These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Evaluating Psychosocial Classroom Environments.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A rating scale was designed to measure college classroom climate in Primary Teacher Training Colleges in Spain, as well as to describe and compare college classroom environments. Data were gathered from 33 classes of students training to be public or private primary school teachers at colleges in Sevilla and Huelva. Participant observation and…

Villar Angulo, Luis Miguel

2

Physical and Psychosocial Environments Associated with Networked Classrooms  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports a study of the learning environments in computer networked classrooms. The study is unique in that it involved an evaluation of both the physical and psychosocial classroom environments in these computerised settings through the use of a combination of questionnaires and ergonomic evaluations. The study involved administering a student questionnaire designed to assess aspects of the psychosocial

David B. Zandvliet; Barry J. Fraser

2005-01-01

3

Physical and Psychosocial Environments Associated with Networked Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports a study of the learning environments in computer networked classrooms. The study is unique in that it involved an evaluation of both the physical and psychosocial classroom environments in these computerised settings through the use of a combination of questionnaires and ergonomic evaluations. The study involved administering…

Zandvliet, David B.; Fraser, Barry J.

2005-01-01

4

Influence of Psychosocial Classroom Environment on Students' Motivation and Self-Regulation in Science Learning: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The primary aim of this study was two-fold: 1) to identify salient psychosocial features of the classroom environment that influence students' motivation and self-regulation in science learning; and 2) to examine the effect of the motivational constructs of learning goal orientation, science task value and self-efficacy in science learning on…

Velayutham, Sunitadevi; Aldridge, Jill M.

2013-01-01

5

Psychosocial environment and affective outcomes in technology-rich classrooms: testing a causal model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research investigated classroom environment antecedent variables and student affective outcomes in Australian high schools.\\u000a The Technology-Rich Outcomes-Focused Learning Environment Inventory (TROFLEI) was used to assess 10 classroom environment\\u000a dimensions: student cohesiveness, teacher support, involvement, investigation, task orientation, cooperation, equity, differentiation,\\u000a computer usage and young adult ethos. A sample of 4,146 high school students from Western Australia and Tasmania responded\\u000a to

Jeffrey P. Dorman; Barry J. Fraser

2009-01-01

6

Classroom Environment Instruments: Development, Validity and Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Few fields of educational research have such a rich diversity of valid, economical and widely-applicable assessment instruments as does the field of learning environments. This article describes nine major questionnaires for assessing student perceptions of classroom psychosocial environment (the Learning Environment Inventory, Classroom Environment Scale, Individualised Classroom Environment Questionnaire, My Class Inventory, College and University Classroom Environment Inventory, Questionnaire on

Barry J. Fraser

1998-01-01

7

Influence of Psychosocial Classroom Environment on Students' Motivation and Self-Regulation in Science Learning: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The primary aim of this study was two-fold: 1) to identify salient psychosocial features of the classroom environment that influence students' motivation and self-regulation in science learning; and 2) to examine the effect of the motivational constructs of learning goal orientation, science task value and self-efficacy in science learning on students' self-regulation in science classrooms. Data collected from 1360 science students in grades 8, 9 and 10 in five public schools in Perth, Western Australia were utilized to validate the questionnaires and to investigate the hypothesized relationships. Structural Equation Modeling analysis suggested that student cohesiveness, investigation and task orientation were the most influential predictors of student motivation and self-regulation in science learning. In addition, learning goal orientation, task value and self-efficacy significantly influenced students' self-regulation in science. The findings offer potential opportunities for educators to plan and implement effective pedagogical strategies aimed at increasing students' motivation and self-regulation in science learning.

Velayutham, Sunitadevi; Aldridge, Jill M.

2013-04-01

8

Classroom psychosocial environment and course experiences in pre-service teacher education courses at an Australian university  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research linking university students' perceptions of their classroom environment and course experiences was conducted in one Australian university. A sample of 495 students responded to the College and University Classroom Environment Inventory (CUCEI) and the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ). Multilevel regression analyses revealed that several CUCEI scales were significant predictors of CEQ scales. Overall, task orientation was the most potent

Jeffrey P. Dorman

2012-01-01

9

Smile: Student Modification in Learning Environments. Establishing Congruence between Actual and Preferred Classroom Learning Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated whether classroom psychosocial environment, as perceived by student teachers, could be improved to their preferred level. Students completed the College and University Classroom Environment Inventory, discussed interventions, then completed it again. Significant deficiencies surfaced in the learning environment early in the…

Yarrow, Allan; Millwater, Jan

1995-01-01

10

Assessing the psychosocial environment of science classes in Catholic secondary schools  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Much Catholic school and church rhetoric suggests that Catholic schools possess distinctive learning environments. Research into this aspect of Catholic schooling has been hampered by the lack of an appropriate assessment instrument. By drawing on contemporary church literature, the perceptions of personnel involved in Catholic education and existing classroom environment questionnaires, a new instrument was developed to assess student perceptions of classroom psychosocial environment in Catholic schools. The use of this instrument in 64 classrooms in Catholic and Government schools indicated significant differences on some scales. The distinctive nature of Catholic schooling did not extend to all classroom environment dimensions deemed important to Catholic education.

Dorman, Jeffrey P.; McRobbie, Campbell J.; Fraser, Barry J.

1993-12-01

11

Teacher perspectives and the psychosocial climate of the classroom in a traditional BSN program.  

PubMed

Developing and implementing a positive psychosocial environment should be one of the main responsibilities of educators. As educators influence the climate, learning is enhanced or hindered. Therefore educators need to understand their own teaching perspectives and how they in turn influence the classroom. Data were collected from nurse educators and BSN nursing students. The relationship between faculty teaching perspectives and the students' perceptions of the learning environment was examined. The data collection tool used to measure the educators' perspective was the Instructional Perspective Inventory (IPI), and to measure the students' perspective was the Adult Classroom Environment Scale (ACES). A MANCOVA was used to determine the relationship and significant differences between educators' and students' perspectives. The results indicated that the teachers in the high group of teacher responsiveness had students who reported greater teacher support, time on task, focus, organization, clarity of subject content, involvement, and satisfaction. PMID:20196760

Rowbotham, Melodie A

2010-01-01

12

Physical and psychosocial aspects of science laboratory learning environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports a survey which was conducted in order to determine teachers’ and students’ perception of science laboratory learning environment schools in Malaysia and to compare their perceptions regarding the physical and psychosocial aspects. Teachers’ and students’ perception on psychosocial aspects were measured by using Science Laboratory Environment Inventory (SLEI) while perception on physical aspects was measured using Physical

Che Nidzam Che Ahmad; Kamisah Osman; Lilia Halim

2010-01-01

13

Creating a Fair Classroom Environment  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Reduce your students' first day jitters by implementing these specific classroom management suggestions that are designed to reduce student anxiety and create a fair environment. These strategies will effectively help all students to participate and feel more at ease, and simultaneously help them to perceive you as a teacher who listens to their ideas and encourages thinking rather than as an unjust autocrat.

Richard Hand

2004-09-01

14

Psychosocial work environment and antidepressant medication: a prospective cohort study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Adverse psychosocial work environments may lead to impaired mental health, but it is still a matter of conjecture if demonstrated associations are causal or biased. We aimed at verifying whether poor psychosocial working climate is related to increase of redeemed subscription of antidepressant medication. METHODS: Information on all antidepressant drugs (AD) purchased at pharmacies from 1995 through 2006 was

Jens Peter E Bonde; Torsten Munch-Hansen; Joanna Wieclaw; Niels Westergaard-Nielsen; Esben Agerbo

2009-01-01

15

The urban built environment and associations with women's psychosocial health.  

PubMed

The determinants that underlie a healthy or unhealthy pregnancy are complex and not well understood. We assess the relationship between the built environment and maternal psychosocial status using directly observed residential neighborhood characteristics (housing damage, property disorder, tenure status, vacancy, security measures, violent crime, and nuisances) and a wide range of psychosocial attributes (interpersonal support evaluation list, self-efficacy, John Henryism active coping, negative partner support, Perceived Stress Scale, perceived racism, Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression) on a pregnant cohort of women living in the urban core of Durham, NC, USA. We found some associations between built environment characteristic and psychosocial health varied by exposure categorization approach, while others (residence in environments with more rental property is associated with higher reported active coping and negative partner support) were consistent across exposure categorizations. This study outlines specific neighborhood characteristics that are modifiable risk markers and therefore important targets for increased research and public health intervention. PMID:22907713

Messer, Lynne C; Maxson, Pamela; Miranda, Marie Lynn

2013-10-01

16

Positive Classroom Environments = Positive Academic Results  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses the effects of a positive classroom environment and its impact on student behavior and achievement. It also provides strategies for developing expectations for student achievement and the importance of parental involvement. A positive classroom environment is essential in keeping behavior problems to a minimum. There are a…

Wilson-Fleming, LaTerra; Wilson-Younger, Dylinda

2012-01-01

17

Health inequalities and the psychosocial environment—two scientific challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

As social inequalities in health continue to be a key public health problem, scientific advances in explaining these inequalities are needed. It is unlikely that there will be a single explanation of social inequalities in health. This introductory paper sets out one explanatory framework, exposure to adverse psychosocial environments during midlife, and particularly at work. We argue that exposure to

Johannes Siegrist; Michael Marmot

2004-01-01

18

Social environment of junior high and high school classrooms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reports on the development of a Classroom Environment Scale (CES), a 90-item perceived environment scale that assesses 9 dimensions (e.g., student involvement, competition) of the classroom. Intercorrelations among the subscales indicate that the CES measures distinct, though moderately correlated, aspects of the classroom environment. Each of the subscales significantly discriminated among 38 classrooms in a standardization sample, and internal consistency

Edison J. Trickett; Rudolph H. Moos

1973-01-01

19

Understanding and Improving Classroom Emotional Climate and Behavior Management in the “Real World”: The Role of Head Start Teachers' Psychosocial Stressors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research Findings: This article reports on two studies. Study 1 considered ways in which Head Start teachers' (n = 90) psychosocial stressors are related to teachers' ability to maintain a positive classroom emotional climate and effective behavior management in preschool classrooms. Study 2 tested the hypothesis that among teachers randomly assigned to a treatment condition (n = 48), psychosocial stressors

Christine Li Grining; C. Cybele Raver; Kina Champion; Latriese Sardin; Molly Metzger; Stephanie M. Jones

2010-01-01

20

Mapping the Classroom Emotional Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Harvey and Evans (2003) have proposed that teachers' emotional skills, as required in the classroom, can be organized into a five-dimensional model. Further research is necessary to validate this model and evaluate the importance of each dimension of teacher emotion competence for educational practice. Using a statistical method for mapping…

Harvey, Shane T.; Bimler, David; Evans, Ian M.; Kirkland, John; Pechtel, Pia

2012-01-01

21

Acoustics and psychosocial environment in intensive coronary care  

PubMed Central

Aims: To examine the influence of different acoustic conditions on the work environment and the staff in a coronary critical care unit (CCU). Method: Psychosocial work environment data from start and end of each individual shift were obtained from three shifts (morning, afternoon, and night) for a one-week baseline period and for two four-week periods during which either sound reflecting or sound absorbing tiles were installed. Results: Reverberation times and speech intelligibility improved during the study period when the ceiling tiles were changed from sound reflecting tiles to sound absorbing ones of identical appearance. Improved acoustics positively affected the work environment; the afternoon shift staff experienced significantly lower work demands and reported less pressure and strain. Conclusions: Important gains in the psychosocial work environment of healthcare can be achieved by improving room acoustics. The study points to the importance of further research on possible effects of acoustics in healthcare on staff turnover, quality of patient care, and medical errors. PMID:15723873

Blomkvist, V; Eriksen, C; Theorell, T; Ulrich, R; Rasmanis, G

2005-01-01

22

Psychosocial work environment, organisational justice and work family conflict as predictors of Malaysian worker wellbeing.  

E-print Network

??This thesis investigates the predictors of Malaysian employee wellbeing, specifically, whether the psychosocial work environment (job demands, job control, social support), organisational justice (procedural, interactional,… (more)

R. Ibrahim, R. Z. Aida

2012-01-01

23

Creating a Safe and Positive Classroom Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To insure that each child has a safe and positive environment at school, teachers should earn their pupils' respect and classroom activities should be oriented to helping each child succeed. Three key phrases reinforce the expectation of success. These phrases, which teacher and pupils should understand and remember, are: (1) It is O.K. to make a…

White, Kimberly A.

24

Classroom Environment and Student Learning: Classroom-Level Effects on Achievement Trajectories in Late Elementary School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study uses a three-level model (within-student, between-student, and between-classroom) to examine the effects of 4th and 5th grade classroom environments on student achievement trajectories during the school year. Between-classroom differences in teacher warmth and classroom order were tested as predictors of student rates of achievement…

Gaskins, Clare Smith

2010-01-01

25

The Learning Environment Associated with Information Technology Education in Taiwan: Combining Psychosocial and Physical Aspects  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated perceptions of senior high school students towards the Taiwanese information technology (IT) classroom with the What Is Happening in this Class? (WIHIC) survey and explored the physical learning environment of the IT classroom using the Computerised Classroom Environment Inventory (CCEI). The participants included 2,869…

Liu, Chia-Ju; Zandvliet, David B.; Hou, I.-Ling

2012-01-01

26

Understanding and Improving Classroom Emotional Climate and Behavior Management in the "Real World": The Role of Head Start Teachers' Psychosocial Stressors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: This article reports on two studies. Study 1 considered ways in which Head Start teachers' (n = 90) psychosocial stressors are related to teachers' ability to maintain a positive classroom emotional climate and effective behavior management in preschool classrooms. Study 2 tested the hypothesis that among teachers randomly…

Grining, Christine Li; Raver, C. Cybele; Champion, Kina; Sardin, Latriese; Metzger, Molly; Jones, Stephanie M.

2010-01-01

27

Classroom Environment, Achievement Goals and Maths Performance: Gender Differences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated how gender shapes the relationships between classroom environment, achievement goals and maths performance. Seventh-grade students ("N"?=?498) from five urban secondary schools filled in achievement goal orientations and classroom environment scales at the beginning of the second semester. Maths performance was assessed as…

Gherasim, Loredana Ruxandra; Butnaru, Simona; Mairean, Cornelia

2013-01-01

28

Workplace gender composition and psychological distress: the importance of the psychosocial work environment  

PubMed Central

Background Health consequences of the gender segregated labour market have previously been demonstrated in the light of gender composition of occupations and workplaces, with somewhat mixed results. Associations between the gender composition and health status have been suggested to be shaped by the psychosocial work environment. The present study aims to analyse how workplace gender composition is related to psychological distress and to explore the importance of the psychosocial work environment for psychological distress at workplaces with different gender compositions. Methods The study population consisted of participants from the Northern Swedish Cohort with a registered workplace in 2007 when the participants were 42 years old (N?=?795). Questionnaire data were supplemented with register data on the gender composition of the participants’ workplaces divided into three groups: workplaces with more women, mixed workplaces, and workplaces with more men. Associations between psychological distress and gender composition were analysed with multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusting for socioeconomic position, previous psychological distress, psychosocial work environment factors and gender. Logistic regression analyses (including interaction terms for gender composition and each work environment factor) were also used to assess differential associations between psychosocial work factor and psychological distress according to gender composition. Results Working at workplaces with a mixed gender composition was related to a higher likelihood of psychological distress compared to workplaces with more men, after adjustments for socioeconomic position, psychological distress at age 21, psychosocial work environment factors and gender. Psychosocial work environment factors did not explain the association between gender composition and psychological distress. Conclusions The association between gender composition and psychological distress cannot be explained by differences in the perception of the psychosocial work environment and thus the work environment hypothesis is not supported. Workplaces with a mixed gender composition needs further research attention to explain the negative development of psychological distress during working life for both women and men at these workplaces. PMID:24612791

2014-01-01

29

Students’ perception of the psycho-social clinical learning environment: An evaluation of placement models  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Nursing is a practice-based discipline. A supportive environment has been identified as important for the transfer of learning in the clinical context. The aim of the paper was to assess undergraduate nurses' perceptions of the psychosocial characteristics of clinical learning environments within three different clinical placement models. Three hundred and eight-nine undergraduate nursing students rated their perceptions of the

Amanda Henderson; Michelle Twentyman; Alison Heel; Belinda Lloyd

2006-01-01

30

Faculty Environments, Psychosocial Dispositions, and the Academic Achievement of College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Postsecondary institutions seek to create a pedagogical environment that increases students' knowledge, expands their powers of reasoning, and shapes their psychosocial dispositions. In this study, we examined a conceptual model of academic attainment including two aspects of the pedagogical environment experienced by students, namely the…

Clifton, Rodney A.; Perry, Raymond P.; Stubbs, Christine Adams; Roberts, Lance W.

2004-01-01

31

Faculty Environments, Psychosocial Dispositions, and the Academic Achievement of College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Postsecondary institutions seek to create a pedagogical environment that increases students' knowledge, expands their powers of reasoning, and shapes their psychosocial dispositions. In this study, we examined a conceptual model of academic attainment including two aspects of the pedagogical environment experienced by students, namely the cognitive demands set by professors and the social support provided by both professors and other

Rodney A. Clifton; Raymond P. Perry; Christine Adams Stubbs; Lance W. Roberts

2004-01-01

32

The Relationship between Gender and Classroom Environment in Turkish Science Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of gender between actual and preferred classroom environment and use of technology in the science classroom of Turkish students. Employing stratified random sampling procedures, data were collected from 985 students from schools across twelve different districts in Istanbul, Turkey. The…

Welch, Anita G.; Cakir, Mustafa; Peterson, Claudette M.; Ray, Christopher M.

2014-01-01

33

Learning Environments in Information and Communications Technology Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study of learning environments provides a useful research framework for investigating the effects of educational innovations such as those which are associated with the use of the Internet in classroom settings. This study reports an investigation into the use of Internet technologies in high-school classrooms in Australia and Canada.…

Zandvliet, David B.; Fraser, Barry J.

2004-01-01

34

Classroom Learning Environments and Students' Approaches to Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four hundred and eighty-four students from two metropolitan secondary schools completed the Learning Process Questionnaire,\\u000a the Individualised Classroom Environment Questionnaire and the Learner Self Concept scale. Relationships between perceptions\\u000a of the classroom learning environment, approaches to learning and self concept as a learner were investigated. Gender and\\u000a level of schooling (junior high versus senior high) differences were examined. Results showed

Barry Dart; Paul Burnett; Gillian Boulton-Lewis; Jenny Campbell; David Smith; Andrea McCrindle

1999-01-01

35

An Exploration of the Psychosocial Aspects of Weight among College Students in the College Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the study was to explore the psychosocial aspects of weight and the daily-lived experiences of college students within the college environment. Two research questions guided this qualitative research: (a) How, and in what ways, does perception of weight influence identity development among college students before and during college;…

Johnson, Jacqueline G.

2012-01-01

36

Teacher Interaction in Psychosocial Learning Environments: Cultural Differences and Their Implications in Science Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine interpersonal behaviour in psychosocial learning environments and to determine the associations between science students' perceptions of their interactions with their teachers, the cultural background of teachers and their attitudinal outcomes. A sample of 1188 students completed the Questionnaire on…

Khine, Myint Swe; Fisher, Darrell

2004-01-01

37

Science Laboratory Classroom Environments in Korean High Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In order to investigate the learning environment of senior high school science laboratory classrooms in Korea, the Science Laboratory Environment Inventory (SLEI) was translated into Korean and administered to 439 students (99 science-independent stream students, 195 science-oriented stream students and 145 humanities stream students). Data…

Fraser, Barry J.; Lee, Sunny S. U.

2009-01-01

38

Psychosocial Characteristics of Optimum Performance in Isolated and Confined Environments (ICE)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Behavioral Health and Performance (BHP) Element addresses human health risks in the NASA Human Research Program (HRP), including the Risk of Adverse Behavioral Conditions and the Risk of Psychiatric Disorders. BHP supports and conducts research to help characteristics and mitigate the Behavioral Medicine risk for exploration missions, and in some instances, current Flight Medical Operations. The Behavioral Health and Performance (BHP) Element identified research gaps within the Behavioral Medicine Risk, including Gap BMed6: What psychosocial characteristics predict success in an isolated, confined environment (ICE)? To address this gap, we conducted an extensive and exhaustive literature review to identify the following: 1) psychosocial characteristics that predict success in ICE environments; 2) characteristics that are most malleable; and 3) specific countermeasures that could enhance malleable characteristics.

Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Keeton, Kathryn E.; Shea, Camille; Leveton, Lauren B.

2010-01-01

39

The Family Environment as a Moderator of Psychosocial Outcomes Following Traumatic Brain Injury in Young Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This study sought to determine whether the family environment moderates psychosocial outcomes after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in young children. Method: Participants were recruited prospectively from consecutive hospital admissions of 3- to 6-year-old children, and included 19 with severe TBI, 56 with complicated mild\\/moderate TBI, and 99 with orthopedic injuries (OI). They completed 4 assessments across the first 18

Keith Owen Yeates; H. Gerry Taylor; Nicolay Chertkoff Walz; Terry Stancin; Shari L. Wade

2010-01-01

40

Classroom Resiliency--A Comparison of Navajo Elementary Students' Perceptions of Their Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a gender difference in how students perceived their classroom environment on the Navajo Nation public school. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be…

Piechowski, Alta Begay

2011-01-01

41

Classroom Dynamics in a Technology-Rich Learning Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the results of a study that examined the classroom dynamics in a K-12 technology-rich learning environment and also assessed the educational outcomes associated with intensive use of technology by teachers and students. Discusses changes in the teacher's role and whether this level of instructional technology is cost-effective. (LRW)

Tiene, Drew; Luft, Pamela

2002-01-01

42

A Brave New World: Synchronous Environments in the Literature Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Internet may be the ultimate immersive and participatory medium, opening doors as it does to countless story worlds. As such, it has much to offer reading instruction in both elementary and secondary classrooms. This paper explores how a teacher used one web application--a text-based virtual environment called a MOO--to encourage his high…

Rozema, Robert

43

Technology-Supported Learning Environments in Science Classrooms in India  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The adoption of technology has created a major impact in the field of education at all levels. Technology-supported classroom learning environments, involving modern information and communication technologies, are also entering the Indian educational system in general and the schools in Jammu region (Jammu & Kashmir State, India) in particular.…

Gupta, Adit; Fisher, Darrell

2012-01-01

44

The Columbia Classroom Environments Project.... Fifth Progress Report, May 1972.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report is organized into seven chapters. Chapter One, an Introduction by Joseph C. Grannis, includes the most relevant sections of the proposal made by the Columbia Classroom Environments Project (CCEP) to Project Follow Through in August 1970. Chapter Two is an Analysis of the Child Behavior Stream Observations from the Spring 1971 Study of…

Grannis, Joseph C.

45

Inferring Ancient Environments from Fossil Foraminifera: A Classroom Activity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This student activity demonstrates how foraminifera can be used to infer ancient environments. It contains background information and the classroom activity, which includes instructions and the required charts and diagrams. Also included are references and active links for further study as well as suggestions for a follow-up activity.

Hilary Olson

46

Setting of Classroom Environments for Hearing Impaired Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper aims to explain effects of acoustical environments in sound perception of hearing impaired people. Important aspects of sound and hearing impairment are explained. Detrimental factors in acoustic conditions for speech perception are mentioned. Necessary acoustic treatment in classrooms and use of FM systems to eliminate these factors…

Turan, Zerrin

2007-01-01

47

Adequacy of the Regular Early Education Classroom Environment for Students with Visual Impairment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study describes the classroom environment that students with visual impairment typically experience in regular Australian early education. Adequacy of the classroom environment (teacher training and experience, teacher support, parent involvement, adult involvement, inclusive attitude, individualization of the curriculum, physical…

Brown, Cherylee M.; Packer, Tanya L.; Passmore, Anne

2013-01-01

48

Childhood family psychosocial environment and carotid intima media thickness: the CARDIA study.  

PubMed

Little is known about whether the childhood family psychosocial environment (characterized by cold, unaffectionate interactions, conflict, aggression, neglect and/or low nurturance) affects coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Objectives were to evaluate associations of childhood family psychosocial environment with carotid intima media thickness (IMT), a subclinical measure of atherosclerosis. The study population included 2659 CARDIA study participants, aged 37-52 years. Childhood family psychosocial environment was measured using a risky family questionnaire via self-report. Carotid IMT was calculated using the average of 20 measurements of mean common carotid, bulb and internal carotid IMT, assessed using high-resolution B-mode ultrasound images. Utilizing linear regression analyses adjusted for age, a 1-unit (range 0-21) increase in risky family score was associated with 0.0036 (95% CI: 0.0006,0.0066 mm) and 0.0020 (95% CI: 0.0002,0.0038) mm increase in mean IMT in white males and females, respectively. Formal mediation analyses and covariate adjustments suggested childhood socioeconomic position and smoking may be important mechanisms in white males and females, as well as education and depressive symptomatology in white males. No associations were found in black participants. Formal statistical tests for interaction between risky family score and sex, and between risky family score and race/ethnicity, demonstrated borderline evidence of interactions for both sex (p = 0.12) and race/ethnicity (p = 0.14) with risky family score for associations with mean IMT. In conclusion, childhood family psychosocial environment was positively associated with IMT in white participants, with little evidence of association in black participants. Mechanisms in white participants may include potential negative impacts of socioeconomic constraints on parenting quality, potentially influencing offspring's cardiovascular risk factors (e.g. smoking), socioeconomic position (e.g. education), and/or psychosocial functioning (e.g. depression), which may in turn lead to atherosclerotic processes. Borderline racial/ethnic differences in findings should be replicated, but add to literature exploring race/ethnicity-specific associations of parenting approaches with health outcomes. PMID:24581057

Loucks, Eric B; Taylor, Shelley E; Polak, Joseph F; Wilhelm, Aude; Kalra, Preety; Matthews, Karen A

2014-03-01

49

Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents K-12 and college classrooms considered outstanding in a competition, which judged the most outstanding learning environments at educational institutions nationwide. Jurors spent two days reviewing projects, focusing on concepts and ideas that made them exceptional. For each citation, the article offers information on the firm, client,…

American School & University, 2003

2003-01-01

50

Effectiveness of classroom response systems within an active learning environment.  

PubMed

In nursing education, the inclusion of pedagogical tools is necessary to transform Millennial classrooms. One such pedagogical tool currently offered is classroom response systems (CRS). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of CRS as a pedagogical tool in improving nursing students' examination performance within an active learning environment. A pretest-posttest design was used to determine whether there was a relationship between the use of CRS (independent variable) and nursing students' examination performance in a first-year Professional Practice course (dependent variable). Paired t tests revealed no greater improvement in posttest scores. Therefore, the use of CRS technology was not effective in increasing nursing students' examination scores in the Professional Practice course. Additional research is needed to provide adequate understanding of the effectiveness of CRS within the nursing education classroom. PMID:24127175

Welch, Susan

2013-11-01

51

Students’ Perception of the Physical and Psychosocial Science Laboratory Environment in Malaysia: Comparison across Subject and School Location  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports a survey which was conducted in order to determine students’ perception of physical and psychosocial science laboratory learning environment in secondary schools in the state of Selangor and it differences based on location and subjects. Students’ perception on science laboratory learning environment was measured by using Science Laboratory Environment Inventory (SLEI) and the suitability of physical aspects

Kamisah Osman; Che Nidzam Che Ahmad; Lilia Halim

2011-01-01

52

Achievement Goals, the Classroom Environment, and Reflective Thinking: A Conceptual Framework  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: Research pertaining to achievement goals and reflective thinking practice has received considerable attention in educational psychology. However, very few, if any, studies have looked at the impact of the classroom climate and how this psychosocial milieu may influence students' engagement in achievement goals and reflective thinking…

Phan, Huy P.

2008-01-01

53

Creating Environments of Success and Resilience: Culturally Responsive Classroom Management and More  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Creating safe and productive environments with a diverse student population requires more than the strategies recommended in the original classroom-management literature. Drawing from the literature on culturally responsive classroom management, psychologically supportive classroom environments, and building resilience, the authors describe the…

Bondy, Elizabeth; Ross, Dorene D.; Gallingane, Caitlin; Hambacher, Elyse

2007-01-01

54

Physical and Psychosocial Aspects of the Learning Environment in the Science Laboratory and Their Relationship to Teacher Satisfaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper is a report of a survey conducted to determine teachers' perception of the science laboratory learning environment and the relationship between different aspects of this environment and satisfaction from teaching and learning. Teachers' perceptions of psychosocial aspects were measured by use of the Science Laboratory…

Che Ahmad, Che Nidzam; Osman, Kamisah; Halim, Lilia

2013-01-01

55

Evaluation of a Classroom-Based Psychosocial Intervention in Conflict-Affected Nepal: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: In situations of ongoing violence, childhood psychosocial and mental health problems require care. However, resources and evidence for adequate interventions are scarce for children in low- and middle-income countries. This study evaluated a school-based psychosocial intervention in conflict-affected, rural Nepal. Methods: A cluster…

Jordans, Mark J. D.; Komproe, Ivan H.; Tol, Wietse A.; Kohrt, Brandon A.; Luitel, Nagendra P.; Macy, Robert D.; de Jong, Joop T. V. M.

2010-01-01

56

Development and Datametric Properties of a Scale Measuring Students' Perceptions of the Classroom Assessment Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Each classroom has its own assessment environment perceived by the students and springs from the teacher's assessment practices. Although students' perceptions of the assessment environment may influence their achievement-related outcomes, little attention has been given to the measurement of perceived classroom assessment environment. This study…

Alkharusi, Hussain

2011-01-01

57

Improving the Psychosocial Work Environment at Multi-Ethnic Workplaces: A Multi-Component Intervention Strategy in the Cleaning Industry  

PubMed Central

Global labour migration has increased in recent years and immigrant workers are often recruited into low status and low paid jobs such as cleaning. Research in a Danish context shows that immigrants working in the cleaning industry often form social networks based on shared languages and backgrounds, and that conflict between different ethnic groups may occur. This paper evaluates the impact of a multi-component intervention on the psychosocial work environment at a multi-ethnic Danish workplace in the cleaning sector. The intervention included Danish lessons, vocational training courses, and activities to improve collaboration across different groups of cleaners. Interviews about the outcome of the intervention were conducted with the cleaners and their supervisor. The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire was used as a supplement to the interviews. The results suggest that the psychosocial work environment had improved after the intervention. According to the interviews with the cleaners, the intervention had led to improved communication, trust, and collaboration. These findings are supported by the questionnaire where social support from supervisor and colleagues, social community, trust, and teamwork seem to have improved together with meaning of work, rewards, and emotional demands. The design of the intervention may provide inspiration for future psychosocial work environment interventions at multi-ethnic work places. PMID:24129115

Smith, Louise Hardman; Hviid, Kirsten; Frydendall, Karen Bo; Flyvholm, Mari-Ann

2013-01-01

58

Work in progress-design of animation oriented classroom multi-media environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The electric machinery in our university had been authorized as the national best course of China. Some undergraduates are organized to take part in the construction of the course teaching. Design of the classroom multi-media environment oriented animation is one of the research programs. This paper analyzes the animation oriented to the classroom multi-media environment. The main characters of the

Yang Song; Ye Zhang; Mingji Liu; Xiqiang Chen; Yingli Luo

2007-01-01

59

Secondary Pre-Service Teachers' Perceptions of an Ideal Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The classroom environment can impact students' motivation and engagement, and can influence students' academic learning. In some cases, pre-service teachers' influence on the classroom environment may not always be conducive for student learning. This exploratory study investigated pre-service teachers' perceptions of an ideal…

Bartelheim, Frederick J.; Conn, Daniel R.

2014-01-01

60

Psychosocial work environment and prediction of job satisfaction among Swedish registered nurses and physicians - a follow-up study.  

PubMed

In Sweden, the health care sector was subject to considerable changes during the 1990s: decreased costs, related staff redundancies and high rates of sick leave. The situation has now changed, and the sector is not facing the same all-embracing and turbulent changes. In addition, there is a shortage of nurses and physicians and a difficulty in retaining qualified staff. Regarding the psychosocial work environment, there is a lack of studies where both physicians and nurses are in focus. It is from a managerial perspective important to take a holistic approach towards questions regarding the work environment in general and the psychosocial work environment in particular. The aims of this study were to analyse similarities and differences in Registered Nurses and physicians' experience of quantitative and qualitative demands, control, role conflicts, role clarity, social support and job satisfaction in 2002 and 2009 and to analyse the stability in the prediction of job satisfaction over time. Questionnaires regarding psychosocial work environment aspects were distributed in 2002 and 2009, and a total of 860 nurses and 866 physicians answered the questionnaire. Independent t tests and linear stepwise regression analyses were conducted. The results indicate that the work environment has improved between 2002 and 2009 and that nurses experience their psychosocial working environment as more satisfactory than physicians. Social support, control, role conflicts, role clarity and qualitative demands were the best predictors of job satisfaction in 2002 and 2009. Quantitative demands did not contribute to predicting job satisfaction. Variables predicting job satisfaction are quite stable over time and are quite comparable for both nurses and physicians. PMID:21923675

Jönsson, Sandra

2012-06-01

61

Effects of teachers' assessment practices on ninth grade students' perceptions of classroom assessment environment and achievement goal orientations in Muscat science classrooms in the Sultanate of Oman  

Microsoft Academic Search

Classroom assessment is a continual activity for teachers to improve the quality of instruction and motivate students to learn (Brookhart, 1999; Gronlund, 2006). Although there is a great deal of research on teachers' classroom assessment practices, few empirical research attempts have been made to link these practices to students' perceptions of classroom assessment environment and motivation defined in terms of

Hussain A. Al Kharusi

2007-01-01

62

Expanding the Psychosocial Work Environment: Workplace Norms and Work-Family Conflict as Correlates of Stress and Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the contributions of organizational level norms about work requirements and social relations, and work-family conflict, to job stress and subjective health symptoms, controlling for Karasek's job demand-control-support model of the psychosocial work environment, in a sample of 1,346 employees from 56 firms in the Norwegian food and beverage industry. Hierarchical linear modeling analyses showed that organizational norms

Tove Helland Hammer; Per Øystein Saksvik; Kjell Nytrø; Hans Torvatn; Mahmut Bayazit

2004-01-01

63

Student, Teacher, and Observer Perceptions of the Classroom Environment Before and after the Transition to Junior High School  

Microsoft Academic Search

Student and teacher perceptions of the classroom environment were assessed during mathematics instruction in 117 sixth grade elementary school classrooms and the following year in 138 seventh grade junior high school classrooms. Observer perceptions were collected in a subset of these classrooms. As hypothesized, after the transition students were given fewer opportunities for input, interaction and cooperation; whole class task

Harriet Feldlaufer; Carol Midgley; Jacquelynne S. Eccles

1988-01-01

64

Learning at Workstations in Two Different Environments: A Museum and a Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Our study compared the learning and motivational outcome of one educational approach in two different learning environments, a natural science museum and a classroom, drawing on studies about the effects of field trips on students' learning and motivation. The educational intervention consisted of an introduction phase in the classroom and…

Sturm, Heike; Bogner, Franz X.

2010-01-01

65

Student Perceptions of Classroom Learning Environments: Development of the ClassMaps Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to describe the means, variability, internal consistency reliability, and structural validity evidence of the ClassMaps Survey, a measure of student perceptions of classroom learning environments. The ClassMaps Survey is a 55-item student rating scale of eight important classroom characteristics. The survey provides a…

Doll, Beth; Spies, Robert A.; LeClair, Courtney M.; Kurien, Sarah A.; Foley, Brett P.

