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Sample records for clathrate compound induced

  1. Clathrate compounds and method of manufacturing

    DOEpatents

    Nolas, George S.; Witanachchi, Sarath; Mukherjee, Pritish

    2009-05-19

    The present invention comprises new materials, material structures, and processes of fabrication of such that may be used in technologies involving the conversion of light to electricity and/or heat to electricity, and in optoelectronics technologies. The present invention provide for the fabrication of a clathrate compound comprising a type II clathrate lattice with atoms of silicon and germanium as a main framework forming lattice spacings within the framework, wherein the clathrate lattice follows the general formula Si.sub.136-yGe.sub.y, where y indicates the number of Ge atoms present in the main framework and 136-y indicates the number of Si atoms present in the main framework, and wherein y>0.

  2. A study on cooling characteristics of clathrate compound as low temperature latent heat storage material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Oh; Kim, Jin Heung; Chung, Nak Kyu

    2007-07-01

    Materials that can store low temperature latent heat are organic/inorganic chemicals, eutectic salt system and clathrate compound. Clathrate compound is the material that host compound in hydrogen bond forms cage and guest compound is included into it and combined. Crystallization of hydrate is generated at higher temperature than that of ice from pure water. And physical properties according to temperature are stable and congruent melting phenomenon is occurred without phase separation and it has relatively high latent heat. But clathrate compound still has supercooling problem occurred in the course of phase change and supercooling should be minimized because it affects efficiency of equipment very much. Therefore, various studies on additives to restrain this or heat storage methods are needed. Supercooling is the phenomenon that low temperature thermal storage material is not crystallized and existed as liquid for some time under phase change temperature. Because phase change into solid is delayed and it is existed as liquid due to this, heat transfer from low temperature thermal storage material is lowered. Therefore it is not crystallized at original phase change temperature and crystallized after cooled as much as supercooling degree and operation time of refrigerator is increased. In this study was investigated the cooling characteristics of the clathrate compound as a low temperature latent heat storage material. And additive was added to clathrate compound and its supercooling restrain effect was studied experimentally.

  3. Simultaneous Pressure-Induced Magnetic and Valence Transitions in Type-I Clathrate Eu8Ga16Ge30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onimaru, Takahiro; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Mizumaki, Masaichiro; Kawamura, Naomi; Ishimatsu, Naoki; Avila, Marcos A.; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Yamane, Haruki; Suekuni, Koichiro; Umeo, Kazunori; Kume, Tetsuji; Nakano, Satoshi; Takabatake, Toshiro

    2014-01-01

    We have performed X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements at pressures up to 17 GPa for the clathrate Eu8Ga16Ge30 (Curie temperature TC = 36 K). The temperature dependence of the XMCD spectra agrees well with that of the DC magnetization at ambient pressure. The TC is gradually enhanced with increasing pressures up to 13.3 GPa, and the divalent state of the Eu ions with J = 7/2 remains stable, but at 17 GPa the XMCD intensity is strongly suppressed and a spectral weight corresponding to the trivalent state of Eu ions (with no magnetic moment) appears in the XAS spectrum. The concurrent change from the type-I clathrate structure to an amorphous phase has been observed by X-ray diffraction experiment. We conclude that the amorphization of this compound induces the mixed valence state, which collapses the ferromagnetism.

  4. Molten gallium flux synthesis of known thermoelectric and novel magnetic inorganic clathrate compounds: Improving thermoelectric performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, John Daniel

    Molten gallium metal has been used as a solvent to grow large single crystals of known inorganic thermoelectric clathrates Sr8Ga 16Ge30, Ba8Ga16Ge30, and Ba8Ga16Si30. X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, electron microprobe, Glow Discharge Mass Spectrometry, temperature dependent electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements characterized the single crystals. The Thermoelectric performance was shown to be heavily dependent on the synthetic conditions including container choice, thermal history and impurity concentration. Inorganic Clathrates have attracted intense interest in last several years as potential new materials for thermoelectric devices. If a small to moderate increase in thermoelectric performance over the currently used materials is realized, substantial environmental and technological gains could be achieved. Since thermoelectric refrigeration modules require no moving parts or heat exchange gas (freon) they offer significant advantages over conventional refrigeration technology that tends to fail due to the finite lifetime of the pumping equipment. High temperature devices are also extremely useful for power generation in harsh unforgiving environments where excess heat is available. The thermoelectric performance, primarily at room temperature, of these compounds was found to be heavily dependent on the synthetic procedures used to obtain them. A flux growth procedure was developed to overcome the problems of the traditional melt-quench-anneal solid-state chemical approach. This procedure yielded large single crystals of the Sr8Ga16Ge 30, Ba8Ga16Ge30 and Ba8Ga 16Si30 compounds which ready facilitated their chemical and electronic study. Finally, an outlook on the application of these compounds as thermoelectric devices is given. Application of the flux method to other systems was also successful in the discovery of two new inorganic clathrate compounds: type IV Eu4Ga 8Ge16 and type V Yb8Ga16Ge14. The Eu4Ga8Ge16 compound was found to

  5. [Pharmacological studies on the clathrate compound of mobenzoxamine with beta-cyclodextrin. (I). Effects on the digestive system].

    PubMed

    Yokochi, E; Kohno, S; Ohata, K

    1988-11-01

    Effects of the clathrate compound of mobenzoxamine (MBX) with beta-cyclodextrin (MBX-CD), a new gastro-intestinal function modulator, on the digestive system were studied in comparison with those of metoclopramide, domperidone and trimebutine. MBX-CD showed inhibitory effects that were approximately 1/4 times as potent as metoclopramide on both apomorphine- and copper sulfate-induced emesis and about 1/40 times as potent as domperidone on apomorphine-induced emesis in dogs. In rats, MBX-CD enhanced gastric emptying as potently as metoclopramide, and only MBX-CD showed a clear amelioration of the delayed gastric emptying induced by BaCl2. Similarly, only MBX-CD showed an ameliorative effect on small intestinal transport accelerated by BaCl2 in mice. Though both MBX and trimebutine inhibited spontaneous contractions of the isolated guinea pig stomach and rabbit intestine, it seemed that the properties of these effects were different from those of papaverine. On isolated guinea pig ileum, MBX inhibited contractions induced by various agonists equally to or more potently than trimebutine or papaverine. The results suggest that MBX-CD or MBX acts extensively on the gastro-intestinal system for the reason that it has not only the respective properties of the gastro-intestinal function modulators used as the standards, but also its own characteristic effects. PMID:3243512

  6. Structural analysis of Sr8Ga16Ge30 clathrate compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schujman, S. B.; Nolas, G. S.; Young, R. A.; Lind, C.; Wilkinson, A. P.; Slack, G. A.; Patschke, R.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Ulutagay, M.; Hwu, S.-J.

    2000-02-01

    Crystal structural characterization of the Sr8Ga16Ge30 compound was carried out with the Rietveld refinement method using x-ray powder diffraction data. The structure corresponds to that of the type-I clathrate hydrate, with the Sr atoms filling the "cages" formed by the Ga and Ge atoms. Anisotropic displacement parameters were refined. The limiting figure for rms values of the Sr(1) atoms enclosed in the dodecahedral cages is a sphere, while that for the Sr(2) atoms in the tetrakaidecahedral cages move is an oblate ellipsoid. A comparison of the sizes of the cages in this structure with the ones in other M8GaxGe46-x (M=K, Ba, or void) structures shows that once the structure is filled (i) there is very little variation in size of the tetrakaidecahedral cages and (ii) the dodecahedral cages expand only slightly (measurably) as a function of the filler size. This is an important result from the thermoelectric point of view because it means that once the structure is full, the cages will not "close over" the guests, limiting their movement and, thus, raising the thermal conductivity. The melting point of Sr8Ga16Ge30 is approximately 765 °C and the apparent optical gap is 0.05 eV.

  7. Liquidus projection of the Ag-Ba-Ge system and melting points of clathrate type-I compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Zeiringer, I.; Grytsiv, A.; Broz, P.

    2012-12-15

    The liquidus and solidus projection has been constructed for the Ag-Ba-Ge system up to 33.3 at% Ba, using electron micro probe analysis (EPMA), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and differential thermal analysis (DSC/DTA). Eight different primary crystallization regions were found: (Ge), Ba{sub 8}Ag{sub x}Ge{sub 46-x-y}{open_square}{sub y} ({kappa}{sub I}) ({open_square} is a vacancy), Ba{sub 6}Ag{sub x}Ge{sub 25-x} ({kappa}{sub Ix}), BaGe{sub 2}, Ba(Ag{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}){sub 2} ({tau}{sub 1}), BaAg{sub 2-x}Ge{sub 2+x} ({tau}{sub 2}) BaAg{sub 5} and (Ag). The ternary invariant reactions have been determined for the region investigated and are the basis for a Schulz-Scheil diagram. The second part of this work provides a comprehensive compilation of melting points of ternary A{sub 8}T{sub x}M{sub 46-x} and quaternary (A=Sr, Ba, Eu; T=Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, Au, Zn, Cd, B, Al, Ga; M=Si, Ge, Sn) clathrate type-I compounds and decomposition temperatures of inverse clathrate type-I Ge{sub 38}{l_brace}P,As,Sb{r_brace}{sub 8}{l_brace}Cl,Br,I{r_brace}{sub 8}, Si{sub 46-x}P{sub x}Te{sub y} and tin based compounds. - Graphical Abstract: Partial liquidus projection of the Ag-Ba-Ge system. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The liquidus and solidus projection has been constructed for the Ag-Ba-Ge system up to 33.33 at% Ba. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Eight different primary crystallization fields have been found. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All the ternary compounds form congruently from the melt. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ternary invariant reactions have been determined and are the basis for a Schulz-Scheil diagram.

  8. Methane clathrates in the solar system.

    PubMed

    Mousis, Olivier; Chassefière, Eric; Holm, Nils G; Bouquet, Alexis; Waite, Jack Hunter; Geppert, Wolf Dietrich; Picaud, Sylvain; Aikawa, Yuri; Ali-Dib, Mohamad; Charlou, Jean-Luc; Rousselot, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    We review the reservoirs of methane clathrates that may exist in the different bodies of the Solar System. Methane was formed in the interstellar medium prior to having been embedded in the protosolar nebula gas phase. This molecule was subsequently trapped in clathrates that formed from crystalline water ice during the cooling of the disk and incorporated in this form into the building blocks of comets, icy bodies, and giant planets. Methane clathrates may play an important role in the evolution of planetary atmospheres. On Earth, the production of methane in clathrates is essentially biological, and these compounds are mostly found in permafrost regions or in the sediments of continental shelves. On Mars, methane would more likely derive from hydrothermal reactions with olivine-rich material. If they do exist, martian methane clathrates would be stable only at depth in the cryosphere and sporadically release some methane into the atmosphere via mechanisms that remain to be determined. In the case of Titan, most of its methane probably originates from the protosolar nebula, where it would have been trapped in the clathrates agglomerated by the satellite's building blocks. Methane clathrates are still believed to play an important role in the present state of Titan. Their presence is invoked in the satellite's subsurface as a means of replenishing its atmosphere with methane via outgassing episodes. The internal oceans of Enceladus and Europa also provide appropriate thermodynamic conditions that allow formation of methane clathrates. In turn, these clathrates might influence the composition of these liquid reservoirs. Finally, comets and Kuiper Belt Objects might have formed from the agglomeration of clathrates and pure ices in the nebula. The methane observed in comets would then result from the destabilization of clathrate layers in the nuclei concurrent with their approach to perihelion. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations show that methane-rich clathrate

  9. Structural, elastic, and electronic properties of sodium atoms encapsulated type-I silicon-clathrate compound under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Qing-Yun; Zeng, Zhao-Yi; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2015-10-01

    We calculated the structural, elastic, and electronic properties of alkali metal Na atoms doped type-I silicon-clathrate compound (Na8Si46) under pressure using first-principles methods. The obtained dependencies of bond lengths and bond angles on pressure show heterogeneous behaviors which may bring out a structural transition. By using the elastic stability criteria from the calculated elastic constants, we confirm that the Na8Si46 is elastically unstable under high pressure. Some of the mechanical and thermal quantities include bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young’s modulus, Debye temperature, sound velocity, melting point, and hardness, which are also derived from the elastic constants. The calculated total and partial electron densities of states of Na8Si46 indicate a weak interaction between the encapsulated Na atoms and the silicon framework. Moreover, the effect of pressure on its electronic structure is also investigated, which suggests that pressure is not a good choice to enhance the thermoelectricity performance of Na8Si46. Project supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11347134 and 11304254) and the Doctor Foundation of Southwest University of Science and Technology, China (Grant No. 13zx7125).

  10. Fully quantal calculation of H2 translation-rotation states in the (p-H2)2@51264 clathrate hydrate inclusion compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felker, Peter M.

    2014-11-01

    The quantal translation-rotation (TR) states of the (p-H2)2@51264 clathrate hydrate inclusion compound have been computed. The ten-dimensional problem (in the rigid-cage and rigid-H2 approximation) is solved by first approximating the H2 moieties as spherically symmetric and solving for their 6D translational eigenstates. These are then combined with H2 free rotational states in a product basis that is used to diagonalize the full TR hamiltonian. The computed low-energy eigenstates have translational components that are essentially identical to the 6D translational eigenstates and rotational components that are 99.9% composed of rotationally unexcited H2 moieties. In other words, TR coupling is minimal for the low-energy states of the species. The low-energy level structure is found to be substantially more congested than that of the more tightly packed (p-H2)4@51264 clathrate species. The level structure is also shown to be understandable in terms of a model of (H2)2 as a semirigid diatomic species consisting of two spherically symmetric H2 pseudo-atoms.

  11. Clathrate hydrates studied by diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Timothy; Hemley, Russell; Mao, Wendy; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Militzer, Burkhard; Struzhkin, Viktor

    2007-03-01

    Clathrate hydrate structures are a potentially viable method for hydrogen storage (Mao and Mao 2004). For simple hydrogen-water clathrates, low temperatures (<150 K) or high pressures (>2 kbar) are needed for stability. We investigated, using inelastic neutron spectroscopy, the hydrogen storage character of a clathrate of hydrogen with the addition of tetrahydrofuran as a promoter molecule. The addition of tetrahydrofuran allows the formation of the clathrate structure at elevated temperature and decreased pressure as compared to the hydrogen clathrate (Lee, et al. 2005). In addition we have examined the higher pressure clathrate forms at lower temperatures. High pressure diamond anvil work has allowed Raman and x-ray spectroscopy on novel clathrate environments. Analysis these model compounds will assist in future investigations to additional clathrate compounds. Lee, Huen, et al. ``Tuning Clathrate Hydrates for Hydrogen Storage.'' Nature 434 (April 2005): 743-746. Mao, Wendy, and Ho-kwang Mao. ``Hydrogen Storage in Molecular Compounds.'' Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 101, no. 3 (2004): 708-710.

  12. Magnetic ordering of hyperfine-coupled nuclear and 4f-electron moments in the clathrate compound Pr3Pd20Ge6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwakami, O.; Namisashi, Y.; Abe, S.; Matsumoto, K.; Ano, G.; Akatsu, M.; Mitsumoto, K.; Nemoto, Y.; Takeda, N.; Goto, T.; Kitazawa, H.

    2014-09-01

    Complex ac susceptibility, χ =χ'-iχ'', measurements of the clathrate compound Pr3Pd20Ge6 were performed in static fields up to 10 mT for H ∥[001] and at temperatures down to 500 μK. Praseodymium (Pr) nuclear magnetic moments at the 8c site, where quadrupole moments of 4f electrons order at TQ1=250 mK, were found to order antiferromagnetically at 9 mK, as shown by a peak in χ' and a substantial increase in thermal relaxation time. The large enhancement factor (1+K8c) obtained by calculation of the hyperfine-enhanced nuclear susceptibility of Pr at the 8c site accounts for the high transition temperature of Pr nuclear magnetic moments and the large χ' below 30 mK. From analysis of the crystalline electric field and the mean-field approximation, we conclude that a χ peak at 77 mK can be ascribed to an antiferromagnetic ordering of magnetic moments of 4f electrons at the 4a site. We found that nuclear and f-electron moments order separately on two sublattices in this compound. The temperature and magnetic field dependence of χ' and χ'' between 30 and 60 mK are discussed in terms of dissipation phenomena.

  13. Nanostructured clathrate phonon glasses: beyond the rattling concept.

    PubMed

    He, Yuping; Galli, Giulia

    2014-05-14

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigated the thermoelectric properties of a newly synthesized Si-based ternary clathrate K8Al8Si38, composed of ∼1 nm hollow cages with a metal atom inside. This compound contains solely Earth abundant elements. We found that, similar to other nanostructured type I clathrates, this system is a semiconductor and has a low thermal conductivity (∼1 W/mK). It was long believed that the mere presence of rattling centers was responsible for the low lattice thermal conductivity of type I clathrates. We found instead that the cage structural disorder induced by atomic substitution plays a crucial role in determining the conductivity of these materials, in addition to the dynamics of the guest atoms. Our calculations showed that the latter is substantially affected by the charge transfer between the metal and the cages. Our results provide design rules for the search of new types of promising nanocage structured thermoelectric materials. PMID:24762084

  14. Preparation and thermoelectric properties of sintered iodine-containing clathrate compounds Ge38Sb8I8 and Sn38Sb8I8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Kengo; Arimura, Shuntaro; Koyanagi, Tsuyoshi

    2006-05-01

    The iodine-containing cationic type-I clathrates Ge38Sb8I8 and Sn38Sb8I8 were prepared and their thermodynamic properties as well as their thermoelectric properties were investigated. Their atomic displacement parameters were as large as those of anionic clathrates such as Ba8Ga16Ge30 and Cs8Cd4Sn42. The room temperature thermal conductivities of Ge38Sb8I8 and Sn38Sb8I8 were 7 and 12mWcm-1K-1, respectively; these values were as low as that of the above anionic clathrates. Both cationic clathrates had negative Seebeck coefficients; the band gap energies of Ge38Sb8I8 and Sn38Sb8I8 were 1.16 and 0.80eV, respectively.

  15. High-pressure synthesis and properties of the Eu-substituted Ba8-xEuxSi46 clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lihua; Song, Bensheng; Sun, Bing; Ma, Hongan; Ma, Xingqiao; Li, Yang

    2016-03-01

    There has been considerable interest in rare-earth doped silicon clathrate compounds in order to understand the relation between the 4f electron moment and superconductivity. The Eu-doped silicon clathrates Ba8-xEuxSi46 (x=0, 0.5 and 1) were synthesized by using high-temperature and high-pressure. Structure characterization and magnetic measurement show Eu atoms enter clathrate lattice to occupy Ba positions. X-ray powder diffraction data indicate that the cubic lattice parameter a decreases with Eu doping. The magnetic measurements for all samples were studied. The incorporation of magnetic Eu2+ into the lattice suppresses the superconductivity completely and induces the Curie-paramagnetic behavior at high temperature. The influences of Eu2+ magnetic moment on the properties of samples were discussed.

  16. Engineering robust polar chiral clathrate crystals.

    PubMed

    Frampton, Christopher S; Ketuly, Kamal A; Hadi, A Hamid A; Gall, James H; Macnicol, David D

    2013-08-21

    The R-(+)-enantiomeric form of Dianin's compound and the S-(+)-enantiomeric form of its direct thiachroman analogue both obtained chromatographically employing a cellulose tris(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) column, are shown to undergo supramolecular assembly to form a polar clathrate lattice which is stable even in the absence of a consolidating guest component. PMID:23799369

  17. Vibrational Dynamics and Guest-Host Coupling in Clathrate Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koza, Michael M.; Schober, Helmut

    Clathrate hydrates may turn out either a blessing or a curse for mankind. On one hand, they constitute a huge reservoir of fossil fuel. On the other hand, their decomposition may liberate large amounts of green house gas and have disastrous consequences on sea floor stability. It is thus of paramount importance to understand the formation and stability of these guest-host compounds. Neutron diffraction has successfully occupied a prominent place on the stage of these scientific investigations. Complete understanding, however, is not achieved without an explanation for the thermal properties of clathrates. In particular, the thermal conductivity has a large influence on clathrate formation and conservation. Neutron spectroscopy allows probing the microscopic dynamics of clathrate hydrates. We will show how comparative studies of vibrations in clathrate hydrates give insight into the coupling of the guest to the host lattice. This coupling together with the anharmonicity of the vibrational modes is shown to lay the foundations for the peculiar thermodynamic properties of clathrate hydrates. The results obtained reach far beyond the specific clathrate system. Similar mechanisms are expected to be at work in any guest-host complex.

  18. Spectroscopic identification and conversion rate of gaseous guest-loaded hydroquinone clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Won; Choi, Ki Jong; Lee, Yongjae; Yoon, Ji-Ho

    2012-03-01

    The formation of hydroquinone clathrates with CO2, CH4, N2, and H2 was investigated using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy. Of the hydroquinones prepared at 5.0 MPa, the CH4- and CO2-loaded hydroquinones show complete conversion to β-form hydroquinone clathrates while the N2-loaded hydroquinone shows only partial conversion; there is no indication of the formation of hydroquinone clathrate with H2. The CO2-loaded hydroquinone is fully converted to the β-form hydroquinone clathrate even at 1.0 MPa. Solid-state 13C NMR measurements of the hydroquinone clathrate samples prepared at different pressures reveal that the conversion rate for the formation of clathrate compounds from CH4 and N2 decreases with decreasing pressure.

  19. Fully quantal calculation of H{sub 2} translation-rotation states in the (p-H{sub 2}){sub 2}@5{sup 12}6{sup 4} clathrate hydrate inclusion compound

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, Peter M.

    2014-11-14

    The quantal translation-rotation (TR) states of the (p-H{sub 2}){sub 2}@5{sup 12}6{sup 4} clathrate hydrate inclusion compound have been computed. The ten-dimensional problem (in the rigid-cage and rigid-H{sub 2} approximation) is solved by first approximating the H{sub 2} moieties as spherically symmetric and solving for their 6D translational eigenstates. These are then combined with H{sub 2} free rotational states in a product basis that is used to diagonalize the full TR hamiltonian. The computed low-energy eigenstates have translational components that are essentially identical to the 6D translational eigenstates and rotational components that are 99.9% composed of rotationally unexcited H{sub 2} moieties. In other words, TR coupling is minimal for the low-energy states of the species. The low-energy level structure is found to be substantially more congested than that of the more tightly packed (p-H{sub 2}){sub 4}@5{sup 12}6{sup 4} clathrate species. The level structure is also shown to be understandable in terms of a model of (H{sub 2}){sub 2} as a semirigid diatomic species consisting of two spherically symmetric H{sub 2} pseudo-atoms.

  20. Phonon-glass dynamics in thermoelectric clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaping; Xi, Qing; Zhou, Jun; Nakayama, Tsuneyoshi; Li, Baowen

    2016-06-01

    Type-I clathrate compounds exhibit glasslike thermal/dynamic properties due to symmetry breaking of guest-atom positions in tetrakaidecahedron cages. All of these features are associated with the phonon dynamics in the THz region, for which we perform large-scale numerical simulations by highlighting the difference between type-I clathrates Ba8Ga16Ge30 (BGG) with on-center guest atoms and Ba8Ga16Sn30 (BGS) with off-center guest atoms. The results of the phonon densities of states D (ω ) , the dynamic structure factors S (Q ,E ) , the specific heats C (T ) , and the participation ratios of eigenmodes clearly realize a drastic change from the conventional phonon dynamics of BGG to the phonon-glass dynamics of BGS.

  1. Experimental study on the effect of ammonia on the phase behavior of tetrahydrofuran clathrates.

    PubMed

    Vu, Tuan Hoang; Gloesener, Elodie; Choukroun, Mathieu; Ibourichene, Anaïs; Hodyss, Robert

    2014-11-26

    Clathrate hydrates, ice-like crystalline compounds in which small guest molecules are enclosed inside cages formed by tetrahedrally hydrogen-bonded water molecules, are naturally abundant on Earth and are generally expected to exist on icy celestial bodies. A prototypical example is Saturn's moon Titan, where dissociation of methane clathrates, a major crustal component, could contribute significantly to the replenishment of atmospheric methane. Ammonia is an important clathrate inhibiting agent that may be present (potentially at high concentrations) in Titan's interior. In this study, low-temperature Raman experiments are conducted to examine the dissociation point of tetrahydrofuran clathrates, an ambient-pressure analogue of methane clathrates, over a wide range of ammonia concentrations from 0 to 25 wt %. A phase diagram for the H2O-THF-NH3 system is generated, showing two main results: (i) ammonia lowers the dissociation point of clathrate hydrates to a similar extent compared to the melting of water ice and (ii) THF clathrate exhibits a "liquidus-like" behavior in the presence of ammonia, with a eutectic temperature of about 203.6 K. As temperatures higher than this estimated eutectic are anticipated within Titan's icy crust, these results imply that partial dissociation of clathrates can occur readily and may contribute to outgassing from the interior. PMID:24940841

  2. CO clathrate hydrate: Near to mid-IR spectroscopic signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartois, E.

    2011-04-01

    Carbon monoxide is the second most abundant molecule after H 2 in the molecular universe, and as such an abundant constituent of interstellar and Solar System ices. To trace the possibility of this molecule to be found in a clathrate hydrate inclusion compound, its pure phase FTIR spectrum is investigated. We confirm the formation of a type I clathrate structure whereas simple guest size estimates would favour a type II clathrate hydrate, revealing interactions of this molecule with its water network during clathrate formation. The observed cage vibrational downshift with respect to pure CO ice is within 5 cm -1. The temperature dependent wavenumber separation between the two enclathrated CO vibrational transitions in the two distinct type I clathrate cages is less than a wavenumber below 140 K, implying that the spectral simplification for detailed spectroscopic analysis of the individual profiles is a difficult task. The dynamics of the CO molecules in its cage change considerably from 5 K to 140 K. At temperatures above 30 K, the molecule is extremely mobile in the cages, as revealed by the infrared profile, significantly different from CO entrapped in water ice and different from observed profiles in astrophysical objects.

  3. Complex admixtures of clathrate hydrates in a water desalination method

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Blake A.; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Anderson, David W.

    2009-07-14

    Disclosed is a method that achieves water desalination by utilizing and optimizing clathrate hydrate phenomena. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline compounds of gas and water that desalinate water by excluding salt molecules during crystallization. Contacting a hydrate forming gaseous species with water will spontaneously form hydrates at specific temperatures and pressures through the extraction of water molecules from the bulk phase followed by crystallite nucleation. Subsequent dissociation of pure hydrates yields fresh water and, if operated correctly, allows the hydrate-forming gas to be efficiently recycled into the process stream.

  4. Clathrate hydrates in cometary nuclei and porosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoluchowski, R.

    1988-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of formation and decomposition of CO2-clathrate hydrate in cometary nuclei are discussed. As far as it is known, this is the only clathrate hydrate which is unstable at low temperatures. Calculation shows that, in accord with other evidence, neither volume nor grain boundary diffusion in the clathrate lattice can be responsible for the rate of these reactions and that a surface mechanism with the attendant sensitivity to pressure must play a crucial role. Density changes accompanying CO2-clathrate decomposition and formation can lead to microporosity and enhanced brittleness or even to fracture of cometary nuclei at low temperatures. Other clathrate hydrates and mixed clathrates are also discussed.

  5. Clathrate hydrates of oxidants in the ice shell of Europa.

    PubMed

    Hand, Kevin P; Chyba, Christopher F; Carlson, Robert W; Cooper, John F

    2006-06-01

    Europa's icy surface is radiolytically modified by high-energy electrons and ions, and photolytically modified by solar ultraviolet photons. Observations from the Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer, ground-based telescopes, the International Ultraviolet Explorer, and the Hubble Space Telescope, along with laboratory experiment results, indicate that the production of oxidants, such as H2O2, O2, CO2, and SO2, is a consequence of the surface radiolytic chemistry. Once created, some of the products may be entrained deeper into the ice shell through impact gardening or other resurfacing processes. The temperature and pressure environments of regions within the europan hydrosphere are expected to permit the formation of mixed clathrate compounds. The formation of carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide clathrates has been examined in some detail. Here we add to this analysis by considering oxidants produced radiolytically on the surface of Europa. Our results indicate that the bulk ice shell could have a approximately 1.7-7.6% by number contamination of oxidants resulting from radiolysis at the surface. Oxidant-hosting clathrates would consequently make up approximately 12-53% of the ice shell by number relative to ice, if oxidants were entrained throughout. We examine, in brief, the consequences of such contamination on bulk ice shell thickness and find that clathrate formation could lead to substantially thinner ice shells on Europa than otherwise expected. Finally, we propose that double occupancy of clathrate cages by O2 molecules could serve as an explanation for the observation of condensed-phase O2 on Europa. Clathrate-sealed, gas-filled bubbles in the near surface ice could also provide an effective trapping mechanism, though they cannot explain the 5771 A (O2)2 absorption. PMID:16805702

  6. Formation Conditions of Clathrates Between HFC Alternative Refrigerants and Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiya, T.; Shimazaki, T.; Oowa, M.; Matsuo, M.; Yoshida, Y.

    1999-11-01

    There are two promising candidates as alternative refrigerants for air-conditioners and heat pumps. The first is R407C, which is composed of HFC-32 (23 mass%), HFC-125 (25 mass%), and HFC-134a (52 mass%). The second is R410A, which is composed of HFC-32 (50 mass%) and HFC-125 (50 mass%). In this study, formation conditions of clathrate compounds between water and HFC alternative refrigerants such as HFC-32, HFC-125, HFC-134a, and their mixtures, R407C and R410A, were investigated. Phase diagrams of clathrates of these HFC alternative refrigerants and their mixtures were determined. From the phase diagrams, the critical decomposition temperature and the critical decomposition pressure were determined. The relationship between the critical decomposition points for the clathrates of HFC-32, HFC-125, HFC-134a, R410A, and R407C were studied. It is found that R407C and R410A form clathrate compounds with water under the evaporating temperature condition in the refrigeration cycle of air-conditioners and heat pumps.

  7. Thermodynamic stability of hydrogen clathrates.

    PubMed

    Patchkovskii, Serguei; Tse, John S

    2003-12-01

    The stability of the recently characterized type II hydrogen clathrate [Mao, W. L., Mao, H.-K., Goncharov, A. F., Struzhkin, V. V., Guo, Q., et al. (2002) Science 297, 2247-2249] with respect to hydrogen occupancy is examined with a statistical mechanical model in conjunction with first-principles quantum chemistry calculations. It is found that the stability of the clathrate is mainly caused by dispersive interactions between H2 molecules and the water forming the cage walls. Theoretical analysis shows that both individual hydrogen molecules and nH2 guest clusters undergo essentially free rotations inside the clathrate cages. Calculations at the experimental conditions--2,000 bar (1 bar = 100 kPa) and 250 K confirm multiple occupancy of the clathrate cages with average occupations of 2.00 and 3.96 H2 molecules per D-5(12) (small) and H-5(12)6(4) (large) cage, respectively. The H2-H2O interactions also are responsible for the experimentally observed softening of the H[bond]H stretching modes. The clathrate is found to be thermodynamically stable at 25 bar and 150 K. PMID:14657391

  8. Hydrogen clusters in clathrate hydrate.

    PubMed

    Mao, Wendy L; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Goncharov, Alexander F; Struzhkin, Viktor V; Guo, Quanzhong; Hu, Jingzhu; Shu, Jinfu; Hemley, Russell J; Somayazulu, Maddury; Zhao, Yusheng

    2002-09-27

    High-pressure Raman, infrared, x-ray, and neutron studies show that H2 and H2O mixtures crystallize into the sII clathrate structure with an approximate H2/H2O molar ratio of 1:2. The clathrate cages are multiply occupied, with a cluster of two H2 molecules in the small cage and four in the large cage. Substantial softening and splitting of hydrogen vibrons indicate increased intermolecular interactions. The quenched clathrate is stable up to 145 kelvin at ambient pressure. Retention of hydrogen at such high temperatures could help its condensation in planetary nebulae and may play a key role in the evolution of icy bodies. PMID:12351785

  9. Structure of the Ice-Clathrate Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Andrew; Koc, Matthew; Shepherd, Tricia; Molinero, Valeria

    2015-03-01

    In the laboratory, clathrates are customarily synthesized from ice and gas guest. It is not clear how and whether ice assists in the nucleation of clathrate hydrates. The structure of the ice-clathrate interface can help assess the role of ice in clathrate nucleation. However, only few studies have addressed the structure of the ice-clathrate interface. Here, we use molecular dynamic simulations to study the structure of the ice-clathrate interface. There is no lattice matching between any plane of ice and clathrate hydrates, therefore an interfacial transition layer has to form to connect the two crystals. We investigate the structure of the ice-clathrate interface produced by alignment and equilibration of the crystals, competitive growth of the two crystals from a common solution, and nucleation of hydrate in the presence of a growing ice front. We find that the interfacial transition layer between ice and clathrate has a width of two to three water layers and it is disordered in all cases. Water in the interfacial transition layer has tetrahedral order lower than either ice or clathrate and higher than liquid water under the same thermodynamic conditions. The work is supported by NSF Grant Number CHE-1012651.

  10. Supramolecular and solid state dynamics of selected Dianin's clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandstedt, Christian A.

    This dissertation investigates the supramolecular and solid state dynamics of the clathrand (empty host) and the ethanol and heptanol clathrates of 4-p-hydroxyphenyl-2,2,4-trimethyl chroman (Dianin's compound). Elastic constants measured through Brillouin scattering illustrate that the size, type, number, and orientation of the guest molecule(s) in the Dianin's cages play a dramatic role in delineating these systems' phonon dynamics. The csb{33} elastic constants indicate the introduction of progressively larger guest molecules substantially weakens the lattice along the three-fold cage axis. Comparison with the empty clathrand indicates a decrease in stiffness of 20% and 25% for the ethanol and heptanol clathrates, respectively. The csb{44} elastic constant, which measures the resistance to yz shear, exhibits an identical trend with the clathrand being the stiffest followed in order by the ethanol and heptanol clathrates. The most surprising aspect of the measured elastic constants was that both the csb{11} and csb{12} elastic constants for the ethanol clathrate were larger than those for the clathrand. This result implies that the ethanol guest molecules provide stability to the host lattice in the hydrogen-bonded hexamer plane. The measured elastic constants for the heptanol clathrate indicate that the introduction of heptanol guest molecules dramatically weakens the overall structure of the lattice. The Brillouin scattering experiments show that the longitudinal acoustic modes propagating along the z (c)-axis are dramatically attenuated for increasing size of the guest. Comparison of the acoustic absorption coefficients between the ethanol clathrate and clathrand indicate a 47% increase in attenuation of the heat carrying acoustic modes. Acoustic attenuation along the z (c)-axis is amplified for the heptanol clathrate where an increase of 80% compared to the clathrand is observed. And finally, the first observation of global vibrations of the entire

  11. Synthesis and electrochemical characterization of Silicon clathrates as anode materials for Lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, Rahul

    Novel materials for Li-ion batteries is one of the principle thrust areas for current research in energy storage, more so than most, considering its widespread use in portable electronic gadgets and plug-in electric and hybrid cars. One of the major limiting factors in a Li-ion battery's energy density is the low specific capacities of the active materials in the electrodes. In the search for high-performance anode materials for Li-ion batteries, many alternatives to carbonaceous materials have been studied. Both cubic and amorphous silicon can reversibly alloy with lithium and have a theoretical capacity of 3500 mAh/g, making silicon a potential high density anode material. However, a large volume expansion of 300% occurs due to changes in the structure during lithium insertion, often leading to pulverization of the silicon. To this end, a class of silicon based cage compounds called clathrates are studied for electrochemical reactivity with lithium. Silicon-clathrates consist of silicon covalently bonded in cage structures comprised of face sharing Si20, Si24 and/or Si28 clusters with guest ions occupying the interstitial positions in the polyhedra. Prior to this, silicon clathrates have been studied primarily for their superconducting and thermoelectric properties. In this work, the synthesis and electrochemical characterization of two categories of silicon clathrates - Type-I silicon clathrate with aluminum framework substitution and barium guest ions (Ba8AlxSi46-x) and Type-II silicon clathrate with sodium guest ions (Nax Si136), are explored. The Type-I clathrate, Ba8AlxSi46-x consists of an open framework of aluminium and silicon, with barium (guest) atoms occupying the interstitial positions. X-ray diffraction studies have shown that a crystalline phase of clathrate is obtained from synthesis, which is powdered to a fine particle size to be used as the anode material in a Li-ion battery. Electrochemical measurements of these type of clathrates have shown

  12. Marine clathrate mining and sediment separation

    DOEpatents

    Borns, David J.; Hinkebein, Thomas E.; Lynch, Richard W.; Northrop, David A.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for mining of hydrocarbons from a hydrocarbon-containing clathrate such as is found on the ocean floor. The hydrocarbon containing clathrate is disaggregated from sediment by first disrupting clathrate-containing strata using continuous mining means such as a rotary tilling drum, a fluid injector, or a drill. The clathrate-rich portion of sediment thus disrupted from the sea floor strata are carried through the apparatus to regions of relative lower pressure and/or relative higher temperature where the clathrate further dissociates into component hydrocarbons and water. The hydrocarbon is recovered with the assistance of a gas that is injected and buoys the hydrocarbon containing clathrate helping it to rise to regions of lower pressure and temperature where hydrocarbon is released. The sediment separated from the hydrocarbon returns to the ocean floor.

  13. The Antimony-Based Type I Clathrate compounds Cs8Cd18Sb28 and Cs8Zn18Sb28**

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi; Wu, Li-Ming; Li, Long-Hua; Du, Shao-Wu; Corbett, John D.; Chen, Ling

    2009-06-17

    The title compounds lie in a new region of phase space for such a structure, and have stoichiometries in accord with a classical Zintl phase formulation. The small semiconductor gaps indicated by DFT calculations are also supported by their diamagnetic susceptibilities.

  14. High pressure study of group-IV clathrate by XRD and Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kume, Tetsuji; Sasaki, Shigeo

    2013-06-01

    Group-IV clathrates, which are open-structured Si, Ge, and Sn cage-like compounds, have attracted increasing attention because of their potential applications for thermoelectric devices due to the behavior of phonon-glass and electron-crystal. One of the keys for the intriguing properties is so called rattling vibrations of guests. The direct observation of the rattling is important for understanding of the clathrate properties. Furthermore, the systematic observations of the rattling vibrations as a function of the cage size controlled by pressure are very significant to investigate the guest-host interaction. The pressurization also throws light on the structural stability of the clathrate, which is improved by the guest atoms. The clathrate structure with sp3 network is preserved up to very high pressure. Instead of the structural change, the doped Si clathrates undergo an isostructural phase transition. This paper is concerned with the structural stabilities under high pressure and the rattling vibrations of the guest as a function of the cage size, investigated for various semiconductor clathrates (Sr8Ga16Ge30, Eu8Ga16Ge30 and so on) by means of Raman and XRD experiments. On the basis of the recent data, the guest-host interaction is discussed.

  15. "Glass-like" thermal conductivity gradually induced in thermoelectric Sr8Ga16Ge30 clathrate by off-centered guest atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Sebastian; Schmøkel, Mette Stokkebro; Borup, Kasper Andersen; Madsen, Georg K. H.; McIntyre, Garry J.; Capelli, Silvia C.; Christensen, Mogens; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt

    2016-05-01

    The origin of the "glass-like" plateau in thermal conductivity of inorganic type I clathrates has been debated for more than a decade. Here, it is demonstrated that the low temperature thermal conductivity of Sr8Ga16Ge30 can be controlled by the synthesis method: A flux-grown sample has a "glass-like" plateau in thermal conductivity at low temperature, while a zone-melted sample instead has a crystalline peak. A combination of flux-growth and zone-melting produces an intermediate thermal conductivity. In a comprehensive study of three single crystal samples, it is shown by neutron diffraction that the transition from crystalline peak to "glass-like" plateau is related to an increase in Sr guest atom off-centering distance from 0.24 Å to 0.43 Å. By modifying ab initio calculated force constants for the guest atom to an isotropic model, we reproduce both measured heat capacity and inelastic neutron scattering data. The transition from peak to plateau in the thermal conductivity can be modeled by a combined increase of Rayleigh and disorder scattering. Measurement of heat capacity refutes simple models for tunneling of Sr between off-center sites. Furthermore, the electronic properties of the same samples are characterized by Hall carrier density, Seebeck coefficient, and resistivity. The present comprehensive analysis excludes tunneling and charge carrier scattering as dominant contributors to the "glass-like" plateau. The increased guest atom off-centering distance controlled by synthesis provides a possible microscopic mechanism for reducing the low temperature thermal conductivity of clathrates.

  16. Alloys of clathrate allotropes for rechargeable batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Candace K; Miller, Michael A; Chan, Kwai S

    2014-12-09

    The present disclosure is directed at an electrode for a battery wherein the electrode comprises clathrate alloys of silicon, germanium or tin. In method form, the present disclosure is directed at methods of forming clathrate alloys of silicon, germanium or tin which methods lead to the formation of empty cage structures suitable for use as electrodes in rechargeable type batteries.

  17. Cyclodextrin-Based Solid-Gas Clathrates.

    PubMed

    Pereva, Stiliana; Himitliiska, Tsveta; Spassov, Tony; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Arnaudov, Luben N; Dudev, Todor

    2015-07-29

    "Cyclodextrin-gas" clathrates were obtained by crystallization from water solution of α-, β-, and γ-cyclodextrins (CDs) under pressure of the gas to be entrapped into the CD molecules. When the pressure is released, these clathrates are stable at ambient conditions and dissociate at elevated temperature, which makes them interesting for various applications as foam boosters in food and other industries. It was found that under these conditions α-CD forms clathrates with all of the gases used in this study (N2, N2O, CO2, Ar), whereas β- and γ-CDs can form clathrates only with N2. The concentration of the cyclodextrin and the temperature and pressure of the gas were varied for achieving higher clathrate yield and larger amount of embedded gas. Highest values of about 2 wt % were found for α-CD-N2O, as it releases in the temperature range of 40-60 °C. PMID:26132981

  18. Stable Isotopes of CH4 and H2S as Potential Biomarkers in Clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvajal-Ortiz, H.; Pratt, L.

    2009-12-01

    Recent reports of persistent trace-level methane in the Martian atmosphere and sulfur-bearing compounds (including sulfate and hydrogen sulfide) over the Jovian satellite Europa suggest dissociation of gas-containing water ice, known as gas hydrates or clathrates containing CH4 and/or H2S. Icy reservoirs containing volatiles are anticipated to be stable in the shallow subsurface of Mars and near the interface of the liquid ocean and solid ice shell on Europa. Of astrobiological interest, the gases trapped within clathrates could be biological in origin and evidence of chemolithotrophic metabolic pathways such as microbial methanogenesis (MOG) and anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled with bacterial sulphate reduction (BSR) such as occurs on Earth. If the gases trapped as guest molecules inside clathrates are the product of MOG, AOM, and BSR then it may be possible to infer their origin and differentiate between biological and abiotically generated gases produced through analyzes of C, H, and S stable isotopes. Samples of gas hydrates obtained by drilling in cryosphere environments provide relatively stable solid materials suitable for preservation of biosignatures in both terrestrial and extraterrestrial systems. Notably, diagnosis of biological or geological origin using isotopic measurements is dependent on a full understanding of isotopic fractionation during clathrate formation or dissociation. We endeavor to assess isotopic fractionation during the process of trapping gas molecules at different temperatures and pressures of clathrate formation. Three clathrate nucleation experiments have been conducted: two using methane (249 K and 1.72 MPa; 240 K and 1.21 MPa ) and one using hydrogen sulfide (233 K and 0.2 MPa) as the guest molecules. Carbon isotopic analyses of the recovered gas fractions (reservoir tank, headspace, and clathrate trapped) from the methane experiments show only small differences in δ13C values (Δ13Creservior-headspace, Max=0.19, Min

  19. Pulse radiolysis study on electrons trapped in semiclathrates and non-clathrate hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Zagorski, Z.P.

    1987-02-12

    Trapping of electrons in specific water molecule vacancies, observed previously in crystalline aqueous clathrates, has also been found in semiclathrates (e.g., tetramethylammonium hydroxide pentahydrate), in clathrates showing hydrogen bonds between host and guest molecules (e.g., piperazine clathrate), and also in inorganic hydrates (e.g., sodium carbonate decahydrate). The lifetime of the electron is sometimes longer than in the case of true clathrates; e.g., t/sub 1/2/ = 3.5 ms (first-order decay in piperazine clathrate). The existence of comparatively long-lived electrons at room temperature may be considered a general phenomenon. The condition for its occurrence is the presence of OH/sup -/ or F/sup -/ anion, which can substitute for H/sub 2/O in the aqueous part of the compound and when displaced leaves an electron trap. In other ionic and nonionic compounds, the condition for the trapping of long-lived electrons is protonation of the principal compound, thereby leaving the solution or melt alkaline during the crystallization of the hydrate. Interpretation in terms of preexistent traps invokes the crystal imperfections chemistry, which in the case of hydrates has not yet been noticed. It has been assumed that electrons occupy the vacancies temporarily revealing their presence. In some clathrates and other hydrates, the long-lived electron traps do not occur; instead, the electron shows a similar spectrum (620 nm maximum), decaying by 2-3 orders of magnitude faster than in long-lived traps. It is assumed that this is a case of electron digging its own hole, although an alternative explanation may be through trapping in other kinds of crystal imperfections in the aqueous moiety of the hydrate.

  20. Rheology and dynamics of repulsive clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eroshenko, V. A.; Lazarev, Yu. F.

    2012-01-01

    The physical and thermodynamic properties of a repulsive clathrate used as a working body for the dissipation, storage, and conversion of energy in thermomechanical systems are studied. In repulsive clathrates, use is made for the first time of the molecular repulsive forces acting in large interfacial areas in a system consisting of a fluid and a capillary-porous matrix not wetted by this fluid. Based on experimental studies of a car damper with a repulsive clathrate, a rheological model of energy dissipation was developed which can be used to design compact high-performance dampers for different purposes and anti-seismic systems of new generation.

  1. Observation of Rattling Vibrations in Clathrate under High Pressure and Low Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funahashi, K.; Yajima, I.; Kume, T.; Sasaki, S.; Shimizu, H.; Takabatake, T.

    2012-07-01

    An experimental system for low-frequency Raman measurements at low temperatures and high pressures was constructed in order to research low frequency vibrations of guest atoms in guest-host materials such as semiconductor clathrates. Raman measurements in the range to 10 cm-1 were attained under low temperature and high pressure by arranging a diamond anvil cell fixed on a cryostat in a quasi-back-scattering geometry. Raman spectra of a clathrate compound Eu8Ga16Ge30 were measured using this experimental system. The low frequency Eu vibration so called the rattling vibration located at ~20 cm-1 was clearly observed under high pressures and low temperatures.

  2. Laboratory study of CH4-N2 clathrate hydrates applied to Titan's surface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nna Mvondo, D.; Tobie, G.; Le Menn, E.; Bollengier, O.; Grasset, O.

    2013-12-01

    It is proposed that clathrate hydrates may be present at the surface of Titan (Choukroun et al., 2013, 2010). At Titan's surface pressure, pure methane and ethane hydrate (as well as other guests) could exist in the sI structure and nitrogen hydrate as sII structure. The large reservoir of several guest compounds in Titan's atmosphere is expected to result in the formation of multicomponent (compound) clathrate hydrates, as sII or sH structures, stable relative to water ice on the surface of Titan, and with faster expected growth kinetics relative to pure hydrate (Osegovic et al., 2005). Compound hydrate could be a likely sink for many chemicals occurring on Titan's surface. We note that experimental studies on the formation and thermodynamics of the methane-water system, at low and high pressures applied to Titan have been carried out (Lunine and Stevenson; 1985; Choukroun et al., 2013, 2010 and references therein). However, laboratory work on mixing of methane with other compounds in the clathrate phase (ethane, N2, CO2, etc...) applied to Titan conditions (and other icy moons) has still to be addressed. In this context, we have studied the formation and spectral signatures of CH4-N2 clathrate hydrates at temperature and pressure conditions relevant for Titan's surface. Clathrate hydrates samples have been synthesized in an autoclave combined with a cooling system and a multi-gas mixer. Few ml of deionized water was introduced in the autoclave and pressurized with the N2 and CH4 gaseous species for a couple of days, at controlled low temperature and low pressure of the formation and stability of clathrate hydrates. Their formation has been monitored by gas chromatography. Their spectral characterization at low temperature was performed by infrared (FTIR) reflectance spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy was also used to give constraints on the composition, structure and cage occupancy of the formed clathrates. Here we present the results obtained for different mixing

  3. Energy landscape of clathrate hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmedt, A.; Bedouret, L.; Pefoute, E.; Pouvreau, M.; Say-Liang-Fat, S.; Alvarez, M.

    2012-11-01

    Clathrate hydrates are nanoporous crystalline materials made of a network of hydrogen-bonded water molecules (forming host cages) that is stabilized by the presence of foreign (generally hydrophobic) guest molecules. The natural existence of large quantities of hydrocarbon hydrates in deep oceans and permafrost is certainly at the origin of numerous applications in the broad areas of energy and environmental sciences and technologies (e.g. gas storage). At a fundamental level, their nanostructuration confers on these materials specific properties (e.g. their "glass-like" thermal conductivity) for which the host-guest interactions play a key role. These interactions occur on broad timescale and thus require the use of multi-technique approach in which neutron scattering brings unvaluable information. This work reviews the dynamical properties of clathrate hydrates, ranging from intramolecular vibrations to Brownian relaxations; it illustrates the contribution of neutron scattering in the understanding of the underlying factors governing chemical-physics properties specific to these nanoporous systems.

  4. Iodine-starch clathrate complexes in low-field acoustic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeev, G. N.; Boldyrev, V. S.; Ermolaeva, V. I.; Eliseeva, N. M.

    2013-01-01

    Experimental data on the kinetics of formation and decomposition of iodine-starch clathrate complexes (amyloiodine and amylopectoiodine) in low-frequency (5-45 Hz) acoustic fields are reported. The biological activity of these compounds suggests their use as a model of biocatalysts, in which iodine represents the coenzyme active group and starch homopolysaccharides (amylopectin and amylose) represents the apoenzyme.

  5. IR reflectance spectroscopy of carbon dioxide clathrate hydrates. Implications for Saturn's icy moons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oancea, A.; Grasset, O.; Le Menn, E.; Bezacier, L.; Bollengier, O.; Le Mouélic, S.; Tobie, G.

    2012-04-01

    A CO2 spectral band was discovered by VIMS on the Saturn's satellites Dione, Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe [1]. The band position on the three first satellites corresponds to CO2 trapped in a complex material, but no indication exists whether this latter is water ice or some mineral or complex organic compound [1]. On Phoebe, the CO2 spectral band is consistent with solid CO2 or CO2 molecules trapped in the small cages of a clathrate hydrate structure [2]. It is thought that clathrate hydrates could play a significant role in the chemistry of the solar nebula [3] and in the physical evolution of astrophysical objects [4]. But so far, no clathrate hydrate structure has been observed in astrophysical environments. Moreover, identification of molecules trapped in a clathrate hydrate structure is extremely difficult because of the strong IR vibration modes of the water ice matrix. In this work, experimental IR reflectance spectra for CO2 clathrate hydrates are studied on grains and films. Clathrates are synthesized in a high pressure autoclave at low temperatures. IR spectral analysis is made with a low pressure and low temperature cryostat. These experimental conditions - 80 < T < 110 K, P~10-5 bar - are relevant to icy moons' surfaces. We have observed that the IR reflectance, in the spectral region (3 - 5 μm) characterized by H2O and CO2 high absorption coefficients, is strongly dependent on physical (size, surface) and optical (n and k) properties of the samples. The impact of these parameters on the CO2 clathrate IR reflectance spectrum will be presented. A comparison between the absorption bands of CO2 clathrate hydrates obtained in our lab and CO2 absorption bands as detected by VIMS on the icy satellites of Saturn will be shown. This experimental work confirms that VIMS data are not consistent with the presence of structure I CO2 clathrate hydrates on the surface of the icy moons. Possibility of having metastable structure II still remains unsolved and will be

  6. Clathrate hydrate formation in amorphous cometary ice analogs in vacuo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David; Allamandola, Louis; Sandford, Scott; Hudgins, Doug; Freund, Friedemann

    1991-01-01

    Experiments conducted in clathrate hydrates with a modified electron microscope have demonstrated the possibility of such compounds' formation during the warming of vapor-deposited amorphous ices in vacuo, through rearrangements in the solid state. Subsolidus crystallization of compositionally complex amorphous ices may therefore be a general and ubiquitous process. Phase separations and microporous textures thus formed may be able to account for such anomalous cometary phenomena as the release of gas at large radial distances from the sun and the retention of volatiles to elevated temperatures.

  7. Clathrate hydrates in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, S. L.

    1985-01-01

    Clathrate hydrates are crystalline compounds in which an expanded ice lattice forms cages that contain gas molecules. There are two principal hydrate structures. Structure I, with a 12 A cubic unit cell, contains 46 water molecules and 8 cages of two types, giving an ideal formula (for CH4) of CH4.5.75H2O. The actual formula contains somewhat more water as the cages are not completely filled. Other examples that form Structure I hydrates are C2H6, C2H4, C2H2, CO2, SO2, OCS, Xe, H2S. Structure II, with a 17 A cubic unit cell, contains 136 water molecules, and 8 large and 16 small cages. The ideal formula for CHCl3 is CHCL3.17H2O. Other examples of Structure II hydrates include C3H8, C2H5Cl, acetone, and tetrahydrofuran. Small molecules such as Ar, Kr and probably N2 and O2 also form a Structure II hydrate. The small molecules occupy both the large and small cages, giving an ideal formula of Ar.5.67H2O. The conditions of pressure and temperature for hydrate formation are discussed.

  8. Clathrate hydrates for ozone preservation.

    PubMed

    Muromachi, Sanehiro; Ohmura, Ryo; Takeya, Satoshi; Mori, Yasuhiko H

    2010-09-01

    We report the experimental evidence for the preservation of ozone (O(3)) encaged in a clathrate hydrate. Although ozone is an unstable substance and is apt to decay to oxygen (O(2)), it may be preserved for a prolonged time if it is encaged in hydrate cavities in the form of isolated molecules. This possibility was assessed using a hydrate formed from an ozone + oxygen gas mixture coexisting with carbon tetrachloride or xenon. Each hydrate sample was stored in an air-filled container at atmospheric pressure and a constant temperature in the range between -20 and 2 degrees C and was continually subjected to iodometric measurements of its fractional ozone content. Such chronological measurements and structure analysis using powder X-ray diffraction have revealed that ozone can be preserved in a hydrate-lattice structure for more than 20 days at a concentration on the order of 0.1% (hydrate-mass basis). PMID:20707330

  9. Method of forming clathrate ice

    DOEpatents

    Hino, Toshiyuki; Gorski, Anthony J.

    1987-01-01

    A method of forming clathrate ice in a supercooled water-based liquid contained in a vessel is disclosed. Initially, an oscillator device is located in the liquid in the vessel. The oscillator device is then oscillated ultrasonically so that small crystals are formed in the liquid. These small crystals serve as seed crystals for ice formation in the liquid and thereby prevent supercooling of the liquid. Preferably, the oscillating device is controlled by a thermostat which initiates operation of the oscillator device when the temperature of the liquid is lowered to the freezing point. Thereafter, the operation of the oscillator device is terminated when ice is sensed in the liquid by an ice sensor.

  10. Phase Transition of a Structure II Cubic Clathrate Hydrate to a Tetragonal Form.

    PubMed

    Takeya, Satoshi; Fujihisa, Hiroshi; Yamawaki, Hiroshi; Gotoh, Yoshito; Ohmura, Ryo; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John A

    2016-08-01

    The crystal structure and phase transition of cubic structure II (sII) binary clathrate hydrates of methane (CH4 ) and propanol are reported from powder X-ray diffraction measurements. The deformation of host water cages at the cubic-tetragonal phase transition of 2-propanol+CH4 hydrate, but not 1-propanol+CH4 hydrate, was observed below about 110 K. It is shown that the deformation of the host water cages of 2-propanol+CH4 hydrate can be explained by the restriction of the motion of 2-propanol within the 5(12) 6(4) host water cages. This result provides a low-temperature structure due to a temperature-induced symmetry-lowering transition of clathrate hydrate. This is the first example of a cubic structure of the common clathrate hydrate families at a fixed composition. PMID:27346760

  11. Clathrate hydrate stability models for Titan: implications for a global subsurface ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu Sarkar, D.; Elwood Madden, M.

    2013-12-01

    Titan is the only planetary body in the solar system, apart from the Earth, with liquid at its surface. Titan's changing rotational period suggests that a global subsurface ocean decouples the icy crust from the interior. Several studies predict the existence of such an internal ocean below an Ice I layer, ranging in depth between a few tens of kilometers to a few hundreds of kilometers, depending on the composition of the icy crust and liquid-ocean. While the overall density of Titan is well constrained, the degree of differentiation within the interior is unclear. These uncertainties lead to poor understanding of the volatile content of the moon. However, unlike other similar large icy moons like Ganymede and Callisto, Titan has a thick nitrogen atmosphere, with methane as the second most abundant constituent - 5% near the surface. Titan's atmosphere, surface, and interior are likely home to various compounds such as C2H6, CO2, Ar, N2 and CH4, capable of forming clathrate hydrates. In addition, the moon has low temperature and low-to-high pressure conditions required for clathrate formation. Therefore the occurrence of extensive multicomponent hydrates may effect the composition of near-surface materials, the subsurface ocean, as well as the atmosphere. This work uses models of hydrate stability for a number of plausible hydrate formers including CH4, C2H6, CH4 + C2H6 and CH4 + NH3, and equilibrium geothermal gradients for probable near-surface materials to delineate the lateral and vertical extent of clathrate hydrate stability zones for Titan. By comparing geothermal gradients with clathrate stability fields for these systems we investigate possible compositions of Titan's global subsurface ocean. Preliminary model results indicate that ethane hydrates or compound hydrates of ethane and methane could be destabilized within the proposed depth range of the internal ocean, while methane/ammonia or pure methane hydrates may not be affected. Therefore, ethane or

  12. Martian methane and link with clathrates in the crust of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloesener, Elodie; Karatekin, Ozgur; Dehant, Veronique

    2013-04-01

    The recent detection of methane in the Martian atmosphere (Krasnopolsky et al., 2004; Formisano et al., 2004; Geminale et al., 2008; Mumma et al., 2009; Fonti and Marzo, 2010) generated a large interest among the scientific community in particular because the source of this gas is still unknown and because it is a potential biomarker. Methane, observed at a level of 10 parts per billion and per volume, has a non-uniform distribution involving a photochemical lifetime of 200 days (Lefevre and Forget, 2009), smaller than the 300 years calculated by photochemical models. In addition, there is a correlation between the mixing ratio of water vapor and methane (Geminale et al., 2008). In order to explain this phenomenon, the existence of metastable clathrates decomposing in the atmosphere and releasing CH4 has been suggested (Chassefière, 2009). Clathrates are chemical compounds formed by the inclusion of gas molecules in the cavities of a water molecules network and are stable at high pressure and low temperature. In addition to the biological origin, often invoked to explain most of the methane on Earth, the Martian methane may also have been produced by hydrogeochemical or volcanic processes or may be the last traces of an amount brought by a meteoritic impact a few hundred or thousands years (Atreya et al., 2007). Methane could also come from the exposure to ultraviolet of meteorites falling continuously on the surface of Mars (Keppler et al., 2012). Although the process is very likely to occur on Mars, it does not produce all the expected amount of methane currently measured. Moreover, conditions in the Martian crust are favorable to the stability of methane clathrates. So CH4 emissions observed may also be due to the dissociation of the clathrates due to a change in temperature, pressure or composition. Current conditions of Mars do not allow them to be stable on the surface but they can remain stable in the crust if they were formed below a certain depth

  13. Clathrate type 2 hydrate formation in vacuo under astrophysical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, D. F.; Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.; Freund, F.

    The properties of clathrate hydrates were used to explain the complex and poorly understood physical processes taking place within cometary nuclei and other icy solar system bodies. Most of all the experiments previously conducted used starting compositions which would yield clathrate types I hydrates. The main criterion for type I vs. type II clathrate hydrate formation is the size of the guest molecule. The stoichiometry of the two structure types is also quite different. In addition, the larger molecules which would form type II clathrate hydrates typically have lower vapor pressures. The result of these considerations is that at temperatures where we identified clathrate formation (120-130 K), it is more likely that type II clathrate hydrates will form. We also formed clathrate II hydrates of methanol by direct vapor deposition in the temperature range 125-135 K.

  14. Clathrate type 2 hydrate formation in vacuo under astrophysical conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, D. F.; Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.; Freund, F.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of clathrate hydrates were used to explain the complex and poorly understood physical processes taking place within cometary nuclei and other icy solar system bodies. Most of all the experiments previously conducted used starting compositions which would yield clathrate types I hydrates. The main criterion for type I vs. type II clathrate hydrate formation is the size of the guest molecule. The stoichiometry of the two structure types is also quite different. In addition, the larger molecules which would form type II clathrate hydrates typically have lower vapor pressures. The result of these considerations is that at temperatures where we identified clathrate formation (120-130 K), it is more likely that type II clathrate hydrates will form. We also formed clathrate II hydrates of methanol by direct vapor deposition in the temperature range 125-135 K.

  15. High-Temperature Thermoelectric Properties of Polycrystalline Silicon Clathrate Ba8TM x Si46- x (TM = Ni, Pt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Daisuke; Fujimura, Koji; Tadokoro, Jun; Matsumoto, Miko; Yamazaki, Satoshi; Sasaki, Hirokazu; Eguchi, Tatsuhiko; Susai, Kyota

    2016-03-01

    The n-/ p-type stability of a silicon clathrate in which silicon was substituted with nickel or platinum was evaluated by density functional theory calculations. Then, Ba8Pt5Si41 and Ba8Pt1.5Ni3.5Si41 were synthesized, and their thermoelectric properties were investigated. The polycrystalline compounds, which have a type-I clathrate structure, were prepared through arc melting and spark-plasma-sintering. The crystal structures and elemental compositions of the synthesized samples were characterized via powder x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analyses, respectively. The temperature dependence of both the electrical resistivity and the Seebeck coefficient was measured.

  16. On the structure selectivity of clathrate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2011-06-30

    We propose a strategic method to search for a new clathrate hydrate by investigating the selectivity of its crystalline structure, which has been expected to depend mostly on the guest species and less on the thermodynamic conditions. Relative stability among various morphologies is examined in terms of the chemical potential of water of clathrate hydrates in equilibrium with guest gases. This evaluation is performed by calculating the free energy of cage occupancy according to the standard statistical mechanical theory with the aid of the Yarmolyuk and Kripyakevich's rule on the Frank-Kasper type alloys to estimate the numbers of cages of various types. Thus, a comprehensive interpretation of the selectivity of crystalline structures is successfully made. We explain why two major structures are stable in most of the thermodynamic conditions and establish a relation between polymorphism of clathrate hydrate and the guest size and other parameters, thereby suggesting a way to find a new clathrate hydrate by appropriate choice of the guest species and/or the thermodynamic properties. It is found that there is a small room in the above parameter space for the other structure than the major two to be the most stable, including a new structure. In addition, simple but thorough elucidation is given for preferential formation of TS-I structure in bromine hydrate. PMID:21619053

  17. Formation and properties of ice XVI obtained by emptying a type sII clathrate hydrate.

    PubMed

    Falenty, Andrzej; Hansen, Thomas C; Kuhs, Werner F

    2014-12-11

    Gas hydrates are ice-like solids, in which guest molecules or atoms are trapped inside cages formed within a crystalline host framework (clathrate) of hydrogen-bonded water molecules. They are naturally present in large quantities on the deep ocean floor and as permafrost, can form in and block gas pipelines, and are thought to occur widely on Earth and beyond. A natural point of reference for this large and ubiquitous family of inclusion compounds is the empty hydrate lattice, which is usually regarded as experimentally inaccessible because the guest species stabilize the host framework. However, it has been suggested that sufficiently small guests may be removed to leave behind metastable empty clathrates, and guest-free Si- and Ge-clathrates have indeed been obtained. Here we show that this strategy can also be applied to water-based clathrates: five days of continuous vacuum pumping on small particles of neon hydrate (of structure sII) removes all guests, allowing us to determine the crystal structure, thermal expansivity and limit of metastability of the empty hydrate. It is the seventeenth experimentally established crystalline ice phase, ice XVI according to the current ice nomenclature, has a density of 0.81 grams per cubic centimetre (making it the least dense of all known crystalline water phases) and is expected to be the stable low-temperature phase of water at negative pressures (that is, under tension). We find that the empty hydrate structure exhibits negative thermal expansion below about 55 kelvin, and that it is mechanically more stable and has at low temperatures larger lattice constants than the filled hydrate. These observations attest to the importance of kinetic effects and host-guest interactions in clathrate hydrates, with further characterization of the empty hydrate expected to improve our understanding of the structure, properties and behaviour of these unique materials. PMID:25503235

  18. Formation and properties of ice XVI obtained by emptying a type sII clathrate hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falenty, Andrzej; Hansen, Thomas C.; Kuhs, Werner F.

    2014-12-01

    Gas hydrates are ice-like solids, in which guest molecules or atoms are trapped inside cages formed within a crystalline host framework (clathrate) of hydrogen-bonded water molecules. They are naturally present in large quantities on the deep ocean floor and as permafrost, can form in and block gas pipelines, and are thought to occur widely on Earth and beyond. A natural point of reference for this large and ubiquitous family of inclusion compounds is the empty hydrate lattice, which is usually regarded as experimentally inaccessible because the guest species stabilize the host framework. However, it has been suggested that sufficiently small guests may be removed to leave behind metastable empty clathrates, and guest-free Si- and Ge-clathrates have indeed been obtained. Here we show that this strategy can also be applied to water-based clathrates: five days of continuous vacuum pumping on small particles of neon hydrate (of structure sII) removes all guests, allowing us to determine the crystal structure, thermal expansivity and limit of metastability of the empty hydrate. It is the seventeenth experimentally established crystalline ice phase, ice XVI according to the current ice nomenclature, has a density of 0.81 grams per cubic centimetre (making it the least dense of all known crystalline water phases) and is expected to be the stable low-temperature phase of water at negative pressures (that is, under tension). We find that the empty hydrate structure exhibits negative thermal expansion below about 55 kelvin, and that it is mechanically more stable and has at low temperatures larger lattice constants than the filled hydrate. These observations attest to the importance of kinetic effects and host-guest interactions in clathrate hydrates, with further characterization of the empty hydrate expected to improve our understanding of the structure, properties and behaviour of these unique materials.

  19. Semiconducting Ge clathrates: Promising candidates for thermoelectric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolas, G. S.; Cohn, J. L.; Slack, G. A.; Schujman, S. B.

    1998-07-01

    Transport properties of polycrystalline Ge clathrates with general composition Sr8Ga16Ge30 are reported in the temperature range 5 K⩽T⩽300 K. These compounds exhibit N-type semiconducting behavior with relatively high Seebeck coefficients and electrical conductivity, and room temperature carrier concentrations in the range of 1017-1018cm-3. The thermal conductivity is more than an order of magnitude smaller than that of crystalline germanium and has a glasslike temperature dependence. The resulting thermoelectric figure of merit, ZT, at room temperature for the present samples is 1/4 that of Bi2Te3 alloys currently used in devices for thermoelectric cooling. Extrapolating our measurements to above room temperature, we estimate that ZT>1 at T>700 K, thus exceeding that of most known materials.

  20. Analysis of cell death inducing compounds.

    PubMed

    Spicker, Jeppe S; Pedersen, Henrik Toft; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Brunak, Søren

    2007-11-01

    Biomarkers for early detection of toxicity hold the promise of improving the failure rates in drug development. In the present study, gene expression levels were measured using full-genome RAE230 version 2 Affymetrix GeneChips on rat liver tissue 48 h after administration of six different compounds, three toxins (ANIT, DMN and NMF) and three non-toxins (Caeruelein, Dinitrophenol and Rosiglitazone). We identified three gene transcripts with exceptional predictive performance towards liver toxicity and/or changes in histopathology. The three genes were: glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR), ornithine aminotransferase (OAT) and Cytochrome P450, subfamily IIC (mephenytoin 4-hydroxylase) (Cyp2C29). RT-PCR for these three genes was performed and four additional compounds were included for validation. The quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed the findings based on the microarray data and using the three genes a classification rate of 55 of 57 samples was achieved for the classification of not toxic versus toxic. The single most promising biomarker (OAT) alone resulted in a surprisingly 100% correctly classified samples. OAT has not previously been linked to toxicity and cell death in the literature and the novel finding represents a putative hepatotoxicity biomarker. PMID:17503021

  1. Roles of Clathrate Hydrates in Crustal Heating and Volatile Storage/Release on Earth, Mars, and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargel, J. S.; Beget, J.; Furfaro, R.; Prieto-Ballesteros, O.; Palmero-Rodriguez, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Clathrate hydrates are stable through much of the Solar System. These materials and hydrate-like amorphous associations of water with N2, CO, CH4, CO2, O2 and other molecules could, in fact, constitute the bulk of the non-rock components of some icy satellites, comets, and Kuiper Belt Objects. CO2 clathrate is thermodynamically stable at the Martian South Pole surface and could form a significant fraction of both Martian polar caps and icy permafrost distributed across one-third of the Martian surface. CH4 clathrate is the largest clathrate material in Earth's permafrost and cold seafloor regions, and it may be a major volatile reservoir on Mars, too. CO2 clathrate is less abundant on Earth but it might store most of Mars' CO2 inventory and thus may be one of the critical components in the climate system of that planet, just as CH4 clathrate is for Earth. These ice-like phases not only store biologically, geologically, and climatologically important gases, but they also are natural thermal insulators. Thus, they retard the conductive flow of geothermal heat, and thick accumulations of them can modify geotherms, cause brines to exist where otherwise they would not, and induce low-grade metamorphism of upper crustal rocks underlying the insulating bodies. This mechanism of crustal heating may be especially important in assisting hydrogeologic activity on Mars, gas-rich carbonaceous asteroids, icy satellites, and Kuiper Belt Objects. These worlds, compared to Earth, are comparatively energy starved and frozen but may partly make up for their deficit of joules by having large accumulations of joule-conserving hydrates. Thick, continuous layers of clathrate may seal in gases and produce high gas fugacities in aquifers underlying the clathrates, thus producing gas-rich reservoirs capable of erupting violently. This may have happened repeatedly in Earth history, with global climatic consequences for abrupt climate change. We have hypothesized that such eruptions may have

  2. A new phase diagram of water under negative pressure: The rise of the lowest-density clathrate s-III

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yingying; Zhu, Chongqin; Wang, Lu; Cao, Xiaoxiao; Su, Yan; Jiang, Xue; Meng, Sheng; Zhao, Jijun; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Ice and ice clathrate are not only omnipresent across polar regions of Earth or under terrestrial oceans but also ubiquitous in the solar system such as on comets, asteroids, or icy moons of the giant planets. Depending on the surrounding environment (temperature and pressure), ice alone exhibits an exceptionally rich and complicated phase diagram with 17 known crystalline polymorphs. Water molecules also form clathrate compounds with inclusion of guest molecules, such as cubic structure I (s-I), cubic structure II (s-II), hexagonal structure H (s-H), tetragonal structure T (s-T), and tetragonal structure K (s-K). Recently, guest-free clathrate structure II (s-II), also known as ice XVI located in the negative-pressure region of the phase diagram of water, is synthesized in the laboratory and motivates scientists to reexamine other ice clathrates with low density. Using extensive Monte Carlo packing algorithm and dispersion-corrected density functional theory optimization, we predict a crystalline clathrate of cubic structure III (s-III) composed of two large icosihexahedral cavities (8668412) and six small decahedral cavities (8248) per unit cell, which is dynamically stable by itself and can be fully stabilized by encapsulating an appropriate guest molecule in the large cavity. A new phase diagram of water ice with TIP4P/2005 (four-point transferable intermolecular potential/2005) model potential is constructed by considering a variety of candidate phases. The guest-free s-III clathrate with ultralow density overtakes s-II and s-H phases and emerges as the most stable ice polymorph in the pressure region below −5834 bar at 0 K and below −3411 bar at 300 K. PMID:26933681

  3. A new phase diagram of water under negative pressure: The rise of the lowest-density clathrate s-III.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yingying; Zhu, Chongqin; Wang, Lu; Cao, Xiaoxiao; Su, Yan; Jiang, Xue; Meng, Sheng; Zhao, Jijun; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-02-01

    Ice and ice clathrate are not only omnipresent across polar regions of Earth or under terrestrial oceans but also ubiquitous in the solar system such as on comets, asteroids, or icy moons of the giant planets. Depending on the surrounding environment (temperature and pressure), ice alone exhibits an exceptionally rich and complicated phase diagram with 17 known crystalline polymorphs. Water molecules also form clathrate compounds with inclusion of guest molecules, such as cubic structure I (s-I), cubic structure II (s-II), hexagonal structure H (s-H), tetragonal structure T (s-T), and tetragonal structure K (s-K). Recently, guest-free clathrate structure II (s-II), also known as ice XVI located in the negative-pressure region of the phase diagram of water, is synthesized in the laboratory and motivates scientists to reexamine other ice clathrates with low density. Using extensive Monte Carlo packing algorithm and dispersion-corrected density functional theory optimization, we predict a crystalline clathrate of cubic structure III (s-III) composed of two large icosihexahedral cavities (8(6)6(8)4(12)) and six small decahedral cavities (8(2)4(8)) per unit cell, which is dynamically stable by itself and can be fully stabilized by encapsulating an appropriate guest molecule in the large cavity. A new phase diagram of water ice with TIP4P/2005 (four-point transferable intermolecular potential/2005) model potential is constructed by considering a variety of candidate phases. The guest-free s-III clathrate with ultralow density overtakes s-II and s-H phases and emerges as the most stable ice polymorph in the pressure region below -5834 bar at 0 K and below -3411 bar at 300 K. PMID:26933681

  4. Triple Guest Occupancy and Negative Compressibility in Hydrogen-Loaded β-Hydroquinone Clathrate.

    PubMed

    Rozsa, Viktor F; Strobel, Timothy A

    2014-06-01

    The molecular interactions and structural behavior of a previously unexplored clathrate system, hydrogen-loaded β-hydroquinone (β-HQ+H2), were investigated under high pressure with synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman/infrared spectroscopies. The β-HQ+H2 system exhibits coupling of two independently rare phenomena: multiple occupancy and negative compressibility. The number of H2 molecules per cavity increases from one to three, causing unit cell volume increase by way of unique crystallographic interstitial guest positioning. We anticipate these occupancy-derived trends may be general to a range of inclusion compounds and may aid the chemical and crystallographic design of both high-occupancy hydrogen storage clathrates and novel, variable-composition materials with tunable mechanical properties. PMID:26273868

  5. Dynamics of Kr in dense clathrate hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, D. D.; Tse, J. S.; Zhao, J. Y.; Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E. E.; Tulk, C. A.

    2011-05-01

    The dynamics of Kr atoms as guests in dense clathrate hydrate structures are investigated using site specific Kr83 nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) spectroscopy in combination with molecular dynamics simulations. The dense structure H hydrate and filled-ice structures are studied at high pressures in a diamond anvil high-pressure cell. The dynamics of Kr in the structure H clathrate hydrate quench recovered at 77 K is also investigated. The Kr phonon density of states obtained from the experimental NRIXS data are compared with molecular dynamics simulations. The temperature and pressure dependence of the phonon spectra provide details of the Kr dynamics in the clathrate hydrate cages. Comparison with the dynamics of Kr atoms in the low-pressure structure II obtained previously was made. The Lamb-Mossbauer factor obtained from NRIXS experiments and molecular dynamics calculations are in excellent agreement and are shown to yield unique information on the strength and temperature dependence of guest-host interactions.

  6. Valproic Acid Induces Antimicrobial Compound Production in Doratomyces microspores

    PubMed Central

    Zutz, Christoph; Bacher, Markus; Parich, Alexandra; Kluger, Bernhard; Gacek-Matthews, Agnieszka; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Wagner, Martin; Rychli, Kathrin; Strauss, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges in public health is the rising number of antibiotic resistant pathogens and the lack of novel antibiotics. In recent years there is a rising focus on fungi as sources of antimicrobial compounds due to their ability to produce a large variety of bioactive compounds and the observation that virtually every fungus may still contain yet unknown so called “cryptic,” often silenced, compounds. These putative metabolites could include novel bioactive compounds. Considerable effort is spent on methods to induce production of these “cryptic” metabolites. One approach is the use of small molecule effectors, potentially influencing chromatin landscape in fungi. We observed that the supernatant of the fungus Doratomyces (D.) microsporus treated with valproic acid (VPA) displayed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and two methicillin resistant clinical S. aureus isolates. VPA treatment resulted in enhanced production of seven antimicrobial compounds: cyclo-(L-proline-L-methionine) (cPM), p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, cyclo-(phenylalanine-proline) (cFP), indole-3-carboxylic acid, phenylacetic acid (PAA) and indole-3-acetic acid. The production of the antimicrobial compound phenyllactic acid was exclusively detectable after VPA treatment. Furthermore three compounds, cPM, cFP, and PAA, were able to boost the antimicrobial activity of other antimicrobial compounds. cPM, for the first time isolated from fungi, and to a lesser extent PAA, are even able to decrease the minimal inhibitory concentration of ampicillin in MRSA strains. In conclusion we could show in this study that VPA treatment is a potent tool for induction of “cryptic” antimicrobial compound production in fungi, and that the induced compounds are not exclusively linked to the secondary metabolism. Furthermore this is the first discovery of the rare diketopiperazine cPM in fungi. Additionally we could demonstrate that cPM and PAA boost antibiotic activity

  7. Clathrate hydrate tuning for technological purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Profio, Pietro; Germani, Raimondo; Savelli, Gianfranco

    2010-05-01

    Gas hydrates are being increasingly considered as convenient media for gas storage and transportation as the knowledge of their properties increases, in particular as relates to methane and hydrogen. Clathrate hydrates may also represent a feasible sequestration technology for carbon dioxide, due to a well defined P/T range of stability, and several research programs are addressing this possibility. Though the understanding of the molecular structure and supramolecular interactions which are responsible of most properties of hydrates have been elucitated in recent years, the underlying theoretical physico-chemical framework is still poor, especially as relates to the role of "conditioners" (inhibitors and promoters) from the molecular/supramolecular point of view. In the present communication we show some results from our research approach which is mainly focused on the supramolecular properties of clathrate hydrate systems - and their conditioners - as a way to get access to a controlled modulation of the formation, dissociation and stabilization of gas hydrates. In particular, this communication will deal with: (a) a novel, compact apparatus for studying the main parameters of formation and dissociation of gas hydrates in a one-pot experiment, which can be easily and rapidly carried out on board of a drilling ship;[1] (b) the effects of amphiphile molecules (surfactants) as inhibitors or promoters of gas hydrate formation;[2] (c) a novel nanotechnology for a reliable and quick production of hydrogen hydrates, and its application to fuel cells;[3,4] and (d) the development of a clathrate hydrate tecnology for the sequestration and geological storage of man-made CO2, possibly with concomitant recovery of natural gas from NG hydrate fields. Furthermore, the feasibility of catalyzing the reduction of carbon dioxide to energy-rich species by hydrates is being investigated. [1] Di Profio, P., Germani, R., Savelli, G., International Patent Application PCT/IT2006

  8. Ice method for production of hydrogen clathrate hydrates

    DOEpatents

    Lokshin, Konstantin; Zhao, Yusheng

    2008-05-13

    The present invention includes a method for hydrogen clathrate hydrate synthesis. First, ice and hydrogen gas are supplied to a containment volume at a first temperature and a first pressure. Next, the containment volume is pressurized with hydrogen gas to a second higher pressure, where hydrogen clathrate hydrates are formed in the process.

