225 displayed ligand-dependent but reduced catalytic activity, an amino-terminal truncation of aa 1 to 153 displayed elevated and ligand-independent activity, and a carboxyl-terminal 26-aa truncation (aa 647 to 672) lacked activity under any conditions. Additional mutations confirmed the distinct functional characteristics of these classes. Our data show that deletion of the V1 and C1 regions results in elevated basal catalytic activity which is still Ca2+ responsive. Internal deletions in the V2 and C2 regions do not abolish phorbol ester or Ca2+ regulation of PKC activity, suggesting that most of the C2 domain is not essential for phorbol ester stimulation and most of the regulatory domain is dispensable for Ca2+ regulation of PKC activity. These distinct activities od the PKC mutants correlate with a specific and proportional yeast phenotype and are quantified on agar plates by yeast colony size. This provides a phenotypic screen which is suitable

  18. The most frequent short sequences in non-coding DNA.

    PubMed

    Subirana, Juan A; Messeguer, Xavier

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine the most frequent short sequences in non-coding DNA. They may play a role in maintaining the structure and function of eukaryotic chromosomes. We present a simple method for the detection and analysis of such sequences in several genomes, including Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster and Homo sapiens. We also study two chromosomes of man and mouse with a length similar to the whole genomes of the other species. We provide a list of the most common sequences of 9-14 bases in each genome. As expected, they are present in human Alu sequences. Our programs may also give a graph and a list of their position in the genome. Detection of clusters is also possible. In most cases, these sequences contain few alternating regions. Their intrinsic structure and their influence on nucleosome formation are not known. In particular, we have found new features of short sequences in C. elegans, which are distributed in heterogeneous clusters. They appear as punctuation marks in the chromosomes. Such clusters are not found in either A. thaliana or D. melanogaster. We discuss the possibility that they play a role in centromere function and homolog recognition in meiosis. PMID:19966278

  19. [Comparison study on the methods for finding borders between coding and non-coding DNA regions in rice].

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi-Gang; Gao, Lei; Zhang, Zhong-Hua; Xue, Qing-Zhong

    2005-07-01

    Entropy-based divergence measures have provided an impelling tool in evaluating sequence complexity, predicting CpG island, and detecting borders between coding and non-coding DNA regions etc. In this paper, two new divergence measures: the alpha-KL divergence and the alpha-Jensen-Shannon divergence were defined and a coarse-graining vector of amino acids- corresponding codons was proposed according to codons GC-content, in order to improve the computational approach to finding borders between coding and non-coding in rice. A comparison of the accuracies gained by different vectors (the Jensen-Shannon divergence, the Jensen-Renyi divergence, the alpha-KL divergence and the alpha-Jensen -Shannon divergence) showed that recognition efficiency based on the new information measures with the vector coarse-graining increase by 4-5 times than that of Bernaola's method in the 'stop codon' of coding regions in rice. PMID:16120591

  20. What Information is Stored in DNA: Does it Contain Digital Error Correcting Codes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebovitch, Larry

    1998-03-01

    The longest term correlations in living systems are the information stored in DNA which reflects the evolutionary history of an organism. The 4 bases (A,T,G,C) encode sequences of amino acids as well as locations of binding sites for proteins that regulate DNA. The fidelity of this important information is maintained by ANALOG error check mechanisms. When a single strand of DNA is replicated the complementary base is inserted in the new strand. Sometimes the wrong base is inserted that sticks out disrupting the phosphate backbone. The new base is not yet methylated, so repair enzymes, that slide along the DNA, can tear out the wrong base and replace it with the right one. The bases in DNA form a sequence of 4 different symbols and so the information is encoded in a DIGITAL form. All the digital codes in our society (ISBN book numbers, UPC product codes, bank account numbers, airline ticket numbers) use error checking code, where some digits are functions of other digits to maintain the fidelity of transmitted informaiton. Does DNA also utitlize a DIGITAL error chekcing code to maintain the fidelity of its information and increase the accuracy of replication? That is, are some bases in DNA functions of other bases upstream or downstream? This raises the interesting mathematical problem: How does one determine whether some symbols in a sequence of symbols are a function of other symbols. It also bears on the issue of determining algorithmic complexity: What is the function that generates the shortest algorithm for reproducing the symbol sequence. The error checking codes most used in our technology are linear block codes. We developed an efficient method to test for the presence of such codes in DNA. We coded the 4 bases as (0,1,2,3) and used Gaussian elimination, modified for modulus 4, to test if some bases are linear combinations of other bases. We used this method to analyze the base sequence in the genes from the lac operon and cytochrome C. We did not find

  1. Stochastic model of homogeneous coding and latent periodicity in DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Chaley, Maria; Kutyrkin, Vladimir

    2016-02-01

    The concept of latent triplet periodicity in coding DNA sequences which has been earlier extensively discussed is confirmed in the result of analysis of a number of eukaryotic genomes, where latent periodicity of a new type, called profile periodicity, is recognized in the CDSs. Original model of Stochastic Homogeneous Organization of Coding (SHOC-model) in textual string is proposed. This model explains the existence of latent profile periodicity and regularity in DNA sequences. PMID:26656186

  2. Sequences encoding identical peptides for the analysis and manipulation of coding DNA

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Joaquín

    2013-01-01

    The use of sequences encoding identical peptides (SEIP) for the in silico analysis of coding DNA from different species has not been reported; the study of such sequences could directly reveal properties of coding DNA that are independent of peptide sequences. For practical purposes SEIP might also be manipulated for e.g. heterologous protein expression. We extracted 1,551 SEIP from human and E. coli and 2,631 SEIP from human and D. melanogaster. We then analyzed codon usage and intercodon dinucleotide tendencies and found differences in both, with more conspicuous disparities between human and E. coli than between human and D. melanogaster. We also briefly manipulated SEIP to find out if they could be used to create new coding sequences. We hence attempted replacement of human by E. coli codons via dicodon exchange but found that full replacement was not possible, this indicated robust species-specific dicodon tendencies. To test another form of codon replacement we isolated SEIP from human and the jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) and we then re-constructed the GFP coding DNA with human tetra-peptide-coding sequences. Results provide proof-of-principle that SEIP may be used to reveal differences in the properties of coding DNA and to reconstruct in pieces a protein coding DNA with sequences from a different organism, the latter might be exploited in heterologous protein expression. PMID:23861567

  3. Sequences encoding identical peptides for the analysis and manipulation of coding DNA.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Joaquín

    2013-01-01

    The use of sequences encoding identical peptides (SEIP) for the in silico analysis of coding DNA from different species has not been reported; the study of such sequences could directly reveal properties of coding DNA that are independent of peptide sequences. For practical purposes SEIP might also be manipulated for e.g. heterologous protein expression. We extracted 1,551 SEIP from human and E. coli and 2,631 SEIP from human and D. melanogaster. We then analyzed codon usage and intercodon dinucleotide tendencies and found differences in both, with more conspicuous disparities between human and E. coli than between human and D. melanogaster. We also briefly manipulated SEIP to find out if they could be used to create new coding sequences. We hence attempted replacement of human by E. coli codons via dicodon exchange but found that full replacement was not possible, this indicated robust species-specific dicodon tendencies. To test another form of codon replacement we isolated SEIP from human and the jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) and we then re-constructed the GFP coding DNA with human tetra-peptide-coding sequences. Results provide proof-of-principle that SEIP may be used to reveal differences in the properties of coding DNA and to reconstruct in pieces a protein coding DNA with sequences from a different organism, the latter might be exploited in heterologous protein expression. PMID:23861567

  4. An improved Huffman coding method for archiving text, images, and music characters in DNA.

    PubMed

    Ailenberg, Menachem; Rotstein, Ori

    2009-09-01

    An improved Huffman coding method for information storage in DNA is described. The method entails the utilization of modified unambiguous base assignment that enables efficient coding of characters. A plasmid-based library with efficient and reliable information retrieval and assembly with uniquely designed primers is described. We illustrate our approach by synthesis of DNA that encodes text, images, and music, which could easily be retrieved by DNA sequencing using the specific primers. The method is simple and lends itself to automated information retrieval. PMID:19852760

  5. Is there an error correcting code in the base sequence in DNA?

    PubMed Central

    Liebovitch, L S; Tao, Y; Todorov, A T; Levine, L

    1996-01-01

    Modern methods of encoding information into digital form include error check digits that are functions of the other information digits. When digital information is transmitted, the values of the error check digits can be computed from the information digits to determine whether the information has been received accurately. These error correcting codes make it possible to detect and correct common errors in transmission. The sequence of bases in DNA is also a digital code consisting of four symbols: A, C, G, and T. Does DNA also contain an error correcting code? Such a code would allow repair enzymes to protect the fidelity of nonreplicating DNA and increase the accuracy of replication. If a linear block error correcting code is present in DNA then some bases would be a linear function of the other bases in each set of bases. We developed an efficient procedure to determine whether such an error correcting code is present in the base sequence. We illustrate the use of this procedure by using it to analyze the lac operon and the gene for cytochrome c. These genes do not appear to contain such a simple error correcting code. PMID:8874027

  6. Palindromic repetitive DNA elements with coding potential in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii.

    PubMed

    Suyama, Mikita; Lathe, Warren C; Bork, Peer

    2005-10-10

    We have identified 141 novel palindromic repetitive elements in the genome of euryarchaeon Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. The total length of these elements is 14.3kb, which corresponds to 0.9% of the total genomic sequence and 6.3% of all extragenic regions. The elements can be divided into three groups (MJRE1-3) based on the sequence similarity. The low sequence identity within each of the groups suggests rather old origin of these elements in M. jannaschii. Three MJRE2 elements were located within the protein coding regions without disrupting the coding potential of the host genes, indicating that insertion of repeats might be a widespread mechanism to enhance sequence diversity in coding regions. PMID:16182294

  7. TOWARDS A PROBABILISTIC RECOGNITION CODE FOR PROTEIN-DNA INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    P. BENOS; ET AL

    2000-09-01

    We are investigating the rules that govern protein-DNA interactions, using a statistical mechanics based formalism that is related to the Boltzmann Machine of the neural net literature. Our approach is data-driven, in which probabilistic algorithms are used to model protein-DNA interactions, given SELEX and phage data as input. Under the ''one-to-one'' model for interactions (i.e. one amino acid contacts one base), we can successfully identify the wild-type binding sites of EGR and MIG protein families. The predictions using our method are the same or better than that of methods existing in the literature, however our methodology offers the potential to capitalize in quantitative detail on more data as it becomes available.

  8. Functional characterization and inhibition of the type II DNA topoisomerase coded by African swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Coelho, João; Ferreira, Fernando; Martins, Carlos; Leitão, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    DNA topoisomerases are essential for DNA metabolism and while their role is well studied in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, it is less known for virally-encoded topoisomerases. African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA virus that infects Ornithodoros ticks and all members of the family Suidae, representing a global threat for pig husbandry with no effective vaccine nor treatment. It was recently demonstrated that ASFV codes for a type II topoisomerase, highlighting a possible target for control of the virus. In this work, the ASFV DNA topoisomerase II was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and found to efficiently decatenate kDNA and to processively relax supercoiled DNA. Optimal conditions for its activity were determined and its sensitivity to a panel of topoisomerase poisons and inhibitors was evaluated. Overall, our results provide new knowledge on viral topoisomerases and on ASFV, as well as a possible target for the control of this virus. PMID:27060564

  9. A novel Lie algebra of the genetic code over the Galois field of four DNA bases.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Robersy; Grau, Ricardo; Morgado, Eberto

    2006-07-01

    Starting from the four DNA bases order in the Boolean lattice, a novel Lie Algebra of the genetic code is proposed. Here, the main partitions of the genetic code table were obtained as equivalent classes of quotient spaces of the genetic code vector space over the Galois field of the four DNA bases. The new algebraic structure shows strong connections among algebraic relationships, codon assignments and physicochemical properties of amino acids. Moreover, a distance defined between codons expresses a physicochemical meaning. It was also noticed that the distance between wild type and mutant codons tends to be small in mutational variants of four genes: human phenylalanine hydroxylase, human beta-globin, HIV-1 protease and HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. These results strongly suggest that deterministic rules in genetic code origin must be involved. PMID:16780898

  10. Peculiar symmetry of DNA sequences and evidence suggesting its evolutionary origin in a primeval genetic code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, R.; Rothen, F.

    2001-08-01

    Statistical analysis of the distribution of codons in DNA coding sequences of bacteria or archaea suggests that, at some stage of the prebiotic world, the most successful RNA replicating sequences afforded some tendency toward a weak form of palindromic symmetry, namely complementary symmetry. As a consequence, as soon as the machinery allowing translation into proteins was beginning to settle, we assume that primeval versions of the genetic code essentially consisted of pairs of sense-antisense codons. Present-day DNA sequences display footprints of this early symmetry, provided that statistics are made over coding sequences issued from groups of organisms and not only from the genome of an individual species. These fossil traces are proven to be significant from the statistical point of view. They shed some light onto the possible evolution of the genetic code and set some constraints on the way it had to follow.

  11. Differential DNA methylation profiles of coding and non-coding genes define hippocampal sclerosis in human temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Miller-Delaney, Suzanne F.C.; Bryan, Kenneth; Das, Sudipto; McKiernan, Ross C.; Bray, Isabella M.; Reynolds, James P.; Gwinn, Ryder; Stallings, Raymond L.

    2015-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with large-scale, wide-ranging changes in gene expression in the hippocampus. Epigenetic changes to DNA are attractive mechanisms to explain the sustained hyperexcitability of chronic epilepsy. Here, through methylation analysis of all annotated C-phosphate-G islands and promoter regions in the human genome, we report a pilot study of the methylation profiles of temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis. Furthermore, by comparative analysis of expression and promoter methylation, we identify methylation sensitive non-coding RNA in human temporal lobe epilepsy. A total of 146 protein-coding genes exhibited altered DNA methylation in temporal lobe epilepsy hippocampus (n = 9) when compared to control (n = 5), with 81.5% of the promoters of these genes displaying hypermethylation. Unique methylation profiles were evident in temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis, in addition to a common methylation profile regardless of pathology grade. Gene ontology terms associated with development, neuron remodelling and neuron maturation were over-represented in the methylation profile of Watson Grade 1 samples (mild hippocampal sclerosis). In addition to genes associated with neuronal, neurotransmitter/synaptic transmission and cell death functions, differential hypermethylation of genes associated with transcriptional regulation was evident in temporal lobe epilepsy, but overall few genes previously associated with epilepsy were among the differentially methylated. Finally, a panel of 13, methylation-sensitive microRNA were identified in temporal lobe epilepsy including MIR27A, miR-193a-5p (MIR193A) and miR-876-3p (MIR876), and the differential methylation of long non-coding RNA documented for the first time. The present study therefore reports select, genome-wide DNA methylation changes in human temporal lobe epilepsy that may contribute to the molecular architecture of the epileptic brain. PMID

  12. Non-Coding RNA: Sequence-Specific Guide for Chromatin Modification and DNA Damage Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Francia, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin conformation shapes the environment in which our genome is transcribed into RNA. Transcription is a source of DNA damage, thus it often occurs concomitantly to DNA damage signaling. Growing amounts of evidence suggest that different types of RNAs can, independently from their protein-coding properties, directly affect chromatin conformation, transcription and splicing, as well as promote the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA repair. Therefore, transcription paradoxically functions to both threaten and safeguard genome integrity. On the other hand, DNA damage signaling is known to modulate chromatin to suppress transcription of the surrounding genetic unit. It is thus intriguing to understand how transcription can modulate DDR signaling while, in turn, DDR signaling represses transcription of chromatin around the DNA lesion. An unexpected player in this field is the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery, which play roles in transcription, splicing and chromatin modulation in several organisms. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and several protein factors involved in the RNAi pathway are well known master regulators of chromatin while only recent reports show their involvement in DDR. Here, we discuss the experimental evidence supporting the idea that ncRNAs act at the genomic loci from which they are transcribed to modulate chromatin, DDR signaling and DNA repair. PMID:26617633

  13. DNA methylation patterns of protein-coding genes and long non-coding RNAs in males with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    LIAO, QI; WANG, YUNLIANG; CHENG, JIA; DAI, DONGJUN; ZHOU, XINGYU; ZHANG, YUZHENG; LI, JINFENG; YIN, HONGLEI; GAO, SHUGUI; DUAN, SHIWEI

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is one of the most complex mental illnesses affecting ~1% of the population worldwide. SCZ pathogenesis is considered to be a result of genetic as well as epigenetic alterations. Previous studies have aimed to identify the causative genes of SCZ. However, DNA methylation of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) involved in SCZ has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, a comprehensive genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation was conducted using samples from two male patients with paranoid and undifferentiated SCZ, respectively. Methyl-CpG binding domain protein-enriched genome sequencing was used. In the two patients with paranoid and undifferentiated SCZ, 1,397 and 1,437 peaks were identified, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that peaks were enriched in protein-coding genes, which exhibited nervous system and brain functions. A number of these peaks in gene promoter regions may affect gene expression and, therefore, influence SCZ-associated pathways. Furthermore, 7 and 20 lncRNAs, respectively, in the Refseq database were hypermethylated. According to the lncRNA dataset in the NONCODE database, ~30% of intergenic peaks overlapped with novel lncRNA loci. The results of the present study demonstrated that aberrant hypermethylation of lncRNA genes may be an important epigenetic factor associated with SCZ. However, further studies using larger sample sizes are required. PMID:26503909

  14. A Molecular Bar-Coded DNA Repair Resource for Pooled Toxicogenomic Screens

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, John P.; Patil, Ashish; Zappala, Maria R.; Conklin, Douglas S.; Cunningham, Richard P.; Begley, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    DNA damage from exogenous and endogenous sources can promote mutations and cell death. Fortunately, cells contain DNA repair and damage signalling pathways to reduce the mutagenic and cytotoxic effects of DNA damage. The identification of specific DNA repair proteins and the coordination of DNA repair pathways after damage has been a central theme to the field of Genetic Toxicology and we have developed a tool for use in this area. We have produced 99 molecular bar-coded Escherichia coli gene-deletion mutants specific to DNA repair and damage signalling pathways, and each bar-coded mutant can be tracked in pooled format using bar-code specific microarrays. Our design adapted bar-codes developed for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gene Deletion Project, which allowed us to utilize an available microarray product for pooled gene-exposure studies. Microarray-based screens were used for en masse identification of individual mutants sensitive to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). As expected, gene deletion mutants specific to direct, base excision, and recombinational DNA repair pathways were identified as MMS-sensitive in our pooled assay, thus validating our resource. We have demonstrated that molecular bar-codes designed for S. cerevisiae are transferable to E. coli, and that they can be used with pre-existing microarrays to perform competitive growth experiments. Further, when comparing microarray to traditional plate-based screens both over-lapping and distinct results were obtained, which is a novel technical finding, with discrepancies between the two approaches explained by differences in output measurements (DNA content verse cell mass). The microarray-based classification of Δtag and ΔdinG cells as depleted after MMS exposure, contrary to plate-based methods, led to the discovery that Δtag and ΔdinG cells show a filamentation phenotype after MMS exposure, thus accounting for the discrepancy. A novel biological finding is the observation that while ΔdinG cells

  15. Systematic analysis of coding and noncoding DNA sequences using methods of statistical linguistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantegna, R. N.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Peng, C. K.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1995-01-01

    We compare the statistical properties of coding and noncoding regions in eukaryotic and viral DNA sequences by adapting two tests developed for the analysis of natural languages and symbolic sequences. The data set comprises all 30 sequences of length above 50 000 base pairs in GenBank Release No. 81.0, as well as the recently published sequences of C. elegans chromosome III (2.2 Mbp) and yeast chromosome XI (661 Kbp). We find that for the three chromosomes we studied the statistical properties of noncoding regions appear to be closer to those observed in natural languages than those of coding regions. In particular, (i) a n-tuple Zipf analysis of noncoding regions reveals a regime close to power-law behavior while the coding regions show logarithmic behavior over a wide interval, while (ii) an n-gram entropy measurement shows that the noncoding regions have a lower n-gram entropy (and hence a larger "n-gram redundancy") than the coding regions. In contrast to the three chromosomes, we find that for vertebrates such as primates and rodents and for viral DNA, the difference between the statistical properties of coding and noncoding regions is not pronounced and therefore the results of the analyses of the investigated sequences are less conclusive. After noting the intrinsic limitations of the n-gram redundancy analysis, we also briefly discuss the failure of the zeroth- and first-order Markovian models or simple nucleotide repeats to account fully for these "linguistic" features of DNA. Finally, we emphasize that our results by no means prove the existence of a "language" in noncoding DNA.

  16. Differentiating the Protein Coding and Noncoding RNA Segments of DNA Using Shannon Entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaheri, P.; Shirazi, A. H.; Saeedi, N.; Reza Jafari, G.; Sahimi, Muhammad

    The complexity of DNA sequences is evaluated in order to differentiate between protein-coding and noncoding RNA segments. The method is based on computing the Shannon entropy of the sequences. By comparing the entropy of the original sequence with that of its shuffled one, we identify the source of the difference between the two segments and their relative contributions to the sequence. To demonstrate the method, the DNA sequences of the bacterium Clostridium difficile 630 (G + C = 29.1%) and Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus (G + C = 50.6%) are analyzed, which are representatives of bacteria with unbalanced and balanced nucleotide content, respectively. It is shown that in both bacteria, regardless of nucleotide content, ΔrS — the relative difference of the two entropies — is significantly greater in protein-coding regions, when compared with noncoding RNA segments.

