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Sample records for cleaning cecc process

  1. Development of the chemical and electrochemical coal cleaning (CECC) process

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan; Basilio, C.I.

    1992-05-01

    The Chemical and Electrochemical Coal Cleaning (CECC) process developed at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University was studied further in this project. This process offers a new method of physically cleaning both low- and high-rank coals without requiring fine grinding. The CECC process is based on liberating mineral matter from coal by osmotic pressure. The majority of the work was conducted on Middle Wyodak, Pittsburgh No. 8 and Elkhorn No. 3 coals. The coal samples were characterized for a variety of physical and chemical properties. Parametric studies were then conducted to identify the important operating parameters and to establish the optimum conditions. In addition, fundamental mechanisms of the process were studied, including mineral matter liberation, kinetics of mineral matter and pyrite dissolution, ferric ion regeneration schemes and alternative methods of separating the cleaned coal from the liberated mineral matter. The information gathered from the parametric and fundamental studies was used in the design, construction and testing of a bench-scale continuous CECC unit. Using this unit, the ash content of a Middle Wyodak coal was reduced from 6.96 to 1.61% at a 2 lbs/hr throughput. With an Elkhorn No. 3 sample, the ash content was reduced from 9.43 to 1.8%, while the sulfur content was reduced from 1.57 to 0.9%. The mass balance and liberation studies showed that liberation played a more dominant role than the chemical dissolution in removing mineral matter and inorganic sulfur from the different bituminous coals tested. However, the opposite was found to be the case for the Wyodak coal since this coal contained a significant amount of acid-soluble minerals.

  2. Development of the chemical and electrochemical coal cleaning (CECC) process. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan; Basilio, C.I.

    1992-05-01

    The Chemical and Electrochemical Coal Cleaning (CECC) process developed at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University was studied further in this project. This process offers a new method of physically cleaning both low- and high-rank coals without requiring fine grinding. The CECC process is based on liberating mineral matter from coal by osmotic pressure. The majority of the work was conducted on Middle Wyodak, Pittsburgh No. 8 and Elkhorn No. 3 coals. The coal samples were characterized for a variety of physical and chemical properties. Parametric studies were then conducted to identify the important operating parameters and to establish the optimum conditions. In addition, fundamental mechanisms of the process were studied, including mineral matter liberation, kinetics of mineral matter and pyrite dissolution, ferric ion regeneration schemes and alternative methods of separating the cleaned coal from the liberated mineral matter. The information gathered from the parametric and fundamental studies was used in the design, construction and testing of a bench-scale continuous CECC unit. Using this unit, the ash content of a Middle Wyodak coal was reduced from 6.96 to 1.61% at a 2 lbs/hr throughput. With an Elkhorn No. 3 sample, the ash content was reduced from 9.43 to 1.8%, while the sulfur content was reduced from 1.57 to 0.9%. The mass balance and liberation studies showed that liberation played a more dominant role than the chemical dissolution in removing mineral matter and inorganic sulfur from the different bituminous coals tested. However, the opposite was found to be the case for the Wyodak coal since this coal contained a significant amount of acid-soluble minerals.

  3. Building Successful Cleaning Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, John P.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how to build a successful cleaning process in order to most effectively maintain school facilities, explaining that the cleaning processes used plays a critical role in productivity. Focuses on: developing a standardized system; making sure that employees have the right tools for the work they perform; training employees; tracking and…

  4. Cleaning Processes across NASA Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, John M.

    2010-01-01

    All significant surfaces of the hardware must be pre-cleaned to remove dirt, grit, scale, corrosion, grease, oil and other foreign matter prior to any final precision cleaning process. Metallic parts shall be surface treated (cleaned, passivated, pickled and/or coated) as necessary to prevent latent corrosion and contamination.

  5. Coal cleaning process

    SciTech Connect

    Kindig, J.K.

    1994-01-11

    Fine particle coal is beneficiated in specially designed dense medium cyclones to improve particle acceleration and enhance separation efficiency. Raw coal feed is first sized to remove fine coal particles. The coarse fraction is then separated into clean coal, middlings, and refuse. Middlings are comminuted for beneficiation with the fine fraction. The fine fraction is deslimed in a countercurrent cyclone circuit and then separated as multiple fractions of different size specifications in dense medium cyclones. The dense medium contains ultra-fine magnetite particles of a narrow size distribution which aid separation and improves magnetite recovery. Magnetite is recovered from each separated fraction independently, with non-magnetic effluent water from one fraction diluting feed to a smaller-size fraction, and improving both overall coal and magnetite recovery. Magnetite recovery is in specially designed recovery units, based on particle size, with final separation in a rougher-cleaner-scavenger circuit of magnetic drum separators incorporating a high strength rare earth magnet. 12 figs.

  6. Comparison of cleaning processes with respect to cleaning efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesladek, Pavel; Osborne, Steve; Rode, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Photomask technology has attained feature sizes of about 50nm and below. Whereas the main feature size is still above 70-80nm at 20nm technology node recently reported e.g. by Toppan Printing Company as developed, assist features for this node are in the range of 50-60nm. One of the critical aspects of this technology development is the cleaning process. Processes are supposed to clean off contamination and particles down to a defect size of about 40nm and at the same time prevent damage to assist features in the same size range. Due to obvious trade offs between cleaning power and Feature Damage Probability (FPD), this task becomes tricky. Improvement of cleaning processes by raising the power of megasonic (MS) cleaning, or adjusting the speed and size of droplets for spray cleaning occurs at the expense of increased feature damage. Prolongation of physical cleaning steps does not necessarily leads to improvement of the cleaning as shown previously. Susceptibility to feature damage occurs predicatively according to dimension and orientation. This allows us to extrapolate a Feature Damage Limit (FDL) which approximates the smallest feature size for which a process has an acceptable probability of success. In a practical sense, the most advantageous approach seems to be to adjust the cleaning power to the maximum allowed by the FDP and then optimize to the lowest process time necessary to reach expected cleaning efficiency. Since there are several alternative physical cleaning principles, we have to pick the best one for a given application. At this point we have to raise the question of how to compare the cleaning efficiency of processes. The goal of this work is to provide a method for evaluation and comparison of cleaning efficiency between physical cleaning processes and demonstrate the method on an example. We will focus on comparing two physical cleaning processes 1MHz megasonic and binary spray process.

  7. Clean salt process final report

    SciTech Connect

    Herting, D.L.

    1996-09-30

    A process has been demonstrated in the laboratory for separating clean, virtually non-radioactive sodium nitrate from Hanford tank waste using fractional crystallization. The name of the process is the Clean Salt Process. Flowsheet modeling has shown that the process is capable of reducing the volume of vitrified low activity waste (LAW) by 80 to 90 %. Construction of the Clean Salt processing plant would cost less than $1 10 million, and would eliminate the need for building a $2.2 billion large scale vitrification plant planned for Privatization Phase 11. Disposal costs for the vitrified LAW would also be reduced by an estimated $240 million. This report provides a summary of five years of laboratory and engineering development activities, beginning in fiscal year 1992. Topics covered include laboratory testing of a variety of processing options; proof-of-principle demonstrations with actual waste samples from Hanford tanks 241-U-110 (U-110), 241-SY-101 (101-SY), and 241-AN-102 (102-AN); descriptions of the primary solubility phase diagrams that govem the process; a review of environmental regulations governing disposition of the reclaimed salt and an assessment of the potential beneficial uses of the reclaimed salt; preliminary plant design and construction cost estimates. A detailed description is given for the large scale laboratory demonstration of the process using waste from tank 241-AW-101 (101-AW), a candidate waste for 0044vitrification during Phase I Privatization.

  8. Cleaning process for contaminated superalloy powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anglin, A. E.

    1978-01-01

    A cleaning process for removing interstitial contaminants from superalloy powders after wet grinding is described. Typical analyses of oxygen, carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen in ball-milled WAZ-20 superalloy samples after hydrogen plus vacuum cleaning are presented. The hydrogen cleaning step involves heating retorts containing superalloy powder twice under flowing hydrogen with a 24-hour hold at each temperature. The vacuum step involves heating cold-pressed billets two hours at an elevated temperature at a pressure of 10 microPa. It is suggested that the hydrogen plus vacuum cleaning procedure can be applied to superalloys contaminated by other substances in other industrial processes.

  9. Cleaning process for EUV optical substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, F.J.; Spiller, E.A.

    1999-09-28

    A cleaning process is disclosed for surfaces with very demanding cleanliness requirements, such as extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) optical substrates. Proper cleaning of optical substrates prior to applying reflective coatings thereon is very critical in the fabrication of the reflective optics used in EUV lithographic systems, for example. The cleaning process involves ultrasonic cleaning in acetone, methanol, and a pH neutral soap, such as FL-70, followed by rinsing in de-ionized water and drying with dry filtered nitrogen in conjunction with a spin-rinse.

  10. Cleaning process for EUV optical substrates

    DOEpatents

    Weber, Frank J.; Spiller, Eberhard A.

    1999-01-01

    A cleaning process for surfaces with very demanding cleanliness requirements, such as extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) optical substrates. Proper cleaning of optical substrates prior to applying reflective coatings thereon is very critical in the fabrication of the reflective optics used in EUV lithographic systems, for example. The cleaning process involves ultrasonic cleaning in acetone, methanol, and a pH neutral soap, such as FL-70, followed by rinsing in de-ionized water and drying with dry filtered nitrogen in conjunction with a spin-rinse.

  11. ASRM process development in aqueous cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swisher, Bill

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs are included on process development in aqueous cleaning which is taking place at the Aerojet Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) Division under a NASA Marshall Space and Flight Center contract for design, development, test, and evaluation of the ASRM including new production facilities. The ASRM will utilize aqueous cleaning in several manufacturing process steps to clean case segments, nozzle metal components, and igniter closures. ASRM manufacturing process development is underway, including agent selection, agent characterization, subscale process optimization, bonding verification, and scale-up validation. Process parameters are currently being tested for optimization utilizing a Taguci Matrix, including agent concentration, cleaning solution temperature, agitation and immersion time, rinse water amount and temperature, and use/non-use of drying air. Based on results of process development testing to date, several observations are offered: aqueous cleaning appears effective for steels and SermeTel-coated metals in ASRM processing; aqueous cleaning agents may stain and/or attack bare aluminum metals to various extents; aqueous cleaning appears unsuitable for thermal sprayed aluminum-coated steel; aqueous cleaning appears to adequately remove a wide range of contaminants from flat metal surfaces, but supplementary assistance may be needed to remove clumps of tenacious contaminants embedded in holes, etc.; and hot rinse water appears to be beneficial to aid in drying of bare steel and retarding oxidation rate.

  12. ASRM process development in aqueous cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swisher, Bill

    1992-12-01

    Viewgraphs are included on process development in aqueous cleaning which is taking place at the Aerojet Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) Division under a NASA Marshall Space and Flight Center contract for design, development, test, and evaluation of the ASRM including new production facilities. The ASRM will utilize aqueous cleaning in several manufacturing process steps to clean case segments, nozzle metal components, and igniter closures. ASRM manufacturing process development is underway, including agent selection, agent characterization, subscale process optimization, bonding verification, and scale-up validation. Process parameters are currently being tested for optimization utilizing a Taguci Matrix, including agent concentration, cleaning solution temperature, agitation and immersion time, rinse water amount and temperature, and use/non-use of drying air. Based on results of process development testing to date, several observations are offered: aqueous cleaning appears effective for steels and SermeTel-coated metals in ASRM processing; aqueous cleaning agents may stain and/or attack bare aluminum metals to various extents; aqueous cleaning appears unsuitable for thermal sprayed aluminum-coated steel; aqueous cleaning appears to adequately remove a wide range of contaminants from flat metal surfaces, but supplementary assistance may be needed to remove clumps of tenacious contaminants embedded in holes, etc.; and hot rinse water appears to be beneficial to aid in drying of bare steel and retarding oxidation rate.

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF COAL CLEANING PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes a 3-year evaluation of coal cleaning processes. It discusses: physical coal cleaning (PCC) technology; the potential role of PCC in producing coals for compliance with SO2 emission regulations; pollution controls for PCC plants; assessment criteria and test ...

  14. Exhaust gas clean up process

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.J.

    1989-04-11

    A method of cleaning an exhaust gas containing particulates, SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ includes prescrubbing with water to remove HCl and most of the particulates, scrubbing with an aqueous absorbent containing a metal chelate and dissolved sulfite salt to remove NO/sub x/ and SO/sub 2/. and regenerating the absorbent solution by controlled heating, electrodialysis and carbonate salt addition. The NO/sub x/ is removed as N/sub 2/ or nitrogen-sulfonate ions and the oxides of sulfur are removed as a valuable sulfate salt.

  15. Exhaust gas clean up process

    DOEpatents

    Walker, R.J.

    1988-06-16

    A method of cleaning an exhaust gas containing particulates, SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ is described. The method involves prescrubbing with water to remove HCl and most of the particulates, scrubbing with an aqueous absorbent containing a metal chelate and dissolved sulfite salt to remove NO/sub x/ and SO/sub 2/, and regenerating the absorbent solution by controlled heating, electrodialysis and carbonate salt addition. The NO/sub x/ is removed as N/sub 2/ gas or nitrogen sulfonate ions and the oxides of sulfur are removed as a valuable sulfate salt. 4 figs.

  16. Exhaust gas clean up process

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    A method of cleaning an exhaust gas containing particulates, SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x includes prescrubbing with water to remove HCl and most of the particulates, scrubbing with an aqueous absorbent containing a metal chelate and dissolved sulfite salt to remove NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2, and regenerating the absorbent solution by controlled heating, electrodialysis and carbonate salt addition. The NO.sub.x is removed as N.sub.2 or nitrogen-sulfonate ions and the oxides of sulfur are removed as a vaulable sulfate salt.

  17. Freezing cleans food processing wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1998-01-01

    Snowfluent is a technology which atomizes wastewater effluent and sprays it into the air as ice crystals at cold temperatures. It has been found effective in treating municipal sewage and food processing wastes. This bulletin reviews pilot- and production-scale studies conducted at an Alberta malt producer to test whether the Snowfluent process has further applications for the treatment of food processing wastes. The study was designed to determine the percentage of nutrients removed by the technology, the point at which contaminants are reduced, the effect of the process on the shallow water table, and the health risk to operators involved.

  18. Freezing cleans food processing wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    Snowfluent is a technology which atomizes wastewater effluent and sprays it into the air as ice crystals at cold temperatures. It has been found effective in treating municipal sewage and food processing wastes. This bulletin reviews pilot- and production-scale studies conducted at an Alberta malt producer to test whether the Snowfluent process has further applications for the treatment of food processing wastes. The study was designed to determine the percentage of nutrients removed by the technology, the point at which contaminants are reduced, the effect of the process on the shallow water table, and the health risk to operators involved.

  19. Integrated coal cleaning, liquefaction, and gasification process

    DOEpatents

    Chervenak, Michael C.

    1980-01-01

    Coal is finely ground and cleaned so as to preferentially remove denser ash-containing particles along with some coal. The resulting cleaned coal portion having reduced ash content is then fed to a coal hydrogenation system for the production of desirable hydrocarbon gases and liquid products. The remaining ash-enriched coal portion is gasified to produce a synthesis gas, the ash is removed from the gasifier usually as slag, and the synthesis gas is shift converted with steam and purified to produce the high purity hydrogen needed in the coal hydrogenation system. This overall process increases the utilization of as-mined coal, reduces the problems associated with ash in the liquefaction-hydrogenation system, and permits a desirable simplification of a liquids-solids separation step otherwise required in the coal hydrogenation system.

  20. Aqueous cleaning and verification processes for precision cleaning of small parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Gale J.; Fishell, Kenneth A.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) has developed a totally aqueous process for precision cleaning and verification of small components. In 1990 the Precision Cleaning Facility at KSC used approximately 228,000 kg (500,000 lbs) of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) 113 in the cleaning operations. It is estimated that current CFC 113 usage has been reduced by 75 percent and it is projected that a 90 percent reduction will be achieved by the end of calendar year 1994. The cleaning process developed utilizes aqueous degreasers, aqueous surfactants, and ultrasonics in the cleaning operation and an aqueous surfactant, ultrasonics, and Total Organic Carbon Analyzer (TOCA) in the nonvolatile residue (NVR) and particulate analysis for verification of cleanliness. The cleaning and verification process is presented in its entirety, with comparison to the CFC 113 cleaning and verification process, including economic and labor costs/savings.

  1. Post cleaning of chemical mechanical polishing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chi-Wen; Dai, Bau-Tong; Yeh, Ching-Fa

    1996-02-01

    We describe a study on the effect of the electrostatic nature in silica particles on the post CMP cleaning behavior. A fall-off for the zeta potential of silica particles is observed as the pH of dip solutions is increased. In this study, we also observed that particle counts on the SiO 2 and the Si 3N 4 dielectric films had a similar dependence on the pH. Furthermore, we confirmed that surface hardness of the wafer is an important factor for particles physically embedded in different dielectric materials during and after the CMP process. The nanoscale surface hardness of dielectric films was measured by the nanoindentation technique. Experimental results showed that particles had difficulty attaching to a harder surface of the dielectric film.

