Note: This page contains sample records for the topic classroom psychosocial environment from Science.gov.
While these samples are representative of the content of Science.gov,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of Science.gov
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.
Last update: August 15, 2014.
1

Psychosocial Learning Environment in Science Classrooms: A Review of Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews studies on the psychosocial learning environment of science classrooms focusing on: (1) assessment of classroom learning environments; (2) predictive validity of environmental perceptions in science classrooms; (3) past criterion validity studies; and (4) directions for future research. (DS)

Fraser, Barry J.; Walberg, Herbert J.

1981-01-01

2

Physical and Psychosocial Environments Associated with Networked Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports a study of the learning environments in computer networked classrooms. The study is unique in that it involved an evaluation of both the physical and psychosocial classroom environments in these computerised settings through the use of a combination of questionnaires and ergonomic evaluations. The study involved administering…

Zandvliet, David B.; Fraser, Barry J.

2005-01-01

3

Some Determinants of Classroom Psychosocial Environment in Australian Catholic High Schools: A Multilevel Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research investigated some determinants of classroom environment in Australian Catholic high schools. The Catholic School Classroom Environment Questionnaire (CSCEQ) was used to assess 7 dimensions of the classroom psychosocial environment: student affiliation, interactions, cooperation, task orientation, order and organization,…

Dorman, Jeffrey P.

2009-01-01

4

Gender effects for student perception of the classroom psychosocial environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A future shortage of science teachers has been predicted, and since women are presently underrepresented in the sciences, they are a good potential source for future science teachers. Unfortunately women appear to become less interested in science as they continue in school. Because the classroom psychosocial environment has been shown to be related to learning outcomes, it may contribute to women's lack of interest in sciences. This study compared the classroom environments perceived by fourth grade, seventh grade and high school boys and girls in classes taught by males and females to determine if any perceptual differences existed. The three, two factor MANOVAS (teacher gender by student gender) showed no differences for fourth grade students, one for seventh grade students and three for high school students. The seventh grade boys and girls perceived classes taught by females as having more friction than classes taught by males and high school boys and girls perceived classes taught by females as being more difficult than classes taught by males. Further, for the high school students it appears that classes are perceived more favorably when the opposite genders are combined. These perceptual differences combined with role modeling may contribute to the lack of women in science. More research is necessary to determine causal relationships.

Lawrenz, Frances

5

Associations between Psychosocial Environment and Outcomes in Technology-Rich Classrooms in Australian Secondary Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research investigated associations between classroom environment and student affective outcomes in Australian secondary schools. The Technology-Rich Outcomes-Focused Learning Environment Inventory (TROFLEI) was used to assess 10 classroom environment dimensions: student cohesiveness, teacher support, involvement, investigation, task…

Dorman, Jeffrey P.

2009-01-01

6

Assessment of the Psychosocial Environment of University Science Laboratory Classrooms: A Cross-National Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of 1,720 students in 71 university science laboratory classes in the United States, Canada, England, Australia, Israel, and Nigeria investigated student and teacher perceptions of dimensions of classroom environment (student cohesiveness, open-endedness, integration, rule clarity, material environment). Results and the utility of the…

Fraser, Barry J.; And Others

1992-01-01

7

An Investigation of Some Features of the Psychosocial Learning Environment in Some Nigerian Secondary Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated features of the classroom- and school-level psychological learning environments in some secondary schools in Ondo State, Nigeria. It was found that age of a school has no effect on classroom- and school-level psychosocial learning environments. The presumed superiority of old schools over new schools in the provision of favorable…

Akindehin, Folajimi

1993-01-01

8

Classrooms as Lexical Environments.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores the vocabulary available in English-as-a-Second-Language classes in which teachers have made a strong commitment to a communicative approach to language teaching. Provides an account of problems that were encountered in an attempt to establish a rich lexical environment in one classroom. (Author/VWL)

Meara, Paul; Lightbown, Patsy M.; Halter, Randall H.

1997-01-01

9

Assessing the psychosocial environment of science classes in Catholic secondary schools  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Much Catholic school and church rhetoric suggests that Catholic schools possess distinctive learning environments. Research into this aspect of Catholic schooling has been hampered by the lack of an appropriate assessment instrument. By drawing on contemporary church literature, the perceptions of personnel involved in Catholic education and existing classroom environment questionnaires, a new instrument was developed to assess student perceptions of classroom psychosocial environment in Catholic schools. The use of this instrument in 64 classrooms in Catholic and Government schools indicated significant differences on some scales. The distinctive nature of Catholic schooling did not extend to all classroom environment dimensions deemed important to Catholic education.

Dorman, Jeffrey P.; McRobbie, Campbell J.; Fraser, Barry J.

1993-12-01

10

Relationship Between School and Classroom Environment and Teacher Burnout: A LISREL Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research was conducted on the relationship between school and classroom psychosocial environment and perceptions of burnout in teachers who staff Queensland private schools. A sample of 246 teachers responded to scales that assess seven school environment and seven classroom environment dimensions and the three facets of burnout measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory: emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and personal accomplishment. Preliminary

Jeffrey P. Dorman

2003-01-01

11

Educational Environments To Support Children's Psychosocial Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This ERIC/EECE report summarizes recent documents and journal articles, and highlights some World Wide Web resources that focus on educational and classroom environments that can support children's social, emotional, and psychological development. Annotations are provided for seven ERIC documents, four ERIC journal articles, and two web resources.…

Cesarone, Bernard

2002-01-01

12

Changing Behaviors by Changing the Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This case study explores the possibility of affecting classroom behaviors by modifying the classroom environment. Although this type of research previously has been conducted in self-contained special education classrooms (Guardino, 2009), this is the first study to explore modifications in an inclusive classroom. The results of this study align…

Guardino, Caroline A.; Fullerton, Elizabeth

2010-01-01

13

Psychosocial work environment and antidepressant medication: a prospective cohort study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Adverse psychosocial work environments may lead to impaired mental health, but it is still a matter of conjecture if demonstrated associations are causal or biased. We aimed at verifying whether poor psychosocial working climate is related to increase of redeemed subscription of antidepressant medication. METHODS: Information on all antidepressant drugs (AD) purchased at pharmacies from 1995 through 2006 was

Jens Peter E Bonde; Torsten Munch-Hansen; Joanna Wieclaw; Niels Westergaard-Nielsen; Esben Agerbo

2009-01-01

14

Safe Space: Student Perspectives on Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on data from a survey of 121 baccalaureate and master of social work students at a western university, this study explores students' perspectives of "safe" and "unsafe" classroom environments. The majority reported that being in a safe classroom changed both what and how much they learned. Students offered a wide range of instructor, fellow…

Holley, Lynn C.; Steiner, Sue

2005-01-01

15

The psychosocial environment: towards an agenda for research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – To review current knowledge regarding the workplace psychosocial environment including the nature and outcomes of organizational stressors and the effectiveness of workplace stress interventions. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Provides a narrative review of the extant literature and extrapolate findings from the emergent literature on positive psychology. Findings – A great deal is known about the environmental characteristics that cause or

E. Kevin Kelloway; Michael Teed; Elizabeth Kelley

2008-01-01

16

Social environment of junior high and high school classrooms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reports on the development of a Classroom Environment Scale (CES), a 90-item perceived environment scale that assesses 9 dimensions (e.g., student involvement, competition) of the classroom. Intercorrelations among the subscales indicate that the CES measures distinct, though moderately correlated, aspects of the classroom environment. Each of the subscales significantly discriminated among 38 classrooms in a standardization sample, and internal consistency

Edison J. Trickett; Rudolph H. Moos

1973-01-01

17

Creating a Safe and Positive Classroom Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To insure that each child has a safe and positive environment at school, teachers should earn their pupils' respect and classroom activities should be oriented to helping each child succeed. Three key phrases reinforce the expectation of success. These phrases, which teacher and pupils should understand and remember, are: (1) It is O.K. to make a…

White, Kimberly A.

18

Psychosocial work environment and mental health among construction workers.  

PubMed

We assessed psychosocial work environment, the prevalence of mental health complaints and the association between these two among bricklayers and construction supervisors. For this cross-sectional study a total of 1500 bricklayers and supervisors were selected. Psychosocial work characteristics were measured using the Dutch Questionnaire on the Experience and Evaluation of Work and compared to the general Dutch working population. Mental health effects were measured with scales to assess fatigue during work, need for recovery after work, symptoms of distress, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. The prevalence of self-reported mental health complaints was determined using the cut-off values. Associations between psychosocial work characteristics and self-reported mental health complaints were analysed using logistic regression. Total response rate was 43%. Compared to the general working population, bricklayers experienced statistically significant worse job control, learning opportunities and future perspectives; supervisors experienced statistically significant higher psychological demands and need for recovery. Prevalence of self-reported mental health effects among bricklayers and supervisors, respectively, were as follows: high need for recovery after work (14%; 25%), distress (5%, 7%), depression (18%, 20%) and post-traumatic stress disorder (11%, 7%). Among both occupations, high work speed and quantity were associated with symptoms of depression. Further, among construction supervisors, low participation in decision making and low social support of the direct supervisor was associated with symptoms of depression. The findings in the present study indicate psychosocial risk factors for bricklayers and supervisors. In each occupation a considerable proportion of workers was positively screened for symptoms of common mental disorders. PMID:23380530

Boschman, J S; van der Molen, H F; Sluiter, J K; Frings-Dresen, M H W

2013-09-01

19

Visibility and Social Recognition as Psychosocial Work Environment Factors among Cleaners in A Multi-Ethnic Workplace Intervention  

PubMed Central

This article focuses on the psychosocial work environment of immigrant cleaners at a Danish workplace. Today, many cleaners working in Danish cleaning jobs are women from the established immigrant communities, but also labour migrants from the newer EU member states have found their way to the cleaning industry. Studies have drawn attention to immigrants’ low position in the cleaning industry and their increased risk of work injuries. This article is based on a case study of an intervention called “Make a Difference” designed to improve the work environment among cleaners at a multi-ethnic workplace. We used semi-structured interviews, photo logs, observation and participation to investigate how the cleaners experienced their work environment. The cleaners reported an overload of heavy work, related to the concept of a classroom’s “readiness for cleaning”, and they expressed strained social relations and communication in addition to a lack of social recognition and invisibility at the workplace, a school. We analysed these psychosocial work environmental problems by investigating the different forms of social relationships and communication within the group of cleaners, and between the cleaners and the teachers and pupils at the school. Moreover, we discussed why the intervention, based on training of language and cleaning skills and social interaction, only partially improved the cleaners’ psychosocial work environment problems. In this article, we argue that social divisions based on ethnicity between the new and the established group of cleaners, combined with their marginal position and poor work organisation at the school, reinforced the cleaners’ experiences of psychosocial work environment problems. This article suggests that increased effort towards social inclusion at work and improved work organisation, especially for the new labour migrants from newer EU-countries, should be considered.

Hviid, Kirsten; Smith, Louise Hardman; Frydendall, Karen Bo; Flyvholm, Mari-Ann

2012-01-01

20

Visibility and social recognition as psychosocial work environment factors among cleaners in a multi-ethnic workplace intervention.  

PubMed

This article focuses on the psychosocial work environment of immigrant cleaners at a Danish workplace. Today, many cleaners working in Danish cleaning jobs are women from the established immigrant communities, but also labour migrants from the newer EU member states have found their way to the cleaning industry. Studies have drawn attention to immigrants' low position in the cleaning industry and their increased risk of work injuries. This article is based on a case study of an intervention called "Make a Difference" designed to improve the work environment among cleaners at a multi-ethnic workplace. We used semi-structured interviews, photo logs, observation and participation to investigate how the cleaners experienced their work environment. The cleaners reported an overload of heavy work, related to the concept of a classroom's "readiness for cleaning", and they expressed strained social relations and communication in addition to a lack of social recognition and invisibility at the workplace, a school. We analysed these psychosocial work environmental problems by investigating the different forms of social relationships and communication within the group of cleaners, and between the cleaners and the teachers and pupils at the school. Moreover, we discussed why the intervention, based on training of language and cleaning skills and social interaction, only partially improved the cleaners' psychosocial work environment problems. In this article, we argue that social divisions based on ethnicity between the new and the established group of cleaners, combined with their marginal position and poor work organisation at the school, reinforced the cleaners' experiences of psychosocial work environment problems. This article suggests that increased effort towards social inclusion at work and improved work organisation, especially for the new labour migrants from newer EU-countries, should be considered. PMID:23263660

Hviid, Kirsten; Smith, Louise Hardman; Frydendall, Karen Bo; Flyvholm, Mari-Ann

2013-01-01

21

The Relationship between Academic Dishonesty and College Classroom Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of 280 undergraduates in two liberal arts colleges examined the relationship between college classroom environment, academic cheating, and the neutralization (justification) of cheating. Results suggest classroom environment is a significant situational variable in academic dishonesty, with both attitudes and behavior being related to…

Pulvers, Kim; Diekhoff, George M.

1999-01-01

22

The Relationship between Students' Perceptions of Classroom Environment and Their Academic Achievement in Korea.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Uses Korean revision and translation of Classroom Environment Scale to measure the psychological characteristics of the classroom environment. Finds differences in students' 10th- and 11th-grade classroom environments by school and classroom organization. Also finds that seven subscales in Korean Classroom Environment Scale (for example, teacher…

Baek, Sun-Geun; Choi, Hye-Jeong

2002-01-01

23

Understanding and Improving Classroom Emotional Climate and Behavior Management in the "Real World": The Role of Head Start Teachers' Psychosocial Stressors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: This article reports on two studies. Study 1 considered ways in which Head Start teachers' (n = 90) psychosocial stressors are related to teachers' ability to maintain a positive classroom emotional climate and effective behavior management in preschool classrooms. Study 2 tested the hypothesis that among teachers randomly…

Grining, Christine Li; Raver, C. Cybele; Champion, Kina; Sardin, Latriese; Metzger, Molly; Jones, Stephanie M.

2010-01-01

24

Between-Classroom Differences in Peer Network Features and Students' Perceptions of the Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of this poster is to examine whether differences in the structural features of classroom peer networks (tight-knittedness, hierarchy, salience norms) are associated with differences in how individual students perceive the classroom environment (relational support from teachers and peers) and express achievement-related beliefs…

Zadzora, Kathleen; Gest, Scott D.; Rodkin, Philip C.

2011-01-01

25

Promoting Kindergarten Children's Creativity in the Classroom Environment in Jordan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aimed at investigating teachers' classroom practices, which either stimulate or inhibit the development of the creative environment of classrooms in Jordan, and determining the differences between practices according to educational level, experience level and type of teaching. The sample of the study consisted of 215 kindergarten…

Dababneh, Kholoud; Ihmeideh, Fathi M.; Al-Omari, Aieman A.

2010-01-01

26

Controlling the Thermal Environment of the Co-ordinated Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The classroom environment is a working surround in which children, through participating in organized experiences, can grow and develop in an optimum manner. Classroom design requires organization of principles of environmental control in order to assure efficient and successful performance. This control cannot be left to chance. In considering…

Harmon, Darell Boyd

27

Learning Environments in Information and Communications Technology Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study of learning environments provides a useful research framework for investigating the effects of educational innovations such as those which are associated with the use of the Internet in classroom settings. This study reports an investigation into the use of Internet technologies in high-school classrooms in Australia and Canada.…

Zandvliet, David B.; Fraser, Barry J.

2004-01-01

28

Interaction Design Patterns for Classroom Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

In our research, we synthesize two lines of development that have been dealt with independently so far: 1) the development\\u000a and evaluation of educational technologies to support problem-oriented and collaborative learning activities inside and outside\\u000a of the classroom, and 2) interaction design patterns as a means to document and generate design knowledge. Primary contributions\\u000a are software prototypes for enhancing classroom

Henning Breuer; Nelson Baloian; Christian Sousa; Mitsuji Matsumoto

2007-01-01

29

Seven Criteria for an Effective Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There are a plethora of variables which affect pupils in the classroom. These might involve the obvious such as uncomfortable temperature readings a well as the following: (1) small group work as compared to individual activities; (2) use of measurably stated objectives versus constructivism as psychologies of learning; (3) a very quiet…

Ediger, Marlow

2009-01-01

30

Using Students' Assessment of Classroom Environment to Develop a Typology of Secondary School Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research employing the Technology-Rich Outcomes-Focused Learning Environment Inventory (TROFLEI) was conducted in Australian secondary schools. A sample of 4,146 students from 286 classes responded to the TROFLEI which assesses 10 classroom environment dimensions: student cohesiveness, teacher support, involvement, task orientation, investigation,…

Dorman, Jeffrey P.; Aldridge, Jill M.; Fraser, Barry J.

2006-01-01

31

Classroom Behavior and Psychosocial Adjustment of Single- and Two-Parent Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared the psychosocial adjustment and social behavior of children from divorced or separated single-parent families with that of children from two-parent families. The theory of attachment was adopted as the conceptual framework for the study because of similarities between the behavioral response of children to parental separation…

Ellison, Edythe

32

Classroom Resiliency--A Comparison of Navajo Elementary Students' Perceptions of Their Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a gender difference in how students perceived their classroom environment on the Navajo Nation public school. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be…

Piechowski, Alta Begay

2011-01-01

33

The Columbia Classroom Environments Project.... Fifth Progress Report, May 1972.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report is organized into seven chapters. Chapter One, an Introduction by Joseph C. Grannis, includes the most relevant sections of the proposal made by the Columbia Classroom Environments Project (CCEP) to Project Follow Through in August 1970. Chapter Two is an Analysis of the Child Behavior Stream Observations from the Spring 1971 Study of…

Grannis, Joseph C.

34

Student Perceptions of Classroom Environment and Instructors' Reflections  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study reports the development of an instrument to assess classroom environment in universities. Using a sample of 665 students from 11 departments of the University of Seville (Spain), an instrument called the Evaluation of University Teaching Activities Questionnaire (E.U.T.A.Q.) was field-tested. The E.U.T.A.Q. consists of 25 items assigned…

Villar, Luis M.; Alegre, Olga M.

2007-01-01

35

Teacher epistemology and scientific inquiry in computerized classroom environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 20-week classroom-based study was conducted to investigate the extent to which a computerized learning environment could facilitate students' development of higher-level thinking skills associated with scientific inquiry. In two classes students' interactions with a scientific data base - Birds of Antarctica - were closely monitored, and the mediating roles of the teachers' epistemologies were examined. Interpretive data were generated

Dorit Maor; Peter Charles Taylor

1995-01-01

36

Quantifying Error in Survey Measures of School and Classroom Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developing indicators that reflect important aspects of school and classroom environments has become central in a nationwide effort to develop comprehensive programs that measure teacher quality and effectiveness. Formulating teacher evaluation policy necessitates accurate and reliable methods for measuring these environmental variables. This…

Schweig, Jonathan David

2014-01-01

37

A Brave New World: Synchronous Environments in the Literature Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Internet may be the ultimate immersive and participatory medium, opening doors as it does to countless story worlds. As such, it has much to offer reading instruction in both elementary and secondary classrooms. This paper explores how a teacher used one web application--a text-based virtual environment called a MOO--to encourage his high…

Rozema, Robert

38

Inferring Ancient Environments from Fossil Foraminifera: A Classroom Activity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This student activity demonstrates how foraminifera can be used to infer ancient environments. It contains background information and the classroom activity, which includes instructions and the required charts and diagrams. Also included are references and active links for further study as well as suggestions for a follow-up activity.

Olson, Hilary

39

Democratizing Classroom Discourse: The Challenge for Online Writing Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article is intended to highlight peer response discourse trends and to initiate a dialogue about the ways in which educators, and designers of educational environments, can play a central role in creating more democratic discourse in classrooms. We report on a research and development project involving education experts, computer engineers,…

Kline, Sonia; Letofsky, Kirsten; Woodard, Rebecca

2013-01-01

40

Interactions between Psychosocial and Built Environment Factors in Explaining Older Adults' Physical Activity  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate ecological model predictions of cross-level interactions among psychosocial and environmental correlates of physical activity in 719 community-dwelling older adults in the Baltimore, Maryland and Seattle, Washington areas during 2005-2008. Method Walkability, access to parks and recreation facilities and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) minutes per week (min/week) were measured objectively. Neighborhood aesthetics, walking facilities, social support, self-efficacy, barriers and transportation and leisure walking min/week were self-reported. Results Walkability interacted with social support in explaining total MVPA (B = 13.71) and with social support (B = 7.90), self-efficacy (B = 7.66) and barriers (B = ?8.26) in explaining walking for transportation. Aesthetics interacted with barriers in explaining total MVPA (B = ?12.20) and walking facilities interacted with self-efficacy in explaining walking for leisure (B = ?10.88; Ps < .05). Summarizing across the interactions, living in a supportive environment (vs. unsupportive) was related to 30-59 more min/week of physical activity for participants with more positive psychosocial attributes, but only 0-28 more min/week for participants with less positive psychosocial attributes. Conclusion Results supported synergistic interactions between built environment and psychosocial factors in explaining physical activity among older adults. Findings suggest multilevel interventions may be most effective in increasing physical activity.

Carlson, Jordan A.; Sallis, James F.; Conway, Terry L.; Saelens, Brian E.; Frank, Lawrence D.; Kerr, Jacqueline; Cain, Kelli L.; King, Abby C.

2011-01-01

41

Adequacy of the Regular Early Education Classroom Environment for Students with Visual Impairment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study describes the classroom environment that students with visual impairment typically experience in regular Australian early education. Adequacy of the classroom environment (teacher training and experience, teacher support, parent involvement, adult involvement, inclusive attitude, individualization of the curriculum, physical…

Brown, Cherylee M.; Packer, Tanya L.; Passmore, Anne

2013-01-01

42

Technology Integration and the Classroom Learning Environment: Research for Action  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes initial results of a collaborative action research endeavor between a regional university and a local\\u000a school (Grade 6 level) using learning environments research to monitor alignment of classroom learning activities with a constructivist\\u000a viewpoint while integrating technology into the curriculum. Student perceptions as measured by the Constructivist Learning\\u000a Environment Survey (CLES) were explored. Teacher logs, teacher interviews,

Sharon H. Harwell; Shannon Gunter; Sandra Montgomery; Cheryl Shelton; Deborah West

2001-01-01

43

A Prospective Study Investigating the Links among Classroom Environment, School Connectedness, and Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

School connectedness and classroom environment have both been strongly linked to depressive symptoms, but their interrelation is unclear. We tested whether school connectedness mediated the link between classroom environment and depressive symptoms. A sample of 504 Australian seventh-and eighth-grade students completed the Classroom Environment

Shochet, Ian M.; Smith, Coral L.

2014-01-01

44

Psychosocial Characteristics of Optimum Performance in Isolated and Confined Environments (ICE)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Behavioral Health and Performance (BHP) Element addresses human health risks in the NASA Human Research Program (HRP), including the Risk of Adverse Behavioral Conditions and the Risk of Psychiatric Disorders. BHP supports and conducts research to help characteristics and mitigate the Behavioral Medicine risk for exploration missions, and in some instances, current Flight Medical Operations. The Behavioral Health and Performance (BHP) Element identified research gaps within the Behavioral Medicine Risk, including Gap BMed6: What psychosocial characteristics predict success in an isolated, confined environment (ICE)? To address this gap, we conducted an extensive and exhaustive literature review to identify the following: 1) psychosocial characteristics that predict success in ICE environments; 2) characteristics that are most malleable; and 3) specific countermeasures that could enhance malleable characteristics.

Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Keeton, Kathryn E.; Shea, Camille; Leveton, Lauren B.

2010-01-01

45

Validation of the "Chinese Language Classroom Learning Environment Inventory" for Investigating the Nature of Chinese Language Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Chinese Language Classroom Environment Inventory (CLCEI) is a bilingual instrument developed for use in measuring students' and teachers' perceptions toward their Chinese Language classroom learning environments in Singapore secondary schools. The English version of the CLCEI was customised from the English version of the "What is happening in…

Lian, Chua Siew; Wong, Angela F. L.; Der-Thanq, Victor Chen

2006-01-01

46

Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents K-12 and college classrooms considered outstanding in a competition, which judged the most outstanding learning environments at educational institutions nationwide. Jurors spent two days reviewing projects, focusing on concepts and ideas that made them exceptional. For each citation, the article offers information on the firm, client,…

American School & University, 2003

2003-01-01

47

The ward atmosphere important for the psychosocial work environment of nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  The nursing staff working in psychiatric care have a demanding work situation, which may be reflected in how they view their\\u000a psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The aims of the present study were to investigate in what way different\\u000a aspects of the ward atmosphere were related to the psychosocial work environment, as perceived by nursing staff working in

Hanna Tuvesson; Christine Wann-Hansson; Mona Eklund

2011-01-01

48

Student Perceptions of Industrial Chemistry Classroom Learning Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes a study conducted in Israel which focused on how learning industrial chemistry case studies affects\\u000a students' perceptions of their classroom learning environment and their interest in chemistry studies. The goal of the study\\u000a was to determine the effects of industrial case studies on students' perceptions of chemistry in general, and industrial chemistry\\u000a in particular. Information on students'

Avi Hofstein; Miri Kesner; Ruth Ben-Zvi

1999-01-01

49

The Effect of Clustering on Statistical Tests: An Illustration Using Classroom Environment Data  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the effect of clustering on statistical tests and illustrates this effect using classroom environment data. Most classroom environment studies involve the collection of data from students nested within classrooms and the hierarchical nature to these data cannot be ignored. In particular, this paper studies the influence of…

Dorman, Jeffrey Paul

2008-01-01

50

Personal correlates of contrasting environments: Student satisfactions in high school classrooms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship of perceived environment of the high school classroom to student satisfactions and moods was assessed in two matched samples of 18 classrooms each. A number of significant and replicated relationships were found between the perceived environment and various satisfactions and moods. The strongest relationships with student satisfactions and positive student mood involved those classrooms emphasizing personal relationship dimensions

Edison J. Trickett; Rudolf H. Moos

1974-01-01

51

Childhood family psychosocial environment and carotid intima media thickness: the CARDIA study.  

PubMed

Little is known about whether the childhood family psychosocial environment (characterized by cold, unaffectionate interactions, conflict, aggression, neglect and/or low nurturance) affects coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Objectives were to evaluate associations of childhood family psychosocial environment with carotid intima media thickness (IMT), a subclinical measure of atherosclerosis. The study population included 2659 CARDIA study participants, aged 37-52 years. Childhood family psychosocial environment was measured using a risky family questionnaire via self-report. Carotid IMT was calculated using the average of 20 measurements of mean common carotid, bulb and internal carotid IMT, assessed using high-resolution B-mode ultrasound images. Utilizing linear regression analyses adjusted for age, a 1-unit (range 0-21) increase in risky family score was associated with 0.0036 (95% CI: 0.0006,0.0066 mm) and 0.0020 (95% CI: 0.0002,0.0038) mm increase in mean IMT in white males and females, respectively. Formal mediation analyses and covariate adjustments suggested childhood socioeconomic position and smoking may be important mechanisms in white males and females, as well as education and depressive symptomatology in white males. No associations were found in black participants. Formal statistical tests for interaction between risky family score and sex, and between risky family score and race/ethnicity, demonstrated borderline evidence of interactions for both sex (p = 0.12) and race/ethnicity (p = 0.14) with risky family score for associations with mean IMT. In conclusion, childhood family psychosocial environment was positively associated with IMT in white participants, with little evidence of association in black participants. Mechanisms in white participants may include potential negative impacts of socioeconomic constraints on parenting quality, potentially influencing offspring's cardiovascular risk factors (e.g. smoking), socioeconomic position (e.g. education), and/or psychosocial functioning (e.g. depression), which may in turn lead to atherosclerotic processes. Borderline racial/ethnic differences in findings should be replicated, but add to literature exploring race/ethnicity-specific associations of parenting approaches with health outcomes. PMID:24581057

Loucks, Eric B; Taylor, Shelley E; Polak, Joseph F; Wilhelm, Aude; Kalra, Preety; Matthews, Karen A

2014-03-01

52

Psychosocial work environment factors and weight change: a prospective study among Danish health care workers  

PubMed Central

Background Lifestyle variables may serve as important intermediate factors between psychosocial work environment and health outcomes. Previous studies, focussing on work stress models have shown mixed and weak results in relation to weight change. This study aims to investigate psychosocial factors outside the classical work stress models as potential predictors of change in body mass index (BMI) in a population of health care workers. Methods A cohort study, with three years follow-up, was conducted among Danish health care workers (3982 women and 152 men). Logistic regression analyses examined change in BMI (more than +/? 2?kg/m2) as predicted by baseline psychosocial work factors (work pace, workload, quality of leadership, influence at work, meaning of work, predictability, commitment, role clarity, and role conflicts) and five covariates (age, cohabitation, physical work demands, type of work position and seniority). Results Among women, high role conflicts predicted weight gain, while high role clarity predicted both weight gain and weight loss. Living alone also predicted weight gain among women, while older age decreased the odds of weight gain. High leadership quality predicted weight loss among men. Associations were generally weak, with the exception of quality of leadership, age, and cohabitation. Conclusion This study of a single occupational group suggested a few new risk factors for weight change outside the traditional work stress models.

2013-01-01

53

Indoor climate, psychosocial work environment and symptoms in open-plan offices.  

PubMed

To study the indoor climate, the psychosocial work environment and occupants' symptoms in offices a cross-sectional questionnaire survey was made in 11 naturally and 11 mechanically ventilated office buildings. Nine of the buildings had mainly cellular offices; five of the buildings had mainly open-plan offices, whereas eight buildings had a mixture of cellular, multi-person and open-plan offices. A total of 2301 occupants, corresponding to a response rate of 72%, completed a retrospective questionnaire. The questionnaire comprised questions concerning environmental perceptions, mucous membrane irritation, skin irritation, central nervous system (CNS) symptoms and psychosocial factors. Occupants in open-plan offices are more likely to perceive thermal discomfort, poor air quality and noise and they more frequently complain about CNS and mucous membrane symptoms than occupants in multi-person and cellular offices. The association between psychosocial factors and office size was weak. Open-plan offices may not be suited for all job types. PRACTICAL IMPLICATION: Open-plan offices may be a risk factor for adverse environmental perceptions and symptoms. PMID:16948715

Pejtersen, J; Allermann, L; Kristensen, T S; Poulsen, O M

2006-10-01

54

Investigation of Junior Secondary Students' Perceptions of Mathematics Classroom Learning Environments in China  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports the findings of a study investigating junior secondary school students' perceptions of mathematics classroom learning environments in China. An adapted 'What Is Happening In this Classroom?' questionnaire was administered to a sample of 2324 junior secondary school students from 72 classrooms in six provinces.…

Yang, Xinrong

2013-01-01

55

Development and Datametric Properties of a Scale Measuring Students' Perceptions of the Classroom Assessment Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Each classroom has its own assessment environment perceived by the students and springs from the teacher's assessment practices. Although students' perceptions of the assessment environment may influence their achievement-related outcomes, little attention has been given to the measurement of perceived classroom assessment environment. This study…

Alkharusi, Hussain

2011-01-01

56

Neighborhood food environment role in modifying psychosocial stress-diet relationships  

PubMed Central

Exposure to highly palatable foods may increase eating in response to stress, but this behavioral response has not been examined in relation to the neighborhood food environment. This study examined whether the neighborhood food environment modified relationships between psychosocial stress and dietary behaviors. Probability-sample survey (n=460) and in-person food environment audit data were used. Dietary behaviors were measured using 17 snack food items and a single eating-out-of-home item. Chronic stress was derived from five subscales; major life events was a count of 9 items. The neighborhood food environment was measured as availability of large grocery stores, small grocery stores, and convenience stores, as well as proportion of restaurants that were fast food. Two-level hierarchical regression models were estimated. Snack food intake was positively associated with convenience store availability and negatively associated with large grocery store availability. The measures of chronic stress and major life events were generally not associated with either dietary behavior overall, although Latinos were less likely to eat out at high levels of major life events than African Americans. Stress-neighborhood food environment interactions were not statistically significant. Important questions remain regarding the role of the neighborhood food environment in the stress-diet relationship that warrant further investigation.

Zenk, Shannon N.; Schulz, Amy J.; Izumi, Betty T.; Mentz, Graciela; Israel, Barbara A.; Lockett, Murlisa

2013-01-01

57

Neighborhood food environment role in modifying psychosocial stress-diet relationships.  

PubMed

Exposure to highly palatable foods may increase eating in response to stress, but this behavioral response has not been examined in relation to the neighborhood food environment. This study examined whether the neighborhood food environment modified relationships between psychosocial stress and dietary behaviors. Probability-sample survey (n=460) and in-person food environment audit data were used. Dietary behaviors were measured using 17 snack food items and a single eating-out-of-home item. Chronic stress was derived from five subscales; major life events was a count of nine items. The neighborhood food environment was measured as availability of large grocery stores, small grocery stores, and convenience stores, as well as proportion of restaurants that were fast food. Two-level hierarchical regression models were estimated. Snack food intake was positively associated with convenience store availability and negatively associated with large grocery store availability. The measures of chronic stress and major life events were generally not associated with either dietary behavior overall, although Latinos were less likely to eat out at high levels of major life events than African Americans. Stress-neighborhood food environment interactions were not statistically significant. Important questions remain regarding the role of the neighborhood food environment in the stress-diet relationship that warrant further investigation. PMID:23415977

Zenk, Shannon N; Schulz, Amy J; Izumi, Betty T; Mentz, Graciela; Israel, Barbara A; Lockett, Murlisa

2013-06-01

58

Perception Shapes Experience: The Influence of Actual and Perceived Classroom Environment Dimensions on Girls' Motivations for Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The classroom environment influences students' academic outcomes, but it is often students' perceptions that shape their classroom experiences. Our study examined the extent to which observed classroom environment features shaped perceptions of the classroom, and explained levels of, and changes in, girls' motivation in junior secondary school…

Spearman, Juliette; Watt, Helen M. G.

2013-01-01

59

Psychometrics and Observations: Issues in a Dual Approach to the Study of Classroom Learning Environments.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Anthropological methods of classroom observation were combined with the results of student responses to three questionnaires in a study of classroom learning environments. The questionnaires were: Learning Environment Inventory, Class Activities Questionnaire, and ALP (Authenticity, Legitimacy, Productivity) Ethos Instrument. Although the…

Cichon, Donald J.; Olson, George E.

60

Creating a Warm and Inclusive Classroom Environment: Planning for All Children to Feel Welcome  

Microsoft Academic Search

The type of classroom environment that a teacher creates and encourages can either increase or decrease a student's ability to learn and feel comfortable as a member of the class. The classroom environment should do as much to foster cooperation and acceptance as the teaching methods that the teacher uses. This article describes a number of methods to help teachers

Bucholz Jessica L. Ed. D; Julie L. Sheffler

2009-01-01

61

Determinants of Classroom Environment in Queensland Secondary Schools: A Multilevel Reanalysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports the reanalysis of data collected in a study of 3 determinants of classroom environment (viz. year level, subject, and school type) using multivariate analysis of variance and multilevel analysis. Data were collected from 2,211 students in Queensland Catholic and government schools. The Catholic School Classroom Environment

Dorman, Jeffrey P.

