Sample records for classroom psychosocial environment

  1. Physical and Psychosocial Environments Associated with Networked Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zandvliet, David B.; Fraser, Barry J.

    2005-01-01

    This article reports a study of the learning environments in computer networked classrooms. The study is unique in that it involved an evaluation of both the physical and psychosocial classroom environments in these computerised settings through the use of a combination of questionnaires and ergonomic evaluations. The study involved administering…

  2. Some Determinants of Classroom Psychosocial Environment in Australian Catholic High Schools: A Multilevel Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, Jeffrey P.

    2009-01-01

    This research investigated some determinants of classroom environment in Australian Catholic high schools. The Catholic School Classroom Environment Questionnaire (CSCEQ) was used to assess 7 dimensions of the classroom psychosocial environment: student affiliation, interactions, cooperation, task orientation, order and organization,…

  3. Physical and psychosocial aspects of the learning environment in information technology rich classrooms.

    PubMed

    Zandvliet, D B; Straker, L M

    2001-07-15

    This paper reports on a study of environments in emerging Internet classrooms. At issue for this study is to what extent these 'technological classrooms' are providing a positive learning environment for students. To investigate this issue, this study involved an evaluation of the physical and psychosocial environments in computerized school settings through a combination of questionnaires and inventories that were later cross-referenced to case studies on a subset of these classrooms. Data were obtained from a series of physical evaluations of 43 settings in 24 school locations in British Columbia, Canada and Western Australia. Evaluations consisted of detailed inventories of the physical environment using the Computerised Classroom Environment Inventory (CCEI): an instrument developed specifically for this study. Data on psychosocial aspects of the environment were obtained with the What is Happening in this Class? (WIHIC) questionnaire administered to 1404 high school students making routine use of these computerized classrooms. Potential deficiencies in the physical environment of these locations included problems with individual workspaces, lighting and air quality, whereas deficiencies in the psychosocial environment were confined to the dimension of Autonomy. Further analysis of these classroom environment data indicated that student Autonomy and Task orientation were independently associated with students' Satisfaction with learning and that many physical (e.g. lighting and workspace dimensions) and psychosocial factors (e.g. students' perceptions of Co-operation and Collaboration) were also associated. The results provide a descriptive account of the learning environment in 'technology-rich' classrooms and, further, indicate that ergonomic guidelines used in the implementation of IT in classrooms may have a positive influence on the learning environment. PMID:11560365

  4. Psychosocial Environment and Affective Outcomes in Technology-Rich Classrooms: Testing a Causal Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, Jeffrey P.; Fraser, Barry J.

    2009-01-01

    Research investigated classroom environment antecedent variables and student affective outcomes in Australian high schools. The Technology-Rich Outcomes-Focused Learning Environment Inventory (TROFLEI) was used to assess 10 classroom environment dimensions: student cohesiveness, teacher support, involvement, investigation, task orientation,…

  5. Assessing the psychosocial environment of science classes in Catholic secondary schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, Jeffrey P.; McRobbie, Campbell J.; Fraser, Barry J.

    1993-12-01

    Much Catholic school and church rhetoric suggests that Catholic schools possess distinctive learning environments. Research into this aspect of Catholic schooling has been hampered by the lack of an appropriate assessment instrument. By drawing on contemporary church literature, the perceptions of personnel involved in Catholic education and existing classroom environment questionnaires, a new instrument was developed to assess student perceptions of classroom psychosocial environment in Catholic schools. The use of this instrument in 64 classrooms in Catholic and Government schools indicated significant differences on some scales. The distinctive nature of Catholic schooling did not extend to all classroom environment dimensions deemed important to Catholic education.

  6. The Classroom Environment: First, Last, and Always

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roskos, Kathleen; Neuman, Susan B.

    2011-01-01

    The classroom environment is uppermost in teachers' minds at the start of each school year. Designing an effective classroom environment for learning to read and reading is both an art and a science. Aligning physical space with instructional goals involves the flexible use of space that is adapted to instructional needs. A well-designed classroom

  7. Psychosocial work environment among employed Swedish dairy and pig farmworkers.

    PubMed

    Kolstrup, Christina; Lundqvist, Peter; Pinzke, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychosocial work environment for employed dairy and pig farmworkers in southern Sweden and to identify potential risk factors related to the psychosocial work environment for the development of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). Thirty-seven workers on 10 dairy farms and 30 workers on 10 pig farms participated in the study. The study was based on a Swedish translation of the short version of the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ) for analyses of self-perceived psychosocial work environment and the general Nordic questionnaire for analyses of self-perceived MSDs. In general, the psychosocial work environment was assessed as "good" by both the dairy and pig farmworkers. However, the dairy and pig farmworkers experienced lower work demands, poorer general and mental health, and poorer vitality (physical and mental strength, vigor, and energy) compared to other occupations. Furthermore, the results indicated that the quality of leadership, feedback, and social support at work were poorer at the dairy farms than at the pig farms. No significant risk factors related to the psychosocial work environment were identified for MSDs in "the back" and in the "upper extremities." This study indicates that the psychosocial work environment for the dairy and pig farmworkers may well be improved in order to promote these workplaces as attractive and healthful. This especially seems to be the case concerning the quality of leadership, feedback, and social support at work for the dairy farmworkers. Furthermore, the present study suggests the probability that physical factors are more likely to lead to MSDs among employed livestock workers than factors related to the psychosocial work environment. PMID:19042690

  8. Creating a Conducive Classroom Environment: Classroom Management Is the Key

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findley, Bev; Varble, Dale

    2006-01-01

    Creating a classroom environment which is conducive to learning is one of the most important things a teacher can do. This becomes even more crucial as students enter classrooms with their cell phones, pagers, and beepers. Additionally, many students are tardy for class, leave early, or may not appear in class on numerous occasions. Therefore,…

  9. Communication Technologies and the Classroom Teaching Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matijevic, Milan; Radovanovic, Diana

    2007-01-01

    The authors consider the present and future of new media and the classroom environment of pupils in primary education. Some experts are inclined to see the future of the classroom teaching environment solely through the perspective of new media, primarily computers and the Internet. The authors agree that these media are essential for modern…

  10. Health inequalities and the psychosocial environment—two scientific challenges

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Johannes Siegrist; Michael Marmot

    2004-01-01

    As social inequalities in health continue to be a key public health problem, scientific advances in explaining these inequalities are needed. It is unlikely that there will be a single explanation of social inequalities in health. This introductory paper sets out one explanatory framework, exposure to adverse psychosocial environments during midlife, and particularly at work. We argue that exposure to

  11. Psychosocial Factors of the Literacy Classroom. A Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matuszowicz, Peter F.

    This paper examines the behavioral issues associated with homelessness and marginal lifestyles. It describes classroom techniques that may be used to develop self-directed learning readiness as a tool for mitigating the psychological problems associated with the causes and outcomes of marginal living and homelessness. Discussed first are 26 issues…

  12. Cultural practices in networked classroom learning environments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nancy Ares

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents results of a case study conducted in secondary mathematics classrooms using a new generation of networked\\u000a classroom technology (Participatory Simulations). Potential for drawing on youths’ cultural practices in networked learning\\u000a environments is explored in terms of opportunities for traditionally underserved students to participate in powerful mathematical\\u000a discourse and practice. As mediated by the networked technology, the multiple

  13. Mapping the Classroom Emotional Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Shane T.; Bimler, David; Evans, Ian M.; Kirkland, John; Pechtel, Pia

    2012-01-01

    Harvey and Evans (2003) have proposed that teachers' emotional skills, as required in the classroom, can be organized into a five-dimensional model. Further research is necessary to validate this model and evaluate the importance of each dimension of teacher emotion competence for educational practice. Using a statistical method for mapping…

  14. Visibility and Social Recognition as Psychosocial Work Environment Factors among Cleaners in A Multi-Ethnic Workplace Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Hviid, Kirsten; Smith, Louise Hardman; Frydendall, Karen Bo; Flyvholm, Mari-Ann

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the psychosocial work environment of immigrant cleaners at a Danish workplace. Today, many cleaners working in Danish cleaning jobs are women from the established immigrant communities, but also labour migrants from the newer EU member states have found their way to the cleaning industry. Studies have drawn attention to immigrants’ low position in the cleaning industry and their increased risk of work injuries. This article is based on a case study of an intervention called “Make a Difference” designed to improve the work environment among cleaners at a multi-ethnic workplace. We used semi-structured interviews, photo logs, observation and participation to investigate how the cleaners experienced their work environment. The cleaners reported an overload of heavy work, related to the concept of a classroom’s “readiness for cleaning”, and they expressed strained social relations and communication in addition to a lack of social recognition and invisibility at the workplace, a school. We analysed these psychosocial work environmental problems by investigating the different forms of social relationships and communication within the group of cleaners, and between the cleaners and the teachers and pupils at the school. Moreover, we discussed why the intervention, based on training of language and cleaning skills and social interaction, only partially improved the cleaners’ psychosocial work environment problems. In this article, we argue that social divisions based on ethnicity between the new and the established group of cleaners, combined with their marginal position and poor work organisation at the school, reinforced the cleaners’ experiences of psychosocial work environment problems. This article suggests that increased effort towards social inclusion at work and improved work organisation, especially for the new labour migrants from newer EU-countries, should be considered. PMID:23263660

  15. Family and School Psychosocial Environment (FSPE): development of a brief questionnaire measuring perceived psychosocial environments in children/siblings.

    PubMed

    Persson, Bertil

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a short Swedish standardized, factor analyzed and cross-validated, family and school psychosocial environment questionnaire (FSPE). The study was based on 244 Swedish girls and boys, 10-19 years old, who filled in the FSPE. Maximum likelihood factor analysis, promax rotation, yielded six primary factors, based on absolute ratings. Since the factors were somewhat correlated, two broader secondary factors, with satisfactory reliabilities, were also included in the form, named Warmth, support and openness from parents, siblings and peers, and Family conflicts and school discipline, respectively. Means and standard deviations for girls and boys showed sex differences in most of the factors. Because the children participated anonymously they could report about spanking without negative consequences. Indeed, 8.1% of the children had been spanked by their parents. Based on relative ratings, two factors were identified, covering environmental questions about "more than, the same as or less than" a sibling. Only 6.6% of the children rated their environment exactly the same on the Family Psychosocial Environment (FPE) factors, compared to a sibling within the family. Thus the majority reported environmental differences. Further research is proposed to evaluate such differences and relations to personality, genotype-environment correlation and genetic mediation. PMID:21332485

  16. Classroom environment in different fields of study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander W. Astin

    1965-01-01

    This study was performed to determine if there are consistent differences, related to the various fields of study, in the classroom environments of different college courses. Ratings of introductory undergraduate courses in 19 different fields were obtained from 4109 students majoring in these fields at 246 colleges and universities. Students in each field were selected from a larger sample of

  17. Teacher interaction in psychosocial learning environments: cultural differences and their implications in science instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khine, Myint Swe; Fisher, Darrell L.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine interpersonal behaviour in psychosocial learning environments and to determine the associations between science students' perceptions of their interactions with their teachers, the cultural background of teachers and their attitudinal outcomes. A sample of 1188 students completed the Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction instrument. The responses to two subscales of Test of Science-related Attitudes were used as attitudinal measures. Significant associations between students' perceptions of teacher interpersonal behaviour and the cultural background of teachers were detected. The results showed that students perceived a more favourable interpersonal relationship with Western teachers in the secondary science classrooms. The students in the classes of Western teachers indicated that they enjoyed science lessons more than those in the classes of Asian teachers. Some implications for science instruction in this context are discussed.

  18. Acoustical Quality Assessment of the Classroom Environment

    E-print Network

    George, Marian

    2012-01-01

    Teaching is one of the most important factors affecting any education system. Many research efforts have been conducted to facilitate the presentation modes used by instructors in classrooms as well as provide means for students to review lectures through web browsers. Other studies have been made to provide acoustical design recommendations for classrooms like room size and reverberation times. However, using acoustical features of classrooms as a way to provide education systems with feedback about the learning process was not thoroughly investigated in any of these studies. We propose a system that extracts different sound features of students and instructors, and then uses machine learning techniques to evaluate the acoustical quality of any learning environment. We infer conclusions about the students' satisfaction with the quality of lectures. Using classifiers instead of surveys and other subjective ways of measures can facilitate and speed such experiments which enables us to perform them continuously...

  19. Classroom Writing Environments and Children's Early Writing Skills: An Observational Study in Head Start Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Chenyi; Hur, Jinhee; Diamond, Karen E.; Powell, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the classroom writing environment in 31 Head Start classrooms, and explored the relations between the writing environment, children's (N = 262) name-writing, and children's letter knowledge using pathway analysis. Our analyses showed that Head Start classrooms provided opportunities (i.e., writing materials and teachers'…

  20. Nature of Mathematics Classroom Environments in Catholic High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Judith J.; Sink, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    In an attempt to reveal the various types of learning environments present in 30 mathematics classrooms in five Catholic high schools, this replication study examined student (N = 602) perceptions of their classrooms using the Classroom Environment Scale. Student attitudes toward mathematics were assessed by the Estes Attitude Scale. Extending…

  1. Negative Peer Perceptions of Obese Children in the Classroom Environment

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Meg H.; Reiter-Purtill, Jennifer; Ramey, Christina

    2009-01-01

    objective It is asserted that the more immediate and observable consequences of pediatric obesity are psychosocial in nature. This study examines the peer relations of clinically referred obese youth compared to demographically comparable nonoverweight peers within the classroom environment. Methods and Procedures Peer-, teacher-, and self-reports of behavioral reputation (Revised Class Play (RCP)), and peer reports of social acceptance, nonsocial attributes (attractiveness, athleticism, academic competence), and health interference (school absence, illness, fatigue) were obtained regarding 90 obese youth (BMI > 95th percentile; 8-16 years, 57% girls, 50% African American) and 76 nonoverweight demographically similar comparison classmates. Results Relative to comparison peers, obese children were nominated significantly less often as a best friend and rated lower in peer acceptance, although the two groups did not differ in the number of reciprocated friendships. Obese youth were described by peer, teacher, and self-report as more socially withdrawn and by peers as displaying less leadership and greater aggressive-disruptive behavior. Peers also described obese youth as less physically attractive, less athletic, more sick, tired, and absent from school. Being seen as less attractive and less athletic by peers helped to explain differences in obese and nonoverweight youth’s levels of peer acceptance. Discussion Clinically referred obese youth are characterized by peer relations that differ from those of nonoverweight youth. The peer environment provides a rich context to understand the social consequences of pediatric obesity as well as factors that could be targeted in intervention to promote more positive health and psychosocial outcomes. PMID:18379560

  2. Visibility and social recognition as psychosocial work environment factors among cleaners in a multi-ethnic workplace intervention.

    PubMed

    Hviid, Kirsten; Smith, Louise Hardman; Frydendall, Karen Bo; Flyvholm, Mari-Ann

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on the psychosocial work environment of immigrant cleaners at a Danish workplace. Today, many cleaners working in Danish cleaning jobs are women from the established immigrant communities, but also labour migrants from the newer EU member states have found their way to the cleaning industry. Studies have drawn attention to immigrants' low position in the cleaning industry and their increased risk of work injuries. This article is based on a case study of an intervention called "Make a Difference" designed to improve the work environment among cleaners at a multi-ethnic workplace. We used semi-structured interviews, photo logs, observation and participation to investigate how the cleaners experienced their work environment. The cleaners reported an overload of heavy work, related to the concept of a classroom's "readiness for cleaning", and they expressed strained social relations and communication in addition to a lack of social recognition and invisibility at the workplace, a school. We analysed these psychosocial work environmental problems by investigating the different forms of social relationships and communication within the group of cleaners, and between the cleaners and the teachers and pupils at the school. Moreover, we discussed why the intervention, based on training of language and cleaning skills and social interaction, only partially improved the cleaners' psychosocial work environment problems. In this article, we argue that social divisions based on ethnicity between the new and the established group of cleaners, combined with their marginal position and poor work organisation at the school, reinforced the cleaners' experiences of psychosocial work environment problems. This article suggests that increased effort towards social inclusion at work and improved work organisation, especially for the new labour migrants from newer EU-countries, should be considered. PMID:23263660

  3. The Learning Environment Associated with Information Technology Education in Taiwan: Combining Psychosocial and Physical Aspects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chia-Ju; Zandvliet, David B.; Hou, I.-Ling

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated perceptions of senior high school students towards the Taiwanese information technology (IT) classroom with the What Is Happening in this Class? (WIHIC) survey and explored the physical learning environment of the IT classroom using the Computerised Classroom Environment Inventory (CCEI). The participants included 2,869…

  4. Measuring Language Learning Environments in Secondary Science Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Beverley J.; Hazari, Anjali

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore a new learning environment instrument which could be used by teaching practitioners and other educators to measure the language learning environment in the secondary science classroom. The science teacher is central in creating science classrooms conductive to the language needs of students and should be…

  5. Classroom Environment, Achievement Goals and Maths Performance: Gender Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gherasim, Loredana Ruxandra; Butnaru, Simona; Mairean, Cornelia

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated how gender shapes the relationships between classroom environment, achievement goals and maths performance. Seventh-grade students ("N"?=?498) from five urban secondary schools filled in achievement goal orientations and classroom environment scales at the beginning of the second semester. Maths performance was assessed as…

  6. Between-Classroom Differences in Peer Network Features and Students' Perceptions of the Classroom Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zadzora, Kathleen; Gest, Scott D.; Rodkin, Philip C.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this poster is to examine whether differences in the structural features of classroom peer networks (tight-knittedness, hierarchy, salience norms) are associated with differences in how individual students perceive the classroom environment (relational support from teachers and peers) and express achievement-related beliefs…

  7. Psychosocial Learning Environments and the Mediating Effect of Personal Meaning upon Satisfaction with Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Prapanna Randall

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the quantitative phase of a mixed-methods study that was conducted to investigate the relationships between psychosocial learning environments and student satisfaction with their education as mediated by Agentic Personal Meaning. The interdisciplinary approach of the study integrated the fields of learning environment

  8. School Violence: Bullying Behaviors and the Psychosocial School Environment in Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer-Adams, Nancy; Conner, Bradley T.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among a school's psychosocial environment and the prevalence and types of bullying behaviors that either lead to or result from that environment. More specifically, this study examined how the frequency of aggressive behaviors (for example, bullying) experienced by students (as…

  9. Learning Environments in Information and Communications Technology Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zandvliet, David B.; Fraser, Barry J.

    2004-01-01

    The study of learning environments provides a useful research framework for investigating the effects of educational innovations such as those which are associated with the use of the Internet in classroom settings. This study reports an investigation into the use of Internet technologies in high-school classrooms in Australia and Canada.…

  10. DCE: A One-on-One Digital Classroom Environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yi-chan Deng; Sung-bin Chang; Ben Chang; Tak-wai Chan

    2005-01-01

    Abstract. This paper describes a platform,that supports for one-on-one digital learning. The platform is named “DCE”, which stands for digital classroom environment. It consists of four major modules, curriculum (including activities) module, user data module, communication module, and external interface module. An application example of DCE was described and demonstrated. 1. Background One-on-one (1:1) digital classroom environment or, simply, 1:1

  11. An Exploration of the Psychosocial Aspects of Weight among College Students in the College Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jacqueline G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the psychosocial aspects of weight and the daily-lived experiences of college students within the college environment. Two research questions guided this qualitative research: (a) How, and in what ways, does perception of weight influence identity development among college students before and during college;…

  12. Science Laboratory Classroom Environments in Korean High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Barry J.; Lee, Sunny S. U.

    2009-01-01

    In order to investigate the learning environment of senior high school science laboratory classrooms in Korea, the Science Laboratory Environment Inventory (SLEI) was translated into Korean and administered to 439 students (99 science-independent stream students, 195 science-oriented stream students and 145 humanities stream students). Data…

  13. Student Perceptions of a Culturally Diverse Classroom Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Sadaquat; Rohindra, David; Coll, Richard K.

    2008-01-01

    The research in the paper involves an application of the "actual" and "preferred" versions of a previously-validated learning environment instrument: the "What is Happening in This Classroom" (WIHIC) instrument in a complex multi-cultural university-level environment. Statistical analyses suggest the instrument is valid in this setting (with…

  14. Classroom acoustics and intervention strategies to enhance the learning environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, Christal

    The classroom environment can be an acoustically difficult atmosphere for students to learn effectively, sometimes due in part to poor acoustical properties. Noise and reverberation have a substantial influence on room acoustics and subsequently intelligibility of speech. The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA, 1995) developed minimal standards for noise and reverberation in a classroom for the purpose of providing an adequate listening environment. A lack of adherence to these standards may have undesirable consequences, which may lead to poor academic performance. The purpose of this capstone project is to develop a protocol to measure the acoustical properties of reverberation time and noise levels in elementary classrooms and present the educators with strategies to improve the learning environment. Noise level and reverberation will be measured and recorded in seven, unoccupied third grade classrooms in Lincoln Parish in North Louisiana. The recordings will occur at six specific distances in the classroom to simulate teacher and student positions. The recordings will be compared to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association standards for noise and reverberation. If discrepancies are observed, the primary investigator will serve as an auditory consultant for the school and educators to recommend remediation and intervention strategies to improve these acoustical properties. The hypothesis of the study is that the classroom acoustical properties of noise and reverberation will exceed the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association standards; therefore, the auditory consultant will provide strategies to improve those acoustical properties.

  15. Psychosocial Characteristics of Optimum Performance in Isolated and Confined Environments (ICE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Keeton, Kathryn E.; Shea, Camille; Leveton, Lauren B.

    2010-01-01

    The Behavioral Health and Performance (BHP) Element addresses human health risks in the NASA Human Research Program (HRP), including the Risk of Adverse Behavioral Conditions and the Risk of Psychiatric Disorders. BHP supports and conducts research to help characteristics and mitigate the Behavioral Medicine risk for exploration missions, and in some instances, current Flight Medical Operations. The Behavioral Health and Performance (BHP) Element identified research gaps within the Behavioral Medicine Risk, including Gap BMed6: What psychosocial characteristics predict success in an isolated, confined environment (ICE)? To address this gap, we conducted an extensive and exhaustive literature review to identify the following: 1) psychosocial characteristics that predict success in ICE environments; 2) characteristics that are most malleable; and 3) specific countermeasures that could enhance malleable characteristics.

  16. Parental Involvement in Schooling, Classroom Environment and Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamski, Aurora; Fraser, Barry J.; Peiro, Maria M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated relationships between students' perceptions of parental involvement in schooling, their Spanish classroom environment and student outcomes (attitudes and achievement). Modified Spanish versions of the What Is Happening In this Class?, Test of Spanish-Related Attitudes-L[subscript 1], a parental involvement questionnaire and a…

  17. Democratizing Classroom Discourse: The Challenge for Online Writing Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Sonia; Letofsky, Kirsten; Woodard, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    This article is intended to highlight peer response discourse trends and to initiate a dialogue about the ways in which educators, and designers of educational environments, can play a central role in creating more democratic discourse in classrooms. We report on a research and development project involving education experts, computer engineers,…

  18. Creating Metacognitive Environments in Primary School RE Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Shirley; Freathy, Rob; Walshe, Karen; Doney, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports on Religious Education (RE) in England and Wales highlight the need for guidance on pedagogy and learning. The RE-flect project addressed this by promoting the creation of metacognitively oriented learning environments in primary school RE classrooms. Six primary school teachers and 160 pupils (eight to 10 years of age) took part in…

  19. Inferring Ancient Environments from Fossil Foraminifera: A Classroom Activity

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Hilary Olson

    This student activity demonstrates how foraminifera can be used to infer ancient environments. It contains background information and the classroom activity, which includes instructions and the required charts and diagrams. Also included are references and active links for further study as well as suggestions for a follow-up activity.

  20. Quantifying Error in Survey Measures of School and Classroom Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweig, Jonathan David

    2014-01-01

    Developing indicators that reflect important aspects of school and classroom environments has become central in a nationwide effort to develop comprehensive programs that measure teacher quality and effectiveness. Formulating teacher evaluation policy necessitates accurate and reliable methods for measuring these environmental variables. This…

  1. Investigation and Analysis of Winter Classroom Thermal Environment in Chongqing

    E-print Network

    Liu, J.; Li, B.; Yao, R.

    2006-01-01

    ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Ma ximize Comfort: Temperature, Humidity, and IAQ, Vol. I-2-3 Investigation and Analysis of Winter Classroom Thermal Environment In Chongqing Jing Liu Baizhan Li Runming Yao...): 94-98. ?In Chinese? [9] Yi WANG. Jia LIU. Investigation on residential building indoor environment in Xi'an and usage of ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Ma ximize Comfort: Temperature, Humidity, and IAQ, Vol. I-2-3 air conditioners...

  2. Student perceptions of a culturally diverse classroom environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sadaquat Ali; David Rohindra; Richard K. Coll

    2008-01-01

    The research in the paper involves an application of the actual and preferred versions of a previously?validated learning environment instrument: the What is Happening in This Classroom (WIHIC) instrument in a complex multi?cultural university?level environment. Statistical analyses suggest the instrument is valid in this setting (with Cronbach alpha above 0.80 for all scales), and data analyses using ANOVA point to

  3. A Prospective Study Investigating the Links among Classroom Environment, School Connectedness, and Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shochet, Ian M.; Smith, Coral L.

    2014-01-01

    School connectedness and classroom environment have both been strongly linked to depressive symptoms, but their interrelation is unclear. We tested whether school connectedness mediated the link between classroom environment and depressive symptoms. A sample of 504 Australian seventh-and eighth-grade students completed the Classroom Environment

  4. Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents K-12 and college classrooms considered outstanding in a competition, which judged the most outstanding learning environments at educational institutions nationwide. Jurors spent two days reviewing projects, focusing on concepts and ideas that made them exceptional. For each citation, the article offers information on the firm, client,…

  5. CHILDHOOD FAMILY PSYCHOSOCIAL ENVIRONMENT AND CAROTID INTIMA MEDIA THICKNESS: THE CARDIA STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Loucks, Eric B.; Taylor, Shelley E.; Polak, Joseph F.; Wilhelm, Aude; Kalra, Preety; Matthews, Karen A.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about whether the childhood family psychosocial environment (characterized by cold, unaffectionate interactions, conflict, aggression, neglect and/or low nurturance) affects coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Objectives were to evaluate associations of childhood family psychosocial environment with carotid intima media thickness (IMT), a subclinical measure of atherosclerosis. The study population included 2,659 CARDIA study participants, aged 37-52 years. Childhood family psychosocial environment was measured using a risky family questionnaire via self-report. Carotid IMT was calculated using the average of 20 measurements of mean common carotid, bulb and internal carotid IMT, assessed using high-resolution B-mode ultrasound images. Utilizing linear regression analyses adjusted for age, a 1-unit (range 0-21) increase in risky family score was associated with 0.0036 (95% CI:0.0006,0.0066 mm) and 0.0020 (95% CI:0.0002,0.0038) mm increase in mean IMT in white males and females, respectively. Formal mediation analyses and covariate adjustments suggested childhood socioeconomic position and smoking may be important mechanisms in white males and females, as well as education and depressive symptomatology in white males. No associations were found in black participants. Formal statistical tests for interaction between risky family score and sex, and between risky family score and race/ethnicity, demonstrated borderline evidence of interactions for both sex (p=0.12) and race/ethnicity (p=0.14) with risky family score for associations with mean IMT. In conclusion, childhood family psychosocial environment was positively associated with IMT in white participants, with little evidence of association in black participants. Mechanisms in white participants may include potential negative impacts of socioeconomic constraints on parenting quality, potentially influencing offspring's cardiovascular risk factors (e.g. smoking), socioeconomic position (e.g. education), and/or psychosocial functioning (e.g. depression), which may in turn lead to atherosclerotic processes. Borderline racial/ethnic differences in findings should be replicated, but add to literature exploring race/ethnicity-specific associations of parenting approaches with health outcomes. PMID:24581057

  6. Censorship, the Classroom, and the Electronic Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Considine, David M.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests that the notion that the young can be protected by denying them access to materials has been invalidated by the expansion of the electronic environment and changes in community standards. Argues that since students today cannot avoid exposure to questionable material, it is important to see that the exposure they receive is educated and…

  7. Psychosocial work environment factors and weight change: a prospective study among Danish health care workers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lifestyle variables may serve as important intermediate factors between psychosocial work environment and health outcomes. Previous studies, focussing on work stress models have shown mixed and weak results in relation to weight change. This study aims to investigate psychosocial factors outside the classical work stress models as potential predictors of change in body mass index (BMI) in a population of health care workers. Methods A cohort study, with three years follow-up, was conducted among Danish health care workers (3982 women and 152 men). Logistic regression analyses examined change in BMI (more than +/? 2?kg/m2) as predicted by baseline psychosocial work factors (work pace, workload, quality of leadership, influence at work, meaning of work, predictability, commitment, role clarity, and role conflicts) and five covariates (age, cohabitation, physical work demands, type of work position and seniority). Results Among women, high role conflicts predicted weight gain, while high role clarity predicted both weight gain and weight loss. Living alone also predicted weight gain among women, while older age decreased the odds of weight gain. High leadership quality predicted weight loss among men. Associations were generally weak, with the exception of quality of leadership, age, and cohabitation. Conclusion This study of a single occupational group suggested a few new risk factors for weight change outside the traditional work stress models. PMID:23327287

  8. Achievement Goals, the Classroom Environment, and Reflective Thinking: A Conceptual Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phan, Huy P.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Research pertaining to achievement goals and reflective thinking practice has received considerable attention in educational psychology. However, very few, if any, studies have looked at the impact of the classroom climate and how this psychosocial milieu may influence students' engagement in achievement goals and reflective thinking…

  9. Creating an Inclusive Classroom Address Wide-Ranging Developmental Needs through Your Classroom Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenspan, Stanley, I.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author answers the following question: In addition to the usual wide-ranging abilities of a new class, I have one 4-year-old who has learning delays and three children with speech and language disorders. What can I do to be sure that I'm creating a classroom environment where the needs of all the children in my group can be…

  10. Psychosocial work environment, stress factors and individual characteristics among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Tuvesson; Mona, Eklund

    2014-01-01

    The psychosocial work environment is an important factor in psychiatric in-patient care, and knowing more of its correlates might open up new paths for future workplace interventions. Thus, the aims of the present study were to investigate perceptions of the psychosocial work environment among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care and how individual characteristics--Mastery, Moral Sensitivity, Perceived Stress, and Stress of Conscience--are related to different aspects of the psychosocial work environment. A total of 93 nursing staff members filled out five questionnaires: the QPSNordic 34+, Perceived Stress Scale, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire, Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire, and Mastery scale. Multivariate analysis showed that Perceived Stress was important for Organisational Climate perceptions. The Stress of Conscience subscale Internal Demands and Experience in current units were indicators of Role Clarity. The other Stress of Conscience subscale, External Demands and Restrictions, was related to Control at Work. Two types of stress, Perceived Stress and Stress of Conscience, were particularly important for the nursing staff's perception of the psychosocial work environment. Efforts to prevent stress may also contribute to improvements in the psychosocial work environment. PMID:24448633

  11. A comparative study of two ESL writing environments: A computer-assisted classroom and a traditional oral classroom

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nancy Sullivan; Ellen Pratt

    1996-01-01

    Networked computer technology has become prevalent in higher education but little research has been conducted to attest to its benefits for the ESL student writer. This study compared students in two ESL writing environments; a networked computer-assisted classroom and a traditional oral classroom. Three measures were used to examine attitudes towards writing with computers, writing apprehension, and writing quality. In

  12. Teachers' Perceptions of the Dimensions of the Psychosocial School Environment in Primary Schools in Trinidad and Tobago

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gowrie, George; Ramdass, Mala

    2014-01-01

    The study explored some of the important psycho-social factors in the primary school environment that impact on students' learning as perceived by teachers. It also attempted to identify, describe and develop conceptual categories as separate dimensions of the social and emotional environment. The sample consisted of 187 teachers and 53 schools…

  13. Physical and Psychosocial Aspects of the Learning Environment in the Science Laboratory and Their Relationship to Teacher Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Che Ahmad, Che Nidzam; Osman, Kamisah; Halim, Lilia

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a report of a survey conducted to determine teachers' perception of the science laboratory learning environment and the relationship between different aspects of this environment and satisfaction from teaching and learning. Teachers' perceptions of psychosocial aspects were measured by use of the Science Laboratory…

  14. Neighborhood food environment role in modifying psychosocial stress-diet relationships.

    PubMed

    Zenk, Shannon N; Schulz, Amy J; Izumi, Betty T; Mentz, Graciela; Israel, Barbara A; Lockett, Murlisa

    2013-06-01

    Exposure to highly palatable foods may increase eating in response to stress, but this behavioral response has not been examined in relation to the neighborhood food environment. This study examined whether the neighborhood food environment modified relationships between psychosocial stress and dietary behaviors. Probability-sample survey (n=460) and in-person food environment audit data were used. Dietary behaviors were measured using 17 snack food items and a single eating-out-of-home item. Chronic stress was derived from five subscales; major life events was a count of nine items. The neighborhood food environment was measured as availability of large grocery stores, small grocery stores, and convenience stores, as well as proportion of restaurants that were fast food. Two-level hierarchical regression models were estimated. Snack food intake was positively associated with convenience store availability and negatively associated with large grocery store availability. The measures of chronic stress and major life events were generally not associated with either dietary behavior overall, although Latinos were less likely to eat out at high levels of major life events than African Americans. Stress-neighborhood food environment interactions were not statistically significant. Important questions remain regarding the role of the neighborhood food environment in the stress-diet relationship that warrant further investigation. PMID:23415977

  15. Perception Shapes Experience: The Influence of Actual and Perceived Classroom Environment Dimensions on Girls' Motivations for Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spearman, Juliette; Watt, Helen M. G.

    2013-01-01

    The classroom environment influences students' academic outcomes, but it is often students' perceptions that shape their classroom experiences. Our study examined the extent to which observed classroom environment features shaped perceptions of the classroom, and explained levels of, and changes in, girls' motivation in junior secondary school…

  16. Improving the psychosocial work environment at multi-ethnic workplaces: a multi-component intervention strategy in the cleaning industry.

