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1

Physical and Psychosocial Environments Associated with Networked Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports a study of the learning environments in computer networked classrooms. The study is unique in that it involved an evaluation of both the physical and psychosocial classroom environments in these computerised settings through the use of a combination of questionnaires and ergonomic evaluations. The study involved administering…

Zandvliet, David B.; Fraser, Barry J.

2005-01-01

2

Development of an Instrument for Assessing Classroom Psychosocial Environment at Universities and Colleges.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The development and validation of a measure of classroom psychosocial environment based on student and teacher perceptions of seven environmental dimensions (personalization, involvement, student cohesiveness, satisfaction, task orientation, innovation, and individualization) of seminars and tutorials are described. (MSE)

Fraser, Barry J.; And Others

1986-01-01

3

Influence of Psychosocial Classroom Environment on Students' Motivation and Self-Regulation in Science Learning: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The primary aim of this study was two-fold: 1) to identify salient psychosocial features of the classroom environment that influence students' motivation and self-regulation in science learning; and 2) to examine the effect of the motivational constructs of learning goal orientation, science task value and self-efficacy in science learning on…

Velayutham, Sunitadevi; Aldridge, Jill M.

2013-01-01

4

Psychosocial Environment and Affective Outcomes in Technology-Rich Classrooms: Testing a Causal Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research investigated classroom environment antecedent variables and student affective outcomes in Australian high schools. The Technology-Rich Outcomes-Focused Learning Environment Inventory (TROFLEI) was used to assess 10 classroom environment dimensions: student cohesiveness, teacher support, involvement, investigation, task orientation,…

Dorman, Jeffrey P.; Fraser, Barry J.

2009-01-01

5

Using Classroom Psychosocial Environment in the Evaluation of Adult Computer Application Courses in Singapore  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews of past research on psychosocial learning environments show that relatively few studies have involved the use of environment dimensions either as criterion variables in the evaluation computer education programs or with adult learners (in contrast to elementary and secondary school students). This study is distinctive in that it used a…

Seng, Khoo Hock; Fraser, Barry J.

2008-01-01

6

Classroom Environment Instruments: Development, Validity and Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Few fields of educational research have such a rich diversity of valid, economical and widely-applicable assessment instruments as does the field of learning environments. This article describes nine major questionnaires for assessing student perceptions of classroom psychosocial environment (the Learning Environment Inventory, Classroom Environment Scale, Individualised Classroom Environment Questionnaire, My Class Inventory, College and University Classroom Environment Inventory, Questionnaire on

Barry J. Fraser

1998-01-01

7

Influence of Psychosocial Classroom Environment on Students' Motivation and Self-Regulation in Science Learning: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The primary aim of this study was two-fold: 1) to identify salient psychosocial features of the classroom environment that influence students' motivation and self-regulation in science learning; and 2) to examine the effect of the motivational constructs of learning goal orientation, science task value and self-efficacy in science learning on students' self-regulation in science classrooms. Data collected from 1360 science students in grades 8, 9 and 10 in five public schools in Perth, Western Australia were utilized to validate the questionnaires and to investigate the hypothesized relationships. Structural Equation Modeling analysis suggested that student cohesiveness, investigation and task orientation were the most influential predictors of student motivation and self-regulation in science learning. In addition, learning goal orientation, task value and self-efficacy significantly influenced students' self-regulation in science. The findings offer potential opportunities for educators to plan and implement effective pedagogical strategies aimed at increasing students' motivation and self-regulation in science learning.

Velayutham, Sunitadevi; Aldridge, Jill M.

2013-04-01

8

Classroom Psychosocial Environment and Course Experiences in Pre-Service Teacher Education Courses at an Australian University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research linking university students' perceptions of their classroom environment and course experiences was conducted in one Australian university. A sample of 495 students responded to the College and University Classroom Environment Inventory (CUCEI) and the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ). Multilevel regression analyses revealed that…

Dorman, Jeffrey P.

2014-01-01

9

Classroom Learning Environments and Effective Schooling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because traditional achievement measures do not give a complete picture of the educational process, consideration is given to important psychosocial aspects of classroom environments. This article makes several economical, hand-scorable classroom environment instruments readily accessible, and provides an overview of numerous past uses of these instruments including studies of the effects of classroom environment on student outcomes, use of environment

Barry J. Fraser

1987-01-01

10

Assessing the psychosocial environment of science classes in Catholic secondary schools  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Much Catholic school and church rhetoric suggests that Catholic schools possess distinctive learning environments. Research into this aspect of Catholic schooling has been hampered by the lack of an appropriate assessment instrument. By drawing on contemporary church literature, the perceptions of personnel involved in Catholic education and existing classroom environment questionnaires, a new instrument was developed to assess student perceptions of classroom psychosocial environment in Catholic schools. The use of this instrument in 64 classrooms in Catholic and Government schools indicated significant differences on some scales. The distinctive nature of Catholic schooling did not extend to all classroom environment dimensions deemed important to Catholic education.

Dorman, Jeffrey P.; McRobbie, Campbell J.; Fraser, Barry J.

1993-12-01

11

Validation and Application of the College and University Classroom Environment Inventory (CUCEI).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes the development, validation, and use of a research instrument, the College and University Classroom Environment Inventory (CUCEI), designed to assess the environment of small higher education classrooms. The instrument evaluates students' or instructors' perceptions of the following seven psychosocial dimensions of actual or…

Treagust, David F.; Fraser, Barry J.

12

Creating a Fair Classroom Environment  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Reduce your students' first day jitters by implementing these specific classroom management suggestions that are designed to reduce student anxiety and create a fair environment. These strategies will effectively help all students to participate and feel more at ease, and simultaneously help them to perceive you as a teacher who listens to their ideas and encourages thinking rather than as an unjust autocrat.

Richard Hand

2004-09-01

13

The Classroom Environment: First, Last, and Always  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The classroom environment is uppermost in teachers' minds at the start of each school year. Designing an effective classroom environment for learning to read and reading is both an art and a science. Aligning physical space with instructional goals involves the flexible use of space that is adapted to instructional needs. A well-designed classroom

Roskos, Kathleen; Neuman, Susan B.

2011-01-01

14

Assessing the Classroom Environment of the Virtual Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This pilot study was conducted in order to determine whether a virtual classroom can be assessed, and whether it can be done using already proven techniques for classroom environment assessment. Study participants were 20 graduate students in education enrolled in three different courses offered at a distance via the World Wide Web. Each of the…

Powers, Susan M.; Davis, Michaeleen; Torrence, Eileen

15

Effect of psychosocial environment in children having mother with schizophrenia.  

PubMed

The process of child?s mental development depends heavily on the social interrelationship between the mother and her child. Schizophrenia in mothers potentially disrupts mother-infant relationship and adaptation to motherhood. Literature is limited on evaluating the emotional and behavioral problems of children of mother having schizophrenia with nearly none from the Indian subcontinent. The aim of the current study was to examine the effect of psychosocial environment in children of females with schizophrenia. Thirty children of mothers suffering with schizophrenia were evaluated with Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview for children and adolescents. The psychosocial environment was assessed using Parent Interview Schedule. Control group of 30 children were evaluated in the same way as the cases. The children of female patients with schizophrenia were found to score significantly higher on internalizing and externalizing behavioral problems on CBCL as compared to control group, along with significant differences in the psychosocial environment between the groups. We conclude that there is a need for screening and evaluation of children of mothers diagnosed with schizophrenia, for identifying and managing possible mental and behavioral problems in them, and to assess the psychosocial environment and provide interventions for issues related to it. PMID:25700567

Malhotra, Mahima; Kumar, Deepak; Verma, Rohit

2015-04-30

16

Understanding and Improving Classroom Emotional Climate and Behavior Management in the “Real World”: The Role of Head Start Teachers' Psychosocial Stressors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research Findings: This article reports on two studies. Study 1 considered ways in which Head Start teachers' (n = 90) psychosocial stressors are related to teachers' ability to maintain a positive classroom emotional climate and effective behavior management in preschool classrooms. Study 2 tested the hypothesis that among teachers randomly assigned to a treatment condition (n = 48), psychosocial stressors

Christine Li Grining; C. Cybele Raver; Kina Champion; Latriese Sardin; Molly Metzger; Stephanie M. Jones

2010-01-01

17

Classroom goal orientation in high school classrooms: revealing links between teacher beliefs and classroom environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Uncovering how teachers’ beliefs about teaching and learning influence their instructional practices and students’ goals in the classroom is important for understanding how to create learning environments focused on mastery and understanding. Most of the previous research on this topic has investigated these relationships in teachers, classrooms and students at either the elementary, middle or college level. Using this research

Sandra Deemer

2004-01-01

18

Acoustics and psychosocial environment in intensive coronary care  

PubMed Central

Aims: To examine the influence of different acoustic conditions on the work environment and the staff in a coronary critical care unit (CCU). Method: Psychosocial work environment data from start and end of each individual shift were obtained from three shifts (morning, afternoon, and night) for a one-week baseline period and for two four-week periods during which either sound reflecting or sound absorbing tiles were installed. Results: Reverberation times and speech intelligibility improved during the study period when the ceiling tiles were changed from sound reflecting tiles to sound absorbing ones of identical appearance. Improved acoustics positively affected the work environment; the afternoon shift staff experienced significantly lower work demands and reported less pressure and strain. Conclusions: Important gains in the psychosocial work environment of healthcare can be achieved by improving room acoustics. The study points to the importance of further research on possible effects of acoustics in healthcare on staff turnover, quality of patient care, and medical errors. PMID:15723873

Blomkvist, V; Eriksen, C; Theorell, T; Ulrich, R; Rasmanis, G

2005-01-01

19

Creating an Inviting Classroom Environment. Fastback 433.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet presents suggestions for teachers, administrators, and parents about how to make a school better by improving the physical environment. Information comes from a study that analyzed environmental features which helped make a difference to students, teachers, and parents. During 1995-1997, two researchers examined classroom environments

Foster-Harrison, Elizabeth S.; Adams-Bullock, Ann

20

Mapping the Classroom Emotional Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Harvey and Evans (2003) have proposed that teachers' emotional skills, as required in the classroom, can be organized into a five-dimensional model. Further research is necessary to validate this model and evaluate the importance of each dimension of teacher emotion competence for educational practice. Using a statistical method for mapping…

Harvey, Shane T.; Bimler, David; Evans, Ian M.; Kirkland, John; Pechtel, Pia

2012-01-01

21

Family and School Psychosocial Environment (FSPE): development of a brief questionnaire measuring perceived psychosocial environments in children/siblings.  

PubMed

The aim of the study was to develop a short Swedish standardized, factor analyzed and cross-validated, family and school psychosocial environment questionnaire (FSPE). The study was based on 244 Swedish girls and boys, 10-19 years old, who filled in the FSPE. Maximum likelihood factor analysis, promax rotation, yielded six primary factors, based on absolute ratings. Since the factors were somewhat correlated, two broader secondary factors, with satisfactory reliabilities, were also included in the form, named Warmth, support and openness from parents, siblings and peers, and Family conflicts and school discipline, respectively. Means and standard deviations for girls and boys showed sex differences in most of the factors. Because the children participated anonymously they could report about spanking without negative consequences. Indeed, 8.1% of the children had been spanked by their parents. Based on relative ratings, two factors were identified, covering environmental questions about "more than, the same as or less than" a sibling. Only 6.6% of the children rated their environment exactly the same on the Family Psychosocial Environment (FPE) factors, compared to a sibling within the family. Thus the majority reported environmental differences. Further research is proposed to evaluate such differences and relations to personality, genotype-environment correlation and genetic mediation. PMID:21332485

Persson, Bertil

2011-06-01

22

Arm Gesture Detection in a Classroom Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Detecting human arm motion in a typical classroom environment is a challenging task due to the noisy and highly dynamic background, varying light conditions, as well as the small size and multiple number of possible matched objects. A robust vision system that can detect events of students' hands being raised for asking questions is described. This system is intended to

Jie Yao; Jeremy R. Cooperstock

2002-01-01

23

Learning Environment Profiles of Turkish Secondary Biology Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purposes of this study were to examine how Turkish students perceived their biology classroom environment, how their perceptions compared to those of students in other countries, and what classroom learning environment profiles could be discerned in Turkish high school biology classrooms. Data were gathered from 1,474 high school students in…

den Brok, Perry; Telli, Sibel; Cakiroglu, Jale; Taconis, Ruurd; Tekkaya, Ceren

2010-01-01

24

The Learning Environment Associated with Information Technology Education in Taiwan: Combining Psychosocial and Physical Aspects  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated perceptions of senior high school students towards the Taiwanese information technology (IT) classroom with the What Is Happening in this Class? (WIHIC) survey and explored the physical learning environment of the IT classroom using the Computerised Classroom Environment Inventory (CCEI). The participants included 2,869…

Liu, Chia-Ju; Zandvliet, David B.; Hou, I.-Ling

2012-01-01

25

Classroom Atmosphere in College: Improving the Teaching/Learning Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Focusing on problems in the teaching/learning process related to the classroom atmosphere, this book demonstrates problems related to gender bias in the classroom, discusses the implications of these and other problems, and offers suggestions for improving the teaching/learning environment. The first section describes the importance of classroom

McGlynn, Angela Provitera

26

A model of psychosocial work environment, stress, and satisfaction among dental students in Sweden.  

PubMed

Dental students are often described as stressed. The stress has, among other things, been connected to stressors in their psychosocial environment and inconsistent feedback. The hypothesis of this study was that the psychosocial work environment in dental schools leads to stress and affects the satisfaction of dental students and that tolerance for ambiguity shields students from stress. A web-based survey was sent to the entire Swedish dental student population in clinical training (N=805); the response rate was 40 percent. Structural equation modeling used in the analyses contains four main constructs: psychosocial work environment, tolerance for ambiguity, perceived stress, and student satisfaction (?(2)=267.437, d.f.=174, p<0.001, Normed ?(2)=1.537, RMSEA= 0.041, CFI=0.98). Psychosocial work environment influenced both perceived stress and satisfaction: it accounted for almost all of the explained variance in perceived stress for women, while about half of the variance for the men was explained by tolerance for ambiguity. This study concluded that about 40 percent of the total perceived stress of these female dental students was related to their psychosocial work environment. Tolerance for ambiguity shielded men but not women from stress. An improved psychosocial work environment in dental schools would decrease the stress of both male and female dental students. PMID:22942417

Schéle, Ingrid A; Hedman, Leif R; Hammarström, Anne

2012-09-01

27

Workplace gender composition and psychological distress: the importance of the psychosocial work environment  

PubMed Central

Background Health consequences of the gender segregated labour market have previously been demonstrated in the light of gender composition of occupations and workplaces, with somewhat mixed results. Associations between the gender composition and health status have been suggested to be shaped by the psychosocial work environment. The present study aims to analyse how workplace gender composition is related to psychological distress and to explore the importance of the psychosocial work environment for psychological distress at workplaces with different gender compositions. Methods The study population consisted of participants from the Northern Swedish Cohort with a registered workplace in 2007 when the participants were 42 years old (N?=?795). Questionnaire data were supplemented with register data on the gender composition of the participants’ workplaces divided into three groups: workplaces with more women, mixed workplaces, and workplaces with more men. Associations between psychological distress and gender composition were analysed with multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusting for socioeconomic position, previous psychological distress, psychosocial work environment factors and gender. Logistic regression analyses (including interaction terms for gender composition and each work environment factor) were also used to assess differential associations between psychosocial work factor and psychological distress according to gender composition. Results Working at workplaces with a mixed gender composition was related to a higher likelihood of psychological distress compared to workplaces with more men, after adjustments for socioeconomic position, psychological distress at age 21, psychosocial work environment factors and gender. Psychosocial work environment factors did not explain the association between gender composition and psychological distress. Conclusions The association between gender composition and psychological distress cannot be explained by differences in the perception of the psychosocial work environment and thus the work environment hypothesis is not supported. Workplaces with a mixed gender composition needs further research attention to explain the negative development of psychological distress during working life for both women and men at these workplaces. PMID:24612791

2014-01-01

28

The Columbia Classroom Environments Project.... Second Progress Report, February 1971.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report discusses the Columbia Classroom Environments Project Autonomy in Learning An Exploration of Pupils' and Teachers Roles in Different Classroom Environments to develop Criteria and Procedures for Evaluation in Project Follow Through. The report begins with a discussion of a set of matrices which combine all of the behavior code…

Grannis, Joseph C.

29

Classroom Environment, Achievement Goals and Maths Performance: Gender Differences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated how gender shapes the relationships between classroom environment, achievement goals and maths performance. Seventh-grade students ("N"?=?498) from five urban secondary schools filled in achievement goal orientations and classroom environment scales at the beginning of the second semester. Maths performance was assessed as…

Gherasim, Loredana Ruxandra; Butnaru, Simona; Mairean, Cornelia

2013-01-01

30

Associations between Psychosocial Environments in Religious Education Classes and Students' Attitude toward Christianity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the past thirty years, independent lines of research in the fields of classroom environment and student attitudes toward Christianity have been conducted. This research brought these two fields together by investigating the relationship between student perceptions of religion classroom environment and their attitudes toward Christianity. A…

Dorman, Jeffrey P.; Mcrobbie, Campbell J.; Foster, William J.

2002-01-01

31

Psychosocial Learning Environments and the Mediating Effect of Personal Meaning upon Satisfaction with Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports the quantitative phase of a mixed-methods study that was conducted to investigate the relationships between psychosocial learning environments and student satisfaction with their education as mediated by Agentic Personal Meaning. The interdisciplinary approach of the study integrated the fields of learning environment

Smith, Prapanna Randall

2013-01-01

32

The Relationship between Gender and Classroom Environment in Turkish Science Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of gender between actual and preferred classroom environment and use of technology in the science classroom of Turkish students. Employing stratified random sampling procedures, data were collected from 985 students from schools across twelve different districts in Istanbul, Turkey. The…

Welch, Anita G.; Cakir, Mustafa; Peterson, Claudette M.; Ray, Christopher M.

2014-01-01

33

Learning Environments in Information and Communications Technology Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study of learning environments provides a useful research framework for investigating the effects of educational innovations such as those which are associated with the use of the Internet in classroom settings. This study reports an investigation into the use of Internet technologies in high-school classrooms in Australia and Canada.…

Zandvliet, David B.; Fraser, Barry J.

2004-01-01

34

Controlling the Thermal Environment of the Co-ordinated Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The classroom environment is a working surround in which children, through participating in organized experiences, can grow and develop in an optimum manner. Classroom design requires organization of principles of environmental control in order to assure efficient and successful performance. This control cannot be left to chance. In considering…

Harmon, Darell Boyd

35

Does change process healthiness reduce the negative effects of organizational change on the psychosocial work environment?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aimed to investigate whether the detrimental effects of organizational change on the psychosocial work environment are reduced by the “healthiness” of change processes. This includes the management's awareness that the change may be experienced differently by various individuals and groups (diversity); availability of the manager during the process; the degree to which conflicts are resolved constructively; and the

Sturle D. Tvedt; Per Øystein Saksvik; Kjell Nytrø

2009-01-01

36

An Exploration of the Psychosocial Aspects of Weight among College Students in the College Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the study was to explore the psychosocial aspects of weight and the daily-lived experiences of college students within the college environment. Two research questions guided this qualitative research: (a) How, and in what ways, does perception of weight influence identity development among college students before and during college;…

Johnson, Jacqueline G.

2012-01-01

37

Science Laboratory Classroom Environments in Korean High Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In order to investigate the learning environment of senior high school science laboratory classrooms in Korea, the Science Laboratory Environment Inventory (SLEI) was translated into Korean and administered to 439 students (99 science-independent stream students, 195 science-oriented stream students and 145 humanities stream students). Data…

Fraser, Barry J.; Lee, Sunny S. U.

2009-01-01

38

Adaptive use patterns of secondary school classroom environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this research is to investigate how secondary school teachers adaptively make use of the classroom learning environment. The approach illustrates the intimate relationship between teaching style, learning style and the adaptive use of space as well as the preferences for different learning environments. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A multi method study approach was used to carry out

Aleksander Sztejnberg; Edward F. Finch

2006-01-01

39

Neighborhood psychosocial environment, apolipoprotein E genotype, and cognitive function in older adults  

PubMed Central

Context The social environment may influence cognitive function in aging. However, to our knowledge, no studies have investigated whether specific genes modify this association. Objective To examine whether the apolipoprotein E (APOE) epsilon-4 allele modified the associations of neighborhood psychosocial hazards and cognitive function. Design A cross-sectional analysis. Setting The Baltimore Memory Study, a population-based sample of older urban residents. The 65 study neighborhoods in Baltimore city were characterized using the Neighborhood Psychosocial Hazards scale, designed to assess social disorganization, physical disorder, public safety, and economic deprivation. Participants One thousand one hundred forty urban residents aged 50 to 70 years at baseline. Main Outcome Measures Cognitive performance on 20 standard tests was measured and combined to form 7 summary domain scores (language, processing speed, eye-hand coordination, executive functioning, verbal memory and learning, visual memory, and visuoconstruction). Results In analyses fully adjusted for individual covariates, we found that high (i.e., worse) neighborhood psychosocial hazards were not consistently associated with worse cognitive performance. However, the interaction of high neighborhood psychosocial hazards and APOE ?4 genotype was found to be associated with worse cognitive domain scores, with evidence of associations in the domains of processing speed (p = 0.02) and executive functioning (p < 0.001). Suggestive evidence was also found for eye-hand coordination (p = 0.05). Conclusion Living in a psychosocially hazardous neighborhood was associated with worse cognitive function in persons with the APOE ?4 allele, evidence of a novel gene x environment interaction. PMID:21383266

Lee, Brian K.; Glass, Thomas A.; James, Bryan D.; Bandeen-Roche, Karen; Schwartz, Brian S.

2012-01-01

40

Psychosocial Characteristics of Optimum Performance in Isolated and Confined Environments (ICE)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Behavioral Health and Performance (BHP) Element addresses human health risks in the NASA Human Research Program (HRP), including the Risk of Adverse Behavioral Conditions and the Risk of Psychiatric Disorders. BHP supports and conducts research to help characteristics and mitigate the Behavioral Medicine risk for exploration missions, and in some instances, current Flight Medical Operations. The Behavioral Health and Performance (BHP) Element identified research gaps within the Behavioral Medicine Risk, including Gap BMed6: What psychosocial characteristics predict success in an isolated, confined environment (ICE)? To address this gap, we conducted an extensive and exhaustive literature review to identify the following: 1) psychosocial characteristics that predict success in ICE environments; 2) characteristics that are most malleable; and 3) specific countermeasures that could enhance malleable characteristics.

Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Keeton, Kathryn E.; Shea, Camille; Leveton, Lauren B.

2010-01-01

41

Psychosocial work environment and sickness absence among British civil servants: the Whitehall II study.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES. This study sought to examine the association between the psychosocial work environment and subsequent rates of sickness absence. METHODS. The analyses were based on a cohort of male and female British civil servants (n=9072). Rates of short spells (7 days) of sickness absence were calculated for different aspects of the psychosocial work environment, as measured by self-reports and personnel managers' ratings (external assessments). RESULTS. Low levels of work demands, control, and support were associated with higher rates of short and long spells of absence in men and, to a lesser extent, in women. The differences were similar for the self-reports and external assessments. After adjustment for grade of employment, the differences were diminished but generally remained significant for short spells. The combination of high demands and low control was only associated with higher rates of short spells in the lower grades. CONCLUSIONS. The psychosocial work environment predicts rates of sickness absence. Increased levels of control and support at work could have beneficial effects in terms of both improving the health and well-being of employees and increasing productivity. PMID:8604757

North, F M; Syme, S L; Feeney, A; Shipley, M; Marmot, M

1996-01-01

42

Classroom Resiliency--A Comparison of Navajo Elementary Students' Perceptions of Their Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a gender difference in how students perceived their classroom environment on the Navajo Nation public school. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be…

Piechowski, Alta Begay

2011-01-01

43

Parental Involvement in Schooling, Classroom Environment and Student Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We investigated relationships between students' perceptions of parental involvement in schooling, their Spanish classroom environment and student outcomes (attitudes and achievement). Modified Spanish versions of the What Is Happening In this Class?, Test of Spanish-Related Attitudes-L[subscript 1], a parental involvement questionnaire and a…

Adamski, Aurora; Fraser, Barry J.; Peiro, Maria M.

2013-01-01

44

A Brave New World: Synchronous Environments in the Literature Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Internet may be the ultimate immersive and participatory medium, opening doors as it does to countless story worlds. As such, it has much to offer reading instruction in both elementary and secondary classrooms. This paper explores how a teacher used one web application--a text-based virtual environment called a MOO--to encourage his high…

Rozema, Robert

45

Quantifying Error in Survey Measures of School and Classroom Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developing indicators that reflect important aspects of school and classroom environments has become central in a nationwide effort to develop comprehensive programs that measure teacher quality and effectiveness. Formulating teacher evaluation policy necessitates accurate and reliable methods for measuring these environmental variables. This…

Schweig, Jonathan David

2014-01-01

46

Setting of Classroom Environments for Hearing Impaired Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper aims to explain effects of acoustical environments in sound perception of hearing impaired people. Important aspects of sound and hearing impairment are explained. Detrimental factors in acoustic conditions for speech perception are mentioned. Necessary acoustic treatment in classrooms and use of FM systems to eliminate these factors…

Turan, Zerrin

2007-01-01

47

Classroom Social Environments, Motivational Beliefs, and Student Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the relationship between features of the social classroom environment (teacher support, student support, teacher promotion of interaction) and three types of student engagement (behavioral, emotional, cognitive) in mathematics, mediated by motivational beliefs (mastery goal orientation, self-efficacy), with a focus on student…

Ferrell, Amanda

2012-01-01

48

Technology-Supported Learning Environments in Science Classrooms in India  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The adoption of technology has created a major impact in the field of education at all levels. Technology-supported classroom learning environments, involving modern information and communication technologies, are also entering the Indian educational system in general and the schools in Jammu region (Jammu & Kashmir State, India) in particular.…

Gupta, Adit; Fisher, Darrell

2012-01-01

49

A Prospective Study Investigating the Links among Classroom Environment, School Connectedness, and Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

School connectedness and classroom environment have both been strongly linked to depressive symptoms, but their interrelation is unclear. We tested whether school connectedness mediated the link between classroom environment and depressive symptoms. A sample of 504 Australian seventh-and eighth-grade students completed the Classroom Environment

Shochet, Ian M.; Smith, Coral L.

2014-01-01

50

Psychosocial work environment factors and weight change: a prospective study among Danish health care workers  

PubMed Central

Background Lifestyle variables may serve as important intermediate factors between psychosocial work environment and health outcomes. Previous studies, focussing on work stress models have shown mixed and weak results in relation to weight change. This study aims to investigate psychosocial factors outside the classical work stress models as potential predictors of change in body mass index (BMI) in a population of health care workers. Methods A cohort study, with three years follow-up, was conducted among Danish health care workers (3982 women and 152 men). Logistic regression analyses examined change in BMI (more than +/? 2?kg/m2) as predicted by baseline psychosocial work factors (work pace, workload, quality of leadership, influence at work, meaning of work, predictability, commitment, role clarity, and role conflicts) and five covariates (age, cohabitation, physical work demands, type of work position and seniority). Results Among women, high role conflicts predicted weight gain, while high role clarity predicted both weight gain and weight loss. Living alone also predicted weight gain among women, while older age decreased the odds of weight gain. High leadership quality predicted weight loss among men. Associations were generally weak, with the exception of quality of leadership, age, and cohabitation. Conclusion This study of a single occupational group suggested a few new risk factors for weight change outside the traditional work stress models. PMID:23327287

2013-01-01

51

Differential exposure and differential vulnerability as counteracting forces linking the psychosocial work environment to socioeconomic health differences  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundIn this article, the link between (1) psychosocial working conditions (job demands, job autonomy, task variation, social support), (2) self-reported health (persistent fatigue, musculoskeletal complaints, emotional well-being) and (3) socioeconomic position (skill levels, occupational status) is explored. The two theoretical pathways linking the psychosocial work environment to socioeconomic differences in health are explored: differential exposure and differential vulnerability. Previously, the

C. Vanroelen; K. Levecque; F. Louckx

2009-01-01

52

Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents K-12 and college classrooms considered outstanding in a competition, which judged the most outstanding learning environments at educational institutions nationwide. Jurors spent two days reviewing projects, focusing on concepts and ideas that made them exceptional. For each citation, the article offers information on the firm, client,…

American School & University, 2003

2003-01-01

53

Psychosocial work environment, stress factors and individual characteristics among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care.  

PubMed

The psychosocial work environment is an important factor in psychiatric in-patient care, and knowing more of its correlates might open up new paths for future workplace interventions. Thus, the aims of the present study were to investigate perceptions of the psychosocial work environment among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care and how individual characteristics--Mastery, Moral Sensitivity, Perceived Stress, and Stress of Conscience--are related to different aspects of the psychosocial work environment. A total of 93 nursing staff members filled out five questionnaires: the QPSNordic 34+, Perceived Stress Scale, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire, Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire, and Mastery scale. Multivariate analysis showed that Perceived Stress was important for Organisational Climate perceptions. The Stress of Conscience subscale Internal Demands and Experience in current units were indicators of Role Clarity. The other Stress of Conscience subscale, External Demands and Restrictions, was related to Control at Work. Two types of stress, Perceived Stress and Stress of Conscience, were particularly important for the nursing staff's perception of the psychosocial work environment. Efforts to prevent stress may also contribute to improvements in the psychosocial work environment. PMID:24448633

Hanna, Tuvesson; Mona, Eklund

2014-01-01

54

Person-Environment Interaction in the Virtual Classroom: An Initial Examination.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This pilot study explores the perceptions of distance education students of their classroom environment using the College/University Classroom Environment Inventory (CUCEI), a traditional classroom assessment tool. The CUCEI has seven scales that cover the areas of personalization, involvement, student cohesiveness, satisfaction, task orientation,…

Powers, Susan M.; Davis, Michaeleen; Torrence, Eileen

55

The Effect of Clustering on Statistical Tests: An Illustration Using Classroom Environment Data  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the effect of clustering on statistical tests and illustrates this effect using classroom environment data. Most classroom environment studies involve the collection of data from students nested within classrooms and the hierarchical nature to these data cannot be ignored. In particular, this paper studies the influence of…

Dorman, Jeffrey Paul

2008-01-01

56

Physical and Psychosocial Aspects of the Learning Environment in the Science Laboratory and Their Relationship to Teacher Satisfaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper is a report of a survey conducted to determine teachers' perception of the science laboratory learning environment and the relationship between different aspects of this environment and satisfaction from teaching and learning. Teachers' perceptions of psychosocial aspects were measured by use of the Science Laboratory…

Che Ahmad, Che Nidzam; Osman, Kamisah; Halim, Lilia

2013-01-01

57

What do police officers value in the classroom? : A qualitative study of the classroom social environment in law enforcement education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This qualitative study seeks to gather rich, narrative data from police officers on the social environment of law enforcement classrooms and the classroom experiences valued most by law enforcement officers. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The study used interview data from a focus group, as well as individual interviews. Findings – Data revealed one predominant theme, students' preference for adult education

Janet R. Oliva; Michael T. Compton

2010-01-01

58

Neighborhood food environment role in modifying psychosocial stress-diet relationships  

PubMed Central

Exposure to highly palatable foods may increase eating in response to stress, but this behavioral response has not been examined in relation to the neighborhood food environment. This study examined whether the neighborhood food environment modified relationships between psychosocial stress and dietary behaviors. Probability-sample survey (n=460) and in-person food environment audit data were used. Dietary behaviors were measured using 17 snack food items and a single eating-out-of-home item. Chronic stress was derived from five subscales; major life events was a count of 9 items. The neighborhood food environment was measured as availability of large grocery stores, small grocery stores, and convenience stores, as well as proportion of restaurants that were fast food. Two-level hierarchical regression models were estimated. Snack food intake was positively associated with convenience store availability and negatively associated with large grocery store availability. The measures of chronic stress and major life events were generally not associated with either dietary behavior overall, although Latinos were less likely to eat out at high levels of major life events than African Americans. Stress-neighborhood food environment interactions were not statistically significant. Important questions remain regarding the role of the neighborhood food environment in the stress-diet relationship that warrant further investigation. PMID:23415977

Zenk, Shannon N.; Schulz, Amy J.; Izumi, Betty T.; Mentz, Graciela; Israel, Barbara A.; Lockett, Murlisa

2013-01-01

59

Environment for Learning: The Application of Selected Research to Classroom Design and Utilization.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Various factors of the classroom environment that can contribute to a more complete learning atmosphere are explored. The author presents a review of certain research findings that may serve as guidelines in the development of an environmentally coordinated classroom. The importance of providing a classroom which promotes a multisensory approach…

McVey, G.F.

60

Bringing the Background to the Foreground: What Do Classroom Environments That Support Authentic Discussions Look Like?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Authentic discussions are dialogically oriented classroom interactions where participants present and consider multiple perspectives and often use others’ input in constructing their contributions. Despite their instructional effectiveness, authentic discussions are reportedly rare in classrooms. This qualitative case study examines the features of the environment of a fifth-grade classroom community where authentic discussions were frequent. The examination used recorded class sessions,

Xenia Hadjioannou

2007-01-01

61

Use of Classroom and School Environment Scales in Evaluating Alternative High Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this research, some alternative high schools were evaluated in terms of both students' perceptions of classroom environment and teachers' perceptions of school environment. A sample of 742 students in 62 classes in alternative and conventional schools responded to the College and University Classroom Environment Inventory's seven scales…

Williamson, John C.; And Others

62

A Web-Based Classroom Environment for Enhanced Residential College Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In this paper, we describe a web based virtual classroom environment, called WTS (Web-based Teaching Support), to enhance\\u000a classroom based residential teaching and learning. WTS implements an online view of physical classrooms with the “desks” and\\u000a “seats”. Teaching information associated with “classrooms” is managed by a database system. WTS also includes such capabilities\\u000a as online attendance check, personalized notification for

Kai Cheng; Limin Xiang; Toyohiko Hirota; Kazuo Ushijima

2005-01-01

63

Secondary Pre-Service Teachers' Perceptions of an Ideal Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The classroom environment can impact students' motivation and engagement, and can influence students' academic learning. In some cases, pre-service teachers' influence on the classroom environment may not always be conducive for student learning. This exploratory study investigated pre-service teachers' perceptions of an ideal…

Bartelheim, Frederick J.; Conn, Daniel R.

2014-01-01

64

It's Safe to Be Smart: Strategies for Creating a Supportive Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Gifted teenagers in middle and high school benefit from classroom environments that support their social and emotional development. Teachers of gifted adolescents may create classroom environments in which young people know it is safe to be smart and where they feel valued and respected for their intellect, creativity, and passions. By utilizing…

Hébert, Thomas P.; Corcoran, Jamie A.; Coté, John M.; Ene, Mihaela C.; Leighton, Elizabeth A.; Holmes, Ashley M.; Padula, Diane D.

2014-01-01

65

Effects of Classroom Environment on Science Attitudes: A Crosscultural Replication in Indonesia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A three-phase study, with a different sample for each phase, involved a total of 1125 secondary school students in Indonesia. The first phase involving 373 grade 8 and 9 students was used to develop and validate an Indonesian classroom environment instrument with eight scales based on the Individualized Classroom Environment Questionnaire and the…

Schibeci, Renato; And Others

66

An Examination of Classroom Social Environment on Motivation and Engagement of College Early Entrant Honors Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study set out to examine the relationships between the classroom social environment, motivation, engagement and achievement of a group of early entrant Honors students at a large urban university. Prior research on the classroom environment, motivation, engagement and high ability students was examined, leading to the assumption that the…

Maddox, Richard S.