2008-01-01

62

Issues of Teacher Professional Learning within "Non-Traditional" Classroom Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In response to the demands of the "21st century learner", classroom environments are increasingly moving away from traditional models of a single-teacher isolated in their classroom. There is an advent of 'non-traditional' environments that challenge long-held practices in teaching. To support these changes there is a pressing…

Campbell, Matthew; Saltmarsh, Sue; Chapman, Amy; Drew, Christopher

2013-01-01

63

It's Safe to Be Smart: Strategies for Creating a Supportive Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Gifted teenagers in middle and high school benefit from classroom environments that support their social and emotional development. Teachers of gifted adolescents may create classroom environments in which young people know it is safe to be smart and where they feel valued and respected for their intellect, creativity, and passions. By utilizing…

Hébert, Thomas P.; Corcoran, Jamie A.; Coté, John M.; Ene, Mihaela C.; Leighton, Elizabeth A.; Holmes, Ashley M.; Padula, Diane D.

2014-01-01

64

A Cross-National Study of Secondary Science Classroom Environments in Australia and Indonesia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article reports a cross-national study of classroom environments in Australia and Indonesia. A modified version of the What Is Happening In this Class? (WIHIC) questionnaire was used simultaneously in these two countries to: 1) crossvalidate the modified WIHIC; 2) investigate differences between countries and sexes in perceptions of classroom environment; and 3) investigate associations between students’ attitudes to science and their perceptions of classroom environment. The sample consisted of 1,161 students (594 students from 18 classes in Indonesia and 567 students from 18 classes in Australia). Principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation supported the validity of a revised structure for the WIHIC. Two-way MANOVA revealed some differences between countries and between sexes in students’ perceptions of their classroom environments. Simple correlation and multiple regression analyses revealed generally positive associations between the classroom environment and student attitudes to science in both countries.

Fraser, Barry J.; Aldridge, Jill M.; Adolphe, F. S. Gerard

2010-08-01

65

Psychosocial work environment and intention to leave the nursing profession: Results from the longitudinal Chinese NEXT study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims: A shortage of nurses happens not only in developed countries, but also in developing countries, such as in China, but the nurse turnover here makes the situation worse. Why do Chinese nurses want to leave the nursing profession? Our hypothesis is that unfavourable psychosocial work environment could predict nurses' intention to leave (ITL). Methods: Collaborating with the EU NEXT

JIAN LI; H UA FU; YAN HU; LI SHANG; YINGHUI WU; TAGE SØNDERGA; BERND HANS MUELLER; HANS MARTIN HASSELHORN

66

The ward atmosphere important for the psychosocial work environment of nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care  

PubMed Central

Background The nursing staff working in psychiatric care have a demanding work situation, which may be reflected in how they view their psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The aims of the present study were to investigate in what way different aspects of the ward atmosphere were related to the psychosocial work environment, as perceived by nursing staff working in psychiatric in-patient care, and possible differences between nurses and nurse assistants. Methods 93 nursing staff working at 12 general psychiatric in-patient wards in Sweden completed two questionnaires, the Ward Atmosphere Scale and the QPSNordic 34+. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney U-test, Spearman rank correlations and forward stepwise conditional logistic regression analyses. Results The data revealed that there were no differences between nurses and nurse assistants concerning perceptions of the psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The ward atmosphere subscales Personal Problem Orientation and Program Clarity were associated with a psychosocial work environment characterized by Empowering Leadership. Program Clarity was related to the staff's perceived Role Clarity, and Practical Orientation and Order and Organization were positively related to staff perceptions of the Organizational Climate. Conclusions The results from the present study indicate that several ward atmosphere subscales were related to the nursing staff's perceptions of the psychosocial work environment in terms of Empowering Leadership, Role Clarity and Organizational Climate. Improvements in the ward atmosphere could be another way to accomplish improvements in the working conditions of the staff, and such improvements would affect nurses and nurse assistants in similar ways.

2011-01-01

67

Improving the Psychosocial Work Environment at Multi-Ethnic Workplaces: A Multi-Component Intervention Strategy in the Cleaning Industry  

PubMed Central

Global labour migration has increased in recent years and immigrant workers are often recruited into low status and low paid jobs such as cleaning. Research in a Danish context shows that immigrants working in the cleaning industry often form social networks based on shared languages and backgrounds, and that conflict between different ethnic groups may occur. This paper evaluates the impact of a multi-component intervention on the psychosocial work environment at a multi-ethnic Danish workplace in the cleaning sector. The intervention included Danish lessons, vocational training courses, and activities to improve collaboration across different groups of cleaners. Interviews about the outcome of the intervention were conducted with the cleaners and their supervisor. The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire was used as a supplement to the interviews. The results suggest that the psychosocial work environment had improved after the intervention. According to the interviews with the cleaners, the intervention had led to improved communication, trust, and collaboration. These findings are supported by the questionnaire where social support from supervisor and colleagues, social community, trust, and teamwork seem to have improved together with meaning of work, rewards, and emotional demands. The design of the intervention may provide inspiration for future psychosocial work environment interventions at multi-ethnic work places.

Smith, Louise Hardman; Hviid, Kirsten; Frydendall, Karen Bo; Flyvholm, Mari-Ann

2013-01-01

68

Improving the psychosocial work environment at multi-ethnic workplaces: a multi-component intervention strategy in the cleaning industry.  

PubMed

Global labour migration has increased in recent years and immigrant workers are often recruited into low status and low paid jobs such as cleaning. Research in a Danish context shows that immigrants working in the cleaning industry often form social networks based on shared languages and backgrounds, and that conflict between different ethnic groups may occur. This paper evaluates the impact of a multi-component intervention on the psychosocial work environment at a multi-ethnic Danish workplace in the cleaning sector. The intervention included Danish lessons, vocational training courses, and activities to improve collaboration across different groups of cleaners. Interviews about the outcome of the intervention were conducted with the cleaners and their supervisor. The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire was used as a supplement to the interviews. The results suggest that the psychosocial work environment had improved after the intervention. According to the interviews with the cleaners, the intervention had led to improved communication, trust, and collaboration. These findings are supported by the questionnaire where social support from supervisor and colleagues, social community, trust, and teamwork seem to have improved together with meaning of work, rewards, and emotional demands. The design of the intervention may provide inspiration for future psychosocial work environment interventions at multi-ethnic work places. PMID:24129115

Smith, Louise Hardman; Hviid, Kirsten; Frydendall, Karen Bo; Flyvholm, Mari-Ann

2013-10-01

69

Modifying the Classroom Environment to Increase Engagement and Decrease Disruption with Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of this study was to examine the effect of physical modifications on the academic engagement and disruptive behavior of Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing students in self-contained classrooms. Three classrooms at a school for the Deaf were modified after consultation with the classroom teachers. The modifications of the classroom environment

Guardino, Caroline; Antia, Shirind D.

2012-01-01

70

A few design perspectives on one-on-one digital classroom environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

educational computing refers to a scenario where every student in a group or class uses a computing device equipped with wireless communication capability to conduct a learning task. This paper, drawing from design experiences with our digital classroom environment series and other studies, attempts to describe a few valuable 1:1 design perspectives for educational computing inside the classroom. We try

J.-K. Liangw; T.-C. Liuw; H.-Y. Wang; B. Chang; Y.-C. Deng; J.-C. Yang; C.-Y. Chou; H.-W. Ko; S. Yang; T.-W. Chan

2005-01-01

71

A History Lab Environment in the Classroom Brings the Standards to Life  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the authors address the gap between the spirit of the national history standards and what now is occurring in middle grades classrooms constrained by state standards and the No Child Left Behind policy. The authors suggest that creating a lab-like classroom environment to promote historical inquiry offers one means to close that…

White, Steven H.; O'Brien, Joseph E.; Smith, Art; Mortensen, Dustin; Hileman, Keil

2006-01-01

72

Powerful Learning Environments: The Critical Link between School and Classroom Cultures.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evaluated classrooms within four Accelerated Schools Project (ASP) schools, operationalizing the ASP principles, values, and concepts of a "powerful learning environment" (PLE), examining how similarly PLE was implemented in different classrooms and schools, and analyzing the relation between degree of implementation and differences in students'…

Finnan, Christine; Schnepel, Katherine C.; Anderson, Lorin W.

2003-01-01

73

Evaluation of a K-5 Mathematics Program Which Integrates Children's Literature: Classroom Environment, Achievement and Attitudes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes a 1-year study of 120 fifth-grade students whose teachers participated in a program entitled Project SMILE (Science and Math Integrated with Literary Experiences). The purpose of the study was to determine the extent to which the classroom implementation of Project SMILE positively influenced the classroom environment and…

Mink, Deborah V.; Fraser, Barry J.

74

Singapore Students' and Teachers' Perceptions of Computer-Supported Project Work Classroom Learning Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The computer-supported Project Work classroom learning environment discussed in this paper represents a paradigm shift from teacher-centered to student-centered teaching and learning in Singapore schools. Besides the face-to-face weekly lessons in existing Project Work classrooms, the students engaged in computer-supported online forum…

Wong, Angela F. L.; Quek, Choon-Lang; Divaharan, Shanti; Liu, Woon-Chia; Peer, Jarina; Williams, Michael D.

2006-01-01

75

Comparison of Self-Concept and Classroom Environment in Elementary School Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While research findings suggest that self-concept and perceptions of classroom environment may be interrelated, there is little empirical evidence to validate the existence of such a relationship. This study was conducted to examine the relationship between fourth- and fifth-grade students' self-concept and their perceptions of classroom

Bailey, Glenda K.; And Others

76

Cognitive Apprenticeship in Computer-Mediated Feedback: Creating a Classroom Environment to Increase Feedback and Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative case study of 1 teacher and 10 students in an Advanced Placement English class explores the role of computer-mediated feedback in the creation of a classroom learning environment that was supported through hybrid learning experiences. Data sources included classroom observations, online conversations, interviews with 10 high…

Boling, Erica C.; Beatty, Jeanine

2010-01-01

77

Student Perceptions of Classroom Learning Environments: Development of the ClassMaps Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to describe the means, variability, internal consistency reliability, and structural validity evidence of the ClassMaps Survey, a measure of student perceptions of classroom learning environments. The ClassMaps Survey is a 55-item student rating scale of eight important classroom characteristics. The survey provides a…

Doll, Beth; Spies, Robert A.; LeClair, Courtney M.; Kurien, Sarah A.; Foley, Brett P.

2010-01-01

78

Classroom Learning Environment Differences between Resilient, Average, and Nonresilient Middle School Students in Reading  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The lack of achievement of students from high-risk and high-poverty environments necessitates changes in today's middle school environments to create a caring, supportive environment where all middle school students can succeed. This study investigated the classroom learning environments of resilient, average, and nonresilient minority…

Padrón, Yolanda N.; Waxman, Hersh C.; Lee, Yuan-Hsuan

2014-01-01

79

Associations between Students' Perceptions of Mathematics Classroom Environment and Self-Handicapping in Australian and Canadian High Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research investigating the relationship between classroom environment and self-handicapping was conducted in Australian and Canadian high schools. A sample of 2,006 students responded to a questionnaire that assessed student perceptions of classroom environment and self-handicapping. Simple and multiple correlational analyses showed that classroom

Dorman, Jeffrey P.; Ferguson, Janet M.

2004-01-01

80

A comparison of actual and preferred classroom environments as perceived by science teachers and students  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study of perceptions of classroom environment is distinctive in that, first, it made use of two instruments (the Individualized Classroom Environment Questionnaire and Classroom Environment Scale) which have had very little use in prior science education research and, second, it involved assessment not only of student perceptions of actual environment, but also of student perceptions of preferred environments and teacher perceptions of actual environment. Administration of these instruments to a sample of 2175 junior high school students in 116 classes revealed that the environment scales exhibited satisfactory internal consistency reliability and discriminant validity in each of the three forms (student actual, student preferred, and teacher actual), and that there were some fascinating systematic differences between the profiles of environment scale scores obtained for the different forms. In particular, it was generally found that students preferred a more favorable classroom environment then was perceived as being actually present and that teachers perceived the environment of their classes more favorably than did students in the same classrooms.

Fisher, Darrell L.; Fraser, Barry J.

81

Injury and the orchestral environment: part I. The role of work organisation and psychosocial factors in injury risk.  

PubMed

That orchestral musicians are exposed to a high risk of playing-related injury is well established, but despite this, little is known about how work organisation and psychosocial factors may contribute to this risk. Lack of research in this area is surprising considering the importance of these factors in managing occupational health risks in a wide range of other working populations. To address this, we conducted a qualitative study with the following aims: to investigate orchestral musicians' and managers' perceptions of those workplace environmental factors that contribute to injury, and to investigate the potential influence of work organisation and psychosocial factors on injury risk for orchestral musicians. Using a qualitative case-study methodology, in-depth, semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 10 professional orchestral cellists (2 casual and 8 full-time members) from a single Australian orchestra. After initial data analysis, further interviews were undertaken with a set of 5 orchestral management staff as a means of data triangulation. All data were analysed using a "themes-based" analysis of narrative approach. The findings indicate that musicians perceive that stress in the orchestral environment increases injury risk. The perceived stressors were divided into two broad categories: psychosocial injury risks, which included performance stress and interpersonal relationships, and combined psychosocial/physical injury risks such as work organisation and lack of control. This article evaluates the findings in terms of existing literature and makes recommendations for better management of environmental injury risk for orchestral musicians. PMID:24337034

Rickert, Dale L; Barrett, Margaret S; Ackermann, Bronwen J

2013-12-01

82

Is there a correlation between students' perceptions of their middle school science classroom learning environment and their classroom grades?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study was to determine if the marking period grades of middle school science students are correlated with their perception of the classroom learning environment, and if so could such an indicator be used in feedback loops for ongoing classroom learning environment evaluation and evolution. The study examined 24 classrooms in three districts representing several different types of districts and a diverse student population. The independent variable was the students' perceptions of their classroom learning environment (CLE). This variable was represented by their responses on the WIHIC (What Is Happening In This Class) questionnaire. The dependent variable was the students' marking period grades. Background data about the students was included, and for further elaboration and clarification, qualitative data was collected through student and teacher interviews. Middle school science students in this study perceived as most positive those domains over which they have more locus of control. Perceptions showed some variance by gender, ethnicity, teacher/district, and socio-economic status when viewing the absolute values of the domain variables. The patterns of the results show consistency between groups. Direct correlation between questionnaire responses and student grades was not found to be significant except for a small significance with "Task Orientation". This unexpected lack of correlation may be explained by inconsistencies between grading schemes, inadequacies of the indicator instrument, and/or by the one-time administration of the variables. Analysis of the qualitative and quantitative data led to the conclusion that this instrument is picking up information, but that revisions in both the variables and in the process are needed. Grading schemes need to be decomposed, the instrument needs to be revised, and the process needs to be implemented as a series of regular feed-back loops.

Snyder, Wayne

83

Resilience Applied in School: Strengthening Classroom Environments for Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the widespread acceptance of ecological models of child development, the tools and strategies underlying school psychological practice emphasize individual characteristics of children. This article describes ClassMaps Consultation, a consultation strategy that assesses the availability of protective factors and risk in school classrooms

Nickolite, Amanda; Doll, Beth

2008-01-01

84

Reading the Environment: Children's Literature in the Science Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Science trade books, both fiction and nonfiction, nurture a child's personal journey of discovery through the anecdotes, adventures, and experiences of others and through vivid word and picture images. This book focuses on the use of children's literature in the science classroom. Chapters include: (1) "Why Science and Literature Belong Together";…

Cerullo, Mary M.

85

Living in a Global Environment. Classroom Activities in Development Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Forty classroom activities selected from New Internationalist Calendars published between 1984-1989 were collected. Each activity is presented in the form of a short story about a real-life person and a graphic spread of data consisting of maps, tables, photographs, diagrams, text, and student exercises. These activities have been written to…

Fien, John, Ed.

86

Developing dance interaction between QRIO and toddlers in a classroom environment: plans for the first steps  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper introduces the early stages of a study designed to understand the development of dance interactions between QRIO and toddlers in a classroom environment. The study is part of a project to explore the potential use of interactive robots as instructional tools in education. After 3 months observation period, we are starting the experiment. The experimental environment, component technologies,

Fumihide Tanaka; Bret Fortenberry; Kazuki Aisaka; Javier R. Movellan

2005-01-01

87

Making Visible the Behaviors that Influence Learning Environment: A Qualitative Exploration of Computer Science Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors conducted ethnographic research to provide deep understanding of the learning environment of a selection of computer science classrooms at a large, research university in the United States. Categories emerging from data analysis included (1) impersonal environment and guarded behavior; and (2) the creation and maintenance of informal…

Barker, Lecia J.; Garvin-Doxas, Kathy

2004-01-01

88

Making Visible the Behaviors that Influence Learning Environment: A Qualitative Exploration of Computer Science Classrooms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors conducted ethnographic research to provide deep understanding of the learning environment of a selection of computer science classrooms at a large, research university in the United States. Categories emerging from data analysis included (1) impersonal environment and guarded behavior; and (2) the creation and maintenance of informal hierarchy resulting in competitive behaviors. Both of these categories describe patterns

Lecia J. Barker; Kathy Garvin-Doxas

2004-01-01

89

Quality of the Literacy Environment in Inclusive Early Childhood Special Education Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine the quality of the literacy environment in inclusive early childhood special education (ECSE) classrooms ("N" = 54). The first aim was to describe the quality of the literacy environment in terms of structure (i.e., book materials and print/writing materials) and instruction (i.e., instructional…

Guo, Ying; Sawyer, Brook E.; Justice, Laura M.; Kaderavek, Joan N.

2013-01-01

90

Using the Language Environment Analysis (LENA) System in Preschool Classrooms with Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study describes the language environment of preschool programs serving children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and examines relationships between child characteristics and an automated measure of adult and child language in the classroom. The Language Environment Analysis (LENA) system was used with 40 children with ASD to collect data…

Dykstra, Jessica R.; Sabatos-DeVito, Maura G.; Irvin, Dwight W.; Boyd, Brian A.; Hume, Kara A.; Odom, Sam L.

2013-01-01

91

Classroom Environment and Student Outcomes among Students Using Anthropometry Activities in High-School Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The main purpose of this research was to evaluate the use of anthropometric activities among a sample of 761 high-school biology students in terms of student outcomes (achievement and attitudes) and classroom environment (assessed with the Science Laboratory Environment Inventory, SLEI). Data analyses supported the SLEI's factorial validity,…

Lightburn, Millard E.; Fraser, Barry J.

2007-01-01

92

Geometry teaching in wireless classroom environments using Java and J2ME  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interactive geometry software is established as an important tool in geometry and math education. We present our research on possible ways to use such software in wireless classroom environments. In particular, we address user interface issues on portable devices and describe how we maintain a common code base for both desktop and mobile environments, thus increasing the stability of the

Ulrich Kortenkamp; Dirk Materlik

2004-01-01

93

Geometry teaching in wireless classroom environments using Java and J2ME  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interactive geometry software is established as a ni mportant tool in geometry and math education. We present our research on possible ways to use such software in wireless classroom environments. In particular, we address user interface issues on portable devices and describe how we maintain a common code base for both desktop and mobile environments, thus increasing the stability of

Ulrich Kortenkampa

94

The Columbia Classroom Environments Project...Fourth Progress Report, December 1971.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Columbia Classroom Environments Project (CCEP) report discusses a number of questions about a set of dimensions of learning and development as well as the instruments the project was developing for the analysis of behavior in learning environments. Joseph C. Grannis examines The Argument, Assumptions, Definitions, Hypothesis; Rochelle Mayer…

Grannis, Joseph C.

95

Psychosocial work environment, job mobility and gender differences in turnover behaviour: a prospective study among the Swedish general population  

PubMed Central

Background Throughout the literature, substantial evidence supports associations between poor psychosocial work characteristics and a variety of ill-health outcomes. Yet, few reports strategies workers carry out to improve detrimental work conditions and consequently their health, such as changing jobs. The aim of this study was to examine if adverse psychosocial work exposure, as measured with the job demand-control and effort-reward imbalance models, could predict job mobility over a 5 years observation period. Method Participants were working men and women (n?=?940; 54.3% women), aged 24–60 years from the population of Gothenburg and surrounding metropolitan area. Job demand-control and effort-reward variables were compared with independent t-tests and chi2-test in persons with and without job mobility. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyse whether psychosocial factors could predict job mobility. All regression analyses were stratified by gender. Results Exposure to a combination of high demands-low control or high imbalance between effort and reward was related to increased odds of changing jobs (OR 1.63; CI 1.03-2.59 and OR 1.46; CI 1.13-1.89 respectively). When analysing men and women separately, men had a higher OR of changing jobs when exposed to either high demands-low control (OR 2.72; CI 1.24-5.98) or high effort-reward imbalance (OR 1.74; CI 1.11-2.72) compared to reference values. The only significant associations for women was slightly decreased odds for turnover in high reward jobs (OR 0.96; CI 0.92-0.99). Conclusions The results indicate that workers will seek to improve poor work environment by changing jobs. There were notable gender differences, where men tended to engage in job mobility when exposed to adverse psychosocial factors, while women did not. The lack of measures for mechanisms driving job mobility was a limitation of this study, thus preventing conclusions regarding psychosocial factors as the primary source for job mobility.

2014-01-01

96

Students' Perceptions of Classroom Instructional Environments in the Context of "Universal Design for Learning"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using a sample of 867 students in Grades 5-12, the present study investigated whether students' perceptions toward the instructional environment in classrooms that employed Universal Design for Learning differed by school grade level and teacher gender. High-school students in the study showed higher perception scores than upper-elementary or…

Abell, Michael M.; Jung, Eunjoo; Taylor, Matthew

2011-01-01

97

Creating a Positive Learning Environment with the Use of Clickers in a High School Chemistry Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although the effectiveness of student response systems in improving student learning is inconclusive, clickers can be used to create a positive learning environment in the classroom, which can help increase student achievement. With the use of clickers, students showed modest improvements in their performance in conceptual summative assessments.…

Vital, Fred

2012-01-01

98

Introducing Real-Time AVHRR-APT Satellite Imagery in the Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A low-cost (US$350) satellite receiving station was assembled and operated within a classroom environment in Gainesville (Florida) on October 2001 for acquiring satellite data directly from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellites. The simplicity of the satellite signal makes this source of real-time satellite data readily…

Moxey, Lucas; Tucker, Compton; Sloan, Jim; Chadwick, John

2004-01-01

99

Motivational Goal Orientation, Perceptions of Biology and Physics Classroom Learning Environments, and Gender  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Researchers have reported persuasive evidence that students' perceptions of their classroom learning environment account for significant variance in cognitive and affective outcomes (e.g. intrinsic motivation, self-concept, liking for particular subjects and students' intention to drop out). The study reported in this paper investigated the…

Koul, Ravinder; Roy, Laura; Lerdpornkulrat, Thanita

2012-01-01

100

Learner-Responsive Instructional Strategies for Adults in Accelerated Classroom Formats: Creating Inclusive Learning Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was focused on investigating inclusive learning environments in accelerated classroom formats. Three 8-week sections of an undergraduate course at Regis University were examined. Results from observations and surveys were analyzed to determine the effectiveness and consistency of 13 inclusive strategies derived from Wlodkowski and…

Gupta, Kalpana

2012-01-01

101

A Few Design Perspectives on One-on-One Digital Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"1:1" educational computing refers to a scenario where every student in a group or class uses a computing device equipped with wireless communication capability to conduct a learning task. This paper, drawing from design experiences with our digital classroom environment series and other studies, attempts to describe a few valuable "1:1" design…

Liang, J.-K.; Liu, T.-C.; Wang, H.-Y.; Chang, B.; Deng, Y.-C.; Yang, J.-C.; Chou, C.-Y.; Ko, H.-W.; Yang, S.; Chan, T.-W.

2005-01-01

102

The Effect of Classroom Environment on Problem Behaviors: A Twin Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children's behavior problems, both internalizing and externalizing, are a function of both genetic and environmental influences. One potentially important environmental influence is the classroom environment. This study of 1941 monozygotic twin pairs examined whether children whose parents rated them as similarly high or low on a number of problem…

DiLalla, Lisabeth Fisher; Mullineaux, Paula Y.

2008-01-01

103

A Study of Measures of Classroom Learning Environments. Technical Report Number 4.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study deals with the following topics: (1) the extent to which three different learning environment instruments and their underlying conceptual framework are empirically related, and (2) the extent to which intensive observation of classrooms aids in the interpretation of instruments' characterizations of a class. In the first part of the…

Cichon, Donald J.; Olson, George E.

104

Monitoring Children's Growth in Early Literacy Skills: Effects of Feedback on Performance and Classroom Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study examined the benefits of providing kindergarten teachers with feedback about students' performance on early literacy progress-monitoring probes. Students were administered the "Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS)" in fall, winter, and spring; classroom environment was evaluated using the "Early Language and…

Ball, Carrie; Gettinger, Maribeth

2009-01-01

105

Teachers' Perceptions of Geometry Instruction and the Learning Environment in Years 9-10 ESL Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes the development of an instrument to assess teachers' views on their geometry instruction and their classroom learning environments in six government high schools in southwest Sydney. The sample consisted of 18 Years 9/10 ESL teachers from participating schools. The study involved completion of a survey form using a modified…

Ly, Rinna K.; Malone, John A.

2010-01-01

106

Associations between Chinese Language Classroom Environments and Students' Motivation to Learn the Language  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Associations between the nature of Chinese Language Classroom Environments and Singapore secondary school students' motivation to learn the Chinese Language were investigated. A sample of 1,460 secondary three (grade 9) students from 50 express stream (above average academic ability) classes in Singapore government secondary schools was involved…

Chua, Siew Lian; Wong, Angela F. L.; Chen, Der-Thanq

2009-01-01

107

Locus of Control and Classroom Environment in Discriminating High and Low Self-Concept.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Improvement in self-concept may facilitate improvement in other areas such as learning and achievement. If the self-concept is formed through experiences with the environment, interactions with significant others, and attributions of one's own behavior, then the classroom atmosphere may be influential in the development of a positive or negative…

Bailey, Glenda K.; And Others

108

Cross-Cultural Interface Design and the Classroom-Learning Environment in Taiwan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined whether using localized interface designs would make a difference in users' learning results and their perceptions of the interface design in a classroom learning environment. This study also sought to learn more about users' attitudes toward the localized interface features. To assess the impact of using localized interfaces…

Chang, Chia-Lin; Su, Yelin

2012-01-01

109

The Electronic Classroom: A Handbook for Education in the Electronic Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book explores emerging technologies and their use in secondary and higher education and in private, corporate, and government training environments. In addition to providing specific classroom applications of technology, the book treats issues of research, technology assessment, legal, copyright, and privacy rights, ethical considerations,…

Boschmann, Erwin, Ed.

110

Single-Sex School Boys' Perceptions of Coeducational Classroom Learning Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews in many countries have found little evidence of consistent advantages in either single-sex education or coeducation. Over the last three decades, coeducation has been introduced into many single-sex schools, but there is a dearth of evidence from the student perspective of the impact of such changes on the classroom learning environment.…

Yates, Shirley M.

2011-01-01

111

An Evaluation of Elementary School Science Kits in Terms of Classroom Environment and Student Attitudes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student perceptions of classroom environment can provide useful criteria for evaluating educational alternatives. The My Class Inventory (MCI) was used with 588 3rd- to 5th-grade students in Texas in evaluating the effectiveness of instruction using a textbook, science kits, or a combination of both. Various analyses attested to the factorial…

Houston, Linda Scott; Fraser, Barry J.; Ledbetter, Cynthia E.

2008-01-01

112

Virtual Classrooms: STAR Simulator Building Virtual Environments for Teacher Training in Effective Classroom Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

The focus of this project is to create research in teacher education that positively impacts teacher recruitment, preparation and retention in urban environments. The novel approach we are using to attack this problem is that of capturing, analyzing, synthesizing and simulating human interactions in Mixed Reality (part real, part synthetic) environments, thereby creating training\\/screening settings that are realistic and yet

Lisa Dieker; Michael Hynes; Christopher Stapleton; Charles Hughes

113

Applying Behaviorological Principles in the Classroom: Creating Responsive Learning Environments.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews the basic principles of behaviorology, beginning with the work of B.F. Skinner, examining how these principles can be applied in creating responsive learning environments and delineating a system of steps needed to transform an ineffective instructional situation, characterized by chronic failure, into a learning environment that is…

Ulman, Jerome D.

1998-01-01

114

Psychosocial work environment and intention to leave the nursing profession: a cross-national prospective study of eight countries.  

PubMed

Many countries throughout the world are facing a serious nursing shortage, and retention of nurses also is a challenge. The aim of this study was to compare the predictive contribution of a broad spectrum of psychosocial work factors, including job strain, effort-reward imbalance, and alternative employment opportunity, to the probability of intention to leave the nursing profession. A total of 7,990 registered female nurses working in hospitals in eight countries (Germany, Italy, France, The Netherlands, Belgium, Poland, Slovakia, and China) were included in the one-year prospective study. A standardized questionnaire on job strain, effort-reward imbalance, employment opportunity, and intention to leave the nursing profession was used in the survey. Multilevel logistic regression modeling was used to analyze the data. Results showed that an imbalance between high effort and low reward (in particular, poor promotion prospects) and good employment opportunity at baseline were independently associated with a new intention to leave the nursing profession at follow-up. However, job strain appeared to have relatively less explanatory power. Findings suggest that interventions to improve the psychosocial work environment, especially the reciprocity experienced between effort and reward, may be effective in improving retention of nurses and tackling the international nursing shortage. PMID:24066419

Li, Jian; Shang, Li; Galatsch, Michael; Siegrist, Johannes; Miüller, Bernd Hans; Hasselhorn, Hans Martin

2013-01-01

115

Systematic review of the effect of the psychosocial working environment on cognition and dementia.  

PubMed

The high incidence of cognitive impairment in the ageing population, together with the challenges it imposes to health systems, raises the question of what affect working life has on cognitive abilities. The study, therefore, reviews recent work on the longitudinal impact of psychosocial work conditions on cognitive functioning and on dementia. Relevant articles were identified by a systematic literature search in PubMed and PsycINFO using a standardised search string and specific inclusion and exclusion criteria. We included articles reporting longitudinal effects that were investigated in cohort studies, case-control studies or randomised controlled trials in the working population. Two independent reviewers evaluated the studies in three subsequent phases: (i) title-abstract screening, (ii) full-text screening and (iii) checklist-based quality assessment.Methodical evaluation of the identified articles resulted in 17 studies of adequate quality. We found evidence for a protective effect of high job control and high work complexity with people and data on the risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Moreover, cognitively demanding work conditions seem to be associated with a decreased risk of cognitive deterioration in old age.Psychosocial work conditions can have an impact on cognitive functioning and even on the risk of dementia. As the world of work is undergoing fundamental changes, such as accelerated technological advances and an ageing working population, optimising work conditions is essential in order to promote and maintain cognitive abilities into old age. PMID:24259677

Then, Francisca S; Luck, Tobias; Luppa, Melanie; Thinschmidt, Marleen; Deckert, Stefanie; Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; Seidler, Andreas; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G

2014-05-01

116

Classroom Learning Environments as a Correlate of Scientific Literacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was aimed at investigating the relationship between science learning environments and scientific literacy level of learners. Descriptive research design of the survey type was employed. The population for the study was made up of both secondary school students and science teachers, stratified into types A, B, and C. Four hundred and…

Oluwatelure, T. A.

2010-01-01

117

A Land-Water Environment for the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes and details the construction of a land-water environment using an aquarium and variety of terrestrial and aquatic materials and organisms. Suggests activities such as identification of organisms, observation of predator-prey interactions, construction of food webs, and recognition of interdependence of biotic and abiotic factors. (CS)

Barman, Charles R.

1977-01-01

118

Development and implementation of a participative intervention to improve the psychosocial work environment and mental health in an acute care hospital  

PubMed Central

Objectives To describe the development and implementation phases of a participative intervention aimed at reducing four theory grounded and empirically supported adverse psychosocial work factors (high psychological demands, low decision latitude, low social support, and low reward), and their mental health effects. Methods The intervention was realised among 500 care providers in an acute care hospital. A prior risk evaluation was performed, using a quantitative approach, to determine the prevalence of adverse psychosocial work factors and of psychological distress in the hospital compared to an appropriate reference population. In addition, a qualitative approach included observation in the care units, interviews with key informants, and collaborative work with an intervention team (IT) including all stakeholders. Results The prior risk evaluation showed a high prevalence of adverse psychosocial factors and psychological distress among care providers compared to a representative sample of workers from the general population. Psychosocial variables at work associated with psychological distress in the prior risk evaluation were high psychological demands (prevalence ratio (PR)?=?2.27), low social support from supervisors and co?workers (PR?=?1.35), low reward (PR?=?2.92), and effort?reward imbalance (PR?=?2.65). These results showed the empirical relevance of an intervention on the four selected adverse psychosocial factors among care providers. Qualitative methods permitted the identification of 56 adverse conditions and of their solutions. Targets of intervention were related to team work and team spirit, staffing processes, work organisation, training, communication, and ergonomy. Conclusion This study adds to the scarce literature describing the development and implementation of preventive intervention aimed at reducing psychosocial factors at work and their health effects. Even if adverse conditions in the psychosocial environment and solutions identified in this study may be specific to the healthcare sector, the intervention process used (participative problem solving) appears highly exportable to other work organisations.

Bourbonnais, R; Brisson, C; Vinet, A; Vezina, M; Lower, A

2006-01-01

119

Educational and Career Interests in Math: A Longitudinal Examination of the Links between Classroom Environment, Motivational Beliefs, and Interests  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drawing on the expectancy-value model, stage-environment fit theory, and self-determination theory, this study examined the longitudinal associations between classroom characteristics, expectancies-values, high school course enrollment, and career aspirations in the domain of math. Data were collected on 3,048 youth who reported on their classroom

Wang, Ming-Te

2012-01-01

120

Exploring the Complexity of Classroom Management: 8 Components of Managing a Highly Productive, Safe, and Respectful Urban Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Creating a learning environment where all students can thrive academically requires an understanding of the complexities of classroom management. The notions of "discipline," "conformity" and "obedience" that have littered discussions of classroom management in the past are no longer sufficient to describe the diverse…

Jones, Karrie A.; Jones, Jennifer L.; Vermette, Paul J.