  17. Non-coding chloroplast DNA for plant molecular systematics at the infrageneric level.

    PubMed

    Böhle, U R; Hilger, H; Cerff, R; Martin, W F

    1994-01-01

    With primers constructed against highly conserved regions of tRNA genes (trnTUGU, trnLUAA and trnFGAA) in chloroplast DNA, we have amplified two different non-coding spacers and one intron from four species within the genus Echium L. (Boraginaceae) and from two confamilial outgroups. The trnTUGU-trnLUAA intergenic spacer contains a greater number of polymorphic sites than the trnLUAA intron or the trnLUAA-trnFGAA intergenic spacer. We analyzed a total of 11 kb of sequence data from this non-coding DNA. Total nucleotide divergence between Echium species is on the order of 1% for these regions, all of which possess infrageneric length polymorphisms. The latter two regions contain indels which occur only in the 14 Macaronesian Island endemic species of Echium studied and suggest that these may form a monophyletic group. PMID:7994117

  18. Junk DNA and the long non-coding RNA twist in cancer genetics

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Hui; Vincent, Kimberly; Pichler, Martin; Fodde, Riccardo; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Slack, Frank J.; Calin, George A

    2015-01-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology states that the flow of genetic information moves from DNA to RNA to protein. However, in the last decade this dogma has been challenged by new findings on non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) such as microRNAs (miRNAs). More recently, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have attracted much attention due to their large number and biological significance. Many lncRNAs have been identified as mapping to regulatory elements including gene promoters and enhancers, ultraconserved regions, and intergenic regions of protein-coding genes. Yet, the biological function and molecular mechanisms of lncRNA in human diseases in general and cancer in particular remain largely unknown. Data from the literature suggest that lncRNA, often via interaction with proteins, functions in specific genomic loci or use their own transcription loci for regulatory activity. In this review, we summarize recent findings supporting the importance of DNA loci in lncRNA function, and the underlying molecular mechanisms via cis or trans regulation, and discuss their implications in cancer. In addition, we use the 8q24 genomic locus, a region containing interactive SNPs, DNA regulatory elements and lncRNAs, as an example to illustrate how single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located within lncRNAs may be functionally associated with the individual’s susceptibility to cancer. PMID:25619839

  19. Junk DNA and the long non-coding RNA twist in cancer genetics.

    PubMed

    Ling, H; Vincent, K; Pichler, M; Fodde, R; Berindan-Neagoe, I; Slack, F J; Calin, G A

    2015-09-24

    The central dogma of molecular biology states that the flow of genetic information moves from DNA to RNA to protein. However, in the last decade this dogma has been challenged by new findings on non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) such as microRNAs (miRNAs). More recently, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have attracted much attention due to their large number and biological significance. Many lncRNAs have been identified as mapping to regulatory elements including gene promoters and enhancers, ultraconserved regions and intergenic regions of protein-coding genes. Yet, the biological function and molecular mechanisms of lncRNA in human diseases in general and cancer in particular remain largely unknown. Data from the literature suggest that lncRNA, often via interaction with proteins, functions in specific genomic loci or use their own transcription loci for regulatory activity. In this review, we summarize recent findings supporting the importance of DNA loci in lncRNA function and the underlying molecular mechanisms via cis or trans regulation, and discuss their implications in cancer. In addition, we use the 8q24 genomic locus, a region containing interactive SNPs, DNA regulatory elements and lncRNAs, as an example to illustrate how single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located within lncRNAs may be functionally associated with the individual's susceptibility to cancer. PMID:25619839

  20. A molecular code dictates sequence-specific DNA recognition by homeodomains.

    PubMed Central

    Damante, G; Pellizzari, L; Esposito, G; Fogolari, F; Viglino, P; Fabbro, D; Tell, G; Formisano, S; Di Lauro, R

    1996-01-01

    Most homeodomains bind to DNA sequences containing the motif 5'-TAAT-3'. The homeodomain of thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1HD) binds to sequences containing a 5'-CAAG-3' core motif, delineating a new mechanism for differential DNA recognition by homeodomains. We investigated the molecular basis of the DNA binding specificity of TTF-1HD by both structural and functional approaches. As already suggested by the three-dimensional structure of TTF-1HD, the DNA binding specificities of the TTF-1, Antennapedia and Engrailed homeodomains, either wild-type or mutants, indicated that the amino acid residue in position 54 is involved in the recognition of the nucleotide at the 3' end of the core motif 5'-NAAN-3'. The nucleotide at the 5' position of this core sequence is recognized by the amino acids located in position 6, 7 and 8 of the TTF-1 and Antennapedia homeodomains. These data, together with previous suggestions on the role of amino acids in position 50, indicate that the DNA binding specificity of homeodomains can be determined by a combinatorial molecular code. We also show that some specific combinations of the key amino acid residues involved in DNA recognition do not follow a simple, additive rule. Images PMID:8890172

  1. HyDEn: a hybrid steganocryptographic approach for data encryption using randomized error-correcting DNA codes.

    PubMed

    Tulpan, Dan; Regoui, Chaouki; Durand, Guillaume; Belliveau, Luc; Léger, Serge

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel hybrid DNA encryption (HyDEn) approach that uses randomized assignments of unique error-correcting DNA Hamming code words for single characters in the extended ASCII set. HyDEn relies on custom-built quaternary codes and a private key used in the randomized assignment of code words and the cyclic permutations applied on the encoded message. Along with its ability to detect and correct errors, HyDEn equals or outperforms existing cryptographic methods and represents a promising in silico DNA steganographic approach. PMID:23984392

  2. HyDEn: A Hybrid Steganocryptographic Approach for Data Encryption Using Randomized Error-Correcting DNA Codes

    PubMed Central

    Regoui, Chaouki; Durand, Guillaume; Belliveau, Luc; Léger, Serge

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel hybrid DNA encryption (HyDEn) approach that uses randomized assignments of unique error-correcting DNA Hamming code words for single characters in the extended ASCII set. HyDEn relies on custom-built quaternary codes and a private key used in the randomized assignment of code words and the cyclic permutations applied on the encoded message. Along with its ability to detect and correct errors, HyDEn equals or outperforms existing cryptographic methods and represents a promising in silico DNA steganographic approach. PMID:23984392

  3. Estimation of correlations between copy-number variants in non-coding DNA.

    PubMed

    Stamoulis, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Allelic DNA aberrations across our genome have been associated with normal human genetic heterogeneity as well as with a number of diseases and disorders. When copy-number variations (CNVs) occur in gene-coding regions, known relationships between genes may help us understand correlations between CNVs. However, a large number of these aberrations occur in non-coding, extragenic regions and their correlations may be characterized only quantitatively, e.g., probabilistically, but not functionally. Using a signal processing approach to CNV detection, we identified distributed CNVs in short, non-coding regions across chromosomes and investigated their potential correlations. We estimated predominantly local correlations between CNVs within the same chromosome, and a small number of apparently random long-distance correlations. PMID:22255599

  4. Classifying Microorganisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Leyva, Kathryn J.; Lang, Michael; Goodmanis, Ben

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on an activity in which students sample air at school and generate ideas about how to classify the microorganisms they observe. The results are used to compare air quality among schools via the Internet. Supports the development of scientific inquiry and technology skills. (DDR)

  5. Long-range correlation properties of coding and noncoding DNA sequences: GenBank analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Mantegna, R. N.; Matsa, M. E.; Peng, C. K.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1995-01-01

    An open question in computational molecular biology is whether long-range correlations are present in both coding and noncoding DNA or only in the latter. To answer this question, we consider all 33301 coding and all 29453 noncoding eukaryotic sequences--each of length larger than 512 base pairs (bp)--in the present release of the GenBank to dtermine whether there is any statistically significant distinction in their long-range correlation properties. Standard fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis indicates that coding sequences have practically no correlations in the range from 10 bp to 100 bp (spectral exponent beta=0.00 +/- 0.04, where the uncertainty is two standard deviations). In contrast, for noncoding sequences, the average value of the spectral exponent beta is positive (0.16 +/- 0.05) which unambiguously shows the presence of long-range correlations. We also separately analyze the 874 coding and the 1157 noncoding sequences that have more than 4096 bp and find a larger region of power-law behavior. We calculate the probability that these two data sets (coding and noncoding) were drawn from the same distribution and we find that it is less than 10(-10). We obtain independent confirmation of these findings using the method of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), which is designed to treat sequences with statistical heterogeneity, such as DNA's known mosaic structure ("patchiness") arising from the nonstationarity of nucleotide concentration. The near-perfect agreement between the two independent analysis methods, FFT and DFA, increases the confidence in the reliability of our conclusion.

  6. DNA strand breaks induced by electrons simulated with Nanodosimetry Monte Carlo Simulation Code: NASIC.

    PubMed

    Li, Junli; Li, Chunyan; Qiu, Rui; Yan, Congchong; Xie, Wenzhang; Wu, Zhen; Zeng, Zhi; Tung, Chuanjong

    2015-09-01

    The method of Monte Carlo simulation is a powerful tool to investigate the details of radiation biological damage at the molecular level. In this paper, a Monte Carlo code called NASIC (Nanodosimetry Monte Carlo Simulation Code) was developed. It includes physical module, pre-chemical module, chemical module, geometric module and DNA damage module. The physical module can simulate physical tracks of low-energy electrons in the liquid water event-by-event. More than one set of inelastic cross sections were calculated by applying the dielectric function method of Emfietzoglou's optical-data treatments, with different optical data sets and dispersion models. In the pre-chemical module, the ionised and excited water molecules undergo dissociation processes. In the chemical module, the produced radiolytic chemical species diffuse and react. In the geometric module, an atomic model of 46 chromatin fibres in a spherical nucleus of human lymphocyte was established. In the DNA damage module, the direct damages induced by the energy depositions of the electrons and the indirect damages induced by the radiolytic chemical species were calculated. The parameters should be adjusted to make the simulation results be agreed with the experimental results. In this paper, the influence study of the inelastic cross sections and vibrational excitation reaction on the parameters and the DNA strand break yields were studied. Further work of NASIC is underway. PMID:25883312

  7. DNA bar coding and pyrosequencing to identify rare HIV drug resistance mutations.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Christian; Minkah, Nana; Leipzig, Jeremy; Wang, Gary; Arens, Max Q; Tebas, Pablo; Bushman, Frederic D

    2007-01-01

    Treatment of HIV-infected individuals with antiretroviral agents selects for drug-resistant mutants, resulting in frequent treatment failures. Although the major antiretroviral resistance mutations are routinely characterized by DNA sequencing, treatment failures are still common, probably in part because undetected rare resistance mutations facilitate viral escape. Here we combined DNA bar coding and massively parallel pyrosequencing to quantify rare drug resistance mutations. Using DNA bar coding, we were able to analyze seven viral populations in parallel, overall characterizing 118 093 sequence reads of average length 103 bp. Analysis of a control HIV mixture showed that resistance mutations present as 5% of the population could be readily detected without false positive calls. In three samples of multidrug-resistant HIV populations from patients, all the drug-resistant mutations called by conventional analysis were identified, as well as four additional low abundance drug resistance mutations, some of which would be expected to influence the response to antiretroviral therapy. Methods for sensitive characterization of HIV resistance alleles have been reported, but only the pyrosequencing method allows all the positions at risk for drug resistance mutations to be interrogated deeply for many HIV populations in a single experiment. PMID:17576693

  8. Comparative Sequence Analysis of the Non-Protein-Coding Mitochondrial DNA of Inbred Rat Strains

    PubMed Central

    Abhyankar, Avinash; Park, Hee-Bok; Tonolo, Giancarlo; Luthman, Holger

    2009-01-01

    The proper function of mammalian mitochondria necessitates a coordinated expression of both nuclear and mitochondrial genes, most likely due to the co-evolution of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. The non-protein coding regions of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) including the D-loop, tRNA and rRNA genes form a major component of this regulated expression unit. Here we present comparative analyses of the non-protein-coding regions from 27 Rattus norvegicus mtDNA sequences. There were two variable positions in 12S rRNA, 20 in 16S rRNA, eight within the tRNA genes and 13 in the D-loop. Only one of the three neutrality tests used demonstrated statistically significant evidence for selection in 16S rRNA and tRNA-Cys. Based on our analyses of conserved sequences, we propose that some of the variable nucleotide positions identified in 16S rRNA and tRNA-Cys, and the D-loop might be important for mitochondrial function and its regulation. PMID:19997590

  9. DANIO-CODE: Toward an Encyclopedia of DNA Elements in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The zebrafish has emerged as a model organism for genomics studies. The symposium “Toward an encyclopedia of DNA elements in zebrafish” held in London in December 2014, was coorganized by Ferenc Müller and Fiona Wardle. This meeting is a follow-up of a similar previous workshop held 2 years earlier and represents a push toward the formalization of a community effort to annotate functional elements in the zebrafish genome. The meeting brought together zebrafish researchers, bioinformaticians, as well as members of established consortia, to exchange scientific findings and experience, as well as to discuss the initial steps toward the formation of a DANIO-CODE consortium. In this study, we provide the latest updates on the current progress of the consortium's efforts, opening up a broad invitation to researchers to join in and contribute to DANIO-CODE. PMID:26671609

  10. Resetting the histone code at CDKN2A in HNSCC by inhibition of DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Coombes, Madelene M; Briggs, Katrina L; Bone, James R; Clayman, Gary L; El-Naggar, Adel K; Dent, Sharon Y R

    2003-12-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the fifth most frequent cancer in the US. Several genetic and epigenetic alterations are associated with HNSCC tumorigenesis, including inactivation of CDKN2A, which encodes the p16 tumor suppressor, in cell lines and primary tumors by DNA methylation. Reactivation of tumor suppressor genes by DNA-demethylating agents and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors shows therapeutic promise for other cancers. Therefore, we investigated the ability of these agents to reactivate p16 in Tu159 HNSCC cells. Treatment of cells with 5-aza-2'deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) increases CDKN2A expression and slightly increases histone H3 acetylation at this gene. No reactivation of CDKN2A is observed upon treatment with the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA), but synergistic reactivation of CDKN2A is observed upon sequential treatment of Tu159 cells with both 5-aza-dC and TSA. Silencing of CDKN2A in Tu159 cells is correlated with increased methylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 and decreased methylation at lysine 4 relative to the upstream p15 gene promoter. Interestingly, global levels of H3-K9 methylation are decreased upon treatment with 5-aza-dC. Together these data indicate that DNA methylation is a dominant epigenetic mark for silencing of CDKN2A in Tu159 tumor cells. Moreover, changes in DNA methylation can reset the histone code by impacting multiple H3 modifications. PMID:14654786

  11. The relationship between non-protein-coding DNA and eukaryotic complexity.

    PubMed

    Taft, Ryan J; Pheasant, Michael; Mattick, John S

    2007-03-01

    There are two intriguing paradoxes in molecular biology--the inconsistent relationship between organismal complexity and (1) cellular DNA content and (2) the number of protein-coding genes--referred to as the C-value and G-value paradoxes, respectively. The C-value paradox may be largely explained by varying ploidy. The G-value paradox is more problematic, as the extent of protein coding sequence remains relatively static over a wide range of developmental complexity. We show by analysis of sequenced genomes that the relative amount of non-protein-coding sequence increases consistently with complexity. We also show that the distribution of introns in complex organisms is non-random. Genes composed of large amounts of intronic sequence are significantly overrepresented amongst genes that are highly expressed in the nervous system, and amongst genes downregulated in embryonic stem cells and cancers. We suggest that the informational paradox in complex organisms may be explained by the expansion of cis-acting regulatory elements and genes specifying trans-acting non-protein-coding RNAs. PMID:17295292

  12. A Two-Locus Global DNA Barcode for Land Plants: The Coding rbcL Gene Complements the Non-Coding trnH-psbA Spacer Region

    PubMed Central

    Kress, W. John; Erickson, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Background A useful DNA barcode requires sufficient sequence variation to distinguish between species and ease of application across a broad range of taxa. Discovery of a DNA barcode for land plants has been limited by intrinsically lower rates of sequence evolution in plant genomes than that observed in animals. This low rate has complicated the trade-off in finding a locus that is universal and readily sequenced and has sufficiently high sequence divergence at the species-level. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, a global plant DNA barcode system is evaluated by comparing universal application and degree of sequence divergence for nine putative barcode loci, including coding and non-coding regions, singly and in pairs across a phylogenetically diverse set of 48 genera (two species per genus). No single locus could discriminate among species in a pair in more than 79% of genera, whereas discrimination increased to nearly 88% when the non-coding trnH-psbA spacer was paired with one of three coding loci, including rbcL. In silico trials were conducted in which DNA sequences from GenBank were used to further evaluate the discriminatory power of a subset of these loci. These trials supported the earlier observation that trnH-psbA coupled with rbcL can correctly identify and discriminate among related species. Conclusions/Significance A combination of the non-coding trnH-psbA spacer region and a portion of the coding rbcL gene is recommended as a two-locus global land plant barcode that provides the necessary universality and species discrimination. PMID:17551588

  13. Coding region SNP analysis to enhance dog mtDNA discrimination power in forensic casework.

    PubMed

    Verscheure, Sophie; Backeljau, Thierry; Desmyter, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    The high population frequencies of three control region haplotypes contribute to the low discrimination power of the dog mtDNA control region. It also diminishes the evidential power of a match with one of these haplotypes in forensic casework. A mitochondrial genome study of 214 Belgian dogs suggested 26 polymorphic coding region sites that successfully resolved dogs with the three most frequent control region haplotypes. In this study, three SNP assays were developed to determine the identity of the 26 informative sites. The control region of 132 newly sampled dogs was sequenced and added to the study of 214 dogs. The assays were applied to 58 dogs of the haplotypes of interest, which confirmed their suitability for enhancing dog mtDNA discrimination power. In the Belgian population study of 346 dogs, the set of 26 sites divided the dogs into 25 clusters of mtGenome sequences with substantially lower population frequency estimates than their control region sequences. In case of a match with one of the three control region haplotypes, using these three SNP assays in conjunction with control region sequencing would augment the exclusion probability of dog mtDNA analysis from 92.9% to 97.0%. PMID:25299153

  14. Temporal and spatial trends in prey composition of wahoo Acanthocybium solandri: a diet analysis from the central North Pacific Ocean using visual and DNA bar-coding techniques.

    PubMed

    Oyafuso, Z S; Toonen, R J; Franklin, E C

    2016-04-01

    A diet analysis was conducted on 444 wahoo Acanthocybium solandri caught in the central North Pacific Ocean longline fishery and a nearshore troll fishery surrounding the Hawaiian Islands from June to December 2014. In addition to traditional observational methods of stomach contents, a DNA bar-coding approach was integrated into the analysis by sequencing the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) region of the mtDNA genome to taxonomically identify individual prey items that could not be classified visually to species. For nearshore-caught A. solandri, juvenile pre-settlement reef fish species from various families dominated the prey composition during the summer months, followed primarily by Carangidae in autumn months. Gempylidae, Echeneidae and Scombridae were dominant prey taxa from the offshore fishery. Molidae was a common prey family found in stomachs collected north-east of the Hawaiian Archipelago while tetraodontiform reef fishes, known to have extended pelagic stages, were prominent prey items south-west of the Hawaiian Islands. The diet composition of A. solandri was indicative of an adaptive feeder and thus revealed dominant geographic and seasonal abundances of certain taxa from various ecosystems in the marine environment. The addition of molecular bar-coding to the traditional visual method of prey identifications allowed for a more comprehensive range of the prey field of A. solandri to be identified and should be used as a standard component in future diet studies. PMID:27059148

  15. Detection of spurious interruptions of protein-coding regions in cloned cDNA sequences by GeneMark analysis.

    PubMed

    Hirosawa, M; Ishikawa, K; Nagase, T; Ohara, O

    2000-09-01

    cDNA is an artificial copy of mRNA and, therefore, no cDNA can be completely free from suspicion of cloning errors. Because overlooking these cloning errors results in serious misinterpretation of cDNA sequences, development of an alerting system targeting spurious sequences in cloned cDNAs is an urgent requirement for massive cDNA sequence analysis. We describe here the application of a modified GeneMark program, originally designed for prokaryotic gene finding, for detection of artifacts in cDNA clones. This program serves to provide a warning when any spurious split of protein-coding regions is detected through statistical analysis of cDNA sequences based on Markov models. In this study, 817 cDNA sequences deposited in public databases by us were subjected to analysis using this alerting system to assess its sensitivity and specificity. The results indicated that any spurious split of protein-coding regions in cloned cDNAs could be sensitively detected and systematically revised by means of this system after the experimental validation of the alerts. Furthermore, this study offered us, for the first time, statistical data regarding the rates and types of errors causing protein-coding splits in cloned cDNAs obtained by conventional cloning methods. PMID:10984451

  16. Locating protein-coding regions in human DNA sequences by a multiple sensor-neural network approach

    SciTech Connect

    Uberbacher, E.C.; Mural, R.J. Univ. of Tennessee, Oak Ridge )

    1991-12-15

    Genes in higher eukaryotes may span tens or hundreds of kilobases with the protein-coding regions accounting for only a few percent of the total sequence. Identifying genes within large regions of uncharacterized DNA is a difficult undertaking and is currently the focus of many research efforts. The authors describe a reliable computational approach for locating protein-coding portions of genes in anonymous DNA sequence. Using a concept suggested by robotic environmental sensing, the authors method combines a set of sensor algorithms and a neural network to localize the coding regions. Several algorithms that report local characteristics of the DNA sequence, and therefore act as sensors, are also described. In its current configuration the coding recognition module identifies 90% of coding exons of length 100 bases or greater with less than one false positive coding exon indicated per five coding exons indicated. This is a significantly lower false positive rate than any method of which the authors are aware. This module demonstrates a method with general applicability to sequence-pattern recognition problems and is available for current research efforts.

  17. Locating protein-coding regions in human DNA sequences by a multiple sensor-neural network approach.

    PubMed Central

    Uberbacher, E C; Mural, R J

    1991-01-01

    Genes in higher eukaryotes may span tens or hundreds of kilobases with the protein-coding regions accounting for only a few percent of the total sequence. Identifying genes within large regions of uncharacterized DNA is a difficult undertaking and is currently the focus of many research efforts. We describe a reliable computational approach for locating protein-coding portions of genes in anonymous DNA sequence. Using a concept suggested by robotic environmental sensing, our method combines a set of sensor algorithms and a neural network to localize the coding regions. Several algorithms that report local characteristics of the DNA sequence, and therefore act as sensors, are also described. In its current configuration the "coding recognition module" identifies 90% of coding exons of length 100 bases or greater with less than one false positive coding exon indicated per five coding exons indicated. This is a significantly lower false positive rate than any method of which we are aware. This module demonstrates a method with general applicability to sequence-pattern recognition problems and is available for current research efforts. PMID:1763041

  18. Basal jawed vertebrate phylogeny inferred from multiple nuclear DNA-coded genes

    PubMed Central

    Kikugawa, Kanae; Katoh, Kazutaka; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Sakurai, Hiroshi; Ishida, Osamu; Iwabe, Naoyuki; Miyata, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    Background Phylogenetic analyses of jawed vertebrates based on mitochondrial sequences often result in confusing inferences which are obviously inconsistent with generally accepted trees. In particular, in a hypothesis by Rasmussen and Arnason based on mitochondrial trees, cartilaginous fishes have a terminal position in a paraphyletic cluster of bony fishes. No previous analysis based on nuclear DNA-coded genes could significantly reject the mitochondrial trees of jawed vertebrates. Results We have cloned and sequenced seven nuclear DNA-coded genes from 13 vertebrate species. These sequences, together with sequences available from databases including 13 jawed vertebrates from eight major groups (cartilaginous fishes, bichir, chondrosteans, gar, bowfin, teleost fishes, lungfishes and tetrapods) and an outgroup (a cyclostome and a lancelet), have been subjected to phylogenetic analyses based on the maximum likelihood method. Conclusion Cartilaginous fishes have been inferred to be basal to other jawed vertebrates, which is consistent with the generally accepted view. The minimum log-likelihood difference between the maximum likelihood tree and trees not supporting the basal position of cartilaginous fishes is 18.3 ± 13.1. The hypothesis by Rasmussen and Arnason has been significantly rejected with the minimum log-likelihood difference of 123 ± 23.3. Our tree has also shown that living holosteans, comprising bowfin and gar, form a monophyletic group which is the sister group to teleost fishes. This is consistent with a formerly prevalent view of vertebrate classification, although inconsistent with both of the current morphology-based and mitochondrial sequence-based trees. Furthermore, the bichir has been shown to be the basal ray-finned fish. Tetrapods and lungfish have formed a monophyletic cluster in the tree inferred from the concatenated alignment, being consistent with the currently prevalent view. It also remains possible that tetrapods are more closely

  19. High resolution methylome map of rat indicates role of intragenic DNA methylation in identification of coding region.