2010-01-01

67

Actual Condition Survey and Evaluation on Acoustic Environment of Open Type Classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

An acoustic environment of open type elementary school has often been reported about sound problems to be solved. Noting such a situation, we have been studying on actual condition of these type schools, such as acoustic characteristics of classroom, sound transmission between classrooms and user's consciousness about acoustic environment. As a series of our studies, we grasped acoustic problems quantitatively

Yuzo Tsuchiya; Tadao Fukuyama; Katsuo Inoue; Yoshio Yamasaki

68

A Cross-National Study of Secondary Science Classroom Environments in Australia and Indonesia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article reports a cross-national study of classroom environments in Australia and Indonesia. A modified version of the What Is Happening In this Class? (WIHIC) questionnaire was used simultaneously in these two countries to: 1) crossvalidate the modified WIHIC; 2) investigate differences between countries and sexes in perceptions of classroom environment; and 3) investigate associations between students’ attitudes to science and their perceptions of classroom environment. The sample consisted of 1,161 students (594 students from 18 classes in Indonesia and 567 students from 18 classes in Australia). Principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation supported the validity of a revised structure for the WIHIC. Two-way MANOVA revealed some differences between countries and between sexes in students’ perceptions of their classroom environments. Simple correlation and multiple regression analyses revealed generally positive associations between the classroom environment and student attitudes to science in both countries.

Fraser, Barry J.; Aldridge, Jill M.; Adolphe, F. S. Gerard

2010-08-01

69

Toward a critical approach to the study of learning environments in science classrooms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Traditional learning environment research in science classrooms has been built on survey methods meant to measure students' and teachers' perceptions of variables used to define the learning environment. This research has led mainly to descriptions of learning environments. We argue that learning environment research should play a transformative role in science classrooms; that learning environment research should take into account contemporary post-positivist ways of thinking about learning and teaching to assist students and teachers to construct a more emancipatory learning environment. In particular, we argue that a critical perspective could lead to research playing a larger role in the transformation of science classroom learning environments. This argument is supplemented with an example from a middle school science classroom.

Lorsbach, Anthony; Tobin, Kenneth

1995-03-01

70

Psychosocial environment and health: methodological variability of the salivary cortisol measurements.  

PubMed

Salivary cortisol offers a novel approach to understand the relationship between psychosocial environment and health. This study examines the intra-individual relationships among indicators of the cortisol circadian rhythm and investigates the influence of determinants affecting the day-to-day variability of the cortisol measures. Over three weekdays, 87 healthy subjects (63 females and 24 males) collected saliva samples at seven time points to assess the cortisol awakening response (CAR), and to evaluate the post morning cortisol profile. The generalized estimating equations method was used to explore the relations between repeated cortisol measures and potential determinants (sociodemographic, health, and sampling factors) influencing salivary cortisol levels. Younger age, being smoker, and sampling on a working day were associated with higher at awakening and total cortisol excretion in the morning period. Higher overall cortisol excretion and cortisol increase in the first hour of the day were found for adherents to sampling procedure. Higher educational level was found associated with greater total cortisol excretion in the morning and post morning period, while a flatter diurnal slope was found in smokers. Results are consistent with the knowledge that the circadian cortisol rhythm is differentially determined by situational factors and that results obtained in the early morning hour are of crucial importance corroborating the evidence that the CAR is a highly state-dependent phenomenon. These data indicate that many confounding factors need to be controlled when using salivary cortisol as biomarker of the mind-health interrelationship. PMID:21896319

Maina, Giovanni; Bovenzi, Massimo; Palmas, Antonio; Rossi, Federica; Filon, Francesca Larese

2012-08-13

71

From the Roots of Psychosocial Practice-Therapeutic Use of Self in the Classroom: Practical Applications for Occupational Therapy Faculty  

Microsoft Academic Search

The roots of occupational therapy stem from psychosocial practice and embrace concepts of humanism, client-centered practice and therapeutic use of self. These concepts are integral to both clinical and academic settings. As the profession has moved toward graduate level education, increased numbers of non-traditional students are entering the field. Models of teaching that incorporate principles of active learning and therapeutic

Kristine Haertl

2008-01-01

72

Effects of teachers' assessment practices on ninth grade students' perceptions of classroom assessment environment and achievement goal orientations in Muscat science classrooms in the Sultanate of Oman  

Microsoft Academic Search

Classroom assessment is a continual activity for teachers to improve the quality of instruction and motivate students to learn (Brookhart, 1999; Gronlund, 2006). Although there is a great deal of research on teachers' classroom assessment practices, few empirical research attempts have been made to link these practices to students' perceptions of classroom assessment environment and motivation defined in terms of

Hussain A. Al Kharusi

2007-01-01

73

Psychosocial Communication and Computerization.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the effect of computerization of the work environment on psychosocial communication. The RAM program, developed at Stockholm University to explore the effect of computers on the structure of organizations and the psychosocial work environment, is described; theoretical models are explained; and the future use of knowledge-based systems…

Bradley, Gunilla; And Others

1993-01-01

74

Power in the Classroom: How the Classroom Environment Shapes Students' Relationships with Each Other and with Concepts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Changes in participant structures in classroom environments are often examined in terms of their effects on student learning. In this study, we proposed a way of examining participant structures in terms of power. According to Wertsch (1998) "the emergence of new cultural tools transforms power and authority" (p. 65). When researchers or teachers…

Cornelius, Lindsay L.; Herrenkohl, Leslie Rupert

2004-01-01

75

Teacher Attitudes, Perceived Influences, and Self-Reported Classroom Behaviors Related to School Nutrition Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study determined attitudes of kindergarten through fifth grade teachers about school nutrition environments, their perceived influence on school nutrition environments, and self-reported classroom behaviors. Specific objectives were to: (a) identify perceived factors that influence the school nutrition environment, according to teachers surveyed; (b) examine relationships between elementary school teacher attitudes about school nutrition environments and perceived influence on the

Beverly Lawler Girard

2010-01-01

76

Evaluation of a K-5 Mathematics Program Which Integrates Children's Literature: Classroom Environment, Achievement and Attitudes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes a 1-year study of 120 fifth-grade students whose teachers participated in a program entitled Project SMILE (Science and Math Integrated with Literary Experiences). The purpose of the study was to determine the extent to which the classroom implementation of Project SMILE positively influenced the classroom environment and…

Mink, Deborah V.; Fraser, Barry J.

77

Management of the Physical Environment in the Classroom and Gymnasium: It's Not "That" Different  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article extends information from a text by Weinstein and Mignano (2003) to address classroom organization in terms of the physical environment. That text is an extrapolation of Steele's (1973) outline of six functions within the classroom setting: (1) security and shelter; (2) social contact; (3) symbolic identification; (4) pleasure; (5)…

Culp, Brian

2006-01-01

78

Promoting kindergarten children’s creativity in the classroom environment in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aimed at investigating teachers’ classroom practices, which either stimulate or inhibit the development of the creative environment of classrooms in Jordan, and determining the differences between practices according to educational level, experience level and type of teaching. The sample of the study consisted of 215 kindergarten teachers. A five?dimensional questionnaire consisting of 50 items was developed to achieve

Kholoud Dababneh; Fathi M. Ihmeideh

2010-01-01

79

Powerful Learning Environments: The Critical Link between School and Classroom Cultures.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evaluated classrooms within four Accelerated Schools Project (ASP) schools, operationalizing the ASP principles, values, and concepts of a "powerful learning environment" (PLE), examining how similarly PLE was implemented in different classrooms and schools, and analyzing the relation between degree of implementation and differences in students'…

Finnan, Christine; Schnepel, Katherine C.; Anderson, Lorin W.

2003-01-01

80

Sound-Field Amplification: Enhancing the Classroom Listening Environment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sound-field amplification is an educational tool that allows control of the acoustic environment in a classroom. Teachers wear small microphones that transmit sound to a receiver system attached to loudspeakers around the classroom. The goal of sound-field amplification is to amplify the teacher's voice by a few decibels, and to provide uniform…

Massie, Robyn; Theodoros, Deborah; McPherson, Bradley; Smaldino, Joseph

2004-01-01

81

Student Perceptions of Classroom Learning Environments: Development of the ClassMaps Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to describe the means, variability, internal consistency reliability, and structural validity evidence of the ClassMaps Survey, a measure of student perceptions of classroom learning environments. The ClassMaps Survey is a 55-item student rating scale of eight important classroom characteristics. The survey provides a…

Doll, Beth; Spies, Robert A.; LeClair, Courtney M.; Kurien, Sarah A.; Foley, Brett P.

2010-01-01

82

A History Lab Environment in the Classroom Brings the Standards to Life  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the authors address the gap between the spirit of the national history standards and what now is occurring in middle grades classrooms constrained by state standards and the No Child Left Behind policy. The authors suggest that creating a lab-like classroom environment to promote historical inquiry offers one means to close that…

White, Steven H.; O'Brien, Joseph E.; Smith, Art; Mortensen, Dustin; Hileman, Keil

2006-01-01

83

Evaluation of an Innovative Mathematics Program in Terms of Classroom Environment, Student Attitudes, and Conceptual Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Dull classroom environments, poor students' attitudes and inhibited conceptual development led to the creation of an innovative mathematics program, the Class Banking System (CBS), which enables teachers to use constructivist ideas and approaches. To assess the effectiveness of the CBS, actual and preferred versions of the Individualized Classroom

Spinner, Howard; Fraser, Barry J.

84

Market Brief In today's highly mobile and social environment, the classroom  

E-print Network

Market Brief In today's highly mobile and social environment, the classroom experience may's lifestyle make it imperative to reach beyond the classroom in order to be effective. Providing Conferencing: Voice, Web, Video UC Market Brief - AT&T Connect for Education

Fisher, Kathleen

85

Positive Classroom Motivational Environments : Convergence between Mastery Goal Structure and Classroom Social Climate  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a series of 4 studies we investigated the relations of mastery goal structure and 4 dimensions of the classroom social climate (teacher academic support, teacher emotional support, classroom mutual respect, task-related interaction). We conducted multidimensional scaling with separate adolescent samples that differed considerably (i.e., by…

Patrick, Helen; Kaplan, Avi; Ryan, Allison M.

2011-01-01

86

An On-Line Classroom for the Unix Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes an electronic classroom (ECR) program that has been developed at Nova University to facilitate online real-time group instruction in graduate degree programs in information and computer science. The first section describes the educational uses of the program, including the simulation of a classroom-type educational setting…

Scigliano, John A.; And Others

87

Teacher Attitudes, Perceived Influences, and Self-Reported Classroom Behaviors Related to School Nutrition Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study determined attitudes of kindergarten through fifth grade teachers about school nutrition environments, their perceived influence on school nutrition environments, and self-reported classroom behaviors. Specific objectives were to: (a) identify perceived factors that influence the school nutrition environment, according to teachers…

Girard, Beverly Lawler

2010-01-01

88

An Examination of Relationships between Psychosocial Satisfaction Scales in an Online Student Learning Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research suggests that students who are satisfied with their learning experiences are typically successful and there is a fundamental theory that suggests if the expectations of students are achieved they will be return customers. This study examined the relationships between the psychosocial satisfaction scales in an online student learning…

Bookout, James Marshall, Jr.

2010-01-01

89

Individual Differences in Adolescents' Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Functioning Moderate Associations between Family Environment and Psychosocial Adjustment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study tested whether individual differences in autonomic nervous system functioning interact with environmental risk factors to predict adolescents' psychosocial functioning. The authors assessed skin conductance and respiratory sinus arrhythmia at rest and during laboratory stressors in 110 14-year-olds. Subsequently, adolescents and…

Diamond, Lisa M.; Fagundes, Christopher P.; Cribbet, Matthew R.

2012-01-01

90

Investigation and Analysis of Winter Classroom Thermal Environment in Chongqing  

E-print Network

The classrooms in Chongqing are taken as a study subject in this paper. Measurements of the indoor thermal environmental parameters, e.g., indoor dry/wet bulb temperature, and air velocity, were taken. Combined with the questionnaire, which included...

Liu, J.; Li, B.; Yao, R.

2006-01-01

91

Psychosocial work environment, job mobility and gender differences in turnover behaviour: a prospective study among the Swedish general population  

PubMed Central

Background Throughout the literature, substantial evidence supports associations between poor psychosocial work characteristics and a variety of ill-health outcomes. Yet, few reports strategies workers carry out to improve detrimental work conditions and consequently their health, such as changing jobs. The aim of this study was to examine if adverse psychosocial work exposure, as measured with the job demand-control and effort-reward imbalance models, could predict job mobility over a 5 years observation period. Method Participants were working men and women (n?=?940; 54.3% women), aged 24–60 years from the population of Gothenburg and surrounding metropolitan area. Job demand-control and effort-reward variables were compared with independent t-tests and chi2-test in persons with and without job mobility. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyse whether psychosocial factors could predict job mobility. All regression analyses were stratified by gender. Results Exposure to a combination of high demands-low control or high imbalance between effort and reward was related to increased odds of changing jobs (OR 1.63; CI 1.03-2.59 and OR 1.46; CI 1.13-1.89 respectively). When analysing men and women separately, men had a higher OR of changing jobs when exposed to either high demands-low control (OR 2.72; CI 1.24-5.98) or high effort-reward imbalance (OR 1.74; CI 1.11-2.72) compared to reference values. The only significant associations for women was slightly decreased odds for turnover in high reward jobs (OR 0.96; CI 0.92-0.99). Conclusions The results indicate that workers will seek to improve poor work environment by changing jobs. There were notable gender differences, where men tended to engage in job mobility when exposed to adverse psychosocial factors, while women did not. The lack of measures for mechanisms driving job mobility was a limitation of this study, thus preventing conclusions regarding psychosocial factors as the primary source for job mobility. PMID:24927628

2014-01-01

92

Developing learning environments which support early algebraic reasoning: a case from a New Zealand primary classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Current reforms in mathematics education advocate the development of mathematical learning communities in which students have opportunities to engage in mathematical discourse and classroom practices which underlie algebraic reasoning. This article specifically addresses the pedagogical actions teachers take which structure student engagement in dialogical discourse and activity which facilitates early algebraic reasoning. Using videotaped recordings of classroom observations, the teacher and researcher collaboratively examined the classroom practices and modified the participatory practices to develop a learning environment which supported early algebraic reasoning. Facilitating change in the classroom environment was a lengthy process which required consistent and ongoing attention initially to the social norms and then to the socio-mathematical norms. Specific pedagogical actions such as the use of specifically designed tasks, materials and representations and a constant press for justification and generalisation were required to support students to link their numerical understandings to algebraic reasoning.

Hunter, Jodie

2014-12-01

93

Best Practices for Teaching Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students: Classroom Environment  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

DeafTEC provides this resource with strategies and ideas for improving the classroom environment in a mainstreamed classroom with a mix of hearing, deaf, and hard-of-hearing students. Eight topics are included such as First Day of Class, Lighting, Competing Sound, Seating, and Line of Sight. Each topic includes a description of the challenge and strategies to overcome it. Related videos are also included from both the interpreter and teacher perspectives.

94

Effects of teachers' assessment practices on ninth grade students' perceptions of classroom assessment environment and achievement goal orientations in Muscat science classrooms in the Sultanate of Oman  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Classroom assessment is a continual activity for teachers to improve the quality of instruction and motivate students to learn (Brookhart, 1999; Gronlund, 2006). Although there is a great deal of research on teachers' classroom assessment practices, few empirical research attempts have been made to link these practices to students' perceptions of classroom assessment environment and motivation defined in terms of achievement goal orientations. This study examined teachers' assessment practices within the framework of classroom assessment literature and achievement goal theory. More specifically, the purposes of this study were to identify the underlying dimensions of students' perceptions of classroom assessment environment and achievement goal orientations and to investigate the possible effects of certain student-level and class-level characteristics on perceived classroom assessment environment and achievement goal orientations. The participants were 1,636 ninth grade students and their corresponding 83 science teachers enrolled in public schools within Muscat educational region in Oman 2 during the spring semester 2007. Two questionnaires were developed and used, one for students and one for teachers. The student's questionnaire focused on students' perceived classroom assessment environment, achievement goal orientations, and academic selfefficacy. The teacher's questionnaire focused on teachers' frequent uses of traditional assessments, alternative assessments, and classroom assessment practices recommended by experts of educational measurement and assessment. Principal components/exploratory factor analyses (PCA/EFA) were conducted to identify the underlying dimensions of students' perceptions of classroom assessment environment and achievement goal orientations. Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) analyses were employed to examine the effects of certain student-level and class-level characteristics on students' perceptions of classroom assessment environment and achievement goal orientations. Results of the PCA/EFA revealed three dimensions of perceived classroom assessment environment: learning-, harsh-, and public-oriented assessment environments; and three dimensions of achievement goal orientations: mastery, performance-approach, and performance-avoidance goals. Results of the HLM showed that class contextual features and teacher's teaching experience and assessment practices interacted significantly with student characteristics in influencing students' perceptions of classroom assessment environment and achievement goal orientations. The findings were compared with findings from previous studies related to classroom assessment environment and achievement goal orientations. Recommendations, implications, and suggestions for future research were discussed.

Al Kharusi, Hussain A.

2007-12-01

95

Effects of teachers' assessment practices on ninth grade students' perceptions of classroom assessment environment and achievement goal orientations in Muscat science classrooms in the Sultanate of Oman  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Classroom assessment is a continual activity for teachers to improve the quality of instruction and motivate students to learn (Brookhart, 1999; Gronlund, 2006). Although there is a great deal of research on teachers' classroom assessment practices, few empirical research attempts have been made to link these practices to students' perceptions of classroom assessment environment and motivation defined in terms of achievement goal orientations. This study examined teachers' assessment practices within the framework of classroom assessment literature and achievement goal theory. More specifically, the purposes of this study were to identify the underlying dimensions of students' perceptions of classroom assessment environment and achievement goal orientations and to investigate the possible effects of certain student-level and class-level characteristics on perceived classroom assessment environment and achievement goal orientations. The participants were 1,636 ninth grade students and their corresponding 83 science teachers enrolled in public schools within Muscat educational region in Oman during the spring semester 2007. Two questionnaires were developed and used, one for students and one for teachers. The student's questionnaire focused on students' perceived classroom assessment environment, achievement goal orientations, and academic self-efficacy. The teacher's questionnaire focused on teachers' frequent uses of traditional assessments, alternative assessments, and classroom assessment practices recommended by experts of educational measurement and assessment. Principal components/exploratory factor analyses (PCA/EFA) were conducted to identify the underlying dimensions of students' perceptions of classroom assessment environment and achievement goal orientations. Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) analyses were employed to examine the effects of certain student-level and class-level characteristics on students' perceptions of classroom assessment environment and achievement goal orientations. Results of the PCA/EFA revealed three dimensions of perceived classroom assessment environment: learning-, harsh-, and public-oriented assessment environments; and three dimensions of achievement goal orientations: mastery, performance-approach, and performance-avoidance goals. Results of the HLM showed that class contextual features and teacher's teaching experience and assessment practices interacted significantly with student characteristics in influencing students' perceptions of classroom assessment environment and achievement goal orientations. The findings were compared with findings from previous studies related to classroom assessment environment and achievement goal orientations. Recommendations, implications, and suggestions for future research were discussed.

Al Kharusi, Hussain A.

2007-12-01

96

Quality of the Literacy Environment in Inclusive Early Childhood Special Education Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine the quality of the literacy environment in inclusive early childhood special education (ECSE) classrooms ("N" = 54). The first aim was to describe the quality of the literacy environment in terms of structure (i.e., book materials and print/writing materials) and instruction (i.e., instructional…

Guo, Ying; Sawyer, Brook E.; Justice, Laura M.; Kaderavek, Joan N.

2013-01-01

97

Making Visible the Behaviors that Influence Learning Environment: A Qualitative Exploration of Computer Science Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors conducted ethnographic research to provide deep understanding of the learning environment of a selection of computer science classrooms at a large, research university in the United States. Categories emerging from data analysis included (1) impersonal environment and guarded behavior; and (2) the creation and maintenance of informal…

Barker, Lecia J.; Garvin-Doxas, Kathy

2004-01-01

98

Developing dance interaction between QRIO and toddlers in a classroom environment: plans for the first steps  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper introduces the early stages of a study designed to understand the development of dance interactions between QRIO and toddlers in a classroom environment. The study is part of a project to explore the potential use of interactive robots as instructional tools in education. After 3 months observation period, we are starting the experiment. The experimental environment, component technologies,

Fumihide Tanaka; Bret Fortenberry; Kazuki Aisaka; Javier R. Movellan

2005-01-01

99

Plans for Developing Real-time Dance Interaction between QRIO and Toddlers in a Classroom Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper introduces the early stages of a study designed to understand the development of dance interactions between QRIO and toddlers in a classroom environment. The study is part of a project to explore the potential use of interactive robots as instructional tools in education. After 3 months observation period, we are starting the experiment. After explaining the experimental environment,

Fumihide Tanaka; Bret Fortenberry; Kazuki Aisaka; Javier R. Movellan

2005-01-01

100

The Columbia Classroom Environments Project...Fourth Progress Report, December 1971.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Columbia Classroom Environments Project (CCEP) report discusses a number of questions about a set of dimensions of learning and development as well as the instruments the project was developing for the analysis of behavior in learning environments. Joseph C. Grannis examines The Argument, Assumptions, Definitions, Hypothesis; Rochelle Mayer…

Grannis, Joseph C.

101

The Classroom Acoustical Environment and the Americans with Disabilities Act.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses the lack of an acoustic standard in classrooms and an effort by a broad-based coalition of engineers, audiologists, parents, architects, and educators to develop a standard for acoustics that would then be referenced in the Americans with Disabilities Act. The benefits to all children are emphasized. (Contains six…

Sorkin, Donna L.

2000-01-01

102

Reading the Environment: Children's Literature in the Science Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Science trade books, both fiction and nonfiction, nurture a child's personal journey of discovery through the anecdotes, adventures, and experiences of others and through vivid word and picture images. This book focuses on the use of children's literature in the science classroom. Chapters include: (1) "Why Science and Literature Belong Together";…

Cerullo, Mary M.

103

A Classroom Environment Checklist for Students with Dual Sensory Impairments.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A checklist is presented for evaluating classroom environmental design for students with dual sensory impairments, and for identifying environmental features that promote communication, independent mobility, student anticipation of events, and self-initiation of activities. Checklist items reflect a variety of considerations including ambience,…

Rikhye, Catherine H.; And Others

1989-01-01

104

Living in a Global Environment. Classroom Activities in Development Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Forty classroom activities selected from New Internationalist Calendars published between 1984-1989 were collected. Each activity is presented in the form of a short story about a real-life person and a graphic spread of data consisting of maps, tables, photographs, diagrams, text, and student exercises. These activities have been written to…

Fien, John, Ed.

105

Can Adding Movement to Learning Improve the Classroom Environment?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Brain Gym is an educational curriculum that promotes whole brain learning through movement repatterning to improve students performance and attitudes about the learning process. This study of Brain Gym in relation to classroom climate and academic performance was conducted with 28 fourth-grade students in a midwestern urban parochial school.…

Templeton, Rosalyn Anstine; Jensen, Rita A.

106

Resilience Applied in School: Strengthening Classroom Environments for Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the widespread acceptance of ecological models of child development, the tools and strategies underlying school psychological practice emphasize individual characteristics of children. This article describes ClassMaps Consultation, a consultation strategy that assesses the availability of protective factors and risk in school classrooms

Nickolite, Amanda; Doll, Beth

2008-01-01

107

Development and Application of the Elementary School Science Classroom Environment Scale (ESSCES): Measuring Student Perceptions of Constructivism within the Science Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the development, validation and application of a Rasch-based instrument, the Elementary School Science Classroom Environment Scale (ESSCES), for measuring students' perceptions of constructivist practices within the elementary science classroom. The instrument, designed to complement the Reformed Teaching Observation…

Peoples, Shelagh M.; O'Dwyer, Laura M.; Wang, Yang; Brown, Jessica J.; Rosca, Camelia V.

2014-01-01

108

Assessment of psychosocial work environment in primary care--development of a questionnaire.  

PubMed

Recent studies have indicated deteriorated working conditions of health care personnel. To have an efficient health care organization requires good working conditions and the well-being of the personnel. Today there are no "gold-standard" assessment tools measuring psychosocial working conditions. The aim of this study was to develop two valid and reliable questionnaires, one generic and one specific, measuring psychosocial working conditions for general practitioners (GPs) and district nurses (DNs) in Sweden, with a special emphasis on organizational changes. The construction of the questionnaires were made after a stepwise developing phase including literature review, interviews, and a pilot study. The pilot study included GPs n = 42 and DNs n = 39. The questionnaires were later on used in a main study (GPs n = 465, DNs n = 465). A factor analysis was carried out and showed that there were fewer items in the main study that had factor loading > or = 0.40 in more than one factor, compared to the pilot study. The factors from the main study were easier to label and had good correspondence with other studies. After this stepwise development phase good construct validity and internal consistency were established for the questionnaire. PMID:10763164

Wilhelmsson, S; Akerlind, I; Faresjö, T; Ek, A C

1999-12-01

109

Early-adolescents' reading comprehension and the stability of the middle school classroom-language environment.  

PubMed

This study examined teachers' language use across the school year in 6th grade urban middle-school classrooms (n = 24) and investigated the influence of this classroom-based linguistic input on the reading comprehension skills of the students (n = 851; 599 language minority learners and 252 English-only) in the participating classrooms. Analysis of speech transcripts revealed substantial variability in teachers' use of sophisticated vocabulary and total amount of talk and that individual teacher's language use was consistent across the school year. Analyses using Hierarchical Linear Modeling showed that when controlling for students' reading comprehension and vocabulary knowledge at the start of the year, teachers' use of sophisticated vocabulary was significantly related to students' reading comprehension outcomes, as was the time spent on vocabulary instruction. These findings suggest that the middle school classroom language environment plays a significant role in the reading comprehension of adolescent learners. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25688998

Gámez, Perla B; Lesaux, Nonie K

2015-04-01

110

Does Math Self-Efficacy Mediate the Effect of the Perceived Classroom Environment on Standardized Math Test Performance?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examined the effect of the perceived classroom environment on math self-efficacy and the effect of math self-efficacy on standardized math test performance. Upper elementary school students (N = 1,163) provided self-reports of their perceived math self-efficacy and the degree to which their math classroom environment was mastery oriented,…

Fast, Lisa A.; Lewis, James L.; Bryant, Michael J.; Bocian, Kathleen A.; Cardullo, Richard A.; Rettig, Michael; Hammond, Kimberly A.

2010-01-01

111

Perceived Learning Environment and Students' Emotional Experiences: A Multilevel Analysis of Mathematics Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A multilevel approach was used to analyze relationships between perceived classroom environments and emotions in mathematics. Based on Pekrun's (2000) [A social-cognitive, control-value theory of achievement emotions. In J. Heckhausen (Ed.), Motivational psychology of human development (pp. 143-163)] social-cognitive, control-value theory of…

Frenzel, Anne C.; Pekrun, Reinhard; Goetz, Thomas

2007-01-01

112

Cross-Cultural Interface Design and the Classroom-Learning Environment in Taiwan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined whether using localized interface designs would make a difference in users' learning results and their perceptions of the interface design in a classroom learning environment. This study also sought to learn more about users' attitudes toward the localized interface features. To assess the impact of using localized interfaces…

Chang, Chia-Lin; Su, Yelin

2012-01-01

113

The Influence of Classroom Environment on High School Students' Mathematics Anxiety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates associations between the classroom environments perceived by high school students and their level of mathematics anxiety. A revised and updated version of the Plake and Parker Revised Mathematics Anxiety Ratings Scale (RMARS) was used to assess students' mathematics anxiety. A revised version of the What is Happening in…

Taylor, Bret A.; Fraser, Barry J.

114

Single-Sex School Boys' Perceptions of Coeducational Classroom Learning Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews in many countries have found little evidence of consistent advantages in either single-sex education or coeducation. Over the last three decades, coeducation has been introduced into many single-sex schools, but there is a dearth of evidence from the student perspective of the impact of such changes on the classroom learning environment.…

Yates, Shirley M.

2011-01-01

115

Student Perceptions of the Classroom Environment: Relations to Motivation and Achievement in Mathematics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the relationship of 979 middle school students' perceptions of their mathematics classroom environment to their motivation and achievement. Structural equation modeling indicated that motivational variables (utility, personal achievement goals, efficacy) mediated the influence of perceived teacher expectations, teacher…

Gilbert, Melissa C.; Musu-Gillette, Lauren E.; Woolley, Michael E.; Karabenick, Stuart A.; Strutchens, Marilyn E.; Martin, W. Gary

2014-01-01

116

A Web Environment to Encourage Students to Do Exercises outside the Classroom: A Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For the past five years, our students have been passing less and less time preparing for lectures and exams. To encourage them to do more exercises, a pedagogical activity was offered outside the classroom. With the goal of making students more active during the problem-solving process, an innovative online environment, Sphinx, was developed.…

Capus, Laurence; Curvat, Frederic; Leclair, Olivier; Tourigny, Nicole

2006-01-01

117

Using Large Shared Displays to Create a Collaborative Classroom Learning Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our goal in this work is to create a more collaborative learning environment in the classroom, by designing and implementing a system infrastructure to support easy use and management of a large shared (tiled) display. Through this shared display space, instructor and student interaction is facilitated. This large display space provides the primary means of presentation of lecture material, allowing

Patrick E. Mantey; Jeremy Richards

118

Facilitating in a Demanding Environment: Experiences of Teaching in Virtual Classrooms Using Web Conferencing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"How to" guides and software training resources support the development of the skills and confidence needed to teach in virtual classrooms using web-conferencing software. However, these sources do not often reveal the subtleties of what it is like to be a facilitator in such an environment--what it feels like, what issues might emerge…

Cornelius, Sarah

2014-01-01

119

Monitoring Children's Growth in Early Literacy Skills: Effects of Feedback on Performance and Classroom Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study examined the benefits of providing kindergarten teachers with feedback about students' performance on early literacy progress-monitoring probes. Students were administered the "Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS)" in fall, winter, and spring; classroom environment was evaluated using the "Early Language and…

Ball, Carrie; Gettinger, Maribeth

2009-01-01

120

Motivational Goal Orientation, Perceptions of Biology and Physics Classroom Learning Environments, and Gender  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Researchers have reported persuasive evidence that students' perceptions of their classroom learning environment account for significant variance in cognitive and affective outcomes (e.g. intrinsic motivation, self-concept, liking for particular subjects and students' intention to drop out). The study reported in this paper investigated the…

Koul, Ravinder; Roy, Laura; Lerdpornkulrat, Thanita

2012-01-01

121

Introducing Real-Time AVHRR-APT Satellite Imagery in the Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A low-cost (US$350) satellite receiving station was assembled and operated within a classroom environment in Gainesville (Florida) on October 2001 for acquiring satellite data directly from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellites. The simplicity of the satellite signal makes this source of real-time satellite data readily…

Moxey, Lucas; Tucker, Compton; Sloan, Jim; Chadwick, John

2004-01-01

122

Can We Bring the Natural Environment into the Art Classroom? Can Natural Sound Foster Creativity?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explores the relationship between the natural world and its potential benefits to the art classroom environment. In particular, it considers the following research question: Can natural sound foster creativity? The study investigates the role of natural sound on creative ability in girls' intermediate schools (12 to 15 years) in Jeddah,…

Alawad, Abeer

2012-01-01

123

The Electronic Classroom: A Handbook for Education in the Electronic Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book explores emerging technologies and their use in secondary and higher education and in private, corporate, and government training environments. In addition to providing specific classroom applications of technology, the book treats issues of research, technology assessment, legal, copyright, and privacy rights, ethical considerations,…

Boschmann, Erwin, Ed.

124

Associations between Chinese Language classroom environments and students' motivation to learn the language  

Microsoft Academic Search

Associations between the nature of Chinese Language Classroom Environments and Singapore secondary school students' motivation to learn the Chinese Language were investigated. A sample of 1,460 secondary three (grade 9) students from 50 express stream (above average academic ability) classes in Singapore government secondary schools was involved in the study. The perceptual measure approach was used to investigate the nature

Siew Lian Chua

2009-01-01

125

Associations between Chinese Language Classroom Environments and Students' Motivation to Learn the Language  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Associations between the nature of Chinese Language Classroom Environments and Singapore secondary school students' motivation to learn the Chinese Language were investigated. A sample of 1,460 secondary three (grade 9) students from 50 express stream (above average academic ability) classes in Singapore government secondary schools was involved…

Chua, Siew Lian; Wong, Angela F. L.; Chen, Der-Thanq

2009-01-01

126

The Effect of Classroom Environment on Problem Behaviors: A Twin Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children's behavior problems, both internalizing and externalizing, are a function of both genetic and environmental influences. One potentially important environmental influence is the classroom environment. This study of 1941 monozygotic twin pairs examined whether children whose parents rated them as similarly high or low on a number of problem…

DiLalla, Lisabeth Fisher; Mullineaux, Paula Y.

2008-01-01

127

A Cross-National Study of Secondary Science Classroom Environments in Australia and Indonesia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports a cross-national study of classroom environments in Australia and Indonesia. A modified version of the What Is Happening In this Class? (WIHIC) questionnaire was used simultaneously in these two countries to: 1) cross validate the modified WIHIC; 2) investigate differences between countries and sexes in perceptions of…

Fraser, Barry J.; Aldridge, Jill M.; Adolphe, F. S. Gerard

2010-01-01

128

An Evaluation of Elementary School Science Kits in Terms of Classroom Environment and Student Attitudes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student perceptions of classroom environment can provide useful criteria for evaluating educational alternatives. The My Class Inventory (MCI) was used with 588 3rd- to 5th-grade students in Texas in evaluating the effectiveness of instruction using a textbook, science kits, or a combination of both. Various analyses attested to the factorial…

Houston, Linda Scott; Fraser, Barry J.; Ledbetter, Cynthia E.

2008-01-01

129

Risk factors of workplace bullying for men and women: The role of the psychosocial and physical work environment.  