    PubMed

    Smith, Louise Hardman; Hviid, Kirsten; Frydendall, Karen Bo; Flyvholm, Mari-Ann

    2013-10-01

    Global labour migration has increased in recent years and immigrant workers are often recruited into low status and low paid jobs such as cleaning. Research in a Danish context shows that immigrants working in the cleaning industry often form social networks based on shared languages and backgrounds, and that conflict between different ethnic groups may occur. This paper evaluates the impact of a multi-component intervention on the psychosocial work environment at a multi-ethnic Danish workplace in the cleaning sector. The intervention included Danish lessons, vocational training courses, and activities to improve collaboration across different groups of cleaners. Interviews about the outcome of the intervention were conducted with the cleaners and their supervisor. The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire was used as a supplement to the interviews. The results suggest that the psychosocial work environment had improved after the intervention. According to the interviews with the cleaners, the intervention had led to improved communication, trust, and collaboration. These findings are supported by the questionnaire where social support from supervisor and colleagues, social community, trust, and teamwork seem to have improved together with meaning of work, rewards, and emotional demands. The design of the intervention may provide inspiration for future psychosocial work environment interventions at multi-ethnic work places. PMID:24129115

  17. Improving the Psychosocial Work Environment at Multi-Ethnic Workplaces: A Multi-Component Intervention Strategy in the Cleaning Industry

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Louise Hardman; Hviid, Kirsten; Frydendall, Karen Bo; Flyvholm, Mari-Ann

    2013-01-01

    Global labour migration has increased in recent years and immigrant workers are often recruited into low status and low paid jobs such as cleaning. Research in a Danish context shows that immigrants working in the cleaning industry often form social networks based on shared languages and backgrounds, and that conflict between different ethnic groups may occur. This paper evaluates the impact of a multi-component intervention on the psychosocial work environment at a multi-ethnic Danish workplace in the cleaning sector. The intervention included Danish lessons, vocational training courses, and activities to improve collaboration across different groups of cleaners. Interviews about the outcome of the intervention were conducted with the cleaners and their supervisor. The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire was used as a supplement to the interviews. The results suggest that the psychosocial work environment had improved after the intervention. According to the interviews with the cleaners, the intervention had led to improved communication, trust, and collaboration. These findings are supported by the questionnaire where social support from supervisor and colleagues, social community, trust, and teamwork seem to have improved together with meaning of work, rewards, and emotional demands. The design of the intervention may provide inspiration for future psychosocial work environment interventions at multi-ethnic work places. PMID:24129115

  18. Secondary Pre-Service Teachers' Perceptions of an Ideal Classroom Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartelheim, Frederick J.; Conn, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    The classroom environment can impact students' motivation and engagement, and can influence students' academic learning. In some cases, pre-service teachers' influence on the classroom environment may not always be conducive for student learning. This exploratory study investigated pre-service teachers' perceptions of an ideal…

  19. ASSESSING THE COMPARABILITY OF CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENTS IN GRADUATE SOCIAL WORK EDUCATION DELIVERED VIA INTERACTIVE INSTRUCTIONAL TELEVISION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul P. Freddolino; Cheryl A. Sutherland

    2000-01-01

    This article reports the comparison of MSW student perceptions of the classroom learning environment among one on-campus and two distance sites linked electronically via interactive instructional television for 13 courses from 1994 through 1998. The authors describe supports provided by the school to make the distance classroom environments comparable. Data analysis revealed no statistically significant differences in students' overall perceptions

  20. An Examination of Classroom Social Environment on Motivation and Engagement of College Early Entrant Honors Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddox, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    This study set out to examine the relationships between the classroom social environment, motivation, engagement and achievement of a group of early entrant Honors students at a large urban university. Prior research on the classroom environment, motivation, engagement and high ability students was examined, leading to the assumption that the…

  1. Actual Condition Survey and Evaluation on Acoustic Environment of Open Type Classroom

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuzo Tsuchiya; Tadao Fukuyama; Katsuo Inoue; Yoshio Yamasaki

    An acoustic environment of open type elementary school has often been reported about sound problems to be solved. Noting such a situation, we have been studying on actual condition of these type schools, such as acoustic characteristics of classroom, sound transmission between classrooms and user's consciousness about acoustic environment. As a series of our studies, we grasped acoustic problems quantitatively

  2. A Cross-National Study of Secondary Science Classroom Environments in Australia and Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Barry J.; Aldridge, Jill M.; Adolphe, F. S. Gerard

    2010-08-01

    This article reports a cross-national study of classroom environments in Australia and Indonesia. A modified version of the What Is Happening In this Class? (WIHIC) questionnaire was used simultaneously in these two countries to: 1) crossvalidate the modified WIHIC; 2) investigate differences between countries and sexes in perceptions of classroom environment; and 3) investigate associations between students’ attitudes to science and their perceptions of classroom environment. The sample consisted of 1,161 students (594 students from 18 classes in Indonesia and 567 students from 18 classes in Australia). Principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation supported the validity of a revised structure for the WIHIC. Two-way MANOVA revealed some differences between countries and between sexes in students’ perceptions of their classroom environments. Simple correlation and multiple regression analyses revealed generally positive associations between the classroom environment and student attitudes to science in both countries.

  3. Toward a critical approach to the study of learning environments in science classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorsbach, Anthony; Tobin, Kenneth

    1995-03-01

    Traditional learning environment research in science classrooms has been built on survey methods meant to measure students' and teachers' perceptions of variables used to define the learning environment. This research has led mainly to descriptions of learning environments. We argue that learning environment research should play a transformative role in science classrooms; that learning environment research should take into account contemporary post-positivist ways of thinking about learning and teaching to assist students and teachers to construct a more emancipatory learning environment. In particular, we argue that a critical perspective could lead to research playing a larger role in the transformation of science classroom learning environments. This argument is supplemented with an example from a middle school science classroom.

  4. Modifying the Classroom Environment to Increase Engagement and Decrease Disruption with Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guardino, Caroline; Antia, Shirind D.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the effect of physical modifications on the academic engagement and disruptive behavior of Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing students in self-contained classrooms. Three classrooms at a school for the Deaf were modified after consultation with the classroom teachers. The modifications of the classroom environment

  5. Expanding the Psychosocial Work Environment: Workplace Norms and Work-Family Conflict as Correlates of Stress and Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tove Helland Hammer; Per Øystein Saksvik; Kjell Nytrø; Hans Torvatn; Mahmut Bayazit

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the contributions of organizational level norms about work requirements and social relations, and work-family conflict, to job stress and subjective health symptoms, controlling for Karasek's job demand-control-support model of the psychosocial work environment, in a sample of 1,346 employees from 56 firms in the Norwegian food and beverage industry. Hierarchical linear modeling analyses showed that organizational norms

  6. Academic Achievement and Perceptions of the Learning Environment in Virtual and Traditional Secondary Mathematics Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Joan E.; McLeod, Scott; Brown, Rachel; Maeda, Yukiko; Choi, Jiyoung

    2007-01-01

    This study examined Algebra students' achievement and perceptions of their classroom environments in both online and traditional face-to-face learning contexts using two validated assessments, the Assessment of Algebraic Understanding (AAU) test and the What is Happening in this Class? (WIHIC) classroom perceptions instrument. Three virtual and…

  7. Academic Achievement and Perceptions of the Learning Environment in Virtual and Traditional Secondary Mathematics Classrooms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joan E. Hughes; Scott McLeod; Rachel Brown; Yukiko Maeda; Jiyoung Choi

    2007-01-01

    This study examined Algebra students' achievement and perceptions of their classroom environments in both online and traditional face-to-face learning contexts using two validated assessments, the Assessment of Algebraic Understanding (AAU) test and the What is Happening in this Class? (WIHIC) classroom perceptions instrument. Three virtual and three traditional schools in three different states participated. Quantitative analysis revealed that online students

  8. Sound-Field Amplification: Enhancing the Classroom Listening Environment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massie, Robyn; Theodoros, Deborah; McPherson, Bradley; Smaldino, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    Sound-field amplification is an educational tool that allows control of the acoustic environment in a classroom. Teachers wear small microphones that transmit sound to a receiver system attached to loudspeakers around the classroom. The goal of sound-field amplification is to amplify the teacher's voice by a few decibels, and to provide uniform…

  9. Management of the Physical Environment in the Classroom and Gymnasium: It's Not "That" Different

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culp, Brian

    2006-01-01

    This article extends information from a text by Weinstein and Mignano (2003) to address classroom organization in terms of the physical environment. That text is an extrapolation of Steele's (1973) outline of six functions within the classroom setting: (1) security and shelter; (2) social contact; (3) symbolic identification; (4) pleasure; (5)…

  10. Associations between the Classroom Learning Environment and Student Engagement in Learning 1: A Rasch Model Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Rob

    2012-01-01

    This report is about one of two phases in an investigation into associations between student engagement in classroom learning and the classroom learning environment. Both phases applied the same instrumentation to the same sample. The difference between the phases was in the measurement approach applied. This report is about application of the…

  11. Psychosocial Communication and Computerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Gunilla; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the effect of computerization of the work environment on psychosocial communication. The RAM program, developed at Stockholm University to explore the effect of computers on the structure of organizations and the psychosocial work environment, is described; theoretical models are explained; and the future use of knowledge-based systems…

  12. An On-Line Classroom for the Unix Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scigliano, John A.; And Others

    This paper describes an electronic classroom (ECR) program that has been developed at Nova University to facilitate online real-time group instruction in graduate degree programs in information and computer science. The first section describes the educational uses of the program, including the simulation of a classroom-type educational setting…

  13. Turkish High School Student's Perceptions of Learning Environment in Biology Classrooms and Their Attitudes toward Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cakiroglu, Jale; Telli, Sibel; Cakiroglu, Erdinc

    The purpose of this study was to examine Turkish high school students' perceptions of learning environment in biology classrooms and to investigate relationships between learning environment and students' attitudes toward biology. Secondly, the study aimed to investigate the differences in students' perceptions of learning environments in biology…

  14. Psychosocial Work Environment and Musculoskeletal Symptoms among 21-Year-Old Workers: A Population-Based Investigation (2011-2013)

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Sara; Carnide, Filomena; Benavides, Fernando G.; Lucas, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    Background The current labour market is becoming more flexible and informal, with job insecurity selectively affecting young workers. However, the role of these increasing adverse psychosocial working conditions on health outcomes remains little known among newly employed workers. Objective To estimate the associations between psychosocial work environment and musculoskeletal outcomes (widespread pain syndrome features and regional pain) in a population-based sample of young workers. Methods Cross-sectional data from workers aged 21 years were collected during the third wave of the EPITeen cohort study (2011-2013; n=650). The Job Content Questionnaire was used to characterize the psychosocial work environment according to the demand-control-support model. Data on pain and non-pain dimensions of the widespread pain syndrome (Fibromyalgia Survey Questionnaire) as well as on regional musculoskeletal pain (Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire) were also collected. Crude and adjusted odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were computed using logistic regression and all estimates were adjusted for sex, education and occupational biomechanical demands. Results Job insecurity was significantly associated to the non-pain dimension of the widespread pain syndrome (adjusted OR [95% CI]=1.51 [1.08, 2.12]). Young workers with strain jobs were significantly more likely to report high levels of non-pain symptoms when compared with those with no-strain jobs and this effect was even stronger when social support was added to the main exposure: workers with strain jobs and low social support had twice the odds of reporting high levels of non-pain features than those with high strain but high social support jobs (adjusted OR=1.86, 95% CI: 1.04, 3.31). These significant associations were not observed when widespread pain or multisite regional pain were the outcomes. Conclusion In the beginning of professional life, high strain jobs were associated to non-pain complaints, especially when the work environment provided also low social support. PMID:26076365

  15. Individual Differences in Adolescents' Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Functioning Moderate Associations between Family Environment and Psychosocial Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Lisa M.; Fagundes, Christopher P.; Cribbet, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    The present study tested whether individual differences in autonomic nervous system functioning interact with environmental risk factors to predict adolescents' psychosocial functioning. The authors assessed skin conductance and respiratory sinus arrhythmia at rest and during laboratory stressors in 110 14-year-olds. Subsequently, adolescents and…

  16. An Examination of Relationships between Psychosocial Satisfaction Scales in an Online Student Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bookout, James Marshall, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Research suggests that students who are satisfied with their learning experiences are typically successful and there is a fundamental theory that suggests if the expectations of students are achieved they will be return customers. This study examined the relationships between the psychosocial satisfaction scales in an online student learning…

  17. Internet Safety Gone Wild? Sacrificing the Educational and Psychosocial Benefits of Online Social Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tynes, Brendesha M.

    2007-01-01

    Many Internet safety and parenting experts suggest that parents prohibit their teens from social networking sites and other online spaces where predators may lurk. But we may do adolescents a disservice when we curtail their participation in these spaces, because the educational and psychosocial benefits of this type of communication can far…

  18. Measuring psychosocial environments using individual responses: an application of multilevel factor analysis to examining students in schools.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Erin C; Masyn, Katherine E; Jones, Stephanie M; Subramanian, S V; Koenen, Karestan C

    2015-07-01

    Interest in understanding how psychosocial environments shape youth outcomes has grown considerably. School environments are of particular interest to prevention scientists as many prevention interventions are school-based. Therefore, effective conceptualization and operationalization of the school environment is critical. This paper presents an illustration of an emerging analytic method called multilevel factor analysis (MLFA) that provides an alternative strategy to conceptualize, measure, and model environments. MLFA decomposes the total sample variance-covariance matrix for variables measured at the individual level into within-cluster (e.g., student level) and between-cluster (e.g., school level) matrices and simultaneously models potentially distinct latent factor structures at each level. Using data from 79,362 students from 126 schools in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (formerly known as the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health), we use MLFA to show how 20 items capturing student self-reported behaviors and emotions provide information about both students (within level) and their school environment (between level). We identified four latent factors at the within level: (1) school adjustment, (2) externalizing problems, (3) internalizing problems, and (4) self-esteem. Three factors were identified at the between level: (1) collective school adjustment, (2) psychosocial environment, and (3) collective self-esteem. The finding of different and substantively distinct latent factor structures at each level emphasizes the need for prevention theory and practice to separately consider and measure constructs at each level of analysis. The MLFA method can be applied to other nested relationships, such as youth in neighborhoods, and extended to a multilevel structural equation model to better understand associations between environments and individual outcomes and therefore how to best implement preventive interventions. PMID:25421872

  19. Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) - Year 5 Evaluation: Classroom Practices

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Barbara Means

    2000-12-01

    This report summarizes the results of the SRI, Inc. evaluation of classroom practices for the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) program. For the past two years, SRI's evaluations have focused on providing data to help this international science and education program refine its partnership approach to teacher training and support. In the Year 5 evaluation, they have taken a closer look at the classroom adaptations of GLOBE, examining ways in which teachers have adapted elements of GLOBE to their particular classrooms and priorities as well as the institutional supports that facilitate sustained program participation.

  20. The classroom is a site for rich CSCW activities. We are interested in prototyping future computing environments that

    E-print Network

    Abowd, Gregory D.

    1 ABSTRACT The classroom is a site for rich CSCW activities. We are interested in prototyping future computing environments that will enhance the classroom experience and empower both student and teacher. In this paper, we describe the Classroom 2000 project at Georgia Tech, which is integrating pen

  1. Quality of the Literacy Environment in Inclusive Early Childhood Special Education Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Ying; Sawyer, Brook E.; Justice, Laura M.; Kaderavek, Joan N.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the quality of the literacy environment in inclusive early childhood special education (ECSE) classrooms ("N" = 54). The first aim was to describe the quality of the literacy environment in terms of structure (i.e., book materials and print/writing materials) and instruction (i.e., instructional…

  2. Plans for Developing Real-time Dance Interaction between QRIO and Toddlers in a Classroom Environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fumihide Tanaka; Bret Fortenberry; Kazuki Aisaka; Javier R. Movellan

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces the early stages of a study designed to understand the development of dance interactions between QRIO and toddlers in a classroom environment. The study is part of a project to explore the potential use of interactive robots as instructional tools in education. After 3 months observation period, we are starting the experiment. After explaining the experimental environment,

  3. Developing dance interaction between QRIO and toddlers in a classroom environment: plans for the first steps

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fumihide Tanaka; Bret Fortenberry; Kazuki Aisaka; Javier R. Movellan

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces the early stages of a study designed to understand the development of dance interactions between QRIO and toddlers in a classroom environment. The study is part of a project to explore the potential use of interactive robots as instructional tools in education. After 3 months observation period, we are starting the experiment. The experimental environment, component technologies,

  4. Development and Application of the Elementary School Science Classroom Environment Scale (ESSCES): Measuring Student Perceptions of Constructivism within the Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peoples, Shelagh M.; O'Dwyer, Laura M.; Wang, Yang; Brown, Jessica J.; Rosca, Camelia V.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development, validation and application of a Rasch-based instrument, the Elementary School Science Classroom Environment Scale (ESSCES), for measuring students' perceptions of constructivist practices within the elementary science classroom. The instrument, designed to complement the Reformed Teaching Observation…

  5. Faculty-Preferred Strategies to Promote a Positive Classroom Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Laurel Johnson; Wygonik, Mindy L.; Frey, Barbara A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the frequency and seriousness of disruptive student behaviors and the effective strategies used by educators to manage these classroom behaviors. At a mid-sized state university, 228 of 780 faculty members (29.2%) completed a 76-item survey. Results indicated that as faculty members' participation in…

  6. Can Adding Movement to Learning Improve the Classroom Environment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Templeton, Rosalyn Anstine; Jensen, Rita A.

    Brain Gym is an educational curriculum that promotes whole brain learning through movement repatterning to improve students performance and attitudes about the learning process. This study of Brain Gym in relation to classroom climate and academic performance was conducted with 28 fourth-grade students in a midwestern urban parochial school.…

  7. Resilience Applied in School: Strengthening Classroom Environments for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickolite, Amanda; Doll, Beth

    2008-01-01

    Despite the widespread acceptance of ecological models of child development, the tools and strategies underlying school psychological practice emphasize individual characteristics of children. This article describes ClassMaps Consultation, a consultation strategy that assesses the availability of protective factors and risk in school classrooms

  8. Classroom acoustics I: The acoustical learning environment: Participatory action research in classrooms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary Jo Hasell; Philip Abbott; Gary W. Siebein; Martin A. Gold; Hee Won Lee; Mitchell Lehde; John Ashby; Michael Ermann; Carl C. Crandell

    1998-01-01

    This pilot study used participatory fieldwork in a number of kindergarten through eighth grade classrooms. The meters of ~ a~ustic =ti~g fiat suppfi a l-ing environmentare mmplex. Dynamic interactions among all participants (administrators, teachers, students, parents and research team members) makes a difference in learning. It was found that what people do in classr~ms depends on the ~ial make-up, anticipated

  9. Discriminating Student Learning and Efficacy Levels in Higher Education: Contributions of Classroom Environment and Teaching and Learning Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rugutt, John K.; Ellett, Chad D.; Culross, Rita R.

    This study examined the contribution of classroom learning environment and teaching and learning effectiveness variables to student learning and learning efficacy in higher education settings. It attempted to identify classroom environment characteristics that differentiate high- and low- academic-efficacy student groups and the teaching and…

  10. Does Math Self-Efficacy Mediate the Effect of the Perceived Classroom Environment on Standardized Math Test Performance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fast, Lisa A.; Lewis, James L.; Bryant, Michael J.; Bocian, Kathleen A.; Cardullo, Richard A.; Rettig, Michael; Hammond, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the effect of the perceived classroom environment on math self-efficacy and the effect of math self-efficacy on standardized math test performance. Upper elementary school students (N = 1,163) provided self-reports of their perceived math self-efficacy and the degree to which their math classroom environment was mastery oriented,…

  11. Classroom learning environments and the mental health of first grade children.

    PubMed

    Milkie, Melissa A; Warner, Catharine H

    2011-03-01

    Sociological research focuses on how poverty, family, and neighborhood dynamics shape children's problems, but knowledge about how school is related to children's mental health is underdeveloped, despite its central presence in children's lives. Using a social structure and personality-stress contagion perspective, the authors use a nationally representative sample of first graders (N = 10,700) to assess how the classroom learning environment affects children's emotional and behavior problems. Children in more negative environments-such as classrooms with fewer material resources and whose teachers receive less respect from colleagues-have more learning, externalizing, interpersonal, and internalizing problems. Moreover, children in classrooms with low academic standards, excessive administrative paperwork, rowdy behavior, and low skill level of peers have more problems across one or more outcomes. Some school effects vary across race and ethnicity. PMID:21362609

  12. An Application of the Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction and College and University Classroom Environment Inventory in a Multicultural Tertiary Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coll, Richard K.; Taylor, Neil; Fisher, Darrell L.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on a study of two classroom learning environment questionnaires developed in a culturally diverse context, specifically the Pacific Islands. Concludes that females perceive their environment more favorably than males. (Contains 96 references.) (DDR)

  13. Systematic review of the effect of the psychosocial working environment on cognition and dementia.

    PubMed

    Then, Francisca S; Luck, Tobias; Luppa, Melanie; Thinschmidt, Marleen; Deckert, Stefanie; Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; Seidler, Andreas; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G

    2014-05-01

    The high incidence of cognitive impairment in the ageing population, together with the challenges it imposes to health systems, raises the question of what affect working life has on cognitive abilities. The study, therefore, reviews recent work on the longitudinal impact of psychosocial work conditions on cognitive functioning and on dementia. Relevant articles were identified by a systematic literature search in PubMed and PsycINFO using a standardised search string and specific inclusion and exclusion criteria. We included articles reporting longitudinal effects that were investigated in cohort studies, case-control studies or randomised controlled trials in the working population. Two independent reviewers evaluated the studies in three subsequent phases: (i) title-abstract screening, (ii) full-text screening and (iii) checklist-based quality assessment.Methodical evaluation of the identified articles resulted in 17 studies of adequate quality. We found evidence for a protective effect of high job control and high work complexity with people and data on the risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Moreover, cognitively demanding work conditions seem to be associated with a decreased risk of cognitive deterioration in old age.Psychosocial work conditions can have an impact on cognitive functioning and even on the risk of dementia. As the world of work is undergoing fundamental changes, such as accelerated technological advances and an ageing working population, optimising work conditions is essential in order to promote and maintain cognitive abilities into old age. PMID:24259677

  14. The relationships among Taiwanese adolescents' perceived classroom environment, academic coping, and burnout.

    PubMed

    Shih, Shu-Shen

    2015-06-01

    Although academic pressures are regarded as a primary source of stress among students in Asian countries, there has been paucity of research on the effects of classroom settings providing structure and peer support on Asian adolescents' use of coping strategies and academic burnout. The present study was intended to address this issue. Three hundred seventy-four 8th Grade Taiwanese students completed a self-reported survey that assessed their perceived classroom structure along with peer support, academic coping, and burnout. Results of structural equation modeling indicated that the full mediation model was well supported by the empirical data. Students' use of coping strategies played a mediational role in relationships between perceived classroom environment and academic burnout. Perceived classroom structure and peer support impact students' choices of coping strategies significantly. Their use of academic coping, in turn, exerted significant influences on burnout experiences. Additionally, students' academic coping and burnout experiences varied with different levels of perceived classroom structure and peer support. Students who perceived higher levels of classroom structure and peer support tend to adopt engagement and support-seeking coping when faced with academic challenges. Moreover, these students displayed lower levels on the indicators of academic burnout. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25264748

  15. Can We Bring the Natural Environment into the Art Classroom? Can Natural Sound Foster Creativity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alawad, Abeer

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between the natural world and its potential benefits to the art classroom environment. In particular, it considers the following research question: Can natural sound foster creativity? The study investigates the role of natural sound on creative ability in girls' intermediate schools (12 to 15 years) in Jeddah,…

  16. Students' Perceptions of Classroom Instructional Environments in the Context of "Universal Design for Learning"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abell, Michael M.; Jung, Eunjoo; Taylor, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Using a sample of 867 students in Grades 5-12, the present study investigated whether students' perceptions toward the instructional environment in classrooms that employed Universal Design for Learning differed by school grade level and teacher gender. High-school students in the study showed higher perception scores than upper-elementary or…

  17. Single-Sex School Boys' Perceptions of Coeducational Classroom Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Shirley M.

    2011-01-01

    Reviews in many countries have found little evidence of consistent advantages in either single-sex education or coeducation. Over the last three decades, coeducation has been introduced into many single-sex schools, but there is a dearth of evidence from the student perspective of the impact of such changes on the classroom learning environment.…

  18. Facilitating in a Demanding Environment: Experiences of Teaching in Virtual Classrooms Using Web Conferencing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornelius, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    "How to" guides and software training resources support the development of the skills and confidence needed to teach in virtual classrooms using web-conferencing software. However, these sources do not often reveal the subtleties of what it is like to be a facilitator in such an environment--what it feels like, what issues might emerge…

  19. Students' Perceptions of Self and Classroom Environment and Their Reported Help Seeking Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Rebecca C.

    This study explored possible relationships between sixth-grade students' perceptions of themselves and their classroom environments and their help-seeking behaviors in mathematics classes. Researchers administered a city-wide survey to sixth-grade Chicago public school students. Half the students answered items regarding their reading/language…

  20. Cross-Level Measurement Invariance in School and Classroom Environment Surveys: Implications for Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweig, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Measures of classroom and school environments are central to policy efforts that assess school and teacher quality. These measures are often formed by aggregating individual survey responses to form group-level measures, and assume an invariant measurement model holds across the individual and group levels. This article explores the tenability of…

  1. Learner-Responsive Instructional Strategies for Adults in Accelerated Classroom Formats: Creating Inclusive Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Kalpana

    2012-01-01

    This study was focused on investigating inclusive learning environments in accelerated classroom formats. Three 8-week sections of an undergraduate course at Regis University were examined. Results from observations and surveys were analyzed to determine the effectiveness and consistency of 13 inclusive strategies derived from Wlodkowski and…

  2. Cross-Cultural Interface Design and the Classroom-Learning Environment in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Chia-Lin; Su, Yelin

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether using localized interface designs would make a difference in users' learning results and their perceptions of the interface design in a classroom learning environment. This study also sought to learn more about users' attitudes toward the localized interface features. To assess the impact of using localized interfaces…

  3. The ``Intelligent Classroom'': changing teaching and learning with an evolving technological environment

    E-print Network

    Cooperstock, Jeremy R.

    for learning is accompanied by a call for developmental research in this area, i.e. research ``focusedThe ``Intelligent Classroom'': changing teaching and learning with an evolving technological environment Laura R. Winera, *, Jeremy Cooperstockb a Centre for University Teaching and Learning, Mc

  4. The Effect of Classroom Environment on Problem Behaviors: A Twin Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiLalla, Lisabeth Fisher; Mullineaux, Paula Y.

    2008-01-01

    Children's behavior problems, both internalizing and externalizing, are a function of both genetic and environmental influences. One potentially important environmental influence is the classroom environment. This study of 1941 monozygotic twin pairs examined whether children whose parents rated them as similarly high or low on a number of problem…

  5. A Cross-National Study of Secondary Science Classroom Environments in Australia and Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Barry J.; Aldridge, Jill M.; Adolphe, F. S. Gerard

    2010-01-01

    This article reports a cross-national study of classroom environments in Australia and Indonesia. A modified version of the What Is Happening In this Class? (WIHIC) questionnaire was used simultaneously in these two countries to: 1) cross validate the modified WIHIC; 2) investigate differences between countries and sexes in perceptions of…

  6. Gender and the relationship between affective beliefs and perceptions of grade 7 mathematics classroom learning environments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Helen J. Forgasz

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines the relationships between a number of affective variables included in models explaining gender differences in mathematics learning and a range of classroom environment dimensions more likely to be associated with effective mathematics learning. A large sample of 12–13 year old grade 7 students participated in the study. The data were explored at the individual level, for whole

  7. A method to design, construct and test digital hardware all in classroom environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reza Hashemian; Jason Riddley

    2007-01-01

    A new technique is presented that allows an instructor to bring the hardware construction and the laboratory experiments into the classroom environment through the Internet. The technique also provides the students with the opportunity to do their entire design projects, including building the hardware and fully testing and debugging the system all from a Web terminal. An experimental unit, called

  8. Irish Adult Learners' Perceptions of Classroom Environment: Some Empirical Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O Fathaigh, Mairtin

    1997-01-01

    Adult learners (n=532) at University College Cork (Ireland) identified the following features of a positive affective learning environment: teacher's key role in class organization and pace, healthy interpersonal interaction among students, and focused cognitive environment. Older learners were particularly sensitive to six of seven dimensions of…

  9. Exploring the Complexity of Classroom Management: 8 Components of Managing a Highly Productive, Safe, and Respectful Urban Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Karrie A.; Jones, Jennifer L.; Vermette, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Creating a learning environment where all students can thrive academically requires an understanding of the complexities of classroom management. The notions of "discipline," "conformity" and "obedience" that have littered discussions of classroom management in the past are no longer sufficient to describe the diverse…

  10. Associations between the Classroom Learning Environment and Student Engagement in Learning 2: A Structural Equation Modelling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harbaugh, Allen G.; Cavanagh, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    This report is about the second of two phases in an investigation into associations between student engagement in classroom learning and the classroom-learning environment. Whereas the first phase utilized Rasch modelling (Cavanagh, 2012), this report uses latent variable modelling to explore the data. The investigations in both phases of this…

  11. The Responsive Environmental Assessment for Classroom Teaching (REACT): The Dimensionality of Student Perceptions of the Instructional Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Peter M.; Demers, Joseph A.; Christ, Theodore J.

    2014-01-01

    This study details the initial development of the Responsive Environmental Assessment for Classroom Teachers (REACT). REACT was developed as a questionnaire to evaluate student perceptions of the classroom teaching environment. Researchers engaged in an iterative process to develop, field test, and analyze student responses on 100 rating-scale…

  12. Educational and Career Interests in Math: A Longitudinal Examination of the Links between Classroom Environment, Motivational Beliefs, and Interests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ming-Te

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on the expectancy-value model, stage-environment fit theory, and self-determination theory, this study examined the longitudinal associations between classroom characteristics, expectancies-values, high school course enrollment, and career aspirations in the domain of math. Data were collected on 3,048 youth who reported on their classroom

  13. Design in the Classroom: Exploring the Built Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine Arts Commission, Augusta.

    Design and the built environment are subjects of concern to Maine communities. State mandated town planning, new school construction, and the Department of Transportation plans to rebuild roads and bridges elicit public discussion. The study of design encourages elementary students to enter this public forum as informed citizens. The study of…

  14. Designing for Learning: Online Social Networks as a Classroom Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Gail; Evans, Terry

    2011-01-01

    This paper deploys notions of emergence, connections, and designs for learning to conceptualize high school students' interactions when using online social media as a learning environment. It makes links to chaos and complexity theories and to fractal patterns as it reports on a part of the first author's action research study, conducted while she…

  15. Classroom Learning Environments as a Correlate of Scientific Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oluwatelure, T. A.

    2010-01-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the relationship between science learning environments and scientific literacy level of learners. Descriptive research design of the survey type was employed. The population for the study was made up of both secondary school students and science teachers, stratified into types A, B, and C. Four hundred and…

  16. The psychosocial environment at work: an assessment of the World Health Organization Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean.

    PubMed

    Join, A; Saeed, K; Arnaout, S; Kortum, E

    2012-04-01

    Psychosocial risks are widely recognised as major challenges to occupational health and safety. The risk management approach, which starts with an assessment of the risk that they pose, is acknowledged as the most effective way of preventing and managing psychosocial risks at the workplace. This paper presents the findings and action taken following a risk assessment of psychosocial risks, at the World health Organization Regional Officeforthe Eastern Mediterranean (EMRO) and country offices, carried outon behalf of the Committee on Health and Safety in the Workplace in EMRO. The findings show that psychosocial risks pose a threat to the mental well-being of staff. Management and co-worker support, rewards, possibilities for development, and trust mitigate the negative impact of psychosocial risks. The results of this risk assessment are being used to develop interventions aimed at enhancing the sense of well-being of staff, initially through actions at the employee level. PMID:22768693

  17. Does Math Self-Efficacy Mediate the Effect of the Perceived Classroom Environment on Standardized Math Test Performance?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lisa A. Fast; James L. Lewis; Michael J. Bryant; Kathleen A. Bocian; Richard A. Cardullo; Michael Rettig; Kimberly A. Hammond

    2010-01-01

    We examined the effect of the perceived classroom environment on math self-efficacy and the effect of math self-efficacy on standardized math test performance. Upper elementary school students (N = 1,163) provided self-reports of their perceived math self-efficacy and the degree to which their math classroom environment was mastery oriented, challenging, and caring. Individual student scores on the California Standards Test

  18. Flexible workspace design and ergonomics training: impacts on the psychosocial work environment, musculoskeletal health, and work effectiveness among knowledge workers.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Michelle M; Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; O'Neill, Michael J; Schleifer, Lawrence M

    2008-07-01

    A macroergonomics intervention consisting of flexible workspace design and ergonomics training was conducted to examine the effects on psychosocial work environment, musculoskeletal health, and work effectiveness in a computer-based office setting. Knowledge workers were assigned to one of four conditions: flexible workspace (n=121), ergonomics training (n=92), flexible workspace+ergonomics training (n=31), and a no-intervention control (n=45). Outcome measures were collected 2 months prior to the intervention and 3 and 6 months post-intervention. Overall, the study results indicated positive, significant effects on the outcome variables for the two intervention groups compared to the control group, including work-related musculoskeletal discomfort, job control, environmental satisfaction, sense of community, ergonomic climate, communication and collaboration, and business process efficiency (time and costs). However, attrition of workers in the ergonomics training condition precluded an evaluation of the effects of this intervention. This study suggests that a macroergonomics intervention is effective among knowledge workers in office settings. PMID:18462704

  19. Stressors, Family Environment and Coping Styles as Predictors of Educational and Psychosocial Adjustment in Palestinian Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khamis, Vivian

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the contributions of child and parents' sociodemographics, daily stressors, family environment, and coping strategies, to academic achievement, cognitive functioning and aggression in a sample of 600 children at the intermediate grade levels from Gaza Strip. Each of the predictor variables exhibited a different pattern…

  20. In pursuit of a holistic learning environment: the impact of music in the medical physiology classroom

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    PhD Harold I Modell (Physiology Educational Research Consortium)

    2009-03-01

    A holistic learning environment is one that nurtures all aspects of students' learning. The environment is safe, supportive, and provides opportunities to help students deal with nonacademic as well as academic factors that impact their learning. Creation of such an environment requires the establishment of a supportive learning community. For a variety of reasons, establishing such a learning community of first-year medical students can be challenging. This communication presents one approach to meeting this challenge in a medical school Human Physiology course. Steps were taken at the beginning of the course to create the community, and activities designed to reinforce these efforts were incorporated into the course as it progressed. Two pilot studies were conducted to test the hypothesis that providing students with a participatory music experience may help to promote a holistic learning environment by helping them restore a sense of balance to their emotional well-being as well as reinforce a sense of community in the classroom. Student response to these activities indicated that these efforts provided emotional support during stressful periods during the quarter, helped promote a feeling of safety within the environment, and reenergized the class during long class sessions. This project illustrates that each instructor, within the confines of his/her own classroom, can make a significant contribution to achieving a holistic learning envrionment for his/her students.