    PubMed

    Sati, Satish; Tanwar, Vinay Singh; Kumar, K Anand; Patowary, Ashok; Jain, Vaibhav; Ghosh, Sourav; Ahmad, Shadab; Singh, Meghna; Reddy, S Umakar; Chandak, Giriraj Ratan; Raghunath, Manchala; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Chakraborty, Kausik; Scaria, Vinod; Sengupta, Shantanu

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is crucial for gene regulation and maintenance of genomic stability. Rat has been a key model system in understanding mammalian systemic physiology, however detailed rat methylome remains uncharacterized till date. Here, we present the first high resolution methylome of rat liver generated using Methylated DNA immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing (MeDIP-Seq) approach. We observed that within the DNA/RNA repeat elements, simple repeats harbor the highest degree of methylation. Promoter hypomethylation and exon hypermethylation were common features in both RefSeq genes and expressed genes (as evaluated by proteomic approach). We also found that although CpG islands were generally hypomethylated, about 6% of them were methylated and a large proportion (37%) of methylated islands fell within the exons. Notably, we obeserved significant differences in methylation of terminal exons (UTRs); methylation being more pronounced in coding/partially coding exons compared to the non-coding exons. Further, events like alternate exon splicing (cassette exon) and intron retentions were marked by DNA methylation and these regions are retained in the final transcript. Thus, we suggest that DNA methylation could play a crucial role in marking coding regions thereby regulating alternative splicing. Apart from generating the first high resolution methylome map of rat liver tissue, the present study provides several critical insights into methylome organization and extends our understanding of interplay between epigenome, gene expression and genome stability. PMID:22355382

  20. 3-base periodicity in coding DNA is affected by intercodon dinucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Joaquín

    2011-01-01

    All coding DNAs exhibit 3-base periodicity (TBP), which may be defined as the tendency of nucleotides and higher order n-tuples, e.g. trinucleotides (triplets), to be preferentially spaced by 3, 6, 9 etc, bases, and we have proposed an association between TBP and clustering of same-phase triplets. We here investigated if TBP was affected by intercodon dinucleotide tendencies and whether clustering of same-phase triplets was involved. Under constant protein sequence intercodon dinucleotide frequencies depend on the distribution of synonymous codons. So, possible effects were revealed by randomly exchanging synonymous codons without altering protein sequences to subsequently document changes in TBP via frequency distribution of distances (FDD) of DNA triplets. A tripartite positive correlation was found between intercodon dinucleotide frequencies, clustering of same-phase triplets and TBP. So, intercodon C|A (where “|” indicates the boundary between codons) was more frequent in native human DNA than in the codon-shuffled sequences; higher C|A frequency occurred along with more frequent clustering of C|AN triplets (where N jointly represents A, C, G and T) and with intense CAN TBP. The opposite was found for C|G, which was less frequent in native than in shuffled sequences; lower C|G frequency occurred together with reduced clustering of C|GN triplets and with less intense CGN TBP. We hence propose that intercodon dinucleotides affect TBP via same-phase triplet clustering. A possible biological relevance of our findings is briefly discussed. PMID:21814388

  1. Segmentation of DNA into Coding and Noncoding Regions Based on Recursive Entropic Segmentation and Stop-Codon Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicorici, Daniel; Astola, Jaakko

    2004-12-01

    Heterogeneous DNA sequences can be partitioned into homogeneous domains that are comprised of the four nucleotides A, C, G, and T and the stop-codons. Recursively, we apply a new entropic segmentation method on DNA sequences using Jensen-Shannon and Jensen-Rényi divergences in order to find the borders between coding and noncoding DNA regions. We have chosen 12- and 18-symbol alphabets that capture (i) the differential nucleotide composition in codons, and (ii) the differential stop-codon composition along all the three phases in both strands of the DNA. The new segmentation method is based on the Jensen-Rényi divergence measure, nucleotide statistics, and stop-codon statistics in both DNA strands. The recursive segmentation process requires no prior training on known datasets. Consequently, for three entire genomes of bacteria, we find that the use of nucleotide composition, stop-codon composition, and Jensen-Rényi divergence improve the accuracy of finding the borders between coding and noncoding regions in DNA sequences.

  2. Classifying Facial Actions

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Gianluca; Bartlett, Marian Stewart; Hager, Joseph C.; Ekman, Paul; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2010-01-01

    The Facial Action Coding System (FACS) [23] is an objective method for quantifying facial movement in terms of component actions. This system is widely used in behavioral investigations of emotion, cognitive processes, and social interaction. The coding is presently performed by highly trained human experts. This paper explores and compares techniques for automatically recognizing facial actions in sequences of images. These techniques include analysis of facial motion through estimation of optical flow; holistic spatial analysis, such as principal component analysis, independent component analysis, local feature analysis, and linear discriminant analysis; and methods based on the outputs of local filters, such as Gabor wavelet representations and local principal components. Performance of these systems is compared to naive and expert human subjects. Best performances were obtained using the Gabor wavelet representation and the independent component representation, both of which achieved 96 percent accuracy for classifying 12 facial actions of the upper and lower face. The results provide converging evidence for the importance of using local filters, high spatial frequencies, and statistical independence for classifying facial actions. PMID:21188284

  3. DNA-guided establishment of nucleosome patterns within coding regions of a eukaryotic genome

    PubMed Central

    Beh, Leslie Y.; Müller, Manuel M.; Muir, Tom W.; Kaplan, Noam; Landweber, Laura F.

    2015-01-01

    A conserved hallmark of eukaryotic chromatin architecture is the distinctive array of well-positioned nucleosomes downstream from transcription start sites (TSS). Recent studies indicate that trans-acting factors establish this stereotypical array. Here, we present the first genome-wide in vitro and in vivo nucleosome maps for the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. In contrast with previous studies in yeast, we find that the stereotypical nucleosome array is preserved in the in vitro reconstituted map, which is governed only by the DNA sequence preferences of nucleosomes. Remarkably, this average in vitro pattern arises from the presence of subsets of nucleosomes, rather than the whole array, in individual Tetrahymena genes. Variation in GC content contributes to the positioning of these sequence-directed nucleosomes and affects codon usage and amino acid composition in genes. Given that the AT-rich Tetrahymena genome is intrinsically unfavorable for nucleosome formation, we propose that these “seed” nucleosomes—together with trans-acting factors—may facilitate the establishment of nucleosome arrays within genes in vivo, while minimizing changes to the underlying coding sequences. PMID:26330564

  4. URF6, Last Unidentified Reading Frame of Human mtDNA, Codes for an NADH Dehydrogenase Subunit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chomyn, Anne; Cleeter, Michael W. J.; Ragan, C. Ian; Riley, Marcia; Doolittle, Russell F.; Attardi, Giuseppe

    1986-10-01

    The polypeptide encoded in URF6, the last unassigned reading frame of human mitochondrial DNA, has been identified with antibodies to peptides predicted from the DNA sequence. Antibodies prepared against highly purified respiratory chain NADH dehydrogenase from beef heart or against the cytoplasmically synthesized 49-kilodalton iron-sulfur subunit isolated from this enzyme complex, when added to a deoxycholate or a Triton X-100 mitochondrial lysate of HeLa cells, specifically precipitated the URF6 product together with the six other URF products previously identified as subunits of NADH dehydrogenase. These results strongly point to the URF6 product as being another subunit of this enzyme complex. Thus, almost 60% of the protein coding capacity of mammalian mitochondrial DNA is utilized for the assembly of the first enzyme complex of the respiratory chain. The absence of such information in yeast mitochondrial DNA dramatizes the variability in gene content of different mitochondrial genomes.

  5. Structure of the gene coding for the sequence-specific DNA-methyltransferase of the B. subtilis phage SPR.

    PubMed Central

    Pósfai, G; Baldauf, F; Erdei, S; Pósfai, J; Venetianer, P; Kiss, A

    1984-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the gene coding for the 5'-GGCC and 5'-CCGG specific DNA methyltransferase of the Bacillus subtilis phage SPR was determined by the Maxam-Gilbert procedure. Transcriptional and translational signals of the sequence were assigned with the help of S1 mapping and translation in E. coli minicells. The gene codes for a 49 kd polypeptide. The amino acid sequence of the SPR methylase shows regions of homology with the sequence of the 5'-GGCC-specific BspRI modification methylase. Images PMID:6096817

  6. DNA sequence variation in a non-coding region of low recombination on the human X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Kaessmann, H; Heissig, F; von Haeseler, A; Pääbo, S

    1999-05-01

    DNA sequence variation has become a major source of insight regarding the origin and history of our species as well as an important tool for the identification of allelic variants associated with disease. Comparative sequencing of DNA has to date focused mainly on mitochondrial (mt) DNA, which due to its apparent lack of recombination and high evolutionary rate lends itself well to the study of human evolution. These advantages also entail limitations. For example, the high mutation rate of mtDNA results in multiple substitutions that make phylogenetic analysis difficult and, because mtDNA is maternally inherited, it reflects only the history of females. For the history of males, the non-recombining part of the paternally inherited Y chromosome can be studied. The extent of variation on the Y chromosome is so low that variation at particular sites known to be polymorphic rather than entire sequences are typically determined. It is currently unclear how some forms of analysis (such as the coalescent) should be applied to such data. Furthermore, the lack of recombination means that selection at any locus affects all 59 Mb of DNA. To gauge the extent and pattern of point substitutional variation in non-coding parts of the human genome, we have sequenced 10 kb of non-coding DNA in a region of low recombination at Xq13.3. Analysis of this sequence in 69 individuals representing all major linguistic groups reveals the highest overall diversity in Africa, whereas deep divergences also exist in Asia. The time elapsed since the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) is 535,000+/-119,000 years. We expect this type of nuclear locus to provide more answers about the genetic origin and history of humans. PMID:10319866

  7. Signalign: An Ontology of DNA as Signal for Comparative Gene Structure Prediction Using Information-Coding-and-Processing Techniques.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ning; Guo, Xuan; Gu, Feng; Pan, Yi

    2016-03-01

    Conventional character-analysis-based techniques in genome analysis manifest three main shortcomings-inefficiency, inflexibility, and incompatibility. In our previous research, a general framework, called DNA As X was proposed for character-analysis-free techniques to overcome these shortcomings, where X is the intermediates, such as digit, code, signal, vector, tree, graph network, and so on. In this paper, we further implement an ontology of DNA As Signal, by designing a tool named Signalign for comparative gene structure analysis, in which DNA sequences are converted into signal series, processed by modified method of dynamic time warping and measured by signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The ontology of DNA As Signal integrates the principles and concepts of other disciplines including information coding theory and signal processing into sequence analysis and processing. Comparing with conventional character-analysis-based methods, Signalign can not only have the equivalent or superior performance, but also enrich the tools and the knowledge library of computational biology by extending the domain from character/string to diverse areas. The evaluation results validate the success of the character-analysis-free technique for improved performances in comparative gene structure prediction. PMID:27046906

  8. Natural Selection on Coding and Noncoding DNA Sequences Is Associated with Virulence Genes in a Plant Pathogenic Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Rech, Gabriel E.; Sanz-Martín, José M.; Anisimova, Maria; Sukno, Serenella A.; Thon, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Natural selection leaves imprints on DNA, offering the opportunity to identify functionally important regions of the genome. Identifying the genomic regions affected by natural selection within pathogens can aid in the pursuit of effective strategies to control diseases. In this study, we analyzed genome-wide patterns of selection acting on different classes of sequences in a worldwide sample of eight strains of the model plant-pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum graminicola. We found evidence of selective sweeps, balancing selection, and positive selection affecting both protein-coding and noncoding DNA of pathogenicity-related sequences. Genes encoding putative effector proteins and secondary metabolite biosynthetic enzymes show evidence of positive selection acting on the coding sequence, consistent with an Arms Race model of evolution. The 5′ untranslated regions (UTRs) of genes coding for effector proteins and genes upregulated during infection show an excess of high-frequency polymorphisms likely the consequence of balancing selection and consistent with the Red Queen hypothesis of evolution acting on these putative regulatory sequences. Based on the findings of this work, we propose that even though adaptive substitutions on coding sequences are important for proteins that interact directly with the host, polymorphisms in the regulatory sequences may confer flexibility of gene expression in the virulence processes of this important plant pathogen. PMID:25193312

  9. Run-length encoding graphic rules, biochemically editable designs and steganographical numeric data embedment for DNA-based cryptographical coding system.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Tomonori

    2013-03-01

    There have been a wide variety of approaches for handling the pieces of DNA as the "unplugged" tools for digital information storage and processing, including a series of studies applied to the security-related area, such as DNA-based digital barcodes, water marks and cryptography. In the present article, novel designs of artificial genes as the media for storing the digitally compressed data for images are proposed for bio-computing purpose while natural genes principally encode for proteins. Furthermore, the proposed system allows cryptographical application of DNA through biochemically editable designs with capacity for steganographical numeric data embedment. As a model case of image-coding DNA technique application, numerically and biochemically combined protocols are employed for ciphering the given "passwords" and/or secret numbers using DNA sequences. The "passwords" of interest were decomposed into single letters and translated into the font image coded on the separate DNA chains with both the coding regions in which the images are encoded based on the novel run-length encoding rule, and the non-coding regions designed for biochemical editing and the remodeling processes revealing the hidden orientation of letters composing the original "passwords." The latter processes require the molecular biological tools for digestion and ligation of the fragmented DNA molecules targeting at the polymerase chain reaction-engineered termini of the chains. Lastly, additional protocols for steganographical overwriting of the numeric data of interests over the image-coding DNA are also discussed. PMID:23750303

  10. Triplet code-independent programming of living systems organisation by DNA: the link with intelligence and memory.

    PubMed

    Adams, D H

    1995-05-01

    Previous suggestions from this laboratory (3), (a) that within its molecular electronic structure, DNA houses a computer-analog program of immense complexity, operating independently of, but complementary to, triplet coding and (b) that, inter alia, this program is the driving force for organising and executing the construction of species individuals in three dimensions, are extended in the present communication. It is now concluded that the DNA program also embodies an 'intelligence' component, which extends its organising ability both qualitatively and quantitatively beyond any of the heavily circumscribed 'self-organising' attributes claimed to be associated with naturally occurring inanimate systems. Further, that as part of the developmental process, a program component organises the fabrication of mammalian central nervous systems, including that of human beings with the associated attributes of intelligence, creativity and constructional skills. It is further suggested that the sophisticated random access memory system associated with human beings in particular may be explicable in terms of an extension of the DNA programming system: basically this involves the latter operating as computer-type 'hardware' for the storage of long-term memory and interacting with, primarily, glial cell RNA, acting as 'software' and storing short term traces. Finally, it is suggested that such an interrelationship between DNA/RNA molecular electronic structures can provide the necessary memory storage capacity and flexibility and also facilitates random access to the long-term DNA memory store. PMID:8583976

  11. Long non-coding RNAs as novel expression signatures modulate DNA damage and repair in cadmium toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhiheng; Liu, Haibai; Wang, Caixia; Lu, Qian; Huang, Qinhai; Zheng, Chanjiao; Lei, Yixiong

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes. Our study was to investigate whether lncRNAs as novel expression signatures are able to modulate DNA damage and repair in cadmium(Cd) toxicity. There were aberrant expression profiles of lncRNAs in 35th Cd-induced cells as compared to untreated 16HBE cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of ENST00000414355 inhibited the growth of DNA-damaged cells and decreased the expressions of DNA-damage related genes (ATM, ATR and ATRIP), while increased the expressions of DNA-repair related genes (DDB1, DDB2, OGG1, ERCC1, MSH2, RAD50, XRCC1 and BARD1). Cadmium increased ENST00000414355 expression in the lung of Cd-exposed rats in a dose-dependent manner. A significant positive correlation was observed between blood ENST00000414355 expression and urinary/blood Cd concentrations, and there were significant correlations of lncRNA-ENST00000414355 expression with the expressions of target genes in the lung of Cd-exposed rats and the blood of Cd exposed workers. These results indicate that some lncRNAs are aberrantly expressed in Cd-treated 16HBE cells. lncRNA-ENST00000414355 may serve as a signature for DNA damage and repair related to the epigenetic mechanisms underlying the cadmium toxicity and become a novel biomarker of cadmium toxicity. PMID:26472689

  12. Long non-coding RNAs as novel expression signatures modulate DNA damage and repair in cadmium toxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhiheng; Liu, Haibai; Wang, Caixia; Lu, Qian; Huang, Qinhai; Zheng, Chanjiao; Lei, Yixiong

    2015-10-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes. Our study was to investigate whether lncRNAs as novel expression signatures are able to modulate DNA damage and repair in cadmium(Cd) toxicity. There were aberrant expression profiles of lncRNAs in 35th Cd-induced cells as compared to untreated 16HBE cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of ENST00000414355 inhibited the growth of DNA-damaged cells and decreased the expressions of DNA-damage related genes (ATM, ATR and ATRIP), while increased the expressions of DNA-repair related genes (DDB1, DDB2, OGG1, ERCC1, MSH2, RAD50, XRCC1 and BARD1). Cadmium increased ENST00000414355 expression in the lung of Cd-exposed rats in a dose-dependent manner. A significant positive correlation was observed between blood ENST00000414355 expression and urinary/blood Cd concentrations, and there were significant correlations of lncRNA-ENST00000414355 expression with the expressions of target genes in the lung of Cd-exposed rats and the blood of Cd exposed workers. These results indicate that some lncRNAs are aberrantly expressed in Cd-treated 16HBE cells. lncRNA-ENST00000414355 may serve as a signature for DNA damage and repair related to the epigenetic mechanisms underlying the cadmium toxicity and become a novel biomarker of cadmium toxicity.

  13. iRSpot-GAEnsC: identifing recombination spots via ensemble classifier and extending the concept of Chou's PseAAC to formulate DNA samples.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Muhammad; Hayat, Maqsood

    2016-02-01

    Meiotic recombination is vital for maintaining the sequence diversity in human genome. Meiosis and recombination are considered the essential phases of cell division. In meiosis, the genome is divided into equal parts for sexual reproduction whereas in recombination, the diverse genomes are combined to form new combination of genetic variations. Recombination process does not occur randomly across the genomes, it targets specific areas called recombination "hotspots" and "coldspots". Owing to huge exploration of polygenetic sequences in data banks, it is impossible to recognize the sequences through conventional methods. Looking at the significance of recombination spots, it is indispensable to develop an accurate, fast, robust, and high-throughput automated computational model. In this model, the numerical descriptors are extracted using two sequence representation schemes namely: dinucleotide composition and trinucleotide composition. The performances of seven classification algorithms were investigated. Finally, the predicted outcomes of individual classifiers are fused to form ensemble classification, which is formed through majority voting and genetic algorithm (GA). The performance of GA-based ensemble model is quite promising compared to individual classifiers and majority voting-based ensemble model. iRSpot-GAEnsC has achieved 84.46 % accuracy. The empirical results revealed that the performance of iRSpot-GAEnsC is not only higher than the examined algorithms but also better than existing methods in the literature developed so far. It is anticipated that the proposed model might be helpful for research community, academia and for drug discovery. PMID:26319782

  14. Bio-bar-code dendrimer-like DNA as signal amplifier for cancerous cells assay using ruthenium nanoparticle-based ultrasensitive chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sai; Hao, Shuangyuan; Li, Li; Zhang, Shusheng

    2010-09-01

    Bio-bar-code dendrimer-like DNA (bbc-DL-DNA) is employed as a label for the amplification assay of cancer cells in combination with the newly explored chemiluminescence (CL) system of luminol-H(2)O(2)-Ru(3+) and specificity of structure-switching aptamers selected by cell-based SELEX. PMID:20652188

  15. A novel non-coding RNA lncRNA-JADE connects DNA damage signalling to histone H4 acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Guohui; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Yunhua; Han, Cecil; Sood, Anil K; Calin, George A; Zhang, Xinna; Lu, Xiongbin

    2013-01-01

    A prompt and efficient DNA damage response (DDR) eliminates the detrimental effects of DNA lesions in eukaryotic cells. Basic and preclinical studies suggest that the DDR is one of the primary anti-cancer barriers during tumorigenesis. The DDR involves a complex network of processes that detect and repair DNA damage, in which long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), a new class of regulatory RNAs, may play an important role. In the current study, we identified a novel lncRNA, lncRNA-JADE, that is induced after DNA damage in an ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent manner. LncRNA-JADE transcriptionally activates Jade1, a key component in the HBO1 (human acetylase binding to ORC1) histone acetylation complex. Consequently, lncRNA-JADE induces histone H4 acetylation in the DDR. Markedly higher levels of lncRNA-JADE were observed in human breast tumours in comparison with normal breast tissues. Knockdown of lncRNA-JADE significantly inhibited breast tumour growth in vivo. On the basis of these results, we propose that lncRNA-JADE is a key functional link that connects the DDR to histone H4 acetylation, and that dysregulation of lncRNA-JADE may contribute to breast tumorigenesis. PMID:24097061

  16. Comparison of nanodosimetric parameters of track structure calculated by the Monte Carlo codes Geant4-DNA and PTra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarakis, P.; Bug, M. U.; Gargioni, E.; Guatelli, S.; Rabus, H.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2012-03-01

    The concept of nanodosimetry is based on the assumption that initial damage to cells is related to the number of ionizations (the ionization cluster size) directly produced by single particles within, or in the close vicinity of, short segments of DNA. The ionization cluster-size distribution and other nanodosimetric quantities, however, are not directly measurable in biological targets and our current knowledge is mostly based on numerical simulations of particle tracks in water, calculating track structure parameters for nanometric target volumes. The assessment of nanodosimetric quantities derived from particle-track calculations using different Monte Carlo codes plays, therefore, an important role for a more accurate evaluation of the initial damage to cells and, as a consequence, of the biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation. The aim of this work is to assess the differences in the calculated nanodosimetric quantities obtained with Geant4-DNA as compared to those of the ad hoc particle-track Monte Carlo code ‘PTra’ developed at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Germany. The comparison of the two codes was made for incident electrons of energy in the range between 50 eV and 10 keV, for protons of energy between 300 keV and 10 MeV, and for alpha particles of energy between 1 and 10 MeV as these were the energy ranges available in both codes at the time this investigation was carried out. Good agreement was found for nanodosimetric characteristics of track structure calculated in the high-energy range of each particle type. For lower energies, significant differences were observed, most notably in the estimates of the biological effectiveness. The largest relative differences obtained were over 50%; however, generally the order of magnitude was between 10% and 20%.