2013-01-01

121

Introducing Real-Time AVHRR-APT Satellite Imagery in the Classroom Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

A low-cost (US$350) satellite receiving station was assembled and operated within a classroom environment in Gainesville (Florida) on October 2001 for acquiring satellite data directly from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellites. The simplicity of the satellite signal makes this source of real-time satellite data readily accessible to the K-16 educational community. The educational strategy of this program

Lucas Moxey; Compton Tucker; Jim Sloan; John Chadwick

2004-01-01

122

In pursuit of a holistic learning environment: the impact of music in the medical physiology classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A holistic learning environment is one that nurtures all aspects of students' learning. The environment is safe, supportive, and provides opportunities to help students deal with nonacademic as well as academic factors that impact their learning. Creation of such an environment requires the establishment of a supportive learning community. For a variety of reasons, establishing such a learning community of first-year medical students can be challenging. This communication presents one approach to meeting this challenge in a medical school Human Physiology course. Steps were taken at the beginning of the course to create the community, and activities designed to reinforce these efforts were incorporated into the course as it progressed. Two pilot studies were conducted to test the hypothesis that providing students with a participatory music experience may help to promote a holistic learning environment by helping them restore a sense of balance to their emotional well-being as well as reinforce a sense of community in the classroom. Student response to these activities indicated that these efforts provided emotional support during stressful periods during the quarter, helped promote a feeling of safety within the environment, and reenergized the class during long class sessions. This project illustrates that each instructor, within the confines of his/her own classroom, can make a significant contribution to achieving a holistic learning envrionment for his/her students.

PhD Harold I Modell (Physiology Educational Research Consortium); Frank G DeMiero (Physiology Educational Research Consortium); Louise Rose (Physiology Educational Research Consortium)

2009-03-01

123

Evidence for teaching practice: the impact of clickers in a large classroom environment.  

PubMed

As the number of nursing students increases, the ability to actively engage all students in a large classroom is challenging and increasingly difficult. Clickers, or student response systems (SRS), are a relatively new technology in nursing education that use wireless technology and enable students to select individual responses to questions posed to them during class. The study design was a quasi-experimental comparison with one section of an adult medical-surgical course using the SRS and one receiving standard teaching. No significant differences between groups on any measure of performance were found. Focus groups were conducted to describe student perceptions of SRS. Three themes emerged: Being able to respond anonymously, validating an answer while providing immediate feedback, and providing an interactive and engaging environment. Although the clickers did not improve learning outcomes as measured by objective testing, perceptions shared by students indicated an increased degree of classroom engagement. Future research needs to examine other potential outcome variables. PMID:20044180

Patterson, Barbara; Kilpatrick, Judith; Woebkenberg, Eric

2010-10-01

124

Erikson's Psychosocial Theories Help Explain Early Adolescence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The early adolescent's psychosocial changes warrant serious consideration and influence both their present and future behavior. Middle school educators can design a learning environment for early dolescents based on an under standing of Erik Erikson's psychosocial heories.

Lee Manning

1988-01-01

125

The influence of family environment on long-term psychosocial functioning of adolescents with juvenile fibromyalgia  

PubMed Central

Little is known about the impact of family environment on the long-term adjustment of patients with juvenile-onset fibromyalgia (JFM). Objective To evaluate whether family environment in early adolescence predicted later physical functioning and depressive symptoms of adolescents with JFM as they transition to early adulthood in the context of a controlled long-term follow-up study. Method Participants were 39 youth (Mage = 18.7 years) with JFM and 38 healthy matched controls who completed web-based surveys about their health status (SF-36 Health Survey) and depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory II) approximately 4 years after a home-based, in-person assessment of child and family functioning. During the initial assessment, parents of participants (94% mothers) completed the Family Environment Scale, and adolescents (Mage = 14.8 years) completed self-report questionnaires about pain (Visual Analog Scale) and depressive symptoms (Children’s Depression Inventory). Results Results indicated that family environment during early adolescence significantly predicted greater depressive symptoms in early adulthood for both the JFM group and healthy controls. In particular, a controlling family environment (use of rules to control the family and allowing little independence) during early adolescence was the driving factor in predicting poorer long-term emotional functioning for patients with JFM. Family environment did not significantly predict longer-term physical impairment for either group. Conclusions Adolescents with JFM from controlling family environments are at increased risk for poorer emotional functioning in early adulthood. Behavioral and family interventions should foster independent coping among adolescents with JFM and greater parenting flexibility to enhance successful long-term coping.

Sil, Soumitri; Lynch-Jordan, Anne; Ting, Tracy V.; Peugh, James; Noll, Jennie; Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita

2012-01-01

126

A qualitative study of the interactions among the psychosocial work environment and family, community and services for workers with low mental health  

PubMed Central

Background The psychosocial work environment can benefit and harm mental health. Poor psychosocial work environments and high level work-family conflict are both associated with poor mental health, yet little is known about how people with poor mental health manage the interactions among multiple life domains. This study explores the interfaces among paid work, family, community and support services and their combined effects on mental health. Methods We conducted 21 in-depth semi-structured interviews with people identified as having poor mental health to examine their experiences of paid employment and mental health and wellbeing in the context of their daily lives. Results The employment-related psychosocial work environment, particularly workplace relationships, employment security and degree of control over hours, strongly affected participants’ mental health. The interfaces among the life domains of family, community and access to support services suggest that effects on mental health differ according to: time spent in each domain, the social, psychological and physical spaces where domain activities take place, life stage and the power available to participants in their multiple domains. This paper is based on a framework analysis of all the interviews, and vignettes of four cases. Cases were selected to represent different types of relationships among the domains and how interactions among them either mitigated and/or exacerbated mental health effects of psychosocial work environments. Conclusions Examining domain interactions provides greater explanatory capacity for understanding how people with low mental health manage their lives than restricting the research to the separate impacts of the psychosocial work environment or work-family conflict. The extent to which people can change the conditions under which they engage in paid work and participate in family and social life is significantly affected by the extent to which their employment position affords them latitude. Policies that provide psychosocial protections to workers that enable them to make changes or complaints without detrimental repercussions (such as vilification or job loss) and increase access to welfare benefits and support services could improve mental health among people with paid work. These policies would have particularly important effects for those in lower socioeconomic status positions.

2013-01-01

127

Stressors, Family Environment and Coping Styles as Predictors of Educational and Psychosocial Adjustment in Palestinian Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the contributions of child and parents' sociodemographics, daily stressors, family environment, and coping strategies, to academic achievement, cognitive functioning and aggression in a sample of 600 children at the intermediate grade levels from Gaza Strip. Each of the predictor variables exhibited a different pattern…

Khamis, Vivian

2013-01-01

128

Flexible workspace design and ergonomics training: impacts on the psychosocial work environment, musculoskeletal health, and work effectiveness among knowledge workers.  

PubMed

A macroergonomics intervention consisting of flexible workspace design and ergonomics training was conducted to examine the effects on psychosocial work environment, musculoskeletal health, and work effectiveness in a computer-based office setting. Knowledge workers were assigned to one of four conditions: flexible workspace (n=121), ergonomics training (n=92), flexible workspace+ergonomics training (n=31), and a no-intervention control (n=45). Outcome measures were collected 2 months prior to the intervention and 3 and 6 months post-intervention. Overall, the study results indicated positive, significant effects on the outcome variables for the two intervention groups compared to the control group, including work-related musculoskeletal discomfort, job control, environmental satisfaction, sense of community, ergonomic climate, communication and collaboration, and business process efficiency (time and costs). However, attrition of workers in the ergonomics training condition precluded an evaluation of the effects of this intervention. This study suggests that a macroergonomics intervention is effective among knowledge workers in office settings. PMID:18462704

Robertson, Michelle M; Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; O'Neill, Michael J; Schleifer, Lawrence M

2008-07-01

129

The Effects of Cooperative Learning on Different Ability Level Students' Perceptions of the Middle School Classroom Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the effects of different types of cooperative learning environments on low, average, and high ability students' perceptions of the middle school science classroom environment. Subjects were 15 teachers and 1,185 students from the sixth-, seventh-, and eighth-grades of two middle schools. Data were gathered from a variety of…

Geer, Cindy H.

130

Adolescent Development and the Junior High School Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Uses a stage-environment fit paradigm to provide evidence of a mismatch between early adolescents' developmental needs and aspects of the junior high school classroom environment. Discusses psychosocial problems possibly caused by this lack of synchronicity. Describes the consequences of differential treatment of adolescent females. Six patterns…

Baer, Judith

1999-01-01

131

Required Changes in the Classroom Environment: It's a Matter of Design  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The New York City Department of Education has recently set forth new mandates for the redesign of classrooms. Teachers must be taught how to redesign their classrooms correctly so that all students will be provided with the necessary space to accommodate their environmental learning-style preferences. By altering the classroom, teachers give some…

Burke, Karen; Burke-Samide, Barbara

2004-01-01

132

Graphing in Groups: Learning about Lines in a Collaborative Classroom Network Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a design experiment in which we explore new structures for classroom collaboration supported by a classroom network of handheld graphing calculators. We describe a design for small group investigations of linear functions and present findings from its implementation in three high school algebra classrooms. Our coding of the…

White, Tobin; Wallace, Matthew; Lai, Kevin

2012-01-01

133

On the Urban-Rural Differences in Classroom Environment in Compulsory Education in the Eastern Coastal Developed Areas of China  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Totally 789 students from 18 schools (9 primary schools and 9 junior high schools) at a medium managed level from Shanghai, Wenzhou, and Aojiang, which are located in the Eastern coastal developed areas of China were investigated with the questionnaire of Hong Kong Classroom Environment Scale in this study. The result indicates that the actual…

Sun, Furong; Xie, Limin

2008-01-01

134

Evaluation of thermal comfort conditions in a classroom equipped with radiant cooling systems and subjected to uniform convective environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this work is to evaluate numerically the human thermal response that 24 students and 1 teacher feel in a classroom equipped with radiant cooling systems and subjected to uniform convective environments, in lightly warm conditions. The evolution of thermal comfort conditions, using the PMV index, is made by the multi-nodal human thermal comfort model.In this numerical model,

Eusébio Z. E. Conceição; M Lúcio

2011-01-01

135

Conceptual Systems and Educational Environment: Relationships Between Teacher Conceptual Systems, Student Conceptual Systems, and Classroom Environment as Perceived by Fifth and Sixth Grade Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was done to determine the significant relationships among teacher conceptual systems, student conceptual systems, and student perceptions of the classroom educational environment in selected elementary schools. Tested was the general hypothesis that students would be more involved with teachers they perceived as being less authoritarian…

Phillips, Mark; Sinclair, Robert

136

Educational and career interests in math: a longitudinal examination of the links between classroom environment, motivational beliefs, and interests.  

PubMed

Drawing on the expectancy-value model, stage-environment fit theory, and self-determination theory, this study examined the longitudinal associations between classroom characteristics, expectancies-values, high school course enrollment, and career aspirations in the domain of math. Data were collected on 3,048 youth who reported on their classroom experiences in 7th grade, expectancies-values in 6th, 7th, and 10th grades, and career aspirations in 12th grade. Student grades for math courses were collected from school records at 6th, 7th, and 10th grades, and their math course enrollment was collected from 9th through 12th grades. Results indicated that students' math classroom experiences predicted their expectancies and values, which, in turn, predicted the number of high school math courses taken and career aspirations in math. Gender and math ability differences are also discussed. PMID:22390667

Wang, Ming-Te

2012-11-01

137

The influence of the International Baccalaureate experimental science program format on classroom learning environment and student attitudes toward the subject of science  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the classroom learning environments and science attitudes of students in three IB Higher Level science classrooms. The study sample consisted of 82 twelfth grade IB science students and three IB Higher Level science teachers. Qualitative and quantitative research methods were used to generate assertions toward the development of a grounded theory on accelerated curriculum effects on the

Lisa Renee Raiford

1998-01-01

138

Role of Psychosocial Care on ICU Trauma  

PubMed Central

Context: Patients treated in intensive care units (ICU) though receive the best medical attention are found to suffer from trauma typically attributed to the ICU environment. Biopsychosocial approach in ICUs is found to minimize ICU trauma. Aims: This study investigates the role of psychosocial care on patients in ICU after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). Settings and Design: The study included 250 post-operative CABG patients from five corporate hospitals. The combination of between subject and correlation design was used. Materials and Methods: The ICU psychosocial care scale (ICUPCS) and ICU trauma scale (ICUTS) were used to measure the psychosocial care and trauma. Statistical Analysis: ANOVA and simple and multiple regression were applied. Results: Hospitals significantly differed in psychosocial care provided in ICUs. Higher the psychosocial care in ICU, lower was the ICU trauma experienced and vice versa. Psychosocial care was a significant major predictor of ICU trauma. Conclusions: The study suggests emphasis on psychosocial aspects in ICU care for optimizing prognosis.

Chivukula, Usha; Hariharan, Meena; Rana, Suvashisa; Thomas, Marlyn; Swain, Sunayana

2014-01-01

139

Bringing the Background to the Foreground: What Do Classroom Environments that Support Authentic Discussions Look Like?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Authentic discussions are dialogically oriented classroom interactions where participants present and consider multiple perspectives and often use others' input in constructing their contributions. Despite their instructional effectiveness, authentic discussions are reportedly rare in classrooms. This qualitative case study examines the features…

Hadjioannou, Xenia

2007-01-01

140

PUPIL-TEACHER ADJUSTEMENT AND MUTUAL ADAPTATION IN CREATING CLASSROOM LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

AN ANALYSIS OF THE DYNAMICS OF THE LEARNING SITUATIONS IN A VARIETY OF PUBLIC SCHOOL CLASSROOMS WAS UNDERTAKEN. THE PROJECT MADE A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE PATTERNS OF COOPERATION OR ALIENATION AMONG PARENTS, TEACHERS, PEERS, AND INDIVIDUAL PUPILS. THE PATTERNS CREATE LEARNING CULTURES OF DIFFERENT PRODUCTIVITY IN VARIOUS CLASSROOMS. THE DATA…

FOX, ROBERT S.; AND OTHERS

141

Evaluation of a K-5 Mathematics Program Which Integrates Children's Literature: Classroom Environment and Attitudes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a one-year study of 120 fifth grade students whose teachers participated in a program entitled Project SMILE (Science and Mathematics Integrated with Literary Experiences). The purpose of the study was to determine the extent to which the classroom implementation of Project SMILE positively influenced the classroom

Mink, Deborah V.; Fraser, Barry J.

2005-01-01

142

Combining an Exciting Classroom Learning Environment with an Effective Computerized Learning Management System  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Imagine a computerized learning management system that enables teachers to deliver pertinent learning materials to students. Lectures are prerecorded and made available to download from the learning management system. If all their lectures were prerecorded, what would teachers do in the classroom? Classroom time could be used to coordinate…

Hallam, Teresa A.; Hallam, Stephen F.

2009-01-01

143

Safe Science Facilities: Reviewing Factors that Affect Classroom Environment, Curriculum, and Safety  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Science teachers often have two different curricula--the ideal framework on paper and the real, day-to-day instructional program that occurs in the classroom. A number of factors can affect how much of that ideal framework is accomplished. For example, how a facility is designed and how space is used can affect student achievement, classroom

Texley, Juliana

2005-01-01

144

English Language Learners' and Non-English Language Learners' Perceptions of the Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the degree to which English language learners' (ELL) descriptions of classroom supports for learning are similar to or different from the descriptions of non-ELL students. Specifically, the study compared the classroom perceptions of ELL students and general education students using the "ClassMaps Survey" (CMS), which includes…

LeClair, Courtney; Doll, Beth; Osborn, Allison; Jones, Kristin

2009-01-01

145

RESEARCH IN CLASSROOM THERMAL ENVIRONMENT AT GARDENHILL SCHOOL IN LA MIRADA, CALIFORNIA.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THIS IS A FINAL REPORT OF A STUDY OVER A FOURTEEN MONTH PERIOD FROM APRIL, 1959 TO JUNE, 1960 OF HEATING AND COOLING TWO SCHOOL CLASSROOMS AND A COMPARISON WITH A THIRD CLASSROOM IN WHICH THERE WAS HEATING AND FRESH AIR CIRCULATION ONLY. ALL THREE ROOMS HAD AN AIR-FLOW DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM. A TYPHOON HEAT PUMP PROVIDED HEATING AND COOLING IN ONE…

HOWATT, CLARKE T.

146

Classroom Discipline. Research Roundup.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent research in classroom discipline tends to show that discipline is a by-product of effective instruction and classroom management. The five publications reviewed in this annotated bibliography explore aspects of the complex classroom environment that relate to student discipline. Walter Doyle's chapter on "Classroom Organization and…

Bielefeldt, Talbot

1989-01-01

147

Geography in a Micro-environment: Teaching the Five Themes in Primary Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contends that primary teachers have an opportunity to teach basic geographic knowledge while they teach social and academic skills. Discusses how primary teachers can identify geographic concepts present in the developmentally appropriate activities currently being used in the classroom. (CFR)

Burlbaw, Lynn M.

1993-01-01

148

Children's perceptions of the classroom environment and social and academic performance: A longitudinal analysis of the contribution of the Responsive Classroom approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the contribution of the Responsive Classroom (RC) Approach, a set of teaching practices that integrate social and academic learning, to children's perceptions of their classroom, and children's academic and social performance over time. Three questions emerge: (a) What is the concurrent and cumulative relation between children's perceptions of the classroom and social and academic outcomes over time?

Laura L. Brock; Tracy K. Nishida; Cynthia Chiong; Kevin J. Grimm; Sara E. Rimm-Kaufman

2008-01-01

149

The psychosocial functioning of nurses in a burn unit  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the study was to determine what the effect of a stressful work environment is on the psychosocial functioning of burn unit nurses. A standardised scale, the Psychosocial Functioning Inventory, was used to measure psychosocial functioning. In addition, a questionnaire was constructed to identify sources of stress, coping mechanisms and the need for support programmes. Scaling and interpretation

W. C. Steenkamp; A. E. van der Merwe

1998-01-01

150

Practice Makes Better? A Study of Meditation Learners in a Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study investigates the effect of length of meditation history on various factors, namely learning motivation, learning outcome and classroom climate. Data were collected from working adult learners (n = 450) attending meditation classes in two large cities in Taiwan. The investigation categorized learners based on meditation experience, namely…

Lin, Chin-Yen; Kuo, Tsung-Hsien; Kuo, Yen-Ku; Kuo, Yen-Lin; Ho, Li-An; Lin, Chien-Ting

2007-01-01

151

Developing a Vision of Teacher Education: How My Classroom Teacher Understandings Evolved in the University Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drawing on my experiences as a former classroom teacher making the transition to teacher education, this study examines how my vision of teacher education developed over the course of my first three years as a graduate teaching assistant in a social studies education program in the United States. A qualitative self-study methodology was used to…

Ritter, Jason K.

2009-01-01

152

A Survey of Graduate Social Work Educators: Teaching Perspectives and Classroom Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social work educators have the challenging task of preparing students to be ethically, morally, and socially responsible professionals. As professionals in the 21st Century, social workers are faced with ever increasing complexity and change. Teaching philosophies are at the foundation of what educators do in the classroom. Research about teaching…

Danhoff, Kristin Lindsay

2012-01-01

153

"Celebration of the Neurons": The Application of Brain Based Learning in Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to investigate approaches and techniques related to how brain based learning used in classroom atmosphere. This general purpose were answered following the questions: (1) What is the aim of brain based learning? (2) What are general approaches and techniques that brain based learning used? and (3) How should be used…

Duman, Bilal

2007-01-01

154

Criteria for Defining the Regular Classroom as the Least Restrictive Environment for LD Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The paper delineates three observable and measurable variables in the regular classroom (response opportunity, teacher-student interaction, and social acceptance) which the placement team can use to make the initial placement decision and to evaluate educational progress in the future for learning disabled students. (Author)

Heron, Timothy E.; Skinner, Michael E.

1981-01-01

155

Building a Classroom Management Plan for Inclusive Environments: From Fear to F.E.A.R.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Inclusive education is here to stay. However, teachers remain fearful of their ability to deliver and assess curriculum and related activities for a diverse population of students. Current literature suggests that effective classroom planning includes four activities: a focus on planning to prompt and sustain student on-task behavior; an…

Niles, William J.

2005-01-01

156

Social-Emotional Development, School Readiness, Teacher-Child Interactions, and Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article investigates the effectiveness of a statewide 6-month early childhood mental health consultation (ECMHC) model on teachers' emotional support of children and classroom organization. We provide a brief historical and theoretical background of the field of ECMHC, present the logic model for our ECMHC intervention, and discuss the…

Heller, Sherryl Scott; Rice, Janet; Boothe, Allison; Sidell, Margo; Vaughn, Krystal; Keyes, Angela; Nagle, Geoffrey

2012-01-01

157

Classroom Environment and Student Outcomes Associated with Using Anthropometry Activities in High School Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study involved implementing and evaluating activities that actively engage students in the process of gathering, processing and analyzing data derived from human body measurements, with students using their prior knowledge acquired in science, mathematics, and computer classes to interpret this information. In the classroom activities…

Lightburn, Millard E.; Fraser, Barry J.

158

Children's Perceptions of the Classroom Environment and Social and Academic Performance: A Longitudinal Analysis of the Contribution of the "Responsive Classroom" Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the contribution of the "Responsive Classroom" (RC) Approach, a set of teaching practices that integrate social and academic learning, to children's perceptions of their classroom, and children's academic and social performance over time. Three questions emerge: (a) What is the concurrent and cumulative relation between…

Brock, Laura L.; Nishida, Tracy K.; Chiong, Cynthia; Grimm, Kevin J.; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.

2008-01-01

159

Teaching pedestrian skills to retarded persons: generalization from the classroom to the natural environment.  

PubMed

Little attention has been given to teaching adaptive community skills to retarded persons. In this study, five retarded male students were taught basic pedestrian skills in a classroom- Training was conducted on a model built to simulate city traffic conditions. Each subject was taught five specific skills involved in street crossing in sequence, viz. intersection recognition, pedestrian-light skills, traffic-light skills, and skills for two different stop-sign conditions. Before, during, and after training, subjects were tested on generalization probes on model and under actual city traffic conditions. Results of a multiple-baseline design acorss both subjects and behaviors indicated that after receiving classroom training on the skills, each subject exhibited appropriate pedestrian skills under city traffic conditions. In addition, training in some skills appeared to facilitate performance in skills not yet trained. PMID:1002631

Page, T J; Iwata, B A; Neef, N A

160

Cardiovascular diseases and psychosocial factors at work.  

PubMed

Besides the 'classic' cardiovascular risk factors (high blood pressure, dyslipidaemia, metabolic syndrome and diabetes), the work environment is playing an increasingly significant role in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Several elements contribute to the effect of the work environment: physical factors, chemical factors, shift work and psychosocial factors. The effects of psychosocial factors on the aetiology and progression of cardiovascular disease have been confirmed by several studies. Identification of these work-related psychosocial factors must be taken into account when evaluating cardiovascular risk factors, in order to ensure better prevention. PMID:22369916

Diène, Eloi; Fouquet, Aurélie; Esquirol, Yolande

2012-01-01

161

Classroom response systems: What do they add to an active learning environment?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigated the impact of completely anonymous Classroom Response System (CRS) use on learning outcomes and student attitudes in a large university physical science course for pre-service teachers. As students were expected to have read the textbook prior to class, class time was devoted primarily to conceptual introductions followed by small group discussions of qualitative questions. In the treatment condition, each group provided a single response anonymously using the CRS. The control group responded individually and publicly by show of hands. Responses formed the basis for further discussion in both cases. Anonymity of responses in the control condition was expected to enhance participation and to provide more reliable formative assessment for the instructor, thus enhancing subsequent instruction and learning. The overwhelmingly female study population comprised two course sections with the same instructor. The sections reversed treatment and control group roles for units on Newtonian mechanics and thermodynamics. Students took pre- and posttests for each unit, completed Response System Surveys once and the VASS twice, and submitted weekly mini-reflections and one metareflection. These were analyzed for evidence of attitudes toward science and learning. Whole-class discussions were video-recorded and analyzed for evidence of participation and use of student responses for "just-in-time" teaching. Although CRS use did not improve learning outcomes over the control as measured by pre and posttests, it improved participation, as reflected in the video record and as self-reported by students in reflections, while it was in use. When they were using the CRS, students also indicated greater interest in learning for understanding, as opposed to preferring authoritarian delivery of information by the instructor and opportunities for procedural drills. A framework for classroom interactions emerged. This "C3" framework comprised three dimensions interacting on and through classroom conditions: concerns (performance goals to mastery goals), centeredness (teacher-centered to learner-centered), and control of discourse (traditional lecture to interactive dialogue). These apply to both instructors and students. In previous work, CRS use in classrooms was determined by instructors' positions on these three dimensions. Here, students shifted their centeredness and concerns based on how much the instructor shared the control of classroom discourse.

Fies, Carmen Hedwig

162

The Effects of Physical Environment on Children's Behavior in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

No significant difference of student-concrete physical environment interaction occurred with a change in physical environment. A test was made on five null hypotheses related to the change of physical environment and (1) student-concrete physical environment interaction; (2) environmental preference by students; (3) student attending behavior; (4)…

Gingold, William

163

Maintaining Discipline in Classroom Instruction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document focuses on classroom discipline and how the teacher can maintain an environment that will optimize appropriate learning. Part 1 defines classroom discipline. Part 2 discusses classroom misbehavior and describes a number of classroom management techniques. Part 3 offers suggestions for control techniques. Part 4 discusses techniques…

Gnagey, William J.

164

The influence of the International Baccalaureate experimental science program format on classroom learning environment and student attitudes toward the subject of science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study examined the classroom learning environments and science attitudes of students in three IB Higher Level science classrooms. The study sample consisted of 82 twelfth grade IB science students and three IB Higher Level science teachers. Qualitative and quantitative research methods were used to generate assertions toward the development of a grounded theory on accelerated curriculum effects on the classroom learning environment. The four research questions that guided this investigation are: (1) What are the shared characteristics of IB Higher Level experimental science instructors? (2) What instructional methods do instructors use to implement the IB Higher Level experimental science program and why do the instructors use these methods? (3) What are the students' perceptions about the classroom learning environment in IB Higher Level experimental science courses? (4) Does a relationship exist between student perceptions of the classroom learning environment and student attitudes toward the subject of science in IB Higher Level experimental science courses? The qualitative data sources were field notes from classroom observations, teacher interview transcripts, and relevant documents. These data sources were analyzed by constant comparison analysis. Assertions were generated about the educational and professional qualifications of the Higher Level science instructors and the teaching methods used to implement the IB science curriculum. Quantitative data sources consisted of student responses to the Preferred and Actual Forms of the Individualized Classroom Environment Questionnaire (ICEQ) and the Attitude Towards Science in School Assessment (ATSSA). Student responses to the Preferred and Actual Forms of the ICEQ were analyzed with paired t-tests and one way analyses of variance to determine the students' perceptions about the science classroom environment. Correlation tests were used to examine the relationship between learning environment dimensions and student science attitudes. The significant findings of this study were the Higher Level science teachers were supportive facilitators with strong educational backgrounds. However, the science teachers demonstrated teaching behaviors associated with teaching to the IB science exit examinations. The ICEQ findings revealed the IB science students preferred more personalized teacher-student interactions. The correlation results suggested more positive science attitudes may result in greater participation in IB Higher Level physics classes.

Raiford, Lisa Renee

165

Cultural Learning Environment in Science Classrooms: Validity and Application of a Questionnaire.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an instrument to assess students' culturally sensitive environments and to examine the associations between these factors and students' attitudes towards science. A measure of students' environment, namely, the Cultural Learning Environment Questionnaire (CLEQ), was developed. The instrument…

Waldrip, Bruce G.; Fisher, Darrell L.

166

In Pursuit of a Holistic Learning Environment: The Impact of Music in the Medical Physiology Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A holistic learning environment is one that nurtures all aspects of students' learning. The environment is safe, supportive, and provides opportunities to help students deal with nonacademic as well as academic factors that impact their learning. Creation of such an environment requires the establishment of a supportive learning community. For a…

Modell, Harold I.; DeMiero, Frank G.; Rose, Louise

2009-01-01

167

Assessing culturally sensitive factors in the learning environment of science classrooms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As schools are becoming increasingly diverse in their scope and clientele, any examination of the interaction of culturally sensitive factors of students' learning environments with learning science assumes critical importance. The purpose of this exploratory study was to develop an instrument to assess learning environment factors that are culturally sensitive, to provide initial validation information on the instrument and to examine associations between students' perceptions of their learning environments and their attitudes towards science and achievement of enquiry skills. A measure of these factors of science student's learning environment, namely the Cultural Learning Environment Questionnaire (CLEQ), was developed from past learning environment instruments and influenced by Hofstede's four dimensions of culture (Power Distance, Uncertainty Avoidance, Individualism, and Masculinity/Femininity). The reliability and discriminant validity for each scale were obtained and associations between learning environment, attitude to science and enquiry skills achievement were found.

Fisher, Darrell L.; Waldrip, Bruce G.

1997-03-01

168

From the Field to the Classroom: A Web-Based Teaching Tool on Depositional Environments and Landscape Development  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The relationship between sedimentary deposits, landforms and soil profile development is difficult for students to grasp in a conventional classroom setting. The ideal way to solve this is to take the students on extended field trips; however, field trips are expensive, have to be conducted during specific time periods, and can only handle a limited number of students. The objective of this project was to bring the field to the classroom via a virtual, dynamic web-based teaching tool illustrating common depositional environments and associated landforms and soils. The teaching tool was largely based on video footage obtained in the Canadian Rocky Mountains and in the grasslands of the southern interior of British Columbia. The Canadian Rockies are undergoing rapid deglaciation and provided excellent examples of new glacial deposits and early landscape development processes. On the other hand, British Columbia's grasslands became ice-free about 10,000 years ago and were used to illustrate landscape evolution and post-glaciation soil profile development. To bring these two environments together, video footage of corresponding landforms was shot at both locations and edited into a series of short video clips illustrating the link between depositional processes, resulting landforms and soils and their post-glacial evolution. Soil scientists, survey specialists and geomorphologists provided live commentary. The teaching tool (http://soilweb.landfood.ubc.ca/landscape/) is an open-access website merging video clips, sound recordings, text, photos and graphics intended to help students situate landforms within their geomorphologic context. This online teaching resource allows students to observe, on their own time, conditions under which sediments are deposited and soils are formed, and to witness the transformation of a barren, glacial landscape into a vegetated soil landscape. The tool can be used in various geomorphology, soil, agriculture, forestry, and natural resource management courses. An interactive overview of the tool will be given during the presentation.

Krzic, M.; Watson, K.; Grand, S.; Crowley, C.; Dyanatkar, S.; Bomke, A.; Smith, S.

2012-04-01

169

The Relationship between Indicators of the Quality of a Head Start Classroom Environment and Ratings of Child Social Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study monitored classroom quality throughout three Head Start programs in the Southeastern United States, using the "Assessment Profile for Early Childhood Programs: Research Edition II." A random sample of classrooms was selected to represent high and low quality classrooms in urban and rural settings. Parents and teachers rated the social…

Lambert, Richard; Abbott-Shim, Martha; McCarty, Frances

170

Measurement of quality in preschool child care classrooms: An exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis of the early childhood environment rating scale-revised  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the current study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale-Revised (ECERS-R) with a large sample (1313 classrooms). We explored both the seven subscales and the possibility of fewer distinct aspects of quality being measured by the scale. The large sample size allowed both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses to be performed.

Deborah J. Cassidy; Linda L. Hestenes; Archana Hegde; Stephen Hestenes; Sharon Mims

2005-01-01

171

The Mainstream Primary Classroom as a Language-Learning Environment for Children with Severe and Persistent Language Impairment--Implications of Recent Language Intervention Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many UK children with severe and persistent language impairment (SLI) attend local mainstream schools. Although this should provide an excellent language-learning environment, opportunities may be limited by difficulties in sustaining time-consuming, child-specific learning activities; restricted co-professional working, and the complex classroom

McCartney, Elspeth; Ellis, Sue; Boyle, James

2009-01-01

172

Classroom Strategies: Classroom Management Systems. Volume 3.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Classroom management is defined as procedures for arranging the classroom environment so that children learn what the teacher wants to teach them in the healthiest and most effective way possible. The Southwestern Cooperative Educational Laboratory presents a discussion of these procedures as they relate to social controls and components of…

Speiss, Madeleine F.; And Others

173

Using online pedagogy to explore student experiences of Science-Technology-Society-Environment (STSE) issues in a secondary science classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the proliferation of 21st century educational technologies, science teaching and learning with digitally acclimatized learners in secondary science education can be realized through an online Science-Technology-Society-Environment (STSE)-based issues approach. STSE-based programs can be interpreted as the exploration of socially-embedded initiatives in science (e.g., use of genetically modified foods) to promote the development of critical cognitive processes and to empower learners with responsible decision-making skills. This dissertation presents a case study examining the online environment of a grade 11 physics class in an all-girls' school, and the outcomes from those online discursive opportunities with STSE materials. The limited in-class discussion opportunities are often perceived as low-quality discussions in traditional classrooms because they originate from an inadequate introduction and facilitation of socially relevant issues in science programs. Hence, this research suggests that the science curriculum should be inclusive of STSE-based issue discussions. This study also examines the nature of students' online discourse and, their perceived benefits and challenges of learning about STSE-based issues through an online environment. Analysis of interviews, offline classroom events and online threaded discussion transcripts draws from the theoretical foundations of critical reflective thinking delineated in the Practical Inquiry (P.I.) Model. The PI model of Cognitive Presence is situated within the Community of Inquiry framework, encompassing two other core elements, Teacher Presence and Social Presence. In studying Cognitive Presence, the online STSE-based discourses were examined according to the four phases of the P.I. Model. The online discussions were measured at macro-levels to reveal patterns in student STSE-based discussions and content analysis of threaded discussions. These analyses indicated that 87% of the students participated in higher quality STSE-based discussions via an online forum as compared to in-class. The micro-level analysis revealed students to attain higher cognitive interactions with STSE issues. Sixteen percent of the students' threaded postings were identified in the Resolution Phase 4 when the teacher intervened with a focused teaching strategy. This research provides a significant theoretical and pedagogical contribution to blended approach to STSE-based secondary science education. It presents a framework for teachers to facilitate students' online discussions and to support learners in exploring STSE-based topics.

Ayyavoo, Gabriel Roman

174

Modelling in the Mathematics Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an experience with modeling as a teaching technique in the mathematics classroom as opposed to mathematical modeling. Offering models in the mathematics classroom is a good idea. Presents fundamental ideas for creating an effective learning environment with models. (WRM)

Lee, Clare

2000-01-01

175

Psychosocial risk factors of pain among employees.  