PubMed

Workplace bullying has been shown to be a severe social stressor at work, resulting in high costs both for the individuals and organizations concerned. The aim of this study is to analyze risk factors in a large, nationally representative sample of Finnish employees (n = 4,392). The study makes three important contributions to the existing literature on workplace bullying: first, it demonstrates the role of the physical work environment alongside the psychosocial work environment - employees with a poor physical work environment are more likely than others to report having been subjected to or having observed bullying. Second, contrary to common assumptions, the results suggest that performance-based pay is associated with a lower, rather than higher risk of bullying. Third, the findings suggest that there are gender differences in risk factors, thereby constituting a call for more studies on the role of gender when identifying risk factors. Increased knowledge of risk factors is important as it enables us to take more effective measures to decrease the risk of workplace bullying. PMID:25330234

Salin, Denise

2015-02-01

130

Virtual Classrooms: STAR Simulator Building Virtual Environments for Teacher Training in Effective Classroom Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

The focus of this project is to create research in teacher education that positively impacts teacher recruitment, preparation and retention in urban environments. The novel approach we are using to attack this problem is that of capturing, analyzing, synthesizing and simulating human interactions in Mixed Reality (part real, part synthetic) environments, thereby creating training\\/screening settings that are realistic and yet

Lisa Dieker; Michael Hynes; Christopher Stapleton; Charles Hughes

131

A qualitative study of the interactions among the psychosocial work environment and family, community and services for workers with low mental health  

PubMed Central

Background The psychosocial work environment can benefit and harm mental health. Poor psychosocial work environments and high level work-family conflict are both associated with poor mental health, yet little is known about how people with poor mental health manage the interactions among multiple life domains. This study explores the interfaces among paid work, family, community and support services and their combined effects on mental health. Methods We conducted 21 in-depth semi-structured interviews with people identified as having poor mental health to examine their experiences of paid employment and mental health and wellbeing in the context of their daily lives. Results The employment-related psychosocial work environment, particularly workplace relationships, employment security and degree of control over hours, strongly affected participants’ mental health. The interfaces among the life domains of family, community and access to support services suggest that effects on mental health differ according to: time spent in each domain, the social, psychological and physical spaces where domain activities take place, life stage and the power available to participants in their multiple domains. This paper is based on a framework analysis of all the interviews, and vignettes of four cases. Cases were selected to represent different types of relationships among the domains and how interactions among them either mitigated and/or exacerbated mental health effects of psychosocial work environments. Conclusions Examining domain interactions provides greater explanatory capacity for understanding how people with low mental health manage their lives than restricting the research to the separate impacts of the psychosocial work environment or work-family conflict. The extent to which people can change the conditions under which they engage in paid work and participate in family and social life is significantly affected by the extent to which their employment position affords them latitude. Policies that provide psychosocial protections to workers that enable them to make changes or complaints without detrimental repercussions (such as vilification or job loss) and increase access to welfare benefits and support services could improve mental health among people with paid work. These policies would have particularly important effects for those in lower socioeconomic status positions. PMID:24004446

2013-01-01

132

Designing for Learning: Online Social Networks as a Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper deploys notions of emergence, connections, and designs for learning to conceptualize high school students' interactions when using online social media as a learning environment. It makes links to chaos and complexity theories and to fractal patterns as it reports on a part of the first author's action research study, conducted while she…

Casey, Gail; Evans, Terry

2011-01-01

133

Exploring the Complexity of Classroom Management: 8 Components of Managing a Highly Productive, Safe, and Respectful Urban Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Creating a learning environment where all students can thrive academically requires an understanding of the complexities of classroom management. The notions of "discipline," "conformity" and "obedience" that have littered discussions of classroom management in the past are no longer sufficient to describe the diverse…

Jones, Karrie A.; Jones, Jennifer L.; Vermette, Paul J.

2013-01-01

134

An Investigation of Relationships Between Fifth Grade Students' Perception of the Physical Classroom Environment and Observed Environmental Factors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An exploratory field study was conducted in 42 self-contained, elementary grade classrooms in 18 school buildings. Subjects were 1,030 fifth-grade students. The purpose of the study was to determine the range of physical environmental conditions in the classrooms; and how students' perceptions of the physical environment (1) describe the…

Faust, Russell Weidner

135

Educational and Career Interests in Math: A Longitudinal Examination of the Links between Classroom Environment, Motivational Beliefs, and Interests  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drawing on the expectancy-value model, stage-environment fit theory, and self-determination theory, this study examined the longitudinal associations between classroom characteristics, expectancies-values, high school course enrollment, and career aspirations in the domain of math. Data were collected on 3,048 youth who reported on their classroom

Wang, Ming-Te

2012-01-01

136

The Effects of a Metacognitive Computer Writing Tool on Classroom Learning Environment, Student Perceptions and Writing Ability.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study investigated how the introduction of a computer writing tool that provides metacognitive guidance to students interacting with it--the Writing Partner2 (WP2)--influenced the classroom environment, and explored both effects "with" and effects "of" working with such a computer tool. Data was gathered from an eighth-grade English classroom

Evans, Karen S.

137

The influence of family environment on long-term psychosocial functioning of adolescents with juvenile fibromyalgia  

PubMed Central

Little is known about the impact of family environment on the long-term adjustment of patients with juvenile-onset fibromyalgia (JFM). Objective To evaluate whether family environment in early adolescence predicted later physical functioning and depressive symptoms of adolescents with JFM as they transition to early adulthood in the context of a controlled long-term follow-up study. Method Participants were 39 youth (Mage = 18.7 years) with JFM and 38 healthy matched controls who completed web-based surveys about their health status (SF-36 Health Survey) and depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory II) approximately 4 years after a home-based, in-person assessment of child and family functioning. During the initial assessment, parents of participants (94% mothers) completed the Family Environment Scale, and adolescents (Mage = 14.8 years) completed self-report questionnaires about pain (Visual Analog Scale) and depressive symptoms (Children’s Depression Inventory). Results Results indicated that family environment during early adolescence significantly predicted greater depressive symptoms in early adulthood for both the JFM group and healthy controls. In particular, a controlling family environment (use of rules to control the family and allowing little independence) during early adolescence was the driving factor in predicting poorer long-term emotional functioning for patients with JFM. Family environment did not significantly predict longer-term physical impairment for either group. Conclusions Adolescents with JFM from controlling family environments are at increased risk for poorer emotional functioning in early adulthood. Behavioral and family interventions should foster independent coping among adolescents with JFM and greater parenting flexibility to enhance successful long-term coping. PMID:23281206

Sil, Soumitri; Lynch-Jordan, Anne; Ting, Tracy V.; Peugh, James; Noll, Jennie; Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita

2012-01-01

138

Stressors, Family Environment and Coping Styles as Predictors of Educational and Psychosocial Adjustment in Palestinian Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the contributions of child and parents' sociodemographics, daily stressors, family environment, and coping strategies, to academic achievement, cognitive functioning and aggression in a sample of 600 children at the intermediate grade levels from Gaza Strip. Each of the predictor variables exhibited a different pattern…

Khamis, Vivian

2013-01-01

139

Changing the Metacognitive Orientation of a Classroom Environment to Enhance Students' Metacognition Regarding Chemistry Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Concerns persist regarding science classroom learning environments and the lack of development of students' metacognition and reasoning processes within such environments. Means of shaping learning environments so that students are encouraged to develop their metacognition are required in order to enhance students' reasoning and…

Thomas, Gregory P.; Anderson, David

2014-01-01

140

In pursuit of a holistic learning environment: the impact of music in the medical physiology classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A holistic learning environment is one that nurtures all aspects of students' learning. The environment is safe, supportive, and provides opportunities to help students deal with nonacademic as well as academic factors that impact their learning. Creation of such an environment requires the establishment of a supportive learning community. For a variety of reasons, establishing such a learning community of first-year medical students can be challenging. This communication presents one approach to meeting this challenge in a medical school Human Physiology course. Steps were taken at the beginning of the course to create the community, and activities designed to reinforce these efforts were incorporated into the course as it progressed. Two pilot studies were conducted to test the hypothesis that providing students with a participatory music experience may help to promote a holistic learning environment by helping them restore a sense of balance to their emotional well-being as well as reinforce a sense of community in the classroom. Student response to these activities indicated that these efforts provided emotional support during stressful periods during the quarter, helped promote a feeling of safety within the environment, and reenergized the class during long class sessions. This project illustrates that each instructor, within the confines of his/her own classroom, can make a significant contribution to achieving a holistic learning envrionment for his/her students.

PhD Harold I Modell (Physiology Educational Research Consortium)

2009-03-01

141

Physical and psychosocial work environment factors and their association with health outcomes in Danish ambulance personnel – a cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Reviews of the literature on the health and work environment of ambulance personnel have indicated an increased risk of work-related health problems in this occupation. The aim of this study was to compare health status and exposure to different work environmental factors among ambulance personnel and the core work force in Denmark. In addition, to examine the association between physical and psychosocial work environment factors and different measures of health among ambulance personnel. Methods Data were taken from a nationwide sample of ambulance personnel and fire fighters (n?=?1,691) and was compared to reference samples of the Danish work force. The questionnaire contained measures of physical and psychosocial work environment as well as measures of musculoskeletal pain, mental health, self-rated health and sleep quality. Results Ambulance personnel have half the prevalence of poor self-rated health compared to the core work force (5% vs. 10%). Levels of mental health were the same across the two samples whereas a substantially higher proportion of the ambulance personnel reported musculoskeletal pain (42% vs. 29%). The ambulance personnel had higher levels of emotional demands and meaningfulness of and commitment to work, and substantially lower levels of quantitative demands and influence at work. Only one out of ten aspects of physical work environment was consistently associated with higher levels of musculoskeletal pain. Emotional demands was the only psychosocial work factor that was associated with both poorer mental health and worse sleep quality. Conclusions Ambulance personnel have similar levels of mental health but substantially higher levels of musculoskeletal pain than the work force in general. They are more exposed to emotional demands and these demands are associated with higher levels of poor mental health and poor sleep quality. To improve work environment, attention should be paid to musculoskeletal problems and the presence of positive organizational support mechanisms that can prevent negative effects from the high levels of emotional demands. PMID:22824415

2012-01-01

142

Classroom Management in Diverse Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Classroom management continues to be a serious concern for teachers and especially in urban and diverse learning environments. The authors present the culturally responsive classroom management practices of two teachers from an urban and diverse middle school to extend the construct, culturally responsive classroom management. The principles that…

Milner, H. Richard, IV; Tenore, F. Blake

2010-01-01

143

Development of an Instrument for Assessing Senior High School Students' Preferred and Perceived Laboratory Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aimed to develop an instrument, named the inquiry-based laboratory classroom environment instrument (ILEI), for assessing senior high-school science students' preferred and perceived laboratory environment. A total of 262 second-year students, from a senior-high school in Taiwan, were recruited for this study. Four stages were…

Hsiao, Chien-Hua; Wu, Ying-Tien; Lin, Chung-Yen; Wong, Terrence William; Fu, Hsieh-Hai; Yeh, Ting-Kuang; Chang, Chung-Yen

2014-01-01

144

Perception of the thermal environment in high school and university classrooms: Subjective preferences and thermal comfort  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work shows some of the results of a field study about environmental comfort investigations in classrooms. In this project thermal, acoustic, visual and air quality aspects were analysed in a number of classrooms—13 classrooms at four different high schools of the Provincia di Torino and four typical medium-sized university classrooms of the Politecnico di Torino, Italy. The investigations were

Stefano Paolo Corgnati; Marco Filippi; Sara Viazzo

2007-01-01

145

The relationships of family and classroom environments with peer relational victimization: an analysis of their gender differences.  

PubMed

This study analyzes the relationships of adolescents' perceptions of their family and classroom environments with peer relational victimization, taking into account that these relationships could be mediated by adolescents' self-esteem, feelings of loneliness, and sociometric status. These relationships, and their possible gender differences, were analyzed in a sample of 1319 Spanish adolescents (48% boys and 52% girls), ages 11 to 16 years (M = 13.7, SD = 1.5). A structural equation modeling was calculated for boys and girls separately. The findings suggested that the adolescents' self-esteem, loneliness, and sociometric status had a significant direct effect on peer relational victimization for boys, and adolescents' loneliness and sociometric status for girls. Their perceptions of family and classroom environments had a significant indirect effect on peer relational victimization for boys and girls, but the paths were different. Overall, findings suggested that a negative classroom environment had a more relevant effect in relational victimization for boys. PMID:20480685

Jesús Cava, María; Musitu, Gonzalo; Buelga, Sofia; Murgui, Sergio

2010-05-01

146

Analyzing the Classroom Teachers' Levels of Creating a Constructivist Learning Environments in Terms of Various Variables: A Mersin Case  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this research, it was aimed to analyze the classroom teachers' level of creating a constructivist learning environment in terms of various variables. For that purpose, relational screening model was used in the research. Classroom teachers' level of creating a constructivist learning environment was determined using the…

Üredi, Lütfi

2014-01-01

147

The Elementary School Classroom. The Study of the Built Environment Through Student and Teacher Responses. The Elementary School and Its Population, Phase 2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An extensive investigation of elementary school classrooms was conducted through the collection and statistical analysis of student and teacher responses to questions concerning the educational environment. Several asepcts of the classroom are discussed, including the spatial, thermal, luminous, and aural environments. Questions were organized so…

Artinian, Vrej-Armen

148

Motivation, Classroom Environment, and Learning in Introductory Geology: A Hierarchical Linear Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Prior research has indicated that highly motivated students perform better and that learning increases in innovative, reformed classrooms, but untangling the student effects from the instructor effects is essential to understanding how to best support student learning. Using a hierarchical linear model, we examine these effects separately and jointly. We use data from nearly 2,000 undergraduate students surveyed by the NSF-funded GARNET (Geoscience Affective Research NETwork) project in 65 different introductory geology classes at research universities, public masters-granting universities, liberal arts colleges and community colleges across the US. Student level effects were measured as increases in expectancy and self-regulation using the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ; Pintrich et al., 1991). Instructor level effects were measured using the Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol, (RTOP; Sawada et al., 2000), with higher RTOP scores indicating a more reformed, student-centered classroom environment. Learning was measured by learning gains on a Geology Concept Inventory (GCI; Libarkin and Anderson, 2005) and normalized final course grade. The hierarchical linear model yielded significant results at several levels. At the student level, increases in expectancy and self-regulation are significantly and positively related to higher grades regardless of instructor; the higher the increase, the higher the grade. At the instructor level, RTOP scores are positively related to normalized average GCI learning gains. The higher the RTOP score, the higher the average class GCI learning gains. Across both levels, average class GCI learning gains are significantly and positively related to student grades; the higher the GCI learning gain, the higher the grade. Further, the RTOP scores are significantly and negatively related to the relationship between expectancy and course grade. The lower the RTOP score, the higher the correlation between change in expectancy and grade. As such, students with low motivation show higher grades and greater learning gains in high RTOP (student-centered) classrooms than in low RTOP ones. These results support the recommendation of student-centered practices in the classroom and consideration of student motivation in our approach to the future of geoscience education.

Gilbert, L. A.; Hilpert, J. C.; Van Der Hoeven Kraft, K.; Budd, D.; Jones, M. H.; Matheney, R.; Mcconnell, D. A.; Perkins, D.; Stempien, J. A.; Wirth, K. R.

2013-12-01

149

The Cognitive and Affective Changes Caused by the Differentiated Classroom Environment Designed for the Subject of Poetry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this research is to analyze the cognitive (learning level) and affective (volunteering to study together, attitude towards the teacher and the lesson) changes which are caused by the differential classroom environment designed for the poetry subject in a Turkish lesson of the 6th grade in elementary education. Theory testing…

Avci, Suleyman; Yuksel, Arzu; Soyer, Makbule; Balikcioglu, Suzan

2009-01-01

150

Examining Hong Kong Students' Achievement Goals and Their Relations with Students' Perceived Classroom Environment and Strategy Use  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined Hong Kong students' achievement goals and their relations with students' perceived classroom environment and strategy use based on the multiple goal perspective of goal orientation theory. A total of 925 Grade 8 students from six secondary schools in Hong Kong voluntarily responded to a questionnaire that measured these three…

Lau, Kit-Ling; Lee, John

2008-01-01

151

The Effects of Motivation and Classroom Environment on the Satisfaction of Noncredit Continuing Education Students. AIR 1994 Annual Forum Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the functional relationships among motivation, perceived classroom environment, and student satisfaction, for three major curricular groups: arts and leisure programs, personal development programs, and professional development programs. The sample included 1,180 students enrolled in noncredit courses at the College of…

Fujita-Starck, Pamela J.; Thompson, John A.

152

Comparison of Preschoolers' Narratives, the Classroom Book Environment, and Teacher Attitudes toward Literacy Practices in Korea and the United States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated Korean and U.S. preschoolers' personal and fictional narratives, their classroom book environments, and their teachers' attitudes about reading aloud. The participants were 70 Korean and American 3- and 4-year-olds enrolled in 2 university lab preschools and their 4 teachers. The structures and content of the preschoolers'…

Lee, Young-Ja; Lee, Jeehyun; Han, Myae; Schickedanz, Judith A.

2011-01-01

153

A Comparison of Childrens' Statements about Social Relations and Teaching in the Classroom and in the Outdoor Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two teachers from a school in Copenhagen were allowed to move their third grade teaching into a forest every Thursday for three years. Thus 20% of the class's regular teaching took place in an outdoor environment. The purpose of the present study was to ask the children how they experienced lessons in the classroom and the forest settings.…

Mygind, Erik

2009-01-01

154

Design of the Technology-Rich Classroom Practices and Facilities Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is widely recognized that technology in the classroom has the potential to transform education at every stage from Pre-K, to K-12, to Higher Education and Adult Education. Using the Digital Teaching Platform as an exemplar of 21st Century classroom instruction style, the author offers an overview of classroom technology and its effects on…

Nelson, Angela C.

2013-01-01

155

PSYCHOSOCIAL ASSESSMENT AND SURVEILLANCE  

E-print Network

.......................................................................... 64 Psychosocial Assessment and Surveillance as an Evaluation Tool ...................... 65 OutcomeDISASTER PSYCHOSOCIAL ASSESSMENT AND SURVEILLANCE TOOLKIT (Disaster-PAST) Methods to Enhance Evaluation ........................................................................................... 65

156

Educational and career interests in math: a longitudinal examination of the links between classroom environment, motivational beliefs, and interests.  

PubMed

Drawing on the expectancy-value model, stage-environment fit theory, and self-determination theory, this study examined the longitudinal associations between classroom characteristics, expectancies-values, high school course enrollment, and career aspirations in the domain of math. Data were collected on 3,048 youth who reported on their classroom experiences in 7th grade, expectancies-values in 6th, 7th, and 10th grades, and career aspirations in 12th grade. Student grades for math courses were collected from school records at 6th, 7th, and 10th grades, and their math course enrollment was collected from 9th through 12th grades. Results indicated that students' math classroom experiences predicted their expectancies and values, which, in turn, predicted the number of high school math courses taken and career aspirations in math. Gender and math ability differences are also discussed. PMID:22390667

Wang, Ming-Te

2012-11-01

157

The importance of leadership style and psychosocial work environment to staff-assessed quality of care: implications for home help services.  

PubMed

Work in home help services is typically conducted by an assistant nurse or nursing aide in the home of an elderly person, and working conditions have been described as solitary with a high workload, little influence and lack of peer and leader support. Relations between leadership styles, psychosocial work environment and a number of positive and negative employee outcomes have been established in research, but the outcome in terms of quality of care has been addressed to a lesser extent. In the present study, we aimed to focus on working conditions in terms of leadership and the employee psychosocial work environment, and how these conditions are related to the quality of care. The hypothesis was that the relation between a transformational leadership style and quality of care is mediated through organisational and peer support, job control and workload. A cross-sectional survey design was used and a total of 469 questionnaires were distributed (March-April 2012) to assistant nurses in nine Swedish home help organisations, including six municipalities and one private organisation, representing both rural and urban areas (302 questionnaires were returned, yielding a 65% response rate). The results showed that our hypothesis was supported and, when indirect effects were also taken into consideration, there was no direct effect of leadership style on quality of care. The mediated model explained 51% of the variance in quality of care. These results indicate that leadership style is important not only to employee outcomes in home help services but is also indirectly related to quality of care as assessed by staff members. PMID:24313819

Westerberg, Kristina; Tafvelin, Susanne

2014-09-01

158

The effect of a science work experience program for teachers on the classroom environment: A qualitative program evaluation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Science Work Experience Programs for Teachers (SWEPTs) provide an opportunity for science and math teachers to work in research laboratories during the summer to experience science as it is practiced in the laboratory-setting. Through the use of interviews with teachers and students, classroom observations, and an analysis of printed student sheets and student work, the lived experience of a cohort of program participants in Columbia University's Summer Research Program for Secondary School Science Teachers was recorded in an effort to describe the effect of experience in a SWEPT on the classroom environment of teacher participants and student outcomes. Relying on Social Learning Theory and science education reform documentation as a theoretical framework the following dimensions of the classroom were examined: (1) emergent themes that include the participants' perceptions of the importance of technology in the classroom, (2) interpersonal relationships with the teachers at the participants' schools, fellow program participants, research scientists, and students, and (3) changes in epistemological structure, curriculum, instructional strategies, and classroom practices. Methodological and theoretical implications are addressed with respect to future studies, and suggestions for refinement of SWEPTs are provided.

Frazier, Wendy Michelle

159

Capturing the complexity: Content, type, and amount of instruction and quality of the classroom learning environment synergistically predict third graders' vocabulary and reading comprehension outcomes.  

PubMed

We examined classrooms as complex systems that affect students' literacy learning through interacting effects of content and amount of time individual students spent in literacy instruction along with the global quality of the classroom-learning environment. We observed 27 third grade classrooms serving 315 target students using two different observation systems. The first assessed instruction at a more micro-level; specifically, the amount of time individual students spent in literacy instruction defined by the type of instruction, role of the teacher, and content. The second assessed the quality of the classroom-learning environment at a more macro level focusing on classroom organization, teacher responsiveness, and support for vocabulary and language. Results revealed that both global quality of the classroom learning environment and time individual students spent in specific types of literacy instruction covering specific content interacted to predict students' comprehension and vocabulary gains whereas neither system alone did. These findings support a dynamic systems model of how individual children learn in the context of classroom literacy instruction and the classroom-learning environment, which can help to improve observations systems, advance research, elevate teacher evaluation and professional development, and enhance student achievement. PMID:25400293

Connor, Carol McDonald; Spencer, Mercedes; Day, Stephanie L; Giuliani, Sarah; Ingebrand, Sarah W; McLean, Leigh; Morrison, Frederick J

2014-08-01

160

Evaluation of a K-5 Mathematics Program Which Integrates Children's Literature: Classroom Environment and Attitudes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a one-year study of 120 fifth grade students whose teachers participated in a program entitled Project SMILE (Science and Mathematics Integrated with Literary Experiences). The purpose of the study was to determine the extent to which the classroom implementation of Project SMILE positively influenced the classroom

Mink, Deborah V.; Fraser, Barry J.

2005-01-01

161

RESEARCH IN CLASSROOM THERMAL ENVIRONMENT AT GARDENHILL SCHOOL IN LA MIRADA, CALIFORNIA.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THIS IS A FINAL REPORT OF A STUDY OVER A FOURTEEN MONTH PERIOD FROM APRIL, 1959 TO JUNE, 1960 OF HEATING AND COOLING TWO SCHOOL CLASSROOMS AND A COMPARISON WITH A THIRD CLASSROOM IN WHICH THERE WAS HEATING AND FRESH AIR CIRCULATION ONLY. ALL THREE ROOMS HAD AN AIR-FLOW DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM. A TYPHOON HEAT PUMP PROVIDED HEATING AND COOLING IN ONE…

HOWATT, CLARKE T.

162

Using Academic Notebooks to Support Achievement and Promote Positive Classroom Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Notebooks are commonly used in middle school classrooms as a place for students to record information delivered via lecture, classroom discussion, or independent work. A primary reason teachers ask students to use notebooks is to capture and organize information. In many cases, students are expected to use these tools with little direction,…

Rheingold, Alison; LeClair, Caitlin; Seaman, Jayson

2013-01-01

163

Classroom Environments and Student Empowerment: An Analysis of Elementary and Secondary Teacher Beliefs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This project explored a classroom model of motivation in which the source of student motivation is based on internal mechanisms or structures and classroom student/instructor interactions. It also extended earlier research in which beliefs of veteran, entry level, and preservice teachers have been explored. For this project, 117 elementary…

Nichols, Joe D.; Zhang, Guanglan

2011-01-01

164

Bringing the Background to the Foreground: What Do Classroom Environments that Support Authentic Discussions Look Like?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Authentic discussions are dialogically oriented classroom interactions where participants present and consider multiple perspectives and often use others' input in constructing their contributions. Despite their instructional effectiveness, authentic discussions are reportedly rare in classrooms. This qualitative case study examines the features…

Hadjioannou, Xenia

2007-01-01

165

Prevalence of fungi in carpeted floor environment: Analysis of dust samples from living-rooms, bedrooms, offices and school classrooms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of 100 carpet dust analyses from atopic individuals' environment were compared according to the sampling period\\u000a or the location. Dust samples were collected with a standard domestic vacuum cleaner, in locations with carpeted floor: in\\u000a residences (living-room and\\/or bedroom), in school classrooms and in offices. The quantities of fungi vary from 5000 CFU\\/g\\u000a to 66 000 000 CFU\\/g

Hugues Beguin; Nicole Nolard

1996-01-01

166

Injury and the orchestral environment: part III. the role of psychosocial factors in the experience of musicians undertaking rehabilitation.  

PubMed

Workplace rehabilitation in the orchestral setting poses a number of challenges that arise in part due to a poor fit between generic injury insurance and medical care and the elite performance requirements of professional musicians. Currently, the orchestral profession lacks information and strategies to best deal with the unique challenges of this complex rehabilitation environment. In order to inform future directions for research and suggest possible changes of practice, the researchers conducted a qualitative case-study aimed at understanding the injury and rehabilitation experiences of professional musicians. In-depth semi-structured interviews were undertaken with three chronically injured professional cellists from a single Australian orchestra. After initial data analysis, further interviews were undertaken with a set of five orchestral management staff as a means of data triangulation. All data were analysed using a themes-based analysis-of-narrative approach. The findings indicate that injury concealment played a considerable role in the development of chronic injuries for these musicians, and management staff felt that this concealment may be the norm amongst orchestral musicians. The musicians in this study suffered emotional and psychological trauma as the result of their injuries, and two participants felt socially marginalised. During rehabilitation, the musicians in this study encountered difficulties with medical staff not understanding the elite performance requirements of orchestral work. The article proposes recommendations that may assist in dealing with the complex challenges of injury rehabilitation in the orchestral environment. PMID:25194109

Rickert, Dale Ll; Barrett, Margaret S; Ackermann, Bronwen J

2014-09-01

167

From club to classroom: toward a unified framework for developing virtual environment applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

The world of computing is becoming a world in which people work, learn, and play together, rather than as single users. This change in people's perspective and expectations will be a major driver of the future of computing. In this paper the convergence of a virtual video club system and a virtual classroom is presented. A single framework for developing

David Boyer; Allen Ginsberg; Anjum Khan

2001-01-01

168

The "Intelligent Classroom": Changing Teaching and Learning with an Evolving Technological Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the development and use of the Intelligent Classroom collaborative project at McGill University that explored technology use to improve teaching and learning. Explains the hardware and software installation that allows for the automated capture of audio, video, slides, and handwritten annotations during a live lecture, with subsequent…

Winer, Laura R.; Cooperstock, Jeremy

2002-01-01

169

"Rewind and Replay:" Changing Teachers' Heterosexist Language to Create an Inclusive Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: By completing the "Rewind and Replay" activity, participants will: (1) identify heterosexist language in common classroom interactions, (2) discuss underlying heterosexist assumptions embedded in common teacher statements, (3) brainstorm inclusive terms and expressions for use in place of heterosexist language, and (4) verbally…

Klein, Nicole Aydt; Markowitz, Linda

2009-01-01

170

Social-Emotional Development, School Readiness, Teacher-Child Interactions, and Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article investigates the effectiveness of a statewide 6-month early childhood mental health consultation (ECMHC) model on teachers' emotional support of children and classroom organization. We provide a brief historical and theoretical background of the field of ECMHC, present the logic model for our ECMHC intervention, and discuss the…

Heller, Sherryl Scott; Rice, Janet; Boothe, Allison; Sidell, Margo; Vaughn, Krystal; Keyes, Angela; Nagle, Geoffrey

2012-01-01

171

"Celebration of the Neurons": The Application of Brain Based Learning in Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to investigate approaches and techniques related to how brain based learning used in classroom atmosphere. This general purpose were answered following the questions: (1) What is the aim of brain based learning? (2) What are general approaches and techniques that brain based learning used? and (3) How should be used…

Duman, Bilal

2007-01-01

172

Teacher-Student Interaction Patterns Within the Learning Environment of Mainstreamed Classrooms. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study examined teacher-student interaction patterns in 21 classrooms serving mainstreamed third and fourth grade mildly handicapped (mildly mentally retarded, mildly emotionally handicapped, and learning disabled) students. Three groups of target students were observed: nonhandicapped high achievers, nonhandicapped low achievers, and mildly…

Thompson, Ray H.

173

Using the Comfortability-in-Learning Scale to Enhance Positive Classroom Learning Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A goal of higher education is to advance learning. This study examined the role "comfortability" plays in that process. Defined as the level of comfort students experience with their classmates, instructor, and course material, comfortability addresses how secure a student feels in the classroom. Comfortability was assessed multiple…

Kiener, Michael; Green, Peter; Ahuna, Kelly

2014-01-01

174

Practice Makes Better? A Study of Meditation Learners in a Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study investigates the effect of length of meditation history on various factors, namely learning motivation, learning outcome and classroom climate. Data were collected from working adult learners (n = 450) attending meditation classes in two large cities in Taiwan. The investigation categorized learners based on meditation experience, namely…

Lin, Chin-Yen; Kuo, Tsung-Hsien; Kuo, Yen-Ku; Kuo, Yen-Lin; Ho, Li-An; Lin, Chien-Ting

2007-01-01

175

Classroom Phenology: Using the Environment as a Source of Data and Observations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity is a classroom and schoolyard investigation where students collect daily temperature and precipitation readings, weather observations, and weekly phenology reports in a phenology binder and in nature journals. Students then analyze this data and compare to recorded values in the Weatherguide calendar.

176

Improving classroom learning environments by Cultivating Awareness and Resilience in Education (CARE): results of a randomized controlled trial.  

PubMed

Cultivating Awareness and Resilience in Education (CARE for Teachers) is a mindfulness-based professional development program designed to reduce stress and improve teachers' performance and classroom learning environments. A randomized controlled trial examined program efficacy and acceptability among a sample of 50 teachers randomly assigned to CARE or waitlist control condition. Participants completed a battery of self-report measures at pre- and postintervention to assess the impact of the CARE program on general well-being, efficacy, burnout/time pressure, and mindfulness. Participants in the CARE group completed an evaluation of the program after completing the intervention. ANCOVAs were computed between the CARE group and control group for each outcome, and the pretest scores served as a covariate. Participation in the CARE program resulted in significant improvements in teacher well-being, efficacy, burnout/time-related stress, and mindfulness compared with controls. Evaluation data showed that teachers viewed CARE as a feasible, acceptable, and effective method for reducing stress and improving performance. Results suggest that the CARE program has promise to support teachers working in challenging settings and consequently improve classroom environments. PMID:24015983

Jennings, Patricia A; Frank, Jennifer L; Snowberg, Karin E; Coccia, Michael A; Greenberg, Mark T

2013-12-01

177

Psychosocial risk factors of pain among employees.  

PubMed

The study of psychosocial risk factors of pain among employees has typically focused on Karasek's job-demand-control model. The aim of the study was to examine the own and independent associations of job strain, organizational justice, workplace bullying, and work-home interface with pain. Data were collected through a postal survey to all 40, 45, 50, 55, and 60-year-old employees of the City of Helsinki in 2001 and 2002 (response rate 66%, N=5819, 80% women). Pain was measured with a three category outcome: no pain, acute pain or chronic pain. Adjustment was made for age, education, physical working conditions, BMI, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Among women, all psychosocial variables were associated with both acute and chronic pain when adjusted for confounders only. When psychosocial factors were additionally adjusted for each other, high job strain and both dimensions of work-home interface remained associated with both types of pain and repeatedly occurring bullying at workplace showed association with acute pain. Among men, when adjusted for confounders only, all psychosocial variables were associated with acute and chronic pain, except for family-to-work conflicts among those with acute pain. When adjusted mutually for all psychosocial variables, only bullying was associated with acute pain. Job strain and organizational justice showed associations with chronic pain. Future studies would benefit from a broad psychosocial framework. Investments to healthier psychosocial working environments are needed to tackle pain related problems among employees. PMID:18440254

Saastamoinen, Peppiina; Laaksonen, Mikko; Leino-Arjas, Päivi; Lahelma, Eero

2009-01-01

178

Teacher-led Relaxation Response Curriculum in an Urban High School: Impact on Student Behavioral Health and Classroom Environment.  

PubMed

Context • Recent data suggest that severe stress during the adolescent period is becoming a problem of epidemic proportions. Elicitation of the relaxation response (RR) has been shown to be effective in treating anxiety, reducing stress, and increasing positive health behaviors. Objective • The research team's objective was to assess the impact of an RR-based curriculum, led by teachers, on the psychological status and health management behaviors of high-school students and to determine whether a train-the-trainer model would be feasible in a high-school setting. Design • The research team designed a pilot study. Setting • The setting was a Horace Mann charter school within Boston's public school system. Participants • Participants were teachers and students at the charter school. Intervention • The team taught teachers a curriculum that included (1) relaxation strategies, such as breathing and imagery; (2) psychoeducation regarding mind-body pathways; and (3) positive psychology. Teachers implemented this curriculum with students. Outcome Measures • The research team assessed changes in student outcomes (eg, stress, anxiety, and stress management behaviors) using preintervention/postintervention surveys, including the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-Form Y (STAI-Y), the stress management subscale of the Health-promoting Lifestyle Profile II (HPLP-II), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), the Locus of Control (LOC) questionnaire, and the Life Orientation Test-Revised (LOTR). Classroom observations using the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS)-Secondary were also completed to assess changes in classroom environment. Results • Using a Bonferroni correction (P < .007), the study found that students experienced a significant reduction (P < .001) in measures of state-level anxiety on the STAI from pre- to postintervention. The study also found an increase in the use of stress management behaviors at that point. Using a Bonferroni correction (P < .007), the study found that students had significantly less perceived stress (P < .001), less state anxiety (P < .001) and trait anxiety (P < . 001), and increased use of positive stress management behaviors (P < .004) at the follow-up assessment in the fall of the following year. Using a Bonferroni correction (P < .002), the study found a significant increase in overall classroom productivity (eg, increased time spent on activities and instruction from pre- to postintervention). Conclusions • This study showed that teachers can lead an RR curriculum with fidelity and suggests that such a curriculum has positive benefits on student emotional and behavioral health and on classroom functioning. PMID:25831429

Wilson, H Kent; Scult, Matthew; Wilcher, Marilyn; Chudnofsky, Rana; Malloy, Laura; Drewel, Emily; Riklin, Eric; Saul, Southey; Fricchione, Gregory L; Benson, Herbert; Denninger, John W

2015-01-01

179

Secondary music students' compositional development with computer-mediated environments in classroom communities  

E-print Network

that could be discovered and created only through electronic audio editing and sound synthesis. I began to find a personal voice in the ways electronics be manipulated and combined to produce sounds that hinted at rich metaphoric worlds. When I became a... which would build on children’s existing experience and promote a more universally relevant classroom music education. A significant feature of this new ‘musical‘ approach was the centrality of composing as a means of uniting different aspects of musical...

Kirkman, Philip

2012-07-03

180

The influence of the International Baccalaureate experimental science program format on classroom learning environment and student attitudes toward the subject of science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study examined the classroom learning environments and science attitudes of students in three IB Higher Level science classrooms. The study sample consisted of 82 twelfth grade IB science students and three IB Higher Level science teachers. Qualitative and quantitative research methods were used to generate assertions toward the development of a grounded theory on accelerated curriculum effects on the classroom learning environment. The four research questions that guided this investigation are: (1) What are the shared characteristics of IB Higher Level experimental science instructors? (2) What instructional methods do instructors use to implement the IB Higher Level experimental science program and why do the instructors use these methods? (3) What are the students' perceptions about the classroom learning environment in IB Higher Level experimental science courses? (4) Does a relationship exist between student perceptions of the classroom learning environment and student attitudes toward the subject of science in IB Higher Level experimental science courses? The qualitative data sources were field notes from classroom observations, teacher interview transcripts, and relevant documents. These data sources were analyzed by constant comparison analysis. Assertions were generated about the educational and professional qualifications of the Higher Level science instructors and the teaching methods used to implement the IB science curriculum. Quantitative data sources consisted of student responses to the Preferred and Actual Forms of the Individualized Classroom Environment Questionnaire (ICEQ) and the Attitude Towards Science in School Assessment (ATSSA). Student responses to the Preferred and Actual Forms of the ICEQ were analyzed with paired t-tests and one way analyses of variance to determine the students' perceptions about the science classroom environment. Correlation tests were used to examine the relationship between learning environment dimensions and student science attitudes. The significant findings of this study were the Higher Level science teachers were supportive facilitators with strong educational backgrounds. However, the science teachers demonstrated teaching behaviors associated with teaching to the IB science exit examinations. The ICEQ findings revealed the IB science students preferred more personalized teacher-student interactions. The correlation results suggested more positive science attitudes may result in greater participation in IB Higher Level physics classes.