  1. Dimensions of Classroom Instruction: A Programmatic Approach to the Description of the Classroom Environment. Planning Report No. 5076.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, R. O.

    An ongoing research project, Dimensions of Classroom Instruction (DCI) is described. The primary data source is a study of reading in nine second-grade classrooms using such observation techniques as categorical observation, ethnographic observation, and videotaping. Three major objectives for the project are stated: 1) developing methods of…

  2. Physical and psychosocial work environment factors and their association with health outcomes in Danish ambulance personnel – a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Reviews of the literature on the health and work environment of ambulance personnel have indicated an increased risk of work-related health problems in this occupation. The aim of this study was to compare health status and exposure to different work environmental factors among ambulance personnel and the core work force in Denmark. In addition, to examine the association between physical and psychosocial work environment factors and different measures of health among ambulance personnel. Methods Data were taken from a nationwide sample of ambulance personnel and fire fighters (n?=?1,691) and was compared to reference samples of the Danish work force. The questionnaire contained measures of physical and psychosocial work environment as well as measures of musculoskeletal pain, mental health, self-rated health and sleep quality. Results Ambulance personnel have half the prevalence of poor self-rated health compared to the core work force (5% vs. 10%). Levels of mental health were the same across the two samples whereas a substantially higher proportion of the ambulance personnel reported musculoskeletal pain (42% vs. 29%). The ambulance personnel had higher levels of emotional demands and meaningfulness of and commitment to work, and substantially lower levels of quantitative demands and influence at work. Only one out of ten aspects of physical work environment was consistently associated with higher levels of musculoskeletal pain. Emotional demands was the only psychosocial work factor that was associated with both poorer mental health and worse sleep quality. Conclusions Ambulance personnel have similar levels of mental health but substantially higher levels of musculoskeletal pain than the work force in general. They are more exposed to emotional demands and these demands are associated with higher levels of poor mental health and poor sleep quality. To improve work environment, attention should be paid to musculoskeletal problems and the presence of positive organizational support mechanisms that can prevent negative effects from the high levels of emotional demands. PMID:22824415

  3. A Comparative Assessment of Student Classroom Behaviors and Learning Environment in Classes of a High Control and a Low Control Teacher through Student Perceptions and Class Observations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turanli, Adem Sultan; Yildirim, Ali

    This study was designed to investigate the relationship between teachers' orientations to classroom management and their students' classroom behaviors and the learning environment. Two teachers with different orientations (non-interventionist and interventionist) to classroom management were selected, and their 91 students were administered the…

  4. Rural Junior Secondary School Students' Perceptions of Classroom Learning Environments and Their Attitude and Achievement in Mathematics in West China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Xinrong

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports findings from a survey of how rural junior secondary school students in the western part of China perceive their mathematics classroom learning environments and associations of learning environment with their attitudes toward mathematics and mathematics achievement. Using adaptations of the widely-used What Is Happening In this…

  5. Perception of the thermal environment in high school and university classrooms: Subjective preferences and thermal comfort

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefano Paolo Corgnati; Marco Filippi; Sara Viazzo

    2007-01-01

    This work shows some of the results of a field study about environmental comfort investigations in classrooms. In this project thermal, acoustic, visual and air quality aspects were analysed in a number of classrooms—13 classrooms at four different high schools of the Provincia di Torino and four typical medium-sized university classrooms of the Politecnico di Torino, Italy. The investigations were

  6. Analyzing the Classroom Teachers' Levels of Creating a Constructivist Learning Environments in Terms of Various Variables: A Mersin Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Üredi, Lütfi

    2014-01-01

    In this research, it was aimed to analyze the classroom teachers' level of creating a constructivist learning environment in terms of various variables. For that purpose, relational screening model was used in the research. Classroom teachers' level of creating a constructivist learning environment was determined using the…

  7. Nature, Nurture, and Perceptions of the Classroom Environment as They Relate to Teacher-Assessed Academic Achievement: A Twin Study of Nine-Year-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Sheila O.; Plomin, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Although prior research has examined children's perceptions of the classroom environment as related to academic achievement, genetically sensitive designs have not been employed. In the first study of its kind for the primary school classroom environment, data were collected for 3,020 pairs of nine-year-old identical and fraternal twin pairs in…

  8. The Elementary School Classroom. The Study of the Built Environment Through Student and Teacher Responses. The Elementary School and Its Population, Phase 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artinian, Vrej-Armen

    An extensive investigation of elementary school classrooms was conducted through the collection and statistical analysis of student and teacher responses to questions concerning the educational environment. Several asepcts of the classroom are discussed, including the spatial, thermal, luminous, and aural environments. Questions were organized so…

  9. Motivation, Classroom Environment, and Learning in Introductory Geology: A Hierarchical Linear Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, L. A.; Hilpert, J. C.; Van Der Hoeven Kraft, K.; Budd, D.; Jones, M. H.; Matheney, R.; Mcconnell, D. A.; Perkins, D.; Stempien, J. A.; Wirth, K. R.

    2013-12-01

    Prior research has indicated that highly motivated students perform better and that learning increases in innovative, reformed classrooms, but untangling the student effects from the instructor effects is essential to understanding how to best support student learning. Using a hierarchical linear model, we examine these effects separately and jointly. We use data from nearly 2,000 undergraduate students surveyed by the NSF-funded GARNET (Geoscience Affective Research NETwork) project in 65 different introductory geology classes at research universities, public masters-granting universities, liberal arts colleges and community colleges across the US. Student level effects were measured as increases in expectancy and self-regulation using the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ; Pintrich et al., 1991). Instructor level effects were measured using the Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol, (RTOP; Sawada et al., 2000), with higher RTOP scores indicating a more reformed, student-centered classroom environment. Learning was measured by learning gains on a Geology Concept Inventory (GCI; Libarkin and Anderson, 2005) and normalized final course grade. The hierarchical linear model yielded significant results at several levels. At the student level, increases in expectancy and self-regulation are significantly and positively related to higher grades regardless of instructor; the higher the increase, the higher the grade. At the instructor level, RTOP scores are positively related to normalized average GCI learning gains. The higher the RTOP score, the higher the average class GCI learning gains. Across both levels, average class GCI learning gains are significantly and positively related to student grades; the higher the GCI learning gain, the higher the grade. Further, the RTOP scores are significantly and negatively related to the relationship between expectancy and course grade. The lower the RTOP score, the higher the correlation between change in expectancy and grade. As such, students with low motivation show higher grades and greater learning gains in high RTOP (student-centered) classrooms than in low RTOP ones. These results support the recommendation of student-centered practices in the classroom and consideration of student motivation in our approach to the future of geoscience education.

  10. Comparison of Preschoolers' Narratives, the Classroom Book Environment, and Teacher Attitudes toward Literacy Practices in Korea and the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Young-Ja; Lee, Jeehyun; Han, Myae; Schickedanz, Judith A.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated Korean and U.S. preschoolers' personal and fictional narratives, their classroom book environments, and their teachers' attitudes about reading aloud. The participants were 70 Korean and American 3- and 4-year-olds enrolled in 2 university lab preschools and their 4 teachers. The structures and content of the preschoolers'…

  11. Improving Classroom Learning Environments by Cultivating Awareness and Resilience in Education (CARE): Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Patricia A.; Frank, Jennifer L.; Snowberg, Karin E.; Coccia, Michael A.; Greenberg, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Cultivating Awareness and Resilience in Education (CARE for Teachers) is a mindfulness-based professional development program designed to reduce stress and improve teachers' performance and classroom learning environments. A randomized controlled trial examined program efficacy and acceptability among a sample of 50 teachers randomly assigned to…

  12. The Effects of Motivation and Classroom Environment on the Satisfaction of Noncredit Continuing Education Students. AIR 1994 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujita-Starck, Pamela J.; Thompson, John A.

    This study examined the functional relationships among motivation, perceived classroom environment, and student satisfaction, for three major curricular groups: arts and leisure programs, personal development programs, and professional development programs. The sample included 1,180 students enrolled in noncredit courses at the College of…

  13. A Typology of Chemistry Classroom Environments: Exploring the Relationships between 10th Grade Students' Perceptions, Attitudes and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giallousi, M.; Gialamas, V.; Pavlatou, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was the first in Greece in which educational effectiveness theory constituted a knowledge base for investigating the impact of chemistry classroom environment in 10 Grade students' enjoyment of class. An interpretive heuristic schema was developed and utilised in order to incorporate two factors of teacher behaviour at…

  14. The Cognitive and Affective Changes Caused by the Differentiated Classroom Environment Designed for the Subject of Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avci, Suleyman; Yuksel, Arzu; Soyer, Makbule; Balikcioglu, Suzan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to analyze the cognitive (learning level) and affective (volunteering to study together, attitude towards the teacher and the lesson) changes which are caused by the differential classroom environment designed for the poetry subject in a Turkish lesson of the 6th grade in elementary education. Theory testing…

  15. Supporting Computer-Mediated Learning: A Case Study in Online Staff Development and Classroom Learning Environment Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angulo, Luis Miguel Villar; de la Rosa, Olga Maria Alegre

    2008-01-01

    The rapid growth of online learning has led to the development of staff inservice evaluation models that are geared towards improving degree programs. Based on best practices in student online assessment, the Online Faculty Development and Classroom Learning Environment Assessment course was designed to serve the dual purpose of staff development…

  16. On the Urban-Rural Differences in Classroom Environment in Compulsory Education in the Eastern Coastal Developed Areas of China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Furong; Xie, Limin

    2008-01-01

    Totally 789 students from 18 schools (9 primary schools and 9 junior high schools) at a medium managed level from Shanghai, Wenzhou, and Aojiang, which are located in the Eastern coastal developed areas of China were investigated with the questionnaire of Hong Kong Classroom Environment Scale in this study. The result indicates that the actual…

  17. Multimedia Environments in Mathematics Teacher Education: Preparing Regular and Special Educators for Inclusive Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De La Paz, Susan; Hernandez-Ramos, Pedro; Barron, Linda

    2004-01-01

    A multimedia CD-ROM program, Mathematics Teaching and Learning in Inclusive Classrooms, was produced to help preservice teachers learn mathematics teaching methods in the context of inclusive classrooms. The contents include text resources, video segments of experts and of classroom lessons, images of student work, an electronic notebook, and a…

  18. Early-Adolescents' Reading Comprehension and the Stability of the Middle School Classroom-Language Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gámez, Perla B.; Lesaux, Nonie K.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined teachers' language use across the school year in 6th grade urban middle-school classrooms (n = 24) and investigated the influence of this classroom-based linguistic input on the reading comprehension skills of the students (n = 851; 599 language minority learners and 252 English-only) in the participating classrooms. Analysis…

  19. Graphing in Groups: Learning about Lines in a Collaborative Classroom Network Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Tobin; Wallace, Matthew; Lai, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a design experiment in which we explore new structures for classroom collaboration supported by a classroom network of handheld graphing calculators. We describe a design for small group investigations of linear functions and present findings from its implementation in three high school algebra classrooms. Our coding of the…

  20. Design of the Technology-Rich Classroom Practices and Facilities Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Angela C.

    2013-01-01

    It is widely recognized that technology in the classroom has the potential to transform education at every stage from Pre-K, to K-12, to Higher Education and Adult Education. Using the Digital Teaching Platform as an exemplar of 21st Century classroom instruction style, the author offers an overview of classroom technology and its effects on…

  1. Educational and career interests in math: a longitudinal examination of the links between classroom environment, motivational beliefs, and interests.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-Te

    2012-11-01

    Drawing on the expectancy-value model, stage-environment fit theory, and self-determination theory, this study examined the longitudinal associations between classroom characteristics, expectancies-values, high school course enrollment, and career aspirations in the domain of math. Data were collected on 3,048 youth who reported on their classroom experiences in 7th grade, expectancies-values in 6th, 7th, and 10th grades, and career aspirations in 12th grade. Student grades for math courses were collected from school records at 6th, 7th, and 10th grades, and their math course enrollment was collected from 9th through 12th grades. Results indicated that students' math classroom experiences predicted their expectancies and values, which, in turn, predicted the number of high school math courses taken and career aspirations in math. Gender and math ability differences are also discussed. PMID:22390667

  2. Capturing the complexity: Content, type, and amount of instruction and quality of the classroom learning environment synergistically predict third graders' vocabulary and reading comprehension outcomes.

    PubMed

    Connor, Carol McDonald; Spencer, Mercedes; Day, Stephanie L; Giuliani, Sarah; Ingebrand, Sarah W; McLean, Leigh; Morrison, Frederick J

    2014-08-01

    We examined classrooms as complex systems that affect students' literacy learning through interacting effects of content and amount of time individual students spent in literacy instruction along with the global quality of the classroom-learning environment. We observed 27 third grade classrooms serving 315 target students using two different observation systems. The first assessed instruction at a more micro-level; specifically, the amount of time individual students spent in literacy instruction defined by the type of instruction, role of the teacher, and content. The second assessed the quality of the classroom-learning environment at a more macro level focusing on classroom organization, teacher responsiveness, and support for vocabulary and language. Results revealed that both global quality of the classroom learning environment and time individual students spent in specific types of literacy instruction covering specific content interacted to predict students' comprehension and vocabulary gains whereas neither system alone did. These findings support a dynamic systems model of how individual children learn in the context of classroom literacy instruction and the classroom-learning environment, which can help to improve observations systems, advance research, elevate teacher evaluation and professional development, and enhance student achievement. PMID:25400293

  3. Improving human computer interaction in a classroom environment using computer vision

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joshua Flachsbart; David Franklin; Kristian J. Hammond

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we discuss our use of multi-modal input to improve human computer interaction. Specifically we look at the methods used in the Intelligent Classroom to combine multiple input modes, and examine in particular the visual input modes. The Classroom provides context that improves the functioning of the visual input modes. It also determines which visual input modes are

  4. Creating a Low-Anxiety Classroom Environment: What Does Language Anxiety Research Suggest?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Dolly Jesusita

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of six potential sources of anxiety in the second language classroom, student manifestations of anxiety, and possible remedies covers such areas as personal and interpersonal anxieties, learner beliefs about language learning, instructor beliefs about language teaching, instructor-learner interactions, classroom procedures, and language…

  5. RESEARCH IN CLASSROOM THERMAL ENVIRONMENT AT GARDENHILL SCHOOL IN LA MIRADA, CALIFORNIA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HOWATT, CLARKE T.

    THIS IS A FINAL REPORT OF A STUDY OVER A FOURTEEN MONTH PERIOD FROM APRIL, 1959 TO JUNE, 1960 OF HEATING AND COOLING TWO SCHOOL CLASSROOMS AND A COMPARISON WITH A THIRD CLASSROOM IN WHICH THERE WAS HEATING AND FRESH AIR CIRCULATION ONLY. ALL THREE ROOMS HAD AN AIR-FLOW DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM. A TYPHOON HEAT PUMP PROVIDED HEATING AND COOLING IN ONE…

  6. Evaluation of a K-5 Mathematics Program Which Integrates Children's Literature: Classroom Environment and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mink, Deborah V.; Fraser, Barry J.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a one-year study of 120 fifth grade students whose teachers participated in a program entitled Project SMILE (Science and Mathematics Integrated with Literary Experiences). The purpose of the study was to determine the extent to which the classroom implementation of Project SMILE positively influenced the classroom

  7. The Organization of Group Care Environments: Behavioral Ecology in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krantz, Patricia J.; Risley, Todd R.

    Many investigators have been interested in the development of techniques for remediating undersirable classroom behavior, but far less attention has been paid to physical, spatial and architectural variables which often set the occasion for inappropriate behavior in the classroom. The present study explored the relationships between these…

  8. English Language Learners' and Non-English Language Learners' Perceptions of the Classroom Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeClair, Courtney; Doll, Beth; Osborn, Allison; Jones, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the degree to which English language learners' (ELL) descriptions of classroom supports for learning are similar to or different from the descriptions of non-ELL students. Specifically, the study compared the classroom perceptions of ELL students and general education students using the "ClassMaps Survey" (CMS), which includes…

  9. Students’ Perception of a Discussion-Driven Classroom Environment in an Upper-Level Ruminant Nutrition Course with Small Enrollment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Wattiaux; P. Crump

    2006-01-01

    This 3-yr classroom research project studied stu- dents' perception of the learning environment when class time was reserved primarily for discussion of pre- assigned reading material as an alternative to a lecture in ruminant nutrition. A student-assessment-of-learn- ing-gain instrument with 46 items was administered anonymously as a survey 3-wk into the semester and as a course evaluation at the end

  10. Secondary music students' compositional development with computer-mediated environments in classroom communities

    E-print Network

    Kirkman, Philip

    2012-07-03

    Over the last decade digital technologies have brought significant changes to classroom music, promising support for the realisation of a musical education for all students. National curricula and exam specifications continue to embed technology...

  11. Middle School Students' Writing and Feedback in a Cloud-Based Classroom Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Binbin; Lawrence, Joshua; Warschauer, Mark; Lin, Chin-Hsi

    2015-01-01

    Individual writing and collaborative writing skills are important for academic success, yet are poorly taught in K-12 classrooms. This study examines how sixth-grade students (n = 257) taught by two teachers used Google Docs to write and exchange feedback. We used longitudinal growth models to analyze a large number of student writing samples…

  12. Creating a Supportive Environment to Enhance Computer Based Learning for Underrepresented Minorities in College Algebra Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendricks, Kimberly D.

    2011-01-01

    Significant research in K-12 education has shown that computer based learning in mathematics positively impacts students' attitudes toward mathematics and greatly increases academic performance. Little research has shown, however, how this success can be replicated in a postsecondary classroom for minority students. This paper is a case study that…

  13. Teaching Cases in a Virtual Environment: When the Traditional Case Classroom Is Problematic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halvorson, Wade; Crittenden, Victoria L.; Pitt, Leyland

    2011-01-01

    The rise in interactive digital media has catapulted faculty-student contact abilities from the traditional Web 1.0 model to a post-Web 2.0 world where students and faculty can have much more interaction in classroom exchanges. Since business cases have long been a pedagogy of choice among professors concerned with training the next generation of…

  14. The Bias-Free Classroom. Learning Environments Must Embrace Diversity of Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Cheryl Burgan

    1991-01-01

    The goal of a bias-free classroom can be achieved through (1) flexible, unbiased curriculum with supporting materials that enhance diversity; (2) teacher attitudes that reflect sensitivity to other cultures; and (3) personal style and delivery that provide a role model of acceptance and belief in the value of cultural diversity. (SK)

  15. "Celebration of the Neurons": The Application of Brain Based Learning in Classroom Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duman, Bilal

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate approaches and techniques related to how brain based learning used in classroom atmosphere. This general purpose were answered following the questions: (1) What is the aim of brain based learning? (2) What are general approaches and techniques that brain based learning used? and (3) How should be used…

  16. Preschool Aggression within the Social Context: A Study of Families, Teachers, and the Classroom Environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer Leigh Adams

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this correlational study was to examine the extent, if any, of possible relationships between child (gender and race), family (birth order, parental age at child’s birth, educational level, marital status, household income, and the biological father living in the home), teacher (proximity and perception), and classroom (global quality and location) variables and aggression (physical, relational, telling, and

  17. The "Intelligent Classroom": Changing Teaching and Learning with an Evolving Technological Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winer, Laura R.; Cooperstock, Jeremy

    2002-01-01

    Describes the development and use of the Intelligent Classroom collaborative project at McGill University that explored technology use to improve teaching and learning. Explains the hardware and software installation that allows for the automated capture of audio, video, slides, and handwritten annotations during a live lecture, with subsequent…

  18. Social-Emotional Development, School Readiness, Teacher-Child Interactions, and Classroom Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Sherryl Scott; Rice, Janet; Boothe, Allison; Sidell, Margo; Vaughn, Krystal; Keyes, Angela; Nagle, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates the effectiveness of a statewide 6-month early childhood mental health consultation (ECMHC) model on teachers' emotional support of children and classroom organization. We provide a brief historical and theoretical background of the field of ECMHC, present the logic model for our ECMHC intervention, and discuss the…

  19. Classroom Phenology: Using the Environment as a Source of Data and Observations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This activity is a classroom and schoolyard investigation where students collect daily temperature and precipitation readings, weather observations, and weekly phenology reports in a phenology binder and in nature journals. Students then analyze this data and compare to recorded values in the Weatherguide calendar.

  20. Children's Perceptions of the Classroom Environment and Social and Academic Performance: A Longitudinal Analysis of the Contribution of the "Responsive Classroom" Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Laura L.; Nishida, Tracy K.; Chiong, Cynthia; Grimm, Kevin J.; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the contribution of the "Responsive Classroom" (RC) Approach, a set of teaching practices that integrate social and academic learning, to children's perceptions of their classroom, and children's academic and social performance over time. Three questions emerge: (a) What is the concurrent and cumulative relation between…

  1. The Effects of Physical Environment on Children's Behavior in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gingold, William

    No significant difference of student-concrete physical environment interaction occurred with a change in physical environment. A test was made on five null hypotheses related to the change of physical environment and (1) student-concrete physical environment interaction; (2) environmental preference by students; (3) student attending behavior; (4)…

  2. Classroom response systems: What do they add to an active learning environment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fies, Carmen Hedwig

    This study investigated the impact of completely anonymous Classroom Response System (CRS) use on learning outcomes and student attitudes in a large university physical science course for pre-service teachers. As students were expected to have read the textbook prior to class, class time was devoted primarily to conceptual introductions followed by small group discussions of qualitative questions. In the treatment condition, each group provided a single response anonymously using the CRS. The control group responded individually and publicly by show of hands. Responses formed the basis for further discussion in both cases. Anonymity of responses in the control condition was expected to enhance participation and to provide more reliable formative assessment for the instructor, thus enhancing subsequent instruction and learning. The overwhelmingly female study population comprised two course sections with the same instructor. The sections reversed treatment and control group roles for units on Newtonian mechanics and thermodynamics. Students took pre- and posttests for each unit, completed Response System Surveys once and the VASS twice, and submitted weekly mini-reflections and one metareflection. These were analyzed for evidence of attitudes toward science and learning. Whole-class discussions were video-recorded and analyzed for evidence of participation and use of student responses for "just-in-time" teaching. Although CRS use did not improve learning outcomes over the control as measured by pre and posttests, it improved participation, as reflected in the video record and as self-reported by students in reflections, while it was in use. When they were using the CRS, students also indicated greater interest in learning for understanding, as opposed to preferring authoritarian delivery of information by the instructor and opportunities for procedural drills. A framework for classroom interactions emerged. This "C3" framework comprised three dimensions interacting on and through classroom conditions: concerns (performance goals to mastery goals), centeredness (teacher-centered to learner-centered), and control of discourse (traditional lecture to interactive dialogue). These apply to both instructors and students. In previous work, CRS use in classrooms was determined by instructors' positions on these three dimensions. Here, students shifted their centeredness and concerns based on how much the instructor shared the control of classroom discourse.

  3. Chronic Psychosocial Stress and Hypertension

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tanya M. Spruill

    2010-01-01

    Genetic and behavioral factors do not fully explain the development of hypertension, and there is increasing evidence suggesting\\u000a that psychosocial factors may also play an important role. Exposure to chronic stress has been hypothesized as a risk factor\\u000a for hypertension, and occupational stress, stressful aspects of the social environment, and low socioeconomic status have\\u000a each been studied extensively. The study

  4. Online Resource-Based Learning Environment: Case Studies in Primary Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    So, Winnie Wing Mui; Ching, Fiona Ngai Ying

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the creation of learning environments with online resources by three primary school teachers for pupil's learning of science-related topics with reference to the resource-based e-learning environments (RBeLEs) framework. Teachers' choice of contexts, resources, tools, and scaffolds in designing the learning environments are…

  5. Cultural Factors of Science Classroom Learning Environments, Teacher-Student Interactions and Student Outcomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Darrell L. Fisher; Bruce G. Waldrip

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an instrument to assess culturally sensitive factors of science students' learning environments, and to examine associations between these factors, students' achievement of enquiry skills, students' attitudes to science and teacher?student interactions. A measure of culturally sensitive factors of the learning environment, namely the Cultural Learning Environment Questionnaire (CLEQ), was developed.

  6. Studying Earth's Environment From Space: Classroom and Laboratory Activities with Instructor Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Elizabeth A.

    2001-01-01

    Standard, text-book based learning for earth, ocean, and atmospheric sciences has been limited by the unavailability of quantitative teaching materials. While a descriptive presentation, in a lecture format, of discrete satellite images is often adequate for high school classrooms, this is seldom the case at the undergraduate level. In order to address these concerns, a series of numerical exercises for the Macintosh was developed for use with satellite-derived Sea Surface Temperature, pigment and sea ice concentration data. Using a modified version of NIH Image, to analyze actual satellite data, students are able to better understand ocean processes, such as circulation, upwelling, primary production, and ocean/atmosphere coupling. Graphical plots, image math, and numerical comparisons are utilized to substantiate temporal and spatial trends in sea surface temperature and ocean color. Particularly for institutions that do not offer a program in remote sensing, the subject matter is presented as modular units, each of which can be readily incorporated into existing curricula. These materials have been produced in both CD-ROM and WWW format, making them useful for classroom or lab setting. Depending upon the level of available computer support, graphics can be displayed directly from the CD-ROM, or as a series of color view graphs for standard overhead projection.

  7. Video Networks in an Electronic Classroom Environment and Analysis of Student Preferences in the Development of a Network- Based Video Distribution System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordonov, Anatoliy; Kress, Michael; Carlin, Marianne

    Faculty experience at the College of Staten Island--City University of New York shows that Hybrid Analog Digital Networks (ADViNet) prove to be useful in the classroom environment. They support major instructional activities, and are very efficient in the distribution of full-screen motion video and other graphical images. The ADViNet does not…

  8. The Effect of Classroom Teachers' Attitudes toward Constructivist Approach on Their Level of Establishing a Constructivist Learning Environment: A Case of Mersin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uredi, Lutfi

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to determine the attitudes of classroom teachers towards constructivist approach and to analyze the effect of their attitudes towards constructivist approach on their level of creating a constructivist learning environment. For that purpose, relational screening model was used in the research. The research sample included 504…

  9. From the Field to the Classroom: A Web-Based Teaching Tool on Depositional Environments and Landscape Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzic, M.; Watson, K.; Grand, S.; Crowley, C.; Dyanatkar, S.; Bomke, A.; Smith, S.

    2012-04-01

    The relationship between sedimentary deposits, landforms and soil profile development is difficult for students to grasp in a conventional classroom setting. The ideal way to solve this is to take the students on extended field trips; however, field trips are expensive, have to be conducted during specific time periods, and can only handle a limited number of students. The objective of this project was to bring the field to the classroom via a virtual, dynamic web-based teaching tool illustrating common depositional environments and associated landforms and soils. The teaching tool was largely based on video footage obtained in the Canadian Rocky Mountains and in the grasslands of the southern interior of British Columbia. The Canadian Rockies are undergoing rapid deglaciation and provided excellent examples of new glacial deposits and early landscape development processes. On the other hand, British Columbia's grasslands became ice-free about 10,000 years ago and were used to illustrate landscape evolution and post-glaciation soil profile development. To bring these two environments together, video footage of corresponding landforms was shot at both locations and edited into a series of short video clips illustrating the link between depositional processes, resulting landforms and soils and their post-glacial evolution. Soil scientists, survey specialists and geomorphologists provided live commentary. The teaching tool (http://soilweb.landfood.ubc.ca/landscape/) is an open-access website merging video clips, sound recordings, text, photos and graphics intended to help students situate landforms within their geomorphologic context. This online teaching resource allows students to observe, on their own time, conditions under which sediments are deposited and soils are formed, and to witness the transformation of a barren, glacial landscape into a vegetated soil landscape. The tool can be used in various geomorphology, soil, agriculture, forestry, and natural resource management courses. An interactive overview of the tool will be given during the presentation.

  10. Kindergarten Students' and Parents' Perceptions of Science Classroom Environments: Achievement and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Esther; Fraser, Barry J.

    2013-01-01

    This study, involving the modification, validation and use of a learning environment questionnaire for both kindergarten students and their parents, is significant because prior learning environment research has normally involved neither parents nor such young students. A questionnaire, which was based on the What Is Happening In this Class? and…

  11. Psychosocial Factors in Children and Adolescents with Conversion Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, I.; Giri, D.; Dutta, Anna; Mazumder, P.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: In view of the limited studies on the psychosocial environment of children presenting with conversion disorders, the present study was carried out to study the psychosocial factors in children with conversion disorders. Method: 40 patients of Conversion Disorder, who presented with "pseudo seizures" and were diagnosed according to…

  12. The Virtual Classroom: A Virtual Reality Environment for the Assessment and Rehabilitation of Attention Deficits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. A. Rizzo; J. G. Buckwalter; T. Bowerly; C. Van Der Zaag; L. Humphrey; U. Neumann; C. Chua; C. Kyriakakis; A. Van Rooyen; D. Sisemore

    2000-01-01

    The Virtual Environments Laboratory at the University of Southern California (USC) has ini- tiated a research program aimed at developing virtual reality (VR) technology applications for the study, assessment, and rehabilitation of cognitive\\/functional processes. This technol- ogy is seen to offer many advantages for these aims and an introductory section of this arti- cle will discuss the specific rationale for

  13. Beyond the Classroom: International Education and the Community College. Volume II: Internationalizing the Campus Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franco, Robert W., Ed.; Shimabukuro, James N., Ed.

    Part of a four-volume set in which community college educators discuss their efforts to internationalize the educational experience of the students and communities they serve, volume II in this series considers the challenges, pitfalls, and rewards of creating campus environments with rich international and intercultural programs and activities.…

  14. Classroom Climate Properties for the Memphis Effective Schools Project on the Learning Environment Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cervetti, Michael J.

    The purpose of the Memphis Effective Schools Project (MESP), first initiated in the fall of 1982, is to help alleviate educational deficits that black students have acquired over the years of segregated schooling. The philosophy behind the MESP is that all students can learn in a conducive learning environment; this study assesses students'…

  15. Beyond the Personal Learning Environment: Attachment and Control in the Classroom of the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mark William; Sherlock, David

    2014-01-01

    The Personal Learning Environment (PLE) has been presented in a number of guises over a period of 10 years as an intervention which seeks the reorganisation of educational technology through shifting the "locus of control" of technology towards the learner. In the intervening period to the present, a number of initiatives have attempted…

  16. Older People of Tomorrow: A Psychosocial Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverstone, Barbara

    1996-01-01

    Attempts to narrow the scope of present uncertainties about the older population by sketching a psychosocial profile of the older people of tomorrow based on what is known today. Focuses on the baby boom generation and the interplay between personal attributes they could bring to late life and the social and physical environment in which they…

  17. Networked Instructional Computers in the Elementary Classroom and Their Effect on the Learning Environment: A Qualitative Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, Carolyn M.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a qualitative evaluation of an elementary schoolwide computer implementation project. Highlights include the use of interviews, questionnaires, and surveys with teachers, students, and parents; changes in teacher attitudes and roles, classroom management, and classroom climate; and a model for creating a community of learners through the…

  18. An Investigation of the Metacognitive Orientation of Confucian-Heritage Culture and Non-Confucian-Heritage Culture Science Classroom Learning Environments in Hong Kong

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gregory P. Thomas

    2006-01-01

    A debate is ongoing in Hong Kong regarding whether local and international schools vary in the extent to which they provide\\u000a classroom learning environments that support the development of students' higher order thinking and metacognition. This study\\u000a investigated commonalities and variations in the metacognitive orientation of local and international schools in Hong Kong.\\u000a Commonalities and substantive differences in the metacognitive

  19. Health Science Students and Their Learning Environment: A Comparison of Perceptions of On-Site, Remote-Site, and Traditional Classroom Students

    PubMed Central

    Elison-Bowers, P.; Snelson, Chareen; Casa de Calvo, Mario; Thompson, Heather

    2008-01-01

    This study compared the responses of on-site, remote-site, and traditional classroom students on measures of student/teacher interaction, course structure, physical learning environment, and overall course enjoyment/satisfaction. The sample population consisted of students taking undergraduate courses in medical terminology at two western colleges. The survey instrument was derived from Thomerson's questionnaire, which included closed- and open-ended questions assessing perceptions of students toward their courses. Controlling for grade expectations, results revealed no significant differences among the on-site, remote-site, and traditional classroom students in any of the four cluster domains. However, a nonsignificant (and continuing) trend suggested that students preferred the traditional classroom environment. When results were controlled for age, significant differences emerged between traditional and nontraditional students on measures of student/teacher interaction, physical learning environment, and overall enjoyment/satisfaction, as nontraditional students exhibited higher scores. Students' responses to open-ended questions indicated they enjoyed the convenience of online instruction, but reported finding frustration with technology itself. PMID:18311326

  20. Climatic Conditions in Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kevan, Simon M.; Howes, John D.

    1980-01-01

    Presents an overview of research on the ways in which classroom thermal environment, lighting conditions, ion state, and electromagnetic and air pollution affect learning and the performance of students and teachers. (SJL)

  1. Classroom Management: What Does Research Tell Us?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Postholm, May Britt

    2013-01-01

    The article reviews studies that focus on classroom management. The aim of classroom management is twofold. The first is to establish a quiet and calm environment in the classroom so that the pupils can take part in meaningful learning in a subject. The second aim is that classroom management contributes to the pupils' social and moral…

  2. Conceptualisation, Development and Validation of an Instrument for Investigating the Metacognitive Orientation of Science Classroom Learning Environments: The Metacognitive Orientation Learning Environment Scale – Science (MOLES-S)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gregory P. Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Metacognition refers to an individual's knowledge, control and awareness of his\\/her learning processes. An important goal\\u000a of education is to develop students as metacognitive, life-long learners. However, developing students' metacognition and\\u000a evaluating whether classrooms are oriented to the development of students' metacognition are difficult and often time-consuming\\u000a tasks. Further, no instruments that measure key dimensions related to classroom factors that

  3. BEAUTIFUL CLASSROOM CAMPAIGN On Tuesday, April 22, 2003, the Office

    E-print Network

    Webb, Peter

    BEAUTIFUL CLASSROOM CAMPAIGN On Tuesday, April 22, 2003, the Office for Classroom Management partnered with Facilities Management to kick-off the Beautiful Classroom Campaign. The campaign- maintained classroom environment. As part of the Beautiful U Day activities, the Beautiful Classroom Campaign

  4. Students' perception of a discussion-driven classroom environment in an upper-level ruminant nutrition course with small enrollment.