  17. Comparison of nanodosimetric parameters of track structure calculated by the Monte Carlo codes Geant4-DNA and PTra.

    PubMed

    Lazarakis, P; Bug, M U; Gargioni, E; Guatelli, S; Rabus, H; Rosenfeld, A B

    2012-03-01

    The concept of nanodosimetry is based on the assumption that initial damage to cells is related to the number of ionizations (the ionization cluster size) directly produced by single particles within, or in the close vicinity of, short segments of DNA. The ionization cluster-size distribution and other nanodosimetric quantities, however, are not directly measurable in biological targets and our current knowledge is mostly based on numerical simulations of particle tracks in water, calculating track structure parameters for nanometric target volumes. The assessment of nanodosimetric quantities derived from particle-track calculations using different Monte Carlo codes plays, therefore, an important role for a more accurate evaluation of the initial damage to cells and, as a consequence, of the biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation. The aim of this work is to assess the differences in the calculated nanodosimetric quantities obtained with Geant4-DNA as compared to those of the ad hoc particle-track Monte Carlo code 'PTra' developed at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Germany. The comparison of the two codes was made for incident electrons of energy in the range between 50 eV and 10 keV, for protons of energy between 300 keV and 10 MeV, and for alpha particles of energy between 1 and 10 MeV as these were the energy ranges available in both codes at the time this investigation was carried out. Good agreement was found for nanodosimetric characteristics of track structure calculated in the high-energy range of each particle type. For lower energies, significant differences were observed, most notably in the estimates of the biological effectiveness. The largest relative differences obtained were over 50%; however, generally the order of magnitude was between 10% and 20%. PMID:22330641

  18. Roles of DNA mutation in the coding region and DNA methylation in the 5' flanking region of BRCA1 in canine mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Hengbin; Lin, Deigui

    2016-07-01

    The Breast cancer 1, early onset gene (BRCA1) is known to be significantly associated with human familial breast cancer and is identified to play an important role in canine mammary tumors. Here, genetic variations in the coding region and DNA methylation in the 5' flanking region of BRCA1 in canine mammary tumor samples, 15 each of benign and malignant against 10 normal canine mammary tissue samples, were analyzed using the direct sequencing method. The results indicated two point mutations each in the coding region of canine BRCA1 in one benign mammary tumor sample (4702G >T and 4765G >T) and in one malignant canine mammary tumor sample (3619A >G and 4006G >A). No mutations were detected in the normal canine mammary tissue samples. The 4702G >T mutation was found to terminate further translation. The physical effect of the 4765G >T mutation was found to be the repalacement of the glutamate residue with glutamine. The physical effect of the 3619A >G mutation was found to be the replacement of the threonine residue with alanine, and that of mutation 4006G >A was the replacement of the valine residue with isoleucine in the BRCA1 protein. Bisulfite sequencing detected methylated CpG sites in one canine malignant mammary tumor sample. In conclusion, the present study elucidated the mutational status of the BRCA1 coding region and methylation status of the 5' flanking region of BRCA1 in canine mammary tumors. PMID:26888582

  19. Roles of DNA mutation in the coding region and DNA methylation in the 5′ flanking region of BRCA1 in canine mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    QIU, Hengbin; LIN, Deigui

    2016-01-01

    The Breast cancer 1, early onset gene (BRCA1) is known to be significantly associated with human familial breast cancer and is identified to play an important role in canine mammary tumors. Here, genetic variations in the coding region and DNA methylation in the 5′ flanking region of BRCA1 in canine mammary tumor samples, 15 each of benign and malignant against 10 normal canine mammary tissue samples, were analyzed using the direct sequencing method. The results indicated two point mutations each in the coding region of canine BRCA1 in one benign mammary tumor sample (4702G >T and 4765G >T) and in one malignant canine mammary tumor sample (3619A >G and 4006G >A). No mutations were detected in the normal canine mammary tissue samples. The 4702G >T mutation was found to terminate further translation. The physical effect of the 4765G >T mutation was found to be the repalacement of the glutamate residue with glutamine. The physical effect of the 3619A >G mutation was found to be the replacement of the threonine residue with alanine, and that of mutation 4006G >A was the replacement of the valine residue with isoleucine in the BRCA1 protein. Bisulfite sequencing detected methylated CpG sites in one canine malignant mammary tumor sample. In conclusion, the present study elucidated the mutational status of the BRCA1 coding region and methylation status of the 5′ flanking region of BRCA1 in canine mammary tumors. PMID:26888582

  20. Recognition Code of ZNF191(243-368) and Its Interaction with DNA

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dongxin; Huang, Zhongxian

    2015-01-01

    ZNF191(243-368) is the C-terminal region of ZNF191 which contains a putative DNA-binding domain of four Cys2His2 zinc finger motifs. In this study, an expression vector of a fusion protein of ZNF191(243-368) with glutathione-S-transferase (GST) was constructed and transformed into Escherichia coli BL21. The fusion protein GST-ZNF191(243-368) was expressed using this vector to investigate the protein-DNA binding reaction through an affinity selection strategy on the basis of the binding quality of the zinc finger domain. Results showed that ZNF191(243-368) can selectively bind with sequences and react with genes which contain an AGGG core. However, the recognition mechanism of Cys2His2 zinc finger proteins to DNA warrants further investigation. PMID:26457075

  1. Non-coding RNA generated following lariat-debranching mediates targeting of AID to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Simin; Vuong, Bao Q.; Vaidyanathan, Bharat; Lin, Jia-Yu; Huang, Feng-Ting; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Transcription through immunoglobulin switch (S) regions is essential for class switch recombination (CSR) but no molecular function of the transcripts has been described. Likewise, recruitment of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to S regions is critical for CSR; however, the underlying mechanism has not been fully elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that intronic switch RNA acts in trans to target AID to S region DNA. AID binds directly to switch RNA through G-quadruplexes formed by the RNA molecules. Disruption of this interaction by mutation of a key residue in the putative RNA-binding domain of AID impairs recruitment of AID to S region DNA, thereby abolishing CSR. Additionally, inhibition of RNA lariat processing leads to loss of AID localization to S regions and compromises CSR; both defects can be rescued by exogenous expression of switch transcripts in a sequence-specific manner. These studies uncover an RNA-mediated mechanism of targeting AID to DNA. PMID:25957684

  2. DNA sequencing and bar-coding using solid-state nanopores.

    PubMed

    Atas, Evrim; Singer, Alon; Meller, Amit

    2012-12-01

    Nanopores have emerged as a prominent single-molecule analytic tool with particular promise for genomic applications. In this review, we discuss two potential applications of the nanopore sensors: First, we present a nanopore-based single-molecule DNA sequencing method that utilizes optical detection for massively parallel throughput. Second, we describe a method by which nanopores can be used as single-molecule genotyping tools. For DNA sequencing, the distinction among the four types of DNA nucleobases is achieved by employing a biochemical procedure for DNA expansion. In this approach, each nucleobase in each DNA strand is converted into one of four predefined unique 16-mers in a process that preserves the nucleobase sequence. The resulting converted strands are then hybridized to a library of four molecular beacons, each carrying a unique fluorophore tag, that are perfect complements to the 16-mers used for conversion. Solid-state nanopores are then used to sequentially remove these beacons, one after the other, leading to a series of photon bursts in four colors that can be optically detected. Single-molecule genotyping is achieved by tagging the DNA fragments with γ-modified synthetic peptide nucleic acid probes coupled to an electronic characterization of the complexes using solid-state nanopores. This method can be used to identify and differentiate genes with a high level of sequence similarity at the single-molecule level, but different pathology or response to treatment. We will illustrate this method by differentiating the pol gene for two highly similar human immunodeficiency virus subtypes, paving the way for a novel diagnostics platform for viral classification. PMID:23109189

  3. Human phosphoribosylformylglycineamide amidotransferase (FGARAT): regional mapping, complete coding sequence, isolation of a functional genomic clone, and DNA sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Patterson, D; Bleskan, J; Gardiner, K; Bowersox, J

    1999-11-01

    Purines play essential roles in many cellular functions, including DNA replication, transcription, intra- and extra-cellular signaling, energy metabolism, and as coenzymes for many biochemical reactions. The de-novo synthesis of purines requires 10 enzymatic steps for the production of inosine monophosphate (IMP). Defects in purine metabolism are associated with human diseases. Further, many anticancer agents function as inhibitors of the de-novo biosynthetic pathway. Genes or cDNAs for most of the enzymes comprising this pathway have been isolated from humans or other mammals. One notable exception is the phosphoribosylformylglycineamide amidotransferase (FGARAT) gene, which encodes the fourth step of this pathway. This gene has been cloned from numerous microorganisms and from Drosophila melanogaster and C. elegans. We report here the identification of a human cDNA containing the coding region of the FGARAT mRNA and the isolation of a P1 clone that contains an intact human FGARAT gene. The P1 clone corrects the purine auxotrophy and protein deficiency of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell mutants (AdeB) deficient in both the activity and the protein for FGARAT. The P1 clone was used to regionally map the FGARAT gene to chromosome region 17p13, a location consistent with our prior assignment of this gene to chromosome 17. A comparison of the DNA sequence of the human FGARAT and FGARAT DNA sequence from 17 other organisms is reported. The isolation of this gene means that DNA clones for all the 10 steps of IMP synthesis have been isolated from humans or other mammals. PMID:10548741

  4. Absence of Novel CYP4F2 and VKORC1 Coding Region DNA Variants in Patients Requiring High Warfarin Doses

    PubMed Central

    Burmester, James K.; Berg, Richard L.; Glurich, Ingrid; Yale, Steven H.; Schmelzer, John R.; Caldwell, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Warfarin is an FDA-approved oral anticoagulant for long-term prevention of thromboembolism. Substantial inter-individual variation in dosing requirements and the narrow therapeutic index of this widely-prescribed drug make safe initiation and dose stabilization challenging. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) occurring in CYP2C9, VKORC1, and CYP4F2 genes are known to impact dose, and VKORC1 and CYP4F2 polymorphisms are associated with higher therapeutic dose requirements in our cohort. However, the most advanced regression models using personal, clinical, and genetic factors to predict individual stable dose account for only 50% to 60% of the observed variability in stable theapeutic dose in Caucasians. Design and Methods In this study, we used DNA sequence analysis to determine whether additional variants in CYP4F2 and VKORC1 gene coding regions contribute to variable dosing requirements among individuals for whom the actual dose was the highest relative to regression model- predicted dose. Results and Conclusions No novel DNA variants in the coding regions of these genes were identified among subjects requiring high warfarin doses, suggesting that other factors yet to be defined contribute to variability in warfarin dose requirements in this subset of our cohort. PMID:21562135

  5. Molecular cloning of the cDNA coding for mouse aldehyde oxidase: tissue distribution and regulation in vivo by testosterone.

    PubMed Central

    Kurosaki, M; Demontis, S; Barzago, M M; Garattini, E; Terao, M

    1999-01-01

    The cDNA coding for mouse aldehyde oxidase (AO), a molybdoflavoprotein, has been isolated and characterized. The cDNA is 4347 nt long and consists of an open reading frame predicting a polypeptide of 1333 amino acid residues, with 5' and 3' untranslated regions of 13 and 335 nt respectively. The apparent molecular mass of the translation product in vitro derived from the corresponding cRNA is consistent with that of the monomeric subunit of the AO holoenzyme. The cDNA codes for a catalytically active form of AO, as demonstrated by transient transfection experiments conducted in the HC11 mouse mammary epithelial cell line. The deduced primary structure of the AO protein contains consensus sequences for two distinct 2Fe-2S redox centres and a molybdopterin-binding site. The amino acid sequence of the mouse AO has a high degree of similarity with the human and bovine counterparts, and a significant degree of relatedness to AO proteins of plant origin. Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses demonstrate that hepatocytes, cardiocytes, lung endothelial or epithelial cells and oesophagus epithelial cells express high levels of AO mRNA. In the various tissues and organs considered, the level of AO mRNA expression is not strictly correlated with the amount of the corresponding protein, suggesting that the synthesis of the AO enzyme is under translational or post-translational control. In addition, we observed sex-related regulation of AO protein synthesis. In the liver of male animals, despite similar amounts of AO mRNA, the levels of the AO enzyme and corresponding polypeptide are significantly higher than those in female animals. Treatment of female mice with testosterone increases the amounts of AO mRNA and of the relative translation product to levels similar to those in male animals. PMID:10377246

  6. An Abundant Class of Non-coding DNA Can Prevent Stochastic Gene Silencing in the C. elegans Germline.

    PubMed

    Frøkjær-Jensen, Christian; Jain, Nimit; Hansen, Loren; Davis, M Wayne; Li, Yongbin; Zhao, Di; Rebora, Karine; Millet, Jonathan R M; Liu, Xiao; Kim, Stuart K; Dupuy, Denis; Jorgensen, Erik M; Fire, Andrew Z

    2016-07-14

    Cells benefit from silencing foreign genetic elements but must simultaneously avoid inactivating endogenous genes. Although chromatin modifications and RNAs contribute to maintenance of silenced states, the establishment of silenced regions will inevitably reflect underlying DNA sequence and/or structure. Here, we demonstrate that a pervasive non-coding DNA feature in Caenorhabditis elegans, characterized by 10-base pair periodic An/Tn-clusters (PATCs), can license transgenes for germline expression within repressive chromatin domains. Transgenes containing natural or synthetic PATCs are resistant to position effect variegation and stochastic silencing in the germline. Among endogenous genes, intron length and PATC-character undergo dramatic changes as orthologs move from active to repressive chromatin over evolutionary time, indicating a dynamic character to the An/Tn periodicity. We propose that PATCs form the basis of a cellular immune system, identifying certain endogenous genes in heterochromatic contexts as privileged while foreign DNA can be suppressed with no requirement for a cellular memory of prior exposure. PMID:27374334

  7. Codon usage, genetic code and phylogeny of Dictyostelium discoideum mitochondrial DNA as deduced from a 7.3-kb region.

    PubMed

    Angata, K; Kuroe, K; Yanagisawa, K; Tanaka, Y

    1995-02-01

    We have sequenced a region (7,376-bp) of the mitochondrial (mt) DNA (54 kb) of the cellular slime mold, Dictyostelium discoideum. From the DNA and amino-acid sequence comparisons with known sequences, genes for ATPase subunit 9 (ATP9), cytochrome b (CYTB), NADH dehydrogenase subunits 1, 3 and 6 (ND1, ND3 and ND6), small subunit rRNA (SSU rRNA) and seven tRNAs (Arg, Asn, Cys, Lys, f-Met, Met and Pro) have been identified. The sequenced region of the mtDNA has a high average A + T-content (70.8%). The A + T-content of protein-genes (73.6%) is considerably higher than that of RNA genes (61.3%). Even with the strong AT-bias, the genetic code employed is most probably the universal one. All seven tRNAs are able to form typical clover leaf structures. The molecular phylogenetic trees of CYTB and SSU rRNA suggest that D. discoideum is closer to green plants than to animals and fungi. PMID:7736610

  8. Rapid and accurate taxonomic classification of insect (class Insecta) cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) DNA barcode sequences using a naïve Bayesian classifier

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Teresita M; Gibson, Joel F; Shokralla, Shadi; Baird, Donald J; Golding, G Brian; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad

    2014-01-01

    Current methods to identify unknown insect (class Insecta) cytochrome c oxidase (COI barcode) sequences often rely on thresholds of distances that can be difficult to define, sequence similarity cut-offs, or monophyly. Some of the most commonly used metagenomic classification methods do not provide a measure of confidence for the taxonomic assignments they provide. The aim of this study was to use a naïve Bayesian classifier (Wang et al. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 2007; 73: 5261) to automate taxonomic assignments for large batches of insect COI sequences such as data obtained from high-throughput environmental sequencing. This method provides rank-flexible taxonomic assignments with an associated bootstrap support value, and it is faster than the blast-based methods commonly used in environmental sequence surveys. We have developed and rigorously tested the performance of three different training sets using leave-one-out cross-validation, two field data sets, and targeted testing of Lepidoptera, Diptera and Mantodea sequences obtained from the Barcode of Life Data system. We found that type I error rates, incorrect taxonomic assignments with a high bootstrap support, were already relatively low but could be lowered further by ensuring that all query taxa are actually present in the reference database. Choosing bootstrap support cut-offs according to query length and summarizing taxonomic assignments to more inclusive ranks can also help to reduce error while retaining the maximum number of assignments. Additionally, we highlight gaps in the taxonomic and geographic representation of insects in public sequence databases that will require further work by taxonomists to improve the quality of assignments generated using any method.

  9. Run-length encoding graphic rules, biochemically editable designs and steganographical numeric data embedment for DNA-based cryptographical coding system

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Tomonori

    2013-01-01

    There have been a wide variety of approaches for handling the pieces of DNA as the “unplugged” tools for digital information storage and processing, including a series of studies applied to the security-related area, such as DNA-based digital barcodes, water marks and cryptography. In the present article, novel designs of artificial genes as the media for storing the digitally compressed data for images are proposed for bio-computing purpose while natural genes principally encode for proteins. Furthermore, the proposed system allows cryptographical application of DNA through biochemically editable designs with capacity for steganographical numeric data embedment. As a model case of image-coding DNA technique application, numerically and biochemically combined protocols are employed for ciphering the given “passwords” and/or secret numbers using DNA sequences. The “passwords” of interest were decomposed into single letters and translated into the font image coded on the separate DNA chains with both the coding regions in which the images are encoded based on the novel run-length encoding rule, and the non-coding regions designed for biochemical editing and the remodeling processes revealing the hidden orientation of letters composing the original “passwords.” The latter processes require the molecular biological tools for digestion and ligation of the fragmented DNA molecules targeting at the polymerase chain reaction-engineered termini of the chains. Lastly, additional protocols for steganographical overwriting of the numeric data of interests over the image-coding DNA are also discussed. PMID:23750303

  10. Fine-tuning the ubiquitin code at DNA double-strand breaks: deubiquitinating enzymes at work

    PubMed Central

    Citterio, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a reversible protein modification broadly implicated in cellular functions. Signaling processes mediated by ubiquitin (ub) are crucial for the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), one of the most dangerous types of DNA lesions. In particular, the DSB response critically relies on active ubiquitination by the RNF8 and RNF168 ub ligases at the chromatin, which is essential for proper DSB signaling and repair. How this pathway is fine-tuned and what the functional consequences are of its deregulation for genome integrity and tissue homeostasis are subject of intense investigation. One important regulatory mechanism is by reversal of substrate ubiquitination through the activity of specific deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), as supported by the implication of a growing number of DUBs in DNA damage response processes. Here, we discuss the current knowledge of how ub-mediated signaling at DSBs is controlled by DUBs, with main focus on DUBs targeting histone H2A and on their recent implication in stem cell biology and cancer. PMID:26442100

  11. Genomic DNA sequence of a rice gene coding for a pullulanase-type of starch debranching enzyme.

    PubMed

    Francisco, P B; Zhang, Y; Park, S Y; Ogata, N; Yamanouchi, H; Nakamura, Y

    1998-09-01

    A genomic DNA containing a rice (Oryza sativa L., cv. Norin-8) gene coding for a pullulanase-type starch debranching enzyme (EC 3.2.1. 41) was sequenced (EMBL/GenBank/DDBJ accession number AB012915). Along the 15, 248 bp DNA, the pullulanase gene is split into 26 exons. The four pullulanase consensus regions are positioned in the middle portion of the sequence and are separated by long introns and 1-3 exons. Comparison of the rice cv. Norin-8 pullulanase genomic structure with that of barley pullulanase (limit dextrinase) (F. Lok et al., EMBL/GenBank/DDBJ accession number AF022725) indicates that most of the pullulanase exons are highly conserved. Alignment of the nucleotide bases of rice exon 8 with those of barley exon 8-intron 8-exon 9 fragment suggests that the 85 bp internal sequence of rice exon 8 was originally an intron, a possibility further indicated by the absence in barley and spinach (A. Renz et al., EMBL/GenBank/DDBJ accession number X83969) pullulanases of amino acid residues encoded by the 85 bp fragment. PMID:9748665

  12. DNA Damage-Induced Transcription of Transposable Elements and Long Non-coding RNAs in Arabidopsis Is Rare and ATM-Dependent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenxing; Schwacke, Rainer; Kunze, Reinhard

    2016-08-01

    Induction and mobilization of transposable elements (TEs) following DNA damage or other stresses has been reported in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Recently it was discovered that eukaryotic TEs are frequently associated with long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), many of which are also upregulated by stress. Yet, it is unknown whether DNA damage-induced transcriptional activation of TEs and lncRNAs occurs sporadically or is a synchronized, genome-wide response. Here we investigated the transcriptome of Arabidopsis wild-type (WT) and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (atm) mutant plants 3 h after induction of DNA damage. In WT, expression of 5.2% of the protein-coding genes is ≥2-fold changed, whereas in atm plants, only 2.6% of these genes are regulated, and the response of genes associated with DNA repair, replication, and cell cycle is largely lost. In contrast, only less than 0.6% of TEs and lncRNAs respond to DNA damage in WT plants, and the regulation of ≥95% of them is ATM-dependent. The ATM-downstream factors BRCA1, DRM1, JMJ30, AGO2, and the ATM-independent AGO4 participate in the regulation of individual TEs and lncRNAs. Remarkably, protein-coding genes located adjacent to DNA damage-responsive TEs and lncRNAs are frequently coexpressed, which is consistent with the hypothesis that TEs and lncRNAs located close to genes commonly function as controlling elements. PMID:27150037

  13. First approximation of a stereochemical rationale for the genetic code based on the topography and physicochemical properties of "cavities" constructed from models of DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hendry, L B; Bransome, E D; Hutson, M S; Campbell, L K

    1981-01-01

    To examine the question of whether or not the genetic code has a stereochemical basis, we used artificial constructs of the topography and physicochemical features of unique "cavities" formed by removal of the second codon base in B-DNA. The effects of base changes on the stereochemistry of the cavities are consistent with the pattern of the genetic code. Fits into the cavities of the side chains of the 20 L amino acids involved in protein synthesis can be demonstrated by using conventional physicochemical principles of hydrogen bonding and steric constraints. The specificity of the fits is remarkably consistent with the genetic code. Images PMID:6950386

  14. Dynamic system classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumpe, Daniel; Greiner, Maksim; Müller, Ewald; Enßlin, Torsten A.

    2016-07-01

    Stochastic differential equations describe well many physical, biological, and sociological systems, despite the simplification often made in their derivation. Here the usage of simple stochastic differential equations to characterize and classify complex dynamical systems is proposed within a Bayesian framework. To this end, we develop a dynamic system classifier (DSC). The DSC first abstracts training data of a system in terms of time-dependent coefficients of the descriptive stochastic differential equation. Thereby the DSC identifies unique correlation structures within the training data. For definiteness we restrict the presentation of the DSC to oscillation processes with a time-dependent frequency ω (t ) and damping factor γ (t ) . Although real systems might be more complex, this simple oscillator captures many characteristic features. The ω and γ time lines represent the abstract system characterization and permit the construction of efficient signal classifiers. Numerical experiments show that such classifiers perform well even in the low signal-to-noise regime.

  15. Quantile-based classifiers

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, C.; Viroli, C.