  2. Development of the LICADO coal cleaning process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-31

    Development of the liquid carbon dioxide process for the cleaning of coal was performed in batch, variable volume (semi-continuous), and continuous tests. Continuous operation at feed rates up to 4.5 kg/hr (10-lb/hr) was achieved with the Continuous System. Coals tested included Upper Freeport, Pittsburgh, Illinois No. 6, and Middle Kittanning seams. Results showed that the ash and pyrite rejections agreed closely with washability data for each coal at the particle size tested (-200 mesh). A 0.91 metric ton (1-ton) per hour Proof-of-Concept Plant was conceptually designed. A 181 metric ton (200 ton) per hour and a 45 metric ton (50 ton) per hour plant were sized sufficiently to estimate costs for economic analyses. The processing costs for the 181 metric ton (200 ton) per hour and 45 metric ton (50 ton) per hour were estimated to be $18.96 per metric ton ($17.20 per ton) and $11.47 per metric ton ($10.40 per ton), respectively for these size plants. The costs for the 45 metric ton per hour plant are lower because it is assumed to be a fines recovery plant which does not require a grinding circuit of complex waste handling system.

  3. Cleaning Process Development for Metallic Additively Manufactured Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tramel, Terri L.; Welker, Roger; Lowery, Niki; Mitchell, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Additive Manufacturing of metallic components for aerospace applications offers many advantages over traditional manufacturing techniques. As a new technology, many aspects of its widespread utilization remain open to investigation. Among these are the cleaning processes that can be used for post finishing of parts and measurements to verify effectiveness of the cleaning processes. Many cleaning and drying processes and measurement methods that have been used for parts manufactured using conventional techniques are candidates that may be considered for cleaning and verification of additively manufactured parts. Among these are vapor degreasing, ultrasonic immersion and spray cleaning, followed by hot air drying, vacuum baking and solvent displacement drying. Differences in porosity, density, and surface finish of additively manufactured versus conventionally manufactured parts may introduce new considerations in the selection of cleaning and drying processes or the method used to verify their effectiveness. This presentation will review the relative strengths and weaknesses of different candidate cleaning and drying processes as they may apply to additively manufactured metal parts for aerospace applications. An ultrasonic cleaning technique for exploring the cleanability of parts will be presented along with an example using additively manufactured Inconel 718 test specimens to illustrate its use. The data analysis shows that this ultrasonic cleaning approach results in a well-behaved ultrasonic cleaning/extraction behavior. That is, it does not show signs of accelerated cavitation erosion of the base material, which was later confirmed by neutron imaging. In addition, the analysis indicated that complete cleaning would be achieved by ultrasonic immersion cleaning at approximately 5 minutes, which was verified by subsequent cleaning of additional parts.

  4. EUV mask surface cleaning effects on lithography process performance

    SciTech Connect

    George, Simi; Baclea-an, Lorie Mae; Naulleau, Patrick; Chen, Robert J.; Liang, Ted

    2010-06-18

    The reflective, multilayer based, mask architectures for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography are highly susceptible to surface oxidation and contamination. As a result, EUV masks are expected to undergo cleaning processes in order to maintain the lifetimes necessary for high volume manufacturing. For this study, the impact of repetitive cleaning of EUV masks on imaging performance was evaluated. Two, high quality industry standard, EUV masks are used for this study with one of the masks undergoing repeated cleaning and the other one kept as a reference. Lithographic performance, in terms of process window analysis and line edge roughness, was monitored after every two cleans and compared to the reference mask performance. After 8x clean, minimal degradation is observed. The cleaning cycles will be continued until significant loss imaging fidelity is found.

  5. Preliminary Results of Cleaning Process for Lubricant Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenmann, D.; Brasche, L.; Lopez, R.

    2006-03-01

    Fluorescent penetrant inspection (FPI) is widely used for aviation and other components for surface-breaking crack detection. As with all inspection methods, adherence to the process parameters is critical to the successful detection of defects. Prior to FPI, components are cleaned using a variety of cleaning methods which are selected based on the alloy and the soil types which must be removed. It is also important that the cleaning process not adversely affect the FPI process. There are a variety of lubricants and surface coatings used in the aviation industry which must be removed prior to FPI. To assess the effectiveness of typical cleaning processes on removal of these contaminants, a study was initiated at an airline overhaul facility. Initial results of the cleaning study for lubricant contamination in nickel, titanium and aluminum alloys will be presented.

  6. ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING: A NEW PROCESS FOR CHEMICALLY CLEANING SAVANNAH RIVER WASTE TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ketusky, E; Neil Davis, N; Renee Spires, R

    2008-01-17

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has 49 high level waste (HLW) tanks that must be emptied, cleaned, and closed as required by the Federal Facilities Agreement. The current method of chemical cleaning uses several hundred thousand gallons per tank of 8 weight percent (wt%) oxalic acid to partially dissolve and suspend residual waste and corrosion products such that the waste can be pumped out of the tank. This adds a significant quantity of sodium oxalate to the tanks and, if multiple tanks are cleaned, renders the waste incompatible with the downstream processing. Tank space is also insufficient to store this stream given the large number of tanks to be cleaned. Therefore, a search for a new cleaning process was initiated utilizing the TRIZ literature search approach, and Chemical Oxidation Reduction Decontamination--Ultraviolet (CORD-UV), a mature technology currently used for decontamination and cleaning of commercial nuclear reactor primary cooling water loops, was identified. CORD-UV utilizes oxalic acid for sludge dissolution, but then decomposes the oxalic acid to carbon dioxide and water by UV treatment outside the system being treated. This allows reprecipitation and subsequent deposition of the sludge into a selected container without adding significant volume to that container, and without adding any new chemicals that would impact downstream treatment processes. Bench top and demonstration loop measurements on SRS tank sludge stimulant demonstrated the feasibility of applying CORD-UV for enhanced chemical cleaning of SRS HLW tanks.

  7. Development of cleaning process for immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ching Yu; Yu, D. C.; Lin, John C.; Lin, Burn J.

    2006-03-01

    In immersion lithography, DI water fills the space between the resist surface and the last lens element. However water is also a good solvent for most of the leaching compounds from resists. The leaching materials from the resist and the original impurities in the water from pipelines pose a significant risk on bottom lens deterioration, wafer surface particles, and facility contamination. If the bottom lens surface deteriorates, it can cause flare and reduce transparency. Particles on the wafer surface can degrade image formation. In addition to contaminating the facility, the impurity inside the water can cause stains or defects after the water is evaporated from the wafer surface. In order to reduce the impact of such contamination, we have evaluated many chemicals for removing organic contamination as well as particles. We have collected and characterized immersion-induced particles from cleaning studies on bare silicon wafers. We have also used oxide wafers to simulate the lens damage caused by the cleaning chemicals. In case, a mega sonic power is not suitable for scanners last lens element in production FABs, the emulsion concept has also been adopted to remove the lens organic contaminants. We have studied many chemical and mechanical methods for tool cleaning, and identified those that possess good organic solubility and particle removal efficiency. These cleaning methods will be used in periodic maintenance procedures to ensure freedom from defects in immersion lithography.

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF COAL CLEANING PROCESSES: TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives a background against which requirements for further developments of coal cleaning technology and control techniques for the associated pollutants can be established, as part of a review of U.S. coal cleaning process technologies and related technologies for envir...

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF COAL CLEANING PROCESSES; MASTER TEST PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives a master test plan, presenting the objectives and general structure of a field testing program designed for an environmental source assessment of coal cleaning processes. The report, to be used to prepare test plans for individual coal cleaning sites, reflects th...

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF COAL CLEANING PROCESSES. SECOND ANNUAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the second year's work for EPA by Battelle's Columbus Laboratories on an environmental assessment of coal cleaning processes. Program activities included systems studies, data acquisition, and general program support. (1) Systems studies have been directed at...

  11. PROJECT LISTING - CLEAN PROCESSES BRANCH (SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This list of projects for the Clean Processes Branch (CPB)of NRMRL's Sustainable Technology Division covers CPB projects in the areas of metal finishing and electronics pollution prevention; green engineering for chemical synthesis; solvent and coatings alternatives; separations ...

  12. Enhanced Chemical Cleaning: A New Process for Chemically Cleaning Savannah River Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Ketusky, Edward; Spires, Renee; Davis, Neil

    2009-02-11

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS) there are 49 High Level Waste (HLW) tanks that eventually must be emptied, cleaned, and closed. The current method of chemically cleaning SRS HLW tanks, commonly referred to as Bulk Oxalic Acid Cleaning (BOAC), requires about a half million liters (130,000 gallons) of 8 weight percent (wt%) oxalic acid to clean a single tank. During the cleaning, the oxalic acid acts as the solvent to digest sludge solids and insoluble salt solids, such that they can be suspended and pumped out of the tank. Because of the volume and concentration of acid used, a significant quantity of oxalate is added to the HLW process. This added oxalate significantly impacts downstream processing. In addition to the oxalate, the volume of liquid added competes for the limited available tank space. A search, therefore, was initiated for a new cleaning process. Using TRIZ (Teoriya Resheniya Izobretatelskikh Zadatch or roughly translated as the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving), Chemical Oxidation Reduction Decontamination with Ultraviolet Light (CORD-UV{reg_sign}), a mature technology used in the commercial nuclear power industry was identified as an alternate technology. Similar to BOAC, CORD-UV{reg_sign} also uses oxalic acid as the solvent to dissolve the metal (hydr)oxide solids. CORD-UV{reg_sign} is different, however, since it uses photo-oxidation (via peroxide/UV or ozone/UV to form hydroxyl radicals) to decompose the spent oxalate into carbon dioxide and water. Since the oxalate is decomposed and off-gassed, CORD-UV{reg_sign} would not have the negative downstream oxalate process impacts of BOAC. With the oxalate destruction occurring physically outside the HLW tank, re-precipitation and transfer of the solids, as well as regeneration of the cleaning solution can be performed without adding additional solids, or a significant volume of liquid to the process. With a draft of the pre-conceptual Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) flowsheet, taking full

  13. Novel acid-free cleaning process for mask blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koster, Harald; Branz, Karsten; Dietze, Uwe; Dress, Peter; Hess, Guenter

    2005-06-01

    Knowledge of particle removal during the mask cleaning was transferred to the blank cleaning and vice versa. The experiments are focusing on a variety of blank substrates (glass substrates, chrome on glass blanks and phase shift mask blanks substrates). The principal equipment concept and the process optimization strategies for cleaning of those different kinds of blank substrates are presented. With a fixed process flow, including UV-treatment, Fulljet and MegaSonic treatment, Rinse and Dry, process parameters are varied to define the optimum process conditions. Criteria for an optimum process are particle removal efficiency in general and optical integrity for phase shift mask blanks in particular. The particle removal efficiency for all investigated blank types is within a range of 96-100%. Especially for Ta/SiO2 phase shift mask blanks we demonstrate that during the cleaning process the optical properties only change by 0.07° phase loss and 0.01% transmission loss per cleaning cycle, respectively.

  14. Analysis of chemical coal cleaning processes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Six chemical coal cleaning processes were examined. Conceptual designs and costs were prepared for these processes and coal preparation facilities, including physical cleaning and size reduction. Transportation of fine coal in agglomerated and unagglomerated forms was also discussed. Chemical cleaning processes were: Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, Ledgemont, Ames Laboratory, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (two versions), and Guth Process (KVB). Three of the chemical cleaning processes are similar in concept: PETC, Ledgemont, and Ames. Each of these is based on the reaction of sulfur with pressurized oxygen, with the controlling factor being the partial pressure of oxygen in the reactor. All of the processes appear technically feasible. Economic feasibility is less certain. The recovery of process chemicals is vital to the JPL and Guth processes. All of the processes consume significant amounts of energy in the form of electric power and coal. Energy recovery and increased efficiency are potential areas for study in future more detailed designs. The Guth process (formally designed KVB) appears to be the simplest of the systems evaluated. All of the processes require future engineering to better determine methods for scaling laboratory designs/results to commercial-scale operations. A major area for future engineering is to resolve problems related to handling, feeding, and flow control of the fine and often hot coal.

  15. Update-processing steam generator cleaning solvent at Palo Verde

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, G.

    1996-10-01

    Framatome Technologies Inc.(FTI) recently completed the steam generator chemical cleanings at the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station Units 1, 2 and 3. Over 500,000 gallons of low-level radioactive solvents were generated during these cleanings and were processed on-site. Chemical cleaning solutions containing high concentrations of organic chelating wastes are difficult to reduce in volume using standard technologies. The process that was ultimately used at Palo Verde involved three distinct processing steps: The evaporation step was conducted using FTI`s submerged combustion evaporator (SCE) that has also been successfully used at Arkansas Nuclear One - Unit 1, Three Mile Island - Unit 1, and Oconee on similar waste. The polishing step of the distillate used ultrafiltration (UF) and reverse osmosis (RO) technology that was also used extensively by Ontario Hydro to assist in their processing of chemical cleaning solvent. This technology, equipment, and operations personnel were provided by Zenon Environmental, Inc. The concentrate from the evaporator was absorbed with a special {open_quotes}peat moss{close_quotes} based media that allowed it to be shipped and buried at the Environcare of Utah facility. This is the first time that this absorption media or burial site has been used for chemical cleaning solvent.

  16. Effect of processing rate on seed cotton cleaning equipment performance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The processing rate per unit width of seed cotton cleaning equipment– cylinder cleaners and stick machines– recommended by manufacturers is 4.8-8.2 bales hr-1 m-1 (1.5-2.5 bales hr-1 ft-1). Survey data has indicated that many gins exceed this processing rate. Previous research with picker-harvested ...

  17. Alternative, Green Processes for the Precision Cleaning of Aerospace Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Phillip R.; Grandelli, Heather Eilenfield; Devor, Robert; Hintze, Paul E.; Loftin, Kathleen B.; Tomlin, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    Precision cleaning is necessary to ensure the proper functioning of aerospace hardware, particularly those systems that come in contact with liquid oxygen or hypergolic fuels. Components that have not been cleaned to the appropriate levels may experience problems ranging from impaired performance to catastrophic failure. Traditionally, this has been achieved using various halogenated solvents. However, as information on the toxicological and/or environmental impacts of each came to light, they were subsequently regulated out of use. The solvent currently used in Kennedy Space Center (KSC) precision cleaning operations is Vertrel MCA. Environmental sampling at KSC indicates that continued use of this or similar solvents may lead to high remediation costs that must be borne by the Program for years to come. In response to this problem, the Green Solvents Project seeks to develop state-of-the-art, green technologies designed to meet KSCs precision cleaning needs.Initially, 23 solvents were identified as potential replacements for the current Vertrel MCA-based process. Highly halogenated solvents were deliberately omitted since historical precedents indicate that as the long-term consequences of these solvents become known, they will eventually be regulated out of practical use, often with significant financial burdens for the user. Three solvent-less cleaning processes (plasma, supercritical carbon dioxide, and carbon dioxide snow) were also chosen since they produce essentially no waste stream. Next, experimental and analytical procedures were developed to compare the relative effectiveness of these solvents and technologies to the current KSC standard of Vertrel MCA. Individually numbered Swagelok fittings were used to represent the hardware in the cleaning process. First, the fittings were cleaned using Vertrel MCA in order to determine their true cleaned mass. Next, the fittings were dipped into stock solutions of five commonly encountered contaminants and were

  18. Contamination detection NDE for cleaning process inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marinelli, W. J.; Dicristina, V.; Sonnenfroh, D.; Blair, D.

    1995-01-01

    In the joining of multilayer materials, and in welding, the cleanliness of the joining surface may play a large role in the quality of the resulting bond. No non-intrusive techniques are currently available for the rapid measurement of contamination on large or irregularly shaped structures prior to the joining process. An innovative technique for the measurement of contaminant levels in these structures using laser based imaging is presented. The approach uses an ultraviolet excimer laser to illuminate large and/or irregular surface areas. The UV light induces fluorescence and is scattered from the contaminants. The illuminated area is viewed by an image-intensified CCD (charge coupled device) camera interfaced to a PC-based computer. The camera measures the fluorescence and/or scattering from the contaminants for comparison with established standards. Single shot measurements of contamination levels are possible. Hence, the technique may be used for on-line NDE testing during manufacturing processes.