2010-01-01

66

Change in Teacher Candidates' Metaphorical Images about Classroom Management in a Social Constructivist Learning Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to understand the conceptual change teacher candidates went through in a constructivist learning environment in a classroom management course. Within a qualitative case study design, teacher candidates' metaphorical images about classroom management were obtained through document analysis before and after they were…

Akar, Hanife; Yildirim, Ali

2009-01-01

67

Cognitive Apprenticeship in Computer-Mediated Feedback: Creating a Classroom Environment to Increase Feedback and Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative case study of 1 teacher and 10 students in an Advanced Placement English class explores the role of computer-mediated feedback in the creation of a classroom learning environment that was supported through hybrid learning experiences. Data sources included classroom observations, online conversations, interviews with 10 high…

Boling, Erica C.; Beatty, Jeanine

2010-01-01

68

Learners' Metaphorical Images about Classroom Management in a Social Constructivist Learning Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to understand the conceptual change teacher candidates went through in the process of a constructivist-learning environment in Classroom Management Course. Teacher candidates' metaphorical images about classroom management were obtained before and after a social constructivist curriculum implementation. Prior to the…

Akar, Hanife; Yildirim, Ali

2006-01-01

69

Sound-Field Amplification: Enhancing the Classroom Listening Environment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sound-field amplification is an educational tool that allows control of the acoustic environment in a classroom. Teachers wear small microphones that transmit sound to a receiver system attached to loudspeakers around the classroom. The goal of sound-field amplification is to amplify the teacher's voice by a few decibels, and to provide uniform…

Massie, Robyn; Theodoros, Deborah; McPherson, Bradley; Smaldino, Joseph

2004-01-01

70

Powerful Learning Environments: The Critical Link between School and Classroom Cultures.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evaluated classrooms within four Accelerated Schools Project (ASP) schools, operationalizing the ASP principles, values, and concepts of a "powerful learning environment" (PLE), examining how similarly PLE was implemented in different classrooms and schools, and analyzing the relation between degree of implementation and differences in students'…

Finnan, Christine; Schnepel, Katherine C.; Anderson, Lorin W.

2003-01-01

71

Academic Achievement and Perceptions of the Learning Environment in Virtual and Traditional Secondary Mathematics Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined Algebra students' achievement and perceptions of their classroom environments in both online and traditional face-to-face learning contexts using two validated assessments, the Assessment of Algebraic Understanding (AAU) test and the What is Happening in this Class? (WIHIC) classroom perceptions instrument. Three virtual and…

Hughes, Joan E.; McLeod, Scott; Brown, Rachel; Maeda, Yukiko; Choi, Jiyoung

2007-01-01

72

An On-Line Classroom for the Unix Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes an electronic classroom (ECR) program that has been developed at Nova University to facilitate online real-time group instruction in graduate degree programs in information and computer science. The first section describes the educational uses of the program, including the simulation of a classroom-type educational setting…

Scigliano, John A.; And Others

73

Classroom Environment Influences on Aggression, Peer Relations, and Academic Focus  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Peers serve as reinforcers and models of behavior, and consequently classrooms containing high numbers of students with poor academic skills or behavior problems are likely to promote these behaviors in individual students. This study examined how variations in social and academic classroom composition as well as the larger school context affected…

Barth, Joan M.; Dunlap, Sarah T.; Dane, Heather; Lochman, John E.; Wells, Karen C.

2004-01-01

74

The classroom learning environment as perceived by students in Arab elementary schools  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, students’ perceptions of the classroom learning environment in Arab elementary schools were investigated. The\\u000a sample included 261 students from Grades 5 and 6. The questionnaire was developed at an Arab college of teacher education\\u000a by 16 fourth-year student teachers who were completing their studies toward a BEd degree. Articles on classroom learning environment\\u000a were distributed to the

Mahmood Khalil; Vered Saar

2009-01-01

75

Investigation and Analysis of Winter Classroom Thermal Environment in Chongqing  

E-print Network

The classrooms in Chongqing are taken as a study subject in this paper. Measurements of the indoor thermal environmental parameters, e.g., indoor dry/wet bulb temperature, and air velocity, were taken. Combined with the questionnaire, which included...

Liu, J.; Li, B.; Yao, R.

2006-01-01

76

Internet Safety Gone Wild? Sacrificing the Educational and Psychosocial Benefits of Online Social Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many Internet safety and parenting experts suggest that parents prohibit their teens from social networking sites and other online spaces where predators may lurk. But we may do adolescents a disservice when we curtail their participation in these spaces, because the educational and psychosocial benefits of this type of communication can far…

Tynes, Brendesha M.

2007-01-01

77

An Examination of Relationships between Psychosocial Satisfaction Scales in an Online Student Learning Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research suggests that students who are satisfied with their learning experiences are typically successful and there is a fundamental theory that suggests if the expectations of students are achieved they will be return customers. This study examined the relationships between the psychosocial satisfaction scales in an online student learning…

Bookout, James Marshall, Jr.

2010-01-01

78

Individual Differences in Adolescents' Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Functioning Moderate Associations between Family Environment and Psychosocial Adjustment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study tested whether individual differences in autonomic nervous system functioning interact with environmental risk factors to predict adolescents' psychosocial functioning. The authors assessed skin conductance and respiratory sinus arrhythmia at rest and during laboratory stressors in 110 14-year-olds. Subsequently, adolescents and…

Diamond, Lisa M.; Fagundes, Christopher P.; Cribbet, Matthew R.

2012-01-01

79

Psychosocial work environment, job mobility and gender differences in turnover behaviour: a prospective study among the Swedish general population  

PubMed Central

Background Throughout the literature, substantial evidence supports associations between poor psychosocial work characteristics and a variety of ill-health outcomes. Yet, few reports strategies workers carry out to improve detrimental work conditions and consequently their health, such as changing jobs. The aim of this study was to examine if adverse psychosocial work exposure, as measured with the job demand-control and effort-reward imbalance models, could predict job mobility over a 5 years observation period. Method Participants were working men and women (n?=?940; 54.3% women), aged 24–60 years from the population of Gothenburg and surrounding metropolitan area. Job demand-control and effort-reward variables were compared with independent t-tests and chi2-test in persons with and without job mobility. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyse whether psychosocial factors could predict job mobility. All regression analyses were stratified by gender. Results Exposure to a combination of high demands-low control or high imbalance between effort and reward was related to increased odds of changing jobs (OR 1.63; CI 1.03-2.59 and OR 1.46; CI 1.13-1.89 respectively). When analysing men and women separately, men had a higher OR of changing jobs when exposed to either high demands-low control (OR 2.72; CI 1.24-5.98) or high effort-reward imbalance (OR 1.74; CI 1.11-2.72) compared to reference values. The only significant associations for women was slightly decreased odds for turnover in high reward jobs (OR 0.96; CI 0.92-0.99). Conclusions The results indicate that workers will seek to improve poor work environment by changing jobs. There were notable gender differences, where men tended to engage in job mobility when exposed to adverse psychosocial factors, while women did not. The lack of measures for mechanisms driving job mobility was a limitation of this study, thus preventing conclusions regarding psychosocial factors as the primary source for job mobility. PMID:24927628

2014-01-01

80

Effective Teaching Practices that Promote a Positive Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Establishing effective academic instruction, effective classroom management, and building relationships can all be accomplished with the application of observable and measurable practices. How an individual applies these practices will vary, yet common components of effective teaching are omnipresent. Across academic instruction, behavior…

MacSuga-Gage, Ashley S.; Simonsen, Brandi; Briere, Donald E.

2012-01-01

81

Resilience Applied in School: Strengthening Classroom Environments for Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the widespread acceptance of ecological models of child development, the tools and strategies underlying school psychological practice emphasize individual characteristics of children. This article describes ClassMaps Consultation, a consultation strategy that assesses the availability of protective factors and risk in school classrooms

Nickolite, Amanda; Doll, Beth

2008-01-01

82

The Literacy Environment of Preschool Classrooms: Contributions to Children's Emergent Literacy Growth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the relations among features of the classroom physical literacy environment (book materials, literacy area and writing materials) and psychological literacy environment (instructional support), and preschool children's gains in two areas of emergent literacy over an academic year. Results showed that features of the physical…

Guo, Ying; Justice, Laura M.; Kaderavek, Joan N.; McGinty, Anita

2012-01-01

83

Classroom Environment and Student Outcomes among Students Using Anthropometry Activities in High-School Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The main purpose of this research was to evaluate the use of anthropometric activities among a sample of 761 high-school biology students in terms of student outcomes (achievement and attitudes) and classroom environment (assessed with the Science Laboratory Environment Inventory, SLEI). Data analyses supported the SLEI's factorial validity,…

Lightburn, Millard E.; Fraser, Barry J.

2007-01-01

84

The Columbia Classroom Environments Project...Fourth Progress Report, December 1971.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Columbia Classroom Environments Project (CCEP) report discusses a number of questions about a set of dimensions of learning and development as well as the instruments the project was developing for the analysis of behavior in learning environments. Joseph C. Grannis examines The Argument, Assumptions, Definitions, Hypothesis; Rochelle Mayer…

Grannis, Joseph C.

85

Development and Application of the Elementary School Science Classroom Environment Scale (ESSCES): Measuring Student Perceptions of Constructivism within the Science Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the development, validation and application of a Rasch-based instrument, the Elementary School Science Classroom Environment Scale (ESSCES), for measuring students' perceptions of constructivist practices within the elementary science classroom. The instrument, designed to complement the Reformed Teaching Observation…

Peoples, Shelagh M.; O'Dwyer, Laura M.; Wang, Yang; Brown, Jessica J.; Rosca, Camelia V.

2014-01-01

86

Does Math Self-Efficacy Mediate the Effect of the Perceived Classroom Environment on Standardized Math Test Performance?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examined the effect of the perceived classroom environment on math self-efficacy and the effect of math self-efficacy on standardized math test performance. Upper elementary school students (N = 1,163) provided self-reports of their perceived math self-efficacy and the degree to which their math classroom environment was mastery oriented,…

Fast, Lisa A.; Lewis, James L.; Bryant, Michael J.; Bocian, Kathleen A.; Cardullo, Richard A.; Rettig, Michael; Hammond, Kimberly A.

2010-01-01

87

Perceived Learning Environment and Students' Emotional Experiences: A Multilevel Analysis of Mathematics Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A multilevel approach was used to analyze relationships between perceived classroom environments and emotions in mathematics. Based on Pekrun's (2000) [A social-cognitive, control-value theory of achievement emotions. In J. Heckhausen (Ed.), Motivational psychology of human development (pp. 143-163)] social-cognitive, control-value theory of…

Frenzel, Anne C.; Pekrun, Reinhard; Goetz, Thomas

2007-01-01

88

The Effect of Classroom Environment on Problem Behaviors: A Twin Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children's behavior problems, both internalizing and externalizing, are a function of both genetic and environmental influences. One potentially important environmental influence is the classroom environment. This study of 1941 monozygotic twin pairs examined whether children whose parents rated them as similarly high or low on a number of problem…

DiLalla, Lisabeth Fisher; Mullineaux, Paula Y.

2008-01-01

89

Classroom environment, achievement, attitudes and self-esteem in geography and mathematics in Singapore  

Microsoft Academic Search

This comprehensive study involved the use of the what is happening in this class? (WIHIC) questionnaire among 2310 Singaporean Grade 10 students (aged 15 years) in 75 geography and mathematics classes in 38 schools. A seven-scale factor structure was strongly supported and the alpha reliability of each scale was high. An investigation of associations between classroom environment and several student

Yan Huay Chionh; Barry J. Fraser

2009-01-01

90

An Evaluation of Elementary School Science Kits in Terms of Classroom Environment and Student Attitudes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student perceptions of classroom environment can provide useful criteria for evaluating educational alternatives. The My Class Inventory (MCI) was used with 588 3rd- to 5th-grade students in Texas in evaluating the effectiveness of instruction using a textbook, science kits, or a combination of both. Various analyses attested to the factorial…

Houston, Linda Scott; Fraser, Barry J.; Ledbetter, Cynthia E.

2008-01-01

91

Locus of Control and Classroom Environment in Discriminating High and Low Self-Concept.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Improvement in self-concept may facilitate improvement in other areas such as learning and achievement. If the self-concept is formed through experiences with the environment, interactions with significant others, and attributions of one's own behavior, then the classroom atmosphere may be influential in the development of a positive or negative…

Bailey, Glenda K.; And Others

92

A Cross-National Study of Secondary Science Classroom Environments in Australia and Indonesia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports a cross-national study of classroom environments in Australia and Indonesia. A modified version of the What Is Happening In this Class? (WIHIC) questionnaire was used simultaneously in these two countries to: 1) cross validate the modified WIHIC; 2) investigate differences between countries and sexes in perceptions of…

Fraser, Barry J.; Aldridge, Jill M.; Adolphe, F. S. Gerard

2010-01-01

93

Cross-Cultural Interface Design and the Classroom-Learning Environment in Taiwan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined whether using localized interface designs would make a difference in users' learning results and their perceptions of the interface design in a classroom learning environment. This study also sought to learn more about users' attitudes toward the localized interface features. To assess the impact of using localized interfaces…

Chang, Chia-Lin; Su, Yelin

2012-01-01

94

Student Perceptions of the Classroom Environment: Relations to Motivation and Achievement in Mathematics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the relationship of 979 middle school students' perceptions of their mathematics classroom environment to their motivation and achievement. Structural equation modeling indicated that motivational variables (utility, personal achievement goals, efficacy) mediated the influence of perceived teacher expectations, teacher…

Gilbert, Melissa C.; Musu-Gillette, Lauren E.; Woolley, Michael E.; Karabenick, Stuart A.; Strutchens, Marilyn E.; Martin, W. Gary

2014-01-01

95

Associations between Chinese Language Classroom Environments and Students' Motivation to Learn the Language  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Associations between the nature of Chinese Language Classroom Environments and Singapore secondary school students' motivation to learn the Chinese Language were investigated. A sample of 1,460 secondary three (grade 9) students from 50 express stream (above average academic ability) classes in Singapore government secondary schools was involved…

Chua, Siew Lian; Wong, Angela F. L.; Chen, Der-Thanq

2009-01-01

96

Cross-Level Measurement Invariance in School and Classroom Environment Surveys: Implications for Policy and Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Measures of classroom and school environments are central to policy efforts that assess school and teacher quality. These measures are often formed by aggregating individual survey responses to form group-level measures, and assume an invariant measurement model holds across the individual and group levels. This article explores the tenability of…

Schweig, Jonathan

2014-01-01

97

Motivational Goal Orientation, Perceptions of Biology and Physics Classroom Learning Environments, and Gender  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Researchers have reported persuasive evidence that students' perceptions of their classroom learning environment account for significant variance in cognitive and affective outcomes (e.g. intrinsic motivation, self-concept, liking for particular subjects and students' intention to drop out). The study reported in this paper investigated the…

Koul, Ravinder; Roy, Laura; Lerdpornkulrat, Thanita

2012-01-01

98

The Status of Science Classroom Learning Environments in Indonesian Lower Secondary Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study reports cross-validation results for an Indonesian-language version of a modified form of the What Is Happening In this Class? (WIHIC) questionnaire and its use in investigating the nature of science classroom learning environments in Indonesian lower secondary schools. Following administration of the WIHIC to approximately 1400…

Wahyudi; Treagust, David F.

2004-01-01

99

Can We Bring the Natural Environment into the Art Classroom? Can Natural Sound Foster Creativity?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explores the relationship between the natural world and its potential benefits to the art classroom environment. In particular, it considers the following research question: Can natural sound foster creativity? The study investigates the role of natural sound on creative ability in girls' intermediate schools (12 to 15 years) in Jeddah,…

Alawad, Abeer

2012-01-01

100

A method to design, construct and test digital hardware all in classroom environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new technique is presented that allows an instructor to bring the hardware construction and the laboratory experiments into the classroom environment through the Internet. The technique also provides the students with the opportunity to do their entire design projects, including building the hardware and fully testing and debugging the system all from a Web terminal. An experimental unit, called

Reza Hashemian; Jason Riddley

2007-01-01

101

School Environment and Technology Implementation in K-12 Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine teachers' perceptions of their school environment in terms of factors that enhance or prohibit the use of instructional technology. The study also investigated whether the technology implementation environment varied for schools at different locations and different levels. Both quantitative and qualitative…

Lu, Ruiling; Overbaugh, Richard C.

2009-01-01

102

Risk factors of workplace bullying for men and women: The role of the psychosocial and physical work environment.  

PubMed

Workplace bullying has been shown to be a severe social stressor at work, resulting in high costs both for the individuals and organizations concerned. The aim of this study is to analyze risk factors in a large, nationally representative sample of Finnish employees (n = 4,392). The study makes three important contributions to the existing literature on workplace bullying: first, it demonstrates the role of the physical work environment alongside the psychosocial work environment - employees with a poor physical work environment are more likely than others to report having been subjected to or having observed bullying. Second, contrary to common assumptions, the results suggest that performance-based pay is associated with a lower, rather than higher risk of bullying. Third, the findings suggest that there are gender differences in risk factors, thereby constituting a call for more studies on the role of gender when identifying risk factors. Increased knowledge of risk factors is important as it enables us to take more effective measures to decrease the risk of workplace bullying. PMID:25330234

Salin, Denise

2015-02-01

103

The Responsive Environmental Assessment for Classroom Teaching (REACT): the dimensionality of student perceptions of the instructional environment.  

PubMed

This study details the initial development of the Responsive Environmental Assessment for Classroom Teachers (REACT). REACT was developed as a questionnaire to evaluate student perceptions of the classroom teaching environment. Researchers engaged in an iterative process to develop, field test, and analyze student responses on 100 rating-scale items. Participants included 1,465 middle school students across 48 classrooms in the Midwest. Item analysis, including exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, was used to refine a 27-item scale with a second-order factor structure. Results support the interpretation of a single general dimension of the Classroom Teaching Environment with 6 subscale dimensions: Positive Reinforcement, Instructional Presentation, Goal Setting, Differentiated Instruction, Formative Feedback, and Instructional Enjoyment. Applications of REACT in research and practice are discussed along with implications for future research and the development of classroom environment measures. PMID:24708280

Nelson, Peter M; Demers, Joseph A; Christ, Theodore J

2014-06-01

104

Designing for Learning: Online Social Networks as a Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper deploys notions of emergence, connections, and designs for learning to conceptualize high school students' interactions when using online social media as a learning environment. It makes links to chaos and complexity theories and to fractal patterns as it reports on a part of the first author's action research study, conducted while she…

Casey, Gail; Evans, Terry

2011-01-01

105

Creating an Inclusive Classroom Environment StudentVeterans  

E-print Network

is increasingly focused on 2 critical dynamics · Backgrounds that introduce meaningful variations in experience to the instructor, not the students 5 6 7 8 #12;should: shape the dynamic make it a safe learning environment for everyone gently disrupt (un)intentional student comments that foster inequities, biases, stereotypes

Buehrer, R. Michael

106

Associations between the Classroom Learning Environment and Student Engagement in Learning 2: A Structural Equation Modelling Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report is about the second of two phases in an investigation into associations between student engagement in classroom learning and the classroom-learning environment. Whereas the first phase utilized Rasch modelling (Cavanagh, 2012), this report uses latent variable modelling to explore the data. The investigations in both phases of this…

Harbaugh, Allen G.; Cavanagh, Robert F.

2012-01-01

107

Exploring the Complexity of Classroom Management: 8 Components of Managing a Highly Productive, Safe, and Respectful Urban Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Creating a learning environment where all students can thrive academically requires an understanding of the complexities of classroom management. The notions of "discipline," "conformity" and "obedience" that have littered discussions of classroom management in the past are no longer sufficient to describe the diverse…

Jones, Karrie A.; Jones, Jennifer L.; Vermette, Paul J.

2013-01-01

108

Educational and Career Interests in Math: A Longitudinal Examination of the Links between Classroom Environment, Motivational Beliefs, and Interests  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drawing on the expectancy-value model, stage-environment fit theory, and self-determination theory, this study examined the longitudinal associations between classroom characteristics, expectancies-values, high school course enrollment, and career aspirations in the domain of math. Data were collected on 3,048 youth who reported on their classroom

Wang, Ming-Te

2012-01-01

109

A qualitative study of the interactions among the psychosocial work environment and family, community and services for workers with low mental health  

PubMed Central

Background The psychosocial work environment can benefit and harm mental health. Poor psychosocial work environments and high level work-family conflict are both associated with poor mental health, yet little is known about how people with poor mental health manage the interactions among multiple life domains. This study explores the interfaces among paid work, family, community and support services and their combined effects on mental health. Methods We conducted 21 in-depth semi-structured interviews with people identified as having poor mental health to examine their experiences of paid employment and mental health and wellbeing in the context of their daily lives. Results The employment-related psychosocial work environment, particularly workplace relationships, employment security and degree of control over hours, strongly affected participants’ mental health. The interfaces among the life domains of family, community and access to support services suggest that effects on mental health differ according to: time spent in each domain, the social, psychological and physical spaces where domain activities take place, life stage and the power available to participants in their multiple domains. This paper is based on a framework analysis of all the interviews, and vignettes of four cases. Cases were selected to represent different types of relationships among the domains and how interactions among them either mitigated and/or exacerbated mental health effects of psychosocial work environments. Conclusions Examining domain interactions provides greater explanatory capacity for understanding how people with low mental health manage their lives than restricting the research to the separate impacts of the psychosocial work environment or work-family conflict. The extent to which people can change the conditions under which they engage in paid work and participate in family and social life is significantly affected by the extent to which their employment position affords them latitude. Policies that provide psychosocial protections to workers that enable them to make changes or complaints without detrimental repercussions (such as vilification or job loss) and increase access to welfare benefits and support services could improve mental health among people with paid work. These policies would have particularly important effects for those in lower socioeconomic status positions. PMID:24004446

2013-01-01

110

A Cross-cultural Study of Classroom Learning Environments in Australia and Taiwan  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research is distinctive in that it not only provides an example of one of the few cross-cultural studies in science education,\\u000a but also it used multiple research methods from different paradigms in exploring classroom learning environments in Taiwan\\u000a and Australia. This article describes the validation and use of an English and Mandarin version of the What is Happening in

JILL M. ALDRIDGE; BARRY J. FRASER

2000-01-01

111

Parent and student perceptions of classroom learning environment and its association with student outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research is distinctive in that parents’ perceptions were utilised in conjunction with students’ perceptions in investigating\\u000a science classroom learning environments among Grade 4 and 5 students in South Florida. The What Is Happening In this Class?\\u000a (WIHIC) questionnaire was modified for young students and their parents and administered to 520 students and 120 parents.\\u000a Data analyses supported the WIHIC’s

Debra Allen; Barry J. Fraser

2007-01-01

112

The influence of family environment on long-term psychosocial functioning of adolescents with juvenile fibromyalgia  

PubMed Central

Little is known about the impact of family environment on the long-term adjustment of patients with juvenile-onset fibromyalgia (JFM). Objective To evaluate whether family environment in early adolescence predicted later physical functioning and depressive symptoms of adolescents with JFM as they transition to early adulthood in the context of a controlled long-term follow-up study. Method Participants were 39 youth (Mage = 18.7 years) with JFM and 38 healthy matched controls who completed web-based surveys about their health status (SF-36 Health Survey) and depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory II) approximately 4 years after a home-based, in-person assessment of child and family functioning. During the initial assessment, parents of participants (94% mothers) completed the Family Environment Scale, and adolescents (Mage = 14.8 years) completed self-report questionnaires about pain (Visual Analog Scale) and depressive symptoms (Children’s Depression Inventory). Results Results indicated that family environment during early adolescence significantly predicted greater depressive symptoms in early adulthood for both the JFM group and healthy controls. In particular, a controlling family environment (use of rules to control the family and allowing little independence) during early adolescence was the driving factor in predicting poorer long-term emotional functioning for patients with JFM. Family environment did not significantly predict longer-term physical impairment for either group. Conclusions Adolescents with JFM from controlling family environments are at increased risk for poorer emotional functioning in early adulthood. Behavioral and family interventions should foster independent coping among adolescents with JFM and greater parenting flexibility to enhance successful long-term coping. PMID:23281206

Sil, Soumitri; Lynch-Jordan, Anne; Ting, Tracy V.; Peugh, James; Noll, Jennie; Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita

2012-01-01

113

The Psychosocial Work Environment, Employee Mental Health and Organizational Interventions: Improving Research and Practice by Taking a Multilevel Approach.  

PubMed

Although there have been several calls for incorporating multiple levels of analysis in employee health and well-being research, studies examining the interplay between individual, workgroup, organizational and broader societal factors in relation to employee mental health outcomes remain an exception rather than the norm. At the same time, organizational intervention research and practice also tends to be limited by a single-level focus, omitting potentially important influences at multiple levels of analysis. The aims of this conceptual paper are to help progress our understanding of work-related determinants of employee mental health by the following: (1) providing a rationale for routine multilevel assessment of the psychosocial work environment; (2) discussing how a multilevel perspective can improve related organizational interventions; and (3) highlighting key theoretical and methodological considerations relevant to these aims. We present five recommendations for future research, relating to using appropriate multilevel research designs, justifying group-level constructs, developing group-level measures, expanding investigations to the organizational level and developing multilevel approaches to intervention design, implementation and evaluation. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25044861

Martin, Angela; Karanika-Murray, Maria; Biron, Caroline; Sanderson, Kristy

2014-07-14

114

Supporting computer-mediated learning: A case study in online staff development and classroom learning environment assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rapid growth of online learning has led to the development of staff inservice evaluation models that are geared towards\\u000a improving degree programs. Based on best practices in student online assessment, the Online Faculty Development and Classroom\\u000a Learning Environment Assessment course was designed to serve the dual purpose of staff development and classroom learning\\u000a environment assessment. Results of analyses showed

Luis Miguel Villar Angulo; Olga María Alegre de la Rosa

2008-01-01

115

Changing the Metacognitive Orientation of a Classroom Environment to Enhance Students' Metacognition Regarding Chemistry Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Concerns persist regarding science classroom learning environments and the lack of development of students' metacognition and reasoning processes within such environments. Means of shaping learning environments so that students are encouraged to develop their metacognition are required in order to enhance students' reasoning and…

Thomas, Gregory P.; Anderson, David

2014-01-01

116

The Development of a Handbook for Teachers to Help Them Improve the Physical Environment of Their Classrooms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many educators argue that the environment to which a child is exposed every day of his school career can and will have a lasting effect on that child. The physical environment of a classroom setting encompasses many areas, according to this point of view. If this physical environment is inviting, colorful, and gives off a \\

Sharon C Steedley

1979-01-01

117

In pursuit of a holistic learning environment: the impact of music in the medical physiology classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A holistic learning environment is one that nurtures all aspects of students' learning. The environment is safe, supportive, and provides opportunities to help students deal with nonacademic as well as academic factors that impact their learning. Creation of such an environment requires the establishment of a supportive learning community. For a variety of reasons, establishing such a learning community of first-year medical students can be challenging. This communication presents one approach to meeting this challenge in a medical school Human Physiology course. Steps were taken at the beginning of the course to create the community, and activities designed to reinforce these efforts were incorporated into the course as it progressed. Two pilot studies were conducted to test the hypothesis that providing students with a participatory music experience may help to promote a holistic learning environment by helping them restore a sense of balance to their emotional well-being as well as reinforce a sense of community in the classroom. Student response to these activities indicated that these efforts provided emotional support during stressful periods during the quarter, helped promote a feeling of safety within the environment, and reenergized the class during long class sessions. This project illustrates that each instructor, within the confines of his/her own classroom, can make a significant contribution to achieving a holistic learning envrionment for his/her students.

PhD Harold I Modell (Physiology Educational Research Consortium)

2009-03-01

118

Classroom Management in Diverse Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Classroom management continues to be a serious concern for teachers and especially in urban and diverse learning environments. The authors present the culturally responsive classroom management practices of two teachers from an urban and diverse middle school to extend the construct, culturally responsive classroom management. The principles that…

Milner, H. Richard, IV; Tenore, F. Blake

2010-01-01

119

Development of an Instrument for Assessing Senior High School Students' Preferred and Perceived Laboratory Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aimed to develop an instrument, named the inquiry-based laboratory classroom environment instrument (ILEI), for assessing senior high-school science students' preferred and perceived laboratory environment. A total of 262 second-year students, from a senior-high school in Taiwan, were recruited for this study. Four stages were…

Hsiao, Chien-Hua; Wu, Ying-Tien; Lin, Chung-Yen; Wong, Terrence William; Fu, Hsieh-Hai; Yeh, Ting-Kuang; Chang, Chung-Yen

2014-01-01

120

Development of an Instrument To Monitor the Success of Outcomes-Based Learning Environments in Science Classrooms in South Africa.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As part of an effort to monitor the transformation of classrooms within Limpopo Province, South Africa, an instrument was developed to assess students perceptions of their learning environments. The developed questionnaire, the Outcomes-Based Learning Environment Questionnaire (OBLEQ), was designed to measure the impact of the Curriculum 2005…

Seopa, Mampone A.; Laugksch, Rudiger C.; Aldridge, Jill M.; Fraser, Barry J.

121

Classroom Tour  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this 5-minute video a mathematics teacher demonstrates how she incorporates accessibility strategies into her physical classroom environment. Several details are shown about the organization and management of a math classroom with a view toward accessibility, expectations, kinesthetic involvement, and a positive environment.

TeacherLine

2012-01-01

122

Prospective Elementary Teachers' Understanding of the Nature of Science and Perceptions of the Classroom Learning Environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigated prospective elementary teachers' understandings of the nature of science and explored associations with their guided-inquiry science learning environment. Over 500 female students completed the Nature of Scientific Knowledge Survey (NSKS), although only four scales were analyzed-Creative, Testable, Amoral, and Unified. The learning environment was assessed using previously-validated and reliable scales from What Is Happening In this Class? (WIHIC) and the Science Laboratory Environment Inventory (SLEI). Analyses indicated moderate multiple correlations that were statistically significant ( p < 0.01) between Creative (R = 0.22), Testable (R = 0.29), and Unified (R = 0.27), and a positive learning environment. Regression coefficients revealed that Open-Endedness was a significant independent predictor of students' understanding of the role of creativity in science (? = 0.16), while Cooperation, Open-Endedness, and Material Environment were linked with understanding the testable nature of science (? = 0.10-0.12). Interview questions probed possible relationships between an improved understanding of the nature of science and elements of a positive classroom environment. Responses suggested that an appropriate level of open-endedness during investigations was very important as this helped students grapple with abstract nature of science concepts and shift their conceptions closer to a more realistic view of scientific practice.

Martin-Dunlop, Catherine S.

2013-06-01

123

Fatigue in seafarers working in the offshore oil and gas re-supply industry: effects of safety climate, psychosocial work environment and shift arrangement.  

PubMed

This study examined the influence of safety climate and psychosocial work environment on the reported fatigue of seafarers working in the offshore oil and gas re-supply industry (n = 402). We found that seafarers who reported high psychological demands and perceived the organisational-level safety climate negatively,reported significantly more mental fatigue, physical fatigue, and lack of energy. In addition, seafarers who reported having high levels of job control reported being significantly less mentally fatigued. We also found some combined effects of safety climate and shift arrangement. Organisational-level safety climate did not influence the levels of physical fatigue in seafarers working on the night shift. On the contrary, seafarers working during the days reported to be more physically fatigued when they perceived the organisational-level climate to be negative compared with the positive. The opposite effect was found for group-level safety climate: seafarers working during the nights reported to be more physically fatigued when they perceived the group-level climate to be negative compared with the positive. The results from this study point to the importance of taking into consideration aspects of the psychosocial work environment and safety climate,and their potential impact on fatigue and safety in the maritime organisations. PMID:23788223

Hystad, Sigurd W; Saus, Evelyn-Rose; Sætrevik, Bjørn; Eid, Jarle

2013-01-01

124

Comparison of Preschoolers' Narratives, the Classroom Book Environment, and Teacher Attitudes toward Literacy Practices in Korea and the United States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated Korean and U.S. preschoolers' personal and fictional narratives, their classroom book environments, and their teachers' attitudes about reading aloud. The participants were 70 Korean and American 3- and 4-year-olds enrolled in 2 university lab preschools and their 4 teachers. The structures and content of the preschoolers'…

Lee, Young-Ja; Lee, Jeehyun; Han, Myae; Schickedanz, Judith A.

2011-01-01

125

Examining Hong Kong students’ achievement goals and their relations with students’ perceived classroom environment and strategy use  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined Hong Kong students’ achievement goals and their relations with students’ perceived classroom environment and strategy use based on the multiple goal perspective of goal orientation theory. A total of 925 Grade 8 students from six secondary schools in Hong Kong voluntarily responded to a questionnaire that measured these three sets of variables. Consistent with previous studies using

John Lee

2008-01-01

126

Examining Hong Kong Students' Achievement Goals and Their Relations with Students' Perceived Classroom Environment and Strategy Use  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined Hong Kong students' achievement goals and their relations with students' perceived classroom environment and strategy use based on the multiple goal perspective of goal orientation theory. A total of 925 Grade 8 students from six secondary schools in Hong Kong voluntarily responded to a questionnaire that measured these three…

Lau, Kit-Ling; Lee, John

2008-01-01

127

A Comparison of Childrens' Statements about Social Relations and Teaching in the Classroom and in the Outdoor Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two teachers from a school in Copenhagen were allowed to move their third grade teaching into a forest every Thursday for three years. Thus 20% of the class's regular teaching took place in an outdoor environment. The purpose of the present study was to ask the children how they experienced lessons in the classroom and the forest settings.…

Mygind, Erik

2009-01-01

128

The Effects of Motivation and Classroom Environment on the Satisfaction of Noncredit Continuing Education Students. AIR 1994 Annual Forum Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the functional relationships among motivation, perceived classroom environment, and student satisfaction, for three major curricular groups: arts and leisure programs, personal development programs, and professional development programs. The sample included 1,180 students enrolled in noncredit courses at the College of…

Fujita-Starck, Pamela J.; Thompson, John A.

129

The English Classroom in an External Degree Program--A Viable Learning Environment for the 1980s.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A technical writing course required as part of an external degree program (EDP) offered to military personnel provides a profile of successful use of the noncampus classroom as a teaching environment. An understanding of the interests and attitudes of military students is essential, with pragmatism and idealism as the instructor's survival skills.…

Philbin, A. I.

130

A Typology of Chemistry Classroom Environments: Exploring the Relationships between 10th Grade Students' Perceptions, Attitudes and Gender  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study was the first in Greece in which educational effectiveness theory constituted a knowledge base for investigating the impact of chemistry classroom environment in 10 Grade students' enjoyment of class. An interpretive heuristic schema was developed and utilised in order to incorporate two factors of teacher behaviour at…

Giallousi, M.; Gialamas, V.; Pavlatou, E. A.

2013-01-01

131

An Application of the Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction and College and University Classroom Environment Inventory in a Multicultural Tertiary Context  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The research reported in this inquiry consisted of the application of two classroom learning environment questionnaires developed in a Western context to a culturally diverse context, namely, the Pacific Islands. The College and University Classroom Environment Inventory (CUCEI) and Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction (QTI) instruments were administered to intact classes of first- and second-year science students ( n= 257) at a regional university in the Pacific Islands, containing a total of 12 ethnicities. The data reveal that the QTI instrument holds good reliability for all scales, whereas the CUCEI holds reliability for only two scales. This may be due to the simple nature of the questions on the QTI whereas the questions on the CUCEI require more interpretation, the latter exacerbated by the fact that English is a second or third language for most participants. Surprisingly, there were few differences in perceptions of teacher student interaction based on ethnicity, but substantial differences based on gender. As reported in previous classroom environment research at the secondary school level, in this study, females perceived their environment more favourably than males. The data for the QTI reveal that the students perceive their classrooms to be highly teacher dominated, consistent with previous naturalistic studies of secondary schools and exploratory studies at the tertiary level in Fiji. Since almost all the graduates from this institution become science teachers, a cycle is completed.

Coll, Richard K.; Taylor, Neil; Fisher, Darrell L.

2002-02-01

132

Design of the Technology-Rich Classroom Practices and Facilities Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is widely recognized that technology in the classroom has the potential to transform education at every stage from Pre-K, to K-12, to Higher Education and Adult Education. Using the Digital Teaching Platform as an exemplar of 21st Century classroom instruction style, the author offers an overview of classroom technology and its effects on…

Nelson, Angela C.