    PubMed

    Wattiaux, M A; Crump, P

    2006-01-01

    This 3-yr classroom research project studied students' perception of the learning environment when class time was reserved primarily for discussion of preassigned reading material as an alternative to a lecture in ruminant nutrition. A student-assessment-of-learning-gain instrument with 46 items was administered anonymously as a survey 3-wk into the semester and as a course evaluation at the end of the semester. Scores, collected on a scale of 1 to 10, were analyzed to determine differences between survey and evaluation, the variation due to student cohort (years 2003, 2004, and 2005), and student standing (undergraduate or graduate) for 5 selected items: item 1 = My level of interest/ curiosity for nutrition is; item 17 = The reading assignments help me learn; item 18 = The in-class discussions help me learn; item 24 = I would prefer the professor lecture; item 38 = I am learning a lot in this class. Although students indicated a preference to using class time for discussion rather than lecture, the degree of consensus was low, as 10% of scores indicated a strong desire for lecture, whereas another 10% indicated strong opposition to lecture. Reading assignments and in-class discussions contributed positively to the perception of learning and both were correlated positively with level of interest in the topic. In the evaluation, the desire for lecture was correlated negatively with level of interest in the topic and the self-assessed level of learning. Students reported a greater interest in the topic at the end of the semester than at wk 3; however, the self-reported learning gains from discussion-related activities varied with student cohort. Graduate students reported a higher interest, more learning from discussion-related activities, and less desire for lecture than undergraduates. Although graduate students were more impervious to the discussion format, undergraduates perceived more learning if the discussion was student-centered (i.e., focused on their questions and answers), rather than subject-centered (i.e., focused on the paper content). PMID:16357299

  5. Evaluating the Efficacy of Questioning Strategies in Lecture-Based Classroom Environments: Are We Asking the Right Questions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, L. R.; Lovelace, M. D.

    2013-01-01

    Classroom questions represent a potentially powerful tool for interacting with students and stimulating critical thinking. However, the efficacy of the question-and-answer approach to teaching is influenced by many factors, such as the type and cognitive level of questions asked as well as students' response time. To examine these factors and…

  6. An Analogous Study of Children's Attitudes Toward School in an Open Classroom Environment as Opposed to a Conventional Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeli, Doris Conti

    A study sought to determine whether intermediate age children exposed to open classroom teaching strategy have a more positive attitude toward school than intermediate age children exposed to conventional teaching strategy. The hypothesis was that there would be no significant difference in attitude between the two groups. The study was limited to…

  7. Using a Virtual Classroom Environment to Describe the Attention Deficits Profile of Children with Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilboa, Yafit; Rosenblum, Sara; Fattal-Valevski, Aviva; Toledano-Alhadef, Hagit; Rizzo, Albert; Josman, Naomi

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe the nature of the attention deficits in children with Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) in comparison with typically developing (TD) children, using the Virtual Classroom (VC), and to assess the utility of this instrument for detecting attention deficits. Twenty-nine NF1 children and 25 age-and…

  8. Reflection Through the ID-PRISM: A Teacher Planning Tool to Transform Classrooms into Web-Enhanced Learning Environments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tiffany A. Koszalka

    2003-01-01

    Recent books and articles are full of definitions of the ideal electronic classroom, prescriptions of how to use web resources, and descriptions of the effects of such resources on teaching practices and learning. Yet Becker (1999) found that only 30% of those teachers who were internet-connected acknowledged using web resources with their students. ID-PRISM was developed as a reflection tool

  9. Relationship between Perceived and Observed Student-Centred Learning Environments in Qatari Elementary Mathematics and Science Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Stephanie L.; Parker, Dawn; Zimmerman, Whitney; Ikhlief, Atman

    2014-01-01

    Recently, Qatar established educational reform in charter (independent) schools focusing on curriculum standards, student-centred teaching, standards-based assessment, English as the language of instruction, and extensive professional development. A primary area of emphasis was the creation of student-centred mathematics and science classrooms

  10. Acoustical evaluation of preschool classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wonyoung; Hodgson, Murray

    2003-10-01

    An investigation was made of the acoustical environments in the Berwick Preschool, Vancouver, in response to complaints by the teachers. Reverberation times (RT), background noise levels (BNL), and in-class sound levels (Leq) were measured for acoustical evaluation in the classrooms. With respect to the measured RT and BNL, none of the classrooms in the preschool were acceptable according to the criteria relevant to this study. A questionnaire was administered to the teachers to assess their subjective responses to the acoustical and nonacoustical environments of the classrooms. Teachers agreed that the nonacoustical environments in the classrooms were fair, but that the acoustical environments had problems. Eight different classroom configurations were simulated to improve the acoustical environments, using the CATT room acoustical simulation program. When the surface absorption was increased, both the RT and speech levels decreased. RASTI was dependent on the volumes of the classrooms when the background noise levels were high; however, it depended on the total absorption of the classrooms when the background noise levels were low. Ceiling heights are critical as well. It is recommended that decreasing the volume of the classrooms is effective. Sound absorptive materials should be added to the walls or ceiling.

  11. Classroom Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Walter

    This booklet describes a foundation for effective classroom management and focuses on some of the basic processes involved in creating a cooperative atmosphere in the classroom. Four topics are considered: the beginning of the school year, selecting and arranging activities, monitoring and timing activities in the classroom, and stopping…

  12. Science beyond the classroom

    SciTech Connect

    Petric, J.; Bonkalski, J. (Illinois Junior Academy of Science, Morris (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Not every student is meant to be a scientist. Students come into a classroom with a variety of experiences, interests, and abilities. Therefore, the goal of any science program is not the production of chemists, physicists, or biologists but the development of scientifically literature individuals: students who can question, hypothesize, test, record, and conclude. The classroom environment cannot always provide the range of real-life experiences necessary for students to internalize the scientific method. The Illinois Junior Academy of Science (IJAS), through its sponsorship of local, regional, and state science fair competitions, seeks to assist the schools by providing just such practical hands-on experiences. The IJAS-sponsored expositions allow students the opportunity to translate classroom knowledge into a form that is tangible and concrete, an event that goes beyond the walls of a classroom into the reality of the world in which they will live and work.

  13. Education, Identity and iClass: From Education to Psychosocial Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcia, James E.

    2009-01-01

    At first consideration, the worlds of the classroom, the psychotherapy office and the experimental psychology laboratory may seem disparate settings with no obvious connection among them. In this article, the author would like to draw such a connection and to suggest the relevance of psychosocial developmental theory and research to self-regulated…

  14. Learning outside the Primary Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedgwick, Fred

    2012-01-01

    In "Learning Outside the Primary Classroom," the educationalist and writer Fred Sedgwick explores in a practical way the many opportunities for intense learning that children and teachers can find outside the confines of the usual learning environment, the classroom. This original work is based on tried and tested methods from UK primary schools.…

  15. Aggression and Classroom Climate: Relations and Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shechtman, Zipora

    One of the best predictors of aggression among schoolchildren is their social environment and relationships with peer and teachers. This study investigated the association between classroom climate and level of classroom aggression. The study population comprised over 9,000 fifth and sixth graders in 97 schools and 360 classrooms in Israel. It was…

  16. The Role of the Constructivist Learning Theory and Collaborative Learning Environment on Wiki Classroom, and the Relationship between Them

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alzahrani, Ibraheem; Woollard, John

    2013-01-01

    This paper seeks to discover the relationship between both the social constructivist learning theory and the collaborative learning environment. This relationship can be identified by giving an example of the learning environment. Due to wiki characteristics, Wiki technology is one of the most famous learning environments that can show the…

  17. Psychosocial Impact of Acne vulgaris

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. M. S. Mulder; V. Sigurdsson; E. J. van Zuuren; E. J. Klaassen; J. A. J. Faber; J. B. F. de Wit; W. A. van Vloten

    2001-01-01

    Background: Although knowledge concerning the impact of acne vulgaris on quality of life has increased in recent years, relatively few studies have assessed the effect of a change in clinical severity on psychosocial state. Objective: Assessment of the effect of a change in clinical acne severity on psychosocial state. Methods: This was investigated by means of questionnaires and clinical assessements

  18. Connecting the physical and psychosocial space to Sandia's mission.

    SciTech Connect

    Emmanuel, Glory Ruth; Silva, Austin Ray

    2014-07-01

    Sandia Labs has corporate, lab-wide efforts to enhance the research environment as well as improve physical space. However, these two efforts are usually done in isolation. The integration of physical space design with the nurturing of what we call psychosocial space can foster more efficient and effective creativity, innovation, collaboration, and performance. This paper presents a brief literature review on how academia and industry are studying the integration of physical and psychosocial space and focuses on the efforts that we, the authors, have made to improve the research environment in the Cyber Engineering Research Lab (CERL), home to Group 1460. Interviews with subject matter experts from Silicon Valley and the University of New Mexico plus changes to actual spaces in CERL provided us with six lessons learned when integrating physical and psychosocial space. We describe these six key takeaways in hopes that Sandia will see this area as an evolving research capability that Sandia can both contribute to and benefit from.

  19. The Classroom Coffeehouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, A. Howard

    1993-01-01

    Describes the way one teacher created in her English classroom an environment similar to a coffeehouse. Claims that using the coffeehouse model, a class meeting devoted to students reading aloud their own creative writing provided inspiration for the students to write. (HB)

  20. Growing a Nurturing Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boorn, Clare; Dunn, Paula Hopkins; Page, Claire

    2010-01-01

    "Growing a nurturing classroom" is an awareness training programme presented by educational psychologists in Leicestershire for professionals working in primary schools with the aim of promoting an optimal environment for learning and emotional well-being. The training helps primary school staff to take a holistic approach to education; see…

  1. My Environment. Grade 2. One in a Series of Career Development Curriculum Units for the Elementary Classroom. (Second Edition).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brayton, Pat; Tutton, Joyce

    Focusing on self awareness (environment), this unit entitled "My Environment" is one of four grade 2 units which are part of a total set of twenty-seven career development curriculum units for grades K-6. This unit is organized into four sections. Section 1 identifies one career development-centered curriculum (CDCC) element (realistic…

  2. Classroom Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinsmore, Terri Sue

    This paper is a report of a middle-school teacher's study of classroom management. The teacher/researcher was interested in how some of the techniques in the Kovalik Integrated Thematic Instruction model of training would influence the teacher/researcher's classroom management; the effects of direct instruction within a community circle; the…

  3. Transformation of Classroom Spaces: Traditional versus Active Learning Classroom in Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Elisa L.; Choi, Bo Keum

    2014-01-01

    Educational environment influences students' learning attitudes, and the classroom conveys the educational philosophy. The traditional college classroom design is based on the educational space that first appeared in medieval universities. Since then classrooms have not changed except in their size. In an attempt to develop a different…

  4. Responsive Classroom

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Responsive Classroom addresses some of the challenges present in any elementary classroom, be it first-grade mathematics or third-grade science, by offering "an approach to teaching and learning that fosters safe, challenging, and joyful classrooms and schools, kindergarten through eighth grade." Through this website, classroom teachers share "practical strategies for bringing together social and academic learning throughout the school day." They report that teachers in urban, rural, and suburban settings nationwide find that these strategies have increased student investment, responsibility, and learning, and decreased problem behaviors. Studies detailing the effectiveness of the program are posted on this website. The basic principles of the program are also described, but the books detailing their approach must be purchased. The newsletter, however, is available free of charge and the archive includes previously published articles, which can be searched by topic, such as technology in the classroom and family involvement.

  5. The Impact of Virtual Classroom Laboratories in CSE Postgraduate Professional Development Program

    E-print Network

    Richards, Debbie

    The Impact of Virtual Classroom Laboratories in CSE Matt Bower Postgraduate Professional classroom environment called Macromedia Breeze Live. Research results indicated that students who completed their practical in the virtual classroom: i) felt they performed significantly more collaboration, ii) expressed

  6. The adaptive basis of psychosocial acceleration: comment on Beyond Mental Health, Life History Strategies articles.

    PubMed

    Nettle, Daniel; Frankenhuis, Willem E; Rickard, Ian J

    2012-05-01

    Four of the articles published in this special section of Developmental Psychology build on and refine psychosocial acceleration theory. In this short commentary, we discuss some of the adaptive assumptions of psychosocial acceleration theory that have not received much attention. Psychosocial acceleration theory relies on the behavior of caregivers being a reliable cue of broader ecological conditions and on those ecological conditions being somewhat stable over the individual's lifetime. There is a scope for empirical and theoretical work investigating the range of environments over which these assumptions hold, to understand more deeply why it is that early life family environment exerts such reliable effects on later life-history strategy. PMID:22545851

  7. Improving Classroom Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanton, Patricia

    2004-03-01

    Frustration with one's ability to deal with classroom discipline is cited as a primary problem facing new teachers and a major factor in teacher retention. As a novice teacher, perhaps you had never been in a classroom where you felt as if the teacher was not in control until it came your time to be the "teacher." Now you are faced with what you expect your students to do and the reality of what they actually will do. How do you develop and nurture a classroom environment where learning is the primary objective of both the students and the teacher? While there is no magic formula that will work for everyone, there are some guidelines to follow and pitfalls to avoid that can increase your chances for success.

  8. Anonymity in Classroom Voting and Debating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainsworth, Shaaron; Gelmini-Hornsby, Giulia; Threapleton, Kate; Crook, Charles; O'Malley, Claire; Buda, Marie

    2011-01-01

    The advent of networked environments into the classroom is changing classroom debates in many ways. This article addresses one key attribute of these environments, namely anonymity, to explore its consequences for co-present adolescents anonymous, by virtue of the computer system, to peers not to teachers. Three studies with 16-17 year-olds used a…

  9. Designing a Classroom as a Learner-Centered Learning Environment Prompting Students' Reflective Thinking in K-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Kyoungna; Grabowski, Barbara L.; Sharma, Priya

    2004-01-01

    Only few studies have explicitly attended to the nature of the perceived underlying factors that prompt young adolescents' reflective thinking in association with K-12 learning environment. This paper focuses on an analysis of the factors that are perceived by young students as prompting their reflective thinking and how those factors apply to the…

  10. Validation and Application of the Constructivist Learning Environment Survey in English Language Teacher Education Classrooms in Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebrahimi, Nabi. A.

    2015-01-01

    This article reports the validation and application of an English language teacher education (LTE) version of the Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (CLES). The instrument, called the CLES-LTE, was field tested with a sample of 622 Iranian English language student teachers in 28 classes. When principal components analysis led to the…

  11. Psychosocial aspects of abortion

    PubMed Central

    Illsley, Raymond; Hall, Marion H.

    1976-01-01

    The literature on psychosocial aspects of abortion is confusing. Individual publications must be interpreted in the context of cultural, religious, and legal constraints obtaining in a particular society at a given time, with due attention to the status and availability of alternatives to abortion that might be chosen by a woman with an “unwanted” pregnancy. A review of the literature shows that, where careful pre- and post-abortion assessments are made, the evidence is that psychological benefit commonly results, and serious adverse emotional sequelae are rare. The outcome of refused abortion seems less satisfactory, with regrets and distress frequently occurring. Research on the administration of abortion services suggests that counselling is often of value, that distress is frequently caused by delays in deciding upon and in carrying out abortions, and by unsympathetic attitudes of service providers. The phenomenon of repeated abortion seeking should be seen in the context of the availability and cost of contraception and sterilization. The place of sterilization with abortion requires careful study. A recommendation is made for observational descriptive research on populations of women with potentially unwanted pregnancies in different cultures, with comparisons of management systems and an evaluation of their impact on service users. PMID:1085671

  12. [Psychosocial aspects of halitosis].

    PubMed

    de Jongh, A; de Baat, C; Horstman, M

    2012-09-01

    Using a representative sample from the Dutch population, some psychosocial aspects of halitosis were examined. The results of the survey showed that almost 90% of the Dutch population aged 16 years and older were regularly faced with halitosis. Forty percent reported to be exposed to someone with halitosis at least once a week, men significantly more frequently than women. Although less strongly than body odour, halitosis was reported as being one of the most severe 'let-downs' in social interactions. The greater the social distance between subjects, the less likely is the chance that a person's attention will be drawn to halitosis experienced. When it comes to an unknown person, the chance was no more than 7%, suggesting that it is problematic to draw a person's attention to the presence of halitosis. Considering the potential social consequences of halitosis is it important that dentists and dental hygienists draw patients' attention to the presence of halitosis, when this is the case, thereby encouraging them to seek adequate treatment. PMID:23050381

  13. Psychosocial work environment and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Danelia, M; Trapaidze, D

    2005-04-01

    In Georgia, like the other post Soviet republics, CHD morbidity is increasing, especially among young and middle aged people-- i.e. among those who should have the most working ability-- that points at both individual and social significance of the problem. CHD is becoming more and more common among rural inhabitants, different professional groups involved not only in mental but also in physical work. The longstanding observation that rates of coronary heart disease vary markedly among occupations more than can be accounted for by conventional risk factors for coronary heart disease has generated a quest for specific components of work that might be of etiological importance. Especially when according to structural changes in society the role of social and psychological factors increased. Case-control study was carried out based on Karasek model. Our results indicate that jobs characterized by low decision latitude, high job strain and low social support at work may be associated with an increased risk of acute coronary events. PMID:15908726

  14. Psychosocial factors and congestive heart failure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judi Profant; Joel E. Dimsdale

    2000-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of congestive heart failure (CHF) are increasing, even after adjustment for an aging population.\\u000a Because coverage of psychosocial factors in CHF has been insufficient, we reviewed the literature in this area. Four major\\u000a themes emerged in our review as we examined relations between psychosocial factors and CHF: psychiatric comorbidity, psychosocial\\u000a precipitation and exacerbation of CHF, psychosocial

  15. Psychosocial Dysfunction in Adults with Epilepsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pershad, Dwarka; Siddiqui, Razia S.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined the amount of psychosocial disturbance experienced by adults (n=53) in India with epilepsy, as well as the relationship between psychosocial dysfunction, duration of illness, and computerized axial tomography findings. Results indicated that three-quarters exhibited no or very mild psychosocial dysfunction. (DB)

  16. Motivating Learners in Secondary Science Classrooms: Analysis of a Computer-Supported, Inquiry-Based Learning Environment Using Self-Determination Theory 

    E-print Network

    Scogin, Stephen C.

    2014-07-29

    In spite of generally poor student reports about science instruction in K-12 classrooms and decreasing interest in STEM careers, some curricular programs have successfully motivated and engaged students. One such program ...

  17. PSYCHOSOCIAL PHENOMENA AND BUILDING DESIGN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IZUMI, KIYOSHI

    THE DEPTH OF PSYCHOSOCIAL CONSIDERATION VARIES WITH ARCHITECTURAL FUNCTION. THESE FACTORS INCREASE AS A BUILDING USAGE BECOMES MORE ANTHROPOPHILIC. SITUATIONS RELATING TO AMBIGUOUS DESIGN MUST BE ELIMINATED IN BUILDING DESIGN. PROBLEMS INVOLVING VISUAL PERCEPTION SUCH AS (1) GLASS DOORS, (2) APPARENT INSECURITY OF STRUCTURE, (3) AMBIGUOUS SYMBOLIC…

  18. Stress, Distress, and Psychosocial Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levi, Lennert

    1973-01-01

    This paper, presented at the Occupational Stress Conference of the Center for Occupational Mental Health, Sept. 22, 1972, discusses the possibility of a relationship between psychosocial stimuli and stress-related disease. Using Selye's understanding of stress, the author views it in relation to non-specific diseases and suggests hypotheses…

  19. Cooley's Anemia: A Psychosocial Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    The directory is intended to aid patients and their families who are coping with the genetic disorder of Cooley's anemia. A brief review of the disease covers background, genetics, symptoms, effect on the patient, treatment, and current research. The next section looks at psychosocial needs at various times (time of diagnosis, infancy and toddler…

  20. [Chronic pain in elderly people: psychosocial dimension].

    PubMed

    Allaz, A F; Cedraschi, C; Rentsch, D; Canuto, A

    2011-06-29

    Chronic pain in elderly people requires to take into account somatic co-morbidities as well as its psychosocial dimensions. Chronic pain often represents a distress signal addressed to the environment and the care providers. Psychological suffering or mood disorders can be presented in the form of somatic complaints often associated with functional impairments, sometimes severe. Therapeutic care has to address functionality through an image-enhancing approach aiming to summon the patients' resources. The treatment of a concomitant depressive state necessitates a true commitment from the therapist. Its benefits are documented in elderly patients. Analgesic treatment as a whole will seek in particular to restore feelings of self-esteem and help the patient recover a good quality of life. PMID:21815497

  1. Nonverbal Communication in the Classroom: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollman, Steven A.

    Research has shown that nonverbal variables have a strong influence on classroom communication. This paper examines the way in which communication in the classroom is affected by the variables of distance, physical environment, facial expression, vocal cues, posture and gestures, touch, use of time, physical attractiveness, and dress. Each…

  2. Hearing and Listening in a Typical Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Catherine V.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses factors that affect how well students with hearing loss and typical students can hear in classrooms. Soundfield equalization is discussed as a way to create an environment where each child is at a favorable speaker-listener distance by routing the teacher's voice to loudspeakers around the classroom. (CR)

  3. Safety in the Elementary Science Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Teachers Association, Arlington, VA.

    This guide gives elementary school teachers suggestions for providing a safe environment for their students and covers general safety concerns in the science classroom. Information is printed in a flip chart format for easy reference. Safety areas covered include: (1) In Case of Accident; (2) Eye Protection; (3) Plants in the Classroom; (4) First…

  4. Code Choice in the Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Glenn S.

    2011-01-01

    Code Choice in the Language Classroom argues that the foreign language classroom is and should be regarded as a multilingual community of practice rather than as a perpetually deficient imitator of an exclusive second-language environment. From a sociocultural and ecological perspective, Levine guides the reader through a theoretical, empirical,…

  5. "Hate in the Classroom": A Rejoinder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinrichs, Terry

    2008-01-01

    Raphael Cohen-Almagor's article "Hate in the Classroom: Free Expression, Holocaust Denial, and Liberal Education" (2008) calls for sanctions on those K-12 public school teachers whose deployment of "hate speech"--and/or associations with others who deploy it--creates a "poisoned environment" in the classroom. While stating his belief in the role…

  6. Integrating Technology in a Montessori Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Arlene; Sikorski, Pat

    The importance of the prepared environment to the Montessori educational philosophy necessitates careful teacher training to successfully implement computer technology in the Montessori classroom. This paper explores the views and experiences of 11 Montessori teachers in integrating computers in their classroom. The paper maintains that Maria…

  7. Design a Net-Zero Energy Classroom

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

    Students create a concept design of their very own net-zero energy classroom by pasting renewable energy and energy-efficiency items into and around a pretend classroom on a sheet of paper. They learn how these items (such as solar panels, efficient lights, computers, energy meters, etc.) interact to create a learning environment that produces as much energy as it uses.

  8. Bringing the Great Outdoors to Your Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky State Dept. of Education, Frankfort. Div. of Program Development.

    This guide suggests ways to study the environment in the classroom. It provides information for setting up a classroom learning center including learning outcomes, activity suggestions, and resources and equipment for the learning center. Guidelines for a recycling program, a bird-feeding program, and terrarium-making are given. A bibliography of…

  9. Classroom Teachers' Reflections on Teaching Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsangaridou, Niki

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore preservice classroom teacher reflection in a physical education teaching and learning environment and to describe how the teachers' reflections related to their practices. Two preservice classroom teachers voluntarily participated in the study. Data were collected using observations, journals, documents, and…

  10. The Role of Music in Classroom Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Mary F.; Joyce, Donna M.

    Several studies have demonstrated that music has many uses in today's classroom. In addition to a positive classroom environment, stronger curriculum content, and effective teaching strategies, research indicates that music is also an effective management strategy. A musical program was designed for third and fourth grade teachers to achieve…

  11. Classroom Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In this issue's "Classroom Notes" section, the following papers are discussed: (1) "Constructing a line segment whose length is equal to the measure of a given angle" (W. Jacob and T. J. Osler); (2) "Generating functions for the powers of Fibonacci sequences" (D. Terrana and H. Chen); (3) "Evaluation of mean and variance integrals without…

  12. JPA Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Elizabeth; And Others

    This instructional guide offers classroom lesson plans that can be used by teachers or police officers with a videotape to present a "Junior Police Academy" (JPA) program for middle school students. The guide also contains lesson plans and student activities to be used independently of the videotape. Following a description of the goals of the…

  13. Classroom Tech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This article features the latest classroom technologies namely the FLY Pentop, WriteToLearn, and a new iris scan identification system. The FLY Pentop is a computerized pen from Leapster that "magically" understands what kids write and draw on special FLY paper. WriteToLearn is an automatic grading software from Pearson Knowledge Technologies and…

  14. Classroom Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In this issue's "Classroom Notes" section, the following papers are described: (1) "Sequences of Definite Integrals" by T. Dana-Picard; (2) "Structural Analysis of Pythagorean Monoids" by M.-Q Zhan and J. Tong; (3) "A Random Walk Phenomenon under an Interesting Stopping Rule" by S. Chakraborty; (4) "On Some Confidence Intervals for Estimating the…

  15. Classroom Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segal, Carmit

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the determinants and malleability of noncognitive skills. Using data on boys from the National Education Longitudinal Survey, I focus on youth behavior in the classroom as a measure of noncognitive skills. I find that student behavior during adolescence is persistent. The variation in behavior can be attributed to…

  16. Classroom Vocabulary Classroom Vocabulary [msamiati wa darasani

    E-print Network

    Lesson 3: Classroom Vocabulary Classroom Vocabulary [msamiati wa darasani] A). Vocabulary. Darasa hili lina vitu gani? [What things does this classroom have?] Darasa hili lina meza, mkoba, chaki, ubao... [This classroom has a table, backpack, chalk, board...] 2. Hii ni nini? [What is this?] Hii ni

  17. Physics Education Research in the Advanced Undergraduate Classroom

    E-print Network

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    21/01/2014 1 Physics Education Research in the Advanced Undergraduate Classroom University of St in advanced classrooms" ­How do we know it's working?" ­Is this relevant to St Andrews? " Outline Traditional. Finkelstein, PRST-PER 4, 010110 (2008) Traditional Classroom Reconceptualise the learning environment

  18. Language, Access, and Power in the Elementary Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoerning, Emily; Hand, Brian; Shelley, Mack; Therrien, William

    2015-01-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards call for the adoption of many aspects of scientific inquiry in the classroom. The ways in which classroom talk and classroom environment change as students and teachers learn to utilize inquiry approaches are underexplored. This study examines the frequency with which linguistic markers related to access and…

  19. Multilevel and Diverse Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baurain, Bradley, Ed.; Ha, Phan Le, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    The benefits and advantages of classroom practices incorporating unity-in-diversity and diversity-in-unity are what "Multilevel and Diverse Classrooms" is all about. Multilevel classrooms--also known as mixed-ability or heterogeneous classrooms--are a fact of life in ESOL programs around the world. These classrooms are often not only multilevel…

  20. Bridging the gap: evaluation of a pilot project to facilitate use of psychosocial strategies across an occupational therapy curriculum.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Sarah K; Stube, Jan; Bass, Gail

    2015-04-01

     The integration of psychosocial strategies into pediatric and physical disabilities coursework presents an issue of importance to advancing the outcomes for both occupational therapy education and practice. After curriculum mapping and modification to course content, a retrospective student survey and review of educational outcomes were undertaken in one curriculum. The programmatic formative evaluation results demonstrated that all students felt moderately prepared to use cognitive-behavioral strategies in their future practices, preferring behavioral strategies over cognitive strategies for changing client thinking. Implications for the importance of integration of psychosocial content across curricula and for future study of effective teaching methods within classroom learning activities and fieldwork are included. PMID:25821886

  1. Differentiation between autism and multiple complex developmental disorder in response to psychosocial stress.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Lucres M C; Gispen-de Wied, Christine C; van der Gaag, Rutger-Jan; van Engeland, Herman

    2003-03-01

    Multiple Complex Developmental Disorder (MCDD) represents a distinct group within the autistic spectrum based on symptomatology. Unlike autistic children, part of MCDD children develop schizophrenia in adult life. Despite the differences, patients of both disorders are mainly characterized by abnormal reactions to their social environment. At the biological level, we showed in a previous study that MCDD children have a reduced cortisol response to psychosocial stress. Given the fact that autistic children clinically show more social impairments, it was hypothesized that they may have even further decreased cortisol responses to psychosocial stress than MCDD patients. Therefore, 10 autistic children were compared to 10 MCDD children and 12 healthy control children in their response to a psychosocial stressor, consisting of a public speaking task. In order to test whether any impairments in the biological stress response are specific for psychosocial stress, the autistic children were compared with 11 MCDD children and 15 control children in their response to a physical stressor, consisting of 10 min of bicycle exercise. Heart rate and salivary cortisol levels were used as indicators of response to the stress tests. Autistic children showed a relatively elevated cortisol response to psychosocial stress, in contrast to MCDD children who showed a reduced cortisol response. No differences in heart rate or cortisol responses to the physical stress test were found. The specific difference between autistic and MCDD children in their cortisol response to psychosocial stress indicates that the disturbed reactions to the social environment observed in these disorders may have different biological backgrounds. PMID:12629541

  2. Science Teacher Beliefs and Classroom Practice Related to Constructivism in Different School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savasci, Funda; Berlin, Donna F.

    2012-01-01

    Science teacher beliefs and classroom practice related to constructivism and factors that may influence classroom practice were examined in this cross-case study. Data from four science teachers in two schools included interviews, demographic questionnaire, Classroom Learning Environment Survey (preferred/perceived), and classroom observations and…

  3. Psychology's Contributions to Classroom Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Steven G.; Akin-Little, Angeleque

    2008-01-01

    Classroom management (CRM) has been associated with discipline, control, or other terms that connote reducing unacceptable student behavior. However, CRM involves not merely responding effectively when problems occur, but also preventing problems from occurring by creating environments that encourage learning and appropriate behavior. Teachers'…

  4. Acoustical Modifications for the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crandell, Carl C.; Smaldino, Joseph J.

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews procedures for evaluating, measuring, and modifying noise and reverberation levels in the classroom environment. Recommendations include: relocating children away from high noise sources, such as fans, air conditioners, heating ducts, and faulty lighting fixtures, using sound-absorbing materials, using acoustical ceiling tile…

  5. Improvisation in the Mathematics Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses ways in which improvisational comedy games and exercises can be used in college mathematics classrooms to obtain a democratic and supportive environment for students. Using improv can help students learn to think creatively, take risks, support classmates, and solve problems. Both theoretical and practical applications are…

  6. Psychosocial Perspectives and the Issue of Prevention in Childhood Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Daniel; Weinberger-Litman, Sarah L.; Latzer, Yael

    2014-01-01

    A dramatic increase in childhood overweight/obesity has been recognized globally over the past 50?years. This observed increase may reflect genetic, as well as psychological, environmental, and socio-cultural influences. In the first part of this review, we present an updated summary of the psychosocial factors associated with this change and discuss possible ways in which they operate. Among these factors, lower socio economic status (in both industrialized and non-industrialized countries), being female, belonging to a minority group, and being exposed to adverse life events may all be associated with a greater risk of childhood overweight/obesity. These influences may be mediated via a variety of mechanisms, in particular above-average food intake of low nutritional quality and reduction in physical activity. Other important psychosocial mediators include the influence of the family and peer environment, and exposure to the media. In the second part of the review, we discuss the potential of psychosocial prevention programs to intervene in the processes involved in the rise of childhood overweight/obesity. Two points are emphasized. First, prevention programs should be multidisciplinary, combining the knowledge of experts from different professions, and taking into consideration the important role of the family environment and relevant influential social organizations, particularly school. Second, effective change is unlikely to occur without large-scale programs carried out on a public policy level. PMID:25133140

  7. An Investigation of Traditional Professional Development versus Reform Professional Development and the Implementation of Strategies, Curriculum and Classroom Environment by Prekindergarten Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver-Brooks, Helen

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate differences between traditional conventional professional development and high quality reflective professional development and curriculum implementation of classroom practices. This study examined the extent to which professional development activities were associated with increased levels of curriculum…

  8. Different Identity Revelation Modes in an Online Peer-Assessment Learning Environment: Effects on Perceptions toward Assessors, Classroom Climate and Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Fu-Yun; Wu, Chun-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The effects of four different identity revelation modes (three fixed modes: real-name, anonymity, nickname and one dynamic user self-choice mode) on participants' perceptions toward their assessors, classroom climate, and past experience with the learning activity in which they were engaged were examined. A pretest-posttest quasi-experimental…

  9. Future's Learning Environments in Health Education: The Effects of Smart Classrooms on the Academic Achievements of the Students at Health College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevindik, Tuncay

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of smart classrooms on the academic achievement of the nursing students. The sample of the research included 66 Health College students in Elazig. The sampling group was randomly chosen from second year students of Nursing and Midwife Education. The research was carried out with experimental…

  10. Building Community from Diversity: Connecting Students to Their Learning Environments. An Anthology of Classroom Projects Undertaken for the Kellogg Beacon Grant. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahony, Elizabeth M., Ed.; And Others

    This five-part anthology presents descriptions of 22 classroom projects undertaken by a consortium of Missouri community colleges and elementary and secondary schools, directed by St. Louis Community College. The collection comprises the following articles: "Views of an Elementary Teacher" (Susan Biffignani); "Writing To Learn and Co-operative…

  11. GLOBE Assessment Classroom Tools

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1999-01-01

    The GLOBE Classroom Assessment site provides sample student assessment tools and frameworks to provide teachers and students with evidence about progress on NASA's Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) program goals. GLOBE Assessment has three main components: (1) GLOBE Assessment Standards - Broad overview of assessment indexing to standards and frameworks that specify commonly referenced science content areas and inquiry strategies (2) GLOBE Assessment Tools - Templates, rubrics, and guided exemplars to tailor your assessments. Exemplars are designed to assess students' deep understanding of GLOBE framework strategies. (3) GLOBE Assessment Alignment - Materials from GLOBE Conference 2001 Alignment Binder which provided tools to link GLOBE to National and State standards.