PubMed

The study of psychosocial risk factors of pain among employees has typically focused on Karasek's job-demand-control model. The aim of the study was to examine the own and independent associations of job strain, organizational justice, workplace bullying, and work-home interface with pain. Data were collected through a postal survey to all 40, 45, 50, 55, and 60-year-old employees of the City of Helsinki in 2001 and 2002 (response rate 66%, N=5819, 80% women). Pain was measured with a three category outcome: no pain, acute pain or chronic pain. Adjustment was made for age, education, physical working conditions, BMI, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Among women, all psychosocial variables were associated with both acute and chronic pain when adjusted for confounders only. When psychosocial factors were additionally adjusted for each other, high job strain and both dimensions of work-home interface remained associated with both types of pain and repeatedly occurring bullying at workplace showed association with acute pain. Among men, when adjusted for confounders only, all psychosocial variables were associated with acute and chronic pain, except for family-to-work conflicts among those with acute pain. When adjusted mutually for all psychosocial variables, only bullying was associated with acute pain. Job strain and organizational justice showed associations with chronic pain. Future studies would benefit from a broad psychosocial framework. Investments to healthier psychosocial working environments are needed to tackle pain related problems among employees. PMID:18440254

Saastamoinen, Peppiina; Laaksonen, Mikko; Leino-Arjas, Päivi; Lahelma, Eero

2009-01-01

176

Development and implementation of a participative intervention to improve the psychosocial work environment and mental health in an acute care hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To describe the development and implementation phases of a participative intervention aimed at reducing four theory grounded and empirically supported adverse psychosocial work factors (high psychological demands, low decision latitude, low social support, and low reward), and their mental health effects.Methods: The intervention was realised among 500 care providers in an acute care hospital. A prior risk evaluation was

R Bourbonnais; C Brisson; A Vinet; M Ve?zina; A Lower

2006-01-01

177

Rethinking the Ethics of Scientific Knowledge: A Case Study of Teaching the Environment in Science Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper we argue that scientific literacy ought to be rethought in that it involves ethics as its core element. Considering the fact that science education has addressed ethical dilemmas of Science, Technology, Society and Environment (STSE) issues, it is worthwhile to question what the ethics of scientific knowledge mean in terms of their…

Kim, Mijung; Roth, Wolff-Michael

2008-01-01

178

Prospective Elementary Teachers' Understanding of the Nature of Science and Perceptions of the Classroom Learning Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated prospective elementary teachers' understandings of the nature of science and explored associations with their guided-inquiry science learning environment. Over 500 female students completed the Nature of Scientific Knowledge Survey (NSKS), although only four scales were analyzed-Creative, Testable, Amoral, and Unified. The…

Martin-Dunlop, Catherine S.

2013-01-01

179

Comparing the Classroom Learning Environments of Traditionally and Alternatively Certified Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Elementary and middle school students' perceptions of the learning environments in classes of traditionally and alternatively certified teachers were compared via an adaptation of the "My Class Inventory." Results indicate differences for several climate variables (e.g., cohesiveness and lack of friction) in favor of traditionally certified…

Knight, Stephanie B.; And Others

1991-01-01

180

Students' Perceptions of the Learning Environment and Attitudes in Game-Based Mathematics Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We investigated whether the introduction of games into college-level mathematics classes in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) was effective in terms of improving students' perceptions of the learning environment and their attitudes towards of mathematics. A pre-post design involved the administration of English and Arabic versions of two surveys (one…

Afari, Ernest; Aldridge, Jill M.; Fraser, Barry J.; Khine, Myint Swe

2013-01-01

181

Observations of the Middle School Environment: The Context for Student Behavior beyond the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the use of an observation system to measure middle school staff practices, environment characteristics, and student behavior in the school common areas. Data were collected at baseline from 18 middle schools participating in a randomized controlled trial of school-wide Positive Behavior Support. The observations were…

Rusby, Julie C.; Crowley, Ryann; Sprague, Jeffrey; Biglan, Anthony

2011-01-01

182

Incorporating Informal Learning Environments and Local Fossil Specimens in Earth Science Classrooms: A Recipe for Success  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In an online graduate paleontology course taken by practicing Earth Science teachers, we designed an investigation using teachers' local informal educational environments. Teachers (N = 28) were responsible for photographing, describing, and integrating fossil specimens from two informal sites into a paleoenvironmental analysis of the landscape in…

Clary, Renee M.; Wandersee, James H.

2009-01-01

183

It's Not Easy Being Green: Bringing Real Life to the Undergraduate Legal Environment of Business Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the Legal Environment of Business course in a traditional undergraduate business curriculum, students are expected to acquire knowledge about many areas of the law and the application of law to business, society, and the international marketplace. Current concepts in undergraduate business education, such as ethics and sustainability, must also…

Marcum, Tanya M.; Perry, Sandra J.

2010-01-01

184

PUSH(ing) Limits: Using Fiction in the Classroom for Human Behavior and the Social Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of fiction and autobiography in social science course work has been shown to enhance students' learning experience. Using the novel PUSH, by Sapphire, we designed a curriculum supplement for the social work course, human behavior and the social environment (HBSE) that encourages students to integrate course content in an innovative way and…

Mendoza, Natasha S.; Bonta, Kimberly; Horn, Philip; Moore, Erin; Gibson, Allison; Simmons, David

2012-01-01

185

The Teaching-Learning Environment in a Student-Centered Physics Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using an ethnographic-interpretive research strategy, a study of teacher-student interaction displayed in a secondary physics class suggests student-centered instructional strategies create an environment that enhances self-esteem, responsibility, behavior and academic performance. Examples of study guides, activity sheets and topic overviews are…

Wilkinson, William; And Others

1988-01-01

186

The Role of Achievement Goal Orientations in Students' Perceptions of and Preferences for Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Recent research on achievement motivation has begun to examine the effects of environmental factors affecting students' motivational beliefs and goal tendencies. However, when interpreting and applying the results, individual factors underlying students' different perceptions of their learning environment are often ignored. An implicit…

Tapola, Anna; Niemivirta, Markku

2008-01-01

187

The Virtual Classroom: A Virtual Reality Environment for the Assessment and Rehabilitation of Attention Deficits  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Virtual Environments Laboratory at the University of Southern California (USC) has ini- tiated a research program aimed at developing virtual reality (VR) technology applications for the study, assessment, and rehabilitation of cognitive\\/functional processes. This technol- ogy is seen to offer many advantages for these aims and an introductory section of this arti- cle will discuss the specific rationale for

A. A. Rizzo; J. G. Buckwalter; T. Bowerly; C. Van Der Zaag; L. Humphrey; U. Neumann; C. Chua; C. Kyriakakis; A. Van Rooyen; D. Sisemore

2000-01-01

188

The Global Classroom Project: Learning a Second Language in a Virtual Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports the progress of a pilot project exploring the integration of a collaborative virtual learning environment (Second Life) with the instruction of English courses at Lingnan University in Hong Kong. An educational partnership was developed with two TESOL teacher-training courses at Texas A&M University in the US. The project…

Knutzen, Brant; Kennedy, David

2012-01-01

189

Incorporating Informal Learning Environments and Local Fossil Specimens in Earth Science Classrooms: A Recipe for Success  

Microsoft Academic Search

In an online graduate paleontology course taken by practicing Earth Science teachers, we designed an investigation using teachers' local informal educational environments. Teachers (N = 28) were responsible for photographing, describing, and integrating fossil specimens from two informal sites into a paleoenvironmental analysis of the landscape in which the fossils were originally deposited. Our practicing teachers also developed mini-units for

Renee M. Clary; James H. Wandersee

2009-01-01

190

Networked Instructional Computers in the Elementary Classroom and Their Effect on the Learning Environment: A Qualitative Evaluation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a qualitative evaluation of an elementary schoolwide computer implementation project. Highlights include the use of interviews, questionnaires, and surveys with teachers, students, and parents; changes in teacher attitudes and roles, classroom management, and classroom climate; and a model for creating a community of learners through the…

Keeler, Carolyn M.

1996-01-01

191

The Classroom as a Place of Formation: Purposefully Creating a Transformative Environment for Today's Diverse Seminary Population  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This essay draws on insights from studies on learning to explore the role of formation in the classroom. Studies of intellectual development, learning styles, and the physiology of learning are reviewed. Methodologies and models for encouraging formative learning in seminary classrooms are explored. This essay was written to address one of the…

Winkelmes, Mary-Ann

2004-01-01

192

Girls' Participatory Learning Activities in the Classroom Environment (GirlsPLACE): A View to the Experiences of Girls.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The manual is a practical guide to empower classroom teachers to be able to see the gender interactions that occur in the classroom - to observe and be aware of events taking place, to reflect on the decisions they are making as well as on the exchanges b...

D. VanBelle-Prouty H. Sey

1998-01-01

193

An Investigation of the Metacognitive Orientation of Confucian-Heritage Culture and Non-Confucian-Heritage Culture Science Classroom Learning Environments in Hong Kong  

Microsoft Academic Search

A debate is ongoing in Hong Kong regarding whether local and international schools vary in the extent to which they provide\\u000a classroom learning environments that support the development of students' higher order thinking and metacognition. This study\\u000a investigated commonalities and variations in the metacognitive orientation of local and international schools in Hong Kong.\\u000a Commonalities and substantive differences in the metacognitive

Gregory P. Thomas

2006-01-01

194

Health Science Students and Their Learning Environment: A Comparison of Perceptions of On-Site, Remote-Site, and Traditional Classroom Students  

PubMed Central

This study compared the responses of on-site, remote-site, and traditional classroom students on measures of student/teacher interaction, course structure, physical learning environment, and overall course enjoyment/satisfaction. The sample population consisted of students taking undergraduate courses in medical terminology at two western colleges. The survey instrument was derived from Thomerson's questionnaire, which included closed- and open-ended questions assessing perceptions of students toward their courses. Controlling for grade expectations, results revealed no significant differences among the on-site, remote-site, and traditional classroom students in any of the four cluster domains. However, a nonsignificant (and continuing) trend suggested that students preferred the traditional classroom environment. When results were controlled for age, significant differences emerged between traditional and nontraditional students on measures of student/teacher interaction, physical learning environment, and overall enjoyment/satisfaction, as nontraditional students exhibited higher scores. Students' responses to open-ended questions indicated they enjoyed the convenience of online instruction, but reported finding frustration with technology itself.

Elison-Bowers, P.; Snelson, Chareen; Casa de Calvo, Mario; Thompson, Heather

2008-01-01

195

Guideline 3: Psychosocial Treatment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The third in seven sets of guidelines based on the consensus of experts in the treatment of psychiatric and behavioral problems in mental retardation (MR) focuses on psychosocial treatment. Guidelines cover general principles, choosing among psychosocial treatments, severity of MR and psychiatric/behavior symptoms, diagnosable disorders, target…

American Journal on Mental Retardation, 2000

2000-01-01

196

The Welcoming Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents ideas for creating a welcoming classroom environment, including: decorating the room by hanging students' names from the ceiling; making a classroom community puzzle involving each student; and developing a variety of welcoming bulletin boards. A reproducible sheet includes cut-out shapes to make an underwater-theme bulletin board that…

Instructor, 2001

2001-01-01

197

Psychosocial Factors in Children and Adolescents with Conversion Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: In view of the limited studies on the psychosocial environment of children presenting with conversion disorders, the present study was carried out to study the psychosocial factors in children with conversion disorders. Method: 40 patients of Conversion Disorder, who presented with "pseudo seizures" and were diagnosed according to…

Sharma, I.; Giri, D.; Dutta, Anna; Mazumder, P.

2005-01-01

198

Classroom Design Manual. Third Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual identifies the essential design elements of modern, high quality learning environments and includes discussions on facility programming, management, utilization, evaluation, and planning for future technology. Classrooms examined include general purpose classrooms, lecture halls, seminar rooms, and specialized classrooms such as…

Allen, Robert L.; Bowen, J. Thomas; Clabaugh, Sue; DeWitt, Beth B.; Francis, JoAllen; Kerstetter, John P.; Rieck, Donald A.

199

Climatic Conditions in Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an overview of research on the ways in which classroom thermal environment, lighting conditions, ion state, and electromagnetic and air pollution affect learning and the performance of students and teachers. (SJL)

Kevan, Simon M.; Howes, John D.

1980-01-01

200

[Psychosocial interventions in dementia].  

PubMed

Psychosocial interventions improve cognitive abilities (cognitive stimulation, cognitive training), enhance emotional well-being (activity planning, reminiscence), reduce behavioral symptoms (aromatherapy, music therapy) and promote everyday functioning (occupational therapy). Through these effects they reinforce and augment pharmacological treatments for dementia. In addition, psychosocial interventions complement the treatment of patients by supporting family caregivers (educational groups, support programs). The potential of psychosocial interventions in dementia needs to be explored further in studies using improved methodology to determine effective components, clinical relevance and duration of effects, predictors of individual treatment response and health-economic implications. PMID:23306213

Kurz, A

2013-01-01

201

A study of student attitudes toward physics and classroom environment based on gender and grade level among senior secondary education students in Indonesia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The main purposes of the present study are to investigate the differences on student's attitudes toward physics and their perceptions regarding classroom climate during physics classes based on gender and grade level. In addition, the study also explores female students' opinions about physics, and examines to what extent this factor might influence their decision to choose or not to choose physics or physics-related fields for their career choices in the future. A group of approximately 864 male and female students, equally proportioned by gender, were assigned to take part in this study. Two standardized instruments, namely the Individualized Classroom Environment Questionnaire (ICEQ) and the Test of Science Related Attitudes (TOSRA), have been employed to collect data. A combination of quantitative and qualitative methods was used to analyze the collected data resulting from the questionnaires as well as from the interviews. The study found, first, regardless of their gender and grade level differences, students expected a more positive classroom climate during learning physics. Also, it has been found that male students experience a more positive classroom environment than female students. Second, the study found that male students do show more positive attitudes toward physics than their female counterparts. Meanwhile, twelfth-grade students show a more positive attitude toward physics than eleventh-graders. Third, the study found that most female students do not like physics based on several reasons such as physics is a hard, monotonous and boring subject. Although eleventh-grade female students do not like physics, most of them intended to choose science as their major in the next grade. Surprisingly, a majority of twelfth-grade female students who are majoring in science have no intention to choose physics or physics-related subjects either for their prospective major at the university or for their career choices in the future.

Chaerul, Andrie

202

SOCIAL WORK PERSPECTIVE ON PSYCHOSOCIAL DWARFISM  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the family pathology affecting five children with growth retardation. Psychosocial dwarfism was suspected in all of them. Emotional trauma from the social environment is believed to have contributed to the children's retarded growth pattern. Striking similarity in the pattern of disturbance in parent-child interaction with child abuse and maltreatment cases is shown. The social worker's responsibility and

Rona Silverton

1982-01-01

203

Reflection Through the ID-PRISM: A Teacher Planning Tool to Transform Classrooms into Web-Enhanced Learning Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent books and articles are full of definitions of the ideal electronic classroom, prescriptions of how to use web resources, and descriptions of the effects of such resources on teaching practices and learning. Yet Becker (1999) found that only 30% of those teachers who were internet-connected acknowledged using web resources with their students. ID-PRISM was developed as a reflection tool

Tiffany A. Koszalka

2003-01-01

204

Rethinking Classroom-Oriented Instructional Development Models to Mediate Instructional Planning in Technology-Enhanced Learning Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although classroom-oriented instructional development (ID) models have the potential to help teachers think and plan for effective instruction with technology, research studies have shown that they are not widely employed. Many of these models have not factored in the complexities that teachers faced when planning for instruction in…

Lim, Cher Ping; Chai, Ching Sing

2008-01-01

205

Integrating Popular Web Applications in Classroom Learning Environments and Its Effects on Teaching, Student Learning Motivation and Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Advancements in information and communication technology (ICT) allowed several tools and systems to be proposed for improving classroom experiences to both instructors and students. However, most of these tools were brand-new and stand-alone programs that require users to invest additional time and effort to become familiar with their use. This…

Lin, Yen-Ting; Jou, Min

2013-01-01

206

Reflection through the ID-PRISM: A Teacher Planning Tool to Transform Classrooms into Web-Enhanced Learning Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent books and articles are full of definitions of the ideal electronic classroom, prescriptions of how to use web resources, and descriptions of the effects of such resources on teaching practices and learning. Yet Becker (1999) found that only 30% of those teachers who were internet-connected acknowledged using web resources with their…

Koszalka, Tiffany A.; Grabowski, Barbara L.; McCarthy, Marianne

2003-01-01

207

Patterns of Control over the Teaching-Studying-Learning Process and Classrooms as Complex Dynamic Environments: A Theoretical Framework  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this theoretical paper the role of power in classroom interactions is examined in terms of a dominance continuum to advance a theoretical framework justifying the emergence of three ways of distributing power when it comes to dealing with the control over the teaching-studying-learning (TSL) "pattern of teacher domination," "pattern of…

Harjunen, Elina

2012-01-01

208

Using a Virtual Classroom Environment to Describe the Attention Deficits Profile of Children with Neurofibromatosis Type 1  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objectives of this study were to describe the nature of the attention deficits in children with Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) in comparison with typically developing (TD) children, using the Virtual Classroom (VC), and to assess the utility of this instrument for detecting attention deficits. Twenty-nine NF1 children and 25 age-and…

Gilboa, Yafit; Rosenblum, Sara; Fattal-Valevski, Aviva; Toledano-Alhadef, Hagit; Rizzo, Albert; Josman, Naomi

2011-01-01

209

Find Your Voice: Eliminate Classroom Phobias  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The academically underprepared community college student may also be psychosocially underprepared for college, a condition contributing to the development of classroom-specific social phobia and to the high attrition rate at community colleges. The "Find Your Voice Program" uses individual and group cognitive-behavioral techniques to develop…

Miranda, Michael V.

2007-01-01

210

The Development and Validation of an Instrument to Monitor the Implementation of Social Constructivist Learning Environments in Grade 9 Science Classrooms in South Africa  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article describes the development and validation of an instrument that can be used to assess students' perceptions of their learning environment as a means of monitoring and guiding changes toward social constructivist learning environments. The study used a mixed-method approach with priority given to the quantitative data collection. During the quantitative data collection phase, a new instrument—the Social Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (SCLES)—was developed and used to collect data from 1,955 grade 9 science students from 52 classes in 50 schools in the Western Cape province, South Africa. The data were analysed to evaluate the reliability and validity of the new instrument, which assessed six dimensions of the classroom learning environment, namely, Working with Ideas, Personal Relevance, Collaboration, Critical Voice, Uncertainty in Science and Respect for Difference. Two dimensions were developed specifically for the present study in order to contextualise the questionnaire to the requirements of the new South African curriculum (namely, Metacognition and Respect for Difference). In the qualitative data collection phase, two case studies were used to investigate whether profiles of class mean scores on the new instrument could provide an accurate and "trustworthy" description of the learning environment of individual science classes. The study makes significant contributions to the field of learning environments in that it is one of the first major studies of its kind in South Africa with a focus on social constructivism and because the instrument developed captures important aspects of the learning environment associated with social constructivism.

Luckay, Melanie B.; Laugksch, Rudiger C.

2014-04-01

211

Psychosocial oncology in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  In China over the past decade, psychosocial oncology has emerged as a new program. Development of this program requires attention\\u000a to current opportunities, obstacles and cultural concerns.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A selected literature review of academic papers in Chinese and English language journals and web sites was analyzed for themes\\u000a regarding the current status, challenges, and opportunities for psychosocial oncology in China.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  China’s

Lili Tang; Janet de Groot; Barry D. Bultz

2009-01-01

212

Classroom Management  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Perhaps the most important skill a good teacher should possess is the ability to control students. A teacher who can devise fascinating and unique lesson plans for her classroom is useless if she can't get the kids to sit down and listen to her instructions. Unfortunately, many beginning teachers simply are not prepared to manage their classrooms effectively. Managing a classroom means you must teach your students behavior expectations, not just post your rules on the classroom wall. Classroom management becomes even more of an issue when it applies to the active nature of the science classroom.

Swango, C. J.; Steward, Sally B.

2003-01-01

213

Classroom Planetarium.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides instructions for the construction of a paper mache classroom planetarium and suggests several student activities using this planetarium model. Lists reasons why students have difficulties in transferring classroom instruction in astronomy to the night sky. (DS)

Ankney, Paul

1981-01-01

214

Classroom Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews research on classroom management, focusing on behavior modification, group management, teacher effects, management training, and planning. Five types of management skills and six principles for effective classroom organization identified by researchers are suggested for application by teachers. (PGD)

Strother, Deborah Burnett

1985-01-01

215

Acoustical evaluation of preschool classrooms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An investigation was made of the acoustical environments in the Berwick Preschool, Vancouver, in response to complaints by the teachers. Reverberation times (RT), background noise levels (BNL), and in-class sound levels (Leq) were measured for acoustical evaluation in the classrooms. With respect to the measured RT and BNL, none of the classrooms in the preschool were acceptable according to the criteria relevant to this study. A questionnaire was administered to the teachers to assess their subjective responses to the acoustical and nonacoustical environments of the classrooms. Teachers agreed that the nonacoustical environments in the classrooms were fair, but that the acoustical environments had problems. Eight different classroom configurations were simulated to improve the acoustical environments, using the CATT room acoustical simulation program. When the surface absorption was increased, both the RT and speech levels decreased. RASTI was dependent on the volumes of the classrooms when the background noise levels were high; however, it depended on the total absorption of the classrooms when the background noise levels were low. Ceiling heights are critical as well. It is recommended that decreasing the volume of the classrooms is effective. Sound absorptive materials should be added to the walls or ceiling.

Yang, Wonyoung; Hodgson, Murray

2003-10-01

216

Capturing Earth Science Learning Dynamics: Communication Interactions of ESE Teachers and Children Occurring in Online, Classroom, and Small-Group Environments.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

While the processes of schooling in science are usually measured in the resulting skills and products that students acquire or generate, another way to understand science learning is to explore the interactions and discourse that occur during actual learning activities. To investigate the dynamics of inquiry-based learning of earth science, we have explored the patterns that emerge in several learning environments: when teachers create dialog with other teachers in online ESE courses; when they teach earth science lessons in their classrooms; when they discuss their teaching perspectives in interviews; and when small groups of children engage in learning earth science together. By observing and scoring lesson exchanges, preserving online discussions, and documenting words and interactions in audio or video recordings, we are able to distinguish communication configurations that occur when teachers and children engage in the learning of earth science that would otherwise be invisible.

Snyder, C. W.; Prince, B. L.

2002-12-01

217

Learning outside the Primary Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In "Learning Outside the Primary Classroom," the educationalist and writer Fred Sedgwick explores in a practical way the many opportunities for intense learning that children and teachers can find outside the confines of the usual learning environment, the classroom. This original work is based on tried and tested methods from UK primary schools.…

Sedgwick, Fred

2012-01-01

218

Blueprint for the Interactive Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an overview and discusses the objectives of the "Blueprint for the Interactive Classroom" (BIC), a project, developed by the Audiovisuele (AV) Dienst of them Katholieke Universiteit (KU) of Leuven (Belgium), that will provide operational blueprints for installing and using tele-teaching classrooms and learning environments. (PEN)

Vanbuel, Mathy

1998-01-01

219

Classroom Management, Bullying, and Teacher Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While bullying in schools has begun to receive attention, little is known about the relationship between classroom management and bullying in the classroom. The process for exploring this relationship will be a review of research and literature related to bullying in the school environment, classroom management, teacher practices, and student…

Allen, Kathleen P.

2010-01-01

220

The psychosocial consequences of traumatic injury.  

PubMed

Long-term stress experienced by trauma patients was assessed for a sample of 137 patients treated at a large urban trauma center after suffering traumatic injuries resulting from motor vehicle/motorcycle accidents, falls, pedestrian accidents, and stabbing and gunshot wounds. Levels of psychological distress reported 3 to 39 months after the accident were considerable, but a measure of injury severity commonly used in critical care settings was not a good predictor of psychosocial outcome. The subjective impact of the accident and injury-related financial and employment problems were more important in predicting outcome than medical variables or time since injury. Family environment ratings were significantly worse for subjects with elevated levels of psychiatric symptoms. The results suggest that psychosocial interventions may benefit many of these individuals. Aspects to be considered in planning the intervention include projected functional disability, likely employment and financial problems, subjective perceptions of the accident and its implications, and family and social support. PMID:2077139

Landsman, I S; Baum, C G; Arnkoff, D B; Craig, M J; Lynch, I; Copes, W S; Champion, H R

1990-12-01

221

Classroom Expernomics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Classroom Expernomics site was jointly developed by Gregory Delemeester, Associate Professor of Economics, Marietta College, and John Neral, Associate Professor of Economics, Frostburg State University. This site features the Classroom Expernomics newsletter aimed at encouraging the "use of economic experiments as teaching tools for the classroom." The newsletter has been published twice a year since the spring of 1992; all current and previous issues are available at the web site. Each newsletter contains two or three articles by various professors profiling their use of economics experiments in the classroom.

1992-01-01

222

Designing the Electronic Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In an increasingly technological environment, traditional teaching presentation methods such as the podium, overhead, and transparencies are no longer sufficient. This document serves as a guide to designing and planning an electronic classroom for "bidirectional" communication between teacher and student. Topics include: (1) determining whether…

Adams, Laural L.

223

[Differential diagnosis of psychosocial dwarfism].  

PubMed

2 case reports regarding patients with a psychosocial dwarfism. Both children showed clinical and endocrinological signs of "idiopathic" hypopituitarism. Both patients came from economically well situated families of the upper middle-class. Disturbances in eating and sleeping behaviour are important hints that there might be a psychosocial etiology. PMID:2377372

Blunck, W; Morlot, M; Börner, S

1990-01-01

224

Classroom Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper is a report of a middle-school teacher's study of classroom management. The teacher/researcher was interested in how some of the techniques in the Kovalik Integrated Thematic Instruction model of training would influence the teacher/researcher's classroom management; the effects of direct instruction within a community circle; the…

Dinsmore, Terri Sue

225

Classroom Screening.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This classroom screening device was developed by the Circle Preschool First Chance Project, a government-funded program to integrate handicapped children into regular classroom activities, for use in preschools, nursery schools, Head Start centers and other agencies working with young children. It is designed to give a gross measure of a child's…

Alpha Plus Corp., Piedmont, CA.

226

Using a Virtual Classroom environment to describe the attention deficits profile of children with Neurofibromatosis type 1.  

PubMed

The objectives of this study were to describe the nature of the attention deficits in children with Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) in comparison with typically developing (TD) children, using the Virtual Classroom (VC), and to assess the utility of this instrument for detecting attention deficits. Twenty-nine NF1 children and 25 age-and gender-matched controls, aged 8-16, were assessed in a VC. Parents' ratings on the Conners' Parent Rating Scales-Revised: Long (CPRS-R:L) questionnaire were used to screen for Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Significant differences were found between the NF1 and the control groups on the number of targets correctly identified (omission errors) and the number of commissions (commission errors) in the VC, with poorer performance by the NF1 children (p < 0.005). Significant correlations were obtained between the number of targets correctly identified, the number of commission errors, and the reaction time. Significant correlations were also found between the total correct hits and the cognitive problems/inattention scale, as well as two other indexes of the CPRS-R:L: the DSM-IV Symptoms Subscale and the ADHD Index. The VC results support the hypothesis that NF1 is marked by inattention and impulsivity and that participants with NF1 are more inattentive (omission errors) and impulsive (commission errors) than normal controls. The VC appears to be a sensitive and ecologically valid assessment tool for use in the diagnosis of attention deficits among children with NF1. PMID:21757320

Gilboa, Yafit; Rosenblum, Sara; Fattal-Valevski, Aviva; Toledano-Alhadef, Hagit; Rizzo, Albert Skip; Josman, Naomi

2011-01-01

227

Psychosocial aspects in phenylketonuria.  

PubMed

Psychosocial aspects in phenylketonuric (PKU) patients are reported. In two separate studies patients with PKU differing in age (children versus adolescents), were assessed. The main message of the first prospective study on 58 10-year-old patients is that normally intelligent PKU patients who were treated early and strictly did not show a higher risk for severe emotional and behavioural maladjustment compared with healthy controls at the age of 10 years. The data were obtained in the course of the German PKU Collaborative Study by the "Personality Questionnaire for Children (PFK 9-14)". All patients received nutritional, medical, and psychological counselling every 6 months. In the second retrospective study, 34 early treated, normally intelligent adolescents with PKU (age: mean = 14.6, SD = 2.0, range = 11-18 years) and their mothers were assessed with several psychometric personality inventories and self-developed questionnaires concerning their psychosocial situation and their disease- and diet-specific knowledge. Using the Mannheimer Biographic Inventory (MBI), the Personality Questionnaire for Children (PFK 9-14), and the Freiburger Personality Inventory (FPI) the adolescent patients described their social life and their emotional development as being distinctly restricted. Their knowledge concerning disease and diet was alarmingly poor and the majority had great difficulties in satisfactory dietetic management without parental help. In addition to the burdensome diet, developmental crises like puberty may cause more frequently emotional and behavioural problems in PKU patients. PMID:8828622

Weglage, J; Fünders, B; Ullrich, K; Rupp, A; Schmidt, E

1996-07-01

228

Designing a Classroom as a Learner-Centered Learning Environment Prompting Students' Reflective Thinking in K-12  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Only few studies have explicitly attended to the nature of the perceived underlying factors that prompt young adolescents' reflective thinking in association with K-12 learning environment. This paper focuses on an analysis of the factors that are perceived by young students as prompting their reflective thinking and how those factors apply to the…

Kim, Kyoungna; Grabowski, Barbara L.; Sharma, Priya

2004-01-01

229

Using a Simulation-Based Learning Environment to Enhance Learning and Instruction in a Middle School Science Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of this project was to help science teachers shift to a more inquiry-based teaching style by supplying learning tools that support a more student-centered approach. The project employed PSI (Personal Study Instrument) Sim Modules, a simulation-based electronic learning environment designed to address misconceptions in middle school…

Foti, Sebastian; Ring, Gail

2008-01-01

230

Using a Humanoid Robot to Develop a Dialogue-Based Interactive Learning Environment for Elementary Foreign Language Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Elementary school is the critical stage during which the development of listening comprehension and oral abilities in language acquisition occur, especially with a foreign language. However, the current foreign language instructors often adopt one-way teaching, and the learning environment lacks any interactive instructional media with which to…

Chang, Chih-Wei; Chen, Gwo-Dong

2010-01-01

231

A Day in Third Grade: A Large-Scale Study of Classroom Quality and Teacher and Student Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Observations of 780 third-grade classrooms described classroom activities, child-teacher interactions, and dimensions of the global classroom environment, which were examined in relation to structural aspects of the classroom and child behavior. 1 child per classroom was targeted for observation in relation to classroom quality and teacher and…

Elementary School Journal, 2005

2005-01-01

232

Home Environment and Classroom Climate: An Investigation of their Relation to Students’ Academic Self-Concept in a Streamed Setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many studies concur that students’ perceptions of their home and school environments, such as relationships with parents and\\u000a teachers, are related to their academic self-concept (for example, Chang et al., Int J of Behav Dev 27(2):182–189, 2003; Ireson and Hallam, Br J Educ Psychol 75:297–311, 2005; Jang, J Kor Home Econ, 39:101–114, 2001; Lau and Leung, Br J Educ Psychol,

Woon Chia Liu; Chee Keng John Wang

2008-01-01

233

Using a Simulation-Based Learning Environment to Enhance Learning and Instruction in a Middle School Science Classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of this project was to help science teachers shift to a more inquiry-based teaching style by supplying learning tools that support a more student-centered approach. The project employed PSI (Personal Study Instrument) Sim Modules, a simulation-based electronic learning environment designed to address misconceptions in middle school science. Our findings indicate that using such tools will encourage teachers to

Sebastian Foti; Gail Ring

2008-01-01

234

Anonymity in Classroom Voting and Debating  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The advent of networked environments into the classroom is changing classroom debates in many ways. This article addresses one key attribute of these environments, namely anonymity, to explore its consequences for co-present adolescents anonymous, by virtue of the computer system, to peers not to teachers. Three studies with 16-17 year-olds used a…

Ainsworth, Shaaron; Gelmini-Hornsby, Giulia; Threapleton, Kate; Crook, Charles; O'Malley, Claire; Buda, Marie

2011-01-01

235

Developing and Validating a New Classroom Climate Observation Assessment Tool  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The climate of school classrooms, shaped by a combination of teacher practices and peer processes, is an important determinant for children's psychosocial functioning and is a primary factor affecting bullying and victimization. Given that there are relatively few theoretically grounded and validated assessment tools designed to measure the social…

Leff, Stephen S.; Thomas, Duane E.; Shapiro, Edward S.; Paskewich, Brooke; Wilson, Kim; Necowitz-Hoffman, Beth; Jawad, Abbas F.

2011-01-01

236

Psychosocial treatments for schizophrenia.  

PubMed

The current state of the literature regarding psychosocial treatments for schizophrenia is reviewed within the frameworks of the recovery model of mental health and the expanded stress-vulnerability model. Interventions targeting specific domains of functioning, age groups, stages of illness, and human service system gaps are classified as evidence-based practices or promising practices according to the extent to which their efficacy is currently supported by meta-analyses and individual randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Evidence-based practices include assertive community treatment (ACT), cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for psychosis, cognitive remediation, family psychoeducation, illness self-management training, social skills training, and supported employment. Promising practices include cognitive adaptive therapy, CBT for posttraumatic stress disorder, first-episode psychosis intervention, healthy lifestyle interventions, integrated treatment for co-occurring disorders, interventions targeting older individuals, peer support services, physical disease management, prodromal stage intervention, social cognition training, supported education, and supported housing. Implications and future directions are discussed. PMID:23330939

Mueser, Kim T; Deavers, Frances; Penn, David L; Cassisi, Jeffrey E

2013-01-01

237

Inclusive Classrooms  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Five Standards-based strategies for successful inclusion of special-needs students in the secondary science classroom are described in this article. Use a multisensory approach; encourage collaboration among students; provide specific expectations and ass

Alexakos, Konstantinos

2001-03-01

238

Classroom Triangles  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students use bearing measurements to triangulate and determine objects' locations. Working in teams of two or three, they must put on their investigative hats as they take bearing measurements to specified landmarks in their classroom (or other rooms in the school) from a "mystery location." With the extension activity, students are challenged with creating their own maps of the classroom or other school location and comparing them with their classmates' efforts.

Institute Of Navigation And Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

239

Classroom Triangles  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students will use bearing measurements to triangulate and determine objects' locations. Working in teams of two or three, students must put on their investigative hats as they take bearing measurements to specified landmarks in their classroom (or other rooms in the school) from a mystery location. With the extension activity, students are challenged with creating their own map of the classroom or other school location and comparing it with their classmates' efforts.

Lippis, Matt; Axelrad, Penny; Yowell, Janet; Zarske, Malinda S.