  9. Structural Collapse of the Hydroquinone-Formic Acid Clathrate: A Pressure-Medium-Dependent Phase Transition.

    PubMed

    Eikeland, Espen; Thomsen, Maja K; Madsen, Solveig R; Overgaard, Jacob; Spackman, Mark A; Iversen, Bo B

    2016-03-14

    The energy landscape governing a new pressure-induced phase transition in the hydroquinone-formic acid clathrate is reported in which the host structure collapses, opening up the cavity channels within which the guest molecules migrate and order. The reversible isosymmetric phase transition causes significant changes in the morphology and the birefringence of the crystal. The subtle intermolecular interaction energies in the clathrate are quantified at varying pressures using novel model energies and energy frameworks. These calculations show that the high-pressure phase forms a more stable host network at the expense of less-stable host-guest interactions. The phase transition can be kinetically hindered using a nonhydrostatic pressure-transmitting medium, enabling the comparison of intermolecular energies in two polymorphic structures in the same pressure range. Overall this study illustrates a need for accurate intermolecular energies when analyzing self-assembly structures and supramolecular aggregates. PMID:26879515

  10. The cardioprotective compound cloxyquin uncouples mitochondria and induces autophagy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jimmy; Nadtochiy, Sergiy M; Urciuoli, William R; Brookes, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial quality control mechanisms have been implicated in protection against cardiac ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. Previously, cloxyquin (5-chloroquinolin-8-ol) was identified via phenotypic screening as a cardioprotective compound. Herein, cloxyquin was identified as a mitochondrial uncoupler in both isolated heart mitochondria and adult cardiomyocytes. Additionally, cardiomyocytes isolated from transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein-tagged microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 showed increased autophagosome formation with cloxyquin treatment. The autophagy inhibitor chloroquine abolished cloxyquin-induced cardioprotection in both cellular and perfused heart (Langendorff) models of IR injury. Finally, in an in vivo murine left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion model of IR injury, cloxyquin significantly reduced infarct size from 31.4 ± 3.4% to 16.1 ± 2.2%. In conclusion, the cardioprotective compound cloxyquin simultaneously uncoupled mitochondria and induced autophagy. Importantly, autophagy appears to be required for cloxyquin-induced cardioprotection. PMID:26519034

  11. Investigating the Metastability of Clathrate Hydrates for Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, Carolyn Ann

    2014-11-18

    Important breakthrough discoveries have been achieved from the DOE award on the key processes controlling the synthesis and structure-property relations of clathrate hydrates, which are critical to the development of clathrate hydrates as energy storage materials. Key achievements include: (i) the discovery of key clathrate hydrate building blocks (stable and metastable) leading to clathrate hydrate nucleation and growth; (ii) development of a rapid clathrate hydrate synthesis route via a seeding mechanism; (iii) synthesis-structure relations of H2 + CH4/CO2 binary hydrates to control thermodynamic requirements for energy storage and sequestration applications; (iv) discovery of a new metastable phase present during clathrate hydrate structural transitions. The success of our research to-date is demonstrated by the significant papers we have published in high impact journals, including Science, Angewandte Chemie, J. Am. Chem. Soc. Intellectual Merits of Project Accomplishments: The intellectual merits of the project accomplishments are significant and transformative, in which the fundamental coupled computational and experimental program has provided new and critical understanding on the key processes controlling the nucleation, growth, and thermodynamics of clathrate hydrates containing hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide, and other guest molecules for energy storage. Key examples of the intellectual merits of the accomplishments include: the first discovery of the nucleation pathways and dominant stable and metastable structures leading to clathrate hydrate formation; the discovery and experimental confirmation of new metastable clathrate hydrate structures; the development of new synthesis methods for controlling clathrate hydrate formation and enclathration of molecular hydrogen. Broader Impacts of Project Accomplishments: The molecular investigations performed in this project on the synthesis (nucleation & growth)-structure-stability relations of clathrate

  12. Nonequilibrium adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations of methane clathrate hydrate decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, J. A.

    2010-04-01

    Nonequilibrium, constant energy, constant volume (NVE) molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the decomposition of methane clathrate hydrate in contact with water. Under adiabatic conditions, the rate of methane clathrate decomposition is affected by heat and mass transfer arising from the breakup of the clathrate hydrate framework and release of the methane gas at the solid-liquid interface and diffusion of methane through water. We observe that temperature gradients are established between the clathrate and solution phases as a result of the endothermic clathrate decomposition process and this factor must be considered when modeling the decomposition process. Additionally we observe that clathrate decomposition does not occur gradually with breakup of individual cages, but rather in a concerted fashion with rows of structure I cages parallel to the interface decomposing simultaneously. Due to the concerted breakup of layers of the hydrate, large amounts of methane gas are released near the surface which can form bubbles that will greatly affect the rate of mass transfer near the surface of the clathrate phase. The effects of these phenomena on the rate of methane hydrate decomposition are determined and implications on hydrate dissociation in natural methane hydrate reservoirs are discussed.

  13. Far-infrared spectra of CO2 clathrate hydrate frosts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landry, J. C.; England, A. W.

    1993-01-01

    As a product of our interest in remote sensing of planetary ices, frost samples of CO2 clathrate hydrate were grown by depositing water vapor on a cooled surface and pressurizing the resulting water frost with CO2 gas. At pressures above the dissociation pressure of the clathrate, the samples exhibit an absorption peak at 75 cm (sup -1). At pressures below the dissociation pressure, the peak disappears. Since the free CO2 molecule does not have rotational or vibrational absorption in this region, the absorption is attributed to a CO2 rattling mode within a clathrate cage.

  14. Method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems

    DOEpatents

    Sloan, Jr., Earle D.

    1995-01-01

    Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from impeding the flow of fluid in a fluid system. An additive is contacted with clathrate hydrate masses in the system to prevent those clathrate hydrate masses from impeding fluid flow. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member and/or six member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) and hydroxyethylcellulose, either in combination or alone.

  15. Understandng of phonon anharmonicity in thermoelectric clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanigaki, Katsumi; Wu, Jiazhen; Shimotani, Hidekazu; Huynh, Khuong; Akagi, Kazuto; AIMR Collaboration; Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science Collaboration

    Anharmonicity in phonons, apart from the conventional Einstein- or Debye- mode harmonic phonons, is frequently observed for amorphous or glass-like materials. A frontier topic relating to anharmonic phonons revolves around the fact that they are also observed in a single crystal with a void of cage structure. Although the origin of the phonon anharmonicity has been the center of scientific debate for many years, a clear understanding has not yet been achieved. In the present study, we show that the anharmonic oscillations in thermoelectric clathrates can successfully be rationalized in terms of a single unified exponential line for a variety of clathrates by employing a new parameter associated with the freedom of space. The intrinsic nature of phonon anharmonicity is described based on the unified picture with a help of first principles calculations. Although the origin of the anharmonicity appearing in disordered materials is complex to understand due to the missing information on the real structure, the present unified picture gives important information applicable to other systems.

  16. Ambient temperature liquefaction using liquid clathrates: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, J.L.

    1988-06-22

    New air-stable liquid clathrates based on simple salts were used to effect liquefaction. The quantity of the liquefied products from the liquid clathrates based on (organic base/center dot/H)/sup + -/(Cl-H-Cl)/sup minus/ is among the highest yet observed. Indeed, liquid clathrates based on classic room temperature molten salts such as (pyridinium)(AlCl/sub 4/) have afforded yields of liquid material which may go as high as 70%. The work-up scheme for the (NBu/sub 4/)(Cl-H-Br) liquefaction products has afforded excellent mass balance. The first model hydrogenation runs in a liquid clathrate have been successfully carried out. In the liquid clathrate based on (NBu/sub 4/)(BF/sub 4/) and benzene, Wilkinson's catalyst has given almost complete conversion of cyclohexene to cyclohexane. Studies on the retention of cyclohexene and cyclohexane in the liquid clathrate phase are in progress. Initial indications are that cyclohexene is more compatible with the lower liquid layer than is cyclohexane.

  17. Density driven structural transformations in amorphous semiconductor clathrates

    SciTech Connect

    Tulk, Christopher A.; dos Santos, Antonio M.; Neuefeind, Joerg C.; Molaison, Jamie J.; Sales, Brian C.; Honkimaeki, Veijo

    2015-01-16

    The pressure induced crystalline collapse at 14.7 GPa and polyamorphic structures of the semiconductor clathrate Sr8Ga16Ge30 are reported up to 35 GPa. In-situ total scattering measurements under pressure allow the direct microscopic inspection of the mechanisms associated with pressure induced amorphization in these systems, as well as the structure of the recovered phase. It is observed that, between 14.7 and 35 GPa the second peak in the structure factor function gradually disappears. Analysis of the radial distribution function extracted from those data indicate that this feature is associated with gradual cage collapse and breakdown of the tetrahedral structure with the consequent systematic lengthening of the nearest-neighbor framework bonds. This suggests an overall local coordination change to an even higher density amorphous form. Upon recovery from high pressure, the sample remains amorphous, and while there is some indication of the guest-host cage reforming, it doesn't seem that the tetrahedral coordination is recovered. As such, the compresion-decompression process in this systems gives rise to three distict amorphous forms.

  18. Density driven structural transformations in amorphous semiconductor clathrates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tulk, Christopher A.; dos Santos, Antonio M.; Neuefeind, Joerg C.; Molaison, Jamie J.; Sales, Brian C.; Honkimaeki, Veijo

    2015-01-16

    The pressure induced crystalline collapse at 14.7 GPa and polyamorphic structures of the semiconductor clathrate Sr8Ga16Ge30 are reported up to 35 GPa. In-situ total scattering measurements under pressure allow the direct microscopic inspection of the mechanisms associated with pressure induced amorphization in these systems, as well as the structure of the recovered phase. It is observed that, between 14.7 and 35 GPa the second peak in the structure factor function gradually disappears. Analysis of the radial distribution function extracted from those data indicate that this feature is associated with gradual cage collapse and breakdown of the tetrahedral structure with themore » consequent systematic lengthening of the nearest-neighbor framework bonds. This suggests an overall local coordination change to an even higher density amorphous form. Upon recovery from high pressure, the sample remains amorphous, and while there is some indication of the guest-host cage reforming, it doesn't seem that the tetrahedral coordination is recovered. As such, the compresion-decompression process in this systems gives rise to three distict amorphous forms.« less

  19. Propane Clathrate Hydrate Formation Accelerated by Methanol.

    PubMed

    Amtawong, Jaruwan; Guo, Jin; Hale, Jared S; Sengupta, Suvrajit; Fleischer, Everly B; Martin, Rachel W; Janda, Kenneth C

    2016-07-01

    The role of methanol as both an inhibitor and a catalyst for the formation of clathrate hydrates (CHs) has been a topic of intense study. We report a new quantitative study of the kinetics of propane CH formation at 253 K from the reaction of propane gas with <75 μm ice particles that have been doped with varying amounts of methanol. We find that methanol significantly accelerates the formation reaction with quite small doping quantities. Even for only 1 methanol molecule per 10 000 water molecules, the maximum uptake rate of propane into CHs is enhanced and the initiation pressure is reduced. These results enable more efficient production of CHs for gas storage. This remarkable acceleration of the CH formation reaction by small quantities of methanol may place constraints on the mechanism of the inhibition effect observed under other conditions, usually employing much larger quantities of methanol. PMID:27275862

  20. Pressure induced phase transitions in ceramic compounds containing tetragonal zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, R.G.; Pfeiffer, G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Stabilized tetragonal zirconia compounds exhibit a transformation toughening process in which stress applied to the material induces a crystallographic phase transition. The phase transition is accompanied by a volume expansion in the stressed region thereby dissipating stress and increasing the fracture strength of the material. The hydrostatic component of the stress required to induce the phase transition can be investigated by the use of a high pressure technique in combination with Micro-Raman spectroscopy. The intensity of Raman lines characteristic for the crystallographic phases can be used to calculate the amount of material that has undergone the transition as a function of pressure. It was found that pressures on the order of 2-5 kBar were sufficient to produce an almost complete transition from the original tetragonal to the less dense monoclinic phase; while a further increase in pressure caused a gradual reversal of the transition back to the original tetragonal structure.

  1. Regimes of Decomposition of Clathrate in Natural Strata Purged by Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasanov, M.; Shagapov, V.

    2016-06-01

    The process of decomposition of a methane clathrate in a finite-length stratum initially saturated with methane clathrate and methane, which is purged by warm methane, is studied. The influence of the initial parameters of the stratum and purging conditions on the evolution of methane clathrate temperature and saturation is examined. The existence of solutions is demonstrated, which predict methane clathrate decomposition both on the frontal surface and in the volume zone.

  2. First-principles calculations for thermodynamic properties of type-I silicon clathrate intercalated by sodium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Qing Yun; Li, Bin; Zeng, Zhao Yi; Cai, Ling Cang

    2015-09-01

    The ground state properties of the silicon clathrate Si46 intercalated by alkali metal sodium atoms (Na8Si46) are investigated by first-principle methods. Birch-Murnaghan equation of state is fitted to two sets of the E-V data calculated by density functional theory based on the plane-wave basis set within both the local density approximation (LDA) and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Through quasi-harmonic Debye model, some thermodynamic properties comprise the heat capacity, the thermal expansion coefficient, Debye temperature and the Grüneisen parameter for this clathrate compounds Na8Si46 are obtained, which agree well with experimental results. Comparing the calculated heat specific in two ways with experimental results, we find that it is more accurate to describe the “rattle” modes of gust Na atoms in the cages as Einstein oscillators. Moreover, the effects of high pressure on these thermodynamic properties are also investigated which will be very helpful for a synthesis of these clathrate compounds in experiments under high pressure and high temperature condition.

  3. Paeoniflorin, a novel heat shock protein–inducing compound

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dai; Saito, Kiyoto; Ohmi, Yuri; Fujie, Noriyo; Ohtsuka, Kenzo

    2004-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are induced by various physical, chemical, and biological stresses. HSPs are known to function as molecular chaperones, and they not only regulate various processes of protein biogenesis but also function as lifeguards against proteotoxic stresses. Because it is very useful to discover nontoxic chaperone-inducing compounds, we searched for them in herbal medicines. Some herbal medicines had positive effects on the induction of HSPs (Hsp70, Hsp40, and Hsp27) in cultured mammalian cells. We next examined 2 major constituents of these herbal medicines, glycyrrhizin and paeoniflorin, with previously defined chemical structures. Glycyrrhizin had an enhancing effect on the HSP induction by heat shock but could not induce HSPs by itself. In contrast, paeoniflorin had not only an enhancing effect but also an inducing effect by itself on HSP expression. Thus, paeoniflorin might be termed a chaperone inducer and glycyrrhizin a chaperone coinducer. Treatment of cells with paeoniflorin but not glycyrrhizin resulted in enhanced phosphorylation and acquisition of the deoxyribonucleic acid–binding ability of heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1), as well as the formation of characteristic HSF1 granules in the nucleus, suggesting that the induction of HSPs by paeoniflorin is mediated by the activation of HSF1. Also, thermotolerance was induced by treatment with paeoniflorin but not glycyrrhizin. Paeoniflorin had no toxic effect at concentrations as high as 80 μg/ mL (166.4 μM). To our knowledge, this is the first report on the induction of HSPs by herbal medicines. PMID:15633296

  4. Phase diagrams for clathrate hydrates of methane, ethane, and propane from first-principles thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaoxiao; Huang, Yingying; Li, Wenbo; Zheng, Zhaoyang; Jiang, Xue; Su, Yan; Zhao, Jijun; Liu, Changling

    2016-01-28

    Natural gas hydrates are inclusion compounds composed of major light hydrocarbon gaseous molecules (CH4, C2H6, and C3H8) and a water clathrate framework. Understanding the phase stability and formation conditions of natural gas hydrates is crucial for their future exploitation and applications and requires an accurate description of intermolecular interactions. Previous ab initio calculations on gas hydrates were mainly limited by the cluster models, whereas the phase diagram and equilibrium conditions of hydrate formation were usually investigated using the thermodynamic models or empirical molecular simulations. For the first time, we construct the chemical potential phase diagrams of type II clathrate hydrates encapsulated with methane/ethane/propane guest molecules using first-principles thermodynamics. We find that the partially occupied structures (136H2O·1CH4, 136H2O·16CH4, 136H2O·20CH4, 136H2O·1C2H6, and 136H2O·1C3H8) and fully occupied structures (136H2O·24CH4, 136H2O·8C2H6, and 136H2O·8C3H8) are thermodynamically favorable under given pressure-temperature (p-T) conditions. The theoretically predicted equilibrium pressures for pure CH4, C2H6 and C3H8 hydrates at the phase transition point are consistent with the experimental data. These results provide valuable guidance for establishing the relationship between the accurate description of intermolecular noncovalent interactions and the p-T equilibrium conditions of clathrate hydrates and other molecular crystals. PMID:26745181

  5. Far-infrared investigations of a methanol clathrate hydrate - Implications for astronomical observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Moore, Marla H.

    1993-01-01

    Observations of nonterrestrial clathrate hydrates are still lacking despite the fact that clathrates first were suggested to exist in cometary and interstellar ices over 40 years ago. Spectroscopy, the most direct method of astronomical detection, has been hampered by the similarity of clathrate hydrate spectra to those of unenclathrated guest molecules and solid H2O. We have prepared a methanol (CH3OH) clathrate hydrate, using a recently published procedure, and have investigated its far-infrared spectrum. The spectrum is quite different from that of either unenclathrated CH3OH or solid H2O and so should be of value in astronomical searches for this clathrate.

  6. Cardiac Mitochondria l Membrane Stability after Deep Hypothermia using a Xenon Clathrate Cryostasis Protocol – an Electron Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Sheleg, Sergey; Hixon, Hugh; Cohen, Bruce; Lowry, David; Nedzved, Mikhail

    2008-01-01

    We investigated a new cryopreservation method using xenon, a clathrate-forming gas, under medium pressure (100psi). The objective of the study was to determine whether this cryostasis protocol could protect cardiac mitochondria at cryogenic temperatures (below 100 degrees Celsius).We analyzed transmission electron microscopy images to obtain information about changes in mitochondrial morphology induced by cryopreservation of the hearts. Our data showed absence of mitochondrial swelling, rupture of inner and outer membranes, and leakage of mitochondrial matrix into the cytoplasm after applying this cryostasis protocol. The electron microscopy results provided the first evidence that a cryostasis protocol using xenon as a clathrate-forming gas under pressure may have protective effects on intracellular membranes. This cryostasis technology may find applications in developing new approaches for long-term cryopreservation protocols. PMID:18787624

  7. Oxime-induced reactivation of carboxylesterase inhibited by organophosphorus compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, D.M.; Lieske, C.N.; Brecht, K.M.

    1993-05-13

    A structure-activity analysis of the ability of oximes to reactivate rat plasma carboxylesterase (CaE) that was inhibited by organophosphorus (OP) compounds revealed that uncharged oximes, such as diacetylmonoxime or monoisonitrosoacetone, were better reactivators than cationic oximes. Cationic oximes that are excellent reactivators of OP-inhibited acetylcholinesteraser such as pyridinium-2-aldoxime or the bis-pyridinium oximes, HI-6 and TMB-4, produced poor reactivation of OP-inhibited CaE. The best uncharged reactivator was diacetylmonoxime which produced complete reactivation at 0.3 mM in 2 hr of CaE that was inhibited by organophosphinates, alkoxy-containing phosphates, and alkoxy-containing phosphonates. Complete reactivation of CaE could be achieved even after inhibition by phosphonates with highly branched alkoxy groups, such as sarin and soman, that undergo rapid aging with acetylcholinesterase. CaE that was inhibited by phosphonates or phosphates that contained aryloxy groups were reactivated to a lower extent. The cause of this decreased reactivation appears to be an oxime-induced aging reaction that competes with the reactivation reaction. This oxime-induced aging reaction is accelerated by electron-withdrawing substituents on the aryloxy groups of phosphonates and by the presence of multiple aryloxy groups on phosphates. Thus, reactivation and aging of OP-inhibited CaE differ from the same processes for OP-inhibited acetylcholinesterase in both their oxime specificity and inhibitor specificity and, presumably, in their underlying mechanisms.

  8. Clathrate hydrate formation in amorphous cometary ice analogs in vacuo.

    PubMed

    Blake, D; Allamandola, L; Sandford, S; Hudgins, D; Freund, F

    1991-10-25

    The presence of clathrate hydrates in cometary ice has been suggested to account for anomalous gas release at large radial distances from the sun as well as the retention of volatiles in comets to elevated temperatures. However, how clathrate hydrates can form in low-pressure environments, such as in cold interstellar molecular clouds, in the outer reaches of the early solar nebula, or in cometary ices, has been poorly understood. Experiments performed with the use of a modified electron microscope demonstrate that during the warming of vapor-deposited amorphous ices in vacuo, clathrate hydrates can form by rearrangements in the solid state. Phase separations and microporous textures that are the result of these rearrangements may account for a variety of anomalous cometary phenomena. PMID:11538372

  9. Thin-film formation of Si clathrates on Si wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Fumitaka; Iwai, Yoshiki; Noguchi, Akihiro; Sugiyama, Tomoya; Hattori, Masashi; Ogura, Takuya; Himeno, Roto; Kume, Tetsuji; Ban, Takayuki; Nonomura, Shuichi

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we prepared Si clathrate films (Na8Si46 and NaxSi136) using a single-crystalline Si substrate. Highly oriented film growth of Zintl-phase sodium silicide, which is a precursor of Si clathrate, was achieved by exposing Na vapour to Si substrates under an Ar atmosphere. Subsequent heat treatment of the NaSi film at 400 °C (3 h) under vacuum (<10-2 Pa) resulted in a film of Si clathrates having a thickness of several micrometres. Furthermore, this technique enabled the selective growth of Na8Si46 and NaxSi136 using the appropriate crystalline orientation of Si substrates.

  10. Hydrogen storage in double clathrates with tert-butylamine.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Pinnelli S R; Sugahara, Takeshi; Sum, Amadeu K; Sloan, E Dendy; Koh, Carolyn A

    2009-06-18

    The first proof-of-concept of the formation of a double tert-butylamine (t-BuNH(2)) + hydrogen (H(2)) clathrate hydrate has been demonstrated. Binary clathrate hydrates with different molar concentrations of the large guest t-BuNH(2) (0.98-9.31 mol %) were synthesized at 13.8 MPa and 250 K, and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and Raman microscopy. A structural transformation from sVI to sII of t-BuNH(2) hydrate was clearly observed under hydrogen pressures. Raman spectroscopic data suggested that the hydrogen molecules occupied the small cages and had similar occupancy to hydrogen in the double tetrahydrofuran (THF) + H(2) clathrate hydrate. The hydrogen storage capacity in this system was approximately 0.7 H(2) wt % at the molar concentration of t-BuNH(2) close to the sII stoichiometry. PMID:19459664

  11. Method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems

    DOEpatents

    Sloan, Jr., Earle D.

    1995-01-01

    Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from impeding the flow of fluid in a fluid system. An additive is contacted with clathrate hydrate masses in the system to prevent those clathrate hydrate masses from impeding fluid flow. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member, six member and/or seven member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) and hydroxyethylcellulose, either in combination or alone. Additives can also contain multiple cyclic chemical groupings having different size rings. One such additive is sold under the name Gaffix VC-713.

  12. Method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems

    DOEpatents

    Sloan, E.D. Jr.

    1995-07-11

    Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from impeding the flow of fluid in a fluid system. An additive is contacted with clathrate hydrate masses in the system to prevent those clathrate hydrate masses from impeding fluid flow. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member, six member and/or seven member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) and hydroxyethylcellulose, either in combination or alone. Additives can also contain multiple cyclic chemical groupings having different size rings. One such additive is sold under the name Gaffix VC-713.

  13. Electronic and vibrational properties of the Na16Rb8Si136 and K16Rb8Si136 clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Koushik; Myles, Charles W.

    2006-10-01

    We have studied the electronic and vibrational properties of the Na16Rb8Si136 and K16Rb8Si136 clathrate compounds using first principles calculations. In qualitative agreement with the rigid-band model, the electronic band structures display no major modifications due to the inclusion of the alkali metal guests. The guest atom valence electrons occupy the Si136 conduction band states, resulting in a shift of the Fermi level into the conduction band of the ``parent'' Si136 framework. Unlike pristine Si136, the electronic density of states of the filled clathrates show two sharply peaked structures and a dip near the Fermi level. This feature may help to qualitatively explain the temperature-dependent Knight shift observed for the NMR active nuclei in Na16Rb8Si136. The phonon dispersion curves for the filled clathrates reveal low frequency, localized ``rattling'' modes for the Na (or K) and Rb guest atoms. These flat rattler modes compress the highly dispersive host acoustic mode band width. As a consequence, the rattler modes may efficiently scatter the heat-carrying host acoustic phonons, potentially suppressing the lattice thermal conductivity. S. Latturner, B. B. Iversen, J. Sepa, V. Srdanov, and G. Stucky, Phys. Rev B 63, 125403 (2001).

  14. Electronic and vibrational properties of the Na16Rb8Si136 and K16Rb8Si136 clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Koushik; Myles, Charles W.

    2006-10-01

    We have studied the electronic and vibrational properties of the Na16Rb8Si136 and K16Rb8Si136 clathrate compounds using first principles calculations. In qualitative agreement with the rigid-band model, the electronic band structures display no major modifications due to the inclusion of the alkali metal guests. The guest atom valence electrons occupy the Si136 conduction band states, resulting in a shift of the Fermi level into the conduction band of the ``parent'' Si136 framework. Unlike pristine Si136, the electronic density of states of the filled clathrates show two sharply peaked structures and a dip near the Fermi level. This feature may help to qualitatively explain the temperature-dependent Knight shift observed for the NMR active nuclei in Na16Rb8Si136. S. Latturner, B. B. Iversen, J. Sepa, V. Srdanov, and G. Stucky, Phys. Rev B 63, 125403 (2001). The phonon dispersion curves for the filled clathrates reveal low frequency, localized ``rattling'' modes for the Na (or K) and Rb guest atoms. These flat rattler modes compress the highly dispersive host acoustic mode band width. As a consequence, the rattler modes may efficiently scatter the heat-carrying host acoustic phonons, potentially suppressing the lattice thermal conductivity.

  15. Measurement of clathrate hydrates via Raman spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sum, A.K.; Burruss, R.C.; Sloan, E.D., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Raman spectra of clathrate hydrate guest molecules are presented for three known structures (I (sI), II (sII), and H (sH)) in the following systems: CH4 (sI), CO2 (sI), C3H8 (sII), CH4 + CO2 (sI), CD4 + C3H8 (sII), CH4 + N2 (sI), CH4 + THF-d8 (sII), and CH4 + C7D14 (sH). Relative occupancy of CH4 in the large and small cavities of sI were determined by deconvoluting the ??1 symmetric bands, resulting in hydration numbers of 6.04 ?? 0.03. The frequency of the ??1 bands for CH4 in structures I, II, and H differ statistically, so that Raman spectroscopy is a potential tool to identify hydrate crystal structure. Hydrate guest compositions were also measured for two vapor compositions of the CH4 + CO2 system, and they compared favorably with predictions. The large cavities were measured to be almost fully occupied by CH4 and CO2, whereas only a small fraction of the small cavities are occupied by CH4. No CO2 was found in the small cavities. Hydration numbers from 7.27 to 7.45 were calculated for the mixed hydrate.

  16. The effect of Al-substitution on superconducting type-I clathrate Ba8Si46

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lihua; Bi, Shanli; Chen, Ning; Li, Feng; Liu, Yang; Cao, Guohui; Li, Yang

    2014-11-01

    A series of samples with the chemical formula Ba8Si46-xAlx (x = 2, 3, 5, 6, 7 and 8) were prepared by arc melting, ball milling and washing with diluted HCl. The lattice parameter of Ba8Si46-xAlx increases linearly with the increase of nominal Al content x. The composition analysis by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) shown that the actual Al contents in clathrates are lager than the nominal compositions because the dilute Al-contained impurity phases were washed out. The experimental results show that the minimum incorporation of Al into clathrate structure is expected to be about 3 at ambient pressure, which is in agreement with a first-principle simulation. The Al substitution for Si results in the decrease of superconducting transition temperature TC, which can be explained on the BCS theoretical frame. The electron density of state at Fermi level N(EF) decreases with the increment of x except for an abnormal increase for the sample x = 6. Such sample has a higher spatial symmetry of the structure in which all the six Si atoms at 6c sites were substituted by Al atoms. Its higher N(EF) causes to a higher TC. In addition, we calculated the phonon-dispersion relations and vibrational density of states for Al-doped silicon clathrates. The high frequency acoustic branch has a red shift from 430 cm-1 to 420 cm-1 with the doping of Al. The decreased frequency of bond-stretching vibration modes is another reason for the suppression of TC induced by Al substitution.

  17. p53 modulates the AMPK inhibitor compound C induced apoptosis in human skin cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shi-Wei; Wu, Chun-Ying; Wang, Yen-Ting; Kao, Jun-Kai; Lin, Chi-Chen; Chang, Chia-Che; Mu, Szu-Wei; Chen, Yu-Yu; Chiu, Husan-Wen; Chang, Chuan-Hsun; Liang, Shu-Mei; Chen, Yi-Ju; Huang, Jau-Ling; Shieh, Jeng-Jer

    2013-02-15

    Compound C, a well-known inhibitor of the intracellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), has been reported to cause apoptotic cell death in myeloma, breast cancer cells and glioma cells. In this study, we have demonstrated that compound C not only induced autophagy in all tested skin cancer cell lines but also caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype skin cancer cells than in p53-mutant skin cancer cells. Compound C can induce upregulation, phosphorylation and nuclear translocalization of the p53 protein and upregulate expression of p53 target genes in wildtype p53-expressing skin basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cells. The changes of p53 status were dependent on DNA damage which was caused by compound C induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and associated with activated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Using the wildtype p53-expressing BCC cells versus stable p53-knockdown BCC sublines, we present evidence that p53-knockdown cancer cells were much less sensitive to compound C treatment with significant G2/M cell cycle arrest and attenuated the compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. The compound C induced G2/M arrest in p53-knockdown BCC cells was associated with the sustained inactive Tyr15 phosphor-Cdc2 expression. Overall, our results established that compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on the cell's p53 status. - Highlights: ► Compound C caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype than p53-mutant skin cancer cells. ► Compound C can upregulate p53 expression and induce p53 activation. ► Compound C induced p53 effects were dependent on ROS induced DNA damage pathway. ► p53-knockdown attenuated compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. ► Compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on p53 status.

  18. Analysis of Subsurface Clathrates in the Upper Crust of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, John

    2011-01-01

    Titan has an atmosphere rich in methane, which should have long since been depleted unless a mechanism exists for storing this molecule below the surface. One hypothesis is that methane could be stored in the form of a clathrate hydrate, which is a structure with an ice lattice forming molecular cages in which gases are trapped. It is stable at low temperatures and over a wide range of pressures, suggesting that a clathrate hydrate may have stored methane on Titan from the beginning of its history.

  19. A clathrate reservoir hypothesis for Enceladus' south polar plume.

    PubMed

    Kieffer, Susan W; Lu, Xinli; Bethke, Craig M; Spencer, John R; Marshak, Stephen; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2006-12-15

    We hypothesize that active tectonic processes in the south polar terrain of Enceladus, the 500-kilometer-diameter moon of Saturn, are creating fractures that cause degassing of a clathrate reservoir to produce the plume documented by the instruments on the Cassini spacecraft. Advection of gas and ice transports energy, supplied at depth as latent heat of clathrate decomposition, to shallower levels, where it reappears as latent heat of condensation of ice. The plume itself, which has a discharge rate comparable to Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park, probably represents small leaks from this massive advective system. PMID:17170301

  20. Volatile inventories in clathrate hydrates formed in the primordial nebula.

    PubMed

    Mousis, Olivier; Lunine, Jonathan I; Picaud, Sylvain; Cordier, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The examination of ambient thermodynamic conditions suggests that clathrate hydrates could exist in the Martian permafrost, on the surface and in the interior of Titan, as well as in other icy satellites. Clathrate hydrates are probably formed in a significant fraction of planetesimals in the solar system. Thus, these crystalline solids may have been accreted in comets, in the forming giant planets and in their surrounding satellite systems. In this work, we use a statistical thermodynamic model to investigate the composition of clathrate hydrates that may have formed in the primordial nebula. In our approach, we consider the formation sequence of the different ices occurring during the cooling of the nebula, a reasonable idealization of the process by which volatiles are trapped in planetesimals. We then determine the fractional occupancies of guests in each clathrate hydrate formed at a given temperature. The major ingredient of our model is the description of the guest-clathrate hydrate interaction by a spherically averaged Kihara potential with a nominal set of parameters, most of which are fitted to experimental equilibrium data. Our model allows us to find that Kr, Ar and N2 can be efficiently encaged in clathrate hydrates formed at temperatures higher than approximately 48.5 K in the primitive nebula, instead of forming pure condensates below 30 K. However, we find at the same time that the determination of the relative abundances of guest species incorporated in these clathrate hydrates strongly depends on the choice of the parameters of the Kihara potential and also on the adopted size of cages. Indeed, by testing different potential parameters, we have noted that even minor dispersions between the different existing sets can lead to non-negligible variations in the determination of the volatiles trapped in clathrate hydrates formed in the primordial nebula. However, these variations are not found to be strong enough to reverse the relative abundances

  1. Oxime-induced reactivation of carboxylesterase inhibited by organophosphorus compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, D.M.; Lieske, C.N.; Brecht, K.M.

    1994-06-01

    A structure-activity analysis of the ability of oximes to reactivate rat plasma carboxylesterase (CaE) that was inhibited by organophosphorus (OP) compounds revealed that uncharged oximes, such as 2,3-butanedione monoxime (diacetylmonoxime) or monoisonitrosoacetone, were better reactivators than cationic oximes. Cationic oximes that are excellent reactivators of OP-inhibited acetylcholinesterase, such as pyridine-2-aldoxime or the bis-pyridine aldoximes, HI-6 and TMB. 4, produced poor reactivation of OP-inhibited CaE. The best uncharged reactivator was 2,3. butanedione monoxime, which produced complete reactivation at 0.3 mM in 2 h of CaE that was inhibited by phosphinates, alkoxy-containing phosphates, and alkoxy-containing phosphonates. Complete reactivation of CaE could be achieved even after inhibition by phosphonates with highly branched alkoxy groups, such as sarin and soman, that undergo rapid aging with acetylcholinesterase. CaE that was inhibited by phosphonates or phosphates that contained aryloxy groups were reactivated to a lesser extent. The cause of this decreased reactivation appears to be an oxime-induced aging reaction that competes with the reactivation reaction. This oxime-induced aging reaction is accelerated by electron-withdrawing substituents on the aryloxy groups of phosphonates and by the presence of multiple aryloxy groups on phosphates. Thus, reactivation and aging of OP-inhibited CaE differ from the same processes for OP- inhibited acetylcholinesterase in both their oxime specificity and inhibitor specificity and, presumably, in their underlying mechanisms.

  2. Non Equilibrium Transformations of Molecular Compounds Induced Mechanically

    SciTech Connect

    Descamps, M.; Willart, J. F.; Dudognon, E.

    2006-05-05

    Results clarifying the effects of mechanical milling on molecular solids are shortly reviewed. Special attention has been paid to the temperature of milling with regard to the glass transition temperature of the compounds. It is shown that decreasing the grinding temperature has for incidence to increase the amorphization tendency whereas milling above Tg produces a crystal-to-crystal transformation between polymorphic varieties. These observations contradict the usual proposition that grinding transforms the physical state only by a heating effect which induces a local melting. Equilibrium thermodynamics does not seem to be appropriate for describing the process. The driven alloys concept offers a more rational framework to interpret the effect of the milling temperature. Other results are presented which demonstrate the possibility for grinding to realize low temperature solid state alloying which offers new promising ways to stabilize amorphous molecular solids. In a second part the effect of dehydration of a molecular hydrate is described. It is shown that the rate of the dehydration process is a driving force for this other type of mechanical non equilibrium transformation.

  3. Clathrate formation in the systems Sr–Cu–Ge and (Ba,Sr)–Cu–Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Zeiringer, I.; Moser, R.; Kneidinger, F.; Podloucky, R.; Royanian, E.; Grytsiv, A.; Bauer, E.; Giester, G.; Falmbigl, M.; Rogl, P.

    2014-09-15

    In the ternary system Sr–Cu–Ge, a novel clathrate type-I phase was detected, Sr{sub 8}Cu{sub x}Ge{sub 46−x} (5.2≤x<5.4), which exists close to the Zintl limit in a small temperature interval. Sr{sub 8}Cu{sub 5.3}Ge{sub 40.7} decomposes eutectoidally on cooling at 730±3 °C into (Ge), SrGe{sub 2} and τ{sub 1}-SrCu{sub 2−x}Ge{sub 2+x}. Phase equilibria at 700 °C have been established for the Ge rich part and are characterized by the appearance of only one ternary compound, τ{sub 1}-SrCu{sub 2−x}Ge{sub 2+x}, which crystallizes with the ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2} structure type and forms a homogeneity range up to x=0.4 (a=0.42850(4), c=1.0370(1) nm). Additionally, the extent of the clathrate type-I solid solution Ba{sub 8−y}Sr{sub y}Cu{sub x}Ge{sub 46−x} (0≤y≤∼5.6; 5.2≤x≤5.4, from as cast alloys) has been studied at various temperatures. The clathrate type-I crystal structure (space group Pm3{sup ¯}n) has been proven by X-ray single crystal diffraction on two single crystals with the composition (from refinement): Sr{sub 8}Cu{sub 5.36}Ge{sub 40.64} (a=1.06368(2) nm at 300 K) and Ba{sub 4.86}Sr{sub 3.14}Cu{sub 5.36}Ge{sub 40.64} (a=1.06748(2) nm at 300 K) measured at 300, 200 and 100 K. From the temperature dependence of the lattice parameters and the atomic displacement parameters, thermal expansion coefficients, Debye- and Einstein-temperatures and the speed of sound have been determined. From heat capacity measurements of Sr{sub 8}Cu{sub 5.3}Ge{sub 40.7} at low temperatures the Sommerfeld coefficient (γ=24 mJ/mol K{sup 2}) and the Debye temperature (Θ{sub D}{sup LT}=273 K) have been extracted. From a detailed analysis of these data at higher temperatures, Einstein branches of the phonon dispersion relation have been derived and compared to those obtained from the atomic displacement parameters. Electrical resistivity measurements of Sr{sub 8}Cu{sub 5.3}Ge{sub 40.7} reveal a rather metallic behavior in the low temperature range (<300 K

  4. Peierls distortion of endohedral atoms in clathrate I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomono, Hidekazu; Tsumuraya, Kazuo

    2008-03-01

    The guest atom displacements in type II clathrates have been reported on experimental and theoretical points of view. The displacements are reported to be 0.6 å from the cage center of the Si28 cage to the hexagonal in the hydrogen terminated double caged Si28 cluster [1]. The distortion can be expected to occur in the type I clathrate which forms with bamboo structures in the x, y, and z directions. The guest atoms show Peiels distortion when we calculate the equilibrium distances between the two Na atoms which locate at the neighboring Si24 cages in the bamboo structure using periodic density functional calculation. The binding energy between the guest atoms is -0.10 eV/Na2. We also confirm the tendency of the Peierls distotion from the force directions of guest atoms in the double unit cells that contain four Na atoms in one dimension; We will propose the cohesion mechanism of the clathrates that the clathrates are precipitated states of the connecting endohedral atoms in the 14 group atoms. So are the hydroclathrates in which the guest molecules bind each other with chains. [1] H. Takenaka and K. Tsumuraya, Mater. Trans. 47, 63 (2006).

  5. Augmented stability of hydrogen clathrate hydrates by weakly polar molecules.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Takato; Koga, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Hideki

    2009-12-01

    Thermodynamic stability of hydrogen clathrate hydrates has been examined in a wide range of pressure based solely on the intermolecular interactions involved. We show that the stability is indeed augmented by a second guest species (here acetone) called a promoter, a consequence of which is notable reduction in the dissociation pressure of the hydrates encaging hydrogen alone. This evaluation is made by extension of the van der Waals-Platteeuw theory combined with semi-grand-canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations where the number of hydrogen molecules is allowed to vary while those of host water and promoter acetone molecules are fixed. The GCMC simulations then provide various types of cage occupancies of hydrogen from single to quadruple, from which the chemical potential of water in the clathrate hydrate is obtained as a function of the cage occupancy by acetone and the pressure. These occupancies are used to calculate the chemical potential of water in the clathrate hydrate. The stability is estimated by comparison of the chemical potential of water in the clathrate hydrate with that in hexagonal ice. We show the extent to which the dissociation pressure is reduced with increasing the occupancy of the larger cages by acetone. PMID:19968350

  6. Augmented stability of hydrogen clathrate hydrates by weakly polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Takato; Koga, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Hideki

    2009-12-01

    Thermodynamic stability of hydrogen clathrate hydrates has been examined in a wide range of pressure based solely on the intermolecular interactions involved. We show that the stability is indeed augmented by a second guest species (here acetone) called a promoter, a consequence of which is notable reduction in the dissociation pressure of the hydrates encaging hydrogen alone. This evaluation is made by extension of the van der Waals-Platteeuw theory combined with semi-grand-canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations where the number of hydrogen molecules is allowed to vary while those of host water and promoter acetone molecules are fixed. The GCMC simulations then provide various types of cage occupancies of hydrogen from single to quadruple, from which the chemical potential of water in the clathrate hydrate is obtained as a function of the cage occupancy by acetone and the pressure. These occupancies are used to calculate the chemical potential of water in the clathrate hydrate. The stability is estimated by comparison of the chemical potential of water in the clathrate hydrate with that in hexagonal ice. We show the extent to which the dissociation pressure is reduced with increasing the occupancy of the larger cages by acetone.

  7. Impact of the Condensed-Phase Environment on the Translation-Rotation Eigenstates and Spectra of a Hydrogen Molecule in Clathrate Hydrates.

    PubMed

    Powers, Anna; Marsalek, Ondrej; Xu, Minzhong; Ulivi, Lorenzo; Colognesi, Daniele; Tuckerman, Mark E; Bačić, Zlatko

    2016-01-21

    We systematically investigate the manifestations of the condensed-phase environment of the structure II clathrate hydrate in the translation-rotation (TR) dynamics and the inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectra of an H2 molecule confined in the small dodecahedral cage of the hydrate. The aim is to elucidate the extent to which these properties are affected by the clathrate water molecules beyond the confining cage and the proton disorder of the water framework. For this purpose, quantum calculations of the TR eigenstates and INS spectra are performed for H2 inside spherical clathrate domains of gradually increasing radius and the number of water molecules ranging from 20 for the isolated small cage to more than 1800. For each domain size, several hundred distinct hydrogen-bonding topologies are constructed in order to simulate the effects of the proton disorder. Our study reveals that the clathrate-induced splittings of the j = 1 rotational level and the translational fundamental of the guest H2 are influenced by the condensed-phase environment to a dramatically different degree, the former very strongly and the latter only weakly. PMID:26727217

  8. Salinity of multivolatile fluid inclusions determined from clathrate hydrate stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamond, Larryn W.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of the final dissociation temperature of gas-clathrate hydrates ( TmCLA) are routinely used to determine the salinity of fluid inclusions which contain a volatile component in addition to water. Traditionally, experimental data are used to quantitatively relate TmCLA to the inclusion electrolyte concentration. Because of limitations in the experimental database, however, this method has hitherto not been applicable to the multivolatile fluid inclusions that are common in crustal rocks. A general solution to this problem is provided by statistical thermodynamics predictions of multivolatile clathrate stability. Published theoretical models explicitly account for the effect of aqueous NaCl in depressing the stability of clathrates composed of any mixture of CO 2, N 2, H 2S, CH 4 and higher-order hydrocarbons. Analysis of phase relations in complex clathrate systems shows that such theoretical predictions yield model salinities if the following fluid inclusion data are available: (1) the identity of the phase assemblage at TmCLA, (2) the relative concentrations of the volatile species, and (3) either the homogenization temperature of the volatile fluid fraction (bubble point or dew point, either stable or metastable), or an independent estimate of internal pressure at TmCLA. Additional data on fluid inclusion cation ratios can be incorporated in the calculations to recast equivalent weight percent aqueous NaCl in terms of effective electrolyte concentrations. New experimental data on mixed N 2-CO 2 clathrates, obtained from synthetic fluid inclusions, provide a test of both the model predictions and of the analytical procedure proposed for natural fluid inclusions. While the accuracy of the predictions varies between volatile compositions, the uncertainties in the salinities derived from the statistical thermodynamics method are generally of the order acceptable for geochemical applications. Applications to multivolatile, multi-electrolyte fluid

  9. Prediction of Giant Thermoelectric Power Factor in Type-VIII Clathrate Si46

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzzadeh, Payam; Myles, Charles W.; Vashaee, Daryoosh

    2014-11-01

    Clathrate materials have been the subject of intense interest and research for thermoelectric application. Nevertheless, from the very large number of conceivable clathrate structures, only a small fraction of them have been examined. Since the thermal conductivity of clathrates is inherently small due to their large unit cell size and open-framework structure, the current research on clathrates is focused on finding the ones with large thermoelectric power factor. Here we predict an extraordinarily large power factor for type-VIII clathrate Si46. We show the existence of a large density of closely packed elongated ellipsoidal carrier pockets near the band edges of this so far hypothetical material structure, which is higher than that of the best thermoelectric materials known today. The high crystallographic symmetry near the energy band edges for Si46-VIII clathrates is responsible for the formation of such a large number of carrier pockets.

  10. Prediction of giant thermoelectric power factor in type-VIII clathrate Si46.

    PubMed

    Norouzzadeh, Payam; Myles, Charles W; Vashaee, Daryoosh

    2014-01-01

    Clathrate materials have been the subject of intense interest and research for thermoelectric application. Nevertheless, from the very large number of conceivable clathrate structures, only a small fraction of them have been examined. Since the thermal conductivity of clathrates is inherently small due to their large unit cell size and open-framework structure, the current research on clathrates is focused on finding the ones with large thermoelectric power factor. Here we predict an extraordinarily large power factor for type-VIII clathrate Si(46). We show the existence of a large density of closely packed elongated ellipsoidal carrier pockets near the band edges of this so far hypothetical material structure, which is higher than that of the best thermoelectric materials known today. The high crystallographic symmetry near the energy band edges for Si(46)-VIII clathrates is responsible for the formation of such a large number of carrier pockets. PMID:25391971

  11. Desalination utilizing clathrate hydrates (LDRD final report).

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Blake Alexander; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Cygan, Randall Timothy; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2008-01-01

    Advances are reported in several aspects of clathrate hydrate desalination fundamentals necessary to develop an economical means to produce municipal quantities of potable water from seawater or brackish feedstock. These aspects include the following, (1) advances in defining the most promising systems design based on new types of hydrate guest molecules, (2) selection of optimal multi-phase reactors and separation arrangements, and, (3) applicability of an inert heat exchange fluid to moderate hydrate growth, control the morphology of the solid hydrate material formed, and facilitate separation of hydrate solids from concentrated brine. The rate of R141b hydrate formation was determined and found to depend only on the degree of supercooling. The rate of R141b hydrate formation in the presence of a heat exchange fluid depended on the degree of supercooling according to the same rate equation as pure R141b with secondary dependence on salinity. Experiments demonstrated that a perfluorocarbon heat exchange fluid assisted separation of R141b hydrates from brine. Preliminary experiments using the guest species, difluoromethane, showed that hydrate formation rates were substantial at temperatures up to at least 12 C and demonstrated partial separation of water from brine. We present a detailed molecular picture of the structure and dynamics of R141b guest molecules within water cages, obtained from ab initio calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, and Raman spectroscopy. Density functional theory calculations were used to provide an energetic and molecular orbital description of R141b stability in both large and small cages in a structure II hydrate. Additionally, the hydrate of an isomer, 1,2-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, does not form at ambient conditions because of extensive overlap of electron density between guest and host. Classical molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory trials support the results for the isomer hydrate. Molecular dynamics simulations

  12. Hantzsch Ester as a Photosensitizer for the Visible-Light-Induced Debromination of Vicinal Dibromo Compounds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenxin; Tao, Huachen; Huang, Wenhao; Wang, Guoqiang; Li, Shuhua; Cheng, Xu; Li, Guigen

    2016-07-01

    The debromination of vicinal dibromo compounds to generate alkenes usually requires harsh reaction conditions and the addition of catalysts. Just recently the visible-light-induced debromination of vicinal dibromo compounds emerged as a possible alternative to commonly used methods, but the substrate scope of this reaction is limited and a photocatalyst is necessary for the successful conversion of the starting compounds. A catalyst-free visible-light-induced debromination of vicinal dibromo compounds with a base-activated Hantzsch ester as photosensitizer is reported. The method has a wide substrate scope and a broad functional-group compatibility. PMID:27128783

  13. Two host-inducible genes of Rhizobium fredii and characterization of the inducing compound.

    PubMed Central

    Sadowsky, M J; Olson, E R; Foster, V E; Kosslak, R M; Verma, D P

    1988-01-01

    Random transcription fusions with Mu d1(Kan lac) generated three mutants in Rhizobium fredii (strain USDA 201) which showed induction of beta-galactosidase when grown in root exudate of the host plants Glycine max, Phaseolus vulgaris, and Vigna ungliculata. Two genes were isolated from a library of total plasmid DNA of one of the mutants, 3F1. These genes, present in tandem on a 4.2-kilobase HindIII fragment, appear in one copy each on the symbiotic plasmid and do not hybridize to the Rhizobium meliloti common nodulation region. They comprise two separate transcriptional units coding for about 450 and 950 nucleotides, both of which are transcribed in the same direction. The two open reading frames are separated by 586 base pairs, and the 5H regions of the two genes show a common sequence. No similarity was found with the promoter areas of Rhizobium trifolii, R. meliloti, or Bradyrhizobium japonicum nif genes and with any known nodulation genes. Regions homologous to both sequences were detected in EcoRI digests of genomic DNAs from B. japonicum USDA 110, USDA 122, and 61A76, but not in genomic DNA from R. trifolii, Rhizobium leguminosarum, or Rhizobium phaseoli. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis indicated that the inducing compound has properties of 4',7-dihydroxyisoflavone, daidzein. These results suggest that, in addition to common nodulation genes, several other genes appear to be specifically induced by compounds in the root exudate of the host plants. Images PMID:2447061

  14. Is water structure around hydrophobic groups clathrate-like?

    PubMed Central

    Head-Gordon, T

    1995-01-01

    The term "clathrate structure" is quantified for solvation of nonpolar groups by enumerating hydrogen-bonded ring sizes both in the solvation shell and through the shell-bulk interface and comparing it to a bulk control using the ST4 water model. For clathrate-like structure to be evident, the distributions along the hydrophobic surface are expected to be dominated by pentagons, with significant depletion of hexagons and larger polygons. While the distribution in this region is indeed distinguished by a large number of pentagons, there are significant contributions from hexagons and larger rings as well. Calculated polygon distributions through the shell-bulk interface indicate that when water structure is highly cooperative along the hydrophobic surface, hydrogen-bonded pathways leading back into bulk are then reduced. These results are qualitatively consistent with the observation that hydrophobicity is proportional to the nonpolar solute surface area. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:11607575

  15. Observation of interstitial molecular hydrogen in clathrate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Grim, R Gary; Barnes, Brian C; Lafond, Patrick G; Kockelmann, Winfred A; Keen, David A; Soper, Alan K; Hiratsuka, Masaki; Yasuoka, Kenji; Koh, Carolyn A; Sum, Amadeu K

    2014-09-26

    The current knowledge and description of guest molecules within clathrate hydrates only accounts for occupancy within regular polyhedral water cages. Experimental measurements and simulations, examining the tert-butylamine + H2 + H2O hydrate system, now suggest that H2 can also be incorporated within hydrate crystal structures by occupying interstitial sites, that is, locations other than the interior of regular polyhedral water cages. Specifically, H2 is found within the shared heptagonal faces of the large (4(3)5(9)6(2)7(3)) cage and in cavities formed from the disruption of smaller (4(4)5(4)) water cages. The ability of H2 to occupy these interstitial sites and fluctuate position in the crystal lattice demonstrates the dynamic behavior of H2 in solids and reveals new insight into guest-guest and guest-host interactions in clathrate hydrates, with potential implications in increasing overall energy storage properties. PMID:25139731

  16. Guest-host interactions in gas clathrate hydrates under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo-Ruiz, F.; Otero-de-la-Roza, A.; Contreras-García, J.; Menéndez, J. M.; Prieto-Ballesteros, O.; Recio, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    First-principles calculations were performed to determine equilibrium geometries, static equation of state parameters, the energetics and orientation of the guest molecule inside the 5? and 5?6? cages, and vibrational frequencies of methane clathrate hydrate. According to our results, the progressive inclusion of one ? molecule in each clathrate cavity is always a stabilizing process up to saturation. The released energy is very similar for both types of cages. In agreement with the experimental observation of roto-vibrational spectra in this hydrate, we calculate an energy barrier of less than 0.5 kcal/mol, indicating free rotation of methane inside the cages. The stabilizing effect of applied pressure leads to a red shift of the O-H stretching frequencies of the water molecules of around 80 cm? in average at 1 GPa. This paper was presented at the LIIth European High Pressure Research Group (EHPRG 52) Meeting in Lyon (France), 7-12 September 2014.

  17. Clathrate formation in the systems Sr-Cu-Ge and {Ba,Sr}-Cu-Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiringer, I.; Moser, R.; Kneidinger, F.; Podloucky, R.; Royanian, E.; Grytsiv, A.; Bauer, E.; Giester, G.; Falmbigl, M.; Rogl, P.

    2014-09-01

    In the ternary system Sr-Cu-Ge, a novel clathrate type-I phase was detected, Sr8CuxGe46-x (5.2≤x<5.4), which exists close to the Zintl limit in a small temperature interval. Sr8Cu5.3Ge40.7 decomposes eutectoidally on cooling at 730±3 °C into (Ge), SrGe2 and τ1-SrCu2-xGe2+x. Phase equilibria at 700 °C have been established for the Ge rich part and are characterized by the appearance of only one ternary compound, τ1-SrCu2-xGe2+x, which crystallizes with the ThCr2Si2 structure type and forms a homogeneity range up to x=0.4 (a=0.42850(4), c=1.0370(1) nm). Additionally, the extent of the clathrate type-I solid solution Ba8-ySryCuxGe46-x (0≤y≤~5.6; 5.2≤x≤5.4, from as cast alloys) has been studied at various temperatures. The clathrate type-I crystal structure (space group Pm3barn) has been proven by X-ray single crystal diffraction on two single crystals with the composition (from refinement): Sr8Cu5.36Ge40.64 (a=1.06368(2) nm at 300 K) and Ba4.86Sr3.14Cu5.36Ge40.64 (a=1.06748(2) nm at 300 K) measured at 300, 200 and 100 K. From the temperature dependence of the lattice parameters and the atomic displacement parameters, thermal expansion coefficients, Debye- and Einstein-temperatures and the speed of sound have been determined. From heat capacity measurements of Sr8Cu5.3Ge40.7 at low temperatures the Sommerfeld coefficient (γ=24 mJ/mol K2) and the Debye temperature (ΘDLT=273 K) have been extracted. From a detailed analysis of these data at higher temperatures, Einstein branches of the phonon dispersion relation have been derived and compared to those obtained from the atomic displacement parameters. Electrical resistivity measurements of Sr8Cu5.3Ge40.7 reveal a rather metallic behavior in the low temperature range (<300 K). Density function theory calculations provide densities of states, electronic resistivity and Seebeck coefficient as well as the vibrational spectrum and specific heat.

  18. Synthesis and structural characterization of the new clathrates K8Cd4Ge42, Rb8Cd4Ge42, and Cs8Cd4Ge42

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schafer, Marion; Bobev, Svilen

    2016-03-25

    This paper presents results from our exploratory work in the systems K-Cd-Ge, Rb-Cd-Ge, and Cs-Cd-Ge, which yielded the novel type-I clathrates with refined compositions K8Cd3.77(7)Ge42.23, Rb8Cd3.65(7)Ge42.35, and Cs7.80(1)Cd3.65(6)Ge42.35. The three compounds represent rare examples of clathrates of germanium with the alkali metals, where a d10 element substitutes a group 14 element. The three structures, established by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, indicate that the framework-building Ge atoms are randomly substituted by Cd atoms on only one of the three possible crystallographic sites. Furthermore, this and several other details of the crystal chemistry are elaborated.

  19. Influence of Sn-substitution on the thermoelectric properties of the clathrate type-I, Ba8Zn(x)Ge(46-x-y)Sn(y).

    PubMed

    Falmbigl, Matthias; Grytsiv, Andriy; Rogl, Peter; Yan, Xinlin; Royanian, Esmaeil; Bauer, Ernst

    2013-02-28

    A systematic investigation is presented on the influence of Sn-substitution in the clathrate-I compound Ba(8)Zn(x)Ge(46-x-y)Sn(y), particularly for the crystal structure and thermoelectric properties including electrical resistivity, Seebeck coefficient, and thermal conductivity. Two series of samples were prepared to explore the changes for different Sn-contents, (y), and to define the optimum Zn-content, (x), for Ba(8)Zn(x)Ge(46-x-y)Sn(y). Sn-incorporation leads to a linear expansion of the unit cell parameters. Sn-atoms occupy the 6d and 24k positions of the clathrate type-I structure (SG Pm3n, standardized setting). Whereas the electrical resistivity and the Seebeck coefficient modify only slightly compared to Ba(8)Zn(x)Ge(46-x), the thermal conductivity is significantly decreased by the Sn-atoms incorporated into the clathrate-I framework. Furthermore the charge carrier mobility is larger and the effective mass (m* = 1.7 m(e)) is much smaller than those of the ternary compound Ba(8)Zn(x)Ge(46-x). The maximum thermoelectric figure of merit is improved by 80% and reaches ZT = 0.82 at 850 K for Ba(8)Zn(7.66)Ge(36.55)Sn(1.79). PMID:23243666

  20. Dipolar ordering and relaxations in acetonitrile-β-hydroquinone clathrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rheinstädter, M. C.; Kityk, A. V.; Klöpperpieper, A.; Knorr, K.

    2002-08-01

    Single crystals of this clathrate have been studied by measurements of the frequency and temperature dependent dielectric permittivity as well as with polarization-electric field cycles and x-ray diffraction. The dipole moments of the acetonitrile guest molecules form Ising chains that are coupled by the electric dipole-dipole interaction and that are arranged in a triangular array. At 345 K a phase transition from a partially disordered antiferroelectric to a ferrielectric arrangement is observed.

  1. Study of high pressure carbon dioxide clathrates hydrates on Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo Ruiz, F.; Méndez, A. S. J.; Prieto-Ballesteros, O.; Recio, J. M.

    2015-10-01

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of carbon dioxide clathrate hydrates at high pressure. Experimental studies are carried out using several high pressure chambers reaching pressures up to 1 GPa. Using finite cluster and periodic models, we perform computer simulations under the density functional theory approximation that complement and provide a microscopic interpretation of these experiments, thus improving our knowledge of icy satellites such as Ganymede

  2. On the possibilty of clathrate hydrates on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, N.; Nealson, K.; Romanovsky, V.

    2000-01-01

    One of the most important inferences of the Lunar Prospector mission data was the existence of subsurface water ice in the permanently shadowed craters near both lunar poles [Feldman et al., 1998]. We propose and substantiate an alternative explanation that hydrogen can exist in the shallow lunar subsurface in the form of clathrate hydrates: CH4 . 6H(2)o and/or CO2 . 6H(2)o.

  3. Noble gas encapsulation: clathrate hydrates and their HF doped analogues.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Sukanta; Chattaraj, Pratim Kumar

    2014-09-01

    The significance of clathrate hydrates lies in their ability to encapsulate a vast range of inert gases. Although the natural abundance of a few noble gases (Kr and Xe) is poor their hydrates are generally abundant. It has already been reported that HF doping enhances the stability of hydrogen hydrates and methane hydrates, which prompted us to perform a model study on helium, neon and argon hydrates with their HF doped analogues. For this purpose 5(12), 5(12)6(8) and their HF doped analogues are taken as the model clathrate hydrates, which are among the building blocks of sI, sII and sH types of clathrate hydrate crystals. We use the dispersion corrected and gradient corrected hybrid density functional theory for the calculation of thermodynamic parameters as well as conceptual density functional theory based reactivity descriptors. The method of the ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation is used through atom centered density matrix propagation (ADMP) techniques to envisage the structural behaviour of different noble gas hydrates on a 500 fs timescale. Electron density analysis is carried out to understand the nature of Ng-OH2, Ng-FH and Ng-Ng interactions. The current results noticeably demonstrate that the noble gas (He, Ne, and Ar) encapsulation ability of 5(12), 5(12)6(8) and their HF doped analogues is thermodynamically favourable. PMID:25047071

  4. Encapsulation kinetics and dynamics of carbon monoxide in clathrate hydrate

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jinlong; Du, Shiyu; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianzhong; Xu, Hongwu; Vogel, Sven C.; Germann, Timothy C.; Francisco, Joseph S.; Izumi, Fujio; Momma, Koichi; Kawamura, Yukihiko; Jin, Changqing; Zhao, Yusheng

    2014-01-01

    Carbon monoxide clathrate hydrate is a potentially important constituent in the solar system. In contrast to the well-established relation between the size of gaseous molecule and hydrate structure, previous work showed that carbon monoxide molecules preferentially form structure-I rather than structure-II gas hydrate. Resolving this discrepancy is fundamentally important to understanding clathrate formation, structure stabilization and the role the dipole moment/molecular polarizability plays in these processes. Here we report the synthesis of structure-II carbon monoxide hydrate under moderate high-pressure/low-temperature conditions. We demonstrate that the relative stability between structure-I and structure-II hydrates is primarily determined by kinetically controlled cage filling and associated binding energies. Within hexakaidecahedral cage, molecular dynamic simulations of density distributions reveal eight low-energy wells forming a cubic geometry in favour of the occupancy of carbon monoxide molecules, suggesting that the carbon monoxide–water and carbon monoxide–carbon monoxide interactions with adjacent cages provide a significant source of stability for the structure-II clathrate framework. PMID:24936712

  5. On the thermodynamic stability of hydrogen clathrate hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsumasa, Keisuke; Koga, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Hideki

    2007-07-01

    The cage occupancy of hydrogen clathrate hydrate has been examined by grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations for wide ranges of temperature and pressure. The simulations are carried out with a fixed number of water molecules and a fixed chemical potential of the guest species so that hydrogen molecules can be created or annihilated in the clathrate. Two types of the GCMC simulations are performed; in one the volume of the clathrate is fixed and in the other it is allowed to adjust itself under a preset pressure so as to take account of compression by a hydrostatic pressure and expansion due to multiple cage occupancy. It is found that the smaller cage in structure II is practically incapable of accommodating more than a single guest molecule even at pressures as high as 500 MPa, which agrees with the recent experimental investigations. The larger cage is found to encapsulate at most 4 hydrogen molecules, but its occupancy is dependent significantly on the pressure of hydrogen.

  6. Stability of rare gas structure H clathrate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, J A; Klug, D D

    2006-09-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the stability of structure H (sH) clathrate hydrates with the rare gases Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. Simulations on a 3 x 3 x 3 sH unit cell replica are performed at ambient pressure at 40 and 100 K temperatures. The small and medium (s+m) cages of the sH unit cell are assigned rare gas guest occupancies of 1 and for large (l) cages guest occupancies of 1-6 are considered. Radial distribution functions for guest pairs with occupancies in the l-l, l-(s+m), and (s+m)-(s+m) cages are presented. The unit cell volumes and configurational energies are studied as a function of large cage occupancy for the rare gases. Free energy calculations are carried out to determine the stability of clathrates for large cage occupancies at 100 K and 1 bar and 20 kbar pressures. These studies show that the most stable argon clathrate has five guests in the large cages. For krypton and xenon the most stable configurations have three and two guests in the large cages, respectively. PMID:16999535

  7. On the thermodynamic stability of hydrogen clathrate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Katsumasa, Keisuke; Koga, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Hideki

    2007-07-28

    The cage occupancy of hydrogen clathrate hydrate has been examined by grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations for wide ranges of temperature and pressure. The simulations are carried out with a fixed number of water molecules and a fixed chemical potential of the guest species so that hydrogen molecules can be created or annihilated in the clathrate. Two types of the GCMC simulations are performed; in one the volume of the clathrate is fixed and in the other it is allowed to adjust itself under a preset pressure so as to take account of compression by a hydrostatic pressure and expansion due to multiple cage occupancy. It is found that the smaller cage in structure II is practically incapable of accommodating more than a single guest molecule even at pressures as high as 500 MPa, which agrees with the recent experimental investigations. The larger cage is found to encapsulate at most 4 hydrogen molecules, but its occupancy is dependent significantly on the pressure of hydrogen. PMID:17672709

  8. Physical modeling of the formation of clathrate hydrates of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drobyshev, A.; Aldiyarov, A.; Kurnosov, V.; Katpaeva, K.; Korshikov, E.; Sokolov, D.; Shinbayeva, A.; Timchenko, A.

    2015-06-01

    Nowadays natural gas hydrates attract special attention as a possible source of fossil fuel. According to various estimates, the reserves of hydrocarbons in hydrates exceed considerably explored reserves of natural gas. Due to the clathrate structure the unit volume of the gas hydrate can contain up to 160-180 volumes of pure gas. In recent years interest to a problem of gas hydrates has considerably increased. Such changes are connected with the progress in searches of the alternative sources of hydrocarbonic raw materials in countries that do not possess the resources of energy carriers. Thus gas hydrates are nonconventional sources of the hydrocarbonic raw materials which can be developed in the near future. At the same time, mechanisms of methane clathrate hydrates formations have not reached an advanced level, their thermophysical and mechanical properties have not been investigated profoundly. Thereby our experimental modeling of the processes of formation of methane clathrate hydrates in water cryomatrix prepared by co-condensation from the gas phase onto a cooled substrate was carried out over the range of condensation temperatures 12-60 K and pressures 10-4-10-6 Torr. In our experiments the concentration of methane in water varied in the range of 5%-90%. The thickness deposited films was 30-60 μm. The vibrational spectra of two-component thin films of CH4 + H2O condensates were measured and analyzed.

  9. High Throughput Screening Identifies a Novel Compound Protecting Cardiomyocytes from Doxorubicin-Induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Gergely, Szabolcs; Hegedűs, Csaba; Lakatos, Petra; Kovács, Katalin; Gáspár, Renáta; Csont, Tamás; Virág, László

    2015-01-01

    Antracyclines are effective antitumor agents. One of the most commonly used antracyclines is doxorubicin, which can be successfully used to treat a diverse spectrum of tumors. Application of these drugs is limited by their cardiotoxic effect, which is determined by a lifetime cumulative dose. We set out to identify by high throughput screening cardioprotective compounds protecting cardiomyocytes from doxorubicin-induced injury. Ten thousand compounds of ChemBridge's DIVERSet compound library were screened to identify compounds that can protect H9C2 rat cardiomyocytes against doxorubicin-induced cell death. The most effective compound proved protective in doxorubicin-treated primary rat cardiomyocytes and was further characterized to demonstrate that it significantly decreased doxorubicin-induced apoptotic and necrotic cell death and inhibited doxorubicin-induced activation of JNK MAP kinase without having considerable radical scavenging effect or interfering with the antitumor effect of doxorubicin. In fact the compound identified as 3-[2-(4-ethylphenyl)-2-oxoethyl]-1,2-dimethyl-1H-3,1-benzimidazol-3-ium bromide was toxic to all tumor cell lines tested even without doxorubicine treatment. This benzimidazole compound may lead, through further optimalization, to the development of a drug candidate protecting the heart from doxorubicin-induced injury. PMID:26137186

  10. Clathrate formation and phase equilibria in the thiourea-bromoform system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekhova, G. N.; Shubin, Yu. V.; Pinakov, D. V.; Alferova, N. I.

    2008-07-01

    Phase equilibria in the thiourea (host)-bromoform (guest) binary system were studied by physicochemical analysis methods over the temperature range 270 455 K. The stoichiometry and stability region were determined for the channel-type compound CHBr3 · 2.40(2)(NH2)2CS; the compound was observed for the first time. When heated, the clathrate incongruently decomposed at 424.0 ± 0.8 K to rhombic thiourea and the guest component. The solubility isotherm of the thiourea-bromoform-acetic acid system was studied to find that the compound was thermodynamically stable at 293 K over the range of guest component concentrations 100 35 wt %. A decrease in its content in an equilibrium mother liquor resulted in the appearance of X-ray diffraction reflections of the initial host α polymorph. Rhombohedral cell parameters were determined (space group R-3 c, a = 15.89(1) Å, c = 12.40(1) Å, V = 2711(6) Å3, d calcd = 2.000 g/cm3, and d expt = 1.98(2) g/cm3). The mode of packing of bromoform molecules was compared with the organization of the guest subsystem in inclusion compounds formed by the substances studied.

  11. Radiation induced chemical changes of phenolic compounds in strawberries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitfellner, F.; Solar, S.; Sontag, G.

    2003-06-01

    In unirradiated strawberries four phenolic acids (gallic acid, p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid), the flavonoids (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin and glycosides from kaempferol and quercetin were determined by reversed phase chromatography with diode array detection. Characteristic linear dose/concentration relationships were found for 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and two unidentified compounds. One of them may be usable as marker to prove an irradiation treatment.

  12. Roles of Autophagy Induced by Natural Compounds in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Naponelli, V.; Bettuzzi, S.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a homeostatic mechanism through which intracellular organelles and proteins are degraded and recycled in response to increased metabolic demand or stress. Autophagy dysfunction is often associated with many diseases, including cancer. Because of its role in tumorigenesis, autophagy can represent a new therapeutic target for cancer treatment. Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most common cancers in aged men. The evidence on alterations of autophagy related genes and/or protein levels in PCa cells suggests a potential implication of autophagy in PCa onset and progression. The use of natural compounds, characterized by low toxicity to normal tissue associated with specific anticancer effects at physiological levels in vivo, is receiving increasing attention for prevention and/or treatment of PCa. Understanding the mechanism of action of these compounds could be crucial for the development of new therapeutic or chemopreventive options. In this review we focus on the current evidence showing the capacity of natural compounds to exert their action through autophagy modulation in PCa cells. PMID:25821782

  13. Gas Clathrate Hydrates Experiment for High School Projects and Undergraduate Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prado, Melissa P.; Pham, Annie; Ferazzi, Robert E.; Edwards, Kimberly; Janda, Kenneth C.

    2007-01-01

    We present a laboratory procedure, suitable for high school and undergraduate students, for preparing and studying propane clathrate hydrate. Because of their gas storage potential and large natural deposits, gas clathrate hydrates may have economic importance both as an energy source and a transportation medium. Similar to pure ice, the gas…

  14. Chemical-clathrate hybrid hydrogen storage: storage in both guest and host.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Timothy A; Kim, Yongkwan; Andrews, Gary S; Ferrell, Jack R; Koh, Carolyn A; Herring, Andrew M; Sloan, E Dendy

    2008-11-12

    Hydrogen storage from two independent sources of the same material represents a novel approach to the hydrogen storage problem, yielding storage capacities greater than either of the individual constituents. Here we report a novel hydrogen storage scheme in which recoverable hydrogen is stored molecularly within clathrate cavities as well as chemically in the clathrate host material. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic measurements confirm the formation of beta-hydroquinone (beta-HQ) clathrate with molecular hydrogen. Hydrogen within the beta-HQ clathrate vibrates at considerably lower frequency than hydrogen in the free gaseous phase and rotates nondegenerately with splitting comparable to the rotational constant. Compared with water-based clathrate hydrate phases, the beta-HQ+H2 clathrate shows remarkable stability over a range of p-T conditions. Subsequent to clathrate decomposition, the host HQ was used to directly power a PEM fuel cell. With one H2 molecule per cavity, 0.61 wt % hydrogen may be stored in the beta-HQ clathrate cavities. When this amount is combined with complete dehydrogenation of the host hydroxyl hydrogens, the maximum hydrogen storage capacity increases nearly 300% to 2.43 wt %. PMID:18928261

  15. Accelerated formation of THF-H2 clathrate hydrate in porous media.

    PubMed

    Saha, Dipendu; Deng, Shuguang

    2010-06-01

    Porous media were used to control the hydrogen clathrate particle size in order to accelerate its formation kinetics. Stoichiometric tetrahydrofuran-hydrogen binary clathrate hydrates with approximately 1 wt % hydrogen loading formed in the mesopores of four porous media with median pore diameters of 49, 65, 100, and 226 A at 270 K and hydrogen pressure of 65 bar. The minimum formation time for the tetrahydrofuran-hydrogen binary clathrate hydrates was 27 min in a porous medium with a median pore diameter of 49 A, which is 6-22 times faster than the tetrahydrofuran-hydrogen binary clathrate hydrates formed in the bulk ice. The clathrate formation time was found to increase with pore size of the porous media. A modified shrinking core kinetic model was used to calculate the diffusivity of hydrogen in the tetrahydrofuran-hydrogen binary clathrate hydrates. Hydrogen diffusivities in the tetrahydrofuran-hydrogen binary clathrate hydrates were found to be on the order of 10(-18)-10(-19) m(2)/s and decrease with increasing pore size or clathrate particle size. PMID:20148547

  16. Yb-substituted clathrates Ba8-xYbxGa16Ge30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L. H.; Wei, Y. P.; Yang, S. W.; Zhu, J.; Li, Y.

    2014-06-01

    Exploration of new rare-earth captured clathrates is an important field of clathrate application. Study on the second phases produced in the synthesis process is crucial for confirming the incorporation of rare earth atoms into the clathrate lattice. In the current study, the Yb-doped clathrate samples with nominal composition of Ba6Yb2Ga16Ge30 were prepared by combining arc melting (ARC), melt spinning (MS) and spark plasma sintering (SPS) techniques. By using the TEM with EDS analysis and X-ray diffraction refinement, phase analysis was systemically performed in different steps of the preparation process. Although the clathrate was the main phase in obtained samples, the Yb content in the clathrate phase was found to be much lower than the nominal composition as the Yb atoms strongly tend to create other byproduct phases including Yb2O3 — which is the main obstacle in the synthesis of Yb-substituted clathrates. For the dilute Yb-doped germanium clathrate sample a decrease in the thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity was simultaneously observed, therefore, no expected improvement of ZT occurred.

  17. Thermoelectric Properties of Au- Containing Type-I Clathrates Ba8AuxGa16-3xGe30+2x

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Zuxin; Cho, Jung Young; Tessema, Misle M.; Salvador, James R.; Waldo, Richard A.; Yang, Jihui; Wang, Hsin; Cai, Wei; Kirkham, Melanie J; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Wenqing

    2014-01-01

    Type I clathrates, with compositions based on Ba8Ga16Ge30, are a class of promising thermoelectric materials due to their intrinsically low thermal conductivity. It has been demonstrated previously that the thermoelectric performance can be improved by transition metal substitution of the framework atoms. In this study, the effects of Au substitution for Ga/Ge on thermal and electrical transport properties of type I clathrate compounds have been investigated. Polycrystalline samples with a large range of Au content have been synthesized using conventional solid state techniques with the actual compositions of resulting materials approximately following Zintl-Klemm rules. The charge carrier type changes from electrons (n) to holes (p) as the Au content increases. The Seebeck coefficient (S) and power factor (S2/ where is the electrical resistivity) were improved by Au substitution and the resulting overall thermoelectric properties were enhanced by Au substitution with a thermoelectric figure of merit ZT ~ 0.63 at temperature T = 740 K for the composition Ba8Au5.47Ge39.96. The results presented herein show that Au-containing type I clathrates are promising p-type thermoelectric materials for high temperature applications.

  18. Radioactive-induced tumors by phosphorus-32 as colloidal compound

    SciTech Connect

    Ubios, A.M.; Silberman, F.S.; Cabrini, R.L.

    1983-05-01

    Chromic colloidal phosphate labeled with 32P, which has been proposed for the treatment of several articular diseases, was injected intra-articularly in the knee joint of adult Wistar rats. After a 270 days minimum latent period, tumors began to appear in the injected zone, to a 70% frequency. Ten lung metastases were detected. In five cases, squamous cell carcinomas were induced in the injected area. The relevance of a sound evaluation of the risk involved in treatments with radioactive isotopes, is discussed.

  19. Competition between the compound and the pre-compound emission processes in α-induced reactions at near astrophysical energy to well above it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Sharma, Vijay Raj; Yadav, Abhiskek; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.