  12. The Classroom Animal: Crickets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, David C.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests using crickets for classroom activities, providing background information on their anatomy and reproduction and tips on keeping individual organisms or a breeding colony in the classroom. (JN)

  13. Impact of classroom design on interactive whiteboard use in a special needs classroom

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Grant Shannon; Sally Jo Cunningham

    2009-01-01

    The physical environment of a classroom—how space is organized and controlled—impacts the use of technology within that setting. This paper presents the initial rationale for choosing an interactive whiteboard (IWB) as the platform for software designed to encourage play in primary students with Autism Spectrum Disorders. An observational study of normal classroom practice and of an installed version of the

  14. Classroom Profiling Training: Increasing Preservice Teachers' Confidence and Knowledge of Classroom Management Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Cliff; Simoncini, Kym; Davidson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Classroom management is a serious concern for beginning teachers including preservice teachers. The Queensland Department of Education, Training and Employment (DETE) has developed the Essential Skills for Classroom Management (ESCM), a system of positive and pro-active strategies for maintaining supportive learning environments. In addition, the…

  15. Robotics competitions and science classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benke, Gertraud

    2012-06-01

    This paper looks at the distinctions between science classrooms and the robotics competition described in the article "Examining the mediation of power in a collaborative community: engaging in informal science as authentic practice" written by Anton Puvirajah, Geeta Verma and Horace Webb. Using the framework of "productive disciplinary engagement" and discussing each principle in turn, the article argues that in order to bring the advantages of informal learning environments into regular classrooms we especially need to address student interest through task design and to change curricular requirements to agree with changing educational values.

  16. Psychosocial factors and financial literacy.

    PubMed

    Murphy, John L

    2013-01-01

    This study uses data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) to analyze the psychological and social variables associated with financial literacy. The HRS is a nationally representative longitudinal survey of individuals older than age 50 and their spouses. An ordinary least squares linear regression analysis explores the relationship between financial literacy and several economic and psychosocial variables. After controlling for earnings, level of education, and other socioeconomic variables in this exploratory study, I find that financial satisfaction and religiosity are correlated with financial literacy. PMID:23687743

  17. Psychosocial Correlates of Adolescent Substance Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Eric F.; Shaw, Daniel S.

    This study examined psychosocial correlates of substance abuse during late adolescence. Older adolescents' (N=276) aged 17-22, self-reported use of marijuana, cocaine, and other illicit drugs was examined in relation to several psychosocial variables, including sensation seeking, aggression, self-esteem, depression, and perceived peer prevalence…

  18. Habitus and the Psychosocial: Bourdieu with Feelings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reay, Diane

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the potential of habitus to provide a window on the psychosocial. The paper works with a notion of psychosocial study as inquiry into the mutual constitution of the individual and the social relations within which they are enmeshed. At the same time it attempts to deepen and enrich notions of habitus. Although the strong focus…

  19. Psychosocial Treatment for Recurrent Genital Herpes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, David J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Assigned 21 individuals with recurrent genital herpes to psychosocial intervention, social support, or waiting-list control conditions. Those receiving psychosocial intervention (herpes simplex virus information, relaxation training, stress management instructions, and an imagery technique) reported significantly greater reductions in herpes…

  20. Explorations in Knowing: Thinking Psychosocially about Legitimacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Anne; Ernest, Paul; Ludhra, Geeta; Mendick, Heather

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we look at what engaging with psychoanalysis, through psychosocial accounts of subjectivity, has contributed to our struggles for legitimacy and security within our ways of knowing. The psychosocial, with its insistence on the unconscious and the irrational, features as both a source of security and of insecurity. We use three…

  1. Assessing the Flipped Classroom in Operations Management: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prashar, Anupama

    2015-01-01

    The author delved into the results of a flipped classroom pilot conducted for an operations management course module. It assessed students' perception of a flipped learning environment after making them experience it in real time. The classroom environment was construed using a case research approach and students' perceptions were studied using…

  2. On Exclusion and Inclusion in Classroom Texts and Talk. Report Series 7.5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Ellen

    To analyze some of the processes through which student voices and lived experiences can be either excluded or included, a study focused on elements of the classroom environment already addressed in previous analyses, examining "texts and talk" in two middle school English classrooms. The study analyzed how the classroom environments that the…

  3. Psychosocial Safety Climate: Development of the PSC-12

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Garry B. Hall; Maureen F. Dollard; Jane Coward

    2010-01-01

    Psychosocial risks in the workplace have the potential for causing psychological and social harm that contributes toward the mental health disability burden. Psychosocial risks are influenced by macrolevel factors such as the psychosocial safety climate within the organization. This paper concerns the development and evaluation of a short instrument to measure psychosocial safety climate (PSC). PSC is conceived as an

  4. Designing the Electronic Classroom: Applying Learning Theory and Ergonomic Design Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmons, Mark; Wilkinson, Frances C.

    2001-01-01

    Applies learning theory and ergonomic principles to the design of effective learning environments for library instruction. Discusses features of electronic classroom ergonomics, including the ergonomics of physical space, environmental factors, and workstations; and includes classroom layouts. (Author/LRW)

  5. Advances in the Psychosocial Treatment of Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Dallery, Jesse

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis The authors present an overview of empirically supported psychosocial interventions for individuals with substance use disorders (SUDs), including recent advances in the field. They also identify barriers to the adoption of evidence-based psychosocial treatments in community-based systems of care, and the promise of leveraging technology (computers, web, mobile phone, and emerging technologies) to markedly enhance the reach of these treatments. Technology-based interventions may provide “on-demand,” ubiquitous access to therapeutic support in diverse settings. A brief discussion of important next steps in developing, refining, and disseminating technology-delivered psychosocial interventions concludes the review. PMID:22640767

  6. Psychosocial Concepts in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    McGillivray, Donald C.

    1973-01-01

    This article reviews and tabulates some of the current concepts of the role of psychosocial factors in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Concepts prevalent during the 1950's are listed followed by discussion of some of the variable factors that complicate studies in this field. Studies are then cited which lead to the following conclusions: 1. Patients with RA tend to have certain personality characteristics, such as depression, rigidity, dependency, neurotic response patterns, emotional instability, feelings of guilt and low ego strength. 2. These are not specific to RA. 3. They may well be sequelae of the disease rather than pre-morbid features. 4. There is no clear evidence as to the role of psychological stress in causing or activating RA. 5. Personality factors have an influence on the course of the disease. PMID:20468900

  7. Environments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steve Benford; John Bowers; Lennart E. Fahl; Chris Greenhalgh; Dave Snowdon

    This paper explores the issue of user embodiment within collaborative virtual environments. By user embodiment we mean the provision of users with appropriate body images so as to represent them to others and also to themselves. By collaborative virtual environments we mean multi-user virtual reality systems which explicitly support co-operative work (although we argue that the results of our exploration

  8. Effect of Aerobic Exercise on Cognition, Academic Achievement, and Psychosocial Function in Children: A Systematic Review of Randomized Control Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lees, Caitlin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Although the effects of aerobic physical activity (APA) on children’s physical health is well characterized, the effect of aerobic physical activity on cognition, academic achievement, and psychosocial function has not yet been established. This systematic review provides an overview of research elucidating the relationship between aerobic physical activity and children’s cognition, academic achievement, and psychosocial function. Methods A systematic review of English articles was performed in April 2013 using MEDLINE, Cochrane, PsycINFO, SPORTDiscus, and EMBASE. Additional studies were identified through back-searching bibliographies. Only randomized control trials with an intervention of aerobic physical activity in children younger than 19 years that measured psychological, behavioral, cognitive, or academic outcomes were included. Results We found 8 relevant randomized control trials that met our inclusion criteria and extracted relevant data and evaluated the methodologic quality of the studies. Of the 8 studies identified, 2 studies were crossover randomized control trials studying the effects of acute aerobic physical activity on cognitive performance. Six studies were parallel-group randomized control studies, of which only 2 had a follow-up period of longer than 6 months. All studies showed that APA had a generally positive impact on children’s cognition and psychosocial function. However, this relationship was found to be minimal in many studies and in some measures, no significant improvement was seen at all. There was no documentation of APA having any negative impact on children’s cognition and psychosocial health, even in cases where school curriculum time was reassigned from classroom teaching to aerobic physical activity. Conclusion APA is positively associated with cognition, academic achievement, behavior, and psychosocial functioning outcomes. More rigorous trials with adequate sample sizes assessing the impact of APA on children’s cognitive abilities, psychosocial functioning, behavior, and academic achievement are needed, with standardized interventions, valid and reliable tools of measurement, and long-term follow-up for sustained cognitive and psychosocial outcomes. PMID:24157077

  9. The Prototype of the Virtual Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Jack M.; Mosher, David N.

    1994-01-01

    Introduces an interactive distance learning environment prototype developed jointly by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) and AT&T which allows students to participate in virtual classroom environments by using computer teleconferencing. Student collaboration, note taking, question answering capabilities, project background, learning theory,…

  10. Classroom Incivilities: Students' Perceptions about Professors' Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stork, Elizabeth; Hartley, Nell Tabor

    2009-01-01

    A learning environment is a social one, and as a social environment it impacts what learners retain, how they form ideas, and what connections are made and lost when acquiring new skills and knowledge (Goleman, 2006). Today's college students' expectations for and perceptions of professors in the classroom are likely to influence their learning…

  11. Associations between peer bullying and classroom concentration: evidence for mediation by perceived personal safety and relationship with teacher

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Boulton; Helen Woodmansey; Emma Williams; Ruth Spells; Beth Nicholas; Eleanor Laxton; Gemma Holman; Elizabeth Duke

    2012-01-01

    Being bullied is associated with a psycho-social maladjustment during childhood. One hitherto largely overlooked correlate is disrupted classroom concentration. Using data collected from 364 9–11-year-old children attending seven junior schools in the UK, we tested a model in which children’s perceived safety in two contexts (classroom and playground) and their perceived relationship with their teacher were hypothesised to mediate the

  12. Civility in the Classroom is taken in part from Strategies for Dealing with Troublesome Behavior in the

    E-print Network

    Rock, Chris

    Civility in the Classroom is taken in part from Strategies for Dealing with Troublesome Behavior in the Classroom, by Dr. Rosalind Reed. FReeDom To TeaCh, FReeDom To LeaRn Texas Tech University values students teaching and learning, proper classroom environments are necessary. This Civility in the Classroom guide

  13. UNCORRECTEDPROOF Challenging Mathematics: Classroom Practices

    E-print Network

    Sriraman, Bharath

    UNCORRECTEDPROOF Chapter 7 Challenging Mathematics: Classroom Practices Gloria Stillman, Kwok classroom practice issues related to teachers provid- ing mathematical challenges in their everyday classrooms. We examine how challenging mathematics can become the essence of mathematics classrooms, how

  14. Psychosocial stress and abdominal pain in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Children and adolescents may express psychiatric symptoms via somatic complaints. Likewise, children with chronic somatic illnesses are likely to experience psychiatric sequelae. We report three cases of adolescents who were admitted to general paediatrics services for abdominal pain and/or nausea and vomiting with a negative medical workup. In each case, a clear psychosocial stressor was evident. It is possible that somatic symptoms without clear medical causes may reflect psychosocial stress, but it is difficult to discern whether the psychosocial issues preceded the somatic complaints or were a result of them. Making an accurate diagnosis is difficult, and broaching such a subject with patients and their families is a delicate matter. More research is needed to determine appropriate screening tools for identifying cases where psychosocial stress may play a relevant role in symptom presentation, as well as potential treatment modalities for such cases. PMID:22477924

  15. Associate of Science Degree in Psychosocial Rehabilitation

    E-print Network

    Cheng, Mei-Fang

    Associate of Science Degree in Psychosocial Rehabilitation Bachelor of Science Degree in Psychiatric Rehabilitation and Psychology exclusively dedicated to healthcare state-of-the-art equipment Rehabilitation and Counseling Professions SHRP School of Health Related Professions Quick Links: Description

  16. Psychosocial/cultural issues in medicine and psychiatry: treating African Americans.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, J. H.

    1995-01-01

    In general, we are raised in a specific cultural environment, and consequently, we have a common sense of identity, shared standards, and religion. The effects of this commonality carries over into health-care situations, including health maintenance and disease prevention. This article provides an overview of how psychosocial/cultural issues have been used with insensitivity to race, culture, and the value orientations of African Americans. It is concluded that the training of all health-care practitioners should include psychosocial/cultural aspects of illnesses. PMID:8558616

  17. The psychosocial impact on standing devices

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, Lars; Ekenberg, Lilly; Näslund, Annika

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to explore the psychosocial impact of standing devices as experienced by users. Method This is the second part of a comprehensive survey in five counties in Sweden where all the subjects with standing devices were invited to participate. The impact of standing devices on functional independence, quality of life and wellbeing was assessed using a questionnaire, Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scale (PIADS). Results The psychosocial impact of the standing devices was perceived as positive. The highest PIADS scores in relation to age were found in the oldest group, aged 65 years and older. The ability to walk and independence in ambulation resulted in higher scores than the use of a wheelchair and/or dependence on others. Those who stood often awarded higher scores in the PIADS questionnaire compared to those who used the device less frequently. When standing was integrated in various activities, its psychosocial impact received high scores. Conclusion The psychosocial impact of standing devices was generally experienced positively. The main results indicated that standing in a standing device had a value and we as professionals should ask the users about the intended purpose of their standing in order to prescribe the optimal device. Implications for RehabilitationStanding in standing devices has positive psychosocial impact for the user.As professionals we should broaden our view of the use of standing devices, i.e. to see the standing device as an aid that not only treats the body’s structures or improves the user’s abilities in activities, but also provides a psychosocial impact on the user’s daily life, and to find meaningful goals for the user from a psychosocial perspective. PMID:23782225

  18. Supervision of psychosocial skills in genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Borders, L DiAnne; Eubanks, Sonja; Callanan, Nancy

    2006-08-01

    Little has been written about how genetic counseling supervisors can help students develop psychosocial skills in their clinical rotations. The authors describe several approaches supervisors can use, ranging from preventive measures (e.g., normalizing anxiety), to skill-enhancing interventions (e.g., modeling and thinking aloud), to more direct approaches (e.g., immediacy, confrontation) that may be necessary for students who are reluctant, or even resistant, to using psychosocial skills with their clients. PMID:16865562

  19. Systematic Prenatal Screening for Psychosocial Risks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patricia A. Harrison; Abbey C. Sidebottom

    2008-01-01

    The Prenatal Risk Overview (PRO) was designed to screen for 13 psychosocial risk factors associated with poor birth outcomes. This study describes the development and implementation of the PRO in 4 community health centers. The study also examines the prevalence, co-occurrence, and inter-correlations of psychosocial risks in their prenatal populations. The study sample included 1,386 prenatal patients screened between November

  20. Psychosocial Research on the International Space Station: Special Privacy Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanas, N.; Salnitskiy, V.; Ritsher, J.; Grund, E.; Weiss, D.; Gushin, V.; Kozerenko, O.

    Conducting psychosocial research with astronauts and cosmonauts requires special privacy and confidentiality precautions due to the high profile nature of the subject population and to individual crewmember perception of the risks inherent in divulging sensitive psychological information. Sampling from this small population necessitates subject protections above and beyond standard scientific human subject protocols. Many of these protections have relevance for psychosocial research on the International Space Station. In our previous study of psychosocial issues involving crewmembers on the Mir space station, special precautions were taken during each phase of the missions. These were implemented in order to gain the trust necessary to ameliorate the perceived risks of divulging potentially sensitive psychological information and to encourage candid responses. Pre-flight, a standard confidentiality agreement was provided along with a special layman's summary indicating that only group-level data would be presented, and subjects chose their own ID codes known only to themselves. In-flight, special procedures and technologies (such as encryption) were employed to protect the data during the collection. Post-flight, an analytic strategy was chosen to further mask subject identifiers, and draft manuscripts were reviewed by the astronaut office prior to publication. All of the eligible five astronauts and eight cosmonauts who flew joint US/Russian missions on the Mir were successfully recruited to participate, and their data completion rate was 76%. Descriptive analyses of the data indicated that there was sufficient variability in all of the measures to indicate that thoughtful, discriminating responses were being provided (e.g., the full range of response options was used in 63 of the 65 items of the Profile of Mood States measure, and both true and false response options were used in all 126 items of the Group Environment and the Work Environment measures). This presentation will discuss and expand on the lessons learned during the Mir study and relate them to future long-duration space missions.

  1. Inside the Primary Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Brian

    1980-01-01

    Presents some of the findings of the ORACLE research program (Observational Research and Classroom Learning Evaluation), a detailed observational study of teacher-student interaction, teaching styles, and management methods within a sample of primary classrooms. (Editor/SJL)

  2. Calculators in the Classroom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royce, George; Shank, James

    1977-01-01

    Reports results of a student attitude survey among junior high school students who had been allowed to utilize classroom calculators to check results of mathematical computations. Students displayed a significant preference for using calculators in the classroom. (SL)

  3. A Student Response System in an Electronic Classroom: Technology Aids for Large Classroom Instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ober, D.; Errington, P.; Islam, S.; Robertson, T.; Watson, J.

    1997-10-01

    In the fall of 1996, thirteen (13) classrooms on the Ball State campus were equipped with technological aids to enhance learning in large classrooms (for typically 100 students or larger). Each classroom was equipped with the following built-in equipment: computer, zip drive, laser disc player, VCR, LAN and Internet connection, TV monitors, and Elmo overhead camera with large-screen projection system. This past fall semester a student response system was added to a 108-seat classroom in the Physics and Astronomy department for use with large General Education courses. Each student seat was equipped with a hardwired hand-held unit possessing input capabilities and LCD feedback for the student. The introduction of the student response system was added in order enhance more active learning by students in the large classroom environment. Attendance, quizzes, hour exams, and in-class surveys are early uses for the system; initial reactions by student and faculty users will be given.

  4. Classroom Constructivism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Andrew

    1995-01-01

    Constructivism, which holds that knowledge is created out of each individual's own experience, is recapturing researchers' attention. To constructivists, teachers are not omniscient oracles, but nutritionists providing an environment for children to grow their own knowledge. Students might learn division by planning a field trip instead of…

  5. Quick Guide: Democratic Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Service Learning Clearinghouse, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Democratic classrooms are those in which the curriculum actively engages students in collaborative inquiry, decision making is shared between students and staff, and students choose their daily activities. Compared with traditional classrooms, students in democratic classrooms take more ownership of and responsibility for their own learning.…

  6. Cockroaches in the Classroom

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Christine Moseley

    2005-03-01

    Welcome the Madagascar hissing cockroach into your classroom--they are not your average pest! This article describes the basic biology of this relatively tame creature, and how to set up and care for a classroom colony. It includes a list of suggested inquiry-centered classroom activities that you and your students will find both educational and fun!

  7. Classroom Quick Breaks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven D Smith

    2010-01-01

    Classroom Quick Breaks helps classroom teachers get their kids moving during the course of the day! Hundreds of creative fitness activities, plus informative fitness tips, make classroom-based physicalEducation programs fun and exciting without the need for specialized equipment.

  8. Competition in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jameson, Daphne

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author shares the strategy she adopted to even out the participation among her multicultural students during their classroom discussions. The author realized that her students had different concepts about the classroom and different philosophies about competition. For the Americans and Indians, the classroom was a site of…

  9. Psychosocial considerations for mass decontamination.

    PubMed

    Lemyre, Louise; Johnson, Colleen; Corneil, Wayne

    2010-11-01

    Mass exposure to explosions, infectious agents, foodborne illnesses, chemicals or radiological materials may require mass decontamination that have critical psychosocial implications for the public and for both traditional and non-traditional responders in terms of impact and of response. Five main issues are common to mass decontamination events: (i) perception, (ii) somatisation, (iii) media role and communication, (iv) information sharing, (v) behavioural guidance and (vi) organisational issues. Empirical evidence is drawn from a number of cases, including Chernobyl; Goiania, Brazil; the sarin gas attack in Tokyo; the anthrax attacks in the USA; Three Mile Island; and by features of the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome pandemic. In this paper, a common platform for mass casualty management is explored and suggestions for mass interventions are proposed across the complete event timeline, from pre-event threat and warning stages through to the impact and reconstruction phases. Implication for responders, healthcare and emergency infrastructure, public behaviour, screening processes, risk communication and media management are described. PMID:20924122

  10. Psychosocial aspects of induced abortion.

    PubMed

    Stotland, N L

    1997-09-01

    US anti-abortion groups have used misinformation on the long-term psychological impact of induced abortion to advance their position. This article reviews the available research evidence on the definition, history, cultural context, and emotional and psychiatric sequelae of induced abortion. Notable has been a confusion of normative, transient reactions to unintended pregnancy and abortion (e.g., guilt, depression, anxiety) with serious mental disorders. Studies of the psychiatric aspects of abortion have been limited by methodological problems such as the impossibility of randomly assigning women to study and control groups, resistance to follow-up, and confounding variables. Among the factors that may impact on an unintended pregnancy and the decision to abort are ongoing or past psychiatric illness, poverty, social chaos, youth and immaturity, abandonment issues, ongoing domestic responsibilities, rape and incest, domestic violence, religion, and contraceptive failure. Among the risk factors for postabortion psychosocial difficulties are previous or concurrent psychiatric illness, coercion to abort, genetic or medical indications, lack of social supports, ambivalence, and increasing length of gestation. Overall, the literature indicates that serious psychiatric illness is at least 8 times more common among postpartum than among postabortion women. Abortion center staff should acknowledge that the termination of a pregnancy may be experienced as a loss even when it is a voluntary choice. Referrals should be offered to women who show great emotional distress, have had several previous abortions, or request psychiatric consultation. PMID:9328746

  11. Technological Challenges: Designing Large Compressed Video and Multimedia Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Russ A.; Parker, Roger

    Designing a distance learning classroom requires integration of educational goals and philosophy with technology and ergonomics. The technological challenge and key to designing effective distance learning and multimedia classrooms is creating an environment in which the participants--students, and teacher--may easily interact with instructional…

  12. Higher Education Classroom Management: Kuwait University Students' Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Hamdan, Jasem

    2007-01-01

    This study attempts to examine students' views on the effectiveness of classroom management techniques used by faculty members. By examining their views, some insights may be gained as to the kinds of management techniques that a faculty member might adopt in order to promote better teaching and learning environment. Effective classroom management…

  13. Using Music in the Adult ESL Classroom. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lems, Kristen

    Music can be used in the adult English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) classroom to create a learning environment; to build listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing skills; to increase vocabulary; and to expand cultural knowledge. This digest looks briefly at research and offers strategies for using music in the adult ESL classroom.…

  14. Assessing English Language Learner Content Knowledge in the Mainstream Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark-Gareca, Beth

    2013-01-01

    In K-12 environments in the US, classroom tests are a central means by which teachers assess English Language Learner (ELL) content knowledge. Performance on routine classroom assessments is often a contributing criterion for school based decision-making and can affect decisions relating to academic tracking, retention, and access to academic…

  15. Otitis Media: Coping with the Effects in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Dorinne S.

    This curriculum adaptation provides a methodology that enables the classroom teacher to recognize the needs of the otitis media-affected child in the classroom. It discusses areas of concern related to otitis media; suggests activities that can enhance these children's language skills; and shows ways to enhance the learning environment by…

  16. Smart Classroom: Enhancing Collaborative Learning Using Pervasive Computing Technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen S. Yau; Sandeep K. S. Gupta; Fariaz Karim; Sheikh I. Ahamed; Yu Wang; Bin Wang

    2003-01-01

    Smart Classroom facilitates collaborative learning among college students. Students in such an environment form small groups to solve a specific problem or develop a group project. In a Smart Classroom, each student has a situation-aware PDA. Students' PDAs dynamically form mobile ad hoc networks for group meetings. Each PDA monitors its situation (locations of PDAs, noise, light, and mobility) and

  17. The noise environment of a school classroom due to the operation of utility helicopters. [acoustic measurements of helicopter noise during flight over building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilton, D. A.; Pegg, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Noise measurements under controlled conditions have been made inside and outside of a school building during flyover operations of four different helicopters. The helicopters were operated at a condition considered typical for a police patrol mission. Flyovers were made at an altitude of 500 ft and an airspeed of 45 miles per hour. During these operations acoustic measurements were made inside and outside of the school building with the windows closed and then open. The outside noise measurements during helicopter flyovers indicate that the outside db(A) levels were approximately the same for all test helicopters. For the windows closed case, significant reductions for the inside measured db(A) values were noted for all overflights. These reductions were approximately 20 db(A); similar reductions were noted in other subjective measuring units. The measured internal db(A) levels with the windows open exceeded published classroom noise criteria values; however, for the windows-closed case they are in general agreement with the criteria values.

  18. Using Tablet PCs in the Classroom: An Investigation of Students' Expectations and Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonds-Raacke, Jennifer M.; Raacke, John D.

    2008-01-01

    The purposes of the current experiments were to investigate: (a) students' expectations with regard to the use of Tablet PCs within the classroom, (b) students' attitudes toward the implementation of Tablet PCs within the classroom, and (c) the resulting classroom environment from the use of various technologies. Results indicated that although…

  19. Using Departmental Surveys to Assess Computing Culture: Quantifying Gender Differences in the Classroom

    E-print Network

    Newhall, Tia

    in the Classroom Lisa Meeden and Tia Newhall Computer Science Swarthmore College Swarthmore, PA 19081 meeden classroom and lab environments, and showed that there are gender differ- ences in students' perceptions Gender Issues, Classroom Culture, Computer Science Edu- cation Permission to make digital or hard copies

  20. Opportunities for Inquiry Science in Montessori Classrooms: Learning from a Culture of Interest, Communication, and Explanation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinke, Carol R.; Gimbel, Steven J.; Haskell, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Although classroom inquiry is the primary pedagogy of science education, it has often been difficult to implement within conventional classroom cultures. This study turned to the alternatively structured Montessori learning environment to better understand the ways in which it fosters the essential elements of classroom inquiry, as defined by…

  1. Title of Dissertation: EXAMINING THE EFFECTS OF STUDENTS' CLASSROOM EXPECTATIONS ON

    E-print Network

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    ABSTRACT Title of Dissertation: EXAMINING THE EFFECTS OF STUDENTS' CLASSROOM EXPECTATIONS of introductory biology students' classroom expectations ­­ what students expect to be the nature of the knowledge the classroom environment and how those perceptions can shape students' interactions with the content

  2. The Electronic Teaching Theater Interactive Hypermedia and Mental Models of the Classroom

    E-print Network

    Golbeck, Jennifer

    The Electronic Teaching Theater Interactive Hypermedia and Mental Models of the Classroom Kent L Teaching Theater #12; Abstract The introduction of hypermedia into the classroom presents both to redesign the classroom and instructional environment to exploit the enhanced features of hypermedia

  3. Psychosocial stress and inflammation in cancer.

    PubMed

    Powell, N D; Tarr, A J; Sheridan, J F

    2013-03-01

    Stress-induced immune dysregulation results in significant health consequences for immune related disorders including viral infections, chronic autoimmune disease, and tumor growth and metastasis. In this mini-review we discuss the sympathetic, neuroendocrine and immunologic mechanisms by which psychosocial stress can impact cancer biology. Both human and animal studies have shown the sympathetic and neuroendocrine responses to psychosocial stress significantly impacts cancer, in part, through regulation of inflammatory mediators. Psychosocial stressors stimulate neuroendocrine, sympathetic, and immune responses that result in the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis, sympathetic nervous system (SNS), and the subsequent regulation of inflammatory responses by immune cells. Social disruption (SDR) stress, a murine model of psychosocial stress and repeated social defeat, provides a novel and powerful tool to probe the mechanisms leading to stress-induced alterations in inflammation, tumor growth, progression, and metastasis. In this review, we will focus on SDR as an important model of psychosocial stress in understanding neural-immune mechanisms in cancer. PMID:22790082

  4. Factors Affecting Psychosocial Adjustment of Deaf Students.

    PubMed

    Polat, Filiz

    2003-01-01

    Deafness is more than a medical condition. Recent theories have emphasized the importance of environmental factors on the psychosocial development of deaf children. As part of a larger scale study, this article aims to investigate the impact of the following variables on deaf students' psychosocial adjustment in Turkey: student-related background and experiential characteristics, parent-related variables, school-related factors, and teacher-related variables. The sample of 1,097 deaf students enrolled in the elementary, secondary, and high schools was drawn from 34 schools in 24 cities on a national geographical spread. The multiple regression analysis revealed that degree of hearing loss, additional handicap, and age at onset of deafness were negatively related to psychosocial adjustment of deaf students. However, there was a positive relationship between psychosocial variables and some of the independent variables, such as use of hearing aids, speech intelligibility, academic achievement, parental hearing status, and communication methods used at school. The findings of the study do not support a "pathological" view of deafness, suggesting that it was not deafness per se but that some environmental factors were also influential on the psychosocial adjustment of deaf students. PMID:15448056

  5. Classroom acoustics: Three pilot studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smaldino, Joseph J.

    2005-04-01

    This paper summarizes three related pilot projects designed to focus on the possible effects of classroom acoustics on fine auditory discrimination as it relates to language acquisition, especially English as a second language. The first study investigated the influence of improving the signal-to-noise ratio on the differentiation of English phonemes. The results showed better differentiation with better signal-to-noise ratio. The second studied speech perception in noise by young adults for whom English was a second language. The outcome indicated that the second language learners required a better signal-to-noise ratio to perform equally to the native language participants. The last study surveyed the acoustic conditions of preschool and day care classrooms, wherein first and second language learning occurs. The survey suggested an unfavorable acoustic environment for language learning.

  6. Master Classrooms: Classroom Design with Technology in Mind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Kathryn

    Technology is changing the classroom requiring new design features and considerations to make the classroom flexible and interactive with the teaching process. The design of a Master Classroom, a product of the Classroom Improvement Project at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is described. These classrooms are specially-equipped to…

  7. Strategies to Address Common Challenges When Teaching in an Active Learning Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Christina I.; Gorman, Kristen S.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides practical strategies for addressing common challenges that arise for teachers in active learning classrooms. Our strategies come from instructors with experience teaching in these environments.

  8. NASA Classroom Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Exploration of space provides a compelling need for cell-based research into the basic mechanisms that underlie the profound changes that occur in terrestrial life that is transitioned to low gravity environments. Toward that end, NASA developed a rotating bioreactor in which cells are cultured while continuously suspended in a cylinder in which the culture medium rotates with the cylinder. The randomization of the gravity vector accomplished by the continuous rotation, in a low shear environment, provides an analog of microgravity. Because cultures grown in bioreactors develop structures and functions that are much closer to those exhibited by native tissue than can be achieved with traditional culture methods, bioreactors have contributed substantially to advancing research in the fields of cancer, diabetes, infectious disease modeling for vaccine production, drug efficacy, and tissue engineering. NASA has developed a Classroom Bioreactor (CB) that is built from parts that are easily obtained and assembled, user-friendly and versatile. It can be easily used in simple school settings to examine the effect cultures of seeds or cells. An educational brief provides assembly instructions and lesson plans that describes activities in science, math and technology that explore free fall, microgravity, orbits, bioreactors, structure-function relationships and the scientific method.