  19. Photomask cleaning process improvement to minimize ArF haze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Michael; McDonald, Andrew

    2008-04-01

    Growth of "haze" defects on photomasks exposed in ArF lithography is recognized as a serious problem. Haze defects that have grown to detectable sizes can be analysed in situ by techniques such as EDX or Raman, but to analyze at the photomask manufacturing stage requires extraction of residues by solution in DI water. The effect of extraction conditions, including surface area and material, water volume, time, and temperature, has been studied. A standard method to compare residual ion levels is proposed. Various methods for reducing residual ion levels from the photomask cleaning process have been published. These include SPM reduction, oxygen plasma, SC1 dilution, Megasonic agitation, hot rinse, UV exposure, thermal bake, ozone water, ozone gas, and hydrogenated water. Critical parameters for the cleaning process, besides residual ion levels and contamination removal efficiency, include CD shift, AR/chrome damage, scatter bar damage, and on phase shift masks, the change in phase and transmission. An optimized process combining conventional and novel techniques is described. Data is presented to show the importance of controlling all resist strip and clean processes, not just the final clean. It has achieved sulphate levels of 0.2ng/cm2 (well below the critical level for haze growth), as well as improved results for the other critical parameters. This process has been demonstrated to allow ArF exposure of large numbers of wafers without the appearance of haze defects.

  20. NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY ON CLEAN PRODUCTS & PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Led by the United States, represented by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Risk Management Research Laboratory, the Pilot Study on Clean Products and Processes was instituted to create an international forum where current trends, developments, and expert...

  1. NICE3 SO3 Cleaning Process in Semiconductor Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, S.

    1999-01-29

    This fact sheet explains how Anon, Inc., has developed a novel method of removing photoresist--a light-sensitive material used to produce semiconductor wafers for computers--from the computer manufacturing process at reduced cost and greater efficiency. The new technology is technically superior to existing semiconductor cleaning methods and results in reduced use of hazardous chemicals.

  2. NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY - CLEAN PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proposed objective of the NATO/CCMS Pilot on clean products and processes is to facilitate further gains in pollution prevention, waste minimization, and design for the environment. It is anticipated that the free exchange of knowledge, experience, data, and models will fost...

  3. Characterization of the cleaning process on a transferred graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Li-Wei; Chang, Cheng-Kai; Chien, Fan-Ching; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Chen, Peilin; Chen, Fu-Rong; Chang, Chia-Seng

    2014-09-01

    Intrinsic graphene possesses many outstanding physical and chemical properties, but their full explorations are often hindered by the effects of substrate and/or contamination. The authors employ the ultrahigh vacuum transmission electron microscopy equipped with a residual gas analyzer to in-situ characterize an effective decontamination process on a suspended graphene. Raman spectroscopic spectra further verify the cleanness of the resultant graphene membrane. The authors also present two contrasting growth morphologies of copper nanoparticles obtained on both clean and unclean graphene surfaces and show that the intrinsic growth dynamics can only manifest on the surface without contaminations.

  4. Innovative technologies on fuel assemblies cleaning for sodium fast reactors: First considerations on cleaning process

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, N.; Lorcet, H.; Beauchamp, F.; Guigues, E.; Lovera, P.; Fleche, J. L.; Lacroix, M.; Carra, O.; Prele, G.

    2012-07-01

    Within the framework of Sodium Fast Reactor development, innovative fuel assembly cleaning operations are investigated to meet the GEN IV goals of safety and of process development. One of the challenges is to mitigate the Sodium Water Reaction currently used in these processes. The potential applications of aqueous solutions of mineral salts (including the possibility of using redox chemical reactions) to mitigate the Sodium Water Reaction are considered in a first part and a new experimental bench, dedicated to this study, is described. Anhydrous alternative options based on Na/CO{sub 2} interaction are also presented. Then, in a second part, a functional study conducted on the cleaning pit is proposed. Based on experimental feedback, some calculations are carried out to estimate the sodium inventory on the fuel elements, and physical methods like hot inert gas sweeping to reduce this inventory are also presented. Finally, the implementation of these innovative solutions in cleaning pits is studied in regard to the expected performances. (authors)

  5. Northwestern University Facility for Clean Catalytic Process Research

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, Tobin Jay

    2013-05-08

    Northwestern University with DOE support created a Facility for Clean Catalytic Process Research. This facility is designed to further strengthen our already strong catalysis research capabilities and thus to address these National challenges. Thus, state-of-the art instrumentation and experimentation facility was commissioned to add far greater breadth, depth, and throughput to our ability to invent, test, and understand catalysts and catalytic processes, hence to improve them via knowledge-based design and evaluation approaches.

  6. Advanced hot gas cleaning system for coal gasification processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newby, R. A.; Bannister, R. L.

    1994-04-01

    The United States electric industry is entering a period where growth and the aging of existing plants will mandate a decision on whether to repower, add capacity, or do both. The power generation cycle of choice, today, is the combined cycle that utilizes the Brayton and Rankine cycles. The combustion turbine in a combined cycle can be used in a repowering mode or in a greenfield plant installation. Today's fuel of choice for new combined cycle power generation is natural gas. However, due to a 300-year supply of coal within the United States, the fuel of the future will include coal. Westinghouse has supported the development of coal-fueled gas turbine technology over the past thirty years. Working with the U.S. Department of Energy and other organizations, Westinghouse is actively pursuing the development and commercialization of several coal-fueled processes. To protect the combustion turbine and environment from emissions generated during coal conversion (gasification/combustion) a gas cleanup system must be used. This paper reports on the status of fuel gas cleaning technology and describes the Westinghouse approach to developing an advanced hot gas cleaning system that contains component systems that remove particulate, sulfur, and alkali vapors. The basic process uses ceramic barrier filters for multiple cleaning functions.

  7. Copper post-CMP cleaning process on a dry-in/dry-out tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Sanjay; Grief, Malcolm; Gupta, Anand; Murella, Krishna; VanDevender, Barrie

    1998-09-01

    Metal Chemical Mechanical Planarization (CMP) and post CMP cleaning have continued to increase in importance in semiconductor manufacturing. The introduction of copper metallization into semiconductor manufacturing processes has created a need for integrating CMP and cleaning tools, as well as a demand for the development of novel cleaning solutions. One system designed for integrated CMP processing and cleaning, commonly referred to as dry-in/dry-out CMP, is the SpeedFam Auriga C. The Auriga C integrates a widely used polishing tool together with a proven cleaning technique. The key to the operation of the Auriga C cleaning process is the effective operation of the PVA brush cleaners, water track transport, final jet rinse and high-speed spinner dryer. The effective operation of the cleaning mechanism for copper post- CMP cleaning requires the use of new chemical solutions. Typical solutions used for post process cleaning of more mature CMP processes are either ineffective for cleaning or chemically incompatible with the copper process. This paper discusses the cleaning mechanism used in an integrated dry- in/dry-out tool and demonstrates an effective and novel cleaning solution for use with this type of post-CMP cleaning process.

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF COAL CLEANING PROCESSES: HOMER CITY POWER COMPLEX TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a preliminary, preoperational environmental survey conducted at a newly constructed advanced physical coal cleaning plant near Homer City, PA. The work is part of a comprehensive environmental assessment of physical and chemical coal cleaning processes perfor...

  9. Influence of cleaning process on the laser-induced damage threshold of substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Zhengxiang; Ding Tao; Ye Xiaowen; Wang Xiaodong; Ma Bin; Cheng Xinbin; Liu Huasong; Ji Yiqin; Wang Zhanshan

    2011-03-20

    The cleaning process of optical substrates plays an important role during the manufacture of high-power laser coatings. Two kinds of substrates, fused silica and BK7 glass, and two cleaning processes, called process 1 and process 2 having different surfactant solutions and different ultrasonic cleaning parameters, are adopted to compare the influence of the ultrasonic cleaning technique on the substrates. The evaluation standards of the cleaning results include contaminant-removal efficiency, weak absorption, and laser-induced damage threshold of the substrates. For both fused silica and BK7, process 2 is more efficient than process 1. Because acid and alkaline solutions can increase the roughness of BK7, process 2 is unsuitable for BK7 glass cleaning. The parameters of the cleaning protocol should be changed depending on the material of the optical components and the type of contamination.

  10. A Hybrid Gas Cleaning Process for Production of Ultraclean Syngas

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, T.C.; Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.P.; Cicero, D.C.; Jain, S.C.

    2002-09-20

    The overall objective of this project is to develop technologies for cleaning/conditioning IGCC generated syngas to meet contaminant tolerance limits for fuel cell and chemical production applications. The specific goals are to develop processes for (1) removal of reduced sulfur species to sub-ppm levels using a hybrid process consisting of a polymer membrane and a regenerable ZnO-coated monolith or a mixed metal oxide sorbent; (2) removal of hydrogen chloride vapors to sub-ppm levels using an inexpensive, high-surface-area material; and (3) removal of NH3 with acidic adsorbents followed by conversion of this NH3 into nitrogen and water. Existing gasification technologies can effectively and efficiently convert a wide variety of carbonaceous feedstocks (coal, petcoke, resids, biomass, etc.) into syngas, which predominantly contains carbon monoxide and hydrogen. Unfortunately, the impurities present in these carbonaceous feedstocks are converted to gaseous contaminants such as H2S, COS, HCl, NH3, alkali macromolecules and heavy metal compounds (such as Hg) during the gasification process. Removal of these contaminants using conventional processes is thermally inefficient and capital intensive. This research and development effort is focused on investigation of modular processes for removal of sulfur, chlorine, nitrogen and mercury compounds from syngas at elevated temperature and pressures at significantly lower costs than conventional technologies.

  11. Process for cleaning the inner walls of a reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Perrot, M.; Jaccaud, M.

    1985-05-21

    A physico-chemical cleaning process for the inner walls of a reactor which serves to maintain these walls in a state close to their main initial characteristics necessitated by a fluorination reaction, said characteristics being degraded by the deposition of a parasitic phase during the reaction, said initial characteristics being maintained by the use of a protective agent belonging to the group constituted by at least one of the reagents, a product resulting from the reaction, a product foreign to the reaction, but compatible with the substances of the main reaction or by the reaction of a third substance with at least one of the reaction substances or a mixture thereof, forming a renewable protective film on the said walls. The protective agent can be deposited by condensation on the walls before, during or after the main reaction, and then vaporized. The protective agent can be in liquid form, and trickling along the walls.

  12. Crude oil tank-cleaning process recovers oil, reduces hazardous wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G.B. ); Goss, M.L. ); Schoemann, P.; Tyler, S.S. )

    1993-12-13

    An improved crude oil tank-cleaning process can reduce hazardous waste generated from tank bottoms and allow the recovery of valuable hydrocarbons. The process uses chemicals, heat, water, and applications technology. Crude oil tank bottoms are typically high in hydrocarbons -- a valuable raw material if recovered and recycled back to the refining process. Nalco's patented program essentially separates sludge into its components: water, nonhazardous solids, and recovered hydrocarbons. The paper describes industry trends, sludge removal, mechanical cleaning, chemical cleaning, environment and safety, case history of a New Jersey refinery, testing, program design, the cleaning process, hydrocarbon recovery, and return on investment.

  13. Effect of two cleaning processes for bone allografts on gentamicin impregnation and in vitro antibiotic release.

    PubMed

    Coraça-Huber, D C; Hausdorfer, J; Fille, M; Steidl, M; Nogler, M

    2013-06-01

    Bone allografts are a useful and sometimes indispensable tool for the surgeon to repair bone defects. Microbial contamination is a major reason for discarding allografts from bone banks. To improve the number of safe allografts, we suggest chemical cleaning of the grafts followed by antibiotic impregnation. Comparison of two chemical cleaning processes for bone allografts aiming for antibiotic impregnation and consequently delivery rates in vitro. Bone chips of 5-10 mm were prepared from human femoral heads. Two cleaning methods (cleaning A and cleaning B) based on solutions containing hydrogen peroxide, paracetic acid, ethanol and biological detergent were carried out and compared. After the cleaning processes, the bone chips were impregnated with gentamicin. Bacillus subtilis bioassay was used to determine the gentamicin release after intervals of 1-7 days. Differences were compared with non-parametric Mann-Whitney U tests. The zones of inhibition obtained from the bone grafts cleaned with both cleaning processes were similar between the groups. The concentration of the released antibiotic was decreasing gradually over time, following a similar pattern for both groups. The cleaning procedure A as well as the cleaning procedure B for bone allografts allowed the impregnation with gentamicin powder in the same concentrations in both groups. The delivery of gentamicin was similar for both groups. Both cleaning procedures were easy to be carried out, making them suitable for routine use at the bone banks. PMID:22581168

  14. Development of a replacement for trichloroethylene in the two-stage cleaning process

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, W.B.

    1992-12-01

    A solvent was sought to replace trichloroethylene in the two-stage cleaning process that is used in the Allied-Signal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD) Miniature Electro-Mechanical Assembly Department. The process is an ultrasonic cleaning process in which product is first cleaned in trichloroethylene and then in isopropyl alcohol. After a general review of the properties of available solvents, isopropyl alcohol, d-limonene, and a synthetic mineral spirits, were chosen to be evaluated as trichloroethylene replacements. Stainless steel test panels were cleaned and then soiled with several different organic materials. Certain of the panels were cleaned by the two-stage process. The others were cleaned by the two-stage process using one or another of the solvents under evaluation in the place of the trichloroethylene. The cleanliness of the panels was determined by Auger and photoelectron spectroscopy. The panels cleaned with any of the three solvents under evaluation were found to be as clean as those cleaned by the standard two-stage process. Because of simplicity and minimization of inventory, it is recommended that the two-stage process be changed to use isopropyl alcohol in both stages.

  15. Tests of an environmental and personnel safe cleaning process for BNL accelerator and storage ring components

    SciTech Connect

    Foerster, C.L.; Lanni, C.; Lee, R.; Mitchell, G.; Quade, W.

    1996-10-01

    A large measure of the successful operation of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for over a decade can be attributed to the cleaning of its UHV components during and after construction. A new UHV cleaning process, which had to be environmentally and personnel safe, was needed to replace the harsh, unfriendly process which was still in use. Dow Advanced Cleaning Systems was contracted to develop a replacement process without the use of harsh chemicals and which must clean vacuum surfaces as well as the existing process. Acceptance of the replacement process was primarily based on Photon Stimulated Desorption (PSD) measurements of beam tube samples run on NSLS beam line U10B. One meter long beam tube samples were fabricated from aluminum, 304 stainless steel and oxygen free copper. Initially, coupon samples were cleaned and passed preliminary testing for the proposed process. Next, beam tube samples of each material were cleaned, and the PSD measured on beam line U10B using white light with a critical energy of 487 ev. Prior to cleaning, the samples were contaminated with a mixture of cutting oils, lubricants, vacuum oils and vacuum grease. The contaminated samples were then baked. Samples of each material were also cleaned with the existing process after the same preparation. Beam tube samples were exposed to between 10{sup 22} and 10{sup 23} photons per meter for a PSD measurement. Desorption yields for H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2}O are reported for both the existing cleaning and for the replacement cleaning process. Preliminary data, residual gas scans, and PSD results are given and discussed. The new process is also compared with new cleaning methods developed in other laboratories.

  16. Development of a cleaning process for uranium chips machined with a glycol-water-borax coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.A.

    1984-12-01

    A chip-cleaning process has been developed to remove the new glycol-water-borax coolant from oralloy chips. The process involves storing the freshly cut chips in Freon-TDF until they are cleaned, washing with water, and displacing the water with Freon-TDF. The wash water can be reused many times and still yield clean chips and then be added to the coolant to make up for evaporative losses. The Freon-TDF will be cycled by evaporation. The cleaning facility is currently being designed and should be operational by April 1985.

  17. Process of cleaning oil spills and the like

    SciTech Connect

    Breisford, J.A.

    1993-06-01

    A process of cleaning spills of toxic or hazardous materials such as oil, antifreeze, gasoline, and the like from bodies of water, garage floors, roadways and the like, comprising spraying unbonded shredded fiberglass blowing wool composition particles onto the spill, absorbing the spill into the shredded fiberglass blowing wool composition particles, and removing the soaked shredded fiberglass blowing wool composition particles and the spill absorbed therein. An absorbent composition for absorbing spills of toxic or hazardous materials such as oil, antifreeze, gasoline, and like, comprising shredded fiberglass blowing wool particles, and means for absorbing the spill and for stiffening the co-position so that the composition fights against being compressed so that less of the absorbed spill escapes from the composition when it is being removed from the spill, said means including cork particles dispersed in with the fiberglass blowing wool particles. An absorbent sock for absorbing or containing a spill of toxic or hazardous materials such as oil, antifreeze, gasoline, and the like, comprising a hollow tube, said tube being permeable to the toxic or hazardous materials and being made of nylon or polypropylene, and unbonded, shredded fiberglass blowing wool composition particles enclosed in the tube. Apparatus for controlling an oil slick on the surface of water, comprising a craft for traversing the slick, a supply of fiberglass blowing wool composition particles stored on the craft in position for being dispersed, shredding means on the craft for shredding the fiberglass blowing wool particles to form unbonded, shredded fiberglass blowing wool particles, and dispensing means on the craft for dispensing the unbonded, shredded fiberglass blowing wool particles onto the slick.

  18. Precision Cleaning and Verification Processes Used at Marshall Space Flight Center for Critical Hardware Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, Salvadore V.