    2016-04-01

    The study of pre-compound emission in α-induced reactions, particularly at the low incident energies, is of considerable interest as the pre-compound emission is more likely to occur at higher energies. With a view to study the competition between the compound and the pre-compound emission processes in α-induced reactions at different energies and with different targets, a systematics for neutron emission channels in targets 51V, 55Mn, 93Nb, 121, 123Sb and 141Pr at energy ranging from astrophysical interest to well above it, has been developed. The off-line γ-ray-spectrometry based activation technique has been adopted to measure the excitation functions. The experimental excitation functions have been analysed within the framework of the compound nucleus mechanism based on the Weisskopf-Ewing model and the pre-compound emission calculations based on the geometry dependent hybrid model. The analysis of the data shows that experimental excitation functions could be reproduced only when the pre-compound emission, simulated theoretically, is taken into account. The strength of pre-compound emission process for each system has been obtained by deducing the pre-compound fraction. Analysis of data indicates that in α-induced reactions, the pre-compound emission process plays an important role, particularly at the low incident energies, where the pure compound nucleus process is likely to dominate.

  20. The mechanism of alcoholic beverage induced superconductivity in Fe-chalcogenide compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguchi, Keita; Demura, Satoshi; Okazaki, Hiroyuki; Denholme, Saleem; Fujioka, Masaya; Ozaki, Toshinori; Yamaguchi, Takahide; Takeya, Hiroyuki; Takano, Yoshihiko

    2013-03-01

    We have clarified the mechanism of alcoholic beverage induced superconductivity in Fe-chalcogenide compounds. Previously we reported that the bulk superconductivity in Fe-based compounds Fe(Te, Se) and Fe(Te, S) is achieved by heating in alcoholic beverages. However, the exact mechanism of how they act to enhance the superconductivity in the compounds remains unsolved. To understand the effect of alcoholic beverage treatment, we investigated the mechanism using a technology of metabolomic analysis. We found that weak acid in alcoholic beverages has the ability to deintercalate the excess Fe, which is not in favor of superconductivity. In this presentation, we will discuss the systematic mechanism to induce superconductivity in Fe-chalcogenide compounds.

  1. Glutathione prevents ethanol induced gastric mucosal damage and depletion of sulfhydryl compounds in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Loguercio, C; Taranto, D; Beneduce, F; del Vecchio Blanco, C; de Vincentiis, A; Nardi, G; Romano, M

    1993-01-01

    Whether parenteral administration of reduced glutathione prevented ethanol induced damage to and depletion of sulfhydryl compounds in the human gastric mucosa was investigated. Ten healthy volunteers underwent endoscopy on three separate occasions. Gastric mucosal damage was induced by spraying 80% ethanol on to the gastric mucosa through the biopsy channel of the endoscope. The gastric mucosal score, total sulfhydryls, glutathione, and cysteine were evaluated in basal conditions and after ethanol administration with and without pretreatment with parenteral glutathione. Glutathione significantly decreased the extent of ethanol induced macroscopic injury to the mucosa of the gastric body and antrum. Glutathione's protective effect is associated with appreciable inhibition of ethanol induced depletion of gastric sulfhydryl compounds. This is the first report of protection against ethanol induced gastric mucosal damage by a sulfhydryl containing agent in humans. PMID:8432465

  2. Hydrogen storage in molecular compounds.

    PubMed

    Mao, Wendy L; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2004-01-20

    At low temperature (T) and high pressure (P), gas molecules can be held in ice cages to form crystalline molecular compounds that may have application for energy storage. We synthesized a hydrogen clathrate hydrate, H(2)(H(2)O)(2), that holds 50 g/liter hydrogen by volume or 5.3 wt %. The clathrate, synthesized at 200-300 MPa and 240-249 K, can be preserved to ambient P at 77 K. The stored hydrogen is released when the clathrate is warmed to 140 K at ambient P. Low T also stabilizes other molecular compounds containing large amounts of molecular hydrogen, although not to ambient P, e.g., the stability field for H(2)(H(2)O) filled ice (11.2 wt % molecular hydrogen) is extended from 2,300 MPa at 300 K to 600 MPa at 190 K, and that for (H(2))(4)CH(4) (33.4 wt % molecular hydrogen) is extended from 5,000 MPa at 300 K to 200 MPa at 77 K. These unique characteristics show the potential of developing low-T molecular crystalline compounds as a new means for hydrogen storage. PMID:14711993

  3. Thermodynamics of clathrate hydrate at low and high pressures with application to the outer solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, J. I.; Stevenson, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The thermodynamic stability of clathrate hydrate is calculated to predict the formation conditions corresponding to a range of solar system parameters. The calculations were performed using the statistical mechanical theory developed by van der Waals and Platteeuw (1959) and existing experimental data concerning clathrate hydrate and its components. Dissociation pressures and partition functions (Langmuir constants) are predicted at low pressure for CO clathrate (hydrate) using the properties of chemicals similar to CO. It is argued that nonsolar but well constrained noble gas abundances may be measurable by the Galileo spacecraft in the Jovian atmosphere if the observed carbon enhancement is due to bombardment of the atmosphere by clathrate-bearing planetesimals sometime after planetary formation. The noble gas abundances of the Jovian satellite Titan are predicted, assuming that most of the methane in Titan is accreted as clathrate. It is suggested that under thermodynamically appropriate conditions, complete clathration of water ice could have occurred in high-pressure nebulas around giant planets, but probably not in the outer solar nebula. The stability of clathrate in other pressure ranges is also discussed.

  4. The Protective Role of Phenolic Compounds Against Doxorubicin-induced Cardiotoxicity: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Razavi-Azarkhiavi, Kamal; Iranshahy, Milad; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Shirani, Kobra; Karimi, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    Although doxorubicin (DOX) is among the most widely used anticancer agents, its clinical application is hampered owing to its cardiotoxicity. Adjuvant therapy with an antioxidant has been suggested as a promising strategy to reduce DOX-induced adverse effects. In this context, many phenolic compounds have been reported to protect against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. The cardioprotective effects of phenolic compounds are exerted via multiple mechanisms including inhibition of reactive oxygen species generation, apoptosis, NF-κB, p53, mitochondrial dysfunction, and DNA damage. In this review, we present a summary of the in vitro, in vivo, and clinical findings on the protective mechanisms of phenolic compounds against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:27341037

  5. Prediction of clathrate structure type and guest position by molecular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Everly B; Janda, Kenneth C

    2013-05-16

    The clathrate hydrates occur in various types in which the number, size, and shape of the various cages differ. Usually the clathrate type of a specific guest is predicted by the size and shape of the molecular guest. We have developed a methodology to determine the clathrate type employing molecular mechanics with the MMFF force field employing a strategy to calculate the energy of formation of the clathrate from the sum of the guest/cage energies. The clathrate type with the most negative (most stable) energy of formation would be the type predicted (we mainly focused on type I, type II, or bromine type). This strategy allows for a calculation to predict the clathrate type for any cage guest in a few minutes on a laptop computer. It proved successful in predicting the clathrate structure for 46 out of 47 guest molecules. The molecular mechanics calculations also provide a prediction of the guest position within the cage and clathrate structure. These predictions are generally consistent with the X-ray and neutron diffraction studies. By supplementing the diffraction study with molecular mechanics, we gain a more detailed insight regarding the details of the structure. We have also compared MM calculations to studies of the multiple occupancy of the cages. Finally, we present a density functional calculation that demonstrates that the inside of the clathrates cages have a relatively uniform and low electrostatic potential in comparison with the outside oxygen and hydrogen atoms. This implies that van der Waals forces will usually be dominant in the guest-cage interactions. PMID:23600658

  6. Deuterium enrichment by selective photo-induced dissociation of an organic carbonyl compound

    DOEpatents

    Marling, John B.

    1981-01-01

    A method for producing a deuterium enriched material by photoinduced dissociation which uses as the working material a gas phase photolytically dissociable organic carbonyl compound containing at least one hydrogen atom bonded to an atom which is adjacent to a carbonyl group and consisting of molecules wherein said hydrogen atom is present as deuterium and molecules wherein said hydrogen atom is present as another isotope of hydrogen. The organic carbonyl compound is subjected to intense infrared radiation at a preselected wavelength to selectively excite and thereby induce dissociation of the deuterium containing species to yield a deuterium enriched stable molecular product. Undissociated carbonyl compound, depleted in deuterium, is preferably redeuterated for reuse.

  7. Geochemistry of clathrate-derived methane in Arctic Ocean waters

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, S.M.; Reagan, M.T.; Moridis, G.J.; Cameron-Smith, P.J.

    2010-03-15

    Alterations to the composition of seawater are estimated for microbial oxidation of methane from large polar clathrate destabilizations, which may arise in the coming century. Gas fluxes are taken from porous flow models of warming Arctic sediment. Plume spread parameters are then used to bracket the volume of dilution. Consumption stoichiometries for the marine methanotrophs are based on growth efficiency and elemental/enzyme composition data. The nutritional demand implied by extra CH{sub 4} removal is compared with supply in various high latitude water masses. For emissions sized to fit the shelf break, reaction potential begins at one hundred micromolar and falls to order ten a thousand kilometers downstream. Oxygen loss and carbon dioxide production are sufficient respectively to hypoxify and acidify poorly ventilated basins. Nitrogen and the monooxygenase transition metals may be depleted in some locations as well. Deprivation is implied relative to existing ecosystems, along with dispersal of the excess dissolved gas. Physical uncertainties are inherent in the clathrate abundance, patch size, outflow buoyancy and mixing rate. Microbial ecology is even less defined but may involve nutrient recycling and anaerobic oxidizers.

  8. Polarization response of clathrate hydrates capsulated with guest molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Qun; Li, Jinshan; Huang, Hui; Wang, Xinqin; Yang, Mingli

    2016-05-01

    Clathrate hydrates are characterized by their water cages encapsulating various guest atoms or molecules. The polarization effect of these guest-cage complexes was studied with combined density functional theory and finite-field calculations. An addition rule was noted for these systems whose total polarizability is approximately equal to the polarizability sum of the guest and the cage. However, their distributional polarizability computed with Hirshfeld partitioning scheme indicates that the guest-cage interaction has considerable influence on their polarization response. The polarization of encapsulated guest is reduced while the polarization of water cage is enhanced. The counteraction of these two opposite effects leads to the almost unchanged total polarizability. Further analysis reveals that the reduced polarizability of encapsulated guest results from the shielding effect of water cage against the external field and the enhanced polarizability of water cage from the enhanced bonding of hydrogen bonds among water molecules. Although the charge transfer through the hydrogen bonds is rather small in the water cage, the polarization response of clathrate hydrates is sensitive to the changes of hydrogen bonding strength. The guest encapsulation strengthens the hydrogen bonding network and leads to enhanced polarizability.

  9. Polarization response of clathrate hydrates capsulated with guest molecules.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qun; Li, Jinshan; Huang, Hui; Wang, Xinqin; Yang, Mingli

    2016-05-28

    Clathrate hydrates are characterized by their water cages encapsulating various guest atoms or molecules. The polarization effect of these guest-cage complexes was studied with combined density functional theory and finite-field calculations. An addition rule was noted for these systems whose total polarizability is approximately equal to the polarizability sum of the guest and the cage. However, their distributional polarizability computed with Hirshfeld partitioning scheme indicates that the guest-cage interaction has considerable influence on their polarization response. The polarization of encapsulated guest is reduced while the polarization of water cage is enhanced. The counteraction of these two opposite effects leads to the almost unchanged total polarizability. Further analysis reveals that the reduced polarizability of encapsulated guest results from the shielding effect of water cage against the external field and the enhanced polarizability of water cage from the enhanced bonding of hydrogen bonds among water molecules. Although the charge transfer through the hydrogen bonds is rather small in the water cage, the polarization response of clathrate hydrates is sensitive to the changes of hydrogen bonding strength. The guest encapsulation strengthens the hydrogen bonding network and leads to enhanced polarizability. PMID:27250307

  10. First-principles stability study of clathrate hydrates under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thonhauser, Timo; Li, Qi; Kolb, Brian

    2010-03-01

    We present a first-principles DFT study of the structural stability of clathrate hydrates under pressure. These materials form under high pressure and low temperature and consist of polyhedral water cages that form an ice-like framework of hydrogen bonds. Clathrate hydrates can be filled with guest molecules such as methane or molecular hydrogen, in which case these materials and their stability are of interest for energy-storage solutions. Since the interactions between the water molecules themselves---but also between the water molecules and the guest molecules---is at least partly determined by van der Waals forces, we utilize the recently developed self-consistent van der Waals density functional vdW-DF (T. Thonhauser, V.R. Cooper, S. Li, A. Puzder, P. Hyldgaard, and D.C. Langreth, Phys. Rev. B 76, 125112 (2007)). For our simulations we consider the empty host lattice, as well as the host lattice filled with methane and molecular hydrogen, for pressures up to 1 GPa. Our results show that the system undergoes phase transitions from structure I to structure II and finally to structure H, in good agreement with experiment.

  11. Calculation of NMR lineshapes for Ba-Al-Ge clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Sergio; Gou, Weiping; Ross, Joseph

    2008-10-01

    Clathrates consist of Si, Ge, or Sn cages in a crystalline framework, with guest atoms inside the cages. They have gained interest due to thermoelectric properties suitable for potential device application. To understand Al substitutional configurations, we calculated Al NMR line shapes for several structures with compositions Ba8Ge46-x-yAlxy for x=3,8,11,12,16,24; y=2,3; where represents a vacancy. The results were obtained by calculating Electric Field Gradients (EFG) for Al sites of type-I clathrates assuming an ordered superstructure of vacancies and framework occupation. We used ab initio methods in the Generalized Gradient Approximation as implemented by the WIEN2k program, and used the results to simulate NMR lineshapes numerically. These were compared to our previously reported NMR lineshapes. In the case of Ba8Ge31Al123 four Al sites in the superstructure include two sites with small EFG where the vacancy is far away and two sites with large EFG with a vacancy adjacent to Al. Assuming a larger Knight shift for sites next to vacancies, we obtain good agreement with NMR experimental results for reduced-Al Ba8Ge34Al12, while for the Zintl phase Ba8Ge30Al16 we obtain good agreement with no spontaneous vacancies. We infer that Al prefers locations close to vacancies rather than random occupation. This work was supported by Robert A. Welch Foundation (Grant A-1526).

  12. Additives and method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems

    DOEpatents

    Sloan, E.D. Jr.; Christiansen, R.L.; Lederhos, J.P.; Long, J.P.; Panchalingam, V.; Du, Y.; Sum, A.K.W.

    1997-06-17

    Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from detrimentally impeding the possible flow of a fluid susceptible to clathrate hydrate formation. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member, six member and/or seven member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include polymers having lactam rings. Additives can also contain polyelectrolytes that are believed to improve conformance of polymer additives through steric hindrance and/or charge repulsion. Also, polymers having an amide on which a C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} group is attached to the nitrogen and/or the carbonyl carbon of the amide may be used alone, or in combination with ring-containing polymers for enhanced effectiveness. Polymers having at least some repeating units representative of polymerizing at least one of an oxazoline, an N-substituted acrylamide and an N-vinyl alkyl amide are preferred.

  13. Additives and method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems

    DOEpatents

    Sloan, Jr., Earle Dendy; Christiansen, Richard Lee; Lederhos, Joseph P.; Long, Jin Ping; Panchalingam, Vaithilingam; Du, Yahe; Sum, Amadeu Kun Wan

    1997-01-01

    Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from detrimentally impeding the possible flow of a fluid susceptible to clathrate hydrate formation. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member, six member and/or seven member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include polymers having lactam rings. Additives can also contain polyelectrolytes that are believed to improve conformance of polymer additives through steric hinderance and/or charge repulsion. Also, polymers having an amide on which a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 group is attached to the nitrogen and/or the carbonyl carbon of the amide may be used alone, or in combination with ring-containing polymers for enhanced effectiveness. Polymers having at least some repeating units representative of polymerizing at least one of an oxazoline, an N-substituted acrylamide and an N-vinyl alkyl amide are preferred.

  14. In vivo pharmacological evaluation of compound 48/80-induced airways oedema by MRI

    PubMed Central

    Karmouty-Quintana, H; Blé, F-X; Cannet, C; Zurbruegg, S; Fozard, J R; Page, C P; Beckmann, N

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Allergen-induced airways oedema in actively sensitized rats has been studied earlier by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We used MRI to follow the consequences of non-immunological mast cell activation induced by compound 48/80 in the rat lungs in vivo. Experimental approach: Male naïve rats were scanned by MRI prior to and at several time points following intratracheal administration of the mast cell secretagogue, compound 48/80. The effects of a range of drugs on the response induced by compound 48/80 were studied. Key results: Strong fluid signals were detected by MRI in the lungs at 24 h after compound 48/80, correlating with increased protein concentration and inflammatory cell infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage, and with perivascular oedema observed histologically. Pharmacological intervention demonstrated that the increase in MRI signal volume induced by compound 48/80 24 h after challenge was blocked by disodium cromoglycate and the glucocorticoid, budesonide. Pretreatment with wortmannin, capsazepine, DNK333 (a dual neurokinin (NK) 1 and NK2 antagonist) or the anti-allergy drug CGS8515, but not indomethacin, resulted in partial inhibition. Conclusions and implications: Compound 48/80 induced a complex inflammatory reaction which did not solely involve mast cell degranulation but also activation of sensory nerves and was qualitatively similar to allergen challenge. Changes observed by MRI correlated with decreases in protein concentration in BAL fluid. However, the magnitude of the changes detected was greater using MRI. Our results demonstrate that MRI is a sensitive and efficient tool to assess the effects of drugs on lung inflammation. PMID:18469845

  15. Tunable ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence detection of trace plastics and dissolved organic compounds in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaprakasam, Vasanthi; Killinger, Dennis K.

    2003-11-01

    We developed a tunable (220-285-nm) UV and fixed 266-nm laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system using a spectrometer and a cooled CCD imaging detector to measure the excitation-emission matrix spectra of various compounds in water, including quinine sulfate and plastic compound bisphenol-A. The LIF instrument was used for the fast, nonspecific determination of trace amounts of dissolved organic compounds present in natural water supplies and various brand name bottled distilled water and bottled drinking water. Plastic-related compounds that leached out of plastic utensils and containers were also detected with this instrument. The sensitivity of the system was approximately 1-2 orders of magnitude better than that for a commercial system.

  16. Tunable ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence detection of trace plastics and dissolved organic compounds in water.

    PubMed

    Sivaprakasam, Vasanthi; Killinger, Dennis K

    2003-11-20

    We developed a tunable (220-285-nm) UV and fixed 266-nm laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system using a spectrometer and a cooled CCD imaging detector to measure the excitation-emission matrix spectra of various compounds in water, including quinine sulfate and plastic compound bisphenol-A. The LIF instrument was used for the fast, nonspecific determination of trace amounts of dissolved organic compounds present in natural water supplies and various brand name bottled distilled water and bottled drinking water. Plastic-related compounds that leached out of plastic utensils and containers were also detected with this instrument. The sensitivity of the system was approximately 1-2 orders of magnitude better than that for a commercial system. PMID:14658478

  17. Benzene solubility in ionic liquids: working toward an understanding of liquid clathrate formation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jorge F B; Flores, Luis A; Wang, Hui; Rogers, Robin D

    2014-11-17

    The solubility of benzene in 15 imidazolium, pyrrolidinium, pyridinium, and piperidinium ionic liquids has been determined; the resulting, benzene-saturated ionic liquid solutions, also known as liquid clathrates, were examined with (1) H and (19) F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to try and understand the molecular interactions that control liquid clathrate formation. The results suggest that benzene interacts primarily with the cation of the ionic liquid, and that liquid clathrate formation (and benzene solubility) is controlled by the strength of the cation-anion interactions, that is, the stronger the cation-anion interaction, the lower the benzene solubility. Other factors that were determined to be important in the final amount of benzene in any given liquid clathrate phase included attractive interactions between the anion and benzene (when significant), and larger steric or free volume demands of the ions, both of which lead to greater benzene solubility. PMID:25297708

  18. Preservation of carbon dioxide clathrate hydrate in the presence of trehalose under freezer conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Hironori D.; Takeya, Satoshi; Uchida, Tsutomu; Ohmura, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the preservation of CO2 clathrate hydrate in the presence of sugar for the novel frozen dessert, mass fractions of CO2 clathrate hydrate in CO2 clathrate hydrate samples coexisting with trehalose were intermittently measured. The samples were prepared from trehalose aqueous solution with trehalose mass fractions of 0.05 and 0.10 at 3.0 MPa and 276.2 K. The samples having particle sizes of 1.0 mm and 5.6–8.0 mm were stored at 243.2 K and 253.2 K for three weeks under atmospheric pressure. The mass fractions of CO2 clathrate hydrate in the samples were 0.87–0.97 before the preservation, and CO2 clathrate hydrate still remained 0.56–0.76 in the mass fractions for 5.6–8.0 mm samples and 0.37–0.55 for 1.0 mm samples after the preservation. The preservation in the trehalose system was better than in the sucrose system and comparable to that in the pure CO2 clathrate hydrate system. This comparison indicates that trehalose is a more suitable sugar for the novel frozen carbonated dessert using CO2 clathrate hydrate than sucrose in terms of CO2 concentration in the dessert. It is inferred that existence of aqueous solution in the samples is a significant factor of the preservation of CO2 clathrate hydrate in the presence of sugar. PMID:26780867

  19. Preservation of carbon dioxide clathrate hydrate in the presence of trehalose under freezer conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, Hironori D.; Takeya, Satoshi; Uchida, Tsutomu; Ohmura, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the preservation of CO2 clathrate hydrate in the presence of sugar for the novel frozen dessert, mass fractions of CO2 clathrate hydrate in CO2 clathrate hydrate samples coexisting with trehalose were intermittently measured. The samples were prepared from trehalose aqueous solution with trehalose mass fractions of 0.05 and 0.10 at 3.0 MPa and 276.2 K. The samples having particle sizes of 1.0 mm and 5.6-8.0 mm were stored at 243.2 K and 253.2 K for three weeks under atmospheric pressure. The mass fractions of CO2 clathrate hydrate in the samples were 0.87-0.97 before the preservation, and CO2 clathrate hydrate still remained 0.56-0.76 in the mass fractions for 5.6-8.0 mm samples and 0.37-0.55 for 1.0 mm samples after the preservation. The preservation in the trehalose system was better than in the sucrose system and comparable to that in the pure CO2 clathrate hydrate system. This comparison indicates that trehalose is a more suitable sugar for the novel frozen carbonated dessert using CO2 clathrate hydrate than sucrose in terms of CO2 concentration in the dessert. It is inferred that existence of aqueous solution in the samples is a significant factor of the preservation of CO2 clathrate hydrate in the presence of sugar.

  20. Preservation of carbon dioxide clathrate hydrate in the presence of trehalose under freezer conditions.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Hironori D; Takeya, Satoshi; Uchida, Tsutomu; Ohmura, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the preservation of CO2 clathrate hydrate in the presence of sugar for the novel frozen dessert, mass fractions of CO2 clathrate hydrate in CO2 clathrate hydrate samples coexisting with trehalose were intermittently measured. The samples were prepared from trehalose aqueous solution with trehalose mass fractions of 0.05 and 0.10 at 3.0 MPa and 276.2 K. The samples having particle sizes of 1.0 mm and 5.6-8.0 mm were stored at 243.2 K and 253.2 K for three weeks under atmospheric pressure. The mass fractions of CO2 clathrate hydrate in the samples were 0.87-0.97 before the preservation, and CO2 clathrate hydrate still remained 0.56-0.76 in the mass fractions for 5.6-8.0 mm samples and 0.37-0.55 for 1.0 mm samples after the preservation. The preservation in the trehalose system was better than in the sucrose system and comparable to that in the pure CO2 clathrate hydrate system. This comparison indicates that trehalose is a more suitable sugar for the novel frozen carbonated dessert using CO2 clathrate hydrate than sucrose in terms of CO2 concentration in the dessert. It is inferred that existence of aqueous solution in the samples is a significant factor of the preservation of CO2 clathrate hydrate in the presence of sugar. PMID:26780867

  1. Carbon dioxide clathrate hydrate FTIR spectrum. Near infrared combination modes for astrophysical remote detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartois, E.; Schmitt, B.

    2009-09-01

    Context: Clathrate hydrates could provide a sink for highly volatile molecules, thus modifying the release and chemical cycling time scales for gases in icy bodies in the solar system (planets, satellites, comets), as well as for interstellar ice mantles. Aims: By providing an infrared spectroscopic identification for the carbon dioxide clathrate hydrate, CO2 being an important constituent of ices in interstellar (ISM) and planetary media, we examine its astrophysical presence or absence. Methods: A carbon dioxide clathrate crystal is produced in an infrared transmitting moderate pressure closed cell. Using FTIR spectroscopy, the stretching modes (ν_312CO_2,13CO_2,18OCO) and accidental resonances combinations (12CO_2,13CO2 , 18OCO ν_1+ν3 Fermi resonance dyad and 2ν_1+ν3 Fermi resonance triad) falling in the 5100-2200 cm-1 (1.96-4.43 μm) range, and their temperature behaviour from 150 K down to 5.6 K are investigated. Results: Combination modes clearly show the two distinct cages expected for type I carbon dioxide clathrate hydrate, and we identify them. The forbidden antisymmetric stretching-mode overtone (2ν_3), activated in the carbon dioxide simple hydrate, is absent in the clathrate hydrate. Combining these distinct spectroscopic profiles will provide a constraint to determine the importance of carbon dioxide clathrate hydrates observationally. Conclusions: We spectroscopically identify the carbon dioxide clathrate hydrate. A direct detection via (near-)infrared probes or telescopic observations is needed to understand whether clathrate formation is ubiquitous, given the widespread occurrence of carbon dioxide and water ice in astrophysics, or whether it is present only very locally in a few objects.

  2. Monte-Carlo sorption and neutron diffraction study of the filling isotherm in clathrate hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Klapproth, Alice; Kuhs, Werner F.; Chazallon, Bertrand

    1999-06-15

    We are interested in the thermodynamics of the gas filling of clathrate hydrates. In order to determine the pressure-dependent filling of the cages, neutron powder diffraction experiments on N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} clathrates were performed. Interaction potentials were refined by comparing the experimentally determined fillings with those generated by MC-sorption calculations. Unsatisfactory agreement between experiment and simulation is observed when using the widely employed SPC water-water interaction potential.

  3. Models of a partially hydrated Titan interior with clathrate crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunine, J. I.; Castillo-Rogez, J.

    2012-04-01

    We present an updated model of the interior evolution of Titan over time, assuming the silicate core was hydrated early in Titan's history and is dehydrating over time. The original model presented in Castillo-Rogez and Lunine (2010) was motivated by a Cassini-derived moment of inertia (Iess et al., 2010) for Titan too large to be accommodated by classical fully differentiated models in which an anhydrous silicate core was overlain by a water ice (with possible perched ocean) mantle. Our model consisted of a silicate core still in the process of dehydrating today, a situation made possible by the leaching of radiogenic potassium from the silicates into the liquid water ocean. The crust of Titan was assumed to be pure water ice I. The model was consistent with the moment of inertia of Titan, but neglected the presence of large amounts of methane in the upper crust invoked to explain methane's persistence at present and through geologic time (Tobie et al. 2006). We have updated our model with such a feature. We have also improved our modeling with a better physical model for the dehydration of antigorite and other hydrated minerals. In particular our modeling now simulates heat advection resulting from water circulation (e.g., Seipold and Schilling 2003), rather than the purely conductive heat transfer regime assumed in the first version of our model. The modeling proceeds as in Castillo-Rogez and Lunine (2010), with the thermal conductivity of the methane clathrate crust rather than that of ice I. The former is several times lower than that of the latter, and the two have rather different temperature dependences (English and Tse, 2009). The crust turns out to have essentially no bearing on the temperature of the silicate core and hence the timing of dehydration, but it profoundly affects the thickness of the high-pressure ice layer beneath the ocean. Indeed, with the insulating methane clathrate crust, there must be a liquid water ocean beneath the methane clathrate

  4. Revisiting the thermodynamic modelling of type I gas-hydroquinone clathrates.

    PubMed

    Conde, M M; Torré, J P; Miqueu, C

    2016-04-21

    Under specific pressure and temperature conditions, certain gaseous species can be engaged in a host lattice of hydroquinone molecules, forming a supramolecular entity called a gas hydroquinone clathrate. This study is devoted to the thermodynamic modelling of type I hydroquinone clathrates. The gases considered in this work are argon, krypton, xenon, methane, nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen sulphide. The basic van der Waals and Platteeuw model, which is, for example, not able to predict well the phase equilibrium properties of such clathrates at high temperature, is modified and extended by considering first the solubility of the guest in solid HQ and then the mutual interactions between the gaseous molecules inside the clathrate structure (i.e. guest-guest interactions). Other improvements of the basic theory, such as the choice of the reference state, are proposed, and a unique set of thermodynamic parameters valid for all the studied guests are finally calculated. Very good agreement is obtained between the model predictions and the experimental data available in the literature. Our results clearly demonstrate that the highest level of theory is necessary to describe well both the triphasic equilibrium line (where the HQ clathrate, the native hydroquinone HQα and the gas coexist), the occupancy of the guest in the clathrate, and the intercalation enthalpy. PMID:27004460

  5. Tropospheric impact of methane emissions from clathrates in the Arctic Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Cameron-Smith, P. J.; Bergmann, D.; Reagan, M. T.; Elliott, S. M.; Moridis, G. J.

    2012-12-01

    A highly potent greenhouse gas, methane, is locked in the solid phase as ice-like deposits containing a mixture of water and gas (mostly methane) called clathrates in both ocean sediments and underneath permafrost regions. Clathrates are stable under high pressures and low temperatures. In a warming climate, increases in ocean temperatures could lead to dissociation of the clathrates and release of methane into the ocean and subsequently into the atmosphere. This is of particular importance in the shallow part of the Arctic Ocean, where clathrates are expected to start outgassing abruptly at depths of around 300m. Here we present a comparison of simulations from the Community Earth System Model (CESM1) for present-day conditions with and without additional methane emissions from a plausible clathrate release scenario based on a state-of-the-art ocean sediment model. The model includes a fully interactive physical ocean and a fast atmospheric chemistry mechanism that represents methane as a fully interactive tracer (with emissions rather than concentration boundary conditions), along with the main chemical reactions for methane, ozone, and nitrous oxide. The results show that such clathrate emissions increase methane concentrations spatially non-uniformly, and that increases in surface ozone concentrations are greatest in polluted regions. We also find that the interannual variability in surface methane and ozone increases. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-570979

  6. Low-pressure clathrate-hydrate formation in amorphous astrophysical ice analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, D. F.; Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S.; Hudgins, D.; Freund, F.

    1991-01-01

    In modeling cometary ice, the properties of clathrate hydrates were used to explain anomalous gas release at large radial distances from the Sun, and the retention of particular gas inventories at elevated temperatures. Clathrates may also have been important early in solar system history. However, there has never been a reasonable mechanism proposed for clathrate formation under the low pressures typical of these environments. For the first time, it was shown that clathrate hydrates can be formed by warming and annealing amorphous mixed molecular ices at low pressures. The complex microstructures which occur as a result of clathrate formation from the solid state may provide an explanation for a variety of unexplained phenomena. The vacuum and imaging systems of an Hitachi H-500H Analytical Electron Microscope was modified to study mixed molecular ices at temperatures between 12 and 373 K. The resulting ices are characterized by low-electron dose Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED). The implications of these results for the mechanical and gas release properties of comets are discussed. Laboratory IR data from similar ices are presented which suggest the possibility of remotely observing and identifying clathrates in astrophysical objects.

  7. Homo- and heterovalent substitutions in the new clathrates I Si30P16Te(8-x)Se(x) and Si(30+x)P(16-x)Te(8-x)Br(x): synthesis, crystal structure, and thermoelectric properties.

    PubMed

    Abramchuk, Nikolay S; Carrillo-Cabrera, Wilder; Veremchuk, Igor; Oeschler, Niels; Olenev, Andrei V; Prots, Yurii; Burkhardt, Ulrich; Dikarev, Evgeny V; Grin, Juri; Shevelkov, Andrei V

    2012-11-01

    The new cationic clathrates I Si(30)P(16)Te(8-x)Se(x) and Si(30+x)P(16-x)Te(8-x)Br(x) were synthesized by the standard ampule technique. The Si(30)P(16)Te(8-x)Se(x) (x = 0-2.3) clathrates crystallize in the cubic space group Pm3̅n with the unit cell parameter a ranging from 9.9382(2) to 9.9696(1) Å. In the case of the Si(30+x)P(16-x)Te(8-x)Br(x) (x = 1-6.4) clathrates, the lattice parameter varies from 9.9720(8) to 10.0405(1) Å; at lower Si/P ratios (x = 1-3) the ordering of bromine atoms induces the splitting of the guest positions and causes the transformation from the space group Pm3n to Pm3. Irrespective of the structure peculiarities, the normal temperature motion of the guest atoms inside the oversized cages of the framework is observed. The title clathrates possess very low thermal expansion coefficients ranging from 6.6 × 10(-6) to 1.0 × 10(-5) K(-1) in the temperature range of 298-1100 K. The characteristic Debye temperature is about 490 K. Measurements of the electrical resistivity and thermopower showed typical behavior of p-type thermally activated semiconductors, whereas the temperature behavior of the thermal conductivity is glasslike and in general consistent with the PGEC concept. The highest value of the thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT = 0.1) was achieved for the Br-bearing clathrate Si(32.1(2))P(13.9(2))Te(6.6(2))Br(1.0(1)) at 750 K. PMID:23072375

  8. The Phenomenology of Ion Implantation-Induced Blistering and Thin-Layer Splitting in Compound Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R.; Christiansen, S. H.; Moutanabbir, O.; Gösele, U.

    2010-10-01

    Hydrogen and/or helium implantation-induced surface blistering and layer splitting in compound semiconductors such as InP, GaAs, GaN, AlN, and ZnO are discussed. The blistering phenomenon depends on many parameters such as the semiconductor material, ion fluence, ion energy, and implantation temperature. The optimum values of these parameters for compound semiconductors are presented. The blistering and splitting processes in silicon have been studied in detail, motivated by the fabrication of the widely used silicon-on-insulator wafers. Hence, a comparison of the blistering process in Si and compound semiconductors is also presented. This comparative study is technologically relevant since ion implantation-induced layer splitting combined with direct wafer bonding in principle allows the transfer of any type of semiconductor layer onto any foreign substrate of choice—the technique is known as the ion-cut or Smart-Cut™ method. For the aforementioned compound semiconductors, investigations regarding layer transfer using the ion-cut method are still in their infancy. We report feasibility studies of layer transfer by the ion-cut method for some of the most important and widely used compound semiconductors. The importance of characteristic values for successful wafer bonding such as wafer bow and surface flatness as well as roughness are discussed, and difficulties in achieving some of these values are pointed out.

  9. Potential for ion-induced nucleation of volatile organic compounds by radon decay in indoor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Daisey, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    There is considerable interest in the ``unattached`` fraction of radon progeny in indoor air because of its significance to the estimation of the risks of radon exposure. Because of its high mobility in air, the unattached fraction is more efficiently deposited in the respiratory tract. Variation in the diameter of the ``unattached`` fraction and in its diffusion coefficient can be due to clustering of other atmospheric species around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential for the formation of clusters of vapor phase organic compounds, found in indoor air, around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion and to determine which were most likely to form clusters. A secondary purpose was to provide a compilation of measurements of indoor organic compounds for future experiments and theoretical calculations by the radon research community. The classical charged liquid droplet theory (Thomson equation) was used to estimate the Gibbs free energy of ion-induced nucleation and to provide an indication of the indoor organic compounds most likely to undergo ion-induced nucleation. Forty-four volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds out of the more than 300 which have been reported in indoor air were investigated. Water vapor was included for comparison. The results indicate that there is a potential for the formation of clusters of organic compounds around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion. The compounds with the greatest potential for cluster formation are the volatile oxidized hydrocarbons (e.g., n-butanol, phenol, hexanal, nonanal, benzaldehyde, the ketones and the acetates) and the semi-volatile organic compounds (pentachlorophenol, nicotine, chlordane, chlorpyrifos).

  10. Potential for ion-induced nucleation of volatile organic compounds by radon decay in indoor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Daisey, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    There is considerable interest in the unattached'' fraction of radon progeny in indoor air because of its significance to the estimation of the risks of radon exposure. Because of its high mobility in air, the unattached fraction is more efficiently deposited in the respiratory tract. Variation in the diameter of the unattached'' fraction and in its diffusion coefficient can be due to clustering of other atmospheric species around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential for the formation of clusters of vapor phase organic compounds, found in indoor air, around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion and to determine which were most likely to form clusters. A secondary purpose was to provide a compilation of measurements of indoor organic compounds for future experiments and theoretical calculations by the radon research community. The classical charged liquid droplet theory (Thomson equation) was used to estimate the Gibbs free energy of ion-induced nucleation and to provide an indication of the indoor organic compounds most likely to undergo ion-induced nucleation. Forty-four volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds out of the more than 300 which have been reported in indoor air were investigated. Water vapor was included for comparison. The results indicate that there is a potential for the formation of clusters of organic compounds around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion. The compounds with the greatest potential for cluster formation are the volatile oxidized hydrocarbons (e.g., n-butanol, phenol, hexanal, nonanal, benzaldehyde, the ketones and the acetates) and the semi-volatile organic compounds (pentachlorophenol, nicotine, chlordane, chlorpyrifos).

  11. Random transverse motion-induced spatial compounding for fiber bundle imaging.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Gyeong Woo; Cha, Jaepyeong; Kang, Jin U

    2014-08-01

    We propose and demonstrate a novel fiber bundle imaging based on spatial compounding induced by random transverse motion to remove the pixelation effect, to improve resolution, and to increase image quality. The experimental results using a USAF target and pyramidal neuron cell showed that 20-frame compounding improved image quality (contrast-to-noise ratio by >9  dB, global SNR by >6  dB, equivalent number of looks by >1.8  times, and 1/β by >1.5  times), resolution by better than 2 μm, and completely eliminated pixelation artifact. PMID:25078179

  12. Parametric investigation of laser-induced fluorescence of solid-state uranyl compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangjun; Su, Yi; Monts, David L

    2008-10-23

    The combination of remote/standoff sensing and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy shows potential for detection of uranyl (UO2(2+)) compounds. Uranyl compounds exhibit characteristic emission in the 450-600 nm (22,200 to 16,700 cm(-1)) spectral region when excited by wavelengths in the ultraviolet or in the short-wavelength portion of the visible spectrum. We report a parametric study of the effects of excitation wavelength [including 532 nm (18,797 cm(-1)), 355 nm (28,169 cm(-1)), and 266 nm (37,594 cm(-1))] and excitation laser power on solid-state uranium compounds. The uranium compounds investigated include uranyl nitrate, uranyl sulfate, uranyl oxalate, uranium dioxide, triuranium octaoxide, uranyl acetate, uranyl formate, zinc uranyl acetate, and uranyl phosphate. We observed the characteristic uranyl fluorescence spectrum from the uranium compounds except for uranium oxide compounds (which do not contain the uranyl moiety) and for uranyl formate, which has a low fluorescence quantum yield. Relative uranyl fluorescence intensity is greatest for 355 nm excitation, and the order of decreasing fluorescence intensity with excitation wavelength (relative intensity/laser output) is 355 nm > 266 nm > 532 nm. For 532 nm excitation, the emission spectrum is produced by two-photon excitation. Uranyl fluorescence intensity increases linearly with increasing laser power, but the rate of fluorescence intensity increase is different for different emission bands. PMID:18823105

  13. Spectroscopic properties and laser induced fluorescence determination of some endocrine disrupting compounds.

    PubMed

    Benmansour, Badr; Stephan, Ludovic; Cabon, Jean-Yves; Deschamps, Laure; Giamarchi, Philippe

    2011-05-01

    This work presents spectroscopic properties of some Endocrine Disrupting Compounds (EDCs), frequently found in food and in natural water. Studied molecules belong to the groups of phenolic and phthalate EDCs. In a first part, we have examined their absorption and fluorescence properties. Fluorescence emission wavelengths are about 300 nm for phenolic compounds and 360 nm for phtalate compounds; main excitation wavelengths being comprised between 210 nm and 230 nm. Fluorescence lifetimes measured are short (about 4 ns) and the fluorescence quantum yield has been determined. In a second part, to avoid the time consuming solvent extraction step, an analytical application to evaluate the performance of a direct analysis by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of ECDs traces in tap water and in raw water is presented. Good detection limits have been obtained, i.e.: 0.35 µg.L(-1) of chlorophenol in tap water, which are always lower than the reported Predictive Non Efficient Concentration (PNEC). PMID:20084436

  14. Synthesis, structure, and transport properties of type-I derived clathrate Ge(46-x)P(x)Se(8-y) (x = 15.4(1); y = 0-2.65) with diverse host-guest bonding.

    PubMed

    Kirsanova, Maria A; Mori, Takao; Maruyama, Satofumi; Matveeva, Maria; Batuk, Dmitry; Abakumov, Artem M; Gerasimenko, Andrei V; Olenev, Andrei V; Grin, Yuri; Shevelkov, Andrei V

    2013-01-18

    A first clathrate compound with selenium guest atoms, [Ge(46-x)P(x)]Se(8-y)□(y) (x = 15.4(1); y = 0-2.65; □ denotes a vacancy), was synthesized as a single-phase and structurally characterized. It crystallizes in the space group Fm3 with the unit cell parameter a varying from 20.310(2) to 20.406(2) Å and corresponding to a 2 × 2 × 2 supercell of a usual clathrate-I structure. The superstructure is formed due to the symmetrical arrangement of the three-bonded framework atoms appearing as a result of the framework transformation of the parent clathrate-I structure. Selenium guest atoms occupy two types of polyhedral cages inside the positively charged framework; all selenium atoms in the larger cages form a single covalent bond with the framework atoms, relating the title compounds to a scanty family of semiclathrates. According to the measurements of electrical resistivity and Seebeck coefficient, [Ge(46-x)P(x)]Se(8-y)□(y) is an n-type semiconductor with E(g) = 0.41 eV for x = 15.4(1) and y = 0; it demonstrates the maximal thermoelectric power factor of 2.3 × 10(-5) W K(-2) m(-1) at 660 K. PMID:23276305

  15. Dynamic free energy surfaces for sodium diffusion in type II silicon clathrates.

    PubMed

    Slingsby, J G; Rorrer, N A; Krishna, L; Toberer, E S; Koh, C A; Maupin, C M

    2016-02-21

    Earth abundant semiconducting type II Si clathrates have attracted attention as photovoltaic materials due to their wide band gaps. To realize the semiconducting properties of these materials, guest species that arise during the synthesis process must be completely evacuated from the host cage structure post synthesis. A common guest species utilized in the synthesis of Si clathrates is Na (metal), which templates the clathrate cage formation. Previous experimental investigations have identified that it is possible to evacuate Na from type II clathrates to an occupancy of less than 1 Na per unit cell. This work investigates the energetics, kinetics, and resulting mechanism of Na diffusion through type II Si clathrates by means of biased molecular dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. Well-tempered metadynamics has been used to determine the potential of mean force for Na moving between clathrate cages, from which the thermodynamic preferences and transition barrier heights have been obtained. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations based on the metadynamics results have identified the mechanism of Na diffusion in type II Si clathrates. The overall mechanism consists of a coupled diffusive process linked via electrostatic guest-guest interactions. The large occupied hexakaidechedral cages initially empty their Na guests to adjacent empty large cages, thereby changing the local electrostatic environment around the occupied small pentagonal dodecahedral cages and increasing the probability of Na guests to leave the small cages. This coupled process continues through the cross-over point that is identified as the point where large and small cages are equally occupied by Na guests. Further Na removal results in the majority of guests residing in the large cages as opposed to the small cages, in agreement with experiments, and ultimately a Na free structure. PMID:26658349

  16. A combination of radar and thermal approaches to search for methane clathrate in the Martian subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duxbury, N. S.; Abyzov, S. S.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Yoshikawa, K.

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that methane clathrate is stable in the subsurface of Mars (Max and Clifford, (J. Geophys. Res.-Planets 105 (E2) (2000) 4165). Max and Clifford (Geophys. Res. Lett. 28(9) (2001) 1787) have proposed that the Martian chaotic terrain could be a surface manifestation of the dissociation of subsurface methane clathrate hydrate. They have used the large terrestrial sub-oceanic landforms (which have formed due to dissociation of methane clathrate) as an analog. The detection of methane (either in the form of gas or in the solid form of clathrate hydrate) would be evidence of indigenous life in the Martian subsurface, since methane on Earth has mostly biogenic origin. Moreover, methane is a valuable resource for the human exploration of Mars. We propose a novel approach to search for potential Martian methane clathrate hydrate and perform related computations. Our method uses the effect of latent heat of clathrate-phase transitions on the internal heat flow, and hence on permafrost thickness above the clathrate deposit. It will allow one to extract related information out of the radar data that will be used to search for the ground ice/ground water interface. The interpretation of the radar data of ground ice/ground water boundary, which we propose here, can be used to analyze the SHARAD radar data set (Seu et al., 2003) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) 2005 mission and the potential Ground Penetrating Radar data on the Mars Science Laboratory, currently planned to be launched in 2009. From this viewpoint we make recommendations for future orbiting/landed missions to Mars.

  17. Lipoic acid suppresses compound 48/80-induced anaphylaxis-like reaction

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun Ho; Chai, Ok Hee; Han, Eui-Hyeog; Choi, Su-Young; Kim, Hyoung Tae

    2010-01-01

    Alpha-lipoic acid (LA), a naturally occurring dithiol compound, is an essential cofactor in metabolic reactions involved in energy utilization. LA improves glycemic control, reduces diabetic polyneuropathies, atherosclerosis, and allergic inflammation. The effects of LA on mast cell-mediated anaphylactic reactions, however, are unknown. LA dose-dependently inhibited systemic and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis-like reactions in mice induced by compound 48/80, a condensation product of N-methyl-p-methoxyphenethylamine and formaldehyde. Pretreatment with LA, prior to induction of the systemic anaphylaxis-like reaction with compound 48/80, reduced plasma histamine levels in a dose-dependent manner. In our in vitro study, LA decreased histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs) triggered by compound 48/80. Moreover, an increase in calcium uptake activated by compound 48/80 was inhibited by LA. LA also significantly elevated intracellular cyclic adenosine-3',5' monophosphate (cAMP) levels in RPMCs. This inhibition of mediator release from RPMCs may be due to inhibition of calcium uptake and augmentation of intracellular cAMP levels. Based on these results, we suggest that LA may be a potential remedy for allergy-related diseases. PMID:21267406

  18. Interplay between thermoelectric and structural properties of type-I clathrate K8Ga8Sn38 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Onimaru, T.; Suekuni, K.; Mano, S.; Fukuoka, H.; Yamanaka, S.; Takabatake, T.

    2010-04-01

    We report structural, transport, and thermal properties of type-I clathrate K8Ga8Sn38 single crystals grown by the self-flux method. Single-crystal x-ray diffraction analysis confirmed that the guest K+ ion locates on the center in the tetrakaidecahedron composed of Ga and Sn atoms. The thermopower is largely negative, -200μV/K at room temperature, irrespective of the flux used during growth (Ga or Sn). The thermal conductivity κ(T) exhibits a large peak at 14 K. These observations in K8Ga8Sn38 are contrasting with the splitting of the guest site and the glasslike behavior in κ(T) reported for type-I Ba8Ga16Sn30 although the free space for the guest is almost the same in both compounds. The electrostatic potential for the tetrakaidecahedron was calculated using the occupation probabilities of Ga ions in the three sites on the cage. It is found that the off-centered state is stabilized for the Ba2+ ions in Ba8Ga16Sn30 by the partial occupation of Ga anion in the 16i site while the on-center state for K8Ga8Sn38 is stabilized by the strongly preferred occupation of Ga anions in the 6c site. We conclude that the charge distribution on the cage is crucial for the splitting of the guest site into off-center positions in the tetrakaidecahedron of the type-I clathrate.

  19. The effect of classical and quantum dynamics on vibrational frequency shifts of H{sub 2} in clathrate hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Plattner, Nuria; Meuwly, Markus

    2014-01-14

    Vibrational frequency shifts of H{sub 2} in clathrate hydrates are important to understand the properties and elucidate details of the clathrate structure. Experimental spectra of H{sub 2} in clathrate hydrates have been measured for different clathrate compositions, temperatures, and pressures. In order to establish reliable relationships between the clathrate structure, dynamics, and observed frequencies, calculations of vibrational frequency shifts in different clathrate environments are required. In this study, a combination of classical molecular dynamics simulations, electronic structure calculations, and quantum dynamical simulation is used to calculate relative vibrational frequencies of H{sub 2} in clathrate hydrates. This approach allows us to assess dynamical effects and simulate the change of vibrational frequencies with temperature and pressure. The frequency distributions of the H{sub 2} vibrations in the different clathrate cage types agree favorably with experiment. Also, the simulations demonstrate that H{sub 2} in the 5{sup 12} cage is more sensitive to the details of the environment and to quantum dynamical effects, in particular when the cage is doubly occupied. We show that for the 5{sup 12} cage quantum effects lead to frequency increases and double occupation is unlikely. This is different for the 5{sup 12}6{sup 4} cages for which higher occupation numbers than one H{sub 2} per cage are likely.

  20. A nuclear magnetic resonance probe of group IV clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Weiping

    The clathrates feature large cages of silicon, germanium, or tin, with guest atoms in the cage centers. The group IV clathrates are interesting because of their thermoelectric efficiency, and their glasslike thermal conductivity at low temperatures. Clathrates show a variety of properties, and the motion of cage center atoms is not well understood. In Sr8Ga16Ge30, we found that the slow atomic motion in the order 10-5 s is present in this system, which is much slower than what would be expected for standard atomic dynamics. NMR studies of Sr8Ga16Ge30 showed that Knight shift and T1 results are consistent with low density metallic behavior. The lineshapes exhibit changes consistent with motional narrowing at low temperatures, and this indicates unusually slow hopping rates. To further investigate this behavior, we made a series of measurements using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill NMR sequence. Fitting the results to a hopping model yielded an activation energy of 4.6 K. We can understand all of our observations in terms of non-resonant atomic tunneling between asymmetric sites within the cages, in the presence of disorder. For Ba8Ga16Ge30, the relaxation behavior (T1) deviates from the Korringa relation, and the Knight shift and linewidth change with temperature. Those results could be explained by carrier freezout, and the development of a dilute set of magnetic moments due to these localized carriers. For Ba8Ga 16Ge30 samples made from Ga flux, we observed different T1 and Knight shift behavior as compared to n type material. This is due to the differences in carrier type among these different samples. The p type sample has a smaller Knight shift and a slower relaxation rate than n type samples made with the stoichiometric ratio, which is consistent with a change in orbital symmetry between the conduction and valence bands. WDS study for Ba8Al10Ge36 showed the existence of vacancies in the Al-deficient samples, which results in some degree of ordering of Al

  1. Type I clathrates as novel silicon anodes: An electrochemical and structural investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying; Raghavan, Rahul; Wagner, Nicholas A.; Davidowski, Stephen K.; Baggetto, Loic; Zhao, Ran; Cheng, Qian; Yarger, Jeffery L.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Ellis-Terrell, Carol; Miller, Michael A.; Chan, Kwai S.; Chan, Candace K.

    2015-05-05

    In this study, silicon clathrates contain cage-like structures that can encapsulate various guest atoms or molecules. Here we present an electrochemical evaluation of type I silicon clathrates based on Ba8AlySi46-y for the anode material in lithium-ion batteries. Post-cycling characterization with NMR and XRD show no discernible structural or volume changes even after electrochemical insertion of 44 Li into the clathrate structure. The observed properties are in stark contrast with lithiation of other silicon anodes, which become amorphous and suffer from larger volume changes. The lithiation/delithiation processes are proposed to occur in single phase reactions at approximately 0.2 and 0.4 V vs. Li/Li+, respectively, distinct from other diamond cubic or amorphous silicon anodes. Reversible capacities as high as 499 mAh g-1 at a 5 mA g-1 rate were observed for silicon clathrate with composition Ba8Al8.54Si37.46, corresponding to Li:Si of 1.18:1. The results show that silicon clathrates could be promising durable anodes for lithium-ion batteries.

  2. Gas-Phase Synthesis and Characterization of CH4-Loaded Hydroquinone Clathrates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Lee, Y; Takeya, S; Kawamura, T; Yamamoto, Y; Lee, Y; Yoon, J

    2010-01-01

    A CH{sub 4}-loaded hydroquinone (HQ) clathrate was synthesized via a gas-phase reaction using the {alpha}-form of crystalline HQ and CH{sub 4} gas at 12 MPa and room temperature. Solid-state {sup 13}C cross-polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR and Raman spectroscopic measurements confirm the incorporation of CH{sub 4} molecules into the cages of the HQ clathrate framework. The chemical analysis indicates that about 69% of the cages are filled by CH{sub 4} molecules, that is, 0.69 CH{sub 4} per three HQ molecules. Rietveld refinement using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) data shows that the CH{sub 4}-loaded HQ clathrate adopts the {beta}-form of HQ clathrate in a hexagonal space group R3 with lattice parameters of a = 16.6191 {angstrom} and c = 5.5038 {angstrom}. Time-resolved synchrotron XRD and quadrupole mass spectroscopic measurements show that the CH{sub 4}-loaded HQ clathrate is stable up to 368 K and gradually transforms to the {alpha}-form by releasing the confined CH{sub 4} gases between 368-378 K. Using solid-state {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR, the reaction kinetics between the {alpha}-form HQ and CH{sub 4} gas is qualitatively described in terms of the particle size of the crystalline HQ.

  3. Ab initio studies on the lattice thermal conductivity of silicon clathrate frameworks II and VIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Härkönen, Ville J.; Karttunen, Antti J.

    2016-01-01

    The lattice thermal conductivities of silicon clathrate frameworks II and VIII are investigated by using ab initio lattice dynamics and an iterative solution of the linearized Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) for phonons. Within the temperature range 100-350 K, the clathrate structures II and VIII were found to have lower lattice thermal conductivity values than the silicon diamond structure (d -Si) by factors of 1/2 and 1/3, respectively. The main reason for the lower lattice thermal conductivity of the clathrate structure II in comparison to d -Si was found to be the harmonic phonon spectra, while in the case of the clathrate structure VIII, the difference is mainly due to the harmonic phonon spectra and partly due to the shorter relaxation times of phonons. In the studied clathrate frameworks, the anharmonic effects have larger impact on the lattice thermal conductivity than the size of the unit cell. For the structure II, the predicted lattice thermal conductivity differs approximately by a factor of 20 from the previous experimental results obtained for a polycrystalline sample at room temperature.

  4. First-Principles Study of Electronic Structure of Type I Hybrid Carbon-Silicon Clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwai S.; Peng, Xihong

    2016-05-01

    A new class of type I hybrid carbon-silicon clathrates has been designed using computational methods by substituting some of the Si atoms in the silicon clathrate framework with carbon atoms. In this work, the electronic structure of hybrid carbon-silicon clathrates with and without alkaline or alkaline-earth metal guest atoms has been computed within the density functional theory framework. The theoretical calculations indicate that a small number of carbon substitutions in the Si46 framework slightly reduces the density of states (DOS) near the band edge and narrows the bandgap of carbon-silicon clathrates. Weak hybridization of the conduction band occurs when alkaline metal (Li, Na, K) atoms are inserted into the structure, while strong hybridization of the conduction band occurs when alkaline-earth metal (Mg, Ca, Ba) atoms are inserted into the hybrid structure. Empty C y Si46-y clathrates within the composition range of 2 ≤ y ≤ 15 can be tuned to exhibit indirect bandgaps of 1.5 eV or less, and may be considered as potential electronic materials.

  5. Type I clathrates as novel silicon anodes: An electrochemical and structural investigation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Ying; Raghavan, Rahul; Wagner, Nicholas A.; Davidowski, Stephen K.; Baggetto, Loic; Zhao, Ran; Cheng, Qian; Yarger, Jeffery L.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Ellis-Terrell, Carol; et al

    2015-05-05

    In this study, silicon clathrates contain cage-like structures that can encapsulate various guest atoms or molecules. Here we present an electrochemical evaluation of type I silicon clathrates based on Ba8AlySi46-y for the anode material in lithium-ion batteries. Post-cycling characterization with NMR and XRD show no discernible structural or volume changes even after electrochemical insertion of 44 Li into the clathrate structure. The observed properties are in stark contrast with lithiation of other silicon anodes, which become amorphous and suffer from larger volume changes. The lithiation/delithiation processes are proposed to occur in single phase reactions at approximately 0.2 and 0.4 Vmore » vs. Li/Li+, respectively, distinct from other diamond cubic or amorphous silicon anodes. Reversible capacities as high as 499 mAh g-1 at a 5 mA g-1 rate were observed for silicon clathrate with composition Ba8Al8.54Si37.46, corresponding to Li:Si of 1.18:1. The results show that silicon clathrates could be promising durable anodes for lithium-ion batteries.« less

  6. A model for the formation and stabilization of charged water clathrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, P. M.; Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A model for the formation and stabilization of charged water clathrates is presented which accounts for observed anomalies in H(+)(H2O)n ion distributions. These anomalies are observed in both ion cluster and neutral expansions and are consistent with the sizes expected for clathrate ions. That the same sizes are observed in both ion cluster and neutral expansions strongly suggests that a rapid ionic process is responsible for their formation. The proposed model is based on the high mobility and bonding effects of the excess proton in water. Computer simulations suggest that excess proton movement in a water clathrate would be suitable for stabilizing the clathrate structure as well as giving it access to a large number of nearly degenerate proton configurations. The formation of clathrates in charged water clusters of proper size can be ascribed to the following: rapid excess proton movement, a strong preference of the H3O(+) for a three-coordinate bonding structure (which is compatible with hydrogen bonding), and finally, relatively slow processes leading to thermal disorder.

  7. First-Principles Study of Electronic Structure of Type I Hybrid Carbon-Silicon Clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwai S.; Peng, Xihong

    2016-08-01

    A new class of type I hybrid carbon-silicon clathrates has been designed using computational methods by substituting some of the Si atoms in the silicon clathrate framework with carbon atoms. In this work, the electronic structure of hybrid carbon-silicon clathrates with and without alkaline or alkaline-earth metal guest atoms has been computed within the density functional theory framework. The theoretical calculations indicate that a small number of carbon substitutions in the Si46 framework slightly reduces the density of states (DOS) near the band edge and narrows the bandgap of carbon-silicon clathrates. Weak hybridization of the conduction band occurs when alkaline metal (Li, Na, K) atoms are inserted into the structure, while strong hybridization of the conduction band occurs when alkaline-earth metal (Mg, Ca, Ba) atoms are inserted into the hybrid structure. Empty C y Si46- y clathrates within the composition range of 2 ≤ y ≤ 15 can be tuned to exhibit indirect bandgaps of 1.5 eV or less, and may be considered as potential electronic materials.

  8. Computational study on the antifreeze glycoproteins as inhibitors of clathrate-hydrate formation.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Torres, Armando; Romero-Martínez, Ascención; Galano, Annia

    2008-08-01

    The ability of antifreeze glycoproteins to inhibit clathrate-hydrate formation is studied using DFT. A 5(12) cavity, dodecahedral (H(2)O)(20), and the AATA peptide are used to model the inhibitor-clathrate interaction. The presence of AATA in the vicinity of the water cavities not only leads to the formation of complexes, with different peptide/cavity ratios, but also to the deformation of the cavity and to the elongation of several of the hydrogen bonds responsible for keeping the dodecahedral (H(2)O)(20) together. The complexes are formed through hydrogen bonding between the peptides and the water cavities. The glycoproteins are expected to anchor onto the clathrate surface, blocking the access of new water molecules and preventing the incipient crystals from growing. They are also expected to weaken the clathrate structure. Amide IR bands are associated with the complexes' formation. They are significantly red-shifted in the hydrogen-bonded systems compared to isolated AATA. The amide A band is the most sensitive to hydrogen bonding. In addition a distinctive band around 3100 cm(-1) is proposed for the identification of clathrate-peptide hydrogen-bonded complexes. PMID:18618535

  9. Protective effects of certain pharmaceutical compounds against abrin induced cell death in Jurkat cell line.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Nandita; Rao, P V L; Bhaskar, A S B; Bhutia, Y D

    2014-08-01

    Abrin is a plant glycoprotein toxin from the seeds of Abrus precatorius, and shares the structure and properties with ricin. Abrin is highly toxic, with an estimated human fatal dose of 0.1-1 μg/kg, causing death after accidental and intentional poisoning. It is a potent toxin warfare agent. There are no antidotes available for abrin intoxication. It is becoming increasingly important to develop countermeasures for abrin by developing pre- and post-exposure medical therapy. The present study involves the screening of certain pharmaceutical agents for their potential to counter abrin toxicity in Jurkat T lymphocytes and the probable mechanism of action of the compounds with protective effect. The compounds studied are: Prednisolone, Minocycline, Amifostine, DRDE-07 (amifostine analog), Melatonin, Ebselen, N-Acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) and Trolox. Among them, only NAC and trolox were found to confer significant protection in Jurkat cells by restoring antioxidant enzymes depleted by abrin treatment. Abrin also shown to increase in stress factor associated proteins SAPK/JNK, c-fos and c-jun levels which were effectively suppressed by NAC and trolox. In addition to this, both compounds significantly inhibit abrin induced inflammation and caspase-3 activity. These data suggest that NAC and trolox may serve as potential candidates for management of abrin-induced poisoning. PMID:24938881

  10. The antiangiogenic compound aeroplysinin-1 induces apoptosis in endothelial cells by activating the mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Poveda, Beatriz; Rodríguez-Nieto, Salvador; García-Caballero, Melissa; Medina, Miguel-Ángel; Quesada, Ana R

    2012-09-01

    Aeroplysinin-1 is a brominated metabolite extracted from the marine sponge Aplysina aerophoba that has been previously characterized by our group as a potent antiangiogenic compound in vitro and in vivo. In this work, we provide evidence of a selective induction of apoptosis by aeroplysinin-1 in endothelial cells. Studies on the nuclear morphology of treated cells revealed that aeroplysinin-1 induces chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation, and it increases the percentage of cells with sub-diploid DNA content in endothelial, but not in HCT-116, human colon carcinoma and HT-1080 human fibrosarcoma cells. Treatment of endothelial cells with aeroplysinin-1 induces activation of caspases-2, -3, -8 and -9, as well as the cleavage of apoptotic substrates, such as poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and lamin-A in a caspase-dependent mechanism. Our data indicate a relevant role of the mitochondria in the apoptogenic activity of this compound. The observation that aeroplysinin-1 prevents the phosphorylation of Bad relates to the mitochondria-mediated induction of apoptosis by this compound. PMID:23118719

  11. Chemiluminescence response induced by mesenteric ischaemia/reperfusion: effect of antioxidative compounds ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nosál'ová, Viera; Sotníková, Ružena; Drábiková, Katarína; Fialová, Silvia; Košťálová, Daniela; Banášová, Silvia; Navarová, Jana

    2010-01-01

    Ischaemia and reperfusion (I/R) play an important role in human pathophysiology as they occur in many clinical conditions and are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Interruption of blood supply rapidly damages metabolically active tissues. Restoration of blood flow after a period of ischaemia may further worsen cell injury due to an increased formation of free radicals. The aim of our work was to assess macroscopically the extent of intestinal pathological changes caused by mesenteric I/R, and to study free radical production by luminol enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) of ileal samples. In further experiments, the antioxidative activity of the drugs tested was evaluated spectrophotometrically by the use of the DPPH radical. We studied the potential protective ex vivo effect of the plant origin compound arbutin as well as of the pyridoindole stobadine and its derivative SMe1EC2. I/R induced pronounced haemorrhagic intestinal injury accompanied by increase of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAGA) activity. Compared to sham operated (control) rats, there was only a slight increase of CL response after I/R, probably in association with neutrophil increase, indicated by enhanced MPO activity. All compounds significantly reduced the peak values of CL responses of the ileal samples ex vivo, thus reducing the I/R induced increase of free radical production. The antioxidants studied showed a similar inhibitory effect on the CL response influenced by mesenteric I/R. If proved in vivo, these compounds would represent potentially useful therapeutic antioxidants. PMID:21217883

  12. Mast cell degranulation mediates compound 48/80-induced hyperalgesia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjea, Devavani; Wetzel, Abigail; Mack, Madison; Engblom, Camilla; Allen, Juliann; Mora-Solano, Carolina; Paredes, Luisa; Balsells, Evelyn; Martinov, Tijana

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells mediate allergies, hypersensitivities, host defense, and venom neutralization. An area of recent interest is the contribution of mast cells to inflammatory pain. Here we found that specific, local activation of mast cells produced plantar hyperalgesia in mice. Basic secretagogue compound 48/80 induced plantar mast cell degranulation accompanied by thermal hyperalgesia, tissue edema, and neutrophil influx in the hindpaws of ND4 Swiss mice. Blocking mast cell degranulation, neutrophil extravasation, and histamine signaling abrogated these responses. Compound 48/80 also produced edema, pain, and neutrophil influx in WT C57BL/6 but not in genetically mast cell-deficient C57BL/6-KitW-sh/W-sh mice. These responses were restored following plantar reconstitution with bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells. PMID:22828511

  13. Effects of compound D600 (methoxyverapamil) on drug-induced contractions of isolated dog uterine muscle.

    PubMed

    Calixto, J B; Antônio, A

    1986-01-01

    The contractile responses of the isolated dog uterus to acetylcholine (Ach), oxytocin (Ot), histamine (Hist) and barium chloride (Ba2+) were non-competitively blocked by compound D600. This compound was significantly more potent against Ba2+-induced contractions. Increasing the calcium (Ca2+) concentration from 0.2 to 2.5 mM reverted the inhibitory effects of D600 against Ach, Ot, Hist and 1 mM Ba2+. The blockade produced by D600 against 30 mM Ba2+ was not reversed by increasing the Ca2+ concentration. In high K+-depolarizing solution, D600 produced a parallel and concentration-dependent displacement to the right to the concentration-response curves of both Ca2+ and Ba2+. The Schild plot yielded similar pA2 values for D600 against Ca2+ and Ba2+. PMID:3699446

  14. Isolation and characterization of wound-induced compounds from the leaves of Citrus hassaku.

    PubMed

    Asai, Tomonori; Matsukawa, Tetsuya; Ishihara, Atsushi; Kajiyama, Shin'ichiro

    2016-08-01

    Citrus plants are world widely cultivated as horticultural tree crops, and nowadays their pharmacological activities have been well studied. Since research of defense responses in citrus plants have been mainly focused on the post-harvested fruits because of their commercial importance, defense mechanisms during their developmental stages have not been well understood. In the present study, two wound-induced compounds were isolated from leaves of Citrus hassaku, and their structures were elucidated by high-resolution electron spray ionization mass spectra (HRESIMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses. One of these compounds was identified as a known flavanone, hesperetin. The other was characterized as a novel furofuran lignan, and was named 'biscitrusnin-A'. Their antimicrobial activities were also evaluated. PMID:26852089

  15. Plant compounds that induce polychlorinated biphenyl biodegradation by Arthrobacter sp. strain B1B.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, E S; Crowley, D E

    1997-01-01

    Plant compounds that induced Arthrobacter sp. strain B1B to cometabolize polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were identified by a screening assay based on the formation of a 4,4'-dichlorobiphenyl ring fission product. A chemical component of spearmint (Mentha spicata), l-carvone, induced Arthrobacter sp. strain B1B to cometabolize Aroclor 1242, resulting in significant degradation of 26 peaks in the mixture, including selected tetra- and pentachlorobiphenyls. Evidence for PCB biodegradation included peak disappearance, formation of a phenylhexdienoate ring fission product, and chlorobenzoate accumulation in the culture supernatant. Carvone was not utilized as a growth substrate and was toxic at concentrations of greater than 500 mg liter-1. Several compounds structurally related to l-carvone, including limonene, p-cymene, and isoprene, also induced cometabolism of PCBs by Arthrobacter sp. strain B1B. A structure-activity analysis showed that chemicals with an unsaturated p-menthane structural motif promoted the strongest cometabolism activity. These data suggest that certain plant-derived terpenoids may be useful for promoting enhanced rates of PCB biodegradation by soil bacteria. PMID:9143124

  16. Antiproliferative and cell apoptosis-inducing activities of compounds from Buddleja davidii in Mgc-803 cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Buddleja davidii is widely distributed in the southwestern region of China. We have undertaken a systematic analysis of B. davidii as a Chinese traditional medicine with anticancer activity by isolating natural products for their activity against the human gastric cancer cell line Mgc-803 and the human breast cancer cell line Bcap-37. Results Ten compounds were extracted and isolated from B. davidii, among which colchicine was identified in B. davidii for the first time. The inhibitory activities of these compounds were investigated in Mgc-803, Bcap-37 cells in vitro by MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay, and the results showed that luteolin and colchicine had potent inhibitory activities against the growth of Mgc-803 cells. Subsequent fluorescence staining and flow cytometry analysis indicated that these two compounds could induce apoptosis in Mgc-803 cells. The results also showed that the percentages of early apoptotic cells (Annexin V+/PI-, where PI is propidium iodide) and late apoptotic cells (Annexin V+/PI+) increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. After 36 h of incubation with luteolin at 20 μM, the percentages of cells were approximately 15.4% in early apoptosis and 43.7% in late apoptosis; after 36 h of incubation with colchicine at 20 μM, the corresponding values were 7.7% and 35.2%, respectively. Conclusions Colchicine and luteolin from B. davidii have potential applications as adjuvant therapies for treating human carcinoma cells. These compounds could also induce apoptosis in tumor cells. PMID:22938042

  17. Fundamental Properties of TBAF Clathrate for Usage as a Latent Heat Storage at a Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizushima, Takanari; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Takao, Shingo; Yabe, Akira

    For promotion of further energy conservation, development of a coolant with a higher heat capacity regulated around a room temperature is strongly required. As a candidate of such a new coolant, we employ the clathrate hydrate, i.e., a mixture of Tetra n-butyl ammonium fluoride (TBAF) and water. This clathrate hydrate is composed of the micro crystals with an order of 100 μm in dimension. It retains fluidity and melting point at a room temperature of about 25 °C. Moreover, the melting point is able to be controlled between 25 °C and 0 °C by changing the concentration of TBAF. The temperature can be regulated by its latent heat at the melting point. Characteristics such as the latent heat and the crystal structure of the clathrate have been experimentally obtained to confirm the feasibility for its usage as the latent heat storage around a room temperature.

  18. NMR Study on Type-I Copper-doped Germanium Clathrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Weiping; Li, Yang; Ross, Joseph H.

    2002-10-01

    NMR Study on Type-I Copper-doped Germanium Clathrate Weiping Gou, Yang Li and Joseph H. Ross, Jr. Department of Physics, Texas A University, College Station, TX 77843-4242 Germanium clathrates are new materials containing a network of nanometer-size cages, in which a wide variety of electronic and magnetic behavior is observed. We have prepared a single-phase clathrate of the composition Ba8Ge44Cu2, Ba8Ge42Cu4 and Ba8Ge40Cu6. From 63Cu nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) we have identified two distinct sites, and we associate these sites with random occupancy of 6c sites on the Ge network, giving different local environments for Cu atoms. We identify a large paramagnetic Knight shift for these NMR lines, and a measure of the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) shows that the Korringa ratio is obeyed. We will discuss the current understanding of this behavior.

  19. On the thermodynamic stability of clathrate hydrates IV: double occupancy of cages.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hideki; Nakatsuka, Takeharu; Koga, Kenichiro

    2004-09-15

    We have extended the van der Waals and Platteeuw theory to treat multiple occupancy of a single cage of clathrate hydrates, which has not been taken into account in the original theory but has been experimentally confirmed as a real entity. We propose a simple way to calculate the free energy of multiple cage occupancy and apply it to argon clathrate structure II in which a larger cage can be occupied by two argon atoms. The chemical potential of argon is calculated treating it as an imperfect gas, which is crucial to predict accurate pressure dependence of double occupancy expected at high pressure. It is found that double occupancy dominates over single occupancy when the guest pressure in equilibrium with the clathrate hydrate exceeds 270 MPa. PMID:15352844

  20. Mechanism of Rare Earth Incorporation and Crystal Growth of Rare Earth Containing Type-I Clathrates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Type-I clathrates possess extremely low thermal conductivities, a property that makes them promising materials for thermoelectric applications. The incorporation of cerium into one such clathrate has recently been shown to lead to a drastic enhancement of the thermopower, another property determining the thermoelectric efficiency. Here we explore the mechanism of the incorporation of rare earth elements into type-I clathrates. Our investigation of the crystal growth and the composition of the phase Ba8–xRExTMySi46–y (RE = rare earth element; TM = Au, Pd, Pt) reveals that the RE content x is mainly governed by two factors, the free cage space and the electron balance. PMID:26823658

  1. Do clathrate hydrates have any influence on the atmosphere of Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.; Mousis, O.; Picaud, S.; Ballenegger, V.; Schmitt, B.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction Recent observations have evidenced traces of methane (CH4) heterogeneously distributed in the Martian atmosphere [1]. However, because the lifetime of CH4 in the atmosphere of Mars is estimated to be around 250-430 years on the basis of gas-phase chemistry [1], its actual sources on Mars remain controversial. Among other assumptions, it has been proposed [2] that clathrate hydrates located in the subsurface of Mars could be at the origin of the small quantities of CH4 detected. In the present work, we have calculated the relative abundance of CH4 in clathrate hydrates on Mars, using a statistical model based on the theory of van der Waals and Platteeuw [3]. Thermodynamic approach To calculate the relative abundance of CH4 incorporated in clathrates formed from the martian atmosphere, we use the same approach as in our previous studies devoted to the trapping of gases by clathrates on Titan [4][5]. This approach is based on the statistical model proposed by van der Waals and Platteuw [3] and it is only briefly summarized here. In this formalism, the relative abundance fG of a guest species G in a clathrate (of structure I or II) is defined as the ratio of the average number of guest molecules of species G in the clathrate over the average total number of enclathrated molecules, as : fG = bLyG;L + bSyG;S bL P J yJ;L + bS P J yJ;S ; (1) where the sums in the denominator run over all species present in the system, and bS and bL are the number of small and large cages per unit cell, respectively. The occupancy fractions yG of the guest species G for a given type of cage and for a given type of clathrate are determined from the Langmuir constants which are related to the strength of the interaction between each guest species and each type of cage. Thus, this statistical approach relies on the accurate determination of the interactions between the guest species G and the water molecules forming the surrounding cage. In a first approximation, this cage is

  2. A novel prohibitin-binding compound induces the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway through NOXA and BIM upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Moncunill-Massaguer, Cristina; Saura-Esteller, José; Pérez-Perarnau, Alba; Palmeri, Claudia Mariela; Núñez-Vázquez, Sonia; Cosialls, Ana M.; González-Gironès, Diana M.; Pomares, Helena; Korwitz, Anne; Preciado, Sara; Albericio, Fernando; Lavilla, Rodolfo; Pons, Gabriel; Langer, Thomas; Iglesias-Serret, Daniel; Gil, Joan

    2015-01-01

    We previously described diaryl trifluorothiazoline compound 1a (hereafter referred to as fluorizoline) as a first-in-class small molecule that induces p53-independent apoptosis in a wide range of tumor cell lines. Fluorizoline directly binds to prohibitin 1 and 2 (PHBs), two proteins involved in the regulation of several cellular processes, including apoptosis. Here we demonstrate that fluorizoline-induced apoptosis is mediated by PHBs, as cells depleted of these proteins are highly resistant to fluorizoline treatment. In addition, BAX and BAK are necessary for fluorizoline-induced cytotoxic effects, thereby proving that apoptosis occurs through the intrinsic pathway. Expression analysis revealed that fluorizoline induced the upregulation of Noxa and Bim mRNA levels, which was not observed in PHB-depleted MEFs. Finally, Noxa−/−/Bim−/− MEFs and NOXA-downregulated HeLa cells were resistant to fluorizoline-induced apoptosis. All together, these findings show that fluorizoline requires PHBs to execute the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. PMID:26497683

  3. A novel prohibitin-binding compound induces the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway through NOXA and BIM upregulation.

    PubMed

    Moncunill-Massaguer, Cristina; Saura-Esteller, José; Pérez-Perarnau, Alba; Palmeri, Claudia Mariela; Núñez-Vázquez, Sonia; Cosialls, Ana M; González-Gironès, Diana M; Pomares, Helena; Korwitz, Anne; Preciado, Sara; Albericio, Fernando; Lavilla, Rodolfo; Pons, Gabriel; Langer, Thomas; Iglesias-Serret, Daniel; Gil, Joan

    2015-12-01

    We previously described diaryl trifluorothiazoline compound 1a (hereafter referred to as fluorizoline) as a first-in-class small molecule that induces p53-independent apoptosis in a wide range of tumor cell lines. Fluorizoline directly binds to prohibitin 1 and 2 (PHBs), two proteins involved in the regulation of several cellular processes, including apoptosis. Here we demonstrate that fluorizoline-induced apoptosis is mediated by PHBs, as cells depleted of these proteins are highly resistant to fluorizoline treatment. In addition, BAX and BAK are necessary for fluorizoline-induced cytotoxic effects, thereby proving that apoptosis occurs through the intrinsic pathway. Expression analysis revealed that fluorizoline induced the upregulation of Noxa and Bim mRNA levels, which was not observed in PHB-depleted MEFs. Finally, Noxa(-/-)/Bim(-/-) MEFs and NOXA-downregulated HeLa cells were resistant to fluorizoline-induced apoptosis. All together, these findings show that fluorizoline requires PHBs to execute the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. PMID:26497683

  4. Anchored Clathrate Waters Bind Antifreeze Proteins to Ice

    SciTech Connect

    C Garnham; R Campbell; P Davies

    2011-12-31

    The mechanism by which antifreeze proteins (AFPs) irreversibly bind to ice has not yet been resolved. The ice-binding site of an AFP is relatively hydrophobic, but also contains many potential hydrogen bond donors/acceptors. The extent to which hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic effect contribute to ice binding has been debated for over 30 years. Here we have elucidated the ice-binding mechanism through solving the first crystal structure of an Antarctic bacterial AFP. This 34-kDa domain, the largest AFP structure determined to date, folds as a Ca{sup 2+}-bound parallel beta-helix with an extensive array of ice-like surface waters that are anchored via hydrogen bonds directly to the polypeptide backbone and adjacent side chains. These bound waters make an excellent three-dimensional match to both the primary prism and basal planes of ice and in effect provide an extensive X-ray crystallographic picture of the AFP{vert_ellipsis}ice interaction. This unobstructed view, free from crystal-packing artefacts, shows the contributions of both the hydrophobic effect and hydrogen bonding during AFP adsorption to ice. We term this mode of binding the 'anchored clathrate' mechanism of AFP action.