  9. Psychosocial aspects of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    King, K; Hanson, V

    1986-10-01

    The earliest studies dating back to the 1950s have tended to present a more pessimistic view of the psychosocial aspects of JRA patients. More carefully designed studies, however, have shown that these children do not have unique personality characteristics, nor are they necessarily socially maladjusted. Stress may play some role in onset of exacerbation of the disease, although this role is unclear at present. The child's level of cognitive development probably does play a role in the perception of pain and should be considered when undertaking patient education. The long-term psychosocial outcome of JRA patients appears to be quite good, with the majority of patients achieving educational levels at or beyond the level of the population as a whole and with the majority of patients able to support themselves. Future research may provide tools for even better assessment of this and other areas of psychosocial function. PMID:3763255

  10. Association of suboptimal health status with psychosocial stress, plasma cortisol and mRNA expression of glucocorticoid receptor ?/? in lymphocyte.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yu-Xiang; Dong, Jing; Liu, You-Qin; Zhang, Jie; Song, Man-Shu; He, Yan; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Suboptimal health status (SHS) has become a new public health challenge in China. This study investigated whether high SHS is associated with psychosocial stress, changes in cortisol level and/or glucocorticoid receptor (GR) isoform expression. Three-hundred eighty-six workers employed in three companies in Beijing were recruited. The SHS score was derived from data collection in the SHS questionnaire (SHSQ-25). The short standard version of the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ) was used to assess job-related psychosocial stress. The mean value of the five scales of COPSOQ and distribution of plasma cortisol and mRNA expression of GR?/GR? between the high level of SHS group and the low level of SHS group were compared using a general linear model procedure. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to analyze the effect of psychosocial stress on SHS. We identified three factors that were predictive of SHS, including "demands at work", "interpersonal relations and leadership" and "insecurity at work". Significantly higher levels of plasma cortisol and GR?/GR? mRNA ratio were observed among the high SHS group. High level of SHS is associated with decreased mRNA expression of GR?. This study confirmed the association between chronic psychosocial stress and SHS, indicating that improving the psychosocial work environment may reduce SHS and then prevent chronic diseases effectively. PMID:25518867

  11. Cervical cancer screening and psychosocial barriers perceived by patients. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Bukowska-Durawa, Alicja

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study This study aimed at integrating research discussing the role of perceived psychosocial barriers in cervical cancer screening (CCS) uptake. In particular, we analyzed the evidence for the associations between CCS uptake and perceived psychosocial barriers and frequency of psychosocial barriers identified by women. Material and methods A systematic search of peer-reviewed papers published until 2011 in 8 databases yielded 48 original studies, analyzing data obtained from 155 954 women. The majority of studies (k = 43) applied correlational design, while 5 had experimental design. Results Experimental research indicated a positive effect of 75% of psychosocial interventions targeting barriers. The interventions resulted in a significant increase of CCS uptake. Overall 100% of correlational studies indicated that perceiving lower levels of barriers significantly predicted higher CCS uptake. 53 psychosocial barriers were listed in at least 2 original correlational studies: 9.5% of barriers were related to CCS facilities/environment, 67.9% dealt with personal characteristics of the patient, and 22.6% addressed social factors. As many as 35.9% of perceived barriers referred to negative emotions related to CCS examination procedures and collecting CCS results, whereas 25.7% of barriers referred to prior contacts with health professionals. Conclusions Leaflets or discussion on psychosocial barriers between patients and health professionals involved in CCS might increase CCS uptake and thus reduce cervical cancer mortality rates. Communication skills training for health professionals conducting CCS might focus on the most frequently reported barriers, referring to emotions related to CCS examination and collecting CCS results. PMID:25520573

  12. Patterns of Interaction and Mathematical Thinking of High School Students in Classroom Environments That Include Use of Java-Based, Curriculum-Embedded Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fonkert, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzes the nature of student interaction and discourse in an environment that includes the use of Java-based, curriculum-embedded mathematical software. The software "CPMP-Tools" was designed as part of the development of the second edition of the "Core-Plus Mathematics" curriculum. The use of the software on…

  13. Explicit and Implicit Methods in Psychosocial Occupational Therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mona Eklund

    2002-01-01

    Sometimes the goal of a psychosocial occupational therapy intervention is not obvious for someone observing the process, and this may lead to misunderstandings as to the targeted outcomes for various occupational therapy methods. Summarizing features found in psychosocial occupational therapy practice, in textbooks, and in occupational therapy models, this paper proposes a simple structure for characterizing psychosocial occupational therapy interventions

  14. Building Psychosocial Programming in Geriatrics Fellowships: A Consortium Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Ronald D.; Ansell, Pamela; Breckman, Risa; Snow, Caitlin E.; Ehrlich, Amy R.; Greene, Michele G.; Greenberg, Debra F.; Raik, Barrie L.; Raymond, Joshua J.; Clabby, John F.; Fields, Suzanne D.; Breznay, Jennifer B.

    2011-01-01

    Geriatric psychosocial problems are prevalent and significantly affect the physical health and overall well-being of older adults. Geriatrics fellows require psychosocial education, and yet to date, geriatrics fellowship programs have not developed a comprehensive geriatric psychosocial curriculum. Fellowship programs in the New York tristate area…

  15. Breaking down the wall of silence around children affected by AIDS in Thailand to support their psychosocial health.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Naoko; Pridmore, Pat; Carr-Hill, Roy; Chaimuangdee, Kreangkrai

    2010-03-01

    This study examines the psychosocial needs of the children affected by AIDS. Eight primary school children aged 10-13 years who lost parents to AIDS or whose parents were living with HIV were closely followed for a period of one year and qualitative data on the psychosocial challenges they faced were collected using semi-structured interviews, observation, drawings and diaries. Data were also collected from their caregivers and classroom teachers using semi-structured interviews, as well as data from their classmates using a self-completion questionnaire. The findings strongly suggested that adults were creating a "wall of silence" around children affected by AIDS by hiding the parents' HIV status from them and avoid talking to them about HIV and AIDS. The silence was intended to protect the children from sadness, embarrassment, bullying and discrimination. In reality, however, the silence was found to have isolated them and increased their psychosocial vulnerability by blocking open communication with family members, peers and teachers, and left them to cope with their problems on their own. It is argued that to support the psychosocial health of these children, it is necessary for the adults to recognise the negative impact of silence and for the families and the school to be involved in a process of participatory learning and action to find culturally appropriate ways to break down the wall of silence, and promote more open communication. PMID:20390510

  16. Psychosocial issues in long-term space flight: overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palinkas, L. A.

    2001-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence of the individual and interpersonal problems that occurred during the Shuttle-Mir Space Program (SMSP) and other long-duration Russian/Soviet missions, and studies of personnel in other isolated and confined extreme (ICE) environments suggest that psychosocial elements of behavior and performance are likely to have a significant impact on the outcome of long-duration missions in space. This impact may range from individual decrements in performance, health and well being, to catastrophic mission failure. This paper reviews our current understanding of the psychosocial issues related to long duration space missions according to three different domains of behavior: the individual domain, the interpersonal domain and the organizational domain. Individual issues include: personality characteristics that predict successful performance, stress due to isolation and confinement and its effect on emotions and cognitive performance, adaptive and maladaptive coping styles and strategies, and requirements for the psychological support of astronauts and their families during the mission. Interpersonal issues include: impact of crew diversity and leadership styles on small group dynamics, adaptive and maladaptive features of ground-crew interactions, and processes of crew cohesion, tension and conflict. Organizational issues include: the influence of organizational culture and mission duration on individual and group performance, and managerial requirements for long duration missions. Improved screening and selection of astronaut candidates, leadership, coping and interpersonal skills training of personnel, and organizational change are key elements in the prevention of performance decrements on long-duration missions.

  17. Environment and Energy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Houghton Mifflin Science

    This self-contained module on environment and energy includes a range of fun activities that students can perform in the classroom and at home with family members. They impart important concepts such as observation, identification, measurement, and differentiation.

  18. Rigorous Schools and Classrooms: Leading the Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Ronald; Blackburn, Barbara R.

    2010-01-01

    Turn your school into a student-centered learning environment, where rigor is at the heart of instruction in every classroom. From the bestselling author of "Rigor is Not a Four-Letter Word," Barbara Blackburn, and award-winning educator Ronald Williamson, this comprehensive guide to establishing a schoolwide culture of rigor is for principals and…

  19. Adults in Prime Time: The Intergenerational Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, J. Michelle; Martin, Kay; Wircenski, Jerry L.

    1998-01-01

    Francis Tuttle Vo-Tech Center in Oklahoma serves adult and secondary students in the same classroom. Effective techniques for intergenerational classes include individualized learning activity packets, varied teaching methods, and peer teaching and mentoring. One challenge is accommodating the different learning-environment preferences of younger…

  20. The Heteronormative Classroom: Questioning and Liberating Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Ana Maria; Slesaransky-Poe, Graciela

    2010-01-01

    This article is a critical examination of the ideologies and practices that educators bring to bear on their classrooms in order to create inclusive, safe, and welcoming environments for all children, but particularly for children with gender variant behaviors and interests. Using a feminist perspective, this article offers a new conceptual lens…

  1. A Question Library for Classroom Voting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cline, Kelly; McGivney-Burelle, Jean; Zullo, Holly

    2012-01-01

    Take a minute and imagine the ideal classroom learning environment. What would it be like? How would students learn? What would they be doing? Certainly, each student would be actively engaged in the lesson, exploring and discovering the key points. Perhaps students would work collaboratively, discussing various concepts and figuring out central…

  2. Build a Bully-Free Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 2005

    2005-01-01

    For most teachers, more important than supplies and a spacious classroom is a happy learning environment in which each child feels welcome and safe. That is why it is so dismaying that according to one recent study, 43% of students worry about going to the restroom for fear of encountering a bully. The same study reported that a child is bullied…

  3. Utilizing the Internet to Facilitate Classroom Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Jan; Courts, Bari

    2010-01-01

    Traditional theories on classroom learning focus on fixed curriculum, static learning tools and believe learning is achieved through repetition and rote memorization. The instructor's role in a traditional learning environment focuses on providing direction to the student versus facilitating learning. As the technology age becomes more prevalent…

  4. Cultural Literacy in the Indian Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Charles G.

    The Indian student should draw upon the past and also think of the future. He should become familiar with one or two Indian spokesmen who have used their heritage in distinctive ways or who speak for their culture and its preservation. The student should examine his own environment, his classroom, and his associates to see if the direction that…

  5. Plants in the Classroom. [Environmental Education Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Independent School District 275, Minn.

    These four documents are concerned with methods of introducing ecology to elementary and kindergarten children. The first describes techniques for use in a classroom investigation of growing plants, emphasizing the interrelationships of plants and environment and is designed so that children learn variables must be controlled to arrive at valid…

  6. Calling All Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    1999-01-01

    Presents examples of innovative public/private partnerships that have successfully provided affordable telephone access to school classrooms. Contact information for each of the programs is provided. (GR)

  7. The Classroom Animal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on the earthworm. Reviews basic anatomical, behavioral, and reproductive facts. Offers suggestions for procuring, maintaining, and breeding colonies for classroom use. (ML)

  8. Psychosocial Precursors and Correlates of Migraine Headache.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levor, Robert M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Tested the interactions of migraine headache cycles and sufferers' daily experiences of stressful events, emotional arousal, and physical activity. Results support a model of migraine characterized by parallel physiological and psychosocial instability during a 4-day cycle and by an interaction of personality and behavioral (self-reported stress)…

  9. Psychosocial and Behavioral Aspects of Bariatric Surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David B. Sarwer; Thomas A. Wadden; Anthony N. Fabricatore

    2005-01-01

    Bariatric surgery has become an increasingly popular treatment option for individuals with extreme obesity (defined as a BMI ? 40 kg\\/m2) or those with less severe obesity accompanied by significant comorbidities. Sustained postoperative weight loss and improvements in obesity-related health problems make bariatric surgery the most effective treatment for this population. Nevertheless, most experts agree that psychosocial and behavioral factors

  10. Middle Adolescents' Dating Pathways and Psychosocial Adjustment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Patrick T.; Windle, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Studied interrelationships between dating patterns and trajectories of psychosocial functioning over a year in middle adolescents. Found that increasing casual dating was associated with rising problem behaviors and improved close friendship quality; pathways culminating in steady relationships were accompanied by increasing friendship discord,…

  11. The invention of the psychosocial: An introduction.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Rhodri

    2012-12-01

    Although the compound adjective 'psychosocial' was first used by academic psychologists in the 1890s, it was only in the interwar period that psychiatrists, psychologists and social workers began to develop detailed models of the psychosocial domain. These models marked a significant departure from earlier ideas of the relationship between society and human nature. Whereas Freudians and Darwinians had described an antagonistic relationship between biological instincts and social forces, interwar authors insisted that individual personality was made possible through collective organization. This argument was advanced by dissenting psychoanalysts such as Ian Suttie and Karen Horney; biologists including Julian Huxley and Hans Selye; philosophers (e.g. Olaf Stapledon), anthropologists (e.g. Margaret Mead) and physicians (e.g John Ryle and James Halliday). This introduction and the essays that follow sketch out the emergence of the psycho-social by examining the methods, tools and concepts through which it was articulated. New statistical technologies and physiological theories allowed individual pathology to be read as an index of broader social problems and placed medical expertise at the centre of new political programmes. In these arguments the intangible structure of social relationships was made visible and provided a template for the development of healthy and effective forms of social organization. By examining the range of techniques deployed in the construction of the psychosocial (from surveys of civilian neurosis, techniques of family observation through to animal models of psychotic breakdown) a critical genealogy of the biopolitical basis of modern society is developed. PMID:23626408

  12. Factors Affecting Psychosocial Adjustment of Deaf Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polat, Filiz

    2003-01-01

    A study involving 1,097 elementary and secondary students who are deaf found that degree of hearing loss, additional disability, and age at onset were negatively related to psychosocial adjustment. However, there was a positive relationship with the use of hearing aids, speech intelligibility, academic achievement, parental hearing status, and…

  13. Psychosocial profile in favor of organ donation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C Conesa; A Ríos; P Ramírez; M. M Rodríguez; P Rivas; M Canteras; P Parrilla

    2003-01-01

    IntroductionThe lack of organ donation continues to be a major limiting factor in transplantation. Our aims are: (1) to define the psychosocial profile against organ donation, and (2) to determine the impact of a law on the procurement and transplantation of organs based on “presumed consent” in the population.

  14. Psycho-Social Development of Child Labourers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaraudanjoki, Esa

    This paper examines the psychosocial development of Nepalese child laborers. The findings are discussed in relation to the questions of where and how learning occurs, whether transfer or generalizations occur from specific skills to other activities, and what role the socialization process plays in the psychological well-being of the Nepalese…

  15. The invention of the psychosocial: An introduction

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Rhodri

    2012-01-01

    Although the compound adjective ‘psychosocial’ was first used by academic psychologists in the 1890s, it was only in the interwar period that psychiatrists, psychologists and social workers began to develop detailed models of the psychosocial domain. These models marked a significant departure from earlier ideas of the relationship between society and human nature. Whereas Freudians and Darwinians had described an antagonistic relationship between biological instincts and social forces, interwar authors insisted that individual personality was made possible through collective organization. This argument was advanced by dissenting psychoanalysts such as Ian Suttie and Karen Horney; biologists including Julian Huxley and Hans Selye; philosophers (e.g. Olaf Stapledon), anthropologists (e.g. Margaret Mead) and physicians (e.g John Ryle and James Halliday). This introduction and the essays that follow sketch out the emergence of the psycho-social by examining the methods, tools and concepts through which it was articulated. New statistical technologies and physiological theories allowed individual pathology to be read as an index of broader social problems and placed medical expertise at the centre of new political programmes. In these arguments the intangible structure of social relationships was made visible and provided a template for the development of healthy and effective forms of social organization. By examining the range of techniques deployed in the construction of the psychosocial (from surveys of civilian neurosis, techniques of family observation through to animal models of psychotic breakdown) a critical genealogy of the biopolitical basis of modern society is developed. PMID:23626408

  16. Blood Pressure, Relative Weight, and Psychosocial Resources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    WILLIAM W. DRESSLER

    Research was conducted to determine the degree to which the effect of obesity on blood pressure was modified by sociocultural factors A measure of psychosocial resources incorporating both access to social supports and coping styles, was developed in research in St. Lucia, a West Indian culture. The study sample consisted of 98 40-49-year olds randomly selected from a community. Obesity

  17. Family Structure and Children's Psychosocial Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Zheng; Hou, Feng; Schimmele, Christoph M.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the influence of family structure on children's short-term psychosocial behavioral outcomes, including emotional disorder, conduct disorder, and prosocial behavior. The analysis uses five waves of data (1994-2003) from Canada's National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth to model how living in a cohabitational…

  18. Psychosocial mediators of a school-based tobacco prevention program in India: Results from the first year of Project MYTRI

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Sheri Lewis; Stigler, Melissa H.; Thompson, Marilyn S.; Arora, Monika; Perry, Cheryl L.; Reddy, K. Srinath; MacKinnon, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Each day in India, an estimated 5,500 youth initiate tobacco use, contributing to predictions that by 2020, tobacco will account for 13% of all deaths in India. Project MYTRI (Mobilizing Youth for Tobacco-Related Initiatives in India) is a multi-component school-based intervention designed to prevent and reduce tobacco use among adolescents in Delhi and Chennai, India. The intervention was implemented over the 2004-2006 school years and involved 6th and 8th grade students in 32 classrooms. Students participated in peer-led classroom activities involving games, competitions, and other activities intended to target a number of psychosocial risk factors believed to prevent tobacco use among urban Indian youth. To more fully understand how Project MYTRI influenced students' intentions to smoke or chew tobacco, the current study used mediation analysis to investigate whether Project MYTRI altered the psychosocial risk factors as intended, and whether the changes in psychosocial risk factors were, in turn, responsible for altering students' tobacco-use intentions. Multi-level mediation models were estimated using student data from baseline and one-year follow-up surveys. Results indicated that the psychosocial risk factors Knowledge of Health Effects, Normative Beliefs, Reasons to Use Tobacco, and Perceived Prevalence were significant mediators between the intervention activities and students' tobacco use intentions. Evidence of inconsistent mediation was observed for the Perceived Prevalence factor. These findings, combined with those from qualitative research and the second-year student data, will help to illuminate the impact of Project MYTRI on participating youth. PMID:19023657

  19. Educational needs of inpatient oncology nurses in providing psychosocial care.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng Hsuan; Raingruber, Bonnie

    2014-02-01

    Patients with cancer have multiple psychosocial needs during inpatient admissions. However, nurses often are not sure how to best approach those psychosocial needs. Therefore, the purpose of this survey was to determine the educational needs of inpatient oncology nurses in terms of providing psychosocial care to patients and to determine the barriers that inpatient nurses experience when providing psychosocial care. Twenty-six inpatient oncology RNs participated in an online survey that assessed barriers to psychosocial care as well as educational needs. Nurses identified that time, lack of patient privacy, nurses' emotional energy, confusion about clinical guidelines, lack of experience with screening tools, not knowing how to approach sensitive topics, and poor communication between team members undermine psychosocial care. Inpatient nurses need additional training to provide excellent psychosocial care. PMID:24476738

  20. Environment Environment

    E-print Network

    Delivery Economy Community Environment Economy Community Environment Economy Community Environment Environment Climate change programme EconomyCommunity #12;Climate change programme | 2 Climate change is one are described. Finally, the programme explains how the commitments will be delivered and monitored. Environment

  1. Evaluation in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becnel, Shirley

    Six classroom research-based instructional projects funded under Chapter 2 are described, and their outcomes are summarized. The projects each used computer hardware and software in the classroom setting. The projects and their salient points include: (1) the Science Technology Project, in which 48 teachers and 2,847 students in 18 schools used…

  2. Classroom Assessment in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shermis, Mark D.; DiVesta, Francis J.

    2011-01-01

    "Classroom Assessment in Action" clarifies the multi-faceted roles of measurement and assessment and their applications in a classroom setting. Comprehensive in scope, Shermis and Di Vesta explain basic measurement concepts and show students how to interpret the results of standardized tests. From these basic concepts, the authors then provide…

  3. Defining Authentic Classroom Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Bruce B.; Schmitt, Vicki L.; Allen, Justin P.

    2012-01-01

    A commonly advocated best practice for classroom assessment is to make the assessments authentic. Authentic is often used as meaning the mirroring of real-world tasks or expectations. There is no consensus, however, in the actual definition of the term or the characteristics of an authentic classroom assessment. Sometimes, the realistic component…

  4. Speaking in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBain, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Too much speaking and indiscipline in class is an on-going problem for any teacher, it is at its least disruptive and at most it destroys a good positive classroom atmosphere. This article recognizes this and continues this debate and suggests key clues to support teachers in their efforts to maintain a positive classroom atmosphere and discipline…

  5. Ideas for the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematics Teaching Incorporating Micromath, 2006

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author shares some of the activities for the classroom invented by Gill Hatch. One of those activities is the activity for older students, which is for the five-year-olds through to post-graduates. Card-sorting game, geometry games, algebra games, and loop games are also some of those activities for the classroom invented by…

  6. Classroom versus Online Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spivey, Michael F.; McMillan, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    The authors examined students' effort and performance using online versus traditional classroom testing procedures. The instructor and instructional methodology were the same in different sections of an introductory finance class. Only the procedure in which students were tested--online versus in the classroom--differed. The authors measured…

  7. Copyrights and the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.; Gluckman, Ivan B.

    1983-01-01

    A copyright infringement suit involving duplication of material for classroom use without permission or acknowledgement and related cases are discussed with reference to the fair use privilege, the Copyright Act of 1976, and congressional guidelines. Generally, fair use has been rejected as a blanket defense in classroom copying. (MJL)

  8. Classrooms and Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloome, David, Ed.

    This book is intended for researchers and teachers interested in literacy and concerned about classrooms as a context for literacy activity and learning. The book contains the following chapters: (1) "What It Means to be Literate about Classrooms" (Lyn Corno); (2) "Beyond Access: An Ethnographic Study of Reading and Writing in a Seventh Grade…

  9. Classroom Assessment. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Airasian, Peter W.

    "Classroom Assessment" is designed for students taking a first course in classroom assessment and measurement. It shows how assessment principles apply to the full range of teacher decision making, and not just the formal evaluation of student learning. For this reason, the book has been organized in a manner that follows the natural progression…

  10. Psychosocial Safety Climate, Work Conditions, and Emotions in the Workplace: A Malaysian Population-Based Work Stress Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohd Awang Idris; Maureen F. Dollard

    2011-01-01

    We integrated psychosocial safety climate (PSC) with the job demands and resources (JD-R; Bakker & Demerouti, 2007) framework to examine the impact of both job demands and job resources at work on employee depression, anger, and engagement. PSC refers to a climate for the protection of employee psychological health and safety. As PSC theoretically influences the working environment, we hypothesized

  11. Psychosocial and demographic correlates of objectively measured physical activity in structured and unstructured after-school recreation sessions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard R. Rosenkranz; Gregory J. Welk; Tanis J. Hastmann; David A. Dzewaltowski

    2011-01-01

    Most studies of psychosocial and demographic correlates of physical activity (PA) have examined relationships across various types of physical and social environments, rather than within a specific environmental behavior setting. The objective of this study was to investigate correlates of PA in structured and unstructured after-school recreation sessions. This study is cross-sectional. School records, questionnaires, and anthropometry were used to

  12. Children's Evaluations of Classroom Friend and Classroom Best Friend Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meurling, Carl-Johan Nils; Ray, Glen E.; LoBello, Steven G.

    1999-01-01

    Examined second-, third-, fifth-, and sixth graders' evaluations of a classroom friend and a classroom best-friend relationship. Found that children rated a classroom best friend higher than a classroom friend on caring, help/guidance, companionship, intimacy, conflict resolution, and exclusivity. Older children distinguished more between friends…

  13. Observed Classroom Quality Profiles of Kindergarten Classrooms in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salminen, Jenni; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Pakarinen, Eija; Siekkinen, Martti; Hannikainen, Maritta; Poikonen, Pirjo-Liisa; Rasku-Puttonen, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: The aim of the present study was to examine classroom quality profiles of kindergarten classrooms using a person-centered approach and to analyze these patterns in regard to teacher and classroom characteristics. Observations of the domains of Emotional Support, Classroom Organization, and Instructional Support were conducted in…

  14. A Stream Ecosystem in the Classroom

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Paul Tweed (Augusta High School REV)

    1995-06-30

    To build a model of the world of nature is never an easy task. In this case the lotic ecosystem for the classroom is no exception. However, with the right materials, some time, and student involvement you can have an operational classroom ecosystem, complete with organisms, physical environment, interactions and relationships, and natural succession. The classroom stream ecosystem provides a focus for biology class projects, lessons, experiments and research. It provides students with a sense of ownership in the class if they are involved in the development of the system early in the school year. I have found students simply standing and observing, conversing about their ideas, and actively wondering what is going on in the stream on a daily basis. The model is a magnet for student curiosity. If you have a chance to build one and use it, I recommend it strongly, and wish you luck in your new quest to make biology real and relevant to your students.

  15. The ethical implications of genetic testing in the classroom.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Ann T S; Rogers, Jill Cellars

    2011-07-01

    The development of classroom experiments where students examine their own DNA is frequently described as an innovative teaching practice. Often these experiences involve students analyzing their genes for various polymorphisms associated with disease states, like an increased risk for developing cancer. Such experiments can muddy the distinction between classroom investigation and medical testing. Although the goals and issues surrounding classroom genotyping do not directly align with those of clinical testing, instructors can use the guidelines and standards established by the medical genetics community when evaluating the ethics of human genotyping. We developed a laboratory investigation and discussion which allowed undergraduate science students to explore current DNA manipulation techniques to isolate their p53 gene, followed by a dialogue probing the ethical implications of examining their sample for various polymorphisms. Students never conducted genotyping on their samples because of the ethical concerns presented in this paper, so the discussion replaced the actual genetic testing in the class. A science faculty member led the laboratory portion, while a genetic counselor facilitated the discussion of the ethical concepts underlying genetic counseling: autonomy, beneficence, confidentiality, and justice. In their final papers, students demonstrated an understanding of the practice guidelines established by the genetics community and acknowledged the ethical considerations inherent in p53 genotyping. Given the burgeoning market for personalized medicine, teaching undergraduates about the psychosocial and ethical dimensions of human genetic testing is important and timely. Moreover, incorporating a genetic counselor in the classroom discussion provided a rich and dynamic discussion of human genetic testing. PMID:21774053

  16. Teacher Practices and Hybrid Space in a Fifth-Grade Mathematics Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cribbs, Jennifer D.; Linder, Sandra M.

    2013-01-01

    Providing students with a classroom environment that allows for meaningful learning experiences is important for students to develop deep and long lasting understanding about mathematics. This article adds to the literature on learning environments in mathematics by presenting a case study of one fifth-grade mathematics teacher and her classroom

  17. Classroom Management and the Librarian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Heidi; Hays, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    As librarians take on more instructional responsibilities, the need for classroom management skills becomes vital. Unfortunately, classroom management skills are not taught in library school and therefore, many librarians are forced to learn how to manage a classroom on the job. Different classroom settings such as one-shot instruction sessions…

  18. Psychosocial Impact of Lymphedema: A Systematic Review of Literature from 2004–2011

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Mei R.; Ridner, Sheila H.; Hu, Sophia H.; Stewart, Bob R.; Cormier, Janice N.; Armer, Jane M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This systematic review aimed to evaluate the level of evidence of contemporary peer-reviewed literature published from 2004–2011 on the psychosocial impact of lymphedema. Methods Eleven electronic databases were searched and 1,311 articles retrieved; 23 met inclusion criteria. Twelve articles utilized qualitative methodology and 11 employed quantitative methodology. An established quality assessment tool was used to assess the quality of the included studies. Results The overall quality of the 23 included studies was adequate. A critical limitation of current literature is the lack of conceptual or operational definitions for the concept of psychosocial impact. Quantitative studies showed statistically significant poorer social well-being in persons with lymphedema, including perceptions related to body image, appearance, sexuality, and social barriers. No statistically significant differences were found between persons with and without lymphedema in the domains of emotional well-being (happy or sad) and psychological distress (depression and anxiety). All 12 of the qualitative studies consistently described negative psychological impact (negative self-identity, emotional disturbance, psychological distress) and negative social impact (marginalization, financial burden, perceived diminished sexuality, social isolation, perceived social abandonment, public insensitivity, non-supportive work environment). Factors associated with psychosocial impact were also identified. Conclusions Lymphedema has a negative psychosocial impact on affected individuals. The current review sheds light on the conceptualization and operationalization of the definitions of psychosocial impact with respect to lymphedema. Development of a lymphedema-specific instrument is needed to better characterize the impact of lymphedema and to examine the factors contributing to these outcomes in cancer and non-cancer-related populations. PMID:23044512

  19. Classroom Design- Lessons from the Technology Trenches

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site makes a CD available for purchase of the following instructional program: Beyond the instructor's skill, technology has had one of the single largest impacts in how students and faculty interact in the classroom. But the nature and boundaries of the learning space are constantly changing. Institutions are challenged to build classrooms smartly, ensuring technology supports the learning process, and that precious dollars and equipment are not wasted on learning environments that are factored late into the planning process. To design an electronic classroom that will have viability long-term, you have to design from the inside out. Changing your perspective will help you guide your campus toward decisions that not only support the educational mission with technology, but favorably impact many other factors, from cost effectiveness and upkeep, to future proofing ensuring that your campus classrooms will even have the capability to accommodate new technology. Join us for this informative webcast that will bring you insights on technology-enabled classrooms from different types of institutions- from the perspective of the technology specialist. Learn what has worked- and perhaps more importantly, what has not worked- from their perspectives. The insights you gain will ease your technology planning, inform your design process, and could save you thousands of dollars in technology purchases and upkeep.

  20. Psychosocial implications of blepharoptosis and dermatochalasis.

    PubMed Central

    Bullock, J D; Warwar, R E; Bienenfeld, D G; Marciniszyn, S L; Markert, R J

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate, for the first time, the psychosocial implications of blepharoptosis and dermatochalasis. METHODS: Two hundred ten individuals rated whole-face photographs of a series of patients on the basis of 11 different personal characteristics: intelligence, throat, friendliness, health, trustworthiness, hard work, mental illness, financial success, attractiveness, alcoholism, and happiness. Preoperative and postoperative photographs of both male and female patients with bilateral blepharoptosis and/or dermatochalasis were used. The paired t test was used to compare preoperative and postoperative ratings on the 11 characteristics. RESULTS: The preoperative photographs were rated more negatively than the postoperative photographs (P < .01-P < .001) on all 11 characteristics for both male and female patients by the 210 study subjects. CONCLUSIONS: Members of society seem to view individuals with blepharoptosis and dermatochalasis negatively. These psychosocial attitudes may lead to unjust bias toward affected patients, and surgical correction likely provides benefits beyond improved visual function. PMID:11797321

  1. The psychosocial challenges of conducting counterinsurgency operations.

    PubMed

    Arincorayan, Derrick; Applewhite, Larry; Almeida, Veronica; DiJoseph, Erica; Romero, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Counterinsurgency (COIN) operations have served as the fundamental component of the nation's military strategy. Without the established boundaries of conventional operations, switching between diplomatic and combative roles can expose Soldiers to unique stressors when conducting COIN operations. An exploratory study of descriptive data obtained from a retrospective records review of 140 service members deployed to Operation Enduring Freedom identified and described problems in psychosocial functioning. Behavioral health records for the first 7 months of the deployment and throughout the first year of redeployment were reviewed. The most common problems reported by Soldiers were operational stress characterized by anxiety, fear, irritability, frustration, and isolation. Additionally, most of the Soldiers engaged services for psychosocial challenges within the first year of returning from deployment. Establishing reliable access to behavioral healthcare has emerged as an essential component of total force protection in COIN deployments. PMID:25830794

  2. Psychosocial risk factors for coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Glozier, Nick; Tofler, Geoffrey H; Colquhoun, David M; Bunker, Stephen J; Clarke, David M; Hare, David L; Hickie, Ian B; Tatoulis, James; Thompson, David R; Wilson, Alison; Branagan, Maree G

    2013-08-01

    In 2003, the National Heart Foundation of Australia published a position statement on psychosocial risk factors and coronary heart disease (CHD). This consensus statement provides an updated review of the literature on psychosocial stressors, including chronic stressors (in particular, work stress), acute individual stressors and acute population stressors, to guide health professionals based on current evidence. It complements a separate updated statement on depression and CHD. Perceived chronic job strain and shift work are associated with a small absolute increased risk of developing CHD, but there is limited evidence regarding their effect on the prognosis of CHD. Evidence regarding a relationship between CHD and job (in)security, job satisfaction, working hours, effort-reward imbalance and job loss is inconclusive. Expert consensus is that workplace programs aimed at weight loss, exercise and other standard cardiovascular risk factors may have positive outcomes for these risk factors, but no evidence is available regarding the effect of such programs on the development of CHD. Social isolation after myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with an adverse prognosis. Expert consensus is that although measures to reduce social isolation are likely to produce positive psychosocial effects, it is unclear whether this would also improve CHD outcomes. Acute emotional stress may trigger MI or takotsubo ("stress") cardiomyopathy, but the absolute increase in transient risk from an individual stressor is low. Psychosocial stressors have an impact on CHD, but clinical significance and prevention require further study. Awareness of the potential for increased cardiovascular risk among populations exposed to natural disasters and other conditions of extreme stress may be useful for emergency services response planning. Wider public access to defibrillators should be available where large populations gather, such as sporting venues and airports, and as part of the response to natural and other disasters. PMID:23909539

  3. Psychosocial aspects of child and adolescent obesity

    PubMed Central

    Nieman, Peter; LeBlanc, Claire MA

    2012-01-01

    In addition to counselling families about regular physical activity and healthy nutrition, clinicians need to identify and help them to address the psychosocial factors that may be contributing to their child’s or adolescent’s obesity. Affected individuals may suffer from depression, low self-esteem, bullying, and weight bias, experiences that can make achieving desired health outcomes more difficult. Clinicians should try to identify these underlying stressors and ensure that appropriate counselling is implemented. PMID:23543619

  4. How Do Classroom Conditions and Children's Risk for School Problems Contribute to Children's Behavioral Engagement in Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downer, Jason T.; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E; Pianta, Robert C.

    2007-01-01

    The primary objective of this investigation was to examine the way in which two facets of the classroom environment (classroom quality and instructional contexts) and children's risk for school problems combine to predict children's behavioral engagement in third-grade classrooms. As part of the National Institute of Child Health and Human…

  5. Evidence Based Psychosocial Interventions in Substance Use

    PubMed Central

    Jhanjee, Sonali

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been significant progress and expansion in the development of evidence-based psychosocial treatments for substance abuse and dependence. A literature review was undertaken using the several electronic databases (PubMed, Cochrane Database of systemic reviews and specific journals, which pertain to psychosocial issues in addictive disorders and guidelines on this topic). Overall psychosocial interventions have been found to be effective. Some interventions, such as cognitive behavior therapy, motivational interviewing and relapse prevention, appear to be effective across many drugs of abuse. Psychological treatment is more effective when prescribed with substitute prescribing than when medication or psychological treatment is used alone, particularly for opiate users. The evidence base for psychological treatment needs to be expanded and should also include research on optimal combinations of psychological therapies and any particular matching effects, if any. Psychological interventions are an essential part of the treatment regimen and efforts should be made to integrate evidence-based interventions in all substance use disorder treatment programs. PMID:24860208

  6. Combining psychosocial treatment with pharmacotherapy for alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Roger D; Kueppenbender, Karsten D

    2006-12-01

    Pharmacotherapy for alcohol dependence is always delivered in a psychosocial context that may affect the outcome of the treatment. The rigorous study of different psychotherapeutic treatments for alcohol dependence has shown several distinct approaches to be effective. This article reviews the combination of alcohol dependence pharmacotherapies, including disulfiram, naltrexone, and acamprosate, with different psychosocial interventions. Many psychosocial interventions for alcohol dependence, including Alcoholics Anonymous, can be integrated successfully with pharmacotherapy. Psychosocial interventions, ranging from brief medical management to more intensive manualized psychotherapies, have all been shown to produce positive outcomes in certain studies, depending on the specific medication and the study context. Particularly successful combinations may include the use of behavioral marital therapy plus a disulfiram contract for patients taking that medication, and the combination of naltrexone or acamprosate with cognitive-behavioral therapy or psychosocial support. Ongoing research examining the optimal combinations of medications with different psychosocial treatments for alcohol dependence may further inform the field. PMID:17114954

  7. [Child and adolescent obesity, psychosocial consequences and treatment strategies].