    1999-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) performs many research and development programs that require hardware and assemblies to be cleaned to levels that are compatible with fuels and oxidizers (liquid oxygen, solid propellants, etc.). Also, the Center is responsible for developing large telescope satellites which requires a variety of optical systems to be cleaned. A precision cleaning shop is operated with-in MSFC by the Fabrication Services Division of the Materials & Processes Division. Verification of cleanliness is performed for all precision cleaned articles in the Analytical Chemistry Branch. Since the Montreal Protocol was instituted, MSFC had to find substitutes for many materials that has been in use for many years, including cleaning agents and organic solvents. As MSFC is a research Center, there is a great variety of hardware that is processed in the Precision Cleaning Shop. This entails the use of many different chemicals and solvents, depending on the nature and configuration of the hardware and softgoods being cleaned. A review of the manufacturing cleaning and verification processes, cleaning materials and solvents used at MSFC and changes that resulted from the Montreal Protocol will be presented.

  19. Precision Cleaning and Verification Processes Used at Marshall Space Flight Center for Critical Hardware Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, Salvadore V.; Cox, Jack A.; McGee, Kathleen A.

    1998-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration performs many research and development programs that require hardware and assemblies to be cleaned to levels that are compatible with fuels and oxidizers (liquid oxygen, solid propellants, etc.). Also, MSFC is responsible for developing large telescope satellites which require a variety of optical systems to be cleaned. A precision cleaning shop is operated within MSFC by the Fabrication Services Division of the Materials & Processes Laboratory. Verification of cleanliness is performed for all precision cleaned articles in the Environmental and Analytical Chemistry Branch. Since the Montreal Protocol was instituted, MSFC had to find substitutes for many materials that have been in use for many years, including cleaning agents and organic solvents. As MSFC is a research center, there is a great variety of hardware that is processed in the Precision Cleaning Shop. This entails the use of many different chemicals and solvents, depending on the nature and configuration of the hardware and softgoods being cleaned. A review of the manufacturing cleaning and verification processes, cleaning materials and solvents used at MSFC and changes that resulted from the Montreal Protocol will be presented.

  20. NATO CCMS PILOT STUDY: CLEAN PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES - PHASE I: AN ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Clean Products and Processes - promote cooperation for improving the common pollution landscape by stimulating cross-national dialogues and collaboration. Share knowledge on the methods, tools, and technologies for making cleaner products and processes possible.

  1. WATER AS A REACTION MEDIUM FOR CLEAN CHEMICAL PROCESSES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Green chemistry is a rapid developing new field that provides us a pro-active avenue for the sustainable development of future science and technologies. When designed properly, clean chemical technology can be developed in water as a reaction media. The technologies generated f...

  2. The importance of cleaning for the overall results of processing endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Martiny, H; Floss, H; Zühlsdorf, B

    2004-04-01

    Reprocessing comprises three steps: cleaning, disinfection and-if required-sterilisation. While the extents of disinfection and of sterilisation are quantitatively defined, there are only imprecise (qualitative) definitions of cleaning. There are two main reasons for accurate cleaning. First organic and inorganic materials that remain on inner and outer surfaces will interfere with the efficacy of the disinfectants. In case of endoscopes this will lead to channel blockages; they remain undisinfected. Second the bioburden found on endoscopes after use can be very high. Data available demonstrate that a bacterial burden of up to 10(9)cfu/endoscope channel can be expected. Therefore it is necessary to perform a thorough cleaning. Studies using endoscopes showed a reduction in microbial counts by a factor of approximately 10(4) by cleaning (manual and mechanical). Therefore in 2001 the German Society of Hospital Hygiene (DGKH) specified its requirements and recommendations for determining cleaning efficacy separately from those for disinfection. Cleaning and disinfecting can be done manually or mechanically, but it seems impossible to validate manual processes. However our studies in two different washer-disinfectors (WD) showed differences in cleaning efficacy. The tested cleaning processes showed different efficacies. Not all cleaning processes showed better results than water alone with regard to visible cleanliness and to a microbiological reduction E. faecium. Our results show that the evaluation of cleanliness exclusively by visible inspection is not sufficient, particular for the lumens of endoscopes. The results also show that a cleaning process may be very effective also in reducing micro-organisms present. PMID:15110118

  3. 7 CFR 201.33 - Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling in General § 201.33 Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or processing. (a) In the case of seed in bulk, the information required...

  4. 7 CFR 201.33 - Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling in General § 201.33 Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or processing. (a) In the case of seed in bulk, the information required...

  5. 7 CFR 201.33 - Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling in General § 201.33 Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or processing. (a) In the case of seed in bulk, the information required...

  6. 7 CFR 201.33 - Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling in General § 201.33 Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or processing. (a) In the case of seed in bulk, the information required...

  7. 7 CFR 201.33 - Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling in General § 201.33 Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or processing. (a) In the case of seed in bulk, the information required...

  8. Evaluation of a no-clean soldering process designed to eliminate the use of ozone depleting chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Iman, R.L.; Armendariz, M.E.; Anderson, D.J. |; Lichtenberg, L.; Van Buren, P.; Paffett, M.T.

    1992-11-01

    The destruction of the Earth`s protective ozone layer is one of today`s largest environmental concerns. Solvent emissions released during the cleaning of printed wiring boards (PWBs) have been identified as a primary contributor to ozone destruction. No-clean soldering (sometimes referred to as self-cleaning) processes represent an ideal solution since they eliminate the need for cleaning after soldering. Elimination of solvent cleaning operations significantly reduces the emissions of ozone depleting chemicals (ODCs), reduces energy consumption, and reduces product costs. Several no-clean soldering processes have been developed over the past few years. The program`s purpose was to evaluate the no-clean soldering process and to determine if hardware produced by the process is acceptable for military applications. That is, determine if the no-clean process produces hardware that is as reliable as that soldered with the existing rosin-based flux solvent cleaning process.

  9. Clean-air legislation will buoy U. S. gas processing

    SciTech Connect

    Haun, R.R.; Ellington, E.E.; Otto, K.W. )

    1991-07-22

    This paper reports on the effects of recent U.S. clean-air legislation on NGL demand and pricing. Demand for all NGL products will be firm throughout the 1990s. Increased requirements for butane as methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) feedstock will strengthen butane prices. Higher base-load requirements for propane in new NGL-based olefin plants will also have a positive impact on propane prices.

  10. Development of CFC-Free Cleaning Processes at the NASA White Sands Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeson, Harold; Kirsch, Mike; Hornung, Steven; Biesinger, Paul

    1995-01-01

    The NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) is developing cleaning and verification processes to replace currently used chlorofluorocarbon-113- (CFC-113-) based processes. The processes being evaluated include both aqueous- and solvent-based techniques. The presentation will include the findings of investigations of aqueous cleaning and verification processes that are based on a draft of a proposed NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) cleaning procedure. Verification testing with known contaminants, such as hydraulic fluid and commonly used oils, established correlations between nonvolatile residue and CFC-113. Recoveries ranged from 35 to 60 percent of theoretical. WSTF is also investigating enhancements to aqueous sampling for organics and particulates. Although aqueous alternatives have been identified for several processes, a need still exists for nonaqueous solvent cleaning, such as the cleaning and cleanliness verification of gauges used for oxygen service. The cleaning effectiveness of tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), ethanol, hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225 (HCFC-225), tert-butylmethylether, and n-Hexane was evaluated using aerospace gauges and precision instruments and then compared to the cleaning effectiveness of CFC-113. Solvents considered for use in oxygen systems were also tested for oxygen compatibility using high-pressure oxygen autoignition and liquid oxygen mechanical impact testing.

  11. Bubble size distribution analysis and control in high frequency ultrasonic cleaning processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, M.; Struyf, H.; Mertens, P.; Heyns, M.; De Gendt, S.; Glorieux, C.; Brems, S.

    2012-12-01

    In the semiconductor industry, the ongoing down-scaling of nanoelectronic elements has lead to an increasing complexity of their fabrication. Hence, the individual fabrication processes become increasingly difficult to handle. To minimize cross-contamination, intermediate surface cleaning and preparation steps are inevitable parts of the semiconductor process chain. Here, one major challenge is the removal of residual nano-particulate contamination resulting from abrasive processes such as polishing and etching. In the past, physical cleaning techniques such as megasonic cleaning have been proposed as suitable solutions. However, the soaring fragility of the smallest structures is constraining the forces of the involved physical removal mechanisms. In the case of "megasonic" cleaning -cleaning with ultrasound in the MHz-domain - the main cleaning action arises from strongly oscillating microbubbles which emerge from the periodically changing tensile strain in the cleaning liquid during sonication. These bubbles grow, oscillate and collapse due to a complex interplay of rectified diffusion, bubble coalescence, non-linear pulsation and the onset of shape instabilities. Hence, the resulting bubble size distribution does not remain static but alternates continuously. Only microbubbles in this distribution that show a high oscillatory response are responsible for the cleaning action. Therefore, the cleaning process efficiency can be improved by keeping the majority of bubbles around their resonance size. In this paper, we propose a method to control and characterize the bubble size distribution by means of "pulsed" sonication and measurements of acoustic cavitation spectra, respectively. We show that the so-obtained bubble size distributions can be related to theoretical predictions of the oscillatory responses of and the onset of shape instabilities for the respective bubbles. We also propose a mechanism to explain the enhancement of both acoustic and cleaning activity

  12. Tunable droplet momentum and cavitation process for damage-free cleaning of challenging particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouk, Roman; Papanu, James; Li, Fred; Jeon, Jason; Liu, Tong; Yalamanchili, Rao

    2008-10-01

    Particle removal without damage has been demonstrated for <60nm photomask sub-resolution assist features with droplet momentum cleaning technology that employs NanoDropletTM mixed-fluid jet nozzle. Although 99%+ particle removal efficiency can be achieved for standard Si3N4 particles with broad size distribution, there are some cleaning challenges with small (<100nm) and large contact area (>500nm) particles. It was found that tunable uniform cavitation can provide the additional physical assist force needed to improve cleaning efficiency of these challenging particles while meeting the damage-fee cleaning requirement. An integrated cleaning process was developed that combines both droplet momentum and damage-free cavitation technology. Cleaning tests were performed with different types of challenging particles. The results showed 5-8% particle removal efficiency improvement as compared to momentum based only cleaning. All masks were processed using the TetraTM mask cleaning tool configured with NanoDropletTM mixed fluid jet technology and full face megasonics.

  13. Development of a replacement for trichloroethylene in the two-stage cleaning process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, W. B.

    1992-12-01

    Isopropyl alcohol, d-limonene, and a synthetic mineral spirits were compared for effectiveness as replacements for trichloroethylene in an ultrasonic cleaning process. All were found to be suitable. Isopropyl alcohol is recommended as the replacement.

  14. New geothermal heat extraction process to deliver clean power generation

    ScienceCinema

    Pete McGrail

    2012-12-31

    A new method for capturing significantly more heat from low-temperature geothermal resources holds promise for generating virtually pollution-free electrical energy. Scientists at the Department of Energys Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will determine if their innovative approach can safely and economically extract and convert heat from vast untapped geothermal resources. The goal is to enable power generation from low-temperature geothermal resources at an economical cost. In addition to being a clean energy source without any greenhouse gas emissions, geothermal is also a steady and dependable source of power.

  15. TREATMENT TANK CORROSION STUDIES FOR THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.

    2011-08-24

    Radioactive waste is stored in high level waste tanks on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is aggressively seeking to close the non-compliant Type I and II waste tanks. The removal of sludge (i.e., metal oxide) heels from the tank is the final stage in the waste removal process. The Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process is being developed and investigated by SRR to aid in Savannah River Site (SRS) High-Level Waste (HLW) as an option for sludge heel removal. Corrosion rate data for carbon steel exposed to the ECC treatment tank environment was obtained to evaluate the degree of corrosion that occurs. These tests were also designed to determine the effect of various environmental variables such as temperature, agitation and sludge slurry type on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel. Coupon tests were performed to estimate the corrosion rate during the ECC process, as well as determine any susceptibility to localized corrosion. Electrochemical studies were performed to develop a better understanding of the corrosion mechanism. The tests were performed in 1 wt.% and 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid with HM and PUREX sludge simulants. The following results and conclusions were made based on this testing: (1) In 1 wt.% oxalic acid with a sludge simulant, carbon steel corroded at a rate of less than 25 mpy within the temperature and agitation levels of the test. No susceptibility to localized corrosion was observed. (2) In 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid with a sludge simulant, the carbon steel corrosion rates ranged between 15 and 88 mpy. The most severe corrosion was observed at 75 C in the HM/2.5 wt.% oxalic acid simulant. Pitting and general corrosion increased with the agitation level at this condition. No pitting and lower general corrosion rates were observed with the PUREX/2.5 wt.% oxalic acid simulant. The electrochemical and coupon tests both indicated that carbon steel is more susceptible to localized corrosion in the HM/oxalic acid environment than

  16. Study of discharge cleaning process in JIPP T-2 Torus by residual gas analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, N.; Hirokura, S.; Taniguchi, Y.; Tanahashi, S.

    1982-12-01

    During discharge cleaning, decay time of water vapor pressure changes when the pressure reaches a certain level. A long decay time observed in the later phase can be interpreted as a result of a slow deoxidization rate of chromium oxide, which may dominate the cleaning process in this phase. Optimization of plasma density for the cleaning is discussed comparing the experimental results on density dependence of water vapor pressure with a result based on a zero dimensional calculation for particle balance. One of the essential points for effective cleaning is the raising of the electron density of the plasma high enough that the dissociation loss rate of H2O is as large as the sticking loss rate. A density as high as 10 to the 11th power/cu cm is required for a clean surface condition where sticking probability is presumed to be around 0.5.

  17. Mechanisms of actions of sodium hypochlorite in cleaning and disinfection processes.

    PubMed

    Fukuzaki, Satoshi

    2006-12-01

    Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) is the most widely used disinfectant in the food industry despite the increasing availability of other disinfectants. Sodium hypochlorite fulfills many requirements as the ideal disinfectant and furthermore it has an excellent cleaning action. The effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite in the cleaning and disinfection processes depends on the concentration of available chlorine and the pH of the solution. Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is a weak acid and dissociates to the hypochlorite ion (-OCl) and proton (H+) depending on the solution pH. It is generally believed that HOCl is the active species in the germicidal action, whereas the concentration of -OCl is a key factor determining the cleaning efficiency. This implies that the optimal pH region of the germicidal activity of sodium hypochlorite differs from that of its cleaning activity. This paper describes the theory and practice of the cleaning and disinfecting operations based on the use of sodium hypochlorite solution. PMID:17190269

  18. Sulfur cement production using by products of the perchloroethylene coal cleaning process and the FC4-1 cleaned soil

    SciTech Connect

    Bassam Masri, K.L.; Fullerton, S.L.

    1995-12-31

    An introductory set of experiments to show the feasibility of making sulfur cement were carried out at the University of Akron according to Parrett and Currett`s patent which requires the use of sulfur, a filler, a plasticizer, and a vulcanization accelerator. Small blocks of cement were made using byproducts of the perchloroethylene coal cleaning process. Extracted elemental and organic sulfur, ash and mineral matters from the float sink portion of the PCE process, and FC4-1 cleaned soil were used as substitutes for sulfur and filler needed for the production of sulfur cement. Leaching tests in different solutions and under different conditions were conducted on the sulfur blocks. Other tests such as strength, durability, resistance to high or low temperatures will be conducted in the future. Sulfur cement can be used as a sealing agent at a joint, roofing purposes, forming ornamental figures, and coating of exposed surfaces of iron or steel. When mixed with an aggregate, sulfur concrete is formed. This concrete can be used for structural members, curbings, guthers, slabs, and can be precast or cast at the job site. An advantage of sulfur cement over Portland cement is that it reaches its design strength in two to three hours after processing and it can be remelted and recast.