  5. Effects of nocloprost clathrate on absorption of acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Siegmund, W; Zschiesche, M; Franke, G; Amon, I

    1994-01-01

    The cytoprotective prostaglandin E2 analog nocloprost clathrate (NOCLO) is tested as a prophylactic for gastrointestinal lesions of NSAID. The effects of 400 micrograms NOCLO versus respective placebos with and without equivalent amounts of beta-cyclodextrin on the pharmacokinetic behavior of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), given 30 min after NOCLO, were studied in two single-blind, parallel-group trials. The trials were performed in 15 male healthy volunteers (age 21-25 years, body weight 62-94 kg, body height 172-187 cm) with known N-acetylation and debrisoquine type hydroxylation phenotype. ASA, salicylic acid (SA), and salicyluric acid (SU) in plasma and SA and SU in urine were measured by HPLC. NOCLO delayed the absorption of ASA (increased tmax, lower Cmax) significantly in comparison with both placebos. AUC and clearance values were not changed by NOCLO premedication. There were neither differences between the two placebo groups nor between the two groups pretreated with NOCLO with regard to any pharmacokinetic parameter. The changes in drug absorption are caused by the sum of those cytoprotective effects of prostaglandin which are also determinants of drug absorption. PMID:8199752

  6. Interpreting Temperature Strain Data from Meso-Scale Clathrate Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Leeman, John R; Rawn, Claudia J; Ulrich, Shannon M; Elwood Madden, Megan; Phelps, Tommy Joe

    2012-01-01

    Gas hydrates are important in global climate change, carbon sequestra- tion, and seafloor stability. Currently, formation and dissociation pathways are poorly defined. We present a new approach for processing large amounts of data from meso-scale experiments, such as the LUNA distributed sensing system (DSS) in the seafloor process simulator (SPS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The DSS provides a proxy for temperature measurement with a high spatial resolution allowing the heat of reaction during gas hydrate formation/dissociation to aid in locating clathrates in the vessel. The DSS fibers are placed in the sediment following an Archimedean spiral design and then the position of each sensor is solved by iterating over the arc length formula with Newtons method. The data is then gridded with 1 a natural neighbor interpolation algorithm to allow contouring of the data. The solution of the sensor locations is verified with hot and cold stimulus in known locations. An experiment was preformed with a vertically split column of sand and silt. The DSS system clearly showed hydrate forming in the sand first, then slowly creeping into the silt. Similar systems and data processing techniques could be used for monitoring of hydrates in natural environments or in any situation where a hybrid temperature/strain index is useful. Further ad- vances in fiber technology allow the fiber to be applied in any configuration and the position of each sensor to be precisely determined making practical applications easier.

  7. Molecular-dynamics study of structure II hydrogen clathrates.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, J A; Klug, D D

    2005-07-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations are used to study the stability of structure II hydrogen clathrates with different H2 guest occupancies. Simulations are done at pressures of 2.5 kbars and 1.013 bars and for temperatures ranging from 100 to 250 K. For a structure II unit cell with 136 water molecules, H2 guest molecule occupancies of 0-64 are studied with uniform occupancies among each type of cage. The simulations show that at 100 K and 2.5 kbars, the most stable configurations have single occupancy in the small cages and quadruple occupancy in the large cages. The optimum occupancy for the large cages decreases as the temperature is raised. Double occupancy in the small cages increases the energy of the structures and causes tetragonal distortion in the unit cell. The spatial distribution of the hydrogen guest molecules in the cages is determined by studying the guest-water and guest-guest radial distribution functions at various temperatures. PMID:16050759

  8. Generalized Electron Counting in Determination of Metal-Induced Reconstruction of Compound Semiconductor Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lixin; Wang, E. G.; Xue, Qi-Kun; Zhang, S. B.; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2006-01-01

    Based on theoretical analysis, first-principles calculations, and experimental observations, we establish a generic guiding principle, embodied in generalized electron counting (GEC), that governs the surface reconstruction of compound semiconductors induced by different metal adsorbates. Within the GEC model, the adsorbates serve as an electron bath, donating or accepting the right number of electrons as the host surface chooses a specific reconstruction that obeys the classic electron-counting model. The predictive power of the GEC model is illustrated for a wide range of metal adsorbates.

  9. Free energies of carbon dioxide sequestration and methane recovery in clathrate hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dornan, Peter; Alavi, Saman; Woo, T. K.

    2007-09-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations are used to compare the stability of methane, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and mixed CO2/N2 structure I (sI) clathrates under deep ocean seafloor temperature and pressure conditions (275K and 30MPa) which were considered suitable for CO2 sequestration. Substitution of methane guests in both the small and large sI cages by CO2 and N2 fluids are considered separately to determine the separate contributions to the overall free energy of substitution. The structure I clathrate with methane in small cages and carbon dioxide in large cages is determined to be the most stable. Substitutions of methane in the small cages with CO2 and N2 have positive free energies. Substitution of methane with CO2 in the large cages has a large negative free energy and substitution of the methane in the large cages with N2 has a small positive free energy. The calculations show that under conditions where storage is being considered, carbon dioxide spontaneously replaces methane from sI clathrates, causing the release of methane. This process must be considered if there are methane clathrates present where CO2 sequestration is to be attempted. The calculations also indicate that N2 does not directly compete with CO2 during methane substitution or clathrate formation and therefore can be used as a carrier gas or may be present as an impurity. Simulations further reveal that the replacement of methane with CO2 in structure II (sII) cages also has a negative free energy. In cases where sII CO2 clathrates are formed, only single occupancy of the large cages will be observed.

  10. Nucleation pathways of clathrate hydrates: effect of guest size and solubility.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Liam C; Hujo, Waldemar; Molinero, Valeria

    2010-11-01

    Understanding the microscopic mechanism of nucleation of clathrate hydrates is important for their use in hydrogen storage, CO(2) sequestration, storage and transport of natural gas, and the prevention of the formation of hydrate plugs in oil and gas pipelines. These applications involve hydrate guests of varied sizes and solubility in water that form different hydrate crystal structures. Nevertheless, molecular studies of the mechanism of nucleation of hydrates have focused on the single class of small hydrophobic guests that stabilize the sI crystal. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations with a very efficient coarse-grained model to elucidate the mechanisms of nucleation of clathrate hydrates of four model guests that span a 2 orders of magnitude range in solubility in water and that encompass sizes which stabilize each one a different hydrate structure (sI and sII, with and without occupancy of the dodecahedral cages). We find that the overall mechanism of clathrate nucleation is similar for all guests and involves a first step of formation of blobs, dense clusters of solvent-separated guest molecules that are the birthplace of the clathrate cages. Blobs of hydrophobic guests are rarer and longer-lived than those for soluble guests. For each guest, we find multiple competing channels to form the critical nuclei, filled dodecahedral (5(12)) cages, empty 5(12) cages, and a variety of filled large (5(12)6(n) with n = 2, 3, and 4) clathrate cages. Formation of empty dodecahedra is an important nucleation channel for all but the smallest guest. The empty 5(12) cages are stabilized by the presence of guests from the blob in their first solvation shell. Under conditions of high supercooling, the structure of the critical and subcritical nuclei is mainly determined by the size of the guest and does not reflect the cage composition or ordering of the stable or metastable clathrate crystals. PMID:20931990

  11. Preparation and antitumor effects of glaucocalyxin A-γ-cyclodextrin clathrate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chong; Qu, Yan; Jia, Yan-Long; Shang, Xiao-Jun; Bai, Su-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To improve the water solubility of glaucocalyxin A (GLA) by the preparation of glaucocalyxin A γ-cyclodextrin clathrate (GLA-γ-CD) and to investigate the inhibitory effect of GLA-γ-CD on tumor growth in S180 cell xenografts. Materials and methods: GLA-γ-CD, γ-cyclodextrin (γ-CD) and GLA were combined at a mass ratio of 1:1, dissolved in 60°C water by stirring. GLA completely entrapped by the γ-CD was verified by differential thermal analysis, the GLA content was determined. Phase solubility, solubility, and in vitro dissolution rate experiments were performed. The S180 xenograft mouse model was used to observe the tumor inhibitory effects of GLA-γ-CD and GLA, and the TUNEL assay was used to detect differences in their rates of tumor cell apoptosis induction. Results: After combination with γ-CD, the solubility of GLA-γ-CD was 21.78-fold greater than that of GLA. The in vitro dissolution rate of GLA-γ-CD was significantly greater than that of GLA, and reached more than 90% in 20 min. Furthermore, GLA-γ-CD was more effective than GLA as an inhibitor of S180 tumor cells; the inhibitory rate of the high-dose group reached 57.26%, which was 54.11% greater than the inhibitory rate of the GLA group at the same dose. In addition, GLA-γ-CD induced tumor cell apoptosis more effectively than did GLA. Conclusion: The water solubility of GLA significantly increased in combination with γ-CD resulting in the production of GLA-γ-CD. Furthermore, GLA-γ-CD was more effective than GLA as an inducer of S180 tumor cell apoptosis and an inhibitor of tumor growth. PMID:26550426

  12. Novel hydrogen sulfide-releasing compound, S-propargyl-cysteine, prevents STZ-induced diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xin; Li, Xinghui; Ma, Fenfen; Luo, Shanshan; Ge, Ruowen; Zhu, Yizhun

    2016-05-13

    In this work, we demonstrated for the first time that S-propargyl-cysteine (SPRC, also named as ZYZ-802), a novel hydrogen sulfide (H2S)-releasing compound, had renoprotective effects on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic kidney injury. SPRC treatment significantly reduced the level of creatinine, kidney to body weight ratio and in particular, markedly decreased 24-h urine microalbuminuria excretion. SPRC suppressed the mRNA expression of fibronectin and type IV collagen. In vitro, SPRC inhibited mesangial cells over-proliferation and hypertrophy induced by high glucose. Additionally, SPRC attenuated inflammation in diabetic kidneys. SPRC also reduced transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) signaling and expression of phosphorylated Smad3 (p-Smad3) pathway. Moreover, SPRC inhibited phosphorylation of ERK, p38 protein. Taken together, SPRC was demonstrated to be a potential therapeutic candidate to suppress diabetic nephropathy. PMID:27055593

  13. Pressure-induced superconductivity in topological parent compound Bi2Te3

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S. J.; Weng, H. M.; Zhang, W.; Yang, L. X.; Liu, Q. Q.; Feng, S. M.; Wang, X. C.; Yu, R. C.; Cao, L. Z.; Wang, L.; Yang, W. G.; Liu, H. Z.; Zhao, W. Y.; Zhang, S. C.; Dai, X.; Fang, Z.; Jin, C. Q.

    2011-01-04

    We report a successful observation of pressure-induced superconductivity in a topological compound Bi₂Te₃ with Tc of ~3 K between 3 to 6 GPa. The combined high-pressure structure investigations with synchrotron radiation indicated that the superconductivity occurred at the ambient phase without crystal structure phase transition. The Hall effects measurements indicated the hole-type carrier in the pressure-induced superconducting Bi₂Te₃ single crystal. Consequently, the first-principles calculations based on the structural data obtained by the Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction patterns at high pressure showed that the electronic structure under pressure remained topologically nontrivial. The results suggested that topological superconductivity can be realized in Bi₂Te₃ due to the proximity effect between superconducting bulk states and Dirac-type surface states. We also discuss the possibility that the bulk state could be a topological superconductor.

  14. Metastable methane clathrate particles as a source of methane to the martian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassefière, Eric

    2009-11-01

    The observations of methane made by the PFS instrument onboard Mars Express exhibit a definite correlation between methane mixing ratio, water vapor mixing ratio, and cloud optical depth. The recent data obtained from ground-based telescopes seem to confirm the correlation between methane and water vapor. In order to explain this correlation, we suggest that the source of gaseous methane is atmospheric, rather than at the solid surface of the planet, and that this source may consist of metastable submicronic particles of methane clathrate hydrate continuously released to the atmosphere from one or several clathrate layers at depth, according to the phenomenon of "anomalous preservation" evidenced in the laboratory. These particles, lifted up to middle atmospheric levels due to their small size, and therefore filling the whole atmosphere, serve as condensation nuclei for water vapor. The observed correlation between methane and water vapor mixing ratios could be the signature of the decomposition of the clathrate crystals by condensation-sublimation processes related to cloud activity. Under the effect of water condensation on crystal walls, metastability could be broken and particles be eroded, resulting in a subsequent irreversible release of methane to the gas phase. Using PFS data, and according to our hypothesis, the lifetime of gaseous methane is estimated to be smaller than an upper limit of 6 ± 3 months, much smaller than the lifetime of 300 yr calculated from atmospheric chemical models. The reason why methane has a short lifetime might be the occurrence of heterogeneous chemical decomposition of methane in the subsurface, where it is known since Viking biology experiments that oxidants efficiently decompose organic matter. If true, it is shown by using existing models of H 2O 2 penetration in the regolith that methane could prevent H 2O 2 from penetrating in the subsurface, and further oxidizing the soil, at depths larger than a few millimeters. The

  15. First-Principles Study of Electronic Structure and Thermoelectric Properties of Ge-Doped Tin Clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akai, K.; Kishimoto, K.; Koyanagi, T.; Kono, Y.; Yamamoto, S.

    2014-06-01

    We calculated the electronic structure and thermoelectric properties of the Ge-doped quaternary clathrate Ba-Ga-Sn-Ge. The electronic structure was calculated by using the WIEN2k code, which is based on the full-potential augmented plane-wave method. Using this method, we calculated the total energies for several Ge configurations to determine the positions of Ge atoms in the unit cell. The calculated Ge positions were in good agreement with the experimental results. Based on the resulting Ge positions, the band structure and thermoelectric properties of the Ba-Ga-Sn-Ge clathrates were calculated.

  16. Measurement of Clathrate Hydrate Thermodynamic Stability in the Presence of Ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, Marc

    2012-01-01

    There is a lack of data available for the stability of clathrate hydrates in the presence of ammonia for low-to-moderate pressures in the 0-10 MPa range. Providing such data will allow for a better understanding of natural mass transfer processes on celestial bodies like Titan and Enceladus, on which destabilization of clathrates may be responsible for replenishment of gases in the atmosphere. The experimental process utilizes a custom-built gas handling system (GHS) and a cryogenic calorimeter to allow for the efficient testing of samples under varying pressures and gas species.

  17. Structure and dynamics of hydrogen molecules in the novel clathrate hydrate by high pressure neutron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Lokshin, Konstantin A; Zhao, Yusheng; He, Duanwei; Mao, Wendy L; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Hemley, Russell J; Lobanov, Maxim V; Greenblatt, Martha

    2004-09-17

    The D2 clathrate hydrate crystal structure was determined as a function of temperature and pressure by neutron diffraction for the first time. The hydrogen occupancy in the (32+X)H2.136H(2)O, x=0-16 clathrate can be reversibly varied by changing the large (hexakaidecahedral) cage occupancy between two and four molecules, while remaining single occupancy of the small (dodecahedral) cage. Above 130-160 K, the guest D2 molecules were found in the delocalized state, rotating around the centers of the cages. Decrease of temperature results in rotation freezing followed by a complete localization below 50 K. PMID:15447276

  18. Molecular-dynamics modelling and neutron diffraction study of the site disorder in air clathrate hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chazallon, Bertrand; Klapproth, Alice; Kuhs, Werner F.

    1999-06-15

    We present the results of MD-simulation runs with subsequent quenches for clathrate hydrates using SPC water in order to model properly the crystallographic site disorder of the guest molecules in the water cages. A procedure is described to transform the results of the quench (symmetry P1) into the proper space-time averaged space group (Fd3-bar m) of the clathrate hydrate. The resulting disorder models are compared with the outcome of crystallographic structure refinements (R-factors, Fourier maps) from our neutron powder diffraction data. A correct description of the disorder is important for a reliable determination of the pressure-dependent cage filling.

  19. Ambient ionization and direct identification of volatile organic compounds with microwave-induced plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Dandan; Tian, Yong-Hui; Zhao, Zhongjun; Li, Wenwen; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-02-01

    An innovative method of volatile organic compounds analysis by using microwave-induced plasma ionization (MIPI) source in combination with an ambient ion trap mass spectrometer is presented here. Using MIPI for direct sample vapor, analysis was achieved without any sample preparation or subsequent heating. The relative abundance of the target compounds can be obtained almost instantly within a few seconds. The ionization processes of different volatile compounds was optimized, and the limits of detection were identified in the range of 0.15-4.5 pptv or 0.73-8.80 pg ml(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSD) is in the range of 4-14%, while correlation coefficients of the working curves (R(2)) are better than 0.98. The new method possesses advantages of ease operation, time-saving, high sensitivity and inexpensive setup. In addition, the ionization processes of short n-alkane chains were investigated with the MIPI technique, and a unique [M + 13](+) was detected, which has not been reported in detail by any other related ionization techniques. An ionization mechanism was proposed on the basis of the experimental results obtained in this work and available information in literatures, in which the n-alkanes in the plasma environment possibly generate protonated cyclopentadiene [M - 5](+) or alkyl-substituted analogues as well as hydrous ions [M + 13](+) and [M + 13 + 18](+), as shown in Scheme 1 in the main text. PMID:25800021

  20. Novel application of brain-targeting polyphenol compounds in sleep deprivation-induced cognitive dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Wang, Jun; Bi, Weina; Ferruzzi, Mario; Yemul, Shrishailam; Freire, Daniel; Mazzola, Paolo; Ho, Lap; Dubner, Lauren; Pasinetti, Giulio Maria

    2016-01-01

    Sleep deprivation produces deficits in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and hippocampal-dependent memory storage. Recent evidence suggests that sleep deprivation disrupts memory consolidation through multiple mechanisms, including the down-regulation of the cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) and of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. In this study, we tested the effects of a Bioactive Dietary Polyphenol Preparation (BDPP), comprised of grape seed polyphenol extract, Concord grape juice, and resveratrol, on the attenuation of sleep deprivation-induced cognitive impairment. We found that BDPP significantly improves sleep deprivation-induced contextual memory deficits, possibly through the activation of CREB and mTOR signaling pathways. We also identified brain-available polyphenol metabolites from BDPP, among which quercetin-3-O-glucuronide activates CREB signaling and malvidin-3-O-glucoside activates mTOR signaling. In combination, quercetin and malvidin-glucoside significantly attenuated sleep deprivation-induced cognitive impairment in -a mouse model of acute sleep deprivation. Our data suggests the feasibility of using select brain-targeting polyphenol compounds derived from BDPP as potential therapeutic agents in promoting resilience against sleep deprivation-induced cognitive dysfunction. PMID:26235983

  1. Novel application of brain-targeting polyphenol compounds in sleep deprivation-induced cognitive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Wang, Jun; Bi, Weina; Ferruzzi, Mario; Yemul, Shrishailam; Freire, Daniel; Mazzola, Paolo; Ho, Lap; Dubner, Lauren; Pasinetti, Giulio Maria

    2015-10-01

    Sleep deprivation produces deficits in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and hippocampal-dependent memory storage. Recent evidence suggests that sleep deprivation disrupts memory consolidation through multiple mechanisms, including the down-regulation of the cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) and of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. In this study, we tested the effects of a Bioactive Dietary Polyphenol Preparation (BDPP), comprised of grape seed polyphenol extract, Concord grape juice, and resveratrol, on the attenuation of sleep deprivation-induced cognitive impairment. We found that BDPP significantly improves sleep deprivation-induced contextual memory deficits, possibly through the activation of CREB and mTOR signaling pathways. We also identified brain-available polyphenol metabolites from BDPP, among which quercetin-3-O-glucuronide activates CREB signaling and malvidin-3-O-glucoside activates mTOR signaling. In combination, quercetin and malvidin-glucoside significantly attenuated sleep deprivation-induced cognitive impairment in -a mouse model of acute sleep deprivation. Our data suggests the feasibility of using select brain-targeting polyphenol compounds derived from BDPP as potential therapeutic agents in promoting resilience against sleep deprivation-induced cognitive dysfunction. PMID:26235983

  2. Induced root-secreted phenolic compounds as a belowground plant defense.

    PubMed

    Lanoue, Arnaud; Burlat, Vincent; Schurr, Ulrich; Röse, Ursula S R

    2010-08-01

    Rhizosphere is the complex place of numerous interactions between plant roots, microbes and soil fauna. Whereas plant interactions with aboveground organisms are largely described, unravelling plant belowground interactions remains challenging. Plant root chemical communication can lead to positive interactions with nodulating bacteria, mycorriza or biocontrol agents or to negative interactions with pathogens or root herbivores. A recent study suggested that root exudates contribute to plant pathogen resistance via secretion of antimicrobial compounds. These findings point to the importance of plant root exudates as belowground signalling molecules, particularly in defence responses. In our report, we showed that under Fusarium attack the barley root system launched secretion of phenolic compounds with antimicrobial activity. The secretion of de novo biosynthesized t-cinnamic acid induced within 2 days illustrates the dynamic of plant defense mechanisms at the root level. We discuss the costs and benefits of induced defense responses in the rhizosphere. We suggest that plant defence through root exudation may be cultivar dependent and higher in wild or less domesticated varieties. PMID:20699651

  3. Cucurbitacins as inducers of cell death and a rich source of potential anticancer compounds.

    PubMed

    Ríos, J L; Andújar, I; Escandell, J M; Giner, R M; Recio, M C

    2012-01-01

    Triterpenes have been reported to induce cell death. One relevant group of this family of compounds is cucurbitacins, which have been studied as inducers of apoptosis in various cancer cell lines. The most significant mechanisms with regard to the apoptotic effects of cucurbitacins are their ability to modify transcriptional activities via nuclear factors or genes and their capability to activate or inhibit pro- or anti-apoptotic proteins. Still, while the majority of studies on these compounds have dealt with their apoptotic effects on cancer cell lines, several research groups have also explored their anti-inflammatory activities. In general, cucurbitacins are considered to be selective inhibitors of the JAK/STAT pathways; however, other mechanisms may be implicated in their apoptotic effects, including the MAPK pathway (known to be important for cancer cell proliferation and survival), PARP cleavage, expression of active caspase-3, decreased pSTAT3 and JAK3 levels, as well as decreases in various downstream STAT3 targets such as Mcl-1, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and cyclin D3, all of which are implicated in apoptosis and the cell cycle. Taking all these effects into account, cucurbitacins may prove useful in the treatment of different kinds of cancers, especially when used with other cytostatic agents. PMID:22443631

  4. Toxic but Drank: Gustatory Aversive Compounds Induce Post-ingestional Malaise in Harnessed Honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Ayestaran, Ainara

    2010-01-01

    Background Deterrent substances produced by plants are relevant due to their potential toxicity. The fact that most of these substances have an unpalatable taste for humans and other mammals contrasts with the fact that honeybees do not reject them in the range of concentrations in which these compounds are present in flower nectars. Here we asked whether honeybees detect and ingest deterrent substances and whether these substances are really toxic to them. Results We show that pairing aversive substances with an odor retards learning of this odor when it is subsequently paired with sucrose. Harnessed honeybees in the laboratory ingest without reluctance a considerable volume (20 µl) of various aversive substances, even if some of them induce significant post-ingestional mortality. These substances do not seem, therefore, to be unpalatable to harnessed bees but induce a malaise-like state that in some cases results in death. Consistently with this finding, bees learning that one odor is associated with sugar, and experiencing in a subsequent phase that the sugar was paired with 20 µl of an aversive substance (devaluation phase), respond less than control bees to the odor and the sugar. Such stimulus devaluation can be accounted for by the malaise-like state induced by the aversive substances. Conclusion Our results indicate that substances that taste bitter to humans as well as concentrated saline solutions base their aversive effect on the physiological consequences that their ingestion generates in harnessed bees rather than on an unpalatable taste. This conclusion is only valid for harnessed bees in the laboratory as freely-moving bees might react differently to aversive compounds could actively reject aversive substances. Our results open a new possibility to study conditioned taste aversion based on post-ingestional malaise and thus broaden the spectrum of aversive learning protocols available in honeybees. PMID:21060877

  5. Physicochemical and structural studies of clathrate hydrates of tetrabutylammonium polyacrylates.

    PubMed

    Terekhova, Irina S; Manakov, Andrey Yu; Komarov, Vladislav Yu; Villevald, Galina V; Burdin, Alexander A; Karpova, Tamara D; Aladko, Eugeny Ya

    2013-03-01

    In this work, physicochemical and structural studies have been carried out for semiclathrate hydrates of linear (un-cross-linked) and cross-linked tetrabutylammonium polyacrylates with different degrees of cross-linking of the polymeric guest molecules (n = 0.5, 1, 2, 3%) and different degrees of substitution of proton ions of carboxylic groups in poly(acrylic acid) for TBA cations (x = 1, 0.8, 0.6). The changes in the hydrates' stability and composition depending on the outlined parameters were examined in the course of phase diagram studies of the binary systems water-tetrabutylammonium polyacrylates using differential thermal analysis method and calorimetric measurements of fusion enthalpies of the hydrates. Phase diagram studies of the binary system water-linear tetrabutylammonium polyacrylate revealed the formation of four hydrates. Based on the data of chemical analysis of hydrate crystals the compositions of all hydrates have been determined. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies revealed a tetragonal structure, space group 4/m, and unit cell parameters are close for different hydrates and lie in the ranges a = 23.4289-23.4713 Å and c = 12.3280-12.3651 Å (150 K). The structure can be related to tetragonal structure I typical for the clathrate hydrates of tetraalkylammonium salts with monomeric anions. Powder X-ray diffraction analyses confirmed the identity of the above crystal structure to that of the hydrates with cross-linked tetrabutylammonium polyacrylates. The behavior of TBA polyacrylate hydrates under the pressure of methane was studied and quantitative assessment of the gas content in the hydrates was made using volumetric analysis method. PMID:23383955

  6. Cryolava flow destabilization of crustal methane clathrate hydrate on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ashley Gerard; Sotin, Christophe; Choukroun, Mathieu; Matson, Dennis L.; Johnson, Torrence V.

    2016-08-01

    To date, there has been no conclusive observation of ongoing endogenous volcanic activity on Saturn's moon Titan. However, with time, Titan's atmospheric methane is lost and must be replenished. We have modeled one possible mechanism for the replenishment of Titan's methane loss. Cryolavas can supply enough heat to release large amounts of methane from methane clathrate hydrates (MCH). The volume of methane released is controlled by the flow thickness and its areal extent. The depth of the destabilisation layer is typically ≈30% of the thickness of the lava flow (≈3 m for a 10-m thick flow). For this flow example, a maximum of 372 kg of methane is released per m2 of flow area. Such an event would release methane for nearly a year. One or two events per year covering ∼20 km2 would be sufficient to resupply atmospheric methane. A much larger effusive event covering an area of ≈9000 km2 with flows 200 m thick would release enough methane to sustain current methane concentrations for 10,000 years. The minimum size of "cryo-flows" sufficient to maintain the current atmospheric methane is small enough that their detection with current instruments (e.g., Cassini) could be challenging. We do not suggest that Titan's original atmosphere was generated by this mechanism. It is unlikely that small-scale surface MCH destabilisation is solely responsible for long-term (> a few Myr) sustenance of Titan's atmospheric methane, but rather we present it as a possible contributor to Titan's past and current atmospheric methane.

  7. Natural compound Alternol induces oxidative stress-dependent apoptotic cell death preferentially in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yuzhe; Chen, Ruibao; Huang, Yan; Li, Guodong; Huang, Yiling; Chen, Jiepeng; Duan, Lili; Zhu, Bao-Ting; Thrasher, J Brantley; Zhang, Xu; Li, Benyi

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancers at the late stage of castration resistance are not responding well to most of current therapies available in clinic, reflecting a desperate need of novel treatment for this life-threatening disease. In this study, we evaluated the anti-cancer effect of a recently isolated natural compound Alternol in multiple prostate cancer cell lines with the properties of advanced prostate cancers in comparison to prostate-derived non-malignant cells. As assessed by trypan blue exclusion assay, a significant cell death was observed in all prostate cancer cell lines except DU145 but not in non-malignant (RWPE-1and BPH1) cells. Further analyses revealed that Alternol-induced cell death was an apoptotic response in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as evidenced by the appearance of apoptosis hallmarks such as Caspase-3 processing and PARP cleavage. Interestingly, Alternol-induced cell death was completely abolished by reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers, N-acetylcysteine (N-Ac) and dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA). We also demonstrated that the pro-apoptotic Bax protein was activated after Alternol treatment and was critical for Alternol-induced apoptosis. Animal xenograft experiments in nude mice showed that Alternol treatment largely suppressed tumor growth of PC-3 xenografts but not Bax-null DU-145 xenografts in vivo. These data suggest that Alternol might serve as a novel anticancer agent for late stage prostate cancer patient. PMID:24688053

  8. SMG1 and NIK regulate apoptosis induced by Smac mimetic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, H H; St Jean, M; Beug, S T; Lejmi-Mrad, R; LaCasse, E; Baird, S D; Stojdl, D F; Screaton, R A; Korneluk, R G

    2011-01-01

    Smac mimetic compounds (SMCs) are experimental small molecules that induce tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)-dependent cancer cell death by targeting the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins. However, many cancer cell lines are resistant to SMC-mediated apoptosis despite the presence of TNFα. To add insight into the mechanism of SMC-resistance, we used functional siRNA-based kinomic and focused chemical screens and identified suppressor of morphogenesis in genitalia-1 (SMG1) and NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK) as novel protective factors. Both SMG1 and NIK prevent SMC-mediated apoptosis likely by maintaining FLICE inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) levels to suppress caspase-8 activation. In SMC-resistant cells, the accumulation of NIK upon SMC treatment enhanced the activity of both the classical and alternative nuclear factor-κB pathways, and increased c-FLIP mRNA levels. In parallel, persistent SMG1 expression in SMC-resistant cells repressed SMC-mediated TNFα-induced JNK activation and c-FLIP levels were sustained. Importantly, SMC-resistance is overcome by depleting NIK and SMG1, which appear to facilitate the downregulation of c-FLIP in response to SMC and TNFα treatment, leading to caspase-8-dependent apoptosis. Collectively, these data show that SMG1 and NIK function as critical repressors of SMC-mediated apoptosis by potentially converging on the regulation of c-FLIP metabolism. PMID:21490678

  9. Biphenyl compounds are hydroxyl radical scavengers: their effective inhibition for UV-induced mutation in Salmonella typhimurium TA102.

    PubMed

    Fujita, S; Taira, J

    1994-09-01

    In our previous study, we found several hydroxylated biphenyl compounds have a great scavenging effect for hydroxyl radicals (.OH). In this study, to elucidate the relationship between generation of the .OH and photo-mutagenesis, six biphenyl compounds such as dehydrodieugenol, dehydrodivanillyl alcohol, dehydrodidihydroeugenol, dehydrodicreosol, magnolol and honokiol, respectively, were examined for their ability to inhibit UV-induced mutation in Salmonella typhimurium TA102. The relative mutagenic activities (RMA, %) indicated the mutation frequency of treated cells divided by the mutation frequency of control cells times 100%. The RMA (%) are as follows: 28 +/- 1, 31 +/- 1, 33 +/- 1, 41 +/- 2, 62 +/- 1, and 62 +/- 4 at concentrations of 5 micrograms per plate for dehydrodieugenol, dehydrodivanillyl alcohol, dehydrodidihydroeugenol, dehydrodicreosol, magnolol, and honokiol, respectively. These values indicate that low concentrations of these biphenyl compounds effectively suppress UV-induced mutagenesis. Also, these compounds acted as effective antimutagens in a dose-dependent manner (0.00005-5 micrograms per plate). These compounds are effective .OH scavengers. Consequently, the results obtained above suggest that these compounds could inhibit against UV-induced mutations by scavenging of .OH generated by UV irradiation. The results also suggest that .OH are associated with UV-induced mutation in Salmonella typhimurium TA102. PMID:7982632

  10. Phyllostachys edulis Compounds Inhibit Palmitic Acid-Induced Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein 1 (MCP-1) Production

    PubMed Central

    Higa, Jason K.; Liang, Zhibin; Williams, Philip G.; Panee, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Background Phyllostachys edulis Carriere (Poaceae) is a bamboo species that is part of the traditional Chinese medicine pharmacopoeia. Compounds and extracts from this species have shown potential applications towards several diseases. One of many complications found in obesity and diabetes is the link between elevated circulatory free fatty acids (FFAs) and chronic inflammation. This study aims to present a possible application of P. edulis extract in relieving inflammation caused by FFAs. Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1/CCL2) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine implicated in chronic inflammation. Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and activator protein 1 (AP-1) are transcription factors activated in response to inflammatory stimuli, and upregulate pro-inflammatory cytokines such as MCP-1. This study examines the effect of P. edulis extract on cellular production of MCP-1 and on the NF-κB and AP-1 pathways in response to treatment with palmitic acid (PA), a FFA. Methodology/Principal Findings MCP-1 protein was measured by cytometric bead assay. NF-κB and AP-1 nuclear localization was detected by colorimetric DNA-binding ELISA. Relative MCP-1 mRNA was measured by real-time quantitative PCR. Murine cells were treated with PA to induce inflammation. PA increased expression of MCP-1 mRNA and protein, and increased nuclear localization of NF-κB and AP-1. Adding bamboo extract (BEX) inhibited the effects of PA, reduced MCP-1 production, and inhibited nuclear translocation of NF-κB and AP-1 subunits. Compounds isolated from BEX inhibited MCP-1 secretion with different potencies. Conclusions/Significance PA induced MCP-1 production in murine adipose, muscle, and liver cells. BEX ameliorated PA-induced production of MCP-1 by inhibiting nuclear translocation of NF-κB and AP-1. Two O-methylated flavones were isolated from BEX with functional effects on MCP-1 production. These results may represent a possible therapeutic

  11. Ab initio lattice dynamical studies of silicon clathrate frameworks and their negative thermal expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Härkönen, Ville J.; Karttunen, Antti J.

    2014-01-01

    The thermal and lattice dynamical properties of seven silicon clathrate framework structures are investigated with ab initio density functional methods (frameworks I, II, IV, V, VII, VIII, and H). The negative thermal expansion (NTE) phenomenon is investigated by means of quasiharmonic approximation and applying it to equal time displacement correlation functions. The thermal properties of the studied clathrate frameworks, excluding the VII framework, resemble those of the crystalline silicon diamond structure. The clathrate framework VII was found to have an anomalous NTE temperature range up to 300 K and it is suitable for further studies of the mechanisms of NTE. Investigation of the displacement correlation functions revealed that in NTE, the volume derivatives of the mean square displacements and mean square relative displacements of atoms behave similarly to the vibrational entropy volume derivatives and consequently to the coefficients of thermal expansion as a function of temperature. All studied clathrate frameworks, excluding the VII framework, possess a phonon band gap or even two in the case of framework V.

  12. DEWATERING WASTEWATER TREATMENT SLUDGE BY CLATHRATE FREEZING: A BENCH-SCALE FEASIBILITY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory studies were performed to prove the concept and feasibility for a novel technology to dewater sludges. This involves the formation of solid hydrate crystals of water and specific clathrate-forming agents followed by separation of the hydrate crystal solids from the slu...

  13. REMOVAL OF TITAN'S ATMOSPHERIC NOBLE GASES BY THEIR SEQUESTRATION IN SURFACE CLATHRATES

    SciTech Connect

    Mousis, Olivier; Picaud, Sylvain; Cordier, Daniel; Mandt, Kathleen E.; Hunter Waite, J. Jr.

    2011-10-10

    A striking feature of the atmosphere of Titan is that no heavy noble gases other than argon were detected by the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer aboard the Huygens probe during its descent to Titan's surface in 2005 January. Here we provide an explanation of the mysterious absence or rarity of these noble gases in Titan's atmosphere: the thermodynamic conditions prevailing at the surface-atmosphere interface of the satellite allow the formation of multiple guest clathrates that preferentially store some species, including all heavy noble gases, over others. The clean water ice needed for the formation of these clathrates could be delivered by successive episodes of cryovolcanic lavas that have been hypothesized to regularly cover the surface of Titan. The formation of clathrates in the porous lavas and their propensity for trapping Ar, Kr, and Xe would progressively remove these species from the atmosphere of Titan over the course of its history. In some circumstances, a global clathrate crust with an average thickness not exceeding a few meters could be sufficient on Titan for a complete removal of the heavy noble gases from the atmosphere.

  14. Disorder of Hydrofluorocarbon Molecules Entrapped in the Water Cages of Structure I Clathrate Hydrate.

    PubMed

    Takeya, Satoshi; Udachin, Konstantin A; Moudrakovski, Igor L; Ohmura, Ryo; Ripmeester, John A

    2016-05-23

    Water versus fluorine: Clathrate hydrates encaging hydrofluorocarbons as guests show both isotropic and anisotropic distributions within host water cages, depending on the number of fluorine atoms in the guest molecule; this is caused by changes in intermolecular interactions to host water molecules in the hydrates. PMID:27105807

  15. Ammonia clathrate hydrates as new solid phases for Titan, Enceladus, and other planetary systems.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kyuchul; Kumar, Rajnish; Udachin, Konstantin A; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John A

    2012-09-11

    There is interest in the role of ammonia on Saturn's moons Titan and Enceladus as the presence of water, methane, and ammonia under temperature and pressure conditions of the surface and interior make these moons rich environments for the study of phases formed by these materials. Ammonia is known to form solid hemi-, mono-, and dihydrate crystal phases under conditions consistent with the surface of Titan and Enceladus, but has also been assigned a role as water-ice antifreeze and methane hydrate inhibitor which is thought to contribute to the outgassing of methane clathrate hydrates into these moons' atmospheres. Here we show, through direct synthesis from solution and vapor deposition experiments under conditions consistent with extraterrestrial planetary atmospheres, that ammonia forms clathrate hydrates and participates synergistically in clathrate hydrate formation in the presence of methane gas at low temperatures. The binary structure II tetrahydrofuran + ammonia, structure I ammonia, and binary structure I ammonia + methane clathrate hydrate phases synthesized have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, molecular dynamics simulation, and Raman spectroscopy methods. PMID:22908239

  16. Molecular-dynamics simulations of binary structure II hydrogen and tetrahydrofurane clathrates.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, J A; Klug, D D

    2006-01-01

    The binary structure II hydrogen and tetrahydrofurane (THF) clathrates are studied with molecular-dynamics simulations. Simulations are done at pressures of 120 and 1.013 bars for temperatures ranging from 100 to 273 K. For the small cages of the structure II unit cell, H2 guest molecule occupancies of 0, 16 (single occupancy), and 32 (double occupancy) are considered. THF occupancies of 0-8 in the large cages are studied. For cases in which THF does not occupy all large cages in a unit cell, the remaining large cages can be occupied with sets of four H2 guest molecules. The unit-cell volumes and configurational energies are compared in the different occupancy cases. Increasing the small cage occupancy leads to an increase in the unit-cell volume and thermal-expansion coefficient. Among simulations with the same small cage occupancy, those with the large cages containing 4H2 guests have the largest volumes. The THF guest molecules have a stabilizing effect on the clathrate and the configurational energy of the unit cell decreases linearly as the THF content increases. For binary THF + H2 clathrates, the substitution of the THF molecules in the large cages with sets of 4H2 molecules increases the configurational energy. For the binary clathrates, various combinations of THF and H2 occupancies have similar configurational energies. PMID:16409048

  17. Selective occupancy of methane by cage symmetry in TBAB ionic clathrate hydrate.

    PubMed

    Muromachi, Sanehiro; Udachin, Konstantin A; Alavi, Saman; Ohmura, Ryo; Ripmeester, John A

    2016-04-12

    Methane trapped in the two distinct dodecahedral cages of the ionic clathrate hydrate of TBAB was studied by single crystal XRD and MD simulation. The relative CH4 occupancies over the cage types were opposite to those of CO2, which illustrates the interplay between the cage symmetry and guest shape and dynamics, and thus the gas selectivity. PMID:27030139

  18. A simplified Van der Waals-Platteeuw model of clathrate hydrates with multiple occupancy of cavities.

    PubMed

    Martín, Angel

    2010-07-29

    In clathrate hydrates formed by small guest molecules such as H(2) or He, hydrate cavities may be occupied by clusters of several guest molecules. Multiple occupancy of cavities is important for applications of clathrate hydrates as gas storage and transportation media due to the increase of storage capacity of the material associated with multiple occupancy. Computational approaches for clathrate hydrates with multiple occupancy such as Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations or van der Waals-Platteeuw (vdW-P) models with rigorous calculations of Langmuir adsorption constants are complex and require considerable computational effort. In this work, a simplified vdW-P model for clathrate hydrates with multiple occupancy is presented. In this model, it is assumed that guest molecules inside cavities form clusters in which molecules occupy fixed positions with respect to each other. For validation of this supposition, results obtained with this model have been compared with GCMC simulations of sII He and H(2) hydrates with multiple occupancy. Results of the simplified procedure presented in this work regarding the fractional occupancy of cavities by molecular clusters agree well with GCMC simulations. The simplified vdW-P model presented in this work requires a small computational effort, equivalent to calculations with the standard vdW-P model for hydrates with single occupancy. PMID:20614878

  19. Phase behaviour of methane clathrate under conditions relevant to Titan's interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sclater, G.; Wood, I. G.; Tucker, M. G.; Crawford, I. A.; Fortes, A. D.

    2013-09-01

    Microporous gas hydrates - known as clathrates - are common on the Earth and are also thought to be abundant in the outer Solar System [1]. The conditions for the existence of clathrates prevail throughout the Solar System and they are considered to be abundant from the Martian permafrost to the surfaces and interiors of many icy satellites [7]. These materials have been extensively studied in the range 0 - 5 GPa at ambient temperatures [2-5]; however, their behaviour in the range close to the dissociation (or melting) point is not well known at all, with some suggesting the occurrence of a facecentred cubic (sII) phase, and others that the clathrate becomes unstable with respect to mixtures of solid methane and ice. The high-pressure behaviour underpins planetary modelling; for example, the behaviour of methane hydrate in the ranges 0-6 GPa and 100-400 K is crucial to accurate modelling of Saturn's largest moon, Titan where clathrates are hypothesised to be the source of CH4 in Titan's atmosphere [6]. In order to address these problems we are carrying out a program of investigation using neutron diffraction to investigate the phase behaviour of methane clathrate close to its dissociation temperature in the 0.6-2.5 GPa region. Our goals were to obtain data to provide the first in-situ diffraction-based evidence for the phase behaviour of methane clathrate near to its high-pressure dissociation temperature (along with a control measurement at room temperature for comparison with other workers), to obtain P-V curves along two isotherms for each of the phases observed, and to complete structure refinements of all three clathrate polymorphs, thereby allowing us to carry out a full audit of the methane concentration in each phase as a function of pressure (including cage occupancies). Thus far we have successfully completed our RT measurements and will make the higher temperature observations in July 2013; we anticipate being able to report our findings from this second

  20. Temperature, grain size, and CO2-clathrate hydrates maps of Enceladus and Dione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taffin, C.; Combe, J.; Grasset, O.; Le Menn, E.; McCord, T. B.; Bollengier, O.; Oancea, A.; Giraud, M.; Tobie, G.

    2011-12-01

    Reflectance spectra of water ice have absorption bands at 1.30 and 1.50 μm that depend on temperature and grain size. Band shape measurements can be used to characterize the surface properties of icy celestial bodies1,2,3. Moreover, CO2-clathrates have a diagnostic and unique absorption band at 2.7 μm. Mapping of these properties and components of the surface can be used to better constrain the internal activity and surface tectonics. We present an analysis of the 1.30 and 1.50 μm water ice absorption bands and the 2.7-μm CO2-clathrates absorption band in reflectance spectra from VIMS on Cassini in order to understand the geological history of the South Pole of Enceladus and an equatorial area of Dione. We have synthesized samples of pure ice Ih grains and acquired reflectance spectra between 1 and 5 μm with a Nicolet Fourier Transform spectrometer to investigate the characteristics of near-IR spectra using temperature and pressure ranges relevant for the icy satellites of Saturn. Forty-seven spectra of crystalline water ice have been acquired. We have derived two empirical laws to calculate temperature and grain size from pure crystalline water ice spectrum4. We have also synthesized samples of CO2-clathrates and acquired reflectance spectra for the band. These two spectra have been used as end-member. A linear sum is computed using the end-member spectra: [CRF×(clathrate)+(1-CRF)×(pure water ice)], where CRF is the to-be-determined clathrate ratio factor, 'clathrate' and 'pure water ice' are the reference spectra (end-member). Figure 1 shows results on one equatorial area where craters and ridges can be observed. Temperature appears to be higher besides the ridges (Figure 1f), but this may indicate that water ice is amorphous, which results in overestimating the temperature. Along the ridge, grain size is larger (Figure 1e), and CO2-clathrates have higher concentration near the ridges (Figure 1d). All these clues indicate a recent activity that we are

  1. Compounds of the upper gastrointestinal tract induce rapid and efficient excystation of Entamoeba invadens

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Biswa Nath; Pradel, Gabriele; Frevert, Ute; Eichinger, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The infective stage of Entamoeba parasites is an encysted form. This stage can be readily generated in vitro, which has allowed identification of stimuli that trigger the differentiation of the parasite trophozoite stage into the cyst stage. Studies of the second differentiation event, emergence of the parasite from the cyst upon infection of a host, have been hampered by the lack of an efficient means to excyst the parasite and complete the life cycle in vitro. We have determined that a combination of exposures to water, bicarbonate and bile induces rapid excystment of Entamoeba invadens cysts. The high efficiency of this method has allowed the visualization of the dynamics of the process by electron and confocal microscopy, and should permit the analysis of stage-specific gene expression and high through-put screening of inhibitory compounds. PMID:20018192

  2. Two new compounds from Semen celosiae and their protective effects against CCl₄-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qian; Sun, Zhen-Liang; Guo, Mei-Li; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Ge; Wang, Xiao-Kang

    2011-04-01

    Two new oleanolic acid saponins, namely celosin A (1) and celosin B (2), together with six known compounds, stigmasterol, β-sitosterol, β-daucosterol, hexacosoic acid, palmitic acid and stearic acid, were isolated from the ethanolic extract of Semen celosiae. The structures of celosin A (1) and celosin B (2) were determined by spectral analysis (including 1D- and 2D-NMR). The hepatoprotective activity of 1 and 2 with oral doses 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mg kg⁻¹ were investigated by carbon tetrachloride CCl₄-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. The results indicate that they have significant hepatoprotective effects, and that these hepatoprotective effects may be due to the antioxidant capability. PMID:20306359

  3. Early myocardial lesions induced by cardiotoxic compounds in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Kemi, M; Matsumoto, H; Nomura, Y; Takahashi, R

    1996-07-01

    Early focal myocardial lesions in rats induced by five cardiotoxic compounds were histopathologically observed 1 hr and 4 hr after a single intravenous injection with 1/10 LD50 and LD50. The lesions were observed 1 hr and 4 hr after the treatment with LD50 of isoproterenol (ISP), 4 hr with 1/10 LD50 of ISP, 4 hr with LD50 of hydralazine (HYD), caffeine (CAF) and cyclophosphamide (CYC), but not with adriamycin (ADR). The lesions consisted of homogeneously intensely eosinophilic staining, contraction band formation and fragmentation of cardiac muscle fibers. The lesions were interspersed in the inner one third of the left ventricular walls including the papillary muscles with ISP, HYD and CAF, and were all over the ventricular myocardium with CYC. PMID:8844612

  4. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of whole blood and other liquid organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melikechi, N.; Ding, H.; Rock, S.; Marcano O., A.; Connolly, D.

    2008-02-01

    We report on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of whole blood and other organic fluids. LIBS spectra, in the region 200-970 nm, are measured by recording the radiation emitted by the samples following their ablation in a helium environment. We show that these spectra, although very complex, reveal the presence of elements such as nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen and carbon and that of important metallic elements such as iron, magnesium, calcium, potassium, and sodium. We compare the measured LIBS spectra of whole blood to that of pure carbon and pure iron and find that in the 200-300 nm region. Nearly 90% of the peaks can be assigned to only these two elements. We also report on similar studies of methanol, ethanol, isopropanol and water solutions of protein molecules of interest to cancer research. We show that using simple numerical algorithms, it is possible to distinguish between complex organic compounds that have nearly the same chemical composition.

  5. Pressure induced structural phase transition in IB transition metal nitrides compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Shubhangi; Kaurav, Netram; Jain, A.; Shah, S.; Choudhary, K. K.

    2015-06-01

    Transition metal mononitrides are known as refractory compounds, and they have, relatively, high hardness, brittleness, melting point, and superconducting transition temperature, and they also have interesting optical, electronic, catalytic, and magnetic properties. Evolution of structural properties would be an important step towards realizing the potential technological scenario of this material of class. In the present study, an effective interionic interaction potential (EIOP) is developed to investigate the pressure induced phase transitions in IB transition metal nitrides TMN [TM = Cu, Ag, and Au] compounds. The long range Coulomb, van der Waals (vdW) interaction and the short-range repulsive interaction upto second-neighbor ions within the Hafemeister and Flygare approach with modified ionic charge are properly incorporated in the EIOP. The vdW coefficients are computed following the Slater-Kirkwood variational method, as both the ions are polarizable. The estimated value of the phase transition pressure (Pt) and the magnitude of the discontinuity in volume at the transition pressure are consistent as compared to the reported data.

  6. Pressure induced structural phase transition in IB transition metal nitrides compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, Shubhangi; Kaurav, Netram Jain, A.; Shah, S.; Choudhary, K. K.

    2015-06-24

    Transition metal mononitrides are known as refractory compounds, and they have, relatively, high hardness, brittleness, melting point, and superconducting transition temperature, and they also have interesting optical, electronic, catalytic, and magnetic properties. Evolution of structural properties would be an important step towards realizing the potential technological scenario of this material of class. In the present study, an effective interionic interaction potential (EIOP) is developed to investigate the pressure induced phase transitions in IB transition metal nitrides TMN [TM = Cu, Ag, and Au] compounds. The long range Coulomb, van der Waals (vdW) interaction and the short-range repulsive interaction upto second-neighbor ions within the Hafemeister and Flygare approach with modified ionic charge are properly incorporated in the EIOP. The vdW coefficients are computed following the Slater-Kirkwood variational method, as both the ions are polarizable. The estimated value of the phase transition pressure (Pt) and the magnitude of the discontinuity in volume at the transition pressure are consistent as compared to the reported data.

  7. Surface induces different crystal structures in a room temperature switchable spin crossover compound.

    PubMed

    Gentili, Denis; Liscio, Fabiola; Demitri, Nicola; Schäfer, Bernhard; Borgatti, Francesco; Torelli, Piero; Gobaut, Benoit; Panaccione, Giancarlo; Rossi, Giorgio; Degli Esposti, Alessandra; Gazzano, Massimo; Milita, Silvia; Bergenti, Ilaria; Ruani, Giampiero; Šalitroš, Ivan; Ruben, Mario; Cavallini, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the influence of surfaces in the formation of different crystal structures of a spin crossover compound, namely [Fe(L)2] (LH: (2-(pyrazol-1-yl)-6-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)pyridine), which is a neutral compound thermally switchable around room temperature. We observed that the surface induces the formation of two different crystal structures, which exhibit opposite spin transitions, i.e. on heating them up to the transition temperature, one polymorph switches from high spin to low spin and the second polymorph switches irreversibly from low spin to high spin. We attributed this inversion to the presence of water molecules H-bonded to the complex tetrazolyl moieties in the crystals. Thin deposits were investigated by means of polarized optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and micro Raman spectroscopy; moreover the analysis of the Raman spectra and the interpretation of spin inversion were supported by DFT calculations. PMID:26575005

  8. A Generic Guiding Principle for the Prediction of Metal-Induced Reconstructions of Compound Semiconductor Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shenyuan; Zhang, Lixin; Chen, Hua; Wang, Enge; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2008-01-01

    We have performed extensive and systematical ab initio calculations to substantiate a recently proposed generalized electron counting (GEC) rule that governs the rich patterns of compound semiconductor reconstruction induced by metal adsorption. In this rule, the metal adsorbates serve as an electron bath, either donating or accepting the right number of electrons, with which the binary host system chooses a specific reconstruction under the classical electron counting rule, and meanwhile, the adsorbates stay in their optimal valency. The GEC rule is applied to different GaAs surfaces deposited by various classes of metal adsorbates, leading to a number of possible reconstructions, which can be further confirmed by first-principles calculations and/or experiments. The alkali metal adsorption on the GaAs(110) surface up to the saturate coverage is a perfect example of the GEC rule. The application of the GEC rule to the prototype system of Mn/GaAs(001) not only predicts possible reconstruction patterns over a wide range of coverage, but also provides an underlying link between the reconstruction structures and the local magnetic moments of the metal adsorbates. In Au/GaAs(100), we demonstrate the application of the GEC rule to those systems where metal adsrobates form covalent bonds with the substrate. The GEC rule, as a generic principle, is expected to be applicable to more metal-adsorbed compound semiconductor surfaces. PACS numbers: 68.35.-p, 68.43.Bc, 75.70.-i

  9. Adamantyl-tethered-biphenylic compounds induce apoptosis in cancer cells by targeting Bcl homologs.

    PubMed

    Anusha, Sebastian; Mohan, Chakrabhavi Dhananjaya; Ananda, Hanumappa; Baburajeev, C P; Rangappa, Shobith; Mathai, Jessin; Fuchs, Julian E; Li, Feng; Shanmugam, Muthu K; Bender, Andreas; Sethi, Gautam; Basappa; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S

    2016-02-01

    Bcl homologs prominently contribute to apoptotic resistance in cancer cells and serve as molecular targets in treatment of various cancers. Herein, we report the synthesis of biphenyl-adamantane derivatives by a ligand free palladium on carbon based Suzuki reaction using diisopropylamine as a base for the coupling of adamantane based aryl chloride with a variety of aryl boronic acids. Among the biphenyl derivatives synthesized, compound 3'-(adamantan-1-yl)-4'-methoxy-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3-ol (AMB) displayed cytotoxic activity against hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines without significantly affecting the normal cell lines. Further, AMB caused increased accumulation of the HCC cells in subG1 phase, decreased the expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, cyclin D1, caspase-3, survivin and increased the cleavage of PARP in a time-dependent manner. In silico molecular interaction studies between Bcl homologs and AMB showed that the biphenyl scaffold is predicted to form π-π interactions with Phe-101 and Tyr-105 and the adamantyl fragment is predicted to occupy another hydrophobic region in the kink region of the binding groove. In summary, we report on the synthesis and biological characterization of adamantyl-tethered biphenylic compounds that induce apoptosis in tumor cells most likely by targeting Bcl homologs. PMID:26725030

  10. Procaspase-activating compound 1 induces a caspase-3-dependent cell death in cerebellar granule neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Gulzeb; Akselsen, Oyvind W.; Hansen, Trond V.; Paulsen, Ragnhild E.

    2010-09-15

    Procaspase-activating compound 1, PAC-1, has been introduced as a direct activator of procaspase-3 and has been suggested as a therapeutic agent against cancer. Its activation of procaspase-3 is dependent on the chelation of zinc. We have tested PAC-1 and an analogue of PAC-1 as zinc chelators in vitro as well as their ability to activate caspase-3 and induce cell death in chicken cerebellar granule neuron cultures. These neurons are non-dividing, primary cells with normal caspase-3. The results reported herein show that PAC-1 chelates zinc, activates procaspase-3, and leads to caspase-3-dependent cell death in neurons, as the specific caspase-3-inhibitor Ac-DEVD-cmk inhibited both the caspase-3 activity and cell death. Thus, chicken cerebellar granule neurons is a suitable model to study mechanisms of interference with apoptosis of PAC-1 and similar compounds. Furthermore, the present study also raises concern about potential neurotoxicity of PAC-1 if used in cancer therapy.

  11. Preliminary Comparison of the Attenuation Properties of Polycrystalline Water Ice and CO2 Clathrate Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choukroun, Mathieu; Castillo-Rogez, J.; Mielke, R. E.; Young, J. B.; Engelhardt, H.; Sotin, C.

    2009-09-01

    We will present measurements of the attenuation properties of CO2 clathrate hydrates and polycrystalline water ice. These laboratory data are necessary to support models of tidal heating within the icy shells of Europa and Enceladus. Particularly, the attenuation properties of clathrates, likely involved in Enceladus’ outgassing, remain unconstrained. Samples are synthesized from ice seeds with a grain size of 150 - 425 microns. Seeds of carbon dioxide clathrate hydrates are synthesized within a high pressure - low temperature vessel, by reaction of CO2 at 30-40 bars with the ice seeds at -10 to -1 °C. Solid samples are produced from the compaction of the seeds at -80 °C, under vacuum and at a 100-MPa pressure applied over several hours. The microstructure of the samples before and after testing is characterized by optical cryo-microscopy and by Cryo - Scanning Electron Microprobe (CryoSEM). The CryoSEM is equipped with an Energy Dispersive Spectrometer, which provides elemental composition of the samples. Microstructural evolution and potential changes in composition resulting from clathrate dissociation can be assessed with these techniques. Cyclic loading measurements are being conducted with the Planetary Tides Simulation Facility at JPL, a cryogenic uniaxial compression system, within the frequency range 3x10-6 - 10-3 Hz, which encompasses the orbital frequencies of Enceladus and Europa. We will compare and contrast the attenuation observed for clathrate hydrates and polycrystalline ice in order to characterize the microstructural mechanisms driving dissipation in these samples. We will address the implications of these new observations in the context of icy satellites. Acknowledgements: MC is supported by a NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellowship, administered by Oak Ridge Associated Universities. This work has been conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA. Copyright 2009, California Institute

  12. Nickel compounds induce histone ubiquitination by inhibiting histone deubiquitinating enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ke Qingdong; Ellen, Thomas P.; Costa, Max

    2008-04-15

    Nickel (Ni) compounds are known carcinogens but underlying mechanisms are not clear. Epigenetic changes are likely to play an important role in nickel ion carcinogenesis. Previous studies have shown epigenetic effects of nickel ions, including the loss of histone acetylation and a pronounced increase in dimethylated H3K9 in nickel-exposed cells. In this study, we demonstrated that both water-soluble and insoluble nickel compounds induce histone ubiquitination (uH2A and uH2B) in a variety of cell lines. Investigations of the mechanism by which nickel increases histone ubiquitination in cells reveal that nickel does not affect cellular levels of the substrates of this modification, i.e., ubiquitin, histones, and other non-histone ubiquitinated proteins. In vitro ubiquitination and deubiquitination assays have been developed to further investigate possible effects of nickel on enzymes responsible for histone ubiquitination. Results from the in vitro assays demonstrate that the presence of nickel did not affect the levels of ubiquitinated histones in the ubiquitinating assay. Instead, the addition of nickel significantly prevents loss of uH2A and uH2B in the deubiquitinating assay, suggesting that nickel-induced histone ubiquitination is the result of inhibition of (a) putative deubiquitinating enzyme(s). Additional supporting evidence comes from the comparison of the response to nickel ions with a known deubiquitinating enzyme inhibitor, iodoacetamide (IAA). This study is the first to demonstrate such effects of nickel ions on histone ubiquitination. It also sheds light on the possible mechanisms involved in altering the steady state of this modification. The study provides further evidence that supports the notion that nickel ions alter epigenetic homeostasis in cells, which may lead to altered programs of gene expression and carcinogenesis.

  13. Enzyme entrapped nanoporous scaffolds formed through flow induced gelation in microfluidic filter device for sensitive biosensing of organophosphorus compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Donglai; Shao, Guocheng; Du, Dan; Wang, Jun; Wang, Limin; Wang, Wanjun; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-02-01

    A novel and versatile processing method was developed for the formation of gel scaffolds with in-situ AChE-AuNPs immobilization for biosensing of organophosphorus compounds. The biosensor designed by our new approach shows high sensitivity, selectivity and reactivation efficiency. This flow induced immobilziation technique opens up new pathways for designing simple, fast, biocompatible, and cost-effective process for enhanced sensor performance and on-site testing of a variety of toxic organophosphorus compounds.

  14. The effect of probiotic microorganisms and bioactive compounds on chemically induced carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Bertkova, I; Hijova, E; Chmelarova, A; Mojzisova, G; Petrasova, D; Strojny, L; Bomba, A; Zitnan, R

    2010-01-01

    Diet interventions and natural bioactive supplements have now been extensively studied to reduce risks of colon cancer, which is one of the major public health problem throughout the world. The objective of our investigation was to study the effects of probiotic, prebiotic, nutritional plant extract, and plant oil on selected biochemical and immunological parameters in rats with colon cancer induced by N,N dimethylhydrazine (DMH). Male and female Wistar albino rats were were fed by a high-fat (HF) diet (10% fat in the diet) and were divided into 9 groups: Control group; PRO group - HF diet supplemented with probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum to provide 3 x 109 c.f.u. of strain/1 ml of medium; PRE group - HF diet supplemented with inulin enriched with oligofructose (2% of HF diet); HES group - HF diet supplemented with plant extract of Aesculus hippocastanum L. (1% of HF diet); OIL group - HF diet comprised Linioleum virginale (2% of HF diet); and combination of probiotic microorganisms and bioactive compounds in the groups - PRO-PRE, PRO-HES, PRO-OIL, PRE-OIL. Carcinogenesis was initiated with subcutaneous injection of DMH (20 mg/kg) two times at week interval and dietary treatments were continued for the six weeks. Application of probiotic microorganisms and bioactive compounds in all treated groups significantly decreased the activities of bacterial enzymes (p<0.001), the fecal bile acids concentration (p<0.01; p<0.001) and significantly increased serum TNFalpha level (p<0.001) in comparison to the control rats. The number of coliforms was reduced in PRO, PRO-PRE, PRO-OIL and PRE-OIL groups and significantly higher count of lactobacilli (p<0.05) was observed in PRO-PRE, PRO-OIL and PRE-OIL groups in compare with the controls. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that probiotic microorganisms and bioactive compounds could exert a preventive effect on colon carcinogenesis induced by DMH. PMID:20568896

  15. The HD molecule in small and medium cages of clathrate hydrates: Quantum dynamics studied by neutron scattering measurements and computation

    SciTech Connect

    Colognesi, Daniele; Celli, Milva; Ulivi, Lorenzo; Powers, Anna; Xu, Minzhong; Bačić, Zlatko

    2014-10-07

    We report inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements on molecular hydrogen deuteride (HD) trapped in binary cubic (sII) and hexagonal (sH) clathrate hydrates, performed at low temperature using two different neutron spectrometers in order to probe both energy and momentum transfer. The INS spectra of binary clathrate samples exhibit a rich structure containing sharp bands arising from both the rotational transitions and the rattling modes of the guest molecule. For the clathrates with sII structure, there is a very good agreement with the rigorous fully quantum simulations which account for the subtle effects of the anisotropy, angular and radial, of the host cage on the HD microscopic dynamics. The sH clathrate sample presents a much greater challenge, due to the uncertainties regarding the crystal structure, which is known only for similar crystals with different promoter, but nor for HD (or H{sub 2}) plus methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE-d12)

  16. Inhibitory effects of curcumin on passive cutaneous anaphylactoid response and compound 48/80-induced mast cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Ho; Yan, Guang-Hai; Chai, Ok Hee

    2010-01-01

    Mast cells participate in allergies and inflammation by secreting a variety of pro-inflammatory mediators. Curcumin, the active component of turmeric, is a polyphenolic phytochemical with anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and anti-allergic properties. The effects of curcumin on compound 48/80-induced mast cell activation and passive cutaneous anaphylactoid reactions are unknown. In this report, we investigated the influences of curcumin on the passive cutaneous anaphylactoid response in vivo and compound 48/80-induced mast cell activation in vitro. The mechanism of action was examined by calcium uptake measurements and cAMP assays in mast cells. Curcumin significantly attenuated the mast cell-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylactoid reaction in an animal model. In agreement with this in vivo activity, curcumin suppressed compound 48/80-induced rat peritoneal mast cell (RPMC) degranulation and histamine release from RPMCs. Moreover, compound 48/80-elicited calcium uptake into RPMCs was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by curcumin. Furthermore, curcumin increased the level of intracellular cAMP and significantly inhibited the compound 48/80-induced reduction of cAMP in RPMCs. These results corroborate the finding that curcumin may have anti-allergic activity. PMID:21190003

  17. Quinuclidine compounds differently act as agonists of Kenyon cell nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and induced distinct effect on insect ganglionic depolarizations.

    PubMed

    Mathé-Allainmat, Monique; Swale, Daniel; Leray, Xavier; Benzidane, Yassine; Lebreton, Jacques; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R; Thany, Steeve H

    2013-12-01

    We have recently demonstrated that a new quinuclidine benzamide compound named LMA10203 acted as an agonist of insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Its specific pharmacological profile on cockroach dorsal unpaired median neurons (DUM) helped to identify alpha-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR2 receptors. In the present study, we tested its effect on cockroach Kenyon cells. We found that it induced an inward current demonstrating that it bounds to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on Kenyon cells. Interestingly, LMA10203-induced currents were completely blocked by the nicotinic antagonist α-bungarotoxin. We suggested that LMA10203 effect occurred through the activation of α-bungarotoxin-sensitive receptors and did not involve α-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR2, previously identified in DUM neurons. In addition, we have synthesized two new compounds, LMA10210 and LMA10211, and compared their effects on Kenyon cells. These compounds were members of the 3-quinuclidinyl benzamide or benzoate families. Interestingly, 1 mM LMA10210 was not able to induce an inward current on Kenyon cells compared to LMA10211. Similarly, we did not find any significant effect of LMA10210 on cockroach ganglionic depolarization, whereas these three compounds were able to induce an effect on the central nervous system of the third instar M. domestica larvae. Our data suggested that these three compounds could bind to distinct cockroach nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. PMID:23884575

  18. Preliminary Measurements on the Mechanical Properties of Clathrate Hydrates with Implications for the Internal Dynamics of Icy Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choukroun, M.; Barmatz, M. B.; Castillo, J. C.; Sotin, C.

    2008-12-01

    Surface features potentially associated with cryovolcanism have been identified on Titan, and the processes taking place beneath the surface are likely associated with the dissociation of clathrate hydrates and the release of methane. On Enceladus, the South Pole plume discovered by the Cassini-Huygens mission contains a large proportion of volatiles, in amounts consistent with models of clathrate hydrates dissociation at depth (Kieffer et al., Science 314, 1764-1766, 2006). The stability of clathrate hydrates is relatively well constrained in pure and mixed gas systems (e.g., Sloan, Clathrate hydrates of natural gases, Marcel Dekker, New York, 1998). Recent measurements of clathrate destabilization in presence of ammonia, a likely component of Titan's interior, led to the development of a new model of cryovolcanism (Choukroun et al., Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf., #1837, Houston, 2008). Internal dynamics relies on ice convection at depth on Titan and Enceladus (e.g., Tobie et al., Icarus 175, 496-502, 2005), and on relatively large tidal stresses on Enceladus. Clathrates are expected to destabilize when subject to stress (Durham et al., J. Geophys. Res. 108 (B4), 2182, 2003). Therefore, addressing the mechanical properties of clathrate hydrates in these environments is a necessary step toward better understanding cryovolcanic processes. We have developed a new apparatus for growing clathrate hydrates samples with controlled geometry, composition, and grain size. This system consists of a high-pressure autoclave and a cooling system and supports gas pressures up to 500 bars, and temperatures within the range -50 - 150 °C. We have started the production of clathrate hydrates of CH4, CO2, and N2 with this system, with the purpose to test their mechanical properties using an Instron compression system (Castillo-Rogez et al., submitted to J. Geophys. Res.; Castillo-Rogez et al., this meeting). We will present initial measurements on the creep response and on the

  19. Inhibition of IL-8 gene expression in Caco-2 cells by compounds which induce histone hyperacetylation.

    PubMed

    Huang, N; Katz, J P; Martin, D R; Wu, G D

    1997-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis, an idiopathic inflammatory disease of the colonic mucosa, can be effectively treated by enemas containing short chain fatty acids (SCFA) such as butyrate, propionate, and acetate. The molecular mechanisms that lead to this response have not been well characterized. It is well known that intestinal inflammation leads to an alteration in patterns of epithelial differentiation with an increase in epithelial proliferation and an expansion of cell populations in an undifferentiated state. SCFAs such as butyrate are capable of inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing a differentiated phenotype in vitro. The Caco-2 colon cancer cell line was used to study the effect of SCFAs and the process of cellular differentiation on the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin 8 (IL-8). SCFAs and trichostatin A, structurally unrelated compounds which both induce histone hyperacetylation, both led to a dose-dependent inhibition of IL-8 gene expression. Furthermore, spontaneous differentiation of Caco-2 cells by growth to a post-confluent state also inhibited the expression of IL-8. A possible mechanism by which SCFAs may be effective in the treatment of ulcerative colitis may be through their ability to increase histone acetylation states and inhibit the production of pro-inflammatory substances by the intestinal epithelium. PMID:9067093

  20. Anti-amyloid compounds protect from silica nanoparticle-induced neurotoxicity in the nematode C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, Andrea; Gührs, Karl-Heinz; von Mikecz, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Identifying nanomaterial-bio-interactions are imperative due to the broad introduction of nanoparticle (NP) applications and their distribution. Here, we demonstrate that silica NPs effect widespread protein aggregation in the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans ranging from induction of amyloid in nucleoli of intestinal cells to facilitation of protein aggregation in body wall muscles and axons of neural cells. Proteomic screening revealed that exposure of adult C. elegans with silica NPs promotes segregation of proteins belonging to the gene ontology (GO) group of “protein folding, proteolysis and stress response” to an SDS-resistant aggregome network. Candidate proteins in this group include chaperones, heat shock proteins and subunits of the 26S proteasome which are all decisively involved in protein homeostasis. The pathway of protein homeostasis was validated as a major target of silica NPs by behavioral phenotyping, as inhibitors of amyloid formation rescued NP-induced defects of locomotory patterns and egg laying. The analysis of a reporter worm for serotonergic neural cells revealed that silica NP-induced protein aggregation likewise occurs in axons of HSN neurons, where presynaptic accumulation of serotonin, e.g. disturbed axonal transport reduces the capacity for neurotransmission and egg laying. The results suggest that in C. elegans silica NPs promote a cascade of events including disturbance of protein homeostasis, widespread protein aggregation and inhibition of serotonergic neurotransmission which can be interrupted by compounds preventing amyloid fibrillation. PMID:26444998

  1. Diet-induced and mono-genetic obesity alter volatile organic compound signature in mice.

    PubMed

    Kistler, Martin; Muntean, Andreea; Szymczak, Wilfried; Rink, Nadine; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Wurst, Wolfgang; Hoeschen, Christoph; Klingenspor, Martin; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Rozman, Jan

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of obesity is still rising in many countries, resulting in an increased risk of associated metabolic diseases. In this study we aimed to describe the volatile organic compound (VOC) patterns symptomatic for obesity. We analyzed high fat diet (HFD) induced obese and mono-genetic obese mice (global knock-in mutation in melanocortin-4 receptor MC4R-ki). The source strengths of 208 VOCs were analyzed in ad libitum fed mice and after overnight food restriction. Volatiles relevant for a random forest-based separation of obese mice were detected (26 in MC4R-ki, 22 in HFD mice). Eight volatiles were found to be important in both obesity models. Interestingly, by creating a partial correlation network of the volatile metabolites, the chemical and metabolic origins of several volatiles were identified. HFD-induced obese mice showed an elevation in the ketone body acetone and acrolein, a marker of lipid peroxidation, and several unidentified volatiles. In MC4R-ki mice, several yet-unidentified VOCs were found to be altered. Remarkably, the pheromone (methylthio)methanethiol was found to be reduced, linking metabolic dysfunction and reproduction. The signature of volatile metabolites can be instrumental in identifying and monitoring metabolic disease states, as shown in the screening of the two obese mouse models in this study. Our findings show the potential of breath gas analysis to non-invasively assess metabolic alterations for personalized diagnosis. PMID:26860833

  2. Thermoelectric and transport properties of sintered n-type K8Ba16Ga40Sn96 with type-II clathrate structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Shota; Kishimoto, Kengo; Akai, Koji; Asada, Hironori; Koyanagi, Tsuyoshi

    2014-07-01

    This clathrate had a maximum dimensionless figure-of-merit, ZT, of 0.93 at 637 K, which was slightly higher than that of 0.83 for the sintered type-VIII clathrate Ba8Ga16Sn30. We investigated the high-temperature thermoelectric properties, transport properties, electronic structures, and thermal stabilities of the clathrates. The type-II clathrate was found to be superior to the type-VIII clathrate as a thermoelectric material; it had a high thermal stability and melting point, 859 K, high mobility, 141 cm2V-1s-1 at 300 K, because of its low inertial mass, and low high-temperature lattice thermal conductivity, approximately 4 mW cm-1K-1, resulting from a larger unit cell and weaker bipolar thermal conduction. We discuss these properties in terms of the electronic structure and the differences between the two types of clathrate.

  3. A Dunnione Compound MB12662 Improves Cisplatin-Induced Tissue Injury and Emesis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dongsun; Jo, In Geun; Jang, Ja Young; Kwak, Tae Hwan; Yoo, Sang Ku; Jeon, Jeong Hee; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Joo, Seong Soo; Kim, Okjin; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2015-01-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of MB12662, a synthetic dunnione compound, on cisplatin-induced vomiting reflexes and intestinal, renal, immune system, and hematopoietic toxicities in ferrets and mice, respectively. Male ICR mice were orally administered MB12662 (5, 10, 25 or 50 mg/kg) for 10 days, during which intraperitoneally challenged with cisplatin (3.5 mg/kg) from day 4 to 7, and sacrificed on day 10 for the pathological examination. Male ferrets were orally administered MB12662 (25, 50 or 100 mg/kg) for 7 days, subcutaneously challenged with cisplatin (5 mg/kg), and monitored for vomiting reflexes and survival of the animals. Four-day injection of cisplatin (3.5 mg/kg) to mice caused body weight loss and degeneration and atrophy of intestinal villi, reducing villi/crypt ratio to a half level of control animals. Cisplatin also induced renal and hepatic toxicities, and depletion of splenocytes and bone marrow progenitor cells. The systemic toxicities including decreased villi/crypt ratio, immune system atrophy, splenocyte depletion, and decreased cellularity in bone marrow were improved by MB12662. Cisplatin (5 mg/kg) induced retching and emetic responses of ferrets, which were remarkably attenuated by MB12662 in a dose-dependent manner. All the ferrets pretreated with MB12662 survived the challenge of cisplatin, in comparison with 40% mortality in vehicle-treated animals, and blood parameters of nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity were markedly recovered. It is expected that MB12662 could be a candidate for the body protection against burden, including emesis, of chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:26336585

  4. The effect of topically applied salicylic compounds on serotonin-induced scratching behaviour in hairless rats.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, J S; Simonsen, L; Benfeldt, E; Jensen, S B; Serup, J

    2002-08-01

    There is a strong need for antipruritic substances for treating itch in clinical dermatology. In one recent human study, topically applied acetylsalicylic acid has been described to rapidly decrease histamine-induced itch. We have established a model for periferally elicited pruritus by injecting serotonin into the rostral back area (neck) in rats. Using this model, we aimed to investigate the antipruritic potential of four different salicylic compounds, which all possess different skin penetration characteristics. Eighteen rats were studied for 6 weeks. Prior to serotonin injections (2 mg/ml, 50 micro l), 10 micro l of test substances was applied to a circular area 18 mm in diameter. The four substances were salicylic acid, butyl salicylate, diethylamine salicylate and salicylamide, all solubilized in dimethyl isosorbide to a concentration of 5% w/w. Diethylamine salicylate and salicylamide were previously shown to be slowly absorbed through rat skin in contrast to salicylic acid and butyl salicylate. After serotonin injections, scratching was monitored by video recording for 1.5 h. Compared with the vehicle, a lower number of scratch sequences were seen when diethylamine salicylate (P < 0.001) and salicylamide (P = 0.005) had been applied. The numbers of scratch sequences were lower with diethylamine salicylate and salicylamide than with the vehicle throughout the 1.5-h study period. We conclude that topical application of diethylamine salicylate and salicylamide could suppress serotonin-induced scratching in rats. The antipruritic effect seems to be related to the slow drug release of the two substances. The results may be clinically relevant as serotonin induces itch in humans. PMID:12190947

  5. A Dunnione Compound MB12662 Improves Cisplatin-Induced Tissue Injury and Emesis.

    PubMed

    Park, Dongsun; Jo, In Geun; Jang, Ja Young; Kwak, Tae Hwan; Yoo, Sang Ku; Jeon, Jeong Hee; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Joo, Seong Soo; Kim, Okjin; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2015-09-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of MB12662, a synthetic dunnione compound, on cisplatin-induced vomiting reflexes and intestinal, renal, immune system, and hematopoietic toxicities in ferrets and mice, respectively. Male ICR mice were orally administered MB12662 (5, 10, 25 or 50 mg/kg) for 10 days, during which intraperitoneally challenged with cisplatin (3.5 mg/kg) from day 4 to 7, and sacrificed on day 10 for the pathological examination. Male ferrets were orally administered MB12662 (25, 50 or 100 mg/kg) for 7 days, subcutaneously challenged with cisplatin (5 mg/kg), and monitored for vomiting reflexes and survival of the animals. Four-day injection of cisplatin (3.5 mg/kg) to mice caused body weight loss and degeneration and atrophy of intestinal villi, reducing villi/crypt ratio to a half level of control animals. Cisplatin also induced renal and hepatic toxicities, and depletion of splenocytes and bone marrow progenitor cells. The systemic toxicities including decreased villi/crypt ratio, immune system atrophy, splenocyte depletion, and decreased cellularity in bone marrow were improved by MB12662. Cisplatin (5 mg/kg) induced retching and emetic responses of ferrets, which were remarkably attenuated by MB12662 in a dose-dependent manner. All the ferrets pretreated with MB12662 survived the challenge of cisplatin, in comparison with 40% mortality in vehicle-treated animals, and blood parameters of nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity were markedly recovered. It is expected that MB12662 could be a candidate for the body protection against burden, including emesis, of chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:26336585

  6. NMR Knight shifts and the electronic properties of Rb{sub 8}Na{sub 16}Si{sub 136} clathrate

    SciTech Connect

    Latturner, Susan; Iversen, Bo B.; Sepa, Jelena; Srdanov, Vojislav; Stucky, Galen

    2001-03-15

    A silicon framework clathrate type-II compound was synthesized with rubidium and sodium atoms in cages. A single crystal of this material was characterized by both conventional and synchrotron x-ray diffraction; the structure belongs to the cubic space group Fd-3m, with a cell edge of 14.738(1) Aa. The alkali metals are ordered in the structure, with the small cages containing sodium, and the large cages containing rubidium. Variable temperature magic-angle-spinning NMR of all three nuclei show large Knight shifts with a strong temperature dependence, unlike conventional metals. The low conductivity (200 S/cm) and high paramagnetic susceptibility (5x10{sup -6}emu/g) indicate that as the temperature is lowered, the electrons become more localized on the alkali atoms, resulting in properties consistent with a correlated narrow band metal system.