Raiford, Lisa Renee

181

In Pursuit of a Holistic Learning Environment: The Impact of Music in the Medical Physiology Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A holistic learning environment is one that nurtures all aspects of students' learning. The environment is safe, supportive, and provides opportunities to help students deal with nonacademic as well as academic factors that impact their learning. Creation of such an environment requires the establishment of a supportive learning community. For a…

Modell, Harold I.; DeMiero, Frank G.; Rose, Louise

2009-01-01

182

Cultural Learning Environment in Science Classrooms: Validity and Application of a Questionnaire.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an instrument to assess students' culturally sensitive environments and to examine the associations between these factors and students' attitudes towards science. A measure of students' environment, namely, the Cultural Learning Environment Questionnaire (CLEQ), was developed. The instrument…

Waldrip, Bruce G.; Fisher, Darrell L.

183

Assessing culturally sensitive factors in the learning environment of science classrooms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As schools are becoming increasingly diverse in their scope and clientele, any examination of the interaction of culturally sensitive factors of students' learning environments with learning science assumes critical importance. The purpose of this exploratory study was to develop an instrument to assess learning environment factors that are culturally sensitive, to provide initial validation information on the instrument and to examine associations between students' perceptions of their learning environments and their attitudes towards science and achievement of enquiry skills. A measure of these factors of science student's learning environment, namely the Cultural Learning Environment Questionnaire (CLEQ), was developed from past learning environment instruments and influenced by Hofstede's four dimensions of culture (Power Distance, Uncertainty Avoidance, Individualism, and Masculinity/Femininity). The reliability and discriminant validity for each scale were obtained and associations between learning environment, attitude to science and enquiry skills achievement were found.

Fisher, Darrell L.; Waldrip, Bruce G.

1997-03-01

184

From the Field to the Classroom: A Web-Based Teaching Tool on Depositional Environments and Landscape Development  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The relationship between sedimentary deposits, landforms and soil profile development is difficult for students to grasp in a conventional classroom setting. The ideal way to solve this is to take the students on extended field trips; however, field trips are expensive, have to be conducted during specific time periods, and can only handle a limited number of students. The objective of this project was to bring the field to the classroom via a virtual, dynamic web-based teaching tool illustrating common depositional environments and associated landforms and soils. The teaching tool was largely based on video footage obtained in the Canadian Rocky Mountains and in the grasslands of the southern interior of British Columbia. The Canadian Rockies are undergoing rapid deglaciation and provided excellent examples of new glacial deposits and early landscape development processes. On the other hand, British Columbia's grasslands became ice-free about 10,000 years ago and were used to illustrate landscape evolution and post-glaciation soil profile development. To bring these two environments together, video footage of corresponding landforms was shot at both locations and edited into a series of short video clips illustrating the link between depositional processes, resulting landforms and soils and their post-glacial evolution. Soil scientists, survey specialists and geomorphologists provided live commentary. The teaching tool (http://soilweb.landfood.ubc.ca/landscape/) is an open-access website merging video clips, sound recordings, text, photos and graphics intended to help students situate landforms within their geomorphologic context. This online teaching resource allows students to observe, on their own time, conditions under which sediments are deposited and soils are formed, and to witness the transformation of a barren, glacial landscape into a vegetated soil landscape. The tool can be used in various geomorphology, soil, agriculture, forestry, and natural resource management courses. An interactive overview of the tool will be given during the presentation.

Krzic, M.; Watson, K.; Grand, S.; Crowley, C.; Dyanatkar, S.; Bomke, A.; Smith, S.

2012-04-01

185

Video Networks in an Electronic Classroom Environment and Analysis of Student Preferences in the Development of a Network- Based Video Distribution System.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Faculty experience at the College of Staten Island--City University of New York shows that Hybrid Analog Digital Networks (ADViNet) prove to be useful in the classroom environment. They support major instructional activities, and are very efficient in the distribution of full-screen motion video and other graphical images. The ADViNet does not…

Gordonov, Anatoliy; Kress, Michael; Carlin, Marianne

186

Investigation of Teachers' Verbal and Non-Verbal Strategies for Managing Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Students' Behaviours within a Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper investigated teachers' verbal and non-verbal strategies for managing ADHD students in a classroom environment. It was found that effective verbal and non-verbal strategies included voice control, short phrases, repeated instructions, using students' names, and visual cues and verbal instructions combined. It has been found that…

Geng, Gretchen

2011-01-01

187

Promoting Cultural Responsiveness: Teachers' Constructs of an Assessment Classroom Environment for Ethnic Minority Students in Hong Kong Secondary Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many Hong Kong schools are concerned about how diverse learning needs of ethnic minority students could be better fulfilled. This study examines local teachers' constructs of assessment classroom environments. Using qualitative data collected from semi-structured interviews with 32 teachers from three secondary schools, this study shows ways…

Hue, Ming-tak; Kennedy, Kerry John

2015-01-01

188

Students' Perception of Important Teaching Behaviors in Classroom and Clinical Environments of a Community College Nursing and Dental Hygiene Education Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student success is dependent on effective instruction. Yet, effective teaching is difficult to define and described differently by students, faculty, and administrators. Nursing and dental hygiene education programs require faculty to teach in both classroom and clinical environments. However, accreditation agencies for these programs mandate…

Kimbrough-Walls, Vickie J.

2012-01-01

189

Guideline 3: Psychosocial Treatment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The third in seven sets of guidelines based on the consensus of experts in the treatment of psychiatric and behavioral problems in mental retardation (MR) focuses on psychosocial treatment. Guidelines cover general principles, choosing among psychosocial treatments, severity of MR and psychiatric/behavior symptoms, diagnosable disorders, target…

American Journal on Mental Retardation, 2000

2000-01-01

190

Kindergarten Students' and Parents' Perceptions of Science Classroom Environments: Achievement and Attitudes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study, involving the modification, validation and use of a learning environment questionnaire for both kindergarten students and their parents, is significant because prior learning environment research has normally involved neither parents nor such young students. A questionnaire, which was based on the What Is Happening In this Class? and…

Robinson, Esther; Fraser, Barry J.

2013-01-01

191

Classroom Acoustics  

MedlinePLUS

Classroom Acoustics A student's ability to hear and understand what is being said in the classroom is vital for ... reverberation time. Who is affected by poor classroom acoustics? All children are affected by poor classroom acoustics, ...

192

Prospective Elementary Teachers' Understanding of the Nature of Science and Perceptions of the Classroom Learning Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated prospective elementary teachers' understandings of the nature of science and explored associations with their guided-inquiry science learning environment. Over 500 female students completed the Nature of Scientific Knowledge Survey (NSKS), although only four scales were analyzed-Creative, Testable, Amoral, and Unified. The…

Martin-Dunlop, Catherine S.

2013-01-01

193

Beyond the Classroom: International Education and the Community College. Volume II: Internationalizing the Campus Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Part of a four-volume set in which community college educators discuss their efforts to internationalize the educational experience of the students and communities they serve, volume II in this series considers the challenges, pitfalls, and rewards of creating campus environments with rich international and intercultural programs and activities.…

Franco, Robert W., Ed.; Shimabukuro, James N., Ed.

194

Incorporating Informal Learning Environments and Local Fossil Specimens in Earth Science Classrooms: A Recipe for Success  

Microsoft Academic Search

In an online graduate paleontology course taken by practicing Earth Science teachers, we designed an investigation using teachers' local informal educational environments. Teachers (N = 28) were responsible for photographing, describing, and integrating fossil specimens from two informal sites into a paleoenvironmental analysis of the landscape in which the fossils were originally deposited. Our practicing teachers also developed mini-units for

Renee M. Clary; James H. Wandersee

2009-01-01

195

Beyond the Personal Learning Environment: Attachment and Control in the Classroom of the Future  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Personal Learning Environment (PLE) has been presented in a number of guises over a period of 10 years as an intervention which seeks the reorganisation of educational technology through shifting the "locus of control" of technology towards the learner. In the intervening period to the present, a number of initiatives have attempted…

Johnson, Mark William; Sherlock, David

2014-01-01

196

The role of achievement goal orientations in students' perceptions of and preferences for classroom environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Recent research on achievement motivation has begun to examine the effects of environmental factors affecting students' motivational beliefs and goal tendencies. However, when interpreting and applying the results, individual factors underlying students' different perceptions of their learning environment are often ignored. An implicit assumption seems to be that regardless of their dispositional differences (e.g. motivational basis), students will experience

Anna Tapola; Markku Niemivirta

2008-01-01

197

It's Not Easy Being Green: Bringing Real Life to the Undergraduate Legal Environment of Business Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the Legal Environment of Business course in a traditional undergraduate business curriculum, students are expected to acquire knowledge about many areas of the law and the application of law to business, society, and the international marketplace. Current concepts in undergraduate business education, such as ethics and sustainability, must also…

Marcum, Tanya M.; Perry, Sandra J.

2010-01-01

198

Incorporating Informal Learning Environments and Local Fossil Specimens in Earth Science Classrooms: A Recipe for Success  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In an online graduate paleontology course taken by practicing Earth Science teachers, we designed an investigation using teachers' local informal educational environments. Teachers (N = 28) were responsible for photographing, describing, and integrating fossil specimens from two informal sites into a paleoenvironmental analysis of the landscape in…

Clary, Renee M.; Wandersee, James H.

2009-01-01

199

Observations of the Middle School Environment: The Context for Student Behavior beyond the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the use of an observation system to measure middle school staff practices, environment characteristics, and student behavior in the school common areas. Data were collected at baseline from 18 middle schools participating in a randomized controlled trial of school-wide Positive Behavior Support. The observations were…

Rusby, Julie C.; Crowley, Ryann; Sprague, Jeffrey; Biglan, Anthony

2011-01-01

200

The Global Classroom Project: Learning a Second Language in a Virtual Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports the progress of a pilot project exploring the integration of a collaborative virtual learning environment (Second Life) with the instruction of English courses at Lingnan University in Hong Kong. An educational partnership was developed with two TESOL teacher-training courses at Texas A&M University in the US. The project…

Knutzen, Brant; Kennedy, David

2012-01-01

201

Transitioning to School: Describing the Classroom Environment of Rural, Low-Income Children in Kindergarten and First Grade  

Microsoft Academic Search

southeastern state. Data was collected as part of the Preschool Curriculum Evaluation Research (PCER) project funded by IES that was initiated in the 2002-2003 school year. The data sample involved 36 preschool classrooms. All classrooms involved were publicly funded and linked to public schools, and there were over 500 children involved. Those children then spread into numerous kindergarten and first

Kerry G. Hofer; Dale C. Farran; Mark W. Lipsey; Sean M. Hurley; Carol Bilbrey

202

Networked Instructional Computers in the Elementary Classroom and Their Effect on the Learning Environment: A Qualitative Evaluation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a qualitative evaluation of an elementary schoolwide computer implementation project. Highlights include the use of interviews, questionnaires, and surveys with teachers, students, and parents; changes in teacher attitudes and roles, classroom management, and classroom climate; and a model for creating a community of learners through the…

Keeler, Carolyn M.

1996-01-01

203

Classroom Management and Safety  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Welcome to the challenge of making good science come to life in your classroom. In this chapter, we look at how to get the science classroom ready for inquiry-based lessons and how to prepare students for engaging, productive, and safe activities. In addition, suggestions are provided to foster an emotionally safe environment for your middle level students.

Jackie Cleveland

2004-01-01

204

My Classroom Physical Activity Pyramid: A Tool for Integrating Movement into the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The classroom teacher is a critical team member of a comprehensive school physical activity program and an activity-friendly school environment. Students spend more time in the classroom than in any other school setting or environment. Classrooms are busy places, and classroom teachers must make decisions about how to make the best use of their…

Orlowski, Marietta; Lorson, Kevin; Lyon, Anna; Minoughan, Susan

2013-01-01

205

The Classroom Animal: Box Turtles.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides basic information on the anatomy, physiology, behaviors, and distribution patterns of the box turtle. Offers suggestions for the turtle's care and maintenance in a classroom environment. (ML)

Kramer, David C.

1986-01-01

206

Climatic Conditions in Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an overview of research on the ways in which classroom thermal environment, lighting conditions, ion state, and electromagnetic and air pollution affect learning and the performance of students and teachers. (SJL)

Kevan, Simon M.; Howes, John D.

1980-01-01

207

Classroom Management: What Does Research Tell Us?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article reviews studies that focus on classroom management. The aim of classroom management is twofold. The first is to establish a quiet and calm environment in the classroom so that the pupils can take part in meaningful learning in a subject. The second aim is that classroom management contributes to the pupils' social and moral…

Postholm, May Britt

2013-01-01

208

Classroom Antarctica  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website is a collection of units designed to teach students about the global importance of Antarctica. Topics covered in these units includes ice, the ocean, geology, weather, topography, auroras, the history of Antarctic exploration, living in Antarctica, animals, plants, the Antarctic Treaty, and the environment. Each unit has a selection of activities that are adaptable to the range of abilities in a class and the particular interests of the students. There are hundreds of useful web links throughout and a wealth of support material listed under Classroom Resources.

Elizabeth Haywood

209

Conceptualisation, Development and Validation of an Instrument for Investigating the Metacognitive Orientation of Science Classroom Learning Environments: The Metacognitive Orientation Learning Environment Scale – Science (MOLES-S)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Metacognition refers to an individual's knowledge, control and awareness of his\\/her learning processes. An important goal\\u000a of education is to develop students as metacognitive, life-long learners. However, developing students' metacognition and\\u000a evaluating whether classrooms are oriented to the development of students' metacognition are difficult and often time-consuming\\u000a tasks. Further, no instruments that measure key dimensions related to classroom factors that

Gregory P. Thomas

2003-01-01

210

A study of student attitudes toward physics and classroom environment based on gender and grade level among senior secondary education students in Indonesia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The main purposes of the present study are to investigate the differences on student's attitudes toward physics and their perceptions regarding classroom climate during physics classes based on gender and grade level. In addition, the study also explores female students' opinions about physics, and examines to what extent this factor might influence their decision to choose or not to choose physics or physics-related fields for their career choices in the future. A group of approximately 864 male and female students, equally proportioned by gender, were assigned to take part in this study. Two standardized instruments, namely the Individualized Classroom Environment Questionnaire (ICEQ) and the Test of Science Related Attitudes (TOSRA), have been employed to collect data. A combination of quantitative and qualitative methods was used to analyze the collected data resulting from the questionnaires as well as from the interviews. The study found, first, regardless of their gender and grade level differences, students expected a more positive classroom climate during learning physics. Also, it has been found that male students experience a more positive classroom environment than female students. Second, the study found that male students do show more positive attitudes toward physics than their female counterparts. Meanwhile, twelfth-grade students show a more positive attitude toward physics than eleventh-graders. Third, the study found that most female students do not like physics based on several reasons such as physics is a hard, monotonous and boring subject. Although eleventh-grade female students do not like physics, most of them intended to choose science as their major in the next grade. Surprisingly, a majority of twelfth-grade female students who are majoring in science have no intention to choose physics or physics-related subjects either for their prospective major at the university or for their career choices in the future.

Chaerul, Andrie

211

Chronic Psychosocial Stress and Hypertension  

PubMed Central

Genetic and behavioral factors do not fully explain the development of hypertension, and there is increasing evidence suggesting that psychosocial factors may also play an important role. Exposure to chronic stress has been hypothesized as a risk factor for hypertension, and occupational stress, stressful aspects of the social environment, and low socioeconomic status have each been studied extensively. The study of discrimination is a more recent and rapidly growing area of investigation and may also help to explain the well-known racial disparities in hypertension. Research regarding mechanisms underlying stress effects on hypertension has largely focused on cardiovascular reactivity, but delayed recovery to the pre-stress level is increasingly being evaluated as another possible pathway. Recent findings in each of these areas are reviewed, and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:20425153

Spruill, Tanya M.

2013-01-01

212

Weight-related teasing in the school environment: associations with psychosocial health and weight control practices among adolescent boys and girls.  

PubMed

Weight-related teasing has been found to be associated with low self-esteem, depressive symptoms, body dissatisfaction, and weight control behaviors in adolescents. While research has typically examined weight-related teasing directed towards the individual, little is known about weight-related teasing at the school level. This study aimed to determine the association between the school-level prevalence of weight-related teasing and psychosocial factors, body dissatisfaction and weight control behaviors in adolescents. Adolescents (N = 2,793; 53.2% female) attending 20 US public middle and high schools were surveyed as part of the Eating and Activity in Teens (EAT) 2010 study. Generalized estimating equations were used to estimate the association between school-level weight-related teasing and health variables, controlling for individual-level weight-related teasing, clustering of individuals within schools, and relevant covariates. A greater school-level prevalence of weight-related teasing was associated with lower self-esteem and greater body fat dissatisfaction in girls, and greater depressive symptoms in boys, over and above individual-level weight-related teasing. Dieting was associated with the school-level prevalence of weight-related teasing in analysis adjusted for covariates in girls, but not following adjustment for individual-level weight-related teasing. Unhealthy weight control behaviors, extreme weight control behaviors, and muscle-enhancing behaviors were not associated with the school-level prevalence of weight-related teasing in girls or boys. Findings from the current study, in conjunction with previous findings showing associations between weight-related teasing, psychological concerns, and weight control behaviors, highlight the importance of implementing strategies to decrease weight-related teasing in schools. PMID:24395152

Lampard, Amy M; MacLehose, Richard F; Eisenberg, Marla E; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Davison, Kirsten K

2014-10-01

213

Relationship between Perceived and Observed Student-Centred Learning Environments in Qatari Elementary Mathematics and Science Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recently, Qatar established educational reform in charter (independent) schools focusing on curriculum standards, student-centred teaching, standards-based assessment, English as the language of instruction, and extensive professional development. A primary area of emphasis was the creation of student-centred mathematics and science classrooms

Knight, Stephanie L.; Parker, Dawn; Zimmerman, Whitney; Ikhlief, Atman

2014-01-01

214

Using a Virtual Classroom Environment to Describe the Attention Deficits Profile of Children with Neurofibromatosis Type 1  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objectives of this study were to describe the nature of the attention deficits in children with Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) in comparison with typically developing (TD) children, using the Virtual Classroom (VC), and to assess the utility of this instrument for detecting attention deficits. Twenty-nine NF1 children and 25 age-and…

Gilboa, Yafit; Rosenblum, Sara; Fattal-Valevski, Aviva; Toledano-Alhadef, Hagit; Rizzo, Albert; Josman, Naomi

2011-01-01

215

Integrating Popular Web Applications in Classroom Learning Environments and Its Effects on Teaching, Student Learning Motivation and Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Advancements in information and communication technology (ICT) allowed several tools and systems to be proposed for improving classroom experiences to both instructors and students. However, most of these tools were brand-new and stand-alone programs that require users to invest additional time and effort to become familiar with their use. This…

Lin, Yen-Ting; Jou, Min

2013-01-01

216

An Analogous Study of Children's Attitudes Toward School in an Open Classroom Environment as Opposed to a Conventional Setting.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study sought to determine whether intermediate age children exposed to open classroom teaching strategy have a more positive attitude toward school than intermediate age children exposed to conventional teaching strategy. The hypothesis was that there would be no significant difference in attitude between the two groups. The study was limited to…

Zeli, Doris Conti

217

Rethinking Classroom-Oriented Instructional Development Models to Mediate Instructional Planning in Technology-Enhanced Learning Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although classroom-oriented instructional development (ID) models have the potential to help teachers think and plan for effective instruction with technology, research studies have shown that they are not widely employed. Many of these models have not factored in the complexities that teachers faced when planning for instruction in…

Lim, Cher Ping; Chai, Ching Sing

2008-01-01

218

Reflection through the ID-PRISM: A Teacher Planning Tool to Transform Classrooms into Web-Enhanced Learning Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent books and articles are full of definitions of the ideal electronic classroom, prescriptions of how to use web resources, and descriptions of the effects of such resources on teaching practices and learning. Yet Becker (1999) found that only 30% of those teachers who were internet-connected acknowledged using web resources with their…

Koszalka, Tiffany A.; Grabowski, Barbara L.; McCarthy, Marianne

2003-01-01

219

Classroom Management  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Perhaps the most important skill a good teacher should possess is the ability to control students. A teacher who can devise fascinating and unique lesson plans for her classroom is useless if she can't get the kids to sit down and listen to her instructions. Unfortunately, many beginning teachers simply are not prepared to manage their classrooms effectively. Managing a classroom means you must teach your students behavior expectations, not just post your rules on the classroom wall. Classroom management becomes even more of an issue when it applies to the active nature of the science classroom.

C. Jill Swango

2003-01-01

220

Classroom Management: Setting Up the Classroom for Learning  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Student learning is directly related to classroom control established the first week of school (Wong and Wong 2001)—what you do the first day counts, and what you do the first 10 minutes counts even more. This article shares the advanced planning aspects of classroom management that should be in place before students enter the classroom for the first time: the physical environment; routines, policies, and procedures; materials management; as well as a review process to extend what students learn.

Donna R. Sterling

2009-07-01

221

Teach the Children Well: A Holistic Approach to Developing Psychosocial and Behavioral Competencies through Physical Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of a positive youth development perspective is the promotion of healthy physical and psychosocial development in young people. This approach consists of social-contextual features (e.g., teacher behaviors, classroom structure, student activities) that help equip youth with attributes, skills, competencies, and values that will contribute…

Weiss, Maureen R.

2011-01-01

222

Classroom Planetarium.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides instructions for the construction of a paper mache classroom planetarium and suggests several student activities using this planetarium model. Lists reasons why students have difficulties in transferring classroom instruction in astronomy to the night sky. (DS)

Ankney, Paul

1981-01-01

223

Psychosocial treatments for adolescent depression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Major Depressive Disorders affect between 2% and 5% of adolescents at any one point in time. Depression in adolescence is associated with serious psychosocial deficits and has negative effects on functioning during young adulthood. Starting with the pioneering work of Lenore Butler and her colleagues, many psychosocial interventions have been developed and studied, with generally positive results. On the basis

Peter M Lewinsohn; Gregory N Clarke

1999-01-01

224

Psychosocial Aspects of Heart Transplantation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an overview of medical and psychosocial aspects of heart transplantation, with a focus on the program at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. Describes social workers' interventions which help patients and families to achieve optimal psychosocial functioning before and after transplantation. (Author/ABL)

Suszycki, Lee H.

1988-01-01

225

Poems, patients, and psychosocial nursing.  

PubMed

1. Holism can prove just as elusive in psychosocial nursing as in any other specialty area. 2. Students in an undergraduate psychosocial nursing course used poetry to express the fullness of the situations in which they found themselves. 3. The poems touched a deeper and more complete sense of humanity than had been possible in other, more traditional, assignments. PMID:11852715

Olson, Tom

2002-02-01

226

Psychosocial development, anomie, and mood  

Microsoft Academic Search

Administered modified versions of Srole's Anomie Scale and the Nowlis Adjective Check List of Mood and A. E. Wessman and D. F. Ricks's Inventory of Psychosocial Development to 100 domiciliated male veterans (mean age = 67 yrs) and to 86 female and 55 male community college students. The hypothesis that E. Erikson's stages in psychosocial development are related to anomie

Gunars Reimanis

1974-01-01

227

Classroom Dimensions and Classroom Types.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although classroom "openness" has been much discussed in recent years, there has been little effort to investigate to what degree this openness occurs within a general sample of classrooms. The purpose of this study is to identify significant attributes of classroom activity and organization relevant to the concepts of "traditional" and "open" and…

Kendall, Arthur J.; Solomon, Daniel

228

Learning outside the Primary Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In "Learning Outside the Primary Classroom," the educationalist and writer Fred Sedgwick explores in a practical way the many opportunities for intense learning that children and teachers can find outside the confines of the usual learning environment, the classroom. This original work is based on tried and tested methods from UK primary schools.…

Sedgwick, Fred

2012-01-01

229

Connecting the physical and psychosocial space to Sandia's mission.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia Labs has corporate, lab-wide efforts to enhance the research environment as well as improve physical space. However, these two efforts are usually done in isolation. The integration of physical space design with the nurturing of what we call psychosocial space can foster more efficient and effective creativity, innovation, collaboration, and performance. This paper presents a brief literature review on how academia and industry are studying the integration of physical and psychosocial space and focuses on the efforts that we, the authors, have made to improve the research environment in the Cyber Engineering Research Lab (CERL), home to Group 1460. Interviews with subject matter experts from Silicon Valley and the University of New Mexico plus changes to actual spaces in CERL provided us with six lessons learned when integrating physical and psychosocial space. We describe these six key takeaways in hopes that Sandia will see this area as an evolving research capability that Sandia can both contribute to and benefit from.

Emmanuel, Glory Ruth; Silva, Austin Ray

2014-07-01

230

Classroom Management Issues for Teaching Assistants  

Microsoft Academic Search

For many graduate teaching assistants, the task of planning, organizing, motivating, and controlling classroom environments can be overwhelming. Empirical research pertaining to major classroom management problems experienced by TAs is scarce. This article is a report of a survey study regarding TA classroom management at a large, land-grant Research 1 University. The study provides specific information about TAs' perceptions of

Jiali Luo; Laurie Bellows; Marilyn Grady

2000-01-01

231

The Dance of Elementary School Classroom Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

At times, classroom management and guidance elude even the most seasoned teachers. Yet, students need guidance and practice in self-regulatory skills to assist in the learning that occurs in classrooms. Teachers need both practical and research-based classroom management strategies that benefit the environment and help create a space conducive to…

Powell, Pamela

2014-01-01

232

In-School Psychosocial Support Services for Safeguarding Children's Rights: Results and Implications of a Botswana Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In-school psychosocial support services are intended to create safe learning environments for children, enabling the children to attain age-appropriate developmental tasks. This study investigated protections to children's right to safe learning environments through the provision of in-school psychosocial support services. Participants were…

Ntinda, Kayi; Maree, Jacobus Gideon; Mpofu, Elias; Seeco, Elizabeth

2014-01-01

233

Psychosocial treatments for schizophrenia.  

PubMed

The current state of the literature regarding psychosocial treatments for schizophrenia is reviewed within the frameworks of the recovery model of mental health and the expanded stress-vulnerability model. Interventions targeting specific domains of functioning, age groups, stages of illness, and human service system gaps are classified as evidence-based practices or promising practices according to the extent to which their efficacy is currently supported by meta-analyses and individual randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Evidence-based practices include assertive community treatment (ACT), cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for psychosis, cognitive remediation, family psychoeducation, illness self-management training, social skills training, and supported employment. Promising practices include cognitive adaptive therapy, CBT for posttraumatic stress disorder, first-episode psychosis intervention, healthy lifestyle interventions, integrated treatment for co-occurring disorders, interventions targeting older individuals, peer support services, physical disease management, prodromal stage intervention, social cognition training, supported education, and supported housing. Implications and future directions are discussed. PMID:23330939

Mueser, Kim T; Deavers, Frances; Penn, David L; Cassisi, Jeffrey E

2013-01-01

234

[The psychosocial roots of racism and xenophobia].  

PubMed

The concept of race is only a human particularity. In spite of this, the racism, as a construction of imagination or a paranocial delusion or an ethnic attitude, is spread among the narcissist personalities and the environment dominated by nationalist or religious fanaticism and anyway generates collective violence. There is also a psychosocial racism almost always actual in the common human relations, appeared in form of positive attitudes towards similar others and negative attitudes towards different others. The best defence against these both phenomena are the attitudes of tolerance, understanding and liking. PMID:10846583

Alonso-Fernández, F

1999-01-01

235

The Classroom Animal: Snapping Turtles.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the distinctive features of the common snapping turtle. Discusses facts and misconceptions held about the turtle. Provides guidelines for proper care and treatment of a young snapper in a classroom environment. (ML)

Kramer, David C.

1987-01-01

236

Cell phones: the psychosocial risks.  

PubMed

Cell phones are a relatively novel and evolving technology. While the potential benefits of this technology continue to emerge, so do the potential psychosocial risks. For example, one psychosocial risk is user stress, which appears to be related to feeling compelled to promptly respond to cell-phone activity in order to maintain spontaneity and access with others. Other potential psychosocial risks include disruptions in sleep; the user's risk of exposure to cyberbullying, particularly the unwanted exposure of photographs and/or videos of the victim; and overuse, particularly among adolescents. With regard to the latter phenomenon, the boundaries among overuse, misuse, dependence, and addiction are not scientifically clear. Therefore, while cell phones are a convenient and expedient technology, they are not without their potential psychosocial hazards. PMID:23439568

Sansone, Randy A; Sansone, Lori A

2013-01-01

237

Classroom, Home and Peer Environment Influences on Student Outcomes in Science and Mathematics: An Analysis of Systemic Reform Data  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using secondary analysis of a large database from a Statewide Systemic Initiative, we examined the effects of several types of environments on student outcomes. Over 3 years, nearly 7,000 students in 392 classes in 200 different schools responded to a questionnaire that assesses class, home, and peer environments as well as student attitudes.…

Fraser, Barry J.; Kahle, Jane Butler

2007-01-01

238

Classroom Contexts for Creativity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Various factors influence the development of creative potential, including everything from individual differences to the kinds of experiences and opportunities that creators experience throughout the lifespan. When it comes to nurturing creativity in the classroom, the learning environment is one of the most important factors--determining, in…

Beghetto, Ronald A.; Kaufman, James C.

2014-01-01

239

Flexible Classroom Furniture  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Classroom design for the 21st-century learning environment should accommodate a variety of learning skills and needs. The space should be large enough so it can be configured to accommodate a number of learning activities. This also includes furniture that provides flexibility and accommodates collaboration and interactive work among students and…

Kim Hassell,

2011-01-01

240

The five steps of comprehensive psychosocial distress screening.  

PubMed

Despite the growing recognition of the impact psychosocial distress has on the quality of life of patients with cancer, the implementation of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Distress Management Guidelines and the mandate of evidence-based policy for routine distress screening continue to lag. To speed adoption of the guideline, the American Psychosocial Oncology Society (APOS) and Yale School of Nursing (YSN) launched the Screening for Psychosocial Distress Program in 2014. The program resulted in the development of five steps necessary to carry out routine psychosocial distress screening. The steps are consistent with the NCCN Distress Management Guidelines and the new criterion for accreditation by the American College of Surgeons (ACS) Commission on Cancer as of 2015. These five steps are as follows: (1) screening, (2) evaluating, (3) referring, (4) following up, and (5) documenting and quality improvement. The purpose of this article is to summarize the detailed procedure of the five steps for cancer care professionals-including oncologists, nurses, psychiatrists, psychologists, and social workers-so they can manage psychosocial distress efficiently in their own clinical environments. PMID:25824699

Lazenby, Mark; Tan, Hui; Pasacreta, Nick; Ercolano, Elizabeth; McCorkle, Ruth

2015-05-01

241

Psychosocial aspects of abortion  

PubMed Central

The literature on psychosocial aspects of abortion is confusing. Individual publications must be interpreted in the context of cultural, religious, and legal constraints obtaining in a particular society at a given time, with due attention to the status and availability of alternatives to abortion that might be chosen by a woman with an “unwanted” pregnancy. A review of the literature shows that, where careful pre- and post-abortion assessments are made, the evidence is that psychological benefit commonly results, and serious adverse emotional sequelae are rare. The outcome of refused abortion seems less satisfactory, with regrets and distress frequently occurring. Research on the administration of abortion services suggests that counselling is often of value, that distress is frequently caused by delays in deciding upon and in carrying out abortions, and by unsympathetic attitudes of service providers. The phenomenon of repeated abortion seeking should be seen in the context of the availability and cost of contraception and sterilization. The place of sterilization with abortion requires careful study. A recommendation is made for observational descriptive research on populations of women with potentially unwanted pregnancies in different cultures, with comparisons of management systems and an evaluation of their impact on service users. PMID:1085671

Illsley, Raymond; Hall, Marion H.

1976-01-01

242

Outdoor Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An outdoor classroom is the ideal vehicle for community involvement: Parents, native plant societies, 4-H, garden clubs, and master naturalists are all resources waiting to be tapped, as are local businesses offering support. If you enlist your community in the development and maintenance of your outdoor classroom, the entire community will…

Mayes, Valynda

2010-01-01

243

Psychosocial needs of burns nurses: a descriptive phenomenological inquiry.  

PubMed

The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the psychosocial needs of nurses who care for patients with severe burn injuries. Burns nurses work in an emotionally challenging and confronting environment, for which they are in need of emotional and clinical support. Exposure to such high levels of stress in this occupational environment has implications for nurses' health and psychosocial well-being. Seven burns nurses were recruited in 2009 from a severe burn injury unit in New South Wales, Australia. A qualitative phenomenological methodology was used to construct themes depicting nurses' experiences. Participants were selected through purposeful sampling, and data were collected through in-depth individual semistructured interviews using open-ended questions. Data were analyzed with Colaizzi's phenomenological method of data analysis. The psychosocial needs of burns nurses were identified and organized into five categories: peer nursing support, informal support, lack of support, multidisciplinary team collaboration, and professional support. The findings clearly demonstrate that support and unity within the workplace are fundamental factors for the psychosocial well-being of nurses caring for patients who have sustained a severe burn injury. Support for nurses in the form of regular professional or collegial debriefing sessions and utilization of employee assistance programs could ease the impact of the stressful environment in which they operate, and could influence staff retention. However, a supportive workplace culture is necessary to encourage nurses to access these services. PMID:21245766

Kornhaber, Rachel Anne; Wilson, Anne

2011-01-01

244

Developing and Validating a New Classroom Climate Observation Assessment Tool  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The climate of school classrooms, shaped by a combination of teacher practices and peer processes, is an important determinant for children's psychosocial functioning and is a primary factor affecting bullying and victimization. Given that there are relatively few theoretically grounded and validated assessment tools designed to measure the social…

Leff, Stephen S.; Thomas, Duane E.; Shapiro, Edward S.; Paskewich, Brooke; Wilson, Kim; Necowitz-Hoffman, Beth; Jawad, Abbas F.

2011-01-01

245

Responsive Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Responsive Classroom addresses some of the challenges present in any elementary classroom, be it first-grade mathematics or third-grade science, by offering "an approach to teaching and learning that fosters safe, challenging, and joyful classrooms and schools, kindergarten through eighth grade." Through this website, classroom teachers share "practical strategies for bringing together social and academic learning throughout the school day." They report that teachers in urban, rural, and suburban settings nationwide find that these strategies have increased student investment, responsibility, and learning, and decreased problem behaviors. Studies detailing the effectiveness of the program are posted on this website. The basic principles of the program are also described, but the books detailing their approach must be purchased. The newsletter, however, is available free of charge and the archive includes previously published articles, which can be searched by topic, such as technology in the classroom and family involvement.