2006-01-01

240

Psychosocial Intervention in Schizophrenia  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Occupational therapy as a psychosocial approach based on cognitive rehabilitation among clients with schizophrenia is discussed\\u000a in this chapter. For these clients it is demonstrated that psychopharmacologic treatment combined with psychosocial interventions\\u000a is more effective than solely psychopharmacologic treatment. This strategy improves cognitive aspects and social functioning\\u000a and consequently counteracts the deterioration caused by the illness (Huxley et al., 2000).

Adriana D. B. Vizzotto; Patricia C. Buchain; Jorge Henna Netto; Hélio Elkis

241

Psychosocial therapies in bipolar disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

The course of bipolar disorder is characterized by frequent recurrences, high levels of intermorbid symptoms, and poor psychosocial\\u000a functioning even when patients take mood stabilizers. Psychosocial interventions have been developed as adjuncts to medication\\u000a to prevent recurrences, enhance medication adherence, and enhance skills for coping with environmental stressors. This review\\u000a of recent randomized clinical trials concludes that cognitive-behavioral therapy, family-focused

David J. Miklowitz

2004-01-01

242

Associations between Peer Bullying and Classroom Concentration: Evidence for Mediation by Perceived Personal Safety and Relationship with Teacher  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Being bullied is associated with a psycho-social maladjustment during childhood. One hitherto largely overlooked correlate is disrupted classroom concentration. Using data collected from 364 9-11-year-old children attending seven junior schools in the UK, we tested a model in which children's perceived safety in two contexts (classroom and…

Boulton, Michael; Woodmansey, Helen; Williams, Emma; Spells, Ruth; Nicholas, Beth; Laxton, Eleanor; Holman, Gemma; Duke, Elizabeth

2012-01-01

243

Assessment of psychosocial risks faced by workers in Almería-type greenhouses, using the Mini Psychosocial Factor method.  

PubMed

This work reports the use of the Mini Psychosocial Factor (MPF) method for assessing the psychosocial risks faced by agricultural workers in the greenhouses of Almería (Spain) with the aim of improving their health. The variables Rhythm, Mobbing, Relationships, Health, Recognition, Autonomy, Emotional Involvement, Support, Compensation, Control, Demands, and Mental Load were recorded using a pre-validated questionnaire containing 15 questions. The sex, age, and nationality of the respondents (n = 310) were also recorded, as were the type of greenhouse in which each worked, the size of the greenhouse, and the crop grown. The results showed psychosocial risks to exist for the workers. Multiple correspondence analysis, however, showed that moderate risks can be offset by new prevention programmes that improve Spanish legislation in terms of workers' salaries, worker-employer social days, work timetables to facilitate family life, and training courses. This could improve the work environment and health of Almería's greenhouse workers as well as their productivity. PMID:22981469

Montoya-García, M E; Callejón-Ferre, A J; Pérez-Alonso, J; Sánchez-Hermosilla, J

2013-03-01

244

The Solid Earth Research and Teaching Environment, a new software framework to share research tools in the classroom and across disciplines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Solid Earth Teaching and Research Environment (SEATREE) is a modular and user-friendly software framework to facilitate the use of solid Earth research tools in the classroom and for interdisciplinary research collaboration. SEATREE is open source and community developed, distributed freely under the GNU General Public License. It is a fully contained package that lets users operate in a graphical mode, while giving more advanced users the opportunity to view and modify the source code. Top level graphical user interfaces which initiate the calculations and visualize results, are written in the Python programming language using an object-oriented, modern design. Results are plotted with either Matlab-like Python libraries, or SEATREE’s own Generic Mapping Tools wrapper. The underlying computational codes used to produce the results can be written in any programming language and accessed through Python wrappers. There are currently four fully developed science modules for SEATREE: (1) HC is a global geodynamics tool based on a semi-analytical mantle-circulation program based on work by B. Steinberger, Becker, and C. O'Neill. HC can compute velocities and tractions for global, spherical Stokes flow and radial viscosity variations. HC is fast enough to be used for classroom instruction, for example to let students interactively explore the role of radial viscosity variations for global geopotential (geoid) anomalies. (2) ConMan wraps Scott King’s 2D finite element mantle convection code, allowing users to quickly observe how modifications to input parameters affect heat flow over time. As seismology modules, SEATREE includes, (3), Larry, a global, surface wave phase-velocity inversion tool and, (4), Syn2D, a Cartesian tomography teaching tool for ray-theory wave propagation in synthetic, arbitrary velocity structure in the presence of noise. Both underlying programs were contributed by Boschi. Using Syn2D, students can explore, for example, how well a given input structure (e.g., a checkerboard pattern) will be resolved by data for different types of earthquake-receiver geometries. Additionally, Larry3D, a three-dimensional seismic tomography tool contributed by Boschi, and NonLinLoc, a nonlinear earthquake relocation tool by Anthony Lomax, are both under development. The goal of all of the implemented modules is to aid in teaching research techniques, while remaining flexible enough for use in true research applications. In the long run, SEATREE may contribute to new ways of sharing scientific research, making published (numerical) experiments truly reproducible again. SEATREE can be downloaded as a package from http://geosys.usc.edu/projects/seatree/wiki/, and users can also subscribe to our Subversion project page. The software is designed to run on GNU/Linux based platforms and has also been successfully run on Mac OS-X. Our poster will present the four currently implemented modules, along with our design philosophies and implementation details.

Milner, K.; Becker, T. W.; Boschi, L.; Sain, J.; Schorlemmer, D.; Waterhouse, H.

2009-12-01

245

Jigsaw Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Jigsaw Classroom is a website for the jigsaw cooperative learning technique that strives to reduce racial conflict, promote better learning, improve motivation, and increase the enjoyment of the learning experience among school children. The website includes an overview of jigsaw techniques, jigsaw history, implementing tips, related books and articles, and links on cooperative learning, school violence, and jigsaw developer Elliot Aronson.

Aronson, Elliot; Network, Social P.

246

Classroom Independence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As a technician for the Continuing Education department at Confederation College, the author was approached by an Academic Support Strategist from college's Learning Centre who was looking for a solution for one of her students. She was working with a hard-of-hearing student, and at the time, they were sitting together in the classrooms, sharing a…

Donlon, Joe

2007-01-01

247

Classroom Notes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this issue's "Classroom Notes" section, the following papers are discussed: (1) "Constructing a line segment whose length is equal to the measure of a given angle" (W. Jacob and T. J. Osler); (2) "Generating functions for the powers of Fibonacci sequences" (D. Terrana and H. Chen); (3) "Evaluation of mean and variance integrals without…

International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 2007

2007-01-01

248

Classroom Antarctica  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As part of the Australian Antarctic Division, Classroom Antarctica gives dozens of downloadable Adobe Acrobat files that allow students to discover this unique continent. Subjects include the history of the scientific research undertaken on Antarctica, surviving its climate, its biological ecosystem, the land's physical characteristics and affects on climate, and much more.

1969-12-31

249

Smart Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

What makes a classroom "smart"? Presentation technologies such as projectors, document cameras, and LCD panels clearly fit the bill, but when considering other technologies for teaching, learning, and developing content, the possibilities become limited only by the boundaries of an institution's innovation. This article presents 32 best practices…

Kelly, Rhea, Ed.

2006-01-01

250

Classrooms Offer Quiet Academic Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A building shell at Southern Illinois University has partitions that can be repositioned to suit changing needs. Silencing, heating, and cooling equipment received close attention to eliminate noise. The University of Minnesota has a new underground building housing a bookstore and offices that does not require heating. (Author/MLF)

Garbrecht, Marilyn

1977-01-01

251

Hey, There's a Forest in that Classroom!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

After a prolonged visit to an elementary classroom, this author was inspiredto share his reflections on the effective combination of creative scienceteaching approaches he observed. In particular, the author highlights the unusual classroom environment, the use of thematic elements, and the hands-on teaching approach.

Coppedge, Ginny; Page, Scott

2004-03-01

252

Code Choice in the Language Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Code Choice in the Language Classroom argues that the foreign language classroom is and should be regarded as a multilingual community of practice rather than as a perpetually deficient imitator of an exclusive second-language environment. From a sociocultural and ecological perspective, Levine guides the reader through a theoretical, empirical,…

Levine, Glenn S.

2011-01-01

253

Before the Year Begins. Classroom Tips  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Good teachers know that the physical environment of the classroom can either enhance or hinder learning. Appropriate room preparation and arrangement of materials reserves class time for learning, while inadequate planning interferes with instruction by causing interruptions and delays. Before the year begins, effective classroom managers…

American Federation of Teachers (NJ), 2010

2010-01-01

254

Hospitable Classrooms: Biblical Hospitality and Inclusive Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper contributes to a Christian hermeneutic of special education by suggesting the biblical concept of hospitality as a necessary characteristic of classroom and school environments in which students with disabilities and other marginalized students can be effectively incorporated into the body of the classroom. Christian hospitality, seen…

Anderson, David W.

2011-01-01

255

Managing Difficult Student Behaviors in the Classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

Given a diverse student population and a variety of classroom cultures, difficult interactions among students and faculty may arise. Use of laptop computers and other electronic devices can present unique challenges, as can inappropriate student classroom behaviors such as texting and being inattentive or disrespectful to others. These challenges can disrupt the learning environment, but there are some effective strategies

Pamela Russell; David Almeida; Anthony Esposito; Elizabeth Spievak

2011-01-01

256

Classroom Teachers' Reflections on Teaching Physical Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to explore preservice classroom teacher reflection in a physical education teaching and learning environment and to describe how the teachers' reflections related to their practices. Two preservice classroom teachers voluntarily participated in the study. Data were collected using observations, journals, documents, and…

Tsangaridou, Niki

2005-01-01

257

The Classroom as Global Media Center  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article looks at ways in which schools buildings designed for today and tomorrow can provide superior environments for learning by keeping pace with rapidly evolving technologies that have redefined the educational landscape. Wireless classrooms, data projectors and wall-mounted plasma monitors are cited as in-classroom technologies of…

Nair, Prakash

2007-01-01

258

The psychosocial aspects of malignancy.  

PubMed

This article has described many of the psychosocial issues associated with malignancy. Issues related to delivering the diagnosis of cancer, such as telling the truth, including the family, and initiating a "shared meaning" process, were considered. Patient reactions related to cancer such as grief, depression, and needs for control were described. Family reactions to the cancer patient, including anticipatory grief and weariness, were noted. The need for psychosocial support for the family of the cancer patient was discussed. Finally, the need for caregivers to pay attention to their own emotional needs was described. PMID:3299423

Kriesel, H T

1987-06-01

259

Configurations of Common Childhood Psychosocial Risk Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Co-occurrence of psychosocial risk factors is commonplace, but little is known about psychiatrically-predictive configurations of psychosocial risk factors. Methods: Latent class analysis (LCA) was applied to 17 putative psychosocial risk factors in a representative population sample of 920 children ages 9 to 17. The resultant class…

Copeland, William; Shanahan, Lilly; Costello, E. Jane; Angold, Adrian

2009-01-01

260

Managing Diverse Classrooms: How to Build on Students' Cultural Strengths  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book will help you understand some of the most powerful cultural differences that can lead to classroom conflict for many students and how you can actually capitalize on these differences to make your classroom a harmonious, productive environment. Drawing from a seven-year action research study of elementary classrooms with high percentages…

Rothstein-Fisch, Carrie; Trumbull, Elise

2008-01-01

261

Concept and design of Ad Hoc and Mobile classrooms  

Microsoft Academic Search

This investigation describes the concept of mobile learning and the design of Ad Hoc and Mobile classrooms. Four classes of mobile learning and implementation of Ad Hoc and eSchoolbag systems are presented. The paper discusses the development of advanced wireless technologies for building an ad hoc classroom to create a modern and new learning environment. As in a traditional classroom,

C. Y. Chang; Jay-ping Sheu; T. W. Chan

2003-01-01

262

A Multi-Instrument Examination of Preschool Classroom Quality and the Relationship between Program, Classroom, and Teacher Characteristics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: A statewide study of preschool classroom quality was conducted using 3 distinct classroom observation measures in order to inform a statewide quality rating system. Findings suggested that Tennessee preschool classrooms were approaching "good" quality on the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale-Revised (ECERS-R) and provided…

Denny, Joanna Hope; Hallam, Rena; Homer, Karen

2012-01-01

263

Future's learning environments in health education: The effects of smart classrooms on the academic achievements of the students at health college  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of smart classrooms on the academic achievement of the nursing students. The sample of the research included 66 Health College students in Elaz??. The sampling group was randomly chosen from second year students of Nursing and Midwife Education. The research was carried out with experimental approach. The experimental group included

Tuncay Sevindik

2010-01-01

264

Different Identity Revelation Modes in an Online Peer-Assessment Learning Environment: Effects on Perceptions toward Assessors, Classroom Climate and Learning Activities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The effects of four different identity revelation modes (three fixed modes: real-name, anonymity, nickname and one dynamic user self-choice mode) on participants' perceptions toward their assessors, classroom climate, and past experience with the learning activity in which they were engaged were examined. A pretest-posttest quasi-experimental…

Yu, Fu-Yun; Wu, Chun-Ping

2011-01-01

265

Building Community from Diversity: Connecting Students to Their Learning Environments. An Anthology of Classroom Projects Undertaken for the Kellogg Beacon Grant. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This five-part anthology presents descriptions of 22 classroom projects undertaken by a consortium of Missouri community colleges and elementary and secondary schools, directed by St. Louis Community College. The collection comprises the following articles: "Views of an Elementary Teacher" (Susan Biffignani); "Writing To Learn and Co-operative…

Mahony, Elizabeth M., Ed.; And Others

266

Cooley's Anemia: A Psychosocial Directory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The directory is intended to aid patients and their families who are coping with the genetic disorder of Cooley's anemia. A brief review of the disease covers background, genetics, symptoms, effect on the patient, treatment, and current research. The next section looks at psychosocial needs at various times (time of diagnosis, infancy and toddler…

National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

267

PSYCHOSOCIAL PHENOMENA AND BUILDING DESIGN.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE DEPTH OF PSYCHOSOCIAL CONSIDERATION VARIES WITH ARCHITECTURAL FUNCTION. THESE FACTORS INCREASE AS A BUILDING USAGE BECOMES MORE ANTHROPOPHILIC. SITUATIONS RELATING TO AMBIGUOUS DESIGN MUST BE ELIMINATED IN BUILDING DESIGN. PROBLEMS INVOLVING VISUAL PERCEPTION SUCH AS (1) GLASS DOORS, (2) APPARENT INSECURITY OF STRUCTURE, (3) AMBIGUOUS SYMBOLIC…

IZUMI, KIYOSHI

268

Attachment and Adolescent Psychosocial Functioning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined attachment's relation to multiple domains of psychosocial functioning in 131 moderately at-risk adolescents. Found that security displayed in adolescents' organization of discourse about attachment experiences was related to competence with peers, lower levels of internalizing behaviors, and lower levels of deviant behaviors.…

Allen, Joseph P.; Moore, Cynthia; Kuperminc, Gabriel; Bell, Kathy

1998-01-01

269

Stress, Distress, and Psychosocial Stimuli  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper, presented at the Occupational Stress Conference of the Center for Occupational Mental Health, Sept. 22, 1972, discusses the possibility of a relationship between psychosocial stimuli and stress-related disease. Using Selye's understanding of stress, the author views it in relation to non-specific diseases and suggests hypotheses…

Levi, Lennert

1973-01-01

270

[Psychosocial functioning in adults with epilepsy].  

PubMed

The Washington Psychosocial Seizure Inventory (WPSI) was used in the assessment of psychosocial functioning of epileptic subjects in Chile. A total sample of 116 outpatients coming form an Epilepsy Program at a Public Health Service was evaluated. Disturbances in several areas relevant to psychosocial adjustment were noted. Their distribution was similar to that previously reported using the WPSI, although a greater severity of disturbances was noted. Peak score scales were financial status, emotional and interpersonal adjustment and overall psychosocial functioning. Rehabilitation measures could play a substantial role in the prevention and treatment of psychosocial disorders in epilepsy. PMID:9723093

Alvarado, L; Ivanovic-Zuvic, F; Candia, X; Ibarra, X; Méndez, M D; Alarcón, J; Campos, A; Marchant, P

1991-12-01

271

Psychosocial factors underlying physical activity  

PubMed Central

Background Given the increasing importance of obesity in China, prevention interventions encouraging physical activity by middle school students are needed. The purpose of this study is to illustrate how a rapid elicitation method can be used to identify salient consequences, referents, and circumstances about physical activity as perceived by middle school students and to provide suggestions for interventions and quantitative research. Method A theory-based qualitative study using a self-completion elicitation was conducted with 155 students from two middle schools in Beijing, China. Following the Theory of Planned Behavior, six open-ended questions asked students for their perceptions about performing physical activity at least 60 minutes each day: advantages of participating in physical activity; disadvantages of doing so; people who approve of participation; people who disapprove; things that make it easy; and things that make it hard. Content analysis revealed categories of salient consequences, reference groups, and circumstances. Results While the three most frequently mentioned advantages elicited from the students were physical health consequences (e.g., will strengthen my body (58.7%)), four of the salient advantages were not (e.g., will improve my grades (12.2%)). Parents were the most frequently mentioned social referent (42.6% as approving; 27.7% as disapproving) when students were asked who might approve or disapprove of their participation. Circumstances perceived to hinder daily physical activity included having too many assignments and not having enough time. Conclusion While many of the beliefs about physical activity elicited from this study were similar to those found with students from England and the US, several were unique to these students from Beijing. The results of this qualitative research suggest that interventions to encourage physical activity among middle school students should address: perceived consequences of physical activity on academic achievement and other factors beyond physical health; barriers of not having enough time and having too many assignments perceived to hinder frequent physical activity; and parental approval. More rigorous research on psychosocial determinants with close-ended items developed from these open-ended data and with larger sample sizes of students is necessary. Research with parents and school staff will be needed to understand the perceptions of these stakeholder groups key to creating the students' social environment.

Zhang, Juan; Middlestadt, Susan E; Ji, Cheng-Ye

2007-01-01

272

Psychosocial Resources in First-Year University Students: The Role of Identity Processes and Social Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

The investigation involved the assessment of a model predicting that family and university relationship environments are linked\\u000a with identity processes and identity states (statuses) that predict psychosocial resources among first-year university students.\\u000a A sample of 351 university students, between the ages of 18 and 21 years, completed measures of psychosocial maturity based\\u000a on Erikson's notions of ego virtues, a measure

Gerald R. Adams; Michael D. Berzonsky; Leo Keating

2006-01-01

273

Science Teacher Beliefs and Classroom Practice Related to Constructivism in Different School Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Science teacher beliefs and classroom practice related to constructivism and factors that may influence classroom practice were examined in this cross-case study. Data from four science teachers in two schools included interviews, demographic questionnaire, Classroom Learning Environment Survey (preferred/perceived), and classroom observations and…

Savasci, Funda; Berlin, Donna F.

2012-01-01

274

Collaborative Learning in Virtual Classroom Scenarios  

Microsoft Academic Search

Possibilities are described to affect the feeling of social presence and group awareness in desktop collaborative virtual environments, also known as virtual classrooms. Social presence is the feeling of being\\u000a present with another person in a virtual environment. Awareness information of the activities of other group members serves\\u000a as a background for one’s own activities. In general, virtual classrooms allow

Katrin Allmendinger; Fabian Kempf; Karin Hamann

2009-01-01

275

Classroom Lessons in Cultivating Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author talks about creating a nurturing classroom environment of mutual respect with students enthralled by possessions and technology. He talks about his life in the city, how life is abundant in the city, and that he acknowledges all that the city offered, from the culture of art and music to racial and ethnic diversity.…

Luck, Philip A.

2006-01-01

276

Improvisation in the Mathematics Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses ways in which improvisational comedy games and exercises can be used in college mathematics classrooms to obtain a democratic and supportive environment for students. Using improv can help students learn to think creatively, take risks, support classmates, and solve problems. Both theoretical and practical applications are…

Young, Andrea

2013-01-01

277

Design Office within the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To help architectural students adapt to the realities of the work environment, Gerard Campbell of Holland College has set up his classroom as a design office. Working as a team, the students prepare a complete set of working drawings and construction documents, simulating an actual design process. (JOW)

Campbell, Kumari

1980-01-01

278

THE CO-ORDINATED CLASSROOM.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THIS REPORT EXPLICATES THE PHYSICAL RELATIONSHIP OF THE CHILD TO HIS CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT IN TERMS OF LIGHT CONTROL. THE STUDY SHOWS HOW SHADOWS, GLARE, INADEQUATE LIGHT DISTRIBUTION, DESKS AND DESK POSITIONS AFFECT THE CHILD'S PHYSIOLOGICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL WELL-BEING. A COMPARATIVE STUDY WAS MADE BETWEEN A CONTROL SCHOOL AND AN EXPERIMENTAL…

HARMON, DARELL BOYD

279

The Classroom Animal: Crickets.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suggests using crickets for classroom activities, providing background information on their anatomy and reproduction and tips on keeping individual organisms or a breeding colony in the classroom. (JN)

Kramer, David C.

1985-01-01

280

GLOBE Assessment Classroom Tools  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The GLOBE Classroom Assessment site provides sample student assessment tools and frameworks to provide teachers and students with evidence about progress on NASA's Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) program goals. GLOBE Assessment has three main components: (1) GLOBE Assessment Standards - Broad overview of assessment indexing to standards and frameworks that specify commonly referenced science content areas and inquiry strategies (2) GLOBE Assessment Tools - Templates, rubrics, and guided exemplars to tailor your assessments. Exemplars are designed to assess students' deep understanding of GLOBE framework strategies. (3) GLOBE Assessment Alignment - Materials from GLOBE Conference 2001 Alignment Binder which provided tools to link GLOBE to National and State standards.

1999-01-01

281

Developing and Validating the Classroom Literacy Environmental Profile (CLEP): A Tool for Examining the “Print Richness” of Early Childhood and Elementary Classrooms  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this report, the development, field testing, and validation of the Classroom Literacy Environment Profile (CLEP) are described. In the first phase, characteristics of print-rich classroom environments were identified, defined, and organized into categories through a review of the literature, classroom observations, and teacher focus groups. In the second phase of the project, categories and themes interpreted from phase one

Mary E. Wolfersberger; D. Ray Reutzel; Richard Sudweeks; Parker C. Fawson

2004-01-01

282

Developing and Validating the Classroom Literacy Environmental Profile (CLEP): A Tool for Examining the "Print Richness" of Early Childhood and Elementary Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this report, the development, field testing, and validation of the Classroom Literacy Environment Profile (CLEP) are described. In the first phase, characteristics of print-rich classroom environments were identified, defined, and organized into categories through a review of the literature, classroom observations, and teacher focus groups. In…

Wolfersberger, Mary E.; Reutzel, D. Ray; Sudweeks, Richard; Fawson, Parker C.

2004-01-01

283

Common-Sense Classroom Management: Surviving September and Beyond in the Elementary Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual contains techniques for creating successful teaching and learning environments in diverse elementary classrooms. Using humor, drawings, and a conversational tone, it provides suggestions for teaching effectively and efficiently. Special highlights include five-steps-or-less strategies that can be adapted into any classroom, an outline…

Lindberg, Jill A.; Swick, April M.

284

A Biological Brain in a Cultural Classroom: Applying Biological Research to Classroom Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book applies the latest in brain research and learning theory to classroom management. The concepts of psychoneurophysiology are made readily accessible. The book offers creative data gathering activities to help students manage their own behavior and to help teachers learn how their own behavior impacts the classroom environment. The seven…

Sylwester, Robert

285

Classroom Profiling Training: Increasing Preservice Teachers' Confidence and Knowledge of Classroom Management Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Classroom management is a serious concern for beginning teachers including preservice teachers. The Queensland Department of Education, Training and Employment (DETE) has developed the Essential Skills for Classroom Management (ESCM), a system of positive and pro-active strategies for maintaining supportive learning environments. In addition, the…

Jackson, Cliff; Simoncini, Kym; Davidson, Mark

2013-01-01

286

Voices from the Classroom: Students with Special Needs in an Elementary Music Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to discover ways in which a music educator can incorporate students with special needs in a music classroom. Music educators seek ways to manage and incorporate these students in the classroom environment. The research question guiding this action research study was: how are students with special needs incorporated in…

Sargent, John; Farley, Ashley

2005-01-01

287

The "Classroom Systems Observation Scale": Development of an Instrument To Assess Classrooms Using a Systems Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the development of the Classroom Systems Observation Scale (CSOS), which assesses preschool through sixth grade classroom functioning from a systems perspective using a theoretical framework based on the Circumplex Model of Marital and Family Systems. Discusses influences of home environment and parental support on learning; and…

Fish, Marian C.; Dane, Elizabeth

2000-01-01

288

The Electronic Classroom. New Classrooms without Walls.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains how teachers can take advantage of the Internet to create classroom projects. The process involves locating collaborating partners via the World Wide Web, then determining which projects would be worthwhile to students. Presents guidelines for organizing a classroom project, discusses classroom considerations, examines teacher…

Barron, Ann E.; Ivers, Karen S.

1998-01-01

289

Psychosocial rehabilitation in developing countries.  

PubMed

Psychosocial rehabilitation (PSR) is an essential component in the management of schizophrenia. It is especially relevant in the improvement of functioning and the quality of life of these individuals. The scarcity of mental health personnel and lack of training in many low and middle income countries (LAMIC) has led to low priority being accorded to PSR. This paper describes some of the PSR initiatives in LAMIC, especially those undertaken after disasters, home-based interventions and community-based rehabilitation programmes. PMID:23057986

Rangaswamy, Thara; Sujit, John

2012-10-01

290

Psychosocial and Mental Status Assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clinicians assess a client’s psychosocial and mental status in a variety of contexts. Clients may be screened at intake to\\u000a a service and at annual staffings, often to determine eligibility for professional services or supportive interventions. In\\u000a this type of referral the important question is whether or not there is a clinically significant problem that requires attention.\\u000a This can also

Peter Sturmey

291

Psychosocial Impact of Cosmetic Rhinoplasty  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   The psychosocial impact of cosmetic rhinoplasty in Scandinavia is poorly investigated. Therefore a study was undertaken utilizing\\u000a a mailed audit covering self-percepted experiences before, during, and after surgery. A total of 67 of 80 patients responded\\u000a to the questionnaire (84%), on average 18 months after surgery. The mean age was 31 years (range, 16–63 years) and the M\\/F\\u000a ratio

P.-O. Haraldsson

1999-01-01

292

Classroom Management. Brief  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In learning-centered classrooms, the emphasis of classroom management shifts from maintaining behavioral control to fostering student engagement and self-regulation as well as community responsibility. This brief describes classroom management in "learning centered" classrooms, where practices are consistent with recent research knowledge about…

National Education Association Research Department, 2006

2006-01-01

293

She Will Succeed! Strategies for Success in Inclusive Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Strategies to help students with disabilities succeed in inclusive classrooms are explained using several mnemonics. These include 14 steps to modify the learning environment by using a SHE WILL SUCCEED mnemonic and examining the classroom by using a CRIME mnemonic (Curriculum, Rules, Instruction, Materials, and Environment). (Contains…

Prater, Mary Anne

2003-01-01

294

The Classroom Assessment Scoring System: Findings from the Prekindergarten Year  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on teacher-child relationships, classroom environments, and teaching practices provided the rationale for constructing a system for observing and assessing emotional and instructional elements of quality in early childhood educational environments: the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS). The CLASS provides a framework for…

La Paro, Karen M.; Pianta, Robert C.; Stuhlman, Megan

2004-01-01

295

Screening for Psychosocial Risk in Pediatric Cancer  

PubMed Central

Major professional organizations have called for psychosocial risk screening to identify specific psychosocial needs of children with cancer and their families and facilitate the delivery of appropriate evidence-based care to address these concerns. However, systematic screening of risk factors at diagnosis is rare in pediatric oncology practice. Subsequent to a brief summary of psychosocial risks in pediatric cancer and the rationale for screening, this review identified three screening models and two screening approaches (Distress Thermometer [DT], Psychosocial Assessment Tool [PAT]), among many more papers calling for screening. Implications of broadly implemented screening for all patients across treatment settings are discussed.

Kazak, Anne E.; Brier, Moriah; Alderfer, Melissa A.; Reilly, Anne; Parker, Stephanie Fooks; Rogerwick, Stephanie; Ditaranto, Susan; Barakat, Lamia P.

2012-01-01

296

Designing the Electronic Classroom: Applying Learning Theory and Ergonomic Design Principles.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Applies learning theory and ergonomic principles to the design of effective learning environments for library instruction. Discusses features of electronic classroom ergonomics, including the ergonomics of physical space, environmental factors, and workstations; and includes classroom layouts. (Author/LRW)

Emmons, Mark; Wilkinson, Frances C.

2001-01-01

297

Foster Family Resources, Psychosocial Functioning, and Retention.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This longitudinal study examined the effect of family resources and psychosocial problems on retention for foster families. Almost 50 percent of families who started preservice training did not complete it. Families with more psychosocial problems and fewer resources were more likely to express uncertainly about continuing. These results have…

Rhodes, Kathryn W.; Orme, John G.; Cox, Mary Ellen; Buehler, Cheryl

2003-01-01

298

Psychosocial Treatment for Recurrent Genital Herpes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Assigned 21 individuals with recurrent genital herpes to psychosocial intervention, social support, or waiting-list control conditions. Those receiving psychosocial intervention (herpes simplex virus information, relaxation training, stress management instructions, and an imagery technique) reported significantly greater reductions in herpes…

Longo, David J.; And Others

1988-01-01

299

Psychosocial Resolution and Counsellor Trainee Empathy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Entry-level counseling students (n=74) were surveyed to investigate the relationship between resolution of Erikson's psychosocial stage of intimacy/isolation and counselor trainee empathy. Results revealed a significant positive relationship between measures of psychosocial stage resolution and counselor empathy and a significant main effect for…

Gold, Joshua M.

1992-01-01

300

Psychosocial and Family Functioning in Spina Bifida  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A developmentally oriented bio-neuropsychosocial model is introduced to explain the variation in family functioning and psychosocial adjustment in youth and young adults with spina bifida (SB). Research on the family functioning and psychosocial adjustment of individuals with SB is reviewed. The findings of past research on families of youth with…

Holmbeck, Grayson N.; Devine, Katie A.

2010-01-01

301

Cross-national Consistency in the Relationship Between Bullying Behaviors and Psychosocial Adjustment  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine whether the relationship between bullying and psychosocial adjustment is consistent across countries by standard measures and methods. Design Cross-sectional self-report surveys were obtained from nationally representative samples of students in 25 countries. Involvement in bullying, as bully, victim, or both bully and victim, was assessed. Setting Surveys were conducted at public and private schools throughout the participating countries. Participants Participants included all consenting students in sampled classrooms, for a total of 113200 students at average ages of 11.5, 13.5, and 15.5 years. Main Outcome Measures Psychosocial adjustment dimensions assessed included health problems, emotional adjustment, school adjustment, relationships with classmates, alcohol use, and weapon carrying. Results Involvement in bullying varied dramatically across countries, ranging from 9% to 54% of youth. However, across all countries, involvement in bullying was associated with poorer psychosocial adjustment (P<.05). In all or nearly all countries, bullies, victims, and bully-victims reported greater health problems and poorer emotional and social adjustment. Victims and bully-victims consistently reported poorer relationships with classmates, whereas bullies and bully-victims reported greater alcohol use and weapon carrying. Conclusions The association of bullying with poorer psychosocial adjustment is remarkably similar across countries. Bullying is a critical issue for the health of youth internationally.

Nansel, Tonja R.; Craig, Wendy; Overpeck, Mary D.; Saluja, Gitanjali; Ruan, W. June

2008-01-01

302

The Dynamics of Motivation and Effort for Classroom Assessments in Middle School Science and Social Studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Motivation and effort patterns associated with achievement on classroom assess- ments in middle-school science and social studies were studied with a sample of 223 8th graders in different classroom assessment environments. Classroom assessment environments were characterized by student perceptions of the importance and value of assessment tasks, perceived self-efficacy, and mastery goal orientations. It was ex- pected that both classroom

Susan M. Brookhart; Janet M. Walsh; Wayne A. Zientarski

2006-01-01

303

Attachment and Adolescent Psychosocial Functioning  

PubMed Central

To explore the meaning and function of attachment organization during adolescence, its relation to multiple domains of psychosocial functioning was examined in a sample of 131 moderately at-risk adolescents. Attachment organization was assessed using the Adult Attachment Interview; multiple measures of functioning were obtained from parents, adolescents, and their peers. Seczurity displayed in adolescents' organization of discourse about attachment experiences was related to competence with peers (as reported by peers), lower levels of internalizing behaviors (as reported by adolescents), and lower levels of deviant behavior (as reported by peers and by mothers). Preoccupation with attachment experiences, seen in angry or diffuse and unfocused discussion of attachment experiences, was linked to higher levels of both internalizing and deviant behaviors. These relations generally remained even when other attachment-related constructs that had been previously related to adolescent functioning were covaried in analyses. Results are interpreted as suggesting an important role for attachment organization in a wide array of aspects of adolescent psychosocial development.

Allen, Joseph P.; Moore, Cynthia; Kuperminc, Gabriel; Bell, Kathy

2006-01-01

304

Psychosocial correlates of internet use among Italian students.  

PubMed

Davis (2001) introduced a cognitive-behavioral theory of generalized pathological internet use (GPIU) that attempts to model the etiology, development, and outcomes associated with PIU. According to this model, pre-existing psychosocial problems (depression, loneliness, or low levels of social support) predispose an individual to GPIU cognitions, behaviors, and negative outcomes. An exploratory study intended to investigate whether GPIU is associated with psychosocial health (loneliness, depression, self-esteem, and shyness), also taking account of types of internet services used, was conducted in a sample of Italian undergraduate students. A cross-sectional and descriptive correlational design was used. The participants were 157 undergraduate students (34 male and 123 female) enrolled at The University of Florence. The results revealed a stronger correlation between the frequency of use of communicative services (as opposed to leisure or informational services) and GPIU levels. Among services, the most significant predictor of GPIU was the frequency of use of chat rooms and "adult" websites. All psychosocial health variables were correlated with GPIU, with the exception of shyness; however, general loneliness was the only significant predictor of GPIU. Depression and self-esteem were not significant predictors of GPIU. These results are consistent with the assumption that GPIU is related to the social aspect of the internet (e.g., online chatting) and arises from the unique communicative environment found online. In accordance with recent studies, social wellbeing (i.e. loneliness) seems to play a greater role than psychological health in deriving negative effects from internet use. PMID:22044272

Casale, Silvia; Fioravanti, Giulia

2011-08-01

305

Tips from the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four tips for use in the English-as-a-Second-Language classroom are highlighted: Mr. Bean in the Classroom; Defining Your Future; Coin Questions; Our Futures: Simple, Progressive, and Perfect. (Author/VWL)

Epstein, Jim; Ashcraft, Nikki; Clarke, Paul M.; Wolf, Grant S.