  7. Dietary Compound Kaempferol Inhibits Airway Thickening Induced by Allergic Reaction in a Bovine Serum Albumin-Induced Model of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Daekeun; Park, Sin-Hye; Choi, Yean-Jung; Kim, Yun-Ho; Antika, Lucia Dwi; Habibah, Nurina Umy; Kang, Min-Kyung; Kang, Young-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by aberrant airways including epithelial thickening, goblet cell hyperplasia, and smooth muscle hypertrophy within the airway wall. The current study examined whether kaempferol inhibited mast cell degranulation and prostaglandin (PG) release leading to the development of aberrant airways, using an in vitro model of dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin (DNP-BSA)-sensitized rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) mast cells and an in vivo model of BSA-challenged asthmatic mice. Nontoxic kaempferol at 10–20 μM suppressed β-hexosaminidase release and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2)-mediated production of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) and prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) in sensitized mast cells. Oral administration of ≤20 mg/kg kaempferol blocked bovine serum albumin (BSA) inhalation-induced epithelial cell excrescence and smooth muscle hypertrophy by attenuating the induction of COX2 and the formation of PGD2 and PGF2α, together with reducing the anti-α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression in mouse airways. Kaempferol deterred the antigen-induced mast cell activation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) responsive to protein kinase Cμ (PKCμ) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Furthermore, the antigen-challenged activation of Syk-phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) pathway was dampened in kaempferol-supplemented mast cells. These results demonstrated that kaempferol inhibited airway wall thickening through disturbing Syk-PLCγ signaling and PKCμ-ERK-cPLA2-COX2 signaling in antigen-exposed mast cells. Thus, kaempferol may be a potent anti-allergic compound targeting allergic asthma typical of airway hyperplasia and hypertrophy. PMID:26694364

  8. Quinones and Aromatic Chemical Compounds in Particulate Matter Induce Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Implications for Ultrafine Particle Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Tian; Korge, Paavo; Weiss, James N.; Li, Ning; Venkatesen, M. Indira; Sioutas, Constantinos; Nel, Andre

    2004-01-01

    Particulate pollutants cause adverse health effects through the generation of oxidative stress. A key question is whether these effects are mediated by the particles or their chemical compounds. In this article we show that aliphatic, aromatic, and polar organic compounds, fractionated from diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), exert differential toxic effects in RAW 264.7 cells. Cellular analyses showed that the quinone-enriched polar fraction was more potent than the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)–enriched aromatic fraction in O2•− generation, decrease of membrane potential (ΔΨm), loss of mitochondrial membrane mass, and induction of apoptosis. A major effect of the polar fraction was to promote cyclosporin A (CsA)–sensitive permeability transition pore (PTP) opening in isolated liver mitochondria. This opening effect is dependent on a direct effect on the PTP at low doses as well as on an effect on ΔΨm at high doses in calcium (Ca2+)-loaded mitochondria. The direct PTP effect was mimicked by redox-cycling DEP quinones. Although the aliphatic fraction failed to perturb mitochondrial function, the aromatic fraction increased the Ca2+ retention capacity at low doses and induced mitochondrial swelling and a decrease in ΔΨm at high doses. This swelling effect was mostly CsA insensitive and could be reproduced by a mixture of PAHs present in DEPs. These chemical effects on isolated mitochondria could be reproduced by intact DEPs as well as ambient ultrafine particles (UFPs). In contrast, commercial polystyrene nanoparticles failed to exert mitochondrial effects. These results suggest that DEP and UFP effects on the PTP and ΔΨm are mediated by adsorbed chemicals rather than the particles themselves. PMID:15471724

  9. Antibacterial active compounds from Hypericum ascyron L. induce bacterial cell death through apoptosis pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-Mei; Luo, Xue-Gang; Si, Chuan-Ling; Wang, Nan; Zhou, Hao; He, Jun-Fang; Zhang, Tong-Cun

    2015-01-01

    Hypericum ascyron L. has been used as a traditional medicine for the treatment of wounds, swelling, headache, nausea and abscesses in China for thousands of years. However, modern pharmacological studies are still necessary to provide a scientific basis to substantiate their traditional use. In this study, the mechanism underlying the antimicrobial effect of the antibacterial activity compounds from H. ascyron L. was investigated. Bioguided fractionation of the extract from H. ascyron L. afforded antibacterial activity fraction 8. The results of cup plate analysis and MTT assay showed that the MIC and MBC of fraction 8 is 5 mg/mL. Furthermore, using Annexin V-FITC/PI, TUNEL labeling and DNA gel electrophoresis, we found that cell death with apoptosis features similar to those in eucaryon could be induced in bacteria strains after exposure to the antibacterial activity compounds from H. ascyron L. at moderate concentration. In addition, we further found fraction 8 could disrupt the cell membrane potential indicate that fraction 8 exerts pro-apoptotic effects through a membrane-mediated apoptosis pathway. Finally, quercetin and kaempferol 3-O-β-(2″-acetyl)-galactopyranoside, were identified from fraction 8 by means of Mass spectrometry and Nuclear magnetic resonance. To our best knowledge, this study is the first to show that Kaempferol 3-O-β-(2″-acetyl)-galactopyranoside coupled with quercetin had significant antibacterial activity via apoptosis pathway, and it is also the first report that Kaempferol 3-O-β-(2″-acetyl)-galactopyranoside was found in clusiacea. Our data might provide a rational base for the use of H. ascyron L. in clinical, and throw light on the development of novel antibacterial drugs. PMID:25916905

  10. Meso-Scale Clathrate Experiments: Effect of Grain Size on Formation Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeman, J. R.; Elwood-Madden, M.; Alford, J.; Phelps, T. J.; Rawn, C.

    2009-12-01

    Clathrates, or gas hydrates result from a guest gas molecule populating a cavity in a cage of water molecules. Gas hydrates naturally occur on Earth under low temperature and moderate pressure environments such as seafloor or permafrost sediments. Gas hydrates are a large sink of methane, a major greenhouse gas and a possible energy reserve. A release from these reservoirs has been hypothesized to have had a major role in climate change throughout geologic time as clathrates are sensitive to pressure and temperature. Hydrates can also be used as a storage technology for both transport and sequestration of carbon. To properly utilize hydrates a thorough understanding of formation characteristics/preferences is essential. Gas hydrates are predicted to show a preference of forming in materials with a large grain size. Verification of this model could aid prediction of natural clathrate reservoirs and make methane production from hydrates economically viable. Predicting the location and extent of clathrate reservoirs throughout geologic time will also aid paleo-climate modeling and improve the accuracy of models of modern global change A mesoscale gas hydrate formation experiment was designed within ORNL’s Seafloor Process Simulator (SPS) to determine how sediment grain-size and synthetic mesh planes affect hydrate formation pathways. The 72-liter pressure vessel was fitted with a sediment column which was vertically split with one-half of the cylindrical vessel containing sand of 500 microns and half containing silt of 65 microns. Inside the column a diffuser injected gas into both sediments at equal flow rates and the formation of clathrate was tracked with both ‘bulk’ pressure/temperature data from the vessel and via approximately 150 sensors embedded in each of four fiber optic planes, which were placed at four levels in the sediment column. Experiments concluded that clathrate formation is more likely to occur in coarse materials due to the high porosity and

  11. Elicitation of induced resistance against Pectobacterium carotovorum and Pseudomonas syringae by specific individual compounds derived from native Korean plant species.

    PubMed

    Song, Geun Cheol; Ryu, Shi Yong; Kim, Young Sup; Lee, Ji Young; Choi, Jung Sup; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2013-01-01

    Plants have developed general and specific defense mechanisms for protection against various enemies. Among the general defenses, induced resistance has distinct characteristics, such as broad-spectrum resistance and long-lasting effectiveness. This study evaluated over 500 specific chemical compounds derived from native Korean plant species to determine whether they triggered induced resistance against Pectobacterium carotovorum supsp. carotovorum (Pcc) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) in Arabidopsis thaliana. To select target compound(s) with direct and indirect (volatile) effects, a new Petri-dish-based in vitro disease assay system with four compartments was developed. The screening assay showed that capsaicin, fisetin hydrate, jaceosidin, and farnesiferol A reduced the disease severity significantly in tobacco. Of these four compounds, capsaicin and jaceosidin induced resistance against Pcc and Pst, which depended on both salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signaling, using Arabidopsis transgenic and mutant lines, including npr1 and NahG for SA signaling and jar1 for JA signaling. The upregulation of the PR2 and PDF1.2 genes after Pst challenge with capsaicin pre-treatment indicated that SA and JA signaling were primed. These results demonstrate that capsaicin and jaceosidin can be effective triggers of strong induced resistance against both necrotrophic and biotrophic plant pathogens. PMID:24135942

  12. Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM), an organosulfur compound, is effective against obesity-induced metabolic disorders in mice.

    PubMed

    Sousa-Lima, Inês; Park, Shin-Young; Chung, Michelle; Jung, Hyun Ju; Kang, Min-Cheol; Gaspar, Joana M; Seo, Ji A; Macedo, M Paula; Park, Kyong Soo; Mantzoros, Christos; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Young-Bum

    2016-10-01

    Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM), an organosulfur compound, has been used as a dietary supplement that can improve various metabolic diseases. However, the effect of MSM on obesity-linked metabolic disorders remains unclear. The goal of the current study is to determine whether MSM has beneficial effects on glucose and lipid homeostasis in obesity-associated pathophysiologic states. High-fat diet-induced obese (DIO) and genetically obese diabetic db/db mice treated with MSM (1%-5% v/v, by drinking water) were studied. Metabolic parameters involved in glucose and lipid metabolism were determined. Treatment of DIO mice with MSM leads to a significant decrease in blood glucose levels. DIO mice treated with MSM are hypersensitive to insulin, as evidenced by decreased serum insulin and an increase in the area above the curve during an ITT. Concurrently, MSM reduces hepatic triglyceride and cholesterol contents in DIO mice. These effects are accompanied by reductions in gene expression of key molecules involved in lipogenesis and inflammation. FACS analysis reveals that MSM markedly increases the frequency of B cells and decreases the frequency of myeloid cells in peripheral blood and in bone marrow. Moreover, overnutrition-induced changes of femur microarchitecture are restored by MSM. In db/db mice, a marked impairment in glucose and lipid metabolic profiles is notably ameliorated when MSM is supplemented. These data suggest that MSM has beneficial effects on multiple metabolic dysfunctions, including hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and inflammation. Thus, MSM could be the therapeutic option for the treatment of obesity-related metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes and fatty liver diseases. PMID:27621186

  13. Proton-induced damage on 2-aminooxazole, a potential prebiotic compound.

    PubMed

    Bacchus-Montabonel, Marie-Christine

    2015-01-29

    Among the complex organic molecules detected in space, in the interstellar medium, on meteorites or comets, special interest is devoted to the potentially exobiologic-relevant species. In the hypothesis, widely discussed, of a possible exogen origin of life, the transport of such compounds and their survival is indeed a fundamental question. Recently, suggestion has been made that 2-aminooxazole could be a possible precursor of RNA nucleotides on early earth and its stability to UV radiation or to collisions may be determinant. We have thus undertaken a detailed theoretical study of the charge transfer collision dynamics induced by the impact of 2-aminooxazole with protons, which could be an important process in particular in proton-rich environments. The theoretical treatment has been developed through ab initio quantum chemistry molecular calculations followed by semiclassical collision dynamics. The results are compared to previous investigations on DNA and RNA building blocks in order to extract some qualitative trends in the damage of prebiotic species under spatial radiation. PMID:25574775

  14. Standoff detection and classification procedure for bioorganic compounds by hyperspectral laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischbach, Thomas; Duschek, Frank; Hausmann, Anita; Pargmann, Carsten; Aleksejev, Valeri; Poryvkina, Larisa; Sobolev, Innokenti; Babichenko, Sergey; Handke, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    The high and still increasing number of attacks by hazardous bioorganic materials makes enormous demands on their detection. A very high detection sensitivity and differentiability are essential, as well as a rapid identification with low false alarm rates. One single technology can hardly achieve this. Point sensors can collect and identify materials, but finding an appropriate position is time consuming and involves several risks. Laser based standoff detection, however, can immediately provide information on propagation and compound type of a released hazardous material. The coupling of both methods may illustrate a solution to optimize the acquisition and detection of hazardous substances. At DLR Lampoldshausen, bioorganic substances are measured, based on laser induced fluorescence (LIF), and subsequently classified. In this work, a procedure is presented, which utilizes lots of information (time-dependent spectral data, local information) and predicts the presence of hazardous substances by statistical data analysis. For that purpose, studies are carried out on a free transmission range at a distance of 22m at two different excitation wavelengths alternating between 280nm and 355 nm. Time-dependent fluorescence spectra are recorded by a gated intensified CCD camera (iCCD). An automated signal processing allows fast and deterministic data collection and a direct subsequent classification of the detected substances. The variation of the substance parameters (physical state, concentration) is included within this method.

  15. Gene expression for peroxisome-associated enzymes in hepatocellular carcinomas induced by ciprofibrate, a hypolipidemic compound

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, M.S.; Nemali, M.R.; Reddy, J.K.

    1986-03-05

    Administration of hypolipidemic compounds leads to marked proliferation of peroxisomes and peroxisome-associated enzymes (PAE) in the livers of rodents and non-rodent species. The increase peroxisome-associated enzymes such as fatty acid ..beta..-oxidation system and catalase is shown to be due to an increase in the levels of mRNA. In this experiment they have examined hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC), induced in male F-344 rats by ciprofibrate (0.025%, w/w for 60 weeks), for gene expression of PAE. Total RNA was purified from HCC as well as from control and ciprofibrate (0.025% for 2 weeks) fed rat livers. Northern blot analysis was performed using (32/sub p/)cDNA probes for albumin, fatty acetyl-CoA oxidase, enoyl-CoA hydratase 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase bifunctional enzyme and catalase. mRNA levels in HCC for albumin, fatty acid ..beta..-oxidation enzymes and catalase were comparable with those levels observed in the livers of rats given ciprofibrate for 2 weeks. In control livers the mRNAs for ..beta..-oxidation enzymes were low. Albumin mRNA levels in all the 3 groups were comparable. Additional studies are necessary to determine whether the increased level of mRNAs for the ..beta..-oxidation enzymes in HCC is due to the effect of ciprofibrate or to the gene amplification.

  16. Strain induced superconductivity in the parent compound BaFe2As2.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, J; Grinenko, V; Chekhonin, P; Skrotzki, W; Efremov, D V; Oswald, S; Iida, K; Hühne, R; Hänisch, J; Hoffmann, M; Kurth, F; Schultz, L; Holzapfel, B

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of superconductivity with a transition temperature, Tc, up to 65 K in single-layer FeSe (bulk Tc=8 K) films grown on SrTiO3 substrates has attracted special attention to Fe-based thin films. The high Tc is a consequence of the combined effect of electron transfer from the oxygen-vacant substrate to the FeSe thin film and lattice tensile strain. Here we demonstrate the realization of superconductivity in the parent compound BaFe2As2 (no bulk Tc) just by tensile lattice strain without charge doping. We investigate the interplay between strain and superconductivity in epitaxial BaFe2As2 thin films on Fe-buffered MgAl2O4 single crystalline substrates. The strong interfacial bonding between Fe and the FeAs sublattice increases the Fe-Fe distance due to the lattice misfit, which leads to a suppression of the antiferromagnetic spin density wave and induces superconductivity with bulk Tc≈10 K. These results highlight the role of structural changes in controlling the phase diagram of Fe-based superconductors. PMID:24309386

  17. Rapid composition analysis of compound semiconductor thin film solar cell by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. H.; Kim, C. K.; In, J. H.; Jeong, S. H.

    2014-03-01

    The characteristics of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) such as short measurement time and no sample preparation provide clear advantages over other analytical techniques for rapid elemental analysis at manufacturing sites where the composition of products need to be determined in real-time for process monitoring or quality control. Thin film solar cells based on CuIn1-xGaxSe2 (CIGS), polycrystalline compound semiconductor material, have unique advantages of high efficiency (>20%), long-term stability, and low manufacturing cost over other types of solar cell. The electrical and optical properties of the thin CIGS films are closely related to the concentration ratios among its major constituent elements Cu, In, Ga and Se such as Ga/(Ga + In) and Cu/(Ga + In), and thus an accurate measurement of the composition of CIGS thin films has been an issue among CIGS solar cell researchers, requiring a fast and reliable technique for composition analysis. This paper presents the results of nanosecond (ns) and femtosecond (fs) laser based LIBS analysis of thin CIGS films. The critical issues for LIBS analysis of CIGS thin films such are discussed in comparison with ns- and fs-LIBS measurement results. The calibration of LIBS signal intensity ratios with respect to reference concentration data is carried out and the results of optimal line selection for LIBS analysis, depth profiling capability, and reproducibility are discussed.

  18. Proteomics Study on Nonallergic Hypersensitivity Induced by Compound 4880 and Ovalbumin

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yubin; Guo, Na; Dou, Deqiang; Ran, Xiaoku; Ma, Xiande; Kuang, Haixue

    2016-01-01

    Nonallergic hypersensitivity reaction (NHR) accounts for more than 77% of all immune-mediated immediate hypersensitivity reactions and has become a serious threat to public health. Here, proteomics was used to study the NHR mechanism of two typical substances, the compound 4880 and ovalbumin. Twelve different proteins were suggested as potential biomarkers for examining the NHR mechanism, and our results revealed that the mechanism mainly encompassed 2 processes, i.e., generation and effect processes. The generation process could be classified as direct stimulation, complement (classical and alternative), coagulation, kallikrein-kinin, and integrated pathways. Thus glutathione peroxidase 1, terminal complement complex (complement factor 4d and Bb), coagulation 13, kininogen-1, and IgE could be used as candidate biomarkers for the indication of the corresponding pathways respectively, the proteins were further confirmed by ELISA. And the effect process was mainly composed of histamine as well as proteins such as DCD and MYLPF, which could be used as important indices for the symptoms of NHR. Our study differs from previous studies in that C4880 was found to not only be involved in the direct stimulation pathway, but also in the activated complement and kallikrein-kinin pathways through the coagulation pathway. We also report for the first time that ovalbumin-induced NHR could be a combination of the coagulation, classical complement, and integrated pathways. PMID:26829397

  19. The natural compound forskolin synergizes with dexamethasone to induce cell death in myeloma cells via BIM

    PubMed Central

    Follin-Arbelet, Virginie; Misund, Kristine; Hallan Naderi, Elin; Ugland, Hege; Sundan, Anders; Kiil Blomhoff, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that activation of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) pathway kills multiple myeloma (MM) cells both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study we have investigated the potential of enhancing the killing of MM cell lines and primary MM cells by combining the cAMP-elevating compound forskolin with the commonly used MM therapeutic drugs melphalan, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, bortezomib and dexamethasone. We observed that forskolin potentiated the killing induced by all the tested agents as compared to treatment with the single agents alone. In particular, forskolin had a synergistic effect on the dexamethasone-responsive cell lines H929 and OM-2. By knocking down the proapoptotic BCL-2 family member BIM, we proved this protein to be involved in the synergistic induction of apoptosis by dexamethasone and forskolin. The ability of forskolin to maintain the killing of MM cells even at lower concentrations of the conventional agents suggests that forskolin may be used to diminish treatment-associated side effects. Our findings support a potential role of forskolin in combination with current conventional agents in the treatment of MM. PMID:26306624

  20. Characterization of Imidazopyridine Compounds as Negative Allosteric Modulators of Proton-Sensing GPR4 in Extracellular Acidification-Induced Responses

    PubMed Central

    Tobo, Ayaka; Tobo, Masayuki; Nakakura, Takashi; Ebara, Masashi; Tomura, Hideaki; Mogi, Chihiro; Im, Dong-Soon; Murata, Naoya; Kuwabara, Atsushi; Ito, Saki; Fukuda, Hayato; Arisawa, Mitsuhiro; Shuto, Satoshi; Nakaya, Michio; Kurose, Hitoshi; Sato, Koichi; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor 4 (GPR4), previously proposed as the receptor for sphingosylphosphorylcholine, has recently been identified as the proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) coupling to multiple intracellular signaling pathways, including the Gs protein/cAMP and G13 protein/Rho. In the present study, we characterized some imidazopyridine compounds as GPR4 modulators that modify GPR4 receptor function. In the cells that express proton-sensing GPCRs, including GPR4, OGR1, TDAG8, and G2A, extracellular acidification stimulates serum responsive element (SRE)-driven transcriptional activity, which has been shown to reflect Rho activity, with different proton sensitivities. Imidazopyridine compounds inhibited the moderately acidic pH-induced SRE activity only in GPR4-expressing cells. Acidic pH-stimulated cAMP accumulation, mRNA expression of inflammatory genes, and GPR4 internalization within GPR4-expressing cells were all inhibited by the GPR4 modulator. We further compared the inhibition property of the imidazopyridine compound with psychosine, which has been shown to selectively inhibit actions induced by proton-sensing GPCRs, including GPR4. In the GPR4 mutant, in which certain histidine residues were mutated to phenylalanine, proton sensitivity was significantly shifted to the right, and psychosine failed to further inhibit acidic pH-induced SRE activation. On the other hand, the imidazopyridine compound almost completely inhibited acidic pH-induced action in mutant GPR4. We conclude that some imidazopyridine compounds show specificity to GPR4 as negative allosteric modulators with a different action mode from psychosine, an antagonist susceptible to histidine residues, and are useful for characterizing GPR4-mediated acidic pH-induced biological actions. PMID:26070068

  1. High pressure optical cell for synthesis and in situ Raman spectroscopy of hydrogen clathrate hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celli, Milva; Zoppi, Marco; Zaghloul, Mohamed A. S.; Ulivi, Lorenzo

    2012-11-01

    We report the design, realization, and test of a high-pressure optical cell that we have used to measure the Raman spectra of hydrogen clathrate hydrates, synthesized in situ by the application of 200-300 MPa of gas pressure on solid water. The optical apparatus is mounted on a cryogenic system so to allow measurements and sample treatment at any temperature between 300 and 20 K. A capillary pipe is connected to the inside of the cell to allow the gas flow into and out of the cell, and to regulate the internal pressure at any value from 0 to 300 MPa. In the experimental test described in this paper, the cell has been partly filled, at room temperature, with a small amount of water, then frozen at 263 K before injecting hydrogen gas, at pressure of 150 MPa, into the cell. This procedure has permitted to study hydrogen clathrate formation, by measuring Raman spectra as a function of time.

  2. Fluid clathrate system for continuous removal of heavy noble gases from mixtures of lighter gases

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.C.; Markun, F.; Zawadzki, M.T.

    1998-04-28

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for separation of heavy noble gas in a gas volume. An apparatus and method have been devised which includes a reservoir containing an oil exhibiting a clathrate effect for heavy noble gases with a reservoir input port and the reservoir is designed to enable the input gas volume to bubble through the oil with the heavy noble gas being absorbed by the oil exhibiting a clathrate effect. The gas having reduced amounts of heavy noble gas is output from the oil reservoir, and the oil having absorbed heavy noble gas can be treated by mechanical agitation and/or heating to desorb the heavy noble gas for analysis and/or containment and allow recycling of the oil to the reservoir. 6 figs.

  3. Fluid clathrate system for continuous removal of heavy noble gases from mixtures of lighter gases

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Markun, Francis; Zawadzki, Mary T.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for separation of heavy noble gas in a gas volume. An apparatus and method have been devised which includes a reservoir containing an oil exhibiting a clathrate effect for heavy noble gases with a reservoir input port and the reservoir is designed to enable the input gas volume to bubble through the oil with the heavy noble gas being absorbed by the oil exhibiting a clathrate effect. The gas having reduced amounts of heavy noble gas is output from the oil reservoir, and the oil having absorbed heavy noble gas can be treated by mechanical agitation and/or heating to desorb the heavy noble gas for analysis and/or containment and allow recycling of the oil to the reservoir.

  4. Molecular dynamics study of the stability of methane structure H clathrate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, J A; Klug, D D

    2007-03-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the stability of structure H (sH) methane clathrate hydrates in a 3 x 3 x 3 sH unit cell replica. Simulations are performed at experimental conditions of 300 K and 2 GPa for three methane intermolecular potentials. The five small cages of the sH unit cell are assigned methane guest occupancies of one and large cage guest occupancies of one to five are considered. Radial distribution functions, unit cell volumes, and configurational energies are studied as a function of large cage CH(4) occupancy. Free energy calculations are carried out to determine the stability of clathrates for large cage occupancies. Large cage occupancy of five is the most stable configuration for a Lennard-Jones united-atom potential and the Tse-Klein-McDonald potential parametrized for condensed methane phases and two for the most stable configuation for the Murad and Gubbins potential. PMID:17411153

  5. Application of liquid clathrates for separation of aromatic hydrocarbons from synthetic fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.F.; Zaworotko, M.J.; Fisher, I.P.

    1988-08-01

    The high aromaticity of synthetic crudes from upgraded tar sands degrades mid-distillate fuel quality and incurs high costs through refining by hydrotreating. Recent work has demonstrated that a class of complex ionic liquids liquid clathrates may be used to extract aromatic components from synthetic fuels at ambient temperatures. Liquid clathrates are formed by matching large organic cations, e.g., alkyl ammonium and alkyl pyridinium with air stable anions Al/sub 2/Cl/sub 7/minus// and AlCl/sub 4/minus// in the presence of an aromatic component. Such ternary mixtures typically form two liquid phases; the lower phase is salt-rich and contains a high concentration of aromatic components. Experimental details are given together with preparation procedures and extraction results determined by mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy.

  6. Clathrates with Me = Mg, Pd, Ni, Au, Ag, Cu, Zn, Al, Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderlich, Wilfried; Amano, Mao; Matsumura, Yoshihito

    2014-06-01

    Clathrate materials of AlSi, CuSi or NiSi type consisting of abundant elements have a realistic chance of becoming useful thermoelectrics in the near future, because the rattling effect due to their crystal cage structure provides a large figure of merit ZT even in experiments measured under large temperature gradients. In the search for better thermoelectrics, new element combinations in the clathrate type I structure with cubic space group Pm3n were calculated using VASP ab initio software. Predictions of the Seebeck coefficient were made by checking the electronic band structure and density of states for a large variety of input data. For x values around 4 to 6 in the structural formula Ba8Me x Si46- x the substituents Cu, Au, and Ag are best for good thermoelectric behavior, which is discussed in this paper as a result of the low electron-phonon interaction parameter.

  7. Low-temperature thermoelectric, galvanomagnetic, and thermodynamic properties of the type-I clathrate Ba8AuxSi46-x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydemir, U.; Candolfi, C.; Ormeci, A.; Oztan, Y.; Baitinger, M.; Oeschler, N.; Steglich, F.; Grin, Yu.

    2011-11-01

    Polycrystalline samples of the clathrate Ba8AuxSi46-x were synthesized for 0.2 ⩽ x ⩽ 10. The homogeneity range of the type-I clathrate phase was determined to be 3.63 ⩽ x ⩽ 6.10 after annealing at 900 °C, while a lower Au concentration (x ≈ 2.2) was obtained by steel-quenching. Quasisingle phase materials were obtained for 4.10 ⩽ x ⩽ 6.10. In this composition range, thermoelectric properties, including electrical resistivity, thermopower, and thermal conductivity, were investigated between 2 and 350 K. These experiments were complemented by low-temperature specific heat and Hall-effect measurements (2-300 K). First-principles calculations were carried out to determine the evolution of the electronic structure as a function of x. Both theoretical and experimental results evidence a progressive evolution, with the Au content, from a metallic-like behavior towards a highly doped semiconducting state which develops around x = 5.43. At this concentration, a crossover from n- to p-type conduction occurs, suggesting that the present system satisfies the Zintl-Klemm concept, which predicts a transition at x = 5.33. This crossover is traced by Hall-effect data indicating a dominant electronlike response for x ⩽ 5.43, which turns into a holelike signal at higher x values. Analysis of the data based on a single-parabolic-band model under the assumption of a single scattering mechanism of the charge carriers proved to adequately describe the transport properties in the compositional range investigated. Interestingly, the temperature dependence of the lattice thermal conductivity is strongly influenced by the Au concentration: the typical behavior of crystalline insulators in the n-type compounds evolves into a glasslike dependence in the p-type samples. The series Ba8AuxSi46-x thus provides an excellent testing ground for the interplay between crystal structure, electronic properties, and lattice thermal conductivity in type-I clathrates.

  8. Neuroprotective Properties of Compounds Extracted from Dianthus superbus L. against Glutamate-induced Cell Death in HT22 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Bo-Ra; Yang, Hye Jin; Weon, Jin Bae; Lee, Jiwoo; Eom, Min Rye; Ma, Choong Je

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dianthus superbus L. has been used in Chinese herbal medicine as a diuretic and anti-inflammatory agent. Objective: In this study, we isolated ten bioactive compounds from D. superbus and evaluated their neuroprotective activity against glutamate-induced cell death in the hippocampal neuronal HT22 cells. Materials and Methods: New compound, (E)-methyl-4-hydroxy-4-(8a-methyl-3-oxodecahydronaphthalen-4a-yl) (1) and, nine known compounds, diosmetin-7-O (2’’,6’’-di-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside (2), 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-pentyl ester benzenepropanoic acid (3), vanillic acid (4), 4-hydroxy-benzeneacetic acid (5), 4-methoxybenzeneacetic acid (6), (E)-4-methoxycinnamic acid (7), 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethanol (8), hydroferulic acid (9), and methyl hydroferulate (10), were isolated by bioactivity-guided separation. Structures of the isolated compounds were identified on the basis of 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), 13C NMR, and two-dimensional NMR spectra, while their neuroprotective properties were evaluated by performing the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Results: D. superbus extract had a neuroprotective effect and isolated 10 compounds. Among the compounds, compounds 5 and 6 effectively protected HT22 cells against glutamate toxicity. Conclusion: In conclusion, the extract of D. superbus and compounds isolated from it exhibited neuroprotective properties, suggesting therapeutic potential for applications in neurotoxic diseases. SUMMARY D. superbus extract significantly protected on glutamate-induced cell death in HT22 cellsNew compound, (E)-methyl-4-hydroxy-4-(8a-methyl-3-oxodecahydronaphthalen-4a-yl) (1) and, nine known compounds, diosmetin-7-O(2’’,6’’-di-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside (2), 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-pentyl ester benzenepropanoic acid (3), vanillic acid (4), 4-hydroxy-benzeneacetic acid (5), 4-methoxybenzeneacetic acid (6), (E)-4-methoxycinnamic acid (7), 3

  9. Permanent Sequestration of Emitted Gases in the Form of Clathrate Hydrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, N.; Romanovsky, V.

    2004-01-01

    Underground sequestration has been proposed as a novel method of permanent disposal of harmful gases emitted into the atmosphere as a result of human activity. The method was conceived primarily for disposal of carbon dioxide (CO2, greenhouse gas causing global warming), but could also be applied to CO, H2S, NOx, and chorofluorocarbons (CFCs, which are super greenhouse gases). The method is based on the fact that clathrate hydrates (e.g., CO2 6H2O) form naturally from the substances in question (e.g., CO2) and liquid water in the pores of sub-permafrost rocks at stabilizing pressures and temperatures. The proposed method would be volumetrically efficient: In the case of CO2, each volume of hydrate can contain as much as 184 volumes of gas. Temperature and pressure conditions that favor the formation of stable clathrate hydrates exist in depleted oil reservoirs that lie under permafrost. For example, CO2-6H2O forms naturally at a temperature of 0 C and pressure of 1.22 MPa. Using this measurement, it has been calculated that the minimum thickness of continuous permafrost needed to stabilize CO2 clathrate hydrate is only about 100 m, and the base of the permafrost is known to be considerably deeper at certain locations (e.g., about 600 m at Prudhoe Bay in Alaska). In this disposal method, the permafrost layers over the reservoirs would act as impermeable lids that would prevent dissociation of the clathrates and diffusion of the evolved gases up through pores.

  10. Molecular simulations and density functional theory calculations of bromine in clathrate hydrate phases.

    PubMed

    Dureckova, Hana; Woo, Tom K; Alavi, Saman

    2016-01-28

    Bromine forms a tetragonal clathrate hydrate structure (TS-I) very rarely observed in clathrate hydrates of other guest substances. The detailed structure, energetics, and dynamics of Br2 and Cl2 in TS-I and cubic structure I (CS-I) clathrate hydrates are studied in this work using molecular dynamics and quantum chemical calculations. X-ray diffraction studies show that the halogen-water-oxygen distances in the cages of these structures are shorter than the sum of the van der Waals radii of halogen and oxygen atoms. This suggests that the stabilizing effects of halogen bonding or other non-covalent interactions (NCIs) may contribute to the formation of the unique tetragonal bromine hydrate structure. We performed molecular dynamics simulations of Br2 and Cl2 clathrate hydrates using our previously developed five-site charge models for the dihalogen molecules [Dureckova et al. Can. J. Chem. 93, 864 (2015)] which reproduce the computed electrostatic potentials of the dihalogens and account for the electropositive σ-hole of the halogen bond donor (the dihalogen). Analysis of the radial distribution functions, enthalpies of encapsulation, velocity and orientation autocorrelation functions, and polar angle distributions are carried out for Br2 and Cl2 guests in various cages to contrast the properties of these guests in the TS-I and CS-I phases. Quantum chemical partial geometry optimizations of Br2 and Cl2 guests in the hydrate cages using the M06-2X functional give short halogen-water distances compatible with values observed in X-ray diffraction experiments. NCI plots of guest-cage structures are generated to qualitatively show the relative strength of the non-bonding interactions between dihalogens and water molecules. The differences between behaviors of Br2 and Cl2 guests in the hydrate cages may explain why bromine forms the unique TS-I phase. PMID:26827220

  11. NH3 quantum rotators in Hofmann clathrates: intensity and width of rotational transition lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorderwisch, Peter; Sobolev, Oleg; Desmedt, Arnaud

    2004-07-01

    Inelastic structure factors for rotational transitions of uniaxial NH3 quantum rotators, measured in a Hofmann clathrate with biphenyl as guest molecule, agree with those calculated for free rotators. A finite intrinsic line width, found for rotational transitions involving the rotational level j=3 at low temperature, supports a recently suggested model based on resonant rotor-rotor coupling. Present address: LPCM, CNRS-Université de Bordeaux I, 351 Cours de Libération, Talence F-33405, France.

  12. Molecular dynamics study of structure H clathrate hydrates of methane and large guest molecules.

    PubMed

    Susilo, Robin; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John A; Englezos, Peter

    2008-05-21

    Methane storage in structure H (sH) clathrate hydrates is attractive due to the relatively higher stability of sH as compared to structure I methane hydrate. The additional stability is gained without losing a significant amount of gas storage density as happens in the case of structure II (sII) methane clathrate. Our previous work has showed that the selection of a specific large molecule guest substance (LMGS) as the sH hydrate former is critical in obtaining the optimum conditions for crystallization kinetics, hydrate stability, and methane content. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are employed to provide further insight regarding the dependence of methane occupancy on the type of the LMGS and pressure. Moreover, the preference of methane molecules to occupy the small (5(12)) or medium (4(3)5(6)6(3)) cages and the minimum cage occupancy required to maintain sH clathrate mechanical stability are examined. We found that thermodynamically, methane occupancy depends on pressure but not on the nature of the LMGS. The experimentally observed differences in methane occupancy for different LMGS may be attributed to the differences in crystallization kinetics and/or the nonequilibrium conditions during the formation. It is also predicted that full methane occupancies in both small and medium clathrate cages are preferred at higher pressures but these cages are not fully occupied at lower pressures. It was found that both small and medium cages are equally favored for occupancy by methane guests and at the same methane content, the system suffers a free energy penalty if only one type of cage is occupied. The simulations confirm the instability of the hydrate when the small and medium cages are empty. Hydrate decomposition was observed when less than 40% of the small and medium cages are occupied. PMID:18500878

  13. Molecular dynamics study of structure H clathrate hydrates of methane and large guest molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susilo, Robin; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John A.; Englezos, Peter

    2008-05-01

    Methane storage in structure H (sH) clathrate hydrates is attractive due to the relatively higher stability of sH as compared to structure I methane hydrate. The additional stability is gained without losing a significant amount of gas storage density as happens in the case of structure II (sII) methane clathrate. Our previous work has showed that the selection of a specific large molecule guest substance (LMGS) as the sH hydrate former is critical in obtaining the optimum conditions for crystallization kinetics, hydrate stability, and methane content. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are employed to provide further insight regarding the dependence of methane occupancy on the type of the LMGS and pressure. Moreover, the preference of methane molecules to occupy the small (512) or medium (435663) cages and the minimum cage occupancy required to maintain sH clathrate mechanical stability are examined. We found that thermodynamically, methane occupancy depends on pressure but not on the nature of the LMGS. The experimentally observed differences in methane occupancy for different LMGS may be attributed to the differences in crystallization kinetics and/or the nonequilibrium conditions during the formation. It is also predicted that full methane occupancies in both small and medium clathrate cages are preferred at higher pressures but these cages are not fully occupied at lower pressures. It was found that both small and medium cages are equally favored for occupancy by methane guests and at the same methane content, the system suffers a free energy penalty if only one type of cage is occupied. The simulations confirm the instability of the hydrate when the small and medium cages are empty. Hydrate decomposition was observed when less than 40% of the small and medium cages are occupied.

  14. Molecular simulations and density functional theory calculations of bromine in clathrate hydrate phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dureckova, Hana; Woo, Tom K.; Alavi, Saman

    2016-01-01

    Bromine forms a tetragonal clathrate hydrate structure (TS-I) very rarely observed in clathrate hydrates of other guest substances. The detailed structure, energetics, and dynamics of Br2 and Cl2 in TS-I and cubic structure I (CS-I) clathrate hydrates are studied in this work using molecular dynamics and quantum chemical calculations. X-ray diffraction studies show that the halogen-water-oxygen distances in the cages of these structures are shorter than the sum of the van der Waals radii of halogen and oxygen atoms. This suggests that the stabilizing effects of halogen bonding or other non-covalent interactions (NCIs) may contribute to the formation of the unique tetragonal bromine hydrate structure. We performed molecular dynamics simulations of Br2 and Cl2 clathrate hydrates using our previously developed five-site charge models for the dihalogen molecules [Dureckova et al. Can. J. Chem. 93, 864 (2015)] which reproduce the computed electrostatic potentials of the dihalogens and account for the electropositive σ-hole of the halogen bond donor (the dihalogen). Analysis of the radial distribution functions, enthalpies of encapsulation, velocity and orientation autocorrelation functions, and polar angle distributions are carried out for Br2 and Cl2 guests in various cages to contrast the properties of these guests in the TS-I and CS-I phases. Quantum chemical partial geometry optimizations of Br2 and Cl2 guests in the hydrate cages using the M06-2X functional give short halogen-water distances compatible with values observed in X-ray diffraction experiments. NCI plots of guest-cage structures are generated to qualitatively show the relative strength of the non-bonding interactions between dihalogens and water molecules. The differences between behaviors of Br2 and Cl2 guests in the hydrate cages may explain why bromine forms the unique TS-I phase.

  15. Local Structure of Cu in Cs8Na16Cu5Ge131 Type II Clathrate

    SciTech Connect

    Mansour, A.; Beekman, M; Wong-Ng, W; Nolas, G

    2008-01-01

    We have used X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to investigate the local structure of Cu and Ge in the Cs8Na16Cu5Ge131 type II clathrate. We show that the local structure parameters for Ge (coordination number and distances) are consistent with those derived on the basis of XRD investigation of Cs8Na16Ge136. The EXAFS data suggest that Cu either randomly substitutes for Ge on the clathrate framework or preferentially on the 96g site but not preferentially on the 32e or 8a sites (Wyckoff notation). Furthermore, we find that the Cu-Ge distance is smaller than the Ge-Ge distance by 0.13 Angstroms, indicating a local distortion around the Cu atoms. The estimated degrees of disorder for Cu-Ge and Ge-Ge interactions indicate the Cu-Ge clathrate framework to be relatively stiff, while those for Na-Ge and Cs-Ge interactions corroborate previous observations of strong thermal disorder of the alkali guests in these materials. Our XAS results offer insight into the site substitution of Cu in this material, information unattainable from X-ray diffraction due to the lack of scattering contrast between Cu and Ge.

  16. Calorimetric and X-ray studies of clathrate hydrates of tetraisoamylammonium polyacrylates.

    PubMed

    Terekhova, Irina S; Manakov, Andrey Yu; Soldatov, Dmitriy V; Suwinska, Kinga; Skiba, Sergey S; Stenin, Yuri G; Villevald, Galina V; Karpova, Tamara D; Yunoshev, Alexander S

    2009-04-30

    The structure of clathrate hydrates with tetraisoamylammonium polyacrylate salt incorporated as guest has been studied in this work. Also, quantitative studies on the stability changes of the clathrate hydrates with different degrees of cross-linking of the guest polymer (varied from 0 to 3%) have been conducted. A single crystal X-ray diffraction study of a crystal of the hydrate with linear (uncross-linked) tetraisoamylammonium polyacrylate as guest reveals a hexagonal structure (space group P6m2, a = 12.15 A, c =12.58 A at 100 K) with 39 host framework water molecules per one guest monomeric unit. Powder X-ray diffraction analyses confirm the identity of the above crystal structure of the hydrate with linear guest polymer and the crystal structure of the hydrates with cross-linked guest (hexagonal, a = 12.25 A, c =12.72 A at 276 K). In order to quantitatively determine the stability differences of the hydrates with the included guests having various degrees of cross-linking of the anionic chain, a series of differential scanning calorimetry measurements of the fusion enthalpy of the hydrate samples has been carried out. On the basis of the results obtained, a structural model describing the decrease in the stability of the clathrate hydrates with tetraisoamylammonium polyacrylate guest as a function of the degree of cross-linking of the guest polymer has been suggested. PMID:19344169

  17. Homogeneous two-dimensional nucleation of guest-free silicon clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Yong jun

    2015-01-01

    The difficulty in synthesizing guest-free semiconductor clathrates complicates the process of determining how these cage-like structures form. This work studies the microscopic mechanism of the nucleation of guest-free Si136 clathrate using molecular dynamics simulations with the Stillinger-Weber potential. The homogeneous nucleation of Si136, which is realized in a narrow negative pressure range before liquid cavitation, exhibits the characteristic feature of the two-dimensional (2D) mode. The critical nucleus is composed of one to two five-membered rings, and the nucleation barrier is close to 1 kBT. According to a thermodynamic model based on atomistic nucleation theory, the effective binding energy associated with the formation of 2D critical nuclei is significantly low, which is responsible for the low nucleation barrier of Si136 clathrate. In the post-nucleation period, the critical nucleus preferentially grows into a dodecahedron, and the latter continuously grows with sharing face along <1 1 0>.

  18. Desorption of low-volatility compounds induced by dynamic friction between microdroplets and an ultrasonically vibrating blade.

    PubMed

    Usmanov, D T; Hiraoka, K; Wada, H; Morita, S; Nonami, H

    2016-02-21

    Friction plays an important role in desorption and/or ionization of nonvolatile compounds in mass spectrometry, e.g., sonic spray, easy ambient sonic-spray ionization, solvent-assisted inlet ionization, desorption electrospray, etc. In our previous work, desorption of low molecular weight compounds induced by solid/solid dynamic friction was studied. The objective of this work was to investigate desorption of low-volatility compounds induced by liquid/solid friction. Water/methanol (1/1) microdroplets with ∼30 μm in diameter were generated by using a piezoelectric microdroplet generator. They were injected to analytes deposited on the flat surface of a blade vibrating ultrasonically with the frequency of 40 kHz. Neutral molecules desorbed from the blade were ionized by a helium dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), generating strong signals for samples including drugs, explosives, and insecticides. These signals were not detected when either the blade vibrator or the piezoelectric microdroplet generator was off. In contrast, for ionic compounds such as 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoro-methylsulfonyl)imide, p-chlorobenzyl pyridinium chloride, and rhodamine B, strong ion signals were obtained when the vibrator and droplet generator were on, but DBD was off. Sub-nanogram limits of detection were attained for low-volatility compounds. PMID:26779570

  19. The natural organosulfur compound dipropyltetrasulfide prevents HOCl-induced systemic sclerosis in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to test the naturally occurring organosulfur compound dipropyltetrasulfide (DPTTS), found in plants, which has antibiotic and anticancer properties, as a treatment for HOCl-induced systemic sclerosis in the mouse. Methods The prooxidative, antiproliferative, and cytotoxic effects of DPTTS were evaluated ex vivo on fibroblasts from normal and HOCl mice. In vivo, the antifibrotic and immunomodulating properties of DPTTS were evaluated in the skin and lungs of HOCl mice. Results H2O2 production was higher in fibroblasts derived from HOCl mice than in normal fibroblasts (P < 0.05). DPTTS did not increase H2O2 production in normal fibroblasts, but DPTTS dose-dependently increased H2O2 production in HOCl fibroblasts (P < 0.001 with 40 μM DPTTS). Because H2O2 reached a lethal threshold in cells from HOCl mice, the antiproliferative, cytotoxic, and proapoptotic effects of DPTTS were significantly higher in HOCl fibroblasts than for normal fibroblasts. In vivo, DPTTS decreased dermal thickness (P < 0.001), collagen content in skin (P < 0.01) and lungs (P < 0.05), αSMA (P < 0.01) and pSMAD2/3 (P < 0.01) expression in skin, formation of advanced oxidation protein products and anti-DNA topoisomerase-1 antibodies in serum (P < 0.05) versus untreated HOCl mice. Moreover, in HOCl mice, DPTTS reduced splenic B-cell counts (P < 0.01), the proliferative rates of B-splenocytes stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (P < 0.05), and T-splenocytes stimulated by anti-CD3/CD28 mAb (P < 0.001). Ex vivo, it also reduced the production of IL-4 and IL-13 by activated T cells (P < 0.05 in both cases). Conclusions The natural organosulfur compound DPTTS prevents skin and lung fibrosis in the mouse through the selective killing of diseased fibroblasts and its immunomodulating properties. DPTTS may be a potential treatment for systemic sclerosis. PMID:24286210

  20. The combination of organoselenium compounds and guanosine prevents glutamate-induced oxidative stress in different regions of rat brains.

    PubMed

    Dalla Corte, Cristiane L; Bastos, Luíza L; Dobrachinski, Fernando; Rocha, João B T; Soares, Félix A A

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of the combination of guanosine and 2 organoselenium compounds (ebselen and diphenyl diselenide) against glutamate-induced oxidative stress in different regions of rat brains. Glutamate caused an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and a decrease in [(3)H]-glutamate uptake in striatal, cortical, and hippocampal slices. Guanosine, ebselen, and diphenyl diselenide prevented glutamate-induced ROS production in striatal, cortical and hippocampal slices. The combination of guanosine with organoselenium compounds was more effective against glutamate-induced ROS production than the individual compounds alone. Guanosine prevented [(3)H]-glutamate uptake inhibition in striatal, cortical, and hippocampal slices. Thus, protection against the harmful effects of glutamate is possibly due to the combination of the antioxidant properties of organoselenium compounds and the stimulatory effect of guanosine on glutamate uptake. In conclusion, the combination of antioxidants and glutamatergic system modulators could be considered a potential therapy against the prooxidant effects of glutamate. PMID:22133308

  1. X-ray Inducible Luminescence and Singlet Oxygen Sensitization by an Octahedral Molybdenum Cluster Compound: A New Class of Nanoscintillators.

    PubMed

    Kirakci, Kaplan; Kubát, Pavel; Fejfarová, Karla; Martinčík, Jiří; Nikl, Martin; Lang, Kamil

    2016-01-19

    Newly synthesized octahedral molybdenum cluster compound (n-Bu4N)2[Mo6I8(OOC-1-adamantane)6] revealed uncharted features applicable for the development of X-ray inducible luminescent materials and sensitizers of singlet oxygen, O2((1)Δg). The compound exhibits a red-NIR luminescence in the solid state and in solution (e.g., quantum yield of 0.76 in tetrahydrofuran) upon excitation by UV-vis light. The luminescence originating from the excited triplet states is quenched by molecular oxygen to produce O2((1)Δg) with a high quantum yield. Irradiation of the compound by X-rays generated a radioluminescence with the same emission spectrum as that obtained by UV-vis excitation. It proves the formation of the same excited triplet states regardless of the excitation source. By virtue of the described behavior, the compound is suggested as an efficient sensitizer of O2((1)Δg) upon X-ray excitation. The luminescence and radioluminescence properties were maintained upon embedding the compound in polystyrene films. In addition, polystyrene induced an enhancement of the radioluminescence intensity via energy transfer from the scintillating polymeric matrix. Sulfonated polystyrene nanofibers were used for the preparation of nanoparticles which form stable dispersions in water, while keeping intact the luminescence properties of the embedded compound over a long time period. Due to their small size and high oxygen diffusivity, these nanoparticles are suitable carriers of sensitizers of O2((1)Δg). The presented results define a new class of nanoscintillators with promising properties for X-ray inducible photodynamic therapy. PMID:26702498

  2. A synthetic compound that potentiates bone morphogenetic protein-2-induced transdifferentiation of myoblasts into the osteoblastic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kato, Satoshi; Sangadala, Sreedhara; Tomita, Katsuro; Titus, Louisa; Boden, Scott D

    2011-03-01

    There is an urgent need to develop methods that lower costs of using recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) to promote bone induction. In this study, we demonstrate the osteogenic effect of a low-molecular weight compound, SVAK-12, that potentiated the effects of BMP-2 in inducing transdifferentiation of C2C12 myoblasts into the osteoblastic phenotype. Here, we report a specific compound, SVAK-12, which was selected based on in silico screenings of small-molecule databases using the homology modeled interaction motif of Smurf1-WW2 domain. The enhancement of BMP-2 activity by SVAK-12 was characterized by evaluating a BMP-specific reporter activity and by monitoring the BMP-2-induced expression of mRNA for osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), which are widely accepted marker genes of osteoblast differentiation. Finally, we confirmed these results by also measuring the enhancement of BMP-2-induced activity of ALP. Smurf1 is an E3 ligase that targets osteogenic Smads for ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation. Smurf1 is an interesting potential target to enhance bone formation based on the positive effects on bone of proteins that block Smurf1-binding to Smad targets or in Smurf1-/- knockout mice. Since Smads bind Smurf1 via its WW2 domain, we performed in silico screening to identify compounds that might interact with the Smurf1-WW2 domain. We recently reported the activity of a compound, SVAK-3. However, SVAK-3, while exhibiting BMP-potentiating activity, was not stable and thus warranted a new search for a more stable and efficacious compound among a selected group of candidates. In addition to being more stable, SVAK-12 exhibited a dose-dependent activity in inducing osteoblastic differentiation of myoblastic C2C12 cells even when multiple markers of the osteoblastic phenotype were parallelly monitored. PMID:21110071

  3. Production of organic compounds in plasmas - A comparison among electric sparks, laser-induced plasmas, and UV light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scattergood, T. W.; McKay, C. P.; Borucki, W. J.; Giver, L. P.; van Ghyseghem, H.; Parris, J. E.; Miller, S. L.

    1989-10-01

    In order to ascertain the features of organic compound-production in planetary atmospheres under the effects of plasmas and shocks, various mixtures of N2, CH4, and H2 modeling the atmosphere of Titan were subjected to discrete sparks, laser-induced plasmas, and UV radiation. The experimental results obtained suggest that UV photolysis from the plasma is an important organic compound synthesis process, as confirmed by the photolysis of gas samples that were exposed to the light but not to the shock waves emitted by the sparks. The thermodynamic equilibrium theory is therefore incomplete in the absence of photolysis.

  4. Production of organic compounds in plasmas - A comparison among electric sparks, laser-induced plasmas, and UV light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scattergood, Thomas W.; Mckay, Christopher P.; Borucki, William J.; Giver, Lawrence P.; Van Ghyseghem, Hilde

    1989-01-01

    In order to ascertain the features of organic compound-production in planetary atmospheres under the effects of plasmas and shocks, various mixtures of N2, CH4, and H2 modeling the atmosphere of Titan were subjected to discrete sparks, laser-induced plasmas, and UV radiation. The experimental results obtained suggest that UV photolysis from the plasma is an important organic compound synthesis process, as confirmed by the photolysis of gas samples that were exposed to the light but not to the shock waves emitted by the sparks. The thermodynamic equilibrium theory is therefore incomplete in the absence of photolysis.

  5. Surface topographical and ultrastructural alterations of Raillietina echinobothrida and Ascaridia galli induced by a compound isolated from Acacia oxyphylla.

    PubMed

    Roy, B; Dasgupta, S; Manivel, V; Parameswaran, P S; Giri, B R

    2012-04-30

    The stem bark of Acacia oxyphylla Graham ex Bentham is used as an anthelmintic by the natives of Mizoram (North-East India). Therefore, the aim of the study was to assess the effect of the active compound isolated from A. oxyphylla on the tegument of adult Raillietina echinobothrida and Ascaridia galli. The test parasites R. echinobothrida and A. galli were incubated in physiological buffered saline containing 0.0005, 0.001, 0.05, 0.1 and 1mg/ml of the isolated compound. The alterations in the tegument of the parasites post paralysis were examined using electron microscopes. The compound reduced the cestode's motility soon after incubation, but did not induce paralysis in the nematodes till about 11-14 h at highest concentration. The compound caused extensive digestion of cestode tegument as evident by electron microscopy. Disorganization of muscle bundles, loss of cell-cell contact, extreme vacuolization and oedema were some of the changes observed. Loss of cellular organelles combined with distortion of those present was markedly noted throughout the parasite tissue. Deformation and disorganization of epicuticle, disruption of mitochondrial and nuclear membrane were also observed in nematode exposed to the active compound of the plant. Substantial structural deformities in the treated parasites are indicative of an efficient vermicidal activity of the isolated compound against cestodes and nematodes. PMID:22265802

  6. Effects of Hepatoprotective Compounds from the Leaves of Lumnitzera racemosa on Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Damage in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Ahmed Gomaa Gomaa; Samy, Mamdouh Nabil; Sugimoto, Sachiko; Otsuka, Hideaki; Abdel-Salam, Hosni; Matsunami, Katsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Phytochemical investigation of the n-BuOH fraction of the mangrove plant Lumnitzera racemosa WILLD. (Combretaceae) led to the isolation of one new flavonoid glycoside; myrcetin 3-O-methyl glucuronate (1), one new phenolic glycoside; lumniracemoside (2) and one new aliphatic alcohol glycoside; n-hexanol 1-O-rutinoside (3), in addition to seven known compounds (4-10). The structures of these compounds were determined by spectroscopic analyses (UV, IR, high resolution-electrospray ionization (HR-ESI)-MS, one- and two-dimensional (1D- and 2D)-NMR). Compound 7 showed the highest hepatoprotective activity against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity using human HepG2 cells at protection % value of 34.2±3.1%, while compounds 1, 2, 3, 6, and 9 showed weak to moderate hepatoprotective activity (11.6-18.9%). Almost all of these compounds showed stronger 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity compared with the standard Trolox. These results suggest the usefulness of this plant extract and the isolated compounds as promising hepatoprotective agents. PMID:27039833

  7. Protective effect of bioactive compounds from Lonicera japonica Thunb. against H2O2-induced cytotoxicity using neonatal rat cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Wang, Gang; Liu, Hong; Hou, Yun-long

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Pharmacological studies showed that the extracts of Jin Yin Hua and its active constituents have lipid lowering, antipyretic, hepatoprotective, cytoprotective, antimicrobial, antibiotic, antioxidative, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory effects. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of caffeoylquinic acids (CQAs) from Jin Yin Hua against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced and hypoxia-induced cytotoxicity using neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Materials and Methods: Seven CQAs (C1 to C7) isolated and identified from Jin Yin Hua were used to examine the effects of H2O2-induced and hypoxia-induced cytotoxicity. We studied C4 and C6 as preventative bioactive compounds of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, apoptotic pathway, and apoptosis-related gene expression. Results: C4 and C6 were screened as bioactive compounds to exert a cytoprotective effect against oxidative injury. Pretreatment with C4 and C6, dose-dependently attenuated hypoxia-induced ROS production and reduced the ratio of GSSG/GStotal. Western blot data revealed that the inhibitory effect of C4 on H2O2-induced up and down-regulation of Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3, and cleaved caspase-3. Apoptosis was evaluated by detection of DNA fragmentation using TUNEL assay, and quantified with Annexin V/PI staining. Conclusion: In vitro experiments revealed that both C4 and C6 protect cardiomyocytes from necrosis and apoptosis during H2O2-induced injury, via inhibiting the generation of ROS and activation of caspase-3 apoptotic pathway. These results demonstrated that CQAs might be a class of compounds which possess potent myocardial protective activity against the ischemic heart diseases related to oxidative stress. PMID:27096070

  8. Macroalgal Morphogenesis Induced by Waterborne Compounds and Bacteria in Coastal Seawater.

    PubMed

    Grueneberg, Jan; Engelen, Aschwin H; Costa, Rodrigo; Wichard, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Axenic gametes of the marine green macroalga Ulva mutabilis Føyn (Ria Formosa, locus typicus) exhibit abnormal development into slow-growing callus-like colonies with aberrant cell walls. Under laboratory conditions, it was previously demonstrated that all defects in growth and thallus development can be completely abolished when axenic gametes are inoculated with a combination of two specific bacterial strains originally identified as Roseobacter sp. strain MS2 and Cytophaga sp. strain MS6. These bacteria release diffusible morphogenetic compounds (= morphogens), which act similar to cytokinin and auxin. To investigate the ecological relevance of the waterborne bacterial morphogens, seawater samples were collected in the Ria Formosa lagoon (Algarve, Southern Portugal) at 20 sampling sites and tidal pools to assess their morphogenetic effects on the axenic gametes of U. mutabilis. Specifically the survey revealed that sterile-filtered seawater samples can completely recover growth and morphogenesis of U. mutabilis under axenic conditions. Morphogenetic activities of free-living and epiphytic bacteria isolated from the locally very abundant Ulva species (i.e., U. rigida) were screened using a multiwell-based testing system. The most represented genera isolated from U. rigida were Alteromonas, Pseudoalteromonas and Sulfitobacter followed by Psychrobacter and Polaribacter. Several naturally occurring bacterial species could emulate MS2 activity (= induction of cell divisions) regardless of taxonomic affiliation, whereas the MS6 activity (= induction of cell differentiation and cell wall formation) was species-specific and is probably a feature of difficult-to-culture bacteria. Interestingly, isolated bacteroidetes such as Algoriphagus sp. and Polaribacter sp. could individually trigger complete Ulva morphogenesis and thus provide a novel mode of action for bacterial-induced algal development. This study also highlights that the accumulation of algal growth factors in

  9. Macroalgal Morphogenesis Induced by Waterborne Compounds and Bacteria in Coastal Seawater

    PubMed Central

    Grueneberg, Jan; Engelen, Aschwin H.; Costa, Rodrigo; Wichard, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Axenic gametes of the marine green macroalga Ulva mutabilis Føyn (Ria Formosa, locus typicus) exhibit abnormal development into slow-growing callus-like colonies with aberrant cell walls. Under laboratory conditions, it was previously demonstrated that all defects in growth and thallus development can be completely abolished when axenic gametes are inoculated with a combination of two specific bacterial strains originally identified as Roseobacter sp. strain MS2 and Cytophaga sp. strain MS6. These bacteria release diffusible morphogenetic compounds (= morphogens), which act similar to cytokinin and auxin. To investigate the ecological relevance of the waterborne bacterial morphogens, seawater samples were collected in the Ria Formosa lagoon (Algarve, Southern Portugal) at 20 sampling sites and tidal pools to assess their morphogenetic effects on the axenic gametes of U. mutabilis. Specifically the survey revealed that sterile-filtered seawater samples can completely recover growth and morphogenesis of U. mutabilis under axenic conditions. Morphogenetic activities of free-living and epiphytic bacteria isolated from the locally very abundant Ulva species (i.e., U. rigida) were screened using a multiwell-based testing system. The most represented genera isolated from U. rigida were Alteromonas, Pseudoalteromonas and Sulfitobacter followed by Psychrobacter and Polaribacter. Several naturally occurring bacterial species could emulate MS2 activity (= induction of cell divisions) regardless of taxonomic affiliation, whereas the MS6 activity (= induction of cell differentiation and cell wall formation) was species-specific and is probably a feature of difficult-to-culture bacteria. Interestingly, isolated bacteroidetes such as Algoriphagus sp. and Polaribacter sp. could individually trigger complete Ulva morphogenesis and thus provide a novel mode of action for bacterial-induced algal development. This study also highlights that the accumulation of algal growth factors in

  10. Volcanic Destabilisation of Methane Clathrate Hydrate on Titan: the Mechanism for Resupplying Atmospheric CH4?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ashley; Sotin, C.; Choukroun, M.; Matson, D. L.; Johnson, T. V.

    2013-10-01

    Titan may have an upper crust rich in methane clathrates which would have formed early in Titan’s history [1-3]. The abundance of atmospheric methane, which has a limited lifetime, and the presence of 40Ar require replenishment over time. Volcanic processes may release these gases from Titan’s interior, although, so far, no conclusive evidence of an ongoing volcanic event has been observed: no “smoking gun” has been seen. Still, some process has recently supplied a considerable amount of methane to Titan’s atmosphere. We have investigated the emplacement of “cryolavas” of varying composition to quantify thermal exchange and lava solidification processes to model thermal wave penetration into a methane-rich substrate (see [4]), and to determine event detectability. Clathrate destabilisation releases methane and other trapped gases, such as argon. A 10-m-thick cryolava covering 100 km2 raises 3 x 108 m3 of substrate methane clathrates to destabilization temperature in ~108 s. With a density of 920 kg/m3, and ≈13% of the mass being methane, 4 x 1010 kg of methane is released. This is an impressive amount, but it would take 5 million similar events to yield the current mass of atmospheric methane. However, meeting Titan’s current global methane replenishment rate is feasible through the thermal interaction between cryolavas and methane clathrate deposits, but only (1) after the flow has solidified; (2) if cracks form, connecting surface to substrate; and (3) the cracks form while the temperature of the clathrates is greater than the destabilisation temperature. The relatively small scale of this activity may be hard to detect. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. Choukroun, M. and Sotin, C. (2012) GRL, 39, L04201. [2] Tobie, G. et al. (2006) Nature, 440, 61-64. [3] Lunine, J. et al. (2009) Origin and Evolution of Titan, in Titan From Cassini-Huygens, ed. R. Brown et al

  11. Methyl Radical in Clathrate Silica Voids. The Peculiar Physisorption Features of the Guest-Host Molecular Dynamics Interaction.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, Yurij A; Buscarino, Gianpiero; Benetis, Nikolas P

    2016-08-11

    EPR line shape simulations of CH3/SiO2 clathrates and comparison to CH3/N2O and CH3/SiO2 experiments reveal the motional conditions of the CH3 radical up to the unusual regime of its stability, the high-temperature diffusional regime, at 300 K. In the low-temperature region, the CH3 in clathrates is found to rotate around the in-plane axes even at as low temperatures as 3.8 K. However, nonrotating methyls performing only libration about the C2-axes as well as around the C3-axis are also found, proving the existence of special sites in the clathrate voids that begin to accumulate a significant fraction of methyl radicals at temperatures below approximately 7 K. A distinctive feature in the spectrum anisotropy and line width temperature profiles is found nearby 25 K, which is interpreted as the radical physisorption inside the voids that occurs with the sample temperature lowering. The unusual increase of the CH3/SiO2 clathrate EPR spectral width with temperature over approximately 120 K has its origin in repeated angular momentum vector alterations due to frequent collisions with the clathrate void walls between periodical free rotation periods. This relaxation mechanism resembles to spin-rotation interaction known only for small molecular species in nonviscous fluids but unknown earlier for methyl hosted in solids. PMID:27405003

  12. A molecular dynamics study of ethanol-water hydrogen bonding in binary structure I clathrate hydrate with CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, Saman; Ohmura, Ryo; Ripmeester, John A.

    2011-02-01

    Guest-host hydrogen bonding in clathrate hydrates occurs when in addition to the hydrophilic moiety which causes the molecule to form hydrates under high pressure-low temperature conditions, the guests contain a hydrophilic, hydrogen bonding functional group. In the presence of carbon dioxide, ethanol clathrate hydrate has been synthesized with 10% of large structure I (sI) cages occupied by ethanol. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations to study hydrogen bonding structure and dynamics in this binary sI clathrate hydrate in the temperature range of 100-250 K. We observe that ethanol forms long-lived (>500 ps) proton-donating and accepting hydrogen bonds with cage water molecules from both hexagonal and pentagonal faces of the large cages while maintaining the general cage integrity of the sI clathrate hydrate. The presence of the nondipolar CO2 molecules stabilizes the hydrate phase, despite the strong and prevalent alcohol-water hydrogen bonding. The distortions of the large cages from the ideal form, the radial distribution functions of the guest-host interactions, and the ethanol guest dynamics are characterized in this study. In previous work through dielectric and NMR relaxation time studies, single crystal x-ray diffraction, and molecular dynamics simulations we have observed guest-water hydrogen bonding in structure II and structure H clathrate hydrates. The present work extends the observation of hydrogen bonding to structure I hydrates.

  13. How much carbon dioxide can be stored in the structure H clathrate hydrates?: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Saman; Woo, T K

    2007-01-28

    The stability of structure H (sH) carbon dioxide clathrate hydrates at three temperature-pressure conditions are determined by molecular dynamics simulations on a 3x3x3 sH unit cell replica. Simulations are performed at 100 K at ambient pressure, 273 K at 100 bars and also 300 K and 5.0 kbars. The small and medium cages of the sH unit cell are occupied by a single carbon dioxide guest and large cage guest occupancies of 1-5 are considered. Radial distribution functions are given for guests in the large cages and unit cell volumes and configurational energies are studied as a function of large cage CO(2) occupancy. Free energy calculations are carried out to determine the stability of clathrates for large cage occupancies at three temperature/pressure conditions stated above. At the low temperature, large cage occupancy of 5 is the most stable while at the higher temperature, the occupancy of 3 is the most favored. Calculations are also performed to show that the CO(2) sH clathrate is more stable than the methane clathrate analog. Implications on CO(2) sequestration by clathrate formation are discussed. PMID:17286495

  14. A spectroscopic study of the structure and occupancies of clathrate hydrates incorporating hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grim, R. Gary

    With the ability to store and concentrate gases inside a clean and abundant water framework, clathrate hydrates are considered to be a promising material for many applications related to gas storage, separation, and sequestration. Hydrates of hydrogen are particularly interesting, for in addition to these potential applications, the small molecular size provides an opportunity for use as a model guest in many fundamental studies such as guest diffusion, multiple guest occupancy, and quantum mechanical effects upon confinement. In attempt to study these effects and the viability of H 2 hydrates as an energy storage material, a combined experimental and theoretical approach incorporating Raman spectroscopy, X-ray and neutron diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance, ab-initio calculations, and molecular dynamic simulations was performed. One of the most significant challenges in the application of H2 clathrate hydrates is the demanding thermodynamic requirements needed for stability. In recent years, a mechanism known as the `tuning' effect had reportedly solved this issue where thermodynamic requirements could be reduced while simultaneously maintaining high storage capacities. In this work, the viability and validity of this technique is explored and alternative explanations in the form of epitaxial hydrate growth under high driving force conditions are discussed. A second, and equally important challenge facing clathrate hydrates as a future storage material is the overall storage capacity of H2. In previous work, H2 has only been experimentally verified to occupy the small 512 and 43566 3 cages and also in the large 51264 cages of the type II clathrate, often with an energy deficient promoter. In order to achieve more robust energy densities, other hydrate cages must be accessible. Herein a new method for increasing overall hydrate energy densities is presented involving the incorporation of H2 in the large cages of the type I clathrate with CH4 as a co

  15. Soil aeration to achieve co-metabolic biodegradation of chlorinated solvents in the presence of inducer compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenbeis, J.J.; Bourquin, A.W.

    1995-12-31

    A chemical distribution facility in Denver has been found to have soil and ground water contaminated with a wide variety of organic compounds, primarily toluene and chlorinated solvents, and their breakdown products. Since toluene and chlorobenzenes (both present at the site) have been shown to be inducers for an aerobic enzyme pathway that can degrade trichloroethene (TCE), 1,2-dichloroethene (DCE) and vinyl chloride, field and laboratory studies are being conducted to determine if cometabolic aerobic biodegradation of these and other compounds is occurring in soils that have been aerated with soil vapor extraction (SVE). Studies summarized in this paper include in situ respiration tests to estimate overall biodegradation rate in aerated soils within the influence of a SVE system, sampling to determine if in situ biodegradation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in ground water has occurred, and a laboratory column study simulating bioventing of unremediated soils.

  16. The Zebrafish, a Novel Model Organism for Screening Compounds Affecting Acute and Chronic Ethanol-Induced Effects.

    PubMed

    Tran, S; Facciol, A; Gerlai, R

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol addiction is a major unmet medical and economic issue for which very few efficacious pharmacological treatment options are currently available. The development and identification of new compounds and drugs to treat alcohol addiction is hampered by the high costs and low amenability of traditional laboratory rodents to high-throughput behavioral screens. The zebrafish represents an excellent compromise between systems complexity and practical simplicity by overcoming many limitations inherent in these rodent models. In this chapter, we review current advances in the behavioral and neurochemical characterization of ethanol-induced changes in zebrafish. We also discuss the basic principles and methods of and the most recent advances in using paradigms with which one can screen for compounds altering acute and chronic ethanol-induced effects in zebrafish. PMID:27055623

  17. New pathway for the formation of metallic cubic phase Ge-Sb-Te compounds induced by an electric current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yong-Jin; Cho, Ju-Young; Jeong, Min-Woo; Na, Sekwon; Joo, Young-Chang

    2016-02-01

    The novel discovery of a current-induced transition from insulator to metal in the crystalline phase of Ge2Sb2Te5 and GeSb4Te7 have been studied by means of a model using line-patterned samples. The resistivity of cubic phase Ge-Sb-Te compound was reduced by an electrical current (~1 MA/cm2), and the final resistivity was determined based on the stress current density, regardless of the initial resistivity and temperature, which indicates that the conductivity of Ge-Sb-Te compound can be modulated by an electrical current. The minimum resistivity of Ge-Sb-Te materials can be achieved at high kinetic rates by applying an electrical current, and the material properties change from insulating to metallic behavior without a phase transition. The current-induced metal transition is more effective in GeSb4Te7 than Ge2Sb2Te5, which depends on the intrinsic vacancy of materials. Electromigration, which is the migration of atoms induced by a momentum transfer from charge carriers, can easily promote the rearrangement of vacancies in the cubic phase of Ge-Sb-Te compound. This behavior differs significantly from thermal annealing, which accompanies a phase transition to the hexagonal phase. This result suggests a new pathway for modulating the electrical conductivity and material properties of chalcogenide materials by applying an electrical current.

  18. New pathway for the formation of metallic cubic phase Ge-Sb-Te compounds induced by an electric current

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong-Jin; Cho, Ju-Young; Jeong, Min-Woo; Na, Sekwon; Joo, Young-Chang

    2016-01-01

    The novel discovery of a current-induced transition from insulator to metal in the crystalline phase of Ge2Sb2Te5 and GeSb4Te7 have been studied by means of a model using line-patterned samples. The resistivity of cubic phase Ge-Sb-Te compound was reduced by an electrical current (~1 MA/cm2), and the final resistivity was determined based on the stress current density, regardless of the initial resistivity and temperature, which indicates that the conductivity of Ge-Sb-Te compound can be modulated by an electrical current. The minimum resistivity of Ge-Sb-Te materials can be achieved at high kinetic rates by applying an electrical current, and the material properties change from insulating to metallic behavior without a phase transition. The current-induced metal transition is more effective in GeSb4Te7 than Ge2Sb2Te5, which depends on the intrinsic vacancy of materials. Electromigration, which is the migration of atoms induced by a momentum transfer from charge carriers, can easily promote the rearrangement of vacancies in the cubic phase of Ge-Sb-Te compound. This behavior differs significantly from thermal annealing, which accompanies a phase transition to the hexagonal phase. This result suggests a new pathway for modulating the electrical conductivity and material properties of chalcogenide materials by applying an electrical current. PMID:26902593

  19. New pathway for the formation of metallic cubic phase Ge-Sb-Te compounds induced by an electric current.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong-Jin; Cho, Ju-Young; Jeong, Min-Woo; Na, Sekwon; Joo, Young-Chang

    2016-01-01

    The novel discovery of a current-induced transition from insulator to metal in the crystalline phase of Ge2Sb2Te5 and GeSb4Te7 have been studied by means of a model using line-patterned samples. The resistivity of cubic phase Ge-Sb-Te compound was reduced by an electrical current (~1 MA/cm(2)), and the final resistivity was determined based on the stress current density, regardless of the initial resistivity and temperature, which indicates that the conductivity of Ge-Sb-Te compound can be modulated by an electrical current. The minimum resistivity of Ge-Sb-Te materials can be achieved at high kinetic rates by applying an electrical current, and the material properties change from insulating to metallic behavior without a phase transition. The current-induced metal transition is more effective in GeSb4Te7 than Ge2Sb2Te5, which depends on the intrinsic vacancy of materials. Electromigration, which is the migration of atoms induced by a momentum transfer from charge carriers, can easily promote the rearrangement of vacancies in the cubic phase of Ge-Sb-Te compound. This behavior differs significantly from thermal annealing, which accompanies a phase transition to the hexagonal phase. This result suggests a new pathway for modulating the electrical conductivity and material properties of chalcogenide materials by applying an electrical current. PMID:26902593

  20. Impact of metal-induced degradation on the determination of pharmaceutical compound purity and a strategy for mitigation.