2013-01-01

133

Multimedia Environments in Mathematics Teacher Education: Preparing Regular and Special Educators for Inclusive Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A multimedia CD-ROM program, Mathematics Teaching and Learning in Inclusive Classrooms, was produced to help preservice teachers learn mathematics teaching methods in the context of inclusive classrooms. The contents include text resources, video segments of experts and of classroom lessons, images of student work, an electronic notebook, and a…

De La Paz, Susan; Hernandez-Ramos, Pedro; Barron, Linda

2004-01-01

134

Graphing in Groups: Learning about Lines in a Collaborative Classroom Network Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a design experiment in which we explore new structures for classroom collaboration supported by a classroom network of handheld graphing calculators. We describe a design for small group investigations of linear functions and present findings from its implementation in three high school algebra classrooms. Our coding of the…

White, Tobin; Wallace, Matthew; Lai, Kevin

2012-01-01

135

Psychosocial work environment and well-being: a cross-sectional study at a thermal power plant in China.  

PubMed

To investigate the effects of the job demand-control (DC) model and the effort-reward imbalance (ERI) model on worker's well-being, self-reports for psychosocial work conditions and well-being were made by a sample of 878 workers at a thermal power plant in China using the main dimensions of DC and ERI questionnaires. Logistic regression analyses were employed controlling for age, gender, and educational level, and negative and positive affection among others. Workers reporting high job demands and low job control or high efforts and low rewards had elevated risks of job dissatisfaction, psychosomatic complaints and depressive symptoms. Odds ratios were generally higher in workers reporting both high efforts and low rewards. Furthermore, low reward proved to be a stronger predictor of poor well-being when both job stress models were simultaneously adjusted. To some extent, interaction effects were found for social support, but no interaction effects were found for overcommitment. The findings indicate independent effects of both the DC model and the ERI model on well-being. Future work should explore the combined effects of these two models of psychosocial stress at work on health more thoroughly. PMID:18403866

Yu, Shanfa; Gu, Guizhen; Zhou, Wenhui; Wang, Sheng

2008-01-01

136

Classroom emotional climate as a moderator of anxious solitary children's longitudinal risk for peer exclusion: a child × environment model.  

PubMed

This study tests the ability of classroom emotional climate to moderate anxious solitary children's risk for peer exclusion over a 3-year period from 3rd through 5th grade. Six hundred eighty-eight children completed peer nominations for anxious solitude and peer exclusion in the fall and spring semesters of each grade, and observations of classroom emotional climate were conducted at the same time points. Results revealed a positive relation between anxious solitude and peer exclusion in the fall semester of each grade. However, in classrooms with supportive versus unsupportive emotional climates, this relation demonstrated a different pattern of change from fall to spring semesters. In classrooms with supportive emotional climates, children with high versus low levels of anxious solitude experienced relative elevation in fall peer exclusion, but this disappeared by the spring, such that spring peer exclusion levels were equalized among children who differed in anxious solitude. This result is consistent with hypotheses guided by the Child × Environment model. However, in classrooms with unsupportive emotional climates, results did not conform to expectations that children with high anxious solitude would experience stable or increased peer exclusion over time. PMID:21688897

Avant, Tamara Spangler; Gazelle, Heidi; Faldowski, Richard

2011-11-01

137

The importance of leadership style and psychosocial work environment to staff-assessed quality of care: implications for home help services.  

PubMed

Work in home help services is typically conducted by an assistant nurse or nursing aide in the home of an elderly person, and working conditions have been described as solitary with a high workload, little influence and lack of peer and leader support. Relations between leadership styles, psychosocial work environment and a number of positive and negative employee outcomes have been established in research, but the outcome in terms of quality of care has been addressed to a lesser extent. In the present study, we aimed to focus on working conditions in terms of leadership and the employee psychosocial work environment, and how these conditions are related to the quality of care. The hypothesis was that the relation between a transformational leadership style and quality of care is mediated through organisational and peer support, job control and workload. A cross-sectional survey design was used and a total of 469 questionnaires were distributed (March-April 2012) to assistant nurses in nine Swedish home help organisations, including six municipalities and one private organisation, representing both rural and urban areas (302 questionnaires were returned, yielding a 65% response rate). The results showed that our hypothesis was supported and, when indirect effects were also taken into consideration, there was no direct effect of leadership style on quality of care. The mediated model explained 51% of the variance in quality of care. These results indicate that leadership style is important not only to employee outcomes in home help services but is also indirectly related to quality of care as assessed by staff members. PMID:24313819

Westerberg, Kristina; Tafvelin, Susanne

2014-09-01

138

Capturing the complexity: Content, type, and amount of instruction and quality of the classroom learning environment synergistically predict third graders' vocabulary and reading comprehension outcomes.  

PubMed

We examined classrooms as complex systems that affect students' literacy learning through interacting effects of content and amount of time individual students spent in literacy instruction along with the global quality of the classroom-learning environment. We observed 27 third grade classrooms serving 315 target students using two different observation systems. The first assessed instruction at a more micro-level; specifically, the amount of time individual students spent in literacy instruction defined by the type of instruction, role of the teacher, and content. The second assessed the quality of the classroom-learning environment at a more macro level focusing on classroom organization, teacher responsiveness, and support for vocabulary and language. Results revealed that both global quality of the classroom learning environment and time individual students spent in specific types of literacy instruction covering specific content interacted to predict students' comprehension and vocabulary gains whereas neither system alone did. These findings support a dynamic systems model of how individual children learn in the context of classroom literacy instruction and the classroom-learning environment, which can help to improve observations systems, advance research, elevate teacher evaluation and professional development, and enhance student achievement. PMID:25400293

Connor, Carol McDonald; Spencer, Mercedes; Day, Stephanie L; Giuliani, Sarah; Ingebrand, Sarah W; McLean, Leigh; Morrison, Frederick J

2014-08-01

139

Improving human computer interaction in a classroom environment using computer vision  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we discuss our use of multi-modal input to improve human computer interaction. Specifically we look at the methods used in the Intelligent Classroom to combine multiple input modes, and examine in particular the visual input modes. The Classroom provides context that improves the functioning of the visual input modes. It also determines which visual input modes are

Joshua Flachsbart; David Franklin; Kristian J. Hammond

2000-01-01

140

Classroom Environments and Student Empowerment: An Analysis of Elementary and Secondary Teacher Beliefs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This project explored a classroom model of motivation in which the source of student motivation is based on internal mechanisms or structures and classroom student/instructor interactions. It also extended earlier research in which beliefs of veteran, entry level, and preservice teachers have been explored. For this project, 117 elementary…

Nichols, Joe D.; Zhang, Guanglan

2011-01-01

141

Using Academic Notebooks to Support Achievement and Promote Positive Classroom Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Notebooks are commonly used in middle school classrooms as a place for students to record information delivered via lecture, classroom discussion, or independent work. A primary reason teachers ask students to use notebooks is to capture and organize information. In many cases, students are expected to use these tools with little direction,…

Rheingold, Alison; LeClair, Caitlin; Seaman, Jayson

2013-01-01

142

Positive Behavior Support in the Classroom: Facilitating Behaviorally Inclusive Learning Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teaching in a public school is a demanding job as the multiple dynamics of a classroom can be a challenge. In addition to addressing the challenging behaviors that many students without disabilities exhibit, more and more students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) are being included in the general education classroom. Effective…

Scott, Terrance M.; Park, Kristy Lee; Swain-Bradway, Jessica; Landers, Eric

2007-01-01

143

Psychosocial Work Environment as a Risk Factor for Absence With a Psychiatric Diagnosis: An Instrumental-Variables Analysis  

PubMed Central

Recent reviews show that self-reported psychosocial factors related to work, such as job demands and job control, are associated with employee mental health, but it is not known whether this association is attributable to reporting bias. The authors examined this question using objectively measured hospital ward overcrowding as an instrument. The extent of overcrowding provided a strong instrument for self-reported job demands but not for job control, and it was used to examine unbiased associations between self-reported job demands and sickness absence with a psychiatric diagnosis among 2,784 female nurses working in somatic illness wards in Finland. During the 12-month follow-up period (2004–2005), 102 nurses had an absence with a psychiatric diagnosis, 33 with a diagnosis of depressive disorder. Both greater extent of overcrowding and higher self-reported job demands were associated with increased risk of psychiatric absence. The latter association was stronger but less precisely estimated in an instrumental-variables analysis which took into account only the variation in self-reported job demands that was explained by overcrowding. Repeating these analyses with absence due to depressive disorders as the outcome led to similar results. Findings from this instrumental-variables analysis support the status of high self-reported job demands as a risk factor for absence with a psychiatric diagnosis. PMID:20534822

Kivimäki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi; Kawachi, Ichiro; Ferrie, Jane E.; Oksanen, Tuula; Joensuu, Matti; Pentti, Jaana; Salo, Paula; Elovainio, Marko; Virtanen, Marianna

2010-01-01

144

Effects of psychosocial stimulation on improving home environment and child-rearing practices: results from a community-based trial among severely malnourished children in Bangladesh  

PubMed Central

Background Parenting programmes are effective in enhancing parenting practices and child development. This study evaluated the effects of a intervention with psychosocial stimulation (PS) on the quality of the home environment and mothers’ child-rearing practices in a community-based trial with severely malnourished Bangladeshi children. Method Severely underweight children (n?=?507), 6–24?months of age, were randomly assigned to five groups: PS; food supplementation (FS); PS?+?FS; clinic-control (CC); and, hospital-control (CH). PS included fortnightly follow-up visits for six months at community clinics where a play leader demonstrated play activities and gave education on child development and child rearing practices. FS comprised cereal-based supplements (150–300?kcal/day) for three months. All groups received medical care, micronutrient supplements and growth monitoring. Mothers were given the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME) inventory and a questionnaire on parenting at baseline and after six months to assess the outcome. Results 322 children completed the study. After six months of intervention the PS?+?FS and PS groups benefitted in the total HOME score (depending on the comparison group, effect sizes varied from 0.66 to 0.33 SD) The PS?+?FS and PS groups also benefitted in two HOME subscales: maternal involvement (effect sizes: 0.8 to 0.55 SD) and play materials, (effect sizes: 0.46 to 0.6 SD), and child-rearing practices scores (effect size: 1.5 to 1.1 SD). The PS?+?FS group benefitted 4.0 points in total HOME score compared with CH, 4.8 points compared with CC and 4.5 points compared with FS (p?environment can be improved through community-based psychosocial stimulation with or without food supplementation. This may be of importance to promote child development. PMID:22871096

2012-01-01

145

Attitude, achievement, and classroom environment in a learner-centered introductory biology course  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of the revision of an undergraduate biology course to meet the standards set forth by current science education reform documents. This course was revised by a collaborate team at a small, religious, liberal arts university located in an urban area of South Texas. This institution is a Hispanic serving institution where the majority of students are Hispanic. The female population of this institution is approximately 70 percent. The course was revised to meet teaching standards called for in the National Science Education Standards. The guiding principle was to use an instructional model that was based on constructivist theories of learning. The lecture and laboratory sections of the course were combined into a class that met two days a week for three hours. A learner-centered instructional model based on learning cycles and the 5E model were used to organize instruction. Three sections of the experimental course were compared to three control sections that were taught in a traditional format of a three-hour lecture with a separate lab. Instruments that measured classroom learning environment, achievement, and attitude toward science were given at the beginning and conclusion of the course. Qualitative data was gathered from a questionnaire, university course evaluations, and student portfolios. Results of the learning environment survey found that two sections of the control class used some active learning within the context of the traditional lecture. These sections were analyzed as a modified lecture and the other control section as the traditional lecture. The experimental sections were the integrated sections. Subjects in the traditional and integrated sections scored higher on the content knowledge test than those in the modified section. This suggests that the integrated course was as successful as the traditional method in acquisition of content knowledge. Subjects the integrated course and the modified lecture course scored higher on the attitude toward science survey than those in the traditional course. This suggests that learner-centered environments are important in determining positive attitudes toward science. The integrated course was the most effective in content acquisition and positive attitude toward science.

McCormick, Bonnie Day

146

Use of an Audience Response System (ARS) in a Dual-Campus Classroom Environment  

PubMed Central

Objectives To implement an audience response system in a dual-campus classroom that aggregated data during graded (attendance and quizzes) and non-graded classroom activities (formative quizzes, case discussions, examination reviews, and team activities) and explore its strengths, weaknesses, and impact on active learning. Design After extensive research, an appropriate audience response system was selected and implemented in a dual-classroom setting for a third-year required PharmD course. Students were assigned a clicker and training and policies regarding clicker use were reviewed. Activities involving clicker use were carefully planned to simultaneously engage students in both classrooms in real time. Focus groups were conducted with students to gather outcomes data. Assessment Students and faculty members felt that the immediate feedback the automated response system (ARS) provided was most beneficial during non-graded activities. Student anxiety increased with use of ARS during graded activities due to fears regarding technology failure, user error, and academic integrity. Summary ARS is a viable tool for increasing active learning in a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program, especially when used for non-graded class activities. Faculty members should proceed cautiously with using ARS for graded classroom activities and develop detailed and documented policies for ARS use. PMID:18483604

Medina, Patrick J; Wanzer, Donald S; Wilson, Jane E; Er, Nelson; Britton, Mark L

2008-01-01

147

The psychosocial work environment and burnout among Swedish registered and assistant nurses: the main, mediating, and moderating role of empowerment.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to explore: the main effect of empowerment on burnout; empowerment as a mediator between the work environment and burnout; and empowerment as a moderator of the association between the work environment and burnout. In order to explore these effects, multiple regression analyses were performed on questionnaire data from 838 registered nurses and 518 assistant nurses in Sweden. The analyses showed that: empowerment has a negative association to burnout; empowerment has a mediating effect between the work environment (especially for control and social support) and burnout; and the moderating effect of empowerment on the association between the work environment and burnout was weak. The results suggest that: empowerment explains variation with regard to burnout over and above what can be explained by established work situation dimensions; the improvement of the work environment is associated with a higher sense of empowerment which, in turn, is related to lower degrees of burnout; and individual and group differences should be considered in workplace health promotion. PMID:17688479

Hochwälder, Jacek

2007-09-01

148

A Survey of Graduate Social Work Educators: Teaching Perspectives and Classroom Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social work educators have the challenging task of preparing students to be ethically, morally, and socially responsible professionals. As professionals in the 21st Century, social workers are faced with ever increasing complexity and change. Teaching philosophies are at the foundation of what educators do in the classroom. Research about teaching…

Danhoff, Kristin Lindsay

2012-01-01

149

The "Intelligent Classroom": Changing Teaching and Learning with an Evolving Technological Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the development and use of the Intelligent Classroom collaborative project at McGill University that explored technology use to improve teaching and learning. Explains the hardware and software installation that allows for the automated capture of audio, video, slides, and handwritten annotations during a live lecture, with subsequent…

Winer, Laura R.; Cooperstock, Jeremy

2002-01-01

150

Effects of Amplification, Speechreading, and Classroom Environments on Reception of Speech  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compared with 18 hard-of-hearing students (7 to 14-years-old) were two sources of amplification (binaural ear-level hearing aids and R F auditory training units with environmental microphones on) in "ideal" and "typical" classroom noise levels, with and without visual speechreading cues provided. (Author/IM)

Blair, James C.

1977-01-01

151

Practice Makes Better? A Study of Meditation Learners in a Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study investigates the effect of length of meditation history on various factors, namely learning motivation, learning outcome and classroom climate. Data were collected from working adult learners (n = 450) attending meditation classes in two large cities in Taiwan. The investigation categorized learners based on meditation experience, namely…

Lin, Chin-Yen; Kuo, Tsung-Hsien; Kuo, Yen-Ku; Kuo, Yen-Lin; Ho, Li-An; Lin, Chien-Ting

2007-01-01

152

Classroom Acoustics: A Resource for Creating Environments with Desirable Listening Conditions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet provides a general overview of classroom acoustic problems and their solutions for both new school construction and renovation. Practical explanations and examples are discussed on topics including reverberation, useful and undesirable reflections, mechanical equipment noise, interior noise sources, and sound reinforcement. Examples…

Seep, Benjamin; Glosemeyer, Robin; Hulce, Emily; Linn, Matt; Aytar, Pamela

153

The ''Intelligent Classroom'': changing teaching and learning with an evolving technological environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Putting technology to work to improve teaching and learning is the goal of the ''Intelligent Classroom'' project at McGill University. A hardware and software installation allows for the automated capture of audio, video, slides, and handwritten annotations during a live lecture, with subsequent access by students. The development process, a collaborative effort of computer engineers, educational specialists, professors and students,

Laura R. Winer; Jeremy Cooperstock

154

Psychosocial Interventions to Improve the School Performance of Students with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder  

PubMed Central

Children with ADHD typically show impairments throughout the school day. A number of interventions have been demonstrated to address both the academic and behavioral impairments associated with this disorder. Although the focus of research has been on classroom-based strategies of intervention for children with ADHD, school-based interventions applicable for non-classroom environments such as lunchrooms and playgrounds are beginning to emerge. This paper provides a brief description of the guiding principles of behavioral intervention, identifies selected strategies to address behavioral and academic concerns, discusses how school contextual factors have an effect on intervention selection and implementation, and considers the effects of using psychosocial interventions in combination with medication. PMID:21152355

Tresco, Katy E.; Lefler, Elizabeth K.; Power, Thomas J.

2010-01-01

155

Injury and the orchestral environment: part III. the role of psychosocial factors in the experience of musicians undertaking rehabilitation.  

PubMed

Workplace rehabilitation in the orchestral setting poses a number of challenges that arise in part due to a poor fit between generic injury insurance and medical care and the elite performance requirements of professional musicians. Currently, the orchestral profession lacks information and strategies to best deal with the unique challenges of this complex rehabilitation environment. In order to inform future directions for research and suggest possible changes of practice, the researchers conducted a qualitative case-study aimed at understanding the injury and rehabilitation experiences of professional musicians. In-depth semi-structured interviews were undertaken with three chronically injured professional cellists from a single Australian orchestra. After initial data analysis, further interviews were undertaken with a set of five orchestral management staff as a means of data triangulation. All data were analysed using a themes-based analysis-of-narrative approach. The findings indicate that injury concealment played a considerable role in the development of chronic injuries for these musicians, and management staff felt that this concealment may be the norm amongst orchestral musicians. The musicians in this study suffered emotional and psychological trauma as the result of their injuries, and two participants felt socially marginalised. During rehabilitation, the musicians in this study encountered difficulties with medical staff not understanding the elite performance requirements of orchestral work. The article proposes recommendations that may assist in dealing with the complex challenges of injury rehabilitation in the orchestral environment. PMID:25194109

Rickert, Dale Ll; Barrett, Margaret S; Ackermann, Bronwen J

2014-09-01

156

Children's Perceptions of the Classroom Environment and Social and Academic Performance: A Longitudinal Analysis of the Contribution of the "Responsive Classroom" Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the contribution of the "Responsive Classroom" (RC) Approach, a set of teaching practices that integrate social and academic learning, to children's perceptions of their classroom, and children's academic and social performance over time. Three questions emerge: (a) What is the concurrent and cumulative relation between…

Brock, Laura L.; Nishida, Tracy K.; Chiong, Cynthia; Grimm, Kevin J.; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.

2008-01-01

157

The Effects of Physical Environment on Children's Behavior in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

No significant difference of student-concrete physical environment interaction occurred with a change in physical environment. A test was made on five null hypotheses related to the change of physical environment and (1) student-concrete physical environment interaction; (2) environmental preference by students; (3) student attending behavior; (4)…

Gingold, William

158

In Pursuit of a Holistic Learning Environment: The Impact of Music in the Medical Physiology Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A holistic learning environment is one that nurtures all aspects of students' learning. The environment is safe, supportive, and provides opportunities to help students deal with nonacademic as well as academic factors that impact their learning. Creation of such an environment requires the establishment of a supportive learning community. For a…

Modell, Harold I.; DeMiero, Frank G.; Rose, Louise

2009-01-01

159

Online Resource-Based Learning Environment: Case Studies in Primary Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the creation of learning environments with online resources by three primary school teachers for pupil's learning of science-related topics with reference to the resource-based e-learning environments (RBeLEs) framework. Teachers' choice of contexts, resources, tools, and scaffolds in designing the learning environments are…

So, Winnie Wing Mui; Ching, Fiona Ngai Ying

2012-01-01

160

Studying Earth's Environment From Space: Classroom and Laboratory Activities with Instructor Resources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Standard, text-book based learning for earth, ocean, and atmospheric sciences has been limited by the unavailability of quantitative teaching materials. While a descriptive presentation, in a lecture format, of discrete satellite images is often adequate for high school classrooms, this is seldom the case at the undergraduate level. In order to address these concerns, a series of numerical exercises for the Macintosh was developed for use with satellite-derived Sea Surface Temperature, pigment and sea ice concentration data. Using a modified version of NIH Image, to analyze actual satellite data, students are able to better understand ocean processes, such as circulation, upwelling, primary production, and ocean/atmosphere coupling. Graphical plots, image math, and numerical comparisons are utilized to substantiate temporal and spatial trends in sea surface temperature and ocean color. Particularly for institutions that do not offer a program in remote sensing, the subject matter is presented as modular units, each of which can be readily incorporated into existing curricula. These materials have been produced in both CD-ROM and WWW format, making them useful for classroom or lab setting. Depending upon the level of available computer support, graphics can be displayed directly from the CD-ROM, or as a series of color view graphs for standard overhead projection.

Smith, Elizabeth A.

2001-01-01

161

Assessing culturally sensitive factors in the learning environment of science classrooms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As schools are becoming increasingly diverse in their scope and clientele, any examination of the interaction of culturally sensitive factors of students' learning environments with learning science assumes critical importance. The purpose of this exploratory study was to develop an instrument to assess learning environment factors that are culturally sensitive, to provide initial validation information on the instrument and to examine associations between students' perceptions of their learning environments and their attitudes towards science and achievement of enquiry skills. A measure of these factors of science student's learning environment, namely the Cultural Learning Environment Questionnaire (CLEQ), was developed from past learning environment instruments and influenced by Hofstede's four dimensions of culture (Power Distance, Uncertainty Avoidance, Individualism, and Masculinity/Femininity). The reliability and discriminant validity for each scale were obtained and associations between learning environment, attitude to science and enquiry skills achievement were found.

Fisher, Darrell L.; Waldrip, Bruce G.

1997-03-01

162

From the Field to the Classroom: A Web-Based Teaching Tool on Depositional Environments and Landscape Development  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The relationship between sedimentary deposits, landforms and soil profile development is difficult for students to grasp in a conventional classroom setting. The ideal way to solve this is to take the students on extended field trips; however, field trips are expensive, have to be conducted during specific time periods, and can only handle a limited number of students. The objective of this project was to bring the field to the classroom via a virtual, dynamic web-based teaching tool illustrating common depositional environments and associated landforms and soils. The teaching tool was largely based on video footage obtained in the Canadian Rocky Mountains and in the grasslands of the southern interior of British Columbia. The Canadian Rockies are undergoing rapid deglaciation and provided excellent examples of new glacial deposits and early landscape development processes. On the other hand, British Columbia's grasslands became ice-free about 10,000 years ago and were used to illustrate landscape evolution and post-glaciation soil profile development. To bring these two environments together, video footage of corresponding landforms was shot at both locations and edited into a series of short video clips illustrating the link between depositional processes, resulting landforms and soils and their post-glacial evolution. Soil scientists, survey specialists and geomorphologists provided live commentary. The teaching tool (http://soilweb.landfood.ubc.ca/landscape/) is an open-access website merging video clips, sound recordings, text, photos and graphics intended to help students situate landforms within their geomorphologic context. This online teaching resource allows students to observe, on their own time, conditions under which sediments are deposited and soils are formed, and to witness the transformation of a barren, glacial landscape into a vegetated soil landscape. The tool can be used in various geomorphology, soil, agriculture, forestry, and natural resource management courses. An interactive overview of the tool will be given during the presentation.

Krzic, M.; Watson, K.; Grand, S.; Crowley, C.; Dyanatkar, S.; Bomke, A.; Smith, S.

2012-04-01

163

The Mainstream Primary Classroom as a Language-Learning Environment for Children with Severe and Persistent Language Impairment--Implications of Recent Language Intervention Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many UK children with severe and persistent language impairment (SLI) attend local mainstream schools. Although this should provide an excellent language-learning environment, opportunities may be limited by difficulties in sustaining time-consuming, child-specific learning activities; restricted co-professional working, and the complex classroom

McCartney, Elspeth; Ellis, Sue; Boyle, James

2009-01-01

164

Investigation of Teachers' Verbal and Non-Verbal Strategies for Managing Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Students' Behaviours within a Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper investigated teachers' verbal and non-verbal strategies for managing ADHD students in a classroom environment. It was found that effective verbal and non-verbal strategies included voice control, short phrases, repeated instructions, using students' names, and visual cues and verbal instructions combined. It has been found that…

Geng, Gretchen

2011-01-01

165

Students' Perception of Important Teaching Behaviors in Classroom and Clinical Environments of a Community College Nursing and Dental Hygiene Education Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student success is dependent on effective instruction. Yet, effective teaching is difficult to define and described differently by students, faculty, and administrators. Nursing and dental hygiene education programs require faculty to teach in both classroom and clinical environments. However, accreditation agencies for these programs mandate…

Kimbrough-Walls, Vickie J.

2012-01-01

166

A comparative study of sensory processing in children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder in the home and classroom environments.  

PubMed

Sensory processing and higher integrative functions impairments are highly prevalent in children with ASD. Context should be considered in analyzing the sensory profile and higher integrative functions. The main objective of this study is to compare sensory processing, social participation and praxis in a group of 79 children (65 males and 14 females) from 5 to 8 years of age (M=6.09) divided into two groups: ASD Group (n=41) and Comparison Group (n=38). The Sensory Processing Measure (SPM) was used to evaluate the sensory profile of the children: parents reported information about their children's characteristics in the home environment, and teachers reported information about the same characteristics in the classroom environment. The ASD Group obtained scores that indicate higher levels of dysfunction on all the assessed measures in both environments, with the greatest differences obtained on the social participation and praxis variables. The most affected sensory modalities in the ASD Group were hearing and touch. Only in the ASD Group were significant differences found between the information reported by parents and what was reported by teachers: specifically, the teachers reported greater dysfunction than the parents in social participation (p=.000), touch (p=.003) and praxis (p=.010). These results suggest that the context-specific qualities found in children with ASD point out the need to receive information from both parents and teachers during the sensory profile assessment process, and use context-specific assessments. PMID:25575284

Fernández-Andrés, M Inmaculada; Pastor-Cerezuela, Gemma; Sanz-Cervera, Pilar; Tárraga-Mínguez, Raúl

2015-03-01

167

Guideline 3: Psychosocial Treatment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The third in seven sets of guidelines based on the consensus of experts in the treatment of psychiatric and behavioral problems in mental retardation (MR) focuses on psychosocial treatment. Guidelines cover general principles, choosing among psychosocial treatments, severity of MR and psychiatric/behavior symptoms, diagnosable disorders, target…

American Journal on Mental Retardation, 2000

2000-01-01

168

Using online pedagogy to explore student experiences of Science-Technology-Society-Environment (STSE) issues in a secondary science classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the proliferation of 21st century educational technologies, science teaching and learning with digitally acclimatized learners in secondary science education can be realized through an online Science-Technology-Society-Environment (STSE)-based issues approach. STSE-based programs can be interpreted as the exploration of socially-embedded initiatives in science (e.g., use of genetically modified foods) to promote the development of critical cognitive processes and to empower learners with responsible decision-making skills. This dissertation presents a case study examining the online environment of a grade 11 physics class in an all-girls' school, and the outcomes from those online discursive opportunities with STSE materials. The limited in-class discussion opportunities are often perceived as low-quality discussions in traditional classrooms because they originate from an inadequate introduction and facilitation of socially relevant issues in science programs. Hence, this research suggests that the science curriculum should be inclusive of STSE-based issue discussions. This study also examines the nature of students' online discourse and, their perceived benefits and challenges of learning about STSE-based issues through an online environment. Analysis of interviews, offline classroom events and online threaded discussion transcripts draws from the theoretical foundations of critical reflective thinking delineated in the Practical Inquiry (P.I.) Model. The PI model of Cognitive Presence is situated within the Community of Inquiry framework, encompassing two other core elements, Teacher Presence and Social Presence. In studying Cognitive Presence, the online STSE-based discourses were examined according to the four phases of the P.I. Model. The online discussions were measured at macro-levels to reveal patterns in student STSE-based discussions and content analysis of threaded discussions. These analyses indicated that 87% of the students participated in higher quality STSE-based discussions via an online forum as compared to in-class. The micro-level analysis revealed students to attain higher cognitive interactions with STSE issues. Sixteen percent of the students' threaded postings were identified in the Resolution Phase 4 when the teacher intervened with a focused teaching strategy. This research provides a significant theoretical and pedagogical contribution to blended approach to STSE-based secondary science education. It presents a framework for teachers to facilitate students' online discussions and to support learners in exploring STSE-based topics.

Ayyavoo, Gabriel Roman

169

[Psychosocial interventions in dementia].  

PubMed

Psychosocial interventions improve cognitive abilities (cognitive stimulation, cognitive training), enhance emotional well-being (activity planning, reminiscence), reduce behavioral symptoms (aromatherapy, music therapy) and promote everyday functioning (occupational therapy). Through these effects they reinforce and augment pharmacological treatments for dementia. In addition, psychosocial interventions complement the treatment of patients by supporting family caregivers (educational groups, support programs). The potential of psychosocial interventions in dementia needs to be explored further in studies using improved methodology to determine effective components, clinical relevance and duration of effects, predictors of individual treatment response and health-economic implications. PMID:23306213

Kurz, A

2013-01-01

170

Virtual Environments for the Assessment of Attention and Memory Processes: The Virtual Classroom and Office  

Microsoft Academic Search

Virtual Reality (VR) technology offers new options for neuropsychological assessment and cognitive rehabilitation. If empirical studies demonstrate effectiveness, virtual environments (VEs) could be of considerable benefit to persons with cognitive and functional impairments due to traumatic brain injury, neurological disorders, and learning disabilities. Testing and training scenarios that would be difficult, if not impossible, to deliver using conventional neuropsychological methods

Albert A Rizzo; Todd Bowerly; J. Galen Buckwalter; Maria Schultheis; Robert Matheis; Cyrus Shahabi; Ulrich Neumann; Laehyun Kim; Mehdi Sharifzadeh

2002-01-01

171

The Virtual Classroom: A Virtual Reality Environment for the Assessment and Rehabilitation of Attention Deficits  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Virtual Environments Laboratory at the University of Southern California (USC) has ini- tiated a research program aimed at developing virtual reality (VR) technology applications for the study, assessment, and rehabilitation of cognitive\\/functional processes. This technol- ogy is seen to offer many advantages for these aims and an introductory section of this arti- cle will discuss the specific rationale for

A. A. Rizzo; J. G. Buckwalter; T. Bowerly; C. Van Der Zaag; L. Humphrey; U. Neumann; C. Chua; C. Kyriakakis; A. Van Rooyen; D. Sisemore

2000-01-01

172

The role of achievement goal orientations in students' perceptions of and preferences for classroom environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Recent research on achievement motivation has begun to examine the effects of environmental factors affecting students' motivational beliefs and goal tendencies. However, when interpreting and applying the results, individual factors underlying students' different perceptions of their learning environment are often ignored. An implicit assumption seems to be that regardless of their dispositional differences (e.g. motivational basis), students will experience

Anna Tapola; Markku Niemivirta

2008-01-01

173

Incorporating Informal Learning Environments and Local Fossil Specimens in Earth Science Classrooms: A Recipe for Success  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In an online graduate paleontology course taken by practicing Earth Science teachers, we designed an investigation using teachers' local informal educational environments. Teachers (N = 28) were responsible for photographing, describing, and integrating fossil specimens from two informal sites into a paleoenvironmental analysis of the landscape in…

Clary, Renee M.; Wandersee, James H.

2009-01-01

174

Incorporating Informal Learning Environments and Local Fossil Specimens in Earth Science Classrooms: A Recipe for Success  

Microsoft Academic Search

In an online graduate paleontology course taken by practicing Earth Science teachers, we designed an investigation using teachers' local informal educational environments. Teachers (N = 28) were responsible for photographing, describing, and integrating fossil specimens from two informal sites into a paleoenvironmental analysis of the landscape in which the fossils were originally deposited. Our practicing teachers also developed mini-units for

Renee M. Clary; James H. Wandersee

2009-01-01

175

It's Not Easy Being Green: Bringing Real Life to the Undergraduate Legal Environment of Business Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the Legal Environment of Business course in a traditional undergraduate business curriculum, students are expected to acquire knowledge about many areas of the law and the application of law to business, society, and the international marketplace. Current concepts in undergraduate business education, such as ethics and sustainability, must also…

Marcum, Tanya M.; Perry, Sandra J.

2010-01-01

176

PUSH(ing) Limits: Using Fiction in the Classroom for Human Behavior and the Social Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of fiction and autobiography in social science course work has been shown to enhance students' learning experience. Using the novel PUSH, by Sapphire, we designed a curriculum supplement for the social work course, human behavior and the social environment (HBSE) that encourages students to integrate course content in an innovative way and…

Mendoza, Natasha S.; Bonta, Kimberly; Horn, Philip; Moore, Erin; Gibson, Allison; Simmons, David

2012-01-01

177

Subjective evaluation of speech and noise in learning environments in the realm of classroom acoustics: Results from laboratory and field experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The impact of different acoustical conditions in learning environments on noise annoyance and the evaluation of speech quality were tested in a series of three experiments. In Experiment 1 (n=79) the auralization of seven classrooms with reverberation times from 0.55 to 3.21 s [average between 250 Hz to 2 kHz] served to develop a Semantic Differential, evaluating a simulated teacher's voice. Four factors were found: acoustical comfort, roughness, sharpness, and loudness. In Experiment 2, the effects of two classroom renovations were examined from a holistic perspective. The rooms were treated acoustically with acoustic ceilings (RT=0.5 s [250 Hz-2 kHz]) and muffling floor materials as well as non-acoustically with a new lighting system and color design. The results indicate that pupils (n=61) in renovated classrooms judged the simulated voice more positively, were less annoyed from the noise in classrooms, and were more motivated to participate in the lessons. In Experiment 3 the sound environments from six different lecture rooms (RT=0.8 to 1.39 s [250 Hz-2 kHz]) in two Universities of Oldenburg were evaluated by 321 students during the lectures. Evidence found supports the assumption that acoustical comfort in rooms is dependent on frequency for rooms with higher reverberation times.

Meis, Markus; Nocke, Christian; Hofmann, Simone; Becker, Bernhard

2005-04-01

178

Older People of Tomorrow: A Psychosocial Profile.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Attempts to narrow the scope of present uncertainties about the older population by sketching a psychosocial profile of the older people of tomorrow based on what is known today. Focuses on the baby boom generation and the interplay between personal attributes they could bring to late life and the social and physical environment in which they…

Silverstone, Barbara

1996-01-01

179

Classroom Design at Binghamton University.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the work of the Classroom Environment Committee at Binghamton University (New York) that created classroom standards for multimedia technology when renovating classrooms. Discusses data display, network connections, screens, laptop computers, lighting, furniture, design considerations, and the need for communication with faculty. (LRW)

Donahue, Jeffrey B.

2000-01-01

180

All part of the job? The contribution of the psychosocial and physical work environment to health inequalities in Europe and the European health divide.  

PubMed

This study is the first to examine the contribution of both psychosocial and physical risk factors to occupational inequalities in self-assessed health in Europe. Data from 27 countries were obtained from the 2010 European Working Conditions Survey for men and women aged 16 to 60 (n = 21,803). Multilevel logistic regression analyses (random intercept) were applied, estimating odds ratios of reporting less than good health. Analyses indicate that physical working conditions account for a substantial proportion of occupational inequalities in health in both Central/Eastern and Western Europe. Physical, rather than psychosocial, working conditions seem to have the largest effect on self-assessed health in manual classes. For example, controlling for physical working conditions reduced the inequalities in the prevalence of"less than good health" between the lowest (semi- and unskilled manual workers) and highest (higher controllers) occupational groups in Europe by almost 50 percent (Odds Ratio 1.87, 95% Confidence Interval 1.62-2.16 to 1.42, 1.23-1.65). Physical working conditions contribute substantially to health inequalities across "post-industrial" Europe, with women in manual occupations being particularly vulnerable, especially those living in Central/Eastern Europe. An increased political and academic focus on physical working conditions is needed to explain and potentially reduce occupational inequalities in health. PMID:24919305

Toch, Marlen; Bambra, Clare; Lunau, Thorsten; van der Wel, Kjetil A; Witvliet, Margot I; Dragano, Nico; Eikemo, Terje A

2014-01-01

181

Health science students and their learning environment: a comparison of perceptions of on-site, remote-site, and traditional classroom students.  