    PubMed

    Hartmann, A S; Hilbert, A

    2013-04-01

    Being overweight and obese in childhood and adolescence is associated with various somatic and psychosocial sequelae. Psychosocial problems can negatively influence the future weight trajectory. Therefore, weight reduction or stabilization should be complemented by the treatment of significant psychosocial problems. This review provides an overview of the psychosocial problems associated with being overweight and obese in childhood and adolescence. Evidence on weight-related stigmatization and discrimination, eating disorder symptoms, general psychopathology, impaired quality of life, lowered self-esteem, social skill deficits, as well as academic problems is summarized. Furthermore, state-of-the-art diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for the psychosocial problems are summarized. Future research should focus on the development of interventions targeting the destigmatization of obesity, as experiences of stigmatization and discrimination likely aggravate the psychosocial sequelae of overweight and obesity. PMID:23529599

  8. The Psychosocial Work Environment and Maternal Postpartum Depression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rada K. Dagher; Patricia M. McGovern; Bruce H. Alexander; Bryan E. Dowd; Laurie K. Ukestad; David J. McCaffrey

    2009-01-01

    Background  Postpartum depression is a debilitating mental disorder affecting women after childbirth. This study examined the correlates\\u000a of postpartum depression at 11 weeks after childbirth, focusing on work-related stressors and applying the job demand–control–support\\u000a model.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Method  Investigators recruited a prospective cohort of 817 employed Minnesota women when hospitalized for childbirth in 2001. Trained\\u000a interviewers collected data in person and by telephone at enrollment

  9. Buffering against Performance Classroom Goal Structures: The Importance of Autonomy Support and Classroom Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciani, Keith D.; Middleton, Michael J.; Summers, Jessica J.; Sheldon, Kennon M.

    2010-01-01

    The culture of schooling in the United States has become increasingly focused on outwardly proving student competence. Some achievement goal theorists suggest that a major casualty of performance-oriented classroom environments may be student motivation for developing and improving competence. The present study extends across theoretical…

  10. Classrooms matter: The design of virtual classrooms influences gender disparities in computer science classes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sapna Cheryan; Andrew N. Meltzoff; Saenam Kim

    2011-01-01

    Three experiments examined whether the design of virtual learning environments influences undergraduates’ enrollment intentions and anticipated success in introductory computer science courses. Changing the design of a virtual classroom – from one that conveys current computer science stereotypes to one that does not – significantly increased women’s interest and anticipated success in computer science. Effects occurred even when the learning

  11. Classrooms Matter: The Design of Virtual Classrooms Influences Gender Disparities in Computer Science Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheryan, Sapna; Meltzoff, Andrew N.; Kim, Saenam

    2011-01-01

    Three experiments examined whether the design of virtual learning environments influences undergraduates' enrollment intentions and anticipated success in introductory computer science courses. Changing the design of a virtual classroom--from one that conveys current computer science stereotypes to one that does not--significantly increased…

  12. Outdoor Classroom Adventures

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kathy Jacobs Maher

    2010-02-01

    In this outdoor classroom adventure, students learn to work cooperatively when facing challenges during overnight camping trips. Perhaps most importantly, students gain direction and purpose in their lives. They also gain self-assurance, which in turn giv

  13. The Classroom Animal: Mealworms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, David C., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Describes appearance, longevity, and changes in each step of the mealworm life cycle. Guidelines for starting a classroom colony are given with housing and care instructions. Suggested observations, activities, and questions for students are included. (DH)

  14. Critters in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert W.; Fleisher, Paul

    1984-01-01

    The use of invertebrates as classroom "pets" can develop students' skills in scientific inquiry and instill respect for science. Few materials are needed for projects involving invertebrates. Suggested activities using snails, crickets, earthworms, crayfish, and guppies are offered. (DF)

  15. The Classroom Space Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verbickas, Sarah

    2002-01-01

    Introduces the Classroom Space project aimed at revitalizing science education at Key Stages 3 and 4 by using exciting examples from Space Science and Astronomy to illustrate key science concepts. (Author/YDS)

  16. For the Classroom: Scrimshaw.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Current, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Procedures are described for practicing the art of scrimshaw in the classroom. Several materials are suggested for use. These include beef soup bones, old piano keys, nails, sandpaper, and lampblack or charcoal. (SA)

  17. Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site provides information on various classroom assessment techniques (CATs) such as primary trait analysis, using anonymous assessments, goal ranking and matching, self assessment, active learning, transfer and applied learning, and group work assessment.

  18. Developing a reliable and valid scale to measure psychosocial acuity.

    PubMed

    Klett, Stacey; Firn, Janice; Abney, Nina; Battles, Alethia; Harrington, Jack; Vantine, Aimee

    2014-01-01

    This tool is a unique comprehensive scale and methodology to measure the psychosocial acuity of patients and families across a health care continuum. Coupled with other measures, psychosocial acuity can tell a complete and compelling story of social work contributions and aid in resource alignment. Accurately conveying the full scope of social work value to anyone, especially health system leadership, requires that the psychosocial acuity of the patient and family be measured and factored into the equation, along with productivity, time spent, and services provided. The development and utilization of the Psychosocial Acuity Tool is the focus of this publication. PMID:24835092

  19. Psychosocial Assessment of Living Organ Donors: Clinical and Ethical Considerations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary Ellen Olbrisch; Sharon M. Benedict

    2001-01-01

    This article outlines psychosocial and ethical issues to be considered when evaluating potential living organ donors. Six types of living donors are described: genetically related, emotionally related, \\

  20. Psychosocial mediators of ethnic disparities in Allostatic Load /

    E-print Network

    Tomfohr, Lianne Marie

    2013-01-01

    Smoking (yes) Alcohol Use (drink/wk) Psychosocial Stressors Discriminationand discrimination. Non-stress psychological variables (depression, hostility, and interpersonal support) and health practices (smoking,

  1. Solar Powered Classroom

    ScienceCinema

    none

    2013-06-27

    A group of fourth graders in Durham, North Carolina, are showing America the way to a clean energy future. They are installing solar panels on their classroom roof for a project that goes above and beyond a normal day in school. From researching solar panel installation, to generating funds for the project via Kickstarter, these are students who put their plans into action. Their accomplishments go beyond the classroom and stress the importance of getting people of all ages involved in renewable energy.

  2. Solar Powered Classroom

    SciTech Connect

    none

    2013-06-13

    A group of fourth graders in Durham, North Carolina, are showing America the way to a clean energy future. They are installing solar panels on their classroom roof for a project that goes above and beyond a normal day in school. From researching solar panel installation, to generating funds for the project via Kickstarter, these are students who put their plans into action. Their accomplishments go beyond the classroom and stress the importance of getting people of all ages involved in renewable energy.

  3. Cable in the Classroom

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Cable in the Classroom is an "initiative by Canada's cable companies and programming services to provide copyright cleared, commercial free, educationally relevant television programming for Canadian schools." Included are a list of hyperlinked program service providers, a searchable and browsable list of classroom TV programs all over Canada, and a large list of Internet resources including schools on the Internet, resources for teachers, and information on getting your school on the Internet. http://www.cableducation.ca/

  4. Data for the Classroom

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Data for the Classroom collection gathers datasets that have accompanying instructional materials or other pertinent information for using the dataset in a classroom setting for grades K-16. The data may be numerical, visual, maps, charts, tables or images. The data may be observational, remotely sensed or model data. The primary component is that there are materials supporting the use and understanding of the data either by educators or directly by students. Additionally, the dataset itself is desribed.

  5. Creating a Positive Work Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The author believes happy staff make for happy classrooms and happy classrooms make for happy children. However, with all the pressures facing child care programs--from the economy to state requirements--creating and maintaining a positive work environment becomes tougher and tougher. In this article, the author discusses the importance of…

  6. [Psychosocial aspects of childhood epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Sell Salazar, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    Epilepsy is without a doubt one of the most ancient and enigmatic conditions in the history of medicine, as it was already described in remote times. From the ancestral obscure understanding of epilepsy to the present, there have been important scientific advances in the knowledge of its diagnosis and treatment. The management of a child with epilepsy requires following a protocol that includes a detailed clinical and laboratory evaluation. All chronic diseases, and also epilepsy, are felt as a double aggression: 1) Internal, related to the changes that the disease causes, and 2) external, related to the tests, medications, excessive protection, and all the rules and prohibitions that are applied. The doctor (pediatrician, pediatric neurologist or epileptologist), when initiating a relationship with the child with epilepsy, is going to propose "a new code", often hard to accept. He is going to intervene far away from the crisis, or soon after it happened, in an environment characterized by significant anguish for the family. There is no question that the disease is difficult for the child, as it is also for the parents, who become responsible for a different type of care, are preoccupied daily about their son taking the medication regularly, and suffer awaiting for another crisis to happen. Epilepsy, more than other conditions, creates a high level of restlessness because of the spectacular, dramatic nature of its presentation and for the ancestral myths still attributed to it. For all these reasons, the diagnosis of epilepsy is frequently accompanied by three relevant reactions in the family: anxiety, guilt and aggressiveness. The intervention of the doctor in the treatment of childhood epilepsy must be "global". With mystic devotion, the doctor must embrace the true Hippocratic concept of patient care. PMID:19239997

  7. Investigation of VOCs and PM{sub 2.5} concentrations at two classrooms with or without air conditioning in Hong Kong

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, M.; Lee, S.C.

    1999-07-01

    The indoor and outdoor levels of VOCs and PM{sub 2.5} were measured at two classrooms of two schools; one is naturally ventilated, while the other had two window type air-conditioners and four exhaust fans. The ventilation rates at the two classrooms were 0.937 ACH (Classroom A) and 0.217 ACH (Classroom B). Both classrooms had ventilation requirements below the ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 assuming that the outdoor contaminant levels were within the ASHRAE requirements. The abundance and concentration of volatile organic species found indoors and outdoors of Classroom B were higher than Classroom A since Classroom B is located in a heavily trafficked area. The classroom without air-conditioner (A) had higher I/O ratios than Classroom B due to the higher ventilation rates. The air-conditioner, though not providing enough fresh air to the classroom, might act as a barrier for outdoor pollutants. The reduction of PM2.5 levels Classroom A was 30% and at Classroom B was 67%. The air-conditioning system in Classroom B could be removing some of the fine particulate matter from the outdoor supply air before entering the classroom. The use of air-conditioners can keep outdoor pollutants from entering the classroom, but could increase the level of indoor produced pollutant. From this study, air-conditioning systems in classroom somehow prevent pollutants from entering, and besides used to lowering environmental noise should be encouraged at schools located in heavily polluted environments.

  8. Using the inverted classroom to teach software engineering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerald C. Gannod; Janet E. Burge; Michael T. Helmick

    2008-01-01

    An inverted classroom is a teaching environment that mixes the use of technology with hands-on activities. In an inverted classroom, typical in-class lecture time is replaced with labo- ratory and in-class activities. Outside class time, lectures are delivered over some other medium such as video on- demand. In a three credit hour course for instance, contact hours are spent having

  9. Infusing learner-centered strategies into the classroom.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Sara J

    2012-10-01

    As an instructor, how do you engage the learners? This paper illustrates the value of using learner-centered teaching strategies to accomplish this goal in your classroom. Learner-centered teaching utilizes the instructor as a facilitator and creates an active learning environment in which the student takes responsibility of learning. Various techniques will be described as well as the practical application of leaner-centered teaching in the classroom. PMID:23899197

  10. Building a Sustaining Classroom Climate for Purposeful Ethical Citizenship

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Darcia Narvaez

    \\u000a In this chapter the author argues that in an age and society where children and adolescents have eroding support for building\\u000a good lives, best practice for classroom teaching needs to be extended beyond mastery learning climates and caring communities.\\u000a The author proposes building “sustaining climates”. A sustaining classroom climate is more than a good learning environment\\u000a and it is more

  11. Virtual Classroom Participants' Views for Effective Synchronous Education Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karaman, Selcuk; Aydemir, Melike; Kucuk, Sevda; Yildirim, Gurkan

    2013-01-01

    Virtual classroom (VC) is the preferred application in distance education since it provides simultaneous interaction and a communication environment between the student and the instructor. The aim of this study is to determine the key components which make VC sessions effective in terms of environment and method. Determination of these components…

  12. Further Fostering Intrinsic Motivation in the Montessori Elementary Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, Victoria A.

    2013-01-01

    The Montessori classroom appears to be the ideal learning environment for children throughout elementary and middle school. It is based on the philosophy of Dr. Maria Montessori which describes an environment tailored to the Sensitive Periods of children, prepared with materials appropriate for the age and abilities of the children in a particular…

  13. Wimba Classroom Version 6.0

    E-print Network

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    Wimba Classroom Version 6.0 Participant Guide #12;Wimba Classroom 6.0 Participant Guide ___________________________________ 1 The Wimba Classroom Interface ______________________________________________ 1 Text Chat Area and Video in Wimba Classroom ________________________________________10 Authorizing Wimba

  14. Barnes and Sutherland Researching classroom interactions

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Barnes and Sutherland Researching classroom interactions: A methodology for teachers on classroom learning is "conducted jointly by outsiders and insiders" (p 250). The work we present classroom interactions which incorporates the perspectives of both classroom teachers and educational

  15. Environmental enrichment requires adult neurogenesis to facilitate the recovery from psychosocial stress

    PubMed Central

    Schloesser, R J; Lehmann, M; Martinowich, K; Manji, H K; Herkenham, M

    2010-01-01

    The subgranular zone of the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus contains a pool of neural stem cells that continuously divide and differentiate into functional granule cells. It has been shown that production of new hippocampal neurons is necessary for amelioration of stress-induced behavioral changes by antidepressants in animal models of depression. The survival of newly born hippocampal neurons is decreased by chronic psychosocial stress and increased by exposure to enriched environments. These observations suggest the existence of a link between hippocampal neurogenesis, stress-induced behavioral changes, and the beneficial effects of enriched environment. To show causality, we subjected transgenic mice with conditionally suppressed neurogenesis to psychosocial stress followed by environmental enrichment. First, we showed that repeated social defeat coupled with chronic exposure to an aggressor produces robust and quantifiable indices of submissive and depressive-like behaviors; second, subsequent exposure to an enriched environment led to extinction of the submissive phenotype, while animals exposed to an impoverished environment retained the submissive phenotype; and third, enrichment was not effective in reversing the submissive and depressive-like behaviors in transgenic mice lacking neurogenesis. Our data show two main findings. First, living in an enriched environment is highly effective in extinguishing submissive behavioral traits developed during chronic social stress, and second, these effects are critically dependent on adult neurogenesis, indicating that beneficial behavioral adaptations are dependent on intact adult neurogenesis. PMID:20308988

  16. Psychosocial correlates of immune responsiveness and illness episodes in US Air Force Academy cadets undergoing basic cadet training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, D. J.; Meehan, R. T.; Robinson, C.; Smith, M. L.; Mabry, T. R.

    1995-01-01

    This study examined psychosocial correlates of immune function and illness in 89 male first-year US Air Force Academy cadets. A psychosocial questionnaire was administered to cadets prior to their arrival at the academy and was readministered during cadet orientation and during the stressful environment of Basic Cadet Training (BCT). Immune responsiveness was analyzed by PHA-, PMA-, or anti-CD3-stimulated thymidine uptake in mononuclear leucocytes. Illness episodes were assessed via medical chart review and self-reported symptoms. There were significant increases in distress levels as cadets entered BCT. No psychosocial measure assessed prior to arrival at the academy predicted level of PHA-, PMA-, and anti-CD3-stimulated thymidine uptake or risk of illness. However, hostility levels reported during BCT predicted risk of illness in the four weeks following psychosocial assessment (odds ratio = 7.1; 95% confidence interval: 1.4-36.1). Elevated response to environmental stressors and lower well-being levels also predicted impending illness, but only in the cohort of cadets who had not contracted food poisoning prior to assessment during BCT (OR = 9.3, CI = 1.9-46.7; OR = 0.09, CI = 0.02-0.53). These results suggest that self-report measures of hostility, response to environmental stressors and well-being may be useful predictors of impending illness episodes in males encountering high stress environments.

  17. Psychosocial Factors Related to Cannabis Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brook, Judith S.; Lee, Jung Yeon; Finch, Stephen J.; Koppel, Jonathan; Brook, David W.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the association between psychosocial risk and protective factors and cannabis use disorders (CUDs) in a cohort of African American and Puerto Rican young adults. A representative sample (N=838) from the East Harlem area of New York City was assessed at four points in time (at mean ages 14.1, 19.2, 24.5, and 29.2). The psychosocial measures came from six domains: personality attributes, family, peer, work, neighborhood, and substance use The psychosocial measures were assessed at each of the first three waves of the study, and CUDs were assessed at the fourth and final wave of the study. Multivariate logistic regression and a cumulative risk analysis were conducted. Increased psychological symptoms (OR=1.21; 95% CI, 1.05–1.39; p<.01), problems resulting from cannabis use (OR=2.69; 95% CI, 1.33–5.46; p<.01), frequent arguments with one’s partner (OR=1.84; 95% CI, 1.09–3.10; p<.05), high levels of deviance (OR=1.81; 95% CI, 1.21–2.71; p<.01), and frequent acts of violence directed toward the participant (OR=1.19; 95% CI, 1.01–1.42; p<.05) were all associated with an increased risk for CUDs. An increase in the number of risks was associated with an increase in the probability of having CUDs at the fourth wave (again, at a mean age of 29.2). A decrease in the number of risk factors may lead to a decrease in CUDs. PMID:22014255

  18. 23. CLASSROOM 302 (SECOND FLOOR). VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. OTHER CLASSROOMS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. CLASSROOM 302 (SECOND FLOOR). VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. OTHER CLASSROOMS IN EAST AND WEST WINGS ARE SIMILAR - Frederika Bremer Intermediate School, 1214 Lowry Avenue North, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  19. 22. CLASSROOM 303 (SECOND FLOOR). VIEW TO NORTHWEST. OTHER CLASSROOMS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. CLASSROOM 303 (SECOND FLOOR). VIEW TO NORTHWEST. OTHER CLASSROOMS IN EAST AND WEST WINGS ARE SIMILAR - Frederika Bremer Intermediate School, 1214 Lowry Avenue North, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  20. Overview of the psychosocial impact of disasters.

    PubMed

    Leon, Gloria R

    2004-01-01

    The psychosocial sequelae can be intense and of long duration in the aftermath of natural and technological disasters, as well as terrorist attacks. Post-traumatic stress symptoms and full syndrome disorder, depression, anxiety, somatic complaints, and excessive alcohol use have been demonstrated consistently, particularly following large-scale disasters. This paper examines the psychological research conducted at various intervals after extensive natural disasters, the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl technological accidents, and recent terrorist events in the United States. Factors predictive of the emergence of emotional distress and psychological and physical problems following a disaster also are discussed. PMID:15453154

  1. Low Back Pain Exacerbated by Psychosocial Factors

    PubMed Central

    Derebery, V. Jane; Tullis, William H.

    1986-01-01

    Patients with low back pain can pose a considerable challenge when there is evidence of a nonorganic or functional overlay. These patients can become frustrating examples of chronicity if proper guidelines in diagnosis and management are not followed. An exploration into the psychosocial factors affecting a patient is essential. Several simple questions and tests can facilitate this process. Significant organic lesions should be ruled out with a minimum of appropriate diagnostic procedures. A supportive and conservative treatment regimen with the goal of returning patients to full functioning as soon as possible is recommended. Patients should be encouraged to take an active role in their own treatment. PMID:2940754

  2. Psychosocial factors in the development of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Steptoe, A

    2000-07-01

    The role of psychosocial factors in human hypertension is being investigated with three research strategies: epidemiological studies of blood pressure, psychological characteristics and life experience in population samples, naturalistic studies of the covariation between blood pressure, psychological state and everyday life events, and experimental studies of cardiovascular and neuroendocrine responses to behavioural stimuli. This article summarizes recent research on hypertension and psychological traits, job characteristics and social support, emphasizing the convergent knowledge deriving from complementary research strategies. The roles of stress-induced cardiovascular responses and prejudicial life styles in mediating influences on risk of hypertension are discussed. PMID:10949069

  3. Emotions for sale: cigarette advertising and women's psychosocial needs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stacey J Anderson; P M Ling

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore messages of psychosocial needs satisfaction in cigarette advertising targeting women and implications for tobacco control policy. Methods: Analysis of internal tobacco industry documents and public advertising collections. Results: Tobacco industry market research attempted to identify the psychosocial needs of different groups of women, and cigarette advertising campaigns for brands that women smoke explicitly aimed to position cigarettes

  4. Psychosocial screening and assessment in oncology and palliative care settings

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Luigi; Caruso, Rosangela; Sabato, Silvana; Massarenti, Sara; Nanni, Maria G.; the UniFe Psychiatry Working Group Coauthors

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric and psychosocial disorders among cancer patients have been reported as a major consequence of the disease and treatment. The problems in applying a pure psychiatric approach have determined the need for structuring more defined methods, including screening for distress and emotional symptoms and a more specific psychosocial assessment, to warrant proper care to cancer patients with psychosocial problems. This review examines some of the most significant issues related to these two steps, screening and assessment of psychosocial morbidity in cancer and palliative care. With regard to this, the many different variables, such as the factors affecting individual vulnerability (e.g., life events, chronic stress and allostatic load, well-being, and health attitudes) and the psychosocial correlates of medical disease (e.g., psychiatric disturbances, psychological symptoms, illness behavior, and quality of life) which are possibly implicated not only in “classical” psychiatric disorders but more broadly in psychosocial suffering. Multidimensional tools [e.g., and specific psychosocially oriented interview (e.g., the Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research)] represent a way to screen for and assess emotional distress, anxiety and depression, maladaptive coping, dysfunctional attachment, as well as other significant psychosocial dimensions secondary to cancer, such as demoralization and health anxiety. Cross-cultural issues, such as language, ethnicity, race, and religion, are also discussed as possible factors influencing the patients and families perception of illness, coping mechanisms, psychological response to a cancer diagnosis. PMID:25709584

  5. Psychosocial interventions for reducing fatigue during cancer treatment in adults

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. M. Goedendorp; M. F. M. Gielissen; C. A. H. H. V. M. Verhagen; G. Bleijenberg

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fatigue is a common symptom in cancer patients receiving active treatment. There are a limited number of reviews evaluating interventions for fatigue during active treatment, and they are restricted to patients with advanced cancer, or to patients during radiotherapy. To date there is no systematic review on psychosocial interventions for fatigue during cancer treatment. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate if psychosocial

  6. The Psychosocial Problems of Cancer Patients: A Prospective Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Wayne; And Others

    The course of psychosocial adjustment to cancer was examined in 105 adults with cancer of the lung, breast and skin. Half of the patients received a program of systematic psychosocial rehabilitation plus evaluation, and the other half received only an evaluation, consisting of a series of psychometric instruments and a problem-oriented structured…

  7. Psychosocial knowledge and allopathic medicine: Points of convergence and departure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Russell Searight

    1994-01-01

    The past 15 years have witnessed a call for allopathic medicine to incorporate psychosocial perspectives into education and clinical practice. While a biopsychosocial perspective has influenced academic medicine in areas such as primary care and psychiatry, its direct impact on clinical medicine has been questionable. One barrier to the incorporation of psychosocial information into medicine which has only recently received

  8. Friendships Moderate Psychosocial Maladjustment in Socially Anxious Early Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erath, Stephen A.; Flanagan, Kelly S.; Bierman, Karen L.; Tu, Kelly M.

    2010-01-01

    Close mutual friendships may help protect socially anxious early adolescents against concurrent psychosocial risks. This study investigated whether close mutual friendships moderated associations among social anxiety and several indices of psychosocial maladjustment (loneliness, peer victimization, and low social self-efficacy) in early…

  9. Psychosocial Correlates of Alexithymia in a Rural Adolescent Residential Population

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephanie Powell; Kenneth M. Coll; Ann Trotter; Patti Thobro; Robin Haas

    2011-01-01

    This study used a multimethod approach to evaluate the relationship of alexithymia (as measured by the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale and the 30-item Emotion Awareness Questionnaire), psychosocial development (assessed with the Measure of Psychosocial Development), and risk behavior (as measured by the Youth Comprehensive Risk Assessment) in 67 adolescents (85% from rural communities) in a rural residential treatment facility. Results

  10. Psychosocial screening and assessment in oncology and palliative care settings.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Luigi; Caruso, Rosangela; Sabato, Silvana; Massarenti, Sara; Nanni, Maria G; The UniFe Psychiatry Working Group Coauthors

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric and psychosocial disorders among cancer patients have been reported as a major consequence of the disease and treatment. The problems in applying a pure psychiatric approach have determined the need for structuring more defined methods, including screening for distress and emotional symptoms and a more specific psychosocial assessment, to warrant proper care to cancer patients with psychosocial problems. This review examines some of the most significant issues related to these two steps, screening and assessment of psychosocial morbidity in cancer and palliative care. With regard to this, the many different variables, such as the factors affecting individual vulnerability (e.g., life events, chronic stress and allostatic load, well-being, and health attitudes) and the psychosocial correlates of medical disease (e.g., psychiatric disturbances, psychological symptoms, illness behavior, and quality of life) which are possibly implicated not only in "classical" psychiatric disorders but more broadly in psychosocial suffering. Multidimensional tools [e.g., and specific psychosocially oriented interview (e.g., the Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research)] represent a way to screen for and assess emotional distress, anxiety and depression, maladaptive coping, dysfunctional attachment, as well as other significant psychosocial dimensions secondary to cancer, such as demoralization and health anxiety. Cross-cultural issues, such as language, ethnicity, race, and religion, are also discussed as possible factors influencing the patients and families perception of illness, coping mechanisms, psychological response to a cancer diagnosis. PMID:25709584

  11. Progeria: Medical Aspects, Psychosocial Perspectives, and Intervention Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livneh, Hanoch; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses progeria (or Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome), a rare childhood disorder that invariably results in death during adolescence. Describes the major medical aspects of progeria, and discusses the psychosocial implications of the disorder with particular emphasis on grief-triggered reactions. Presents an overview of psychosocial intervention…

  12. Psychosocial and Moral Development of PTSD-Diagnosed Combat Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, John G.; Baker, Stanley B.

    2007-01-01

    Two related studies were conducted in order to investigate whether psychosocial and moral development appeared to have been disrupted and arrested in veterans diagnosed as having posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Study 1 was devoted to developing a measure of late adolescence, early adulthood, and adulthood stages of psychosocial

  13. Psychosocial Factors and Behavioral Medicine Interventions in Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritz, Thomas; Meuret, Alicia E.; Trueba, Ana F.; Fritzsche, Anja; von Leupoldt, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This review examines the evidence for psychosocial influences in asthma and behavioral medicine approaches to its treatment. Method: We conducted a systematic review of the literature on psychosocial influences and the evidence for behavioral interventions in asthma with a focus on research in the past 10 years and clinical trials.…

  14. Earthquake Education Environment (E3)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Earthquake Education Environment (E3) supports high-quality K-12 and undergraduate education by providing up-to-date earthquake information, authoritative technical sources and educational resources for the classroom.

  15. Teachers' Practical Knowledge about Classroom Management in Multicultural Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Tartwijk, Jan; den Brok, Perry; Veldman, Ietje; Wubbels, Theo

    2009-01-01

    Creating a positive working atmosphere in the classroom is the first concern of many student and beginning teachers in secondary education. Teaching in multicultural classrooms provides additional challenges for these teachers. This study identified shared practical knowledge about classroom management strategies of teachers who were successful in…

  16. Psychosocial Factors and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Potential Biobehavioral Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Jennifer M.; Lyness, Jeffrey M.; Sahler, Olle Jane Z.; Liesveld, Jane L.; Moynihan, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    While psychosocial factors are known to affect cancer progression via biobehavioral pathways in many patient populations, these relationships remain largely unexplored in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) patients. The purpose of this paper is to critically review the literature regarding psychosocial and endocrine/immune aspects of HCT, with an emphasis on exploring pathways that may mediate the associations between psychosocial factors and disease outcomes. These include the roles of catecholamines, glucocorticoids, inflammation, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), immune reconstitution and infectious susceptibility, as well as the new opportunities available in genomics research. We also discuss the implications for potential immunomodulating psychosocial interventions. Elucidating the biological pathways that account for the associations between psychosocial factors and clinical course could ultimately lead to improved outcomes for this psychologically and immunologically vulnerable population. PMID:23845514

  17. Psychosocial work characteristics predicting daytime sleepiness in day and shift workers.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masaya; Nakata, Akinori; Haratani, Takashi; Otsuka, Yasumasa; Kaida, Kosuke; Fukasawa, Kenji

    2006-01-01

    Characteristics of work organization other than working time arrangements may contribute importantly to daytime sleepiness. The present study was designed to identify the psychosocial factors at work that predict daytime sleepiness in a sample of day and shift workers. Participants working at a pulp and chemical factory completed an annual questionnaire regarding psychosocial factors at work using the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Generic Job Stress Questionnaire (i.e., quantitative workload, variance in workload, job control, support from supervisor, coworkers, or family/friends, job satisfaction, and depressive symptoms), as well as daytime sleepiness (through the Epworth Sleepiness Scale [ESS]) and sleep disturbances for three years starting in 2002 (response rates, 94.6-99.0%). The present analysis included 55 day workers (11 women) and 57 shift workers (all men) who participated in all three years of the study, worked under the same work schedule throughout the study period, and had no missing data on any of the daytime sleep items. A repeated-measures analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to test the effects of work schedule (day vs. shift work) and psychosocial factors at work in 2002 on the ESS scores in subsequent years, with sleep duration, insomnia symptoms, chronic diseases, and sleepiness levels at baseline as covariates. Given significant and near-significant interactions of work schedules with psychosocial factor or study year, the ANCOVA, with the factors of psychosocial work characteristics and study year, was performed by type of work schedule. The results indicated a significant main effect of psychosocial work characteristics (p = 0.010, partial eng2 = 0.14) and an almost significant main effect of study year (p = 0.067, partial eng2 = 0.06) and interaction between psychosocial work characteristics and study year (p = 0.085, partial eng2 = 0.06) for variance in workload among the day work group. The day workers reporting high variance in workload in 2002 exhibited significantly higher ESS scores in 2003 and 2004 than did those reporting low variance in workload. The ANCOVA for the shift work group showed a main effect of psychosocial work characteristics for job satisfaction (p = 0.026, partial eng2 = 0.10) and depressive symptoms (p = 0.094, partial eng2 = 0.06) with the interaction between psychosocial work characteristics and study year for job satisfaction (p = 0.172, partial eng2 = 0.04) and depressive symptoms (p = 0.035, partial eng2 = 0.07). The shift workers with low job satisfaction and high symptoms of depression in 2002 showed significantly greater ESS scores in 2003 and/or 2004 than did those with opposite characteristics. These results may suggest a potential predictive value of variance in workload for day workers as well as job satisfaction and depressive symptoms for shift workers with respect to daytime sleepiness. The present findings may imply that redesigning these aspects of work environment would be of help in managing daytime sleepiness. PMID:17190723

  18. Expert Secondary Inclusive Classroom Management 

    E-print Network

    Montague, Marcia

    2011-02-22

    The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of the management practices of expert secondary general education teachers in inclusive classrooms. Specifically, expert teachers of classrooms who included students ...

  19. Security for Classroom Learning Partner

    E-print Network

    Iancu, Karin

    2006-01-01

    This MENG thesis implements a security system for a classroom presentation system called the Classroom Learning Partner (CLP). The goal of the security system is to prevent cheating on electronic quizzes. CLP is a system ...

  20. Visualization in Multicultural Mathematics Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presmeg, Norma C.

    1989-01-01

    Deals with the issue of visualization as it is related to the learning of mathematics in multicultural classrooms. Discusses the importance and the role of visualization in multicultural classrooms. (YP)

  1. The Dirt on Outdoor Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Steve

    2000-01-01

    Explains the planning procedure for outdoor classrooms and introduces an integrated unit on monarch butterflies called the Monarch Watch program. Makes recommendations to solve financial problems of outdoor classrooms. (YDS)

  2. Stage IV malignant melanoma. Psychosocial issues.

    PubMed

    Pensiero, L

    1995-01-15

    The diagnosis of Stage IV malignant melanoma presents a difficult challenge for the patient with cancer, family, and health care providers. All must deal with a variety of psychosocial issues that range from the existential to the pragmatic. In the past decade an evolution in health care reimbursement methods has occurred, resulting in decreased length of stay in acute care facilities. It is at the point of hospitalization that patients' increasing needs most often become apparent. Physicians, nurses, and hospital social workers face the dilemma of providing care and support services in the reality of shrinking resources brought about by prospective payment, managed care, and cost containment policies. Health care delivery systems strive to meet the needs of patients with cancer through case management methods that link patients with a wide variety of medical and community resources. A case history is presented to demonstrate the need for collaboration among the members of the health care community in order to meet patient and family psychosocial needs. PMID:7805003

  3. Welcome Biological Breakthroughs, Supply Psychosocial Insights

    PubMed Central

    Tekkalaki, Bheemsain; Tripathi, Adarsh; Trivedi, J. K.