    PubMed

    Dotterer, Sally K; Forbes, Robert A; Hammill, Cynthia L

    2011-04-01

    Case studies are presented demonstrating how exposure to traces of transition metals such as copper and/or iron during sample preparation or analysis can impact the accuracy of purity analysis of pharmaceuticals. Some compounds, such as phenols and indoles, react with metals in the presence of oxygen to produce metal-induced oxidative decomposition products. Compounds susceptible to metal-induced decomposition can degrade following preparation for purity analysis leading to falsely high impurity results. Our work has shown even metals at levels below 0.1 ppm can negatively impact susceptible compounds. Falsely low results are also possible when the impurities themselves react with metals and degrade prior to analysis. Traces of metals in the HPLC mobile phase can lead to chromatographic artifacts, affecting the reproducibility of purity results. To understand and mitigate the impact of metal induced decomposition, a proactive strategy is presented. The pharmaceutical would first be tested for reactivity with specific transition metals in the sample solvent/diluents and in the HPLC mobile phase. If found to be reactive, alternative sample diluents and/or mobile phases with less reactive solvents or addition of a metal chelator would be explored. If unsuccessful, glassware cleaning or sample solution refrigeration could be investigated. By employing this strategy during method development, robust purity methods would be delivered to the quality control laboratories, preventing future problems from potential sporadic contamination of glassware with metals. PMID:21163601

  1. Novel dichlorophenyl urea compounds inhibit proliferation of human leukemia HL-60 cells by inducing cell cycle arrest, differentiation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Figarola, James L; Weng, Yehua; Lincoln, Christopher; Horne, David; Rahbar, Samuel

    2012-08-01

    Two novel dichlorophenyl urea compounds, SR4 and SR9, were synthesized in our laboratory and evaluated for anti-cancer activities. Specifically, we investigated the antiproliferative properties of these new compounds on promyelocytic HL-60 leukemia cells by analyzing their effects on cell differentiation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis. SR4 and SR9 were both cytotoxic to HL-60 cells in a dose-and time-dependent manner, with IC(50) of 1.2 μM and 2.2 μM, respectively, after 72 h treatment. Both compounds strongly suppressed growth of HL-60 cells by promoting cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 transition, with concomitant decrease in protein levels of cyclins D1 and E2 and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK 2 and CDK 4), and increased protein expression of CDK inhibitors p21(WAF1/Cip1) and p27(Kip1). In addition, either compounds induce cell differentiation as detected by increased NBT staining and expression of CD11b and CD14. Treatment with SR compounds also promoted mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis as confirmed by Annexin V-FITC double staining, DNA fragmentation, increased expression of caspase 3, 7 and 9, cytochrome c release, PARP degradation, and collapse in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(MT)). Collectively, these results provide evidence that SR4 and SR9 have the potential for the treatment of human leukemia and merit further investigation as therapeutic agents against other types of cancer. PMID:21728022

  2. Growth inhibition and apoptosis in cancer cells induced by polyphenolic compounds of Acacia hydaspica: Involvement of multiple signal transduction pathways

    PubMed Central

    Afsar, Tayyaba; Trembley, Janeen H.; Salomon, Christine E.; Razak, Suhail; Khan, Muhammad Rashid; Ahmed, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Acacia hydaspica R. Parker is known for its medicinal uses in multiple ailments. In this study, we performed bioassay-guided fractionation of cytotoxic compounds from A. hydaspica and investigated their effects on growth and signaling activity in prostate and breast cancer cell lines. Four active polyphenolic compounds were identified as 7-O-galloyl catechin (GC), catechin (C), methyl gallate (MG), and catechin-3-O-gallate (CG). The four compounds inhibited prostate cancer PC-3 cell growth in a dose-dependent manner, whereas CG and MG inhibited breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell growth. All tested compounds inhibited cell survival and colony growth in both cell lines, and there was evidence of chromatin condensation, cell shrinkage and apoptotic bodies. Further, acridine orange, ethidium bromide, propidium iodide and DAPI staining demonstrated that cell death occurred partly via apoptosis in both PC-3 and MDA-MB-231 cells. In PC-3 cells treatment repressed the expression of anti-apoptotic molecules Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and survivin, coupled with down-regulation of signaling pathways AKT, NFκB, ERK1/2 and JAK/STAT. In MDA-MB-231 cells, treatment induced reduction of CK2α, Bcl-xL, survivin and xIAP protein expression along with suppression of NFκB, JAK/STAT and PI3K pathways. Our findings suggest that certain polyphenolic compounds derived from A. hydaspica may be promising chemopreventive/therapeutic candidates against cancer. PMID:26975752

  3. Growth inhibition and apoptosis in cancer cells induced by polyphenolic compounds of Acacia hydaspica: Involvement of multiple signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Afsar, Tayyaba; Trembley, Janeen H; Salomon, Christine E; Razak, Suhail; Khan, Muhammad Rashid; Ahmed, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Acacia hydaspica R. Parker is known for its medicinal uses in multiple ailments. In this study, we performed bioassay-guided fractionation of cytotoxic compounds from A. hydaspica and investigated their effects on growth and signaling activity in prostate and breast cancer cell lines. Four active polyphenolic compounds were identified as 7-O-galloyl catechin (GC), catechin (C), methyl gallate (MG), and catechin-3-O-gallate (CG). The four compounds inhibited prostate cancer PC-3 cell growth in a dose-dependent manner, whereas CG and MG inhibited breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell growth. All tested compounds inhibited cell survival and colony growth in both cell lines, and there was evidence of chromatin condensation, cell shrinkage and apoptotic bodies. Further, acridine orange, ethidium bromide, propidium iodide and DAPI staining demonstrated that cell death occurred partly via apoptosis in both PC-3 and MDA-MB-231 cells. In PC-3 cells treatment repressed the expression of anti-apoptotic molecules Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and survivin, coupled with down-regulation of signaling pathways AKT, NFκB, ERK1/2 and JAK/STAT. In MDA-MB-231 cells, treatment induced reduction of CK2α, Bcl-xL, survivin and xIAP protein expression along with suppression of NFκB, JAK/STAT and PI3K pathways. Our findings suggest that certain polyphenolic compounds derived from A. hydaspica may be promising chemopreventive/therapeutic candidates against cancer. PMID:26975752

  4. Novel therapeutic compound tuftsin-phosphorylcholine attenuates collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bashi, T; Shovman, O; Fridkin, M; Volkov, A; Barshack, I; Blank, M; Shoenfeld, Y

    2016-04-01

    Treatment with helminthes and helminthes ova improved the clinical symptoms of several autoimmune diseases in patients and in animal models. Phosphorylcholine (PC) proved to be the immunomodulatory molecule. We aimed to decipher the tolerogenic potential of tuftsin-PC (TPC), a novel helminth-based compound in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). CIA DBA/1 mice were treated with TPC subcutaneously (5 µg/0.1 ml) or orally (250 µg/0.1 ml), starting prior to disease induction. The control groups were treated with PBS. Collagen antibodies were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), cytokine protein levels by ELISA kits and regulatory T (Treg ) and regulatory B (Breg ) cell phenotypes by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). TPC-treated mice had a significantly lower arthritis score of 1.5 in comparison with control mice 11.8 (P < 0.0001) in both subcutaneous and orally treated groups at day 31. Moreover, histology analysis demonstrated highly inflamed joints in control mice, whereas TPC-treated mice maintained normal joint structure. Furthermore, TPC decreased the titres of circulating collagen II antibodies in mice sera (P < 0.0001), enhanced expression of IL-10 (P < 0.0001) and inhibited production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-1β (P < 0.0001). TPC significantly expanded the CD4(+) CD25(+) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+) ) Treg cells and CD19(+) IL-10(+) CD5(high) CD1d(high) T cell immunoglobulin mucin-1 (TIM-1(+) ) Breg cell phenotypes (P < 0.0001) in treated mice. Our data indicate that treatment with TPC attenuates CIA in mice demonstrated by low arthritic score and normal joints histology. TPC treatment reduced proinflammatory cytokines and increased anti-inflammatory cytokine expression, as well as expansion of Treg and Breg cells. Our results may lead to a new approach for a natural therapy for early rheumatoid arthritis onset. PMID:26618631

  5. Anti-aphrodisiac compounds of male butterflies increase the risk of egg parasitoid attack by inducing plant synomone production.

    PubMed

    Fatouros, Nina E; Pashalidou, Foteini G; Aponte Cordero, Wilma V; van Loon, Joop J A; Mumm, Roland; Dicke, Marcel; Hilker, Monika; Huigens, Martinus E

    2009-11-01

    During mating in many butterfly species, males transfer spermatophores that contain anti-aphrodisiacs to females that repel conspecific males. For example, males of the large cabbage white, Pieris brassicae (Lepidoptera: Pieridae), transfer the anti-aphrodisiac, benzyl cyanide (BC) to females. Accessory reproductive gland (ARG) secretion of a mated female P. brassicae that is deposited with an egg clutch contains traces of BC, inducing Brussels sprouts plants (Brassica oleracea var. gemmifera) to arrest certain Trichogramma egg parasitoids. Here, we assessed whether deposition of one egg at a time by the closely related small cabbage white, Pieris rapae, induced B. oleracea var. gemmifera to arrest Trichogramma wasps, and whether this plant synomone is triggered by substances originating from male P. rapae seminal fluid. We showed that plants induced by singly laid eggs of P. rapae arrest T. brassicae wasps three days after butterfly egg deposition. Elicitor activity was present in ARG secretion of mated female butterflies, whereas the secretion of virgin females was inactive. Pieris rapae used a mixture of methyl salicylate (MeSA) and indole as an anti-aphrodisiac. We detected traces of both anti-aphrodisiacal compounds in the ARG secretion of mated female P. rapae, whereas indole was lacking in the secretion of virgin female P. rapae. When applied onto the leaf, indole induced changes in the foliar chemistry that arrested T. brassicae wasps. This study shows that compounds of male seminal fluid incur possible fitness costs for Pieris butterflies by indirectly promoting egg parasitoid attack. PMID:19949841

  6. Restraint stress-induced central monoaminergic & oxidative changes in rats & their prevention by novel Ocimum sanctum compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Ausaf; Rasheed, Naila; Chand, Kailash; Maurya, Rakesh; Banu, Naheed; Palit, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Ocimum sanctum (OS) is known to possess various therapeutic properties. We have earlier isolated and characterized three OS compounds; Ocimarin, Ocimumoside A and Ocimumoside B. However, their role in modulating stress-induced central changes is unexplored. Thus, the present study was aimed to investigate the effect of these OS compounds on restraint stress (RS)-induced changes in the monoaminergic and antioxidant systems in the frontal cortex, striatum and hippocampus of rats. Methods: RS was produced by immobilizing (restraining) the Sprague Dawley rats for a period of 2.5 h inside cylindrical steel tubes. The monoamine levels and the in vivo antioxidant status in brain regions were evaluated by HPLC-EC and spectrophotometric assays, respectively. Results: RS significantly increased the dopamine levels in the frontal cortex and decreased in the striatum and hippocampus, and accompanied with selective increase of dopamine metabolites compared to the NS control group. The serotonin and its metabolite levels were significantly increased, while noradrenaline levels were decreased by RS in the three brain regions studied. The activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase in the frontal cortex and striatum were significantly increased by RS with decreased glutathione levels and increased lipid peroxidation. Pre-treatment with Ocimumoside A and B (40 mg/kg po) for a period of 3 days prevented the RS-induced changes with an efficacy similar to that of standard anti-stress (Panax quinquefolium; 100 mg/kg po) and antioxidant (Melatonin; 20 mg/kg ip) drugs, while, Ocimarin failed to modulate these changes. OS compounds per se had no effect on these parameters. Interpretation & conclusions: The present findings showed the anti-stress potential of Ocimumoside A and B in relation to their simultaneous modulatory effects on the central monoaminergic and antioxidant systems implicating their therapeutic importance in stress

  7. Ordering of vacancies in type-I tin clathrate: superstructure of Rb8Sn44 square2.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Franck; Fässler, Thomas F

    2005-03-16

    One important step toward the understanding of the mechanisms of thermoelectric properties is the knowledge about local distortions and vacancy ordering in clathrates. The type-I clathrate Rb8Sn44 shows in single-crystal and powder diffraction patterns a 2 x 2 x 2 supercell of the primitive cubic unit cell (Pmn), which originates from an ordering of the partially occupied site. The latter is distributed around a 41 screw axis, and the vacancies lead to a relaxation of the tin framework, thereby creating a local distortion of the tetrakaidecahedron. PMID:15755128

  8. Organic compounds characteristics associated with heat-induced increases of water repellency in Australian eucalypt forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassova, Irena; Doerr, Stefan H.

    2010-05-01

    Ground surface heating during wildfires often leads to increased water repellency in soils. The effect of elevated soil temperature on water repellency has been investigated in many laboratory-based studies and temperature thresholds for increases in, and destruction of, water repellency have been established. However, little is known about the changes in organic compounds patterns and their chemical structure that associated with these changes. Here we report on the characterisation of the chemical changes of organic compounds associated with heat-induced increases in water repellency in Eucalypt soils of different repellency levels. Fires are very common in eucalypt forest environments and soils under eucalypt species exhibit one of the most severe repellency levels, providing an ideal study case. Three SE Australian eucalypt forest soils from different locations (two sands and one sandy loam) were heated in the laboratory for 10 min at 300° C. Laboratory heating resulted in extreme repellency in the three soils studied. Heated and unheated control samples were then extracted by accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) with iso-propanol/ammonia mixture (IPA/NH3 95:5). Extraction led to the elimination of any water repellency present both in the original (heated) and the control samples. Organic compounds in the IPA/NH3 solvent were measured in extracts of increasing polarity in order to solubilise the residue. Before heating, the total solvent extracts from the soils with sandy texture were dominated by n-alkanols, terpenoids, C16 acid, C29 alkane, β-sitosterol and polar compounds such as glycerol, monosaccharides and glycosides. Fatty acids with chain length over C20 were detected in the sandy soils, while the soil of heavier texture (sandy loam) lacked longer than C20 fatty acids and had lower concentrations of alkanols (exceeding C26 chain lenght) and alkanes (C29, C31). Alkane patterns were characterized by the predominance of C21 - C31 homologues with a

  9. Preparation of inorganic crystalline compounds induced by ionizing, UV and laser radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čuba, Václav; Pavelková, Tereza; Bárta, Jan; Gbur, Tomáš; Vlk, Martin; Zavadilová, Alena; Indrei, Jakub; Dočekalová, Zuzana; Pospíšil, Milan; Múčka, Viliam

    2012-09-01

    Results on preparation of nickel, zinc, yttrium, aluminum and cobalt oxides, zinc peroxide and hydroxide, yttrium and lutetium aluminum garnets and cobalt(II) aluminate via irradiation of aqueous solutions containing soluble metal salts and radical scavengers (formate anion or propan-2-ol) are summarized in this paper. Various physico-chemical and structural properties of prepared compounds (e.g. crystallinity, specific surface area, particle size) are also reported. All used variants of radiation method are rather convenient and simple, and yield nano-scale powder materials with interesting characteristics. Prepared materials generally have high chemical purity, high specific surface area and narrow distribution of particle size (ranging in tens of nm). Generally, accelerated electrons, gamma, and UV radiation yield materials with comparable properties and structural characteristics, but UV-radiation seems to be the most convenient for preparation of intricate compounds such as synthetic garnets and spinels, while ionizing radiation is better for preparation of compounds doped with foreign ions. Among discussed compounds, only zinc oxide, peroxide and hydroxide were prepared directly via irradiation. For preparation of other crystalline oxidic compounds, mild heat treatment of amorphous or weakly crystalline solid phase was necessary.

  10. Photoperiod and aggression induce changes in ventral gland compounds exclusively in male Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Rendon, Nikki M; Soini, Helena A; Scotti, Melissa-Ann L; Weigel, Ellen R; Novotny, Milos V; Demas, Gregory E

    2016-05-01

    Chemical communication is a critical component of social behavior as it facilitates social encounters, allows for evaluation of the social partner, defines territories and resources, and advertises information such as sex and physiological state of an animal. Odors provide a key source of information about the social environment to rodents; however, studies identifying chemical compounds have thus far focused primarily on few species, particularly the house mouse. Moreover, considerably less attention has been focused on how environmental factors, reproductive phenotype, and behavioral context alter these compounds outside of reproduction. We examined the effects of photoperiod, sex, and social context on chemical communication in the seasonally breeding Siberian hamster. We sampled ventral gland secretions in both male and female hamsters before and after an aggressive encounter and identified changes in a range of volatile compounds. Next, we investigated how photoperiod, reproductive phenotype, and aggression altered ventral gland volatile compound composition across the sexes. Males exhibited a more diverse chemical composition, more sex-specific volatiles, and showed higher levels of excretion compared to females. Individual volatiles were also differentially excreted across photoperiod and reproductive phenotype, as well as differentially altered in response to an aggressive encounter. Female volatile compound composition, in contrast, did not differ across photoperiods or in response to aggression. Collectively, these data contribute to a greater understanding of context-dependent changes in chemical communication in a seasonally breeding rodent. PMID:26944610

  11. Protective effects of the compounds isolated from the seed of Psoralea corylifolia on oxidative stress-induced retinal damage

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyung-A; Shim, Sang Hee; Ahn, Hong Ryul; Jung, Sang Hoon

    2013-06-01

    The mechanism underlying glaucoma remains controversial, but apoptosis caused by increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is thought to play a role in its pathogenesis. We investigated the effects of compounds isolated from Psoralea corylifolia on oxidative stress-induced cell death in vitro and in vivo. Transformed retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5) were treated with L-buthione-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) and glutamate in the presence or with pre-treatment with compound 6, bakuchiol isolated from P. corylifolia. We observed reduced cell death in cells pre-treated with bakuchiol. Moreover, bakuchiol inhibited the oxidative stress-induced decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, ΔΨm). Furthermore, while intracellular Ca{sup 2+} was high in RGC-5 cells after exposure to oxidative stress, bakuchiol reduced these levels. In an in vivo study, in which rat retinal damage was induced by intravitreal injection of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), bakuchiol markedly reduced translocation of AIF and release of cytochrome c, and inhibited up-regulation of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9, and cleaved PARP. The survival rate of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) 7 days after optic nerve crush (ONC) in mice was significantly decreased; however, bakuchiol attenuated the loss of RGCs. Moreover, bakuchiol attenuated ONC-induced up-regulation of apoptotic proteins, including cleaved PARP, cleaved caspase-3, and cleaved caspase-9. Bakuchiol also significantly inhibited translocation of mitochondrial AIF into the nuclear fraction and release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into the cytosol. These results demonstrate that bakuchiol isolated from P. corylifolia has protective effects against oxidative stress-induced retinal damage, and may be considered as an agent for treating or preventing retinal degeneration. - Highlights: • Psoralea corylifolia have neuroprotective effects in vitro and in vivo. • Bakuchiol attenuated the increase of apoptotic proteins induced by oxidative

  12. Nanowired drug delivery of antioxidant compound H-290/51 enhances neuroprotection in hyperthermia-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Muresanu, Dafin F; Sharma, Aruna; Tian, Z Ryan; Smith, Mark A; Sharma, Hari Shanker

    2012-02-01

    Nanoparticles from the environment or through industrial sources can induce profound alterations in human health, often leading to brain dysfunction. However, it is still unclear whether nanoparticle intoxication could also alter the physiological or pathological responses of additional brain injury, stress response or disease processes. Military personals engaged in combat or peacekeeping operations are often exposed to nanoparticles from various environmental sources, e.g., Ag, Cu, Si, C, Al. In addition, these military personals are often exposed to high environmental heat, or gun and missle explosion injury leading to head or spinal trauma. Thus it is likely that additional CNS injury or stress-induced pathophysiological processes are influenced by nanoparticle intoxication. In this situation, when a combination of nanoparticles and central nervous system (CNS) injury or stress exist together, drug therapy needed to correct these anomalies may not work as effectively as in normal situation. Previous studies from our laboratory show that nanoparticle-intoxicated animals when subjected to hyperthermia resulted in exacerbation of brain pathology. In these animals, antioxidant compounds, e.g., H-290/51 that inhibits free radical formation and induces marked neuroprotection in normal rats after heat stress, failed to protect brain damage when a combination of nanoparticles and heat exposure was used. However, nanowired H-290/51 resulted in better neuroprotection in nanoparticles intoxicated animals after heat stress. Interestingly, high doses of the normal compound induced some neuroprotection in these nanoparticle-treated, heat-stressed rats. These observations suggest that a combination of nanoparticles and heat stress is dangerous and in such situations modification of drug dosage is needed to achieve comparable neuroprotection. In this review possible mechanisms of nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of heat induced neurotoxicity and brain protection achieved by

  13. Catalytic activity of methanol in all-vapor subsecond clathrate-hydrate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devlin, J. Paul

    2014-04-01

    Methanol's property as a catalyst in the formation of gas clathrate hydrates has been recognized for several years and was recently employed in a broad ranging study [K. Shin, K. A. Udachin, I. L. Moudrakovski, D. M. Leek, S. Alavi, C. I. Ratcliffe, and J. A. Ripmeester, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 110, 8437 (2013)]. A new measure of that activity is offered here from comparative rates of formation of methanol (MeOH) clathrate hydrates within our all-vapor aerosol methodology for which tetrahydrofuran (THF) and other small ethers have set a standard for catalytic action. We have previously described numerous examples of the complete conversion of warm all-vapor mixtures to aerosols of gas clathrate hydrates on a sub-second time scale, generally with the catalyst confined primarily to the large cage of either structure-I (s-I) or structure-II (s-II) hydrates. THF has proven to be the most versatile catalyst for the complete subsecond conversion of water to s-II hydrate nanocrystals that follows pulsing of appropriate warm vapor mixtures into a cold chamber held in the 140-220 K range. Here, the comparative ability of MeOH to catalyze the formation of s-I hydrates in the presence of a small-cage help-gas, CO2 or acetylene, is examined. The surprising result is that, in the presence of either help gas, CH-formation rates appear largely unchanged by a complete replacement of THF by MeOH in the vapor mixtures for a chamber temperature of 170 K. However, as that temperature is increased, the dependence of effective catalysis by MeOH on the partial pressure of help gases also increases. Nevertheless, added MeOH is shown to markedly accelerate the s-II THF-CO2 CH formation rate at 220 K.

  14. Simultaneous structure and carrier tuning of dimorphic clathrate Ba8Ga16Sn30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suekuni, K.; Avila, M. A.; Umeo, K.; Fukuoka, H.; Yamanaka, S.; Nakagawa, T.; Takabatake, T.

    2008-06-01

    We report structural, transport, and thermal properties of carrier-tuned Ba8Ga16Sn30 single crystals with the type-1 clathrate structure ( β phase), demonstrating that Ba8Ga16Sn30 is a unique thermoelectric clathrate material wherein both the structure type and the carrier type are tunable. The results are compared with the properties of the better known type-8 structure ( α phase) and of A8Ga16Ge30 (A=Sr,Eu) . Differential thermal analysis and powder x-ray diffraction show that both phases are stable up to their virtually identical melting point of 520±3°C . Refinements of single-crystal x-ray diffraction data indicate that the Ba(2) guest ion in the tetrakaidecahedron occupies the off-center 24k sites which are 0.43 0.44Å away from the centered 6d site. The temperature-linear coefficient of the specific heat is 29mJ/molK2 for both n - and p -type carriers in the β phase, four times larger than that for the α phase, suggesting contributions from tunneling of the Ba(2) guest ions between off-center minima. Analysis of specific heat with a soft-potential model (SPM) gives a characteristic energy of 20 K for the Ba(2) vibration, significantly lower than 50 K for the α phase and in fact the lowest among type-1 clathrates. The lattice thermal conductivities κL for the β phase with both charge carrier types are very similar and show a glasslike temperature dependence. This behavior in κL(T) is also described using SPM analysis, where it is found that the coupling strength between guest modes and acoustic phonons for the β phase is significantly larger than that for Sr8Ga16Ge30 .

  15. Effect of ammonia on the stability of clathrate hydrates: experimental study and implications for Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choukroun, M.; Ibourichene, A.; Smythe, W. D.; Mielke, R. E.; Barmatz, M.; Hodyss, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    The likely presence of clathrate hydrates on Titan has long been inferred from cosmochemical, thermal, and thermodynamic models. As gas-laden icy structures (up to 15 mol%), they may be internal reservoirs of methane and other atmospheric gasses, and their dissociation during cryovolcanic activity could be a main contributor to the replenishment of Titan's atmospheric methane. However, the controversial nature of the few cryovolcanic features tentatively detected on Titan by the Cassini spacecraft questions our current understanding of the modalities of outgassing processes. The paucity of data on the stability of clathrate hydrates in presence of ammonia (likely source of Titan's atmospheric nitrogen) hinders our capability to address outgassing processes. We are conducting an experimental study in the ternary systems H2O-CH4-NH3 and H2O-THF-NH3. Phase diagrams of the former are constructed under pressures up to 100 bars using a high-pressure cryogenic calorimeter, while the latter is investigated at atmospheric pressure using a liquid nitrogen cooled cryostage coupled to a microscope and a Raman spectrometer. The main preliminary results are: 1/ although ammonia does affect the stability of clathrate hydrates, its influence appears lower than on the melting of water ice; 2/ the dissociation proceeds incongruently, similarly to the incongruent melting of water ice in the H2O-NH3 system. These results and their implications will be presented at the meeting. This work has been conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. Copyright 2013, Caltech. Support by the NASA Outer Planets Research Program and government sponsorship acknowledged.

  16. Radiation-induced crystalline-to-amorphous transition in intermetallic compounds of the Cu-Ti alloy system

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.; Devanathan, R. ); Sabochick, M.J. . Computer Applications Div.)

    1992-02-01

    Recent progress in molecular-dynamics studies of radiation-induced crystalline-to-amorphous transition in the ordered intermetallic compounds of the Cu-Ti system is discussed. The effect of irradiation was simulated by the generation of Frenkel pairs,which resulted in both the formation of stable point defects and chemical disorder upon defect recombination. The thermodynamic, structural and mechanical responses of the compounds during irradiation were determined by monitoring changes in the system potential energy, volume expansion, pair correlation function, diffraction patterns, and elastic constants. It was found that the intermetallics Cu{sub 4}Ti{sub 3}, CuTi, and CuTi{sub 2} could be rendered amorphous by the creation of Frenkel pairs, but Cu{sub 4}Ti could not, consistent with experimental observations during electron irradiation. However, the simulations showed that Cu{sub 4}Ti did become amorphous when clusters of Frenkel pairs were introduced, indicating that this compound may be susceptible to amorphization by heavy-ion bombardment. A generalization of the Lindemann criterion was used to develop a thermodynamic description of solid-state amorphization as a disorder- induced melting process.

  17. Salvinorin A analogues PR-37 and PR-38 attenuate compound 48/80-induced itch responses in mice

    PubMed Central

    Salaga, M; Polepally, P R; Zielinska, M; Marynowski, M; Fabisiak, A; Murawska, N; Sobczak, K; Sacharczuk, M; Do Rego, J C; Roth, B L; Zjawiony, J K; Fichna, J

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The opioid system plays a crucial role in several physiological processes in the CNS and in the periphery. It has also been shown that selective opioid receptor agonists exert potent inhibitory action on pruritus and pain. In this study we examined whether two analogues of Salvinorin A, PR-37 and PR-38, exhibit antipruritic properties in mice. Experimental Approach To examine the antiscratch effect of PR-37 and PR-38 we used a mouse model of compound 48/80-induced pruritus. In order to elucidate the mechanism of action of tested compounds, specific antagonists of opioid and cannabinoid receptors were used. The effect of PR-37 on the CNS was assessed by measuring motor parameters and exploratory behaviours in mice. Key Results PR-37 and PR-38, jnjected s.c., significantly reduced the number of compound 48/80-induced scratching behaviours in mice in a dose- and time-dependent manner. PR-38 was also active when orally administered. The antiscratch activity of PR-37 was blocked by the selective κ opioid receptor antagonist, nor-binaltorphimine, and that of PR-38 by the selective μ opioid receptor antagonist, β-funaltrexamine. Conclusion and Implications In conclusion, a novel framework for the development of new antipruritic drugs derived from salvinorin A has been validated. PMID:26040667

  18. Odorants that induce hygienic behavior in honeybees: identification of volatile compounds in chalkbrood-infected honeybee larvae.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Jodi A I; Torto, Baldwyn; Kells, Stephen A; Mesce, Karen A; Tumlinson, James H; Spivak, Marla

    2009-09-01

    Social insects that live in large colonies are vulnerable to disease transmission due to relatively high genetic relatedness among individuals and high rates of contact within and across generations. While individual insects rely on innate immune responses, groups of individuals also have evolved social immunity. Hygienic behavior, in which individual honeybees detect chemical stimuli from diseased larvae and subsequently remove the diseased brood from the nest, is one type of social immunity that reduces pathogen transmission. Three volatile compounds, collected from larvae infected with the fungal pathogen Ascosphaera apis and detected by adult honey bees, were identified by coupled gas chromatography-electroantennographic detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. These three compounds, phenethyl acetate, 2-phenylethanol, and benzyl alcohol, were present in volatile collections from infected larvae but were absent from collections from healthy larvae. Two field bioassays revealed that one of the compounds, phenethyl acetate is a key compound associated with Ascosphaera apis-infected larvae that induces hygienic behavior. PMID:19816752

  19. Single crystal growth of type I Na-Si clathrate by using Na-Sn flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morito, Haruhiko; Shimoda, Masashi; Yamane, Hisanori

    2016-09-01

    Single crystals of type I Na-Si clathrate, Na8Si46, were synthesized by heating Na, Na4Si4, and Na15Sn4 at 723 K under an Ar gas pressure of 104 Pa for 12 h. The single crystals having {110} habit planes grew up to 1.5 mm in size due to Na evaporation from a Na-Si-Sn melt with a starting compositional molar ratio of Na/Si/Sn=5.75:2:1.

  20. Ionic Strength-Induced Formation of Smectite Quasicrystals Enhances Nitroaromatic Compound Sorption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of ionic strength on nitroaromatic compound sorption from water by K+- and Ca2+-saturated smectite (SWy-2) was examined. The results indicated that sorption of 1,3-dinitrobenzene by K-SWy-2 increased up to 2.2 times as KCl ionic strength increased from 0.01 to 0.30 M. In contrast, sorp...

  1. Pressure-induced bonding and compound formation in xenon-hydrogen solids

    SciTech Connect

    Somayazulu, Maddury; Dera, Przemyslaw; Goncharov, Alexander F; Gramsch, Stephen A; Liermann, Peter; Yang, Wenge; Liu, Zhenxian; Mao, Ho-kwang; Hemley, Russell J

    2010-11-03

    Closed electron shell systems, such as hydrogen, nitrogen or group 18 elements, can form weakly bound stoichiometric compounds at high pressures. An understanding of the stability of these van der Waals compounds is lacking, as is information on the nature of their interatomic interactions. We describe the formation of a stable compound in the Xe-H{sub 2} binary system, revealed by a suite of X-ray diffraction and optical spectroscopy measurements. At 4.8 GPa, a unique hydrogen-rich structure forms that can be viewed as a tripled solid hydrogen lattice modulated by layers of xenon, consisting of xenon dimers. Varying the applied pressure tunes the Xe-Xe distances in the solid over a broad range from that of an expanded xenon lattice to the distances observed in metallic xenon at megabar pressures. Infrared and Raman spectra indicate a weakening of the intramolecular covalent bond as well as persistence of semiconducting behaviour in the compound to at least 255 GPa.

  2. AURANOFIN, AS AN ANTI-RHEUMATIC GOLD COMPOUND SUPPRESSES LPS-INDUCED HOMODIMERIZATION OF TLR4

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which are activated by invading microorganisms or endogenous molecules, evoke immune and inflammatory responses. TLR activation is closely linked to the development of many chronic inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis. Auranofin, an Au(I) compound, is a we...

  3. Diet-induced endogenous formation of nitroso compounds in the GI tract.

    PubMed

    Kuhnle, Gunter G C; Story, Giles W; Reda, Torsten; Mani, Ali R; Moore, Kevin P; Lunn, Joanne C; Bingham, Sheila A

    2007-10-01

    Red or processed meat, but not white meat or fish, is associated with colorectal cancer. The endogenous formation of nitroso compounds is a possible explanation, as red or processed meat--but not white meat or fish--causes a dose-dependent increase in fecal apparent total N-nitroso compounds (ATNC) and the formation of nitroso-compound-specific DNA adducts. Red meat is particularly rich in heme and heme has also been found to promote the formation of ATNC. To investigate the underlying mechanism of ATNC formation, fecal and ileal samples of volunteers fed a high red meat or a vegetarian diet were analyzed for nitrosyl iron, nitrosothiols, and heme. To simulate the processes in the stomach, food homogenates and hemoglobin were incubated under simulated gastric conditions. Nitrosyl iron and nitrosothiols were significantly (p < 0.0001) increased in ileal and fecal samples after a high red meat diet compared with a vegetarian diet; significantly more nitrosyl iron than nitrosothiols was detectable in ileal (p < 0.0001) and fecal (p < 0.001) samples. The strong correlation between fecal nitrosyl iron and heme (0.776; p < 0.0001) suggested that nitrosyl heme is the main source of nitrosyl iron, and ESR confirmed the presence of nitrosyl heme in fecal samples after a high red meat diet. Under simulated gastric conditions, mainly nitrosothiols were formed, suggesting that acid-catalyzed thionitrosation is the initial step in the endogenous formation of nitroso compounds. Nitrosyl heme and other nitroso compounds can then form under the alkaline and reductive conditions of the small and large bowel. PMID:17761300

  4. Low-temperature magnetic, galvanomagnetic, and thermoelectric properties of the type-I clathrates Ba8NixSi46-x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candolfi, C.; Aydemir, U.; Ormeci, A.; Baitinger, M.; Oeschler, N.; Steglich, F.; Grin, Yu.

    2011-05-01

    Galvanomagnetic and thermoelectric properties including Hall effect, electrical resistivity, thermopower, and thermal conductivity of polycrystalline type-I clathrates Ba8NixSi46-x (2.6 ⩽ x ⩽ 3.8) have been studied in the 2- to 350-K temperature range. Further characterization of the electronic properties of these compounds has been performed via low-temperature specific heat and magnetic susceptibility measurements (2-300 K). The electronic band structure, density of states, dispersion curves, and Fermi surface were calculated within the full-potential local-orbital method (FPLO). These calculations have not only revealed that the electronic band structure evolves in a nonrigid manner but have also shown that the density of states at the Fermi level strongly varies with x. The variations in the band structure have been experimentally confirmed by transport properties and specific heat measurements. Regardless of the Ni content, the Fermi surface shows disconnected electron and hole sections that appear consistent with thermopower data indicating that both types of carriers contribute to the electrical conduction in these materials. Magnetic susceptibility measurements have indicated that the Ni atoms do not carry any magnetic moment in these compounds. All the investigated samples exhibit metallic-like behavior resulting in moderate thermopower values and thus, in low dimensionless thermoelectric figures of merit ZT.

  5. Newly synthesized bis-benzimidazole compound 8 induces apoptosis, autophagy and reactive oxygen species generation in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Naying; Yao, Guodong; Liu, Yuan; Cheng, Maosheng; Ikejima, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Compound 8 (C8) is a newly synthesized bis-benzimidazole derivative and exerts significant anti-tumor activity in vitro. Previous studies demonstrated that C8 induced apoptosis and autophagy in human promyelocytic leukemia HL60 cells. However, cytotoxicity study on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC) showed that C8 exhibited less toxicity in normal cells. In this study, the molecular mechanism of C8 on human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells was investigated. The results showed that C8 inhibited the growth of HeLa cells and triggered both apoptotic and autophagic cell death. Subsequent experiment also indicated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was induced in C8-treated HeLa cells. Since ROS scavenger decreased the ratio of apoptotic and autophagic cells, ROS generation contributed to C8-induced apoptosis and autophagy. Furthermore, inhibitors of apoptosis and autophagy also reduced ROS generation, respectively. Autophagy inhibition increased cell growth compared to C8-treated group and attenuated apoptotic cell death, indicating that C8-induced autophagy promoted apoptosis for cell death. However, the percentage of autophagic cells was enhanced when limiting apoptosis process. Taken together, C8 induced ROS-mediated apoptosis and autophagy in HeLa cells, autophagy promoted apoptosis but the former was antagonized by the latter. The data also gave us a new perspective on the anti-tumor effect of C8. PMID:27497983

  6. In situ apparatus for the study of clathrate hydrates relevant to solar system bodies using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Sarah J.; Thompson, Stephen P.; Evans, Aneurin; Parker, Julia E.

    2015-02-01

    Context. Clathrate hydrates are believed to play a significant role in various solar system environments, e.g. comets, and the surfaces and interiors of icy satellites. However, the structural factors governing their formation and dissociation are poorly understood. Aims: We demonstrate the application of a high pressure gas cell, combined with variable temperature non-contact cooling and fast, time-resolved data collection, to the in situ study of clathrate hydrates under conditions relevant to solar system environments. Methods: Clathrates formed and processed within the sample cell are monitored in situ using time-resolved synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction and laser Raman spectroscopy. Results: X-ray diffraction allows the formation of clathrate hydrates to be observed as CO2 gas is applied to ice formed within the cell. Complete conversion is obtained by annealing at temperatures just below the ice melting point. A subsequent rise in the quantity of clathrate is observed as the cell is thermally cycled. Four regions between 100-5000 cm-1 are present in the in situ Raman spectra that carry features characteristic of both ice and clathrate formation. Conclusions: This novel experimental arrangement is well suited to studying clathrate hydrates over a wide range of temperature (80 -500 K) and pressure (1-100 bar) conditions relevant to solar system bodies and can be used with a variety of different gases and starting aqueous compositions (e.g. saline solutions). We propose the increase in clathrate formation observed during thermal cycling may be due to the formation of a quasi liquid-like phase that forms at temperatures below the ice melting point, but which allows either easier formation of new clathrate cages, or the retention and delocalisation of previously formed clathrate structures, possibly as amorphous clathrate. The structural similarities between hexagonal ice, the quasi liquid-like phase, and crystalline CO2 hydrate mean that differences in the

  7. Polar/apolar compounds induce leukemia cell differentiation by modulating cell-surface potential.

    PubMed Central

    Arcangeli, A; Carlà, M; Del Bene, M R; Becchetti, A; Wanke, E; Olivotto, M

    1993-01-01

    The mechanism of action of polar/apolar inducers of cell differentiation, such as dimethyl sulfoxide and hexamethylene-bisacetamide, is still obscure. In this paper evidence is provided that their effects on murine erythroleukemia cells are modulated by various extracellular cations as a precise function of the cation effects on membrane surface potential. The interfacial effects of the inducers were directly measured on the charged electrode, showing that both dimethyl sulfoxide and hexamethylene-bisacetamide, at the effective concentrations for cell differentiation and within the physiological range of charge density, adsorb at the charged surface and produce a potential shift. A linear correlation was found between this shift and the inducer effects on cell differentiation. Besides offering a different interpretation of the mechanism of action of the inducers, these findings indicate that surface potential has a signaling function. They may also be relevant to cancer treatments based on tumor-cell commitment to terminal differentiation. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8516337

  8. COMPOUND-INDUCED ALTERATIONS OF SEXUAL DIFFERENTIATION: A REVIEW OF EFFECTS IN HUMANS AND RODENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    During sexual differentiation there are a number of critical periods when the reproductive system is uniquely susceptible to chemically-induced perturbations. At these times an inappropriate chemical signal can result in irreversible lesions that often result in infertility, wher...

  9. Laser-induced fluorescence detection strategies for sodium atoms and compounds in high-pressure combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiland, Karen J. R.; Wise, Michael L.; Smith, Gregory P.

    1993-01-01

    A variety of laser-induced fluorescence schemes were examined experimentally in atmospheric pressure flames to determine their use for sodium atom and salt detection in high-pressure, optically thick environments. Collisional energy transfer plays a large role in fluorescence detection. Optimum sensitivity, at the parts in 10 exp 9 level for a single laser pulse, was obtained with the excitation of the 4p-3s transition at 330 nm and the detection of the 3d-3p fluorescence at 818 nm. Fluorescence loss processes, such as ionization and amplified spontaneous emission, were examined. A new laser-induced atomization/laser-induced fluorescence detection technique was demonstrated for NaOH and NaCl. A 248-nm excimer laser photodissociates the salt molecules present in the seeded flames prior to atom detection by laser-induced fluorescence.

  10. Methane molecular motion in clathrate hydrate host framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiyama, T.; Seki, N.; Iwasa, H.; Uchida, T.; Ebinuma, T.; Narita, H.; Igawa, N.; Ishii, Y.; Bennington, S. M.; Kiyanagi, Y.

    2006-11-01

    Methane hydrate (MH)is a nonstoichiometric inclusion compound of methane with the host framework being composed of two kinds of water cages in a unit cell. We performed neutron inelastic measurements of MH to construct a scattering model of MH. The measurements were carried around 12 K with MARI spectrometer at ISIS in UK and TAS-2 spectrometer at JAERI in Japan. The experimental results show that methane molecular motion can be considered as a free rotor approximately and there still remains some excess peaks less than 10 meV. The origin of these peaks is considered as the localized translational motion of the methane molecule in two kinds of the water cages.

  11. Magnetic Precursor of the Pressure-Induced Superconductivity in Fe-Ladder Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Songxue; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Cao, Huibo; Hirata, Yasuyuki; Hashizume, Kazuki; Aoyama, Takuya; Ohgushi, Kenya

    2016-07-01

    The pressure effects on the antiferromagentic orders in iron-based ladder compounds CsFe2Se3 and BaFe2S3 have been studied using neutron diffraction. With identical crystal structure and similar magnetic structures, the two compounds exhibit highly contrasting magnetic behaviors under moderate external pressures. In CsFe2Se3 the ladders are brought much closer to each other by pressure, but the stripe-type magnetic order shows no observable change. In contrast, the stripe order in BaFe2S3 undergoes a quantum phase transition where an abrupt increase of Néel temperature by more than 50% occurs at about 1 GPa, accompanied by a jump in the ordered moment. With its spin structure unchanged, BaFe2S3 enters an enhanced magnetic phase that bears the characteristics of an orbital selective Mott phase, which is the true neighbor of superconductivity emerging at higher pressures.

  12. Low field induced giant magnetocaloric effect in TmGa compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Zhao-Jun; Shen, Jun; Yan, Li-Qin; Tang, Cheng-Chun; Lin, Jing; Wu, Jian-Feng; Sun, Ji-Rong; Wang, Li-Chen; Zheng, Xin-Qi; Shen, Bao-Gen

    2013-07-01

    The magnetic properties and magnetocaloric effect in TmGa compound are investigated. TmGa exhibits two successive magnetic transitions: ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic at TFA = 12 K and antiferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition at TN = 15 K. Under field changes of 1 and 2 T, giant reversible values of magnetic entropy change (12.9 and 20.6 J/kg K) and large values of refrigerant capacity (69 and 149 J/kg) are observed, respectively. Additionally, the maximal values of adiabatic temperature change are 3.2 and 5 K for field changes of 1 and 2 T, respectively. The TmGa compound with excellent magnetocaloric effect is expected to have effective applications in low temperature magnetic refrigeration.

  13. Preparation and thermoelectric properties of sintered type-I clathrates K8Ga(x)Sn(46-x).

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masahiro; Kishimoto, Kengo; Kishio, Kazuma; Akai, Koji; Asada, Hironori; Koyanagi, Tsuyoshi

    2010-01-28

    Polycrystalline clathrate samples of nominal K(8)Ga(x)Sn(46-x) were prepared by the spark plasma sintering method to investigate their crystal structures, mobilities and thermoelectric properties. The samples almost had a single-phase type-I clathrate structure, and their relative densities reached as high as 98%. The room-temperature mobility of the K(8)Ga(8)Sn(38) sample was 25 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), which substantially exceeded the reported mobilities of Rb- and Cs-containing Sn clathrates. Moreover, the mobility was larger than those of the type-I Ba(8)Ga(16)Sn(30), which had more Ga substituting atoms in unit cell. A higher mobility might accordingly be achieved in thermoelectric clathrates with a smaller number of substituting atoms. Their electrical conductivities and Seebeck coefficients in the temperature range 300-450 K were typical of n-type doped semiconductors in the extrinsic region while their room-temperature lattice thermal conductivities were as low as approximately 11 mW cm(-1) K(-1). The maximum dimensionless figure of merit ZT was estimated to be 0.27 at 490 K from the Seebeck coefficient of -262 microV K(-1) and the electrical conductivity of 96 S cm(-1) for the K(8)Ga(8)Sn(38) sample with a carrier concentration of 2.9 x 10(19) cm(-3). PMID:20066199

  14. On the thermodynamic stability of clathrate hydrates V: phase behaviors accommodating large guest molecules with new reference states.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hideki; Matsumoto, Masakazu

    2011-12-01

    We present a method that brings prediction of phase behaviors of various clathrate hydrates with firm statistical mechanical ground adopting a different reference state from the usual one. Accommodation of a large guest molecule makes the frequencies of the lattice vibrational motions higher, which is one of the breakdowns of the assumptions in the original van der Waals and Platteeuw theory. The frequency modulations are incorporated in the free energy of cage occupation in the present method. Moreover, the reference state, which is originally the corresponding empty clathrate structure, is alternated to a state where cages of at least one sort are fully occupied. This meets the stability condition of clathrate hydrates that most of the cages should be accommodated. Owing to this new reference state, the thermodynamic stability is evaluated with reasonable accuracy from the free energy of cage occupation especially by a large guest molecule without considering its dependence on the cage occupancy. This conversion is also beneficial to establish a relation between the chemical potential of water and the cage occupancy from grandcanonical Monte Carlo simulation. We show a new method indeed works well in predicting the dissociation pressures of clathrate hydrates containing isobutane, propane, ethane, Xe, and CF(4). PMID:21902174

  15. Vitamin K2-derived compounds induce growth inhibition in radioresistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Amalia, Helfi; Sasaki, Ryohei; Suzuki, Yoko; Demizu, Yusuke; Bito, Toshinori; Nishimura, Hideki; Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Yoshida, Kenji; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Kawabe, Tetsuya; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2010-01-01

    A strategy to overcome radioresistance in cancer treatment has been expected. To evaluate the strategy, appropriate experimental models are needed. Radioresistant tumour models were originally established from human colon cancer cells, and we evaluated their molecular basis. Next, the growth inhibitory effects of newly synthesized vitamin K2 (VK2)-related compounds were tested. Here, we showed that these novel compounds have growth inhibitory effects not only on cancer cells of various origins, but also on radioresistant cells, through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Human colon, lung, and breast cancer cell lines were used for testing the growth inhibitory activities of several chemical compounds. Radioresistant tumour models were established by fractionated radiation exposure. Irradiated cells were selected by a single cell cloning method, and their sensitivity to ionizing radiation was evaluated by a colony-forming assay. The VK2 derivatives (named MQ-1, MQ-2, and MQ-3) were chemically synthesized. To evaluate the generation of ROS, flow cytometer analyses were performed. A radioresistant tumour model was established from the HCT116 human colon cancer cell line. The radioresistant cells from HCT116 also showed resistance to cisplatin. In the radioresistant cells, NF-κB was highly activated. MQ-1, MQ-2, and MQ-3 showed greater growth inhibitory activities than VK2 not only in various cancer cells but also in radioresistant cells through the generation of ROS. In conclusion, a radioresistant tumour model was originally established from colon cancer cell lines through NF-κB activation, and it could be a useful tool for evaluating anti-tumour agents. Newly synthesized VK2 derivatives (MQ-1, MQ-2 and MQ-3) seemed to be potential anti-tumour agents in various cancers and radioresistant cancers. The efficacy of those compounds was related to the generation of ROS. These findings together might pave the way for the treatment of radioresistant or

  16. Identification of Novel Compounds Inhibiting Chikungunya Virus-Induced Cell Death by High Throughput Screening of a Kinase Inhibitor Library

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Rafael G. B.; da Silva, Camila T.; Taniguchi, Juliana B.; No, Joo Hwan; Lombardot, Benoit; Schwartz, Olivier; Hansen, Michael A. E.; Freitas-Junior, Lucio H.

    2013-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne arthrogenic alphavirus that causes acute febrile illness in humans accompanied by joint pains and in many cases, persistent arthralgia lasting weeks to years. The re-emergence of CHIKV has resulted in numerous outbreaks in the eastern hemisphere, and threatens to expand in the foreseeable future. Unfortunately, no effective treatment is currently available. The present study reports the use of resazurin in a cell-based high-throughput assay, and an image-based high-content assay to identify and characterize inhibitors of CHIKV-infection in vitro. CHIKV is a highly cytopathic virus that rapidly kills infected cells. Thus, cell viability of HuH-7 cells infected with CHIKV in the presence of compounds was determined by measuring metabolic reduction of resazurin to identify inhibitors of CHIKV-associated cell death. A kinase inhibitor library of 4,000 compounds was screened against CHIKV infection of HuH-7 cells using the resazurin reduction assay, and the cell toxicity was also measured in non-infected cells. Seventy-two compounds showing ≥50% inhibition property against CHIKV at 10 µM were selected as primary hits. Four compounds having a benzofuran core scaffold (CND0335, CND0364, CND0366 and CND0415), one pyrrolopyridine (CND0545) and one thiazol-carboxamide (CND3514) inhibited CHIKV-associated cell death in a dose-dependent manner, with EC50 values between 2.2 µM and 7.1 µM. Based on image analysis, these 6 hit compounds did not inhibit CHIKV replication in the host cell. However, CHIKV-infected cells manifested less prominent apoptotic blebs typical of CHIKV cytopathic effect compared with the control infection. Moreover, treatment with these compounds reduced viral titers in the medium of CHIKV-infected cells by up to 100-fold. In conclusion, this cell-based high-throughput screening assay using resazurin, combined with the image-based high content assay approach identified compounds against CHIKV having a novel

  17. The antitumor natural compound falcarindiol promotes cancer cell death by inducing endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Jin, H R; Zhao, J; Zhang, Z; Liao, Y; Wang, C-Z; Huang, W-H; Li, S-P; He, T-C; Yuan, C-S; Du, W

    2012-01-01

    Falcarindiol (FAD) is a natural polyyne with various beneficial biological activities. We show here that FAD preferentially kills colon cancer cells but not normal colon epithelial cells. Furthermore, FAD inhibits tumor growth in a xenograft tumor model and exhibits strong synergistic killing of cancer cells with 5-fluorouracil, an approved cancer chemotherapeutic drug. We demonstrate that FAD-induced cell death is mediated by induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Decreasing the level of ER stress, either by overexpressing the ER chaperone protein glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) or by knockout of components of the UPR pathway, reduces FAD-induced apoptosis. In contrast, increasing the level of ER stress by knocking down GRP78 potentiates FAD-induced apoptosis. Finally, FAD-induced ER stress and apoptosis is correlated with the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins, suggesting that FAD functions at least in part by interfering with proteasome function, leading to the accumulation of unfolded protein and induction of ER stress. Consistent with this, inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide significantly decreases the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and blocks FAD-induced ER stress and cell death. Taken together, our study shows that FAD is a potential new anticancer agent that exerts its activity through inducing ER stress and apoptosis. PMID:22914324

  18. Triorganotin compounds--ligands for "rexinoid" inducible transcription factors: biological effects.

    PubMed

    Brtko, J; Dvorak, Z

    2015-04-01

    We review trialkyltin and triaryltin compounds, representing a class of organometallic compounds that function as nuclear retinoid X receptors (RXR) agonists due to their capability to bind to the ligand-binding domain of RXR subtypes and function as transcriptional activators. RXRs act predominantly as heterodimers with other nuclear receptors as permissive heterodimers with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, liver X receptors, farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor and constitutive androstan receptor or as non-permissive heterodimer with vitamin D receptor, and as conditional heterodimers with retinoid receptors, and thyroid hormone receptors. RXR - "partner" receptor heterodimers are considered to be ligand-activated, DNA-binding, trans-acting, transcription-modulating proteins involved in a general molecular mechanism responsible for transcriptional responses in target genes. Tributyltin at even pico- or nanomolar concentrations may cause the superimposition of male genitalia on female in several aquatic organisms, since they are DNA-targeted, mitotic, and their actions are occurring through target gene(s)-mediated pathways. They may cause molecular interactions with reproductive system in mammals, and as potent environmental obesogens, they promote adipocyte differentiation. Organotin compounds become known also for their immunotoxicity, neurotoxicity, for their effects on reproduction and/or development. We also review effects of organotins with respect to levels and activities of hepatic P450s and aromatase activity. PMID:25683035

  19. Atomic disorder induced by mechanical milling in the intermetallic compound CoAl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, L. M.; Bakker, H.; de Boer, F. R.

    1992-10-01

    The stoichiometric intermetallic compound CoAl with the CsCl-structure was subjected to ball milling. Structural changes during ball milling were studied by measurements of the magnetization and the lattice parameter. The behaviour of Coal upon milling turns out to be quite similar to that of CoGa. The increase of the magnetization and the decrease of the lattice parameter with the milling time show that, similar to CoGa, triple-defect disorder is generated by ball milling. By comparing the measured magnetization to the magnetization of Co xAl 100- x compounds with excess Co, the concentration of defects is derived for milled samples. In order to interpret our results, the existing experimental data of lattice parameters, X-ray densities calculated from the lattice parameters and macroscopic densities for Co xAl 100- x compounds were analyzed according to Edelin's equations. The defect volumes for vacancies and anti-site atoms obtained by fitting these experimental data have reasonable values. By means of the defect concentrations obtained from our magnetization measurements and the defect volumes by fitting the experimental data, the change of the lattice parameter was calculated by means of Edelin's equation. The agreement between the calculated lattice parameter and the measured lattice parameter is quite satisfactory.

  20. The presence of clathrates in comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luspay-Kuti, A.; Mousis, O.; Hässig, M.; Fuselier, S. A.; Lunine, J. I.; Marty, B.; Mandt, K. E.; Wurz, P.; Rubin, M.

    2016-04-01

    Cometary nuclei are considered to most closely reflect the composition of the building blocks of our solar system. As such, comets carry important information about the prevalent conditions in the solar nebula before and after planet formation. Recent measurements of the time variation of major and minor volatile species in the coma of the Jupiter family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P) by the ROSINA (Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis) instrument onboard Rosetta provide insight into the possible origin of this comet. The observed outgassing pattern indicates that the nucleus of 67P contains crystalline ice, clathrates, and other ices. The observed outgassing is not consistent with gas release from an amorphous ice phase with trapped volatile gases. If the building blocks of 67P were formed from crystalline ices and clathrates, then 67P would have agglomerated from ices that were condensed and altered in the protosolar nebula closer to the Sun instead of more pristine ices originating from the interstellar medium or the outskirts of the disc, where amorphous ice may dominate.

  1. Magnetic field penetration depth of superconducting aluminum-substituted Ba8Si42Al4 clathrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Garcia, Jose; Franco, Giogiovanni

    2014-03-01

    During past years, efforts have been made to explore the superconductivity of Group IV clathrates with particular attention to the sp3 hybridized networks. In the study, we report on the superconductivity of Al-substituted type-I silicon clathrates. Pure phase samples of the general formula Ba8Si46-xAlx with different values of x were synthesized. The magnetic susceptibility measurements show that Ba8Si42Al4 is a bulk superconductor, with an onset at Tc =6 K. Al substitution results in a large decrease of the electronic density of states at the Fermi level, which explains the decreased superconducting critical temperature within the BCS framework. To further characterize the superconducting state, we carried out magnetic measurements showing Ba8Si42Al4 to be a type II superconductor. The critical magnetic fields were measured to be Hc1 = 77 Oe and Hc2 = 40 kOe. We deduce the London penetration depth 2900 Å and the coherence length 90 Å. Our estimate of the electron-phonon coupling reveals that Ba8Si42Al4 is a moderate phonon-mediated BCS superconductor. NASA PRSG IDEAS-ER Program(Granted No. NNX10AM80H).

  2. The presence of clathrates in comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

    PubMed

    Luspay-Kuti, Adrienn; Mousis, Olivier; Hässig, Myrtha; Fuselier, Stephen A; Lunine, Jonathan I; Marty, Bernard; Mandt, Kathleen E; Wurz, Peter; Rubin, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Cometary nuclei are considered to most closely reflect the composition of the building blocks of our solar system. As such, comets carry important information about the prevalent conditions in the solar nebula before and after planet formation. Recent measurements of the time variation of major and minor volatile species in the coma of the Jupiter family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P) by the ROSINA (Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis) instrument onboard Rosetta provide insight into the possible origin of this comet. The observed outgassing pattern indicates that the nucleus of 67P contains crystalline ice, clathrates, and other ices. The observed outgassing is not consistent with gas release from an amorphous ice phase with trapped volatile gases. If the building blocks of 67P were formed from crystalline ices and clathrates, then 67P would have agglomerated from ices that were condensed and altered in the protosolar nebula closer to the Sun instead of more pristine ices originating from the interstellar medium or the outskirts of the disc, where amorphous ice may dominate. PMID:27152351

  3. Experimental inelastic neutron scattering spectrum of hydrogen hexagonal clathrate-hydrate compared with rigorous quantum simulations.

    PubMed

    Celli, Milva; Powers, Anna; Colognesi, Daniele; Xu, Minzhong; Bačić, Zlatko; Ulivi, Lorenzo

    2013-10-28

    We have performed high-resolution inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements on binary hydrogen clathrate hydrates exhibiting the hexagonal structure (sH). Two samples, differing only in the ortho/para fraction of hydrogen, were prepared using heavy water and methyl tert-butyl ether as the promoter in its perdeuterated form. The INS spectrum of the translation-rotation (TR) excitations of the guest H2 molecule was obtained by subtracting the very weak signal due to the D2O lattice modes. By means of a subtraction procedure, it has been possible to obtain separately the spectra of caged p-H2 and o-H2. sH clathrates are comprised of three distinct types of cages, two of which, differing in shape and size, are each occupied by one H2 molecule only. Both contribute to the measured INS spectrum which is, therefore, rather complex and challenging to assign unambiguously. To assist with the interpretation, the INS spectra are calculated accurately utilizing the quantum methodology which incorporates the coupled five-dimensional TR energy levels and wave functions of the H2 molecule confined in each type of nanocage. The computed INS spectra are highly realistic and reflect the complexity of the coupled TR dynamics of the guest H2 in the anisotropic confining environment. The simulated INS spectra of p-H2 and o-H2 in the small and medium cages are compared with the experimental data, and are indispensable for their interpretation. PMID:24182049

  4. Exploring Dynamics and Cage-Guest Interactions in Clathrate Hydrates Using Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Suvrajit; Guo, Jin; Janda, Kenneth C; Martin, Rachel W

    2015-12-17

    Interactions between guest molecules and the water cages in clathrates are dominated by isotropic van der Waals forces at low temperatures because the cage structures satisfy the hydrogen bonding propensity of the water. However, above 200 K the water molecules become more labile and may interact strongly with the guests through hydrogen bonding. In this work we compare the dynamics of tetrahydrofuran (THF) and cyclopentane (CP) guests in the hydrate cages above 200 K. Since THF can form hydrogen bonds while CP cannot, the dynamics provide insight into host-guest hydrogen bonding. We use magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to measure proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) of the guests as a function of temperature and find that the activation barrier to the motion of THF molecules is 4.7 kcal/mol (19.7 kJ/mol) at temperatures above 200 K. This is almost 5 times higher than the barrier at lower temperatures. In contrast, the barrier to guest motion in CP hydrate is found to be about 0.67 kcal/mol (2.8 kJ/mol), which agrees well with data at lower temperatures. These results demonstrate that hydrogen bonding interactions between the THF guest and the clathrate cage are significant above 200 K due to the host lattice mobility. PMID:26583257

  5. Electric Double-Layer Capacitor Based on an Ionic Clathrate Hydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Wonhee; Kwon, Minchul; Park, Seongmin; Lim, Dongwook; Cha, Jong-Ho; Lee, Huen

    2013-05-13

    Herein, we suggest a new approach to an electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC) that is based on a proton-conducting ionic clathrate hydrate (ICH). The ice-like structures of clathrate hydrates, which are comprised of host water molecules and guest ions, make them suitable for applications in EDLC electrolytes, owing to their high proton conductivities and thermal stabilities. The carbon materials in the ICH Me{sub 4}NOH[DOT OPERATOR]5 H{sub 2}O show a high specific capacitance, reversible charge–discharge behavior, and a long cycle life. The ionic-hydrate complex provides the following advantages in comparison with conventional aqueous and polymer electrolytes: 1) The ICH does not cause leakage problems under normal EDLC operating conditions. 2) The hydrate material can be utilized itself, without requiring any pre-treatments or activation for proton conduction, thus shortening the preparation procedure of the EDLC. 3) The crystallization of the ICH makes it possible to tailor practical EDLC dimensions because of its fluidity as a liquid hydrate. 4) The hydrate solid electrolyte exhibits more-favorable electrochemical stability than aqueous and polymer electrolytes. Therefore, ICH materials are expected to find practical applications in versatile energy devices that incorporate electrochemical systems.

  6. Chemical shift changes and line narrowing in 13C NMR spectra of hydrocarbon clathrate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Kida, Masato; Sakagami, Hirotoshi; Takahashi, Nobuo; Nagao, Jiro

    2013-05-23

    The solid-state (13)C NMR spectra of various guest hydrocarbons (methane, ethane, propane, adamantane) in clathrate hydrates were measured to elucidate the local structural environments around hydrocarbon molecules isolated in guest-host frameworks of clathrate hydrates. The results show that, depending on the cage environment, the trends in the (13)C chemical shift and line width change as a function of temperature. Shielding around the carbons of the guest normal alkanes in looser cage environments tends to decrease with increasing temperature, whereas shielding in tighter cage environments tends to increase continuously with increasing temperature. Furthermore, the (13)C NMR line widths suggest, because of the reorientation of the guest alkanes, that the local structures in structure II are more averaged than those in structure I. The differences between structures I and II tend to be very large in the lower temperature range examined in this study. The (13)C NMR spectra of adamantane guest molecules in structure H hydrate show that the local structures around adamantane guests trapped in structure H hydrate cages are averaged at the same level as in the α phase of solid adamantane. PMID:23607335

  7. NMR and Magnetic Properties of Type-I Germanium-Copper Clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamar, Ramsey; Ross, Yang Li, Jr.

    2002-03-01

    Germanium clathrates are new materials containing a network of nanometer-sized cages, in which a wide variety of electronic and magnetic behavior is observed. We have synthesized a single-phase clathrate of the composition Ba_8Ge_44Cu_2, and here report on its magnetic properties. SQUID magnetometry shows the material to exhibit a large diamagnetism. From ^63Cu nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) we have identified two distinct copper sites, and we associate these sites with random occupancy of the 6c sites on the Ge framework, giving different local environments for Cu atoms. We identify a large paramagnetic Knight shift (metallic shift) for these NMR lines, and a measure of the spin-lattice relaxation time (T_1) shows that the Korringa ratio is obeyed, confirming the presence of metallic electrons as the source of these shifts. The combination of large diamagnetism and metallic NMR shifts in this material is similar to the behavior recently observed in intermetallics exhibiting hybridization-gap behavior, and also in quasi-crystalline intermetallics. We will discuss the current understanding of this behavior.

  8. Rattler Site Selectivity and Covalency Effects in Type-I Clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arčon, Denis; Zorko, Andrej; Jeglič, Peter; Xu, Jingtao; Tang, Jun; Tanabe, Yoichi; Heguri, Satoshi; Tanigaki, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    Type-I germanium clathrates comprised of Ga/Ge tetrakaidecahedra and dodecahedra cages that host alkaline earth atoms exemplify the properties of good thermoelectrics where the guest-atom anharmonic vibrations play a major role. However, while the host lattice--guest atom interaction is essential for this class of materials it is at the same time difficult to investigate due to the random Ga/Ge site occupation in the host lattice. In the present 71Ga NMR study of Sr8Ga16Ge30 and Ba8Ga16Ge30 samples we extract different Ga crystallographic site contributions from otherwise complex NMR spectra by exploring differences in their spin--lattice relaxation rates. Such approach opens a unique possibility for a site-selective study that directly proves non-negligible interaction of the anisotropic rattling motions of endohedral Sr with Ga atoms occupying the specific 24k sites of larger tetrakaidecahedral cages. This interaction affects electron--phonon coupling and modifies the local chemical environment --- possibly even through weak covalent bonding of Sr to the cage. Our results are thus in agreement with claims that the conventional picture of purely ionic interactions between the rattling guest atoms and the cage is only approximate and that covalent effects should be taken into account in clathrates or similar thermoelectric cage materials.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of binary structure H hydrogen and methyl-tert-butylether clathrate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, J A; Klug, D D

    2006-05-28

    Binary structure H (sH) hydrogen and methyl-tert-butylether (MTBE) clathrate hydrates are studied with molecular dynamics simulations. Simulations on a 3 x 3 x 3 sH unit cell with up to 4.7 mass % hydrogen gas are run at pressures of 100 bars and 2 kbars at 100 and 273 K. For the small and medium cages of the sH unit cell, H2 guest molecule occupancies of 0, 1 (single occupancy), and 2 (double occupancy) are considered with the MTBE molecule occupying all of the large cages. An increase of the small and medium cage occupancies from 1 to 2 leads to a jump in the unit cell volume and configurational energy. Calculations are also set up with 13, 23, and 89 of the MTBE molecules in the large cages replaced by sets of three to six H2 molecules, and the effects on the configurational energy and volume of the simulation cell are determined. As MTBE molecules are replaced with sets of H2 guests in the large cages, the configurational energy of the unit cell increases. At the lower temperature, the energy and volume of the clathrate are not sensitive to the number of hydrogen guests in the large cages; however, at higher temperatures the repulsions among the H2 guest molecules in the large cages cause an increase in the system energy and volume. PMID:16774364

  10. Simulations of structure II H2 and D2 clathrates: potentials incorporating quantum corrections.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Saman; Klug, D D; Ripmeester, J A

    2008-02-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the stability of structure II H(2) and D(2) clathrates with different large and small guest occupancies at 160 and 250 K and 2.0 kbars. Simulations are performed with the recently proposed anisotropic site-site potentials of Wang for H2 and D2 [J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf. 76, 23 (2003)] which are parameterized to account for quantum corrections of order variant Planck's over 2pi(2) in the second virial coefficient. Occupancies of 0-2 in the small cages and 2-5 in the large cages are considered. Thermodynamic integration is used to determine the most stable guest occupancy at each temperature. Since lattice free energy and configurational energy differences are small for a number of different combinations of cage occupancies, one must expect that in bulk samples various combinations will indeed be observed. Special attention is given to the differences between H(2) and D(2) guests and implications on the hydrogen storage capacity of the clathrates are discussed. PMID:18282055

  11. Experimental inelastic neutron scattering spectrum of hydrogen hexagonal clathrate-hydrate compared with rigorous quantum simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celli, Milva; Powers, Anna; Colognesi, Daniele; Xu, Minzhong; Bačić, Zlatko; Ulivi, Lorenzo

    2013-10-01

    We have performed high-resolution inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements on binary hydrogen clathrate hydrates exhibiting the hexagonal structure (sH). Two samples, differing only in the ortho/para fraction of hydrogen, were prepared using heavy water and methyl tert-butyl ether as the promoter in its perdeuterated form. The INS spectrum of the translation-rotation (TR) excitations of the guest H2 molecule was obtained by subtracting the very weak signal due to the D2O lattice modes. By means of a subtraction procedure, it has been possible to obtain separately the spectra of caged p-H2 and o-H2. sH clathrates are comprised of three distinct types of cages, two of which, differing in shape and size, are each occupied by one H2 molecule only. Both contribute to the measured INS spectrum which is, therefore, rather complex and challenging to assign unambiguously. To assist with the interpretation, the INS spectra are calculated accurately utilizing the quantum methodology which incorporates the coupled five-dimensional TR energy levels and wave functions of the H2 molecule confined in each type of nanocage. The computed INS spectra are highly realistic and reflect the complexity of the coupled TR dynamics of the guest H2 in the anisotropic confining environment. The simulated INS spectra of p-H2 and o-H2 in the small and medium cages are compared with the experimental data, and are indispensable for their interpretation.

  12. Simulations of structure II H2 and D2 clathrates: Potentials incorporating quantum corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, Saman; Klug, D. D.; Ripmeester, J. A.

    2008-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the stability of structure II H2 and D2 clathrates with different large and small guest occupancies at 160 and 250K and 2.0kbars. Simulations are performed with the recently proposed anisotropic site-site potentials of Wang for H2 and D2 [J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf. 76, 23 (2003)] which are parameterized to account for quantum corrections of order ℏ2 in the second virial coefficient. Occupancies of 0-2 in the small cages and 2-5 in the large cages are considered. Thermodynamic integration is used to determine the most stable guest occupancy at each temperature. Since lattice free energy and configurational energy differences are small for a number of different combinations of cage occupancies, one must expect that in bulk samples various combinations will indeed be observed. Special attention is given to the differences between H2 and D2 guests and implications on the hydrogen storage capacity of the clathrates are discussed.

  13. Ba8Ga16Sn30 type-I clathrate NMR lineshape simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Sergio Y.; Zheng, Xiang; Saribaev, Laziz; Ross, Joseph H., Jr.

    2010-03-01

    Semiconductor clathrates consist of Si, Ge or Sn networks containing guest atoms. Clathrates have gained considerable attention due to their potential for thermoelectric device application. To understand the Ga substitutional configuration and Ga-Ga bonding, we calculated Ga NMR lineshapes for type-I Ba8Ga16Sn30. The results were obtained by calculating Electric Field Gradients (EFG) for different Ga framework occupation. To obtain the EFG's we used ab initio methods with the Generalized Gradient Approximation for the exchange-correlation term as implemented in the WIEN2k code. These were compared with our experimental NMR lineshapes. By x-ray-absorption fine structure technique simulations it had previously being suggested that the number of Ga-Ga bonds was between 4 and 5. Our results showed that this number should be lower due to the mismatch between the experimental and simulated NMR lineshapes. Furthermore it was obtained that Ga-Ga bonds on 16i adjacent sites are not energetically favorable. EFG's corresponding to such configurations are also extremely large and do not agree with our measured NMR lineshapes. On the other hand we found good agreement between the measured lineshapes and the configuration with the lowest computed energy. This work was supported by Robert A. Welch Foundation (Grant A-1526).

  14. Release control of industrial biocide (CMI) using clathrate crystal with TEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Mitsutaka; Fujimoto, Masanari

    2003-09-01

    The release control of 5-chloro-2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one (CMI) (biocide) by forming clathrate crystals with TEP (1,1,2,2-tetrakis(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethane) as the host was investigated. The CMI concentration released from TEP-CMI crystals increases with the amount of TEP-CMI clathrate crystals, however, it is limited. In the concentration change of TEP the peak appears and afterwards the concentration approaches to the constant value. The appearance of the peak in the TEP concentration changes is related with the crystal structure change of TEP-CMI crystals and the rate of the structural change is retarded with increase of the amount of crystals. The release mechanism of CMI is cleared to be the combination of the dissolution of TEP-CMI crystal and the crystallization of the new solid phase. The composition of the new solid phase was determined as TEP·CH 3OH·H 2O (TEP-SOL crystal). The crystal morphology is different between the TEP-CMI crystal and TEP-SOL crystal. With the increase of water composition ( VH) from 0.5 to 0.67 and 0.91 in the solvent, CMI concentration released from TEP-CMI crystals and the solubility of TEP decreased. The rate of the structural change of TEP-CMI crystal decreased with the increase of water composition.

  15. Inelastic neutron scattering and raman light scattering from hydrogen-filled clathrates hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulivi, L.; Celli, M.; Giannasi, A.; Ramirez-Cuesta, A. J.; Zoppi, M.

    2008-07-01

    Several samples of ternary tetrahydrofuran-H2O-H2 and binary H2O-H2 clathrate hydrates have been analysed by high-resolution inelastic neutron scattering and Raman light scattering. The neutron spectrum presents several intense bands due to H2 molecule excitations and in particular to rotational transitions, centre-of-mass translational transitions of either para-or ortho-H2, and to combinations of these. The H2 molecule behaves in the clathrate cage as an almost free rotor, and performs a translational motion (rattling), that is a paradigmatic example of the motion of a quantum particle in a non-harmonic three-dimensional potential well. Both the H2 rotational transition and the fundamental of the rattling transition split into triplets. Raman spectra show a similar splitting of the S0(0) rotational transition, due to a significant anisotropy of the potential with respect to the orientation of the molecule in the cage. The comparison of our experimental values for the transition frequencies to a recent quantum mechanical calculation is discussed.

  16. Accurate description of phase diagram of clathrate hydrates at the molecular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belosludov, Rodion V.; Subbotin, Oleg S.; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Belosludov, Vladimir R.

    2009-12-01

    In order to accurately estimate the thermodynamic properties of hydrogen clathrate hydrates, we developed a method based on the solid solution theory of van der Waals and Platteeuw. This model allows one to take into account the influence of guest molecules on the host lattice and guest-guest interactions—especially when more than one guest molecule occupies a cage. The free energies, equations of state, and chemical potentials of hydrogen and mixed propane-hydrogen clathrate hydrates of cubic structure II with different cage fillings have been estimated using this approach. Moreover, the proposed theory has been used for construction p -T phase diagrams of hydrogen hydrate and mixed hydrogen-propane hydrates in a wide range of pressures and temperatures. For the systems with well defined interactions the calculated curves of "guest gas-hydrate-ice Ih" equilibrium agree with the available experimental data. We also believe that the present model allows one not only to calculate the hydrogen storage ability of known hydrogen hydrate but also predict this value for structures that have not yet been realized by experiment.

  17. The presence of clathrates in comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    PubMed Central

    Luspay-Kuti, Adrienn; Mousis, Olivier; Hässig, Myrtha; Fuselier, Stephen A.; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Marty, Bernard; Mandt, Kathleen E.; Wurz, Peter; Rubin, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Cometary nuclei are considered to most closely reflect the composition of the building blocks of our solar system. As such, comets carry important information about the prevalent conditions in the solar nebula before and after planet formation. Recent measurements of the time variation of major and minor volatile species in the coma of the Jupiter family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P) by the ROSINA (Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis) instrument onboard Rosetta provide insight into the possible origin of this comet. The observed outgassing pattern indicates that the nucleus of 67P contains crystalline ice, clathrates, and other ices. The observed outgassing is not consistent with gas release from an amorphous ice phase with trapped volatile gases. If the building blocks of 67P were formed from crystalline ices and clathrates, then 67P would have agglomerated from ices that were condensed and altered in the protosolar nebula closer to the Sun instead of more pristine ices originating from the interstellar medium or the outskirts of the disc, where amorphous ice may dominate. PMID:27152351

  18. Characterization of the apoptotic response induced by the cyanine dye D112: a potentially selective anti-cancer compound.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ning; Gilman, Paul; Mirzayans, Razmik; Sun, Xuejun; Touret, Nicolas; Weinfeld, Michael; Goping, Ing Swie

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic drugs that are used in anti-cancer treatments often cause the death of both cancerous and noncancerous cells. This non-selective toxicity is the root cause of untoward side effects that limits the effectiveness of therapy. In order to improve chemotherapeutic options for cancer patients, there is a need to identify novel compounds with higher discrimination for cancer cells. In the past, methine dyes that increase the sensitivity of photographic emulsions have been investigated for anti-cancer properties. In the 1970's, Kodak Laboratories initiated a screen of approximately 7000 dye structural variants for selective toxicity. Among these, D112 was identified as a promising compound with elevated toxicity against a colon cancer cell line in comparison to a non-transformed cell line. Despite these results changing industry priorities led to a halt in further studies on D112. We decided to revive investigations on D112 and have further characterized D112-induced cellular toxicity. We identified that in response to D112 treatment, the T-cell leukemia cell line Jurkat showed caspase activation, mitochondrial depolarization, and phosphatidylserine externalization, all of which are hallmarks of apoptosis. Chemical inhibition of caspase enzymatic activity and blockade of the mitochondrial pathway through Bcl-2 expression inhibited D112-induced apoptosis. At lower concentrations, D112 induced growth arrest. To gain insight into the molecular mechanism of D112 induced mitochondrial dysfunction, we analyzed the intracellular localization of D112, and found that D112 associated with mitochondria. Interestingly, in the cell lines that we tested, D112 showed increased toxicity toward transformed versus non-transformed cells. Results from this work identify D112 as a potentially interesting molecule warranting further investigation. PMID:25927702

  19. (-)-Rhazinilam and the diphenylpyridazinone NSC 613241: Two compounds inducing the formation of morphologically similar tubulin spirals but binding apparently to two distinct sites on tubulin.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ruoli; Hamel, Ernest

    2016-08-15

    The most potent microtubule assembly inhibitor of newer diphenylpyridazinone derivatives examined was NSC 613241. Because NSC 613241 and (-)-rhazinilam also induce the formation of similar 2-filament spirals, these aberrant reactions were compared. Spiral formation with both compounds was enhanced by GTP and inhibited by GDP and by 15 other inhibitors of microtubule assembly. Similarly, microtubule assembly induced by paclitaxel or laulimalide is enhanced by GTP and inhibited by GDP and assembly inhibitors, but neither [(3)H]NSC 613241 nor [(3)H](-)-rhazinilam bound to microtubules or inhibited the binding of [(3)H]paclitaxel or [(3)H]peloruside A to microtubules. Differences in the pitch of aberrant polymers were found: NSC 613241-induced and (-)-rhazinilam-induced spirals had average repeats of 85 and 79-80 nm, respectively. We found no binding of [(3)H]NSC 613241 or [(3)H](-)-rhazinilam to αβ-tubulin dimer, but both compounds were incorporated into the polymers they induced in substoichiometric reactions, with as little as 0.1-0.2 mol compound/mol of tubulin, and no cross-inhibition by NSC 613241 or (-)-rhazinilam into spirals occurred. Under reaction conditions where neither compound induced spiral formation, both compounds together synergistically induced substantial spiral formation. We conclude that (-)-rhazinilam and NSC 613241 bind to different sites on tubulin that differ from binding sites for other antitubulin agents. PMID:27311615

  20. Impurity induced antiferromagnetic order in Haldane gap compound SrNi2-xMgxV2O8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahari, B.; Ghoshray, K.; Ghoshray, A.; Samanta, T.; Das, I.

    2007-05-01

    The effect of nonmagnetic Mg doping in SrNi2V2O8, a Haldane gap system with a disordered ground state, was investigated using DC magnetic susceptibility and heat capacity measurements in polycrystalline samples of SrNi2-xMgxV2O8 with x=0.03, 0.05, 0.07, 0.1 and 0.14. The results clearly reveal that the substitution of Ni(S=1) ion by Mg(S=0) ion induces a magnetic phase transition with the ordering temperatures lying in the range 3.4-4.3 K, for the samples with lowest and highest value of x. The intrachain exchange constant (J/kB) and the Haldane gap (Δ) for all the compounds were estimated to be ∼98±2 and 25 K, respectively, which are close to that of the undoped compound. The magnetization data further suggest that the compounds exhibit metamagnetic behavior below TN, supporting a picture of antiferromagnet with significant magnetic anisotropy and competing intrachain and interchain interactions.

  1. The antioxidant compound tert-butylhydroquinone activates Akt in myocardium, suppresses apoptosis and ameliorates pressure overload-induced cardiac dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongtao; Fang Liu, Fang; Bi, Xiaolei; Wang, Shuangxi; Wu, Xiao; Jiang, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Tert-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ) is an antioxidant compound which shows multiple cytoprotective actions. We evaluated the effects of TBHQ on pathological cardiac remodeling and dysfunction induced by chronic overload. Pressure overload was created by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) in male C57BL/6 mice. TBHQ was incorporated in the diet and administered for 4 weeks. TBHQ treatment prevented left ventricular dilatation and cardiac dysfunction induced by TAC, and decreased the prevalence of myocardial apoptosis. The beneficial effects of TBHQ were associated with an increase in Akt activation, but not related to activations of Nrf2 or AMP-activated protein kinase. TBHQ-induced Akt activation was accompanied by increased phosphorylation of Bad, glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Mechanistically, we showed that in cultured H9c2 cells and primary cardiac myocytes, TBHQ stimulated Akt phosphorylation and suppressed oxidant-induced apoptosis; this effect was abolished by wortmannin or an Akt inhibitor. Blockade of the Akt pathway in vivo accelerated cardiac dysfunction, and abrogated the protective effects of TBHQ. TBHQ also reduced the reactive aldehyde production and protein carbonylation in stressed myocardium. We suggest that TBHQ treatment may represent a novel strategy for timely activation of the cytoprotective Akt pathway in stressed myocardium. PMID:26260024

  2. Standoff Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds In Air Using Laser Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Jerry; Alexander, Alonzo; Wiggins, Delonia; Williams, Sydney; Akpovo, Charlemagne; Mezonlin, Ephrem; Johnson, Joseph, III; CenterPlasma Science; Technology (CePaST) Team

    2011-10-01

    The use of laser-induced fluorescence has proven to be an excellent method of detecting important intermediates in turbulent systems. However, Acetylene detection in air at ambient temperatures has proven more challenging. Molecular spectra were collected in laser induced acetylene plasmas using a 250 mJ Nd:YAG laser and an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to achieve the 260 nm wavelength and greater than 3 mJ energy necessary to excite acetylene molecules. The acetylene laser-induced fluorescence excitation was observed at the 228 nm wavelength. Using various concentration ratios, acetylene was mixed with air to specifically determine the capabilities of standoff acetylene detection at atmospheric pressure. These results will lead to further research and development of turbulence based battlefield ready detection devices. Research supported in part by NSF grants to FAMU.