PubMed

This study compared the responses of on-site, remote-site, and traditional classroom students on measures of student/teacher interaction, course structure, physical learning environment, and overall course enjoyment/satisfaction. The sample population consisted of students taking undergraduate courses in medical terminology at two western colleges. The survey instrument was derived from Thomerson's questionnaire, which included closed- and open-ended questions assessing perceptions of students toward their courses. Controlling for grade expectations, results revealed no significant differences among the on-site, remote-site, and traditional classroom students in any of the four cluster domains. However, a nonsignificant (and continuing) trend suggested that students preferred the traditional classroom environment. When results were controlled for age, significant differences emerged between traditional and nontraditional students on measures of student/teacher interaction, physical learning environment, and overall enjoyment/satisfaction, as nontraditional students exhibited higher scores. Students' responses to open-ended questions indicated they enjoyed the convenience of online instruction, but reported finding frustration with technology itself. PMID:18311326

Elison-Bowers, P; Snelson, Chareen; Casa de Calvo, Mario; Thompson, Heather

2008-01-01

182

Climatic Conditions in Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an overview of research on the ways in which classroom thermal environment, lighting conditions, ion state, and electromagnetic and air pollution affect learning and the performance of students and teachers. (SJL)

Kevan, Simon M.; Howes, John D.

1980-01-01

183

Classroom Emotional Climate as a Moderator of Anxious Solitary Children's Longitudinal Risk for Peer Exclusion: A Child × Environment Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study tests the ability of classroom emotional climate to moderate anxious solitary children's risk for peer exclusion over a 3-year period from 3rd through 5th grade. Six hundred eighty-eight children completed peer nominations for anxious solitude and peer exclusion in the fall and spring semesters of each grade, and observations of classroom emotional climate were conducted at the same

Tamara Spangler Avant; Heidi Gazelle; Richard Faldowski

2011-01-01

184

Classroom Antarctica  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website is a collection of units designed to teach students about the global importance of Antarctica. Topics covered in these units includes ice, the ocean, geology, weather, topography, auroras, the history of Antarctic exploration, living in Antarctica, animals, plants, the Antarctic Treaty, and the environment. Each unit has a selection of activities that are adaptable to the range of abilities in a class and the particular interests of the students. There are hundreds of useful web links throughout and a wealth of support material listed under Classroom Resources.

Haywood, Elizabeth

185

Thursday's Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Every Thursday, this NASA-created learning resource presents a new topic with the aim of providing "a lasting connection between NASA's latest research and the classroom environment." Prior lesson topics have included the recent solar eclipse, the Mars Polar Lander, and organisms that survive in extreme conditions and their implications for the possibility of extraterrestrial life. For each lesson, there are links to news reports and a range of lesson plans and activity sheets designed for different age groups. The site also contains an archive/ schedule of prior and future lessons.

186

Conceptualisation, Development and Validation of an Instrument for Investigating the Metacognitive Orientation of Science Classroom Learning Environments: The Metacognitive Orientation Learning Environment Scale – Science (MOLES-S)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Metacognition refers to an individual's knowledge, control and awareness of his\\/her learning processes. An important goal\\u000a of education is to develop students as metacognitive, life-long learners. However, developing students' metacognition and\\u000a evaluating whether classrooms are oriented to the development of students' metacognition are difficult and often time-consuming\\u000a tasks. Further, no instruments that measure key dimensions related to classroom factors that

Gregory P. Thomas

2003-01-01

187

Psychosocial aspects of diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article discusses the dilemmas that patients and health care professionals face as they attempt to deal with the psychologic issues inherent in diabetes care. It includes discussions of assessment of psychosocial functioning; type I and type II diabetes assess ment ; adherence and motivation; empowerment; and specific recommendations geared to help health care professionals care for the diabetic patient

Joseph B. Nelson

1992-01-01

188

Short Stature: Psychosocial Interventions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of the term ‘psychosocial interventions’ in the title implies that short stature (SS) carries with it a burden predisposing the person to problems of psychological adjustment. Because of the visible salience of SS and its potential to serve as a lightning rod for false causal attributions, there is a need to differentiate assumptions and stereotypes from evidence. This

David E. Sandberg

2011-01-01

189

Psychosocial stress and cardiovascular risk : current opinion.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Epidemiologic research of the last half-century has clearly shown that psychosocial factors related to the social environment, personality characteristics, and negative affect increase the risk of incident CVD and also impact prognosis of cardiac patients. Several mechanisms may explain this link, including a genetic predisposition, poor lifestyle choices, low adherence to health recommendations, and direct pathophysiologic perturbations. The latter include alteration of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis and autonomic dysfunction resulting in endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and a prothrombotic state further downstream. Screening for psychosocial factors seems appropriate as part of the standard history and based on the clinician's knowledge of the patient and the purpose of the visit. Psychological interventions generally alleviate distress in cardiac patients, but whether they reduce the risk of hard cardiovascular endpoints and all-cause mortality is less evident. Cardiac patients with more severe depression may particularly profit from antidepressant medications. Due to their pharmacologic properties, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors were shown to improve cardiovascular outcome. The most effective psychosocial treatment is multicomponent therapy that combines elements of cognitive behaviour therapy ("stress management") and changes in health behaviours, including the adoption of a regular exercise regimen. Gender-specific issues should probably be considered. The field of behavioural cardiology has accumulated a wealth of epidemiological, mechanistic and clinical knowledge that undoubtedly has furthered our understanding about the important role of psychosocial risk factors in patients with a heart disease. PMID:22271452

von Känel, Roland

2012-01-01

190

The Development and Validation of an Instrument to Monitor the Implementation of Social Constructivist Learning Environments in Grade 9 Science Classrooms in South Africa  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article describes the development and validation of an instrument that can be used to assess students' perceptions of their learning environment as a means of monitoring and guiding changes toward social constructivist learning environments. The study used a mixed-method approach with priority given to the quantitative data collection. During the quantitative data collection phase, a new instrument—the Social Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (SCLES)—was developed and used to collect data from 1,955 grade 9 science students from 52 classes in 50 schools in the Western Cape province, South Africa. The data were analysed to evaluate the reliability and validity of the new instrument, which assessed six dimensions of the classroom learning environment, namely, Working with Ideas, Personal Relevance, Collaboration, Critical Voice, Uncertainty in Science and Respect for Difference. Two dimensions were developed specifically for the present study in order to contextualise the questionnaire to the requirements of the new South African curriculum (namely, Metacognition and Respect for Difference). In the qualitative data collection phase, two case studies were used to investigate whether profiles of class mean scores on the new instrument could provide an accurate and "trustworthy" description of the learning environment of individual science classes. The study makes significant contributions to the field of learning environments in that it is one of the first major studies of its kind in South Africa with a focus on social constructivism and because the instrument developed captures important aspects of the learning environment associated with social constructivism.

Luckay, Melanie B.; Laugksch, Rudiger C.

2015-02-01

191

Reflection through the ID-PRISM: A Teacher Planning Tool to Transform Classrooms into Web-Enhanced Learning Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent books and articles are full of definitions of the ideal electronic classroom, prescriptions of how to use web resources, and descriptions of the effects of such resources on teaching practices and learning. Yet Becker (1999) found that only 30% of those teachers who were internet-connected acknowledged using web resources with their…

Koszalka, Tiffany A.; Grabowski, Barbara L.; McCarthy, Marianne

2003-01-01

192

An Analogous Study of Children's Attitudes Toward School in an Open Classroom Environment as Opposed to a Conventional Setting.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study sought to determine whether intermediate age children exposed to open classroom teaching strategy have a more positive attitude toward school than intermediate age children exposed to conventional teaching strategy. The hypothesis was that there would be no significant difference in attitude between the two groups. The study was limited to…

Zeli, Doris Conti

193

Classroom Emotional Climate as a Moderator of Anxious Solitary Children's Longitudinal Risk for Peer Exclusion: A Child x Environment Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study tests the ability of classroom emotional climate to moderate anxious solitary children's risk for peer exclusion over a 3-year period from 3rd through 5th grade. Six hundred eighty-eight children completed peer nominations for anxious solitude and peer exclusion in the fall and spring semesters of each grade, and observations of…

Avant, Tamara Spangler; Gazelle, Heidi; Faldowski, Richard

2011-01-01

194

Weight-related teasing in the school environment: associations with psychosocial health and weight control practices among adolescent boys and girls.  

PubMed

Weight-related teasing has been found to be associated with low self-esteem, depressive symptoms, body dissatisfaction, and weight control behaviors in adolescents. While research has typically examined weight-related teasing directed towards the individual, little is known about weight-related teasing at the school level. This study aimed to determine the association between the school-level prevalence of weight-related teasing and psychosocial factors, body dissatisfaction and weight control behaviors in adolescents. Adolescents (N = 2,793; 53.2% female) attending 20 US public middle and high schools were surveyed as part of the Eating and Activity in Teens (EAT) 2010 study. Generalized estimating equations were used to estimate the association between school-level weight-related teasing and health variables, controlling for individual-level weight-related teasing, clustering of individuals within schools, and relevant covariates. A greater school-level prevalence of weight-related teasing was associated with lower self-esteem and greater body fat dissatisfaction in girls, and greater depressive symptoms in boys, over and above individual-level weight-related teasing. Dieting was associated with the school-level prevalence of weight-related teasing in analysis adjusted for covariates in girls, but not following adjustment for individual-level weight-related teasing. Unhealthy weight control behaviors, extreme weight control behaviors, and muscle-enhancing behaviors were not associated with the school-level prevalence of weight-related teasing in girls or boys. Findings from the current study, in conjunction with previous findings showing associations between weight-related teasing, psychological concerns, and weight control behaviors, highlight the importance of implementing strategies to decrease weight-related teasing in schools. PMID:24395152

Lampard, Amy M; MacLehose, Richard F; Eisenberg, Marla E; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Davison, Kirsten K

2014-10-01

195

Resources for Democratic Classrooms. Teacher's Resources.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Maintains that it is difficult to imagine a democratic classroom environment where student power is a primary concern. Provides an annotated bibliography of 17 teacher and 21 student resources on student participation and democratic classrooms. (CFR)

McDermott, J. Cynthia, Ed.

1994-01-01

196

[Psychosocial aspects of strabismus].  

PubMed

Binocular vision is characterized by a harmonious relation between sensory and motor systems of both eyes. This relation enables directing visual axes toward the observed object simultaneously, fusing images from two eyes, and the sense of three-dimensionality. Motility and binocular vision disorders occur in manifest and latent strabismus. The irregular position of eyes in strabismus is perceived by most people as an esthetic defect. Also, psychosocial consequences and the importance of treating strabismus are very superficially explained in this context. Bearing in mind the results of recent researches, which indicate that individuals of all ages with strabismus face different difficulties in psychosocial functioning, we believe that this issue in our surroundings should be dealt with. Strabismus leads to forming prejudices which usually have a negative impact on socialization and employment opportunities.Timely treatment of strabismus has a positive influence on the functionality of binocular vision, building self-esteem and self-satisfaction, being accepted by typically developing population, the quality and quantity of social interaction. The aim of this paper is to present the relation between strabismus and psychosocial reactions with regard to the available literature. PMID:25233699

Jablan, Branka; Vucini?, Vesna; Eskirovi?, Branka; Ljutica, Milorad

2014-01-01

197

Classroom Acoustics  

MedlinePLUS

... desks or chairs. When sound lingers in a room there is more interference with speech. In a classroom it is important to have a short reverberation time. Who is affected by poor classroom acoustics? All children are affected by poor classroom acoustics, ...

198

Class climate moderates peer relations and emotional adjustment in children with an early history of anxious solitude: a Child X Environment model.  

PubMed

Classroom emotional climate was hypothesized to moderate psychosocial adjustment in 1st grade for children with an early childhood history of anxious solitude. Participants were 1,364 children in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Study of Early Child Care and their mothers, child-care providers, and teachers. As anticipated, children with an early childhood history of anxious solitude were more rejected, poorly accepted (boys), and victimized (girls) by peers and demonstrated more depressive symptoms (girls) in 1st-grade classrooms with negative observed emotional climate. Results support a Child x Environment model of children's social and emotional adjustment. PMID:17087551

Gazelle, Heidi

2006-11-01

199

Education, Identity and iClass: From Education to Psychosocial Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

At first consideration, the worlds of the classroom, the psychotherapy office and the experimental psychology laboratory may seem disparate settings with no obvious connection among them. In this article, the author would like to draw such a connection and to suggest the relevance of psychosocial developmental theory and research to self-regulated…

Marcia, James E.

2009-01-01

200

Psychosocial development, anomie, and mood  

Microsoft Academic Search

Administered modified versions of Srole's Anomie Scale and the Nowlis Adjective Check List of Mood and A. E. Wessman and D. F. Ricks's Inventory of Psychosocial Development to 100 domiciliated male veterans (mean age = 67 yrs) and to 86 female and 55 male community college students. The hypothesis that E. Erikson's stages in psychosocial development are related to anomie

Gunars Reimanis

1974-01-01

201

The Role of the Constructivist Learning Theory and Collaborative Learning Environment on Wiki Classroom, and the Relationship between Them  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper seeks to discover the relationship between both the social constructivist learning theory and the collaborative learning environment. This relationship can be identified by giving an example of the learning environment. Due to wiki characteristics, Wiki technology is one of the most famous learning environments that can show the…

Alzahrani, Ibraheem; Woollard, John

2013-01-01

202

The Dance of Elementary School Classroom Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

At times, classroom management and guidance elude even the most seasoned teachers. Yet, students need guidance and practice in self-regulatory skills to assist in the learning that occurs in classrooms. Teachers need both practical and research-based classroom management strategies that benefit the environment and help create a space conducive to…

Powell, Pamela

2014-01-01

203

In-School Psychosocial Support Services for Safeguarding Children's Rights: Results and Implications of a Botswana Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In-school psychosocial support services are intended to create safe learning environments for children, enabling the children to attain age-appropriate developmental tasks. This study investigated protections to children's right to safe learning environments through the provision of in-school psychosocial support services. Participants were…

Ntinda, Kayi; Maree, Jacobus Gideon; Mpofu, Elias; Seeco, Elizabeth

2014-01-01

204

A Restructured Biology Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As his high school restructured to improve student outcomes, a biology teacher altered the instructional environment of his classroom accordingly, emphasizing curriculum, instruction, and assessment. As he acted more like a coach than a dispenser of information, students took more responsibility for learning and improving the quality of their…

McCauley, Kevin J.

1995-01-01

205

Flexible Classroom Furniture  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Classroom design for the 21st-century learning environment should accommodate a variety of learning skills and needs. The space should be large enough so it can be configured to accommodate a number of learning activities. This also includes furniture that provides flexibility and accommodates collaboration and interactive work among students and…

Kim Hassell,

2011-01-01

206

Classroom Contexts for Creativity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Various factors influence the development of creative potential, including everything from individual differences to the kinds of experiences and opportunities that creators experience throughout the lifespan. When it comes to nurturing creativity in the classroom, the learning environment is one of the most important factors--determining, in…

Beghetto, Ronald A.; Kaufman, James C.

2014-01-01

207

Classroom, Home and Peer Environment Influences on Student Outcomes in Science and Mathematics: An analysis of systemic reform data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using secondary analysis of a large database from a Statewide Systemic Initiative, we examined the effects of several types of environments on student outcomes. Over 3 years, nearly 7,000 students in 392 classes in 200 different schools responded to a questionnaire that assesses class, home, and peer environments as well as student attitudes. Students also completed an achievement measure that,

Barry J. Fraser; Jane Butler Kahle

2007-01-01

208

Cell phones: the psychosocial risks.  

PubMed

Cell phones are a relatively novel and evolving technology. While the potential benefits of this technology continue to emerge, so do the potential psychosocial risks. For example, one psychosocial risk is user stress, which appears to be related to feeling compelled to promptly respond to cell-phone activity in order to maintain spontaneity and access with others. Other potential psychosocial risks include disruptions in sleep; the user's risk of exposure to cyberbullying, particularly the unwanted exposure of photographs and/or videos of the victim; and overuse, particularly among adolescents. With regard to the latter phenomenon, the boundaries among overuse, misuse, dependence, and addiction are not scientifically clear. Therefore, while cell phones are a convenient and expedient technology, they are not without their potential psychosocial hazards. PMID:23439568

Sansone, Randy A; Sansone, Lori A

2013-01-01

209

Classroom Organization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Good organization skills are key to running an efficient classroom, and having the right tools makes it easier to manage all of the tasks, save time, and be more productive. Having the power of information when and where anyone need it makes a difference in how well any teacher runs the classroom and knows his or her students. A Palm handheld…

Technology & Learning, 2005

2005-01-01

210

Responsive Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Responsive Classroom addresses some of the challenges present in any elementary classroom, be it first-grade mathematics or third-grade science, by offering "an approach to teaching and learning that fosters safe, challenging, and joyful classrooms and schools, kindergarten through eighth grade." Through this website, classroom teachers share "practical strategies for bringing together social and academic learning throughout the school day." They report that teachers in urban, rural, and suburban settings nationwide find that these strategies have increased student investment, responsibility, and learning, and decreased problem behaviors. Studies detailing the effectiveness of the program are posted on this website. The basic principles of the program are also described, but the books detailing their approach must be purchased. The newsletter, however, is available free of charge and the archive includes previously published articles, which can be searched by topic, such as technology in the classroom and family involvement.

211

Classroom Interventions for Students With Traumatic Brain Injuries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Students who have sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI) return to the school setting with a range of cognitive, psychosocial, and physical deficits that can significantly affect their academic functioning. Successful educational reintegration for students with TBI requires careful assessment of each child's unique needs and abilities and the selection of classroom interventions designed to meet those needs. In this

Julie M. Bowen

2005-01-01

212

Developing and Validating a New Classroom Climate Observation Assessment Tool  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The climate of school classrooms, shaped by a combination of teacher practices and peer processes, is an important determinant for children's psychosocial functioning and is a primary factor affecting bullying and victimization. Given that there are relatively few theoretically grounded and validated assessment tools designed to measure the social…

Leff, Stephen S.; Thomas, Duane E.; Shapiro, Edward S.; Paskewich, Brooke; Wilson, Kim; Necowitz-Hoffman, Beth; Jawad, Abbas F.

2011-01-01

213

Transformation of Classroom Spaces: Traditional versus Active Learning Classroom in Colleges  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educational environment influences students' learning attitudes, and the classroom conveys the educational philosophy. The traditional college classroom design is based on the educational space that first appeared in medieval universities. Since then classrooms have not changed except in their size. In an attempt to develop a different…

Park, Elisa L.; Choi, Bo Keum

2014-01-01

214

The Constructivist Classroom Learning Environment and Its Associations with Critical Thinking Ability of Secondary School Students in Liberal Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, we investigated-secondary school students' perceptions of their constructivist learning environment in Liberal Studies, and whether their perceptions were related to their critical thinking ability. A convenience sample of Secondary Three students (N = 967) studying Liberal Studies in Hong Kong participated in this research by…

Kwan, Yee Wan; Wong, Angela F. L.

2014-01-01

215

Using a Humanoid Robot to Develop a Dialogue-Based Interactive Learning Environment for Elementary Foreign Language Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Elementary school is the critical stage during which the development of listening comprehension and oral abilities in language acquisition occur, especially with a foreign language. However, the current foreign language instructors often adopt one-way teaching, and the learning environment lacks any interactive instructional media with which to…

Chang, Chih-Wei; Chen, Gwo-Dong

2010-01-01

216

Designing a Classroom as a Learner-Centered Learning Environment Prompting Students' Reflective Thinking in K-12  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Only few studies have explicitly attended to the nature of the perceived underlying factors that prompt young adolescents' reflective thinking in association with K-12 learning environment. This paper focuses on an analysis of the factors that are perceived by young students as prompting their reflective thinking and how those factors apply to the…

Kim, Kyoungna; Grabowski, Barbara L.; Sharma, Priya

2004-01-01

217

Using Technology-Enhanced Learning Environments to Support Problem-Based Historical Inquiry in Secondary School Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article summarizes findings from a nine-year research program investigating how technological affordances might be used as a part of holistic learning environments to support teachers and learners in disciplined inquiry about persistent social issues. We discuss what our findings suggest about the potential and the limitations of…

Saye, John W.; Brush, Thomas

2007-01-01

218

BEAUTIFUL CLASSROOM CAMPAIGN On Tuesday, April 22, 2003, the Office  

E-print Network

- maintained classroom environment. As part of the Beautiful U Day activities, the Beautiful Classroom Campaign focused on the QUAD-system recycling program and launched the Beautiful Classroom Campaign. Thank you our work environment. The reorganization changes the way we will be doing our jobs. For some of you

Webb, Peter

219

Classroom Catapults  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"Wow, our plastic load flew 540 centimeters! This is so cool!" An interdisciplinary unit on catapults was responsible for the excitement and enthusiasm generated in the author's classroom. In their social studies class, students learned about the Middle A

Villano, Diane D.

2001-02-01

220

Inclusive Classrooms  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Five Standards-based strategies for successful inclusion of special-needs students in the secondary science classroom are described in this article. Use a multisensory approach; encourage collaboration among students; provide specific expectations and ass

Konstantinos Alexakos

2001-03-01

221

Reflections on an informal learning environment with invocations for classroom learning in Dubai, the United Arab Emirates  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article explores postgraduate student-teacher perceptions of the educational value of learning in informal environments through a well-known global edutainment centre – KidZania – in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. It provides an interpretive analysis of student-teacher reflections in online reflective discourse communities, which followed a connect–extend–challenge format. Findings show that students identified benefits and some limitations to learning in the

Fiona Baker

2012-01-01

222

Computer-Intensive School Environments and the Reorganization of Knowledge and Learning: A Qualitative Assessment of Apple Computer's Classroom of Tomorrow.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Apple Classroom of Tomorrow (ACOT) project is an attempt to alter the instructional premises of a selected group of seven experimental classrooms in the United States by saturating them with computer technology. A recent proposal submitted to Apple Computer described STAR (Sensible Technology Assessment/Research), which includes both…

Levine, Harold G.

223

The learning environment in clicker classrooms: student processes of learning and involvement in large university?level courses using student response systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

To explore what social and educational infrastructure is needed to support classroom use of student response systems (Roschelle et al., 2004), this study investigated the ways in which student characteristics and course design choices were related to students’ assessments of the contribution of clicker use to their learning and involvement in the classroom. Survey responses of over 1500 undergraduates enrolled

April R. Trees; Michele H. Jackson

2007-01-01

224

Associations between Peer Bullying and Classroom Concentration: Evidence for Mediation by Perceived Personal Safety and Relationship with Teacher  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Being bullied is associated with a psycho-social maladjustment during childhood. One hitherto largely overlooked correlate is disrupted classroom concentration. Using data collected from 364 9-11-year-old children attending seven junior schools in the UK, we tested a model in which children's perceived safety in two contexts (classroom and…

Boulton, Michael; Woodmansey, Helen; Williams, Emma; Spells, Ruth; Nicholas, Beth; Laxton, Eleanor; Holman, Gemma; Duke, Elizabeth

2012-01-01

225

Interplay of Psychosocial Factors and the Long-Term Course of Adolescents with a Substance Use Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines the association of psychosocial factors and long-term drug use behaviors (year-5.5) among adolescents with a substance dependence disorder. One group received treatment with a 12-Step approach (n = 159) and one group was on a waiting list (n = 62). Four psychosocial factors (deviant behavior, peer drug environment,…

Winters, Ken C.; Stinchfield, Randy D.; Lee, Susanne; Latimer, William W.

2008-01-01

226

Psychosocial factors in juvenile diabetes: A review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies assessing (1) the influence of psychosocial factors on the onset of juvenile diabetes, (2) the influence of psychosocial factors on the course of this disease, and (3) the influence of diabetes on the psychosocial development of the child are reviewed. Directions for future research are suggested.

Suzanne Bennett Johnson

1980-01-01

227

Psychosocial support for youth living with HIV.  

PubMed

This clinical report provides guidance for the pediatrician in addressing the psychosocial needs of adolescents and young adults living with HIV, which can improve linkage to care and adherence to life-saving antiretroviral (ARV) therapy. Recent national case surveillance data for youth (defined here as adolescents and young adults 13 to 24 years of age) revealed that the burden of HIV/AIDS fell most heavily and disproportionately on African American youth, particularly males having sex with males. To effectively increase linkage to care and sustain adherence to therapy, interventions should address the immediate drivers of ARV compliance and also address factors that provide broader social and structural support for HIV-infected adolescents and young adults. Interventions should address psychosocial development, including lack of future orientation, inadequate educational attainment and limited health literacy, failure to focus on the long-term consequences of near-term risk behaviors, and coping ability. Associated challenges are closely linked to the structural environment. Individual case management is essential to linkage to and retention in care, ARV adherence, and management of associated comorbidities. Integrating these skills into pediatric and adolescent HIV practice in a medical home setting is critical, given the alarming increase in new HIV infections in youth in the United States. PMID:24567016

Martinez, Jaime; Chakraborty, Rana

2014-03-01

228

The ISI Classroom Observation System: Examining the Literacy Instruction Provided to Individual Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Individualizing Student Instruction (ISI) classroom observation and coding system is designed to provide a detailed picture of the classroom environment at the level of the individual student. Using a multidimensional conceptualization of the classroom environment, foundational elements (teacher warmth and responsiveness to students, classroom

Connor, Carol McDonald; Morrison, Frederick J.; Fishman, Barry J.; Ponitz, Claire Cameron; Glasney, Stephanie; Underwood, Phyllis S.; Piasta, Shayne B.; Crowe, Elizabeth Coyne; Schatschneider, Christopher

2009-01-01

229

Environment  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Through 10 lessons and more than 20 hands-on activities, students are introduced to the concept of an environment and the many interactions within it. As they learn about natural and human-made environments, as well as renewable and non-renewable natural resources, they see how people use our planet's natural resources and the many resulting environmental issues that exist in our world today. Topics include: solid waste disposal; the concepts of reduce, reuse, recycle and compost; the causes and effects of water pollution and the importance of water treatment and clean-up methods; air pollution and air quality and the many engineering technologies to prevent it and clean it up; land use and community planning, seeing how decisions made by people have a long-term impact on our natural world; and renewable energy sources, seeing how solar, water and wind energy can be transformed into electricity. In the hands-on activities, students: create a yarn "web" to identify environmental interactions, which they tally and graph; use Moebius strips (loops of paper with a half twist) to demonstrate the environmental interconnectedness and explore natural cycles (water, oxygen/carbon dioxide, carbon, nitrogen); conduct an environmental issue survey to gather and graph data and use an opinion spectrum; brainstorm ways that they use and waste natural resources; use cookies to simulate the distribution of nonrenewable resources; collect, categorize, weigh and analyze classroom solid waste for a week; build and observe a model landfill; evaluate alternative product packaging; use models to investigate the process and consequences of water contamination; design and build water filters; observe and discuss a balloon model of an electrostatic precipitator; build particulate matter collectors; observe and discuss a model of a wet scrubber; dig into the newspaper's daily air quality index; act as community planning engineers to determine optimal structure placement in a community; investigate the thermal storage properties of sand, salt, water and paper to evaluate their suitability as passive solar thermal mass; design and create models for new waterwheels within time and material constraints; build model anemometers; and create publications to communicate what they have learned.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

230

Cooley's Anemia: A Psychosocial Directory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The directory is intended to aid patients and their families who are coping with the genetic disorder of Cooley's anemia. A brief review of the disease covers background, genetics, symptoms, effect on the patient, treatment, and current research. The next section looks at psychosocial needs at various times (time of diagnosis, infancy and toddler…

National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

231

Cyberaddictions: toward a psychosocial perspective.  

PubMed

The concept of cyberaddiction is far from being unanimously accepted by scientists (Ko, Yen, Yen, Chen, & Chen, 2012; Pezoa-Jares, Espinoza-Luna & Vasquez-Medina, 2012; Nadeau & et al. 2011; Perraton, Fusaro & Bonenfant, 2011. The same is true of addiction to videogames (Hellman, Schoenmakers, Nordstrom, & Van Holst 2013); Coulombe (2010); or to Facebook (Andreassen et al. 2012; Levard & Soulas, 2010). While certain researchers wished to see this condition included in the DSM-5, others question the operational and practical basis for the diagnostic criteria (Block, 2008). Through a review of litterature and results from research findings; the aim of this article is to propose a psychosocial perspective for the cyberaddiction phenomenon. By a psychosocial perspective, we mean the inclusion of social determinants (weak social ties, social exclusion, hyper individualism, poverty, unemployment, etc) and not only the individual characteristics associated with the disease model in the addiction field. To what extent social conditions and cyberaddiction behaviors constitute a potential pathology ? Can we include a psychosocial approach to gain a more general picture of this contemporary issue? In response to these questions, a contextualization and an attempt to define cyberaddiction will be followed by an analysis of some major issues in the development of this type of addiction. As a conclusion, a demonstration of the cycle of addiction on how people develop addictions, including cyberaddictions, will be done within a psychosocial perspective in order to seize the multifactorial aspects of this addiction. PMID:25173593

Suissa, Amnon Jacob

2014-12-01

232

Psychosocial Resources in First-Year University Students: The Role of Identity Processes and Social Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

The investigation involved the assessment of a model predicting that family and university relationship environments are linked\\u000a with identity processes and identity states (statuses) that predict psychosocial resources among first-year university students.\\u000a A sample of 351 university students, between the ages of 18 and 21 years, completed measures of psychosocial maturity based\\u000a on Erikson's notions of ego virtues, a measure

Gerald R. Adams; Michael D. Berzonsky; Leo Keating

2006-01-01

233

Smart Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

What makes a classroom "smart"? Presentation technologies such as projectors, document cameras, and LCD panels clearly fit the bill, but when considering other technologies for teaching, learning, and developing content, the possibilities become limited only by the boundaries of an institution's innovation. This article presents 32 best practices…

Kelly, Rhea, Ed.

2006-01-01

234

Classroom Antarctica  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As part of the Australian Antarctic Division, Classroom Antarctica gives dozens of downloadable Adobe Acrobat files that allow students to discover this unique continent. Subjects include the history of the scientific research undertaken on Antarctica, surviving its climate, its biological ecosystem, the land's physical characteristics and affects on climate, and much more.

1969-12-31

235

Classroom Notes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this issue's "Classroom Notes" section, the following papers are discussed: (1) "Constructing a line segment whose length is equal to the measure of a given angle" (W. Jacob and T. J. Osler); (2) "Generating functions for the powers of Fibonacci sequences" (D. Terrana and H. Chen); (3) "Evaluation of mean and variance integrals without…

International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 2007

2007-01-01

236

Jigsaw Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Jigsaw Classroom is a website for the jigsaw cooperative learning technique that strives to reduce racial conflict, promote better learning, improve motivation, and increase the enjoyment of the learning experience among school children. The website includes an overview of jigsaw techniques, jigsaw history, implementing tips, related books and articles, and links on cooperative learning, school violence, and jigsaw developer Elliot Aronson.

Aronson, Elliot; Network, Social P.

237

Role of Psychosocial Stress in the Cause of Pica  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fifty children with iron deficiency anemia with pica and 50 children with iron deficiency anemia without pica were studied to detail their psychosocial environment. Children in two groups were individually matched for age, sex, socioeconomic class, and degree of anemia. The pica group had significantly greater stress scores (7.6 ± 2.8) as compared to the control group (4.1 + 2.1;

Sunit Singhi; Pratibha Singhi; Gul B. Adwani

1981-01-01

238

Multicultural Messages: Nonverbal Communication in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the drive to facilitate inclusion in the classroom, one often overlooked factor that affects the environment of all classrooms is nonverbal interaction. This study was conducted to identify some specific nonverbal messages that are often culturally bound; to help educators and others involved in education understand nonverbal signals and avoid…

Pitton, Debra; And Others

239

"Hate in the Classroom": A Rejoinder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Raphael Cohen-Almagor's article "Hate in the Classroom: Free Expression, Holocaust Denial, and Liberal Education" (2008) calls for sanctions on those K-12 public school teachers whose deployment of "hate speech"--and/or associations with others who deploy it--creates a "poisoned environment" in the classroom. While stating his belief in the role…

Heinrichs, Terry

2008-01-01

240

Hospitable Classrooms: Biblical Hospitality and Inclusive Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper contributes to a Christian hermeneutic of special education by suggesting the biblical concept of hospitality as a necessary characteristic of classroom and school environments in which students with disabilities and other marginalized students can be effectively incorporated into the body of the classroom. Christian hospitality, seen…

Anderson, David W.

2011-01-01

241

Design a Net-Zero Energy Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students create a concept design of their very own net-zero energy classroom by pasting renewable energy and energy-efficiency items into and around a pretend classroom on a sheet of paper. They learn how these items (such as solar panels, efficient lights, computers, energy meters, etc.) interact to create a learning environment that produces as much energy as it uses.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

242

[Psychosocial interventions and caregiver support].  

PubMed

Despite an increasing number of trials on the effects of psychosocial interventions in dementia, recommendations concerning these interventions are still based on limited evidence. The S3 dementia guidelines, initiated by the German associations of psychiatry and neurology (DGPPN and DGN), suggest the use of procedures including reality orientation, reminiscence, and cognitive stimulation at recommendation level C. Occupational therapy (including caregiver education), physical activation and music therapy are also suggested at recommendation level C. On a higher level of recommendation (level B), structured support of the caregiver is recommended. Based on the German healthcare system and depending on local structures, this may be offered at the medical office of a general practitioner, a specialist for neurology or psychiatry or at a memory clinic or an outpatient clinic. Furthermore, caregiver support is provided by local branches of the German Alzheimer Association. An increase in recent high level trials suggests an upcoming improvement of the evidence base for psychosocial interventions. PMID:20567961

Hüll, M; Wernher, I

2010-07-01

243

Guerrilla Video: A New Protocol for Producing Classroom Video  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contemporary changes in pedagogy point to the need for a higher level of video production value in most classroom video, replacing the default video protocol of an unattended camera in the back of the classroom. The rich and complex environment of today's classroom can be captured more fully using the higher level, but still easily manageable,…

Fadde, Peter; Rich, Peter

2010-01-01

244

Psychosocial Issues in Cancer Pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cancer pain is a complex and multidimensional experience that affects and is affected by psychological and social factors.\\u000a This article reviews recent research that points to a number of key psychosocial factors associated with pain, including psychological\\u000a distress, coping, and social support, as well as the impact of socioeconomic factors on barriers to pain management. We also\\u000a review recent research

Laura S. Porter; Francis J. Keefe

245

Psychosocial and Mental Status Assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clinicians assess a client’s psychosocial and mental status in a variety of contexts. Clients may be screened at intake to\\u000a a service and at annual staffings, often to determine eligibility for professional services or supportive interventions. In\\u000a this type of referral the important question is whether or not there is a clinically significant problem that requires attention.\\u000a This can also

Peter Sturmey

246

Multilevel and Diverse Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The benefits and advantages of classroom practices incorporating unity-in-diversity and diversity-in-unity are what "Multilevel and Diverse Classrooms" is all about. Multilevel classrooms--also known as mixed-ability or heterogeneous classrooms--are a fact of life in ESOL programs around the world. These classrooms are often not only multilevel…

Baurain, Bradley, Ed.; Ha, Phan Le, Ed.