    2014-01-01

    Human behaviour, emotions, and cognition are complex to understand and explain. It is even more difficult to understand the basis for abnormal behaviour, disturbed emotions, and impaired cognitions, something mental health professionals are trying for long. In these pursuits, psychiatry has traversed through eras of humours, witchcraft, spirits, psychoanalysis, and gradually deviated from other medical specialities. Now, with recent biological breakthroughs like advances in psychopharmacology, neuroimaging and genetics, increasingly more emphasis is being given to the biological model of psychiatric disorders. These new biological models have given a more scientific appearance to the speciality. It has also revolutionised the management strategies and outcome of many psychiatric disorders. However, this rapid development in biological understanding of psychiatry also leads to a new wave of reductionism. In an attempt to deduce everything in terms of neurons, neurochemicals, and genes, can we neglect psychosocial aspects of mental health? Patients’ personality, expectations, motives, family background, sociocultural backgrounds continue to affect mental health no matter how much ‘biological’ psychiatry gets. Biological and psychosocial approaches are not mutually exclusive but complementary. Integrating them harmoniously is the skill psychiatry demands for comprehensive understanding of mental and behavioural disorders. PMID:24891799

  4. Psychosocial aspects of Hansen's disease (leprosy)

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurvinder Pal

    2012-01-01

    In general, the prevalence of psychiatric disorders among people with Hansen's disease has greatly increased to date. However, inadequate psychiatric care of people with Hansen's disease is an area of increasing concern. Many studies have been conducted in India and abroad to find out the prevalence of comorbid psychiatric disorders in patients suffering from Hansen's disease. Although efforts have been made by the government and international organizations to solve the medical problems among this group of patients, this disease still carries a number of psychosocial issues. The social stigma connected to these patients makes this disease completely different from others. Even nowadays people affected by Hansen's disease have to leave their village and are socially isolated. Depression is the most common psychiatric disorder found in these patients. Early detection and treatment of psychiatric disorders among Hansen's disease patients is a powerful psychotherapeutic measure. Integrated healthcare strategy will be beneficial to these patients. A comprehensive MEDLINE search and review of relevant literature was carried out and the data extracted and studied with particular reference to psychosocial issues in Hansen's disease. The focus of this research work is related to psychiatric and social aspects vis-à-vis stigma in these patients with Hansen's disease. PMID:23189247

  5. Overweight trajectories and psychosocial adjustment among adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bin; Ishibashi, Keri; Lin, Cindy; Peterson, Darleen V.; Susman, Elizabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Few studies have investigated overweight trajectories and psychosocial adjustment among adolescents. We conducted analyses with data from the multisite Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (SECCYD). Methods Sample included 1,350 youth born in 1991. Data consisted of repeated measures of weight, height, and multiple subscales of internalizing and externalizing behavioral problems measured by the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) from age nine to age 15. Results Three trajectory patterns were identified: never/rarely overweight/obese (59.5%), late start/light overweight/obese (12.1%), and chronically/heavy overweight/obese (28.4%). Youths with chronically/heavy overweight/obese trajectory pattern had significantly higher scores of internalizing problems over time, as well as syndrome subscales of somatic complaints, social problems and social withdrawal over time than youths with the never/rare overweight/obese trajectory pattern. There was no significant difference in either broad-band behavioral problems or narrow-band syndrome subscales between youths with the never/rare overweight/obese trajectory pattern and those with the late start/light overweight/obesity trajectory pattern. Conclusions Study findings may advance knowledge on the distinct developmental trajectory patterns of overweight youth and their linkages to the psychosocial adjustment during the period of pubertal transition. The results highlight the need for future prevention research to improve the physical development and mental well-being of adolescents. PMID:24075819

  6. International perspectives on psychosocial working conditions, mental health, and stress of dairy farm operators.

    PubMed

    Lunner Kolstrup, Christina; Kallioniemi, Marja; Lundqvist, Peter; Kymäläinen, Hanna-Riitta; Stallones, Lorann; Brumby, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Dairy farm operators-farmers, workers, and family members-are faced with many demands and stressors in their daily work and these appear to be shared across countries and cultures. Dairy operators experience high psychosocial demands with respect to a hard work and production ethos, economic influences, and social and environmental responsibility. Furthermore, both traditional and industrial farms are highly dependent on external conditions, such as weather, fluctuating markets, and regulations from government authorities. Possible external stressors include disease outbreaks, taxes related to dairy production, and recent negative societal attitudes to farming in general. Dairy farm operators may have very few or no opportunities to influence and control these external conditions, demands, and expectations. High work demands and expectations coupled with low control and lack of social support can lead to a poor psychosocial work environment, with increased stress levels, ill mental health, depression, and, in the worst cases, suicide. Internationally, farmers with ill mental health have different health service options depending on their location. Regardless of location, it is initially the responsibility of the individual farmer and farm family to handle mental health and stress, which can be of short- or long-term duration. This paper reviews the literature on the topics of psychosocial working conditions, mental health, stress, depression, and suicide among dairy farm operators, farm workers, and farm family members in an international perspective. PMID:23844791

  7. Sound Advice on Classroom Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the importance of acoustic standards in classroom design, presenting an interview with the Acoustical Society of America's (ASA's) standards manager which focuses on reasons for the new ASA standards, the standards document (which was written for K-12 classroom but applies to college classrooms), the need to avoid echo and be able to…

  8. Cooperative Learning and Classroom Climate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zahn, G. Lawrence; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Compared a traditional whole class format to the impact of two cooperative learning techniques, Student Teams-Achievement Divisions and Teams-Games-Tournaments, on classroom climate among students. Supports the conclusion that choice of classroom structure can bias classroom climate in favor of or against different ethnic groups. (Author/ABB)

  9. Expert Secondary Inclusive Classroom Management

    E-print Network

    Montague, Marcia

    2011-02-22

    ...................................................................... 5 Definition of Terms ..................................................................... 6 II REVIEW OF LITERATURE............................................................. 9 Classroom Management Decisions of Teachers... (Savage & Wolcott, 1994). 9 CHAPTER II REVIEW OF LITERATURE Classroom Management Decisions of Teachers Research has consistently shown that effective classroom management is associated with student achievement gains (Brophy & Evertson, 1976...

  10. Agriculture in the Classroom

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Agriculture in the Classroom Web site(last mentioned in the October 27, 1999 Scout Report for Science & Engineering) has recently been updated. One of the current features, Listening to the Prairie - Farming in Nature's Image, is a useful resource which has many lesson plans and classroom activities for all grades and can be downloaded in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format. These lesson plans explore subjects like how energy passes through food webs, where our food comes from, how agriculture affects our lives, and soil and erosion. This is a useful site that focuses on a subject that many urban students may not normally be exposed to.

  11. Re-Inventing Classroom And Campus

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Rossman, Parker

    The university may need to reorganize itself quite differently, stressing forms of pedagogy and extracurricular experiences to nurture and teach the art and skill of creativity and innovation. This would probably imply a shift away from highly specialized disciplines and degree programs to programs placing more emphasis on integrating knowledge. To this end, perhaps it is time to integrate the educational mission of the university with the research and service activities of the faculty by ripping instruction out of the classroom- or at least the lecture hall- and placing it instead in the discovery environment of the laboratory or studio or the experiential environment of professional practice.

  12. Types of psychosocial job demands and adverse events due to dental mismanagement: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Akizumi; Umehara, Katsura; Ono, Hiroshi; Kawakami, Norito

    2007-01-01

    Background A harsh work environment including psychosocial job demands might cause adverse events due to medical mismanagement, but the association has not been explored. The purpose of the study was to investigate whether some types of psychosocial job demands are associated with adverse events due to dental mismanagement experienced by general dental practitioners. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to members of a local branch of the Japan dental association. A total of 261 dental practitioners responded anonymously (response rate 53%). Psychosocial job demands were measured by a Japanese version of the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, which comprises five sub-scales: quantitative demands, cognitive demands, emotional demands, demands for hiding emotions, and sensorial demands. The outcome was defined according to whether the respondent's patients experienced one of the following adverse events due to dental mismanagement at least once during the previous one year: dropping of dental instrument or broken injection needle, soft tissue or nerve injury, accidental bleeding, loss of a tooth root into the maxillary sinus, and emphysema. Associations between each demand index and experience of adverse events were examined by logistic regression analyses adjusting for potential confounders. Results Emotional demands and sensorial demands were significantly associated with the experience of adverse events (odds ratio = 3.9 for each). Other than the indices, male gender, younger age, practice alone, many dental chairs (five or more), and many patients (30 or more per day) were the risks. Working hours per week and number of paramedical staff had no significant associations. Conclusion Emotional and sensorial job demands are a potential target for the reduction of adverse events due to dental mismanagement. PMID:17408488

  13. Breaking the Code: Changing Our Thinking about Children's Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    It is the responsibility of educators and architects of classrooms to create spaces that promote positive relationships between people and their environments. Life in early childhood classrooms organizes and clusters around the relationships between adults, children, and the space they occupy. Classrooms become living systems, which experience…

  14. Does Context Matter? Explicit Print Instruction during Reading Varies in Its Influence by Child and Classroom Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinty, Anita S.; Justice, Laura M.; Piasta, Shayne B.; Kaderavek, Joan; Fan, Xitao

    2012-01-01

    This study examined preschool teachers' (n = 59) explicit print instruction during shared reading and considered whether the benefits of this practice to children's learning (n = 379) varied as a function of the classroom environment and children's developmental characteristics. Measures of explicit print instruction and the classroom environment

  15. Psychosocial effects of an exercise program in older persons who fall

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin M. Means; Patricia S. O'Sullivan; Daniel E. Rodell

    2003-01-01

    Falling is associated with psychosocial sequelae that may influence functional performance and fall risk. Exer- cise can improve psychosocial factors. To address the research questions (1) Do psychosocial variables differ among persons with and without falls? and (2) Among persons who fall, can exercise improve psychosocial variables? we evaluated psycho- social and functional performance variables in older persons with and

  16. A comparison of incidental focus on form in the second language classroom and chatroom

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shawn Loewen; Sophie Reissner

    2009-01-01

    Although many second language learners still study in a traditional, face-to-face classroom, an increasing number of students now participate in virtual classrooms and communicate online. Regardless of the mode of communication, interaction and focus on form can be considered important components of the learning environment. This paper reports on a study comparing teacher and student interaction on a single communicative

  17. Preparing the Inclusion Classroom for Students with Special Physical and Health Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadsworth, Donna E. Dugger; Knight, Diane

    1999-01-01

    The Classroom Ecological Preparation Inventory (CEPI) is designed to aid in inclusion of students with physical impairments and health needs in the general-education classroom. The CEPI focuses on health and medical concerns, arrangement of the physical environment, assistive equipment, instructional adaptations, and social-skills management. A…

  18. Seeing the Light: A Classroom-Sized Pinhole Camera Demonstration for Teaching Vision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prull, Matthew W.; Banks, William P.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a classroom-sized pinhole camera demonstration (camera obscura) designed to enhance students' learning of the visual system. The demonstration consists of a suspended rear-projection screen onto which the outside environment projects images through a small hole in a classroom window. Students can observe these images in a darkened…

  19. Predicting Acceptance of Diversity in Pre-Kindergarten Classrooms. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Kay; Downer, Jason T.

    2013-01-01

    Given the increasing ethnic and language diversity within the United States, this study examined practices that acknowledge and promote diversity in pre-Kindergarten classrooms. Findings indicate that acceptance of diversity is a component of positive environments for young children, particularly in classrooms with high poverty levels where there…

  20. Venturing into Co-Operative Learning in the Early Years of Schooling: A Classroom Teacher's Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Rebecca

    An early childhood classroom teacher integrated academic goals with the acquisition of social skills by using a specific teaching strategy of co-operative learning. The teacher of 5- to 7-year-olds experienced a classroom environment which lacked respect, fairness, and tolerance in the following dynamics: (1) boys toward girls; (2) older children…

  1. “Laboratories of Democracy”: A Situated Perspective on Learning Social Studies in Detracked Classrooms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Beth C. Rubin

    2007-01-01

    Many of the primary aims of social studies education mesh with detracking reformers' goals of creating more equitable and democratic learning environments. However, little empirical data exist on detracked social studies classrooms. This article reports the results of a qualitative, cross-case comparison study of detracking in the ninth grade social studies classrooms of three public high schools. Employing a situated

  2. Student Personal Perception of Classroom Climate: Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Ellen W.; Kim, Sangwon; Baker, Jean A.; Kamphaus, Randy W.; Horne, Arthur M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the factor structure of an instrument developed to assess elementary students' individual perceptions of their classroom environments. The Student Personal Perception of Classroom Climate (SPPCC) originally consisted of six subscales adapted from previously published scales. Exploratory factor analysis…

  3. What Contributes to First-Year Student Teachers' Sense of Professional Agency in the Classroom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soini, Tiina; Pietarinen, Janne; Toom, Auli; Pyhältö, Kirsi

    2015-01-01

    This study explores Finnish first-year primary teacher students' (N = 244) sense of professional agency in the classroom. In addition, the interrelation between student teachers' sense of professional agency and the perceptions of teacher education as a learning environment is explored. The sense of professional agency in the classroom

  4. Lessons from the Culturally Diverse Classroom: Intellectual Challenges and Opportunities of Teaching in the American University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwieger, Florian; Gros, Emmeline; Barberan, Laura

    2010-01-01

    University education in the United States has become an increasingly global environment. In the classrooms of a modern university students and teachers from literally all corners of the world come together and reshape the face of higher education. Without a doubt the multicultural classroom of the 21st century necessitates fresh pedagogical…

  5. Strategies, Challenges and Prospects for Active Learning in the Computer-Based Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holbert, K. E.; Karady, G. G.

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of computer-equipped classrooms into engineering education has brought with it a host of opportunities and issues. Herein, some of the challenges and successes for creating an environment for active learning within computer-based classrooms are described. The particular teaching approach developed for undergraduate electrical…

  6. Instructional Accommodations for Students with Asperger Syndrome in the General High School Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylis, Myrna

    2011-01-01

    General education teachers in the secondary sector are held responsible for adapting their lessons and classroom environment for students with Asperger Syndrome. With the growing number of students with Autism Spectrum Disorder being placed in general education classrooms, teachers are faced with yet another challenge in making their curriculum…

  7. A Teacher's Manual for Outdoor Classrooms -- How to Plan, Develop, and Use Them.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, E. Wayne, Comp.; Waters, Robert E., Comp.

    Using experience gained while helping elementary, junior high, and high school teachers plan, develop, and use thousands of outdoor classrooms, the Alabama Soil Conservation Service (SCS) produced this teacher's manual for outdoor classrooms. Emphasis is on conservation education and the environment and man's relationship to it. Rationale for…

  8. Back to Basics: Working with Young Children with Autism in Inclusive Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deris, Aaron R.; Di Carlo, Cynthia F.

    2013-01-01

    Young children with autism benefit from various adaptations made to an early childhood classroom. This article includes modifications for both teacher-directed and child-initiated activities. Adaptations are given for the classroom environment, daily schedule, sensory needs, transitions and general teaching strategies. The techniques described are…

  9. An Effective Approach to Developing Function-Based Interventions in Early Childhood Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Brenna K.; Ferro, Jolenea B.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the unique features of early childhood classrooms, teachers routinely modify the social and physical environment to support children with mild to moderate challenges. Yet despite their access to behavioral consultants, school-based prekindergarten programs are more likely to expel young children from their classroom settings compared with…

  10. Creating a Positive Classroom Atmosphere: Teachers' Use of Effective Praise and Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conroy, Maureen A.; Sutherland, Kevin S.; Snyder, Angela; Al-Hendawi, Maha; Vo, Abigail

    2009-01-01

    Creating a positive and engaging classroom atmosphere is one of the most powerful tools teachers can use to encourage children's learning and prevent problem behaviors from occurring. Teachers' responses to children's appropriate and problem behavior can help set the tone of the classroom environment. Creating positive interactions between a…

  11. An Environmental Impact Statement: Designing Supportive Literacy Classrooms for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reutzel, D. Ray; Wolfersberger, Mary

    1996-01-01

    Cites a relationship between the quality of classroom environments and literacy-related behaviors and learning. Presents four effective design concepts for literacy classrooms which affect learning: presence/absence of literacy tools; space arrangement and placement of literacy tools within that space; social interaction using literacy tools; and…

  12. Willingness to Communicate in English: A Model in the Chinese EFL Classroom Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peng, Jian-E; Woodrow, Lindy

    2010-01-01

    This study involves a large-scale investigation of willingness to communicate (WTC) in Chinese English-as-a-foreign-language (EFL) classrooms. A hypothesized model integrating WTC in English, communication confidence, motivation, learner beliefs, and classroom environment was tested using structural equation modeling. Validation of the…

  13. A Half-Flipped Classroom or an Alternative Approach?: Primary Sources and Blended Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westermann, Edward B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines an alternate approach to the "flipped" classroom paradigm for an upper level history class using a blended on-line and in-class format. The concept of the flipped classroom has received increasing emphasis based on its potential to create a student-centered learning environment that incorporates practical instruction…

  14. Differential Use of the Open Classroom: A Study of More and Less Exploratory Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minuchin, Patricia P.

    This grant application describes the theoretical background and research design of a project intended to study the interaction between children's styles of functioning and the opportunities and requirements of an open classroom environment. A major assumption to be tested is that exploratory children function more effectively in open classrooms.…

  15. The "Responsive Classroom" Approach and Its Implications for Improving Reading and Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McTigue, Erin M.; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a social and emotional learning intervention, the "Responsive Classroom"[R] (RC) approach, which is designed to produce classroom environments conducive to learning. It summarizes a new body of research describing the efficacy of the RC approach. One component of the RC approach is the Morning Meeting. This article describes…

  16. Construction of mathematical knowledge using graphic calculators (CAS) in the mathematics classroom

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fernando Hitt

    2011-01-01

    Mathematics education researchers are asking themselves about why technology has impacted heavily on the social environment and not in the mathematics classroom. The use of technology in the mathematics classroom has not had the expected impact, as it has been its use in everyday life (i.e. cell phone). What about teachers’ opinions? Mathematics teachers can be divided into three categories:

  17. The Relationship between Trainee Teachers' Views and Practices Related to Classroom Discipline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ustunel, Eda

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the relationship between English language trainee teachers' views on how to deal with large classes at the primary school level, create a positive environment in young learners' classroom and hold young learners' attention, and how far their views are reflected in classroom practice. The data were collected by means of…

  18. Flipping the Classroom and Student Performance in Advanced Statistics: Evidence from a Quasi-Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Touchton, Michael

    2015-01-01

    I administer a quasi-experiment using undergraduate political science majors in statistics classes to evaluate whether "flipping the classroom" (the treatment) alters students' applied problem-solving performance and satisfaction relative to students in a traditional classroom environment (the control). I also assess whether general…

  19. The Brain-Compatible Classroom: Using What We Know about Learning To Improve Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlauer, Laura

    This book summarizes current brain research and shows how teachers can use this knowledge in the classroom every day. It explores how the brain works, how students' emotions and stress affect their ability to learn, how the physical classroom environment influences learning, and what forms of assessment work best. An introduction discusses the…

  20. No Child Is Left Behind in the Family and Consumer Sciences Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Card, Beverly

    2004-01-01

    Over the years, family and consumer sciences (FCS) classrooms have provided education for all students--from the gifted and talented to the mentally challenged. The typical classroom environment is warm, inviting, and realistic. Students work together to apply knowledge to real life experiences. The importance of reading, writing, math, and…

  1. Analyzing Verbal Classroom Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kryspin, William J.; Feldhusen, John F.

    This textbook on verbal classroom interaction is designed to be used as one unit in an educational psychology course at the postsecondary level. The book is divided into three sections which discuss the Flanders' Interaction Analysis System (FIAS), the categories in the system, and the use of the system. The first section gives the underlying…

  2. LOGO in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The Computing Teacher, 1985

    1985-01-01

    This collection of articles and features reprinted from "The Computing Teacher" begins with an outline (the table of contents) of a 20-session course, "Logo in the Classroom," by Shirley Torgerson, Mary Kay Kriley, and Janet Stone. The text of the first session and a student exercise sheet are also provided. Five articles included in the…

  3. Salvage in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCollum, Dannel

    1977-01-01

    Describes the development of a program to establish in-school salvage systems for school-generated and nonschool-generated waste materials. Students from conservation classes became involved in collecting waste from "recycle" boxes in every classroom, in field trips, newspaper drives, and salvage of aluminum cans. (CS)

  4. Tips from the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TESOL Journal, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Four short articles are combined: "Adding Discourse-Level Practice to Sentence-Level Exercises" (Eric S. Nelson); "Presenting Picture Books in the ESL Classroom" (Lijun Shen); "Role Playing in a Large Class" (Ellen Rosen); and "Calvin and Hobbes and Other Icons of Americana" (Daniel J. Conrad). (Contains seven references.) (LB)

  5. Robots in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, George; Spain, Tom

    1984-01-01

    Educational robots are defined, their essential characteristics and features are outlined, and their educational applications and what makes them run are discussed. Classroom experiences with five educational robots--Topo, Rhino XR-2, RB5X, Hero I and Tasman Turtle--are described. (MBR)

  6. The Classroom as Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritschel, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the importance of creating a learning community in the classroom to help stimulate community college student success. Urges teachers to examine teaching methods and modify content and delivery to meet the complex needs of each new community. Urges instructors to encourage cooperation among students and respect diverse talents and ways of…

  7. Implementing the Synchronous Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furman, Jan A.

    2010-01-01

    This commentary describes an action research project conducted by selected staff at the Northern Valley Regional High School District in New Jersey. The project focused on the idea of developing a synchronous classroom to provide world language learning opportunities to students. Relevant research is provided as are ideas regarding logistics and…

  8. Classroom of the Sea

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Denise Monte

    2000-03-01

    Although most students do not have the opportunity to conduct in situ research projects until college, the Classroom of the Sea program at the American School for the Deaf (ASD) provides an unusual opportunity for students to work directly with scientists

  9. Culture in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le, Thuong Van; Le, Nancylee

    New methods are proposed for teachers to increase the cultural knowledge of their students. Rather than emphasizing food, festivals, and famous faces from other lands, there should be an attempt to use culture in the classroom as content in the regular instruction of speaking, listening, writing, mathematics, reading, and science. Teaching…

  10. The CAS Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Sue

    2004-01-01

    The Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority (VCAA) Computer Algebra System (CAS)Pilot study (2001-2005) is monitoring the use of CAS in senior secondary mathematics. This article explores the author's experiences in the CAS classroom and delineates changes in teaching style, as a result of the introduction of CAS into the senior mathematics…

  11. Poetry in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyman, Linda, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    The articles in this journal issue focus on the use of poetry for study in classrooms at all levels. Titles and authors of the articles include (1) "Summoning the Poem: Several Roads to Xanadu" by Ben F. Nelms; (2) "ABC's of Reading and Writing Poetry in Junior High" by Barbara Arnold; (3) "Invitations" by Elizabeth D. Nelms; (4) "Teaching Poetry…

  12. Dimensions of Classroom Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmer, Edmund T.; Peck, Robert F.

    Relationships among behaviors, defined within each of several observation systems, were determined and relationships across systems were examined to empirically derive dimensions of classroom behavior. These four observation systems were selected to include as broad a range of categories as possible: Fuller Affective Interaction Records (FAIR),…

  13. Cockroaches in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagler, Ron; Moseley, Christine

    2005-01-01

    The Madagascar hissing cockroach (MHC) provides an excellent avenue to introduce students to the joys of inquiry-centered learning. MHC's are relatively tame, produce little odor, do not bite, and are easy to handle and breed. Because of these characteristics, they are ideal for classroom activities, science projects, and as pets. They also help…

  14. Windows into Art Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Kit, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    An editorial by Kit Grauer introduces this collection of articles which establish that there is no such thing as a simple definition of art education even within one culture, and that people's views can be reflected by art educators across the world. The first article, "A Window on Three Singapore Art Classrooms" (Jane Chia; John Matthews; Paul…

  15. Existentialism: Practical Classroom Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Gary

    1993-01-01

    Existential principles--celebrating authenticity and fostering the courage to be--can be applied in the classroom by using teachable moments, varying questions (imaginative-divergent, evaluative, hypothetical), and providing students opportunities to make meaningful decisions and accept responsibility. (SK)

  16. Inquiry in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stohl, Christina

    2010-01-01

    (Purpose) As schools scramble to restructure in the hope of thwarting failure, administrators often appropriate money for outside experts who counsel on professional development as well as outside magic-pill programs for student achievement. High-stakes testing remains the arbiter. Perhaps the use of the best practice of inquiry, or classroom

  17. Your Outdoor Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinman, Laurie

    2005-01-01

    Physical education is still taught in outdoor settings in many warmer climates of the United States. Even when indoor facilities are available, physical education may be moved outside because of other curricular needs or facility issues. How can physical educators make the outdoor setting seem more like an indoor classroom? Outdoor teaching…

  18. A Monopoly Classroom Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxoby, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    Uses a simple classroom experiment to develop the economic model of monopoly. Introduces students to the nature of the monopoly problem and motivates them to think of the associated effects. Highlights the role of information and fairness ideals in determining economic outcomes. (RLH)

  19. Ag in the Classroom

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ag in the Classroom is a resource for teachers who teach about agriculture. Information is provided about grants for teaching agriculture, links for resources, conferences, and a teacher page. The teachers page contains downloadable issues of Acres of Agventures, Ag Mags for kids, many agriculture lessons, kits for teachers available to loan, and a 4 Kids Only page.

  20. Flipping the Classroom Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riendeau, Diane

    2013-02-01

    I received many emails following the first column on flipping the classroom. Many of my local colleagues also approached me at our physics alliance, Physics Northwest. Teachers are very interested in this new pedagogy. As I result, I wanted to share some more videos to inspire you.

  1. The Cultivated Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilder, Rosalind

    1983-01-01

    Teachers who follow this monthly schedule for starting and cultivating plants in their classrooms can look forward to blooms and greenery throughout the year. Advice on choosing plants, making cuttings, forcing bulbs, rooting sweet potatoes and pineapples, and holding a Mother's Day plant sale is included. (PP)

  2. Recommendations on Classroom Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miami-Dade Community Coll. District, FL.

    Prepared by the Classroom Feedback Subcommittee of the Teaching/Learning Project, this report offers recommendations on "the sharing of constructive information between students and faculty relative to each other's performance through a process by which faculty learn about their teaching and students learn about their learning." After presenting…

  3. The Electronic Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mizell, Al P.; Centini, Barry M.

    The role of telecommunications in establishing the electronic classroom in distance education is illustrated. Using a computer-based doctoral program and the UNIX operating system as an example, how a personal computer and modem may be combined with a telephone line for instructional delivery is described. A number of issues must be addressed in…

  4. Injuries in preschool classrooms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cecilia Obeng

    2009-01-01

    Purpose – The primary purpose of this paper is to examine the kinds of injuries that preschool teachers working in Indiana, USA, believed to be the most common in their preschool (3-6 year olds) classrooms, the causes of such injuries, and the most important precautions they take to prevent them. Also examined are the measures the teachers take when an

  5. Assessing Classroom Assessment Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson-Beck, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Classroom assessment techniques (CATs) are teaching strategies that provide formative assessments of student learning. It has been argued that the use of CATs enhances and improves student learning. Although the various types of CATs have been extensively documented and qualitatively studied, there appears to be little quantitative research…

  6. Classroom influences on bullying

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erling Roland; David Galloway

    2002-01-01

    The relationship between estimates of teachers' management of the class, the social structure of the class and bullying otherswas investigated by questionnaires answered by 2,002 pupils and 99 teachers in Norwegian primary schools. A path analysis demonstrated that the social structure of the class had a direct impact on bullying behaviour. Classroom management had a direct impact on the prevalence

  7. Calculators in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendleton, Deedee

    1975-01-01

    Presents the pro and con of the use of calculators in the classroom. Some feel that calculators make learning mathematics more fun and when used for creative problem solving provide student motivation. Others feel that dependence on the calculators will result in students unable to do simple mathematics on paper. (GS)

  8. Teachers' Classroom Assessment Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Bruce B.; Schmitt, Vicki L.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined classroom assessment practices of 3rd- through 12th-grade teachers in a Midwestern state. In addition to determining the frequency with which specific assessment item formats were utilized, the level of use of selected "best practice" approaches to assessment was considered ("performance-based assessment, teacher-made tests,…

  9. The Engineered Adjustment Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spilker, George

    Described are the curriculum, behavioral modification program, summer activities, and parent involvement in the Papillion (Nebraska) Title III elementary level "engineered classroom" program for emotionally disturbed students. Noted is program initiation after parents and teachers became upset over poor academic progress and behaviors of an…

  10. Tips from the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glick, Christopher; Niemeyer, Susan; Rebscher, Mary; Smith, Bryan; Turner, Rebecca Heaton

    1998-01-01

    Five ideas for English-as-a-Second-Language classroom activities are described, including a geography pronunciation drill, a project in which students design retail stores, a real-life business role-playing exercise, student-designed coats of arms, and use of prizes for student motivation, followed by prize-related assignments. (MSE)

  11. Deprivatizing the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Paul B.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the "ADE Statement of Good Practice: Teaching, Evaluation, and Scholarship" and the related issue of peer evaluation and the deprivatization of the classroom. Outlines the benefits of peer review of teaching. Argues for increased attention to the documentation of teaching. Appends the "Statement." (HB)

  12. Researching Classroom Questioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lores Gonzalez, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    The complexities of the modern society and interconnected world in which we live requires students who are able to problem solve and think critically. The research on which this article is based aims to explore how classroom questioning can help students guide their learning and model the spirit of inquiry to become lifelong learners. The research…

  13. Idea Bank: Classroom Newsletter

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mackenzie O'Connor

    2005-02-01

    Have you ever struggled with trying to motivate your students to learn science? If your answer is a resounding "yes!"-- the implementation of a class newsletter may be the solution. A class newsletter project can improve student self-confidence and motivate students to learn science. This article describes how to incorporate this effective strategy into your science classroom.

  14. Connellys' Classroom Cutaway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connelly, John; Connelly, Marilyn

    2008-01-01

    This article aims to help classroom teachers use the educational tool of student-produced media to meet their curriculum objectives. It has been the authors' experience in three decades of utilizing this tool personally and observing other teachers utilizing this tool, across nearly all grades and course content areas, that it is very effective.…

  15. Biological and psychosocial effects of space travel: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsia, Robert Edward Tien Ming

    This dissertation interviewed a single astronaut to explore psychosocial issues relevant to long-duration space travel and how these issues relate to the astronaut's training. It examined the psychological impact of isolation, crew interaction, and the experience of microgravity with the goal of increasing understanding of how to foster crew survivability and positive small group interactions in space (Santy, 1994). It also focused on how to develop possible treatments for crews when they transition back to Earth from the extreme environment of space missions. The astronaut's responses agreed with the literature and the predictions for long-duration space missions except the participant reported no temporary or permanent cognitive or memory deficits due to microgravity exposure. The dissertation identified five frequently endorsed themes including communication, environmental stressors, personal strengths, un-researched problems, and other. The agreement found between the literature and astronaut's responses offer a strong foundation of questions and data that needs to be further studied before conducting research in space or long-duration space missions.

  16. In Proc. of Euro-CSCL2001, p. 593, Maastricht, Netherlands. Collaborative Writing in a Computer-integrated Classroom for Early Learning

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -integrated Classroom for Early Learning Frank Tewissen1 , Andreas Lingnau1 , Ulrich Hoppe1 , Gerd Mannhaupt2 , Daniel-integrated environment for young children. The NIMIS project has set up three Computer-integrated Classrooms across-integrated classroom, early learning 1 Introduction A prominent scenario in CSCL is synchronous cooperation

  17. Psycho-social reflections on craniofacial morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Partridge, James

    2010-05-01

    Psychologists are now increasingly involved in understanding the challenges faced by people who experience facial disfigurements from many causes (congenital, traumatic, oncological, iatrogenic, neurological, ophthalmological or dermatological). This article describes how the author has combined the lessons of his personal recovery after severe facial burns with the rigorous science of psychological research to enable improved psycho-social support and interventions to be developed, through a UK not-for-profit (Changing Faces) and in formal health care services. It suggests that against the background of a culture that is less-than-positive about disfigurement, anyone who experiences it needs access to a range of support, advice, counselling and social skills training to enable them to live full, confident lives. PMID:20083216

  18. [Psychosocial rehabilitation and care under constraint].

    PubMed

    Thomazic, Valérie; Best, Richard; Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon

    2014-09-17

    Psychosocial rehabilitation is a theoretical tools used in psychiatry to fight against the marginalization of chronic patients. In Geneva, the "Tilleuls", a rehabilitation unit located in the psychiatric hospital, provides a range of group and individual interventionsfocusing on recovery for patients with criminal or civil constraints but also patient with severe and debilitating forms of psychotic illness. This article addresses the various types of constraints (medical, civil or criminal) and their impact on for the recovery process. In agreement with other studies, subjective perception of constraints in our clinical setting does not correspond to the legal status of admission. Similarly, the outcome of care is only marginally related to the presence of criminal or civil constraints. PMID:25322498

  19. [The shamanic cure: a psychosocial interpretation].

    PubMed

    Pelcastre-Villafuerte, B

    1999-01-01

    The present paper is basically a theoretical analysis of the shamanic cure, which proposes communication as the basis of the healing process. This process is described as a communicative act focusing on the interpretation of symbolic elements. The context is the social dimension in which the process is inscribed, the linguistic mode employed, and the type of relationship established between the shaman, the patient and the people. We also recount the way in which a shared symbolic reality is built, and how the shaman's world view has important effects on people. The interpretative framework is the psychosocial focus and an explanation is offered in terms of the establishment of a communicative act as a scenario in which the symbolic reality is constructed, and in itself constitutes the cure into which the patient enters every session. The magical vision of shamanism is analyzed and its influence on the health-illness process. PMID:10420792

  20. Brief report: Teen sexting and psychosocial health.

    PubMed

    Temple, Jeff R; Le, Vi Donna; van den Berg, Patricia; Ling, Yan; Paul, Jonathan A; Temple, Brian W

    2014-01-01

    The current study examines whether adolescents who report sexting exhibit more psychosocial health problems, compared to their non-sexting counterparts. Participants included 937 ethnically diverse male and female adolescents recruited and assessed from multiple high schools in southeast Texas. Measures included self-report of sexting, impulsivity, alcohol and drug use, and depression and anxiety symptoms. Teen sexting was significantly associated with symptoms of depression, impulsivity, and substance use. When adjusted for prior sexual behavior, age, gender, race/ethnicity, and parent education, sexting was only related to impulsivity and substance use. While teen sexting appears to correlate with impulsive and high-risk behaviors (substance use), we did not find sexting to be a marker of mental health. PMID:24331302