  19. Optimizing EUV mask blank cleaning processes using the Lasertec M7360

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Takeya; Kadaksham, Arun John; House, Matt; Ma, Andy; Goodwin, Frank

    2012-03-01

    EUV lithography is considered the most promising lithography solution for the 16 nm node and beyond. As EUV light is strongly absorbed by all known materials, reflective optics are used instead of conventional transmittance optics applied to ArF and KrF lithography. The EUV mask must also need be reflective. It typically consists of a Ta-based absorber layer, Ru capping layer, Si/Mo multilayer on a low thermal expansion material (LTEM) substrate with a backside Cr-based metal coating. Because of the strong absorbance of the EUV light, a pellicle is not practical. Therefore, EUV masks must be cleaned more frequently to maintain the necessary cleanliness. This poses numerous unique challenges in cleaning processes. For example, the EUV mask integrity, including critical dimension (CD), EUV reflectivity, and absorber thickness must be kept intact during multiple cleanings throughout the mask's lifetime. Requirements of defect size for the cleaning, furthermore, are becoming tighter as semiconductor circuit design rules get smaller. According to the International Technology Roadmap For Semiconductors (ITRS), the smallest defect size that must be removed is 23 nm for the 18 nm NAND Flash node in 2013. In addition to defects on the frontside, defects on a backside also need to be minimized since they might lead overlay error due to local distortions of EUV masks on an electrostatic chuck. This paper focuses on evaluations of cleaning performances using the Lasertec M1350 and M7360 blank inspection system, which has a 71 nm and 43 nm sensitivity. The 43nm is the current best sensitivity while keeping a >90% defect capture rate. First, the cleaning performance using the standard process has been investigated. We found a mitigation of adders was a key challenge for the EUV mask cleaning. The primary source of the adders was also identified as pits. Secondly, the megasonic cleaning process has been optimized to mitigate the adders. We could successfully reduce the adders by

  20. Fine coal cleaning via the micro-mag process

    DOEpatents

    Klima, Mark S.; Maronde, Carl P.; Killmeyer, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    A method of cleaning particulate coal which is fed with a dense medium slurry as an inlet feed to a cyclone separator. The coal particle size distribution is in the range of from about 37 microns to about 600 microns. The dense medium comprises water and ferromagnetic particles that have a relative density in the range of from about 4.0 to about 7.0. The ferromagnetic particles of the dense medium have particle sizes of less than about 15 microns and at least a majority of the particle sizes are less than about 5 microns. In the cyclone, the particulate coal and dense-medium slurry is separated into a low gravity product stream and a high gravity produce stream wherein the differential in relative density between the two streams is not greater than about 0.2. The low gravity and high gravity streams are treated to recover the ferromagnetic particles therefrom.

  1. Characterization of an oxygen plasma process for cleaning packaged semiconductor devices. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B.E.

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this research was to experimentally determine the operating {open_quotes}window{close_quotes} for an oxygen plasma cleaning process to be used on microelectronics components just prior to wire bonding. The process was being developed to replace one that used vapor degreasing with trichlorotrifluoroethane, an ozone-depleting substance. A Box-Behnken experimental design was used to generate data from which the oxygen plasma cleaning process could be characterized. Auger electron spectrophotometry was used to measure the contamination thickness on the dice after cleaning. An empirical equation correlating the contamination thickness on the die surface with the operating parameters of the plasma system was developed from the collected Auger data, and optimum settings for cleaning semiconductor devices were determined. Devices were also tested for undesirable changes in electrical parameters resulting from cleaning in the plasma system. An increase in leakage current occurred for bipolar transistors and diodes after exposure to the oxygen plasma. Although an increase in leakage current occurred, each device`s parameter remained well below the acceptable specification limit. Based upon the experimental results, the optimum settings for the plasma cleaning process were determined to be 200 watts of power applied for five minutes in an enclosure maintained at 0.7 torr. At these settings, all measurable contamination was removed without compromising the reliability of the devices.

  2. ECR plasma cleaning: an in-situ processing technique for RF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, G.; Moeller, W-D.; Antoine, C.; Jiang, H.; Pechenezhskiy, I.; Cooley, L.; Khabiboulline, T.; Terechkine, Y.; Edwards, H.; Koeth, T.; Romanenko, A.; /Cornell U., Phys. Dept. /Jefferson Lab

    2008-01-01

    A condition for Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) can be established inside a fully assembled RF cavity without the need for removing high-power couplers. As such, plasma generated by this process can be used as a final cleaning step, or as an alternative cleaning step in place of other techniques. Tests showed filtered dry air plasma can successfully remove sulfur particles on niobium surface while the surface oxygen content remains intact.

  3. The study and practice of clean coal pressure filter and dewatering process

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, G.; Wu, L.; Ou, Z.

    1999-07-01

    This paper introduces the current status of dewatering of the flotation clean coal and the problems in China. The industrial application of the dewatering process and the newly developed clean coal pressure filter is represented. And the results indicated that this filter press possesses such advantages as fast speed in filter lower moisture in filter cake, convenience in operation, obvious saving on energy, etc. It will have a broad applications.

  4. Development of the Ultra-Clean Dry Cleanup Process for Coal-Based Syngases

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Slimane, R.B.; Lau, F.S.; Jain, S.C.

    2002-09-20

    The Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) has proposed a novel scheme for polishing sulfur species, halides, and particulate from syngas to meet stringent cleaning requirements, the ''Ultra-Clean syngas polishing process.'' The overall development objective for this syngas polishing process is to economically achieve the most stringent cleanup requirements for sulfur species, halide species and particulate expected for chemical and fuel synthesis applications (total sulfur species < 60 ppbv, halides < 10 ppbv, and particulate < 0.1 ppmw). A Base Program was conducted to produce ground-work, laboratory test data and process evaluations for a conceptual feasibility assessment of this novel syngas cleaning process. Laboratory testing focused on the identification of suitable sulfur and halide sorbents and operating temperatures for the process. This small-scale laboratory testing was also performed to provide evidence of the capability of the process to reach its stringent syngas cleaning goals. Process evaluations were performed in the Base Program to identify process alternatives, to devise process flow schemes, and to estimate process material & energy balances, process performance, and process costs. While the work has focused on sulfur, halide, and particulate control, considerations of ammonia, and mercury control have also been included.

  5. Two-Step Plasma Process for Cleaning Indium Bonding Bumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Harold F.; Vasquez, Richard P.; Jones, Todd J.; Hoenk, Michael E.; Dickie, Matthew R.; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2009-01-01

    A two-step plasma process has been developed as a means of removing surface oxide layers from indium bumps used in flip-chip hybridization (bump bonding) of integrated circuits. The two-step plasma process makes it possible to remove surface indium oxide, without incurring the adverse effects of the acid etching process.

  6. Influence of microbubble in physical cleaning of MF membrane process for wastewater reuse.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eui-Jong; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hyung-Soo; Jang, Am

    2015-06-01

    Currently, there is a growing emphasis on wastewater reclamation and reuse all over the world due to restricted water resources. Among a variety of wastewater reuse technologies, the use of microfiltration membranes (MF) is one of the popular processes because it has the ability to successfully eliminate particulates and colloidal matters. However, successful fouling control is not easy because effluents from the activated sludge process still contain small particulates and colloidal matters such as extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) and soluble microbial products (SMP). On the other hand, microbubbles have advantageous properties compared to common bubbles, but there hasn't been reporting of the use of microbubbles in physical cleaning instead of aeration. Encouraging results were obtained herein through the application of microbubbles for physical cleaning. In evaluation of the cleaning efficiency, the efficiency of microbubbles was observed to be twice as high as that of aeration, except during the course of the initial 30 min. Total organic carbon (TOC) concentration of the membrane tank after treatment with microbubbles was more than twice as high as that after aeration for physical cleaning. The membrane cleaned with microbubbles also had the smoothest surface, with a roughness of 42.5 nm. In addition, microbubbles were found to effectively remove EPS and make the structure of the gel layer loose. In particular, the microbubbles had the ability to remove proteins through the effect of pyrolytic decomposition. Therefore, in FT-IR spectra of the membrane surfaces taken before and after physical cleaning, while each treatment showed similar peak positions, the peak values of the membrane treated with microbubbles were the lowest. Through various analyses, it was confirmed that microbubbles can remove foulants on the gel layer in spite of their very low shear force. This means that microbubble cleaning has full potential for use as a physical cleaning

  7. MSO spent salt clean-up recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M G; Brummond, W A; Hipple, D L; Hsu, P C; Summers, L J; Von Holtz, E H; Wang, F T

    1997-02-01

    An effective process has been developed to separate metals, mineral residues, and radionuclides from spent salt, a secondary waste generated by Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO). This process includes salt dissolution, pH adjustment, chemical reduction and/or sulfiding, filtration, ion exchange, and drying. The process uses dithionite to reduce soluble chromate and/or sulfiding agent to suppress solubilities of metal compounds in water. This process is capable of reducing the secondary waste to less than 5% of its original weight. It is a low temperature, aqueous process and has been demonstrated in the laboratory [1].

  8. Study of Sn removal processes for in-situ collector cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elg, Daniel T.; Panici, Gianluca A.; Srivastava, Shailendra N.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2016-03-01

    An in-situ hydrogen plasma cleaning technique to clean Sn off of EUV collector optics is studied in detail. The cleaning process uses hydrogen radicals (formed in the hydrogen plasma) to interact with Sn-coated surfaces, forming SnH4 and being pumped away. This technique has been used to clean a 300mm-diameter stainless steel dummy collector optic, and EUV reflectivity of multilayer mirror samples was restored after cleaning Sn from them, validating the potential of this technology. This method has the potential to significantly reduce downtime and increase source availability. However, net Sn removal is limited by decomposition of the SnH4 molecule upon impact with the collector and the resulting redeposition of Sn. This is true in all cleaning systems that make use of hydrogen radicals. Thus, to guide the design of effective cleaning systems, the transport of Sn in the chamber, and the fundamental processes affecting it, must be understood. Accordingly, an investigation into these processes Sn removal is being performed. These processes include the advection of gas through the chamber, the creation of hydrogen radicals, the etching of Sn by radicals, and the surface decomposition of SnH4. In this paper, experiments to determine the radical density are presented, along with a theoretical plasma chemistry model that explains the processes behind radical creation and validates the radical density measurements. Additionally, experiments are shown that provide an insight into the etching of Sn by hydrogen radicals, yielding calculations of etching probability as well as showing that Sn etching is very sensitive to oxygen contamination and surface morphology.

  9. The mechanical stability of allografts after a cleaning process: comparison of two preparation modes.

    PubMed

    Putzer, David; Huber, Debora Coraca; Wurm, Alexander; Schmoelz, Werner; Nogler, Michael

    2014-08-01

    In revision hip arthroplasty, bone loss can be compensated by impacting allograft material. Cleaning processes reduce the risk of bacterial and viral contamination. Cleaned allograft material was compared to native untreated allografts by using a uniaxial compression test. 30 measurements were performed for each group before and after compaction. Grain size distribution and weight loss were determined. A reduction in the amount of large bone fragments and a higher compaction rate were observed in the cleaned bone grafts. The cleaned bone chips presented with a better mechanical resistance to a compression force and a reduced flowability. The benefit of a cleaner and a mechanical stable graft material comes with the drawback that higher initial amounts of graft material are needed. PMID:24793889

  10. Effect of Dissolved Oxygen on Cu Corrosion in Single Wafer Cleaning Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Masayoshi; Yamashita, Yukinari; Futatsuki, Takashi; Shiohara, Morio; Kondo, Seiichi; Saito, Shuichi

    2009-04-01

    We investigated Cu corrosion at the via bottom of multi-layered Cu interconnects that occurred after post-etching wet cleaning and caused via open failures. We found that oxygen was dissolved into de-ionized water (DIW) on the wafer edge from the air atmosphere during the rinse step after chemical cleaning and that Cu was oxidized due to the high oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of the rinse DIW. To prevent Cu interconnects from being corroded, control of the dissolved oxygen and the ORP of the rinse DIW by decreasing the oxygen concentration of the atmosphere in the cleaning machine as well as by using H2 water is required. This will become indispensable in the cleaning process of the next generation Cu interconnects.

  11. Development of Statistical Process Control Methodology for an Environmentally Compliant Surface Cleaning Process in a Bonding Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchens, Dale E.; Doan, Patrick A.; Boothe, Richard E.

    1997-01-01

    Bonding labs at both MSFC and the northern Utah production plant prepare bond test specimens which simulate or witness the production of NASA's Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM). The current process for preparing the bonding surfaces employs 1,1,1-trichloroethane vapor degreasing, which simulates the current RSRM process. Government regulations (e.g., the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act) have mandated a production phase-out of a number of ozone depleting compounds (ODC) including 1,1,1-trichloroethane. In order to comply with these regulations, the RSRM Program is qualifying a spray-in-air (SIA) precision cleaning process using Brulin 1990, an aqueous blend of surfactants. Accordingly, surface preparation prior to bonding process simulation test specimens must reflect the new production cleaning process. The Bonding Lab Statistical Process Control (SPC) program monitors the progress of the lab and its capabilities, as well as certifies the bonding technicians, by periodically preparing D6AC steel tensile adhesion panels with EA-91 3NA epoxy adhesive using a standardized process. SPC methods are then used to ensure the process is statistically in control, thus producing reliable data for bonding studies, and identify any problems which might develop. Since the specimen cleaning process is being changed, new SPC limits must be established. This report summarizes side-by-side testing of D6AC steel tensile adhesion witness panels and tapered double cantilevered beams (TDCBs) using both the current baseline vapor degreasing process and a lab-scale spray-in-air process. A Proceco 26 inches Typhoon dishwasher cleaned both tensile adhesion witness panels and TDCBs in a process which simulates the new production process. The tests were performed six times during 1995, subsequent statistical analysis of the data established new upper control limits (UCL) and lower control limits (LCL). The data also demonstrated that the new process was equivalent to the vapor

  12. IMPACT OF NOX SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION PROCESSES ON FLUE GAS CLEANING SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of the impact of the ammonia leaving a nitrogen oxide (NOx) selective catalytic reduction (SCR) process on downstream flue gas cleaning processes. (NOx emissions from electric utility boilers may be reduced 80-90% by the application of pollutio...

  13. Evaluation of seed cotton cleaning equipment performance at various processing rates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The processing rate per unit width of seed cotton cleaning equipment– cylinder cleaners and stick machines– recommended by manufacturers is 4.9-8.2 bales hr-1 m-1 (1.5-2.5 bales hr-1 ft-1). Survey data has indicated that many gins exceed this processing rate. Little research has been conducted wit...

  14. Cleaning process for corrugated aluminum electrical transmission line enclosure

    DOEpatents

    Bowman, Gary K.

    1984-07-24

    A process for preparing the interior of a corrugated pipe or sheath comprises the steps of placing a predetermined amount of a tumbling abrasive material into the sheath, and then rotating the sheath.

  15. The TEES process cleans waste and produces energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, D. C.; Silva, L. J.

    1995-02-01

    A gasification system is under development that can be used with most types of wet organic wastes. The system operates at 350 C and 205 atm using a liquid water phase as the processing medium. Since a pressurized system is used, the wet waste can be fed as a solution or slurry to the reactor without drying. Through the development of catalysts, a useful processing system has been produced. The system has utility both for direct conversion of high-moisture biomass to fuel gas or as a wastewater cleanup system for wet organic wastes including unconverted biomass from bioconversion processes. By the use of this system more than 99% conversions of organic waste to medium-Btu fuel gas can be achieved.

  16. Processes For Cleaning a Cathode Tube and Assemblies In A Hollow Cathode Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor); Verhey, Timothy R. R. (Inventor); Soulas, George C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is a process for cleaning a cathode tube and other subassemblies in a hollow cathode assembly. In the disclosed process, hand covering elastomer gloves are used for handling all cathode assembly parts. The cathode tube and other subassemblies are cleaned with a lint-free cloth damped with acetone, then wiped with alcohol, immersed in ethyl alcohol or acetone, and ultrasonic agitation is applied, heating to 60 C. for ethyl alcohol or 56 C. for acetone. The cathode tube and other subassemblies are dried by blowing with nitrogen gas.

  17. Investigation of the impact of cleaning on the adhesive bond and the process implications

    SciTech Connect

    EMERSON,JOHN A.; GUESS,TOMMY R.; ADKINS,CAROL L. JONES; CURRO,JOHN G.; REEDY JR.,EARL DAVID; LOPEZ,EDWIN P.; LEMKE,PAUL A.

    2000-05-01

    While surface cleaning is the most common process step in DOE manufacturing operations, the link between a successful adhesive bond and the surface clean performed before adhesion is not well understood. An innovative approach that combines computer modeling expertise, fracture mechanics understanding, and cleaning experience to address how to achieve a good adhesive bond is discussed here to develop a capability that would result in reduced cleaning development time and testing, improved bonds, improved manufacturability, and even an understanding that leads to improved aging. A simulation modeling technique, polymer reference interaction site model applied near wall (Wall PRISM), provided the capability to include contaminants on the surface. Calculations determined an approximately 8% reduction in the work of adhesion for 1% by weight of ethanol contamination on the structure of a silicone adhesive near a surface. The demonstration of repeatable coatings and quantitative analysis of the surface for deposition of controlled amounts of contamination (hexadecane and mineral oil) was based on three deposition methods. The effect of the cleaning process used on interfacial toughness was determined. The measured interfacial toughness of samples with a Brulin cleaned sandblasted aluminum surface was found to be {approximately} 15% greater than that with a TCE cleaned aluminum surface. The sensitivity of measured fracture toughness to various test conditions determined that both interfacial toughness and interface corner toughness depended strongly on surface roughness. The work of adhesion value for silicone/silicone interface was determined by a contact mechanics technique known as the JKR method. Correlation with fracture data has allowed a better understanding between interfacial fracture parameters and surface energy.

  18. Enhancing the performance of multilayer-dielectric diffraction gratings through cleaning process modifications and defect mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddell, Heather P. H.