246

Assessment of psychosocial risks faced by workers in Almería-type greenhouses, using the Mini Psychosocial Factor method.  

PubMed

This work reports the use of the Mini Psychosocial Factor (MPF) method for assessing the psychosocial risks faced by agricultural workers in the greenhouses of Almería (Spain) with the aim of improving their health. The variables Rhythm, Mobbing, Relationships, Health, Recognition, Autonomy, Emotional Involvement, Support, Compensation, Control, Demands, and Mental Load were recorded using a pre-validated questionnaire containing 15 questions. The sex, age, and nationality of the respondents (n = 310) were also recorded, as were the type of greenhouse in which each worked, the size of the greenhouse, and the crop grown. The results showed psychosocial risks to exist for the workers. Multiple correspondence analysis, however, showed that moderate risks can be offset by new prevention programmes that improve Spanish legislation in terms of workers' salaries, worker-employer social days, work timetables to facilitate family life, and training courses. This could improve the work environment and health of Almería's greenhouse workers as well as their productivity. PMID:22981469

Montoya-García, M E; Callejón-Ferre, A J; Pérez-Alonso, J; Sánchez-Hermosilla, J

2013-03-01

247

Validation and Application of the Constructivist Learning Environment Survey in English Language Teacher Education Classrooms in Iran  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports the validation and application of an English language teacher education (LTE) version of the Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (CLES). The instrument, called the CLES-LTE, was field tested with a sample of 622 Iranian English language student teachers in 28 classes. When principal components analysis led to the…

Ebrahimi, Nabi. A.

2015-01-01

248

Using a Humanoid Robot to Develop a Dialogue-Based Interactive Learning Environment for Elementary Foreign Language Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Elementary school is the critical stage during which the development of listening comprehension and oral abilities in language acquisition occur, especially with a foreign language. However, the current foreign language instructors often adopt one-way teaching, and the learning environment lacks any interactive instructional media with which to…

Chang, Chih-Wei; Chen, Gwo-Dong

2010-01-01

249

The Constructivist Classroom Learning Environment and Its Associations with Critical Thinking Ability of Secondary School Students in Liberal Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, we investigated-secondary school students' perceptions of their constructivist learning environment in Liberal Studies, and whether their perceptions were related to their critical thinking ability. A convenience sample of Secondary Three students (N = 967) studying Liberal Studies in Hong Kong participated in this research by…

Kwan, Yee Wan; Wong, Angela F. L.

2014-01-01

250

Psychosocial impact of narcolepsy.  

PubMed

Despite remarkable progress in our understanding of narcolepsy, the disease continues to cause the sufferer severe negative life effects. Before and after diagnosis, narcoleptics often experience unrelenting severe psychosocial stress. Child and adolescent narcoleptics report embarrassment, academic decline and feelings of loss of self-worth related to the symptoms of their disease. Personality characteristics may be adapted in order to avoid social situations that would precipitate cataplexy or draw attention to the patient's degree of somnolence. Misdiagnosis of these illnesses may result in inappropriate treatment and underestimation of an individual's potential. Adult narcoleptics also face the concerns of the workplace. Worry about loss of job and income are a source of anxiety and are often based in reality. Accidents at home, while driving and in the workplace are increased, creating safety concerns for both the patient and the community. Marital difficulties are common and psychopathology is known to occur more frequently. Narcolepsy's marked impact on quality of life has been found to be similar across cultural lines and these effects appear to be an inherent part of the disease. The socioeconomic impact in general is even more severe than those of comparable forms of epilepsy. Successful diagnosis and treatment do not end the narcoleptic's difficulties. The need for stimulants often creates problems with pharmacists and family. Somnolence, which responds the most poorly of all narcoleptic symptoms, leads to continued problems in the workplace. Side effects related to stimulant use may be a further source of difficulty. Finally, families may be unwilling to accept the illness and thereby alienate the patient.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7701199

Broughton, W A; Broughton, R J

1994-12-01

251

Psychosocial issues in space: future challenges.  

PubMed

As the duration of space flights increases and crews become more heterogeneous, psychosocial factors are likely to play an increasingly important role in determining mission success. The operations of the International Space Station and planning of interplanetary missions represent important future challenges for how to select, train and monitor crews. So far, empirical evidence about psychological factors in space is based on simulations and personnel in analog environments (i.e. polar expeditions, submarines). It is apparent that attempts to transfer from these environments to space requires a thorough analysis of the human behavior specific to the fields. Recommendations for research include the effects of multi-nationality on crew interaction, development of tension within crews and between Mission Control, and prediction of critical phases in adaptation over time. Selection of interpersonally compatible crews, pre-mission team training and implementation of tools for self-monitoring of psychological parameters ensure that changes in mission requirements maximize crew performance. PMID:11865868

Sandal, G M

2001-06-01

252

Reflections on an informal learning environment with invocations for classroom learning in Dubai, the United Arab Emirates  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article explores postgraduate student-teacher perceptions of the educational value of learning in informal environments through a well-known global edutainment centre – KidZania – in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. It provides an interpretive analysis of student-teacher reflections in online reflective discourse communities, which followed a connect–extend–challenge format. Findings show that students identified benefits and some limitations to learning in the

Fiona Baker

2012-01-01

253

Home Environment and Classroom Climate: An Investigation of their Relation to Students’ Academic Self-Concept in a Streamed Setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many studies concur that students’ perceptions of their home and school environments, such as relationships with parents and\\u000a teachers, are related to their academic self-concept (for example, Chang et al., Int J of Behav Dev 27(2):182–189, 2003; Ireson and Hallam, Br J Educ Psychol 75:297–311, 2005; Jang, J Kor Home Econ, 39:101–114, 2001; Lau and Leung, Br J Educ Psychol,

Woon Chia Liu; Chee Keng John Wang

2008-01-01

254

Psychosocial factors and congestive heart failure  

Microsoft Academic Search

The incidence and prevalence of congestive heart failure (CHF) are increasing, even after adjustment for an aging population.\\u000a Because coverage of psychosocial factors in CHF has been insufficient, we reviewed the literature in this area. Four major\\u000a themes emerged in our review as we examined relations between psychosocial factors and CHF: psychiatric comorbidity, psychosocial\\u000a precipitation and exacerbation of CHF, psychosocial

Judi Profant; Joel E. Dimsdale

2000-01-01

255

The learning environment in clicker classrooms: student processes of learning and involvement in large university?level courses using student response systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

To explore what social and educational infrastructure is needed to support classroom use of student response systems (Roschelle et al., 2004), this study investigated the ways in which student characteristics and course design choices were related to students’ assessments of the contribution of clicker use to their learning and involvement in the classroom. Survey responses of over 1500 undergraduates enrolled

April R. Trees; Michele H. Jackson

2007-01-01

256

Psychosocial factors in juvenile diabetes: A review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies assessing (1) the influence of psychosocial factors on the onset of juvenile diabetes, (2) the influence of psychosocial factors on the course of this disease, and (3) the influence of diabetes on the psychosocial development of the child are reviewed. Directions for future research are suggested.

Suzanne Bennett Johnson

1980-01-01

257

Configurations of Common Childhood Psychosocial Risk Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Co-occurrence of psychosocial risk factors is commonplace, but little is known about psychiatrically-predictive configurations of psychosocial risk factors. Methods: Latent class analysis (LCA) was applied to 17 putative psychosocial risk factors in a representative population sample of 920 children ages 9 to 17. The resultant class…

Copeland, William; Shanahan, Lilly; Costello, E. Jane; Angold, Adrian

2009-01-01

258

Inclusive Classrooms  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Five Standards-based strategies for successful inclusion of special-needs students in the secondary science classroom are described in this article. Use a multisensory approach; encourage collaboration among students; provide specific expectations and ass

Konstantinos Alexakos

2001-03-01

259

Classroom Wildlife.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A game is used to study population control factors on a wolf pack and to explore human competition with these animals. A game board and chance cards to be photocopied for use in the classroom are provided. (DH)

Fleer, Daryl

1984-01-01

260

Classroom Catapults  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"Wow, our plastic load flew 540 centimeters! This is so cool!" An interdisciplinary unit on catapults was responsible for the excitement and enthusiasm generated in the author's classroom. In their social studies class, students learned about the Middle A

Diane D. Villano

2001-02-01

261

Classroom Triangles  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students use bearing measurements to triangulate and determine objects' locations. Working in teams of two or three, they must put on their investigative hats as they take bearing measurements to specified landmarks in their classroom (or other rooms in the school) from a "mystery location." With the extension activity, students are challenged with creating their own maps of the classroom or other school location and comparing them with their classmates' efforts.

2014-09-18

262

Classroom Triangles  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students will use bearing measurements to triangulate and determine objects' locations. Working in teams of two or three, students must put on their investigative hats as they take bearing measurements to specified landmarks in their classroom (or other rooms in the school) from a mystery location. With the extension activity, students are challenged with creating their own map of the classroom or other school location and comparing it with their classmates' efforts.

Matt Lippis

2006-01-01

263

Associations between Peer Bullying and Classroom Concentration: Evidence for Mediation by Perceived Personal Safety and Relationship with Teacher  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Being bullied is associated with a psycho-social maladjustment during childhood. One hitherto largely overlooked correlate is disrupted classroom concentration. Using data collected from 364 9-11-year-old children attending seven junior schools in the UK, we tested a model in which children's perceived safety in two contexts (classroom and…

Boulton, Michael; Woodmansey, Helen; Williams, Emma; Spells, Ruth; Nicholas, Beth; Laxton, Eleanor; Holman, Gemma; Duke, Elizabeth

2012-01-01

264

Environment  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Through 10 lessons and more than 20 hands-on activities, students are introduced to the concept of an environment and the many interactions within it. As they learn about natural and human-made environments, as well as renewable and non-renewable natural resources, they see how people use our planet's natural resources and the many resulting environmental issues that exist in our world today. Topics include: solid waste disposal; the concepts of reduce, reuse, recycle and compost; the causes and effects of water pollution and the importance of water treatment and clean-up methods; air pollution and air quality and the many engineering technologies to prevent it and clean it up; land use and community planning, seeing how decisions made by people have a long-term impact on our natural world; and renewable energy sources, seeing how solar, water and wind energy can be transformed into electricity. In the hands-on activities, students: create a yarn "web" to identify environmental interactions, which they tally and graph; use Moebius strips (loops of paper with a half twist) to demonstrate the environmental interconnectedness and explore natural cycles (water, oxygen/carbon dioxide, carbon, nitrogen); conduct an environmental issue survey to gather and graph data and use an opinion spectrum; brainstorm ways that they use and waste natural resources; use cookies to simulate the distribution of nonrenewable resources; collect, categorize, weigh and analyze classroom solid waste for a week; build and observe a model landfill; evaluate alternative product packaging; use models to investigate the process and consequences of water contamination; design and build water filters; observe and discuss a balloon model of an electrostatic precipitator; build particulate matter collectors; observe and discuss a model of a wet scrubber; dig into the newspaper's daily air quality index; act as community planning engineers to determine optimal structure placement in a community; investigate the thermal storage properties of sand, salt, water and paper to evaluate their suitability as passive solar thermal mass; design and create models for new waterwheels within time and material constraints; build model anemometers; and create publications to communicate what they have learned.

Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

265

The ISI Classroom Observation System: Examining the Literacy Instruction Provided to Individual Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Individualizing Student Instruction (ISI) classroom observation and coding system is designed to provide a detailed picture of the classroom environment at the level of the individual student. Using a multidimensional conceptualization of the classroom environment, foundational elements (teacher warmth and responsiveness to students, classroom

Connor, Carol McDonald; Morrison, Frederick J.; Fishman, Barry J.; Ponitz, Claire Cameron; Glasney, Stephanie; Underwood, Phyllis S.; Piasta, Shayne B.; Crowe, Elizabeth Coyne; Schatschneider, Christopher

2009-01-01

266

Diagnosis: medical and psychosocial conditions  

E-print Network

Disorders (FASD) What you can do to help your child www.beinthekNOwnj.org How We Can Help Through a grant Diagnosis: medical and psychosocial conditions Case Management: referrals to community resources pregnancy. Babies with identifiable facial characteristics, stunted growth and possible brain damage

Garfunkel, Eric

267

Psychosocial Correlates of Methamphetamine Use  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methamphetamine (MA) abuse is a devastating problem that has been sweeping the United States from west to east and has reached epidemic proportion in many areas. Literature on the drug itself, its history, and its effects are reviewed. The current project aimed to examine the psychosocial correlates of MA use using Hudson's Multi-Problem Screening Inventory (MPSI). The MPSI was given

Greg J. Eisinger; John S. Wodarski; Deana Ferguson

2009-01-01

268

Psychosocial Issues, Sexuality, and Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is well-documented in the literature that psychosocial factors play a significant role in the development and progress of, adaptation to, and survival from cancer. Cancer and its treatment often lead to psychiatric co-morbidity, precipitate spiritual crisis, compel lifestyle changes, and disrupt family and social relationships. One area most affected by cancer is quality of life, including sexual functioning. Cancer

Gabriel Tan; Karen Waldman; Rose Bostick

2002-01-01

269

Cyberaddictions: toward a psychosocial perspective.  

PubMed

The concept of cyberaddiction is far from being unanimously accepted by scientists (Ko, Yen, Yen, Chen, & Chen, 2012; Pezoa-Jares, Espinoza-Luna & Vasquez-Medina, 2012; Nadeau & et al. 2011; Perraton, Fusaro & Bonenfant, 2011. The same is true of addiction to videogames (Hellman, Schoenmakers, Nordstrom, & Van Holst 2013); Coulombe (2010); or to Facebook (Andreassen et al. 2012; Levard & Soulas, 2010). While certain researchers wished to see this condition included in the DSM-5, others question the operational and practical basis for the diagnostic criteria (Block, 2008). Through a review of litterature and results from research findings; the aim of this article is to propose a psychosocial perspective for the cyberaddiction phenomenon. By a psychosocial perspective, we mean the inclusion of social determinants (weak social ties, social exclusion, hyper individualism, poverty, unemployment, etc) and not only the individual characteristics associated with the disease model in the addiction field. To what extent social conditions and cyberaddiction behaviors constitute a potential pathology ? Can we include a psychosocial approach to gain a more general picture of this contemporary issue? In response to these questions, a contextualization and an attempt to define cyberaddiction will be followed by an analysis of some major issues in the development of this type of addiction. As a conclusion, a demonstration of the cycle of addiction on how people develop addictions, including cyberaddictions, will be done within a psychosocial perspective in order to seize the multifactorial aspects of this addiction. PMID:25173593

Suissa, Amnon Jacob

2014-12-01

270

Psychosocial Resources in First-Year University Students: The Role of Identity Processes and Social Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

The investigation involved the assessment of a model predicting that family and university relationship environments are linked\\u000a with identity processes and identity states (statuses) that predict psychosocial resources among first-year university students.\\u000a A sample of 351 university students, between the ages of 18 and 21 years, completed measures of psychosocial maturity based\\u000a on Erikson's notions of ego virtues, a measure

Gerald R. Adams; Michael D. Berzonsky; Leo Keating

2006-01-01

271

Psychosocial Issues in Cancer Pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cancer pain is a complex and multidimensional experience that affects and is affected by psychological and social factors.\\u000a This article reviews recent research that points to a number of key psychosocial factors associated with pain, including psychological\\u000a distress, coping, and social support, as well as the impact of socioeconomic factors on barriers to pain management. We also\\u000a review recent research

Laura S. Porter; Francis J. Keefe

272

Classroom Notes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this issue's "Classroom Notes" section, the following papers are described: (1) "Sequences of Definite Integrals" by T. Dana-Picard; (2) "Structural Analysis of Pythagorean Monoids" by M.-Q Zhan and J. Tong; (3) "A Random Walk Phenomenon under an Interesting Stopping Rule" by S. Chakraborty; (4) "On Some Confidence Intervals for Estimating the…

International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 2007

2007-01-01

273

Classroom Notes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this issue's "Classroom Notes" section, the following papers are discussed: (1) "Constructing a line segment whose length is equal to the measure of a given angle" (W. Jacob and T. J. Osler); (2) "Generating functions for the powers of Fibonacci sequences" (D. Terrana and H. Chen); (3) "Evaluation of mean and variance integrals without…

International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 2007

2007-01-01

274

Classroom Tips.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes five classroom activities or projects used in Canadian social studies classes. Includes discussions of the use of artifacts, a field trip to Spain, a simulation of the Earth Summit meeting, and the application of mahatma Gandhi's philosophy to current problems. (CFR)

Stevens, Jacqueline; And Others

1993-01-01

275

Classroom Tech  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article features the latest classroom technologies namely the FLY Pentop, WriteToLearn, and a new iris scan identification system. The FLY Pentop is a computerized pen from Leapster that "magically" understands what kids write and draw on special FLY paper. WriteToLearn is an automatic grading software from Pearson Knowledge Technologies and…

Instructor, 2006

2006-01-01

276

Jigsaw Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Jigsaw Classroom is a website for the jigsaw cooperative learning technique that strives to reduce racial conflict, promote better learning, improve motivation, and increase the enjoyment of the learning experience among school children. The website includes an overview of jigsaw techniques, jigsaw history, implementing tips, related books and articles, and links on cooperative learning, school violence, and jigsaw developer Elliot Aronson.

Elliot Aronson

277

Classroom Antarctica  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As part of the Australian Antarctic Division, Classroom Antarctica gives dozens of downloadable Adobe Acrobat files that allow students to discover this unique continent. Subjects include the history of the scientific research undertaken on Antarctica, surviving its climate, its biological ecosystem, the land's physical characteristics and affects on climate, and much more.

1969-12-31

278

"Hate in the Classroom": A Rejoinder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Raphael Cohen-Almagor's article "Hate in the Classroom: Free Expression, Holocaust Denial, and Liberal Education" (2008) calls for sanctions on those K-12 public school teachers whose deployment of "hate speech"--and/or associations with others who deploy it--creates a "poisoned environment" in the classroom. While stating his belief in the role…

Heinrichs, Terry

2008-01-01

279

Hospitable Classrooms: Biblical Hospitality and Inclusive Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper contributes to a Christian hermeneutic of special education by suggesting the biblical concept of hospitality as a necessary characteristic of classroom and school environments in which students with disabilities and other marginalized students can be effectively incorporated into the body of the classroom. Christian hospitality, seen…

Anderson, David W.

2011-01-01

280

The Role of Music in Classroom Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Several studies have demonstrated that music has many uses in today's classroom. In addition to a positive classroom environment, stronger curriculum content, and effective teaching strategies, research indicates that music is also an effective management strategy. A musical program was designed for third and fourth grade teachers to achieve…

Jackson, Mary F.; Joyce, Donna M.

281

Hearing and Listening in a Typical Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses factors that affect how well students with hearing loss and typical students can hear in classrooms. Soundfield equalization is discussed as a way to create an environment where each child is at a favorable speaker-listener distance by routing the teacher's voice to loudspeakers around the classroom. (CR)

Palmer, Catherine V.

1997-01-01

282

Hey, There's a Forest in that Classroom!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

After a prolonged visit to an elementary classroom, this author was inspiredto share his reflections on the effective combination of creative scienceteaching approaches he observed. In particular, the author highlights the unusual classroom environment, the use of thematic elements, and the hands-on teaching approach.

Ginny Coppedge

2004-03-01

283

Nonverbal Communication in the Classroom: An Overview.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research has shown that nonverbal variables have a strong influence on classroom communication. This paper examines the way in which communication in the classroom is affected by the variables of distance, physical environment, facial expression, vocal cues, posture and gestures, touch, use of time, physical attractiveness, and dress. Each…

Rollman, Steven A.

284

Encouraging "Math Talk" in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses ways for middle school teachers to encourage their students to discuss mathematical concepts in the classroom. Considers setting up the classroom environment to facilitate mathematics discussion, the role of the teacher, small group discussions, whole-class discussions, and student presentations. (JPB)

Cooke, Linda B.; Adams, Verna M.

1998-01-01

285

Design a Net-Zero Energy Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students create a concept design of their very own net-zero energy classroom by pasting renewable energy and energy-efficiency items into and around a pretend classroom on a sheet of paper. They learn how these items (such as solar panels, efficient lights, computers, energy meters, etc.) interact to create a learning environment that produces as much energy as it uses.

Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

286

Before the Year Begins. Classroom Tips  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Good teachers know that the physical environment of the classroom can either enhance or hinder learning. Appropriate room preparation and arrangement of materials reserves class time for learning, while inadequate planning interferes with instruction by causing interruptions and delays. Before the year begins, effective classroom managers…

American Federation of Teachers (NJ), 2010

2010-01-01

287

The Solid Earth Research and Teaching Environment, a new software framework to share research tools in the classroom and across disciplines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Solid Earth Teaching and Research Environment (SEATREE) is a modular and user-friendly software framework to facilitate the use of solid Earth research tools in the classroom and for interdisciplinary research collaboration. SEATREE is open source and community developed, distributed freely under the GNU General Public License. It is a fully contained package that lets users operate in a graphical mode, while giving more advanced users the opportunity to view and modify the source code. Top level graphical user interfaces which initiate the calculations and visualize results, are written in the Python programming language using an object-oriented, modern design. Results are plotted with either Matlab-like Python libraries, or SEATREE’s own Generic Mapping Tools wrapper. The underlying computational codes used to produce the results can be written in any programming language and accessed through Python wrappers. There are currently four fully developed science modules for SEATREE: (1) HC is a global geodynamics tool based on a semi-analytical mantle-circulation program based on work by B. Steinberger, Becker, and C. O'Neill. HC can compute velocities and tractions for global, spherical Stokes flow and radial viscosity variations. HC is fast enough to be used for classroom instruction, for example to let students interactively explore the role of radial viscosity variations for global geopotential (geoid) anomalies. (2) ConMan wraps Scott King’s 2D finite element mantle convection code, allowing users to quickly observe how modifications to input parameters affect heat flow over time. As seismology modules, SEATREE includes, (3), Larry, a global, surface wave phase-velocity inversion tool and, (4), Syn2D, a Cartesian tomography teaching tool for ray-theory wave propagation in synthetic, arbitrary velocity structure in the presence of noise. Both underlying programs were contributed by Boschi. Using Syn2D, students can explore, for example, how well a given input structure (e.g., a checkerboard pattern) will be resolved by data for different types of earthquake-receiver geometries. Additionally, Larry3D, a three-dimensional seismic tomography tool contributed by Boschi, and NonLinLoc, a nonlinear earthquake relocation tool by Anthony Lomax, are both under development. The goal of all of the implemented modules is to aid in teaching research techniques, while remaining flexible enough for use in true research applications. In the long run, SEATREE may contribute to new ways of sharing scientific research, making published (numerical) experiments truly reproducible again. SEATREE can be downloaded as a package from http://geosys.usc.edu/projects/seatree/wiki/, and users can also subscribe to our Subversion project page. The software is designed to run on GNU/Linux based platforms and has also been successfully run on Mac OS-X. Our poster will present the four currently implemented modules, along with our design philosophies and implementation details.

Milner, K.; Becker, T. W.; Boschi, L.; Sain, J.; Schorlemmer, D.; Waterhouse, H.

2009-12-01

288

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MALE-PERPETRATED INTERPARENTAL AGGRESSION, PATERNAL CHARACTERISTICS, AND CHILD PSYCHOSOCIAL FUNCTIONING.  

PubMed

It is well established that children in homes where interparental violence is present are at increased risk for psychosocial (i.e., internalizing, externalizing, and attention) difficulties. However, previous studies have provided a limited view on the variety of factors that commonly co-occur in these environments (e.g., other characteristics of the parents and family) and how they may collectively impact children. Knowing this information could have implications for parental interventions aimed at preventing the continuation or initiation of psychosocial problems in children. Thus, the present study simultaneously examined the association between father-perpetrated interparental aggression, father characteristics, and child psychosocial functioning in a sample of 145 men arrested for domestic violence. Results showed that of all the variables examined, paternal antisocial personality traits and interpersonal hostility were uniquely associated with overall child psychosocial impairment, externalizing problems, and attention problems. Implications for intervention programs are discussed. PMID:25132790

Febres, Jeniimarie; Shorey, Ryan C; Zucosky, Heather C; Brasfield, Hope; Vitulano, Michael; Elmquist, JoAnna; Ninnemann, Andrew; Labrecque, Lindsay; Stuart, Gregory L

2014-07-01

289

Guerrilla Video: A New Protocol for Producing Classroom Video  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contemporary changes in pedagogy point to the need for a higher level of video production value in most classroom video, replacing the default video protocol of an unattended camera in the back of the classroom. The rich and complex environment of today's classroom can be captured more fully using the higher level, but still easily manageable,…

Fadde, Peter; Rich, Peter

2010-01-01

290

Language, Access, and Power in the Elementary Science Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Next Generation Science Standards call for the adoption of many aspects of scientific inquiry in the classroom. The ways in which classroom talk and classroom environment change as students and teachers learn to utilize inquiry approaches are underexplored. This study examines the frequency with which linguistic markers related to access and…

Schoerning, Emily; Hand, Brian; Shelley, Mack; Therrien, William

2015-01-01

291

Does Early Psychosocial Stress Affect Mate Choice?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Early psychosocial stress (e.g., parental divorce, abuse) is conjectured to place individuals on a developmental trajectory\\u000a leading to earlier initiation of sexual activity, earlier reproduction, and having more sex partners than those with less\\u000a early psychosocial stress. But does it also affect an individual’s mate choice? The present study examined whether early psychosocial\\u000a stress affects preferences and dislikes for opposite-sex

Nicole Koehler; James S. Chisholm

2009-01-01

292

A Multi-Instrument Examination of Preschool Classroom Quality and the Relationship between Program, Classroom, and Teacher Characteristics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: A statewide study of preschool classroom quality was conducted using 3 distinct classroom observation measures in order to inform a statewide quality rating system. Findings suggested that Tennessee preschool classrooms were approaching "good" quality on the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale-Revised (ECERS-R) and provided…

Denny, Joanna Hope; Hallam, Rena; Homer, Karen

2012-01-01

293

Psychosocial Perspectives and the Issue of Prevention in Childhood Obesity  

PubMed Central

A dramatic increase in childhood overweight/obesity has been recognized globally over the past 50?years. This observed increase may reflect genetic, as well as psychological, environmental, and socio-cultural influences. In the first part of this review, we present an updated summary of the psychosocial factors associated with this change and discuss possible ways in which they operate. Among these factors, lower socio economic status (in both industrialized and non-industrialized countries), being female, belonging to a minority group, and being exposed to adverse life events may all be associated with a greater risk of childhood overweight/obesity. These influences may be mediated via a variety of mechanisms, in particular above-average food intake of low nutritional quality and reduction in physical activity. Other important psychosocial mediators include the influence of the family and peer environment, and exposure to the media. In the second part of the review, we discuss the potential of psychosocial prevention programs to intervene in the processes involved in the rise of childhood overweight/obesity. Two points are emphasized. First, prevention programs should be multidisciplinary, combining the knowledge of experts from different professions, and taking into consideration the important role of the family environment and relevant influential social organizations, particularly school. Second, effective change is unlikely to occur without large-scale programs carried out on a public policy level. PMID:25133140

Stein, Daniel; Weinberger-Litman, Sarah L.; Latzer, Yael

2014-01-01

294

An Investigation of Traditional Professional Development versus Reform Professional Development and the Implementation of Strategies, Curriculum and Classroom Environment by Prekindergarten Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to investigate differences between traditional conventional professional development and high quality reflective professional development and curriculum implementation of classroom practices. This study examined the extent to which professional development activities were associated with increased levels of curriculum…

Oliver-Brooks, Helen

2013-01-01

295

Motivating Learners in Secondary Science Classrooms: Analysis of a Computer-Supported, Inquiry-Based Learning Environment Using Self-Determination Theory  

E-print Network

Science, an inquiry-based, computer-supported learning curriculum developed by the Botanical Society of America. PlantingScience uniquely utilizes professional scientists who serve as online mentors to K-12 students engaged in classroom inquiry projects. In an effort...

Scogin, Stephen C.

2014-07-29

296

Different Identity Revelation Modes in an Online Peer-Assessment Learning Environment: Effects on Perceptions toward Assessors, Classroom Climate and Learning Activities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The effects of four different identity revelation modes (three fixed modes: real-name, anonymity, nickname and one dynamic user self-choice mode) on participants' perceptions toward their assessors, classroom climate, and past experience with the learning activity in which they were engaged were examined. A pretest-posttest quasi-experimental…

Yu, Fu-Yun; Wu, Chun-Ping

2011-01-01

297

Building Community from Diversity: Connecting Students to Their Learning Environments. An Anthology of Classroom Projects Undertaken for the Kellogg Beacon Grant. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This five-part anthology presents descriptions of 22 classroom projects undertaken by a consortium of Missouri community colleges and elementary and secondary schools, directed by St. Louis Community College. The collection comprises the following articles: "Views of an Elementary Teacher" (Susan Biffignani); "Writing To Learn and Co-operative…

Mahony, Elizabeth M., Ed.; And Others

298

Future's Learning Environments in Health Education: The Effects of Smart Classrooms on the Academic Achievements of the Students at Health College  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of smart classrooms on the academic achievement of the nursing students. The sample of the research included 66 Health College students in Elazig. The sampling group was randomly chosen from second year students of Nursing and Midwife Education. The research was carried out with experimental…

Sevindik, Tuncay

2010-01-01

299

The Relation of Classroom Environment and School Belonging to Academic Self-Efficacy among Urban Fourth- and Fifth-Grade Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, 149 low-income, ethnically heterogeneous, fourth- and fifth-grade students completed self-report surveys in the fall and spring of 1 academic year. We examined classroom climate (satisfaction, cohesion, friction, task difficulty, and competition) and school belonging in relation to language arts and math and science self-efficacy,…

McMahon, Susan D.; Wernsman, Jamie; Rose, Dale S.

2009-01-01

300

Science Teacher Beliefs and Classroom Practice Related to Constructivism in Different School Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Science teacher beliefs and classroom practice related to constructivism and factors that may influence classroom practice were examined in this cross-case study. Data from four science teachers in two schools included interviews, demographic questionnaire, Classroom Learning Environment Survey (preferred/perceived), and classroom observations and…

Savasci, Funda; Berlin, Donna F.

2012-01-01

301

Sensitivity Training in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sensitivity training in the classroom can help children cope with and adapt to their environment--family, peer group, friends, school, and teachers--and get them to talk honestly and openly about emotional, social, and intellectual feelings and concepts. Some techniques of encouraging students to explore, to become involved with and aware of…

Cameron, Brent

1970-01-01

302

Voicing Concern about Noisy Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background noise from loud ventilation systems, outdoor activities, and poor acoustics can lead to voice problems for teachers, worsen hearing-impaired students' listening ability, and create unhealthy learning environments. Solutions include providing teachers with a sound-field amplification system and improving classroom acoustics. (MLH)

Anderson, Karen L.

2001-01-01

303

Revoicing Classrooms: A Spatial Manifesto  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Why is the physical learning environment in schools largely ignored by teachers within pedagogical practice? The cellular classroom has remained seemingly immutable since the Industrial Revolution, with spatiality playing a silent and subconscious role in schooling other than related to concerns around surveillance. Previous studies have shown…

Fisher, Kenn

2004-01-01

304

Connecting Classrooms and Early Interventions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses how not all children have benefited from the Accelerated Literacy Learning program. Conducts a case study to illuminate various rates of progress between students who began the school year with similar academic profiles but returned to different classroom environments after their daily lessons. Finds a complex relationship between the…

Short, Ruth A.; Frye, Barbara J.; King, James R.; Homan, Susan P.

1999-01-01

305

Adaptive Instruction and Classroom Time  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study described in this paper assessed (a) the degree of implementation of a program of primary grades instruction-the Adaptive Learning Environments Model; and (b) the association of the degree of implementation with efficient use of student time and other classroom resources and processes. Data were collected on 156 kindergarten- through third-grade classes (138 teachers) that included students with economically

Margaret C Wang; Herbert J Walberg

1983-01-01

306

Classroom Lessons in Cultivating Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author talks about creating a nurturing classroom environment of mutual respect with students enthralled by possessions and technology. He talks about his life in the city, how life is abundant in the city, and that he acknowledges all that the city offered, from the culture of art and music to racial and ethnic diversity.…

Luck, Philip A.

2006-01-01

307

Improvisation in the Mathematics Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses ways in which improvisational comedy games and exercises can be used in college mathematics classrooms to obtain a democratic and supportive environment for students. Using improv can help students learn to think creatively, take risks, support classmates, and solve problems. Both theoretical and practical applications are…

Young, Andrea

2013-01-01

308

Psychology's Contributions to Classroom Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Classroom management (CRM) has been associated with discipline, control, or other terms that connote reducing unacceptable student behavior. However, CRM involves not merely responding effectively when problems occur, but also preventing problems from occurring by creating environments that encourage learning and appropriate behavior. Teachers'…

Little, Steven G.; Akin-Little, Angeleque

2008-01-01

309

Acoustical Modifications for the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reviews procedures for evaluating, measuring, and modifying noise and reverberation levels in the classroom environment. Recommendations include: relocating children away from high noise sources, such as fans, air conditioners, heating ducts, and faulty lighting fixtures, using sound-absorbing materials, using acoustical ceiling tile…

Crandell, Carl C.; Smaldino, Joseph J.

1999-01-01

310

Subtypes of Psychosocial Adjustment to breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

By means of cluster analytic techniques, four subtypes of psychosocial adjustment were identified in a sample of 122 breast cancer patients who completed the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale. Internal consistency and internal validity of the derived typology were suggested by the finding that two different hierarchical agglomerative clustering methods (average linkage between groups, Ward's) produced similar solutions. Three of

David V. Nelson; Lois C. Friedman; Paul E. Baer; Frank E. Smith

1994-01-01

311

Objectivity In Psychosocial Measurement: What, Why, How.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses objectivity in psychosocial measurement, considering what it is, why it is important, and how it can be achieved. Presents an approach to achieving full objectivity in psychosocial measurement that is adapted from a publication of the American Society for Testing and Materials describing standard practice for conducting an…

Fisher, William P., Jr.

2000-01-01

312

Habitus and the Psychosocial: Bourdieu with Feelings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explores the potential of habitus to provide a window on the psychosocial. The paper works with a notion of psychosocial study as inquiry into the mutual constitution of the individual and the social relations within which they are enmeshed. At the same time it attempts to deepen and enrich notions of habitus. Although the strong focus…

Reay, Diane

2015-01-01

313

Androgyny, ego development, and psychosocial crisis resolution  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined the relationship of psychological androgyny with ego development in the context of Loevinger's theory and with psychosocial crisis resolution from the perspective of Erikson's theory. A sample of 30 male and 30 female adults completed the Bem Sex-role Inventory, the Washington University Sentence Completion Test, and the Inventory of Psychosocial Development (IPD). The androgynous individuals were

Karen J. Prager; John M. Bailey

1985-01-01

314

The Relation of Individuation and Psychosocial Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, the authors examined gender differences in levels of individuation, the relation of individuation and psychosocial development, and whether this relation is of a curvilinear nature. Two hundred and twenty-four students completed the Measure of Psychosocial Development (G. A. Hawley, 1988), the Level of Differentiation of Self Scale (LDSS; J. Haber, 1990a), and the Personal Authority in the

Jennifer Garbarino; John P. Gaa; Paul Swank; Robert McPherson; Linda V. Gratch

1995-01-01

315

Psychosocial development and friendship functions in adolescence  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study concerns the relationship between friendship variables and adolescent psychosocial development, in particular identity and psychosocial intimacy as envisaged by E. Erikson [(1950), Childhood and Society, New York: Norton; (1968), Identity: Youth and Crisis, New York: Norton]. Two hundred and twenty-three secondary school and college students were surveyed regarding friendship networks, beliefs about friendship, functions of friendship in general,

Susan Moore; Jennifer Boldero

1991-01-01

316

Explorations in Knowing: Thinking Psychosocially about Legitimacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper, we look at what engaging with psychoanalysis, through psychosocial accounts of subjectivity, has contributed to our struggles for legitimacy and security within our ways of knowing. The psychosocial, with its insistence on the unconscious and the irrational, features as both a source of security and of insecurity. We use three…

Chappell, Anne; Ernest, Paul; Ludhra, Geeta; Mendick, Heather

2014-01-01

317

Psychosocial and Family Functioning in Spina Bifida  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A developmentally oriented bio-neuropsychosocial model is introduced to explain the variation in family functioning and psychosocial adjustment in youth and young adults with spina bifida (SB). Research on the family functioning and psychosocial adjustment of individuals with SB is reviewed. The findings of past research on families of youth with…

Holmbeck, Grayson N.; Devine, Katie A.