2010-01-01

247

A Multi-Instrument Examination of Preschool Classroom Quality and the Relationship between Program, Classroom, and Teacher Characteristics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: A statewide study of preschool classroom quality was conducted using 3 distinct classroom observation measures in order to inform a statewide quality rating system. Findings suggested that Tennessee preschool classrooms were approaching "good" quality on the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale-Revised (ECERS-R) and provided…

Denny, Joanna Hope; Hallam, Rena; Homer, Karen

2012-01-01

248

Does Early Psychosocial Stress Affect Mate Choice?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Early psychosocial stress (e.g., parental divorce, abuse) is conjectured to place individuals on a developmental trajectory\\u000a leading to earlier initiation of sexual activity, earlier reproduction, and having more sex partners than those with less\\u000a early psychosocial stress. But does it also affect an individual’s mate choice? The present study examined whether early psychosocial\\u000a stress affects preferences and dislikes for opposite-sex

Nicole Koehler; James S. Chisholm

2009-01-01

249

Developing and Validating a New Classroom Climate Observation Assessment Tool  

PubMed Central

The climate of school classrooms, shaped by a combination of teacher practices and peer processes, is an important determinant for children’s psychosocial functioning and is a primary factor affecting bullying and victimization. Given that there are relatively few theoretically-grounded and validated assessment tools designed to measure the social climate of classrooms, our research team developed an observation tool through participatory action research (PAR). This article details how the assessment tool was designed and preliminarily validated in 18 third-, fourth-, and fifth-grade classrooms in a large urban public school district. The goals of this study are to illustrate the feasibility of a PAR paradigm in measurement development, ascertain the psychometric properties of the assessment tool, and determine associations with different indices of classroom levels of relational and physical aggression. PMID:21643447

Leff, Stephen S.; Thomas, Duane E.; Shapiro, Edward S.; Paskewich, Brooke; Wilson, Kim; Necowitz-Hoffman, Beth; Jawad, Abbas F.

2011-01-01

250

Psychosocial Perspectives and the Issue of Prevention in Childhood Obesity  

PubMed Central

A dramatic increase in childhood overweight/obesity has been recognized globally over the past 50?years. This observed increase may reflect genetic, as well as psychological, environmental, and socio-cultural influences. In the first part of this review, we present an updated summary of the psychosocial factors associated with this change and discuss possible ways in which they operate. Among these factors, lower socio economic status (in both industrialized and non-industrialized countries), being female, belonging to a minority group, and being exposed to adverse life events may all be associated with a greater risk of childhood overweight/obesity. These influences may be mediated via a variety of mechanisms, in particular above-average food intake of low nutritional quality and reduction in physical activity. Other important psychosocial mediators include the influence of the family and peer environment, and exposure to the media. In the second part of the review, we discuss the potential of psychosocial prevention programs to intervene in the processes involved in the rise of childhood overweight/obesity. Two points are emphasized. First, prevention programs should be multidisciplinary, combining the knowledge of experts from different professions, and taking into consideration the important role of the family environment and relevant influential social organizations, particularly school. Second, effective change is unlikely to occur without large-scale programs carried out on a public policy level. PMID:25133140

Stein, Daniel; Weinberger-Litman, Sarah L.; Latzer, Yael

2014-01-01

251

Psychosocial perspectives and the issue of prevention in childhood obesity.  

PubMed

A dramatic increase in childhood overweight/obesity has been recognized globally over the past 50?years. This observed increase may reflect genetic, as well as psychological, environmental, and socio-cultural influences. In the first part of this review, we present an updated summary of the psychosocial factors associated with this change and discuss possible ways in which they operate. Among these factors, lower socio economic status (in both industrialized and non-industrialized countries), being female, belonging to a minority group, and being exposed to adverse life events may all be associated with a greater risk of childhood overweight/obesity. These influences may be mediated via a variety of mechanisms, in particular above-average food intake of low nutritional quality and reduction in physical activity. Other important psychosocial mediators include the influence of the family and peer environment, and exposure to the media. In the second part of the review, we discuss the potential of psychosocial prevention programs to intervene in the processes involved in the rise of childhood overweight/obesity. Two points are emphasized. First, prevention programs should be multidisciplinary, combining the knowledge of experts from different professions, and taking into consideration the important role of the family environment and relevant influential social organizations, particularly school. Second, effective change is unlikely to occur without large-scale programs carried out on a public policy level. PMID:25133140

Stein, Daniel; Weinberger-Litman, Sarah L; Latzer, Yael

2014-01-01

252

Acoustical Modifications for the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reviews procedures for evaluating, measuring, and modifying noise and reverberation levels in the classroom environment. Recommendations include: relocating children away from high noise sources, such as fans, air conditioners, heating ducts, and faulty lighting fixtures, using sound-absorbing materials, using acoustical ceiling tile…

Crandell, Carl C.; Smaldino, Joseph J.

1999-01-01

253

THE CO-ORDINATED CLASSROOM.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THIS REPORT EXPLICATES THE PHYSICAL RELATIONSHIP OF THE CHILD TO HIS CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT IN TERMS OF LIGHT CONTROL. THE STUDY SHOWS HOW SHADOWS, GLARE, INADEQUATE LIGHT DISTRIBUTION, DESKS AND DESK POSITIONS AFFECT THE CHILD'S PHYSIOLOGICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL WELL-BEING. A COMPARATIVE STUDY WAS MADE BETWEEN A CONTROL SCHOOL AND AN EXPERIMENTAL…

HARMON, DARELL BOYD

254

Revoicing Classrooms: A Spatial Manifesto  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Why is the physical learning environment in schools largely ignored by teachers within pedagogical practice? The cellular classroom has remained seemingly immutable since the Industrial Revolution, with spatiality playing a silent and subconscious role in schooling other than related to concerns around surveillance. Previous studies have shown…

Fisher, Kenn

2004-01-01

255

The Relation of Classroom Environment and School Belonging to Academic Self-Efficacy among Urban Fourth- and Fifth-Grade Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, 149 low-income, ethnically heterogeneous, fourth- and fifth-grade students completed self-report surveys in the fall and spring of 1 academic year. We examined classroom climate (satisfaction, cohesion, friction, task difficulty, and competition) and school belonging in relation to language arts and math and science self-efficacy,…

McMahon, Susan D.; Wernsman, Jamie; Rose, Dale S.

2009-01-01

256

Motivating Learners in Secondary Science Classrooms: Analysis of a Computer-Supported, Inquiry-Based Learning Environment Using Self-Determination Theory  

E-print Network

Science, an inquiry-based, computer-supported learning curriculum developed by the Botanical Society of America. PlantingScience uniquely utilizes professional scientists who serve as online mentors to K-12 students engaged in classroom inquiry projects. In an effort...

Scogin, Stephen C.

2014-07-29

257

The Classroom Animal: Crickets.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suggests using crickets for classroom activities, providing background information on their anatomy and reproduction and tips on keeping individual organisms or a breeding colony in the classroom. (JN)

Kramer, David C.

1985-01-01

258

Psychosocial aspects of childhood obesity.  

PubMed

Rates of childhood obesity are increasing at alarming rates worldwide. This is especially alarming as obesity is associated with many physical and psychological consequences. A great number of studies indicate that obese children have an impaired psychological well-being (e.g., depression, self-esteem, and quality of life) compared to their non-overweight peers. There has been an overwhelming amount of research conducted in this area over the past few decades, and as such, this paper provides a summarized overview of the vast trove of available information on the psychosocial aspects of childhood obesity. In this paper we provide a summarized overview of: 1) psychosocial aspects that contribute to the onset of childhood obesity; 2) psychosocial consequences of childhood obesity; and 3) familial-based lifestyle behavior modification interventions for treating childhood obesity and its treatment success. Although it seems obvious that obese children and adolescents would likely be at higher risk for psychological problems, the mediating factors in the relationship between psychological problems and obesity are still not well established. Obesity is a complex disorder with an equally complex etiology, and is thus associated with complex behaviors and outcomes that make it difficult to study in children. It has been indicated that family-based lifestyle interventions can improve psychological well-being in obese children; however, not all children profit from these interventions. Interventions aimed at improving treatment results need further investigation. For example, interventions targeted specifically at groups that tend to be less successful in weight-loss programs and interventions providing long-term support to these individuals are recommended. PMID:22075804

De Niet, J E; Naiman, D I

2011-12-01

259

Androgyny, ego development, and psychosocial crisis resolution  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined the relationship of psychological androgyny with ego development in the context of Loevinger's theory and with psychosocial crisis resolution from the perspective of Erikson's theory. A sample of 30 male and 30 female adults completed the Bem Sex-role Inventory, the Washington University Sentence Completion Test, and the Inventory of Psychosocial Development (IPD). The androgynous individuals were

Karen J. Prager; John M. Bailey

1985-01-01

260

Psychosocial development and friendship functions in adolescence  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study concerns the relationship between friendship variables and adolescent psychosocial development, in particular identity and psychosocial intimacy as envisaged by E. Erikson [(1950), Childhood and Society, New York: Norton; (1968), Identity: Youth and Crisis, New York: Norton]. Two hundred and twenty-three secondary school and college students were surveyed regarding friendship networks, beliefs about friendship, functions of friendship in general,

Susan Moore; Jennifer Boldero

1991-01-01

261

The Relation of Individuation and Psychosocial Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, the authors examined gender differences in levels of individuation, the relation of individuation and psychosocial development, and whether this relation is of a curvilinear nature. Two hundred and twenty-four students completed the Measure of Psychosocial Development (G. A. Hawley, 1988), the Level of Differentiation of Self Scale (LDSS; J. Haber, 1990a), and the Personal Authority in the

Jennifer Garbarino; John P. Gaa; Paul Swank; Robert McPherson; Linda V. Gratch

1995-01-01

262

Psychosocial Treatment for Recurrent Genital Herpes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Assigned 21 individuals with recurrent genital herpes to psychosocial intervention, social support, or waiting-list control conditions. Those receiving psychosocial intervention (herpes simplex virus information, relaxation training, stress management instructions, and an imagery technique) reported significantly greater reductions in herpes…

Longo, David J.; And Others

1988-01-01

263

Explorations in Knowing: Thinking Psychosocially about Legitimacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper, we look at what engaging with psychoanalysis, through psychosocial accounts of subjectivity, has contributed to our struggles for legitimacy and security within our ways of knowing. The psychosocial, with its insistence on the unconscious and the irrational, features as both a source of security and of insecurity. We use three…

Chappell, Anne; Ernest, Paul; Ludhra, Geeta; Mendick, Heather

2014-01-01

264

Habitus and the Psychosocial: Bourdieu with Feelings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explores the potential of habitus to provide a window on the psychosocial. The paper works with a notion of psychosocial study as inquiry into the mutual constitution of the individual and the social relations within which they are enmeshed. At the same time it attempts to deepen and enrich notions of habitus. Although the strong focus…

Reay, Diane

2015-01-01

265

Improving Classroom Communication. The Talking and Writing Series, K-12: Successful Classroom Practices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Prepared as part of a series applying recent research in oral and written communication instruction to classroom practice, this booklet reviews research and presents suggestions designed to improve the classroom communication climate. The first section of the booklet describes the process of building a supportive environment to reflect a range of…

Cooper, Pamela J.; Galvin, Kathleen M.

266

Common-Sense Classroom Management: Surviving September and Beyond in the Elementary Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual contains techniques for creating successful teaching and learning environments in diverse elementary classrooms. Using humor, drawings, and a conversational tone, it provides suggestions for teaching effectively and efficiently. Special highlights include five-steps-or-less strategies that can be adapted into any classroom, an outline…

Lindberg, Jill A.; Swick, April M.

267

Classroom Profiling Training: Increasing Preservice Teachers' Confidence and Knowledge of Classroom Management Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Classroom management is a serious concern for beginning teachers including preservice teachers. The Queensland Department of Education, Training and Employment (DETE) has developed the Essential Skills for Classroom Management (ESCM), a system of positive and pro-active strategies for maintaining supportive learning environments. In addition, the…

Jackson, Cliff; Simoncini, Kym; Davidson, Mark

2013-01-01

268

A Biological Brain in a Cultural Classroom: Applying Biological Research to Classroom Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book applies the latest in brain research and learning theory to classroom management. The concepts of psychoneurophysiology are made readily accessible. The book offers creative data gathering activities to help students manage their own behavior and to help teachers learn how their own behavior impacts the classroom environment. The seven…

Sylwester, Robert

269

Robotics competitions and science classrooms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper looks at the distinctions between science classrooms and the robotics competition described in the article "Examining the mediation of power in a collaborative community: engaging in informal science as authentic practice" written by Anton Puvirajah, Geeta Verma and Horace Webb. Using the framework of "productive disciplinary engagement" and discussing each principle in turn, the article argues that in order to bring the advantages of informal learning environments into regular classrooms we especially need to address student interest through task design and to change curricular requirements to agree with changing educational values.

Benke, Gertraud

2012-06-01

270

ASD Classroom Development System: Designing an ASD Classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Increase knowledge of the elements related to effective learning environments\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Increase knowledge of the elements of the ASD Classroom Model\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Increase knowledge of the components of the ASD Classroom Development System\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Increase knowledge of how to develop and evaluate an ASD classroom within your district

Caroline I. Magyar

271

The psychosocial impact of epilepsy in adults  

PubMed Central

Although defined by the presence of recurrent seizures, epilepsy can be so much more and can include a very wide range of difficulties in cognition, psychiatric status, and social adaptive functioning. These psychosocial complications of epilepsy have a long history, generating calls for action by national commissions, public health agencies, and special action groups which are briefly summarized here. Next, a brief overview of the prevalence of psychosocial complications of epilepsy in population-based and other non-selected studies is presented. Finally, focusing on the onset and development of psychosocial difficulties, the following points are stressed: 1) neurobiological factors likely contribute to psychosocial problems in a major way, but currently this contribution is poorly understood, and 2) while neurobiological factors may prove important, they operate in a social setting, and therefore a full accounting of the etiology, treatment and prevention of psychosocial problems in epilepsy will require an integrated biopsychosocial model and lifespan perspective. PMID:19318133

Hermann, Bruce; Jacoby, Ann

2009-01-01

272

Attachment and Adolescent Psychosocial Functioning  

PubMed Central

To explore the meaning and function of attachment organization during adolescence, its relation to multiple domains of psychosocial functioning was examined in a sample of 131 moderately at-risk adolescents. Attachment organization was assessed using the Adult Attachment Interview; multiple measures of functioning were obtained from parents, adolescents, and their peers. Seczurity displayed in adolescents' organization of discourse about attachment experiences was related to competence with peers (as reported by peers), lower levels of internalizing behaviors (as reported by adolescents), and lower levels of deviant behavior (as reported by peers and by mothers). Preoccupation with attachment experiences, seen in angry or diffuse and unfocused discussion of attachment experiences, was linked to higher levels of both internalizing and deviant behaviors. These relations generally remained even when other attachment-related constructs that had been previously related to adolescent functioning were covaried in analyses. Results are interpreted as suggesting an important role for attachment organization in a wide array of aspects of adolescent psychosocial development. PMID:9839424

Allen, Joseph P.; Moore, Cynthia; Kuperminc, Gabriel; Bell, Kathy

2006-01-01

273

Psychosocial correlates of internet use among Italian students.  

PubMed

Davis (2001) introduced a cognitive-behavioral theory of generalized pathological internet use (GPIU) that attempts to model the etiology, development, and outcomes associated with PIU. According to this model, pre-existing psychosocial problems (depression, loneliness, or low levels of social support) predispose an individual to GPIU cognitions, behaviors, and negative outcomes. An exploratory study intended to investigate whether GPIU is associated with psychosocial health (loneliness, depression, self-esteem, and shyness), also taking account of types of internet services used, was conducted in a sample of Italian undergraduate students. A cross-sectional and descriptive correlational design was used. The participants were 157 undergraduate students (34 male and 123 female) enrolled at The University of Florence. The results revealed a stronger correlation between the frequency of use of communicative services (as opposed to leisure or informational services) and GPIU levels. Among services, the most significant predictor of GPIU was the frequency of use of chat rooms and "adult" websites. All psychosocial health variables were correlated with GPIU, with the exception of shyness; however, general loneliness was the only significant predictor of GPIU. Depression and self-esteem were not significant predictors of GPIU. These results are consistent with the assumption that GPIU is related to the social aspect of the internet (e.g., online chatting) and arises from the unique communicative environment found online. In accordance with recent studies, social wellbeing (i.e. loneliness) seems to play a greater role than psychological health in deriving negative effects from internet use. PMID:22044272

Casale, Silvia; Fioravanti, Giulia

2011-08-01

274

Classroom Management. Brief  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In learning-centered classrooms, the emphasis of classroom management shifts from maintaining behavioral control to fostering student engagement and self-regulation as well as community responsibility. This brief describes classroom management in "learning centered" classrooms, where practices are consistent with recent research knowledge about…

National Education Association Research Department, 2006

2006-01-01

275

Promoting a combination approach to paediatric HIV psychosocial support.  

PubMed

Ninety percent of the 3.4 million HIV-infected children live in sub-Saharan Africa. Their psychosocial well being is fundamental to establishing and maintaining successful treatment outcomes and overall quality of life. With the increased roll-out of antiretroviral treatment, HIV infection is shifting from a life-threatening to a chronic disease. However, even for paediatric patients enrolled in care and treatment, HIV can still be devastating due to the interaction of complex factors, particularly in the context of other household illness and overextended healthcare systems in sub-Saharan Africa.This article explores the negative effect of several interrelated HIV-specific factors on the psychosocial well being of HIV-infected children: disclosure, stigma and discrimination, and bereavement. However, drawing on clinical studies of resilience, it stresses the need to move beyond a focus on the individual as a full response to the needs of a sick child requires support for the individual child, caregiver-child dyads, extended families, communities, and institutions. This means providing early and progressive age appropriate interventions aimed at increasing the self-reliance and self-acceptance in children and their caregivers and promoting timely health-seeking behaviours. Critical barriers that cause poorer biomedical and psychosocial outcomes among children and caregiver must also be addressed as should the causes and consequences of stigma and associated gender and social norms.This article reviews interventions at different levels of the ecological model: individual-centred programs, family-centred interventions, programs that support or train healthcare providers, community interventions for HIV-infected children, and initiatives that improve the capacity of schools to provide more supportive environments for HIV-infected children. Although experience is increasing in approaches that address the psychosocial needs of vulnerable and HIV-infected children, there is still limited evidence demonstrating which interventions have positive effects on the well being of HIV-infected children. Interventions that improve the psychosocial well being of children living with HIV must be replicable in resource-limited settings, avoiding dependence on specialized staff for implementation.This paper advocates for combination approaches that strengthen the capacity of service providers, expand the availability of age appropriate and family-centred support and equip schools to be more protective and supportive of children living with HIV. The coordination of care with other community-based interventions is also needed to foster more supportive and less stigmatizing environments. To ensure effective, feasible, and scalable interventions, improving the evidence base to document improved outcomes and longer term impact as well as implementation of operational studies to document delivery approaches are needed. PMID:24361624

Amzel, Anouk; Toska, Elona; Lovich, Ronnie; Widyono, Monique; Patel, Tejal; Foti, Carrie; Dziuban, Eric J; Phelps, B Ryan; Sugandhi, Nandita; Mark, Daniella; Altschuler, Jenny

2013-11-01

276

*Adapted, with permission, from Pavela, G. (2001). LPR 26: Questions and answers on classroom disruption. ASJA Law and Policy Report, July 18, 2001.  

E-print Network

have broad authority to manage the classroom environment. One court compared teachers to judges on classroom disruption. ASJA Law and Policy Report, July 18, 2001. QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ON CLASSROOM should disruptive behavior in the classroom be defined? A. Classroom disruption is generally regarded

277

Advances in the Psychosocial Treatment of Addiction  

PubMed Central

Synopsis The authors present an overview of empirically supported psychosocial interventions for individuals with substance use disorders (SUDs), including recent advances in the field. They also identify barriers to the adoption of evidence-based psychosocial treatments in community-based systems of care, and the promise of leveraging technology (computers, web, mobile phone, and emerging technologies) to markedly enhance the reach of these treatments. Technology-based interventions may provide “on-demand,” ubiquitous access to therapeutic support in diverse settings. A brief discussion of important next steps in developing, refining, and disseminating technology-delivered psychosocial interventions concludes the review. PMID:22640767

Dallery, Jesse

2012-01-01

278

Understanding the Psychosocial Experience of Vitiligo in Understudied Populations: The Potential for Psychosocial Self-Help.  

E-print Network

??The literature review, which employed systematic search techniques, aimed to identify and critique the literature reporting on the psychosocial experience of childhood and adolescent vitiligo.… (more)

Taylor, Nick

2013-01-01

279

Designing the Electronic Classroom: Applying Learning Theory and Ergonomic Design Principles.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Applies learning theory and ergonomic principles to the design of effective learning environments for library instruction. Discusses features of electronic classroom ergonomics, including the ergonomics of physical space, environmental factors, and workstations; and includes classroom layouts. (Author/LRW)

Emmons, Mark; Wilkinson, Frances C.

2001-01-01

280

Supervision of psychosocial skills in genetic counseling.  

PubMed

Little has been written about how genetic counseling supervisors can help students develop psychosocial skills in their clinical rotations. The authors describe several approaches supervisors can use, ranging from preventive measures (e.g., normalizing anxiety), to skill-enhancing interventions (e.g., modeling and thinking aloud), to more direct approaches (e.g., immediacy, confrontation) that may be necessary for students who are reluctant, or even resistant, to using psychosocial skills with their clients. PMID:16865562

Borders, L DiAnne; Eubanks, Sonja; Callanan, Nancy

2006-08-01

281

Indoor air quality: A psychosocial perspective  

SciTech Connect

The incidence of indoor air quality problems has increased dramatically over the past decade. Investigation of these problems has yielded a definitive cause in only one third of the cases. Psychosocial factors may play a key role in the development and propagation of symptoms attributed to poor indoor air quality. Guidelines for managing indoor air quality problems from the organizational perspective are based upon psychosocial principles and elements of risk perception.

Boxer, P.A. (Metropolitan Clinic of Counseling of Ohio, Inc, Cincinnati (USA))

1990-05-01

282

Toward the virtual classroom  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) encourages its employees to remotely attend classes given by Stanford University, University of California at Davis, and the National Technological University (NTU). To improve the quality of education for LLNL employees, we are cooperating with Stanford University in upgrading the Stanford Instructional Television Network (SITN). A dedicated high-speed communication link (Tl) between Stanford and LLNL will be used for enhanced services such as videoconferencing, real time classnotes distribution, and electronic distribution of homework assignments. The new network will also allow students to take classes from their offices with the ability to ask the professor questions via an automatically dialed telephone call. As part of this upgrade, we have also proposed a new videoconferencing based classroom environment where students taking remote classes would feel as though they are attending the live class. All paperwork would be available in near real time and students may converse normally with, and see, other remote students as though they were all in the same physical location. We call this the Virtual Classroom.'' 1 ref., 6 figs.

Pihlman, M.; Dirks, D.H.

1990-01-03

283

Classroom Intellectual Composition and Academic Achievement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Assuming that the intellectual level of the classroom affects learning environment quality and student achievement, separating students into homogeneous groupings enriches the environment for high-resource students and impoverishes it for low-resource students. The converse occurs under heterogenous mixing. This argument is supported by data from…

Dar, Yehezkel; Resh, Nura

1986-01-01

284

Psychosocial Research on the International Space Station: Special Privacy Considerations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Conducting psychosocial research with astronauts and cosmonauts requires special privacy and confidentiality precautions due to the high profile nature of the subject population and to individual crewmember perception of the risks inherent in divulging sensitive psychological information. Sampling from this small population necessitates subject protections above and beyond standard scientific human subject protocols. Many of these protections have relevance for psychosocial research on the International Space Station. In our previous study of psychosocial issues involving crewmembers on the Mir space station, special precautions were taken during each phase of the missions. These were implemented in order to gain the trust necessary to ameliorate the perceived risks of divulging potentially sensitive psychological information and to encourage candid responses. Pre-flight, a standard confidentiality agreement was provided along with a special layman's summary indicating that only group-level data would be presented, and subjects chose their own ID codes known only to themselves. In-flight, special procedures and technologies (such as encryption) were employed to protect the data during the collection. Post-flight, an analytic strategy was chosen to further mask subject identifiers, and draft manuscripts were reviewed by the astronaut office prior to publication. All of the eligible five astronauts and eight cosmonauts who flew joint US/Russian missions on the Mir were successfully recruited to participate, and their data completion rate was 76%. Descriptive analyses of the data indicated that there was sufficient variability in all of the measures to indicate that thoughtful, discriminating responses were being provided (e.g., the full range of response options was used in 63 of the 65 items of the Profile of Mood States measure, and both true and false response options were used in all 126 items of the Group Environment and the Work Environment measures). This presentation will discuss and expand on the lessons learned during the Mir study and relate them to future long-duration space missions.

Kanas, N.; Salnitskiy, V.; Ritsher, J.; Grund, E.; Weiss, D.; Gushin, V.; Kozerenko, O.

285

Inside the Primary Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents some of the findings of the ORACLE research program (Observational Research and Classroom Learning Evaluation), a detailed observational study of teacher-student interaction, teaching styles, and management methods within a sample of primary classrooms. (Editor/SJL)

Simon, Brian

1980-01-01

286

Classroom Constructivism.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Constructivism, which holds that knowledge is created out of each individual's own experience, is recapturing researchers' attention. To constructivists, teachers are not omniscient oracles, but nutritionists providing an environment for children to grow their own knowledge. Students might learn division by planning a field trip instead of…

Trotter, Andrew

1995-01-01

287

[Psychosocial background in sterility patients].  

PubMed

150 childless couples from the infertility clinic of the department of gynecology and obstetrics, University of Graz, received a questionnaire. Psychosocial factors and special problems of childless marriage represented the background at which the investigation was aimed. Of special interest were the reactions of the male partner regarding the andrological investigation within the gynecological department. The patients were confronted by a total of 41 questions. 15 of them were equal for both partners, whereas the male partner had to answer 11 additional questions. The questionnaire concerned problems such as interactions of the couple, motivations for the desire of children, psychosomatics, andrological investigation within the gynecological department and the organization of the andrological outpatient section. 72% of the questionnaires were returned. More than 50% of the sterile couples preferred to attend the infertility clinic together. 26% felt restrictions in their sexual behaviour due to the unrealized desire of children, 48% expected an improvement in their partnership if they could have children. 98% considered their childless marriage as a problem of both partners. The desire to set up a family ranks first on the list of motivations. The evaluation of the questionnaire yielded valuable results for the infertility clinic and especially for the andrological department. 72% of the andrological patients did not feel embarrassed by being evaluated and treated in a women's department. 63% preferred to attend the andrological department jointly with their wife. PMID:6557979

Pusch, H

1983-11-01

288

Psychosocial aspects of induced abortion.  

PubMed

US anti-abortion groups have used misinformation on the long-term psychological impact of induced abortion to advance their position. This article reviews the available research evidence on the definition, history, cultural context, and emotional and psychiatric sequelae of induced abortion. Notable has been a confusion of normative, transient reactions to unintended pregnancy and abortion (e.g., guilt, depression, anxiety) with serious mental disorders. Studies of the psychiatric aspects of abortion have been limited by methodological problems such as the impossibility of randomly assigning women to study and control groups, resistance to follow-up, and confounding variables. Among the factors that may impact on an unintended pregnancy and the decision to abort are ongoing or past psychiatric illness, poverty, social chaos, youth and immaturity, abandonment issues, ongoing domestic responsibilities, rape and incest, domestic violence, religion, and contraceptive failure. Among the risk factors for postabortion psychosocial difficulties are previous or concurrent psychiatric illness, coercion to abort, genetic or medical indications, lack of social supports, ambivalence, and increasing length of gestation. Overall, the literature indicates that serious psychiatric illness is at least 8 times more common among postpartum than among postabortion women. Abortion center staff should acknowledge that the termination of a pregnancy may be experienced as a loss even when it is a voluntary choice. Referrals should be offered to women who show great emotional distress, have had several previous abortions, or request psychiatric consultation. PMID:9328746

Stotland, N L

1997-09-01

289

Classroom Management. TESOL Classroom Practice Series  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This series captures the dynamics of the contemporary ESOL classroom. It showcases state-of-the-art curricula, materials, tasks, and activities reflecting emerging trends in language education and seeks to build localized language teaching and learning theories based on teachers' and students' unique experiences in and beyond the classroom. Each…

Farrell, Thomas S. C., Ed.

2008-01-01

290

Trout in the Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Trout in the Classroom (TIC) is a conservation-oriented environmental education program for elementary, middle, and high school students. During the year each teacher tailors the program to fit his or her curricular needs. Therefore, each TIC program is unique. TIC has interdisciplinary applications in science, social studies, mathematics, language arts, fine arts, and physical education. In the program, students and teachers raise trout from fertilized eggs supplied by Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VGIF) hatcheries, in aquariums equipped with special chillers designed to keep the water near 50 degrees F. The students make daily temperature measurements, and monitor pH, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, and ammonia levels. They record their data, plot trends, and make sure that the water quality is sufficient to support trout development. The fingerlings, which hatch in late October, are almost an inch and a half long by mid-January. And towards the end of the school year, students will release the fry into VGIF approved watersheds. TIC programs have been in place all across the country for more than 20 years, and are the result of numerous collaborations between teachers, volunteers, government agencies, and local organizations like Trout Unlimited. The programs were designed specifically for teachers who wanted to incorporate more environmental education into their curriculum. While the immediate goal of Trout in the Classroom is to increase student knowledge of water quality and cold water conservation, its long-term goal is to reconnect an increasingly urbanized population of youth to the system of streams, rivers, and watersheds that sustain them. Successful programs have helped: connect students to their local environments and their local watersheds; teach about watershed health and water quality, and; get students to care about fish and the environment. In Virginia, the TIC program is now in its 8th year. Over the past year, the program experienced an amazing growth spurt. Thanks to AEP and Dominion grants and chapter fundraising efforts, we now have more than 200 classrooms throughout the state, ranging from elementary school through high school.

Heath, Thomas

2014-05-01

291

Cockroaches in the Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Welcome the Madagascar hissing cockroach into your classroom--they are not your average pest! This article describes the basic biology of this relatively tame creature, and how to set up and care for a classroom colony. It includes a list of suggested inquiry-centered classroom activities that you and your students will find both educational and fun!

Moseley, Christine; Wagler, Ron

2005-03-01

292

Language Socialization in Korean-as-a-Foreign-Language Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Within the language socialization framework, the second language (L2) classroom would constitute a powerful context of secondary socialization, particularly when it exists outside the learners' culture of origin. In this paper, first year Korean-as-a-Foreign-Language (KFL) classrooms are viewed as L2 socializing environments in which students are…

Byon, Andrew Sangpil

2006-01-01

293

Differentiation of Classroom Climate among Home Economics Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Findings from a study using the Student Estimate of Teacher Concern (SETC) to measure home economics students' perceptions of classroom climate and environment suggest that the SETC should not be used for an overall picture of the classroom or for teacher evaluation but only for students' perceptions. (MF)

Zimmerman, Karen W.; Fanslow, Alyce M.

1979-01-01

294

Higher Education Classroom Management: Kuwait University Students' Views  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study attempts to examine students' views on the effectiveness of classroom management techniques used by faculty members. By examining their views, some insights may be gained as to the kinds of management techniques that a faculty member might adopt in order to promote better teaching and learning environment. Effective classroom management…

Al-Hamdan, Jasem

2007-01-01

295

Classroom Amplification: Not Just for the Hearing Impaired Anymore.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the difficulties that children with central auditory processing difficulties can have in the classroom environment. Classroom acoustics that can hinder a child's accessibility to instruction are discussed, including open windows or windows not designed to be acoustic barriers, increased reverberation time in rooms with high…

Dahlquist, Lori Hubble

296

Welcome All Students to Room 202: Creating Culturally Responsive Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author contends that, in many ways, our classrooms are like our homes. How much time, energy, and thought do educators devote to making the classroom (or school) environment welcoming for the students (their guests)? Expanding upon this analogy, the author equates preparing a meal for guests at her home with preparing the…

Ford, Donna Y.

2005-01-01

297

Collaboratively Evaluating and Deploying Smart Technology in Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For several years prior to 2000, students and faculty at McMaster University rated classrooms below those at peer universities. In the case of many classrooms, the teaching environments were outdated and the technology was old. The provost determined in 2000 that they needed to make a long-term investment in their learning spaces. For sound…

Strong, Bart; Kidney, David

2004-01-01

298

Digital Image Manipulation and Avatar Configuration: Implications for Inclusive Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper outlines concerns for inclusive classrooms involving personal digital image modifications and selections, as well as avatar configurations. Classroom interactions incorporate various dimensions of personal appearance; however, educators try to make them primarily about knowledge and wisdom. Students in environments where they can…

Oravec, Jo Ann

2012-01-01

299

Psychosocial issues near the end of life.  

PubMed

End-of-life care has received increasing attention in the last decade; however, the focus continues to be on the physical aspects of suffering and care to the virtual exclusion of psychosocial areas. This paper provides an overview of the literature on the intra- and interpersonal aspects of dying, including the effects that psychosocial variables have on end-of-life decision-making; common diagnosable mental disorders (e.g., clinical depression, delirium); other types of personal considerations (e.g., autonomy/control, grief); and interpersonal/environmental issues (e.g., cultural factors, financial variables). Six roles that qualified mental health professionals can play (i.e., advocate, counselor, educator, evaluator, multidisciplinary team member, and researcher) are also outlined. Because psychosocial issues are ubiquitous and can have enormous impact near the end of life, properly trained mental health professionals can play vital roles in alleviating suffering and improving the quality of life of people who are dying. PMID:12425774

Werth, J L; Gordon, J R; Johnson, R R

2002-11-01

300

Opportunities for Inquiry Science in Montessori Classrooms: Learning from a Culture of Interest, Communication, and Explanation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although classroom inquiry is the primary pedagogy of science education, it has often been difficult to implement within conventional classroom cultures. This study turned to the alternatively structured Montessori learning environment to better understand the ways in which it fosters the essential elements of classroom inquiry, as defined by…

Rinke, Carol R.; Gimbel, Steven J.; Haskell, Sophie

2013-01-01

301

Teachers' conflict management styles: The role of attachment styles and classroom management efficacy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Constructive conflict management strategies are important in maintaining a positive classroom environment yet little is known about interpersonal or school variables associated with teachers' use of such strategies with students. Teachers high in self-reported classroom management efficacy (CMEFF) and security of attachment (low on avoidance, anxiety) were predicted to endorse use of positive classroom management strategies (e.g., integrating, compromising) more

Britta K. Morris-Rothschild; Marla R. Brassard

2006-01-01

302

Cervical cancer screening and psychosocial barriers perceived by patients. A systematic review  

PubMed Central

Aim of the study This study aimed at integrating research discussing the role of perceived psychosocial barriers in cervical cancer screening (CCS) uptake. In particular, we analyzed the evidence for the associations between CCS uptake and perceived psychosocial barriers and frequency of psychosocial barriers identified by women. Material and methods A systematic search of peer-reviewed papers published until 2011 in 8 databases yielded 48 original studies, analyzing data obtained from 155 954 women. The majority of studies (k = 43) applied correlational design, while 5 had experimental design. Results Experimental research indicated a positive effect of 75% of psychosocial interventions targeting barriers. The interventions resulted in a significant increase of CCS uptake. Overall 100% of correlational studies indicated that perceiving lower levels of barriers significantly predicted higher CCS uptake. 53 psychosocial barriers were listed in at least 2 original correlational studies: 9.5% of barriers were related to CCS facilities/environment, 67.9% dealt with personal characteristics of the patient, and 22.6% addressed social factors. As many as 35.9% of perceived barriers referred to negative emotions related to CCS examination procedures and collecting CCS results, whereas 25.7% of barriers referred to prior contacts with health professionals. Conclusions Leaflets or discussion on psychosocial barriers between patients and health professionals involved in CCS might increase CCS uptake and thus reduce cervical cancer mortality rates. Communication skills training for health professionals conducting CCS might focus on the most frequently reported barriers, referring to emotions related to CCS examination and collecting CCS results. PMID:25520573

Bukowska-Durawa, Alicja

2014-01-01

303

Integrating Psychosocial and Behavioral Interventions to Achieve Optimal Rehabilitation Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: Psychosocial factors are important contributors to work disability associated with musculoskeletal conditions. The primary objectives of this paper were 1) to describe different psychosocial interventions that have been developed to prevent prolonged work disability, and 2) to identify future research directions that might enhance the impact of programs targeting psychosocial risk factors for work disability. Methods: Selective review of

Michael Jl Sullivan; Michael Feuerstein; Robert Gatchel; Steven J. Linton; Glenn Pransky

2005-01-01

304

NASA Classroom Bioreactor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Exploration of space provides a compelling need for cell-based research into the basic mechanisms that underlie the profound changes that occur in terrestrial life that is transitioned to low gravity environments. Toward that end, NASA developed a rotating bioreactor in which cells are cultured while continuously suspended in a cylinder in which the culture medium rotates with the cylinder. The randomization of the gravity vector accomplished by the continuous rotation, in a low shear environment, provides an analog of microgravity. Because cultures grown in bioreactors develop structures and functions that are much closer to those exhibited by native tissue than can be achieved with traditional culture methods, bioreactors have contributed substantially to advancing research in the fields of cancer, diabetes, infectious disease modeling for vaccine production, drug efficacy, and tissue engineering. NASA has developed a Classroom Bioreactor (CB) that is built from parts that are easily obtained and assembled, user-friendly and versatile. It can be easily used in simple school settings to examine the effect cultures of seeds or cells. An educational brief provides assembly instructions and lesson plans that describes activities in science, math and technology that explore free fall, microgravity, orbits, bioreactors, structure-function relationships and the scientific method.