    2014-05-01

    The laser-damage resistance of multilayer-dielectric (MLD) pulse compressor gratings currently limits the energy performance of the petawatt-class OMEGA EP laser system at University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The cleanliness of these components is of paramount importance; contaminants can act as absorbers during laser irradiation, initiating intense local heating and catastrophic laser-induced damage. Unfortunately, some of the most effective cleaning methods for MLD gratings - usually involving high temperatures and strong acids or bases - can themselves induce chemical degradation and thermal stresses, leading to coating delamination and defects. This work explores ways to improve the laser-damage resistance of MLD gratings through modifications to the final cleaning phase of the manufacturing process. Processes of defect formation are investigated through a combination of chemical cleaning experiments, microscopy, and modeling. We use a fracture-mechanics approach to formulate a mechanism for the initiation of micrometer-scale delamination defects that are commonly observed after chemical cleaning. The stress responses of MLD coatings to elevated-temperature chemical cleaning are estimated using a thermomechanical model, enabling us to study the effects of substrate thickness, solution temperature, and heating rates on coating stresses (and thus the risk of stress-induced failure). Finally, a low-temperature chemical cleaning approach is developed to improve laser-damage resistance while avoiding defect formation and mitigating coating stresses. We find that grating coupons cleaned using the optimized method consistently meet OMEGA EP requirements on diffraction efficiency and 1054-nm laser-damage resistance at 10 ps.

  19. Clean burning process which converts pollutants into value added product

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Xuefang

    1999-07-01

    By adding a multiple composite admixture in coal-fired boilers, the new technology turns ash and the sulfur in coal into cement clinker materials, deepens and stabilizes combustion process, decreases mechanical and chemical instabilities during combustion, and eliminates the production of NO{sub x}. While generating heat and power, the technology produces cement clinkers, and gets rid of the soot type of air pollution caused by cement kilns, thus effects a radical cure for the two pollution sources in coal-fired power plants and cement kilns. The new technology makes use of coal ashes as renewable resources, saves energy resources and the land needed to discard the ashes. Therefore, it benefits for ecological balance and economics.

  20. Tests of an environmental and personnel safe cleaning process for Brookhaven National Laboratory accelerator and storage ring components

    SciTech Connect

    Foerster, C.L.; Lanni, C.; Lee, R.; Mitchell, G.; Quade, W.

    1997-05-01

    A large measure of the successful operation of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for over a decade can be attributed to the cleaning of its ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) components during and after construction. A new UHV cleaning process, which has to be environmentally and personnel safe, is needed to replace the harsh, unfriendly process which is still in use. Dow Advanced Cleaning Systems was contracted to develop a replacement process without the use of harsh chemicals and which must clean vacuum surfaces as well as the existing process. Acceptance of the replacement process was primarily based on photon stimulated desorption (PSD) measurements of beam tube samples run on NSLS beam line U10B. One meter long beam tube samples were fabricated from aluminum, 304 stainless steel, and oxygen-free copper. Initially, coupon samples were cleaned and passed preliminary testing for the proposed process. Next, beam tube samples of each material were cleaned, and the PSD measured on beam line U10B using white light with a critical energy of 487 eV. Prior to cleaning, the samples were contaminated with a mixture of cutting oils, lubricants, vacuum oils, and vacuum grease. The contaminated samples were then baked. Samples of each material were also cleaned with the existing process after the same preparation. Beam tube samples were exposed to between 10{sup 22} and 10{sup 23} photons per meter for a PSD measurement. Desorption yields for H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and H{sub 2}O are reported for both the existing cleaning and for the replacement cleaning process. Preliminary data, residual gas scans, and PSD results are given and discussed. The new process is also compared with new cleaning methods developed in other laboratories. After modification, the new UHV cleaning process was accepted by BNL.

  1. NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY CLEAN PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES (PHASE II) 2003 ANNUAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 6th annual meeting of the NATO CCMS Pilot Study, Clean Products and Processes, was held in Cetraro, Italy, from May 11 to 15, 2003. This was also the first meeting of its Phase II study. 24 country representatives attended this meeting. This meeting was very ably run by th...

  2. NATO CCMS PILOT STUDY ON CLEAN PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES -(PHASE I) - 2002 ANNUAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The annual report summarizes the activities of the NATO CCMS Pilot Study on clean products and processes for 2002, including the proceedings of the 2002 annual meeting held in Vilnius, Lithuania. The report presents a wealth of information on cleaner production activities in ove...

  3. NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY - CLEAN PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES (PHASE I) 2000 ANNUAL REPORT, NUMBER 242

    EPA Science Inventory

    This annual report presents the proceedings of the Third Annual NATO/CCMS pilot study meeting in Copenhagen, Denmark. Guest speakers focused on efforts in the area of research of clean products and processes, life cycle analysis, computer tools and pollution prevention.

  4. DEMONSTRATION OF A LIQUID CARBON DIOXIDE PROCESS FOR CLEANING METAL PARTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a demonstration of liquid carbon dioxide (LCO2) as an alternative to chlorinated solvents for cleaning metal parts. It describes the LCO2 process, the parts tested, the contaminants removed, and results from preliminary laboratory testing and on-site d...

  5. Selection of a Non-ODC Solvent for Rubber Processing Equipment Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, R. E.; Thornton, T. N.; Semmel, L.; Selvidge, S. A.

    2003-01-01

    NASA/MSFC has recently acquired new equipment for the manufacture and processing of rubber and rubber containing items that are used in the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) system. Work with a previous generation of rubber equipment at MSFC in the 1970's had involved the use of Oxygen Deficient Center (ODC's) such as 1,1,1-Trichloroethane or VOC's such as Toluene as the solvents of choice in cleaning the equipment. Neither of these options is practical today. This paper addresses the selection and screening of candidate cleaning solvents that are not only effective, but also meet the new environmental standards.

  6. Selection of a Non-ODC Solvent for Rubber Processing Equipment Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, R. E.; Thornton, T. N.; Semmel, L.; Selvidge, S. A.; Cash, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA/MSFC has recently acquired new equipment for the manufacture and processing of rubber and rubber containing items that are used in the RSRM (Reusable Solid Rocket Motor) system. Work with a previous generation of rubber equipment at MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) in the 1970's had involved the use of ODC's such as 1,1,1-Trichloroethane or VOC's such as Toluene as the solvents of choice in cleaning the equipment. Neither of these options is practical today. This paper addresses the selection and screening of candidate cleaning solvents that are not only effective, but also meet the new environmental standards.

  7. EXPLORING ENGINEERING CONTROL THROUGH PROCESS MANIPULATION OF RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE TANK CHEMICAL CLEANING

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.

    2014-04-27

    One method of remediating legacy liquid radioactive waste produced during the cold war, is aggressive in-tank chemical cleaning. Chemical cleaning has successfully reduced the curie content of residual waste heels in large underground storage tanks; however this process generates significant chemical hazards. Mercury is often the bounding hazard due to its extensive use in the separations process that produced the waste. This paper explores how variations in controllable process factors, tank level and temperature, may be manipulated to reduce the hazard potential related to mercury vapor generation. When compared using a multivariate regression analysis, findings indicated that there was a significant relationship between both tank level (p value of 1.65x10{sup -23}) and temperature (p value of 6.39x10{sup -6}) to the mercury vapor concentration in the tank ventilation system. Tank temperature showed the most promise as a controllable parameter for future tank cleaning endeavors. Despite statistically significant relationships, there may not be confidence in the ability to control accident scenarios to below mercury’s IDLH or PAC-III levels for future cleaning initiatives.

  8. Reducing the emission of ozone depleting chemicals through use of a self-cleaning soldering process

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenberg, L.; Martin, G.; Van Buren, P.; Iman, R.; Paffett, M.T.

    1991-12-31

    Motorola has jointed with Sandia and Los Alamos National Laboratories to perform work under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to reduce the use of CFC`s and other ozone depleting printing wiring board (PWB) cleaning solvents. This study evaluated the use of a new soldering process that uses dilute adipic acid in lieu of rosin flux. The process consumes the adipic acid in lieu of rosin flux. The process consumes the adipic acid during the soldering process and precludes the need for subsequent cleaning with ozone depleting solvents. This paper presents results from a series of designed experiments that evaluated PWB cleanliness as a function of various levels of machine control parameters. The study included a comprehensive hardware reliability evaluation, which included environmental conditioning, cleanliness testing, surface chemical analysis, surface insulation resistance testing, along with electrical, mechanical and long term storage testing. The results of this study that the new process produces quality, reliable hardware over a wide range of processing parameters. Adoption of this process, which eliminates the need for supplemental cleaning, will have a positive impact on many environmental problems, including depletion of the ozone layer.

  9. Reducing the emission of ozone depleting chemicals through use of a self-cleaning soldering process

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenberg, L.; Martin, G.; Van Buren, P. . Government Electronics Group); Iman, R. ); Paffett, M.T. )

    1991-01-01

    Motorola has jointed with Sandia and Los Alamos National Laboratories to perform work under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to reduce the use of CFC's and other ozone depleting printing wiring board (PWB) cleaning solvents. This study evaluated the use of a new soldering process that uses dilute adipic acid in lieu of rosin flux. The process consumes the adipic acid in lieu of rosin flux. The process consumes the adipic acid during the soldering process and precludes the need for subsequent cleaning with ozone depleting solvents. This paper presents results from a series of designed experiments that evaluated PWB cleanliness as a function of various levels of machine control parameters. The study included a comprehensive hardware reliability evaluation, which included environmental conditioning, cleanliness testing, surface chemical analysis, surface insulation resistance testing, along with electrical, mechanical and long term storage testing. The results of this study that the new process produces quality, reliable hardware over a wide range of processing parameters. Adoption of this process, which eliminates the need for supplemental cleaning, will have a positive impact on many environmental problems, including depletion of the ozone layer.

  10. Evaluation, modelling and optimization of the cleaning process of contaminated plastic food refillables.

    PubMed

    Devlieghere, F; De Meulenaer, B; Sekitoleko, P; Estrella Garcia, A A; Huyghebaert, A

    1997-01-01

    In this study several types of bottle materials (glass, PET (polyethylene terephthalate), PC (polycarbonate), HDPE (high density polyethylene), PP (polypropylene) and PVC (polyvinyl chloride)) were evaluated in order to be used as food refillables, comparing the residual chemical contamination after classical caustic washing. Bottles were contaminated with model chemicals (chloroxylenol and d-limonene) and caustic washed with varied process parameters using a simulated laboratory-scale washing procedure. After washing, the chemical-contaminated bottles were filled with water and stored for 28 days at 37 degrees C. The concentrations of the model chemicals in the water after storage were taken as a measure of chemical contamination. The influence of the cleaning parameters (temperature, caustic and commercial additive concentration) was studied using response surface methodology. Washing temperature showed a significant influence on the removal of absorbed chemicals from surfaces compared with the effect of the caustic and especially the additive concentration. Optimization of caustic cleaning for the cleaning process in question led to better cleaning effectiveness, although none of the different washing conditions were able to remove all absorbed chemicals out of the polymeric resins. Commercially available plastic refillables (PET and PC) showed the best chemical rinsability. Glass bottles, however, had in every case the best rinsing characteristics. PMID:9373531

  11. Effect of Process Parameters on Particle Removal Efficiency in Poly(vinyl alcohol) Brush Scrubber Cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Joonho; Lee, Hyunseop; Kim, Hyoungjae; Jeong, Haedo

    2012-02-01

    Wafer cleaning is one of the most critical processes in the semiconductor device manufacturing. Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) brush scrubber cleaning is much attractive when compared with traditional wet-batch cleaning which causes the cross-contamination among the wafers in a bath and environmental issues with huge amount of chemical and deionized water (DIW) usages. The mechanical forces generated from PVA brush contact can remove the particles on a wafer surface under low concentration of chemical solution without cross-contamination. In this research, we monitored the change of the dynamic forces including normal and friction force generated by PVA brush contacts during cleaning process, and also investigated the effects of scrubbing conditions of PVA brush overlap and velocity, and the surface tension (low- or high-hydrophilic) of the wafer on the particle removal efficiency. The results show that the driving mechanism to remove the particle on a wafer surface can be changed by the PVA brush overlap and velocity condition such as the hydrodynamic drag force in the brush soft contact condition and friction force in the brush hard contact condition. The particle removal efficiency is higher under the low-hydrophilic surface having a low surface tension compared to high-hydrophilic surface.

  12. 7 CFR 361.8 - Cleaning of imported seed and processing of certain Canadian-origin screenings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cleaning of imported seed and processing of certain... (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IMPORTATION OF SEED AND SCREENINGS UNDER THE FEDERAL SEED ACT § 361.8 Cleaning of imported seed and processing of certain...

  13. Optimizing a Cleaning Process for Multilayer-Dielectric- (MLD) Diffraction Grating

    SciTech Connect

    Ashe, B.; Giacofei, C.; Myhre, G.; Schmid, A.W.

    2008-01-30

    A critical component for the OMEGA EP short-pulse petawatt laser system is the grating compressor chamber. This large vacuum chamber contains critical optics where laser-pulse compression is performed at the output of the system on two 40 cm-sq-aperture, IR (1054-nm) laser beams. Critical to this compression, within the grating compressor chamber, are four sets of tiled multilayer-dielectric-diffraction gratings that provide the capability for producing 2.6-kJ output IR energy per beam at 10 ps. Degradation of the grating laser-damage threshold due to adsorption of contaminants from the manufacturing process must be prevented to maintain system performance. In this paper we discuss an optimized cleaning process to achieve the OMEGA EP requirements. The fabrication of multilayer-dielectric gratings involves processes that utilize a wide variety of both organic materials (photoresist processes) and inorganic materials (metals and metal oxides) that can affect the final cleaning process. A number of these materials have significant optical absorbance; therefore, incomplete cleaning of these residues may result in the multilayer-dielectric gratings experiencing laser damage.

  14. Temporal pulse cleaning by a self-diffraction process for ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Na; Zhou, Kainan; Sun, Li; Wang, Xiaodong; Guo, Yi; Li, Qing; Su, Jingqin

    2014-11-01

    Applying the self-diffraction process to clean ultrashort laser pulses temporally is a recently developed effective way to temporal contrast enhancement. In this paper, we attempt to clean ultrashort laser pulses temporally by the self-diffraction process. Experiments were carried out to study the temporal contrast improvement in the front-end system of an ultraintense and ultrashort laser facility, i.e. the super intense laser for experiment on the extremes (SILEX-I). The results show that the maximum conversion efficiency of the first-order self-diffraction (SD1) pulse is 11%. The temporal contrast of the SD1 signal is improved by two orders of magnitude, i.e. to 103, for a 2.4-ns prepulse with initial contrast of ~10. For a 5.5 -ns prepulse with initial contrast of 2×103, the temporal contrast of the SD1 signal is improved by more than three orders of magnitude.

  15. Cleaning and sanitation of Salmonella-contaminated peanut butter processing equipment.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Elizabeth M; Grove, Stephen F; Halik, Lindsay A; Arritt, Fletcher; Keller, Susanne E

    2015-04-01

    Microbial contamination of peanut butter by Salmonella poses a significant health risk as Salmonella may remain viable throughout the product shelf life. Effective cleaning and sanitation of processing lines are essential for preventing cross-contamination. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a cleaning and sanitation procedure involving hot oil and 60% isopropanol, ± quaternary ammonium compounds, to decontaminate pilot-scale processing equipment harboring Salmonella. Peanut butter inoculated with a cocktail of four Salmonella serovars (∼ 7 log CFU/g) was used to contaminate the equipment (∼ 75 L). The system was then emptied of peanut butter and treated with hot oil (90 °C) for 2 h followed by sanitizer for 1 h. Microbial analysis of food-contact surfaces (7 locations), peanut butter, and oil were conducted. Oil contained ∼ 3.2 log CFU/mL on both trypticase soy agar with yeast extract (TSAYE) and xylose lysine deoxycholate (XLD), indicating hot oil alone was not sufficient to inactivate Salmonella. Environmental sampling found 0.25-1.12 log CFU/cm(2) remaining on processing equipment. After the isopropanol sanitation (± quaternary ammonium compounds), no Salmonella was detected in environmental samples on XLD (<0.16 log CFU/cm(2)). These data suggest that a two-step hot oil clean and isopropanol sanitization treatment may eliminate pathogenic Salmonella from contaminated equipment. PMID:25475272

  16. Effectiveness of bone cleaning process using chemical and entomology approaches: time and cost.

    PubMed

    Lai, Poh Soon; Khoo, Lay See; Mohd Hilmi, Saidin; Ahmad Hafizam, Hasmi; Mohd Shah, Mahmood; Nurliza, Abdullah; Nazni, Wasi Ahmad

    2015-08-01

    Skeletal examination is an important aspect of forensic pathology practice, requiring effective bone cleaning with minimal artefact. This study was conducted to compare between chemical and entomology methods of bone cleaning. Ten subjects between 20 and 40 years old who underwent uncomplicated medico-legal autopsies at the Institute of Forensic Medicine Malaysia were randomly chosen for this descriptive cross sectional study. The sternum bone was divided into 4 parts, each part subjected to a different cleaning method, being two chemical approaches i.e. laundry detergent and a combination of 6% hydrogen peroxide and powder sodium bicarbonate and two entomology approaches using 2nd instar maggots of Chrysomyia rufifacies and Ophyra spinigera. A scoring system for grading the outcome of cleaning was used. The effectiveness of the methods was evaluated based on average weight reduction per day and median number of days to achieve the average score of less than 1.5 within 12 days of the bone cleaning process. Using maggots was the most time-effective and costeffective method, achieving an average weight reduction of 1.4 gm per day, a median of 11.3 days to achieve the desired score and an average cost of MYR 4.10 per case to reach the desired score within 12 days. This conclusion was supported by blind validation by forensic specialists achieving a 77.8% preference for maggots. Emission scanning electron microscopy evaluation also revealed that maggots especially Chrysomyia rufifacies preserved the original condition of the bones better allowing improved elucidation of bone injuries in future real cases. PMID:26277669

  17. Extensive separations (CLEAN) processing strategy compared to TRUEX strategy and sludge wash ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, B.J.; Jansen, G.; Zimmerman, B.D.; Seeman, S.E.; Lauerhass, L.; Hoza, M.