2010-01-01

318

The Classroom Animal: Crickets.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suggests using crickets for classroom activities, providing background information on their anatomy and reproduction and tips on keeping individual organisms or a breeding colony in the classroom. (JN)

Kramer, David C.

1985-01-01

319

[Psychosocial aspects of cancer screening].  

PubMed

Psychosocial reluctance is a major obstacle to the success of mass screening. In France, several opinion polls demonstrated that the fear of cancer as a disease, the fear of a positive result and the fear of the possible therapeutic consequences were the major determinants opposed to screening despite information often known to the public. The psychological obstacles appear less important in the US population, except for minorities. Age seems to be a discriminating factor, indeed after 50 years, reluctance to screening is increased probably due to a generation effect influencing the meaning of the disease and the interest of screening. Site specific constraints also exist, in colorectal cancer, 30% of the people feel as an embarrassment the manipulation of the stools. If false positives are responsible for a supplementary anxiety, it doesn't last long and it doesn't influence the observation of future campaign. These psychosocial obstacles as a whole justify the need of converging information that must take into account cultural problems. The favourable influence of the general practitioner explains his essential role for the success of mass screening. PMID:7492816

Schraub, S; Arveux, P; Mercier, M

1995-08-01

320

Voices from the Classroom: Students with Special Needs in an Elementary Music Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to discover ways in which a music educator can incorporate students with special needs in a music classroom. Music educators seek ways to manage and incorporate these students in the classroom environment. The research question guiding this action research study was: how are students with special needs incorporated in…

Sargent, John; Farley, Ashley

2005-01-01

321

A Biological Brain in a Cultural Classroom: Applying Biological Research to Classroom Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book applies the latest in brain research and learning theory to classroom management. The concepts of psychoneurophysiology are made readily accessible. The book offers creative data gathering activities to help students manage their own behavior and to help teachers learn how their own behavior impacts the classroom environment. The seven…

Sylwester, Robert

322

Classroom Profiling Training: Increasing Preservice Teachers' Confidence and Knowledge of Classroom Management Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Classroom management is a serious concern for beginning teachers including preservice teachers. The Queensland Department of Education, Training and Employment (DETE) has developed the Essential Skills for Classroom Management (ESCM), a system of positive and pro-active strategies for maintaining supportive learning environments. In addition, the…

Jackson, Cliff; Simoncini, Kym; Davidson, Mark

2013-01-01

323

Classroom Activities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

StarDate.org is the public education and outreach department of the University of Texas McDonald Observatory, which offers astronomy resources for teaches on their Classroom Activities site. The various projects are categorized by age and grade level including k-4, 5-8, and 9-12. Each provides a teachers guide, materials needed, a description of the process, any needed links (such as the StarDate Moon Phase Calculator within the Observing the Moon activity), and even printable versions of each lesson. Although not remarkable, the site does give teachers well designed and easy to accomplish activities which students should enjoy.

324

Robotics competitions and science classrooms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper looks at the distinctions between science classrooms and the robotics competition described in the article "Examining the mediation of power in a collaborative community: engaging in informal science as authentic practice" written by Anton Puvirajah, Geeta Verma and Horace Webb. Using the framework of "productive disciplinary engagement" and discussing each principle in turn, the article argues that in order to bring the advantages of informal learning environments into regular classrooms we especially need to address student interest through task design and to change curricular requirements to agree with changing educational values.

Benke, Gertraud

2012-06-01

325

Psychosocial impacts in populations exposed to solid waste facilities.  

PubMed

This interdisciplinary study uses a parallel case study design to investigate psychosocial impacts in populations exposed to three solid waste facilities in Southern Ontario. Impacts are examined at three social scales: individual, social network and community levels. The objectives and design derive from a feasibility study recently completed by the same research team. A two stage approach is adopted. The first is an epidemiologic survey to determine the prevalence of psychosocial impacts in the populations within a prescribed area around each site. A disproportionate stratified (by distance) random sample of 250 households is surveyed at each site. Data on awareness, knowledge, concern and action regarding the site are also obtained. Scores on pre-validated health measurement scales will be compared with population norms to determine the frequency distribution above, within and below the range of normal. The second stage involves the use of qualitative methodologies to provide an in-depth analysis of the individual, social network and community level factors affecting psychosocial impacts and reactions to the situation. Depth interviews with a sub-sample of survey respondents explore individual perceptions, attitudes and actions. Focus groups composed of members of relevant organizations and discussion groups comprising non-members uncover social network and community perspectives in an interactional setting. Interviews and group sessions are taped and transcribed for content analysis of salient themes. Textual analysis of media reports and other relevant documentation provide insights regarding the informational environment and the community context of the issues. PMID:1948158

Taylor, S M; Elliott, S; Eyles, J; Frank, J; Haight, M; Streiner, D; Walter, S; White, N; Willms, D

1991-01-01

326

Promoting a combination approach to paediatric HIV psychosocial support.  

PubMed

Ninety percent of the 3.4 million HIV-infected children live in sub-Saharan Africa. Their psychosocial well being is fundamental to establishing and maintaining successful treatment outcomes and overall quality of life. With the increased roll-out of antiretroviral treatment, HIV infection is shifting from a life-threatening to a chronic disease. However, even for paediatric patients enrolled in care and treatment, HIV can still be devastating due to the interaction of complex factors, particularly in the context of other household illness and overextended healthcare systems in sub-Saharan Africa.This article explores the negative effect of several interrelated HIV-specific factors on the psychosocial well being of HIV-infected children: disclosure, stigma and discrimination, and bereavement. However, drawing on clinical studies of resilience, it stresses the need to move beyond a focus on the individual as a full response to the needs of a sick child requires support for the individual child, caregiver-child dyads, extended families, communities, and institutions. This means providing early and progressive age appropriate interventions aimed at increasing the self-reliance and self-acceptance in children and their caregivers and promoting timely health-seeking behaviours. Critical barriers that cause poorer biomedical and psychosocial outcomes among children and caregiver must also be addressed as should the causes and consequences of stigma and associated gender and social norms.This article reviews interventions at different levels of the ecological model: individual-centred programs, family-centred interventions, programs that support or train healthcare providers, community interventions for HIV-infected children, and initiatives that improve the capacity of schools to provide more supportive environments for HIV-infected children. Although experience is increasing in approaches that address the psychosocial needs of vulnerable and HIV-infected children, there is still limited evidence demonstrating which interventions have positive effects on the well being of HIV-infected children. Interventions that improve the psychosocial well being of children living with HIV must be replicable in resource-limited settings, avoiding dependence on specialized staff for implementation.This paper advocates for combination approaches that strengthen the capacity of service providers, expand the availability of age appropriate and family-centred support and equip schools to be more protective and supportive of children living with HIV. The coordination of care with other community-based interventions is also needed to foster more supportive and less stigmatizing environments. To ensure effective, feasible, and scalable interventions, improving the evidence base to document improved outcomes and longer term impact as well as implementation of operational studies to document delivery approaches are needed. PMID:24361624

Amzel, Anouk; Toska, Elona; Lovich, Ronnie; Widyono, Monique; Patel, Tejal; Foti, Carrie; Dziuban, Eric J; Phelps, B Ryan; Sugandhi, Nandita; Mark, Daniella; Altschuler, Jenny

2013-11-01

327

An Engaging Learning Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author believes that a stimulating learning environment can offer benefits to the general classroom conduct of young people through the different charts displayed in his classroom. Students see the teacher taking pride in their shared working environment and wall or table graffiti. He mentions that he does not only care for his students'…

Krueger, Tom

2010-01-01

328

Enrolment of children and adolescents in psychosocial care: more likely with low family social support and poor parenting skills.  

PubMed

Knowledge about determinants of child and adolescent enrolment in psychosocial care concerns only single types of care and usually only socio-demographic factors. The social environment is also a likely key determinant but evidence is lacking. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between family social support, parenting skills and child and adolescent enrolment in psychosocial care. We obtained data on 1,331 children (response rate 56.6 %), 4-18 years old, enrolled in preventive child health care, and child and adolescent social care and mental health care because of psychosocial problems, and on 463 children (response rate 70.3 %) not enrolled in psychosocial care. Results showed that enrolment in psychosocial care was associated with low family social support (odds ratio; 95 %-confidence interval: 3.2; 2.4-4.4), and with poor parenting skills, i.e. poor supervision (1.5; 1.1-2.1) and inconsistent disciplining (1.5; 1.1-2.1). Children's psychosocial problems partially mediated the associations with family social support and completely with parenting skills. Children's problems did not moderate the associations. Positive parenting was not associated with care enrolment. We conclude that low family social support and poor parenting are important factors associated with enrolment, in particular because they are associated with more frequent occurrence of children's psychosocial problems. This implies that professionals and policymakers need to be aware that factors in children's social environment are related with enrolment in psychosocial care, in addition to children's psychosocial problems. PMID:25116036

Nanninga, Marieke; Jansen, Danielle E M C; Knorth, Erik J; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

2015-04-01

329

The Classroom Assessment Scoring System: Findings from the Prekindergarten Year  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on teacher-child relationships, classroom environments, and teaching practices provided the rationale for constructing a system for observing and assessing emotional and instructional elements of quality in early childhood educational environments: the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS). The CLASS provides a framework for…

La Paro, Karen M.; Pianta, Robert C.; Stuhlman, Megan

2004-01-01

330

Finding Autonomy in Activity: Development and Validation of a Democratic Classroom Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper developed a Democratic Classroom Survey to measure students' perceived democratic environment of the classroom. Perceived democratic environment is one of the most important variables for understanding classroom activity and indeed any type of group activity, but actually measuring perceptions in an objective manner has been…

Hur, Eun Hye; Glassman, Michael; Kim, Yunhwan

2013-01-01

331

J Epidemiol Community Health . Author manuscript Contribution of material, occupational, and psychosocial factors in the  

E-print Network

Analysis ; Self Report ; Sex Distribution ; Sex Factors ; Social Class ; Social Environment ; Social of the most well-known findings in the epidemiological literature: the higher the social class, the lower, and psychosocial factors in the explanation of social inequalities in health in 28 countries in Europe B n dicte

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

332

Adolescent Satisfaction in Family Rituals and Psychosocial Development: A Developmental Systems Theory Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adolescent satisfaction in family rituals and psychosocial development (E. Greenberger & A. B. Sorenson, 1974) were explored in the context of adolescent personality characteristics (International Personality Item Pool, 1999) and family environment characteristics (S. M. Gavazzi, M. J. Reese, & R. M. Sabatelli, 1998; D. H. Olson et al., 1983). Data were collected from 159 female undergraduates with the Adolescent

Dawn Goettler Eaker; Lynda Henley Walters

2002-01-01

333

Psychosocial stress and abdominal pain in adolescents.  

PubMed

Children and adolescents may express psychiatric symptoms via somatic complaints. Likewise, children with chronic somatic illnesses are likely to experience psychiatric sequelae. We report three cases of adolescents who were admitted to general paediatrics services for abdominal pain and/or nausea and vomiting with a negative medical workup. In each case, a clear psychosocial stressor was evident. It is possible that somatic symptoms without clear medical causes may reflect psychosocial stress, but it is difficult to discern whether the psychosocial issues preceded the somatic complaints or were a result of them. Making an accurate diagnosis is difficult, and broaching such a subject with patients and their families is a delicate matter. More research is needed to determine appropriate screening tools for identifying cases where psychosocial stress may play a relevant role in symptom presentation, as well as potential treatment modalities for such cases. PMID:22477924

Shapiro, Michael A; Nguyen, Mathew L

2010-06-01

334

Associate of Science Degree in Psychosocial Rehabilitation  

E-print Network

Associate of Science Degree in Psychosocial Rehabilitation Bachelor of Science Degree in Psychiatric Rehabilitation and Psychology exclusively dedicated to healthcare state-of-the-art equipment Rehabilitation and Counseling Professions SHRP School of Health Related Professions Quick Links: Description

Cheng, Mei-Fang

335

Designing the Electronic Classroom: Applying Learning Theory and Ergonomic Design Principles.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Applies learning theory and ergonomic principles to the design of effective learning environments for library instruction. Discusses features of electronic classroom ergonomics, including the ergonomics of physical space, environmental factors, and workstations; and includes classroom layouts. (Author/LRW)

Emmons, Mark; Wilkinson, Frances C.

2001-01-01

336

The psychosocial impact on standing devices  

PubMed Central

Purpose The aim of this study was to explore the psychosocial impact of standing devices as experienced by users. Method This is the second part of a comprehensive survey in five counties in Sweden where all the subjects with standing devices were invited to participate. The impact of standing devices on functional independence, quality of life and wellbeing was assessed using a questionnaire, Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scale (PIADS). Results The psychosocial impact of the standing devices was perceived as positive. The highest PIADS scores in relation to age were found in the oldest group, aged 65 years and older. The ability to walk and independence in ambulation resulted in higher scores than the use of a wheelchair and/or dependence on others. Those who stood often awarded higher scores in the PIADS questionnaire compared to those who used the device less frequently. When standing was integrated in various activities, its psychosocial impact received high scores. Conclusion The psychosocial impact of standing devices was generally experienced positively. The main results indicated that standing in a standing device had a value and we as professionals should ask the users about the intended purpose of their standing in order to prescribe the optimal device. Implications for RehabilitationStanding in standing devices has positive psychosocial impact for the user.As professionals we should broaden our view of the use of standing devices, i.e. to see the standing device as an aid that not only treats the body’s structures or improves the user’s abilities in activities, but also provides a psychosocial impact on the user’s daily life, and to find meaningful goals for the user from a psychosocial perspective. PMID:23782225

Nyberg, Lars; Ekenberg, Lilly; Näslund, Annika

2014-01-01

337

The Role of Family and Academic Support in the Relationship between Gender Role Beliefs and Psychosocial Distress among Latina College Students  

E-print Network

conflict and intragroup marginalization, both of which can contribute to psychosocial distress in ethnic minority groups. As Latina students face unique educational challenges, and may develop family conflicts, a supportive academic environment may serve...

Niebes-Davis, Allison Janine

2012-10-19

338

A review of psychosocial interventions in infertility.  

PubMed

Counselling has been strongly recommended by numerous governmental, medical and community associations to help infertile people. The purpose of this review was to determine whether psychosocial interventions improved well-being and pregnancy rates, and to identify the kinds of interventions that were most effective. A systematic search identified all published and unpublished papers in any language and any source that (1) described a psychosocial intervention and (2) evaluated its effect on at least one outcome measure in an infertile population. A total of 380 studies met the first criteria but only 6.6% (n=25) of these were independent evaluation studies. Analysis of these studies showed that psychosocial interventions were more effective in reducing negative affect than in changing interpersonal functioning (e.g., marital and social functioning). Pregnancy rates were unlikely to be affected by psychosocial interventions. It was also found that group interventions which had emphasised education and skills training (e.g., relaxation training) were significantly more effective in producing positive change across a range of outcomes than counselling interventions which emphasised emotional expression and support and/or discussion about thoughts and feelings related to infertility. Men and women were found to benefit equally from psychosocial interventions. Directions for future research on the evaluation of psychosocial interventions are discussed. PMID:14572840

Boivin, J

2003-12-01

339

Psychosocial/cultural issues in medicine and psychiatry: treating African Americans.  

PubMed Central

In general, we are raised in a specific cultural environment, and consequently, we have a common sense of identity, shared standards, and religion. The effects of this commonality carries over into health-care situations, including health maintenance and disease prevention. This article provides an overview of how psychosocial/cultural issues have been used with insensitivity to race, culture, and the value orientations of African Americans. It is concluded that the training of all health-care practitioners should include psychosocial/cultural aspects of illnesses. PMID:8558616

Carter, J. H.

1995-01-01

340

Work with visual display terminals: psychosocial aspects and health. Report on a World Health Organization meeting.  

PubMed

When health effects related to the use of visual display terminals (VDTs) can be substantiated, complaints are largely associated with poor job and workstation design. Psychosocial aspects of work with VDTs may affect users' health and well-being and include a variety of situations: work demands, work design and organizational problems, workload breakdown control, pacing, social support and isolation, deskilling, management of change and user involvement, task analysis and job design, training, work scheduling, and rest periods. Although various physical aspects may affect the health of VDT users and are, to a large extent, inseparable from psychosocial effects, they have been addressed in a previous report. This report takes the view that, in the prevention of VDT-related health problems, psychosocial factors are at least as important as the physical ergonomics of workstations and the working environment. PMID:2693653

1989-12-01

341

[Psychosocial aspects of fertility disorders].  

PubMed

The number of couples experiencing unwanted childlessness will in all likelihood continue to grow. Thus, ever more couples are undergoing IVF treatment; in Germany, this is, however, successful in only 13.9% of attempts. An unfulfilled wish for a child can have both negative emotional effects on individual partner and consequences for the couple's relationship. Women in particular suffer from the psychological stress that can be caused by infertility; they are more anxious, depressed, and have a decreased self-esteem than their partners. The desire to counteract these emotional strains and to enhance the quality of life is increasing and accordingly requests for counseling services are on the rise. As is the case in so many other psychosocial counseling services offered, there are shortcomings in the information available and a threshold of fear and dread of stigmatization by others persist. Studies have shown that various psychological treatments can often contribute to reducing stress but they do rarely increase the possibility of pregnancy. PMID:15791698

Wischmann, T

2005-02-01

342

Psychosocial stress and asthma morbidity  

PubMed Central

Purpose of review The objective of this review is to provide an overview and discussion of recent epidemiologic and mechanistic studies of stress in relation to asthma incidence and morbidity. Recent findings Recent findings suggest that stress, whether at the individual- (i.e., epigenetics, perceived stress), family- (i.e., prenatal maternal stress, early life exposure or intimate partner violence) or community- (i.e.., neighborhood violence; neighborhood disadvantage) level influences asthma and asthma morbidity. Key recent findings regarding how psychosocial stress may influence asthma through Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), pre-and post-natal maternal/caregiver stress, and community violence and deprivation are highlighted. Summary New research illustrates the need to further examine, characterize and address the influence of social and environmental factors (i.e., psychological stress) on asthma. Further research and innovative methodologies are needed to characterize the relationship and pathways associated with stress at multiple levels to more fully understand and address asthma morbidity, and to design potential interventions, especially to address persistent disparities in asthma in ethnic minorities and economically disadvantaged communities. PMID:22266773

Yonas, Michael A.; Lange, Nancy E.; Celedón, Juan C.

2012-01-01

343

Childhood adversities and psychosocial disorders.  

PubMed

Adverse childhood experiences--especially inadequacies in early parental care--are associated with elevated rates of both acute and chronic psychosocial disorders in adult life. In most instances, adverse outcomes are confined to a minority of children exposed; variations in the severity or pervasiveness of early risk, individual differences in susceptibility, and interactions with later stressors are all thus likely to be important in mediating effects. At present, knowledge of intervening processes is limited, and dependent on retrospective studies of adult samples or short-term longitudinal findings in childhood. We review current evidence on the long-term outcomes of prenatal divorce, childhood maltreatment, and institutional rearing, and on the early antecedents of depression and antisocial behaviour in adult life, to highlight possible interviewing mechanisms. Most long-term sequelae seem likely to depend on a series of shorter-term links, some running through elevated risks of continued environmental adversity, others through psychological vulnerabilities and problems in social relationships. PMID:9158291

Maughan, B; McCarthy, G

1997-01-01

344

The Development and Validation of an Instrument to Monitor the Implementation of Social Constructivist Learning Environments in Grade 9 Science Classrooms in South Africa  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the development and validation of an instrument that can be used to assess students' perceptions of their learning environment as a means of monitoring and guiding changes toward social constructivist learning environments. The study used a mixed-method approach with priority given to the quantitative data collection.…

Luckay, Melanie B.; Laugksch, Rudiger C.

2015-01-01

345

Classroom Paper  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this data collection and analysis activity students investigate data in connection with recyclable materials and develop plans to help the environment. This activity requires students to keep track of their own paper use for a week, graph the data with a line graph and then interpret their results with a partner. The lesson includes student worksheets and extension suggestions.

2008-01-01

346

Trout in the Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Trout in the Classroom (TIC) is a conservation-oriented environmental education program for elementary, middle, and high school students. During the year each teacher tailors the program to fit his or her curricular needs. Therefore, each TIC program is unique. TIC has interdisciplinary applications in science, social studies, mathematics, language arts, fine arts, and physical education. In the program, students and teachers raise trout from fertilized eggs supplied by Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VGIF) hatcheries, in aquariums equipped with special chillers designed to keep the water near 50 degrees F. The students make daily temperature measurements, and monitor pH, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, and ammonia levels. They record their data, plot trends, and make sure that the water quality is sufficient to support trout development. The fingerlings, which hatch in late October, are almost an inch and a half long by mid-January. And towards the end of the school year, students will release the fry into VGIF approved watersheds. TIC programs have been in place all across the country for more than 20 years, and are the result of numerous collaborations between teachers, volunteers, government agencies, and local organizations like Trout Unlimited. The programs were designed specifically for teachers who wanted to incorporate more environmental education into their curriculum. While the immediate goal of Trout in the Classroom is to increase student knowledge of water quality and cold water conservation, its long-term goal is to reconnect an increasingly urbanized population of youth to the system of streams, rivers, and watersheds that sustain them. Successful programs have helped: connect students to their local environments and their local watersheds; teach about watershed health and water quality, and; get students to care about fish and the environment. In Virginia, the TIC program is now in its 8th year. Over the past year, the program experienced an amazing growth spurt. Thanks to AEP and Dominion grants and chapter fundraising efforts, we now have more than 200 classrooms throughout the state, ranging from elementary school through high school.

Heath, Thomas

2014-05-01

347

Classroom Management. TESOL Classroom Practice Series  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This series captures the dynamics of the contemporary ESOL classroom. It showcases state-of-the-art curricula, materials, tasks, and activities reflecting emerging trends in language education and seeks to build localized language teaching and learning theories based on teachers' and students' unique experiences in and beyond the classroom. Each…

Farrell, Thomas S. C., Ed.

2008-01-01

348

Classroom Use and Utilization.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses how classrooms are distributed by size on a campus, how well they are used, and how their use changes with faculty and student needs and desires. Details how to analyze classroom space, use, and utilization, taking into account such factors as scheduling and classroom stations. (EV)

Fink, Ira

2002-01-01

349

Classrooms Are Killing Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

From his knowledge of the brain and learning, the author argues that Horace Mann's classroom system is the core cause for the outdated state of public education and attendant problems. He asserts that the conventional classroom is brain-antagonistic and the continued use of graded classrooms, ruinous. (Author/WD)

Hart, Leslie A.

1981-01-01

350

Competition in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author shares the strategy she adopted to even out the participation among her multicultural students during their classroom discussions. The author realized that her students had different concepts about the classroom and different philosophies about competition. For the Americans and Indians, the classroom was a site of…

Jameson, Daphne

2007-01-01

351

Arranging the Informal Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the advent of the informal or open classroom, a new area of concern has become important--classroom arrangement. In the past, classrooms were oriented toward the front, toward the teacher's desk and the blackboard. Education depended mainly on the pupil's interaction with the teacher and with printed materials. Nowadays, in informal…

Engel, Brenda S.

352

Cockroaches in the Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Welcome the Madagascar hissing cockroach into your classroom--they are not your average pest! This article describes the basic biology of this relatively tame creature, and how to set up and care for a classroom colony. It includes a list of suggested inquiry-centered classroom activities that you and your students will find both educational and fun!

Christine Moseley

2005-03-01

353

Psychosocial risk factors in home and community settings and their associations with population health and health inequalities: A systematic meta-review  

PubMed Central

Background The effects of psychosocial risk factors on population health and health inequalities has featured prominently in epidemiological research literature as well as public health policy strategies. We have conducted a meta-review (a review of reviews) exploring how psychosocial factors may relate to population health in home and community settings. Methods Systematic review (QUORUM) of literature reviews (published in any language or country) on the health associations of psychosocial risk factors in community settings. The literature search included electronic and manual searches. Two reviewers appraised included reviews using criteria for assessing systematic reviews. Data from the more robust reviews were extracted, tabulated and synthesised. Results Thirty-one reviews met our inclusion criteria. These explored a variety of psychosocial factors including social support and networks, social capital, social cohesion, collective efficacy, participation in local organisations – and less favourable psychosocial risk factors such as demands, exposure to community violence or anti-social behaviour, exposure to discrimination, and stress related to acculturation to western society. Most of the reviews focused on associations between social networks/support and physical or mental health. We identified some evidence of favourable psychosocial environments associated with better health. Reviews also found evidence of unfavourable psychosocial risk factors linked to poorer health, particularly among socially disadvantaged groups. However, the more robust reviews each identified studies with inconclusive findings, as well as studies finding evidence of associations. We also identified some evidence of apparently favourable psychosocial risk factors associated with poorer health. Conclusion From the review literature we have synthesised, where associations have been identified, they generally support the view that favourable psychosocial environments go hand in hand with better health. Poor psychosocial environments may be health damaging and contribute to health inequalities. The evidence that underpins our understanding of these associations is of variable quality and consistency. Future research should seek to improve this evidence base, with more longitudinal analysis (and intervention evaluations) of the effects of apparently under-researched psychosocial factors such as control and participation within communities. Future policy interventions relevant to this field should be developed in partnership with researchers to enable a better understanding of psychosocial mechanisms and the effects of psychosocial interventions. PMID:18631374

Egan, Matt; Tannahill, Carol; Petticrew, Mark; Thomas, Sian

2008-01-01

354

Collaboratively Evaluating and Deploying Smart Technology in Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For several years prior to 2000, students and faculty at McMaster University rated classrooms below those at peer universities. In the case of many classrooms, the teaching environments were outdated and the technology was old. The provost determined in 2000 that they needed to make a long-term investment in their learning spaces. For sound…

Strong, Bart; Kidney, David

2004-01-01

355

Evaluation of Energy Efficiency Improvements to Portable Classrooms in Florida.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Findings are presented from a 2-year experiment exploring ways to reduce energy costs and improve the learning environment in Florida's 25,000 portable classrooms. Improvements were made in two highly instrumented portable classrooms in the following areas: installation of a T8 lighting system with electronic ballasts; a high efficiency heat pump…

Callahan, Michael P.; Parker, Danny S.; Sherwin, John R.; Anello, Michael T.

356

Higher Education Classroom Management: Kuwait University Students' Views  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study attempts to examine students' views on the effectiveness of classroom management techniques used by faculty members. By examining their views, some insights may be gained as to the kinds of management techniques that a faculty member might adopt in order to promote better teaching and learning environment. Effective classroom management…

Al-Hamdan, Jasem

2007-01-01

357

Situational Leadership and Innovation in the ESOL Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Situational leadership can be used in the English-as-a-Second-Language classroom to help students accept and adapt to instructional innovation. Leadership style is determined by the leader's task (directive) and relationship (supportive) behavior and by the classroom environment. Follower readiness is both job-related and psychological. Case…

Osburne, Andrea G.

1992-01-01

358

The Virtual Classroom: A Catalyst for Institutional Transformation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explores the use of the virtual classroom which has been created in "myVLE", a learning management system used by the Open University Malaysia (OUM). The virtual classroom in "myVLE" is an asynchronous-based online learning environment that delivers course materials to learners and provides collaboration and interaction using an…

Subramaniam, Nantha Kumar; Kandasamy, Maheswari

2011-01-01

359

Classroom Amplification: Not Just for the Hearing Impaired Anymore.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the difficulties that children with central auditory processing difficulties can have in the classroom environment. Classroom acoustics that can hinder a child's accessibility to instruction are discussed, including open windows or windows not designed to be acoustic barriers, increased reverberation time in rooms with high…

Dahlquist, Lori Hubble

360

Technological Challenges: Designing Large Compressed Video and Multimedia Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designing a distance learning classroom requires integration of educational goals and philosophy with technology and ergonomics. The technological challenge and key to designing effective distance learning and multimedia classrooms is creating an environment in which the participants--students, and teacher--may easily interact with instructional…

Hart, Russ A.; Parker, Roger

361

Flamingos in the Bathroom, Love in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes lively and attractive learning environment in halls, classrooms, playground, and even rest rooms of an Ohio elementary school on kindergarten assessment day. School's equally lively principal, a former classroom teacher, is seldom in her office, preferring to mix with teachers and students. Books are everywhere, and children with…

Chenfield, Mimi Brodsky

1993-01-01

362

Digital Image Manipulation and Avatar Configuration: Implications for Inclusive Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper outlines concerns for inclusive classrooms involving personal digital image modifications and selections, as well as avatar configurations. Classroom interactions incorporate various dimensions of personal appearance; however, educators try to make them primarily about knowledge and wisdom. Students in environments where they can…

Oravec, Jo Ann

2012-01-01

363

Assessing English Language Learner Content Knowledge in the Mainstream Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In K-12 environments in the US, classroom tests are a central means by which teachers assess English Language Learner (ELL) content knowledge. Performance on routine classroom assessments is often a contributing criterion for school based decision-making and can affect decisions relating to academic tracking, retention, and access to academic…

Clark-Gareca, Beth

2013-01-01

364

Cervical cancer screening and psychosocial barriers perceived by patients. A systematic review  

PubMed Central

Aim of the study This study aimed at integrating research discussing the role of perceived psychosocial barriers in cervical cancer screening (CCS) uptake. In particular, we analyzed the evidence for the associations between CCS uptake and perceived psychosocial barriers and frequency of psychosocial barriers identified by women. Material and methods A systematic search of peer-reviewed papers published until 2011 in 8 databases yielded 48 original studies, analyzing data obtained from 155 954 women. The majority of studies (k = 43) applied correlational design, while 5 had experimental design. Results Experimental research indicated a positive effect of 75% of psychosocial interventions targeting barriers. The interventions resulted in a significant increase of CCS uptake. Overall 100% of correlational studies indicated that perceiving lower levels of barriers significantly predicted higher CCS uptake. 53 psychosocial barriers were listed in at least 2 original correlational studies: 9.5% of barriers were related to CCS facilities/environment, 67.9% dealt with personal characteristics of the patient, and 22.6% addressed social factors. As many as 35.9% of perceived barriers referred to negative emotions related to CCS examination procedures and collecting CCS results, whereas 25.7% of barriers referred to prior contacts with health professionals. Conclusions Leaflets or discussion on psychosocial barriers between patients and health professionals involved in CCS might increase CCS uptake and thus reduce cervical cancer mortality rates. Communication skills training for health professionals conducting CCS might focus on the most frequently reported barriers, referring to emotions related to CCS examination and collecting CCS results. PMID:25520573

Bukowska-Durawa, Alicja

2014-01-01

365

Psychosocial issues in long-term space flight: overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Anecdotal evidence of the individual and interpersonal problems that occurred during the Shuttle-Mir Space Program (SMSP) and other long-duration Russian/Soviet missions, and studies of personnel in other isolated and confined extreme (ICE) environments suggest that psychosocial elements of behavior and performance are likely to have a significant impact on the outcome of long-duration missions in space. This impact may range from individual decrements in performance, health and well being, to catastrophic mission failure. This paper reviews our current understanding of the psychosocial issues related to long duration space missions according to three different domains of behavior: the individual domain, the interpersonal domain and the organizational domain. Individual issues include: personality characteristics that predict successful performance, stress due to isolation and confinement and its effect on emotions and cognitive performance, adaptive and maladaptive coping styles and strategies, and requirements for the psychological support of astronauts and their families during the mission. Interpersonal issues include: impact of crew diversity and leadership styles on small group dynamics, adaptive and maladaptive features of ground-crew interactions, and processes of crew cohesion, tension and conflict. Organizational issues include: the influence of organizational culture and mission duration on individual and group performance, and managerial requirements for long duration missions. Improved screening and selection of astronaut candidates, leadership, coping and interpersonal skills training of personnel, and organizational change are key elements in the prevention of performance decrements on long-duration missions.

Palinkas, L. A.

2001-01-01

366

Breaking down the wall of silence around children affected by AIDS in Thailand to support their psychosocial health.  

PubMed

This study examines the psychosocial needs of the children affected by AIDS. Eight primary school children aged 10-13 years who lost parents to AIDS or whose parents were living with HIV were closely followed for a period of one year and qualitative data on the psychosocial challenges they faced were collected using semi-structured interviews, observation, drawings and diaries. Data were also collected from their caregivers and classroom teachers using semi-structured interviews, as well as data from their classmates using a self-completion questionnaire. The findings strongly suggested that adults were creating a "wall of silence" around children affected by AIDS by hiding the parents' HIV status from them and avoid talking to them about HIV and AIDS. The silence was intended to protect the children from sadness, embarrassment, bullying and discrimination. In reality, however, the silence was found to have isolated them and increased their psychosocial vulnerability by blocking open communication with family members, peers and teachers, and left them to cope with their problems on their own. It is argued that to support the psychosocial health of these children, it is necessary for the adults to recognise the negative impact of silence and for the families and the school to be involved in a process of participatory learning and action to find culturally appropriate ways to break down the wall of silence, and promote more open communication. PMID:20390510

Ishikawa, Naoko; Pridmore, Pat; Carr-Hill, Roy; Chaimuangdee, Kreangkrai

2010-03-01

367

Using Tablet PCs in the Classroom: An Investigation of Students' Expectations and Reactions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purposes of the current experiments were to investigate: (a) students' expectations with regard to the use of Tablet PCs within the classroom, (b) students' attitudes toward the implementation of Tablet PCs within the classroom, and (c) the resulting classroom environment from the use of various technologies. Results indicated that although…

Bonds-Raacke, Jennifer M.; Raacke, John D.

2008-01-01

368

Opportunities for Inquiry Science in Montessori Classrooms: Learning from a Culture of Interest, Communication, and Explanation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although classroom inquiry is the primary pedagogy of science education, it has often been difficult to implement within conventional classroom cultures. This study turned to the alternatively structured Montessori learning environment to better understand the ways in which it fosters the essential elements of classroom inquiry, as defined by…

Rinke, Carol R.; Gimbel, Steven J.; Haskell, Sophie

2013-01-01

369

NASA Classroom Bioreactor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Exploration of space provides a compelling need for cell-based research into the basic mechanisms that underlie the profound changes that occur in terrestrial life that is transitioned to low gravity environments. Toward that end, NASA developed a rotating bioreactor in which cells are cultured while continuously suspended in a cylinder in which the culture medium rotates with the cylinder. The randomization of the gravity vector accomplished by the continuous rotation, in a low shear environment, provides an analog of microgravity. Because cultures grown in bioreactors develop structures and functions that are much closer to those exhibited by native tissue than can be achieved with traditional culture methods, bioreactors have contributed substantially to advancing research in the fields of cancer, diabetes, infectious disease modeling for vaccine production, drug efficacy, and tissue engineering. NASA has developed a Classroom Bioreactor (CB) that is built from parts that are easily obtained and assembled, user-friendly and versatile. It can be easily used in simple school settings to examine the effect cultures of seeds or cells. An educational brief provides assembly instructions and lesson plans that describes activities in science, math and technology that explore free fall, microgravity, orbits, bioreactors, structure-function relationships and the scientific method.