    2016-01-01

    Classification with small samples of high-dimensional data is important in many application areas. Quantile classifiers are distance-based classifiers that require a single parameter, regardless of the dimension, and classify observations according to a sum of weighted componentwise distances of the components of an observation to the within-class quantiles. An optimal percentage for the quantiles can be chosen by minimizing the misclassification error in the training sample. It is shown that this choice is consistent for the classification rule with the asymptotically optimal quantile and that under some assumptions, as the number of variables goes to infinity, the probability of correct classification converges to unity. The effect of skewness of the distributions of the predictor variables is discussed. The optimal quantile classifier gives low misclassification rates in a comprehensive simulation study and in a real-data application. PMID:27279668

  16. Identification of internal transcribed spacer sequence motifs in truffles: a first step toward their DNA bar coding.

    PubMed

    El Karkouri, Khalid; Murat, Claude; Zampieri, Elisa; Bonfante, Paola

    2007-08-01

    This work presents DNA sequence motifs from the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the nuclear rRNA repeat unit which are useful for the identification of five European and Asiatic truffles (Tuber magnatum, T. melanosporum, T. indicum, T. aestivum, and T. mesentericum). Truffles are edible mycorrhizal ascomycetes that show similar morphological characteristics but that have distinct organoleptic and economic values. A total of 36 out of 46 ITS1 or ITS2 sequence motifs have allowed an accurate in silico distinction of the five truffles to be made (i.e., by pattern matching and/or BLAST analysis on downloaded GenBank sequences and directly against GenBank databases). The motifs considered the intraspecific genetic variability of each species, including rare haplotypes, and assigned their respective species from either the ascocarps or ectomycorrhizas. The data indicate that short ITS1 or ITS2 motifs (< or = 50 bp in size) can be considered promising tools for truffle species identification. A dot blot hybridization analysis of T. magnatum and T. melanosporum compared with other close relatives or distant lineages allowed at least one highly specific motif to be identified for each species. These results were confirmed in a blind test which included new field isolates. The current work has provided a reliable new tool for a truffle oligonucleotide bar code and identification in ecological and evolutionary studies. PMID:17601808

  17. A pathogenic non-coding RNA induces changes in dynamic DNA methylation of ribosomal RNA genes in host plants.

    PubMed

    Martinez, German; Castellano, Mayte; Tortosa, Maria; Pallas, Vicente; Gomez, Gustavo

    2014-02-01

    Viroids are plant-pathogenic non-coding RNAs able to interfere with as yet poorly known host-regulatory pathways and to cause alterations recognized as diseases. The way in which these RNAs coerce the host to express symptoms remains to be totally deciphered. In recent years, diverse studies have proposed a close interplay between viroid-induced pathogenesis and RNA silencing, supporting the belief that viroid-derived small RNAs mediate the post-transcriptional cleavage of endogenous mRNAs by acting as elicitors of symptoms expression. Although the evidence supporting the role of viroid-derived small RNAs in pathogenesis is robust, the possibility that this phenomenon can be a more complex process, also involving viroid-induced alterations in plant gene expression at transcriptional levels, has been considered. Here we show that plants infected with the 'Hop stunt viroid' accumulate high levels of sRNAs derived from ribosomal transcripts. This effect was correlated with an increase in the transcription of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) precursors during infection. We observed that the transcriptional reactivation of rRNA genes correlates with a modification of DNA methylation in their promoter region and revealed that some rRNA genes are demethylated and transcriptionally reactivated during infection. This study reports a previously unknown mechanism associated with viroid (or any other pathogenic RNA) infection in plants providing new insights into aspects of host alterations induced by the viroid infectious cycle. PMID:24178032

  18. cDNA sequence coding for the alpha'-chain of the third complement component in the African lungfish.

    PubMed

    Sato, A; Sültmann, H; Mayer, W E; Figueroa, F; Tichy, H; Klein, J

    1999-04-01

    cDNA clones coding for almost the entire C3 alpha-chain of the African lungfish (Protopterus aethiopicus), a representative of the Sarcopterygii (lobe-finned fishes), were sequenced and characterized. From the sequence it is deduced that the lungfish C3 molecule is probably a disulphide-bonded alpha:beta dimer similar to that of the C3 components of other jawed vertebrates. The deduced sequence contains conserved sites presumably recognized by proteolytic enzymes (e.g. factor I) involved in the activation and inactivation of the component. It also contains the conserved thioester region and the putative site for binding properdin. However, the site for the interaction with complement receptor 2 and factor H are poorly conserved. Either complement receptor 2 and factor H are not present in the lungfish or they bind to different residues at the same or a different site than mammalian complement receptor 2 and factor H. The C3 alpha-chain sequences faithfully reflect the phylogenetic relationships among vertebrate classes and can therefore be used to help to resolve the long-standing controversy concerning the origin of the tetrapods. PMID:10219761

  19. Recognition Using Hybrid Classifiers.

    PubMed

    Osadchy, Margarita; Keren, Daniel; Raviv, Dolev

    2016-04-01

    A canonical problem in computer vision is category recognition (e.g., find all instances of human faces, cars etc., in an image). Typically, the input for training a binary classifier is a relatively small sample of positive examples, and a huge sample of negative examples, which can be very diverse, consisting of images from a large number of categories. The difficulty of the problem sharply increases with the dimension and size of the negative example set. We propose to alleviate this problem by applying a "hybrid" classifier, which replaces the negative samples by a prior, and then finds a hyperplane which separates the positive samples from this prior. The method is extended to kernel space and to an ensemble-based approach. The resulting binary classifiers achieve an identical or better classification rate than SVM, while requiring far smaller memory and lower computational complexity to train and apply. PMID:26959677

  20. Genome defense against exogenous nucleic acids in eukaryotes by non-coding DNA occurs through CRISPR-like mechanisms in the cytosol and the bodyguard protection in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Guo-Hua

    2016-01-01

    In this review, the protective function of the abundant non-coding DNA in the eukaryotic genome is discussed from the perspective of genome defense against exogenous nucleic acids. Peripheral non-coding DNA has been proposed to act as a bodyguard that protects the genome and the central protein-coding sequences from ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage. In the proposed mechanism of protection, the radicals generated by water radiolysis in the cytosol and IR energy are absorbed, blocked and/or reduced by peripheral heterochromatin; then, the DNA damage sites in the heterochromatin are removed and expelled from the nucleus to the cytoplasm through nuclear pore complexes, most likely through the formation of extrachromosomal circular DNA. To strengthen this hypothesis, this review summarizes the experimental evidence supporting the protective function of non-coding DNA against exogenous nucleic acids. Based on these data, I hypothesize herein about the presence of an additional line of defense formed by small RNAs in the cytosol in addition to their bodyguard protection mechanism in the nucleus. Therefore, exogenous nucleic acids may be initially inactivated in the cytosol by small RNAs generated from non-coding DNA via mechanisms similar to the prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas system. Exogenous nucleic acids may enter the nucleus, where some are absorbed and/or blocked by heterochromatin and others integrate into chromosomes. The integrated fragments and the sites of DNA damage are removed by repetitive non-coding DNA elements in the heterochromatin and excluded from the nucleus. Therefore, the normal eukaryotic genome and the central protein-coding sequences are triply protected by non-coding DNA against invasion by exogenous nucleic acids. This review provides evidence supporting the protective role of non-coding DNA in genome defense. PMID:27036064

  1. Systematic comparison of gene expression through analysis of cDNA fragments within or near to the protein-coding region.

    PubMed

    Ke, Y; Jing, C; Rudland, P S; Smith, P H; Foster, C S

    1999-02-01

    Life is controlled by the timely and ordered expression of genes. Identification of important genes involved in specific physiological and pathological conditions requires efficient methods to analyse differential gene expression. We describe a novel strategy, namely complete comparison of gene expression (CCGE), for a systematic assessment of differentially expressed genes. Using the CCGE method, double-stranded cDNA is digested with two restriction enzymes that cut with different frequencies, the representative cDNA fragments are generated within or near to the protein-coding region. After being flanked by two different types of adapters, and amplified by a nested suppression PCR, the selected cDNA fragments, representing entire cDNA population, can be divided into 256 subsets; amplified and compared in a systematic manner. PMID:9889292

  2. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA clone for the complete protein coding region of the delta subunit of the mouse acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    LaPolla, R J; Mayne, K M; Davidson, N

    1984-01-01

    A mouse cDNA clone has been isolated that contains the complete coding region of a protein highly homologous to the delta subunit of the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR). The cDNA library was constructed in the vector lambda 10 from membrane-associated poly(A)+ RNA from BC3H-1 mouse cells. Surprisingly, the delta clone was selected by hybridization with cDNA encoding the gamma subunit of the Torpedo AcChoR. The nucleotide sequence of the mouse cDNA clone contains an open reading frame of 520 amino acids. This amino acid sequence exhibits 59% and 50% sequence homology to the Torpedo AcChoR delta and gamma subunits, respectively. However, the mouse nucleotide sequence has several stretches of high homology with the Torpedo gamma subunit cDNA, but not with delta. The mouse protein has the same general structural features as do the Torpedo subunits. It is encoded by a 3.3-kilobase mRNA. There is probably only one, but at most two, chromosomal genes coding for this or closely related sequences. Images PMID:6096870

  3. Classifying Adolescent Perfectionists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Kenneth G.; Ashby, Jeffrey S.; Gilman, Rich

    2011-01-01

    A large school-based sample of 9th-grade adolescents (N = 875) completed the Almost Perfect Scale-Revised (APS-R; Slaney, Mobley, Trippi, Ashby, & Johnson, 1996). Decision rules and cut-scores were developed and replicated that classify adolescents as one of two kinds of perfectionists (adaptive or maladaptive) or as nonperfectionists. A…

  4. Classifying Cereal Data

    Cancer.gov

    The DSQ includes questions about cereal intake and allows respondents up to two responses on which cereals they consume. We classified each cereal reported first by hot or cold, and then along four dimensions: density of added sugars, whole grains, fiber, and calcium.

  5. Number in Classifier Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nomoto, Hiroki

    2013-01-01

    Classifier languages are often described as lacking genuine number morphology and treating all common nouns, including those conceptually count, as an unindividuated mass. This study argues that neither of these popular assumptions is true, and presents new generalizations and analyses gained by abandoning them. I claim that no difference exists…

  6. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  7. New Insights into the Lake Chad Basin Population Structure Revealed by High-Throughput Genotyping of Mitochondrial DNA Coding SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Černý, Viktor; Carracedo, Ángel

    2011-01-01

    Background Located in the Sudan belt, the Chad Basin forms a remarkable ecosystem, where several unique agricultural and pastoral techniques have been developed. Both from an archaeological and a genetic point of view, this region has been interpreted to be the center of a bidirectional corridor connecting West and East Africa, as well as a meeting point for populations coming from North Africa through the Saharan desert. Methodology/Principal Findings Samples from twelve ethnic groups from the Chad Basin (n = 542) have been high-throughput genotyped for 230 coding region mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (mtSNPs) using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-Of-Flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. This set of mtSNPs allowed for much better phylogenetic resolution than previous studies of this geographic region, enabling new insights into its population history. Notable haplogroup (hg) heterogeneity has been observed in the Chad Basin mirroring the different demographic histories of these ethnic groups. As estimated using a Bayesian framework, nomadic populations showed negative growth which was not always correlated to their estimated effective population sizes. Nomads also showed lower diversity values than sedentary groups. Conclusions/Significance Compared to sedentary population, nomads showed signals of stronger genetic drift occurring in their ancestral populations. These populations, however, retained more haplotype diversity in their hypervariable segments I (HVS-I), but not their mtSNPs, suggesting a more ancestral ethnogenesis. Whereas the nomadic population showed a higher Mediterranean influence signaled mainly by sub-lineages of M1, R0, U6, and U5, the other populations showed a more consistent sub-Saharan pattern. Although lifestyle may have an influence on diversity patterns and hg composition, analysis of molecular variance has not identified these differences. The present study indicates that analysis of mt

  8. DNA-LCEB: a high-capacity and mutation-resistant DNA data-hiding approach by employing encryption, error correcting codes, and hybrid twofold and fourfold codon-based strategy for synonymous substitution in amino acids.

    PubMed

    Hafeez, Ibbad; Khan, Asifullah; Qadir, Abdul

    2014-11-01

    Data-hiding in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences can be used to develop an organic memory and to track parent genes in an offspring as well as in genetically modified organism. However, the main concerns regarding data-hiding in DNA sequences are the survival of organism and successful extraction of watermark from DNA. This implies that the organism should live and reproduce without any functional disorder even in the presence of the embedded data. Consequently, performing synonymous substitution in amino acids for watermarking becomes a primary option. In this regard, a hybrid watermark embedding strategy that employs synonymous substitution in both twofold and fourfold codons of amino acids is proposed. This work thus presents a high-capacity and mutation-resistant watermarking technique, DNA-LCEB, for hiding secret information in DNA of living organisms. By employing the different types of synonymous codons of amino acids, the data storage capacity has been significantly increased. It is further observed that the proposed DNA-LCEB employing a combination of synonymous substitution, lossless compression, encryption, and Bose-Chaudary-Hocquenghem coding is secure and performs better in terms of both capacity and robustness compared to existing DNA data-hiding schemes. The proposed DNA-LCEB is tested against different mutations, including silent, miss-sense, and non-sense mutations, and provides substantial improvement in terms of mutation detection/correction rate and bits per nucleotide. A web application for DNA-LCEB is available at http://111.68.99.218/DNA-LCEB. PMID:25195035

  9. Detecting selection in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, using DNA sequence data from multiple nuclear protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Yednock, Bree K; Neigel, Joseph E

    2014-01-01

    The identification of genes involved in the adaptive evolution of non-model organisms with uncharacterized genomes constitutes a major challenge. This study employed a rigorous and targeted candidate gene approach to test for positive selection on protein-coding genes of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. Four genes with putative roles in physiological adaptation to environmental stress were chosen as candidates. A fifth gene not expected to play a role in environmental adaptation was used as a control. Large samples (n>800) of DNA sequences from C. sapidus were used in tests of selective neutrality based on sequence polymorphisms. In combination with these, sequences from the congener C. similis were used in neutrality tests based on interspecific divergence. In multiple tests, significant departures from neutral expectations and indicative of positive selection were found for the candidate gene trehalose 6-phosphate synthase (tps). These departures could not be explained by any of the historical population expansion or bottleneck scenarios that were evaluated in coalescent simulations. Evidence was also found for balancing selection at ATP-synthase subunit 9 (atps) using a maximum likelihood version of the Hudson, Kreitmen, and Aguadé test, and positive selection favoring amino acid replacements within ATP/ADP translocase (ant) was detected using the McDonald-Kreitman test. In contrast, test statistics for the control gene, ribosomal protein L12 (rpl), which presumably has experienced the same demographic effects as the candidate loci, were not significantly different from neutral expectations and could readily be explained by demographic effects. Together, these findings demonstrate the utility of the candidate gene approach for investigating adaptation at the molecular level in a marine invertebrate for which extensive genomic resources are not available. PMID:24896825

  10. Gene control in eukaryotes and the c-value paradox "excess" DNA as an impediment to transcription of coding sequences.

    PubMed

    Zuckerkandl, E

    1976-12-31

    Ways in which control of gene activity may lead to the observed high DNA content per haploid eukaryote genome are examined. It is proposed that deoxyribonucleoprotein (DNP) acts as a barrier to transcription at two distinct structural levels. At the lower level, melting of the nucleosome supercoil (quaternary structure) and of the nucleosomes (tertiary structure) might be brought about by the process of transcription itself. After unwinding the barrier section, the polymerase would eventually reach the structural gene. The transcripts of noncoding sequences, at least as far as their "unique" sequence components are concerned, may thus have filled their main function through the very process of transcription. The possibility of an inverse relationship between the length of the DNP barrier and the rates of transcription of the coding sequences is to some extent supported by available data. Different modes of coordination between the transcription of mRNA and of hnRNA from a single functional unit of gene action (funga) are considered. An analysis of gene control at high structural levels of DNP is made on the basis of other data, in relation to the concepts of eurygenic and stenogenic control. The concept of a euryon is introduced, namely of a set of linked fugas under common eurygenic control. Structure of order higher than quaternary can be inferred to exist in larger chromomeres of polytene chromosomes and in corresponding sections of ordinary chromosomes. Only moderate amounts of highest order interphase euchromatic structure are likely to be able to be accomodated in average chromomeres and none in very thin chromomeres. Puffs are interpreted as the melting of highest order interphase structure, and the absence of puffs during transcription as the absence of this highest order structure in the resting state of the chromomeres. Genes that are constantly active in all tissues may dispense with highest order interphase structure and with the corresponding control

  11. Screening for Functional Non-coding Genetic Variants Using Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay (EMSA) and DNA-affinity Precipitation Assay (DAPA).

    PubMed

    Miller, Daniel E; Patel, Zubin H; Lu, Xiaoming; Lynch, Arthur T; Weirauch, Matthew T; Kottyan, Leah C

    2016-01-01

    Population and family-based genetic studies typically result in the identification of genetic variants that are statistically associated with a clinical disease or phenotype. For many diseases and traits, most variants are non-coding, and are thus likely to act by impacting subtle, comparatively hard to predict mechanisms controlling gene expression. Here, we describe a general strategic approach to prioritize non-coding variants, and screen them for their function. This approach involves computational prioritization using functional genomic databases followed by experimental analysis of differential binding of transcription factors (TFs) to risk and non-risk alleles. For both electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and DNA affinity precipitation assay (DAPA) analysis of genetic variants, a synthetic DNA oligonucleotide (oligo) is used to identify factors in the nuclear lysate of disease or phenotype-relevant cells. For EMSA, the oligonucleotides with or without bound nuclear factors (often TFs) are analyzed by non-denaturing electrophoresis on a tris-borate-EDTA (TBE) polyacrylamide gel. For DAPA, the oligonucleotides are bound to a magnetic column and the nuclear factors that specifically bind the DNA sequence are eluted and analyzed through mass spectrometry or with a reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) followed by Western blot analysis. This general approach can be widely used to study the function of non-coding genetic variants associated with any disease, trait, or phenotype. PMID:27585267

  12. Reduced-Median-Network Analysis of Complete Mitochondrial DNA Coding-Region Sequences for the Major African, Asian, and European Haplogroups

    PubMed Central

    Herrnstadt, Corinna; Elson, Joanna L.; Fahy, Eoin; Preston, Gwen; Turnbull, Douglass M.; Anderson, Christen; Ghosh, Soumitra S.; Olefsky, Jerrold M.; Beal, M. Flint; Davis, Robert E.; Howell, Neil

    2002-01-01

    The evolution of the human mitochondrial genome is characterized by the emergence of ethnically distinct lineages or haplogroups. Nine European, seven Asian (including Native American), and three African mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups have been identified previously on the basis of the presence or absence of a relatively small number of restriction-enzyme recognition sites or on the basis of nucleotide sequences of the D-loop region. We have used reduced-median-network approaches to analyze 560 complete European, Asian, and African mtDNA coding-region sequences from unrelated individuals to develop a more complete understanding of sequence diversity both within and between haplogroups. A total of 497 haplogroup-associated polymorphisms were identified, 323 (65%) of which were associated with one haplogroup and 174 (35%) of which were associated with two or more haplogroups. Approximately one-half of these polymorphisms are reported for the first time here. Our results confirm and substantially extend the phylogenetic relationships among mitochondrial genomes described elsewhere from the major human ethnic groups. Another important result is that there were numerous instances both of parallel mutations at the same site and of reversion (i.e., homoplasy). It is likely that homoplasy in the coding region will confound evolutionary analysis of small sequence sets. By a linkage-disequilibrium approach, additional evidence for the absence of human mtDNA recombination is presented here. PMID:11938495

  13. Massively parallel sequencing of the entire control region and targeted coding region SNPs of degraded mtDNA using a simplified library preparation method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Young; Lee, Hwan Young; Oh, Se Yoon; Jung, Sang-Eun; Yang, In Seok; Lee, Yang-Han; Yang, Woo Ick; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2016-05-01

    The application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) to forensic genetics is being explored by an increasing number of laboratories because of the potential of high-throughput sequencing for recovering genetic information from multiple markers and multiple individuals in a single run. A cumbersome and technically challenging library construction process is required for NGS. In this study, we propose a simplified library preparation method for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis that involves two rounds of PCR amplification. In the first-round of multiplex PCR, six fragments covering the entire mtDNA control region and 22 fragments covering interspersed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the coding region that can be used to determine global haplogroups and East Asian haplogroups were amplified using template-specific primers with read sequences. In the following step, indices and platform-specific sequences for the MiSeq(®) system (Illumina) were added by PCR. The barcoded library produced using this simplified workflow was successfully sequenced on the MiSeq system using the MiSeq Reagent Nano Kit v2. A total of 0.4 GB of sequences, 80.6% with base quality of >Q30, were obtained from 12 degraded DNA samples and mapped to the revised Cambridge Reference Sequence (rCRS). A relatively even read count was obtained for all amplicons, with an average coverage of 5200 × and a less than three-fold read count difference between amplicons per sample. Control region sequences were successfully determined, and all samples were assigned to the relevant haplogroups. In addition, enhanced discrimination was observed by adding coding region SNPs to the control region in in silico analysis. Because the developed multiplex PCR system amplifies small-sized amplicons (<250 bp), NGS analysis using the library preparation method described here allows mtDNA analysis using highly degraded DNA samples. PMID:26844917

  14. A sandwich-hybridization assay for simultaneous determination of HIV and tuberculosis DNA targets based on signal amplification by quantum dots-PowerVision™ polymer coding nanotracers.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhongdan; Gan, Ning; Zhang, Huairong; Wang, De; Qiao, Li; Cao, Yuting; Li, Tianhua; Hu, Futao

    2015-09-15

    A novel sandwich-hybridization assay for simultaneous electrochemical detection of multiple DNA targets related to human immune deficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis (TB) was developed based on the different quantum dots-PowerVision(TM) polymer nanotracers. The polymer nanotracers were respectively fabricated by immobilizing SH-labeled oligonucleotides (s-HIV or s-TB), which can partially hybrid with virus DNA (HIV or TB), on gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and then modified with PowerVision(TM) (PV) polymer-encapsulated quantum dots (CdS or PbS) as signal tags. PV is a dendrimer enzyme linked polymer, which can immobilize abundant QDs to amplify the stripping voltammetry signals from the metal ions (Pb or Cd). The capture probes were prepared through the immobilization of SH-labeled oligonucleotides, which can complementary with HIV and TB DNA, on the magnetic Fe3O4@Au (GMPs) beads. After sandwich-hybridization, the polymer nanotracers together with HIV and TB DNA targets were simultaneously introduced onto the surface of GMPs. Then the two encoding metal ions (Cd(2+) and Pb(2+)) were used to differentiate two viruses DNA due to the different subsequent anodic stripping voltammetric peaks at -0.84 V (Cd) and -0.61 V (Pb). Because of the excellent signal amplification of the polymer nanotracers and the great specificity of DNA targets, this assay could detect targets DNA as low as 0.2 femtomolar and exhibited excellent selectivity with the dynamitic range from 0.5 fM to 500 pM. Those results demonstrated that this electrochemical coding assay has great potential in applications for screening more viruses DNA while changing the probes. PMID:25911447

  15. The Use and Effectiveness of Triple Multiplex System for Coding Region Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in Mitochondrial DNA Typing of Archaeologically Obtained Human Skeletons from Premodern Joseon Tombs of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chang Seok; Lee, Soong Deok; Kim, Yi-Suk; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Previous study showed that East Asian mtDNA haplogroups, especially those of Koreans, could be successfully assigned by the coupled use of analyses on coding region SNP markers and control region mutation motifs. In this study, we tried to see if the same triple multiplex analysis for coding regions SNPs could be also applicable to ancient samples from East Asia as the complementation for sequence analysis of mtDNA control region. By the study on Joseon skeleton samples, we know that mtDNA haplogroup determined by coding region SNP markers successfully falls within the same haplogroup that sequence analysis on control region can assign. Considering that ancient samples in previous studies make no small number of errors in control region mtDNA sequencing, coding region SNP analysis can be used as good complimentary to the conventional haplogroup determination, especially of archaeological human bone samples buried underground over long periods. PMID:26345190

  16. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  17. Stack filter classifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Reid B; Hush, Don

    2009-01-01

    Just as linear models generalize the sample mean and weighted average, weighted order statistic models generalize the sample median and weighted median. This analogy can be continued informally to generalized additive modeels in the case of the mean, and Stack Filters in the case of the median. Both of these model classes have been extensively studied for signal and image processing but it is surprising to find that for pattern classification, their treatment has been significantly one sided. Generalized additive models are now a major tool in pattern classification and many different learning algorithms have been developed to fit model parameters to finite data. However Stack Filters remain largely confined to signal and image processing and learning algorithms for classification are yet to be seen. This paper is a step towards Stack Filter Classifiers and it shows that the approach is interesting from both a theoretical and a practical perspective.