Scully, Robert

2004-01-01

305

An Environment of Conducting Families of Software Engineering Experiments  

E-print Network

an environment that simplifies the process of collecting, managing and sanitizing data from classroom experiments Environment of Conducting Families of 2 #12;Software Engineering Experiments Abstract The classroom of experiments in classroom environments presents a number of challenges to researchers. This paper describes

Basili, Victor R.

306

Psychosocial issues in long-term space flight: overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Anecdotal evidence of the individual and interpersonal problems that occurred during the Shuttle-Mir Space Program (SMSP) and other long-duration Russian/Soviet missions, and studies of personnel in other isolated and confined extreme (ICE) environments suggest that psychosocial elements of behavior and performance are likely to have a significant impact on the outcome of long-duration missions in space. This impact may range from individual decrements in performance, health and well being, to catastrophic mission failure. This paper reviews our current understanding of the psychosocial issues related to long duration space missions according to three different domains of behavior: the individual domain, the interpersonal domain and the organizational domain. Individual issues include: personality characteristics that predict successful performance, stress due to isolation and confinement and its effect on emotions and cognitive performance, adaptive and maladaptive coping styles and strategies, and requirements for the psychological support of astronauts and their families during the mission. Interpersonal issues include: impact of crew diversity and leadership styles on small group dynamics, adaptive and maladaptive features of ground-crew interactions, and processes of crew cohesion, tension and conflict. Organizational issues include: the influence of organizational culture and mission duration on individual and group performance, and managerial requirements for long duration missions. Improved screening and selection of astronaut candidates, leadership, coping and interpersonal skills training of personnel, and organizational change are key elements in the prevention of performance decrements on long-duration missions.

Palinkas, L. A.

2001-01-01

307

Development and Validation of an Instrument to Monitor the Implementation of Outcomes-Based Learning Environments in Science Classrooms in South Africa  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the development and validation of an instrument that can be used to assess students' perceptions of their learning environment as a means of monitoring and guiding changes towards outcomes-based education. In the first phase, data collected from 2638 Grade 8 science students from 50 classes in 50 schools in the Limpopo…

Aldridge, Jill M.; Laugksch, Rudiger C.; Seopa, Mampone A.; Fraser, Barry J.

2006-01-01

308

Ethical Considerations Regarding Classroom Use of Personal Genomic Information  

PubMed Central

Rapidly decreasing costs of genetic technologies—especially next-generation sequencing—and intensifying need for a clinical workforce trained in genomic medicine have increased interest in having students use personal genomic information to motivate and enhance genomics education. Numerous ethical issues attend classroom/pedagogical use of students’ personal genomic information, including their informed decision to participate, pressures to participate, privacy concerns, and psychosocial sequelae of learning genomic information. This paper addresses these issues, advocates explicit discussion of these issues to cultivate students’ ethical reasoning skills, suggests ways to mitigate potential harms, and recommends collection of ethically relevant data regarding pedagogical use of personal genomic information. PMID:25574277

Parker, Lisa S.; Grubs, Robin

2014-01-01

309

Ethical considerations regarding classroom use of personal genomic information.  

PubMed

Rapidly decreasing costs of genetic technologies-especially next-generation sequencing-and intensifying need for a clinical workforce trained in genomic medicine have increased interest in having students use personal genomic information to motivate and enhance genomics education. Numerous ethical issues attend classroom/pedagogical use of students' personal genomic information, including their informed decision to participate, pressures to participate, privacy concerns, and psychosocial sequelae of learning genomic information. This paper addresses these issues, advocates explicit discussion of these issues to cultivate students' ethical reasoning skills, suggests ways to mitigate potential harms, and recommends collection of ethically relevant data regarding pedagogical use of personal genomic information. PMID:25574277

Parker, Lisa S; Grubs, Robin

2014-12-01

310

Absence of widespread psychosocial and cognitive effects of school-based music instruction in 10–13-year-old students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous studies demonstrate that private music training has benefits which may transfer to other domains, including verbal memory, intelligence and self-esteem. The current paper reports on the impact of an increase in school-based music training on a range of cognitive and psychosocial measures for 10–13-year-olds in two independent studies. In the first study, the benefits of increased frequency of classroom-based

Nikki S. Rickard; Caroline J. Bambrick; Anneliese Gill

2012-01-01

311

Mapping the Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners discover the importance of maps and scale as they work together to create a map of the classroom. The printable four-page PDF handout includes: a series of inquiry-based questions to get learners thinking about what they already know about maps and their classroom; and a worksheet with step-by-step directions for creating a scale and determining the size and relative location of objects in the classroom.

History, American M.

2001-01-01

312

Mapping the Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this Biodiversity Counts activity, students learn the importance of maps and scale as they work together to create a map of the classroom. The printable four-page PDF handout includes a series of inquiry-based questions to get students thinking about what they already know about maps and their classroom and a worksheet with step-by-step directions for creating a scale and determining the size and relative location of objects in the classroom.

313

On Blocks and Broccoli: How to Organize Your Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compares the organization of supermarkets to classroom environments. Emphasizes the efficient use of space with the use of containers, keeping materials in place, and grouping objects together. Provides suggestions on the use of color and adding storage space. (MOK)

Alexander, Nancy

1996-01-01

314

Erikson Psychosocial Stage Inventory: A Factor Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 72-item Erikson Psychosocial Inventory (EPSI) was factor analyzed for a group of 534 university freshmen and sophomore students. Seven factors including 54 items emerged which the authors labeled Initiative, Industry, Identity, Friendship, Dating, Goal Clarity and Self-Confidence. Items representing Erikson's first two factors, Trust and Autonomy, were dispersed across the new set of factors; this factor pattern was discussed

Mary McPhail Gray; Jean M. Ispa; Kathy R. Thornburg

1986-01-01

315

Psychosocial Functioning in Youth With Barth Syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

This pilot study assessed the quality of life and psychosocial functioning of pediatric patients with Barth Syndrome. Thirty-four boys with Barth Syndrome and 22 healthy male controls were administered a measure of verbal ability and completed measures of quality of life, loneliness, perceived peer support, and sibling relationship quality. Parents completed measures of parental distress, parenting stress, child academic functioning,

Eric A. Storch; Mary Keeley; Lisa J. Merlo; Jay B. St. Amant; Marni Jacob; Jill F. Storch; Carolyn Spencer; Barry J. Byrne

2009-01-01

316

Advance Directive Use and Psychosocial Characteristics  

PubMed Central

Advance directives (ADs) refer to a category of documents that enable individuals to state their preferences for future healthcare decisions in the event of incapacitation. The purpose of the study was to examine differences in psychosocial characteristics and AD completion rates in persons newly diagnosed with cancer. This sample comes from data collected for a psychosocial registry for patients with cancer. The following psychosocial data were collected: Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General, Profile of Mood States-short form, and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-being Scale. The sample included 312 persons who had been diagnosed with cancer within the previous 5 months. There were no statistically significant differences between completion of an AD and the measured psychosocial characteristics at baseline (mean, 4.2 months); however, at 3 months, patients who reported higher quality of life (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General) were associated with lower AD completion rates and persons with greater mood disturbances had higher rates of AD completion. Our data suggest the need to develop strategies that would facilitate discussion of ADs for patients entering the cancer care continuum. PMID:19444078

Kelley, Carol G.; Lipson, Amy R.; Daly, Barbara J.; Douglas, Sara L.

2010-01-01

317

Service: Its Psychosocial Aspects and Psychospiritual Context.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article is based on the keynote address that initiated the American Rehabilitation Counseling Association symposium on psychosocial aspects of rehabilitation, held at the 2002 American Counseling Association annual conference. It lays philosophical groundwork regarding the provision of general human services and, particularly, services…

Vash, Carolyn L.

2003-01-01

318

Is Subjective Status Influenced by Psychosocial Factors?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Associations between subjective status and health are still relatively unexplored. This study aimed at testing whether subjective status is uniquely confounded by psychosocial factors compared to objective status, and what factors that may predict subjective status. Design: A cross-sectional analysis of a population-based, random sample…

Lundberg, Johanna; Kristenson, Margareta

2008-01-01

319

Survey Questions Answered Only by Psychosocial Experts.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Twelve tables provide a breakdown of answers to a survey responded to by 48 experts in the psychosocial treatment of psychiatric and behavioral problems in people with mental retardation. Questions address treatment of self-injurious or aggressive behavior, specific psychiatric disorders, specific target symptoms, use of applied behavior analysis…

American Journal on Mental Retardation, 2000

2000-01-01

320

Psychosocial Determinants of Childhood and Adolescent Obesity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this article was to identify psychosocial determinants of childhood and adolescent obesity. Some of the determinants were considered non-modifiable such as genetics, sex, age, and race. The risk of developing obesity started early on in life, with high birth weight, rapid growth in infancy, maternal smoking during pregnancy, and lack of breastfeeding indicated as positive predictors. Family

Manoj Sharma; Melinda J. Ickes

2008-01-01

321

The invention of the psychosocial: An introduction  

PubMed Central

Although the compound adjective ‘psychosocial’ was first used by academic psychologists in the 1890s, it was only in the interwar period that psychiatrists, psychologists and social workers began to develop detailed models of the psychosocial domain. These models marked a significant departure from earlier ideas of the relationship between society and human nature. Whereas Freudians and Darwinians had described an antagonistic relationship between biological instincts and social forces, interwar authors insisted that individual personality was made possible through collective organization. This argument was advanced by dissenting psychoanalysts such as Ian Suttie and Karen Horney; biologists including Julian Huxley and Hans Selye; philosophers (e.g. Olaf Stapledon), anthropologists (e.g. Margaret Mead) and physicians (e.g John Ryle and James Halliday). This introduction and the essays that follow sketch out the emergence of the psycho-social by examining the methods, tools and concepts through which it was articulated. New statistical technologies and physiological theories allowed individual pathology to be read as an index of broader social problems and placed medical expertise at the centre of new political programmes. In these arguments the intangible structure of social relationships was made visible and provided a template for the development of healthy and effective forms of social organization. By examining the range of techniques deployed in the construction of the psychosocial (from surveys of civilian neurosis, techniques of family observation through to animal models of psychotic breakdown) a critical genealogy of the biopolitical basis of modern society is developed. PMID:23626408

Hayward, Rhodri

2012-01-01

322

Identifying and Locating Complete Psychosocial Instruments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reference librarians often encounter "instrument seekers," library users who need to find a complete psychosocial test, scale, or questionnaire to use or adapt for research or clinical use. This article focuses on the resources that can help to answer these types of questions. Reference books, monographs, journal articles, and online databases are…

Stover, Mark

2007-01-01

323

Considering the Chalkless Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article shares some personal reflections on several years of integrating educational technology into mathematics courses while retaining the direct interaction strengths of the traditional classroom.

Ellis-Monaghan, Joanna A.

2010-01-01

324

The Classroom Animal.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides background information on the earthworm. Reviews basic anatomical, behavioral, and reproductive facts. Offers suggestions for procuring, maintaining, and breeding colonies for classroom use. (ML)

Science and Children, 1986

1986-01-01

325

Analyzing Multimodal Interaction within a Classroom Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Human interactions are multimodal in nature. From simple to complex forms of transferal of information, human beings draw on a multiplicity of communicative modes, such as intonation and gaze, to make sense of everyday experiences. Likewise, the learning process, either within traditional classrooms or Virtual Learning Environments, is shaped by…

Moura, Heloisa

2006-01-01

326

Build a Bully-Free Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For most teachers, more important than supplies and a spacious classroom is a happy learning environment in which each child feels welcome and safe. That is why it is so dismaying that according to one recent study, 43% of students worry about going to the restroom for fear of encountering a bully. The same study reported that a child is bullied…

Instructor, 2005

2005-01-01

327

Incorporate Technology into the Modern Language Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This column describes how technology can enrich the learning environment provided by the modern language classroom. Typically, modern languages taught in U.S. public schools are French, Spanish, and German. A general broadening of high school graduation and college and professional school admission requirements to include a certain level of modern…

Castleberry, Gwen Troxell; Evers, Rebecca B.

2010-01-01

328

Native American Recipes for the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of recipes is intended to assist teachers in using food in the classroom to enhance the study of Native American people. Several concepts are identified to guide teachers in developing instructional units centering around food as a means of understanding the Native American culture: (1) the impact of physical environment and…

Harvey, Karen D., Comp.

329

Classroom of the Future...Now!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes projects at the University of Central Florida to test new training technologies under controlled but realistic settings. Original plans for an "Experimental Prototyping Classroom" are discussed; and current developments in language training research, gaming technology, and virtual environments are described. (EAM)

Orwig, Gary; And Others

1993-01-01

330

The Heteronormative Classroom: Questioning and Liberating Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article is a critical examination of the ideologies and practices that educators bring to bear on their classrooms in order to create inclusive, safe, and welcoming environments for all children, but particularly for children with gender variant behaviors and interests. Using a feminist perspective, this article offers a new conceptual lens…

Garcia, Ana Maria; Slesaransky-Poe, Graciela

2010-01-01

331

Psychosocial mediators of a school-based tobacco prevention program in India: Results from the first year of Project MYTRI  

PubMed Central

Each day in India, an estimated 5,500 youth initiate tobacco use, contributing to predictions that by 2020, tobacco will account for 13% of all deaths in India. Project MYTRI (Mobilizing Youth for Tobacco-Related Initiatives in India) is a multi-component school-based intervention designed to prevent and reduce tobacco use among adolescents in Delhi and Chennai, India. The intervention was implemented over the 2004-2006 school years and involved 6th and 8th grade students in 32 classrooms. Students participated in peer-led classroom activities involving games, competitions, and other activities intended to target a number of psychosocial risk factors believed to prevent tobacco use among urban Indian youth. To more fully understand how Project MYTRI influenced students' intentions to smoke or chew tobacco, the current study used mediation analysis to investigate whether Project MYTRI altered the psychosocial risk factors as intended, and whether the changes in psychosocial risk factors were, in turn, responsible for altering students' tobacco-use intentions. Multi-level mediation models were estimated using student data from baseline and one-year follow-up surveys. Results indicated that the psychosocial risk factors Knowledge of Health Effects, Normative Beliefs, Reasons to Use Tobacco, and Perceived Prevalence were significant mediators between the intervention activities and students' tobacco use intentions. Evidence of inconsistent mediation was observed for the Perceived Prevalence factor. These findings, combined with those from qualitative research and the second-year student data, will help to illuminate the impact of Project MYTRI on participating youth. PMID:19023657

Bate, Sheri Lewis; Stigler, Melissa H.; Thompson, Marilyn S.; Arora, Monika; Perry, Cheryl L.; Reddy, K. Srinath; MacKinnon, David P.

2010-01-01

332

Environment and Energy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This self-contained module on environment and energy includes a range of fun activities that students can perform in the classroom and at home with family members. They impart important concepts such as observation, identification, measurement, and differentiation.

Houghton Mifflin Science

333

Ideas for the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author shares some of the activities for the classroom invented by Gill Hatch. One of those activities is the activity for older students, which is for the five-year-olds through to post-graduates. Card-sorting game, geometry games, algebra games, and loop games are also some of those activities for the classroom invented by…

Mathematics Teaching Incorporating Micromath, 2006

2006-01-01

334

Lawyer In The Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Modern drug education is marked by an increased use of the professional from the community as a guest speaker in the classroom. The use of some basic guidelines may assist the teacher in finding a "classroom lawyer," and in making his presentation more meaningful. (Author)

Ingram, Verner M., Jr.

1974-01-01

335

Creating the Multiage Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

School restructuring movements have gained a great deal of national attention. This guidebook addresses the multi-age classroom movement, in which a mixed-age group of children stays with a given teacher for a number of years. The work provides a complete design for the mixed-age primary classroom, from philosophy and rationale to sample lesson…

Stone, Sandra J.

336

Understanding Classroom Communication.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Learning in classrooms occurs through and is embedded in the interpersonal communication between teachers and students and among students. Classroom communication is negotiated by teachers and students as they act and react to each other through their verbal and nonverbal behavior. (CB)

Puro, Pamela; Bloome, David

1987-01-01

337

Frontloading Classroom Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the authors describe a systematic approach to planning for the first days of school that is appropriate for today's demanding high school science classrooms. These strategies apply to any science subject and benefit student teachers, new teachers, and those teachers wishing to improve their classroom management skills. (Contains 3…

Roscoe, Keith; Orr, Kim

2010-01-01

338

Epidemiology in the Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This high school classroom exercise from the Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion gives an introduction to epidemiology. Visitors will find background materials (including an introduction to epidemiology and how to investigate and outbreak) and suggestions for classroom use.

339

Promoting Classroom Technology Use  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to test two hypotheses: (1) that participation in a course providing theory and practice in the classroom use of technology promotes its use and results in gained competence in technology use; and (2) that functional relations exist among the availability of technology in the classroom, technology utilization, and…

Rosenfeld, Barbara; Martinez-Pons, Manuel

2005-01-01

340

Tips from the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This group of classroom tips discusses the benefits of peer coaching, peer group conversation about teachers' classroom experiences, using visual displays for collegial sharing, using cultural brokers in educational settings, and the role of picture books in developing literacy skills in diverse students with disabilities. (Author/CK)

Benedetti, Teresa; De Gaetano, Yvonne; Weinstein-McShane, Ruth; Paez, Doris; McCarty, Laurie; Ehlers-Zavala, Fabiola; Bakken, Jeffrey P.

1997-01-01

341

Culturally Responsive Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The ethnic and cultural makeup of classrooms is changing rapidly, the percentage of school children of color is increasing, and the percentage of teachers of color is declining. This paper examines the challenge of preparing primarily white, middle-class teachers to create culturally responsive classrooms for all children. Teacher education…

Mosher, Darlean A.; Sia, Archibald P.

342

Evaluation in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Six classroom research-based instructional projects funded under Chapter 2 are described, and their outcomes are summarized. The projects each used computer hardware and software in the classroom setting. The projects and their salient points include: (1) the Science Technology Project, in which 48 teachers and 2,847 students in 18 schools used…

Becnel, Shirley

343

Teachers’ practical knowledge about classroom management in multicultural classrooms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Creating a positive working atmosphere in the classroom is the first concern of many student and beginning teachers in secondary education. Teaching in multicultural classrooms provides additional challenges for these teachers. This study identified shared practical knowledge about classroom management strategies of teachers who were successful in creating a positive working atmosphere in their multicultural classrooms. Twelve teachers were selected

Jan van Tartwijk; Perry den Brok; Ietje Veldman; Theo Wubbels

2009-01-01

344

Classroom Management and Students' Perceptions of Classroom Climate  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The impact of classroom management and the impact of classroom climate on student academic achievement has been independently documented by scholars. Less is currently know regarding the relationship linking classroom management and climate. Therefore, the purpose of this quasi experimental study was to explore the influence of classroom

Ratzburg, Susan A.

2010-01-01

345

Psychosocial considerations about children and radiological events.  

PubMed

Children are identified as a vulnerable population in the case of radiological events because of their increased physical sensitivity to radiation and its impact on critical development stages. Using a comprehensive integrated risk framework, psychosocial risk protective factors are discussed in a social ecology paradigm. Children have been shown to be both vulnerable and resilient; they are both easily impressionable and also quick to adapt and learn. Psychosocial interventions during, after and most efficiently before an event can improve outcome, especially if they involve parents and schools, media and work organisations. Public education through children should be encouraged to increase knowledge of radiation and strategies to minimise exposure and irradiation. Children can become vectors of prevention, preparedness and mitigation through information and behavioural rehearsal. Special consideration must therefore be given to education, school programmes, practice rehearsal and media exposure. PMID:20798186

Lemyre, Louise; Corneil, Wayne; Johnson, Colleen; Boutette, Paul

2010-11-01

346

The ethical implications of genetic testing in the classroom.  

PubMed

The development of classroom experiments where students examine their own DNA is frequently described as an innovative teaching practice. Often these experiences involve students analyzing their genes for various polymorphisms associated with disease states, like an increased risk for developing cancer. Such experiments can muddy the distinction between classroom investigation and medical testing. Although the goals and issues surrounding classroom genotyping do not directly align with those of clinical testing, instructors can use the guidelines and standards established by the medical genetics community when evaluating the ethics of human genotyping. We developed a laboratory investigation and discussion which allowed undergraduate science students to explore current DNA manipulation techniques to isolate their p53 gene, followed by a dialogue probing the ethical implications of examining their sample for various polymorphisms. Students never conducted genotyping on their samples because of the ethical concerns presented in this paper, so the discussion replaced the actual genetic testing in the class. A science faculty member led the laboratory portion, while a genetic counselor facilitated the discussion of the ethical concepts underlying genetic counseling: autonomy, beneficence, confidentiality, and justice. In their final papers, students demonstrated an understanding of the practice guidelines established by the genetics community and acknowledged the ethical considerations inherent in p53 genotyping. Given the burgeoning market for personalized medicine, teaching undergraduates about the psychosocial and ethical dimensions of human genetic testing is important and timely. Moreover, incorporating a genetic counselor in the classroom discussion provided a rich and dynamic discussion of human genetic testing. PMID:21774053

Taylor, Ann T S; Rogers, Jill Cellars

2011-07-01

347

Opportunities for Inquiry Science in Montessori Classrooms: Learning from a Culture of Interest, Communication, and Explanation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although classroom inquiry is the primary pedagogy of science education, it has often been difficult to implement within conventional classroom cultures. This study turned to the alternatively structured Montessori learning environment to better understand the ways in which it fosters the essential elements of classroom inquiry, as defined by prominent policy documents. Specifically, we examined the opportunities present in Montessori classrooms for students to develop an interest in the natural world, generate explanations in science, and communicate about science. Using ethnographic research methods in four Montessori classrooms at the primary and elementary levels, this research captured a range of scientific learning opportunities. The study found that the Montessori learning environment provided opportunities for students to develop enduring interests in scientific topics and communicate about science in various ways. The data also indicated that explanation was largely teacher-driven in the Montessori classroom culture. This study offers lessons for both conventional and Montessori classrooms and suggests further research that bridges educational contexts.

Rinke, Carol R.; Gimbel, Steven J.; Haskell, Sophie

2013-08-01

348

Psychosocial issues during an expedition to Mars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Much is known about psychological and interpersonal issues affecting astronauts participating in manned space missions near the Earth. But in a future long-distance, long-duration expedition to Mars, additional stressors will occur that will result in psychological, psychiatric, and interpersonal effects on the crew, both negative and positive. This paper will review what is known about important psychosocial issues in space and will extrapolate them to the scenario of a future manned space mission to Mars.

Kanas, Nick

2014-10-01

349

A Stream Ecosystem in the Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

To build a model of the world of nature is never an easy task. In this case the lotic ecosystem for the classroom is no exception. However, with the right materials, some time, and student involvement you can have an operational classroom ecosystem, complete with organisms, physical environment, interactions and relationships, and natural succession. The classroom stream ecosystem provides a focus for biology class projects, lessons, experiments and research. It provides students with a sense of ownership in the class if they are involved in the development of the system early in the school year. I have found students simply standing and observing, conversing about their ideas, and actively wondering what is going on in the stream on a daily basis. The model is a magnet for student curiosity. If you have a chance to build one and use it, I recommend it strongly, and wish you luck in your new quest to make biology real and relevant to your students.

Paul Tweed (Augusta High School REV)

1995-06-30

350

Classroom Research by Classroom Teachers, 1992.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This volume celebrates teachers as life-long learners of the art of teaching, by presenting 21 action research studies designed and implemented by classroom teachers. A "How To Get Started" section outlines action research steps and offers worksheets. Descriptions of the research studies begin with ethnographic studies, which include "Adopt a…

Tanner, Michael, Ed.

1992-01-01

351

[Child and adolescent obesity, psychosocial consequences and treatment strategies].  

PubMed

Being overweight and obese in childhood and adolescence is associated with various somatic and psychosocial sequelae. Psychosocial problems can negatively influence the future weight trajectory. Therefore, weight reduction or stabilization should be complemented by the treatment of significant psychosocial problems. This review provides an overview of the psychosocial problems associated with being overweight and obese in childhood and adolescence. Evidence on weight-related stigmatization and discrimination, eating disorder symptoms, general psychopathology, impaired quality of life, lowered self-esteem, social skill deficits, as well as academic problems is summarized. Furthermore, state-of-the-art diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for the psychosocial problems are summarized. Future research should focus on the development of interventions targeting the destigmatization of obesity, as experiences of stigmatization and discrimination likely aggravate the psychosocial sequelae of overweight and obesity. PMID:23529599

Hartmann, A S; Hilbert, A

2013-04-01

352

Psychosocial Stress and Psychosis. A Review of the Neurobiological Mechanisms and the Evidence for Gene-Stress Interaction  

PubMed Central

This article presents evidence suggesting that psychosocial stress may increase risk for psychosis, especially in the case of cumulative exposure. A heuristically useful framework to study the underlying mechanisms is the concept of “behavioral sensitization” that stipulates that exposure to psychosocial stress—such as life events, childhood trauma, or discriminatory experiences—may progressively increase the behavioral and biological response to subsequent exposures. The neurobiological substrate of sensitization may involve dysregulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, contributing to a hypothesized final common pathway of dopamine sensitization in mesolimbic areas and increased stress-induced striatal dopamine release. It is argued that, in order to reconcile genetic and environmental influences on the development of psychosis, gene-environment interactions may be an important mechanism in explaining between-subject differences in risk following (cumulative) exposure to psychosocial stress. To date, most studies suggestive of gene-stress interaction have used proxy measures for genetic vulnerability such as a family history of psychosis; studies investigating interactions between molecular genetic measures and psychosocial stressors are still relatively scarce. Preliminary evidence suggests that polymorphisms within the catechol-O-methyltransferase and brain-derived neurotrophic factor genes may interact with psychosocial stress in the development of psychosis; however, extensive further investigations are required to confirm this. PMID:18718885

van Winkel, Ruud; Stefanis, Nicholas C.; Myin-Germeys, Inez

2008-01-01

353

Classroom Design- Lessons from the Technology Trenches  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site makes a CD available for purchase of the following instructional program: Beyond the instructor's skill, technology has had one of the single largest impacts in how students and faculty interact in the classroom. But the nature and boundaries of the learning space are constantly changing. Institutions are challenged to build classrooms smartly, ensuring technology supports the learning process, and that precious dollars and equipment are not wasted on learning environments that are factored late into the planning process. To design an electronic classroom that will have viability long-term, you have to design from the inside out. Changing your perspective will help you guide your campus toward decisions that not only support the educational mission with technology, but favorably impact many other factors, from cost effectiveness and upkeep, to future proofing ensuring that your campus classrooms will even have the capability to accommodate new technology. Join us for this informative webcast that will bring you insights on technology-enabled classrooms from different types of institutions- from the perspective of the technology specialist. Learn what has worked- and perhaps more importantly, what has not worked- from their perspectives. The insights you gain will ease your technology planning, inform your design process, and could save you thousands of dollars in technology purchases and upkeep.

354

Noise Levels in Hong Kong Primary Schools: Implications for Classroom Listening  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many researchers have stressed that the acoustic environment is crucial to the speech perception, academic performance, attention, and participation of students in classrooms. Classrooms in highly urbanised locations are especially vulnerable to noise, a major influence on the acoustic environment. The purpose of this investigation was to…

Choi, Ching Yee; McPherson, Bradley

2005-01-01

355

Teacher Practices and Hybrid Space in a Fifth-Grade Mathematics Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Providing students with a classroom environment that allows for meaningful learning experiences is important for students to develop deep and long lasting understanding about mathematics. This article adds to the literature on learning environments in mathematics by presenting a case study of one fifth-grade mathematics teacher and her classroom

Cribbs, Jennifer D.; Linder, Sandra M.

2013-01-01

356

The role of psycho-social experience in chronic disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the role of psycho-social factors in contributing to chronic illness, in particular Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) and cancer. Research conducted over the last 50 years indicates a modest role for psycho-social factors as risk factors for these conditions. The research suggests that in combination with other modest risk factors, psycho-social factors play an equally important role. Grossarth-Maticek

James McAlister Alexander

2006-01-01

357

Psychopathology, Defence Mechanisms, and the Psychosocial Work Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The body of evidence verifies the predictive value of certain work characteristics for mental health problems and that various levels of adaptation mechanisms are employed when dealing with adversity. Data on the relationships between employees’ mental health status, their perceptions of work, and their psychological defences are scarce.Aims: To examine the role that personal defences play in the relationship

Anelia Larsen; Henrik Bøggild; Jens Tølbøll Mortensen; Leslie Foldager; John Hansen; Anders Christensen; Mikkel Arendt; Nicole Rosenberg; Povl Munk-Jørgensen

2010-01-01

358

Localization of post-disaster psychosocial care in China  

PubMed Central

Disaster is not independent of society and culture and always happens in specific cultural and social contexts. Cultural and social characteristics influence the responses of people affected by disaster, as well as the process of disaster relief. As one of the countries in the world that suffer most from natural disasters, various ethnic groups in China vary greatly in psychology and behavior characteristics after major disasters due to different geographical environments and economic and political conditions. To launch an effective post-disaster psychosocial care, 1) it is necessary to consider how to satisfy material, health, and other fundamental biological needs of affected people; 2) it is necessary to relieve disaster victims of their mental pain (spiritual in Chinese) and help them restore their psychological health; 3) it is necessary to revitalize the seriously unbalanced communities affected by disasters so that these communities would burst with vitality again. In addition, it is necessary to take specific ethnic and regional culture into account when helping people in these areas gradually achieve social adaptation and cultural identification. All these require us to intensify our efforts in the following four aspects: 1) to strengthen legislation and institutional construction in this field; 2) to help citizens master the most fundamental psychological principles and methods of coping with disasters to enable timely self-aid and mutual-aid; 3) to build a national database of the post-disaster psychosocial care teams; 4) to continue the research on disaster psychology, so as to provide a scientific basis as well as techniques and methods for implementing disaster relief efforts in a scientific way. PMID:25511729

Zhang, Sujuan

2014-01-01

359

Developing a reliable and valid scale to measure psychosocial acuity.  

PubMed

This tool is a unique comprehensive scale and methodology to measure the psychosocial acuity of patients and families across a health care continuum. Coupled with other measures, psychosocial acuity can tell a complete and compelling story of social work contributions and aid in resource alignment. Accurately conveying the full scope of social work value to anyone, especially health system leadership, requires that the psychosocial acuity of the patient and family be measured and factored into the equation, along with productivity, time spent, and services provided. The development and utilization of the Psychosocial Acuity Tool is the focus of this publication. PMID:24835092

Klett, Stacey; Firn, Janice; Abney, Nina; Battles, Alethia; Harrington, Jack; Vantine, Aimee

2014-01-01

360

Development of Multi-video Based Virtual Classroom and Its Application in English as Second Language Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

As virtual classrooms become more and more popular, companies are focusing on developing collaboration tools that help boost the effectiveness of online learning environments. These tools are referred to as synchronous collaboration tools. However, few virtual classrooms have multi-video function. This paper develops a multi-video based virtual classroom (MVVC) by Java media framework (JMF), a new method to provide advanced

Ruimin Zhang; Bofeng Zhang; Jingchen Zhu; Huiting Huang

2008-01-01

361

Classroom Constitutional Conventions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This lesson provides a simulation in which upper elementary and middle school students establish classroom routines, participate in decision-making activities, improve their understanding of the Constitutional Convention, and differentiate among the three branches of government. (BSR)

Roach, Carol

1987-01-01

362

Stargazing in Your Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

When taking students outside to see the stars is not an option, teachers can bring the stars inside the classroom. These instructions for building a portable planetarium also include suggestions for cross-cultural and social studies connections.

Rios, Jos�

2003-05-01

363

Toys in The Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A number of chemical concepts can be easily illustrated in a more friendly way to children by using toys as teaching tools in the classroom. Some of the examples illustrated are shrinking toys, drinking birds and hand boiler.

Sarquis, Jerry L.; Sarquis, Arlyne M.

2005-01-01

364

Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site provides information on various classroom assessment techniques (CATs) such as primary trait analysis, using anonymous assessments, goal ranking and matching, self assessment, active learning, transfer and applied learning, and group work assessment.

2010-06-25

365

The Classroom Animal: Mealworms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes appearance, longevity, and changes in each step of the mealworm life cycle. Guidelines for starting a classroom colony are given with housing and care instructions. Suggested observations, activities, and questions for students are included. (DH)

Kramer, David C., Ed.

1985-01-01

366

Culture in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Culture plays a large but often unnoticeable role in what we teach and how we teach children. We are a country of immense diversity, but in classrooms the dominant European-American culture has become the language of learning.

Medin, Douglas L.; Bang, Megan

2014-01-01

367

For the Classroom: Scrimshaw.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Procedures are described for practicing the art of scrimshaw in the classroom. Several materials are suggested for use. These include beef soup bones, old piano keys, nails, sandpaper, and lampblack or charcoal. (SA)

Current, 1979

1979-01-01

368

EPIcenter in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Details the summer workshop experiences of a participant in the EPIcenter (Earth Processes Information Center for Teachers). Describes the impact of the experience on the professional practices of the classroom teacher. (DDR)

Svoboda, Michele

1998-01-01

369

Critters in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of invertebrates as classroom "pets" can develop students' skills in scientific inquiry and instill respect for science. Few materials are needed for projects involving invertebrates. Suggested activities using snails, crickets, earthworms, crayfish, and guppies are offered. (DF)

Smith, Robert W.; Fleisher, Paul

1984-01-01

370

Craters in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Details an activity in which students create and study miniature impact craters in the classroom. Engages students in making detailed, meaningful observations, drawing inferences, reaching conclusions based on scientific evidence, and designing experiments to test selected variables. (DDR)

McArdle, Heather K.

1997-01-01

371

Professional School Counselors as Process Observers in the Classroom: Collaboration with Classroom Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article defines process observation and how it can be used by professional school counselors to assist classroom teachers in enhancing the learning environment for students. Further, this article elucidates the skills used by process observers. A case illustration is provided to demonstrate application of this service. Finally, practical…

Fazio-Griffith, Laura; Curry, Jennifer R.

2008-01-01

372

Classrooms Matter: The Design of Virtual Classrooms Influences Gender Disparities in Computer Science Classes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three experiments examined whether the design of virtual learning environments influences undergraduates' enrollment intentions and anticipated success in introductory computer science courses. Changing the design of a virtual classroom--from one that conveys current computer science stereotypes to one that does not--significantly increased…

Cheryan, Sapna; Meltzoff, Andrew N.; Kim, Saenam

2011-01-01

373

Data for the Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Data for the Classroom collection gathers datasets that have accompanying instructional materials or other pertinent information for using the dataset in a classroom setting for grades K-16. The data may be numerical, visual, maps, charts, tables or images. The data may be observational, remotely sensed or model data. The primary component is that there are materials supporting the use and understanding of the data either by educators or directly by students. Additionally, the dataset itself is desribed.