1999-01-01

306

Adapting Classroom Schemata.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses schema theory in relation to the language classroom. Argues that as teachers themselves are former learners, the schemata they have developed both inside and outside the classroom will provide them assumptions about how people learn. (Author/VWL)

Littlewood, William

1999-01-01

307

Cameras in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the following uses for a video camera in the science classroom: video presentations, microscope work, taping and/or monitoring experiments, analyzing everyday phenomena, lesson enhancement, field trip alternative, and classroom management. (PR)

Steinman, Richard C.

1993-01-01

308

Promoting a combination approach to paediatric HIV psychosocial support.  

PubMed

Ninety percent of the 3.4 million HIV-infected children live in sub-Saharan Africa. Their psychosocial well being is fundamental to establishing and maintaining successful treatment outcomes and overall quality of life. With the increased roll-out of antiretroviral treatment, HIV infection is shifting from a life-threatening to a chronic disease. However, even for paediatric patients enrolled in care and treatment, HIV can still be devastating due to the interaction of complex factors, particularly in the context of other household illness and overextended healthcare systems in sub-Saharan Africa.This article explores the negative effect of several interrelated HIV-specific factors on the psychosocial well being of HIV-infected children: disclosure, stigma and discrimination, and bereavement. However, drawing on clinical studies of resilience, it stresses the need to move beyond a focus on the individual as a full response to the needs of a sick child requires support for the individual child, caregiver-child dyads, extended families, communities, and institutions. This means providing early and progressive age appropriate interventions aimed at increasing the self-reliance and self-acceptance in children and their caregivers and promoting timely health-seeking behaviours. Critical barriers that cause poorer biomedical and psychosocial outcomes among children and caregiver must also be addressed as should the causes and consequences of stigma and associated gender and social norms.This article reviews interventions at different levels of the ecological model: individual-centred programs, family-centred interventions, programs that support or train healthcare providers, community interventions for HIV-infected children, and initiatives that improve the capacity of schools to provide more supportive environments for HIV-infected children. Although experience is increasing in approaches that address the psychosocial needs of vulnerable and HIV-infected children, there is still limited evidence demonstrating which interventions have positive effects on the well being of HIV-infected children. Interventions that improve the psychosocial well being of children living with HIV must be replicable in resource-limited settings, avoiding dependence on specialized staff for implementation.This paper advocates for combination approaches that strengthen the capacity of service providers, expand the availability of age appropriate and family-centred support and equip schools to be more protective and supportive of children living with HIV. The coordination of care with other community-based interventions is also needed to foster more supportive and less stigmatizing environments. To ensure effective, feasible, and scalable interventions, improving the evidence base to document improved outcomes and longer term impact as well as implementation of operational studies to document delivery approaches are needed. PMID:24361624

Amzel, Anouk; Toska, Elona; Lovich, Ronnie; Widyono, Monique; Patel, Tejal; Foti, Carrie; Dziuban, Eric J; Phelps, B Ryan; Sugandhi, Nandita; Mark, Daniella; Altschuler, Jenny

2013-11-01

309

Classroom Management. TESOL Classroom Practice Series  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This series captures the dynamics of the contemporary ESOL classroom. It showcases state-of-the-art curricula, materials, tasks, and activities reflecting emerging trends in language education and seeks to build localized language teaching and learning theories based on teachers' and students' unique experiences in and beyond the classroom. Each…

Farrell, Thomas S. C., Ed.

2008-01-01

310

Analysing Bilingual Classroom Discourse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present paper analyses and evaluates spoken discourse in the bilingual classroom at Damascus University. It looks at the mechanism of classroom interaction: the use of questions, initiations, repetitions and expansions. Although this paper deals with classroom interaction at Damascus University, it is believed that the results arrived at may…

Hasan, Ali S.

2006-01-01

311

Competition in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author shares the strategy she adopted to even out the participation among her multicultural students during their classroom discussions. The author realized that her students had different concepts about the classroom and different philosophies about competition. For the Americans and Indians, the classroom was a site of…

Jameson, Daphne

2007-01-01

312

Cockroaches in the Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Welcome the Madagascar hissing cockroach into your classroom--they are not your average pest! This article describes the basic biology of this relatively tame creature, and how to set up and care for a classroom colony. It includes a list of suggested inquiry-centered classroom activities that you and your students will find both educational and fun!

Moseley, Christine; Wagler, Ron

2005-03-01

313

Classroom Use and Utilization.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses how classrooms are distributed by size on a campus, how well they are used, and how their use changes with faculty and student needs and desires. Details how to analyze classroom space, use, and utilization, taking into account such factors as scheduling and classroom stations. (EV)

Fink, Ira

2002-01-01

314

Trout in the Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Trout in the Classroom (TIC) is a conservation-oriented environmental education program for elementary, middle, and high school students. During the year each teacher tailors the program to fit his or her curricular needs. Therefore, each TIC program is unique. TIC has interdisciplinary applications in science, social studies, mathematics, language arts, fine arts, and physical education. In the program, students and teachers raise trout from fertilized eggs supplied by Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VGIF) hatcheries, in aquariums equipped with special chillers designed to keep the water near 50 degrees F. The students make daily temperature measurements, and monitor pH, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, and ammonia levels. They record their data, plot trends, and make sure that the water quality is sufficient to support trout development. The fingerlings, which hatch in late October, are almost an inch and a half long by mid-January. And towards the end of the school year, students will release the fry into VGIF approved watersheds. TIC programs have been in place all across the country for more than 20 years, and are the result of numerous collaborations between teachers, volunteers, government agencies, and local organizations like Trout Unlimited. The programs were designed specifically for teachers who wanted to incorporate more environmental education into their curriculum. While the immediate goal of Trout in the Classroom is to increase student knowledge of water quality and cold water conservation, its long-term goal is to reconnect an increasingly urbanized population of youth to the system of streams, rivers, and watersheds that sustain them. Successful programs have helped: connect students to their local environments and their local watersheds; teach about watershed health and water quality, and; get students to care about fish and the environment. In Virginia, the TIC program is now in its 8th year. Over the past year, the program experienced an amazing growth spurt. Thanks to AEP and Dominion grants and chapter fundraising efforts, we now have more than 200 classrooms throughout the state, ranging from elementary school through high school.

Heath, Thomas

2014-05-01

315

Development and Validation of an Instrument to Monitor the Implementation of Outcomes-based Learning Environments in Science Classrooms in South Africa  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article describes the development and validation of an instrument that can be used to assess students’ perceptions of their learning environment as a means of monitoring and guiding changes towards outcomes-based education. In the first phase, data collected from 2638 Grade 8 science students from 50 classes in 50 schools in the Limpopo Province of South Africa were analysed to provide evidence about the reliability and validity of the new instrument. In the second phase, two case studies were used to investigate whether profiles of class mean scores on the new instrument could provide an accurate and “trustworthy” description of the learning environment of individual science classes. The study makes significant contributions to the field of learning environments in that it is one of the first major studies of its kind in South Africa and because the instrument developed captures important aspects of the learning environment associated with outcomes-based education.

Aldridge, Jill M.; Laugksch, Rüdiger C.; Seopa, Mampone A.; Fraser, Barry J.

2006-01-01

316

Psychosocial aspects of disabling musculoskeletal pain.  

PubMed

Psychosocial factors are important determinants of pain intensity and disability in patients with disabling musculoskeletal pain. The psychosocial aspects of disabling musculoskeletal pain include cognitive (e.g., beliefs, expectations, and coping style), affective (e.g., depression, pain anxiety, heightened concern about illness, and anger), behavioral (e.g., avoidance), social (e.g., secondary gain), and cultural factors. The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy and other treatments that address the psychosocial aspects of disabling musculoskeletal pain has been confirmed in numerous high-quality studies. PMID:19651964

Vranceanu, Ana-Maria; Barsky, Arthur; Ring, David

2009-08-01

317

Advances in the Psychosocial Treatment of Addiction  

PubMed Central

Synopsis The authors present an overview of empirically supported psychosocial interventions for individuals with substance use disorders (SUDs), including recent advances in the field. They also identify barriers to the adoption of evidence-based psychosocial treatments in community-based systems of care, and the promise of leveraging technology (computers, web, mobile phone, and emerging technologies) to markedly enhance the reach of these treatments. Technology-based interventions may provide “on-demand,” ubiquitous access to therapeutic support in diverse settings. A brief discussion of important next steps in developing, refining, and disseminating technology-delivered psychosocial interventions concludes the review.

Dallery, Jesse

2012-01-01

318

Effect of Aerobic Exercise on Cognition, Academic Achievement, and Psychosocial Function in Children: A Systematic Review of Randomized Control Trials  

PubMed Central

Introduction Although the effects of aerobic physical activity (APA) on children’s physical health is well characterized, the effect of aerobic physical activity on cognition, academic achievement, and psychosocial function has not yet been established. This systematic review provides an overview of research elucidating the relationship between aerobic physical activity and children’s cognition, academic achievement, and psychosocial function. Methods A systematic review of English articles was performed in April 2013 using MEDLINE, Cochrane, PsycINFO, SPORTDiscus, and EMBASE. Additional studies were identified through back-searching bibliographies. Only randomized control trials with an intervention of aerobic physical activity in children younger than 19 years that measured psychological, behavioral, cognitive, or academic outcomes were included. Results We found 8 relevant randomized control trials that met our inclusion criteria and extracted relevant data and evaluated the methodologic quality of the studies. Of the 8 studies identified, 2 studies were crossover randomized control trials studying the effects of acute aerobic physical activity on cognitive performance. Six studies were parallel-group randomized control studies, of which only 2 had a follow-up period of longer than 6 months. All studies showed that APA had a generally positive impact on children’s cognition and psychosocial function. However, this relationship was found to be minimal in many studies and in some measures, no significant improvement was seen at all. There was no documentation of APA having any negative impact on children’s cognition and psychosocial health, even in cases where school curriculum time was reassigned from classroom teaching to aerobic physical activity. Conclusion APA is positively associated with cognition, academic achievement, behavior, and psychosocial functioning outcomes. More rigorous trials with adequate sample sizes assessing the impact of APA on children’s cognitive abilities, psychosocial functioning, behavior, and academic achievement are needed, with standardized interventions, valid and reliable tools of measurement, and long-term follow-up for sustained cognitive and psychosocial outcomes.

Lees, Caitlin

2013-01-01

319

[Psychosocial factors and health status of employees].  

PubMed

An issue of relationship between exposure to psychosocial factors and health status of employees is presented in this review. It is difficult to find hard evidence that could reliably confirm this relationship. Methodological difliculties encountered in measuring psychosocial factors and health effects and in designing research procedures are responsible for equivocal study results. However, a huge number of articles presenting the results of numerous studies make us convinced that many human organs are targets of dangerous impact of stress evoked by job conditions. Bearing in mind that work processes and working conditions become more and snore stressogenic. one can expect that in the near future psychosocial factors will form a group of the most dangerous health hazards. Therefore, it is an urgent challenge facing the occupational health service (OHS) to adapt its system of prevention to the specificity of threats, and thus better protect employees against harmful impact of the psychosocial factors. PMID:16483009

Dudek, Bohdan

2005-01-01

320

Military Families: Psychosocial Adaptation to Pregnancy.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the study was twofold: (1) to prospectively examine the influence of military separations and perceived social support on maternal psychosocial adaptation to pregnancy, and (2) to determine the influence of first and second trimester family...

K. Weiss

2005-01-01

321

Rethinking Classroom Management: Strategies for Prevention, Intervention, and Problem Solving.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book illustrates an approach to achieving a positive, harmonious classroom environment which enables educators to evolve effectively from managers to leaders by rethinking their roles as teachers, discussing how to create classrooms where students are more self-managing and demonstrate mutual respect, self-esteem, and responsibility. Key…

Belvel, Patricia Sequeira; Jordan, Maya Marcia

322

Phenomena and Methodology of Studying Social Structures in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this research report, classrooms are seen as affective learning environments in which human relationships expand or restrict the quality of learning. The two-part report discusses (a) fundamental differences in social structures among classrooms, as measured by the Centrality-Diffuseness Index (C-D Index); and (b) relationships between the…

Daily, Frances M.; Phillips, James A., Jr.

323

Quality in Inclusive and Noninclusive Infant and Toddler Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The quality of care in infant and toddler classrooms was compared across inclusive (n=64) and noninclusive classrooms (n=400). Quality was measured using the Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scale-Revised (ITERS-R). An exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis revealed four distinct dimensions of quality within the ITERS-R. Inclusive…

Hestenes, Linda L.; Cassidy, Deborah J.; Hegde, Archana V.; Lower, Joanna K.

2007-01-01

324

The Challenge of the Classroom: A Political-Economy Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Societal and political and economic forces that affect college instruction are considered. Classroom interaction is affected by the culture, the personalities of teachers and students, and the social situation (the physical and social environment). All the factors that influence the classroom are affected by political and economic factors both…

Black, Charlene Rushton

325

Do Prekindergarten Teachers Design Their Classrooms to Enhance Early Literacy?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Young children develop language and early literacy interactions that are the building blocks for future skilled reading. This study was designed to evaluate the early childhood classroom to determine teachers? knowledge of early literacy. Based on the Literacy Environment Checklist (LEC) of the Early Literacy and Language Classroom Observation…

LoRusso, Jo Ann D.

2010-01-01

326

Higher Education Classroom Management: Kuwait University Students' Views  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study attempts to examine students' views on the effectiveness of classroom management techniques used by faculty members. By examining their views, some insights may be gained as to the kinds of management techniques that a faculty member might adopt in order to promote better teaching and learning environment. Effective classroom management…

Al-Hamdan, Jasem

2007-01-01

327

Otitis Media: Coping with the Effects in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum adaptation provides a methodology that enables the classroom teacher to recognize the needs of the otitis media-affected child in the classroom. It discusses areas of concern related to otitis media; suggests activities that can enhance these children's language skills; and shows ways to enhance the learning environment by…

Davis, Dorinne S.

328

The psychosocial impact on standing devices.  

PubMed

Abstract Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the psychosocial impact of standing devices as experienced by users. Method: This is the second part of a comprehensive survey in five counties in Sweden where all the subjects with standing devices were invited to participate. The impact of standing devices on functional independence, quality of life and wellbeing was assessed using a questionnaire, Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scale (PIADS). Results: The psychosocial impact of the standing devices was perceived as positive. The highest PIADS scores in relation to age were found in the oldest group, aged 65 years and older. The ability to walk and independence in ambulation resulted in higher scores than the use of a wheelchair and/or dependence on others. Those who stood often awarded higher scores in the PIADS questionnaire compared to those who used the device less frequently. When standing was integrated in various activities, its psychosocial impact received high scores. Conclusion: The psychosocial impact of standing devices was generally experienced positively. The main results indicated that standing in a standing device had a value and we as professionals should ask the users about the intended purpose of their standing in order to prescribe the optimal device. Implications for Rehabilitation Standing in standing devices has positive psychosocial impact for the user. As professionals we should broaden our view of the use of standing devices, i.e. to see the standing device as an aid that not only treats the body's structures or improves the user's abilities in activities, but also provides a psychosocial impact on the user's daily life, and to find meaningful goals for the user from a psychosocial perspective. PMID:23782225

Nordström, Birgitta; Nyberg, Lars; Ekenberg, Lilly; Näslund, Annika

2014-07-01

329

The psychosocial impact on standing devices  

PubMed Central

Purpose The aim of this study was to explore the psychosocial impact of standing devices as experienced by users. Method This is the second part of a comprehensive survey in five counties in Sweden where all the subjects with standing devices were invited to participate. The impact of standing devices on functional independence, quality of life and wellbeing was assessed using a questionnaire, Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scale (PIADS). Results The psychosocial impact of the standing devices was perceived as positive. The highest PIADS scores in relation to age were found in the oldest group, aged 65 years and older. The ability to walk and independence in ambulation resulted in higher scores than the use of a wheelchair and/or dependence on others. Those who stood often awarded higher scores in the PIADS questionnaire compared to those who used the device less frequently. When standing was integrated in various activities, its psychosocial impact received high scores. Conclusion The psychosocial impact of standing devices was generally experienced positively. The main results indicated that standing in a standing device had a value and we as professionals should ask the users about the intended purpose of their standing in order to prescribe the optimal device. Implications for RehabilitationStanding in standing devices has positive psychosocial impact for the user.As professionals we should broaden our view of the use of standing devices, i.e. to see the standing device as an aid that not only treats the body’s structures or improves the user’s abilities in activities, but also provides a psychosocial impact on the user’s daily life, and to find meaningful goals for the user from a psychosocial perspective.

Nyberg, Lars; Ekenberg, Lilly; Naslund, Annika

2014-01-01

330

An Investigation of the Environment for Educational Microform Utilization. Phase II. "Student Use of Classroom Microform in Support of a Content Course." Final Phase Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An undergraduate psychology course which relied on readings instead of textbooks and which required extensive notetaking was the environment for a study of microform utilization. The material for the course was made available in hardcopy and was also reduced 150x onto a 4 x 6 inch microfiche. Four microform readers were made available for…

Kottenstette, James P.; Dailey, K. Anne

331

Master Classrooms: Classroom Design with Technology in Mind.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Technology is changing the classroom requiring new design features and considerations to make the classroom flexible and interactive with the teaching process. The design of a Master Classroom, a product of the Classroom Improvement Project at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is described. These classrooms are specially-equipped to…

Conway, Kathryn

332

Do science coaches promote inquiry-based instruction in the elementary science classroom?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The South Carolina Mathematics and Science Coaching Initiative established a school-based science coaching model that was effective in improving instruction by increasing the level of inquiry-based instruction in elementary science classrooms. Classroom learning environment data from both teacher groups indicated considerable differences in the quality of inquiry instruction for those classrooms of teachers supported by a science coach. All essential

Rosemary Knight Wicker

2006-01-01

333

Using Tablet PCs in the Classroom: An Investigation of Students' Expectations and Reactions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purposes of the current experiments were to investigate: (a) students' expectations with regard to the use of Tablet PCs within the classroom, (b) students' attitudes toward the implementation of Tablet PCs within the classroom, and (c) the resulting classroom environment from the use of various technologies. Results indicated that although…

Bonds-Raacke, Jennifer M.; Raacke, John D.

2008-01-01

334

Teachers' conflict management styles: The role of attachment styles and classroom management efficacy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Constructive conflict management strategies are important in maintaining a positive classroom environment yet little is known about interpersonal or school variables associated with teachers' use of such strategies with students. Teachers high in self-reported classroom management efficacy (CMEFF) and security of attachment (low on avoidance, anxiety) were predicted to endorse use of positive classroom management strategies (e.g., integrating, compromising) more

Britta K. Morris-Rothschild; Marla R. Brassard

2006-01-01

335

Using Data in the Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I will review a few short examples of how NVO and large astronomy data-producting projects can enable inquiry-based science through the use of scientific data in the classroom. This will include a brief report from a successful NASA IDEAS grant, which funded a workshop for geography teachers in Native American schools. Examples of how data mining of large data collections has impacted some non-traditional learning environments will also be presented. Even in such non-astronomy classroom settings, the use of astronomy data offers stimulation for learning and can have amazing results. Support for this work was provided in part by NSF through Cooperative Agreement AST0122449 to the Johns Hopkins University and through the NSF Cooperative Agreement to the LSST Corporation.

Borne, K. D.

2005-12-01

336

Classroom acoustics: Three pilot studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper summarizes three related pilot projects designed to focus on the possible effects of classroom acoustics on fine auditory discrimination as it relates to language acquisition, especially English as a second language. The first study investigated the influence of improving the signal-to-noise ratio on the differentiation of English phonemes. The results showed better differentiation with better signal-to-noise ratio. The second studied speech perception in noise by young adults for whom English was a second language. The outcome indicated that the second language learners required a better signal-to-noise ratio to perform equally to the native language participants. The last study surveyed the acoustic conditions of preschool and day care classrooms, wherein first and second language learning occurs. The survey suggested an unfavorable acoustic environment for language learning.

Smaldino, Joseph J.

2005-04-01

337

Psychosocial Research on the International Space Station: Special Privacy Considerations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Conducting psychosocial research with astronauts and cosmonauts requires special privacy and confidentiality precautions due to the high profile nature of the subject population and to individual crewmember perception of the risks inherent in divulging sensitive psychological information. Sampling from this small population necessitates subject protections above and beyond standard scientific human subject protocols. Many of these protections have relevance for psychosocial research on the International Space Station. In our previous study of psychosocial issues involving crewmembers on the Mir space station, special precautions were taken during each phase of the missions. These were implemented in order to gain the trust necessary to ameliorate the perceived risks of divulging potentially sensitive psychological information and to encourage candid responses. Pre-flight, a standard confidentiality agreement was provided along with a special layman's summary indicating that only group-level data would be presented, and subjects chose their own ID codes known only to themselves. In-flight, special procedures and technologies (such as encryption) were employed to protect the data during the collection. Post-flight, an analytic strategy was chosen to further mask subject identifiers, and draft manuscripts were reviewed by the astronaut office prior to publication. All of the eligible five astronauts and eight cosmonauts who flew joint US/Russian missions on the Mir were successfully recruited to participate, and their data completion rate was 76%. Descriptive analyses of the data indicated that there was sufficient variability in all of the measures to indicate that thoughtful, discriminating responses were being provided (e.g., the full range of response options was used in 63 of the 65 items of the Profile of Mood States measure, and both true and false response options were used in all 126 items of the Group Environment and the Work Environment measures). This presentation will discuss and expand on the lessons learned during the Mir study and relate them to future long-duration space missions.

Kanas, N.; Salnitskiy, V.; Ritsher, J.; Grund, E.; Weiss, D.; Gushin, V.; Kozerenko, O.

338

Environment and Energy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This self-contained module on environment and energy includes a range of fun activities that students can perform in the classroom and at home with family members. They impart important concepts such as observation, identification, measurement, and differentiation.

Science, Houghton M.

339

NASA Classroom Bioreactor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Exploration of space provides a compelling need for cell-based research into the basic mechanisms that underlie the profound changes that occur in terrestrial life that is transitioned to low gravity environments. Toward that end, NASA developed a rotating bioreactor in which cells are cultured while continuously suspended in a cylinder in which the culture medium rotates with the cylinder. The randomization of the gravity vector accomplished by the continuous rotation, in a low shear environment, provides an analog of microgravity. Because cultures grown in bioreactors develop structures and functions that are much closer to those exhibited by native tissue than can be achieved with traditional culture methods, bioreactors have contributed substantially to advancing research in the fields of cancer, diabetes, infectious disease modeling for vaccine production, drug efficacy, and tissue engineering. NASA has developed a Classroom Bioreactor (CB) that is built from parts that are easily obtained and assembled, user-friendly and versatile. It can be easily used in simple school settings to examine the effect cultures of seeds or cells. An educational brief provides assembly instructions and lesson plans that describes activities in science, math and technology that explore free fall, microgravity, orbits, bioreactors, structure-function relationships and the scientific method.

Scully, Robert

2004-01-01

340

Psychosocial considerations for mass decontamination.  

PubMed

Mass exposure to explosions, infectious agents, foodborne illnesses, chemicals or radiological materials may require mass decontamination that have critical psychosocial implications for the public and for both traditional and non-traditional responders in terms of impact and of response. Five main issues are common to mass decontamination events: (i) perception, (ii) somatisation, (iii) media role and communication, (iv) information sharing, (v) behavioural guidance and (vi) organisational issues. Empirical evidence is drawn from a number of cases, including Chernobyl; Goiania, Brazil; the sarin gas attack in Tokyo; the anthrax attacks in the USA; Three Mile Island; and by features of the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome pandemic. In this paper, a common platform for mass casualty management is explored and suggestions for mass interventions are proposed across the complete event timeline, from pre-event threat and warning stages through to the impact and reconstruction phases. Implication for responders, healthcare and emergency infrastructure, public behaviour, screening processes, risk communication and media management are described. PMID:20924122

Lemyre, Louise; Johnson, Colleen; Corneil, Wayne

2010-11-01

341

Mapping the Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this Biodiversity Counts activity, students learn the importance of maps and scale as they work together to create a map of the classroom. The printable four-page PDF handout includes a series of inquiry-based questions to get students thinking about what they already know about maps and their classroom and a worksheet with step-by-step directions for creating a scale and determining the size and relative location of objects in the classroom.

342

Mapping the Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners discover the importance of maps and scale as they work together to create a map of the classroom. The printable four-page PDF handout includes: a series of inquiry-based questions to get learners thinking about what they already know about maps and their classroom; and a worksheet with step-by-step directions for creating a scale and determining the size and relative location of objects in the classroom.

History, American M.

2001-01-01

343

On Blocks and Broccoli: How to Organize Your Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compares the organization of supermarkets to classroom environments. Emphasizes the efficient use of space with the use of containers, keeping materials in place, and grouping objects together. Provides suggestions on the use of color and adding storage space. (MOK)

Alexander, Nancy

1996-01-01

344

Humanism: The Vital Ingredient in the Ethnically Aware Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the characteristics of the culturally aware classroom and teacher in order to provide an environment that will help replace the destructive aspects of the perceptual systems of the ethically different student. (Author/RK)

Luna, F. C.; Cordell, Franklin D.

1978-01-01

345

The Classroom Animal.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides background information on the earthworm. Reviews basic anatomical, behavioral, and reproductive facts. Offers suggestions for procuring, maintaining, and breeding colonies for classroom use. (ML)

Science and Children, 1986

1986-01-01

346

Considering the Chalkless Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article shares some personal reflections on several years of integrating educational technology into mathematics courses while retaining the direct interaction strengths of the traditional classroom.

Ellis-Monaghan, Joanna A.

2010-01-01

347

Integrating Workforce Practices into the English Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Asserts that effectively preparing students for the challenges of an ever-changing workplace requires incorporating the use of technology and the principles of business management into the classroom environment. Summarizes the development of a formal team research project for an English course that teaches skills that include planning and…

Mayes, Donna

1999-01-01

348

Analyzing Multimodal Interaction within a Classroom Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Human interactions are multimodal in nature. From simple to complex forms of transferal of information, human beings draw on a multiplicity of communicative modes, such as intonation and gaze, to make sense of everyday experiences. Likewise, the learning process, either within traditional classrooms or Virtual Learning Environments, is shaped by…

Moura, Heloisa

2006-01-01

349

Incorporate Technology into the Modern Language Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This column describes how technology can enrich the learning environment provided by the modern language classroom. Typically, modern languages taught in U.S. public schools are French, Spanish, and German. A general broadening of high school graduation and college and professional school admission requirements to include a certain level of modern…

Castleberry, Gwen Troxell; Evers, Rebecca B.

2010-01-01

350

Future Teachers' Classroom Applications of Technology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student teachers from North Carolina's public teacher preparation institutions were surveyed in 2002 and 2003 to learn about the environment in which they taught and the activities they undertook with respect to using technology. Responses regarding the "most successful" use of technology in the classroom were analyzed to determine if they…

Brawner, Catherine E.; Allen, Rodney H.

2006-01-01

351

Using Environmental Assessments to Make Better Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this article is to describe ways in which information based on environmental perceptions can form the basis for facilitating changes in classroom environments. The method involved reviewing a diverse range of related literature and providing data on various profiles which might be useful for guiding environmental improvement.…

Fraser, B.J.

1981-01-01

352

Plants in the Classroom. [Environmental Education Units.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These four documents are concerned with methods of introducing ecology to elementary and kindergarten children. The first describes techniques for use in a classroom investigation of growing plants, emphasizing the interrelationships of plants and environment and is designed so that children learn variables must be controlled to arrive at valid…

Minneapolis Independent School District 275, Minn.

353

"Reflective Conversation" in the Virtual Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Argues that conscious reflection is still necessary in an interactive learning environment and that a challenge facing developers of the virtual-language classroom is how to combine the processes of conscious reflection with those of spontaneous interaction. Examples of computer-mediated communication exchanges are examined that were generated…

Lamy, Marie-Noelle; Goodfellow, Robin

1999-01-01

354

Psychosocial adaptation to stoma surgery: a review.  

PubMed

During the last decade strong improvements have been made in the medical care of patients with a digestive tract stoma, particularly with regard to nursing skills and to the quality of collecting material for faecal products. Scientific investigation into the psychosocial adjustment of patients after stoma surgery has intensified as well, giving us indications for quality of life. These developments induced a review of the actual state of affairs in psychological issues. After evaluating the results of psychosocial stoma research, it can be concluded that the technical improvements in stoma care during the past decade did not result in a decline in psychosocial problems after stoma surgery. However, there are some serious problems when interpreting the results of studies in this field of investigation. Stoma surgery is not per se solely responsible for the reported psychosocial problems, first, because many conclusions are based on research studies with poor design and, second, because these studies lack a theoretical framework within which the process of psychosocial adjustment has been measured and explained. This review assesses the most current developments and controversies in this field. PMID:7595949

Bekkers, M J; van Knippenberg, F C; van den Borne, H W; Poen, H; Bergsma, J; vanBergeHenegouwen, G P

1995-02-01

355

Psychosocial stress and inflammation in cancer.  

PubMed

Stress-induced immune dysregulation results in significant health consequences for immune related disorders including viral infections, chronic autoimmune disease, and tumor growth and metastasis. In this mini-review we discuss the sympathetic, neuroendocrine and immunologic mechanisms by which psychosocial stress can impact cancer biology. Both human and animal studies have shown the sympathetic and neuroendocrine responses to psychosocial stress significantly impacts cancer, in part, through regulation of inflammatory mediators. Psychosocial stressors stimulate neuroendocrine, sympathetic, and immune responses that result in the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis, sympathetic nervous system (SNS), and the subsequent regulation of inflammatory responses by immune cells. Social disruption (SDR) stress, a murine model of psychosocial stress and repeated social defeat, provides a novel and powerful tool to probe the mechanisms leading to stress-induced alterations in inflammation, tumor growth, progression, and metastasis. In this review, we will focus on SDR as an important model of psychosocial stress in understanding neural-immune mechanisms in cancer. PMID:22790082

Powell, N D; Tarr, A J; Sheridan, J F

2013-03-01

356

Psychosocial impact of onychomycosis: a review.  

PubMed

Onychomycosis (tinea unguium) is the most common nail disorder. Nonetheless, it requires lengthy, often ineffective treatments, and recurrence is frequent. Predominantly a disease of the elderly, onychomycosis is becoming more and more common. Besides interfering with normal nail function, fungal nail infections are relatively painful, unsightly in appearance, disrupt daily activities, and have a negative psychosocial connotation. Commonly reported psychosocial factors are embarrassment, low self-esteem, and social withdrawal. Yet advances in therapy have been achieved since these reports were made, and many of these treatment options have proven to be more effective. Thus, the impact of these advances on psychosocial well-being of patients with onychomycosis is worth analyzing. The objective of this paper is to review studies that investigated the psychosocial impact of onychomycosis on a variety of patient populations. An alternative, total patient approach that dermatologists and general practitioners alike could use to incorporate patients' psychosocial well-being into the holistic management of onychomycosis will also be discussed. PMID:24164152

Chacon, Anna; Franca, Katlein; Fernandez, Alexandra; Nouri, Keyvan

2013-11-01

357

Psychosocial Care of Pediatric and Adolescent Cancer Patients.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Psychosocial adjustment to pediatric and adolescent cancer; Social functioning of families and pediatric cancer patients; Psychosocial effects of therapy on pediatric cancer patients; Neuroendocrinological effects of therapy on pediatric cancer ...

1983-01-01

358

Psychosocial adjustment of epilepsy patients in Cyprus.  

PubMed

This study investigated aspects of psychosocial adjustment in epilepsy patients in Cyprus. Sixty-three patients under 55 years of age with idiopathic or symptomatic epilepsy and 89 neurologically matched healthy volunteers participated. Subjects completed the State and Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory; patients with epilepsy also completed the Epilepsy Foundation Concerns Index. Results showed that patients with symptomatic epilepsy had significantly higher scores on state and trait anxiety and depressive symptoms. Sociodemographic characteristics including gender, marital status, and education levels contributed to differences in trait and state anxiety, depressive symptom scales, autonomy concerns, and fear for seizure recurrence. Variables such as poor seizure control and use of polytherapy were associated with lower adjustment scores and reduced psychosocial outcome. Finally, patients with epilepsy scored significantly higher on depression and anxiety symptoms. The results provide further evidence on challenges patients with epilepsy face and on the need for implementing psychosocial prevention programs. PMID:22871254

Stavrinides, Panayiotis; Constantinidou, Fofi; Anastassiou, Irena; Malikides, Antri; Papacostas, Savvas

2012-09-01

359

Extending the Classroom "Vineland"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An improved method for the assessment of Social Development of secondary school students is described. For those with Social Development difficulties, the "Vineland Classroom" Edition can be used and interpreted to provide an Adaptive Behaviour Composite score. Prior to the present development, the "Classroom" Edition was only applicable to…

King, Michael G.

2007-01-01

360

Frontloading Classroom Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the authors describe a systematic approach to planning for the first days of school that is appropriate for today's demanding high school science classrooms. These strategies apply to any science subject and benefit student teachers, new teachers, and those teachers wishing to improve their classroom management skills. (Contains 3…

Roscoe, Keith; Orr, Kim

2010-01-01

361

For the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four games for use in the foreign language classroom are described. The first, "A Shopping Game," by Gordon Hartig, is played on a game board in the German classroom and provides practice in producing sentences with the preposition "in," which in some instances takes the dative and in others takes the accusative. A diagram of the game board is…

Hartig, Gordon; And Others

1978-01-01

362

Differentiating Classroom Guidance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To differentiate is to make different, distinct, or specialized (Costello, 1994). Differentiation has become popular in education as an instructional philosophy aimed at equitably meeting the learning needs of all students in the classroom. Differentiated planning and delivery of classroom guidance is also necessary for appropriate school…

Akos, Patrick; Cockman, Caroline R.; Strickland, Cindy A.

2007-01-01

363

Creating the Multiage Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

School restructuring movements have gained a great deal of national attention. This guidebook addresses the multi-age classroom movement, in which a mixed-age group of children stays with a given teacher for a number of years. The work provides a complete design for the mixed-age primary classroom, from philosophy and rationale to sample lesson…

Stone, Sandra J.

364

Epidemiology in the Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This high school classroom exercise from the Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion gives an introduction to epidemiology. Visitors will find background materials (including an introduction to epidemiology and how to investigate and outbreak) and suggestions for classroom use.

2007-02-11

365

Copyrights and the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A copyright infringement suit involving duplication of material for classroom use without permission or acknowledgement and related cases are discussed with reference to the fair use privilege, the Copyright Act of 1976, and congressional guidelines. Generally, fair use has been rejected as a blanket defense in classroom copying. (MJL)

Zirkel, Perry A.; Gluckman, Ivan B.