  18. Transionospheric chirp event classifier

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, P.E.; Fitzgerald, T.J.; Freeman, M.J.

    1995-09-01

    In this paper we will discuss a project designed to provide computer recognition of the transionospheric chirps/pulses measured by the Blackbeard (BB) satellite, and expected to be measured by the upcoming FORTE satellite. The Blackbeard data has been perused by human means -- this has been satisfactory for the relatively small amount of data taken by Blackbeard. But with the advent of the FORTE system, which by some accounts might ``see`` thousands of events per day, it is important to provide a software/hardware method of accurately analyzing the data. In fact, we are providing an onboard DSP system for FORTE, which will test the usefulness of our Event Classifier techniques in situ. At present we are constrained to work with data from the Blackbeard satellite, and will discuss the progress made to date.

  19. Cellulases and coding sequences

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides three fungal cellulases, their coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules comprising the cellulase coding sequences, recombinant host cells and methods for producing same. The present cellulases are from Orpinomyces PC-2.

  20. Cellulases and coding sequences

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong

    2001-02-20

    The present invention provides three fungal cellulases, their coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules comprising the cellulase coding sequences, recombinant host cells and methods for producing same. The present cellulases are from Orpinomyces PC-2.

  1. Salamander Hox clusters contain repetitive DNA and expanded non-coding regions: a typical Hox structure for non-mammalian tetrapod vertebrates?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Hox genes encode transcription factors that regulate embryonic and post-embryonic developmental processes. The expression of Hox genes is regulated in part by the tight, spatial arrangement of conserved coding and non-coding sequences. The potential for evolutionary changes in Hox cluster structure is thought to be low among vertebrates; however, recent studies of a few non-mammalian taxa suggest greater variation than originally thought. Using next generation sequencing of large genomic fragments (>100 kb) from the red spotted newt (Notophthalamus viridescens), we found that the arrangement of Hox cluster genes was conserved relative to orthologous regions from other vertebrates, but the length of introns and intergenic regions varied. In particular, the distance between hoxd13 and hoxd11 is longer in newt than orthologous regions from vertebrate species with expanded Hox clusters and is predicted to exceed the length of the entire HoxD clusters (hoxd13–hoxd4) of humans, mice, and frogs. Many repetitive DNA sequences were identified for newt Hox clusters, including an enrichment of DNA transposon-like sequences relative to non-coding genomic fragments. Our results suggest that Hox cluster expansion and transposon accumulation are common features of non-mammalian tetrapod vertebrates. PMID:23561734

  2. Undetectable levels of N6-methyl adenine in mouse DNA: Cloning and analysis of PRED28, a gene coding for a putative mammalian DNA adenine methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Ratel, David; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Charles, Marie-Pierre; Platet, Nadine; Breuillaud, Lionel; Lunardi, Joël; Berger, François; Wion, Didier

    2006-05-29

    Three methylated bases, 5-methylcytosine, N4-methylcytosine and N6-methyladenine (m6A), can be found in DNA. However, to date, only 5-methylcytosine has been detected in mammalian genomes. To reinvestigate the presence of m6A in mammalian DNA, we used a highly sensitive method capable of detecting one N6-methyldeoxyadenosine per million nucleosides. Our results suggest that the total mouse genome contains, if any, less than 10(3) m6A. Experiments were next performed on PRED28, a putative mammalian N6-DNA methyltransferase. The murine PRED28 encodes two alternatively spliced RNA. However, although recombinant PRED28 proteins are found in the nucleus, no evidence for an adenine-methyltransferase activity was detected. PMID:16684535

  3. Cloning and sequence of a cDNA coding for the human beta-migrating endothelial-cell-type plasminogen activator inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Ny, T; Sawdey, M; Lawrence, D; Millan, J L; Loskutoff, D J

    1986-01-01

    A lambda gt11 expression library containing cDNA inserts prepared from human placental mRNA was screened immunologically using an antibody probe developed against the beta-migrating plasminogen activator inhibitor (beta-PAI) purified from cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells. Thirty-four positive clones were isolated after screening 7 X 10(5) phages. Three clones (lambda 1.2, lambda 3, and lambda 9.2) were randomly picked and further characterized. These contained inserts 1.9, 3.0, and 1.9 kilobases (kb) long, respectively. Escherichia coli lysogenic for lambda 9.2, but not for lambda gt11, produced a fusion protein of 180 kDa that was recognized by affinity-purified antibodies against the bovine aortic endothelial cell beta-PAI and had beta-PAI activity when analyzed by reverse fibrin autography. The largest cDNA insert was sequenced and shown to be 2944 base pairs (bp) long. It has a large 3' untranslated region [1788 bp, excluding the poly(A) tail] and contains the entire coding region of the mature protein but lacks the initiation codon and part of the signal peptide coding region at the 5' terminus. The two clones carrying the 1.9-kb cDNA inserts were partially sequenced and shown to be identical to the 3.0-kb cDNA except that they were truncated, lacking much of the 3' untranslated region. Blot hybridization analysis of electrophoretically fractionated RNA from the human fibrosarcoma cell line HT-1080 was performed using the 3.0-kb cDNA as hybridization probe. Two distinct transcripts, 2.2 and 3.0 kb, were detected, suggesting that the 1.9-kb cDNA may have been copied from the shorter RNA transcript. The amino acid sequence deduced from the cDNA was aligned with the NH2-terminal sequence of the human beta-PAI. Based on this alignment, the mature human beta-PAI is 379 amino acids long and contains an NH2-terminal valine. The deduced amino acid sequence has extensive (30%) homology with alpha 1-antitrypsin and antithrombin III, indicating that the beta

  4. Homological stabilizer codes

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Jonas T.

    2013-03-15

    In this paper we define homological stabilizer codes on qubits which encompass codes such as Kitaev's toric code and the topological color codes. These codes are defined solely by the graphs they reside on. This feature allows us to use properties of topological graph theory to determine the graphs which are suitable as homological stabilizer codes. We then show that all toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. We show that the topological color codes and toric codes correspond to two distinct classes of graphs. We define the notion of label set equivalencies and show that under a small set of constraints the only homological stabilizer codes without local logical operators are equivalent to Kitaev's toric code or to the topological color codes. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that Kitaev's toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that toric codes and color codes correspond to homological stabilizer codes on distinct graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find and classify all 2D homological stabilizer codes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find optimal codes among the homological stabilizer codes.

  5. Cloning and Stable Expression of cDNA Coding For Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule -1 (PECAM-1, CD31) in NIH-3T3 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Salehi-Lalemarzi, Hamed; Shanehbandi, Dariush; Shafaghat, Farzaneh; Abbasi-Kenarsari, Hajar; Baradaran, Behzad; Movassaghpour, Ali Akbar; Kazemi, Tohid

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: PECAM-1 (CD31) is a glycoprotein expressed on endothelial and bone marrow precursor cells. It plays important roles in angiogenesis, maintenance and integration of the cytoskeleton and direction of leukocytes to the site of inflammation. We aimed to clone the cDNA coding for human CD31 from KG1a for further subcloning and expression in NIH-3T3 mouse cell line. Methods: CD31 cDNA was cloned from KG1a cell line after total RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis. Pfu DNA polymerase-amplified specific band was ligated to pGEMT-easy vector and sub-cloned in pCMV6-Neo expression vector. After transfection of NIH-3T3 cells using 3 μg of recombinant construct and 6 μl of JetPEI transfection reagent, stable expression was obtained by selection of cells by G418 antibiotic and confirmed by surface flow cytometry. Results: 2235 bp specific band was aligned completely to human CD31 reference sequence in NCBI database. Transient and stable expression of human CD31 on transfected NIH-3T3 mouse fibroblast cells was achieved (23% and 96%, respectively) as shown by flow cytometry. Conclusion: Due to murine origin of NIH-3T3 cell line, CD31-expressing NIH-3T3 cells could be useful as immunogen in production of diagnostic monoclonal antibodies against human CD31, with no need for purification of recombinant proteins. PMID:26236664

  6. Cloning and expression of a cDNA coding for the human platelet-derived growth factor receptor: Evidence for more than one receptor class

    SciTech Connect

    Gronwald, R.G.K.; Grant, F.J.; Haldeman, B.A.; Hart, C.E.; O'Hara, P.J.; Hagen, F.S.; Ross, R.; Bowen-Pope, D.F.; Murray, M.J. )

    1988-05-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a cDNA encoding the human platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor is presented. The cDNA contains an open reading frame that codes for a protein of 1106 amino acids. Comparison to the mouse PDGF receptor reveals an overall amino acid sequence identity of 86%. This sequence identity rises to 98% in the cytoplasmic split tyrosine kinase domain. RNA blot hybridization analysis of poly(A){sup +} RNA from human dermal fibroblasts detects a major and a minor transcript using the cDNA as a probe. Baby hamster kidney cells, transfected with an expression vector containing the receptor cDNA, express an {approx} 190-kDa cell surface protein that is recognized by an anti-human PDGF receptor antibody. The recombinant PDGF receptor is functional in the transfected baby hamster kidney cells as demonstrated by ligand-induced phosphorylation of the receptor. Binding properties of the recombinant PDGF receptor were also assessed with pure preparations of BB and AB isoforms of PDGF. Unlike human dermal fibroblasts, which bind both isoforms with high affinity, the transfected baby hamster kidney cells bind only the BB isoform of PDGF with high affinity. This observation is consistent with the existence of more than one PDGF receptor class.

  7. Analysis of the coding potential of the ORF in the control region of the female-transmitted Mytilus mtDNA.

    PubMed

    Minoiu, Ioana; Burzyński, Artur; Breton, Sophie

    2016-01-15

    Key elements in determining the sex-specific transmission of the female and male mitochondrial genomes in Mytilus species with doubly uniparental inheritance of mtDNA are suspected to be contained in the control region. A novel F genome-specific open reading frame (ORF) identified in this region has previously been hypothesized to be involved in the DUI mechanism. In their recent work Kyriakou et al. (2014a) questioned the functionality of this ORF. Here, we present evidence that this ORF is transcribed and may thus code for a functional product. PMID:26424598

  8. Classifying partner femicide.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Louise; Hamilton-Giachritsis, Catherine; Browne, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    The heterogeneity of domestic violent men has long been established. However, research has failed to examine this phenomenon among men committing the most severe form of domestic violence. This study aims to use a multidimensional approach to empirically construct a classification system of men who are incarcerated for the murder of their female partner based on the Holtzworth-Munroe and Stuart (1994) typology. Ninety men who had been convicted and imprisoned for the murder of their female partner or spouse in England were identified from two prison samples. A content dictionary defining offense and offender characteristics associated with two dimensions of psychopathology and criminality was developed. These variables were extracted from institutional records via content analysis and analyzed for thematic structure using multidimensional scaling procedures. The resultant framework classified 80% (n = 72) of the sample into three subgroups of men characterized by (a) low criminality/low psychopathology (15%), (b) moderate-high criminality/ high psychopathology (36%), and (c) high criminality/low-moderate psychopathology (49%). The latter two groups are akin to Holtzworth-Munroe and Stuart's (1994) generally violent/antisocial and dysphoric/borderline offender, respectively. The implications for intervention, developing consensus in research methodology across the field, and examining typologies of domestic violent men prospectively are discussed. PMID:18087033

  9. XR-C1, a new CHO cell mutant which is defective in DNA-PKcs, is impaired in both V(D)J coding and signal joint formation.

    PubMed Central

    Errami, A; He, D M; Friedl, A A; Overkamp, W J; Morolli, B; Hendrickson, E A; Eckardt-Schupp, F; Oshimura, M; Lohman, P H; Jackson, S P; Zdzienicka, M Z

    1998-01-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) plays an important role in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair and V(D)J recombination. We have isolated a new X-ray-sensitive CHO cell line, XR-C1, which is impaired in DSB repair and which was assigned to complementation group 7, the group that is defective in the XRCC7 / SCID ( Prkdc ) gene encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA-PK (DNA-PKcs). Consistent with this complementation analysis, XR-C1 cells lackeddetectable DNA-PKcs protein, did not display DNA-PK catalytic activity and were complemented by the introduction of a single human chromosome 8 (providing the Prkdc gene). The impact of the XR-C1 mutation on V(D)J recombination was quite different from that found in most rodent cells defective in DNA-PKcs, which are preferentially blocked in coding joint formation, whereas XR-C1 cells were defective in forming both coding and signal joints. These results suggest that DNA-PKcs is required for both coding and signal joint formation during V(D)J recombination and that the XR-C1 mutant cell line may prove to be a useful tool in understanding this pathway. PMID:9628911

  10. Characterization of Non-coding DNA Satellites Associated with Sweepoviruses (Genus Begomovirus, Geminiviridae) - Definition of a Distinct Class of Begomovirus-Associated Satellites.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Gloria; Trenado, Helena P; Fiallo-Olivé, Elvira; Chirinos, Dorys; Geraud-Pouey, Francis; Briddon, Rob W; Navas-Castillo, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Begomoviruses (family Geminiviridae) are whitefly-transmitted, plant-infecting single-stranded DNA viruses that cause crop losses throughout the warmer parts of the World. Sweepoviruses are a phylogenetically distinct group of begomoviruses that infect plants of the family Convolvulaceae, including sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas). Two classes of subviral molecules are often associated with begomoviruses, particularly in the Old World; the betasatellites and the alphasatellites. An analysis of sweet potato and Ipomoea indica samples from Spain and Merremia dissecta samples from Venezuela identified small non-coding subviral molecules in association with several distinct sweepoviruses. The sequences of 18 clones were obtained and found to be structurally similar to tomato leaf curl virus-satellite (ToLCV-sat, the first DNA satellite identified in association with a begomovirus), with a region with significant sequence identity to the conserved region of betasatellites, an A-rich sequence, a predicted stem-loop structure containing the nonanucleotide TAATATTAC, and a second predicted stem-loop. These sweepovirus-associated satellites join an increasing number of ToLCV-sat-like non-coding satellites identified recently. Although sharing some features with betasatellites, evidence is provided to suggest that the ToLCV-sat-like satellites are distinct from betasatellites and should be considered a separate class of satellites, for which the collective name deltasatellites is proposed. PMID:26925037

  11. Characterization of Non-coding DNA Satellites Associated with Sweepoviruses (Genus Begomovirus, Geminiviridae) – Definition of a Distinct Class of Begomovirus-Associated Satellites

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Gloria; Trenado, Helena P.; Fiallo-Olivé, Elvira; Chirinos, Dorys; Geraud-Pouey, Francis; Briddon, Rob W.; Navas-Castillo, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Begomoviruses (family Geminiviridae) are whitefly-transmitted, plant-infecting single-stranded DNA viruses that cause crop losses throughout the warmer parts of the World. Sweepoviruses are a phylogenetically distinct group of begomoviruses that infect plants of the family Convolvulaceae, including sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas). Two classes of subviral molecules are often associated with begomoviruses, particularly in the Old World; the betasatellites and the alphasatellites. An analysis of sweet potato and Ipomoea indica samples from Spain and Merremia dissecta samples from Venezuela identified small non-coding subviral molecules in association with several distinct sweepoviruses. The sequences of 18 clones were obtained and found to be structurally similar to tomato leaf curl virus-satellite (ToLCV-sat, the first DNA satellite identified in association with a begomovirus), with a region with significant sequence identity to the conserved region of betasatellites, an A-rich sequence, a predicted stem–loop structure containing the nonanucleotide TAATATTAC, and a second predicted stem–loop. These sweepovirus-associated satellites join an increasing number of ToLCV-sat-like non-coding satellites identified recently. Although sharing some features with betasatellites, evidence is provided to suggest that the ToLCV-sat-like satellites are distinct from betasatellites and should be considered a separate class of satellites, for which the collective name deltasatellites is proposed. PMID:26925037

  12. Arabidopsis RNASE THREE LIKE2 Modulates the Expression of Protein-Coding Genes via 24-Nucleotide Small Interfering RNA-Directed DNA Methylation[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hachet, Mélanie; Comella, Pascale; Zytnicki, Matthias; Vaucheret, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    RNaseIII enzymes catalyze the cleavage of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and have diverse functions in RNA maturation. Arabidopsis thaliana RNASE THREE LIKE2 (RTL2), which carries one RNaseIII and two dsRNA binding (DRB) domains, is a unique Arabidopsis RNaseIII enzyme resembling the budding yeast small interfering RNA (siRNA)-producing Dcr1 enzyme. Here, we show that RTL2 modulates the production of a subset of small RNAs and that this activity depends on both its RNaseIII and DRB domains. However, the mode of action of RTL2 differs from that of Dcr1. Whereas Dcr1 directly cleaves dsRNAs into 23-nucleotide siRNAs, RTL2 likely cleaves dsRNAs into longer molecules, which are subsequently processed into small RNAs by the DICER-LIKE enzymes. Depending on the dsRNA considered, RTL2-mediated maturation either improves (RTL2-dependent loci) or reduces (RTL2-sensitive loci) the production of small RNAs. Because the vast majority of RTL2-regulated loci correspond to transposons and intergenic regions producing 24-nucleotide siRNAs that guide DNA methylation, RTL2 depletion modifies DNA methylation in these regions. Nevertheless, 13% of RTL2-regulated loci correspond to protein-coding genes. We show that changes in 24-nucleotide siRNA levels also affect DNA methylation levels at such loci and inversely correlate with mRNA steady state levels, thus implicating RTL2 in the regulation of protein-coding gene expression. PMID:26764378

  13. Cloning and sequence analysis of cDNA coding for a lectin from Helianthus tuberosus callus and its jasmonate-induced expression.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, R; Yasokawa, D; Okumura, Y; Nagashima, K

    2000-06-01

    Two lectins (designated as HTA I and HTA II) that seemed to be isolectins were found in Helianthus tuberosus callus. cDNA encoding HTA I was isolated from a ZAP Express expression library by immunoselection by using the anti-HTA antiserum. The sequence of this cDNA consisted of 432 bp nucleotides coding for a polypeptide of 143 amino acid residues (Mr, 15,314). When introduced into E. coli, the cDNA directed the synthesis of active HTA I as indicated by the hemagglutination activity. The deduced amino acid sequence showed homology with some lectins and jasmonate-induced proteins. When callus was cultured in the presence of methyl jasmonate (MeJA), the hemagglutination activity increased in a dose-dependent manner. The levels of expression of the HTA protein and of the corresponding mRNA also increased in the treated callus. In view of these results, HTA I is considered to be a jasmonate-induced protein. PMID:10923797

  14. The non-coding B2 RNA binds to the DNA cleft and active-site region of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Ponicsan, Steven L; Houel, Stephane; Old, William M; Ahn, Natalie G; Goodrich, James A; Kugel, Jennifer F

    2013-10-01

    The B2 family of short interspersed elements is transcribed into non-coding RNA by RNA polymerase III. The ~180-nt B2 RNA has been shown to potently repress mRNA transcription by binding tightly to RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and assembling with it into complexes on promoter DNA, where it keeps the polymerase from properly engaging the promoter DNA. Mammalian Pol II is an ~500-kDa complex that contains 12 different protein subunits, providing many possible surfaces for interaction with B2 RNA. We found that the carboxy-terminal domain of the largest Pol II subunit was not required for B2 RNA to bind Pol II and repress transcription in vitro. To identify the surface on Pol II to which the minimal functional region of B2 RNA binds, we coupled multi-step affinity purification, reversible formaldehyde cross-linking, peptide sequencing by mass spectrometry, and analysis of peptide enrichment. The Pol II peptides most highly recovered after cross-linking to B2 RNA mapped to the DNA binding cleft and active-site region of Pol II. These studies determine the location of a defined nucleic acid binding site on a large, native, multi-subunit complex and provide insight into the mechanism of transcriptional repression by B2 RNA. PMID:23416138

  15. Emergent behaviors of classifier systems

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, S.; Miller, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses some examples of emergent behavior in classifier systems, describes some recently developed methods for studying them based on dynamical systems theory, and presents some initial results produced by the methodology. The goal of this work is to find techniques for noticing when interesting emergent behaviors of classifier systems emerge, to study how such behaviors might emerge over time, and make suggestions for designing classifier systems that exhibit preferred behaviors. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Two hybrid plasmids with D. melanogaster DNA sequences complementary to mRNA coding for the major heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Schedl, P; Artavanis-Tsakonas, S; Steward, R; Gehring, W J; Mirault, M E; Goldschmidt-Clermont, M; Moran, L; Tissières, A

    1978-08-01

    The isolation and partial characterization of two cloned segments of Drosophila melanogaster DNA containing "heat shock" gene sequences is described. We have inserted sheared embryonic D. melanogaster DNA by the poly(dA-dt) connector method (Lobban and Kaiser, 1973) into the R1 restriction site of the ampicillin-resistant plasmid pSF2124 (So, Gill and Falkow, 1975). A collection of independent hybrid plasmids was screened by colony hybridization (Grunstein and Hogness, 1975) for sequences complementary to in vitro labeled polysomal poly(A)+ heat shock RNA. Two clones were identified which contain sequences complementary to a heat shock mRNA species that directs the in vitro synthesis of the 70,000 dalton heat-induced polypeptide. Both cloned segments hybridize in situ to the heat-induced puff sites located at 87A and 87C of the salivary gland polytene chromosomes. PMID:99246

  17. Restriction maps of the regions coding for methicillin and tobramycin resistances on chromosomal DNA in methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    PubMed Central

    Ubukata, K; Nonoguchi, R; Matsuhashi, M; Song, M D; Konno, M

    1989-01-01

    Chromosomal BamHI DNA fragments containing both the mecA gene encoding the penicillin-binding protein responsible for methicillin resistance and the aadD gene encoding 4',4"-adenylyltransferase responsible for tobramycin resistance were cloned from three methicillin- and tobramycin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus and one strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis. Physical maps of the fragments were similar, suggesting their unique origin. Images PMID:2817861

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of Pythium insidiosum Thai strains using cytochrome oxidase II (COX II) DNA coding sequences and internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS).