  3. Analysis of the vibrational bandwidths of alkane-urea clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Kurt A.; Snyder, Robert G.; Strauss, Herbert L.

    1989-11-01

    The only large amplitude motion possible for an n-alkane molecule in urea-inclusion compounds is libration-torsion about the long axis of the chain. We present a quantitative model that incorporates the effect of this motion on the widths of the alkane vibrational bands. This model explains the difference in the widths of the different vibrations of the alkanes and their temperature dependence. Two effects are combined: (1) a modulation of the angles between the components of the polarizability in the space and the molecule-fixed frames for Raman spectra or between the components of the dipole moment for the infrared spectra, and (2) a modulation of the frequency of the alkane vibration via anharmonic coupling terms with the libration-torsion. The first effect gives rise to a distinctly non-Lorentzian band shape, which is convoluted with the approximately Lorentzian band of the second effect to produce the final result. The libration-torsional motion is modeled as that of a Brownian harmonic oscillator. Most of the parameters that enter the calculation are obtained from data other than that involving the bandwidths themselves. The libration-torsion relaxation time of about 1 ps obtained from fitting the observed bandwidths agrees with the value obtained from recent quasielastic neutron scattering experiments. Other bandwidth mechanisms that have been proposed are evaluated and it is shown that site hopping is too slow to account for the observations.

  4. Superconductive sodalite-like clathrate calcium hydride at high pressures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Tse, John S.; Tanaka, Kaori; Iitaka, Toshiaki; Ma, Yanming

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen-rich compounds hold promise as high-temperature superconductors under high pressures. Recent theoretical hydride structures on achieving high-pressure superconductivity are composed mainly of H2 fragments. Through a systematic investigation of Ca hydrides with different hydrogen contents using particle-swam optimization structural search, we show that in the stoichiometry CaH6 a body-centered cubic structure with hydrogen that forms unusual “sodalite” cages containing enclathrated Ca stabilizes above pressure 150 GPa. The stability of this structure is derived from the acceptance by two H2 of electrons donated by Ca forming an “H4” unit as the building block in the construction of the three-dimensional sodalite cage. This unique structure has a partial occupation of the degenerated orbitals at the zone center. The resultant dynamic Jahn–Teller effect helps to enhance electron–phonon coupling and leads to superconductivity of CaH6. A superconducting critical temperature (Tc) of 220–235 K at 150 GPa obtained from the solution of the Eliashberg equations is the highest among all hydrides studied thus far. PMID:22492976

  5. Novel Piperazine-based Compounds Inhibit Microtubule Dynamics and Sensitize Colon Cancer Cells to Tumor Necrosis Factor-induced Apoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Avijeet; Anderson, Amy; Giardina, Charles

    2014-01-01

    We recently identified a series of mitotically acting piperazine-based compounds that potently increase the sensitivity of colon cancer cells to apoptotic ligands. Here we describe a structure-activity relationship study on this compound class and identify a highly active derivative ((4-(3-chlorophenyl)piperazin-1-yl)(2-ethoxyphenyl)methanone), referred to as AK301, the activity of which is governed by the positioning of functional groups on the phenyl and benzoyl rings. AK301 induced mitotic arrest in HT29 human colon cancer cells with an ED50 of ≈115 nm. Although AK301 inhibited growth of normal lung fibroblast cells, mitotic arrest was more pronounced in the colon cancer cells (50% versus 10%). Cells arrested by AK301 showed the formation of multiple microtubule organizing centers with Aurora kinase A and γ-tubulin. Employing in vitro and in vivo assays, tubulin polymerization was found to be slowed (but not abolished) by AK301. In silico molecular docking suggests that AK301 binds to the colchicine-binding domain on β-tubulin, but in a novel orientation. Cells arrested by AK301 expressed elevated levels of TNFR1 on their surface and more readily activated caspases-8, -9, and -3 in the presence of TNF. Relative to other microtubule destabilizers, AK301 was the most active TNF-sensitizing agent and also stimulated Fas- and TRAIL-induced apoptosis. In summary, we report a new class of mitosis-targeting agents that effectively sensitizes cancer cells to apoptotic ligands. These compounds should help illuminate the role of microtubules in regulating apoptotic ligand sensitivity and may ultimately be useful for developing agents that augment the anti-cancer activities of the immune response. PMID:24338023

  6. Effect of flavonoid compounds extracted from Iris species in prevention of carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y L; Lv, H Y; Zhang, Q

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of flavonoid compounds extracted from species of genus Iris L. on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced rat liver fibrosis. Thirty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into normal control group, liver fibrosis model group, and drug treatment group (N = 10 each). Next, 0.2 mL/100 g CCl4 was subcutaneously injected for 6 weeks in both model and treatment rats to generate the liver fibrosis model. In the control group, an equal volume of castor oil was injected subcutaneously. Rats in the treatment group also received 100 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) flavonoid compounds via gastric tubes. After 6 weeks, rats were sacrificed, and their liver tissues were examined for pathological changes, including alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, total bilirubin, hyaluronic acid, laminin, and procollagen type-3. Liver tissues from control rats showed no significant pathological changes, while model animals showed significant liver fibrosis. In the treatment group, liver fibrosis significantly decreased compared to the model group (P < 0.05). Liver fibrotic indices, including hyaluronic acid, laminin, and procollagen type-3, in treatment rats were all significantly lower than those in the model group (P < 0.05), but not significantly different compared to the normal group (P > 0.05). Other liver function indices, including alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and total bilirubin, in treatment rats were also significantly lower than those in model rats (P < 0.01) but higher than those in control animals (P < 0.05). Flavonoid compounds extracted from Iris plants showed significant inhibitory effects on CCl4-induced rat liver fibrosis. PMID:26400326

  7. Wild Bitter Melon Leaf Extract Inhibits Porphyromonas gingivalis-Induced Inflammation: Identification of Active Compounds through Bioassay-Guided Isolation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tzung-Hsun; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Ying, How-Ting; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Shen, Chien-Chang; Lin, Yin-Ku; Tsai, Po-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis has been identified as one of the major periodontal pathogens. Activity-directed fractionation and purification processes were employed to identify the anti-inflammatory active compounds using heat-killed P. gingivalis-stimulated human monocytic THP-1 cells in vitro. Five major fractions were collected from the ethanol/ethyl acetate extract of wild bitter melon (Momordica charantia Linn. var. abbreviata Ser.) leaves and evaluated for their anti-inflammatory activity against P. gingivalis. Among the test fractions, Fraction 5 effectively decreased heat-killed P. gingivalis-induced interleukin (IL)-8 and was subjected to separation and purification by using chromatographic techniques. Two cucurbitane triterpenoids were isolated from the active fraction and identified as 5β,19-epoxycucurbita-6,23-diene-3β,19,25-triol (1) and 3β,7β,25-trihydroxycucurbita-5,23-dien-19-al (2) by comparing spectral data. Treatments of both compounds in vitro potently suppressed P. gingivalis-induced IL-8, IL-6, and IL-1β levels and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in THP-1 cells. Both compounds effectively inhibited the mRNA levels of IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in P. gingivalis-stimulated gingival tissue of mice. These findings imply that 5β,19-epoxycucurbita-6,23-diene-3β,19,25-triol and 3β,7β,25-trihydroxycucurbita-5,23-dien-19-al could be used for the development of novel therapeutic approaches against P. gingivalis infections. PMID:27058519

  8. Large drought-induced variations in oak leaf volatile organic compound emissions during PINOT NOIR 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Geron, Chris; Gu, Lianhong; Daly, Ryan; Harley, Peter; Rasmussen, Rei; Seco, Roger; Guenther, Alex; Karl, Thomas

    2015-12-17

    Here, leaf-level isoprene and monoterpene emissions were collected and analyzed from five of the most abundant oak (Quercus) species in Central Missouri's Ozarks Region in 2012 during PINOT NOIR (Particle Investigations at a Northern Ozarks Tower – NOx, Oxidants, Isoprene Research). June measurements, prior to the onset of severe drought, showed isoprene emission rates and leaf temperature responses similar to those previously reported in the literature and used in Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) emission models. During the peak of the drought in August, isoprene emission rates were substantially reduced, and response to temperature was dramatically altered, especially for the species in the red oak subgenus (Erythrobalanus).

  9. Intercalation-induced phases in layer compounds of the A /SUP III/ B /SUP VI/ -type

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalyuk, Z.D.; Pyrlya, M.N.; Seredyuk, A.I.; Tovstyuk, K.D.

    1986-03-01

    The authors investigate the kinetics of combined electrochemical intercalation and the physicochemical properties of the introduced phases. InSe and GaSe single crystals were used in the experiments; the crystals were grown by the Bridgman method. The authors determined the concentration dependences of the electrode potentials and electrical conductivity of the compounds InSe and GaSe intercalated with lithium and lead. The results of the measurements are presented. Lithium and lead enter into the matrix of the crystals in a nonconducting state.

  10. Disorder-induced structural transitions in topological insulating Ge-Sb-Te compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeongwoo; Jhi, Seung-Hoon

    2015-05-01

    The mechanism for the fast switching between amorphous, metastable, and crystalline structures in chalcogenide phase-change materials has been a long-standing puzzle. Based on first-principles calculations, we study the atomic and electronic properties of metastable Ge2Sb2Te5 and investigate the atomic disorder to understand the transition between crystalline hexagonal and cubic structures. In addition, we study the topological insulating property embedded in these compounds and its evolution upon structural changes and atomic disorder. We also discuss the role of the surface-like states arising from the topological insulating property in the metal-insulator transition observed in the hexagonal structure.

  11. An Evaluation of Sensor Performance for Harmful Compounds by Using Photo-Induced Electron Transfer from Photosynthetic Membranes to Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kasuno, Megumi; Kimura, Hiroki; Yasutomo, Hisataka; Torimura, Masaki; Murakami, Daisuke; Tsukatani, Yusuke; Hanada, Satoshi; Matsushita, Takayuki; Tao, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Rapid, simple, and low-cost screening procedures are necessary for the detection of harmful compounds in the effluent that flows out of point sources such as industrial outfall. The present study investigated the effects on a novel sensor of harmful compounds such as KCN, phenol, and herbicides such as 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), 2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine (atrazine), and 2-N-tert-butyl-4-N-ethyl-6-methylsulfanyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (terbutryn). The sensor employed an electrode system that incorporated the photocurrent of intra-cytoplasmic membranes (so-called chromatophores) prepared from photosynthetic bacteria and linked using carbon paste electrodes. The amperometric curve (photocurrent-time curve) of photo-induced electron transfer from chromatophores of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides to the electrode via an exogenous electron acceptor was composed of two characteristic phases: an abrupt increase in current immediately after illumination (I₀), and constant current over time (Ic). Compared with other redox compounds, 2,5-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone (DCBQ) was the most useful exogenous electron acceptor in this system. Photo-reduction of DCBQ exhibited Michaelis-Menten-like kinetics, and reduction rates were dependent on the amount of DCBQ and the photon flux intensity. The Ic decreased in the presence of KCN at concentrations over 0.05 μM (=μmol·dm(-3)). The I₀ decreased following the addition of phenol at concentrations over 20 μM. The Ic was affected by terbutryn at concentrations over 10 μM. In contrast, DCMU and atrazine had no effect on either I₀ or Ic. The utility of this electrode system for the detection of harmful compounds is discussed. PMID:27023553

  12. An Evaluation of Sensor Performance for Harmful Compounds by Using Photo-Induced Electron Transfer from Photosynthetic Membranes to Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Kasuno, Megumi; Kimura, Hiroki; Yasutomo, Hisataka; Torimura, Masaki; Murakami, Daisuke; Tsukatani, Yusuke; Hanada, Satoshi; Matsushita, Takayuki; Tao, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Rapid, simple, and low-cost screening procedures are necessary for the detection of harmful compounds in the effluent that flows out of point sources such as industrial outfall. The present study investigated the effects on a novel sensor of harmful compounds such as KCN, phenol, and herbicides such as 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), 2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine (atrazine), and 2-N-tert-butyl-4-N-ethyl-6-methylsulfanyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (terbutryn). The sensor employed an electrode system that incorporated the photocurrent of intra-cytoplasmic membranes (so-called chromatophores) prepared from photosynthetic bacteria and linked using carbon paste electrodes. The amperometric curve (photocurrent-time curve) of photo-induced electron transfer from chromatophores of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides to the electrode via an exogenous electron acceptor was composed of two characteristic phases: an abrupt increase in current immediately after illumination (I0), and constant current over time (Ic). Compared with other redox compounds, 2,5-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone (DCBQ) was the most useful exogenous electron acceptor in this system. Photo-reduction of DCBQ exhibited Michaelis-Menten-like kinetics, and reduction rates were dependent on the amount of DCBQ and the photon flux intensity. The Ic decreased in the presence of KCN at concentrations over 0.05 μM (=μmol·dm−3). The I0 decreased following the addition of phenol at concentrations over 20 μM. The Ic was affected by terbutryn at concentrations over 10 μM. In contrast, DCMU and atrazine had no effect on either I0 or Ic. The utility of this electrode system for the detection of harmful compounds is discussed. PMID:27023553

  13. Vitamin C Compound Mixtures Prevent Ozone-Induced Oxidative Damage in Human Keratinocytes as Initial Assessment of Pollution Protection

    PubMed Central

    Valacchi, Giuseppe; Sticozzi, Claudia; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Cervellati, Franco; Demaude, Julien; Chen, Nannan; Krol, Yevgeniy; Oresajo, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction One of the main functions of cutaneous tissues is to protect our body from the outdoor insults. Ozone (O3) is among the most toxic stressors to which we are continuously exposed and because of its critical location, the skin is one of the most susceptible tissues to the oxidative damaging effect of O3. O3 is not able to penetrate the skin, and although it is not a radical per se, the damage is mainly a consequence of its ability to induce oxidative stress via the formation of lipid peroxidation products. Aim of Study In this study we investigated the protective effect of defined “antioxidant” mixtures against O3 induced oxidative stress damage in human keratinocytes and understand their underlying mechanism of action. Results Results showed that the mixtures tested were able to protect human keratinocytes from O3-induced cytotoxicity, inhibition of cellular proliferation, decrease the formation of HNE protein adducts, ROS, and carbonyls levels. Furthermore, we have observed the decreased activation of the redox sensitive transcription factor NF-kB, which is involved in transcribing pro-inflammatory cytokines and therefore constitutes one of the main players associated with O3 induced skin inflammation. Cells exposed to O3 demonstrated a dose dependent increase in p65 subunit nuclear expression as a marker of NF-kB activation, while pre-treatment with the mixtures abolished NF-kB nuclear translocation. In addition, a significant activation of Nrf2 in keratinocytes treated with the mixtures was also observed. Conclusion Overall this study was able to demonstrate a protective effect of the tested compounds versus O3-induced cell damage in human keratinocytes. Pre-treatment with the tested compounds significantly reduced the oxidative damage induced by O3 exposure and this protective effect was correlated to the abolishment of NF-kB nuclear translocation, as well as activation of Nrf2 nuclear translocation activating the downstream defence enzymes

  14. Bioassay-Guided Isolation of Neuroprotective Compounds from Uncaria rhynchophylla against Beta-Amyloid-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Xian, Yan-Fang; Lin, Zhi-Xiu; Mao, Qing-Qiu; Hu, Zhen; Zhao, Ming; Che, Chun-Tao; Ip, Siu-Po

    2012-01-01

    Uncaria rhynchophylla is a component herb of many Chinese herbal formulae for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Previous study in our laboratory has demonstrated that an ethanol extract of Uncaria rhynchophylla ameliorated cognitive deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease induced by D-galactose. However, the active ingredients of Uncaria rhynchophylla responsible for the anti-Alzheimer's disease activity have not been identified. This study aims to identify the active ingredients of Uncaria rhynchophylla by a bioassay-guided fractionation approach and explore the acting mechanism of these active ingredients by using a well-established cellular model of Alzheimer's disease, beta-amyloid- (Aβ-) induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells. The results showed that six alkaloids, namely, corynoxine, corynoxine B, corynoxeine, isorhynchophylline, isocorynoxeine, and rhynchophylline were isolated from the extract of Uncaria rhynchophylla. Among them, rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline significantly decreased Aβ-induced cell death, intracellular calcium overloading, and tau protein hyperphosphorylation in PC12 cells. These results suggest that rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline are the major active ingredients responsible for the protective action of Uncaria rhynchophylla against Aβ-induced neuronal toxicity, and their neuroprotective effect may be mediated, at least in part, by inhibiting intracellular calcium overloading and tau protein hyperphosphorylation. PMID:22778778

  15. Magnetic Precursor of the Pressure-Induced Superconductivity in Fe-Ladder Compounds.

    PubMed

    Chi, Songxue; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Cao, Huibo; Hirata, Yasuyuki; Hashizume, Kazuki; Aoyama, Takuya; Ohgushi, Kenya

    2016-07-22

    The pressure effects on the antiferromagentic orders in iron-based ladder compounds CsFe_{2}Se_{3} and BaFe_{2}S_{3} have been studied using neutron diffraction. With identical crystal structure and similar magnetic structures, the two compounds exhibit highly contrasting magnetic behaviors under moderate external pressures. In CsFe_{2}Se_{3} the ladders are brought much closer to each other by pressure, but the stripe-type magnetic order shows no observable change. In contrast, the stripe order in BaFe_{2}S_{3} undergoes a quantum phase transition where an abrupt increase of Néel temperature by more than 50% occurs at about 1 GPa, accompanied by a jump in the ordered moment. With its spin structure unchanged, BaFe_{2}S_{3} enters an enhanced magnetic phase that bears the characteristics of an orbital selective Mott phase, which is the true neighbor of superconductivity emerging at higher pressures. PMID:27494496

  16. Flavonoid-induced conversion of catalase to its inactive form--Compound II.

    PubMed

    Krych, J; Gebicki, J L; Gebicka, L

    2014-11-01

    Flavonoids (FlaOHs), plant polyphenols, are ubiquitous components of human diet and are known as antioxidants. However, their prooxidant activity has also been reported. We have recently found that FlaOHs inhibit catalase, the heme enzyme which catalyzes the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) into water and molecular oxygen. The catalytic cycle proceeds with the formation of the intermediate, Compound I (Cpd I), an oxoferryl porphyrin π-cation radical, the two-electron oxidation product of a heme group. Under conditions of low H2O2 fluxes and in the presence of an appropriate substrate, Cpd I can undergo one-electron reduction to inactive Compound II (Cpd II), oxoferryl derivative without radical site. Here we show that in vitro, under low fluxes of H2O2, FlaOHs reduce Cpd I to inactive Cpd II. Measurable amounts of Cpd II can be formed even in the presence of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) at concentration comparable with the investigated FlaOHs. Possible mechanisms of electron transfer from FlaOH molecule to the heme are discussed. PMID:25111015

  17. Induced production of brominated aromatic compounds in the alga Ceramium tenuicorne.

    PubMed

    Dahlgren, Elin; Enhus, Carolina; Lindqvist, Dennis; Eklund, Britta; Asplund, Lillemor

    2015-11-01

    In the Baltic Sea, high concentrations of toxic brominated aromatic compounds have been detected in all compartments of the marine food web. A growing body of evidence points towards filamentous algae as a natural producer of these chemicals. However, little is known about the effects of environmental factors and life history on algal production of brominated compounds. In this study, several congeners of methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (MeO-PBDEs), hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs) and brominated phenols (BPs) were identified in a naturally growing filamentous red algal species (Ceramium tenuicorne) in the Baltic Sea. The identified substances displayed large seasonal variations in the alga with a concentration peak in July. Production of MeO-/OH-PBDEs and BPs by C. tenuicorne was also established in isolated clonal material grown in a controlled laboratory setting. Based on three replicates, herbivory, as well as elevated levels of light and salinity in the culture medium, significantly increased the production of 2,4,6-tribromophenol (2,4,6-TBP). Investigation of differences in production between the isomorphic female, male and diploid clonal life stages of the alga grown in the laboratory revealed a significantly higher production of 2,4,6-TBP in the brackish water female gametophytes, compared to the corresponding marine gametophytes. Even higher concentrations of 2,4,6-TBP were produced by marine male gametophytes and sporophytes. PMID:26178826

  18. Vascular relaxation induced by Eucommiae Ulmoides Oliv. and its compounds Oroxylin A and wogonin: implications on their cytoprotection action

    PubMed Central

    Akinyi, Mary; Gao, Xiu Mei; Li, Yu Hong; Wang, Bing Yao; Liu, Er Wei; Chai, Li Juan; JawoBah, Abdulai; Fan, Guan Wei

    2014-01-01

    The vascular relaxation action of Eucommiae Ulmoides Oliv. also known as Duzhong has been seen on arteries of the heart such as the aorta and the coronary artery which are elastic in nature. Duzhong is historically an active ingredient commonly used in hypertensive herbal prescriptions in China. This work investigated the vasodilating effect of Duzhong and its compounds (wogonin 10 μM and oroxylin-A) in the isolated intact rat heart, perfused retrograde according the method of Langendorff and the cytoprotective effect in EA.hy926 cell lines Coronary perfusion pressure was monitored with a pressure transducer connected to a side-arm of the aortic perfusion cannula. Duzhong induced vasorelaxation in a dose dependent manner, on precontracting the vessels with endothelin-1, Duzhong 10 mg/ml, wogonin 10 μM and oroxylin-A 10 μM could significantly lower the perfusion pressure in reference to positive control SNP, Duzhong induced vasodilation was not inhibited by L-NAME (nitric oxide inhibitor), but was significantly inhibited by Tetraethyl ammonium (TEA, a K+ channel blocker and almost abolished by potassium chloride. The underlying mechanism was carried out in EA.hy926 cell lines. When these cells were treated with H2O2, there was higher expression of NOX-4, TNF-α and COX-2 mRNA. However, wogonin treatment attenuated the mRNA of NOX-4, TNF-α and COX-2. Wogonin also upregulated the mRNA expression of CAT, SOD-1 and GSR in oxidative stress induced by H2O2 EA.hy926 cells. Duzhong and compounds can exert an in vitro relaxation effect of the coronary artery and improve the heart function in Langendorff apparatus. This action appears to be endothelium dependent but not NO mediated. Cell culture findings indicated that wogonin can exert vascular and cellular protection by scavenging Reactive Oxygen Species. PMID:25419347

  19. Interstitial doping induced superconductivity at 15.3 K in Nb5Ge3 compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolozo, A. D.; dos Santos, C. A. M.; Jardim, R. F.; Ritter, C.; Devishvili, A.; Rotter, M.; Gandra, F. G.; Machado, A. J. S.

    2012-06-01

    It is reported superconductivity in Nb5Ge3C0.3, an interstitial carbide compound. The temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity, ac-susceptibility, and heat capacity (HC) indicate that a bulk type-II superconductivity appears at TC = 15.3 K. Magneto-resistance measurements suggest an upper critical field of BC2 ˜ 10.6 T and a coherence length of ξ ˜ 55 Å at zero temperature. Neutron diffraction analyzes locate the carbon atoms at the interstitial 2b site of the Mn5Si3 type-structure. Heat capacity data below TC are well described by BCS theory. The size of the jump at TC is in good agreement with the superconducting volume fraction observed in susceptibility measurements. A Debye temperature and Sommerfeld constant were also extracted from heat capacity data as 343 K and 34 mJ/mol K2, respectively.

  20. Large drought-induced variations in oak leaf volatile organic compound emissions during PINOT NOIR 2012

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Geron, Chris; Gu, Lianhong; Daly, Ryan; Harley, Peter; Rasmussen, Rei; Seco, Roger; Guenther, Alex; Karl, Thomas

    2015-12-17

    Here, leaf-level isoprene and monoterpene emissions were collected and analyzed from five of the most abundant oak (Quercus) species in Central Missouri's Ozarks Region in 2012 during PINOT NOIR (Particle Investigations at a Northern Ozarks Tower – NOx, Oxidants, Isoprene Research). June measurements, prior to the onset of severe drought, showed isoprene emission rates and leaf temperature responses similar to those previously reported in the literature and used in Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) emission models. During the peak of the drought in August, isoprene emission rates were substantially reduced, and response to temperature was dramatically altered, especially for themore » species in the red oak subgenus (Erythrobalanus).« less

  1. Disorder-induced structural transitions in topological insulating Ge-Sb-Te compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeongwoo; Jhi, Seung-Hoon

    2015-05-21

    The mechanism for the fast switching between amorphous, metastable, and crystalline structures in chalcogenide phase-change materials has been a long-standing puzzle. Based on first-principles calculations, we study the atomic and electronic properties of metastable Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} and investigate the atomic disorder to understand the transition between crystalline hexagonal and cubic structures. In addition, we study the topological insulating property embedded in these compounds and its evolution upon structural changes and atomic disorder. We also discuss the role of the surface-like states arising from the topological insulating property in the metal-insulator transition observed in the hexagonal structure.

  2. Strain induced topological phase transitions in monolayer honeycomb structures of group-V binary compounds

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Yaozhuang; Rahman, Mavlanjan; Wang, Daowei; Wang, Can; Guo, Guanghua

    2015-01-01

    We present first-principles calculations of electronic structures of a class of two-dimensional (2D) honeycomb structures of group-V binary compounds. Our results show these new 2D materials are stable semiconductors with direct or indirect band gaps. The band gap can be tuned by applying lattice strain. During their stretchable regime, they all exhibit metal-indirect gap semiconductor-direct gap semiconductor-topological insulator (TI) transitions with increasing strain from negative (compressive) to positive (tensile) values. The topological phase transition results from the band inversion at the Γ point which is due to the evolution of bonding and anti-bonding states under lattice strain. PMID:26656257

  3. Pressure-induced electronic phase transition in compound EuCu2Ge2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geondzhian, A. Y.; Yaroslavtsev, A. A.; Alekseev, P. A.; Chernikov, R. V.; Gaynanov, B. R.; Baudelet, F.; Nataf, L.; Menushenkov, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    We report the high-pressure XANES study of the electronic phase transition from 4f7 to 4f 6 configuration of europium in the rare-earth compound EuCu2Ge2. The hydrostatic pressure dependence of the europium valence was obtained in a wide pressure range (1-30 GPa) at room temperature. It was found that upon the pressure increase above 20 GPa the europium valence does not reach the integer value +3 but stabilizes at 2.87. The experimental results were supported by the band structure calculations in the framework of DFT, which allowed us to discuss the features of 3d-4f hybridization in this system. The study also compares the mechanisms of external and “chemical” pressure by the Si substitution in Ge site in series EuCu2(SixGe1-x)2.

  4. Triptolide, an active compound identified in a traditional Chinese herb, induces apoptosis of rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kusunoki, Natsuko; Yamazaki, Ryuta; Kitasato, Hidero; Beppu, Moroe; Aoki, Haruhito; Kawai, Shinichi

    2004-01-01

    Background Extracts of Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F (TWHF), a traditional Chinese herb, have been reported to show efficacy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Since RA is not only characterized by inflammation but also by synovial proliferation in the joints, we examined whether triptolide (a constituent of TWHF) could influence the proliferation of rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts (RSF) by induction of apoptosis. Results RSF were obtained from RA patients during surgery and were treated with triptolide under various conditions. The viability and proliferation of RSF were measured by the 4-[3-(4-iodophenyl)-2-(4-nitrophenyl)-2H-5-tetrazolio]-1,3-benzene disulfonate (WST-1) assay and by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation, respectively. Apoptosis was identified by detection of DNA fragmentation using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL). The role of caspases in apoptosis of RSF was analyzed by measuring caspase-3 activity. Activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ was assessed by a luciferase reporter gene assay using RSF transfected with a plasmid containing the peroxisome proliferator response element. Triptolide decreased viability, inhibited proliferation, and induced apoptosis of RSF in a concentration-dependent manner at very low (nM) concentrations. Caspase-3 activity was increased by treatment with triptolide and was suppressed by caspase inhibitors. Although PPARγ activation was induced by 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2, triptolide did not induce it under the same experimental conditions. An extract of TWHF also induced DNA fragmentation in RSF. Conclusion The mechanism of action remains to be studied; however, triptolide may possibly have a disease-modifying effect in patients with RA. PMID:15040811

  5. Active hexose correlated compound modulates LPS-induced hypotension and gut injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Doursout, Marie-Francoise; Liang, Yangyan; Sundaresan, Alamelu; Wakame, Koji; Fujii, Hajime; Takanari, Jun; Devakottai, Sundar; Kulkarni, Anil

    2016-10-01

    We hypothesized that AHCC; (Amino UP Chemical Co., Ltd., Sapporo, Japan), a mushroom mycelium extract obtained from liquid culture of Lentinula edodes, restores immune function in LPS-induced inflammation in the gut, especially when the nitric oxide signaling pathway is impaired. This is the first inter-disciplinary proposal to identify molecular mechanisms involved in LPS-induced immune dysfunction in the gut in conscious animals treated or non-treated with AHCC, a promoter of immune support. Specifically, we have tested the effects of AHCC on LPS-induced deleterious effects on blood pressure and gut injury in conscious rats. The time course of biological markers of innate/acquired immune responses, and inflammation/oxidative stress is fully described in the present manuscript. Rats were randomly assigned into 3 groups (N=6 per group). Group 1 received 10% of AHCC in drinking water for 5days; Group 2 received lipopolysaccharide (LPS; Escherichia coli 0111:B4 purchased from Sigma) only at 20mg/kg IV; Group 3 received combined treatments (AHCC + LPS). LPS was administered at 20mg/kg IV, 5days following AHCC treatment. We have demonstrated that AHCC decreased the LPS-deleterious effects of blood pressure and also decreased inflammatory markers e.g., cytokines, nitric oxide and edema formation. Finally, AHCC diminished lymphocyte infiltration, restoring gut architecture. Because AHCC was administered prior to LPS, our results indicate the potential impact of AHCC's prophylactic effects on LPS inflammation. Consequently, additional experiments are warrant to assess its therapeutic effects in sepsis-induced inflammation. PMID:27500458

  6. Mechanisms of G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in myeloma cells induced by hybrid-compound histone deacetylase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Seiko; Okinaga, Toshinori; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Takahashi, Osamu; Iwanaga, Kenjiro; Nishino, Norikazu; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Nishihara, Tatsuji

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Novel histone deacetylase inhibitor Ky-2, remarkably inhibits myeloma cell growth. •Ky-2 demonstrates no cytotoxicity against normal lymphocytic cells. •Ky-2 induces cell cycle arrest through the cell cycle-associated proteins. •Ky-2 induces Bcl-2-inhibitable apoptosis through a caspase-dependent cascade. -- Abstract: Objectives: Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are new therapeutic agents, used to treat various types of malignant cancers. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Ky-2, a hybrid-compound HDAC inhibitor, on the growth of mouse myeloma cells. Materials and methods: Myeloma cells, HS-72, P3U1, and mouse normal cells were used in this study. Effect of HDAC inhibitors on cell viability was determined by WST-assay and trypan blue assay. Cell cycle was analyzed using flow cytometer. The expression of cell cycle regulatory and the apoptosis associated proteins were examined by Western blot analysis. Hoechst’s staining was used to detect apoptotic cells. Results: Our findings showed that Ky-2 decreased the levels of HDACs, while it enhanced acetylation of histone H3. Myeloma cell proliferation was inhibited by Ky-2 treatment. Interestingly, Ky-2 had no cytotoxic effects on mouse normal cells. Ky-2 treatment induced G1-phase cell cycle arrest and accumulation of a sub-G1 phase population, while Western blotting analysis revealed that expressions of the cell cycle-associated proteins were up-regulated. Also, Ky-2 enhanced the cleavage of caspase-9 and -3 in myeloma cells, followed by DNA fragmentation. In addition, Ky-2 was not found to induce apoptosis in bcl-2 overexpressing myeloma cells. Conclusion: These findings suggest that Ky-2 induces apoptosis via a caspase-dependent cascade and Bcl-2-inhibitable mechanism in myeloma cells.

  7. A genetically-based latitudinal cline in the emission of herbivore-induced plant volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Wason, Elizabeth L; Agrawal, Anurag A; Hunter, Mark D

    2013-08-01

    The existence of predictable latitudinal variation in plant defense against herbivores remains controversial. A prevailing view holds that higher levels of plant defense evolve at low latitudes compared to high latitudes as an adaptive plant response to higher herbivore pressure on low-latitude plants. To date, this prediction has not been examined with respect to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that many plants emit, often thus attracting the natural enemies of herbivores. Here, we compared genetically-based constitutive and herbivore-induced aboveground vegetative VOC emissions from plants originating across a gradient of more than 10° of latitude (>1,500 km). We collected headspace VOCs from Asclepias syriaca (common milkweed) originating from 20 populations across its natural range and grown in a common garden near the range center. Feeding by specialist Danaus plexippus (monarch) larvae induced VOCs, and field environmental conditions (temperature, light, and humidity) also influenced emissions. Monarch damage increased plant VOC concentrations and altered VOC blends. We found that genetically-based induced VOC emissions varied with the latitude of plant population origin, although the pattern followed the reverse of that predicted-induced VOC concentration increased with increasing latitude. This pattern appeared to be driven by a greater induction of sesquiterpenoids at higher latitudes. In contrast, constitutive VOC emission did not vary systematically with latitude, and the induction of green leafy volatiles declined with latitude. Our results do not support the prevailing view that plant defense is greater at lower than at higher latitudes. That the pattern holds only for herbivore-induced VOC emission, and not constitutive emission, suggests that latitudinal variation in VOCs is not a simple adaptive response to climatic factors. PMID:23888386

  8. Pressure induced magneto-structural phase transitions in layered RMn2X2 compounds (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Shane; Wang, Jianli; Campbell, Stewart; Hofmann, Michael; Dou, Shixue

    2014-05-01

    We have studied a range of pseudo-ternaries derived from the parent compound PrMn2Ge2, substituting for each constituent element with a smaller one to contract the lattice. This enables us to observe the magneto-elastic transitions that occur as the Mn-Mn nearest neighbour distance is reduced and to assess the role of Pr on the magnetism. Here, we report on the PrMn2Ge2-xSix, Pr1-xYxMn2Ge2, and PrMn2-xFexGe2 systems. The pressure produced by chemical substitution in these pseudo-ternaries is inherently non-uniform, with local pressure variations dependent on the local atomic distribution. We find that concentrated chemical substitution on the R or X site (e.g., in Pr0.5Y0.5Mn2Ge2 and PrMn2Ge0.8Si1.2) can produce a separation into two distinct magnetic phases, canted ferromagnetic and canted antiferromagnetic, with a commensurate phase gap in the crystalline lattice. This phase gap is a consequence of the combination of phase separation and spontaneous magnetostriction, which is positive on transition to the canted ferromagnetic phase and negative on transition to the canted antiferromagnetic phase. Our results show that co-existence of canted ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases depends on chemical pressure from the rare earth and metalloid sites, on local lattice strain distributions and on applied magnetic field. We demonstrate that the effects of chemical pressure bear close resemblance to those of mechanical pressure on the parent compound.

  9. The profile of FR140423, a novel anti-inflammatory compound, in yeast-induced rat hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Ochi, T; Fujii, T; Motoyama, Y; Goto, T

    1999-09-01

    The mechanism of action of FR140423 (3-(difluoromethyl)-1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-[4-(methylsulfinyl)phenyl]pyra zole), a novel anti-inflammatory compound, in a rat yeast-induced hyperalgesic model was investigated and compared with those of indomethacin and morphine. We tested the inhibitory effects of FR140423 on the formation of arachidonic acid metabolites, prostaglandin (PG) E2, thromboxane (TX) B2 and leukotriene (LT) B4, in yeast-injected inflamed paws and the effect of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone on FR140423-induced anti-hyperalgesic effect and inhibition of the formation of arachidonic acid metabolites. Oral administration of FR140423 showed a dose-dependent anti-hyperalgesic effect. This effect was fourfold more potent than that of indomethacin but less potent than that of morphine. Unlike morphine, FR140423 suppressed the levels of PGE2 and TXB2 but not LTB4 in inflamed paws. FR140423 did not inhibit yeast-induced paw edema. The anti-hyperalgesic effect of FR140423 in yeast-injected rat paws was partially blocked by naloxone. However, the inhibitory effects of FR140423 on the formation of PGE2 and TXB2 in yeast-injected rat paws were not antagonized by naloxone. These results suggest that FR140423 shows a potent anti-hyperalgesic effect mediated by inhibition of PGs in inflamed tissue and by activation of opioid receptors. PMID:10580376

  10. Protective Effect of Artemisia asiatica Extract and Its Active Compound Eupatilin against Cisplatin-Induced Renal Damage

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun Yeon; Lee, Dahae; Jang, Hyuk-Jai; Jang, Dae Sik; Kwon, Hak Cheol; Kim, Ki Hyun; Kim, Su-Nam; Hwang, Gwi Seo; Kang, Ki Sung; Eom, Dae-Woon

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the renoprotective effect of an Artemisia asiatica extract and eupatilin in kidney epithelial (LLC-PK1) cells. Although cisplatin is effective against several cancers, its use is limited due to severe nephrotoxicity. Eupatilin is a flavonoid compound isolated from the Artemisia plant and possesses antioxidant as well as potent anticancer properties. In the LLC-PK1 cellular model, the decline in cell viability induced by oxidative stress, such as that induced by cisplatin, was significantly and dose-dependently inhibited by the A. asiatica extract and eupatilin. The increased protein expressions of phosphorylated JNK and p38 by cisplatin in cells were markedly reduced after A. asiatica extract or eupatilin cotreatment. The elevated expression of cleaved caspase-3 was significantly reduced by A. asiatica extract and eupatilin, and the elevated percentage of apoptotic cells after cisplatin treatment in LLC-PK1 cells was markedly decreased by cotreatment with A. asiatica extract or eupatilin. Taken together, these results suggest that A. asiatica extract and eupatilin could cure or prevent cisplatin-induced renal toxicity without any adverse effect; thus, it can be used in combination with cisplatin to prevent nephrotoxicity. PMID:26539226

  11. First Principles Study of the Properties of the Type II Clathrate Alloy Si136-xGex(x = 8, 32, 96)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Dong; Myles, Charles

    The Type-II clathrate materials based on Si, Ge, and Sn have ``open-framework'' lattices consisting of large ``cages'' of atoms covalently bonded together. Due primarily to their potential thermoelectric applications, there has been considerable research on these materials with various guest atoms in the cages and with various substitutional atoms on the lattice framework. Also of interest are the pure Type II clathrates M136 (M = Si, Ge, Sn) with neither framework substitution nor guest atoms in the cages. A fundamental understanding of the intrinsic properties of these ``guest-free'' clathrates is therefore also needed. Mixtures or ``alloys'' of two different Type II clathrate materials are also potentially interesting. For example, Moriguchi et al. have reported the successful synthesis of Type II clathrates with mixtures of Si and Ge on the framework lattice. Motivated by these experiments, we have carried out a computational and theoretical study the properties of the Type II clathrate ``alloy'' Si136-xGex. We report the results of DFT-based first-principles calculations of the structural, electronic, vibrational, and thermal properties of Si136-xGex for x = 8, 32, 96. Our calculations have assumed that the ideal lattice symmetry is unaffected by the mixing of Si and Ge. Among other results, we predict that Si136-xGex should have a direct band gap ranging from 1.2 to 2.0 eV.

  12. Pressure-induced metal-insulator transition in spinel compound CuV 2S 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, H.; Koyama, K.; Hedo, M.; Uwatoko, Y.; Watanabe, K.

    2008-04-01

    In order to investigate the pressure effect on electrical properties of CuV 2S 4, we performed the electrical resistivity measurements under high pressures up to 8 GPa for a high-quality polycrystalline sample. The charge density wave (CDW) transition temperatures increase with increasing pressure. The residual resistivity rapidly increases with increasing pressure over 4 GPa, and the temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity at 8 GPa exhibits a semiconducting behavior below about 150 K, indicating that a pressure-induced metal-insulator transition occurs in CuV 2S 4 at 8 GPa.

  13. Small compound 6-O-angeloylplenolin induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in human multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YING; DONG, YING; ZHANG, BO; CHENG, YONG-XIAN

    2013-01-01

    6-O-angeloylplenolin (6-OAP) is a sesquiterpene lactone agent that has been previously demonstrated to inhibit the growth of multiple myeloma (MM) cells through mitotic arrest with accumulated cyclin B1. In the present study, the levels of apoptosis were analyzed in dexamethasone-sensitive (MM.1S), dexamethasone-resistant (U266) and chemotherapy-sensitive (RPMI 8226) myeloma cell lines. Enhanced apoptosis was identified following a 48-h incubation with 6-OAP (0–10 μM) that induced a dose-dependent decrease in pro-casp-3 and the cleavage of its substrate, anti-poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). In addition, time-dependent cleavage of PARP was also detected in U266 and MM.1S cells. The mechanism of 6-OAP cytotoxicity in all cell lines was associated with the induction of apoptosis with the presence of cleaved caspase-3 and PARP. In conclusion, 6-OAP-induced apoptosis is caspase-dependent. These observations are likely to provide a framework for future studies of 6-OAP therapy in MM. PMID:24137368

  14. Bioactive compounds from crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) white blood cells induced apoptotic cell death in hela cells.

    PubMed

    Patathananone, Supawadee; Thammasirirak, Sompong; Daduang, Jureerut; Chung, Jing Gung; Temsiripong, Yosapong; Daduang, Sakda

    2016-08-01

    Crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) white blood cell extracts (WBCex) were examined for anticancer activity in HeLa cell lines using the MTT assay. The percentage viability of HeLa cells significantly deceased after treatment with WBCex in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The IC50 dose was suggested to be approximately 225 μg/mL protein. Apoptotic cell death occurred in a time-dependent manner based on investigation by flow cytometry using annexin V-FITC and PI staining. DAPI nucleic acid staining indicated increased chromatin condensation. Caspase-3, -8 and -9 activities also increased, suggesting the induction of the caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm ) of HeLa cells was lost as a result of increasing levels of Bax and reduced levels of Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, Bcl-Xs, and XIAP. The decreased ΔΨm led to the release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspase-9 and -3. Apoptosis-inducing factor translocated into the nuclei, and endonuclease G (Endo G) was released from the mitochondria. These results suggest that anticancer agents in WBCex can induce apoptosis in HeLa cells via both caspase-dependent and -independent pathways. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 986-997, 2016. PMID:25691005

  15. A natural compound, methyl angolensate, induces mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis in Daudi cells.

    PubMed

    Chiruvella, Kishore K; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2011-08-01

    Natural products discovered from medicinal plants have played an important role in the treatment of cancer. In an effort to identify novel small molecules which can affect the proliferation of lymphoma cells, we tested methyl angolensate (MA), a plant derived tetranortriterpenoid, purified from the crude extract of the root callus of Soymida febrifuga commonly known as Indian red wood tree. We have tested MA for its cytotoxic properties on Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines, using various cellular assays. We observed that MA induces cytotoxicity in Daudi cells in a dose-dependent manner using trypan blue, MTT and LDH assays. We find that the treatment with MA led to activation of DNA double-strand break repair proteins including KU70 and KU80, suggesting the activation of nonhomologous DNA end joining pathway in surviving cells. Further, we find that methyl angolensate could induce apoptosis by cell cycle analysis, annexin V-FITC staining, DNA fragmentation and PARP cleavage. Besides, MA treatment led to reactive oxygen species generation and loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. These results suggest the activation of mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Hence, we identify MA as a potential chemotherapeutic agent against Daudi cells. PMID:20169399

  16. Giant rotating magnetocaloric effect induced by highly texturing in polycrystalline DyNiSi compound.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hu; Li, YaWei; Liu, Enke; Ke, YaJiao; Jin, JinLing; Long, Yi; Shen, BaoGen

    2015-01-01

    Large rotating magnetocaloric effect (MCE) has been observed in some single crystals due to strong magnetocrystalline anisotropy. By utilizing the rotating MCE, a new type of rotary magnetic refrigerator can be constructed, which could be more simplified and efficient than the conventional one. However, compared with polycrystalline materials, the high cost and complexity of preparation for single crystals hinder the development of this novel magnetic refrigeration technology. For the first time, here we observe giant rotating MCE in textured DyNiSi polycrystalline material, which is larger than those of most rotating magnetic refrigerants reported so far. This result suggests that DyNiSi compound could be attractive candidate of magnetic refrigerants for novel rotary magnetic refrigerator. By considering the influence of demagnetization effect on MCE, the origin of large rotating MCE in textured DyNiSi is attributed to the coexistence of strong magnetocrystalline anisotropy and highly preferred orientation. Our study on textured DyNiSi not only provides a new magnetic refrigerant with large rotating MCE for low temperature magnetic refrigeration, but also opens a new way to exploit magnetic refrigeration materials with large rotating MCE, which will be highly beneficial to the development of rotating magnetic refrigeration technology. PMID:26159558

  17. Utilizing small nutrient compounds as enhancers of exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Daniel M.; Ashcroft, Stephen P.; Belew, Micah Y.; Stocks, Ben; Currell, Kevin; Baar, Keith; Philp, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Endurance exercise, when performed regularly as part of a training program, leads to increases in whole-body and skeletal muscle-specific oxidative capacity. At the cellular level, this adaptive response is manifested by an increased number of oxidative fibers (Type I and IIA myosin heavy chain), an increase in capillarity and an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis. The increase in mitochondrial biogenesis (increased volume and functional capacity) is fundamentally important as it leads to greater rates of oxidative phosphorylation and an improved capacity to utilize fatty acids during sub-maximal exercise. Given the importance of mitochondrial biogenesis for skeletal muscle performance, considerable attention has been given to understanding the molecular cues stimulated by endurance exercise that culminate in this adaptive response. In turn, this research has led to the identification of pharmaceutical compounds and small nutritional bioactive ingredients that appear able to amplify exercise-responsive signaling pathways in skeletal muscle. The aim of this review is to discuss these purported exercise mimetics and bioactive ingredients in the context of mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. We will examine proposed modes of action, discuss evidence of application in skeletal muscle in vivo and finally comment on the feasibility of such approaches to support endurance-training applications in humans. PMID:26578969

  18. A small molecule screen identifies a novel compound that induces a homeotic transformation in Hydra.

    PubMed

    Glauber, Kristine M; Dana, Catherine E; Park, Steve S; Colby, David A; Noro, Yukihiko; Fujisawa, Toshitaka; Chamberlin, A Richard; Steele, Robert E

    2013-12-01

    Developmental processes such as morphogenesis, patterning and differentiation are continuously active in the adult Hydra polyp. We carried out a small molecule screen to identify compounds that affect patterning in Hydra. We identified a novel molecule, DAC-2-25, that causes a homeotic transformation of body column into tentacle zone. This transformation occurs in a progressive and polar fashion, beginning at the oral end of the animal. We have identified several strains that respond to DAC-2-25 and one that does not, and we used chimeras from these strains to identify the ectoderm as the target tissue for DAC-2-25. Using transgenic Hydra that express green fluorescent protein under the control of relevant promoters, we examined how DAC-2-25 affects tentacle patterning. Genes whose expression is associated with the tentacle zone are ectopically expressed upon exposure to DAC-2-25, whereas those associated with body column tissue are turned off as the tentacle zone expands. The expression patterns of the organizer-associated gene HyWnt3 and the hypostome-specific gene HyBra2 are unchanged. Structure-activity relationship studies have identified features of DAC-2-25 that are required for activity and potency. This study shows that small molecule screens in Hydra can be used to dissect patterning processes. PMID:24255098

  19. Protection of Erwinia amylovora bacteriophage Y2 from UV-induced damage by natural compounds

    PubMed Central

    Born, Yannick; Bosshard, Lars; Duffy, Brion; Loessner, Martin J.; Fieseler, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages have regained much attention as biocontrol agents against bacterial pathogens. However, with respect to stability, phages are biomolecules and are therefore sensitive to a number of environmental influences. UV-irradiation can readily inactivate phage infectivity, which impedes their potential application in the plant phyllosphere. Therefore, phages for control of Erwinia amylovora, the causative agent of fire blight, need to be protected from UV-damage by adequate measures. We investigated the protective effect of different light-absorbing substances on phage particles exposed to UV-light. For this, natural extracts from carrot, red pepper, and beetroot, casein and soy peptone in solution, and purified substances such as astaxanthin, aromatic amino acids, and Tween 80 were prepared and tested as natural sunscreens for phage. All compounds were found to significantly increase half-life of UV-irradiated phage particles and they did not negatively affect phage viability or infectivity. Altogether, a range of readily available, natural substances are suitable as UV-protectants to prevent phage particles from UV-light damage. PMID:26904378

  20. A small molecule screen identifies a novel compound that induces a homeotic transformation in Hydra

    PubMed Central

    Glauber, Kristine M.; Dana, Catherine E.; Park, Steve S.; Colby, David A.; Noro, Yukihiko; Fujisawa, Toshitaka; Chamberlin, A. Richard; Steele, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Developmental processes such as morphogenesis, patterning and differentiation are continuously active in the adult Hydra polyp. We carried out a small molecule screen to identify compounds that affect patterning in Hydra. We identified a novel molecule, DAC-2-25, that causes a homeotic transformation of body column into tentacle zone. This transformation occurs in a progressive and polar fashion, beginning at the oral end of the animal. We have identified several strains that respond to DAC-2-25 and one that does not, and we used chimeras from these strains to identify the ectoderm as the target tissue for DAC-2-25. Using transgenic Hydra that express green fluorescent protein under the control of relevant promoters, we examined how DAC-2-25 affects tentacle patterning. Genes whose expression is associated with the tentacle zone are ectopically expressed upon exposure to DAC-2-25, whereas those associated with body column tissue are turned off as the tentacle zone expands. The expression patterns of the organizer-associated gene HyWnt3 and the hypostome-specific gene HyBra2 are unchanged. Structure-activity relationship studies have identified features of DAC-2-25 that are required for activity and potency. This study shows that small molecule screens in Hydra can be used to dissect patterning processes. PMID:24255098

  1. Protective Actions of 17β-Estradiol and Progesterone on Oxidative Neuronal Injury Induced by Organometallic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Takemoto, Takuya; Yamazaki, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Steroid hormones synthesized in and secreted from peripheral endocrine glands pass through the blood-brain barrier and play a role in the central nervous system. In addition, the brain possesses an inherent endocrine system and synthesizes steroid hormones known as neurosteroids. Increasing evidence shows that neuroactive steroids protect the central nervous system from various harmful stimuli. Reports show that the neuroprotective actions of steroid hormones attenuate oxidative stress. In this review, we summarize the antioxidative effects of neuroactive steroids, especially 17β-estradiol and progesterone, on neuronal injury in the central nervous system under various pathological conditions, and then describe our recent findings concerning the neuroprotective actions of 17β-estradiol and progesterone on oxidative neuronal injury induced by organometallic compounds, tributyltin, and methylmercury. PMID:25815107

  2. Mycofumigation by the Volatile Organic Compound-Producing Fungus Muscodor albus Induces Bacterial Cell Death through DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Alpha, Cambria J.; Campos, Manuel; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Muscodor albus belongs to a genus of endophytic fungi that inhibit and kill other fungi, bacteria, and insects through production of a complex mixture of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This process of mycofumigation has found commercial application for control of human and plant pathogens, but the mechanism of the VOC toxicity is unknown. Here, the mode of action of these volatiles was investigated through a series of genetic screens and biochemical assays. A single-gene knockout screen revealed high sensitivity for Escherichia coli lacking enzymes in the pathways of DNA repair, DNA metabolic process, and response to stress when exposed to the VOCs of M. albus. Furthermore, the sensitivity of knockouts involved in the repair of specific DNA alkyl adducts suggests that the VOCs may induce alkylation. Evidence of DNA damage suggests that these adducts lead to breaks during DNA replication or transcription if not properly repaired. Additional cytotoxicity profiling indicated that during VOC exposure, E. coli became filamentous and demonstrated an increase in cellular membrane fluidity. The volatile nature of the toxic compounds produced by M. albus and their broad range of inhibition make this fungus an attractive biological agent. Understanding the antimicrobial effects and the VOC mode of action will inform the utility and safety of potential mycofumigation applications for M. albus. PMID:25452287

  3. High-temperature- and high-pressure-induced formation of the Laves-phase compound XeS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xiaozhen; Chen, Yangmei; Xiang, Shikai; Kuang, Xiaoyu; Bi, Yan; Chen, Haiyan

    2016-06-01

    We explore the reactivity of xenon with sulfur under high pressure, using unbiased structure searching techniques combined with first-principles calculations, which identify a stable XeS2 compound crystallized in a Laves phase with hypercoordinated (16-fold) Xe at 191 GPa and 0 K. Taking the thermal effects into account, we find that increasing the temperature could further stabilize it. The formation of XeS2 is a consequence of pressure-induced charge transfer from Xe to S atoms and the delocalization of Xe 5 p and S 3 p electrons. Meanwhile, the stabilization into a Laves phase of XeS2 is the result of delocalized chemical bonding and the need for optimum structure packing. The present discussion of the formation mechanism in XeS2 is general, and conclusions can be used to understand the formation of other Laves-phase compounds and the Xe chemistry that allows closed-shell Xe to participate in chemical reactions.

  4. 6-shogaol, a major compound in ginger, induces aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated transcriptional activity and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kazutaka; Satsu, Hideo; Mikubo, Ayano; Ogiwara, Haru; Yakabe, Takafumi; Inakuma, Takahiro; Shimizu, Makoto

    2014-06-18

    Xenobiotics are usually detoxified by drug-metabolizing enzymes and excreted from the body. The expression of many of drug-metabolizing enzymes is regulated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). Some substances in vegetables have the potential to be AHR ligands. To search for vegetable components that exhibit AHR-mediated transcriptional activity, we assessed the activity of vegetable extracts and identified the active compounds using the previously established stable AHR-responsive HepG2 cell line. Among the hot water extracts of vegetables, the highest activity was found in ginger. The ethyl acetate fraction of the ginger hot water extract remarkably induced AHR-mediated transcriptional activity, and the major active compound was found to be 6-shogaol. Subsequently, the mRNA levels of AHR-targeting drug-metabolizing enzymes (CYP1A1, UGT1A1, and ABCG 2) and the protein level of CYP1A1 in HepG2 cells were shown to be increased by 6-shogaol. This is the first report that 6-shogaol can regulate the expression of detoxification enzymes by AHR activation. PMID:24857157

  5. A disk-diffusion-based target identification platform for antibacterials (TIPA): an inducible assay for profiling MOAs of antibacterial compounds.

    PubMed

    Silva, Isba; Real, Lilian J; Ward, Matthew S; Xu, H Howard

    2014-06-01

    One of the challenges in antibiotic lead discovery is the difficulty and time-consuming task of determining the mechanism of action (MOA) of antibacterial compounds. In this report, we describe the development and validation of a facile and inexpensive assay system utilizing disk diffusion of inhibitors on solid agar medium embedded with mixed pools of a comprehensive collection of Escherichia coli clones each containing a plasmid-borne inducible essential gene from E. coli. From individual clones, pilot small-scale (48 or 50 clones) assays, to full-scale target identification platform for antibacterials (TIPA) system, involving a variety of assay formats (liquid vs solid media, individual vs mix clones), we demonstrate that elevated resistance phenotypes of relevant cell clones were highly specific. In particular, the TIPA system was able to reveal cellular targets of several known antibacterial inhibitors: cerulenin, diazaborine, indolmycin, phosphomycin, and triclosan. Complementary to several existing MOA profiling schemes, the TIPA system offers a simple and low-cost method for elucidating the target proteins of antibacterial inhibitors, thus will facilitate discovery and development of novel antibacterial compounds to combat multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:24622888

  6. Production of organic compounds in plasmas: A comparison among electric sparks, laser-induced plasmas and UV light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scattergood, T. W.; Mckay, C. P.; Borucki, W. J.; Giver, L. P.; Vanghyseghem, H.; Parris, J. E.; Miller, S. L.

    1991-01-01

    In order to study the production of organic compounds in plasmas (and shocks), various mixtures of N2, CH4, and H2, modeling the atmosphere of Titan, were exposed to discrete sparks, laser-induced plasmas (LIP) and ultraviolet light. The yields of HCN and simple hydrocarbons were measured and compared to those calculated from a simple quenched thermodynamic equilibrium model. The agreement between experiment and theory was fair for HCN and C2H2. However, the yields of C2H6 and other hydrocarbons were much higher than those predicted by the model. Our experiments suggest that photolysis by ultraviolet light from the plasma is an important process in the synthesis. This was confirmed by the photolysis of gas samples exposed to the light, but not to the plasma or shock waves. The results of these experiments demonstrate that, in addition to the well-known efficient synthesis of organic compounds in plasmas, the yields of saturated species, e.g., ethane, may be higher than predicted by theory and that LIP provide a convenient and clean way of simulating planetary lightning and impact plasmas in the laboratory.

  7. Modeling and Ab initio Calculations of Thermal Transport in Si-Based Clathrates and Solar Perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yuping

    2015-03-01

    We present calculations of the thermal transport coefficients of Si-based clathrates and solar perovskites, as obtained from ab initio calculations and models, where all input parameters derived from first principles. We elucidated the physical mechanisms responsible for the measured low thermal conductivity in Si-based clatherates and predicted their electronic properties and mobilities, which were later confirmed experimentally. We also predicted that by appropriately tuning the carrier concentration, the thermoelectric figure of merit of Sn and Pb based perovskites may reach values ranging between 1 and 2, which could possibly be further increased by optimizing the lattice thermal conductivity through engineering perovskite superlattices. Work done in collaboration with Prof. G. Galli, and supported by DOE/BES Grant No. DE-FG0206ER46262.

  8. Order-disorder transition in clathrate Ba6Ge25 studied by positron annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. F.; Zhao, B.; Zhang, T.; He, H. F.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, D. W.; Chen, Z. Q.; Tang, X. F.

    2015-07-01

    Clathrate Ba6Ge25 is prepared by melt method and spark plasma sintering. Structural transition below room temperature is studied by positron annihilation and X-ray diffraction measurements. There is a pronounced transition in the temperature range of 200-250 K which might be involved with the movement of Ba atoms in Ge cages and result in disordered structure. This transition is further confirmed by the theoretical calculation of positron annihilation states. Thus our results confirm the structural models proposed by Carrillo-Cabrera et al. (2005). The measured specific heat capacity, electric resistivity and magnetic susceptibility all show anomalous transition in the same temperature range, indicating that the movement of Ba atoms in the cage has influence on the thermal, electric as well as magnetic properties of Ba6Ge25.

  9. Evolution of the energetic characteristics of {silicalite-1 + water} repulsive clathrates in a wide temperature range.

    PubMed

    Ievtushenko, Oleksii V; Eroshenko, Valentin A; Grosu, Yaroslav G; Nedelec, Jean-Marie; Grolier, Jean-Pierre E

    2013-03-28

    Recently {lyophobic porous powders + liquid} systems were proposed to be used for nontraditional energy storage and conversion purposes. This article reports the experimental study of the mechanical behavior, within the pressure-volume (PV) diagram, of the {hydrophobic silicalite-1 + water} system in the temperature range 10-80 °C. Repeated recordings of PV-isotherms and thermal effects of the repulsive clathrate during successive compression-decompression runs were performed using scanning transitiometry. An unexpected steady decline in the intrusion-extrusion pressure and volume of embedded water was found during the forced (repeated) intrusion of water into the pores of silicalite-1 and its spontaneous extrusion at constant temperature. A discussion of possible reasons of unconventional behavior of these heterogeneous systems as well as a thermodynamic analysis is presented. PMID:23407667

  10. The atmosphere of a dirty-clathrate cometary nucleus - A two-phase, multifluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marconi, M. L.; Mendis, D. A.

    1983-10-01

    The dynamical and thermal structure of a dirty-clathrate cometary nucleus' gas atmosphere is presently given a self-consistent, transonic multifluid solution in which, although the heavy neutron and ion species are treated as a single fluid in the collision-dominated region, the photoproduced H is treated separately. The thermal profile of the atmosphere thus obtained is entirely different from those predicted by the earlier, single-fluid models as well as the multifluid models which assumed equipartition of energy between electrons and ions. While the electron gas, like the neutrals and the ions, cools due to expansion, its main mode of energy loss in the inner coma is by way of inelastic collisions with the predominant H2O molecule. The high electron temperature in the outer coma also decreases the efficiency of electron removal by dissociative recombination, thereby increasing electron density throughout the coma.

  11. Structural Stability and Phase Transitions in K8Si46 Clathrate under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, John S.; Desgreniers, Serge; Li, Zhi-Qiang; Ferguson, Michael R.; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2002-10-01

    The structural stability of type-I K8Si46 clathrate has been investigated at high pressure by synchrotron x-ray diffraction. In contrast to that observed in the Na-doped structure-II analogue [

    A. San-Miguel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 5290 (1999)
    ], no phase separation into the β-Sn Si structure was identified at 11 GPa. Instead, K8Si46 is found to undergo a transition to an isostructural positional disordered phase at around 15 GPa. Ab initio phonon band structure calculations reveal a novel phenomenon of phonon instabilities of K atoms in the large cavities is responsible for this transition. Above 32 GPa, the new structure transforms into an amorphous phase.

  12. Influence of guest loading on thermal properties of NaxSi136 clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, Andrew D.; Johnson, Michel B.; Niven, John F.; Beekman, Matt; Nolas, George S.; Gryko, Jan; White, Mary Anne

    2013-10-01

    Thermal properties of a series of type II clathrates of the formula NaxSi136 with 0 < x < 24 and Na guests occupying the Si cages have been investigated over the temperature range from 2 to 300 K. Heat capacity and thermal conductivity results show that the structure is remarkably responsive to the loading of Na guests. The response is phononic: the host lattice expands in a non-monotonic way, and first stiffens, then relaxes at low loading into the larger Si28 cages (x < 9), then stiffens again as the Na concentration increases further. The response is also electronic, through changes in electronic properties as additional Na is loaded into the smaller Si20 cages at high loading (x > 9). In total, the influence of the guest loading illustrates the complexities of structure-property relations in a guest-host system.

  13. Synthesis of hydrogen-carbon clathrate material and hydrogen evolution therefrom at moderate temperatures and pressures

    DOEpatents

    Lueking, Angela; Narayanan, Deepa

    2011-03-08

    A process for making a hydrogenated carbon material is provided which includes forming a mixture of a carbon source, particularly a carbonaceous material, and a hydrogen source. The mixture is reacted under reaction conditions such that hydrogen is generated and/or released from the hydrogen source, an amorphous diamond-like carbon is formed, and at least a portion of the generated and/or released hydrogen associates with the amorphous diamond-like carbon, thereby forming a hydrogenated carbon material. A hydrogenated carbon material including a hydrogen carbon clathrate is characterized by evolution of molecular hydrogen at room temperature at atmospheric pressure in particular embodiments of methods and compositions according to the present invention.

  14. Compound C induces the ramification of murine microglia in an AMPK-independent and small rhogtpase-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Huang, C; Lu, X; Wang, J L; Tong, L J; Ling, Y; Jiang, B; Yang, R R; Zhang, W

    2016-09-01

    Microglial cells are the pivotal immune cells of the central nervous system. Adult microglia cells under physiological conditions are in a ramification state with extensively branched processes. Upon disease stimulation, they retract their processes and become activated. Induction of ramification is an attracting strategy to terminate the excessive activation of microglia. Here, we investigated the influence of compound C (CC) on microglial shape. Results showed that CC reversibly induced a ramification of murine microglia in both basal and inflammatory conditions. These pro-ramification effects were independent of adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibition as both AMPKα1 and AMPKα2 silence failed to induce microglial ramification. The ramification state of microglia induced by CC was associated with a decrease in pro-inflammatory factors and an increase in brain-derived neurotrophic factors (BDNF) protein and phagocytic activity. Mechanistic studies confirmed that the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-protein kinase B (Akt) signal, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) or small RhoGTPase activation mediated the effect of CC on microglial shape change based on the following observations: (i) CC induced a significant activation of the small RhoGTPase Rac1 and Cdc42; (ii) CC promoted the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt; (iii) inhibition of Rac1, Cdc42, ERK1/2, or the PI3K-Akt signal abolished the effect of CC on microglial shape change. These signal mechanisms were also ascertained in primary microglia. Our results explore a potential agent that promotes microglial ramification, and provide an alternative explanation for the neuroprotective effects of CC in various disease models such as brain ischemia and subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:27318303

  15. A novel isoquinoline compound abolishes chronic unpredictable mild stress-induced depressive-like behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Pesarico, Ana Paula; Sartori, Gláubia; Brüning, César A; Mantovani, Anderson C; Duarte, Thiago; Zeni, Gilson; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne

    2016-07-01

    Chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) elicits aspects of cognitive and behavioral alterations that can be used to model comparable aspects of depression in humans. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antidepressant-like potential of 7-fluoro-1,3-diphenylisoquinoline-1-amine (FDPI), a novel isoquinoline compound, in CUMS, a model that meets face, construct and predictive criteria for validity. Swiss mice were subjected to different stress paradigms daily for a period of 35 days to induce the depressive-like behavior. The animals received concomitant FDPI (0.1 and 1mg/kg, intragastric) or paroxetine (8mg/kg, intraperitoneal) and CUMS. The behavioral tests (splash test, tail suspension test, modified forced swimming test and locomotor activity) were performed. The levels of cytokines, corticosterone and adrenocorticotropic (ACTH) hormones were determined in the mouse prefrontal cortex and serum. The synaptosomal [(3)H] serotonin (5-HT) uptake, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, tyrosine kinase receptor (TrkB) and pro-brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels were determined in the mouse prefrontal cortex. CUMS induced a depressive-like behavior in mice, which was demonstrated in the modified forced swimming, tail suspension and splash tests. FDPI at both doses prevented depressive-like behavior induced by CUMS, without altering the locomotor activity of mice. FDPI at the highest dose prevented the increase in the levels of NF-kB, pro-inflammatory cytokines, corticosterone and ACTH and modulated [(3)H]5-HT uptake and the proBDNF/TrkB signaling pathway altered by CUMS. The present findings demonstrated that FDPI elicited an antidepressant-like effect in a model of stress-induced depression. PMID:27036647

  16. Production of organic compounds in plasmas: a comparison among electric sparks, laser-induced plasmas, and UV light.

    PubMed

    Scattergood, T W; McKay, C P; Borucki, W J; Giver, L P; Van Ghyseghem, H; Parris, J E; Miller, S L

    1989-01-01

    The chemistry in planetary atmospheres that is induced by processes associated with high-temperature plasmas is of broad interest because such processes may explain many of the chemical species observed. There are at least two important phenomena that are known to generate plasmas (and shocks) in planetary atmospheres: lightning and meteor impacts. For both phenomena, rapid heating of atmospheric gases leads to formation of a high-temperature plasma which emits radiation and produces shock waves that propagate through the surrounding atmosphere. These processes initiate chemical reactions that can transform simple gases into more complex compounds. In order to study the production of organic compounds in plasmas (shocks), various mixtures of N2, CH4, and H2, modeling the atmosphere of Titan, were exposed to discrete sparks, laser-induced plasmas (LIP), an ultraviolet radiation. The yields of HCN and several simple hydrocarbons were measured by gas chromatography and compared to those calculated from a simple quenched thermodynamic equilibrium model. The agreement between experiment and theory was fair for HCN and C2H2. However, the agreement for C2H6 and the other hydrocarbons was poor, indicating that a more comprehensive theory is needed. Our experiments suggest that photolysis by ultraviolet light from the plasma is an important process in the synthesis. This was confirmed by the photolysis of gas samples exposed to the light but not to the shock waves emitted by the sparks. Hence, the results of these experiments demonstrate that the thermodynamic equilibrium theory does not adequately model lightning and meteor impacts and that photolysis must be included. Finally, the similarity in yields between the spark and the LIP experiments suggest that LIP provide valid and clean simulations of lightning and meteor impacts and that photolysis must be included. Finally, the similarity in yields between the spark and the LIP experiments suggests that LIP provide valid

  17. Origin of Titan and the clathration processes in the solar nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousis, O.; Alibert, Y.; Lunine, J.; Marboeuf, U.; Thomas, C.

    2007-08-01

    We present an evolutionary turbulent model of the Saturn's subnebula consistent with the recent core accretion formation models of the giant planet. Using the thermodynamic conditions of our model, we calculate the evolution of the CO2:CO:CH4 and N2:NH3 molar mixing ratios in the subnebula.We thus show that the carbon and nitrogen homogeneous gas-phase chemistry is inhibited in the subnebula.We also consider the role played by Fischer-Tropsch catalysis in the gas-phase conversions of CO and CO2 into CH4. We demonstrate that, even if a catalytically active zone is likely to exist in the early Saturn's subnebula, it does not alter the composition of volatiles ultimately trapped in the forming solids. Assuming solar abundances for elements in the solar nebula gas-phase, we show that planetesimals that contributed to the formation of Titan were formed from hydrates, clathrate hydrates and pure condensates. In order to reproduce the observational constraints (deficiency of primordial noble gas and CO) derived by the Huygens probe mission in its atmosphere, we argue that Titan was formed from planetesimals produced in the solar nebula and partially vaporized in the balmy and early Saturn's subnebula. We note that, even if most of noble gases can be eliminated during the formation of Titan via this mechanism, tiny amounts of these species may remain trapped in clathrate hydrates of methane incorporated in the planetesimals accreted by Titan. We then discuss the processes that, added to our formation scenario, might explain the origin of the deficiency of noble gases observed in the atmosphere of Titan

  18. Unification of the low-energy excitation peaks in the heat capacity that appears in clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiazhen; Akagi, Kazuto; Xu, Jingtao; Shimotani, Hidekazu; Huynh, Khuong K.; Tanigaki, Katsumi

    2016-03-01

    We report that anomalous low-energy excitation (ALE) peaks in the heat capacity emerging from single-crystal cage materials can be successfully rationalized in terms of a single unified exponential line for a variety of type-I clathrates by employing a parameter associated with the freedom of space and the modified radii of guest atoms estimated by band calculations. The origin of these low-energy excitations is interpreted in the framework of quasiharmonic van der Waals type guest-host interactions based on a unified picture with the help of first-principles calculations. It is shown that the influence of guest-host ionic and covalent bonding interactions on the phonon anharmonicity, which have so far been considered to play an important role, are not significant as long as high symmetry of the cage structure is preserved. The dominant van der Waals interactions explain the soft vibrational modes of the rattling, which suppress phonon transport and lead to the concept of "phonon-glass electron-crystal" (PGEC) for thermoelectric applications. A few exceptions existing in type-I clathrates, as indicated by deviations from the unified line, suggest that a quasiharmonic potential can become more asymmetric via lower symmetry of the cage structure, towards glasslike disordered states at even lower temperatures. Although the origin of the boson peaks appearing in disordered materials is still under debate due to incomplete information on the real structure, the understanding provided by the present paper for crystalline cage materials may provide information partly applicable to other disordered systems.

  19. Small Compound 6-O-Angeloylplenolin Induces Mitotic Arrest and Exhibits Therapeutic Potentials in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Chen, Xiao-Qin; Liang, Heng-Xing; Zhang, Feng-Xiang; Zhang, Bo; Jin, Jie; Chen, Yong-Long; Cheng, Yong-Xian; Zhou, Guang-Biao

    2011-01-01

    Background Multiple myeloma (MM) is a disease of cell cycle dysregulation while cell cycle modulation can be a target for MM therapy. In this study we investigated the effects and mechanisms of action of a sesquiterpene lactone 6-O-angeloylplenolin (6-OAP) on MM cells. Methodology/Principal Findings MM cells were exposed to 6-OAP and cell cycle distribution were analyzed. The role for cyclin B1 to play in 6-OAP-caused mitotic arrest was tested by specific siRNA analyses in U266 cells. MM.1S cells co-incubated with interleukin-6 (IL-6), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), or bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were treated with 6-OAP. The effects of 6-OAP plus other drugs on MM.1S cells were evaluated. The in vivo therapeutic efficacy and pharmacokinetic features of 6-OAP were tested in nude mice bearing U266 cells and Sprague-Dawley rats, respectively. We found that 6-OAP suppressed the proliferation of dexamethasone-sensitive and dexamethasone-resistant cell lines and primary CD138+ MM cells. 6-OAP caused mitotic arrest, accompanied by activation of spindle assembly checkpoint and blockage of ubiquitiniation and subsequent proteasomal degradation of cyclin B1. Combined use of 6-OAP and bortezomib induced potentiated cytotoxicity with inactivation of ERK1/2 and activation of JNK1/2 and Casp-8/-3. 6-OAP overcame the protective effects of IL-6 and IGF-I on MM cells through inhibition of Jak2/Stat3 and Akt, respectively. 6-OAP inhibited BMSCs-facilitated MM cell expansion and TNF-α-induced NF-κB signal. Moreover, 6-OAP exhibited potent anti-MM activity in nude mice and favorable pharmacokinetics in rats. Conclusions/Significance These results indicate that 6-OAP is a new cell cycle inhibitor which shows therapeutic potentials for MM. PMID:21755010

  20. Functional inhibition of aquaporin-3 with a gold-based compound induces blockage of cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Serna, Ana; Galán-Cobo, Ana; Rodrigues, Claudia; Sánchez-Gomar, Ismael; Toledo-Aral, Juan José; Moura, Teresa F; Casini, Angela; Soveral, Graça; Echevarría, Miriam

    2014-11-01

    AQP3 has been correlated with higher transport of glycerol, increment of ATP content, and larger proliferation capacity. Recently, we described the gold(III) complex Auphen as a very selective and potent inhibitor of AQP3's glycerol permeability (Pgly ). Here we evaluated Auphen effect on the proliferation of various mammalian cell lines differing in AQP3 expression level: no expression (PC12), moderate (NIH/3T3) or high (A431) endogenous expression, cells stably expressing AQP3 (PC12-AQP3), and human HEK293T cells transiently transfected (HEK-AQP3) for AQP3 expression. Proliferation was evaluated in the absence or presence of Auphen (5 μM) by counting number of viable cells and analyzing 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. Auphen reduced ≈50% the proliferation in A431 and PC12-AQP3, ≈15% in HEK-AQP3 and had no effect in PC12-wt and NIH/3T3. Strong arrest in the S-G2/M phases of the cell cycle, supported by analysis of cyclins (A, B1, D1, E) levels, was observed in AQP3-expressing cells treated with Auphen. Flow-cytometry of propidium iodide incorporation and measurements of mitochondrial dehydrogenases activity confirmed absence of cytotoxic effect of the drug. Functional studies evidenced ≈50% inhibition of A431 Pgly by Auphen, showing that the compound's antiproliferative effect correlates with its ability to inhibit AQP3 Pgly . Role of Cys-40 on AQP3 permeability blockage by Auphen was confirmed by analyzing the mutated protein (AQP3-Ser-40). Accordingly, cells transfected with mutated AQP3 gained resistance to the antiproliferative effect of Auphen. These results highlight an Auphen inhibitory effect on proliferation of cells expressing AQP3 and suggest a targeted therapeutic effect on carcinomas with large AQP3 expression. PMID:24676973

  1. Epicoccum nigrum P16, a Sugarcane Endophyte, Produces Antifungal Compounds and Induces Root Growth

    PubMed Central

    Fávaro, Léia Cecilia de Lima; Sebastianes, Fernanda Luiza de Souza; Araújo, Welington Luiz

    2012-01-01

    Background Sugarcane is one of the most important crops in Brazil, mainly because of its use in biofuel production. Recent studies have sought to determine the role of sugarcane endophytic microbial diversity in microorganism-plant interactions, and their biotechnological potential. Epicoccum nigrum is an important sugarcane endophytic fungus that has been associated with the biological control of phytopathogens, and the production of secondary metabolites. In spite of several studies carried out to define the better conditions to use E. nigrum in different crops, little is known about the establishment of an endophytic interaction, and its potential effects on plant physiology. Methodology/Principal Findings We report an approach based on inoculation followed by re-isolation, molecular monitoring, microscopic analysis, plant growth responses to fungal colonization, and antimicrobial activity tests to study the basic aspects of the E. nigrum endophytic interaction with sugarcane, and the effects of colonization on plant physiology. The results indicate that E. nigrum was capable of increasing the root system biomass and producing compounds that inhibit the in vitro growth of sugarcane pathogens Fusarium verticillioides, Colletotrichum falcatum, Ceratocystis paradoxa, and Xanthomomas albilineans. In addition, E. nigrum preferentially colonizes the sugarcane surface and, occasionally, the endophytic environment. Conclusions/Significance Our work demonstrates that E. nigrum has great potential for sugarcane crop application because it is capable of increasing the root system biomass and controlling pathogens. The study of the basic aspects of the interaction of E. nigrum with sugarcane demonstrated the facultative endophytism of E. nigrum and its preference for the phylloplane environment, which should be considered in future studies of biocontrol using this species. In addition, this work contributes to the knowledge of the interaction of this ubiquitous endophyte

  2. Large drought-induced variations in oak leaf volatile organic compound emissions during PINOT NOIR 2012.

    PubMed

    Geron, Chris; Daly, Ryan; Harley, Peter; Rasmussen, Rei; Seco, Roger; Guenther, Alex; Karl, Thomas; Gu, Lianhong

    2016-03-01

    Leaf-level isoprene and monoterpene emissions were collected and analyzed from five of the most abundant oak (Quercus) species in Central Missouri's Ozarks Region in 2012 during PINOT NOIR (Particle Investigations at a Northern Ozarks Tower - NOx, Oxidants, Isoprene Research). June measurements, prior to the onset of severe drought, showed isoprene emission rates and leaf temperature responses similar to those previously reported in the literature and used in Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) emission models. During the peak of the drought in August, isoprene emission rates were substantially reduced, and response to temperature was dramatically altered, especially for the species in the red oak subgenus (Erythrobalanus). Quercus stellata (in the white oak subgenus Leucobalanus), on the other hand, increased its isoprene emission rate during August, and showed no decline at high temperatures during June or August, consistent with its high tolerance to drought and adaptation to xeric sites at the prairie-deciduous forest interface. Mid-late October measurements were conducted after soil moisture recharge, but were affected by senescence and cooler temperatures. Isoprene emission rates were considerably lower from all species compared to June and August data. The large differences between the oaks in response to drought emphasizes the need to consider BVOC emissions at the species level instead of just the whole canopy. Monoterpene emissions from Quercus rubra in limited data were highest among the oaks studied, while monoterpene emissions from the other oak species were 80-95% lower and less than assumed in current BVOC emission models. Major monoterpenes from Q. rubra (and in ambient air) were p-cymene, α-pinene, β-pinene, d-limonene, γ-terpinene, β-ocimene (predominantly1,3,7-trans-β-ocimene, but also 1,3,6-trans-β-ocimene), tricyclene, α-terpinene, sabinene, terpinolene, and myrcene. Results are discussed in the context of canopy flux studies

  3. Ti plasmid-specified chemotaxis of Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58C1 toward vir-inducing phenolic compounds and soluble factors from monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants.