1983-01-01

366

Is Your Classroom Exciting?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suggests ways for making classrooms fun, including giving children opportunities to work together, moving things around, letting children learn to set their own controls, setting up the classroom so students can experiment and discover together, and providing bonuses or incentives for the child who is falling behind. (CR)

Grambo, Gregory

1997-01-01

367

Preventive Classroom Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This chapter of "Helping Teachers Manage Classrooms" presents strategies and processes that teachers can use to establish well-managed classrooms. These recommendations are based on the results of year-long descriptive studies of the management methods used by third grade teachers and by seventh and eighth grade English and mathematics teachers.…

Evertson, Carolyn M.; Emmer, Edmund T.

368

Sociolinguistics in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There are three areas of interest in the topic of sociolinguistics in the classroom. First, the study of sociolinguistics is the interest of the professional linguist; second, the application of sociolinguistic principles is or should be the concern of all professional people who care about what goes on in the classroom, especially the teacher;…

Dumas, Bethany K.

369

Classroom Assessment in Action  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Classroom Assessment in Action" clarifies the multi-faceted roles of measurement and assessment and their applications in a classroom setting. Comprehensive in scope, Shermis and Di Vesta explain basic measurement concepts and show students how to interpret the results of standardized tests. From these basic concepts, the authors then provide…

Shermis, Mark D.; DiVesta, Francis J.

2011-01-01

370

Defining Authentic Classroom Assessment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A commonly advocated best practice for classroom assessment is to make the assessments authentic. Authentic is often used as meaning the mirroring of real-world tasks or expectations. There is no consensus, however, in the actual definition of the term or the characteristics of an authentic classroom assessment. Sometimes, the realistic component…

Frey, Bruce B.; Schmitt, Vicki L.; Allen, Justin P.

2012-01-01

371

Evangelism in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is frequently said that evangelism or proselytizing has no place in the classroom. The purpose of this essay is to counter this generalization and to explore the nature of legitimate religious influence in the classroom. In doing so I will offer some criteria to help us determine what is and what is not acceptable by way of religious persuasion…

Thiessen, Elmer John

2013-01-01

372

Psychosocial risk factors in home and community settings and their associations with population health and health inequalities: A systematic meta-review  

PubMed Central

Background The effects of psychosocial risk factors on population health and health inequalities has featured prominently in epidemiological research literature as well as public health policy strategies. We have conducted a meta-review (a review of reviews) exploring how psychosocial factors may relate to population health in home and community settings. Methods Systematic review (QUORUM) of literature reviews (published in any language or country) on the health associations of psychosocial risk factors in community settings. The literature search included electronic and manual searches. Two reviewers appraised included reviews using criteria for assessing systematic reviews. Data from the more robust reviews were extracted, tabulated and synthesised. Results Thirty-one reviews met our inclusion criteria. These explored a variety of psychosocial factors including social support and networks, social capital, social cohesion, collective efficacy, participation in local organisations – and less favourable psychosocial risk factors such as demands, exposure to community violence or anti-social behaviour, exposure to discrimination, and stress related to acculturation to western society. Most of the reviews focused on associations between social networks/support and physical or mental health. We identified some evidence of favourable psychosocial environments associated with better health. Reviews also found evidence of unfavourable psychosocial risk factors linked to poorer health, particularly among socially disadvantaged groups. However, the more robust reviews each identified studies with inconclusive findings, as well as studies finding evidence of associations. We also identified some evidence of apparently favourable psychosocial risk factors associated with poorer health. Conclusion From the review literature we have synthesised, where associations have been identified, they generally support the view that favourable psychosocial environments go hand in hand with better health. Poor psychosocial environments may be health damaging and contribute to health inequalities. The evidence that underpins our understanding of these associations is of variable quality and consistency. Future research should seek to improve this evidence base, with more longitudinal analysis (and intervention evaluations) of the effects of apparently under-researched psychosocial factors such as control and participation within communities. Future policy interventions relevant to this field should be developed in partnership with researchers to enable a better understanding of psychosocial mechanisms and the effects of psychosocial interventions.

Egan, Matt; Tannahill, Carol; Petticrew, Mark; Thomas, Sian

2008-01-01

373

Psychosocial benefits and implications of exercise.  

PubMed

This review is based on a case report that concerns a young female athlete who experienced some of the negative aspects of exercise. Overtraining, a negative byproduct of excessive exercise, can turn the positive psychosocial and physiologic benefits of regular physical activity into an activity detrimental to one's health. With the proper psychological skills and appropriate exercise regimen, these negatives can be turned into positives. Once learned, the psychosocial benefits of exercise, as well as the positive implications, will become more prevalent, similar to the way in which proper physical training helps one become more fit over time. PMID:23174543

Gaz, Daniel V; Smith, Aynsley M

2012-11-01

374

Psychosocial assessment after traumatic brain injury.  

PubMed

Psychosocial outcome has been difficult to define, but nevertheless widely reported. More recent studies have demonstrated not only that the long term emotional costs of head injury are enormous for survivor and family members, but the functional consequences in terms of changes in family life, recreational and vocational activities, are great and prolonged. These consequences have more recently become the focus of rehabilitation, with studies demonstrating dramatic improvements in many aspects of productive living, and consequent lifetime cost savings of an enormous amount. The psychosocial deficits matter, they can be the focus of treatment, and the treatment can be successful and cost effective. PMID:1488634

Brooks, N

1992-01-01

375

Adolescent Psychopathology: II. Psychosocial Risk Factors for Depression  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a prospective study of adolescent depression, adolescents (N = 1,508) were assessed at Time 1 and after 1 year (Time 2) on psychosocial variables hypothesized to be associated with depression. Most psychosocial variables were associated with current (n = 45) depression. Formerly depressed adolescents (n = 217) continued to differ from never depressed controls on many of the psychosocial

Peter M. Lewinsohn; Robert E. Roberts; John R. Seeley; Paul Rohde; Ian H. Gotlib; Hyman Hops

1994-01-01

376

Explicit and Implicit Methods in Psychosocial Occupational Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sometimes the goal of a psychosocial occupational therapy intervention is not obvious for someone observing the process, and this may lead to misunderstandings as to the targeted outcomes for various occupational therapy methods. Summarizing features found in psychosocial occupational therapy practice, in textbooks, and in occupational therapy models, this paper proposes a simple structure for characterizing psychosocial occupational therapy interventions

Mona Eklund

2002-01-01

377

Building Psychosocial Programming in Geriatrics Fellowships: A Consortium Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Geriatric psychosocial problems are prevalent and significantly affect the physical health and overall well-being of older adults. Geriatrics fellows require psychosocial education, and yet to date, geriatrics fellowship programs have not developed a comprehensive geriatric psychosocial curriculum. Fellowship programs in the New York tristate area…

Adelman, Ronald D.; Ansell, Pamela; Breckman, Risa; Snow, Caitlin E.; Ehrlich, Amy R.; Greene, Michele G.; Greenberg, Debra F.; Raik, Barrie L.; Raymond, Joshua J.; Clabby, John F.; Fields, Suzanne D.; Breznay, Jennifer B.

2011-01-01

378

Psychosocial correlates of physical activity in adolescents with haemophilia.  

PubMed

Boys with haemophilia are now encouraged to exercise and take part in physical activities, but actual measures of time spent in active participation is lacking. The aim of this study was to obtain an objective measure of daily physical activity in boys with haemophilia as compared with healthy controls. The study also aimed to ascertain the social and cognitive factors associated with exercise in this population. Seventeen patients (aged 11-18 years) with haemophilia were studied and compared with 44 healthy controls (aged 10-16.5 years). Physical activity was measured by accelerometry. Psychosocial correlates were assessed using validated questionnaires. Measured physical activity levels in subjects with haemophilia were slightly higher than for the control group. Both groups spent 70% of the day inactive, with similar proportions of time in moderate and vigorous activity. Subjects with haemophilia had a favourable self-image and similar levels of anxiety as peers without a bleeding disorder. Self-efficacy scores were lower than for controls suggesting increased sensitivity to barriers and lack of acceptance of alternatives. Health beliefs did not influence physical activity, but a negative correlation of time spent in high or vigorous activity with scores for support-seeking was observed. The data demonstrate that in the appropriate social environment and with medical support, patients with haemophilia may be as physically active as their peers without a bleeding disorder. Further investigation into the psychosocial barriers of physical activity in patients with haemophilia is needed to more effectively encourage healthy behaviours. PMID:20331760

Buxbaum, N P; Ponce, M; Saidi, P; Michaels, L A

2010-07-01

379

Psychosocial issues in long-term space flight: overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Anecdotal evidence of the individual and interpersonal problems that occurred during the Shuttle-Mir Space Program (SMSP) and other long-duration Russian/Soviet missions, and studies of personnel in other isolated and confined extreme (ICE) environments suggest that psychosocial elements of behavior and performance are likely to have a significant impact on the outcome of long-duration missions in space. This impact may range from individual decrements in performance, health and well being, to catastrophic mission failure. This paper reviews our current understanding of the psychosocial issues related to long duration space missions according to three different domains of behavior: the individual domain, the interpersonal domain and the organizational domain. Individual issues include: personality characteristics that predict successful performance, stress due to isolation and confinement and its effect on emotions and cognitive performance, adaptive and maladaptive coping styles and strategies, and requirements for the psychological support of astronauts and their families during the mission. Interpersonal issues include: impact of crew diversity and leadership styles on small group dynamics, adaptive and maladaptive features of ground-crew interactions, and processes of crew cohesion, tension and conflict. Organizational issues include: the influence of organizational culture and mission duration on individual and group performance, and managerial requirements for long duration missions. Improved screening and selection of astronaut candidates, leadership, coping and interpersonal skills training of personnel, and organizational change are key elements in the prevention of performance decrements on long-duration missions.

Palinkas, L. A.

2001-01-01

380

Opportunities for Inquiry Science in Montessori Classrooms: Learning from a Culture of Interest, Communication, and Explanation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although classroom inquiry is the primary pedagogy of science education, it has often been difficult to implement within conventional classroom cultures. This study turned to the alternatively structured Montessori learning environment to better understand the ways in which it fosters the essential elements of classroom inquiry, as defined by prominent policy documents. Specifically, we examined the opportunities present in Montessori classrooms for students to develop an interest in the natural world, generate explanations in science, and communicate about science. Using ethnographic research methods in four Montessori classrooms at the primary and elementary levels, this research captured a range of scientific learning opportunities. The study found that the Montessori learning environment provided opportunities for students to develop enduring interests in scientific topics and communicate about science in various ways. The data also indicated that explanation was largely teacher-driven in the Montessori classroom culture. This study offers lessons for both conventional and Montessori classrooms and suggests further research that bridges educational contexts.

Rinke, Carol R.; Gimbel, Steven J.; Haskell, Sophie

2013-08-01

381

The differentiated classroom observation scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents a new classroom observation scale that was developed to examine the differential learning activities and experiences of gifted children educated in regular classroom settings. The Differentiated Classroom Observation Scale (DCOS) is presented in total, with clarification of the coding practices and strategies. Although the DCOS was developed to examine the impact of differentiated classroom practices for gifted

Jerrell C. Cassady; Kristie L. Speirs Neumeister; Cheryll M. Adams; Tracy L. Cross; Felicia A. Dixon; Rebecca L. Pierce

2004-01-01

382

Quality in Inclusive Preschool Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: Quality of care for preschool children in inclusive and noninclusive classrooms was examined in two studies. In Study 1, comparisons across a large sample of classrooms (N = 1, 313) showed that inclusive classrooms were higher than noninclusive classrooms in global quality as well as on two dimensions of quality…

Hestenes, Linda L.; Cassidy, Deborah J.; Shim, Jonghee; Hegde, Archana V.

2008-01-01

383

Psychosocial Correlates of Adolescent Males' Pregnancy Intention  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT. Objective. To identify psychosocial dif- ferences between sexually experienced male adolescents who indicate intentions to get someone pregnant and those who do not. Methodology. Cross-sectional study of 101 sexually experienced adolescent males recruited from a sexually transmitted disease clinic in northern California. We used Student’s t tests and regressions to examine psycho- social differences between males who reported any

Cynthia Rosengard; Maureen G. Phipps; Nancy E. Adler; Jonathan M. Ellen

2010-01-01

384

Psychosocial adjustment of adult children of alcoholics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review examines controlled studies of the psychosocial adjustment of adult children of alcoholics (ACOAs) published since 1988. ACOAs appear at increased risk for a variety of negative outcomes, including substance abuse, antisocial or undercontrolled behaviors, depressive symptoms, anxiety disorders, low self-esteem, difficulties in family relationships, and generalized distress and maladjustment. However, none of these outcomes are uniformly observed in

Stephanie Lewis Harter

2000-01-01

385

Psychosocial effect of common skin diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE To increase awareness of the psychosocial effect of acne, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE A literature review was based on a MEDLINE search (1966 to 2000). Selected articles from the dermatologic and psychiatric literature, as well as other relevant medical journals, were reviewed and used as the basis for discussion of how skin disease affects patients' lives

Benjamin Barankin; Joel DeKoven

2002-01-01

386

Psychosocial practice trends in pediatric oncology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children with cancer are now living longer lives. As a result, the focus on care has shifted to include psychosocial components to help promote healthy adjustment to the diagnosis of cancer. In addition, the focus extends to the systems that encompass the patient and family. This ranges from cultural needs to comfort care and how the medical team and institutions

Melissa Deifer Hicks; Rebecca Lavender

2001-01-01

387

Survey Questions Answered Only by Psychosocial Experts.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Twelve tables provide a breakdown of answers to a survey responded to by 48 experts in the psychosocial treatment of psychiatric and behavioral problems in people with mental retardation. Questions address treatment of self-injurious or aggressive behavior, specific psychiatric disorders, specific target symptoms, use of applied behavior analysis…

American Journal on Mental Retardation, 2000

2000-01-01

388

Psycho-Social Considerations of Environmental Design.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Identifying psychological and sociological design considerations is a difficult matter. So much is hidden behind our normal, but biased, level of perception. The importance of psycho-social considerations can be drawn from an examination of the quantity and types of buildings produced today for human occupancy--office buildings, libraries,…

Izumi, K.

389

Psychosocial adaptation to stoma surgery: A review  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the last decade strong improvements have been made in the medical care of patients with a digestive tract stoma, particularly with regard to nursing skills and to the quality of collecting material for faecal products. Scientific investigation into the psychosocial adjustment of patients after stoma surgery has intensified as well, giving us indications for quality of life. These developments

M. J. T. M. Bekkers; F. C. E. van Knippenberg; H. W. van den Borne; H. Poen; J. Bergsma; G. P. van BergeHenegouwen

1995-01-01

390

Psychosocial Issues in Counseling Mastectomy Patients  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports that breast cancer is an increasingly widespread illness among women. It notes that there are many severe psychosocial adjustments to be made to having the disease and explores ways that counselors and therapists can help women undergoing this ordeal. (NG)

Schain, Wendy S.

1976-01-01

391

Psychosocial Factors in Sunbathing and Sunscreen Use  

Microsoft Academic Search

Excessive exposure to the sun has been related to the development of various types of skin cancer, but use of sunscreen decreases the risk. The present project was designed to empirically examine psychosocial factors in sunbathing and sunscreen use. One hundred twenty sunbathing and nonsunbathing beachgoers were interviewed about their health practices, knowledge about skin cancer, moods, and social rewards

Barbara Keesling; Howard S. Friedman

1987-01-01

392

Anticipatory grief: a psychosocial concept reconsidered.  

PubMed

Formerly anticipatory grief was viewed as a potential coping mechanism for a prospective loss. More recently it has been studied in preventive psychiatry as a determinant of the severity of post-mortem grief. The authors in a critical analysis of methodological and theoretical inconsistencies recommend a reconsideration of the concept within a psychosocial context. PMID:7006728

Fulton, R; Gottesman, D J

1980-07-01

393

Psychosocial Precursors and Correlates of Migraine Headache.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Tested the interactions of migraine headache cycles and sufferers' daily experiences of stressful events, emotional arousal, and physical activity. Results support a model of migraine characterized by parallel physiological and psychosocial instability during a 4-day cycle and by an interaction of personality and behavioral (self-reported stress)…

Levor, Robert M.; And Others

1986-01-01

394

The invention of the psychosocial: An introduction  

PubMed Central

Although the compound adjective ‘psychosocial’ was first used by academic psychologists in the 1890s, it was only in the interwar period that psychiatrists, psychologists and social workers began to develop detailed models of the psychosocial domain. These models marked a significant departure from earlier ideas of the relationship between society and human nature. Whereas Freudians and Darwinians had described an antagonistic relationship between biological instincts and social forces, interwar authors insisted that individual personality was made possible through collective organization. This argument was advanced by dissenting psychoanalysts such as Ian Suttie and Karen Horney; biologists including Julian Huxley and Hans Selye; philosophers (e.g. Olaf Stapledon), anthropologists (e.g. Margaret Mead) and physicians (e.g John Ryle and James Halliday). This introduction and the essays that follow sketch out the emergence of the psycho-social by examining the methods, tools and concepts through which it was articulated. New statistical technologies and physiological theories allowed individual pathology to be read as an index of broader social problems and placed medical expertise at the centre of new political programmes. In these arguments the intangible structure of social relationships was made visible and provided a template for the development of healthy and effective forms of social organization. By examining the range of techniques deployed in the construction of the psychosocial (from surveys of civilian neurosis, techniques of family observation through to animal models of psychotic breakdown) a critical genealogy of the biopolitical basis of modern society is developed.

Hayward, Rhodri

2012-01-01

395

Blood Pressure, Relative Weight, and Psychosocial Resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research was conducted to determine the degree to which the effect of obesity on blood pressure was modified by sociocultural factors A measure of psychosocial resources incorporating both access to social supports and coping styles, was developed in research in St. Lucia, a West Indian culture. The study sample consisted of 98 40-49-year olds randomly selected from a community. Obesity

WILLIAM W. DRESSLER

396

Black-White Differences in Psychosocial Maturity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present investigation reviews the racial comparison literature in order to make specific predictions about racial differences on the psychosocial maturity scale developed by Greenberger, Campbell, Sorensen, and O'Connor (1971). On the basis of this review, it was predicted that blacks would score lower than whites on the scale, and that this…

Starr, B. James; And Others

397

Psychosocial evaluation of adults with epilepsy in Chile.  

PubMed

The Washington Psychosocial Seizure Inventory (WPSI) was used to assess psychosocial functioning of 116 epileptic outpatients being treated in an epilepsy program at a public health service (PHS). Disturbances in several areas of psychosocial adjustment were noted. Although the distribution was similar to those previously reported using the WPSI, the severity of the observed disturbances was greater. Peak-score scales were Financial Status, Emotional and Interpersonal Adjustment, and Overall Psychosocial Functioning. Rehabilitation measures in epilepsy could play a substantial role in prevention and treatment of psychosocial disorders. PMID:1628579

Alvarado, L; Ivanovic-Zuvic, F; Candia, X; Méndez, M; Ibarra, X; Alarcón, J

1992-01-01

398

Teacher Practices and Hybrid Space in a Fifth-Grade Mathematics Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Providing students with a classroom environment that allows for meaningful learning experiences is important for students to develop deep and long lasting understanding about mathematics. This article adds to the literature on learning environments in mathematics by presenting a case study of one fifth-grade mathematics teacher and her classroom

Cribbs, Jennifer D.; Linder, Sandra M.

2013-01-01

399

Classroom Design- Lessons from the Technology Trenches  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site makes a CD available for purchase of the following instructional program: Beyond the instructor's skill, technology has had one of the single largest impacts in how students and faculty interact in the classroom. But the nature and boundaries of the learning space are constantly changing. Institutions are challenged to build classrooms smartly, ensuring technology supports the learning process, and that precious dollars and equipment are not wasted on learning environments that are factored late into the planning process. To design an electronic classroom that will have viability long-term, you have to design from the inside out. Changing your perspective will help you guide your campus toward decisions that not only support the educational mission with technology, but favorably impact many other factors, from cost effectiveness and upkeep, to future proofing ensuring that your campus classrooms will even have the capability to accommodate new technology. Join us for this informative webcast that will bring you insights on technology-enabled classrooms from different types of institutions- from the perspective of the technology specialist. Learn what has worked- and perhaps more importantly, what has not worked- from their perspectives. The insights you gain will ease your technology planning, inform your design process, and could save you thousands of dollars in technology purchases and upkeep.

2010-06-10

400

Neuropsychiatric and Psychosocial Issues of Patients With Hepatitis C Infection: A Selective Literature Review  

PubMed Central

Context We briefly reviewed the evidence on the association of hepatitis C (HCV) infection with several aspects of mental and psychosocial health. Evidence Acquisition Medline was searched with appropriate keywords. The primary sources were the systematic reviews. If systematic reviews were not available for a subject, then the most relevant and methodologically sound original studies were selected. Results HCV infection is associated with poorer health-related quality of life, and physical, mental, and social health. A part of impaired health of these patients is related to cirrhosis, intravenous drug use, co morbid psychiatric disorders, stigmatization, poor social support, alcohol abuse, and interferon treatment. However, HCV itself is also associated with poorer health status particularly in the physical and cognitive domains, which might be related to brain alterations induced by the virus. Interferon treatment is an important cause of depression in HCV patients and sometimes is associated with irritability, manic episode, or acute confusional state. Social health of HCV patients is significantly impaired by stigmatization, poor social support, psychiatric comorbidties, and impaired coping. Psychosocial impairment of HCV patients significantly impairs their treatment adherence. A supportive and nonjudgmental multidisciplinary team is required for optimal management of these patients. Conclusions Patients with HCV infection had complex neuropsychiatric and psychosocial problems. These problems are challenges for management of HCV infection, affect the patient’s care significantly, and might alter the course of the disease. A multidisciplinary approach, a supportive environment, and a nonjudgmental healthcare team are required for optimal medical and psychosocial management of patients with HCV.

Modabbernia, Amirhossein; Poustchi, Hossein; Malekzadeh, Reza

2013-01-01

401

Stargazing in Your Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

When taking students outside to see the stars is not an option, teachers can bring the stars inside the classroom. These instructions for building a portable planetarium also include suggestions for cross-cultural and social studies connections.

Rios, Jos�

2003-05-01

402

Classroom Communication of Science.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This project analyzes the regular patterns of social interaction in science classrooms and the verbal and nonverbal strategies by which the science content of lessons is communicated. Based on observation and recording of 60 lessons by 20 teachers in seco...

J. L. Lemke

1982-01-01

403

View from My Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the philosophy of a high school chemistry teacher, providing examples through classroom experiences, with emphasis on the use of demonstrations as instructional aids. Specific stoichiometry and conductometric titration demonstrations are discussed. (CS)

Harris, Sidney P.

1980-01-01

404

Forensics Science Classroom Activities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

These classroom activities on forensics science from the University of Colorado at Boulder were designed to help students understand the process of scientific investigation and develop better laboratory and data-collection techniques.

Leslie Leinwand (University of Colorado at Boulder;)

2010-05-28

405

Craters in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Details an activity in which students create and study miniature impact craters in the classroom. Engages students in making detailed, meaningful observations, drawing inferences, reaching conclusions based on scientific evidence, and designing experiments to test selected variables. (DDR)

McArdle, Heather K.

1997-01-01

406

For the Classroom: Scrimshaw.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Procedures are described for practicing the art of scrimshaw in the classroom. Several materials are suggested for use. These include beef soup bones, old piano keys, nails, sandpaper, and lampblack or charcoal. (SA)

Current, 1979

1979-01-01

407

Critters in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of invertebrates as classroom "pets" can develop students' skills in scientific inquiry and instill respect for science. Few materials are needed for projects involving invertebrates. Suggested activities using snails, crickets, earthworms, crayfish, and guppies are offered. (DF)

Smith, Robert W.; Fleisher, Paul

1984-01-01

408

Toys in The Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A number of chemical concepts can be easily illustrated in a more friendly way to children by using toys as teaching tools in the classroom. Some of the examples illustrated are shrinking toys, drinking birds and hand boiler.

Sarquis, Jerry L.; Sarquis, Arlyne M.

2005-01-01

409

Culture in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes four approaches to utilizing and addressing cultural differences in the classroom: multicultural education, anti-bias curriculum, global education, and international education. Presents diversity education techniques in terms of direct communication (explicit), indirect communication (implicit), cultural information resources available…

Levy, Alison

1997-01-01

410

Classrooms Matter: The Design of Virtual Classrooms Influences Gender Disparities in Computer Science Classes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three experiments examined whether the design of virtual learning environments influences undergraduates' enrollment intentions and anticipated success in introductory computer science courses. Changing the design of a virtual classroom--from one that conveys current computer science stereotypes to one that does not--significantly increased…

Cheryan, Sapna; Meltzoff, Andrew N.; Kim, Saenam

2011-01-01

411

Psychopathology, Defence Mechanisms, and the Psychosocial Work Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The body of evidence verifies the predictive value of certain work characteristics for mental health problems and that various levels of adaptation mechanisms are employed when dealing with adversity. Data on the relationships between employees’ mental health status, their perceptions of work, and their psychological defences are scarce.Aims: To examine the role that personal defences play in the relationship

Anelia Larsen; Henrik Bøggild; Jens Tølbøll Mortensen; Leslie Foldager; John Hansen; Anders Christensen; Mikkel Arendt; Nicole Rosenberg; Povl Munk-Jørgensen

2010-01-01

412

An Instrument for Investigating Chinese Language Learning Environments in Singapore Secondary Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes how a new classroom environment instrument, the "Chinese Language Classroom Environment Inventory (CLCEI)", was developed to investigate the nature of Chinese language classroom learning environments in Singapore secondary schools. The CLCEI is a bilingual instrument (English and Chinese Language) with 48 items written in both…

Chua, Siew Lian; Wong, Angela F. L.; Chen, Der-Thanq

2009-01-01

413

Data for the Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Data for the Classroom collection gathers datasets that have accompanying instructional materials or other pertinent information for using the dataset in a classroom setting for grades K-16. The data may be numerical, visual, maps, charts, tables or images. The data may be observational, remotely sensed or model data. The primary component is that there are materials supporting the use and understanding of the data either by educators or directly by students. Additionally, the dataset itself is desribed.

414

Solar Powered Classroom  

ScienceCinema

A group of fourth graders in Durham, North Carolina, are showing America the way to a clean energy future. They are installing solar panels on their classroom roof for a project that goes above and beyond a normal day in school. From researching solar panel installation, to generating funds for the project via Kickstarter, these are students who put their plans into action. Their accomplishments go beyond the classroom and stress the importance of getting people of all ages involved in renewable energy.

none

2013-06-27

415

Solar Powered Classroom  

ScienceCinema

A group of fourth graders in Durham, North Carolina, are showing America the way to a clean energy future. They are installing solar panels on their classroom roof for a project that goes above and beyond a normal day in school. From researching solar panel installation, to generating funds for the project via Kickstarter, these are students who put their plans into action. Their accomplishments go beyond the classroom and stress the importance of getting people of all ages involved in renewable energy.

416

Worker Role Interview: Toward Validation of a Psychosocial Work-Related Measure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three studies were conducted to examine the validity of the Worker Role Interview (WRI), a semi-structured interview and rating scale designed to assess psychosocial capacity for return to work in injured workers. The first Rasch analysis study of 119 work-hardening clients with low back pain showed that scale items worked together to measure unidimensional construct, except for two work-environment items

Craig A. Velozo; Gary Kielhofner; Alicia Gern; Fang-Ling Lin; Fatema Azhar; Jin-Shei Lai; Gail Fisher

1999-01-01

417

Psychosocial Safety Climate, Work Conditions, and Emotions in the Workplace: A Malaysian Population-Based Work Stress Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

We integrated psychosocial safety climate (PSC) with the job demands and resources (JD-R; Bakker & Demerouti, 2007) framework to examine the impact of both job demands and job resources at work on employee depression, anger, and engagement. PSC refers to a climate for the protection of employee psychological health and safety. As PSC theoretically influences the working environment, we hypothesized

Mohd Awang Idris; Maureen F. Dollard

2011-01-01

418

Predicting Return to Work After Low Back Injury Using the Psychosocial Risk for Occupational Disability Instrument: A Validation Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: This paper reports on the predictive validity of a Psychosocial Risk for Occupational Disability Scale in the workers’ compensation environment using a paper and pencil version of a previously validated multimethod instrument on a new, subacute sample of workers with low back pain. Methods: A cohort longitudinal study design with a randomly selected cohort off work for 4–6 weeks

I. Z. Schultz; J. Crook; J. Berkowitz; R. Milner; G. R. Meloche

2005-01-01

419

Psychosocial influences on the development and course of coronary heart disease: Current status and implications for research and practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychosocial characteristics predict the development and course of coronary heart disease (CHD). In this review, the authors discussed human and animal research on psychophysiological mechanisms influenc- ing coronary artery disease and its progression to CHD. They then reviewed literature on personality and characteristics of the social environment as risk factors for CHD. Hostility confers increased risk, and a group of

Timothy W. Smith; John M. Ruiz

2002-01-01

420

Build a Positive Classroom Environment: Avoid Competition!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Elementary teachers often instigate competition among their students through such common statements as: "Students who make 100 on the spelling test may have 10 minutes of extra center time" and "The most creatively written story this week will be placed on the bulletin board." While such pronouncements motivate some students into action, they…

Self, Nancy S.

2009-01-01

421

Classroom acoustics IV: Speech perception of normal-hearing and hearing-impaired children in classrooms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present investigation examined the speech-perception abilities of children with norrnrd hearing and children with heting impairment in various classroom environments. Speech perception was assessed at different teacher-student dis(ances via nonsense syllables, monosyllabic words, and sentences. The acoustical environments varied as a function of reverberation time, early reverberation time, early to late energy ratios, loudness (or relative strength), speech transmission

Carl C. Crandell; Gary W. Siebein; Martin A. Gold; Mary Jo Hasell; Philip Abbott; Mitchell Lehde; Hee Won Lee

1998-01-01

422

PSYCHOSOCIAL PROFILE OF JUVENILE DIABETES  

PubMed Central

A study of the complex relationships between the patient characteristics, family and environmental influences, physician's behaviour and the demands of the disease with its management in Juvenile Diabetics was taken up at a general hospital. 90 subjects were selected for the study and grouped into three. Group A consisted of 30 Juvenile Diabetics, Group B of 30 Adult Diabetics and Group C of 30 Normal healthy adolescents. The impact of the illness was measured on the Diabetes Impact Measurement Scale (DIMS), the behavioural deviations and the parental attitudes towards child rearing on the Fallstrom's Questionnaire (FQ) and the family environment on the Family Climate Scale (FCS). Psychiatric morbidity was assessed using DSM-IV criteria. Group A & B were compared on the DIMS and Group A & C on FQ & FCS. Adult diabetics had a greater impact of diabetes. Juvenile diabetics had significantly higher frequency of behavioural deviations as compared to controls. Also there was a higher number of responses on questions indicating an overprotecting attitude amongst parents of juvenile diabetics. There was an increased incidence of psychiatric morbidity in juvenile diabetics as compared to normal adolescents irrespective of the family environment. The results are discussed in relation to current literature.

Dass, Jyoti; Dhavale, H.S.; Rathi, Anup

1999-01-01

423

Psychosocial Correlates of Adolescent Males' Pregnancy Intention  

PubMed Central

Objective To identify psychosocial differences between sexually experienced male adolescents who indicate intentions to get someone pregnant and those who do not. Methodology Cross-sectional study of 101 sexually experienced adolescent males recruited from an STD clinic in northern California. Student’s t-tests and regressions examined psychosocial differences between males who reported any intention versus no intention to get someone pregnant in the next six months. ANOVAs examined differences among different combinations of pregnancy plans/likelihood. Results Adolescents’ reports of their plans for getting someone pregnant differed from their assessments of the likelihood that they would do so (?2 = 24.33, df = 1, p < .0001). Attitudes toward pregnancy and participants’ mothers’ educational attainment differentiated those with clear pregnancy intentions (Planning, and Likely) from those with clear intentions to avoid pregnancy (Not Planning & Not Likely) Conclusions To reduce the rates of adolescent childbearing, males’ pregnancy intentions must be assessed and asked about in multiple ways.

Rosengard, Cynthia; Phipps, Maureen G.; Adler, Nancy E.; Ellen, Jonathan M.

2005-01-01

424

[Health and psychosocial effects of miscarriage].  

PubMed

The importance of psychosocial consequences of spontaneous abortion is increasingly pointed out. Different studies showed grief responses in about 50-80% of the women and consequences on occupation, martial relation and family life. The most observed long-term consequences are chronical depressive disorders. Unresolved grief in connection with pregnancy loss is to be considered an important risk factor. Immunological studies demonstrated a reduction of T-lymphocyte function in grief and depression as a probable cause of a higher disease risk. Further study is required for more precise definitions of long-term effects. Moreover psychosocial help and counseling for the couples after the pregnancy loss could help to prevent serious chronical disorders. PMID:1869233

Läpple, M

1991-05-01

425

Eating disorders, trauma, PTSD, and psychosocial resources.  

PubMed

The frequency of traumatic events and comorbid post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in women with eating disorders (ED) was assessed. Also, patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) were compared; post-traumatic symptomatology and the role of psychosocial resources were analyzed. One hundred three ED patients (29.1±10.5 years) were studied through the use of standardized questionnaires. We found that 23.1% of AN and 25.5% of BN patients fulfilled the study definition for a current diagnosis of PTSD. Cumulative traumatization led to more severe symptomatology. Psychosocial resources were found to have strong associations with symptomatology. These findings provide additional support for the association between traumatization and ED. Clinical interventions for traumatized ED patients may benefit from a focus on post-traumatic stress symptomatology and personal resources. PMID:24365526

Tagay, Sefik; Schlottbohm, Ellen; Reyes-Rodriguez, Mae Lynn; Repic, Nevena; Senf, Wolfgang

2014-01-01

426

Psychosocial Outcomes in Children with Hemifacial Microsomia  

PubMed Central

Objective?To determine whether children with hemifacial microsomia (HFM) have higher risk for psychosocial problems than children without HFM.?Methods?One hundred and thirty-six children with HFM (64% male, mean age?=?6.9 years) were compared to 568 matched controls (50% male, mean age?=?7.0 years) on parent and teacher measures of behavior problems and social competence, and teacher rankings of peer acceptance.?Results?Parents of cases and controls reported similar levels of behavior problems and social competence. Teachers reported higher frequencies of internalizing problems, lower social competence and less peer acceptance for cases. Relative to controls, teacher-rated outcomes were worse for female cases, those with younger mothers at the time of birth, those with eye anomalies, and those with one or more malformations in addition to the core features of HFM.?Conclusions?This study provides the first evidence of relatively poor psychosocial outcomes among children with HFM.