    1994-08-01

    Numerous pretreatment flowsheets have been proposed for processing the radioactive wastes in Hanford`s 177 underground storage tanks. The CLEAN Option is examined along with two other flowsheet alternatives to quantify the trade-off of greater capital equipment and operating costs for aggressive separations with the reduced waste disposal costs and decreased environmental/health risks. The effect on the volume of HLW glass product and radiotoxicity of the LLW glass or grout product is predicted with current assumptions about waste characteristics and separations processes using a mass balance model. The prediction is made on three principal processing options: washing of tank wastes with removal of cesium and technetium from the supernatant, with washed solids routed directly to the glass (referred to as the Sludge Wash C processing strategy); the previous steps plus dissolution of the solids and removal of transuranic (TRU) elements, uranium, and strontium using solvent extraction processes (referred to as the Transuranic Extraction Option C (TRUEX-C) processing strategy); and an aggressive yet feasible processing strategy for separating the waste components to meet several main goals or objectives (referred to as the CLEAN Option processing strategy), such as the LLW is required to meet the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Class A limits; concentrations of technetium, iodine, and uranium are reduced as low as reasonably achievable; and HLW will be contained within 1,000 borosilicate glass canisters that meet current Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant glass specifications.

  18. NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY CLEAN PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES (PHASE 1) 1998 ANNUAL REPORT (EPA/600/R-98/065)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This annual report presents the proceedings of the first annual NATO/CCMS pilot study meeting in Cincinnati in March 1998. Guest speakers focused on efforts in the research arena of clean products, clean processes, life cycle analysis, ecolabeling, and pollution prevention tools.

  19. Application of non-invasive optical monitoring methodologies to follow and record painting cleaning processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, R.; Dal Fovo, A.; Striova, J.; Pezzati, L.; Pampaloni, E.; Raffaelli, M.; Barucci, M.

    2015-11-01

    The cleaning of painted artworks, i.e. the critical operation whereby materials are selectively removed from a painted surface by partial thinning or complete elimination of varnish, is one of the most debated conservation operations, being an irreversible process, which may result in chromatic and morphological variations in the painted surface. Due to ageing, the upper layer is subject to darkening and yellowing because of blanching and fading from ultraviolet exposure, dust deposition, and overpainted layers due, for instance, to restoration interventions. This degradation can either alter the original appearance of painting polychromy or cause mechanical failure of the finishes. To address these adverse conditions, a process of examination and analysis is critical to the definition and interpretation of the varnish layer. When investigating the ageing process of old paintings, it is of great importance to obtain insight into the painting technique as practiced in the past, and the first step in gaining this knowledge is, to a large extent, based on the study of the varnish film. An effective control of the process and objective evaluation of its outcome requires therefore instrumental/analytical support. The present study illustrates the successful application of non-invasive optical techniques—such as colorimetry, multispectral reflectography, laser scanning micro-profilometry, and optical coherence tomography—to the monitoring of an Italian fourteenth-century painting cleaning process. Results presented here confirm that optical techniques play a pivotal role in artwork diagnostics, especially with regard to conservation operations, while also indicating their validity when applied to the monitoring of the cleaning process.

  20. Cleaning conveyor belts in the chicken-cutting area of a poultry processing plant with 45°c water.

    PubMed

    Soares, V M; Pereira, J G; Zanette, C M; Nero, L A; Pinto, J P A N; Barcellos, V C; Bersot, L S

    2014-03-01

    Conveyor belts are widely used in food handling areas, especially in poultry processing plants. Because they are in direct contact with food and it is a requirement of the Brazilian health authority, conveyor belts are required to be continuously cleaned with hot water under pressure. The use of water in this procedure has been questioned based on the hypothesis that water may further disseminate microorganisms but not effectively reduce the organic material on the surface. Moreover, reducing the use of water in processing may contribute to a reduction in costs and emission of effluents. However, no consistent evidence in support of removing water during conveyor belt cleaning has been reported. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to compare the bacterial counts on conveyor belts that were or were not continuously cleaned with hot water under pressure. Superficial samples from conveyor belts (cleaned or not cleaned) were collected at three different times during operation (T1, after the preoperational cleaning [5 a.m.]; T2, after the first work shift [4 p.m.]; and T3, after the second work shift [1:30 a.m.]) in a poultry meat processing facility, and the samples were subjected to mesophilic and enterobacterial counts. For Enterobacteriaceae, no significant differences were observed between the conveyor belts, independent of the time of sampling or the cleaning process. No significant differences were observed between the counts of mesophilic bacteria at the distinct times of sampling on the conveyor belt that had not been subjected to continuous cleaning with water at 45°C. When comparing similar periods of sampling, no significant differences were observed between the mesophilic counts obtained from the conveyor belts that were or were not subjected to continuous cleaning with water at 45°C. Continuous cleaning with water did not significantly reduce microorganism counts, suggesting the possibility of discarding this procedure in chicken processing

  1. Fouling of a spiral-wound reverse osmosis membrane processing swine wastewater: effect of cleaning procedure on fouling resistance.

    PubMed

    Camilleri-Rumbau, M S; Masse, L; Dubreuil, J; Mondor, M; Christensen, K V; Norddahl, B

    2016-01-01

    Swine manure is a valuable source of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. After solid-liquid separation, the resulting swine wastewater can be concentrated by reverse osmosis (RO) to produce a nitrogen-potassium rich fertilizer. However, swine wastewater has a high fouling potential and an efficient cleaning strategy is required. In this study, a semi-commercial farm scale RO spiral-wound membrane unit was fouled while processing larger volumes of swine wastewater during realistic cyclic operations over a 9-week period. Membrane cleaning was performed daily. Three different cleaning solutions, containing SDS, SDS+EDTA and NaOH were compared. About 99% of the fouling resistance could be removed by rinsing the membrane with water. Flux recoveries (FRs) above 98% were achieved for all the three cleaning solutions after cleaning. No significant differences in FR were found between the cleaning solutions. The NaOH solution thus is a good economical option for cleaning RO spiral-wound membranes fouled with swine wastewater. Soaking the membrane for 3 days in permeate water at the end of each week further improved the FR. Furthermore, a fouling resistance model for predicting the fouling rate, permeate flux decay and cleaning cycle periods based on processing time and swine wastewater conductivity was developed. PMID:26698296

  2. Optimization of clean fractionation processing as a pre-treatment technology for prairie cordgrass.

    PubMed

    Brudecki, Grzegorz; Cybulska, Iwona; Rosentrater, Kurt; Julson, James

    2012-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to fractionate prairie cordgrass (PCG) obtaining the highest cellulose digestibility. Following clean fractionation (CF) processing, the PCG lignocellulosic biomass was fractionated into three main building blocks: cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Effects of processing factors such as time, temperature, catalyst concentration and organic solvent mixture composition were evaluated. Organic solvent-aqueous mixture contained methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK), ethanol and water in different proportions. Sulfuric acid was used as a catalyst. In order to evaluate the degree of pre-treatment, enzymatic saccharification was employed on the cellulose fraction obtained from the CF process. Response surface methodology was used for process optimization and statistical analysis. Optimal conditions (39 min, 154°C, 0.69% catalyst and 9% MIBK) resulted in 84% glucose yield and 87% acid insoluble lignin (AIL). PMID:22244901

  3. Isotopic compositions of s-process elements in acid-cleaned mainstream presolar silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nan

    Pristine meteorites contain ancient stellar relicts that survived destructions in the early solar system. Isotopic studies of these presolar grains have proven to be a unique method to understand various known and unknown nucleosynthetic processes occurred in their parent stars. Previous studies of isotopic compositions of heavy elements in mainstream SiC grains from low-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars reported contamination from solar system materials with normal isotopic compositions on grain surfaces and prevented the authors from obtaining the pure nucleosynthetic isotopic signature from stars. In addition, in these previous studies uncertainties in the major neutron source 13C within the 13C-pocket were underestimated because only the 13C mass fraction was considered as a parameter with the 13C-pocket mass and the 13C profile fixed in model calculations. The oversimplified treatment of the 13C-pocket mainly resulted from the fact that it was unclear if there exists any tracer to distinguish different effects of the 13C concentration, the 13C-pocket mass, and the 13C profile within the 13C-pocket. To address these issues, we acid-cleaned all the presolar SiC grains used in this study after their separation from the bulk Murchison meteorite. In addition, we chose to measure strontium and barium isotopic compositions in these acid-cleaned SiC grains, because both elements sit at the first and second s-process peaks along the s-process path, and are sensitive to varying parameters for the s-process in model calculations. By comparing our new acid-cleaned grain data with single grain data from previous studies for barium isotopes, we conclude that the acid-cleaning procedure is quite effective in removing surface barium contamination. For the first time, we find that model predictions for 138Ba/ 136Ba are sensitive to all three variables of the 13C-pocket adopted in AGB model calculations. In order to match the low 138Ba/ 136Ba values in a minor group of

  4. Ultrasonically treated liquid interfaces for progress in cleaning and separation processes.

    PubMed

    Radziuk, Darya; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound and acoustic cavitation enable ergonomic and eco-friendly treatment of complex liquids with outstanding performance in cleaning, separation and recycling of resources. A key element of ultrasonic-based technology is the high speed of mixing by streams, flows and jets (or shock waves), which is accompanied by sonochemical reactions. Mass transfer across the phase boundary with a great variety of catalytic processes is substantially enhanced through acoustic emulsification. Encapsulation, separation and recovery of liquids are fast with high production yield if applied by ultrasound. Here we discuss the state of knowledge of these processes by ultrasound and acoustic cavitation from a perspective of a physico-chemical model in order to predict and control the outcome. We focus on the physical interpretation and quantification of ultrasonic parameters and properties of liquids to understand the chemistry of liquid/liquid interfaces in acoustic fields. The roles of thermodynamic enthalpy and entropy (incl. Laplace and osmotic pressure) in the context of sonochemical reactions (separation, catalysis, degradation, cross-linking, ion exchange and phase transfer) are outlined. The synergy of ultrasound and electric fields or continuous flow chemistry for cleaning and separation via emulsification is highlighted by specific strategies involving polymers and ultrasonic membranes. PMID:26435267

  5. Fabrication of free standing anodic titanium oxide membranes with clean surface using recycling process.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianhui; Lee, Tae-Young; Chen, Huiyu; Shin, Dong-Wook; Kwon, Kee-Won; Kwon, Sang Jik; Yoo, Ji-Beom

    2010-07-01

    Large area of self-organized, free standing anodic titanium oxide (ATO) nanotube membranes with clean surfaces were facilely prepared to desired lengths via electrochemical anodization of highly pure Ti sheets in an ethylene glycol electrolyte, with a small amount of NH4F and H2O at 50 V, followed by self-detachment of the ATO membrane from the Ti substrate using recycling processes. In the first anodization step, the nanowire oxide layer existed over the well-arranged ATO nanotube. After sufficiently rinsing with water, the whole ATO layer was removed from the Ti sheet by high pressure N2 gas, and a well-patterned dimple layer with a thickness of about 30 nm existed on the Ti substrate. By using these naturally formed nano-scale pits as templates, in the second and third anodization process, highly ordered, vertically aligned, and free standing ATO membranes with the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO)-like clean surface were obtained. The inter-pore distance and diameter was 154 +/- 2 nm and 91+/- 2 nm, the tube arrays lengths for 25 and 46 hours were 44 and 70 microm, respectively. The present study demonstrates a simple approach to producing high quality, length controllable, large area TiO2 membrane. PMID:21128409

  6. Solar production of industrial process steam at the Home Cleaning and Laundry Co. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    This report presents the results of the operation and performance evaluation period at the Home Laundry Solar Industrial Process Heat Project at Pasadena, California. The installation comprises 6496 ft/sup 2/ (603.5 m/sup 2/) of linear parabolic trough concentrating collectors supplying solar thermal energy for use in laundry and dry cleaning processes. The design phase began in September 1977, and an acceptance test was conducted during the week of April 12, 1982. The plant has been in operation since May 1982, with the 12-month Phase III (operational) period starting in October 1982. The objective of the operational evaluation experiment was to maximize energy delivery to the industrial participant while characterizing system performance. Data were acquired for monthly documentation of system performance, maintenance requirements, and operating costs.

  7. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY A new cleaning process for the metallic contaminants on a post-CMP wafer's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baohong, Gao; Yuling, Liu; Chenwei, Wang; Yadong, Zhu; Shengli, Wang; Qiang, Zhou; Baimei, Tan

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a new cleaning process using boron-doped diamond (BDD) film anode electrochemical oxidation for metallic contaminants on polished silicon wafer surfaces. The BDD film anode electrochemical oxidation can efficiently prepare pyrophosphate peroxide, pyrophosphate peroxide can oxidize organic contaminants, and pyrophosphate peroxide is deoxidized into pyrophosphate. Pyrophosphate, a good complexing agent, can form a metal complex, which is a structure consisting of a copper ion, bonded to a surrounding array of two pyrophosphate anions. Three polished wafers were immersed in the 0.01 mol/L CuSO4 solution for 2 h in order to make comparative experiments. The first one was cleaned by pyrophosphate peroxide, the second by RCA (Radio Corporation of America) cleaning, and the third by deionized (DI) water. The XPS measurement result shows that the metallic contaminants on wafers cleaned by the RCA method and by pyrophosphate peroxide is less than the XPS detection limits of 1 ppm. And the wafer's surface cleaned by pyrophosphate peroxide is more efficient in removing organic carbon residues than RCA cleaning. Therefore, BDD film anode electrochemical oxidation can be used for microelectronics cleaning, and it can effectively remove organic contaminants and metallic contaminants in one step. It also achieves energy saving and environmental protection.

  8. Experimental investigation of fabrication process-, transportation-, storage, and handling-induced contamination of 157-nm reticles and vacuum UV cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okoroanyanwu, Uzodinma; Stepanenko, Nickolay; Vereecke, Guy; Eliat, Astrid; Kocsis, Michael K.; Kang, Young-Seog; Jonckheere, Rik M.; Conard, Thierry; Ronse, Kurt G.

    2004-05-01

    Mask fabrication process, transportation, storage, and handling contribute to contamination of 157nm reticles and modified fused silica substrates, resulting in transmission loss. A stable VUV cleaning procedure for contaminated binary, alternating, and attenuated phase shift reticles has been developed. This cleaning procedure was verified by lithographic imaging on the 157nm ASML MS-VII exposure scanner. A point-to-point steady state dose transmission uniformity range across a batch of 25 wafers (the exposure conditions of which were equivalent to that of a 300 mm wafer, 26mm×33mm fields, 50mJ/cm2) that were exposed with a modified fused silica substrate, was found to be <0.24% for a reticle that was cleaned prior to exposure using this VUV cleaning process. In-situ laser cleaning of contaminated mask substrates during exposure in the MS-VII resulted in 1% change in transmission at doses of up to 20 J/cm2, above which transmission remains stable (<0.24% variation). The cleaning procedure involves exposing the contaminated reticle in the UVO Reticle Cleaning Station for 30 minutes, using a cleaning gas mixture of N2/O2=99%/1%. Transmission loss due to contamination within the clean room is limited to 1 - 2 % and is reversible upon VUV cleaning. Flare levels of 3% were measured on contaminated reticle relative to a clean state of the same reticle. VUV cleaning is not only good for improving and maintaining stable mask transmission, but it is also good for preventing reticle contamination-induced flare. Contamination rate and contaminant type appear to be dependent on the storage environment of mask substrates and reticles. Typical contaminants included molecular acids (halogens, sulfur, sulfates), molecular bases (ammonia, amines), molecular condensables (hydrocarbons, alcohols, ketones, fatty acids, siloxanes, phthalate), molecular dopant (boron) and molecular metals (Ca, Mg, Al, Cu). Contamination of mask substrates appears to be through a competitive adsorption

  9. Investigation of the Timesaver process for de-burring and cleaning the plate for the Atlas Tilecalorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Guarino, V.; Kocenko, L.; Wood, K.