Scully, Robert

2004-01-01

370

Development and Validation of an Instrument to Monitor the Implementation of Outcomes-Based Learning Environments in Science Classrooms in South Africa  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the development and validation of an instrument that can be used to assess students' perceptions of their learning environment as a means of monitoring and guiding changes towards outcomes-based education. In the first phase, data collected from 2638 Grade 8 science students from 50 classes in 50 schools in the Limpopo…

Aldridge, Jill M.; Laugksch, Rudiger C.; Seopa, Mampone A.; Fraser, Barry J.

2006-01-01

371

Absence of widespread psychosocial and cognitive effects of school-based music instruction in 10–13-year-old students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous studies demonstrate that private music training has benefits which may transfer to other domains, including verbal memory, intelligence and self-esteem. The current paper reports on the impact of an increase in school-based music training on a range of cognitive and psychosocial measures for 10–13-year-olds in two independent studies. In the first study, the benefits of increased frequency of classroom-based

Nikki S. Rickard; Caroline J. Bambrick; Anneliese Gill

2012-01-01

372

An overview of psychosocial assessment procedures in reconstructive hand transplantation.  

PubMed

There have been more than 90 hand and upper extremity transplants performed worldwide. Functional and sensory outcomes have been reported in several studies, but little is known about the psychosocial outcomes. A comprehensive systematic literature review was performed, addressing the psychosocial impact of reconstructive hand transplantation. This review provides an overview of psychosocial evaluation protocols and identifies standards in this novel and exciting field. Essentials of the psychosocial assessment are discussed and a new protocol, the 'Chauvet Protocol', representing a standardized assessment protocol for future multicenter psychosocial trials is being introduced. PMID:24164333

Kumnig, Martin; Jowsey, Sheila G; Moreno, Elisa; Brandacher, Gerald; Azari, Kodi; Rumpold, Gerhard

2014-05-01

373

Strategies to Address Common Challenges When Teaching in an Active Learning Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This chapter provides practical strategies for addressing common challenges that arise for teachers in active learning classrooms. Our strategies come from instructors with experience teaching in these environments.

Petersen, Christina I.; Gorman, Kristen S.

2014-01-01

374

Blood Pressure, Relative Weight, and Psychosocial Resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research was conducted to determine the degree to which the effect of obesity on blood pressure was modified by sociocultural factors A measure of psychosocial resources incorporating both access to social supports and coping styles, was developed in research in St. Lucia, a West Indian culture. The study sample consisted of 98 40-49-year olds randomly selected from a community. Obesity

WILLIAM W. DRESSLER

375

Psychosocial profile in favor of organ donation  

Microsoft Academic Search

IntroductionThe lack of organ donation continues to be a major limiting factor in transplantation. Our aims are: (1) to define the psychosocial profile against organ donation, and (2) to determine the impact of a law on the procurement and transplantation of organs based on “presumed consent” in the population.

C Conesa; A Ríos; P Ramírez; M. M Rodríguez; P Rivas; M Canteras; P Parrilla

2003-01-01

376

Terminology and the Psychosocial Burden of Blindness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Various denotations and connotations of the word "blindness" are examined and the inference is drawn that they constitute a psychosocial burden that perpetuates prejudice. The analysis leads on to a hypothesis in which a more progressive terminology could lead to reduction of this burden.

Bolt, David

2004-01-01

377

Psychosocial Precursors and Correlates of Migraine Headache.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Tested the interactions of migraine headache cycles and sufferers' daily experiences of stressful events, emotional arousal, and physical activity. Results support a model of migraine characterized by parallel physiological and psychosocial instability during a 4-day cycle and by an interaction of personality and behavioral (self-reported stress)…

Levor, Robert M.; And Others

1986-01-01

378

The invention of the psychosocial: An introduction  

PubMed Central

Although the compound adjective ‘psychosocial’ was first used by academic psychologists in the 1890s, it was only in the interwar period that psychiatrists, psychologists and social workers began to develop detailed models of the psychosocial domain. These models marked a significant departure from earlier ideas of the relationship between society and human nature. Whereas Freudians and Darwinians had described an antagonistic relationship between biological instincts and social forces, interwar authors insisted that individual personality was made possible through collective organization. This argument was advanced by dissenting psychoanalysts such as Ian Suttie and Karen Horney; biologists including Julian Huxley and Hans Selye; philosophers (e.g. Olaf Stapledon), anthropologists (e.g. Margaret Mead) and physicians (e.g John Ryle and James Halliday). This introduction and the essays that follow sketch out the emergence of the psycho-social by examining the methods, tools and concepts through which it was articulated. New statistical technologies and physiological theories allowed individual pathology to be read as an index of broader social problems and placed medical expertise at the centre of new political programmes. In these arguments the intangible structure of social relationships was made visible and provided a template for the development of healthy and effective forms of social organization. By examining the range of techniques deployed in the construction of the psychosocial (from surveys of civilian neurosis, techniques of family observation through to animal models of psychotic breakdown) a critical genealogy of the biopolitical basis of modern society is developed. PMID:23626408

Hayward, Rhodri

2012-01-01

379

A review of psychosocial interventions in infertility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Counselling has been strongly recommended by numerous governmental, medical and community associations to help infertile people. The purpose of this review was to determine whether psychosocial interventions improved well-being and pregnancy rates, and to identify the kinds of interventions that were most effective. A systematic search identified all published and unpublished papers in any language and any source that (1)

J. Boivin

2003-01-01

380

The invention of the psychosocial: An introduction.  

PubMed

Although the compound adjective 'psychosocial' was first used by academic psychologists in the 1890s, it was only in the interwar period that psychiatrists, psychologists and social workers began to develop detailed models of the psychosocial domain. These models marked a significant departure from earlier ideas of the relationship between society and human nature. Whereas Freudians and Darwinians had described an antagonistic relationship between biological instincts and social forces, interwar authors insisted that individual personality was made possible through collective organization. This argument was advanced by dissenting psychoanalysts such as Ian Suttie and Karen Horney; biologists including Julian Huxley and Hans Selye; philosophers (e.g. Olaf Stapledon), anthropologists (e.g. Margaret Mead) and physicians (e.g John Ryle and James Halliday). This introduction and the essays that follow sketch out the emergence of the psycho-social by examining the methods, tools and concepts through which it was articulated. New statistical technologies and physiological theories allowed individual pathology to be read as an index of broader social problems and placed medical expertise at the centre of new political programmes. In these arguments the intangible structure of social relationships was made visible and provided a template for the development of healthy and effective forms of social organization. By examining the range of techniques deployed in the construction of the psychosocial (from surveys of civilian neurosis, techniques of family observation through to animal models of psychotic breakdown) a critical genealogy of the biopolitical basis of modern society is developed. PMID:23626408

Hayward, Rhodri

2012-12-01

381

Erikson Psychosocial Stage Inventory: A Factor Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 72-item Erikson Psychosocial Stage Inventory (EPSI) was factor analyzed for a group of 534 university freshmen and sophomore students. Seven factors emerged, which were labeled Initiative, Industry, Identity, Friendship, Dating, Goal Clarity, and Self-Confidence. Item's representing Erikson's factors, Trust and Autonomy, were dispersed across…

Gray, Mary McPhail; And Others

1986-01-01

382

Survey Questions Answered Only by Psychosocial Experts.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Twelve tables provide a breakdown of answers to a survey responded to by 48 experts in the psychosocial treatment of psychiatric and behavioral problems in people with mental retardation. Questions address treatment of self-injurious or aggressive behavior, specific psychiatric disorders, specific target symptoms, use of applied behavior analysis…

American Journal on Mental Retardation, 2000

2000-01-01

383

Erikson Psychosocial Stage Inventory: A Factor Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 72-item Erikson Psychosocial Inventory (EPSI) was factor analyzed for a group of 534 university freshmen and sophomore students. Seven factors including 54 items emerged which the authors labeled Initiative, Industry, Identity, Friendship, Dating, Goal Clarity and Self-Confidence. Items representing Erikson's first two factors, Trust and Autonomy, were dispersed across the new set of factors; this factor pattern was discussed

Mary McPhail Gray; Jean M. Ispa; Kathy R. Thornburg

1986-01-01

384

A European framework to address psychosocial hazards.  

PubMed

Over the past decades, emphasis has been placed on the changing nature of work and new forms of risk that could negatively affect employee health and safety. These are mainly associated with new types of occupational hazards that have been termed psychosocial. Issues such as work-related stress, bullying and harassment are now receiving attention on a global basis and efforts have been made to address them at the workplace level. However, it has been acknowledged that despite developments of policy in this area, there still appear to be a broad science-policy gap and an even broader one between policy and practice. The WHO Network of Collaborating Centers in Occupational Health has, since the late 1990s, been supporting a dedicated program of work on psychosocial factors and work-related stress. Part of the Network's work is currently focusing on the translation of existing knowledge into practice in the area of psychosocial risk management. This program has identified that the optimum way forward lies in the development of a European framework for psychosocial risk management. This framework will serve as the basis for coordination of research activities and preventive action with an emphasis on evidence based interventions and best practice on an international basis. PMID:18408344

Leka, Stavroula; Kortum, Evelyn

2008-01-01

385

Psychosocial Factors in Sunbathing and Sunscreen Use  

Microsoft Academic Search

Excessive exposure to the sun has been related to the development of various types of skin cancer, but use of sunscreen decreases the risk. The present project was designed to empirically examine psychosocial factors in sunbathing and sunscreen use. One hundred twenty sunbathing and nonsunbathing beachgoers were interviewed about their health practices, knowledge about skin cancer, moods, and social rewards

Barbara Keesling; Howard S. Friedman

1987-01-01

386

Psychosocial research in traumatic stress: An update  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents an update of psychosocial research in the traumatic stress field, presenting an overview of recent studies in several areas: the epidemiology of traumatic events and of PTSD in the general adult population, other diagnoses associated with trauma exposure and PTSD, the course and longevity of PTSD symptomatology, and risk factors for the diagnosis. Other areas of increasing

Bonnie L. Green

1994-01-01

387

Psychosocial Determinants of Childhood and Adolescent Obesity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this article was to identify psychosocial determinants of childhood and adolescent obesity. Some of the determinants were considered non-modifiable such as genetics, sex, age, and race. The risk of developing obesity started early on in life, with high birth weight, rapid growth in infancy, maternal smoking during pregnancy, and lack of breastfeeding indicated as positive predictors. Family

Manoj Sharma; Melinda J. Ickes

2008-01-01

388

Is Subjective Status Influenced by Psychosocial Factors?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Associations between subjective status and health are still relatively unexplored. This study aimed at testing whether subjective status is uniquely confounded by psychosocial factors compared to objective status, and what factors that may predict subjective status. Design: A cross-sectional analysis of a population-based, random sample…

Lundberg, Johanna; Kristenson, Margareta

2008-01-01

389

Factors Affecting Psychosocial Adjustment of Deaf Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study involving 1,097 elementary and secondary students who are deaf found that degree of hearing loss, additional disability, and age at onset were negatively related to psychosocial adjustment. However, there was a positive relationship with the use of hearing aids, speech intelligibility, academic achievement, parental hearing status, and…

Polat, Filiz

2003-01-01

390

Classroom Vocabulary Classroom Vocabulary [msamiati wa darasani  

E-print Network

/ chaki [chalk / chalks] zulia / mazulia [carpet / carpets] swichi [switch] swichi ya feni [fan switch, ubao... [This classroom has a table, backpack, chalk, board...] 2. Hii ni nini? [What is this?] Hii ni

391

Cyber addictions: toward a psychosocial perspective.  

PubMed

The concept of cyberaddiction is far from being unanimously accepted by scientists (Ko, Yen, Yen, Chen, & Chen 2012; Pezoa-Jares, Espinoza-Luna & Vasquez-Medina 2012; Nadeau et al., 2011; Perraton, Fusaro & Bonenfant 2011). The same is true of addiction to videogames (Hellman, Schoenmakers, Nordstrom, & Van Holst 2013; Coulombe 2010); or to Facebook (Andreassen et al., 2012; Levard & Soulas, 2010). While certain researchers wished to see this condition included in the DSM-5 (Block, 2008), others question the operational and practical bases for the diagnostic criteria. Some see cyberaddiction as a problem linked more to time management, to brain deficits, to an impulse-control disorder or to psychosocial conditions while others consider it to be a pre-existing comorbidity. Considering that most addiction problems are generally understood more as individual and pathological problems rather than the result of psychosocial conditions (poverty, unemployment, weak social ties, social exclusion, hyper individualism, etc), the aim of this article is to propose a psychosocial perspective for this emerging trend in cyberaddictions. To what extent social conditions and cyberaddiction behaviors constitute a potential pathology? Can we include a psychosocial approach to gain a more general picture of this contemporary issue? In response to these questions, a contextualization and an attempt to define cyberaddiction will be followed by an analysis of some major issues in the development of this type of addiction. A demonstration of the cycle of addiction on how people develop addictions, including cyberaddictions, will be done within a psychosocial perspective in order to seize the multifactorial aspects of this addiction. PMID:25541291

Suissa, Amnon Jacob

2015-04-01

392

Ethical Considerations Regarding Classroom Use of Personal Genomic Information  

PubMed Central

Rapidly decreasing costs of genetic technologies—especially next-generation sequencing—and intensifying need for a clinical workforce trained in genomic medicine have increased interest in having students use personal genomic information to motivate and enhance genomics education. Numerous ethical issues attend classroom/pedagogical use of students’ personal genomic information, including their informed decision to participate, pressures to participate, privacy concerns, and psychosocial sequelae of learning genomic information. This paper addresses these issues, advocates explicit discussion of these issues to cultivate students’ ethical reasoning skills, suggests ways to mitigate potential harms, and recommends collection of ethically relevant data regarding pedagogical use of personal genomic information. PMID:25574277

Parker, Lisa S.; Grubs, Robin

2014-01-01

393

Ethical considerations regarding classroom use of personal genomic information.  

PubMed

Rapidly decreasing costs of genetic technologies-especially next-generation sequencing-and intensifying need for a clinical workforce trained in genomic medicine have increased interest in having students use personal genomic information to motivate and enhance genomics education. Numerous ethical issues attend classroom/pedagogical use of students' personal genomic information, including their informed decision to participate, pressures to participate, privacy concerns, and psychosocial sequelae of learning genomic information. This paper addresses these issues, advocates explicit discussion of these issues to cultivate students' ethical reasoning skills, suggests ways to mitigate potential harms, and recommends collection of ethically relevant data regarding pedagogical use of personal genomic information. PMID:25574277

Parker, Lisa S; Grubs, Robin

2014-12-01

394

Environment and Energy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This self-contained module on environment and energy includes a range of fun activities that students can perform in the classroom and at home with family members. They impart important concepts such as observation, identification, measurement, and differentiation.

Houghton Mifflin Science

395

Humanism: The Vital Ingredient in the Ethnically Aware Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the characteristics of the culturally aware classroom and teacher in order to provide an environment that will help replace the destructive aspects of the perceptual systems of the ethically different student. (Author/RK)

Luna, F. C.; Cordell, Franklin D.

1978-01-01

396

Distributed communication and psychosocial performance in simulated space dwelling groups.  

PubMed

The present report describes the development and application of a distributed interactive multi-person simulation in a computer-generated planetary environment as an experimental test bed for modeling the human performance effects of variations in the types of communication modes available, and in the types of stress and incentive conditions underlying the completion of mission goals. The results demonstrated a high degree of interchangeability between communication modes(audio, text) when one mode was not available. Additionally, the addition of time pressure stress to complete tasks resulted in a reduction in performance effectiveness, and these performance reductions were ameliorated via the introduction of positive incentives contingent upon improved performances. The results obtained confirmed that cooperative and productive psychosocial interactions can be maintained between individually isolated and dispersed members of simulated spaceflight crews communicating and problem-solving effectively over extended time intervals without the benefit of one another's physical presence. PMID:15835052

Hienz, R D; Brady, J V; Hursh, S R; Ragusa, L C; Rouse, C O; Gasior, E D

2005-01-01

397

Environment Environment  

E-print Network

Delivery Economy Community Environment Economy Community Environment Economy Community Environment Environment Climate change programme EconomyCommunity #12;Climate change programme | 2 Climate change is one are described. Finally, the programme explains how the commitments will be delivered and monitored. Environment

398

The Classroom Animal.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides background information on the earthworm. Reviews basic anatomical, behavioral, and reproductive facts. Offers suggestions for procuring, maintaining, and breeding colonies for classroom use. (ML)

Science and Children, 1986

1986-01-01

399

Experience-Based Discrimination: Classroom Games  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors present a simple classroom game in which students are randomly designated as employers, purple workers, or green workers. This environment may generate "statistical" discrimination if workers of one color tend not to invest because they anticipate lower opportunities in the labor market, and these beliefs are self-confirming as…

Fryer, Roland G., Jr.; Goeree, Jacob K.; Holt, Charles A.

2005-01-01

400

A Question Library for Classroom Voting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Take a minute and imagine the ideal classroom learning environment. What would it be like? How would students learn? What would they be doing? Certainly, each student would be actively engaged in the lesson, exploring and discovering the key points. Perhaps students would work collaboratively, discussing various concepts and figuring out central…

Cline, Kelly; McGivney-Burelle, Jean; Zullo, Holly

2012-01-01

401

Incorporate Technology into the Modern Language Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This column describes how technology can enrich the learning environment provided by the modern language classroom. Typically, modern languages taught in U.S. public schools are French, Spanish, and German. A general broadening of high school graduation and college and professional school admission requirements to include a certain level of modern…

Castleberry, Gwen Troxell; Evers, Rebecca B.

2010-01-01

402

Listening Technologies for Individuals and the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Assistive technology has always been an important component of individualized education programs. The individualized education program process can be used to supply hearing assistive technology to students. One goal of audiologists and educators is to improve the acoustic environment of classrooms for all students by constructing school buildings…

Marttila, Joan

2004-01-01

403

Librarian Participation in the Online Classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

As distance education courses increasingly move to the online environment, librarians are discovering new challenges and opportunities for reaching distant students. Collaboration with faculty is essential in reaching students who may never enter the library building. One such method of collaboration is librarian participation in online courses through “lurking” in Blackboard and Desire2Learn classrooms and monitoring discussion threads devoted to

Jill S. Markgraf

2005-01-01

404

Teaching Economics with Classroom Experiments: A Symposium  

Microsoft Academic Search

Classroom experiments are effective because students are placed directly into the economic environments being studied. The papers in this special section span diverse applications, for example, speculation and multiple markets, coordination and voting games, and a simple macroeconomy. All experiments can be run with simple props, such as ordinary playing cards. After participating, students bring firsthand experience to the discussion

Charles A. Holt

1999-01-01

405

The Heteronormative Classroom: Questioning and Liberating Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article is a critical examination of the ideologies and practices that educators bring to bear on their classrooms in order to create inclusive, safe, and welcoming environments for all children, but particularly for children with gender variant behaviors and interests. Using a feminist perspective, this article offers a new conceptual lens…

Garcia, Ana Maria; Slesaransky-Poe, Graciela

2010-01-01

406

Psychosocial Safety Climate, Work Conditions, and Emotions in the Workplace: A Malaysian Population-Based Work Stress Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

We integrated psychosocial safety climate (PSC) with the job demands and resources (JD-R; Bakker & Demerouti, 2007) framework to examine the impact of both job demands and job resources at work on employee depression, anger, and engagement. PSC refers to a climate for the protection of employee psychological health and safety. As PSC theoretically influences the working environment, we hypothesized

Mohd Awang Idris; Maureen F. Dollard

2011-01-01

407

Liver Transplant—Psychiatric and Psychosocial Aspects  

PubMed Central

Liver transplantation is a life saving surgical procedure that is associated with improved longevity and enhanced quality of life. The number of successful liver transplants is growing worldwide. The procedure requires a dedicated and trained team of experts. A psychiatrist plays an important role in such a team. Psychiatric and psychosocial assessment is considered imperative to evaluate the candidate's suitability as a transplant recipient. Many psychiatric disorders may lead to the need for liver transplant, and if kept unchecked can adversely affect outcomes. Psychiatric problems arising in the post-transplant period may also require intervention of the psychiatrist. The donor too needs to be evaluated adequately to assess for psychological fitness for the procedure. This article provides broad overview of the various psychiatric and psychosocial issues pertaining to liver transplantation. PMID:25755459

Grover, Sandeep; Sarkar, Siddharth

2012-01-01

408

Psychosocial considerations about children and radiological events.  

PubMed

Children are identified as a vulnerable population in the case of radiological events because of their increased physical sensitivity to radiation and its impact on critical development stages. Using a comprehensive integrated risk framework, psychosocial risk protective factors are discussed in a social ecology paradigm. Children have been shown to be both vulnerable and resilient; they are both easily impressionable and also quick to adapt and learn. Psychosocial interventions during, after and most efficiently before an event can improve outcome, especially if they involve parents and schools, media and work organisations. Public education through children should be encouraged to increase knowledge of radiation and strategies to minimise exposure and irradiation. Children can become vectors of prevention, preparedness and mitigation through information and behavioural rehearsal. Special consideration must therefore be given to education, school programmes, practice rehearsal and media exposure. PMID:20798186

Lemyre, Louise; Corneil, Wayne; Johnson, Colleen; Boutette, Paul

2010-11-01

409

What psychosocial factors influence adolescents' oral health?  

PubMed

Few studies have examined, comprehensively and prospectively, determinants of oral-health-related quality of life. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between psychosocial factors and oral health status, health perceptions, and quality of life. Measures of symptom and functional status, health perceptions, quality of life, oral health beliefs, and psychological (sense of coherence, self-esteem, health locus of control) and social factors (parents' income and education) were collected from 439 12- and 13-year-olds at baseline and six-month follow-up, together with a clinical examination at baseline. Structural equation modeling indicated that increased levels of caries and more symptoms predicted more functional limitations, and, cross-sectionally, greater functional impact was associated with worse health perceptions, which were linked to lower quality of life. Sense of coherence was the most important psychosocial predictor. These factors are important in understanding how oral health affects young people's daily lives. PMID:20739689

Baker, S R; Mat, A; Robinson, P G

2010-11-01

410

Psychosocial aspects of functional gastrointestinal disorders.  

PubMed

Psychosocial factors, such as stress, abuse history, psychiatric disturbance, coping style, and learned illness behaviors, play an important role in functional GI disorders in terms of symptom experience and clinical outcome. These psychosocial factors are influenced by and influence GI symptoms in a bidirectional manner as mediated through the brain-gut axis (CNS and ENS pathways). Entering the patient encounter using a biopsychosocial approach and a care (versus cure) style can help avoid excessive diagnostic testing, and elicit crucial information about potential abuse history or psychiatric symptoms that can help guide therapy. Finally, for patients with severe, refractory symptoms, multicomponent treatment involving psychologic therapy, such as CBT, relaxation, or hypnotherapy, can be beneficial. PMID:12858603

Budavari, Adriane I; Olden, Kevin W

2003-06-01

411

Ideas for the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author shares some of the activities for the classroom invented by Gill Hatch. One of those activities is the activity for older students, which is for the five-year-olds through to post-graduates. Card-sorting game, geometry games, algebra games, and loop games are also some of those activities for the classroom invented by…

Mathematics Teaching Incorporating Micromath, 2006

2006-01-01

412

For the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four games for use in the foreign language classroom are described. The first, "A Shopping Game," by Gordon Hartig, is played on a game board in the German classroom and provides practice in producing sentences with the preposition "in," which in some instances takes the dative and in others takes the accusative. A diagram of the game board is…

Hartig, Gordon; And Others

1978-01-01

413

Technology in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This theme issue contains 20 articles dealing with technology in the classroom. The articles are: (1) "Distance Learning and the Future of Kamehameha Schools Bishop Estate" (Henry E. Meyer); (2) "Technology and Multiple Intelligences" (Bette Savini); (3) "Technology Brings Voyagers into Classrooms" (Kristina Inn and others); (4) "Technologies Old…

Speidel, Gisela E., Ed.

1995-01-01

414

Speaking in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Too much speaking and indiscipline in class is an on-going problem for any teacher, it is at its least disruptive and at most it destroys a good positive classroom atmosphere. This article recognizes this and continues this debate and suggests key clues to support teachers in their efforts to maintain a positive classroom atmosphere and discipline…

McBain, Robert

2011-01-01

415

The Homeliving Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A system of point cards, which may be redeemed in tokens, money, or privileges, motivates mentally retarded teenagers to succeed in a "homeliving" classroom employing individualized work stations to prepare functioning students to leave the institution and live in the community. The classroom procedures are outlined. (AJ)

Langdon, Katie

1975-01-01

416

Artifacts, Tools, and Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although schools contain many material artifacts, studies in classrooms have tended to focus on discourse and quality of social interaction even when artifacts are being used. Responding to Engstrom's (1999) invitation to take artifacts seriously, three studies are described in which a material object was essential to a classroom activity. The…

McDonald, Geraldine; Le, Huong; Higgins, Joanna; Podmore, Valerie

2005-01-01

417

Frontloading Classroom Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the authors describe a systematic approach to planning for the first days of school that is appropriate for today's demanding high school science classrooms. These strategies apply to any science subject and benefit student teachers, new teachers, and those teachers wishing to improve their classroom management skills. (Contains 3…

Roscoe, Keith; Orr, Kim

2010-01-01

418

Is Your Classroom Exciting?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suggests ways for making classrooms fun, including giving children opportunities to work together, moving things around, letting children learn to set their own controls, setting up the classroom so students can experiment and discover together, and providing bonuses or incentives for the child who is falling behind. (CR)

Grambo, Gregory

1997-01-01

419

Evaluation in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Six classroom research-based instructional projects funded under Chapter 2 are described, and their outcomes are summarized. The projects each used computer hardware and software in the classroom setting. The projects and their salient points include: (1) the Science Technology Project, in which 48 teachers and 2,847 students in 18 schools used…

Becnel, Shirley

420

Classroom versus Online Assessment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors examined students' effort and performance using online versus traditional classroom testing procedures. The instructor and instructional methodology were the same in different sections of an introductory finance class. Only the procedure in which students were tested--online versus in the classroom--differed. The authors measured…

Spivey, Michael F.; McMillan, Jeffrey J.

2014-01-01

421

Epidemiology in the Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This high school classroom exercise from the Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion gives an introduction to epidemiology. Visitors will find background materials (including an introduction to epidemiology and how to investigate and outbreak) and suggestions for classroom use.

422

Psychosocial Milestones in Normal Puberty and Adolescence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Puberty and adolescence are not generally times of great stress and turmoil. The storm-and-stress theory has a long history, but can no longer be supported by recent empirical research. A modern approach to the psychosocial changes of these phases is based on the concept of developmental tasks in an age-appropriate and stage-appropriate way. Biological processes can influence an individual’s psychological

H. Remschmidt

1994-01-01

423

Psychosocial interventions in people with multiple sclerosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Upon diagnosis individuals with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) must cope with both day to day and disease-related stressors in addition\\u000a to unpredictable, fluctuating and confusing symptoms. Furthermore, disease progression may interfere with employment, family\\u000a life, relationships and social activities. Psychosocial interventions aim to help individuals manage these psychological,\\u000a social and emotional challenges. However, there are no specific guidelines available regarding the

K. S. Malcomson; L. Dunwoody; A. S. Lowe-Strong

2007-01-01

424

Structured psychosocial stress and therapeutic failure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Generalized language-of-thought arguments appropriate to interacting cognitive modules permit exploration of how disease states interact with medical treatment. The interpenetrating feedback between treatment and response to it creates a kind of idiotypic hall-of-mirrors generating a synergistic pattern of efficacy, treatment failure, adverse reactions, and patient noncompliance which, from a Rate Distortion perspective, embodies a distorted image of externally-imposed structured psychosocial

Rodrick Wallace; Deborah Wallace

2003-01-01

425

Psychosocial Functioning in Youth with Chronic Illness  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a A substantial number of children and adolescents experience chronic illness. Due to medical advances, many young patients\\u000a survive into adulthood. A chronic illness has the potential to affect several facets of a young patient’s life. The impact\\u000a that chronic illness may have on various domains of psychosocial functioning will be reviewed. Youth with chronic illness\\u000a and their families can experience

John A. Yozwiak; Regan E. Settles; Rachel F. Steffens

426

Psychosocial Complications of Coronary Artery Disease  

PubMed Central

Background: Cardiovascular diseases are the leading causes of death around the world. The coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the most common diseases in this category, which can be the trigger to various psychosocial complications. We believe that inadequate attention has been paid to this issue. Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to explore the psychosocial complications of CAD from the Iranian patients’ perspective. Patients and Methods: A qualitative design based on the content analysis approach was used to collect the data and analyze the perspective of 18 Iranian patients suffered from CAD, chosen by a purposeful sampling strategy. Semi-structured interviews were held in order to collect the data. Sampling was continued until the data saturation. The data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis approach by MAXQUDA 2010 software. Results: This study revealed the theme of the patients’ challenges with CAD. This theme consisted of: "primary challenges," including doubting early diagnosis and treatment, and feeling being different from others; "psychological issues," including preoccupation, fear of death and surgical intervention, recurrence stress , anxiety and depression; "problems of life," including financial problems, work-related problems, and family-related problems; and "sociocultural issues," including change in perspective of people towards the patient, and cultural issues. Conclusions: Although the management of physical problems in patients with CAD is important, psychosocial effects of this disease is more important. Thus, health care personnel should pay ample attention to identify and resolve psychosocial problems of these patients. Results of this study can be used to empower these patients. PMID:25068057

Karimi-Moonaghi, Hossein; Mojalli, Mohammad; Khosravan, Shahla

2014-01-01

427

Psychosocial issues during an expedition to Mars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Much is known about psychological and interpersonal issues affecting astronauts participating in manned space missions near the Earth. But in a future long-distance, long-duration expedition to Mars, additional stressors will occur that will result in psychological, psychiatric, and interpersonal effects on the crew, both negative and positive. This paper will review what is known about important psychosocial issues in space and will extrapolate them to the scenario of a future manned space mission to Mars.

Kanas, Nick

2014-10-01

428

Psychosocial Impact of Lymphedema: A Systematic Review of Literature from 2004–2011  

PubMed Central

Objective This systematic review aimed to evaluate the level of evidence of contemporary peer-reviewed literature published from 2004–2011 on the psychosocial impact of lymphedema. Methods Eleven electronic databases were searched and 1,311 articles retrieved; 23 met inclusion criteria. Twelve articles utilized qualitative methodology and 11 employed quantitative methodology. An established quality assessment tool was used to assess the quality of the included studies. Results The overall quality of the 23 included studies was adequate. A critical limitation of current literature is the lack of conceptual or operational definitions for the concept of psychosocial impact. Quantitative studies showed statistically significant poorer social well-being in persons with lymphedema, including perceptions related to body image, appearance, sexuality, and social barriers. No statistically significant differences were found between persons with and without lymphedema in the domains of emotional well-being (happy or sad) and psychological distress (depression and anxiety). All 12 of the qualitative studies consistently described negative psychological impact (negative self-identity, emotional disturbance, psychological distress) and negative social impact (marginalization, financial burden, perceived diminished sexuality, social isolation, perceived social abandonment, public insensitivity, non-supportive work environment). Factors associated with psychosocial impact were also identified. Conclusions Lymphedema has a negative psychosocial impact on affected individuals. The current review sheds light on the conceptualization and operationalization of the definitions of psychosocial impact with respect to lymphedema. Development of a lymphedema-specific instrument is needed to better characterize the impact of lymphedema and to examine the factors contributing to these outcomes in cancer and non-cancer-related populations. PMID:23044512

Fu, Mei R.; Ridner, Sheila H.; Hu, Sophia H.; Stewart, Bob R.; Cormier, Janice N.; Armer, Jane M.

2014-01-01

429

Errorless Embedding for Children with On-Task and Conduct Difficulties: Rapport-Based, Success-Focused Intervention in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children exposed to psychosocial stressors often develop behavior disorders that include off-task responding in the classroom. We used errorless embedding, a rapport-based, nonpunitive intervention, to improve on-task behavior in such children. In a multiple-baseline across subjects design, we observed 5 children with severe behavioral…

Ducharme, Joseph M.; Harris, Kimberly E.

2005-01-01

430

Evidence Based Psychosocial Interventions in Substance Use  

PubMed Central

In recent years, there has been significant progress and expansion in the development of evidence-based psychosocial treatments for substance abuse and dependence. A literature review was undertaken using the several electronic databases (PubMed, Cochrane Database of systemic reviews and specific journals, which pertain to psychosocial issues in addictive disorders and guidelines on this topic). Overall psychosocial interventions have been found to be effective. Some interventions, such as cognitive behavior therapy, motivational interviewing and relapse prevention, appear to be effective across many drugs of abuse. Psychological treatment is more effective when prescribed with substitute prescribing than when medication or psychological treatment is used alone, particularly for opiate users. The evidence base for psychological treatment needs to be expanded and should also include research on optimal combinations of psychological therapies and any particular matching effects, if any. Psychological interventions are an essential part of the treatment regimen and efforts should be made to integrate evidence-based interventions in all substance use disorder treatment programs. PMID:24860208

Jhanjee, Sonali

2014-01-01

431

Psychosocial services in rehabilitation medicine: an interdisciplinary approach.  

PubMed

Psychosocial adjustment to disability is an area of special need, often requiring intervention by mental health professionals, including social workers, psychologists, and psychiatrists. While the availability of all these disciplines is optimal for comprehensive psychosocial intervention, the use of multiple mental health disciplines may create problems of role confusion, overlapping efforts, and discontinuity of care. This paper presents the development of a psychosocial team as a method for identifying service goals, differentiating roles, coordinating psychosocial care, and educating rehabilitation staff on the expertise and proper use of the psychosocial disciplines. Four stages of team development are described: I. Identification of Purpose; II. Role Definition; III. Task Assignment; IV. Integration. A case example illustrates the functions of the interdisciplinary psychosocial team. PMID:4051711

Palmer, S; Conn, L; Siebens, A A; Pence, W; Michael, J L

1985-10-01

432

Observed Classroom Quality Profiles of Kindergarten Classrooms in Finland  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: The aim of the present study was to examine classroom quality profiles of kindergarten classrooms using a person-centered approach and to analyze these patterns in regard to teacher and classroom characteristics. Observations of the domains of Emotional Support, Classroom Organization, and Instructional Support were conducted in…

Salminen, Jenni; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Pakarinen, Eija; Siekkinen, Martti; Hannikainen, Maritta; Poikonen, Pirjo-Liisa; Rasku-Puttonen, Helena

2012-01-01

433

Opportunities for Inquiry Science in Montessori Classrooms: Learning from a Culture of Interest, Communication, and Explanation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although classroom inquiry is the primary pedagogy of science education, it has often been difficult to implement within conventional classroom cultures. This study turned to the alternatively structured Montessori learning environment to better understand the ways in which it fosters the essential elements of classroom inquiry, as defined by prominent policy documents. Specifically, we examined the opportunities present in Montessori classrooms for students to develop an interest in the natural world, generate explanations in science, and communicate about science. Using ethnographic research methods in four Montessori classrooms at the primary and elementary levels, this research captured a range of scientific learning opportunities. The study found that the Montessori learning environment provided opportunities for students to develop enduring interests in scientific topics and communicate about science in various ways. The data also indicated that explanation was largely teacher-driven in the Montessori classroom culture. This study offers lessons for both conventional and Montessori classrooms and suggests further research that bridges educational contexts.