    PubMed Central

    Ashby, A M; Watson, M D; Loake, G J; Shaw, C H

    1988-01-01

    Twelve phenolic compounds with related structures were analyzed for their ability to act as chemoattractants for Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58C1 and as inducers of the Ti plasmid virulence operons. The results divided the phenolic compounds into three groups: compounds that act as strong vir inducers and are chemoattractants for A. tumefaciens C58C1 harboring the nopaline Ti plasmid pDUB1003 delta 31, but not the isogenic cured strain; compounds that are at best weak vir inducers and are weak chemoattractants for Ti plasmid-harboring and cured A. tumefaciens C58C1; and compounds that are vir noninducers and are also nonattractants. A strong correlation between vir-inducing ability and Ti plasmid requirement for chemotaxis is thus established. In addition, chemical structure rules for vir induction and chemotaxis are outlined. Positive chemotaxis toward root and shoot homogenates from monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants was observed. At low extract concentrations, chemotaxis was enhanced by the presence of Ti plasmid. The chemoattractants do not derive from intact cell walls. Lack of attraction is not responsible for the apparent block to monocot transformation by A. tumefaciens. PMID:3410827

  4. Cinitapride protects against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats: role of 5-hydroxytryptamine, prostaglandins and sulfhydryl compounds.

    PubMed

    Alarcón-de-la-Lastra Romero, C; López, A; Martín, M J; la Casa, C; Motilva, V

    1997-04-01

    This study was designed to determine the gastroprotective properties of cinitapride (CNT), a novel prokinetic benzamide derivative agonist of 5-HT4 and 5-HT1 receptors and 5-HT2 antagonist, on mucosal injury produced by 50% (v/v) ethanol. Results were compared with those for 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT: 10 mg kg-1). The possible involvements of gastric mucus secretion, endogenous prostaglandins (PGs) and sulfhydryl compounds (SH) in the protection mediated by CNT were also examined. Intraperitoneal administration of CNT (0.50 and 1 mg kg-1), 30 min before ethanol, significantly prevented gastric ulceration and increased the hexosamine content of gastric mucus. CNT (1 mg kg-1) also produced a significant increase in gastric mucosal levels of PGE2, but did not induce any significant changes in SH values. On the contrary, pretreatment with 5-HT worsened ethanol-induced erosions, however, did not affect gastric mucus secretion, glycoprotein content or PGE2 levels, although the non-protein SH fraction was significantly decreased. The present results demonstrate that the gastroprotective effects of CNT could be partly explained by a complex PG dependent mechanism. We suggest that 5-HT dependent mechanisms through 5-HT2 receptor blockade and 5-HT1 receptor activation could be also involved. PMID:9211565

  5. Neurosupportive Role of Vanillin, a Natural Phenolic Compound, on Rotenone Induced Neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dhanalakshmi, Chinnasamy; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Nataraj, Jagatheesan; Justin Thenmozhi, Arokiasamy; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Vanillin, a phenolic compound, has been reported to offer neuroprotection against experimental Huntington's disease and global ischemia by virtue of its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic properties. The present study aims to elucidate the underlying neuroprotective mechanism of vanillin in rotenone induced neurotoxicity. Cell viability was assessed by exposing SH-SY5Y cells to various concentrations of rotenone (5–200 nM) for 24 h. The therapeutic effectiveness of vanillin against rotenone was measured by pretreatment of vanillin at various concentrations (5–200 nM) and then incubation with rotenone (100 nM). Using effective dose of vanillin (100 nM), mitochondrial membrane potential, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and expression patterns of apoptotic markers were assessed. Toxicity of rotenone was accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, increased ROS generation, release of cyt-c, and enhanced expressions of proapoptotic and downregulation of antiapoptotic indices via the upregulation of p38 and JNK-MAPK pathway proteins. Our results indicated that the pretreatment of vanillin attenuated rotenone induced mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Thus, vanillin may serve as a potent therapeutic agent in the future by virtue of its multiple pharmacological properties in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases including PD. PMID:26664453

  6. Canopy light cues affect emission of constitutive and methyl jasmonate-induced volatile organic compounds in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kegge, Wouter; Weldegergis, Berhane T; Soler, Roxina; Vergeer-Van Eijk, Marleen; Dicke, Marcel; Voesenek, Laurentius A C J; Pierik, Ronald

    2013-11-01

    The effects of plant competition for light on the emission of plant volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were studied by investigating how different light qualities that occur in dense vegetation affect the emission of constitutive and methyl-jasmonate-induced VOCs. Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia (Col-0) plants and Pieris brassicae caterpillars were used as a biological system to study the effects of light quality manipulations on VOC emissions and attraction of herbivores. VOCs were analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and the effects of light quality, notably the red : far red light ratio (R : FR), on expression of genes associated with VOC production were studied using reverse transcriptase-quantitative PCR. The emissions of both constitutive and methyl-jasmonate-induced green leaf volatiles and terpenoids were partially suppressed under low R : FR and severe shading conditions. Accordingly, the VOC-based preference of neonates of the specialist lepidopteran herbivore P. brassicae was significantly affected by the R : FR ratio. We conclude that VOC-mediated interactions among plants and between plants and organisms at higher trophic levels probably depend on light alterations caused by nearby vegetation. Studies on plant-plant and plant-insect interactions through VOCs should take into account the light quality within dense stands when extrapolating to natural and agricultural field conditions. PMID:23845065

  7. Effects of Dimethylaminoethanol and Compound Amino Acid on D-Galactose Induced Skin Aging Model of Rat

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Su; Chen, Zhenyu; Cai, Xia; Sun, Ying; Zhao, Cailing

    2014-01-01

    A lasting dream of human beings is to reverse or postpone aging. In this study, dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE) and compound amino acid (AA) in Mesotherapy were investigated for their potential antiaging effects on D-galactose induced aging skin. At 18 days after D-gal induction, each rat was treated with intradermal microinjection of saline, AA, 0.1% DMAE, 0.2% DMAE, 0.1% DMAE + AA, or 0.2% DMAE + AA, respectively. At 42 days after treatment, the skin wound was harvested and assayed. Measurement of epidermal and dermal thickness in 0.1% DMAE + AA and 0.2% DMAE + AA groups appeared significantly thicker than aging control rats. No differences were found in tissue water content among groups. Hydroxyproline in 0.1% DMAE + AA, 0.2% DMAE + AA, and sham control groups was much higher than all other groups. Collagen type I, type III, and MMP-1 expression was highly upregulated in both 0.1% DMAE + AA and 0.2% DMAE + AA groups compared with aging control. In contrast, TIMP-1 expression levels of various aging groups were significantly reduced when compared to sham control. Coinjection of DMAE and AA into target tissue has marked antiaging effects on D-galactose induced skin aging model of rat. PMID:25133239

  8. Effects of dimethylaminoethanol and compound amino acid on D-galactose induced skin aging model of rat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Su; Chen, Zhenyu; Cai, Xia; Sun, Ying; Zhao, Cailing; Liu, Fangjun; Liu, Dalie

    2014-01-01

    A lasting dream of human beings is to reverse or postpone aging. In this study, dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE) and compound amino acid (AA) in Mesotherapy were investigated for their potential antiaging effects on D-galactose induced aging skin. At 18 days after D-gal induction, each rat was treated with intradermal microinjection of saline, AA, 0.1% DMAE, 0.2% DMAE, 0.1% DMAE + AA, or 0.2% DMAE + AA, respectively. At 42 days after treatment, the skin wound was harvested and assayed. Measurement of epidermal and dermal thickness in 0.1% DMAE + AA and 0.2% DMAE + AA groups appeared significantly thicker than aging control rats. No differences were found in tissue water content among groups. Hydroxyproline in 0.1% DMAE + AA, 0.2% DMAE + AA, and sham control groups was much higher than all other groups. Collagen type I, type III, and MMP-1 expression was highly upregulated in both 0.1% DMAE + AA and 0.2% DMAE + AA groups compared with aging control. In contrast, TIMP-1 expression levels of various aging groups were significantly reduced when compared to sham control. Coinjection of DMAE and AA into target tissue has marked antiaging effects on D-galactose induced skin aging model of rat. PMID:25133239

  9. Novel piperazine core compound induces death in human liver cancer cells: possible pharmacological properties.

    PubMed

    Samie, Nima; Muniandy, Sekaran; Kanthimathi, M S; Haerian, Batoul Sadat; Raja Azudin, Raja Elina

    2016-01-01

    The current study evaluates the cytotoxic mechanism of a novel piperazine derivate designated as PCC against human liver cancer cells. In this context, human liver cancer cell lines, SNU-475 and 243, human monocyte/macrophage cell line, CRL-9855, and human B lymphocyte cell line, CCL-156, were used to determine the IC50 of PCC using the standard MTT assay. PCC displayed a strong suppressive effect on SNU-475 and SNU-423 cells with an IC50 value of 6.98 ± 0.11 μg/ml and 7.76 ± 0.45 μg/ml respectively, after 24 h of treatment. Significant dipping in the mitochondrial membrane potential and elevation in the released of cytochrome c from the mitochondria indicated the induction of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway by PCC. Activation of this pathway was further evidenced by significant activation of caspase 3/7 and 9. PCC was also shown to activate the extrinsic pathways of apoptosis via activation of caspase-8 which is linked to the suppression of NF-ƙB translocation to the nucleus. Cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase was confirmed by flow cytometry and up-regulation of glutathione reductase expression was quantified by qPCR. This study suggests that PCC is a simultaneous inducer of intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis in liver cancer cell lines. PMID:27072064

  10. Photochromism induced nonlinear optical absorption enhancement and ultrafast responses of several dithienylethene compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yaochuan; Yan, Yongli; Liu, Dajun; Wang, Guiqiu; Pu, Shouzhi

    2015-11-01

    The nonlinear optical properties and ultrafast dynamics of three dithienylethene photochromic derivatives (i.e., P1, P2, and P3) were investigated by two-photon fluorescence, open-aperture Z-scan, and femtosecond pump-probe experiments. Photoinduced ring-closure and ring-opening phenomena, as well as a photochromism induced nonlinear optical property enhancement, were observed. For both the ring-opening and ring-closure state, the curve exhibited an ultrafast absorption peak approximately 200 fs followed by a fast decay process (i.e., ˜1 ps) and a long decay process that had a duration longer than 5 ps. The ultrafast peak followed by a fast decay process and the long decay process were attributable to a special two-photon absorption process, the formation of a charge separation state, and the relaxation of the charge separation state, respectively. However, the magnitude of the signal under the ring-closure state is approximately fivefold greater than that of the ring-opening state, which is in good agreement with nonlinear optical results. Intramolecular charge transfer processes were observed in the dynamics curves of the P2' and P3' isomers with D- π-A and D- π-D structures.

  11. Field-induced density wave in the heavy-fermion compound CeRhIn₅.

    PubMed

    Moll, Philip J W; Zeng, Bin; Balicas, Luis; Galeski, Stanislaw; Balakirev, Fedor F; Bauer, Eric D; Ronning, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Strong electron correlations lead to a variety of distinct ground states, such as magnetism, charge order or superconductivity. Understanding the competitive or cooperative interplay between neighbouring phases is an outstanding challenge in physics. CeRhIn₅ is a prototypical example of a heavy-fermion superconductor: it orders anti-ferromagnetically below 3.8 K, and moderate hydrostatic pressure suppresses the anti-ferromagnetic order inducing unconventional superconductivity. Here we show evidence for a phase transition to a state akin to a density wave (DW) under high magnetic fields (>27 T) in high-quality single crystal microstructures of CeRhIn₅. The DW is signalled by a hysteretic anomaly in the in-plane resistivity accompanied by non-linear electrical transport, yet remarkably thermodynamic measurements suggest that the phase transition involves only small portions of the Fermi surface. Such a subtle order might be a common feature among correlated electron systems, reminiscent of the similarly subtle charge DW state in the cuprates. PMID:25798749

  12. Recurrent phagocytosis-induced apoptosis in the cyclical generation change of the compound ascidian Botryllus schlosseri.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Nicola; Ballin, Francesca; Manni, Lucia; Schiavon, Filippo; Basso, Giuseppe; Ballarin, Loriano

    2016-09-01

    Colonies of the marine, filter-feeding ascidian Botryllus schlosseri undergo cyclical generation changes or takeovers. These events are characterised by the progressive resorption of adult zooids and their replacement by their buds that grow to adult size, open their siphons and start filtering. During the take-over, tissues of adult zooids undergo extensive apoptosis; circulating, spreading phagocytes enter the effete tissues, ingest dying cells acquiring a giant size and a round morphology. Then, phagocytes re-enter the circulation where they represent a considerable fraction (more than 20%) of circulating haemocytes. In this study, we evidence that most of these circulating phagocytes show morphological and biochemical signs of apoptosis. Accordingly, these phagocytes express transcripts of orthologues of the apoptosis-related genes Bax, AIF1 and PARP1. Electron microscopy shows that giant phagocytes contain apoptotic phagocytes inside their own phagocytic vacuole. The transcript of the orthologues of the anti-apoptotic gene IAP7 was detected only in spreading phagocytes, mostly abundant in phases far from the take-over. Therefore, the presented data suggest that, at take-over, phagocytes undergo phagocytosis-induced apoptosis (PIA). In mammals, PIA is assumed to be a process assuring the killing and the complete elimination of microbes, by promoting the disposal of terminally differentiated phagocytes and the resolution of infection. In B. schlosseri, PIA assumes a so far undescribed role, being required for the control of asexual development and colony homeostasis. PMID:27106705

  13. Rhododendrol, a depigmentation-inducing phenolic compound, exerts melanocyte cytotoxicity via a tyrosinase-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Minoru; Kondo, Masatoshi; Sato, Kohji; Umeda, Mai; Kawabata, Keigo; Takahashi, Yoshito; Suzuki, Tamio; Matsunaga, Kayoko; Inoue, Shintaro

    2014-09-01

    Rhododendrol, an inhibitor of melanin synthesis developed for lightening/whitening cosmetics, was recently reported to induce a depigmentary disorder principally at the sites of repeated chemical contact. Rhododendrol competitively inhibited mushroom tyrosinase and served as a good substrate, while it also showed cytotoxicity against cultured human melanocytes at high concentrations sufficient for inhibiting tyrosinase. The cytotoxicity was abolished by phenylthiourea, a chelator of the copper ions at the active site, and by specific knockdown of tyrosinase with siRNA. Hence, the cytotoxicity appeared to be triggered by the enzymatic conversion of rhododendrol to active product(s). No reactive oxygen species were detected in the treated melanocytes, but up-regulation of the CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein gene responsible for apoptosis and/or autophagy and caspase-3 activation were found to be tyrosinase dependent. These results suggest that a tyrosinase-dependent accumulation of ER stress and/or activation of the apoptotic pathway may contribute to the melanocyte cytotoxicity. PMID:24890809

  14. Gene expression profiling in rat liver treated with compounds inducing phospholipidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hirode, Mitsuhiro |; Ono, Atsushi |; Miyagishima, Toshikazu; Nagao, Taku; Ohno, Yasuo; Urushidani, Tetsuro |

    2008-06-15

    We have constructed a large-scale transcriptome database of rat liver treated with various drugs. In an effort to identify a biomarker for diagnosis of hepatic phospholipidosis, we extracted 78 probe sets of rat hepatic genes from data of 5 drugs, amiodarone, amitriptyline, clomipramine, imipramine, and ketoconazole, which actually induced this phenotype. Principal component analysis (PCA) using these probes clearly separated dose- and time-dependent clusters of treated groups from their controls. Moreover, 6 drugs (chloramphenicol, chlorpromazine, gentamicin, perhexiline, promethazine, and tamoxifen), which were reported to cause phospholipidosis but judged as negative by histopathological examination, were designated as positive by PCA using these probe sets. Eight drugs (carbon tetrachloride, coumarin, tetracycline, metformin, hydroxyzine, diltiazem, 2-bromoethylamine, and ethionamide), which showed phospholipidosis-like vacuolar formation in the histopathology, could be distinguished from the typical drugs causing phospholipidosis. Moreover, the possible induction of phospholipidosis was predictable by the expression of these genes 24 h after single administration in some of the drugs. We conclude that these identified 78 probe sets could be useful for diagnosis of phospholipidosis, and that toxicogenomics would be a promising approach for prediction of this type of toxicity.

  15. Gene expression profiling in rat liver treated with compounds inducing phospholipidosis.

    PubMed

    Hirode, Mitsuhiro; Ono, Atsushi; Miyagishima, Toshikazu; Nagao, Taku; Ohno, Yasuo; Urushidani, Tetsuro

    2008-06-15

    We have constructed a large-scale transcriptome database of rat liver treated with various drugs. In an effort to identify a biomarker for diagnosis of hepatic phospholipidosis, we extracted 78 probe sets of rat hepatic genes from data of 5 drugs, amiodarone, amitriptyline, clomipramine, imipramine, and ketoconazole, which actually induced this phenotype. Principal component analysis (PCA) using these probes clearly separated dose- and time-dependent clusters of treated groups from their controls. Moreover, 6 drugs (chloramphenicol, chlorpromazine, gentamicin, perhexiline, promethazine, and tamoxifen), which were reported to cause phospholipidosis but judged as negative by histopathological examination, were designated as positive by PCA using these probe sets. Eight drugs (carbon tetrachloride, coumarin, tetracycline, metformin, hydroxyzine, diltiazem, 2-bromoethylamine, and ethionamide), which showed phospholipidosis-like vacuolar formation in the histopathology, could be distinguished from the typical drugs causing phospholipidosis. Moreover, the possible induction of phospholipidosis was predictable by the expression of these genes 24 h after single administration in some of the drugs. We conclude that these identified 78 probe sets could be useful for diagnosis of phospholipidosis, and that toxicogenomics would be a promising approach for prediction of this type of toxicity. PMID:18355885

  16. Direct and compound reactions induced by unstable helium beams near the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navin, A.; Tripathi, V.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Nanal, V.; Simenel, C.; Casandjian, J. M.; de France, G.; Raabe, R.; Bazin, D.; Chatterjee, A.; Dasgupta, M.; Kailas, S.; Lemmon, R. C.; Mahata, K.; Pillay, R. G.; Pollacco, E. C.; Ramachandran, K.; Rejmund, M.; Shrivastava, A.; Sida, J. L.; Tryggestad, E.

    2004-10-01

    Reactions induced by radioactive 6,8 He beams from the SPIRAL facility were studied on 63,65 Cu and 188,190,192 Os targets and compared to reactions with the stable 4He projectiles from the Mumbai Pelletron. Partial residue cross sections for fusion and neutron transfer obtained from the measured intensities of characteristic in-beam γ rays for the 6He + 63,65 Cu systems are presented. Coincidence measurements of heavy reaction products, identified by their characteristic γ rays, with projectilelike charged particles, provide direct evidence for a large transfer cross section with Borromean nuclei 6He at 19.5 and 30 MeV and 8He at 27 MeV. Reaction cross sections were also obtained from measured elastic angular distributions for 6,8 He +Cu systems. Cross sections for fusion and direct reactions with 4,6 He beams on heavier targets of 188,192 Os at 30 MeV are also presented. The present work underlines the need to distinguish between various reaction mechanisms leading to the same products before drawing conclusions about the effect of weak binding on the fusion process. The feasibility of extracting small cross sections from inclusive in-beam γ -ray measurements for reaction studies near the Coulomb barrier with low intensity isotope separation on-line beams is highlighted.

  17. Direct and compound reactions induced by unstable helium beams near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Navin, A.; Tripathi, V.; Chatterjee, A.; Kailas, S.; Mahata, K.; Ramachandran, K.; Shrivastava, A.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Tryggestad, E.; Nanal, V.; Pillay, R.G.; Simenel, C.; Casandjian, J.M.; France, G. de; Rejmund, M.; Raabe, R.; Pollacco, E.C.; Sida, J.L.; Dasgupta, M.

    2004-10-01

    Reactions induced by radioactive {sup 6,8}He beams from the SPIRAL facility were studied on {sup 63,65}Cu and {sup 188,190,192}Os targets and compared to reactions with the stable {sup 4}He projectiles from the Mumbai Pelletron. Partial residue cross sections for fusion and neutron transfer obtained from the measured intensities of characteristic in-beam {gamma} rays for the {sup 6}He+{sup 63,65}Cu systems are presented. Coincidence measurements of heavy reaction products, identified by their characteristic {gamma} rays, with projectilelike charged particles, provide direct evidence for a large transfer cross section with Borromean nuclei {sup 6}He at 19.5 and 30 MeV and {sup 8}He at 27 MeV. Reaction cross sections were also obtained from measured elastic angular distributions for {sup 6,8}He+Cu systems. Cross sections for fusion and direct reactions with {sup 4,6}He beams on heavier targets of {sup 188,192}Os at 30 MeV are also presented. The present work underlines the need to distinguish between various reaction mechanisms leading to the same products before drawing conclusions about the effect of weak binding on the fusion process. The feasibility of extracting small cross sections from inclusive in-beam {gamma}-ray measurements for reaction studies near the Coulomb barrier with low intensity isotope separation on-line beams is highlighted.

  18. Novel piperazine core compound induces death in human liver cancer cells: possible pharmacological properties

    PubMed Central

    Samie, Nima; Muniandy, Sekaran; Kanthimathi, M. S.; Haerian, Batoul Sadat; Raja Azudin, Raja Elina

    2016-01-01

    The current study evaluates the cytotoxic mechanism of a novel piperazine derivate designated as PCC against human liver cancer cells. In this context, human liver cancer cell lines, SNU-475 and 243, human monocyte/macrophage cell line, CRL-9855, and human B lymphocyte cell line, CCL-156, were used to determine the IC50 of PCC using the standard MTT assay. PCC displayed a strong suppressive effect on SNU-475 and SNU-423 cells with an IC50 value of 6.98 ± 0.11 μg/ml and 7.76 ± 0.45 μg/ml respectively, after 24 h of treatment. Significant dipping in the mitochondrial membrane potential and elevation in the released of cytochrome c from the mitochondria indicated the induction of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway by PCC. Activation of this pathway was further evidenced by significant activation of caspase 3/7 and 9. PCC was also shown to activate the extrinsic pathways of apoptosis via activation of caspase-8 which is linked to the suppression of NF-ƙB translocation to the nucleus. Cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase was confirmed by flow cytometry and up-regulation of glutathione reductase expression was quantified by qPCR. This study suggests that PCC is a simultaneous inducer of intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis in liver cancer cell lines. PMID:27072064

  19. Roasting coffee beans produces compounds that induce prophage lambda in E. coli and are mutagenic in E. coli and S. typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, A; Nagao, M; Suwa, Y; Wakabayashi, K; Sugimura, T

    1983-03-01

    Freshly brewed blended coffee, instant coffee and instant caffeine-free coffee induced prophage lambda in lysogenic E. coli K12, strain GY5027. Because coffee prepared from green beans by the same extraction method as used for freshly brewed blended coffee had no prophage-inducing activity, this activity may be attributed to compounds produced in the roasting process. Roasting also produced compounds that were mutagenic in S. typhimurium TA100 and E. coli WP2 uvrA/pKM101. PMID:6220221

  20. Preparation and characterization of planetary ball milled Si-based clathrates and their spark plasma sintered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirataki, R.; Hokazono, M.; Nakabayashi, T.; Anno, H.

    2011-05-01

    Ba8Ga16Si30 clathrate particles ranging in size from several tens nanometers to submicron have been prepared by a planetary ball milling technique, and their sintered materials with microstructures have been prepared by a spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique. Relatively low temperature, short time and high pressure conditions of SPS are needed for the densification without the decomposition and/or the oxidation of clathrate phase. In comparison with Ba8Ga16Si30 prepared by SPS of micro powders, Ba8Ga16Si30 prepared by SPS of pulverized powders shows relatively large Seebeck coefficient about -100 μV/K at middle temperature range, low thermal diffusivity as low as 0.6 mm2/s (RT) and extremely low electrical conductivity of the orders of 0.1 - 1 S/cm (RT), due probably to the increased scattering at the interfaces and pores in the microstructures.

  1. Raman study of Si clathrates Sr8AlxGa16-xSi30 under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imaeda, Y.; Kume, T.; Sasaki, S.; Shimizu, H.; Kishimoto, K.; Ikeda, N.; Koyanagi, T.

    2012-07-01

    High-pressure Raman scattering experiments were carried out for Si clathrates (Sr8AlxGa16-xSi30) with structures of type I and type VIII. The type I clathrate (Sr8Al7Ga9Si30) indicated spectral changes at 13 GPa and 19 GPa. The spectral shape was characteristic of amorphous above 19 GPa. For type VIII (Sr8Al8Ga8Si30), the spectral shape changed to amorphous like one at 20 GPa. After releasing the pressure after the amorphizations, the measured Raman spectra were the same as that of type I, for both the cases of type I and VIII, which suggests that type VIII structure irreversibly transforms to type I via an amorphous phase.

  2. Effects of Anthocyanin and Flavanol Compounds on Lipid Metabolism and Adipose Tissue Associated Systemic Inflammation in Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Martine C.; Sheedfar, Fareeba; Mulder, Petra; Schreurs, Marijke; Hommelberg, Pascal P. H.; Hofker, Marten H.; Schalkwijk, Casper; Kleemann, Robert; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Koonen, Debby P. Y.; Heeringa, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background. Naturally occurring substances from the flavanol and anthocyanin family of polyphenols have been proposed to exert beneficial effects in the course of obesity. We hypothesized that their effects on attenuating obesity-induced dyslipidemia as well as the associated inflammatory sequelae especially have health-promoting potential. Methods. Male C57BL/6J mice (n = 52) received a control low-fat diet (LFD; 10 kcal% fat) for 6 weeks followed by 24 weeks of either LFD (n = 13) or high-fat diet (HFD; 45 kcal% fat; n = 13) or HFD supplemented with 0.1% w/w of the flavanol compound epicatechin (HFD+E; n = 13) or an anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract (HFD+B; n = 13). Energy substrate utilization was determined by indirect calorimetry in a subset of mice following the dietary switch and at the end of the experiment. Blood samples were collected at baseline and at 3 days and 4, 12, and 20 weeks after dietary switch and analyzed for systemic lipids and proinflammatory cytokines. Adipose tissue (AT) histopathology and inflammatory gene expression as well as hepatic lipid content were analyzed after sacrifice. Results. The switch from a LFD to a HFD lowered the respiratory exchange ratio and increased plasma cholesterol and hepatic lipid content. These changes were not attenuated by HFD+E or HFD+B. Furthermore, the polyphenol compounds could not prevent HFD-induced systemic rise of TNF-α levels. Interestingly, a significant reduction in Tnf gene expression in HFD+B mice was observed in the AT. Furthermore, HFD+B, but not HFD+E, significantly prevented the early upregulation of circulating neutrophil chemoattractant mKC. However, no differences in AT histopathology were observed between the HFD types. Conclusion. Supplementation of HFD with an anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract but not with the flavanol epicatechin may exert beneficial effects on the systemic early inflammatory response associated with diet-induced obesity. These systemic effects were transient and

  3. Effects of Anthocyanin and Flavanol Compounds on Lipid Metabolism and Adipose Tissue Associated Systemic Inflammation in Diet-Induced Obesity.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Roel A; Morrison, Martine C; Sheedfar, Fareeba; Mulder, Petra; Schreurs, Marijke; Hommelberg, Pascal P H; Hofker, Marten H; Schalkwijk, Casper; Kleemann, Robert; Tietge, Uwe J F; Koonen, Debby P Y; Heeringa, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background. Naturally occurring substances from the flavanol and anthocyanin family of polyphenols have been proposed to exert beneficial effects in the course of obesity. We hypothesized that their effects on attenuating obesity-induced dyslipidemia as well as the associated inflammatory sequelae especially have health-promoting potential. Methods. Male C57BL/6J mice (n = 52) received a control low-fat diet (LFD; 10 kcal% fat) for 6 weeks followed by 24 weeks of either LFD (n = 13) or high-fat diet (HFD; 45 kcal% fat; n = 13) or HFD supplemented with 0.1% w/w of the flavanol compound epicatechin (HFD+E; n = 13) or an anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract (HFD+B; n = 13). Energy substrate utilization was determined by indirect calorimetry in a subset of mice following the dietary switch and at the end of the experiment. Blood samples were collected at baseline and at 3 days and 4, 12, and 20 weeks after dietary switch and analyzed for systemic lipids and proinflammatory cytokines. Adipose tissue (AT) histopathology and inflammatory gene expression as well as hepatic lipid content were analyzed after sacrifice. Results. The switch from a LFD to a HFD lowered the respiratory exchange ratio and increased plasma cholesterol and hepatic lipid content. These changes were not attenuated by HFD+E or HFD+B. Furthermore, the polyphenol compounds could not prevent HFD-induced systemic rise of TNF-α levels. Interestingly, a significant reduction in Tnf gene expression in HFD+B mice was observed in the AT. Furthermore, HFD+B, but not HFD+E, significantly prevented the early upregulation of circulating neutrophil chemoattractant mKC. However, no differences in AT histopathology were observed between the HFD types. Conclusion. Supplementation of HFD with an anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract but not with the flavanol epicatechin may exert beneficial effects on the systemic early inflammatory response associated with diet-induced obesity. These systemic effects were transient and

  4. cis-Jasmone induces accumulation of defence compounds in wheat, Triticum aestivum.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Maria C Blassioli; Birkett, Michael A; Gordon-Weeks, Ruth; Smart, Lesley E; Martin, Janet L; Pye, Barry J; Bromilow, Richard; Pickett, John A

    2008-01-01

    Liquid phase extraction (LPE) and vapor phase extraction (VPE) methodologies were used to evaluate the impact of the plant activator, cis-jasmone, on the secondary metabolism of wheat, Triticum aestivum, var. Solstice. LPE allowed the measurement of benzoxazinoids, i.e. 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one (DIMBOA), 2-hydroxy-7-methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one (HMBOA) and 6-methoxy-benzoxazolin-2-one (MBOA), and phenolic acids such as trans-p-coumaric acid, syringic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid and cis- and trans-ferulic acid. Using LPE, a significantly higher level of DIMBOA was found in aerial parts and roots of T. aestivum following treatment with cis-jasmone, when compared with untreated plants. Similar results were obtained for phenolic acids, such as trans-ferulic acid and vanillic acid in roots. Using VPE, it was possible to measure levels of 2-hydroxy-7-methoxy-(2H)-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one (HBOA), benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one (BOA), ferulic acid, syringic acid and coumaric acid. The levels of HBOA in aerial parts and roots were significantly greater in cis-jasmone treated plants compared to untreated plants. cis-Jasmone is known to be a plant activator in terms of production of defence-related volatile semiochemicals that repel aphids and increase the foraging activity of aphid parasitoids. These results show, for the first time, that cis-jasmone also induces selective production of secondary metabolites that are capable of directly reducing development of pests, diseases and weeds. PMID:17681563

  5. Pyranocycloartobiloxanthone A, a novel gastroprotective compound from Artocarpus obtusus Jarret, against ethanol-induced acute gastric ulcer in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sidahmed, Heyam M A; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Amir, Junaidah; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Hadi, A Hamid A; Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Taha, Manal Mohamed Elhassan; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Teh, Xinsheng; Loke, Mun Fai; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Rahmani, Mawardi; Mohan, Syam

    2013-07-15

    Pyranocycloartobiloxanthone A (PA), a xanthone derived from the Artocarpus obtusus Jarret, belongs to the Moraceae family which is native to the tropical forest of Malaysia. In this study, the efficacy of PA as a gastroprotective compound was examined against ethanol-induced ulcer model in rats. The rats were pretreated with PA and subsequently exposed to acute gastric lesions induced by absolute ethanol. The ulcer index, gastric juice acidity, mucus content, histological analysis, glutathione (GSH) levels, malondialdehyde level (MDA), nitric oxide (NO) and non-protein sulfhydryl group (NP-SH) contents were evaluated in vivo. The activities of PA as anti-Helicobacter pylori, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor and free radical scavenger were also investigated in vitro. The results showed that the oral administration of PA protects gastric mucosa from ethanol-induced gastric lesions. PA pretreatment significantly (p<0.05) restored the depleted GSH, NP-SH and NO levels in the gastric homogenate. Moreover, PA significantly (p<0.05) reduced the elevated MDA level due to ethanol administration. The gastroprotective effect of PA was associated with an over expression of HSP70 and suppression of Bax proteins in the ulcerated tissue. In addition, PA exhibited a potent FRAP value and significant COX-2 inhibition. It also showed a significant minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against H. pylori bacterium. The efficacy of PA was accomplished safely without the presence of any toxicological parameters. The results of the present study indicate that the gastroprotective effect of PA might contribute to the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties as well as the anti-apoptotic mechanism and antibacterial action against Helicobacter pylori. PMID:23570997

  6. Experimental investigation and planetary implications of the stability of clathrate hydrates in aqueous solution at icy satellite conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, M.; Choukroun, M.; Barmatz, M.; Hodyss, R. P.; Smythe, W. D.

    2012-12-01

    Clathrate hydrates consist of hydrogen-bonded water molecules forming cages in which gas molecules are trapped individually. They are among the favored volatile reservoirs in solar system bodies, and are expected to play an important role in many processes: accretion of volatiles in planetesimals, outgassing on Titan, Enceladus, and comets. Their insulating thermal properties and high mechanical strength also bear important implications for understanding the evolution of icy satellites like Europa. However, the conditions allowing for their formation and/or their dissociation and the release of volatiles to the atmosphere (Titan) or the plumes (Enceladus) are still poorly understood. This is mainly because of a lack of knowledge on the stability of mixed clathrate hydrates in presence of anti-freeze agents such as ammonia. We have developed a high-pressure cryogenic calorimeter to address this deficiency in the literature. This liquid nitrogen - cooled Setaram BT2.15 calorimeter is located at the JPL Ice Physics Laboratory. The temperature range achievable with this instrument is 77-473 K. This calorimeter uses Calvet elements (3D arrays of thermocouples) to measure the heat flow required to follow a predefined heating rate within a sample and a reference cell with a resolution of 0.1 μW. A gas handling system has been designed and fabricated in house to reach pressures up to 100 bars, corresponding to several km depth in icy satellites. The thermodynamic properties of CO2 and CH4 clathrates with ammonia are under investigation, and the results will be used to constrain a statistical thermodynamic model of clathrates for applications to planetary environments. Preliminary results will be shown at the meeting. This work has been conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. Support from the Minnesota Space Grant Consortium, the NASA Outer Planets Research program, and government sponsorship are gratefully

  7. High temperature thermoelectric properties of the type-I clathrate Ba8NixGe46-x-y□y

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydemir, U.; Candolfi, C.; Ormeci, A.; Baitinger, M.; Oeschler, N.; Steglich, F.; Grin, Yu

    2014-12-01

    Polycrystalline samples of the type-I clathrate Ba8NixGe46-x-y□y were synthesized for 0.2 ⩽ x ⩽ 3.5 by melt quenching and for 3.5clathrate framework at this temperature was found to be x ≈ 4.2 atoms per unit cell. Thermoelectric and thermodynamic properties of the type-I clathrate were investigated from 300 to 700 K by means of electrical resistivity, thermopower, thermal conductivity and specific heat measurements. As the Ni content increases, the electronic properties gradually evolve from a metallic character (x < 3.5) towards a highly doped semiconducting state (x ⩾ 3.5). Below x ≈ 4.0 transport is dominated by electrons, while further addition of Ni (x ≈ 4.2) switches the electrical conduction to p-type. Maximum value of the dimensionless thermoelectric figure of merit ZT ≈ 0.2 was achieved at 500 K and 650 K for x ≈ 2.0 and x ≈ 3.8, respectively.

  8. Theoretical study of phase transitions in Kr and Ar clathrate hydrates from structure II to structure I under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbotin, Oleg S.; Adamova, Tatiana P.; Belosludov, Rodion V.; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Kudoh, Jun-ichi; Rodger, P. M.; Belosludov, Vladimir R.

    2009-09-01

    The theory developed in our earlier papers is extended to predict dynamical and thermodynamic properties of clathrate structures by accounting for the possibility of multiple filling of cavities by guest molecules. The method is applied to the thermodynamic properties of argon and krypton hydrates, considering both structures I (sI) and II (sII), in which the small cages can be singly occupied and large cages of sII can be singly or doubly occupied. It was confirmed that the structure of the clathrate hydrate is determined by two main factors: intermolecular interaction between guest and host molecules and the configurational entropy. It is shown that for guests weakly interacting with water molecules, such as argon or krypton, the free energy of host lattices without the contribution of entropy is the main structure-determining factor for clathrate hydrates, and it is a cause of hydrate sII formation at low pressure with these guests. Explicit account of the entropy contribution in the Gibbs free energy allows one to determine the stability of hydrate phases and to estimate the line of structural transition from sII to sI in P-T plane. The structural transition between sII and sI in argon and krypton hydrates at high pressure is shown to be the consequence of increasing intermolecular interaction and the degree of occupancy of the large cavities.

  9. Theoretical study of phase transitions in Kr and Ar clathrate hydrates from structure II to structure I under pressure.

    PubMed

    Subbotin, Oleg S; Adamova, Tatiana P; Belosludov, Rodion V; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Kudoh, Jun-ichi; Rodger, P M; Belosludov, Vladimir R

    2009-09-21

    The theory developed in our earlier papers is extended to predict dynamical and thermodynamic properties of clathrate structures by accounting for the possibility of multiple filling of cavities by guest molecules. The method is applied to the thermodynamic properties of argon and krypton hydrates, considering both structures I (sI) and II (sII), in which the small cages can be singly occupied and large cages of sII can be singly or doubly occupied. It was confirmed that the structure of the clathrate hydrate is determined by two main factors: intermolecular interaction between guest and host molecules and the configurational entropy. It is shown that for guests weakly interacting with water molecules, such as argon or krypton, the free energy of host lattices without the contribution of entropy is the main structure-determining factor for clathrate hydrates, and it is a cause of hydrate sII formation at low pressure with these guests. Explicit account of the entropy contribution in the Gibbs free energy allows one to determine the stability of hydrate phases and to estimate the line of structural transition from sII to sI in P-T plane. The structural transition between sII and sI in argon and krypton hydrates at high pressure is shown to be the consequence of increasing intermolecular interaction and the degree of occupancy of the large cavities. PMID:19778129

  10. High temperature thermoelectric properties of the type-I clathrate Ba8NixGe46-x-y□y.

    PubMed

    Aydemir, U; Candolfi, C; Ormeci, A; Baitinger, M; Oeschler, N; Steglich, F; Grin, And Yu

    2014-12-01

    Polycrystalline samples of the type-I clathrate Ba(8)Ni(x)Ge(46-x-y)□(y) were synthesized for 0.2 ⩽ x ⩽ 3.5 by melt quenching and for 3.5clathrate framework at this temperature was found to be x ≈ 4.2 atoms per unit cell. Thermoelectric and thermodynamic properties of the type-I clathrate were investigated from 300 to 700 K by means of electrical resistivity, thermopower, thermal conductivity and specific heat measurements. As the Ni content increases, the electronic properties gradually evolve from a metallic character (x < 3.5) towards a highly doped semiconducting state (x ⩾ 3.5). Below x ≈ 4.0 transport is dominated by electrons, while further addition of Ni (x ≈ 4.2) switches the electrical conduction to p-type. Maximum value of the dimensionless thermoelectric figure of merit ZT ≈ 0.2 was achieved at 500 K and 650 K for x ≈ 2.0 and x ≈ 3.8, respectively. PMID:25373324

  11. Systematic Studies on Anharmonicity of Rattling Phonons in Type I Clathrates by Low Temperature Heat Capacity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanigaki, Katsumi; Wu, Jiazhen; Tanabe, Yoichi; Heguri, Satoshi; Shiimotani, Hidekazu; Tohoku University Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Clathrates are featured by cage-like polyhedral hosts mainly composed of the IVth group elements of Si, Ge, or Sn and alkali metal or alkaline-earth metal elements can be accommodated inside as a guest atom. One of the most intriguing issues in clathrates is their outstanding high thermoelectric performances thanks to the low thermal conductivity. Being irrespective of good electric conductivity σ, the guest atom motions provide a low-energy lying less-dispersive phonons and can greatly suppress thermal conductivity κ. This makes clathrates close to the concept of ``phonon glass electron crystal: PGEC'' and useful in thermoelectric materials from the viewpoint of the figure of merit. In the present study, we show that the local phonon anharmonicity indicated by the tunneling-term of the endohedral atoms (αT) and the itinerant-electron term (γeT), both of which show T-linear dependences in specific heat Cp, can successfully be separated by employing single crystals with various carrier concentrations in a wide range of temperture experimennts. The factors affecting on the phonon anharmonicity as well as the strength of electron-phonon interactions will be discussed based on our recent experiments. The research was financially supported by Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture, Grant in Aid for Science, and Technology of Japan.

  12. Flavonoid Compound Icariin Activates Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α in Chondrocytes and Promotes Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    He, Qiling; Wang, Jianqi; Shiu, Hoi Ting; Shu, Yinglan; Tsang, Wing Pui; Liang, Shuang; Zhao, Kai; Wan, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage has poor capability for repair following trauma or degenerative pathology due to avascular property, low cell density and migratory ability. Discovery of novel therapeutic approaches for articular cartilage repair remains a significant clinical need. Hypoxia is a hallmark for cartilage development and pathology. Hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α) has been identified as a key mediator for chondrocytes to response to fluctuations of oxygen availability during cartilage development or repair. This suggests that HIF-1α may serve as a target for modulating chondrocyte functions. In this study, using phenotypic cellular screen assays, we identify that Icariin, an active flavonoid component from Herba Epimedii, activates HIF-1α expression in chondrocytes. We performed systemic in vitro and in vivo analysis to determine the roles of Icariin in regulation of chondrogenesis. Our results show that Icariin significantly increases hypoxia responsive element luciferase reporter activity, which is accompanied by increased accumulation and nuclear translocation of HIF-1α in murine chondrocytes. The phenotype is associated with inhibiting PHD activity through interaction between Icariin and iron ions. The upregulation of HIF-1α mRNA levels in chondrocytes persists during chondrogenic differentiation for 7 and 14 days. Icariin (10−6 M) increases the proliferation of chondrocytes or chondroprogenitors examined by MTT, BrdU incorporation or colony formation assays. Icariin enhances chondrogenic marker expression in a micromass culture including Sox9, collagen type 2 (Col2α1) and aggrecan as determined by real-time PCR and promotes extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis indicated by Alcian blue staining. ELISA assays show dramatically increased production of aggrecan and hydroxyproline in Icariin-treated cultures at day 14 of chondrogenic differentiation as compared with the controls. Meanwhile, the expression of chondrocyte catabolic marker genes

  13. Flavonoid Compound Icariin Activates Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α in Chondrocytes and Promotes Articular Cartilage Repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengzhen; Zhang, Fengjie; He, Qiling; Wang, Jianqi; Shiu, Hoi Ting; Shu, Yinglan; Tsang, Wing Pui; Liang, Shuang; Zhao, Kai; Wan, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage has poor capability for repair following trauma or degenerative pathology due to avascular property, low cell density and migratory ability. Discovery of novel therapeutic approaches for articular cartilage repair remains a significant clinical need. Hypoxia is a hallmark for cartilage development and pathology. Hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α) has been identified as a key mediator for chondrocytes to response to fluctuations of oxygen availability during cartilage development or repair. This suggests that HIF-1α may serve as a target for modulating chondrocyte functions. In this study, using phenotypic cellular screen assays, we identify that Icariin, an active flavonoid component from Herba Epimedii, activates HIF-1α expression in chondrocytes. We performed systemic in vitro and in vivo analysis to determine the roles of Icariin in regulation of chondrogenesis. Our results show that Icariin significantly increases hypoxia responsive element luciferase reporter activity, which is accompanied by increased accumulation and nuclear translocation of HIF-1α in murine chondrocytes. The phenotype is associated with inhibiting PHD activity through interaction between Icariin and iron ions. The upregulation of HIF-1α mRNA levels in chondrocytes persists during chondrogenic differentiation for 7 and 14 days. Icariin (10-6 M) increases the proliferation of chondrocytes or chondroprogenitors examined by MTT, BrdU incorporation or colony formation assays. Icariin enhances chondrogenic marker expression in a micromass culture including Sox9, collagen type 2 (Col2α1) and aggrecan as determined by real-time PCR and promotes extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis indicated by Alcian blue staining. ELISA assays show dramatically increased production of aggrecan and hydroxyproline in Icariin-treated cultures at day 14 of chondrogenic differentiation as compared with the controls. Meanwhile, the expression of chondrocyte catabolic marker genes

  14. Systemic Resistance Induced by Volatile Organic Compounds Emitted by Plant Growth-Promoting Fungi in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Naznin, Hushna Ara; Kiyohara, Daigo; Kimura, Minako; Miyazawa, Mitsuo; Shimizu, Masafumi; Hyakumachi, Mitsuro

    2014-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) were extracted and identified from plant growth-promoting fungi (PGPF), Phoma sp., Cladosporium sp. and Ampelomyces sp., using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Among the three VOC extracted, two VOC blends (emitted from Ampelomyces sp. and Cladosporium sp.) significantly reduced disease severity in Arabidopsis plants against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst). Subsequently, m-cresol and methyl benzoate (MeBA) were identified as major active volatile compounds from Ampelomyces sp. and Cladosporium sp., respectively, and found to elicit induced systemic resistance (ISR) against the pathogen. Molecular signaling for disease suppression by the VOC were investigated by treating different mutants and transgenic Arabidopsis plants impaired in salicylic acid (SA) or Jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) signaling pathways with m-cresol and MeBA followed by challenge inoculation with Pst. Results show that the level of protection was significantly lower when JA/ET-impaired mutants were treated with MeBA, and in SA-, and JA/ET-disrupted mutants after m-cresol treatment, indicating the involvement of these signal transduction pathways in the ISR primed by the volatiles. Analysis of defense-related genes by real-time qRT-PCR showed that both the SA-and JA-signaling pathways combine in the m-cresol signaling of ISR, whereas MeBA is mainly involved in the JA-signaling pathway with partial recruitment of SA-signals. The ET-signaling pathway was not employed in ISR by the volatiles. Therefore, this study identified two novel volatile components capable of eliciting ISR that may be promising candidates in biological control strategy to protect plants from diseases. PMID:24475190

  15. Systemic resistance induced by volatile organic compounds emitted by plant growth-promoting fungi in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Naznin, Hushna Ara; Kiyohara, Daigo; Kimura, Minako; Miyazawa, Mitsuo; Shimizu, Masafumi; Hyakumachi, Mitsuro

    2014-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) were extracted and identified from plant growth-promoting fungi (PGPF), Phoma sp., Cladosporium sp. and Ampelomyces sp., using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Among the three VOC extracted, two VOC blends (emitted from Ampelomyces sp. and Cladosporium sp.) significantly reduced disease severity in Arabidopsis plants against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst). Subsequently, m-cresol and methyl benzoate (MeBA) were identified as major active volatile compounds from Ampelomyces sp. and Cladosporium sp., respectively, and found to elicit induced systemic resistance (ISR) against the pathogen. Molecular signaling for disease suppression by the VOC were investigated by treating different mutants and transgenic Arabidopsis plants impaired in salicylic acid (SA) or Jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) signaling pathways with m-cresol and MeBA followed by challenge inoculation with Pst. Results show that the level of protection was significantly lower when JA/ET-impaired mutants were treated with MeBA, and in SA-, and JA/ET-disrupted mutants after m-cresol treatment, indicating the involvement of these signal transduction pathways in the ISR primed by the volatiles. Analysis of defense-related genes by real-time qRT-PCR showed that both the SA-and JA-signaling pathways combine in the m-cresol signaling of ISR, whereas MeBA is mainly involved in the JA-signaling pathway with partial recruitment of SA-signals. The ET-signaling pathway was not employed in ISR by the volatiles. Therefore, this study identified two novel volatile components capable of eliciting ISR that may be promising candidates in biological control strategy to protect plants from diseases. PMID:24475190

  16. [Black water bloom induced by different types of organic matters and forming mechanisms of major odorous compounds].

    PubMed

    Lu, Xin; Feng, Zi-Yan; Shang, Jing-Ge; Fan, Cheng-Xin; Deng, Jian-Cai

    2012-09-01

    Self-made glass reactors were employed to study the occurrence of black water bloom induced by different types of organic matters, to clarify the precursor of volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs), and then to preliminarily study its degradation mechanisms under laboratory-controlled conditions. Our research indicated that provided organic matrix were as high as 1.0 g x L(-1), all organic matters could blacken the lake water regardless of sulfur appearance or not. However, compared with sulfur-free compounds that took more than 13 d to blacken the water, sulfur containing materials could accelerate the occurrence of black color to 7-13 d and increase the water chromaticity to above 410 which causing offensive odor consisted chiefly of DMDS, DMTS and DMTeS. Based on the function of methionine on the production of VOSCs, methionine was identified to be the precursors of VOSCs. Methionine was readily broke down by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) (also other bacteria) (at 95% with the duration of 35 d) to produce hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol, and dominantly dimethylpolysulfides such as DMDS, DMTS and DMTeS. And the occurrence of black color had been advanced from 13 d to 8 d. Methanogenic bacteria slightly inhibited the degradation of methionine and reduced the evolution of sulfide. Therefore, the addition of methanogenic bacteria inhibitor set the formation of black color ahead by 1 d. Methionine was also degraded by nonbiodegradation, but it was a secondary pathway and cannot completely degrade methionine to blacken the water. PMID:23243873

  17. The angular structure of ONC201, a TRAIL pathway-inducing compound, determines its potent anti-cancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Jessica; Kline, Christina Leah; Pottorf, Richard S.; Nallaganchu, Bhaskara Rao; Olson, Gary L.; Dicker, David T.; Allen, Joshua E.; El-Deiry, Wafik S.

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified TRAIL-inducing compound 10 (TIC10), also known as NSC350625 or ONC201, from a NCI chemical library screen as a small molecule that has potent anti-tumor efficacy and a benign safety profile in preclinical cancer models. The chemical structure that was originally published by Stahle, et. al. in the patent literature was described as an imidazo[1,2-a]pyrido[4,3-d]pyrimidine derivative. The NCI and others generally accepted this as the correct structure, which was consistent with the mass spectrometry analysis outlined in the publication by Allen et. al. that first reported the molecule's anticancer properties. A recent publication demonstrated that the chemical structure of ONC201 material from the NCI is an angular [3,4-e] isomer of the originally disclosed, linear [4,3-d] structure. Here we confirm by NMR and X-ray structural analysis of the dihydrochloride salt form that the ONC201 material produced by Oncoceutics is the angular [3,4-e] structure and not the linear structure originally depicted in the patent literature and by the NCI. Similarly, in accordance with our biological evaluation, the previously disclosed anti-cancer activity is associated with the angular structure and not the linear isomer. Together these studies confirm that ONC201, produced by Oncoceutics or obtained from the NCI, possesses an angular [3,4-e] structure that represents the highly active anti-cancer compound utilized in prior preclinical studies and now entering clinical trials in advanced cancers. PMID:25587031

  18. Compound 13, an α1-selective small molecule activator of AMPK, inhibits Helicobacter pylori-induced oxidative stresses and gastric epithelial cell apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Hangyong; Zhu, Huanghuang; Lin, Zhou; Lin, Gang; Lv, Guoqiang

    2015-08-07

    Half of the world's population experiences Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, which is a main cause of gastritis, duodenal and gastric ulcer, and gastric cancers. In the current study, we investigated the potential role of compound 13 (C13), a novel α1-selective small molecule activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), against H. pylori-induced cytotoxicity in cultured gastric epithelial cells (GECs). We found that C13 induced significant AMPK activation, evidenced by phosphorylation of AMPKα1 and ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase), in both primary and transformed GECs. Treatment of C13 inhibited H. pylori-induced GEC apoptosis. AMPK activation was required for C13-mediated GEC protection. Inhibition of AMPK kinase activity by the AMPK inhibitor Compound C, or silencing AMPKα1 expression by targeted-shRNAs, alleviated C13-induced GEC protective activities against H. pylori. Significantly, C13 inhibited H. pylori-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in GECs. C13 induced AMPK-dependent expression of anti-oxidant gene heme oxygenase (HO-1) in GECs. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) and tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), two HO-1 inhibitors, not only suppressed C13-mediated ROS scavenging activity, but also alleviated its activity in GECs against H. pylori. Together, these results indicate that C13 inhibits H. pylori-induced ROS production and GEC apoptosis through activating AMPK–HO–1 signaling. - Highlights: • We synthesized compound 13 (C13), a α1-selective small molecule AMPK activator. • C13-induced AMPK activation requires α1 subunit in gastric epithelial cells (GECs). • C13 enhances Helicobacter pylori-induced pro-survival AMPK activation to inhibit GEC apoptosis. • C13 inhibits H. pylori-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in GECs. • AMPK-heme oxygenase (HO-1) activation is required for C13-mediated anti-oxidant activity.

  19. Effects of benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine compounds on the GABA-induced response in frog isolated sensory neurones.

    PubMed

    Yakushiji, T; Fukuda, T; Oyama, Y; Akaike, N

    1989-11-01

    1. The effects of benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine compounds on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced chloride current (ICl) were studied in frog isolated sensory neurones by use of a concentration-jump (termed 'concentration-clamp') technique, under single-electrode voltage-clamp conditions. The drugs used were classified into four categories as follows: full benzodiazepine receptor agonists (diazepam, clonazepam, nitrazepam, midazolam, clotiazepam and etizolam), partial agonists (CL 218,872, Ro 16-6028, Ro 17-1812 and Ro 23-0364), inverse agonists (Ro 15-3505, FG 7142 and beta-CCE) and a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, Ro 15-1788 (flumazenil). 2. All full agonists at concentrations of 3 x 10(-6) M or less increased dose-dependently the peak amplitude of ICl elicited by 3 x 10(-6) M GABA to twice to three times larger than the control. However, no further augmentation of the GABA response was observed at concentrations of 1 x 10(-5) M or higher. Partial agonists also showed a dose-dependent augmentation of the GABA response at concentrations ranging from 3 x 10(-8) M to 3 x 10(-5) M, but their efficacies of augmentation of the GABA response were only about half or less of those of full agonists. Of the inverse agonists, beta-CCE had a unique dose-dependent effect on the GABA response. Beta-CCE reduced dose-dependently the GABA response at concentrations of less than 3 x 10(-6) M, but augmented it at concentrations of 3 x 10(-5) M and 6 x 10(-5) M. The inverse agonists reduced dose-dependently the GABA response. The benzodiazepine antagonist, flumazenil, slightly augmented the GABA response at concentrations between 3 x 10 7M and 3 x 10 5 M. 3. These results show clear differences in the effects on the GABA response between these four categories of compounds known to affect the benzodiazepine recognition site of the GABA/ benzodiazepine receptor-chloride channel complex. Our experimental system of frog isolated sensory neurones and a 'concentration

  20. Chrysotoxine, a novel bibenzyl compound, inhibits 6-hydroxydopamine induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells via mitochondria protection and NF-κB modulation.

    PubMed

    Song, Ju-Xian; Shaw, Pang-Chui; Sze, Cho-Wing; Tong, Yao; Yao, Xin-Sheng; Ng, Tzi-Bun; Zhang, Yan-Bo

    2010-11-01

    Some naturally occurring bibenzyl compounds have been reported as free radical scavengers. The present study tested our hypothesis that bibenzyl compounds may be neuroprotective against apoptosis induced by the neurotoxins. Five structurally similar bibenzyl derivatives were tested for their protective effect against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced toxicity in the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. The results showed that one bibenzyl compound, namely chrysotoxine, significantly attenuated 6-OHDA-induced cell death. The subsequent mechanism study demonstrated that chrysotoxine significantly attenuated 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis characterized by DNA fragmentation and nuclear condensation in a dose-dependent manner. 6-OHDA-induced intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), activation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2, and mitochondrial dysfunctions, including the decrease of membrane potential, increase of intracellular free Ca2+, release of cytochrome c, imbalance of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and activation of caspase-3 were strikingly attenuated by chrysotoxine pretreatment. Meanwhile, chrysotoxine counteracted NF-κB activation by blocking its translocation to the nucleus, thereby preventing up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and intracellular NO release. The data provide the first evidence that chrysotoxine protects SH-SY5Y cells against 6-OHDA toxicity possibly through mitochondria protection and NF-κB modulation. Chrysotoxine is thus a candidate for further evaluation of its protection against neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease. PMID:20708055

  1. In vitro evaluation of candidate pretreatment and treatment compounds against sulfur mustard (HD) -induced human mononuclear leukocyte toxicity using a dye exclusion cell viability assay

    SciTech Connect

    Starner, R.A.; Blank, J.A.; Hobson, D.W.; Menton, R.G.; Meier, H.L.

    1993-05-13

    An assay measuring propidium iodide (PI) incorporation into nonviable human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBML) was established at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense (USAMRICD), and the technology transferred and implemented at Battelle's Medical Research and Evaluation Facility (MREF) for use as a screen to evaluate candidate compounds for direct cytotoxicity as well as for efficacy in preventing HD-induced cytotoxicity. For assay transition, studies were performed to establish a fixed HD challenge concentration; to develop a positive and negative control dataset; and to establish the reproducibility in obtaining an EC50 (concentration of candidate compound required to provide 50 percent protection against the fixed HD concentration) for niacinamide (NM). Various concentrations of candidate compounds were preincubated for 15 to 30 min with PBML prior to adding the fixed HD challenge. At 24 hr after exposure, PI was added to the cultures and the number of nonviable (PI positive) cells was determined by flow cytometry. Positive (NM pretreated) and negative (HD only) controls were examined concurrently and used to maintain data quality. From this dataset, candidate compounds were evaluated for direct cytotoxic effects and for efficacy in preventing HD-induced cytotoxicity. EC50 values for effective candidate compounds were estimated and reported for ranking compound effectiveness. Results from these studies demonstrate assay function and reproducibility during routine screening operations.

  2. Bowman-Birk inhibitor and genistein among soy compounds that synergistically inhibit nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 pathways in lipopolysaccharide-induced macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inflammation has an important role in the development of chronic diseases. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory properties of eight soybean bioactive compounds using lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages. Genistein, daidzein, mix isoflavone glucosides, saponin A group glyco...

  3. Ferromagnetic coupling mediated by Coπ non-covalent contacts in a pentacoordinate Co(ii) compound showing field-induced slow relaxation of magnetization.

    PubMed

    Nemec, I; Herchel, R; Trávníček, Z

    2016-08-01

    [Co(II)(dpt)(NCS)2], where dpt = bis(3-aminopropyl)amine, was identified as a pentacoordinate Co(II) compound showing field-induced slow relaxation of magnetization. Furthermore, intermolecular ferromagnetic coupling mediated by Coπ non-covalent contacts, where π orbitals originate from the thiocyanato ligand, is reported for the first time. PMID:27435418

  4. Cross-nucleation between clathrate hydrate polymorphs: Assessing the role of stability, growth rate, and structure matching

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Andrew H.; Molinero, Valeria

    2014-02-28

    Cross-nucleation is a phenomenon where a new crystal nucleates and grows upon the surface of a different polymorph. Previous studies indicate that faster growth rate of the new crystal is a necessary but not sufficient condition for cross-nucleation. The thermodynamic stability of the different polymorphs can also affect cross-nucleation by modulating the rates of crystal growth. The interplay between thermodynamic stability of the polymorphs involved, the growth rate of the crystals, and the need for creation of an interfacial transition layer that seamlessly connects the two structures has not yet been fully elucidated. Predicting cross-nucleation is particularly challenging for clathrate hydrates, for which there are sometimes several polymorphs with similar stability and for which growth rates are not known. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate which factor (stability, growth rate, or formation of interfacial transition layer) controls cross-nucleation between the four known Frank-Kasper clathrate hydrate polymorphs: sI, sII, TS, and HS-I. We investigate the growth and cross-nucleation of these four hydrates filled with a set of guest molecules that produce different order of stabilities for the four crystal structures. We determine that the growth rate of sII clathrate is the fastest, followed by TS, HS-I, and sI. We find that cross-nucleation into or from sII clathrates is preceded by the formation of an interfacial transition layer at the seed crystal/liquid interface because sII does not share a crystal plane with sI, HS-I, or TS. Cross-nucleation between the latter three can occur seamlessly and is determined only by their growth rates. Our results indicate that nucleation of an interfacial transition layer between non-matching polymorphs can control cross-nucleation or lack thereof under conditions of small driving force. Under conditions of sufficient supercooling clathrate hydrate polymorphs cross-nucleate into the fastest

  5. Color- and morphology-controlled self-assembly of new electron-donor-substituted aggregation-induced emission compounds.

    PubMed

    Niu, Caixia; Zhao, Liu; Fang, Tao; Deng, Xuebin; Ma, Hui; Zhang, Jiaxin; Na, Na; Han, Jingsa; Ouyang, Jin

    2014-03-11

    Four electron-donor-substituted aggregation-induced emission (AIE) compounds, N,N'-bis(4-methoxylsalicylidene)-p-phenylenediamine (BSPD-OMe), N,N'-bis(4-methylsalicylidene)-p-phenylenediamine (BSPD-Me), N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-p-phenylenediamine (BSPD), and N,N'-bis(4-hydroxylsalicylidene)-p-phenylenediamine (BSPD-OH), are designed and synthesized. They are all found to exhibit controlled self-assembly behaviors and good thermal properties. By changing the terminal electron-donor groups, they are controlled to self-assemble into three emission colors (green, yellow, and orange) and four morphologies (microblocks, microparticles, microrods, and nanowires) in THF/water mixtures. Their self-assembled structures were investigated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fluorescent microscopy images, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) techniques. In addition, the emission colors of BSPD-OH can be successfully controlled to three colors (green → yellow → orange) through simply changing the water fraction (fw). Their thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) results indicate that their thermal decomposition temperatures (Td, corresponding to 5% weight loss) range from 282 to 319 °C. Their differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) data show that BSPD-OH bears a glass-transition temperature (Tg) of 118 °C. The good Td and Tg values will ensure them to be luminogens for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The theoretical calculations and single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of BSPD-OMe and BSPD suggest that the stronger electron donor substituent can twist the molecular conformation, decrease the degree of π conjugation, increase the energy gap, and then induce the emission colors' blue shift and morphology variation. The results are meaningful in controlling the emission colors and self-assembly shapes of these derivatives, and they also provide a novel but facile way to get color-tunable AIE luminogens for OLEDs. PMID

  6. High-pressure/low-temperature neutron scattering of gas inclusion compounds: progress and prospects.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yusheng; Xu, Hongwu; Daemen, Luke L; Lokshin, Konstantin; Tait, Kimberly T; Mao, Wendy L; Luo, Junhua; Currier, Robert P; Hickmott, Donald D

    2007-04-01

    Alternative energy resources such as hydrogen and methane gases are becoming increasingly important for the future economy. A major challenge for using hydrogen is to develop suitable materials to store it under a variety of conditions, which requires systematic studies of the structures, stability, and kinetics of various hydrogen-storing compounds. Neutron scattering is particularly useful for these studies. We have developed high-pressure/low-temperature gas/fluid cells in conjunction with neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering instruments allowing in situ and real-time examination of gas uptake/release processes. We studied the formation of methane and hydrogen clathrates, a group of inclusion compounds consisting of frameworks of hydrogen-bonded H(2)O molecules with gas molecules trapped inside the cages. Our results reveal that clathrate can store up to four hydrogen molecules in each of its large cages with an intermolecular H(2)-H(2) distance of only 2.93 A. This distance is much shorter than that in the solid/metallic hydrogen (3.78 A), suggesting a strong densification effect of the clathrate framework on the enclosed hydrogen molecules. The framework-pressurizing effect is striking and may exist in other inclusion compounds such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Owing to the enormous variety and flexibility of their frameworks, inclusion compounds may offer superior properties for storage of hydrogen and/or hydrogen-rich molecules, relative to other types of compounds. We have investigated the hydrogen storage properties of two MOFs, Cu(3)[Co(CN)(6)](2) and Cu(3)(BTC)(2) (BTC = benzenetricarboxylate), and our preliminary results demonstrate that the developed neutron-scattering techniques are equally well suited for studying MOFs and other inclusion compounds. PMID:17389387

  7. High-pressure/low-temperature neutron scattering of gas inclusion compounds: Progress and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yusheng; Xu, Hongwu; Daemen, Luke L.; Lokshin, Konstantin; Tait, Kimberly T.; Mao, Wendy L.; Luo, Junhua; Currier, Robert P.; Hickmott, Donald D.

    2007-01-01

    Alternative energy resources such as hydrogen and methane gases are becoming increasingly important for the future economy. A major challenge for using hydrogen is to develop suitable materials to store it under a variety of conditions, which requires systematic studies of the structures, stability, and kinetics of various hydrogen-storing compounds. Neutron scattering is particularly useful for these studies. We have developed high-pressure/low-temperature gas/fluid cells in conjunction with neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering instruments allowing in situ and real-time examination of gas uptake/release processes. We studied the formation of methane and hydrogen clathrates, a group of inclusion compounds consisting of frameworks of hydrogen-bonded H2O molecules with gas molecules trapped inside the cages. Our results reveal that clathrate can store up to four hydrogen molecules in each of its large cages with an intermolecular H2–H2 distance of only 2.93 Å. This distance is much shorter than that in the solid/metallic hydrogen (3.78 Å), suggesting a strong densification effect of the clathrate framework on the enclosed hydrogen molecules. The framework-pressurizing effect is striking and may exist in other inclusion compounds such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Owing to the enormous variety and flexibility of their frameworks, inclusion compounds may offer superior properties for storage of hydrogen and/or hydrogen-rich molecules, relative to other types of compounds. We have investigated the hydrogen storage properties of two MOFs, Cu3[Co(CN)6]2 and Cu3(BTC)2 (BTC = benzenetricarboxylate), and our preliminary results demonstrate that the developed neutron-scattering techniques are equally well suited for studying MOFs and other inclusion compounds. PMID:17389387

  8. Effects of Water in Synthetic Lubricant Systems and Clathrate Formation: A Literature Search and Review

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, Ngoc Dung T.

    2001-08-08

    An extensive literature search and a confidential survey were critically analyzed to determine the effects of water on the stability of hydrofluorocarbon/synthetic lubricant systems and to identify key areas requiring further investigation. Following are highlights from the analysis: Clathrate hydrates are solid solutions formed when water molecules are linked through hydrogen bonding creating cavities that can enclose various guest molecules from hydrate formers, such as hydrofluorocarbons R-32, R-125, R-134a, R-407C and R-410A. The four methods for preventing clathrate formation were drying the gas, heating it, reducing its pressure, or using inhibitors. The hydrolysis of polyolester lubricants was mostly acid-catalyzed and its reaction rate constant typically followed the Arrhenius equation of an activated process. Hydrolytic stability improved with hindered molecular structures, and with the presence of acid catcher additives and desiccants. Water vapor can effect the adsorption of long-chain fatty acids and the chemistry of formation of protective oxide film. However, these effects on lubrication can be either positive or negative. Fifty to sixty percent of the moisture injected into an air-conditioning system remained in the refrigerant and the rest mixed with the compressor oil. In an automotive air-conditioning system using R-134a, ice would form at 0 C evaporating temperature when the water content in the vapor refrigerant on the low-pressure side was more than 350 ppm. Moisture would cause the embrittlement of polyethylene terephthalate and the hydrolysis of polyesters, but would reduce the effect of amine additives on fluoroelastomer rubbers. The reactions of water with refrigerants and lubricants would cause formicary and large-pit corrosion in copper tubes, as well as copper plating and sludge formation. Moreover, blockage of capillary tubes increased rapidly in the presence of water. Twenty-four companies responded to the survey. From the responses

  9. Structural transformation and tuning behavior induced by the propylamine concentration in hydrogen clathrate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Park, Seongmin; Kang, Hyery; Shin, Kyuchul; Seo, Yutaek; Lee, Huen

    2015-01-21

    The structures and the guest-host distributions of iso-propylamine (i-PA) and n-propylamine (n-PA) hydrates with hydrogen as a secondary guest were identified by powder X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic analysis. The structure of 11.1 mol% i-PA + H2 hydrate was identified to be hexagonal (space group P63/mmc) with a few unindexed diffraction peaks, while 5.6 mol% i-PA + H2 hydrate had a cubic structure (space group Fd3¯m). Similarly, the structure of 13.3 mol% n-PA + H2 hydrate was found to be monoclinic (space group P2(1)/n), while 5.6 mol% n-PA + H2 hydrate had a cubic structure (space group Fd3¯m). The 'tuning' phenomenon, multiple occupancy of hydrogen in the large cage at the pressure and temperature regions outside of pure hydrogen hydrate stability, was observed in the i-PA + H2 hydrate only when the amine concentration was lower than the stoichiometric value of structure II hydrate. The three-phase (H-L(w)-V) equilibria for alkylamine + H2 + water mixtures were also measured to investigate their thermodynamic stability. PMID:25475482

  10. The first silicon-based cationic clathrate III with high thermal stability: Si172-xPxTey (x=2y, y>20).

    PubMed

    Zaikina, Julia V; Kovnir, Kirill A; Haarmann, Frank; Schnelle, Walter; Burkhardt, Ulrich; Borrmann, Horst; Schwarz, Ulrich; Grin, Yuri; Shevelkov, Andrei V

    2008-01-01

    A new representative of a very rare clathrate III family, Si130P42Te21, has been synthesized from the elements. It crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4(2)/mnm (no. 136) with the unit cell parameters a=19.2632(3) angstroms, c=10.0706(2) angstroms. Single crystal X-ray diffraction and solid state 31P NMR revealed a non-random distribution of phosphorus atoms over the framework positions. The crystal structure features a peculiar packing of large polyhedra Te@(Si/P)(n) never observed before for cationic clathrates. Despite the structural complexity, the composition of the novel clathrate Is in accordance with the Zintl rule, which was confirmed by a combination of optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDXS), as well as by diamagnetic and semiconducting behavior of the synthesized phase. Clathrate Si130P42Te21 exhibits the highest reported thermal stability for this class of materials, it decomposes at 1510 K. This opens new perspectives for the creation of clathrate-based materials for high-temperature applications. PMID:18504725

  11. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of the Bioactive Compound Ferulic Acid Contained in Oldenlandia diffusa on Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hao; Liang, Qing-Hua; Xiong, Xin-Gui; Chen, Jiang; Wu, Dan; Yang, Bo; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Yong; Huang, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to identify the active compounds in Oldenlandia diffusa (OD) decoction and the compounds absorbed into plasma, and to determine whether the absorbed compounds derived from OD exerted any anti-inflammatory effects in rats with collagen induced arthritis (CIA). Methods. The UPLC-PDA (Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography Photo-Diode Array) method was applied to identify the active compounds both in the decoction and rat plasma. The absorbable compound was administered to the CIA rats, and the effects were dynamically observed. X-ray films of the joints and HE stain of synovial tissues were analyzed. The levels of IL-1β and TNF-α in the rats from each group were measured by means of ELISA. The absorbed compound in the plasma of CIA rats was identified as ferulic acid (FA), following OD decoction administration. Two weeks after the administration of FA solution or OD decoction, the general conditions improved compared to the model group. The anti-inflammatory effect of FA was inferior to that of the OD decoction (P < 0.05), based on a comparison of IL-1β TNF-α levels. FA from the OD decoction was absorbed into the body of CIA rats, where it elicited anti-inflammatory responses in rats with CIA. Conclusions. These results suggest that FA is the bioactive compound in OD decoction, and FA exerts its effects through anti-inflammatory pathways. PMID:24883069

  12. Magnetically-induced ferroelectricity in the (ND4)2[FeCl5(D2O)] molecular compound

    PubMed Central

    Alberto Rodríguez-Velamazán, José; Fabelo, Óscar; Millán, Ángel; Campo, Javier; Johnson, Roger D.; Chapon, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The number of magnetoelectric multiferroic materials reported to date is scarce, as magnetic structures that break inversion symmetry and induce an improper ferroelectric polarization typically arise through subtle competition between different magnetic interactions. The (NH4)2[FeCl5(H2O)] compound is a rare case where such improper ferroelectricity has been observed in a molecular material. We have used single crystal and powder neutron diffraction to obtain detailed solutions for the crystal and magnetic structures of (NH4)2[FeCl5(H2O)], from which we determined the mechanism of multiferroicity. From the crystal structure analysis, we observed an order-disorder phase transition related to the ordering of the ammonium counterion. We have determined the magnetic structure below TN, at 2 K and zero magnetic field, which corresponds to a cycloidal spin arrangement with magnetic moments contained in the ac-plane, propagating parallel to the c-axis. The observed ferroelectricity can be explained, from the obtained magnetic structure, via the inverse Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya mechanism. PMID:26417890

  13. Compound K attenuates stromal cell-derived growth factor 1 (SDF-1)-induced migration of C6 glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyuck; Roh, Hyo Sun; Kim, Jai Eun; Park, Sun Dong; Park, Won Hwan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Stromal cell-derived growth factor 1 (SDF-1), also known as chemokine ligand 12, and chemokine receptor type 4 are involved in cancer cell migration. Compound K (CK), a metabolite of protopanaxadiol-type ginsenoside by gut microbiota, is reported to have therapeutic potential in cancer therapy. However, the inhibitory effect of CK on SDF-1 pathway-induced migration of glioma has not yet been established. MATERIALS/METHODS Cytotoxicity of CK in C6 glioma cells was determined using an EZ-Cytox cell viability assay kit. Cell migration was tested using the wound healing and Boyden chamber assay. Phosphorylation levels of protein kinase C (PKC)α and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) were measured by western blot assay, and matrix metallopeptidases (MMP) were measured by gelatin-zymography analysis. RESULTS CK significantly reduced the phosphorylation of PKCα and ERK1/2, expression of MMP9 and MMP2, and inhibited the migration of C6 glioma cells under SDF-1-stimulated conditions. CONCLUSIONS CK is a cell migration inhibitor that inhibits C6 glioma cell migration by regulating its downstream signaling molecules including PKCα, ERK1/2, and MMPs. PMID:27247721

  14. Melatonin and a spin-trap compound block radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in rat brain cells.

    PubMed

    Lai, H; Singh, N P

    1997-01-01

    Effects of in vivo microwave exposure on DNA strand breaks, a form of DNA damage, were investigated in rat brain cells. In previous research, we have found that acute (2 hours) exposure to pulsed (2 microseconds pulses, 500 pps) 2450-MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RFR) (power density 2 mW/cm2, average whole body specific absorption rate 1.2 W/kg) caused an increase in DNA single- and double-strand breaks in brain cells of the rat when assayed 4 hours post exposure using a microgel electrophoresis assay. In the present study, we found that treatment of rats immediately before and after RFR exposure with either melatonin (1 mg/kg/injection, SC) or the spin-trap compound N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone (PBN) (100 mg/kg/injection, i.p.) blocks this effects of RFR. Since both melatonin and PBN are efficient free radical scavengers it is hypothesized that free radicals are involved in RFR-induced DNA damage in the brain cells of rats. Since cumulated DNA strand breaks in brain cells can lead to neurodegenerative diseases and cancer and an excess of free radicals in cells has been suggested to be the cause of various human diseases, data from this study could have important implications for the health effects of RFR exposure. PMID:9261542

  15. Inhibition of SREBP transcriptional activity by a boron-containing compound improves lipid homeostasis in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoping; Xiaoli; Zong, Haihong; Abdulla, Arian; Yang, Ellen S T; Wang, Qun; Ji, Jun-Yuan; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Das, Bhaskar C; Yang, Fajun

    2014-07-01

    Dysregulation of lipid homeostasis is intimately associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Sterol regulatory-element binding proteins (SREBPs) are the master regulators of lipid biosynthesis. Previous studies have shown that the conserved transcriptional cofactor Mediator complex is critically required for the SREBP transcriptional activity, and recruitment of the Mediator complex to the SREBP transactivation domains (TADs) is through the MED15-KIX domain. Recently, we have synthesized several boron-containing small molecules. Among these novel compounds, BF175 can specifically block the binding of MED15-KIX to SREBP1a-TAD in vitro, resulting in an inhibition of the SREBP transcriptional activity and a decrease of SREBP target gene expression in cultured hepatocytes. Furthermore, BF175 can improve lipid homeostasis in the mouse model of diet-induced obesity. Compared with the control, BF175 treatment decreased the expression of SREBP target genes in mouse livers and decreased hepatic and blood levels of lipids. These results suggest that blocking the interaction between SREBP-TADs and the Mediator complex by small molecules may represent a novel approach for treating diseases with aberrant lipid homeostasis. PMID:24608444

  16. Effects of Phenolic Compounds of Fermented Thai Indigenous Plants on Oxidative Stress in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chaiyasut, Chaiyavat; Kusirisin, Winthana; Lailerd, Narissara; Lerttrakarnnon, Peerasak; Suttajit, Maitree; Srichairatanakool, Somdet

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of antioxidant activity of fermentation product (FP) of five Thai indigenous products on oxidative stress in Wistar rats with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes type II. The rats were fed with placebo and with the FP (2 and 6 mL/kg body weight/day) for 6 weeks. Rutin, pyrogallol and gallic acid were main compounds found in the FP. Plasma glucose levels in diabetic rats receiving the higher dose of the FP increased less when compared to the diabetic control group as well as the group receiving the lower FP dose (13.1%, 29%, and 21.1%), respectively. A significant dose-dependent decrease in plasma levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (P < .05) was observed. In addition, the doses of 2 and 6 mL FP/kg/day decreased the levels of erythrocyte ROS in diabetic rats during the experiment, but no difference was observed when compared to the untreated diabetic rat group. Results imply that FP decreased the diabetes-associated oxidative stress to a large extent through the inhibition of lipid peroxidation. The FP also improved the abnormal glucose metabolism slightly but the difference was not statistically significant. Thus, FP may be a potential therapeutic agent by reducing injury caused by oxidative stress associated with diabetes. PMID:21423638