374

Solar Powered Classroom  

ScienceCinema

A group of fourth graders in Durham, North Carolina, are showing America the way to a clean energy future. They are installing solar panels on their classroom roof for a project that goes above and beyond a normal day in school. From researching solar panel installation, to generating funds for the project via Kickstarter, these are students who put their plans into action. Their accomplishments go beyond the classroom and stress the importance of getting people of all ages involved in renewable energy.

none

2013-06-27

375

The (co-)occurrence of problematic video gaming, substance use, and psychosocial problems in adolescents  

PubMed Central

Abstract Aims: The current study explored the nature of problematic (addictive) video gaming (PVG) and the association with game type, psychosocial health, and substance use. Methods: Data were collected using a paper and pencil survey in the classroom setting. Three samples were aggregated to achieve a total sample of 8478 unique adolescents. Scales included measures of game use, game type, the Video game Addiction Test (VAT), depressive mood, negative self-esteem, loneliness, social anxiety, education performance, and use of cannabis, alcohol and nicotine (smoking). Results: Findings confirmed problematic gaming is most common amongst adolescent gamers who play multiplayer online games. Boys (60%) were more likely to play online games than girls (14%) and problematic gamers were more likely to be boys (5%) than girls (1%). High problematic gamers showed higher scores on depressive mood, loneliness, social anxiety, negative self-esteem, and self-reported lower school performance. Nicotine, alcohol, and cannabis using boys were almost twice more likely to report high PVG than non-users. Conclusions: It appears that online gaming in general is not necessarily associated with problems. However, problematic gamers do seem to play online games more often, and a small subgroup of gamers – specifically boys – showed lower psychosocial functioning and lower grades. Moreover, associations with alcohol, nicotine, and cannabis use are found. It would appear that problematic gaming is an undesirable problem for a small subgroup of gamers. The findings encourage further exploration of the role of psychoactive substance use in problematic gaming. PMID:25317339

VAN ROOIJ, ANTONIUS J.; KUSS, DARIA J.; GRIFFITHS, MARK D.; SHORTER, GILLIAN W.; SCHOENMAKERS, M. TIM; VAN DE MHEEN, DIKE

2014-01-01

376

Breast feeding and later psychosocial adjustment.  

PubMed

The relationship between the duration of breast feeding and psychosocial outcomes measured between the ages of 15 and 18 years was examined in a birth cohort of 999 New Zealand children. During the period from birth to 1 year, information was collected on maternal breast-feeding practices. Between the ages of 15 and 18 years, sample members were assessed using a range of psychosocial measures, including measures of the quality of parent-child relationships, juvenile delinquency, substance abuse and mental health. Children who were breast fed for a longer duration were more likely to report higher levels of parental attachment and tended to perceive their mothers as being more caring and less overprotective towards them compared with bottle-fed children. No association was found between the extent of breast feeding and subsequent rates of juvenile offending, substance use and mental health in later life. Mothers who elected to breast feed were also more likely to be older, better educated, living with a partner, less likely to smoke during pregnancy, and to come from advantaged socio-economic backgrounds characterised by better living standards and a higher family income. Rates of breast feeding were also greater among mothers who gave birth to a first-born child of higher birthweight. After adjustment for these maternal and perinatal factors, the duration of breast feeding remained significantly associated with adolescent perceptions of maternal care, with increasing duration of breast feeding being associated with higher levels of perceived maternal care during childhood. It is concluded that: (a) it is unlikely that breast feeding is associated with reduced risks of psychiatric disorder in later life; (b) breast feeding may lead to closer parent-child relationships; and (c) it is unlikely that the association between breast feeding and cognitive development is mediated by intervening processes relating to improved psychosocial adjustment in breast-fed children. PMID:10214606

Fergusson, D M; Woodward, L J

1999-04-01

377

Contextual variables associated with psychosocial adjustment of adolescents.  

PubMed

This study investigated associations of contextual variables of risk (stressful events and exposure to community violence), variables of protection (family environment, connectivity to the school and community perceptions) and demographic variables (gender and age) with indicators of psychosocial adjustment (self-esteem, involvement in illegal activities and alcohol use in past month) among adolescents. The participants were 685 students (61.5% girls) aged between 12 and 18 years (M = 15.10, SD = 1.52) of public schools in southern Brazil. They answered a questionnaire with 77 questions and an inventory for assessment of family relationships. Logistic regression analyses indicated that the negative perception of family environment, poor connectivity to the school and exposure to community violence were associated with low self-esteem. Involvement in illegal activities was associated with low connectivity to school, stressful events, exposure to community violence and male sex. Finally, alcohol use/month was associated with negative perception of the community, community violence, stressful events, and particularly at the ages of 15-16 years. PMID:23866204

Sbicigo, Juliana Burges; Dell'Aglio, Débora Dalbosco

2013-01-01

378

Investigation of VOCs and PM{sub 2.5} concentrations at two classrooms with or without air conditioning in Hong Kong  

SciTech Connect

The indoor and outdoor levels of VOCs and PM{sub 2.5} were measured at two classrooms of two schools; one is naturally ventilated, while the other had two window type air-conditioners and four exhaust fans. The ventilation rates at the two classrooms were 0.937 ACH (Classroom A) and 0.217 ACH (Classroom B). Both classrooms had ventilation requirements below the ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 assuming that the outdoor contaminant levels were within the ASHRAE requirements. The abundance and concentration of volatile organic species found indoors and outdoors of Classroom B were higher than Classroom A since Classroom B is located in a heavily trafficked area. The classroom without air-conditioner (A) had higher I/O ratios than Classroom B due to the higher ventilation rates. The air-conditioner, though not providing enough fresh air to the classroom, might act as a barrier for outdoor pollutants. The reduction of PM2.5 levels Classroom A was 30% and at Classroom B was 67%. The air-conditioning system in Classroom B could be removing some of the fine particulate matter from the outdoor supply air before entering the classroom. The use of air-conditioners can keep outdoor pollutants from entering the classroom, but could increase the level of indoor produced pollutant. From this study, air-conditioning systems in classroom somehow prevent pollutants from entering, and besides used to lowering environmental noise should be encouraged at schools located in heavily polluted environments.

Chang, M.; Lee, S.C.

1999-07-01

379

[Vertigo as a symptom of psychosocial pain].  

PubMed

Vertigo in a patient with end stage lung cancer challenges the caring team. No relief can be achieved by various treatment attempts. In a retrospective analysis it turns out that the physical symptom of vertigo makes up for psychosocial pain. Causes for this reaction can be found in the patient's history and deal with solitude and loss in a wider sense. Finding out what means quality of life to an individual patient leads to general ideas about human needs. Considerations about the best place to stay for a dying person need to be merged with the options a medical system offers. PMID:20694758

Gartner, Verena; Fässler-Weibel, Peter

2010-07-01

380

An Instrument for Investigating Chinese Language Learning Environments in Singapore Secondary Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes how a new classroom environment instrument, the "Chinese Language Classroom Environment Inventory (CLCEI)", was developed to investigate the nature of Chinese language classroom learning environments in Singapore secondary schools. The CLCEI is a bilingual instrument (English and Chinese Language) with 48 items written in both…

Chua, Siew Lian; Wong, Angela F. L.; Chen, Der-Thanq

2009-01-01

381

Psychosocial correlates of immune responsiveness and illness episodes in US Air Force Academy cadets undergoing basic cadet training  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This study examined psychosocial correlates of immune function and illness in 89 male first-year US Air Force Academy cadets. A psychosocial questionnaire was administered to cadets prior to their arrival at the academy and was readministered during cadet orientation and during the stressful environment of Basic Cadet Training (BCT). Immune responsiveness was analyzed by PHA-, PMA-, or anti-CD3-stimulated thymidine uptake in mononuclear leucocytes. Illness episodes were assessed via medical chart review and self-reported symptoms. There were significant increases in distress levels as cadets entered BCT. No psychosocial measure assessed prior to arrival at the academy predicted level of PHA-, PMA-, and anti-CD3-stimulated thymidine uptake or risk of illness. However, hostility levels reported during BCT predicted risk of illness in the four weeks following psychosocial assessment (odds ratio = 7.1; 95% confidence interval: 1.4-36.1). Elevated response to environmental stressors and lower well-being levels also predicted impending illness, but only in the cohort of cadets who had not contracted food poisoning prior to assessment during BCT (OR = 9.3, CI = 1.9-46.7; OR = 0.09, CI = 0.02-0.53). These results suggest that self-report measures of hostility, response to environmental stressors and well-being may be useful predictors of impending illness episodes in males encountering high stress environments.

Lee, D. J.; Meehan, R. T.; Robinson, C.; Smith, M. L.; Mabry, T. R.

1995-01-01

382

Psychosocial Correlates of Alexithymia in a Rural Adolescent Residential Population  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study used a multimethod approach to evaluate the relationship of alexithymia (as measured by the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale and the 30-item Emotion Awareness Questionnaire), psychosocial development (assessed with the Measure of Psychosocial Development), and risk behavior (as measured by the Youth Comprehensive Risk Assessment) in 67 adolescents (85% from rural communities) in a rural residential treatment facility. Results

Stephanie Powell; Kenneth M. Coll; Ann Trotter; Patti Thobro; Robin Haas

2011-01-01

383

Psychosocial Stress and Change in Weight Among US Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The association of psychosocial stress with weight gain may have important implications for clinical practice and workplace and public health interventions. To determine whether multiple domains of psychosocial stress were associated with weight gain from 1995 to 2004, the authors analyzed a nationally representative longitudinal cohort of 1,355 men and women in the United States. Change in body mass index

Jason P. Block; Yulei He; Alan M. Zaslavsky; Lin Ding; John Z. Ayanian

2009-01-01

384

Psychosocial antecedents of unwed motherhood among indigent adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Theoretically based hypotheses regarding psychosocial antecedents of unwed motherhood among indigent adolescents are tested. Data regarding psychosocial antecedents were obtained from a survey of a 50% sample of seventhgraders in a large urban school system. Hypotheses were tested by comparing three groups of subjects from among these respondents: (1) 82 female adolescents who received perinatal care at an adult development

Howard B. Kaplan; Peggy B. Smith; Alex D. Pokorny

1979-01-01

385

Psychosocial and Moral Development of PTSD-Diagnosed Combat Veterans  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two related studies were conducted in order to investigate whether psychosocial and moral development appeared to have been disrupted and arrested in veterans diagnosed as having posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Study 1 was devoted to developing a measure of late adolescence, early adulthood, and adulthood stages of psychosocial

Taylor, John G.; Baker, Stanley B.

2007-01-01

386

Psychosocial Factors in Heart Surgery: Presurgical Vulnerability and Postsurgical Recovery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Distress and low perceived social support were examined as indicators of psychosocial vulnerability in patients about to undergo heart surgery. Design: A total of 550 study patients underwent heart surgeries, including bypass grafting and valve procedures. Psychosocial interviews were conducted about five days before surgery, and biomedical data were obtained from hospital records. Main Outcome Measures: Sociodemographic, personality, religious,

Richard J. Contrada; David A. Boulifard; Eric B. Hekler; Ellen L. Idler; Tanya M. Spruill; Erich W. Labouvie; Tyrone J. Krause

2008-01-01

387

Psychosocial interventions for reducing fatigue during cancer treatment in adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Fatigue is a common symptom in cancer patients receiving active treatment. There are a limited number of reviews evaluating interventions for fatigue during active treatment, and they are restricted to patients with advanced cancer, or to patients during radiotherapy. To date there is no systematic review on psychosocial interventions for fatigue during cancer treatment. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate if psychosocial

M. M. Goedendorp; M. F. M. Gielissen; C. A. H. H. V. M. Verhagen; G. Bleijenberg

2009-01-01

388

Cervical Cancer: A Review of the Psychosocial Factors Following Treatment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cervical cancer is a diagnosis that has a profound psychosocial impact, constituting a physical and emotional crisis for patients as well as family. In general, research indicates that the choice of treatment and the stage of the disease are instrumental in determining the psychosocial adjustment. Disruptions are likely to occur in self-esteem,…

Gilliland, Kevin Clark

389

Research and Development of Web-Based Virtual Online Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To build a web-based virtual learning environment depends on information technologies, concerns technology supporting learning methods and theories. A web-based virtual online classroom is designed and developed based on learning theories and streaming media technologies. And it is composed of two parts: instructional communicating environment

Yang, Zongkai; Liu, Qingtang

2007-01-01

390

Supporting the Outdoor Classroom: An Archaeo-Astronomy Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Field trips and the outdoor classroom are a vital part of many areas of education. Ideally, the content should be taught within a realistic environment rather than just by providing a single field trip at the end of a course. The archaeo-astronomy project located at Nottingham Trent University envisages the development of a virtual environment

Brown, Daniel; Francis, Robert; Alder, Andy

2013-01-01

391

Build a Positive Classroom Environment: Avoid Competition!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Elementary teachers often instigate competition among their students through such common statements as: "Students who make 100 on the spelling test may have 10 minutes of extra center time" and "The most creatively written story this week will be placed on the bulletin board." While such pronouncements motivate some students into action, they…

Self, Nancy S.

2009-01-01

392

The 2009 Schizophrenia PORT Psychosocial Treatment Recommendations and Summary Statements  

PubMed Central

The Schizophrenia Patient Outcomes Research Team (PORT) psychosocial treatment recommendations provide a comprehensive summary of current evidence-based psychosocial treatment interventions for persons with schizophrenia. There have been 2 previous sets of psychosocial treatment recommendations (Lehman AF, Steinwachs DM. Translating research into practice: the Schizophrenia Patient Outcomes Research Team (PORT) treatment recommendations. Schizophr Bull. 1998;24:1–10 and Lehman AF, Kreyenbuhl J, Buchanan RW, et al. The Schizophrenia Patient Outcomes Research Team (PORT): updated treatment recommendations 2003. Schizophr Bull. 2004;30:193–217). This article reports the third set of PORT recommendations that includes updated reviews in 7 areas as well as adding 5 new areas of review. Members of the psychosocial Evidence Review Group conducted reviews of the literature in each intervention area and drafted the recommendation or summary statement with supporting discussion. A Psychosocial Advisory Committee was consulted in all aspects of the review, and an expert panel commented on draft recommendations and summary statements. Our review process produced 8 treatment recommendations in the following areas: assertive community treatment, supported employment, cognitive behavioral therapy, family-based services, token economy, skills training, psychosocial interventions for alcohol and substance use disorders, and psychosocial interventions for weight management. Reviews of treatments focused on medication adherence, cognitive remediation, psychosocial treatments for recent onset schizophrenia, and peer support and peer-delivered services indicated that none of these treatment areas yet have enough evidence to merit a treatment recommendation, though each is an emerging area of interest. This update of PORT psychosocial treatment recommendations underscores both the expansion of knowledge regarding psychosocial treatments for persons with schizophrenia at the same time as the limitations in their implementation in clinical practice settings. PMID:19955389

Dixon, Lisa B.; Dickerson, Faith; Bellack, Alan S.; Bennett, Melanie; Dickinson, Dwight; Goldberg, Richard W.; Lehman, Anthony; Tenhula, Wendy N.; Calmes, Christine; Pasillas, Rebecca M.; Peer, Jason; Kreyenbuhl, Julie

2010-01-01

393

Welcome Biological Breakthroughs, Supply Psychosocial Insights  

PubMed Central

Human behaviour, emotions, and cognition are complex to understand and explain. It is even more difficult to understand the basis for abnormal behaviour, disturbed emotions, and impaired cognitions, something mental health professionals are trying for long. In these pursuits, psychiatry has traversed through eras of humours, witchcraft, spirits, psychoanalysis, and gradually deviated from other medical specialities. Now, with recent biological breakthroughs like advances in psychopharmacology, neuroimaging and genetics, increasingly more emphasis is being given to the biological model of psychiatric disorders. These new biological models have given a more scientific appearance to the speciality. It has also revolutionised the management strategies and outcome of many psychiatric disorders. However, this rapid development in biological understanding of psychiatry also leads to a new wave of reductionism. In an attempt to deduce everything in terms of neurons, neurochemicals, and genes, can we neglect psychosocial aspects of mental health? Patients’ personality, expectations, motives, family background, sociocultural backgrounds continue to affect mental health no matter how much ‘biological’ psychiatry gets. Biological and psychosocial approaches are not mutually exclusive but complementary. Integrating them harmoniously is the skill psychiatry demands for comprehensive understanding of mental and behavioural disorders. PMID:24891799

Tekkalaki, Bheemsain; Tripathi, Adarsh; Trivedi, J. K.

2014-01-01

394

Psychosocial aspects of Hansen's disease (leprosy)  

PubMed Central

In general, the prevalence of psychiatric disorders among people with Hansen's disease has greatly increased to date. However, inadequate psychiatric care of people with Hansen's disease is an area of increasing concern. Many studies have been conducted in India and abroad to find out the prevalence of comorbid psychiatric disorders in patients suffering from Hansen's disease. Although efforts have been made by the government and international organizations to solve the medical problems among this group of patients, this disease still carries a number of psychosocial issues. The social stigma connected to these patients makes this disease completely different from others. Even nowadays people affected by Hansen's disease have to leave their village and are socially isolated. Depression is the most common psychiatric disorder found in these patients. Early detection and treatment of psychiatric disorders among Hansen's disease patients is a powerful psychotherapeutic measure. Integrated healthcare strategy will be beneficial to these patients. A comprehensive MEDLINE search and review of relevant literature was carried out and the data extracted and studied with particular reference to psychosocial issues in Hansen's disease. The focus of this research work is related to psychiatric and social aspects vis-à-vis stigma in these patients with Hansen's disease. PMID:23189247

Singh, Gurvinder Pal

2012-01-01

395

Teachers' Practical Knowledge about Classroom Management in Multicultural Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Creating a positive working atmosphere in the classroom is the first concern of many student and beginning teachers in secondary education. Teaching in multicultural classrooms provides additional challenges for these teachers. This study identified shared practical knowledge about classroom management strategies of teachers who were successful in…

van Tartwijk, Jan; den Brok, Perry; Veldman, Ietje; Wubbels, Theo

2009-01-01

396

Classroom Teachers and Classroom Research. JALT Applied Materials.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of papers leads classroom language teachers through the process of developing and completing a classroom research project. Arranged in four sections, they include: "Language Teaching and Research" (David Nunan); "Where Are We Now? Trends, Teachers, and Classroom Research" (Dale T. Griffee); "First Things First: Writing the Research…

Griffee, Dale T., Ed.; Nunan, David, Ed.

397

Sherlock Holmes in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a three-day classroom activity combining criminal investigations and scientific skills, especially observation skills. Provides detailed classroom procedures with an illustration of eight basic fingerprint patterns and a classification chart. (YP)

Faia, Jean E.

1988-01-01

398

Mathematics Classrooms, Gender and Affect.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a study that explores the relationship between classroom factors and students' beliefs about themselves as learners of mathematics. Identifies classroom factors that might influence students' beliefs. Contains 45 references. (DDR)

Forgasz, Helen J.; Leder, Gilah C.

1996-01-01

399

Managing Inquiry-Based Classrooms  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Though it may seem that classroom management comes naturally to some teachers, upon closer examination youâll probably discover that preparation and adaptation are more important than any innate ability when it comes to successful classroom management. Any experienced middle school science teacher can tell you that successful classroom management is an ongoing, evolving processâteachers need to modify their daily practices based on the observed behaviors and feedback of their students. This article describes some strategies to manage inquiry-based science classrooms effectively.

Wolfgang, Christie N.

2009-07-01

400

Inverting the Linear Algebra Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The inverted classroom is a course design model in which students' initial contact with new information takes place outside of class meetings, and students spend class time on high-level sense-making activities. The inverted classroom model is so called because it inverts or "flips" the usual classroom design where typically class…

Talbert, Robert

2014-01-01

401

The Differentiated Classroom Observation Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a new classroom observation scale that was developed to examine the differential learning activities and experiences of gifted children educated in regular classroom settings. The Differentiated Classroom Observation Scale (DCOS) is presented in total, with clarification of the coding practices and strategies. Although the…

Cassady, Jerrell C.; Neumeister, Kristie L. Speirs; Adams, Cheryll M.; Cross, Tracy L.; Dixon, Felicia A.; Pierce, Rebecca L.

2004-01-01

402

Managing Inquiry-Based Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Though it may seem that classroom management comes naturally to some teachers, upon closer examination you'll probably discover that preparation and adaptation are more important than any innate ability when it comes to successful classroom management. Any experienced middle school science teacher can tell you that successful classroom management…

Wolfgang, Christie Nicole

2009-01-01

403

Comparison of Students' Satisfaction and Dissatisfaction Factors in Different Classroom Types in Higher Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Effective classroom learning requires a good learning environment integrated with quality teaching, quality course content,\\u000a and a collaborative approach towards learning. This study sets out to examine the drivers of student satisfaction and dissatisfaction\\u000a in the three classroom settings common to higher education: face-to-face, Web-based, and blended classrooms. The Critical\\u000a Incident Technique was used to collect data and to form

Fong-Ling Fu

2010-01-01

404

Adverse psychosocial working conditions and minor psychiatric disorders among bank workers  

PubMed Central

Background In most countries, the financial service sector has undergone great organizational changes in the past decades, with potential negative impact on bank workers' mental health. The aim of this paper is to estimate the prevalence of minor psychiatric disorders (MPD) among Brazilian bank workers and to investigate whether they are associated with an adverse psychosocial working environment. Methods A cross-sectional study of a random sample of 2,500 workers in a Brazilian state bank in 2008. The presence of MPD was determined by the General Health Questionnaire.(GHQ). Psychosocial work conditions were assessed by means of the Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) and Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ). The presence and magnitude of the independent associations between MPD and adverse psychosocial working conditions were determined by Prevalence Ratios, obtained by Poisson regression. Results From 2,337 eligible workers, 88% participated. The prevalence of MPD was greater among women (45% vs. 41%; p > 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, the prevalence of MPD was twice as high among bank workers exposed to high psychological demand and low control at work and under high effort and low reward working conditions. The lack of social support at work and the presence of over-commitment were also associated with higher prevalence of MPD. A negative interaction effect was found between over-commitment and effort-reward imbalance. Conclusion The prevalence of MPD is high among bank workers. The results reinforce the association between MPD and adverse psychosocial working conditions, assessed by the JCQ and ERI models. The direction of the interaction observed between over-commitment and ERI was contrary to what was expected. PMID:21062496

2010-01-01

405

Neuropsychiatric and Psychosocial Issues of Patients With Hepatitis C Infection: A Selective Literature Review  

PubMed Central

Context We briefly reviewed the evidence on the association of hepatitis C (HCV) infection with several aspects of mental and psychosocial health. Evidence Acquisition Medline was searched with appropriate keywords. The primary sources were the systematic reviews. If systematic reviews were not available for a subject, then the most relevant and methodologically sound original studies were selected. Results HCV infection is associated with poorer health-related quality of life, and physical, mental, and social health. A part of impaired health of these patients is related to cirrhosis, intravenous drug use, co morbid psychiatric disorders, stigmatization, poor social support, alcohol abuse, and interferon treatment. However, HCV itself is also associated with poorer health status particularly in the physical and cognitive domains, which might be related to brain alterations induced by the virus. Interferon treatment is an important cause of depression in HCV patients and sometimes is associated with irritability, manic episode, or acute confusional state. Social health of HCV patients is significantly impaired by stigmatization, poor social support, psychiatric comorbidties, and impaired coping. Psychosocial impairment of HCV patients significantly impairs their treatment adherence. A supportive and nonjudgmental multidisciplinary team is required for optimal management of these patients. Conclusions Patients with HCV infection had complex neuropsychiatric and psychosocial problems. These problems are challenges for management of HCV infection, affect the patient’s care significantly, and might alter the course of the disease. A multidisciplinary approach, a supportive environment, and a nonjudgmental healthcare team are required for optimal medical and psychosocial management of patients with HCV. PMID:23550100

Modabbernia, Amirhossein; Poustchi, Hossein; Malekzadeh, Reza

2013-01-01

406

Earthquake Education Environment (E3)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Earthquake Education Environment (E3) supports high-quality K-12 and undergraduate education by providing up-to-date earthquake information, authoritative technical sources, and educational resources for the classroom.

2007-07-16

407

The Psychosocial Inventory of Ego Strengths: Development and Validation of a New Eriksonian Measure  

Microsoft Academic Search

An underexamined component of Erik Erikson's psychosocial theory is the concept of ego strengths. The eight ego strengths are present throughout the life span, but each have their ascendance in conjunction with successful psychosocial stage resolutions. Upon careful analysis of Erikson's writings, the Psychosocial Inventory of Ego Strengths (PIES) was developed to assess this component of psychosocial theory. The measure

Carol A. Markstrom; Vicky M. Sabino; Bonnie J. Turner; Rachel C. Berman

1997-01-01

408

Arthritis and pain. Psychosocial aspects in the management of arthritis pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this review is to summarize psychosocial factors associated with arthritis pain and highlight recent evidence for psychosocial approaches to managing arthritis pain. By definition, psychosocial factors refer to two dimensions of experience: the psychological (cognitive, affective) and social (interacting with others, engaging in life activities). Psychosocial factors influence the perception of pain and the presence of pain

Catherine L Backman

2006-01-01

409

Re-Inventing Classroom And Campus  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The university may need to reorganize itself quite differently, stressing forms of pedagogy and extracurricular experiences to nurture and teach the art and skill of creativity and innovation. This would probably imply a shift away from highly specialized disciplines and degree programs to programs placing more emphasis on integrating knowledge. To this end, perhaps it is time to integrate the educational mission of the university with the research and service activities of the faculty by ripping instruction out of the classroom- or at least the lecture hall- and placing it instead in the discovery environment of the laboratory or studio or the experiential environment of professional practice.

Rossman, Parker

410

The Electronic Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The role of telecommunications in establishing the electronic classroom in distance education is illustrated. Using a computer-based doctoral program and the UNIX operating system as an example, how a personal computer and modem may be combined with a telephone line for instructional delivery is described. A number of issues must be addressed in…

Mizell, Al P.; Centini, Barry M.

411

Networking the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This issue of "CQ Researcher" examines the theme of computer networking in the classroom and discusses uses past and present. It begins with an essay by Christopher Conte that discusses: "Does computer networking really enhance learning? Are teachers adequately prepared to take advantage of computer networking? Will computer networking promote…

Stencel, Sandra, Ed.; And Others

1995-01-01

412

Cockroaches in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Madagascar hissing cockroach (MHC) provides an excellent avenue to introduce students to the joys of inquiry-centered learning. MHC's are relatively tame, produce little odor, do not bite, and are easy to handle and breed. Because of these characteristics, they are ideal for classroom activities, science projects, and as pets. They also help…

Wagler, Ron; Moseley, Christine

2005-01-01

413

Windows into Art Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An editorial by Kit Grauer introduces this collection of articles which establish that there is no such thing as a simple definition of art education even within one culture, and that people's views can be reflected by art educators across the world. The first article, "A Window on Three Singapore Art Classrooms" (Jane Chia; John Matthews; Paul…

Grauer, Kit, Ed.

1995-01-01

414

Fluency in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book offers two distinct approaches to oral reading instruction that can easily be incorporated into primary-grade literacy curricula. It enables teachers to go beyond the conventional "round-robin" approach by providing strong instructional support and using challenging texts. Grounded in research and classroom experience, the book explains…

Kuhn, Melanie R., Ed.; Schwanenflugel, Paula J., Ed.

2007-01-01

415

Your Outdoor Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Physical education is still taught in outdoor settings in many warmer climates of the United States. Even when indoor facilities are available, physical education may be moved outside because of other curricular needs or facility issues. How can physical educators make the outdoor setting seem more like an indoor classroom? Outdoor teaching…

Hinman, Laurie

2005-01-01

416

Elementary Classroom Web Sites  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to understand how elementary classroom Web sites support children's literacy. From a sociocultural perspective of literacy and a transformative stance toward the integration of literacy and technology, and building on explorations of new literacies, I discuss opportunities provided by the Internet that can support…

Baker, Elizabeth A.

2007-01-01

417

Tips from the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Seven articles on classroom icebreakers are compiled: "Picture Stories and Other Opportunities" (Joy Egbert, Deborah Hanley, Rosemary Delaney); "Hey, What's Your Name" (Janet Leamy); "Surprise!" (Lynne Burgess); "Memory Game" (Sally Winn); "Picturesque" (Margaret Beiter); "The Name Game" (Jeanne-Marie Garcia); "Exercise the Body--And the Mind…

TESOL Journal, 1993

1993-01-01

418

Classroom of the Sea  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Although most students do not have the opportunity to conduct in situ research projects until college, the Classroom of the Sea program at the American School for the Deaf (ASD) provides an unusual opportunity for students to work directly with scientists

Monte, Denise; Hupper, Mary L.; Scheifele, Peter

2000-03-01

419

Assessing Classroom Assessment Techniques  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Classroom assessment techniques (CATs) are teaching strategies that provide formative assessments of student learning. It has been argued that the use of CATs enhances and improves student learning. Although the various types of CATs have been extensively documented and qualitatively studied, there appears to be little quantitative research…

Simpson-Beck, Victoria

2011-01-01

420

Singing Smoothes Classroom Transitions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Just as humming a merry tune helped Snow White and her furry animal friends to quickly clean a filthy cottage in the movie "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" (Disney & Cottrell, 1937), singing can be an effective way to help keep young children fully engaged during classroom transitions. The purposes of this article are to: (1) consider why…

Mathews, Sarah E.

2012-01-01

421

Reorganizing Your Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents guidelines for teachers in competency-based education settings to use in establishing and maintaining a system of classroom and individual student progress charts and records. Describes the development of an instructional materials file to help students become more responsible for obtaining the materials needed for each lesson. (LRA)

Owenby, Ermine M.

1979-01-01

422

Inquiry in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

(Purpose) As schools scramble to restructure in the hope of thwarting failure, administrators often appropriate money for outside experts who counsel on professional development as well as outside magic-pill programs for student achievement. High-stakes testing remains the arbiter. Perhaps the use of the best practice of inquiry, or classroom

Stohl, Christina

2010-01-01

423

The Classroom Equalizer.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Multiple Activities Curriculum, developed by the Stanford University Center for Educational Research, broadens the scope of classroom experiences and thinking skills required, so that students weak in the traditional academic skills of reading and language have more chance to participate in class and to feel worthwhile. (Author/SJL)

Rosenholtz, Susan J.

1979-01-01

424

Classroom multiplayer presential games  

Microsoft Academic Search

Given the promising results of massively multiplayer online games (MMOGs) for educational purposes, this paper maps the essential concepts behind MMOGs, into the classroom context. Since the number of students in this context is not massive and play takes place within a single room rather than on the Internet, we have changed the terms ldquomassivelyrdquo and ldquoonlinerdquo to ldquoclassroomrdquo and

Miguel Nussbaum; Heinz Susaeta; Felipe Jimenez; Ignacio Gajardo; Juan José Andreu; M. Villalta; J. Nordlinger

2009-01-01

425

Classroom Management That Works  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to find the best classroom management strategies to use when teaching in an elementary school setting. I wanted to conduct the best possible management tools for a variety of age groups as well as meet educational standards. Through my research I found different approaches in different grade levels is an important…

Cleve, Lauren

2012-01-01

426

Classroom management and disaffection  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports on aspects of the Norwich Area Schools Consortium (NASC) cross-school Classroom Management and Disaffection research project undertaken as part of the NASC programme. It documents the dual interwoven ‘stories’ of teacher engagement in research as a learning expand the substantive research undertaken. The project took place in two stages, the focus of the second stage emerging from

Barbara Zamorski; Terry Haydn

2002-01-01

427

Strategies in Classroom Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Teaching—always a challenging profession —has, in today's complex society, become even more difficult. Large classes, sophisticated students, legal constraints, all compound the problems of dealing with student misbehavior. Today's teacher must be well-prepared to deal with problems, this author believes. He outlines six strategies that constitute a basic plan for classroom management.

Robert L. Shrigley

1979-01-01

428

The Intelligent Classroom  

E-print Network

This paper is an adaptation of an article that appeared in the September/October 1999 issue of the IEEE Intelligent Systems journal. It provides an informal description of the Intelligent Classroom and looks at examples of what happens as the speaker writes on the board, lectures from slides, and does an anatomy lecture. Also, the paper features pretty color pictures.

David Franklin; Joshua Flachsbart; Kristian Hammond

1999-01-01

429

Flipping the Classroom Revisited  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I received many emails following the first column on flipping the classroom. Many of my local colleagues also approached me at our physics alliance, Physics Northwest. Teachers are very interested in this new pedagogy. As I result, I wanted to share some more videos to inspire you.

Riendeau, Diane

2013-02-01

430

Language, Schools and Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of language in education is examined, and the ways in which recent research helps in the understanding of classroom language are explored. The relevance of such research to practicing teachers as well as to sociologists is also discussed. The volume is divided into nine chapters: (1) "Why Is Language Important in Education?"; (2) "Some…

Stubbs, Michael

431

Classroom Idea-Sparkers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents four Idea-Sparkers that were submitted by Jason McKinney, a graduate student at Southern Mississippi University and a 1st-grade teacher at Pisgah Elementary in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. First is entitled, "Raceway in the Classroom." This activity can help increase children's fluency and ability to identify numerous sight…

Kieff, Judith

2007-01-01

432

Using Your Classroom Library.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A series of articles provides suggestions on using classroom libraries. One article suggests filling the library with genre books to inspire critical reading, critical thinking, and learning across the curriculum (folktales, fairy tales, tall tales, historical fiction, biographies, and autobiographies). Another article presents information on…

Barchers, Suzanne; And Others

1993-01-01

433

The Structured Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this article is to highlight the organisation of the remedial classroom. The data were collected from observations and semi-structured interviews with 10 teachers in remedial classes for children seen and treated as having concentration deficits. The teachers use primarily compensatory language that places the deficits in the pupils.…

Ljusberg, Anna-Lena

2011-01-01

434

Formation in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

What is the relationship between the academic knowledge of the guild and the formation of students in the classroom? This Forum gathers four essays originally presented at a Special Topics Session at the 2009 conference of the American Academy of Religion (Atlanta, Georgia), with a brief introductory essay by Fred Glennon explaining the genesis of…

Glennon, Fred; Jacobsen, Douglas; Jacobsen, Rhonda Hustedt; Thatamanil, John J.; Porterfield, Amanda; Moore, Mary Elizabeth

2011-01-01

435

Librarian in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As community college learning resource centers deal more with student instruction, librarians are gaining credence as true educators. In an effort to reinforce library usage and understand teaching faculty constraints, some librarians--many of them teaching "drop-outs"--have returned to the classroom. This paper describes the experiences of one…

Sabol, Cathy

436

The Engineered Adjustment Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described are the curriculum, behavioral modification program, summer activities, and parent involvement in the Papillion (Nebraska) Title III elementary level "engineered classroom" program for emotionally disturbed students. Noted is program initiation after parents and teachers became upset over poor academic progress and behaviors of an…

Spilker, George

437

The Fight Free Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes implementation of the Fight Free Classroom intervention (designed to decrease fighting and aggressiveness by helping students take ownership of their behavior) in an urban elementary school that included students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). Overall, aggressive acts among students with and without EBD decreased…

Whedon, Craig K.; Bakken, Jeffrey P.; Fletcher, Reginald

2000-01-01

438

The Network Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discussion of the role of new computer communications technologies in education focuses on modern networking systems, including fiber distributed data interface and Integrated Services Digital Network; strategies for implementing networked-based communication; and public online information resources for the classroom, including Bitnet, Internet,…

Maule, R. William

1993-01-01

439

Theme: The Electronic Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Consists of seven articles on the use of electronics in vocational agricultural education. Topics include (1) the Ag Ed Network, (2) computer simulations, (3) video simulation, (4) classroom equipment, (4) online information systems, (5) expert systems, and (6) computer networking in California. (CH)

Herz, Bruce; And Others

1988-01-01

440

In the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Fourteen conference papers on classroom techniques for second language teaching are presented, including: "Cooperative Learning at the Post-Secondary Level in Japan" (Steve McGuire, Patricia Thornton, David Kluge); "Shared Inquiry Fosters Critical Thinking Skills in EFL Students" (Carol Browning, Jerold Halvorsen, Denise Ahlquist); "Story Grammar:…

1997

441

The Classroom Animal.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Tree frogs are small (2-5 cm) animals which not only interest students but also can be maintained in classrooms for a few days. Characteristics (species, ranges, habitat, reproductive cycle, and locomotion) and housing/care needs are described. Long-term maintenance is not recommended due to the difficulty of providing live food. (DH)

Kramer, David C.