    PubMed

    Kammarnjesadakul, Patcharee; Palaga, Tanapat; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya; Mendoza, Leonel; Krajaejun, Theerapong; Vanittanakom, Nongnuch; Tongchusak, Songsak; Denduangboripant, Jessada; Chindamporn, Ariya

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the phylogenetic relationship among Pythium insidiosum isolates in Thailand, we investigated the genomic DNA of 31 P. insidiosum strains isolated from humans and environmental sources from Thailand, and two from North and Central America. We used PCR to amplify the partial COX II DNA coding sequences and the ITS regions of these isolates. The nucleotide sequences of both amplicons were analyzed by the Bioedit program. Phylogenetic analysis using genetic distance method with Neighbor Joining (NJ) approach was performed using the MEGA4 software. Additional sequences of three other Pythium species, Phytophthora sojae and Lagenidium giganteum were employed as outgroups. The sizes of the COX II amplicons varied from 558-564 bp, whereas the ITS products varied from approximately 871-898 bp. Corrected sequence divergences with Kimura 2-parameter model calculated for the COX II and the ITS DNA sequences ranged between 0.0000-0.0608 and 0.0000-0.2832, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis using both the COX II and the ITS DNA sequences showed similar trees, where we found three sister groups (A(TH), B(TH), and C(TH)) among P. insidiosum strains. All Thai isolates from clinical cases and environmental sources were placed in two separated sister groups (B(TH) and C(TH)), whereas the Americas isolates were grouped into A(TH.) Although the phylogenetic tree based on both regions showed similar distribution, the COX II phylogenetic tree showed higher resolution than the one using the ITS sequences. Our study indicates that COX II gene is the better of the two alternatives to study the phylogenetic relationships among P. insidiosum strains. PMID:20818919

  19. Feature Selection and Effective Classifiers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deogun, Jitender S.; Choubey, Suresh K.; Raghavan, Vijay V.; Sever, Hayri

    1998-01-01

    Develops and analyzes four algorithms for feature selection in the context of rough set methodology. Experimental results confirm the expected relationship between the time complexity of these algorithms and the classification accuracy of the resulting upper classifiers. When compared, results of upper classifiers perform better than lower…

  20. The evolution of the coding exome of the Arabidopsis species - the influences of DNA methylation, relative exon position, and exon length

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The evolution of the coding exome is a major driving force of functional divergence both between species and between protein isoforms. Exons at different positions in the transcript or in different transcript isoforms may (1) mutate at different rates due to variations in DNA methylation level; and (2) serve distinct biological roles, and thus be differentially targeted by natural selection. Furthermore, intrinsic exonic features, such as exon length, may also affect the evolution of individual exons. Importantly, the evolutionary effects of these intrinsic/extrinsic features may differ significantly between animals and plants. Such inter-lineage differences, however, have not been systematically examined. Results Here we examine how DNA methylation at CpG dinucleotides (CpG methylation), in the context of intrinsic exonic features (exon length and relative exon position in the transcript), influences the evolution of coding exons of Arabidopsis thaliana. We observed fairly different evolutionary patterns in A. thaliana as compared with those reported for animals. Firstly, the mutagenic effect of CpG methylation is the strongest for internal exons and the weakest for first exons despite the stringent selective constraints on the former group. Secondly, the mutagenic effect of CpG methylation increases significantly with length in first exons but not in the other two exon groups. Thirdly, CpG methylation level is correlated with evolutionary rates (dS, dN, and the dN/dS ratio) with markedly different patterns among the three exon groups. The correlations are generally positive, negative, and mixed for first, last, and internal exons, respectively. Fourthly, exon length is a CpG methylation-independent indicator of evolutionary rates, particularly for dN and the dN/dS ratio in last and internal exons. Finally, the evolutionary patterns of coding exons with regard to CpG methylation differ significantly between Arabidopsis species and mammals. Conclusions

  1. The tamas gene, identified as a mutation that disrupts larval behavior in Drosophila melanogaster, codes for the mitochondrial DNA polymerase catalytic subunit (DNApol-gamma125).

    PubMed Central

    Iyengar, B; Roote, J; Campos, A R

    1999-01-01

    From a screen of pupal lethal lines of Drosophila melanogaster we identified a mutant strain that displayed a reproducible reduction in the larval response to light. Moreover, this mutant strain showed defects in the development of the adult visual system and failure to undergo behavioral changes characteristic of the wandering stage. The foraging third instar larvae remained in the food substrate for a prolonged period and died at or just before pupariation. Using a new assay for individual larval photobehavior we determined that the lack of response to light in these mutants was due to a primary deficit in locomotion. The mutation responsible for these phenotypes was mapped to the lethal complementation group l(2)34Dc, which we renamed tamas (translated from Sanskrit as "dark inertia"). Sequencing of mutant alleles demonstrated that tamas codes for the mitochondrial DNA polymerase catalytic subunit (DNApol-gamma125). PMID:10581287

  2. Rare Failures of DNA Bar Codes to Separate Morphologically Distinct Species in a Biodiversity Survey of Iberian Leaf Beetles

    PubMed Central

    Baselga, Andrés; Gómez-Rodríguez, Carola; Novoa, Francisco; Vogler, Alfried P.

    2013-01-01

    During a survey of genetic and species diversity patterns of leaf beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) assemblages across the Iberian Peninsula we found a broad congruence between morphologically delimited species and variation in the cytochrome oxidase (cox1) gene. However, one species pair each in the genera Longitarsus Berthold and Pachybrachis Chevrolat was inseparable using molecular methods, whereas diagnostic morphological characters (including male or female genitalia) unequivocally separated the named species. Parsimony haplotype networks and maximum likelihood trees built from cox1 showed high genetic structure within each species pair, but no correlation with the morphological types and neither with geographic distributions. This contrasted with all analysed congeneric species, which were recovered as monophyletic. A limited number of specimens were sequenced for the nuclear 18S rRNA gene, which showed no or very limited variation within the species pair and no separation of morphological types. These results suggest that processes of lineage sorting for either group are lagging behind the clear morphological and presumably reproductive separation. In the Iberian chrysomelids, incongruence between DNA-based and morphological delimitations is a rare exception, but the discovery of these species pairs may be useful as an evolutionary model for studying the process of speciation in this ecological and geographical setting. In addition, the study of biodiversity patterns based on DNA requires an evolutionary understanding of these incongruences and their potential causes. PMID:24040352

  3. Color bar coding the BRCA1 gene on combed DNA: a useful strategy for detecting large gene rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Gad, S; Aurias, A; Puget, N; Mairal, A; Schurra, C; Montagna, M; Pages, S; Caux, V; Mazoyer, S; Bensimon, A; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D

    2001-05-01

    Genetic linkage data have shown that alterations of the BRCA1 gene are responsible for the majority of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. BRCA1 germline mutations, however, are found less frequently than expected. Mutation detection strategies, which are generally based on the polymerase chain reaction, therefore focus on point and small gene alterations. These approaches do not allow for the detection of large gene rearrangements, which also can be involved in BRCA1 alterations. Indeed, a few of them, spread over the entire BRCA1 gene, have been detected recently by Southern blotting or transcript analysis. We have developed an alternative strategy allowing a panoramic view of the BRCA1 gene, based on dynamic molecular combing and the design of a full four-color bar code of the BRCA1 region. The strategy was tested with the study of four large BRCA1 rearrangements previously reported. In addition, when screening a series of 10 breast and ovarian cancer families negatively tested for point mutation in BRCA1/2, we found an unreported 17-kb BRCA1 duplication encompassing exons 3 to 8. The detection of rearrangements as small as 2 to 6 kb with respect to the normal size of the studied fragment is achieved when the BRCA1 region is divided into 10 fragments. In addition, as the BRCA1 bar code is a morphologic approach, the direct observation of complex and likely underreported rearrangements, such as inversions and insertions, becomes possible. PMID:11284038

  4. Application of DNA bar codes for screening of industrially important fungi: the haplotype of Trichoderma harzianum sensu stricto indicates superior chitinase formation.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Viviana; Seidl, Verena; Szakacs, George; Komoń-Zelazowska, Monika; Kubicek, Christian P; Druzhinina, Irina S

    2007-11-01

    Selection of suitable strains for biotechnological purposes is frequently a random process supported by high-throughput methods. Using chitinase production by Hypocrea lixii/Trichoderma harzianum as a model, we tested whether fungal strains with superior enzyme formation may be diagnosed by DNA bar codes. We analyzed sequences of two phylogenetic marker loci, internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and ITS2 of the rRNA-encoding gene cluster and the large intron of the elongation factor 1-alpha gene, tef1, from 50 isolates of H. lixii/T. harzianum, which were also tested to determine their ability to produce chitinases in solid-state fermentation (SSF). Statistically supported superior chitinase production was obtained for strains carrying one of the observed ITS1 and ITS2 and tef1 alleles corresponding to an allele of T. harzianum type strain CBS 226.95. A tef1-based DNA bar code tool, TrichoCHIT, for rapid identification of these strains was developed. The geographic origin of the strains was irrelevant for chitinase production. The improved chitinase production by strains containing this haplotype was not due to better growth on N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosamine or glucosamine. Isoenzyme electrophoresis showed that neither the isoenzyme profile of N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidases or the endochitinases nor the intensity of staining of individual chitinase bands correlated with total chitinase in the culture filtrate. The superior chitinase producers did not exhibit similarly increased cellulase formation. Biolog Phenotype MicroArray analysis identified lack of N-acetyl-beta-D-mannosamine utilization as a specific trait of strains with the chitinase-overproducing haplotype. This observation was used to develop a plate screening assay for rapid microbiological identification of the strains. The data illustrate that desired industrial properties may be an attribute of certain populations within a species, and screening procedures should thus include a balanced mixture of all

  5. PCR assay based on DNA coding for 16S rRNA for detection and identification of mycobacteria in clinical samples.

    PubMed Central

    Kox, L F; van Leeuwen, J; Knijper, S; Jansen, H M; Kolk, A H

    1995-01-01

    A PCR and a reverse cross blot hybridization assay were developed for the detection and identification of mycobacteria in clinical samples. The PCR amplifies a part of the DNA coding for 16S rRNA with a set of primers that is specific for the genus Mycobacterium and that flanks species-specific sequences within the genes coding for 16S rRNA. The PCR product is analyzed in a reverse cross blot hybridization assay with probes specific for M. tuberculosis complex (pTub1), M. avium (pAvi3), M. intracellulare (pInt5 and pInt7), M. kansasii complex-M. scrofulaceum complex (pKan1), M. xenopi (pXen1), M. fortuitum (pFor1), M. smegmatis (pSme1), and Mycobacterium spp. (pMyc5a). The PCR assay can detect 10 fg of DNA, the equivalent of two mycobacteria. The specificities of the probes were tested with 108 mycobacterial strains (33 species) and 31 nonmycobacterial strains (of 17 genera). The probes pAvi3, pInt5, pInt7, pKan1, pXen1, and pMyc5a were specific. With probes pTub1, pFor1, and pSme1, slight cross hybridization occurred. However, the mycobacterial strains from which the cross-hybridizing PCR products were derived belonged to nonpathogenic or nonopportunistic species which do not occur in clinical samples. The test was used on 31 different clinical specimens obtained from patients suspected of having mycobacterial disease, including a patient with a double mycobacterial infection. The samples included sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage, tissue biopsy samples, cerebrospinal fluid, pus, peritoneal fluid, pleural fluid, and blood. The results of the PCR assay agreed with those of conventional identification methods or with clinical data, showing that the test can be used for the direct and rapid detection and identification of mycobacteria in clinical samples. PMID:8586707

  6. Classifying Chondrules Based on Cathodoluminesence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristarela, T. C.; Sears, D. W.

    2011-03-01

    Sears et al. (1991) proposed a scheme to classify chondrules based on cathodoluminesence color and electron microprobe analysis. This research evaluates that scheme and criticisms received from Grossman and Brearley (2005).

  7. Cloning by differential screening of a Xenopus cDNA coding for a protein highly homologous to cdc2.

    PubMed Central

    Paris, J; Le Guellec, R; Couturier, A; Le Guellec, K; Omilli, F; Camonis, J; MacNeill, S; Philippe, M

    1991-01-01

    Fertilization of Xenopus laevis eggs triggers a period of rapid cell division comprising 12 nearly synchronous mitoses. Protein synthesis is required for these divisions, and new proteins appear after fertilization. Others proteins however, which are synthesized in the unfertilized egg, are no longer made in the early embryo. To identify such proteins, a differential screen of an egg cDNA library gave nine clones corresponding to mRNAs that are deadenylylated soon after fertilization. The sequence of one of these clones (Eg1) revealed a high homology to p34cdc2, the kinase subunit of maturation-promoting factor. Only 12 amino acids in the deduced amino acid sequence were unique to Eg1 when its sequence was compared to all other known examples of cdc2. Despite this strong similarity, however, Eg1 was unable to complement a yeast cdc2- mutant in Schizosaccharomyces pombe or a cdc28 mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Four Eg1 transcripts, two major and two minor, were found in Xenopus oocytes and early embryos. These RNAs appeared very early (stage I) in oogenesis and their level remained constant until the midblastula transition, at which time they declined. Eg1 RNA is found in the poly(A)+ fraction of oocytes only between the time of meiotic maturation and fertilization--that is to say, in the unfertilized egg. At fertilization the RNA loses its poly(A) tail and at the same time leaves the polyribosomes. Images PMID:1704128

  8. Fast turnover of genome transcription across evolutionary time exposes entire non-coding DNA to de novo gene emergence

    PubMed Central

    Neme, Rafik; Tautz, Diethard

    2016-01-01

    Deep sequencing analyses have shown that a large fraction of genomes is transcribed, but the significance of this transcription is much debated. Here, we characterize the phylogenetic turnover of poly-adenylated transcripts in a comprehensive sampling of taxa of the mouse (genus Mus), spanning a phylogenetic distance of 10 Myr. Using deep RNA sequencing we find that at a given sequencing depth transcriptome coverage becomes saturated within a taxon, but keeps extending when compared between taxa, even at this very shallow phylogenetic level. Our data show a high turnover of transcriptional states between taxa and that no major transcript-free islands exist across evolutionary time. This suggests that the entire genome can be transcribed into poly-adenylated RNA when viewed at an evolutionary time scale. We conclude that any part of the non-coding genome can potentially become subject to evolutionary functionalization via de novo gene evolution within relatively short evolutionary time spans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09977.001 PMID:26836309

  9. 3D-Trajectories Adopted by Coding and Regulatory DNA Elements: First-Passage Times for Genomic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Joseph S.; Zhang, Yaojun; Dudko, Olga K.; Murre, Cornelis

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY During B lymphocyte development, immunoglobulin heavy chain variable (VH), diversity (DH) and joining (JH) segments assemble to generate a diverse antigen receptor repertoire. Here we have marked the distal VH and DH-JH-Eμ regions with Tet-operator binding sites and traced their 3D-trajectories in pro-B cells transduced with a retrovirus encoding Tet-repressor-EGFP. We found that these elements displayed fractional Langevin motion (fLm) due to the viscoelastic hindrance from the surrounding network of proteins and chromatin fibers. Using fractional Langevin dynamics modeling, we found that, with high probability, DHJH elements reach a VH element within minutes. Spatial confinement emerged as the dominant parameter that determined the frequency of such encounters. We propose that the viscoelastic nature of the nuclear environment causes coding elements and regulatory elements to bounce back and forth in a spring-like fashion until specific genomic interactions are established and that spatial confinement of topological domains largely controls first-passage times for genomic interactions. PMID:24998931

  10. Cloning and DNA sequence of the gene coding for Clostridium thermocellum cellulase Ss (CelS), a major cellulosome component.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, W K; Kruus, K; Wu, J H

    1993-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 produces an extracellular cellulase system capable of hydrolyzing crystalline cellulose. The enzyme system involves a multicomponent protein aggregate (the cellulosome) with a total molecular weight in the millions, impeding mechanistic studies. However, two major components of the aggregate, SS (M(r) = 82,000) and SL (M(r) = 250,000), which act synergistically to hydrolyze crystalline cellulose, have been identified (J. H. D. Wu, W. H. Orme-Johnson, and A. L. Demain, Biochemistry 27:1703-1709, 1988). To further study this synergism, we cloned and sequenced the gene (celS) coding for the SS (CelS) protein by using a degenerate, inosine-containing oligonucleotide probe whose sequence was derived from the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the CelS protein. The open reading frame of celS consisted of 2,241 bp encoding 741 amino acid residues. It encoded the N-terminal amino acid sequence and two internal peptide sequences determined for the native CelS protein. A putative ribosome binding site was identified at the 5' end of the gene. A putative signal peptide of 27 amino acid residues was adjacent to the N terminus of the CelS protein. The predicted molecular weight of the secreted protein was 80,670. The celS gene contained a conserved reiterated sequence encoding 24 amino acid residues found in proteins encoded by many other clostridial cel or xyn genes. A palindromic structure was found downstream from the open reading frame. The celS gene is unique among the known cel genes of C. thermocellum. However, it is highly homologous to the partial open reading frame found in C. cellulolyticum and in Caldocellum saccharolyticum, indicating that these genes belong to a new family of cel genes. Images PMID:8444792

  11. Testing the use of ITS rDNA and protein-coding genes in the generic and species delimitation of the lichen genus Usnea (Parmeliaceae, Ascomycota).

    PubMed

    Truong, Camille; Divakar, Pradeep K; Yahr, Rebecca; Crespo, Ana; Clerc, Philippe

    2013-08-01

    In lichen-forming fungi, traditional taxonomical concepts are frequently in conflict with molecular data, and identifying appropriate taxonomic characters to describe phylogenetic clades remains challenging in many groups. The selection of suitable markers for the reconstruction of solid phylogenetic hypotheses is therefore fundamental. The lichen genus Usnea is highly diverse, with more than 350 estimated species, distributed in polar, temperate and tropical regions. The phylogeny and classification of Usnea have been a matter of debate, given the lack of phenotypic characters to describe phylogenetic clades and the low degree of resolution of phylogenetic trees. In this study, we investigated the phylogenetic relationships of 52 Usnea species from across the genus, based on ITS rDNA, nuLSU, and two protein-coding genes RPB1 and MCM7. ITS comprised several highly variable regions, containing substantial genetic signal, but also susceptible to causing bias in the generation of the alignment. We compared several methods of alignment of ITS and found that a simultaneous optimization of alignment and phylogeny (using BAli-phy) improved significantly both the topology and the resolution of the phylogenetic tree. However the resolution was even better when using protein-coding genes, especially RPB1 although it is less variable. The phylogeny based on the concatenated dataset revealed that the genus Usnea is subdivided into four highly-supported clades, corresponding to the traditionally circumscribed subgenera Eumitria, Dolichousnea, Neuropogon and Usnea. However, characters that have been used to describe these clades are often homoplasious within the phylogeny and their parallel evolution is suggested. On the other hand, most of the species were reconstructed as monophyletic, indicating that combinations of phenotypic characters are suitable discriminators for delimitating species, but are inadequate to describe generic subdivisions. PMID:23603312

  12. The Classified Catalogue: LU Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, C.-C.; Mount, Joan

    1971-01-01

    The Laurentian University Library has evolved a bilingual classified catalogue consisting of a public shelflist supplement by a French/English subject index. This produces an effective tool for locating all materials pertaining to a given topic in either or both of two languages. (Author/NH)

  13. Method for classifying ceramic powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takabe, K.

    1983-01-01

    Under the invented method, powder A of particles of less than 10 microns, and carrier powder B, whose average particle diameter is more than five times that of powder A, are premixed so that the powder is less than 40 wt.% of the total mixture, before classifying.

  14. Rheostatic Regulation of the SERCA/Phospholamban Membrane Protein Complex Using Non-Coding RNA and Single-Stranded DNA oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Soller, Kailey J.; Verardi, Raffaello; Jing, Meng; Abrol, Neha; Yang, Jing; Walsh, Naomi; Vostrikov, Vitaly V.; Robia, Seth L.; Bowser, Michael T.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2015-01-01

    The membrane protein complex between sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) and phospholamban (PLN) is a prime therapeutic target for reversing cardiac contractile dysfunctions caused by calcium mishandling. So far, however, efforts to develop drugs specific for this protein complex have failed. Here, we show that non-coding RNAs and single-stranded DNAs (ssDNAs) interact with and regulate the function of the SERCA/PLN complex in a tunable manner. Both in HEK cells expressing the SERCA/PLN complex, as well as in cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum preparations, these short oligonucleotides bind and reverse PLN’s inhibitory effects on SERCA, increasing the ATPase’s apparent Ca2+ affinity. Solid-state NMR experiments revealed that ssDNA interacts with PLN specifically, shifting the conformational equilibrium of the SERCA/PLN complex from an inhibitory to a non-inhibitory state. Importantly, we achieved rheostatic control of SERCA function by modulating the length of ssDNAs. Since restoration of Ca2+ flux to physiological levels represents a viable therapeutic avenue for cardiomyopathies, our results suggest that oligonucleotide-based drugs could be used to fine-tune SERCA function to counterbalance the extent of the pathological insults. PMID:26292938

  15. Lichenase and coding sequences

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong

    2000-08-15

    The present invention provides a fungal lichenase, i.e., an endo-1,3-1,4-.beta.-D-glucanohydrolase, its coding sequence, recombinant DNA molecules comprising the lichenase coding sequences, recombinant host cells and methods for producing same. The present lichenase is from Orpinomyces PC-2.

  16. 48 CFR 1803.907 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Classified information... Whistleblower Protections 1803.907 Classified information. Nothing in this subpart provides any rights to disclose classified information not otherwise provided by law....

  17. 75 FR 705 - Classified National Security Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... Executive Order 13526--Classified National Security Information Memorandum of December 29, 2009--Implementation of the Executive Order ``Classified National Security Information'' Order of December 29, 2009... ] Executive Order 13526 of December 29, 2009 Classified National Security Information This order prescribes...

  18. 76 FR 34761 - Classified National Security Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ... Classified National Security Information AGENCY: Marine Mammal Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... information, as directed by Information Security Oversight Office regulations. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT..., ``Classified National Security Information,'' and 32 CFR part 2001, ``Classified National Security...

  19. Translator, Traitor, Source of Data: Classifying Translations of "Foreign Phrases" as an Awareness-Raising Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkinson, Brian

    1998-01-01

    A system for classifying (coding) translations of sentence-length or similar material is presented and illustrated with codings of entries in the "Dictionary of Foreign Phrases and Classical Quotations." Problems in coding are discussed, relating especially to intertextuality, intention, and ownership. The system is intended for pedagogic use, and…

  20. Clustering signatures classify directed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahnert, S. E.; Fink, T. M. A.

    2008-09-01

    We use a clustering signature, based on a recently introduced generalization of the clustering coefficient to directed networks, to analyze 16 directed real-world networks of five different types: social networks, genetic transcription networks, word adjacency networks, food webs, and electric circuits. We show that these five classes of networks are cleanly separated in the space of clustering signatures due to the statistical properties of their local neighborhoods, demonstrating the usefulness of clustering signatures as a classifier of directed networks.

  1. Classifying Southern Hemisphere extratropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catto, Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    There is a wide variety of flavours of extratropical cyclones in the Southern Hemisphere, with differing structures and lifecycles. Previous studies have classified these manually using upper level flow features or satellite data. In order to be able to evaluate climate models and understand how extratropical cyclones might change in the future, we need to be able to use an automated method to classify cyclones. Extratropical cyclones have been identified in the Southern Hemisphere from the ERA-Interim reanalysis dataset with a commonly used identification and tracking algorithm that employs 850hPa relative vorticity. A clustering method applied to large-scale fields from ERA-Interim at the time of cyclone genesis (when the cyclone is first identified), has been used to objectively classify these cyclones in the Southern Hemisphere. This simple method is able to separate the cyclones into classes with quite different development mechanisms and lifecycle characteristics. Some of the classes seem to coincide with previous manual classifications on shorter timescales, showing their utility for climate model evaluation and climate change studies.

  2. Lactococcus lactis carrying the pValac DNA expression vector coding for IL-10 reduces inflammation in a murine model of experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are intestinal disorders characterized by inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. Interleukin-10 is one of the most important anti-inflammatory cytokines involved in the intestinal immune system and because of its role in downregulating inflammatory cascades, its potential for IBD therapy is under study. We previously presented the development of an invasive strain of Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis) producing Fibronectin Binding Protein A (FnBPA) which was capable of delivering, directly to host cells, a eukaryotic DNA expression vector coding for IL-10 of Mus musculus (pValac:il-10) and diminish inflammation in a trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced mouse model of intestinal inflammation. As a new therapeutic strategy against IBD, the aim of this work was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of two L. lactis strains (the same invasive strain evaluated previously and the wild-type strain) carrying the therapeutic pValac:il-10 plasmid in the prevention of inflammation in a dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced mouse model. Results Results obtained showed that not only delivery of the pValac:il-10 plasmid by the invasive strain L. lactis MG1363 FnBPA+, but also by the wild-type strain L. lactis MG1363, was effective at diminishing intestinal inflammation (lower inflammation scores and higher IL-10 levels in the intestinal tissues, accompanied by decrease of IL-6) in the DSS-induced IBD mouse model. Conclusions Administration of both L. lactis strains carrying the pValac:il-10 plasmid was effective at diminishing inflammation in this murine model of experimental colitis, showing their potential for therapeutic intervention of IBD. PMID:25106058

  3. 32 CFR 1602.8 - Classifying authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Classifying authority. 1602.8 Section 1602.8....8 Classifying authority. The term classifying authority refers to any official or board who is authorized in § 1633.1 to classify a registrant....