Speltz, Matthew L.; Kelly, Judith P.; Leroux, Brian; Collett, Brent R.; Werler, Martha M.

2011-01-01

427

Earthquake Education Environment (E3)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Earthquake Education Environment (E3) supports high-quality K-12 and undergraduate education by providing up-to-date earthquake information, authoritative technical sources, and educational resources for the classroom.

2007-07-16

428

[Psychosocial intervention for persons infected with HIV].  

PubMed

We describe a psychosocial intervention program designed to enhance coping with the stress associated with HIV infection. The NUCARE intervention program is based on six components of coping including: cognitive reframing, problem-solving, relaxation, goal setting, social support and use of resources and services. The rationale and development of the intervention is discussed and practical case examples illustrating the benefits of each component are presented. PMID:1515518

Hamel, M A; Edgar, L; Darsigny, R; Lamping, D L

1992-01-01

429

Psychosocial Complications of Coronary Artery Disease  

PubMed Central

Background: Cardiovascular diseases are the leading causes of death around the world. The coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the most common diseases in this category, which can be the trigger to various psychosocial complications. We believe that inadequate attention has been paid to this issue. Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to explore the psychosocial complications of CAD from the Iranian patients’ perspective. Patients and Methods: A qualitative design based on the content analysis approach was used to collect the data and analyze the perspective of 18 Iranian patients suffered from CAD, chosen by a purposeful sampling strategy. Semi-structured interviews were held in order to collect the data. Sampling was continued until the data saturation. The data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis approach by MAXQUDA 2010 software. Results: This study revealed the theme of the patients’ challenges with CAD. This theme consisted of: "primary challenges," including doubting early diagnosis and treatment, and feeling being different from others; "psychological issues," including preoccupation, fear of death and surgical intervention, recurrence stress , anxiety and depression; "problems of life," including financial problems, work-related problems, and family-related problems; and "sociocultural issues," including change in perspective of people towards the patient, and cultural issues. Conclusions: Although the management of physical problems in patients with CAD is important, psychosocial effects of this disease is more important. Thus, health care personnel should pay ample attention to identify and resolve psychosocial problems of these patients. Results of this study can be used to empower these patients.

Karimi-Moonaghi, Hossein; Mojalli, Mohammad; Khosravan, Shahla

2014-01-01

430

Psychosocial risk factors for coronary heart disease.  

PubMed

In 2003, the National Heart Foundation of Australia published a position statement on psychosocial risk factors and coronary heart disease (CHD). This consensus statement provides an updated review of the literature on psychosocial stressors, including chronic stressors (in particular, work stress), acute individual stressors and acute population stressors, to guide health professionals based on current evidence. It complements a separate updated statement on depression and CHD. Perceived chronic job strain and shift work are associated with a small absolute increased risk of developing CHD, but there is limited evidence regarding their effect on the prognosis of CHD. Evidence regarding a relationship between CHD and job (in)security, job satisfaction, working hours, effort-reward imbalance and job loss is inconclusive. Expert consensus is that workplace programs aimed at weight loss, exercise and other standard cardiovascular risk factors may have positive outcomes for these risk factors, but no evidence is available regarding the effect of such programs on the development of CHD. Social isolation after myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with an adverse prognosis. Expert consensus is that although measures to reduce social isolation are likely to produce positive psychosocial effects, it is unclear whether this would also improve CHD outcomes. Acute emotional stress may trigger MI or takotsubo ("stress") cardiomyopathy, but the absolute increase in transient risk from an individual stressor is low. Psychosocial stressors have an impact on CHD, but clinical significance and prevention require further study. Awareness of the potential for increased cardiovascular risk among populations exposed to natural disasters and other conditions of extreme stress may be useful for emergency services response planning. Wider public access to defibrillators should be available where large populations gather, such as sporting venues and airports, and as part of the response to natural and other disasters. PMID:23909539

Glozier, Nick; Tofler, Geoffrey H; Colquhoun, David M; Bunker, Stephen J; Clarke, David M; Hare, David L; Hickie, Ian B; Tatoulis, James; Thompson, David R; Wilson, Alison; Branagan, Maree G

2013-08-01

431

Making Early Childhood Classrooms Conducive to Literacy Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using the findings of two studies of the home environments of children who are successful at reading at young ages, this paper suggests ways in which early childhood classrooms can create environments that promote literacy growth and provide children with an appropriate background and interest for later successful experiences in learning to read…

Rasinski, Timothy V.

432

Research and Development of Web-Based Virtual Online Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To build a web-based virtual learning environment depends on information technologies, concerns technology supporting learning methods and theories. A web-based virtual online classroom is designed and developed based on learning theories and streaming media technologies. And it is composed of two parts: instructional communicating environment

Yang, Zongkai; Liu, Qingtang

2007-01-01

433

Supporting the Outdoor Classroom: An Archaeo-Astronomy Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Field trips and the outdoor classroom are a vital part of many areas of education. Ideally, the content should be taught within a realistic environment rather than just by providing a single field trip at the end of a course. The archaeo-astronomy project located at Nottingham Trent University envisages the development of a virtual environment

Brown, Daniel; Francis, Robert; Alder, Andy

2013-01-01

434

The conference\\/classroom of the future: an interdisciplinary approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

A vital step towards the vision of an 'international office' is to create actual environments in which different design options and solution strategies can be evaluated in practice. This paper describes the Conference\\/Classroom of the Future (CCF) project which aims at setting up a learning and working environment that uses advanced information technology to support cooperative activities. The CCF project

J. Borchers; C. Falkowski; K. Manske

435

Virtual Classroom Participants' Views for Effective Synchronous Education Process  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Virtual classroom (VC) is the preferred application in distance education since it provides simultaneous interaction and a communication environment between the student and the instructor. The aim of this study is to determine the key components which make VC sessions effective in terms of environment and method. Determination of these components…

Karaman, Selcuk; Aydemir, Melike; Kucuk, Sevda; Yildirim, Gurkan

2013-01-01

436

Evidence Based Psychosocial Interventions in Substance Use  

PubMed Central

In recent years, there has been significant progress and expansion in the development of evidence-based psychosocial treatments for substance abuse and dependence. A literature review was undertaken using the several electronic databases (PubMed, Cochrane Database of systemic reviews and specific journals, which pertain to psychosocial issues in addictive disorders and guidelines on this topic). Overall psychosocial interventions have been found to be effective. Some interventions, such as cognitive behavior therapy, motivational interviewing and relapse prevention, appear to be effective across many drugs of abuse. Psychological treatment is more effective when prescribed with substitute prescribing than when medication or psychological treatment is used alone, particularly for opiate users. The evidence base for psychological treatment needs to be expanded and should also include research on optimal combinations of psychological therapies and any particular matching effects, if any. Psychological interventions are an essential part of the treatment regimen and efforts should be made to integrate evidence-based interventions in all substance use disorder treatment programs.

Jhanjee, Sonali

2014-01-01

437

Psychosocial effect of common skin diseases.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To increase awareness of the psychosocial effect of acne, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A literature review was based on a MEDLINE search (1966 to 2000). Selected articles from the dermatologic and psychiatric literature, as well as other relevant medical journals, were reviewed and used as the basis for discussion of how skin disease affects patients' lives and of appropriate management. Studies in the medical literature provide mainly level III evidence predominantly based on descriptive studies and expert opinion. MAIN MESSAGE: Dermatologic problems can result in psychosocial effects that seriously affect patients' lives. More than a cosmetic nuisance, skin disease can produce anxiety, depression, and other psychological problems that affect patients' lives in ways comparable to arthritis or other disabling illnesses. An appreciation for the effects of sex, age, and location of lesions is important, as well as the bidirectional relationship between skin disease and psychological distress. This review focuses on the effects of three common skin diseases seen by family physicians: acne, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis. CONCLUSION: How skin disease affects psychosocial well-being is underappreciated. Increased understanding of the psychiatric comorbidity associated with skin disease and a biopsychosocial approach to management will ultimately improve patients' lives.

Barankin, Benjamin; DeKoven, Joel

2002-01-01

438

Effect of perceived social support on psychosocial adjustment of Turkish patients with breast cancer.  

PubMed

Aims: To identify the psychosocial adjustment of Turkish patients with breast cancer and the effects of perceived social support on their adjustment. Materials and Methods: The sample comprised 100 volunteering patients diagnosed with breast cancer in the last six months reporting to the Outpatient Chemotherapy Unit at the Medical Faculty Hospital in northern Turkey. The data for the study were collected through the Descriptive Information Form, the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale-Self-reflection (PAIS-SR) and the Cancer-Specific Social Support Scale and analyzed via SPSS 16.0 for Windows. Descriptive statistics, Chi square test, ANOVA and correlation were used to evaluate data. Results: There was a negative significant correlation between mean scores in the sub-scales of the social support scale and the ones in the sub-scales of the psychosocial adjustment to illness scale (p<0.05). Similarly, there was a negative significant correlation between confidence support and health care orientation as well as adjustment to social environment. Likewise, emotional support was in a negative significant correlation with health care orientation, adjustment to domestic environment, extended family relationships and adjustment to social environment. Conclusions: It was concluded that social support for patients with breast cancer had an influence on their psychosocial adjustment to illness. Holistic care should be given to breast cancer patients by oncology nurses especially in the first six months of treatment. It could be concluded that patients should be accompanied by their family/relatives in treatment and care following their diagnosis with breast cancer, that their family should be made more aware of the fact that the patient should be physically and psychologically supported, that patients with breast cancer should be provided with domiciliary care, and that they should be encouraged to participate in social support groups. PMID:24870734

Rizalar, Selda; Ozbas, Ayfer; Akyolcu, Neriman; Gungor, Bulent

2014-01-01

439

[Psychopathology and psychosocial functioning of adults with epilepsy. Preliminary evaluation].  

PubMed

To examine the relationship between psychosocial functioning and psychopathology in epilepsy, a total 37-outpatient sample was assessed by means of both the Washington Psychosocial Seizure Inventory (WPSI) and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). Patients came from an epilepsy program of the Hospital psiquiátrico, Chile. Disorders in several areas pertaining to psychosocial functioning and psychopathology were observed: Their distribution was quite similar to disorders previously reported when using both instruments. The WPSI scales showed a positive correlation with the MMPI's--a relevant correlation as far as the Overall Psychosocial Functioning, and Emotional adjustment sub-scales are concerned. The relationship between psychopathology and psychosocial functioning in epilepsy is discussed as well as the usefulness of the WPSI as a screening-test for the psychosocial assessment of epileptic subjects. PMID:1305358

Alvarado, L; Ivanovic-Zuvic, F; Candia, X; Ibarra, X; Méndez, M D; Campos, A; Alarcón, J

1992-03-01

440

[Child and adolescent obesity, psychosocial consequences and treatment strategies].  

PubMed

Being overweight and obese in childhood and adolescence is associated with various somatic and psychosocial sequelae. Psychosocial problems can negatively influence the future weight trajectory. Therefore, weight reduction or stabilization should be complemented by the treatment of significant psychosocial problems. This review provides an overview of the psychosocial problems associated with being overweight and obese in childhood and adolescence. Evidence on weight-related stigmatization and discrimination, eating disorder symptoms, general psychopathology, impaired quality of life, lowered self-esteem, social skill deficits, as well as academic problems is summarized. Furthermore, state-of-the-art diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for the psychosocial problems are summarized. Future research should focus on the development of interventions targeting the destigmatization of obesity, as experiences of stigmatization and discrimination likely aggravate the psychosocial sequelae of overweight and obesity. PMID:23529599

Hartmann, A S; Hilbert, A

2013-04-01

441

Interprofessional Psychosocial Oncology Education: Nurse Outcomes of the IPODE Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims  Standards of Care in Psychosocial Oncology (CAPO, 2010) identify that patients and families should expect to receive evidence-based\\u000a psychosocial oncology health services in addition to their medical care. In Canada however, and in many other countries, the\\u000a reality often falls short of these standards. While nurses often recognize the psychosocial needs of their patients, they\\u000a identify that they do not

D. L. McLeod; J. Curran; M. White

2011-01-01

442

The Dirt on Outdoor Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains the planning procedure for outdoor classrooms and introduces an integrated unit on monarch butterflies called the Monarch Watch program. Makes recommendations to solve financial problems of outdoor classrooms. (YDS)

Rich, Steve

2000-01-01

443

Sherlock Holmes in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a three-day classroom activity combining criminal investigations and scientific skills, especially observation skills. Provides detailed classroom procedures with an illustration of eight basic fingerprint patterns and a classification chart. (YP)

Faia, Jean E.

1988-01-01

444

Psychosocial Assessment of Living Organ Donors: Clinical and Ethical Considerations  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article outlines psychosocial and ethical issues to be considered when evaluating potential living organ donors. Six types of living donors are described: genetically related, emotionally related, \\

Mary Ellen Olbrisch; Sharon M. Benedict

2001-01-01

445

Psychosocial sequelae of epilepsy: the role of associated cerebral pathology.  

PubMed

The psychosocial problems of a group of subjects with idiopathic epilepsy and another with posttraumatic epilepsy were assessed using the Washington Psychosocial Seizure Inventory (WPSI). A comparison between the two aetiological groups suggests that the associated cerebral pathology is the salient epilepsy-related factor in the emergence of psychosocial disability in a proportion of people with epilepsy. It is suggested that cerebral pathology may account for variations in previous psychosocial comparisons and future research should minimise possible confounding by attempting to control this factor. PMID:3816706

Beran, R G; Flanagan, P J

1987-01-01

446

Managing Inquiry-Based Classrooms  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Though it may seem that classroom management comes naturally to some teachers, upon closer examination youâll probably discover that preparation and adaptation are more important than any innate ability when it comes to successful classroom management. Any experienced middle school science teacher can tell you that successful classroom management is an ongoing, evolving processâteachers need to modify their daily practices based on the observed behaviors and feedback of their students. This article describes some strategies to manage inquiry-based science classrooms effectively.

Wolfgang, Christie N.

2009-07-01

447

Comets in the Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We proposed a partnership with the Rochester (New York) City School District to enhance their space science curriculum through teacher training seminars designed to increase teachers' knowledge of astronomy. On 1 April 1998, we facilitated the third grade science in-service program. We presented background science information on the Moon and demonstrated hands-on activities that teachers could transfer to their classrooms. During the 1998-99 school year, we visited several middle schools within the school district to facilitate the ``Comet in the Classroom'' program with sixth grade teachers. ``Comets in the Classroom'' presents background knowledge about comets and explains several hands-on activities regarding comets and their travels through the inner solar system. This work is funded through NASA's Initiative to Develop Education through Astronomy and Space Sciences (IDEAS) program.

Goetz, J. A.; Pipher, J. L.; Kort, E.

1999-05-01

448

Global measure of satisfaction with psychosocial work conditions versus measures of specific aspects of psychosocial work conditions in explaining sickness absence  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Attempts to identify particular aspects of psychosocial work conditions as predictors of sickness absence remain inconclusive. A global measure has previously been suggested to be an efficient way to measure psychosocial work conditions in questionnaires. This paper investigates whether satisfaction with specific aspects of psychosocial work conditions explains sickness absence beyond its association with a global measure of psychosocial

Torsten Munch-Hansen; Joanna Wieclaw; Esben Agerbo; Niels Westergaard-Nielsen; Jens Peter Bonde

2008-01-01

449

Managing Inquiry-Based Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Though it may seem that classroom management comes naturally to some teachers, upon closer examination you'll probably discover that preparation and adaptation are more important than any innate ability when it comes to successful classroom management. Any experienced middle school science teacher can tell you that successful classroom management…

Wolfgang, Christie Nicole

2009-01-01

450

Classroom Management: Beliefs of Preservice Teachers and Classroom Teachers Concerning Classroom Management Styles.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Noting that preservice teachers and experienced teachers share a concern for classroom management, this study compared the beliefs of classroom teachers, intern teachers, and senior level practicum students regarding classroom management styles. Participating in the study were 43 early childhood and 44 elementary education preservice teachers, and…

Laut, John

451

Networking the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This issue of "CQ Researcher" examines the theme of computer networking in the classroom and discusses uses past and present. It begins with an essay by Christopher Conte that discusses: "Does computer networking really enhance learning? Are teachers adequately prepared to take advantage of computer networking? Will computer networking promote…

Stencel, Sandra, Ed.; And Others

1995-01-01

452

The CAS Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority (VCAA) Computer Algebra System (CAS)Pilot study (2001-2005) is monitoring the use of CAS in senior secondary mathematics. This article explores the author's experiences in the CAS classroom and delineates changes in teaching style, as a result of the introduction of CAS into the senior mathematics…

Garner, Sue

2004-01-01

453

Elementary Classroom Web Sites  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to understand how elementary classroom Web sites support children's literacy. From a sociocultural perspective of literacy and a transformative stance toward the integration of literacy and technology, and building on explorations of new literacies, I discuss opportunities provided by the Internet that can support…

Baker, Elizabeth A.

2007-01-01

454

The Outdoor Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An Outdoor Classroom to prepare pre-service and in-service teachers to utilize vital natural resources as an outdoor laboratory was established in 1974 by Elizabeth City State University. Because of its proximity to the Great Dismal Swamp and the Atlantic, the university's geographical location made it especially suitable for such a course of…

Thomas, Dorothy E.

455

Your Outdoor Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Physical education is still taught in outdoor settings in many warmer climates of the United States. Even when indoor facilities are available, physical education may be moved outside because of other curricular needs or facility issues. How can physical educators make the outdoor setting seem more like an indoor classroom? Outdoor teaching…

Hinman, Laurie

2005-01-01

456

Poetry in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The articles in this journal issue focus on the use of poetry for study in classrooms at all levels. Titles and authors of the articles include (1) "Summoning the Poem: Several Roads to Xanadu" by Ben F. Nelms; (2) "ABC's of Reading and Writing Poetry in Junior High" by Barbara Arnold; (3) "Invitations" by Elizabeth D. Nelms; (4) "Teaching Poetry…

Wyman, Linda, Ed.

1984-01-01

457

Marine Mammal Classroom Activities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Teachers' guides developed by Sea World featuring marine mammal educational materials for K-12. 14 different topics covered including sharks, wetlands, whales, birds, and much more. Several feature activities for all grade levels. Each guide includes goals and objectives, information, vocabulary, a bibliography, and classroom activities. Activities strive to integrate science, mathematics, geography, art, and language. Orca guide is in Spanish.

458

Photography in Pink Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The teaching of photography provides many opportunities to attack the assumption of universal heterosexuality, which is central to our society, in order to provide space for other sexualities such as gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender. This article is based on many years of lecturing in art schools and focuses on the classroom teaching of…

Ashburn, Liz

2007-01-01

459

Classroom multiplayer presential games  

Microsoft Academic Search

Given the promising results of massively multiplayer online games (MMOGs) for educational purposes, this paper maps the essential concepts behind MMOGs, into the classroom context. Since the number of students in this context is not massive and play takes place within a single room rather than on the Internet, we have changed the terms ldquomassivelyrdquo and ldquoonlinerdquo to ldquoclassroomrdquo and

Miguel Nussbaum; Heinz Susaeta; Felipe Jimenez; Ignacio Gajardo; Juan José Andreu; M. Villalta; J. Nordlinger

2009-01-01

460

Robots in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educational robots are defined, their essential characteristics and features are outlined, and their educational applications and what makes them run are discussed. Classroom experiences with five educational robots--Topo, Rhino XR-2, RB5X, Hero I and Tasman Turtle--are described. (MBR)

Marsh, George; Spain, Tom

1984-01-01

461

In the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Offers five reading activities for classroom use, including "Poetry in Motion" (Janet Millar Grant); "Book-a-Mania" (Maria Ramirez Zirkelback); "Signs of Life" (Karl A. Matz); "Football and Reading Do Mix!" (Cindy Visser); and "Poetry-of-the-Month Club" (Steven Schneider). (MG)

French, Michael P.; Danielson, Kathy Everts

1991-01-01

462

Global Classroom Resource Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This sourcebook for teachers contains resources and learning activities to help middle and high school age students learn about Boston as an international and multicultural city. The materials can easily be adapted by teachers for use with elementary students. Staff of the Global Classroom Project developed the sourcebooks. For the past two years…

Ruelius, Andrea

463

Ag in the Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Ag in the Classroom is a resource for teachers who teach about agriculture. Information is provided about grants for teaching agriculture, links for resources, conferences, and a teacher page. The teachers page contains downloadable issues of Acres of Agventures, Ag Mags for kids, many agriculture lessons, kits for teachers available to loan, and a 4 Kids Only page.

2007-03-22

464

Cockroaches in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Madagascar hissing cockroach (MHC) provides an excellent avenue to introduce students to the joys of inquiry-centered learning. MHC's are relatively tame, produce little odor, do not bite, and are easy to handle and breed. Because of these characteristics, they are ideal for classroom activities, science projects, and as pets. They also help…

Wagler, Ron; Moseley, Christine

2005-01-01

465

Classroom of the Sea  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Although most students do not have the opportunity to conduct in situ research projects until college, the Classroom of the Sea program at the American School for the Deaf (ASD) provides an unusual opportunity for students to work directly with scientists

Monte, Denise; Hupper, Mary L.; Scheifele, Peter

2000-03-01

466

The Classroom Traffic Jam  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The importance of energy conservation is developed in this simulation. Children draw an automobile and then are asked to drive it through the classroom roadways. When a traffic jam results, students offer ways to eliminate it. The importance of mass transportation and car pools is stressed by the teacher. (MA)

Edwards, Arthur W.

1977-01-01

467

Injuries in Preschool Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The primary purpose of this paper is to examine the kinds of injuries that preschool teachers working in Indiana, USA, believed to be the most common in their preschool (3-6 year olds) classrooms, the causes of such injuries, and the most important precautions they take to prevent them. Also examined are the measures the teachers take…

Obeng, Cecilia

2009-01-01

468

Windows into Art Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An editorial by Kit Grauer introduces this collection of articles which establish that there is no such thing as a simple definition of art education even within one culture, and that people's views can be reflected by art educators across the world. The first article, "A Window on Three Singapore Art Classrooms" (Jane Chia; John Matthews; Paul…

Grauer, Kit, Ed.

1995-01-01

469

Composition: Classroom Strategies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The articles in this journal issue present a variety of teaching methods to enhance writing instruction. The titles of the articles and their authors are as follows: (1) "Writing for Real World Audiences in the Classroom?" (James P. Beck); (2) "Copycatting: Learning to Write by Imitating" (Mary Ann Stemper); (3) "The Journal" (Ellen Byers); (4)…

Karolides, Nicholas J., Ed.

1982-01-01

470

[Science Modules: Classroom Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This module, one in a series of science modules (Appendix A) designed for use in a science methods course research project at Central Michigan University, emphasizes classroom management skills. All of the modules are part of a project aimed at developing, evaluating, and revising competency-based materials for use in science methods education for…

Oana, Robert G.; Eiszler, Charles F.

471

Creating a Classroom Community.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual for elementary school teachers discusses the stages of social reasoning and suggests methods for establishing a classroom and school-wide community to aid students in social reasoning and self-governance. The document contains five sections. Section one focuses on the stages of social reasoning according to William Damon: premoral…

Nicholes, Daniel R.; Kubelick, Cheryl L.

472

Caring as Classroom Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When planning for the new school year, K-2 teachers might consider the benefits of creating a caring classroom. Caring has the potential to not only encourage thoughtful social studies practice, but to also enhance it. The best K-2 teachers also recognize the importance of caring in the development of responsible citizens. Such teachers plan and…

Johnson, Chrystal S.; Thomas, Adrian T.

2009-01-01

473

The Cultivated Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers who follow this monthly schedule for starting and cultivating plants in their classrooms can look forward to blooms and greenery throughout the year. Advice on choosing plants, making cuttings, forcing bulbs, rooting sweet potatoes and pineapples, and holding a Mother's Day plant sale is included. (PP)

Schilder, Rosalind

1983-01-01

474

Inquiry in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

(Purpose) As schools scramble to restructure in the hope of thwarting failure, administrators often appropriate money for outside experts who counsel on professional development as well as outside magic-pill programs for student achievement. High-stakes testing remains the arbiter. Perhaps the use of the best practice of inquiry, or classroom

Stohl, Christina

2010-01-01

475

Animals in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Use of animals in middle school science classrooms is a curriculum component worthy of consideration, providing proper investigation and planning are addressed. A responsible approach to this action, including safety, must be adopted for success. In this month's column, the author provides some suggestions on incorporating animals into the…

Roy, Ken

2011-01-01

476

The Electronic Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Vanderbilt University (Tennessee) is experimenting with a special multimedia classroom designed around cutting-edge electronic equipment that allows faculty to use computer and audiovisual technology together. Initially used most in sciences and mathematics, faculty from other disciplines are joining in. The facility encourages development of new…

Watkins, Beverly T.

1991-01-01

477

Fluency in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book offers two distinct approaches to oral reading instruction that can easily be incorporated into primary-grade literacy curricula. It enables teachers to go beyond the conventional "round-robin" approach by providing strong instructional support and using challenging texts. Grounded in research and classroom experience, the book explains…

Kuhn, Melanie R., Ed.; Schwanenflugel, Paula J., Ed.

2007-01-01

478

Assessment and Classroom Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article is a review of the literature on classroom formative assessment. Several studies show firm evidence that innovations designed to strengthen the frequent feedback that students receive about their learning yield substantial learning gains. The perceptions of students and their role in self?assessment are considered alongside analysis of the strategies used by teachers and the formative strategies incorporated in

Paul Black; Dylan Wiliam

1998-01-01

479

Principals as Classroom Leaders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author suggests five ways in which busy principals can indirectly demonstrate their classroom leadership by encouraging teacher specialization, giving teachers opportunities to present case studies of at-risk students, building a diverse intellectual climate, instituting an idea exchange, and scheduling time for teachers to openly discuss a…

Bunting, Carolyn

2007-01-01

480

Idea Bank: Classroom Newsletter  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Have you ever struggled with trying to motivate your students to learn science? If your answer is a resounding "yes!"-- the implementation of a class newsletter may be the solution. A class newsletter project can improve student self-confidence and motivate students to learn science. This article describes how to incorporate this effective strategy into your science classroom.

O'Connor, Mackenzie

2005-02-01

481

Classroom Management That Works  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to find the best classroom management strategies to use when teaching in an elementary school setting. I wanted to conduct the best possible management tools for a variety of age groups as well as meet educational standards. Through my research I found different approaches in different grade levels is an important…

Cleve, Lauren

2012-01-01

482

Singing Smoothes Classroom Transitions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Just as humming a merry tune helped Snow White and her furry animal friends to quickly clean a filthy cottage in the movie "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" (Disney & Cottrell, 1937), singing can be an effective way to help keep young children fully engaged during classroom transitions. The purposes of this article are to: (1) consider why…

Mathews, Sarah E.

2012-01-01

483

Transforming Classroom Grading.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book presents viable alternatives to classroom grading, explaining how to design grading systems that are both precise and efficient. It provides educators with a thorough grounding in grading research and theory. After clarifying the basic purposes of grades, the book discusses what should be included in them, how to use a rubric-based…

Marzano, Robert J.

484

Flipping the Classroom Revisited  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I received many emails following the first column on flipping the classroom. Many of my local colleagues also approached me at our physics alliance, Physics Northwest. Teachers are very interested in this new pedagogy. As I result, I wanted to share some more videos to inspire you.

Riendeau, Diane

2013-02-01

485

Psychosocial outcome after coronary artery surgery.  

PubMed

To describe psychosocial adaptation after coronary artery surgery and to identify preoperative factors associated with good outcome, the authors interviewed 30 patients before and 1--2 years after surgery. Despite good physiologic outcome (as measured by treadmill and cardiac function) this sample was found to be functioning poorly. Eighty-three percent were unemployed, and 57% were sexually impaired. A preoperative duration of symptoms of eight months or more was associated with significantly worse postoperative overall adaptation. Most patients who had suffered angina eight months or longer evidenced a damaged self-concept, which was reinforced rather than repaired by the experience of surgery. PMID:6969034

Gundle, M J; Reeves, B R; Tate, S; Raft, D; McLaurin, L P

1980-12-01

486

Ethical and Psychosocial Impact of Female Infertility  

PubMed Central

This manuscript reviews research from the past year on the ethical and psychosocial impact of infertility on women and men. We discuss several issues surrounding ovarian stimulation, particularly high-order multiple births, egg banking (especially for research purposes), and diminished ovarian reserve. We also present recent work on distress and counseling, which includes greater attention to subgroups of infertile women. More research on issues confronting men has emerged recently, and we outline these with regard to their relationships with infertile women, or as the infertility patient. Last, we outline some ethical issues posed by newer procedures of fertility preservation and uterine transplant.

Leyser-Whalen, Ophra; Temple, Jeff R.

2012-01-01

487

[Psychosocial stress factors and suicidal acts].  

PubMed

Suicidal behaviour is actually understood as being multidetermined and the result of an interaction between state and trait related effects. Several types of risk factors have been extensively studied: psychiatric and personality disorders, genetic variables, biological factors and psychosocial stressors, the latter being the purpose of this review. Social and familial factors, negative life events and medical illness may interact with the factors mentioned above in three main ways to produce suicidal acts: as predisposing factors increasing vulnerability, as precipitating or as contributing factors. A summary of social and clinical studies will be presented and implications for medical care and prevention will be discussed. PMID:8281899

Abbar, M; Caer, Y; Schenk, L; Castelnau, D

1993-03-01

488

Overview of the psychosocial impact of disasters.  

PubMed

The psychosocial sequelae can be intense and of long duration in the aftermath of natural and technological disasters, as well as terrorist attacks. Post-traumatic stress symptoms and full syndrome disorder, depression, anxiety, somatic complaints, and excessive alcohol use have been demonstrated consistently, particularly following large-scale disasters. This paper examines the psychological research conducted at various intervals after extensive natural disasters, the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl technological accidents, and recent terrorist events in the United States. Factors predictive of the emergence of emotional distress and psychological and physical problems following a disaster also are discussed. PMID:15453154

Leon, Gloria R

2004-01-01

489

A Comparison of Two Types of Early Intervention Environments Serving Toddler-Age Children with Disabilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A comparison was made of the quality of 24 inclusive childcare classroom environments serving toddler-age children with and without disabilities and 25 segregated early intervention classroom environments serving children with disabilities only. The Infant Toddler Environmental Rating Scale documented that the inclusive classrooms scored higher on…

Bruder, Mary Beth; Brand, Marie

1995-01-01

490

Does Context Matter? Explicit Print Instruction during Reading Varies in Its Influence by Child and Classroom Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined preschool teachers' (n = 59) explicit print instruction during shared reading and considered whether the benefits of this practice to children's learning (n = 379) varied as a function of the classroom environment and children's developmental characteristics. Measures of explicit print instruction and the classroom environment

McGinty, Anita S.; Justice, Laura M.; Piasta, Shayne B.; Kaderavek, Joan; Fan, Xitao

2012-01-01

491

Power in the Classroom IV: Teacher Communication Techniques as Alternatives to Discipline.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As the fourth in a series of investigations of teacher power in the classroom, a study focused primarily on extending and refining the classification of behavior alteration techniques (BATs) and behavior alteration messages (BAMs) that teachers report as representative of the classroom environment. The study took place in three phases. First,…

Kearney, Patricia; And Others

492

Making It Happen: Interaction in the Second Language Classroom, From Theory to Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A discussion linking theory and practice in second language instruction focuses on ways of providing opportunities for meaningful interaction in language classrooms. The first part lays a theoretical foundation, looking at: the variety and evolution of instructional approaches from grammar-based to communicative; the classroom as environment for…

Richard-Amato, Patricia A.

493

Middle School Students' Understanding of Meaningful Learning and Engaging Classroom Activities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study centers on middle school (grades 4–8) children's perceptions of the conditions that foster their meaningful engagement in classroom learning. The students described classroom environments in which students are active, both mentally and physically, in instructional activities that are meaningful, varied, interesting, and that involve group learning. Interesting and varied tasks were contrasted favorably with routines that discourage their

Nancy Ares; Jeffrey Gorrell

2002-01-01

494

School Counselors Connecting the Dots between Disruptive Classroom Behavior and Youth Self-Concept  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students exhibiting emotional and behavioral problems in the classroom can significantly impact the learning environment and often are referred to school counselors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between high school students' self-concept and disruptive classroom behaviors (DCB). High school students (N = 92)…

Bidell, Markus P.; Deacon, Robert E.

2010-01-01

495

An Effective Approach to Developing Function-Based Interventions in Early Childhood Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Due to the unique features of early childhood classrooms, teachers routinely modify the social and physical environment to support children with mild to moderate challenges. Yet despite their access to behavioral consultants, school-based prekindergarten programs are more likely to expel young children from their classroom settings compared with…

Wood, Brenna K.; Ferro, Jolenea B.

2014-01-01

496

An Environmental Impact Statement: Designing Supportive Literacy Classrooms for Young Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cites a relationship between the quality of classroom environments and literacy-related behaviors and learning. Presents four effective design concepts for literacy classrooms which affect learning: presence/absence of literacy tools; space arrangement and placement of literacy tools within that space; social interaction using literacy tools; and…

Reutzel, D. Ray; Wolfersberger, Mary

1996-01-01

497

Instructional Accommodations for Students with Asperger Syndrome in the General High School Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

General education teachers in the secondary sector are held responsible for adapting their lessons and classroom environment for students with Asperger Syndrome. With the growing number of students with Autism Spectrum Disorder being placed in general education classrooms, teachers are faced with yet another challenge in making their curriculum…

Baylis, Myrna

2011-01-01

498

Predicting Acceptance of Diversity in Pre-Kindergarten Classrooms. Research Brief  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Given the increasing ethnic and language diversity within the United States, this study examined practices that acknowledge and promote diversity in pre-Kindergarten classrooms. Findings indicate that acceptance of diversity is a component of positive environments for young children, particularly in classrooms with high poverty levels where there…

Sanders, Kay; Downer, Jason T.

2013-01-01

499

A Teacher's Manual for Outdoor Classrooms -- How to Plan, Develop, and Use Them.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using experience gained while helping elementary, junior high, and high school teachers plan, develop, and use thousands of outdoor classrooms, the Alabama Soil Conservation Service (SCS) produced this teacher's manual for outdoor classrooms. Emphasis is on conservation education and the environment and man's relationship to it. Rationale for…

Chapman, E. Wayne, Comp.; Waters, Robert E., Comp.

500

Design and Implementation of Ad Hoc Classroom and eSchoolbag Systems for Ubiquitous Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the design and implementation of a learning technology project. The purpose of this project is to develop advanced wireless technologies for building an Ad Hoc classroom in order to contrive a modern and new learning environment. A wireless platform is developed for teacher and students to establish a classroom dynamically irrespective of location and time bounds. As

Chih-yung Chang; Jang-ping Sheu

2002-01-01