1985-01-01

442

Poetry in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These reprints from the "English Journal's" department, "Poetry in the Classroom," present successful approaches to teaching 22 poems. The poems are grouped under seven headings: "Poems from the Tradition,""The Creation,""The Carpe Diem Theme,""Where Shall Man Journey?""Symbolic Settings,""Poems for the Junior High School," and "Poems of our…

Petitt, Dorothy, Ed.

443

The Classroom Animal: Snails.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Points out that snails are interesting and easily-managed classroom animals. One advantage of this animal is that it requires no special attention over weekends or holidays. Background information, anatomy, reproduction, and feeding are discussed, along with suggestions for housing aquatic and/or land snails. (DH)

Kramer, David S.

1985-01-01

444

[The psychosocial background of sterile patients].  

PubMed

The psychosocial background of 300 childless couples from the Infertility Clinic of the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University of Graz, was evaluated by means of a questionnaire and statistical analysis of data from their files. Points of special interest were problems such as interactions of the couple, motivations for the desire of children, psychosomatics, andrological investigation within the gynecological department, sexual habits and motivation and compliance concerning investigations and treatment. 72% of the questionnaires were returned. 50% of the sterile couples preferred to attend the infertility clinic together. 26% felt restrictions in their sexual behaviour due to the unrealized desire of children, 48% expected improvements in their partnership if they could have children. Compliance of male partners concerning the regular intake of prescribed medicaments was 83%, 63% accepted to stop smoking in cases of pathospermia. PMID:2802686

Pusch, H H; Urdl, W; Walcher, W

1989-01-01

445

Preliminary Evidence for a Classroom Based Psychosocial Intervention for Disaster Exposed Children with Posttraumatic Stress Symptomatology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: In 2004, a firework factory in a residential area of a large Danish city exploded. The children at the local school were screened for symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) 16 months and 3½ years after the incident. A large proportion of the children still suffered from a substantial number of symptoms 3½ years after the…

Rønholt, Stine; Karsberg, Sidsel; Elklit, Ask

2013-01-01

446

Psychosocial value of space simulation for extended spaceflight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There have been over 60 studies of Earth-bound activities that can be viewed as simulations of manned spaceflight. These analogs have involved Antarctic and Arctic expeditions, submarines and submersible simulators, land-based simulators, and hypodynamia environments. None of these analogs has accounted for all the variables related to extended spaceflight (e.g., microgravity, long-duration, heterogeneous crews), and some of the stimulation conditions have been found to be more representative of space conditions than others. A number of psychosocial factors have emerged from the simulation literature that correspond to important issues that have been reported from space. Psychological factors include sleep disorders, alterations in time sense, transcendent experiences, demographic issues, career motivation, homesickness, and increased perceptual sensitivities. Psychiatric factors include anxiety, depression, psychosis, psychosomatic symptoms, emotional reactions related to mission stage, asthenia, and postflight personality, and marital problems. Finally, interpersonal factors include tension resulting from crew heterogeneity, decreased cohesion over time, need for privacy, and issues involving leadership roles and lines of authority. Since future space missions will usually involve heterogeneous crews working on complicated objectives over long periods of time, these features require further study. Socio-cultural factors affecting confined crews (e.g., language and dialect, cultural differences, gender biases) should be explored in order to minimize tension and sustain performance. Career motivation also needs to be examined for the purpose of improving crew cohesion and preventing subgrouping, scapegoating, and territorial behavior. Periods of monotony and reduced activity should be addressed in order to maintain morale, provide meaningful use of leisure time, and prevent negative consequences of low stimulation, such as asthenia and crew member withdrawal. Leadership roles and lines of authority need to be studied further to understand the factors leading to status leveling, leadership competition, and role confusion. Finally, the relationship between crews and ground personnel should be characterized in order to minimize the displacement of anger and tension to the outside, to counter the effects of inter-group miscommunications, and to develop support strategies that can help to counter in-group/out-group conflicts. Ground-based space simulations still have a role to play in terms of understanding the impact of these factors and ways of dealing with them. In particular, issues involving language, cultural differences, gender biases, career motivation, monotonous conditions, use of free time, leadership, lines of authority, and the relationship between crews and outside monitoring personnel need to be further characterized and examined under controlled conditions. Until such time as these factors can be studied directly in space, simulations provide an opportunity to learn more about these psychosocial issues and to plan ways of minimizing their negative consequences during actual space missions.

Kanas, N.

1997-01-01

447

Psychosocial value of space simulation for extended spaceflight.  

PubMed

There have been over 60 studies of Earth-bound activities that can be viewed as simulations of manned spaceflight. These analogs have involved Antarctic and Arctic expeditions, submarines and submersible simulators, land-based simulators, and hypodynamia environments. None of these analogs has accounted for all the variables related to extended spaceflight (e.g., microgravity, long-duration, heterogeneous crews), and some of the stimulation conditions have been found to be more representative of space conditions than others. A number of psychosocial factors have emerged from the simulation literature that correspond to important issues that have been reported from space. Psychological factors include sleep disorders, alterations in time sense, transcendent experiences, demographic issues, career motivation, homesickness, and increased perceptual sensitivities. Psychiatric factors include anxiety, depression, psychosis, psychosomatic symptoms, emotional reactions related to mission stage, asthenia, and postflight personality, and marital problems. Finally, interpersonal factors include tension resulting from crew heterogeneity, decreased cohesion over time, need for privacy, and issues involving leadership roles and lines of authority. Since future space missions will usually involve heterogeneous crews working on complicated objectives over long periods of time, these features require further study. Socio-cultural factors affecting confined crews (e.g., language and dialect, cultural differences, gender biases) should be explored in order to minimize tension and sustain performance. Career motivation also needs to be examined for the purpose of improving crew cohesion and preventing subgrouping, scapegoating, and territorial behavior. Periods of monotony and reduced activity should be addressed in order to maintain morale, provide meaningful use of leisure time, and prevent negative consequences of low stimulation, such as asthenia and crew member withdrawal. Leadership roles and lines of authority need to be studied further to understand the factors leading to status leveling, leadership competition, and role confusion. Finally, the relationship between crews and ground personnel should be characterized in order to minimize the displacement of anger and tension to the outside, to counter the effects of inter-group miscommunications, and to develop support strategies that can help to counter in-group/out-group conflicts. Ground-based space simulations still have a role to play in terms of understanding the impact of these factors and ways of dealing with them. In particular, issues involving language, cultural differences, gender biases, career motivation, monotonous conditions, use of free time, leadership, lines of authority, and the relationship between crews and outside monitoring personnel need to be further characterized and examined under controlled conditions. Until such time as these factors can be studied directly in space, simulations provide an opportunity to learn more about these psychosocial issues and to plan ways of minimizing their negative consequences during actual space missions. PMID:9048134

Kanas, N

1997-01-01

448

Classroom Physical Design Influencing Student Learning and Evaluations of College Instructors: A Review of Literature  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The physical design of classrooms, including studios, laboratories, auditoriums, and other indoor environments, can have a profound impact on student learning and subsequent overall ratings (student evaluations) of college instructors. Many college classrooms have been conventionally designed in the shape of a square or a rectangle, with…

Lei, Simon A.

2010-01-01

449

An Effective Approach to Developing Function-Based Interventions in Early Childhood Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Due to the unique features of early childhood classrooms, teachers routinely modify the social and physical environment to support children with mild to moderate challenges. Yet despite their access to behavioral consultants, school-based prekindergarten programs are more likely to expel young children from their classroom settings compared with…

Wood, Brenna K.; Ferro, Jolenea B.

2014-01-01

450

The "Responsive Classroom" Approach and Its Implications for Improving Reading and Writing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a social and emotional learning intervention, the "Responsive Classroom"[R] (RC) approach, which is designed to produce classroom environments conducive to learning. It summarizes a new body of research describing the efficacy of the RC approach. One component of the RC approach is the Morning Meeting. This article describes…

McTigue, Erin M.; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.

2011-01-01

451

Effects of Speech-to-Text Recognition Application on Learning Performance in Synchronous Cyber Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to apply Speech-to-Text Recognition (STR) in an effort to improve learning performance in an online synchronous cyber classroom environment. Students' perceptions and their behavioral intentions toward using STR and the effectiveness of applying STR in synchronous cyber classrooms were also investigated. After the…

Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Shadiev, Rustam; Kuo, Tony C. T.; Chen, Nian-Shing

2012-01-01

452

The Role of Fictive Kinship Relationships in Mediating Classroom Competition and Supporting Reciprocal Mentoring  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous research has suggested that competitive classroom environments can play a role in perpetuating race and class inequalities. However, classroom competition can also promote learning, and eliminating it could do students a disservice. This paper draws on research literature and data from a qualitative study by Konstantinos Alexakos, Jayson…

Olitsky, Stacy

2011-01-01

453

Construction of Mathematical Knowledge Using Graphic Calculators (CAS) in the Mathematics Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mathematics education researchers are asking themselves about why technology has impacted heavily on the social environment and not in the mathematics classroom. The use of technology in the mathematics classroom has not had the expected impact, as it has been its use in everyday life (i.e. cell phone). What about teachers' opinions? Mathematics…

Hitt, Fernando

2011-01-01

454

Integrating Annotations into a Dual-Slide PowerPoint Presentation for Classroom Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study introduces a learning environment integrating annotations with a dual-slide PowerPoint presentation for classroom learning. Annotation means a kind of additional information to emphasize the explanations for the learning objects. The use of annotations is to support the cognitive process for PowerPoint presentation in a classroom. The…

Lai, Yen-Shou; Tsai, Hung-Hsu; Yu, Pao-Ta

2011-01-01

455

RECOMMENDATIONS ON THE LEARNINGS WHICH SHOULD OCCUR IN THE LANGUAGE LAB AND IN THE CLASSROOM.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THIS PAPER WAS PRESENTED AT A TWO-PART CONFERENCE ON PLANNING AND OPERATING LANGUAGE LABORATORIES. THE MAIN TOPIC OF THE PAPER CENTERED ON IDEAL LEARNING SITUATIONS IN THE LANGUAGE LABORATORY, CONSIDERING THE TOTAL LABORATORY-CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT. SPECIFIC DISCUSSIONS WERE INCLUDED ON (1) LABORATORY INTEGRATION WITH THE CLASSROOM, (2) LEARNING…

MATHIEU, G.

456

Preparing the Inclusion Classroom for Students with Special Physical and Health Needs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Classroom Ecological Preparation Inventory (CEPI) is designed to aid in inclusion of students with physical impairments and health needs in the general-education classroom. The CEPI focuses on health and medical concerns, arrangement of the physical environment, assistive equipment, instructional adaptations, and social-skills management. A…

Wadsworth, Donna E. Dugger; Knight, Diane

1999-01-01

457

Observing Emotional Interactions between Teachers and Students in Elementary School Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Fostering emotional skills in the elementary (primary) school classroom can lead to improved learning outcomes, more prosocial behavior, and positive emotional development. Incorporating emotional skill development into the naturalistic and implicit teaching environment is a key feature of what is meant by the emotional climate of the classroom.…

Yan, Elizabeth M.; Evans, Ian M.; Harvey, Shane T.

2011-01-01

458

Theory and Phenomena in Curriculum Research: The Classroom as a Test Case.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the major issues in education is curriculum relevancy. To make education more relevant, curricula have been revised and redesigned; but many of these revisions have failed to be implemented at the classroom level because teachers and administrators are incapable of changing the classroom environment. Traditional 19th century instruction…

Westbury, Ian; Abrahamson, Jon H.

459

Creating a Positive Classroom Atmosphere: Teachers' Use of Effective Praise and Feedback  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Creating a positive and engaging classroom atmosphere is one of the most powerful tools teachers can use to encourage children's learning and prevent problem behaviors from occurring. Teachers' responses to children's appropriate and problem behavior can help set the tone of the classroom environment. Creating positive interactions between a…

Conroy, Maureen A.; Sutherland, Kevin S.; Snyder, Angela; Al-Hendawi, Maha; Vo, Abigail

2009-01-01

460

Humor on Learning in the College Classroom: Evaluating Benefits and Drawbacks from Instructors' Perspectives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Some college instructors believe that the only way for students to take their education seriously is to be serious and solemn in the classroom. This often means creating a strict classroom environment built on discipline and hard work, perhaps with little or no room for discussion and laughter. However, the most effective instructors are those who…

Lei, Simon A.; Cohen, Jillian L.; Russler, Kristen M.

2010-01-01

461

The Role of Assistive Listening Devices in the Classroom. PEPNet Tipsheet  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many students who use hearing aids effectively in quiet environments have a difficult time following information presented in large college classrooms. In the classroom, the instructor's voice is competing with background noise, room echo, and distance. Therefore, the intelligibility of the instructor's voice is degraded by the poor room acoustics…

Clark, Catherine

2000-01-01

462

The Brain-Compatible Classroom: Using What We Know about Learning To Improve Teaching.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book summarizes current brain research and shows how teachers can use this knowledge in the classroom every day. It explores how the brain works, how students' emotions and stress affect their ability to learn, how the physical classroom environment influences learning, and what forms of assessment work best. An introduction discusses the…

Erlauer, Laura

463

Trading Places: When Teachers Utilize Student Expertise in Technology-Intensive Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Utilizing self-report data from 32 elementary and secondary teachers, this longitudinal, qualitative study examines the role shifts of both teachers and students as they adapted to teaching and learning in educational, technology-rich, Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow environments. At first, teachers in these instructionally innovative classrooms

Ringstaff, Cathy; And Others

464

Is Your Classroom Woman-Friendly? Ten Strategies for Reaching This Goal  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A recent report by the National Council for Research on Women (2001) revealed that the number of women entering technology-driven careers has declined. Among the reasons cited is the sometimes chilly climate for women in college classrooms, particularly classrooms with technology-rich environments. In this article, I present strategies that…

Wasburn, Mara H.

2004-01-01

465

Instructional Accommodations for Students with Asperger Syndrome in the General High School Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

General education teachers in the secondary sector are held responsible for adapting their lessons and classroom environment for students with Asperger Syndrome. With the growing number of students with Autism Spectrum Disorder being placed in general education classrooms, teachers are faced with yet another challenge in making their curriculum…

Baylis, Myrna

2011-01-01

466

Finding balance: impact of classroom management conceptions on developing teacher practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

A sociocultural perspective on teacher learning was used to investigate how three beginning teachers’ conceptions of classroom management affected their developing teaching practices. Students were followed from student teaching through their first 2 years of teaching. Data sources included interviews, classroom observations, and teacher education portfolios. Although all three teachers shared common conceptions of management as establishing positive learning environments,

Susan D. Martin

2004-01-01

467

Back to Basics: Working with Young Children with Autism in Inclusive Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Young children with autism benefit from various adaptations made to an early childhood classroom. This article includes modifications for both teacher-directed and child-initiated activities. Adaptations are given for the classroom environment, daily schedule, sensory needs, transitions and general teaching strategies. The techniques described are…

Deris, Aaron R.; Di Carlo, Cynthia F.

2013-01-01

468

How to Stimulate--and Manage--Participation in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Some methods for getting adult learners to participate in classroom discussions are offered by a training manager. The trainer's attitude and the classroom environment contribute to motivating all trainees to participate, stimulate the nonparticipant to join in, and control the aggressiveness of the overparticipant. (MF)

Cornwell, J. B.

1979-01-01

469

Six Head Start Classrooms Begin To Explore the Reggio Emilia Approach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Documents the process of exploring the Reggio Emilia approach in Head Start classrooms in Iowa. Describes areas of exploration, including revising the classroom environments and daily schedules, using more documentation, instituting child-initiated projects, and collaborating on a deeper level with colleagues. Includes excerpts from children's…

Gillespie, Catherine Wilson

2000-01-01

470

Seeing the Light: A Classroom-Sized Pinhole Camera Demonstration for Teaching Vision  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We describe a classroom-sized pinhole camera demonstration (camera obscura) designed to enhance students' learning of the visual system. The demonstration consists of a suspended rear-projection screen onto which the outside environment projects images through a small hole in a classroom window. Students can observe these images in a darkened…

Prull, Matthew W.; Banks, William P.

2005-01-01

471

Communicating in a Multicultural Classroom: A Study of Students' Nonverbal Behavior and Attitudes toward Faculty Attire  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Economic and market globalization in the United States has engendered a multicultural learning environment that challenges both faculty and students. Diversity in the classroom is further complicated by nonverbal communication, which impacts on students' attitudes toward faculty members. Because today's classrooms are changing and undergoing rapid…

Okoro, Ephraim; Washington, Melvin

2011-01-01

472

Predicting Acceptance of Diversity in Pre-Kindergarten Classrooms. Research Brief  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Given the increasing ethnic and language diversity within the United States, this study examined practices that acknowledge and promote diversity in pre-Kindergarten classrooms. Findings indicate that acceptance of diversity is a component of positive environments for young children, particularly in classrooms with high poverty levels where there…

Sanders, Kay; Downer, Jason T.

2013-01-01

473

Hemodialysis patients' psychosocial characteristics and quality of life indicators.  

E-print Network

??This research examines Hemodialysis patients' psycho-social characteristics and predictors of quality of life and compliance at a small rural hospital. Sixty-four patients from the hemodialysis… (more)

Riopelle, Donna Michele.

2005-01-01

474

Diet quality and psychosocial mediators in rural African Americans  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

PURPOSE: Obesity and its comorbidities, including cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and diabetes, are largely preventable or modifiable through behavioral factors, such as dietary intake. We examined associations among diet quality, dietary intake, and psychosocial mediators of behavioral chan...

475

Psychosocial intervention for adults with cancer: a meta-analysis.  

PubMed

Cancer affects a significant number of people and their families. In addition to physical symptoms, people with cancer experience considerable levels of psychosocial distress. Psychosocial oncology has been developed to address this distress. In this meta-analysis, psychosocial interventions for adults with cancer were systematically reviewed. A central finding was the dearth of clinical trials published by social work researchers and clinicians. Small intervention effects were noted for some psychosocial interventions, particularly those in which a focus on stress and coping were included; however, the poor quality of reporting negated conclusive results. The synthesis of research conducted and reported with methodological rigor may inform social work practice, with the ultimate goal of improving the quality of patient care and the quality of patient outcomes. The implications for social work clinicians and researchers are discussed. PMID:20183681

Preyde, Michèle; Synnott, Emily

2009-10-01

476

Early Psychosocial Risks for Adolescent Suicidal Ideation and Attempts  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveAn ongoing, 14-year, longitudinal community study examined psychosocial risks for adolescent suicidal ideation and attempts, as well as the link between earlier suicidal behavior and later functioning.

HELEN Z. REINHERZ; ROSE M. GIACONIA; AMY B. SILVERMAN; ARTHUR FRIEDMAN; BILGE PAKIZ; ABBIE K. FROST; ELAINE COHEN

1995-01-01

477

Insomnia and psychosocial crisis: Two studies of Erikson's developmental theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two studies examined the relevance of E. H. Erikson's (1959) developmental theory to understanding insomnia. Study 1 investigated the relationship between sleep disturbances in the elderly and the resolution of the psychosocial crisis of \\

Karen D. Wagner; Raymond P. Lorion; Thomas E. Shipley

1983-01-01

478

AYAs Are Not Alone: Confronting Psychosocial Challenges of Cancer  

Cancer.gov

Adolescents and young adults with cancer have unique and specific psychosocial needs. Getting support to meet those needs is critical for enabling AYAs to adapt and cope as they navigate the course of their illness and beyond.

479

Coping with Rosacea: Managing Psychosocial Aspects of Rosacea  

MedlinePLUS

... text size You are here Home Coping With Rosacea Managing Psychosocial Aspects of Rosacea The conspicuous redness, blemishes and swelling caused by ... constructive opportunities to create understanding. top Living With Rosacea Millions of people suffer from rosacea, yet increasing ...

480

Need for Cognition as a Predictor of Psychosocial Identity Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors examined the hypothesis that psychosocial identity development is related to need for cognition (NFC), a social-cognitive individual-difference variable defined as the desire to engage in effortful thinking (J. T. Cacioppo, R. E. Petty, J. Feinstein, & W. Jarvis, 1996). They administered 2 measures of psychosocial identity—a scale from the Extended Objective Measure of Ego Identity Status 2 (EOMEIS-2;

David Njus; Dan R. Johnson

2008-01-01

481

Psychologic and Psychosocial Factors Contributing to Chronic Pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article explores psychologic and psychosocial factors contributing to chronic pain including depression, seasonal affective\\u000a disorder, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, and anger.Also included are alexithymia and somatothymia, which are perhaps\\u000a less easily identified but can have a negative impact on treatment outcome. Psychosocial factors such as family influence\\u000a and litigation or compensation are also reviewed.

Janice M. Livengood

1999-01-01

482

Psychosocial interventions for dementia patients in long-term care  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Psychosocial interventions in long-term care have the potential to improve the quality of care and quality of life of persons with dementia. Our aim is to explore the evidence and consensus on psychosocial interventions for persons with dementia in long-term care. METHODS: This study comprises an appraisal of research reviews and of European, U.S. and Canadian dementia guidelines. RESULTS:

M. J. F. J. Vernooij-Dassen; E. Vasse; S. U. Zuidema; J. Cohen-Mansfield; W. Moyle

2010-01-01

483

Young child socioemotional/behavioral problems and cumulative psychosocial risk.  

PubMed

Limited information is available about the rates and risk correlates of socioemotional/behavioral problems in young children in pediatric primary care settings serving low-income families. Our objective was to determine rates of clinically significant socioemotional/behavior problems in 12- to 48-month-olds from low-income families and identify associations between problems and individual and cumulative demographic and psychosocial risks. In this study, 378 Spanish- and English-speaking mothers attending a pediatric primary care practice serving low-income families were surveyed before well-child visits to assess socioemotional/behavioral problems (Brief Infant-Toddler Social-Emotional Assessment; M.J. Briggs-Gowan & A.S. Carter, ) and psychosocial and demographic risks (e.g., unemployment, low social support) (Parent Risk Questionnaire; D.I. Lowell, A.S. Carter, L. Godoy, B. Paulicin, & M.J. Briggs-Gowan, ). We found that 19.8% of children had clinically significant problems, and 53.2% experienced one or more psychosocial risks. Clinically significant socioemotional/behavioral problems were modestly to strongly associated with individual psychosocial risks, with the strongest associations with parental medical problems, parent depression/anxiety, and extreme parental distress, Adjusted Relative Risk (ARR) = 4.8-6.6, p < .0001. Cumulative demographic and psychosocial risk were uniquely associated with clinically significant problems, particularly among children experiencing three to four psychosocial risks, ARR = 3.0-11.6, p < .05. Psychosocial risks affect the majority of low-income families with young children, with a steep increase in likelihood of clinically significant socioemotional/behavioral problems as risks accumulate, underscoring the need to address both socioemotional/behavioral issues and psychosocial risk in young children. PMID:25424401

Weitzman, Carol; Edmonds, Diana; Davagnino, Judith; Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J

2014-01-01

484

Psychosocial impact of visual impairment in working-age adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

AimTo review the evidence for the presence of lower levels of psychosocial well-being in working-age adults with visual impairment and for interventions to improve such levels of psychosocial well-being.MethodsSystematic review of quantitative studies published in English from 2001 to July 2008 that measured depression\\/mental health, anxiety, quality of life, social functioning or social support.ResultsIncluded were 29 studies that measured one

S. R. Nyman; M. A. Gosney; C. R. Victor

2009-01-01

485

Sedimentary Environments  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity is designed for students to learn about sedimentary environments. Students will learn about grain size, shape, and arrangement and how it relates to deciphering sedimentary environments. Students are given a sediment sample to analyze. They first examine the sample under the microscope and then will use sieves to separate the sediments into size classes. They will also take time to compare their sample versus another group's sample in the classroom. They will also have an opportunity to look at rock specimens representing sedimentary structures including mud cracks, cross bedding, and ripple marks. In the end, students should gain some skills at using basic observations and data collection to interpret the original depositional environment.

Dawson, John

486

National recommendations: Psychosocial management of diabetes in India  

PubMed Central

Although several evidence-based guidelines for managing diabetes are available, few, if any, focus on the psychosocial aspects of this challenging condition. It is increasingly evident that psychosocial treatment is integral to a holistic approach of managing diabetes; it forms the key to realizing appropriate biomedical outcomes. Dearth of attention is as much due to lack of awareness as due to lack of guidelines. This lacuna results in diversity among the standards of clinical practice, which, in India, is also due to the size and complexity of psychosocial care itself. This article aims to highlight evidence- and experience-based Indian guidelines for the psychosocial management of diabetes. A systemic literature was conducted for peer-reviewed studies and publications covering psychosocial aspects in diabetes. Recommendations are classified into three domains: General, psychological and social, and graded by the weight they should have in clinical practice and by the degree of support from the literature. Ninety-four recommendations of varying strength are made to help professionals identify the psychosocial interventions needed to support patients and their families and explore their role in devising support strategies. They also aid in developing core skills needed for effective diabetes management. These recommendations provide practical guidelines to fulfill unmet needs in diabetes management, and help achieve a qualitative improvement in the way physicians manage patients. The guidelines, while maintaining an India-specific character, have global relevance, which is bound to grow as the diabetes pandemic throws up new challenges. PMID:23869293

Kalra, Sanjay; Sridhar, G. R.; Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh; Sahay, Rakesh Kumar; Bantwal, Ganapathy; Baruah, Manash P.; John, Mathew; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalkrishnan; Madhu, K.; Verma, Komal; Sreedevi, Aswathy; Shukla, Rishi; Prasanna Kumar, K. M.

2013-01-01

487

Psychosocial assistance after environmental accidents: a policy perspective.  

PubMed Central

There is a substantial body of literature on psychosocial impacts of chemical and nuclear accidents. Less attention, however, has been focused on the program and policy issues that are connected with efforts to provide psychosocial assistance to the victims of such accidents. Because psychosocial assistance efforts are certain to be an essential part of the response to future environmental emergencies, it is vital that relevant program and policy issues by more fully considered. This article discusses the highly complex nature of contamination situations and highlights some of the key policy issues that are associated with the provision of psychosocial services after environmental accidents. One issue concerns the potential for assistance efforts to become objects of conflict. In the context of the intense controversy typically associated with chemical or nuclear accidents, and with debates over the causation of illness usually at the center of environmental accidents, psychosocial assistance services may themselves become contested terrain. Other significant program and policy issues include determining how to interface with citizen self-help and other voluntary groups, addressing the problem of stigma, and deciding how to facilitate stakeholder participation in the shaping of service provision. This article offers a series of policy proposals that may help smooth the way for psychosocial assistance programs in future environmental emergencies. PMID:9467082

Becker, S M

1997-01-01

488

Stimulation of systemic low-grade inflammation by psychosocial stress.  

PubMed

Psychosocial stress is an important precursor of disease and reduced quality of life in humans. The biological pathways between stress exposure and pathophysiological processes underlying disease have received substantial scientific attention, although the roles of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and sympathetic nervous system remain insufficiently understood. Recent attention has focused on chronic systemic low-grade inflammation as a promising pathway because elevated inflammation often accompanies chronic psychosocial distress. These alterations of inflammatory activity play a key role in the pathophysiology of diseases that are adversely affected by chronic distress, such as cardiovascular disease. Transient increases in systemic inflammation are observed in response to acute psychosocial stress, with larger responses among individuals reporting adverse psychosocial states or conditions such as depression, lower self-esteem, or lower self-compassion. Recent evidence shows that lower subjective social status and perceived purpose in life are associated with sensitization of inflammatory stress responses to repeated stress exposure. The aims of this selective review article are to summarize current knowledge of the role of acute and chronic psychosocial stress on low-grade inflammation in humans and to discuss potential relationships between inflammatory responses to acute psychosocial stress and long-term development of disease. PMID:24608036

Rohleder, Nicolas

2014-04-01

489

Psychosocial paediatric training in Iraq: perspectives of trainers and students.  

PubMed

There is an absence of education regarding psychosocial issues in Iraqi paediatric training programmes. The aim of this study is to examine current knowledge and perspectives around these topics and to explore potential development in these programmes. 56 paediatric trainers and students at the Child Central Teaching Hospital, a hospital affiliated to the Al-Mustansyria medical college in Baghdad, responded to a questionnaire to evaluate knowledge and perspectives regarding psychosocial approaches to child and adolescent health as delivered presently via academic training and used in professional practice. The majority of the respondents reported having no training in psychosocial interventions. Using a scale from 0 ('not relevant') to 10 ('very important'), psychosocial issues were rated 7.1 in their relevance to everyday paediatric practice. On a scale of 0 ('very poor') to 10 ('totally adequate'), respondents rated formal current psychosocial training at 2.5. It is concluded that incorporating psychosocial approaches in paediatric training will lead to a broader base of knowledge in children's health and contribute to the promotion of multidisciplinary practice in Iraq. PMID:23729097

Al-Obaidi, A K; Corcoran, T; Hussein, M A; Ghazi, A

2013-01-01

490

Connected Classroom Climate: A Validity Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Connected classroom climate, which focuses on the role of student–student communication in establishing a positive classroom climate, is a relatively new construct with the potential to enhance the understanding of classroom interaction. Results of this study support both the content and construct validity of Dwyer et al.'s (2004) Connected Classroom Climate Inventory as a measure of connected classroom climate. As

Danette Ifert Johnson

2009-01-01

491

The classroom space project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Classroom Space is a national education project funded by PPARC and run by the University of Leicester, in collaboration with the National Space Centre. It aims to revitalize science education at Key Stages 3 and 4 by using exciting examples from Space Science and Astronomy to illustrate key science concepts. The comprehensive classroom resources-which are available to download free of charge from the project website www.classroomspace.org.uk-are all linked to the National Curriculum and are fully self-contained. The materials are developed through partnership between space scientists, teachers and education professionals. The project was launched at the ASE Annual Meeting in January, and this paper summarizes the motivation for the project and its development, as well as looking forward to ideas for an extension to the project for which funding has been confirmed.

Verbickas, Sarah

2005-11-28

492

Everyday Classroom Tools  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Everyday Classroom Tools site has developed The Threads of Inquiry, an integrated inquiry-inspiring curriculum framework that brings science and the Internet into the everyday life of the K-6 classroom. Students are involved in 10 hands-on investigations that focus on the changing seasons, shadows, light, night and day, and the sun. Each thread is divided into 3 grade level sections (K-2, 2-4, and 4-6). Each investigation contains the title; purpose (how the thread fits into the curriculum, the National Science Standards that are stressed and vocabulary words); materials needed and time requirements; teacher background information; suggested fiction and nonfiction books and other Web sites; and development issues and inquiring investigation for each of the three grade levels. Assessments for the threads, additional activities and lessons, and journals from teachers who have participated in the investigations are included.

Anderson, Carl; Jones, Christine; Mandel, Eric; Astrophysics, Harvard-Smithsonian C.; Project, Nasa'S L.; Ruiz, Tania

2007-12-12

493

Classroom Assessment Techniques: Interviews  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page describes the technique of using interviews to assess student understanding. The assessment tool is one of a series of Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) provided by the Field-tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG) website. The CATs of FLAG were constructed as a resource for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) instructors to emphasize deeper levels of learning and to give instructors valuable feedback during a course. Interviews enable instructors to judge the extent of understanding students have developed with respect to a series of well-focused, conceptually-related scientific ideas. This site provides an overview of this assessment instrument including information about how to use classroom interviews to their maximum benefit. The site is also linked to a set of discipline-specific "tools" that can be downloaded for immediate use, as well as supplementary links and sources to further explore this assessment tool.

Smith, Mike U.; Southerland, Sherry A.; The National Institute for Science Education; College Level One Team

494

Improving classroom quality with the RULER Approach to Social and Emotional Learning: proximal and distal outcomes.  

PubMed

The RULER Approach to Social and Emotional Learning ("RULER") is designed to improve the quality of classroom interactions through professional development and classroom curricula that infuse emotional literacy instruction into teaching-learning interactions. Its theory of change specifies that RULER first shifts the emotional qualities of classrooms, which are then followed, over time, by improvements in classroom organization and instructional support. A 2-year, cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted to test hypotheses derived from this theory. Sixty-two urban schools either integrated RULER into fifth- and sixth-grade English language arts (ELA) classrooms or served as comparison schools, using their standard ELA curriculum only. Results from multilevel modeling with baseline adjustments and structural equation modeling support RULER's theory of change. Compared to classrooms in comparison schools, classrooms in RULER schools exhibited greater emotional support, better classroom organization, and more instructional support at the end of the second year of program delivery. Improvements in classroom organization and instructional support at the end of Year 2 were partially explained by RULER's impacts on classroom emotional support at the end of Year 1. These findings highlight the important contribution of emotional literacy training and development in creating engaging, empowering, and productive learning environments. PMID:23444004

Hagelskamp, Carolin; Brackett, Marc A; Rivers, Susan E; Salovey, Peter

2013-06-01

495

C-SPAN Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The C-SPAN in the classroom website is geared toward teachers of political science - or specifically U.S. Government. The site is split into six segments: Principles of Government, the Constitution, Political Participation and each of the three branches of government. Each of these sections features video clips, and questions for class discussion. Free site membership is available, but not required to use the site. Some additional content and services are available with membership.

496

Marine Mammal Classroom Activities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website features teachers' guides developed by Sea World featuring marine mammal educational materials for K-12. 14 different topics covered including sharks, wetlands, whales, birds, and much more. Several feature activities for all grade levels. Each guide includes goals and objectives, information, vocabulary, a bibliography, and classroom activities. Activities strive to integrate science, mathematics, geography, art, and language. Orca guide is also in Spanish.

497

CIESE Online Classroom Projects  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Teachers of all grades can use these projects to enhance their science curriculum through use of the Internet. Many projects utilize real time data, others draw from primary/historical information sources. In collaborative projects, students from around the world contribute data for comparison. Each project includes a brief description, teacher guide, standards, classroom activities, data source links, even online help. Many projects focus on water, water quality, weather, oceanography topics. Undergraduate science education is also featured.

498

Sustainable Seas Classroom Ideas  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Multimedia approach promotes ocean exploration and conservation. Underwater expeditions to National Marine Sanctuaries provide case studies and data for lesson plans. Topics include: biological oceanography; ocean regions and habitats; physical ocean process; human links to and impacts on the ocean; applications of oceanography. Virtual expeditions link the classroom experience with the individual National Marine Sanctuaries, research methods and technology, and researchers' experiences. Free, on-line teacher workshops feature top ocean researchers and policy makers.

499

Transactional Literature Circles and the Reading Comprehension of English Learners in the Mainstream Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines a problem that many mainstream teachers face today: how to successfully improve reading comprehension for English language learners (ELLs) in an English-only environment. The researcher examines both the academic and psychosocial effects of the Transactional Literature Circles (TLC) programme on a treatment group of 75 fourth…

McElvain, Cheryl Marie

2010-01-01

500

The construction of different classroom norms during Peer Instruction: Students perceive differences  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This paper summarizes variations in instructorsâ implementation practices during Peer Instruction (PI) and shows how these differences in practices shape different norms of classroom interaction. We describe variations in classroom norms along three dimensions of classroom culture that are integral to Peer Instruction, emphasis on: (1) faculty-student collaboration, (2) student-student collaboration, and (3) sense-making vs answer-making. Based on interpretations by an observing researcher, we place three different PI classrooms along a continuum representing a set of possible norms. We then check these interpretations against studentsâ perceptions of these environments from surveys collected at the end of the term. We find significant correspondence between the researchersâ interpretations and studentsâ perceptions of Peer Instruction in these environments. We find that variation in faculty practices can set up what students perceive as discernibly different norms. For interested instructors, concrete classroom practices are described that appear to encourage or discourage these norms.

Turpen, Chandra; Finkelstein, Noah D.

2012-05-21