  4. 10 CFR 25.35 - Classified visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Classified visits. 25.35 Section 25.35 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACCESS AUTHORIZATION Classified Visits § 25.35 Classified visits. (a) The number of classified visits must be held to a minimum. The licensee, certificate holder, applicant for a...

  5. 28 CFR 701.14 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Classified information. 701.14 Section... UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT § 701.14 Classified information. In processing a request for information that is classified or classifiable under Executive Order 12356 or any other Executive...

  6. 28 CFR 701.14 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Classified information. 701.14 Section... UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT § 701.14 Classified information. In processing a request for information that is classified or classifiable under Executive Order 12356 or any other Executive...

  7. 28 CFR 700.14 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Classified information. 700.14 Section... the Privacy Act of 1974 § 700.14 Classified information. In processing a request for access to a record containing information that is classified or classifiable under Executive Order 12356 or any...

  8. 32 CFR 1633.1 - Classifying authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Classifying authority. 1633.1 Section 1633.1... CLASSIFICATION § 1633.1 Classifying authority. The following officials are authorized to classify registrants... Service may in accord with the provisions of this chapter classify a registrant into any class for...

  9. 32 CFR 1633.1 - Classifying authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Classifying authority. 1633.1 Section 1633.1... CLASSIFICATION § 1633.1 Classifying authority. The following officials are authorized to classify registrants... Service may in accord with the provisions of this chapter classify a registrant into any class for...

  10. 32 CFR 1602.8 - Classifying authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Classifying authority. 1602.8 Section 1602.8....8 Classifying authority. The term classifying authority refers to any official or board who is authorized in § 1633.1 to classify a registrant....

  11. 32 CFR 1602.8 - Classifying authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Classifying authority. 1602.8 Section 1602.8....8 Classifying authority. The term classifying authority refers to any official or board who is authorized in § 1633.1 to classify a registrant....

  12. 14 CFR 1216.317 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Classified information. 1216.317 Section... Classified information. Environmental assessments and impact statements which contain classified information... organized so that the classified portions are appendices to the environmental document itself....

  13. 32 CFR 1633.1 - Classifying authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Classifying authority. 1633.1 Section 1633.1... CLASSIFICATION § 1633.1 Classifying authority. The following officials are authorized to classify registrants... Service may in accord with the provisions of this chapter classify a registrant into any class for...

  14. 32 CFR 1602.8 - Classifying authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Classifying authority. 1602.8 Section 1602.8....8 Classifying authority. The term classifying authority refers to any official or board who is authorized in § 1633.1 to classify a registrant....

  15. 28 CFR 700.14 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Classified information. 700.14 Section... the Privacy Act of 1974 § 700.14 Classified information. In processing a request for access to a record containing information that is classified or classifiable under Executive Order 12356 or any...

  16. 28 CFR 701.14 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Classified information. 701.14 Section... UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT § 701.14 Classified information. In processing a request for information that is classified or classifiable under Executive Order 12356 or any other Executive...

  17. 28 CFR 701.14 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Classified information. 701.14 Section... UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT § 701.14 Classified information. In processing a request for information that is classified or classifiable under Executive Order 12356 or any other Executive...

  18. 10 CFR 25.35 - Classified visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Classified visits. 25.35 Section 25.35 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACCESS AUTHORIZATION Classified Visits § 25.35 Classified visits. (a) The number of classified visits must be held to a minimum. The licensee, certificate holder, applicant for a...

  19. 28 CFR 700.14 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Classified information. 700.14 Section... the Privacy Act of 1974 § 700.14 Classified information. In processing a request for access to a record containing information that is classified or classifiable under Executive Order 12356 or any...

  20. 14 CFR 1216.317 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Classified information. 1216.317 Section... Classified information. Environmental assessments and impact statements which contain classified information... organized so that the classified portions are appendices to the environmental document itself....

  1. 28 CFR 701.14 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Classified information. 701.14 Section... UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT § 701.14 Classified information. In processing a request for information that is classified or classifiable under Executive Order 12356 or any other Executive...

  2. 32 CFR 651.13 - Classified actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Classified actions. 651.13 Section 651.13... § 651.13 Classified actions. (a) For proposed actions and NEPA analyses involving classified information... proposed action. (c) When classified information can be reasonably separated from other information and...

  3. 32 CFR 1602.8 - Classifying authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Classifying authority. 1602.8 Section 1602.8....8 Classifying authority. The term classifying authority refers to any official or board who is authorized in § 1633.1 to classify a registrant....

  4. 28 CFR 700.14 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Classified information. 700.14 Section... the Privacy Act of 1974 § 700.14 Classified information. In processing a request for access to a record containing information that is classified or classifiable under Executive Order 12356 or any...

  5. 10 CFR 25.35 - Classified visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Classified visits. 25.35 Section 25.35 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACCESS AUTHORIZATION Classified Visits § 25.35 Classified visits. (a) The number of classified visits must be held to a minimum. The licensee, certificate holder, applicant for a...

  6. 28 CFR 700.14 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Classified information. 700.14 Section... the Privacy Act of 1974 § 700.14 Classified information. In processing a request for access to a record containing information that is classified or classifiable under Executive Order 12356 or any...

  7. 10 CFR 25.35 - Classified visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Classified visits. 25.35 Section 25.35 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACCESS AUTHORIZATION Classified Visits § 25.35 Classified visits. (a) The number of classified visits must be held to a minimum. The licensee, certificate holder, applicant for a...

  8. 32 CFR 1633.1 - Classifying authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Classifying authority. 1633.1 Section 1633.1... CLASSIFICATION § 1633.1 Classifying authority. The following officials are authorized to classify registrants... Service may in accord with the provisions of this chapter classify a registrant into any class for...

  9. 10 CFR 25.35 - Classified visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Classified visits. 25.35 Section 25.35 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACCESS AUTHORIZATION Classified Visits § 25.35 Classified visits. (a) The number of classified visits must be held to a minimum. The licensee, certificate holder, applicant for a...

  10. 14 CFR 1216.317 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Classified information. 1216.317 Section... Classified information. Environmental assessments and impact statements which contain classified information... organized so that the classified portions are appendices to the environmental document itself....

  11. 32 CFR 1633.1 - Classifying authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Classifying authority. 1633.1 Section 1633.1... CLASSIFICATION § 1633.1 Classifying authority. The following officials are authorized to classify registrants... Service may in accord with the provisions of this chapter classify a registrant into any class for...

  12. DNA sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and processes producing human phospholipase inhibitor polypeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, B.P.; Pepinsky, R.B.; Garwin, J.L.

    1989-11-07

    This patent describes a recombinant DNA molecule. In comprises a DNA sequence coding for a phospholopase inhibitor polypeptide and being selected from the group consisting of: the cDNA insert of ALC, DNA sequences which code on expression for a phospholopase inhibitor, and DNA sequences which are degenerate as a result of the genetic code to either of the foregoing DNA sequences and which code on expression for a phospholipase inhibitor.

  13. Dimensionality Reduction Through Classifier Ensembles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunj C.; Tumer, Kagan; Norwig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    In data mining, one often needs to analyze datasets with a very large number of attributes. Performing machine learning directly on such data sets is often impractical because of extensive run times, excessive complexity of the fitted model (often leading to overfitting), and the well-known "curse of dimensionality." In practice, to avoid such problems, feature selection and/or extraction are often used to reduce data dimensionality prior to the learning step. However, existing feature selection/extraction algorithms either evaluate features by their effectiveness across the entire data set or simply disregard class information altogether (e.g., principal component analysis). Furthermore, feature extraction algorithms such as principal components analysis create new features that are often meaningless to human users. In this article, we present input decimation, a method that provides "feature subsets" that are selected for their ability to discriminate among the classes. These features are subsequently used in ensembles of classifiers, yielding results superior to single classifiers, ensembles that use the full set of features, and ensembles based on principal component analysis on both real and synthetic datasets.

  14. 75 FR 51609 - Classified National Security Information Program for State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ..., August 18, 2010. [FR Doc. 2010-21016 Filed 8-20-10; 8:45 am] Billing code 3195-W0-P ... Documents#0;#0; #0; #0;Title 3-- #0;The President ] Executive Order 13549 of August 18, 2010 Classified... with Executive Order 13526 of December 29, 2009 (``Classified National Security...

  15. Classifying sex biased congenital anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Lubinsky, M.S.

    1997-03-31

    The reasons for sex biases in congenital anomalies that arise before structural or hormonal dimorphisms are established has long been unclear. A review of such disorders shows that patterning and tissue anomalies are female biased, and structural findings are more common in males. This suggests different gender dependent susceptibilities to developmental disturbances, with female vulnerabilities focused on early blastogenesis/determination, while males are more likely to involve later organogenesis/morphogenesis. A dual origin for some anomalies explains paradoxical reductions of sex biases with greater severity (i.e., multiple rather than single malformations), presumably as more severe events increase the involvement of an otherwise minor process with opposite biases to those of the primary mechanism. The cause for these sex differences is unknown, but early dimorphisms, such as differences in growth or presence of H-Y antigen, may be responsible. This model provides a useful rationale for understanding and classifying sex-biased congenital anomalies. 42 refs., 7 tabs.

  16. Explosive Formulation Code Naming SOP

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, H. E.

    2014-09-19

    The purpose of this SOP is to provide a procedure for giving individual HME formulations code names. A code name for an individual HME formulation consists of an explosive family code, given by the classified guide, followed by a dash, -, and a number. If the formulation requires preparation such as packing or aging, these add additional groups of symbols to the X-ray specimen name.

  17. Deciphering the Combinatorial DNA-binding Code of the CCAAT-binding Complex and the Iron-regulatory Basic Region Leucine Zipper (bZIP) Transcription Factor HapX*

    PubMed Central

    Hortschansky, Peter; Ando, Eriko; Tuppatsch, Katja; Arikawa, Hisashi; Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Haas, Hubertus; Brakhage, Axel A.

    2015-01-01

    The heterotrimeric CCAAT-binding complex (CBC) is evolutionarily conserved in eukaryotic organisms, including fungi, plants, and mammals. The CBC consists of three subunits, which are named in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans HapB, HapC, and HapE. HapX, a fourth CBC subunit, was identified exclusively in fungi, except for Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the closely related Saccharomycotina species. The CBC-HapX complex acts as the master regulator of iron homeostasis. HapX belongs to the class of basic region leucine zipper transcription factors. We demonstrated that the CBC and HapX bind cooperatively to bipartite DNA motifs with a general HapX/CBC/DNA 2:1:1 stoichiometry in a class of genes that are repressed by HapX-CBC in A. nidulans during iron limitation. This combinatorial binding mode requires protein-protein interaction between the N-terminal domain of HapE and the N-terminal CBC binding domain of HapX as well as sequence-specific DNA binding of both the CBC and HapX. Initial binding of the CBC to CCAAT boxes is mandatory for DNA recognition of HapX. HapX specifically targets the minimal motif 5′-GAT-3′, which is located at a distance of 11–12 bp downstream of the respective CCAAT box. Single nucleotide substitutions at the 5′- and 3′-end of the GAT motif as well as different spacing between the CBC and HapX DNA-binding sites revealed a remarkable promiscuous DNA-recognition mode of HapX. This flexible DNA-binding code may have evolved as a mechanism for fine-tuning the transcriptional activity of CBC-HapX at distinct target promoters. PMID:25589790

  18. Hybrid k -Nearest Neighbor Classifier.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiwen; Chen, Hantao; Liuxs, Jiming; You, Jane; Leung, Hareton; Han, Guoqiang

    2016-06-01

    Conventional k -nearest neighbor (KNN) classification approaches have several limitations when dealing with some problems caused by the special datasets, such as the sparse problem, the imbalance problem, and the noise problem. In this paper, we first perform a brief survey on the recent progress of the KNN classification approaches. Then, the hybrid KNN (HBKNN) classification approach, which takes into account the local and global information of the query sample, is designed to address the problems raised from the special datasets. In the following, the random subspace ensemble framework based on HBKNN (RS-HBKNN) classifier is proposed to perform classification on the datasets with noisy attributes in the high-dimensional space. Finally, the nonparametric tests are proposed to be adopted to compare the proposed method with other classification approaches over multiple datasets. The experiments on the real-world datasets from the Knowledge Extraction based on Evolutionary Learning dataset repository demonstrate that RS-HBKNN works well on real datasets, and outperforms most of the state-of-the-art classification approaches. PMID:26126291

  19. Molecular cloning of amyloid cDNA derived from mRNA of the Alzheimer disease brain: coding and noncoding regions of the fetal precursor mRNA are expressed in the cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Zain, S.B.; Salim, M.; Chou, W.G.; Sajdel-Sulkowska, E.M.; Majocha, R.E.; Marotta, C.A.

    1988-02-01

    To gain insight into factors associated with the excessive accumulation of ..beta..-amyloid in the Alzheimer disease (AD) brain, the present studies were initiated to distinguish between a unique primary structure of the AD-specific amyloid precursor mRNA vis a vis other determinants that may affect amyloid levels. Previous molecular cloning experiments focused on amyloid derived from sources other than AD cases. In the present work, the authors cloned and characterized amyloid cDNA derived directly from AD brain mRNA. Poly(A)/sup +/ RNA from AD cortices was used for the preparation of lambdagt11 recombinant cDNA libraries. An insert of 1564 nucleotides was isolated that included the ..beta..-amyloid domain and corresponded to 75% of the coding region and approx. = 70% of the 3'-noncoding region of the fetal precursor amyloid cDNA reported by others. On RNA blots, the AD amyloid mRNA consisted of a doublet of 3.2 and 3.4 kilobases. In control and AD cases, the amyloid mRNA levels were nonuniform and were independent of glial-specific mRNA levels. Based on the sequence analysis data, they conclude that a segment of the amyloid gene is expressed in the AD cortex as a high molecular weight precursor mRNA with major coding and 3'-noncoding regions that are identical to the fetal brain gene product.

  20. Molecular cloning and characterization of the cDNA coding for the biotin-containing subunit of 3-methylcrotonoyl-CoA carboxylase: identification of the biotin carboxylase and biotin-carrier domains.

    PubMed Central

    Song, J; Wurtele, E S; Nikolau, B J

    1994-01-01

    Soybean genomic clones were isolated based on hybridization to probes that code for the conserved biotinylation domain of biotin-containing enzymes. The corresponding cDNA was isolated and expressed in Escherichia coli through fusion to the bacterial trpE gene. The resulting chimeric protein was biotinylated in E. coli. Antibodies raised against the chimeric protein reacted specifically with an 85-kDa biotin-containing polypeptide from soybean and inhibited 3-methylcrotonoyl-CoA carboxylase (EC 6.4.1.4) activity in cell-free extracts of soybean leaves. Thus, the isolated soybean gene and corresponding cDNA code for the 85-kDa biotin-containing subunit of 3-methylcrotonoyl-CoA carboxylase. The nucleotide sequence of the cDNA and portions of the genomic clones was determined. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the biotin-containing subunit of 3-methylcrotonoyl-CoA carboxylase with sequences of other biotin enzymes suggests that this subunit contains the functional domains for the first half-reaction catalyzed by all biotin-dependent carboxylases--namely, the carboxylation of biotin. These domains are arranged serially on the polypeptide, with the biotin carboxylase domain at the amino terminus and the biotin-carboxyl carrier domain at the carboxyl terminus. Images PMID:8016064

  1. 28 CFR 61.8 - Classified proposals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Classified proposals. 61.8 Section 61.8... ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Implementing Procedures § 61.8 Classified proposals. If an environmental document includes classified matter, a version containing only unclassified material shall be prepared unless...

  2. 15 CFR 4.8 - Classified Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Classified Information. 4.8 Section 4... INFORMATION Freedom of Information Act § 4.8 Classified Information. In processing a request for information classified under Executive Order 12958 or any other executive order concerning the classification of...

  3. 6 CFR 5.7 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Freedom of Information Act § 5.7 Classified information. In processing a request for information that is classified under Executive Order 12958 (3 CFR, 1996 Comp., p. 333) or any other executive order, the... 6 Domestic Security 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Classified information. 5.7 Section 5.7...

  4. 15 CFR 4.8 - Classified Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Classified Information. 4.8 Section 4... INFORMATION Freedom of Information Act § 4.8 Classified Information. In processing a request for information classified under Executive Order 12958 or any other executive order concerning the classification of...

  5. 14 CFR 1216.310 - Classified actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Classified actions. 1216.310 Section 1216... 1216.3 Procedures for Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) § 1216.310 Classified... environmental impacts of a proposed action. (b) When classified information can reasonably be separated...

  6. 6 CFR 5.24 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Classified information. 5.24 Section 5.24... INFORMATION Privacy Act § 5.24 Classified information. In processing a request for access to a record containing information that is classified under Executive Order 12958 or any other executive order,...

  7. 32 CFR 775.5 - Classified actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Classified actions. 775.5 Section 775.5 National... IMPLEMENTING THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 775.5 Classified actions. (a) The fact that a proposed action is of a classified nature does not relieve the proponent of the action from complying with...

  8. 28 CFR 61.8 - Classified proposals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Classified proposals. 61.8 Section 61.8... ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Implementing Procedures § 61.8 Classified proposals. If an environmental document includes classified matter, a version containing only unclassified material shall be prepared unless...

  9. 6 CFR 5.7 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Freedom of Information Act § 5.7 Classified information. In processing a request for information that is classified under Executive Order 12958 (3 CFR, 1996 Comp., p. 333) or any other executive order, the... 6 Domestic Security 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Classified information. 5.7 Section 5.7...

  10. 12 CFR 1301.9 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Classified information. 1301.9 Section 1301.9 Banks and Banking FINANCIAL STABILITY OVERSIGHT COUNCIL FREEDOM OF INFORMATION § 1301.9 Classified information. (a) Referrals of requests for classified information. Whenever a request is made for a...

  11. 6 CFR 5.24 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Classified information. 5.24 Section 5.24... INFORMATION Privacy Act § 5.24 Classified information. In processing a request for access to a record containing information that is classified under Executive Order 12958 or any other executive order,...

  12. 28 CFR 16.44 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Classified information. 16.44 Section 16... Protection of Privacy and Access to Individual Records Under the Privacy Act of 1974 § 16.44 Classified information. In processing a request for access to a record containing information that is classified...

  13. 32 CFR 775.5 - Classified actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Classified actions. 775.5 Section 775.5 National... IMPLEMENTING THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 775.5 Classified actions. (a) The fact that a proposed action is of a classified nature does not relieve the proponent of the action from complying with...

  14. 32 CFR 148.2 - Classified programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Classified programs. 148.2 Section 148.2... Inspections of Facilities § 148.2 Classified programs. Once a facility is authorized, approved, certified, or accredited, all U.S. Government organizations desiring to conduct classified programs at the facility at...

  15. 12 CFR 1070.19 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Classified information. 1070.19 Section 1070.19... of Information Act § 1070.19 Classified information. Whenever a request is made for a record containing information that another agency has classified, or which may be appropriate for classification...

  16. 6 CFR 5.24 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Classified information. 5.24 Section 5.24... INFORMATION Privacy Act § 5.24 Classified information. In processing a request for access to a record containing information that is classified under Executive Order 12958 or any other executive order,...

  17. 6 CFR 5.7 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Freedom of Information Act § 5.7 Classified information. In processing a request for information that is classified under Executive Order 12958 (3 CFR, 1996 Comp., p. 333) or any other executive order, the... 6 Domestic Security 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Classified information. 5.7 Section 5.7...

  18. 32 CFR 775.5 - Classified actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Classified actions. 775.5 Section 775.5 National... IMPLEMENTING THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 775.5 Classified actions. (a) The fact that a proposed action is of a classified nature does not relieve the proponent of the action from complying with...

  19. 28 CFR 16.44 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Classified information. 16.44 Section 16... Protection of Privacy and Access to Individual Records Under the Privacy Act of 1974 § 16.44 Classified information. In processing a request for access to a record containing information that is classified...

  20. 28 CFR 61.8 - Classified proposals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Classified proposals. 61.8 Section 61.8... ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Implementing Procedures § 61.8 Classified proposals. If an environmental document includes classified matter, a version containing only unclassified material shall be prepared unless...

  1. 15 CFR 4.8 - Classified Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Classified Information. 4.8 Section 4... INFORMATION Freedom of Information Act § 4.8 Classified Information. In processing a request for information classified under Executive Order 12958 or any other executive order concerning the classification of...

  2. 28 CFR 16.44 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Classified information. 16.44 Section 16... Protection of Privacy and Access to Individual Records Under the Privacy Act of 1974 § 16.44 Classified information. In processing a request for access to a record containing information that is classified...

  3. 28 CFR 61.8 - Classified proposals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Classified proposals. 61.8 Section 61.8... ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Implementing Procedures § 61.8 Classified proposals. If an environmental document includes classified matter, a version containing only unclassified material shall be prepared unless...

  4. 28 CFR 16.7 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Procedures for Disclosure of Records Under the Freedom of Information Act § 16.7 Classified information. In processing a request for information that is classified under Executive Order 12958 (3 CFR, 1996 Comp., p... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Classified information. 16.7 Section...

  5. 32 CFR 148.2 - Classified programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Classified programs. 148.2 Section 148.2... Inspections of Facilities § 148.2 Classified programs. Once a facility is authorized, approved, certified, or accredited, all U.S. Government organizations desiring to conduct classified programs at the facility at...

  6. 15 CFR 4.8 - Classified Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Classified Information. 4.8 Section 4... INFORMATION Freedom of Information Act § 4.8 Classified Information. In processing a request for information classified under Executive Order 12958 or any other executive order concerning the classification of...

  7. 6 CFR 5.7 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Freedom of Information Act § 5.7 Classified information. In processing a request for information that is classified under Executive Order 12958 (3 CFR, 1996 Comp., p. 333) or any other executive order, the... 6 Domestic Security 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Classified information. 5.7 Section 5.7...

  8. 6 CFR 5.24 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Classified information. 5.24 Section 5.24... INFORMATION Privacy Act § 5.24 Classified information. In processing a request for access to a record containing information that is classified under Executive Order 12958 or any other executive order,...

  9. 32 CFR 148.2 - Classified programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Classified programs. 148.2 Section 148.2... Inspections of Facilities § 148.2 Classified programs. Once a facility is authorized, approved, certified, or accredited, all U.S. Government organizations desiring to conduct classified programs at the facility at...

  10. 12 CFR 1070.19 - Classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Classified information. 1070.19 Section 1070.19... of Information Act § 1070.19 Classified information. Whenever a request is made for a record containing information that another agency has classified, or which may be appropriate for classification...