Rinke, Carol R.; Gimbel, Steven J.; Haskell, Sophie

2013-08-01

434

Psychosocial Stress and Psychosis. A Review of the Neurobiological Mechanisms and the Evidence for Gene-Stress Interaction  

PubMed Central

This article presents evidence suggesting that psychosocial stress may increase risk for psychosis, especially in the case of cumulative exposure. A heuristically useful framework to study the underlying mechanisms is the concept of “behavioral sensitization” that stipulates that exposure to psychosocial stress—such as life events, childhood trauma, or discriminatory experiences—may progressively increase the behavioral and biological response to subsequent exposures. The neurobiological substrate of sensitization may involve dysregulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, contributing to a hypothesized final common pathway of dopamine sensitization in mesolimbic areas and increased stress-induced striatal dopamine release. It is argued that, in order to reconcile genetic and environmental influences on the development of psychosis, gene-environment interactions may be an important mechanism in explaining between-subject differences in risk following (cumulative) exposure to psychosocial stress. To date, most studies suggestive of gene-stress interaction have used proxy measures for genetic vulnerability such as a family history of psychosis; studies investigating interactions between molecular genetic measures and psychosocial stressors are still relatively scarce. Preliminary evidence suggests that polymorphisms within the catechol-O-methyltransferase and brain-derived neurotrophic factor genes may interact with psychosocial stress in the development of psychosis; however, extensive further investigations are required to confirm this. PMID:18718885

van Winkel, Ruud; Stefanis, Nicholas C.; Myin-Germeys, Inez

2008-01-01

435

[A shipwreck and organization of the psychosocial support work].  

PubMed

During recent years attention has been drawn to the importance of psychosocial support to victims of accidents and disasters. Post-traumatic stress disorder seems to be more frequent than earlier believed, and early psychosocial assistance is thought to reduce the psychological effects of the traumatic experience. The authors describe the psychosocial work, as it was organized at Haukeland Hospital, after a shipwreck. Experiences with mobile medical teams with stress competence are also discussed. PMID:8209337

Isaksen, P M; Bovin, K J; Haug, T T; Roness, A; Wilhelmsen, I

1994-02-20

436

A Stream Ecosystem in the Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

To build a model of the world of nature is never an easy task. In this case the lotic ecosystem for the classroom is no exception. However, with the right materials, some time, and student involvement you can have an operational classroom ecosystem, complete with organisms, physical environment, interactions and relationships, and natural succession. The classroom stream ecosystem provides a focus for biology class projects, lessons, experiments and research. It provides students with a sense of ownership in the class if they are involved in the development of the system early in the school year. I have found students simply standing and observing, conversing about their ideas, and actively wondering what is going on in the stream on a daily basis. The model is a magnet for student curiosity. If you have a chance to build one and use it, I recommend it strongly, and wish you luck in your new quest to make biology real and relevant to your students.

Paul Tweed (Augusta High School REV)

1995-06-30

437

Psychosocial Assessment of Living Organ Donors: Clinical and Ethical Considerations  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article outlines psychosocial and ethical issues to be considered when evaluating potential living organ donors. Six types of living donors are described: genetically related, emotionally related, \\

Mary Ellen Olbrisch; Sharon M. Benedict

2001-01-01

438

Teacher Practices and Hybrid Space in a Fifth-Grade Mathematics Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Providing students with a classroom environment that allows for meaningful learning experiences is important for students to develop deep and long lasting understanding about mathematics. This article adds to the literature on learning environments in mathematics by presenting a case study of one fifth-grade mathematics teacher and her classroom

Cribbs, Jennifer D.; Linder, Sandra M.

2013-01-01

439

Classroom Management: Theory into Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educators cite classroom management as intrinsic to the learning process. This paper presents a broad picture of classroom management and offers some suggestions for actual classroom implementation. Major findings are highlighted, along with practical techniques for their instructional application. Classroom management is an organizational process…

Guernsey, Marsha A.; Peary, Marjorie

440

The Inclusion Classroom. Your Middle School Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Special education students struggle with labels. Other kids can be very cruel with names and attitudes toward anyone who is different. Teachers cannot solve this problem completely, but they can minimize its effects with careful manipulation. The author, a teacher in an inclusion classroom, suggests passing out modified assignments along with all…

Barnes, Peter

2006-01-01

441

Classroom Research by Classroom Teachers, 1992.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This volume celebrates teachers as life-long learners of the art of teaching, by presenting 21 action research studies designed and implemented by classroom teachers. A "How To Get Started" section outlines action research steps and offers worksheets. Descriptions of the research studies begin with ethnographic studies, which include "Adopt a…

Tanner, Michael, Ed.

1992-01-01

442

Classroom Design- Lessons from the Technology Trenches  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site makes a CD available for purchase of the following instructional program: Beyond the instructor's skill, technology has had one of the single largest impacts in how students and faculty interact in the classroom. But the nature and boundaries of the learning space are constantly changing. Institutions are challenged to build classrooms smartly, ensuring technology supports the learning process, and that precious dollars and equipment are not wasted on learning environments that are factored late into the planning process. To design an electronic classroom that will have viability long-term, you have to design from the inside out. Changing your perspective will help you guide your campus toward decisions that not only support the educational mission with technology, but favorably impact many other factors, from cost effectiveness and upkeep, to future proofing ensuring that your campus classrooms will even have the capability to accommodate new technology. Join us for this informative webcast that will bring you insights on technology-enabled classrooms from different types of institutions- from the perspective of the technology specialist. Learn what has worked- and perhaps more importantly, what has not worked- from their perspectives. The insights you gain will ease your technology planning, inform your design process, and could save you thousands of dollars in technology purchases and upkeep.

443

Psychosocial factors and the development of breast cancer: a meta-analysis.  

PubMed

A meta-analysis examined the relationship between psychosocial factors and the development of breast cancer. Average effect sizes (Hedges's g) were calculated from 46 studies for 8 major construct categories: anxiety/depression, childhood family environment, conflict-avoidant personality, denial/repression coping, anger expression, extraversion-introversion, stressful life events, and separation/loss. Significant effect sizes were found for denial/repression coping (g = .38), separation/loss experiences (g = .29), and stressful life events (g = .25). Although conflict-avoidant personality style was also significant (g = .19), the effect size was less robust, and a moderate number of future studies with null results would reduce the significance. Results overall support only a modest association between specific psychosocial factors and breast cancer and are contrary to the conventional wisdom that personality and stress influence the development of breast cancer. PMID:10519468

McKenna, M C; Zevon, M A; Corn, B; Rounds, J

1999-09-01

444

The (co-)occurrence of problematic video gaming, substance use, and psychosocial problems in adolescents  

PubMed Central

Abstract Aims: The current study explored the nature of problematic (addictive) video gaming (PVG) and the association with game type, psychosocial health, and substance use. Methods: Data were collected using a paper and pencil survey in the classroom setting. Three samples were aggregated to achieve a total sample of 8478 unique adolescents. Scales included measures of game use, game type, the Video game Addiction Test (VAT), depressive mood, negative self-esteem, loneliness, social anxiety, education performance, and use of cannabis, alcohol and nicotine (smoking). Results: Findings confirmed problematic gaming is most common amongst adolescent gamers who play multiplayer online games. Boys (60%) were more likely to play online games than girls (14%) and problematic gamers were more likely to be boys (5%) than girls (1%). High problematic gamers showed higher scores on depressive mood, loneliness, social anxiety, negative self-esteem, and self-reported lower school performance. Nicotine, alcohol, and cannabis using boys were almost twice more likely to report high PVG than non-users. Conclusions: It appears that online gaming in general is not necessarily associated with problems. However, problematic gamers do seem to play online games more often, and a small subgroup of gamers – specifically boys – showed lower psychosocial functioning and lower grades. Moreover, associations with alcohol, nicotine, and cannabis use are found. It would appear that problematic gaming is an undesirable problem for a small subgroup of gamers. The findings encourage further exploration of the role of psychoactive substance use in problematic gaming. PMID:25317339

VAN ROOIJ, ANTONIUS J.; KUSS, DARIA J.; GRIFFITHS, MARK D.; SHORTER, GILLIAN W.; SCHOENMAKERS, M. TIM; VAN DE MHEEN, DIKE

2014-01-01

445

A New Mirror for the Classroom: A Technology-Based Tool for Documenting the Impact of Technology on Instruction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the new measures developed as part of the Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow (ACOT) program is described. The ACOT project examines the impact of access to educational technology on the kindergarten through grade 12 classroom environments. The new measure is a technology-based classroom observation instrument for documenting the impact of…

Gearhart, Maryl; And Others

446

How Do Classroom Conditions and Children's Risk for School Problems Contribute to Children's Behavioral Engagement in Learning?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The primary objective of this investigation was to examine the way in which two facets of the classroom environment (classroom quality and instruc- tional contexts) and children's risk for school problems combine to predict children's behavioral engagement in third-grade classrooms. As part of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development,

Jason T. Downer; Sara E. Rimm-Kaufman; Robert C. Pianta

2007-01-01

447

Buffering against Performance Classroom Goal Structures: The Importance of Autonomy Support and Classroom Community  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The culture of schooling in the United States has become increasingly focused on outwardly proving student competence. Some achievement goal theorists suggest that a major casualty of performance-oriented classroom environments may be student motivation for developing and improving competence. The present study extends across theoretical…

Ciani, Keith D.; Middleton, Michael J.; Summers, Jessica J.; Sheldon, Kennon M.

2010-01-01

448

Classrooms Matter: The Design of Virtual Classrooms Influences Gender Disparities in Computer Science Classes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three experiments examined whether the design of virtual learning environments influences undergraduates' enrollment intentions and anticipated success in introductory computer science courses. Changing the design of a virtual classroom--from one that conveys current computer science stereotypes to one that does not--significantly increased…

Cheryan, Sapna; Meltzoff, Andrew N.; Kim, Saenam

2011-01-01

449

Toys in The Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A number of chemical concepts can be easily illustrated in a more friendly way to children by using toys as teaching tools in the classroom. Some of the examples illustrated are shrinking toys, drinking birds and hand boiler.

Sarquis, Jerry L.; Sarquis, Arlyne M.

2005-01-01

450

Cartoons in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Approaches the topic of responsible pet care through the use of cartoon strips. Provides a two-page cartoon layout that can be duplicated for classroom use. Poses questions for possible discussions and investigations. (ML)

Children and Animals, 1985

1985-01-01

451

Polymer Literature for Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Lists eight sources of technical information suitable for classroom use which deal with polymer materials. Provides the names and addresses of these societies and associations and describes the type of information each has available. (TW)

Kirshenbaum, Gerald S.

1987-01-01

452

Frontloading Classroom Management  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this article, the authors describe a systematic approach to planning for the first days of school that is appropriate for today's demanding high school science classrooms. These strategies apply to any science subject and benefit student teachers, new

Keith Roscoe

2010-07-01

453

Craters in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Details an activity in which students create and study miniature impact craters in the classroom. Engages students in making detailed, meaningful observations, drawing inferences, reaching conclusions based on scientific evidence, and designing experiments to test selected variables. (DDR)

McArdle, Heather K.

1997-01-01

454

Culture in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Culture plays a large but often unnoticeable role in what we teach and how we teach children. We are a country of immense diversity, but in classrooms the dominant European-American culture has become the language of learning.

Medin, Douglas L.; Bang, Megan

2014-01-01

455

The Classroom Animal.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the behavior, housing, care, diet, and feeding of painted turtles. Also suggests several classroom activities and provides guidelines related to long-term captivity and human disease prevention. (DH)

Kramer, David C., Ed.

1985-01-01

456

The Classroom Space Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduces the Classroom Space project aimed at revitalizing science education at Key Stages 3 and 4 by using exciting examples from Space Science and Astronomy to illustrate key science concepts. (Author/YDS)

Verbickas, Sarah

2002-01-01

457

Critters in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of invertebrates as classroom "pets" can develop students' skills in scientific inquiry and instill respect for science. Few materials are needed for projects involving invertebrates. Suggested activities using snails, crickets, earthworms, crayfish, and guppies are offered. (DF)

Smith, Robert W.; Fleisher, Paul

1984-01-01

458

In the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using cartoons and comic strips to teach the concept of social class and newspapers to teach economic principles are suggested classroom activities for elementary and secondary courses. A lesson plan for teaching democratic values is also included. (JR)

History and Social Science Teacher, 1975

1975-01-01

459

Stargazing in Your Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

When taking students outside to see the stars is not an option, teachers can bring the stars inside the classroom. These instructions for building a portable planetarium also include suggestions for cross-cultural and social studies connections.

Jos? Rios

2003-05-01

460

Natural Resources: Outdoor Classrooms  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

An outdoor classroom is the ideal vehicle for community involvement: Parents, native plant societies, 4-H, garden clubs, and master naturalists are all resources waiting to be tapped, as are local businesses offering support. If you enlist your community

Valynda Mayes

2010-02-01

461

Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site provides information on various classroom assessment techniques (CATs) such as primary trait analysis, using anonymous assessments, goal ranking and matching, self assessment, active learning, transfer and applied learning, and group work assessment.

462

For the Classroom: Scrimshaw.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Procedures are described for practicing the art of scrimshaw in the classroom. Several materials are suggested for use. These include beef soup bones, old piano keys, nails, sandpaper, and lampblack or charcoal. (SA)

Current, 1979

1979-01-01

463

An Instrument for Investigating Chinese Language Learning Environments in Singapore Secondary Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes how a new classroom environment instrument, the "Chinese Language Classroom Environment Inventory (CLCEI)", was developed to investigate the nature of Chinese language classroom learning environments in Singapore secondary schools. The CLCEI is a bilingual instrument (English and Chinese Language) with 48 items written in both…

Chua, Siew Lian; Wong, Angela F. L.; Chen, Der-Thanq

2009-01-01

464

Ethical and Psychosocial Impact of Female Infertility  

PubMed Central

This manuscript reviews research from the past year on the ethical and psychosocial impact of infertility on women and men. We discuss several issues surrounding ovarian stimulation, particularly high-order multiple births, egg banking (especially for research purposes), and diminished ovarian reserve. We also present recent work on distress and counseling, which includes greater attention to subgroups of infertile women. More research on issues confronting men has emerged recently, and we outline these with regard to their relationships with infertile women, or as the infertility patient. Last, we outline some ethical issues posed by newer procedures of fertility preservation and uterine transplant. PMID:23336092

Leyser-Whalen, Ophra; Temple, Jeff R.

2012-01-01

465

Cardiac rehabilitation I: review of psychosocial factors.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death and disability for women and men. There are gender differences in recovery from coronary events, which may be due physiological, sociodemographic, or psychosocial factors. Cardiac rehabilitation programs have beneficial effects on coronary recovery. The following presents a review of the literature from MedLine (1997-2001) and PsychInfo (1984-2001) on gender differences in participation in cardiac rehabilitation programs, with a focus on depression, anxiety, self-efficacy and social support. A critical analysis of gaps in the literature as well as areas for future research are presented. PMID:12062135

Grace, Sherry L; Abbey, Susan E; Shnek, Zachary M; Irvine, Jane; Franche, Renée Louise; Stewart, Donna E

2002-01-01

466

Floor Plan Your Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource guides the learner, step-by-step, in creating a scale floor plan of a classroom. The instructions include sample drawings of student work. The activity includes: sketching a map of the classroom; measuring the room and calculating the area and perimeter; creating a scale drawing; and drafting a CAD (computer-aided design) floor plan. The lesson provides students with hands-on, real world practice solving problems of measurement, ratio, and scale.

2010-07-19

467

Data for the Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Data for the Classroom collection gathers datasets that have accompanying instructional materials or other pertinent information for using the dataset in a classroom setting for grades K-16. The data may be numerical, visual, maps, charts, tables or images. The data may be observational, remotely sensed or model data. The primary component is that there are materials supporting the use and understanding of the data either by educators or directly by students. Additionally, the dataset itself is desribed.

468

Solar Powered Classroom  

ScienceCinema

A group of fourth graders in Durham, North Carolina, are showing America the way to a clean energy future. They are installing solar panels on their classroom roof for a project that goes above and beyond a normal day in school. From researching solar panel installation, to generating funds for the project via Kickstarter, these are students who put their plans into action. Their accomplishments go beyond the classroom and stress the importance of getting people of all ages involved in renewable energy.

none

2013-06-27

469

Solar Powered Classroom  

SciTech Connect

A group of fourth graders in Durham, North Carolina, are showing America the way to a clean energy future. They are installing solar panels on their classroom roof for a project that goes above and beyond a normal day in school. From researching solar panel installation, to generating funds for the project via Kickstarter, these are students who put their plans into action. Their accomplishments go beyond the classroom and stress the importance of getting people of all ages involved in renewable energy.

none

2013-06-13

470

Psychosocial correlates of immune responsiveness and illness episodes in US Air Force Academy cadets undergoing basic cadet training  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This study examined psychosocial correlates of immune function and illness in 89 male first-year US Air Force Academy cadets. A psychosocial questionnaire was administered to cadets prior to their arrival at the academy and was readministered during cadet orientation and during the stressful environment of Basic Cadet Training (BCT). Immune responsiveness was analyzed by PHA-, PMA-, or anti-CD3-stimulated thymidine uptake in mononuclear leucocytes. Illness episodes were assessed via medical chart review and self-reported symptoms. There were significant increases in distress levels as cadets entered BCT. No psychosocial measure assessed prior to arrival at the academy predicted level of PHA-, PMA-, and anti-CD3-stimulated thymidine uptake or risk of illness. However, hostility levels reported during BCT predicted risk of illness in the four weeks following psychosocial assessment (odds ratio = 7.1; 95% confidence interval: 1.4-36.1). Elevated response to environmental stressors and lower well-being levels also predicted impending illness, but only in the cohort of cadets who had not contracted food poisoning prior to assessment during BCT (OR = 9.3, CI = 1.9-46.7; OR = 0.09, CI = 0.02-0.53). These results suggest that self-report measures of hostility, response to environmental stressors and well-being may be useful predictors of impending illness episodes in males encountering high stress environments.

Lee, D. J.; Meehan, R. T.; Robinson, C.; Smith, M. L.; Mabry, T. R.

1995-01-01

471

The Role of Spirituality versus Religiosity in Adolescent Psychosocial Adjustment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the interaction between religiosity (defined as church attendance) and spirituality (defined as personal beliefs in God or a higher power) on psychosocial adjustment. Four groups were created capturing 4 different religious/spiritual orientations. Differences were assessed between the groups on a wide range of psychosocial

Good, Marie; Willoughby, Teena

2006-01-01

472

Psychosocial Factors and Behavioral Medicine Interventions in Asthma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This review examines the evidence for psychosocial influences in asthma and behavioral medicine approaches to its treatment. Method: We conducted a systematic review of the literature on psychosocial influences and the evidence for behavioral interventions in asthma with a focus on research in the past 10 years and clinical trials.…

Ritz, Thomas; Meuret, Alicia E.; Trueba, Ana F.; Fritzsche, Anja; von Leupoldt, Andreas

2013-01-01

473

Psychosocial Support for Women with Advanced Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Women with advanced breast cancer frequently experience psychologic distress as a result of their illness and its treatment. This distress may be manifest as depression, anxiety, symptoms of the stress-response syndrome, difficulty coping and social isolation. Six randomized trials of psychosocial interventions have been conducted in metastatic breast cancer. Five of these evaluated group psychosocial support – supportive-expressive therapy in

Pamela J. Goodwin

2003-01-01

474

A Literature Review of the Psychosocial Development of Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this literature review is to examine existing models of psychosocial development of older adults especially framed around human mortality as a point of discussion that informs all aspects of human development in older adulthood. Well known, in addition to burgeoning, human psychosocial development models that considered older…

Moon, Paul J.

2005-01-01

475

Progeria: Medical aspects, psychosocial perspectives, and intervention guidelines  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article discusses pogeria, a rare genetic childhood disorder that invariably results in the individual's death during early adolescence. The article begins by describing the major medical aspects of piogeria. This is, followed by a discussion of the psychosocial implications of the disorder with particular emphasis upon grief-triggered reactions. The article concludes with an overview, of psychosocial intervention guidelines for

Hanoch Livneh; Richard F. Antonak; Sheldon Maron

1995-01-01

476

Integrating Psychosocial Programs in Multisector Responses to International Disasters  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the role of psychosocial support programs in American Red Cross-sponsored humanitarian assistance efforts in international disasters. The American Red Cross psychosocial support program consists of four specific components: participatory crisis assessment, dealing with survivors' root shock, community mobilization, and…

Diaz, Joseph Orlando Prewitt

2008-01-01

477

Predicting psychosocial risk in patients with breast cancer.  

PubMed

Breast cancer is the most common neoplasm in North American women. The psychosocial impact of breast cancer has been extensively studied, and a number of investigators have attempted to characterize women who are at high risk for increased psychosocial morbidity. Although a detailed interview performed by a professional is the clinical standard for psychosocial assessment, such interviews are usually time-consuming and expensive, and thus are rarely performed. This study was designed to develop a strategy for the rapid identification of newly-diagnosed breast cancer patients at risk for psychosocial morbidity. A sample of 227 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients were interviewed systematically by a clinical social worker and were subsequently classified for risk of psychosocial distress in the year after diagnosis. In addition, these women completed a battery of standardized instruments designed to assess quality of life, rehabilitation needs and psychological distress. A logistic regression procedure was used to examine a wide range of variables for their ability to correctly classify the risk of psychosocial distress in this sample. The final model included the Cancer Rehabilitation Evaluation System (CARES) Psychosocial Summary Scale, the Karnofsky Performance Status score and age as the best predictors of psychosocial risk. Subsequently these three variables were used to construct a clinically usable risk prediction model. Additional research should be performed to validate this predictive model. PMID:8501990

Ganz, P A; Hirji, K; Sim, M S; Schag, C A; Fred, C; Polinsky, M L

1993-05-01

478

Psychosocial screening and assessment in oncology and palliative care settings  

PubMed Central

Psychiatric and psychosocial disorders among cancer patients have been reported as a major consequence of the disease and treatment. The problems in applying a pure psychiatric approach have determined the need for structuring more defined methods, including screening for distress and emotional symptoms and a more specific psychosocial assessment, to warrant proper care to cancer patients with psychosocial problems. This review examines some of the most significant issues related to these two steps, screening and assessment of psychosocial morbidity in cancer and palliative care. With regard to this, the many different variables, such as the factors affecting individual vulnerability (e.g., life events, chronic stress and allostatic load, well-being, and health attitudes) and the psychosocial correlates of medical disease (e.g., psychiatric disturbances, psychological symptoms, illness behavior, and quality of life) which are possibly implicated not only in “classical” psychiatric disorders but more broadly in psychosocial suffering. Multidimensional tools [e.g., and specific psychosocially oriented interview (e.g., the Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research)] represent a way to screen for and assess emotional distress, anxiety and depression, maladaptive coping, dysfunctional attachment, as well as other significant psychosocial dimensions secondary to cancer, such as demoralization and health anxiety. Cross-cultural issues, such as language, ethnicity, race, and religion, are also discussed as possible factors influencing the patients and families perception of illness, coping mechanisms, psychological response to a cancer diagnosis. PMID:25709584

Grassi, Luigi; Caruso, Rosangela; Sabato, Silvana; Massarenti, Sara; Nanni, Maria G.; the UniFe Psychiatry Working Group Coauthors

2014-01-01

479

Psychosocial Stress and Change in Weight Among US Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The association of psychosocial stress with weight gain may have important implications for clinical practice and workplace and public health interventions. To determine whether multiple domains of psychosocial stress were associated with weight gain from 1995 to 2004, the authors analyzed a nationally representative longitudinal cohort of 1,355 men and women in the United States. Change in body mass index

Jason P. Block; Yulei He; Alan M. Zaslavsky; Lin Ding; John Z. Ayanian

2009-01-01

480

Progeria: Medical Aspects, Psychosocial Perspectives, and Intervention Guidelines.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses progeria (or Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome), a rare childhood disorder that invariably results in death during adolescence. Describes the major medical aspects of progeria, and discusses the psychosocial implications of the disorder with particular emphasis on grief-triggered reactions. Presents an overview of psychosocial intervention…

Livneh, Hanoch; And Others

1995-01-01

481

Emotions for sale: cigarette advertising and women's psychosocial needs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To explore messages of psychosocial needs satisfaction in cigarette advertising targeting women and implications for tobacco control policy. Methods: Analysis of internal tobacco industry documents and public advertising collections. Results: Tobacco industry market research attempted to identify the psychosocial needs of different groups of women, and cigarette advertising campaigns for brands that women smoke explicitly aimed to position cigarettes

Stacey J Anderson; P M Ling

2005-01-01

482

Psychosocial factors in peptic ulcer and inflammatory bowel disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past decade, while gastroenterologists' interest in mind- body interactions in organic disorders dwindled, stronger evidence has linked psychosocial factors with the incidence and recurrence of peptic ulcer and with the course of inflammatory bowel disease. Psychological- behavioral approaches to treatment continue to be disappointing. Psychosocial factors may affect ulcer by increasing duodenal acid load, altering local circulation or

Susan Levenstein

2002-01-01

483

Gifted Children and Erikson's Theory of Psychosocial Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

After presenting an overview of Erik Erikson's theory of psychosocial development, the theory is applied to the development of gifted children. The psychosocial crisis experienced by children when they are infants, toddlers, preschoolers, elementary-aged, and during adolescence are examined, along with ways parents and teachers can help at each…

Cross, Tracy L.

2001-01-01

484

Psychosocial Response to Mass Casualty Terrorism: Guidelines for Physicians  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: All physicians would need to address the psychosocial consequences of a mass casualty terrorist attack should it occur. Method: A review of evidence and expert opinion regarding psychosocial response to mass casualty incidents was performed. Data were obtained via the PubMed database in an English- language search using the terms PTSD secondary prevention, psychological first aid, and disaster psychiatry

Jeffrey C. Fetter

2005-01-01

485

Psychosocial Correlates of Alexithymia in a Rural Adolescent Residential Population  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study used a multimethod approach to evaluate the relationship of alexithymia (as measured by the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale and the 30-item Emotion Awareness Questionnaire), psychosocial development (assessed with the Measure of Psychosocial Development), and risk behavior (as measured by the Youth Comprehensive Risk Assessment) in 67 adolescents (85% from rural communities) in a rural residential treatment facility. Results

Stephanie Powell; Kenneth M. Coll; Ann Trotter; Patti Thobro; Robin Haas

2011-01-01

486

Psychosocial development in three generations of college students  

Microsoft Academic Search

The college years are a time of significant growth in the individual's adaptive capacities in the cognitive, emotional, and social domains. Erikson 's theory of 1963 predicts that the college years are specifically a time of growth in the psychosocial issue of ego identity, but along with this development are increases in other aspects of psychosocial functioning. The opportunity to

Michael K. Zuschlag; Susan Krauss Whitbourne

1994-01-01

487

The Psychosocial Problems of Cancer Patients: A Prospective Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The course of psychosocial adjustment to cancer was examined in 105 adults with cancer of the lung, breast and skin. Half of the patients received a program of systematic psychosocial rehabilitation plus evaluation, and the other half received only an evaluation, consisting of a series of psychometric instruments and a problem-oriented structured…

Gordon, Wayne; And Others

488

Cervical Cancer: A Review of the Psychosocial Factors Following Treatment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cervical cancer is a diagnosis that has a profound psychosocial impact, constituting a physical and emotional crisis for patients as well as family. In general, research indicates that the choice of treatment and the stage of the disease are instrumental in determining the psychosocial adjustment. Disruptions are likely to occur in self-esteem,…

Gilliland, Kevin Clark

489

Psychosocial and Moral Development of PTSD-Diagnosed Combat Veterans  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two related studies were conducted in order to investigate whether psychosocial and moral development appeared to have been disrupted and arrested in veterans diagnosed as having posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Study 1 was devoted to developing a measure of late adolescence, early adulthood, and adulthood stages of psychosocial

Taylor, John G.; Baker, Stanley B.

2007-01-01

490

Psychosocial Implications During Adolescence for Infant Heart Transplant Recipients  

E-print Network

long-term psychosocial and neurodevelopmental outcomes is imperative. The limited literature available suggests risk for psychosocial difficulties and lower cognitive, academic, and neuropsychological functioning. This paper reviews topic-related literature and provides preliminary data examining psychosocial and neuropsychological functioning of adolescents who received their heart transplant during infancy. Method: This paper offers a literature review AND presents preliminary data from studies conducted through Loma Linda University Children’s Hospital (LLUCH). Study one examined psychosocial functioning and quality of life of adolescent infant heart transplant recipients. In study two, cognitive, academic, and neuropsychological data were analyzed. Results: Study 1: Overall psychosocial functioning fell in the Average range, however, a significant percentage of participants presented with difficulties on one or more of the psychosocial domains. Quality of life was also within normal limits, though concerns with general health and bodily discomfort were noted. Study 2: Cognitive functioning was assessed to be Below Average, with 43-62 % of the participants demonstrating significant impairments. Neuropsychological functioning yielded significant weakness on language functioning, and mild weakness on visual-motor integration and executive functioning. Conclusion: While the majority of the participants demonstrate psychosocial resiliency, a subgroup present with difficulties suggesting the need for intervention. Cognitive/neuropsychological functioning suggests poorer functioning with patterns similar to other high-risk pediatric populations. These results are preliminary and further research on long-term psychosocial and neuropsychological development of pediatric heart transplant recipients is needed to better understand and ameliorate developmental trajectories.

Vidhya Krishnamurthy; Catherin Freier R; Richard Chinnock

491

Romantic Experience and Psychosocial Adjustment in Middle Adolescence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concurrent and longitudinal relations between the amount of romantic experience and psychosocial adjustment were examined in a 1-year study of a community based sample of 200 tenth graders. Adolescents, parents, and friends completed measures of psychosocial adjustment. The amount of romantic experience was associated with higher reports of social acceptance, friendship competence, and romantic competence; at the same time, romantic

Wyndol Furman; Sabina Low; Martin J. Ho

2009-01-01

492

Psychosocial Subgroups, Coping, and Chronic Low-Back Pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to compare psychosocial subgroups in terms of pain coping strategies, pain severity, physical impairment, pain behavior, affective distress, and response to pain management treatment. The Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI) was used to classify 67 chronic low-back pain (CLBP) patients into the following psychosocial subgroups: Dysfunctional, Interpersonally Distressed, Adaptive Coping, and Anomalous. These MPI subgroups

Timothy P. Carmody

2001-01-01

493

Chinese Adolescent Immigrants: Factors Related to Psychosocial Adjustment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Factors related to psychosocial adjustment of 113 adolescent immigrants to the United States from the People's Republic of China were studied. Levels of psychosocial functioning were lower for adolescents with higher family conflict, lower family organization, and higher family authoritarianism. Value orientation mediated the relationship between…

Florsheim, Paul

1997-01-01

494

Orchestrating Learning in a One-to-One Technology Classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

One-to-one technology classrooms equip each child with a computing device that provides personalised learning tools. They offer promising environments to support individual and small group learning through the affordances of handheld devices such as portability, low cost and wireless communication features. However, there are management problems in the technology-enabled classroom, for instance, lack of support for scaffolding collaborative and whole

Jitti Niramitranon; Mike Sharples; Chris Greenhalgh; Chiu-Pin Lin

2010-01-01

495

Using the inverted classroom to teach software engineering  

Microsoft Academic Search

An inverted classroom is a teaching environment that mixes the use of technology with hands-on activities. In an inverted classroom, typical in-class lecture time is replaced with labo- ratory and in-class activities. Outside class time, lectures are delivered over some other medium such as video on- demand. In a three credit hour course for instance, contact hours are spent having

Gerald C. Gannod; Janet E. Burge; Michael T. Helmick

2008-01-01

496

Religious involvement and adolescent psychosocial development.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to determine if religious involvement was associated with psychosocial maturity of adolescents as understood in Erikson's psychosocial theory. Three forms of religious involvement (attendance at religious services, participation in a Bible study group, and youth group involvement) were examined in relation to ego strengths, ideological and ethnic forms of identity, general self-esteem, and school self-esteem. Questionnaires were completed by 62 African-American and 63 European-American students in the 11th grade. All participants were from rural areas in West Virginia and of lower income status. Ego strengths of hope, will, purpose, fidelity, love, and care were associated with various forms of religious involvement. These associations were most apparent for European-Americans. Although ideological identity was not related to religious involvement, higher ethnic identity was associated with being African-American, especially for those more religiously involved. General self-esteem was not significant in the analyses, but school self-esteem was higher for each form of religious involvement. PMID:10089120

Markstrom, C A

1999-04-01

497

Welcome Biological Breakthroughs, Supply Psychosocial Insights  

PubMed Central

Human behaviour, emotions, and cognition are complex to understand and explain. It is even more difficult to understand the basis for abnormal behaviour, disturbed emotions, and impaired cognitions, something mental health professionals are trying for long. In these pursuits, psychiatry has traversed through eras of humours, witchcraft, spirits, psychoanalysis, and gradually deviated from other medical specialities. Now, with recent biological breakthroughs like advances in psychopharmacology, neuroimaging and genetics, increasingly more emphasis is being given to the biological model of psychiatric disorders. These new biological models have given a more scientific appearance to the speciality. It has also revolutionised the management strategies and outcome of many psychiatric disorders. However, this rapid development in biological understanding of psychiatry also leads to a new wave of reductionism. In an attempt to deduce everything in terms of neurons, neurochemicals, and genes, can we neglect psychosocial aspects of mental health? Patients’ personality, expectations, motives, family background, sociocultural backgrounds continue to affect mental health no matter how much ‘biological’ psychiatry gets. Biological and psychosocial approaches are not mutually exclusive but complementary. Integrating them harmoniously is the skill psychiatry demands for comprehensive understanding of mental and behavioural disorders. PMID:24891799

Tekkalaki, Bheemsain; Tripathi, Adarsh; Trivedi, J. K.

2014-01-01

498

Supporting the Outdoor Classroom: An Archaeo-Astronomy Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Field trips and the outdoor classroom are a vital part of many areas of education. Ideally, the content should be taught within a realistic environment rather than just by providing a single field trip at the end of a course. The archaeo-astronomy project located at Nottingham Trent University envisages the development of a virtual environment

Brown, Daniel; Francis, Robert; Alder, Andy

2013-01-01

499

Reflections from the Neck Down: Embodied Learning in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The mind/body split internalized in Western culture does not acknowledge the body's role in learning. Three environmental education teachers' techniques for engaging all the senses to enhance other ways of knowing include: a comfortable classroom environment, experiencing the natural environment, playfulness, imagination, storytelling, crafting…

Barndt, Deborah; MacEachren, Zabe; Rigby, Heather

1999-01-01

500

Virtual Classroom Participants' Views for Effective Synchronous Education Process  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Virtual classroom (VC) is the preferred application in distance education since it provides simultaneous interaction and a communication environment between the student and the instructor. The aim of this study is to determine the key components which make VC sessions effective in terms of environment and method. Determination of these components…

Karaman, Selcuk; Aydemir, Melike; Kucuk, Sevda; Yildirim, Gurkan

2013-01-01