    1997-11-25

    The Timesaver belt grinding machine has been selected by the Atlas collaboration for deburring the master and spacer plates after die stamping and laser cutting, respectively. However, the question has been raised as to whether or not the plates are sufficiently clean after going through the Timesaver machine to immediately be glued into a submodule assembly. This would greatly enhance the production of submodules because the task of cleaning individual master and spacer plates is labor intensive and time consuming as well as raises environmental issues with the detergent that is used. In order to investigate the possibility of using the Timesaver process to clean the plates as well as debur them, several plates were run through the machine and their cleanliness inspected before and after. In addition, several glue samples were subjected to the same process, glued, and then pulled apart in an attempt to gauge the cleanliness of the plates. From this series of tests it can be concluded that the wet Timesaver machine can adequately prepare the surface of the master and spacer plates as well as clean the plates for gluing. The machine was able to adequately remove all of the oil and grime from the test plates. Also, from the single test on the dry machine it appears that significant cleaning will be required to adequately clean the plates before gluing in order to remove the remaining grit.

  10. Active biopolymers in green non-conventional media: a sustainable tool for developing clean chemical processes.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Pedro; Bernal, Juana M; Nieto, Susana; Gomez, Celia; Garcia-Verdugo, Eduardo; Luis, Santiago V

    2015-12-21

    The greenness of chemical processes turns around two main axes: the selectivity of catalytic transformations, and the separation of pure products. The transfer of the exquisite catalytic efficiency shown by enzymes in nature to chemical processes is an important challenge. By using appropriate reaction systems, the combination of biopolymers with supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and ionic liquids (ILs) resulted in synergetic and outstanding platforms for developing (multi)catalytic green chemical processes, even under flow conditions. The stabilization of biocatalysts, together with the design of straightforward approaches for separation of pure products including the full recovery and reuse of enzymes/ILs systems, are essential elements for developing clean chemical processes. By understanding structure-function relationships of biopolymers in ILs, as well as for ILs themselves (e.g. sponge-like ionic liquids, SLILs; supported ionic liquids-like phases, SILLPs, etc.), several integral green chemical processes of (bio)catalytic transformation and pure product separation are pointed out (e.g. the biocatalytic production of biodiesel in SLILs, etc.). Other developments based on DNA/ILs systems, as pathfinder studies for further technological applications in the near future, are also considered. PMID:26497761

  11. Bench-scale testing of a micronized magnetite, fine-coal cleaning process

    SciTech Connect

    Suardini, P.J.

    1995-11-01

    Custom Coals, International has installed and is presently testing a 500 lb/hr. micronized-magnetite, fine-coal cleaning circuit at PETC`s Process Research Facility (PRF). The cost-shared project was awarded as part of the Coal Preparation Program`s, High Efficiency Preparation Subprogram. The project includes design, construction, testing, and decommissioning of a fully-integrated, bench-scale circuit, complete with feed coal classification to remove the minus 30 micron slimes, dense medium cycloning of the 300 by 30 micron feed coal using a nominal minus 10 micron size magnetite medium, and medium recovery using drain and rinse screens and various stages and types of magnetic separators. This paper describes the project circuit and goals, including a description of the current project status and the sources of coal and magnetite which are being tested.

  12. Monte Carlo simulations of the clean and disordered contact process in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    The absorbing-state transition in the three-dimensional contact process with and without quenched randomness is investigated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. In the clean case, a reweighting technique is combined with a careful extrapolation of the data to infinite time to determine with high accuracy the critical behavior in the three-dimensional directed percolation universality class. In the presence of quenched spatial disorder, our data demonstrate that the absorbing-state transition is governed by an unconventional infinite-randomness critical point featuring activated dynamical scaling. The critical behavior of this transition does not depend on the disorder strength, i.e., it is universal. Close to the disordered critical point, the dynamics is characterized by the nonuniversal power laws typical of a Griffiths phase. We compare our findings to the results of other numerical methods, and we relate them to a general classification of phase transitions in disordered systems based on the rare region dimensionality. PMID:23214768

  13. Evaluation of no-clean solder process designed to eliminate the use of ozone-depleting chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Paffett, M.T.; Farr, J.D.; Rogers, Y.C.; Hutchinson, W.B.

    1993-10-01

    This paper summarizes the LANL contributions to a joint Motorola/SNLA/LANL cooperative research and development agreement study on the reliability of an alternative solder process that is intended to reduce or eliminate the use of ozone-depleting chemicals in the manufacture of printed wire boards (PWBs). This process is termed self-cleaning because of the nature of the thermal chemistry associated with the adipic and formic acid components used in place of traditional solder rosin fluxes. Traditional rosin fluxes used in military electronic hardware applications are cleaned (by requirement) using chlorofluorohydrocarbons. The LANL contribution centers around analytical determination of PWB cleanliness after soldering using the self-cleaning method. Results of these analytical determinations involving primarily surface analysis of boards following temperature, temperature and humidity, and long-term storage testing are described with representative data. It is concluded that the self-cleaning process leaves behind levels of solid residue that are visually and analytically observable using most of these surface analysis techniques. The materials compatibility of electronic components soldered using the self-cleaning soldering process is more fully described in the project report issued by SNLA that encompasses the complete project with statistical lifetime and accelerated aging studies. Analytical surface specificity and suggestions for further work are also given.

  14. Cleaning Process Versus Laser-Damage Threshold of Coated Optical Components

    SciTech Connect

    Rigatti, A.L.

    2005-03-31

    The cleaning of optical surfaces is important in the manufacture of high-laser-damage-threshold coatings, which are a key component on peak-power laser systems such as OMEGA located at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). Since cleaning adds time, labor, and ultimately cost to the final coated component, this experiment was designed to determine the impact of different cleaning protocols on the measured laser-damage performance.

  15. DEVELOPING AN OPTIMIZED PROCESS STRATEGY FOR ACID CLEANING OF THE SAVANNAH RIVERSITE HLW TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ketusky, E

    2006-12-04

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), there remains approximately 35 million gallons of High Level Waste (HLW) that was mostly created from Purex and SRS H-Area Modified (HM) nuclear fuel cycles. The waste is contained in approximately forty-nine tanks fabricated from commercially available carbon steel. In order to minimize general corrosion, the waste is maintained as very-alkaline solution. The very-alkaline chemistry has caused hydrated metal oxides to precipitate and form a sludge heel. Over the years, the sludge waste has aged, with some forming a hardened crust. To aid in the removal of the sludge heels from select tanks for closure the use of oxalic acid to dissolve the sludge is being investigated. Developing an optimized process strategy based on laboratory analyses would be prohibitively costly. This research, therefore, demonstrates that a chemical equilibrium based software program can be used to develop an optimized process strategy for oxalic acid cleaning of the HLW tanks based on estimating resultant chemistries, minimizing resultant oxalates sent to the evaporator, and minimizing resultant solids sent to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF).

  16. Development of the LICADO coal cleaning process. Final report, October 1, 1987--April 2, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-31

    Development of the liquid carbon dioxide process for the cleaning of coal was performed in batch, variable volume (semi-continuous), and continuous tests. Continuous operation at feed rates up to 4.5 kg/hr (10-lb/hr) was achieved with the Continuous System. Coals tested included Upper Freeport, Pittsburgh, Illinois No. 6, and Middle Kittanning seams. Results showed that the ash and pyrite rejections agreed closely with washability data for each coal at the particle size tested (-200 mesh). A 0.91 metric ton (1-ton) per hour Proof-of-Concept Plant was conceptually designed. A 181 metric ton (200 ton) per hour and a 45 metric ton (50 ton) per hour plant were sized sufficiently to estimate costs for economic analyses. The processing costs for the 181 metric ton (200 ton) per hour and 45 metric ton (50 ton) per hour were estimated to be $18.96 per metric ton ($17.20 per ton) and $11.47 per metric ton ($10.40 per ton), respectively for these size plants. The costs for the 45 metric ton per hour plant are lower because it is assumed to be a fines recovery plant which does not require a grinding circuit of complex waste handling system.

  17. State-of-the-Art Evaluation of Ultra-Clean ULSI Processes^*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer-Colbrie, Alice M.

    1996-03-01

    Ultra-clean Si wafer surfaces are critical to the fabrication of ULSI-quality gate oxides. At present, the best methods for removing surface metal impurities exceeds our ability to measure them using traditional methods. New methods are being actively developed to fill this gap. One approach has been to extend the capability of a technique widely used throughout the semiconductor industry, total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF), by using synchrotron radiation. To date, synchrotron radiation total reflection x-ray fluorescence (SR TXRF) has a state-of-the-art transition metal sensitivity of ~ 3 × 10^8/cm^2 (<10 fg) as determined from Fe, Ni, and Zn dip-contaminated standards. This sensitivity is over an order of magnitude better than for an in-house x-ray source. These results have been obtained through the specific development of beam-line optics, detectors and wafer handling protocols. At this time, SR TXRF has been used by Sematech member companies to measure the cleanliness of full wafers (up to 150mm) at various steps in the integrated circuit fabrication process. In addition, SR TXRF results from clean wafers have been compared to conventional TXRF results from wafers which have been prepared by chemically concentrating the impurities. These data show that the higher sensitivity made possible by the synchrotron radiation source is in a useful regime. With the completion of on-going hardware improvements and improved availability of beamtime, this method could be integrated into ULSI process development. ^*Work done in collaboration with: S.S. Laderman, Hewlett-Packard Labs; S. Brennan, A. Waldhauer, N. Takaura, P. Pianetta, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory; A. Shimazaki, K. Miyazaki, Toshiba Corp.; I. Cornelissen, M. Meuris, IMEC; D.C. Wherry, S. Barkan, Kevex, Inc; E. Adem, AMD; D. Werho, Motorola, Inc.; M. Zaitz, IBM; J. Rose, DEC; L. Files, Texas Instruments; K. Gupta, Intel; Synchrotron radiation experiments were performed at the Stanford

  18. The microbial ecology of processing equipment in different fish industries-analysis of the microflora during processing and following cleaning and disinfection.

    PubMed

    Bagge-Ravn, Dorthe; Ng, Yin; Hjelm, Mette; Christiansen, Jesper N; Johansen, Charlotte; Gram, Lone

    2003-11-01

    The microflora adhering to the processing equipment during production and after cleaning and disinfecting procedures was identified in four different processing plants. A total of 1009 microorganisms was isolated from various-agar plates and identified. A stepwise procedure using simple phenotypic tests was used to identify the isolates and proved a fast way to group a large collection of microorganisms. Pseudomonas, Neisseriaceae, Enterobactericeae, Coryneform, Acinetobacter and lactic acid bacteria dominated the microflora of cold-smoked salmon plants, whereas the microflora in a plant processing semi-preserved herring consisted of Pseudomonas, Alcaligenes and Enterobactericeae. Psychrobacter, Staphylococcus and yeasts were found in a caviar processing plant. Overall, many microorganisms that are often isolated from fish were also isolated from the fish processing plants. However, some selection depending on processing parameters occurred, since halo- and osmo-tolerant organisms dominated in the caviar processing. After cleaning and disinfection, yeasts, Pseudomonas, Neisseriaceae and Alcaligenes remained in smokehouses, yeasts and Pseudomonas in the herring plant and Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus and yeasts in the caviar plant. The dominant adhering organisms after cleaning and disinfection were pseudomonads and yeasts independently of the microflora during processing. Knowledge of the adhering microflora is essential in the Good Hygienic Practises programme of food processing plants, as the development and design of improved cleaning and disinfecting procedures should target the microorganisms persisting and potentially contaminating the product. PMID:14527796

  19. Final Report of NATO/SPS Pilot Study on Clean Products and Processes (Phase I and II)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Early in 1998 the NATO Committee for Challenges to Modern Society (SPS) (Science for Peace and Security) approved the Pilot Study on Clean Products and Processes for an initial period of five years. The pilot was to provide a forum for member country representatives to discuss t...

  20. Aircraft Materials, Processes, Cleaning and Corrosion Control (Course Outline), Aviation Mechanics 1 (Power and Frame): 9073.01.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This document presents an outline for a 135-hour course designed to familiarize the beginning student with the basic concepts common to aircraft materials and processes, together with the requirements of proper cleaning and corrosion control as outlined by the Federal Aviation Agency. The aviation airframe and powerplant maintenance technician is…

  1. Impact of different cleaning processes on the laser damage threshold of antireflection coatings for Z-Backlighter optics at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Ella; Bellum, John; Kletecka, Damon

    2014-11-06

    We have examined how different cleaning processes affect the laser-induced damage threshold of antireflection coatings for large dimension, Z-Backlighter laser optics at Sandia National Laboratories. Laser damage thresholds were measured after the coatings were created, and again 4 months later to determine which cleaning processes were most effective. There is a nearly twofold increase in laser-induced damage threshold between the antireflection coatings that were cleaned and those that were not cleaned. Aging of the coatings after 4 months resulted in even higher laser-induced damage thresholds. Also, the laser-induced damage threshold results revealed that every antireflection coating had a high defect density, despite the cleaning process used, which indicates that improvements to either the cleaning or deposition processes should provide even higher laser-induced damage thresholds.

  2. Impact of different cleaning processes on the laser damage threshold of antireflection coatings for Z-Backlighter optics at Sandia National Laboratories

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Field, Ella; Bellum, John; Kletecka, Damon

    2014-11-06

    We have examined how different cleaning processes affect the laser-induced damage threshold of antireflection coatings for large dimension, Z-Backlighter laser optics at Sandia National Laboratories. Laser damage thresholds were measured after the coatings were created, and again 4 months later to determine which cleaning processes were most effective. There is a nearly twofold increase in laser-induced damage threshold between the antireflection coatings that were cleaned and those that were not cleaned. Aging of the coatings after 4 months resulted in even higher laser-induced damage thresholds. Also, the laser-induced damage threshold results revealed that every antireflection coating had a high defectmore » density, despite the cleaning process used, which indicates that improvements to either the cleaning or deposition processes should provide even higher laser-induced damage thresholds.« less

  3. Well-ordered polymer nano-fibers with self-cleaning property by disturbing crystallization process

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bionic self-cleaning surfaces with well-ordered polymer nano-fibers are firstly fabricated by disturbing crystallization during one-step coating-curing process. Orderly thin (100 nm) and long (5–10 μm) polymer nano-fibers with a certain direction are fabricated by external macroscopic force (Fblow) interference introduced by H2 gas flow, leading to superior superhydrophobicity with a water contact angle (WCA) of 170° and a water sliding angle (WSA) of 0-1°. In contrast, nano-wires and nano-bridges (1–8 μm in length/10-80 nm in width) are generated by “spinning/stretching” under internal microscopic force (FT) interference due to significant temperature difference in the non-uniform cooling medium. The findings provide a novel theoretical basis for controllable polymer “bionic lotus” surface and will further promote practical application in many engineering fields such as drag-reduction and anti-icing. PMID:25114644

  4. Well-ordered polymer nano-fibers with self-cleaning property by disturbing crystallization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qin; Luo, Zhuangzhu; Tan, Sheng; Luo, Yimin; Wang, Yunjiao; Zhang, Zhaozhu; Liu, Weimin

    2014-07-01

    Bionic self-cleaning surfaces with well-ordered polymer nano-fibers are firstly fabricated by disturbing crystallization during one-step coating-curing process. Orderly thin (100 nm) and long (5-10 μm) polymer nano-fibers with a certain direction are fabricated by external macroscopic force ( F blow) interference introduced by H2 gas flow, leading to superior superhydrophobicity with a water contact angle (WCA) of 170° and a water sliding angle (WSA) of 0-1°. In contrast, nano-wires and nano-bridges (1-8 μm in length/10-80 nm in width) are generated by "spinning/stretching" under internal microscopic force ( F T) interference due to significant temperature difference in the non-uniform cooling medium. The findings provide a novel theoretical basis for controllable polymer "bionic lotus" surface and will further promote practical application in many engineering fields such as drag-reduction and anti-icing.

  5. Well-ordered polymer nano-fibers with self-cleaning property by disturbing crystallization process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; Luo, Zhuangzhu; Tan, Sheng; Luo, Yimin; Wang, Yunjiao; Zhang, Zhaozhu; Liu, Weimin

    2014-01-01

    Bionic self-cleaning surfaces with well-ordered polymer nano-fibers are firstly fabricated by disturbing crystallization during one-step coating-curing process. Orderly thin (100 nm) and long (5-10 μm) polymer nano-fibers with a certain direction are fabricated by external macroscopic force (F blow) interference introduced by H2 gas flow, leading to superior superhydrophobicity with a water contact angle (WCA) of 170° and a water sliding angle (WSA) of 0-1°. In contrast, nano-wires and nano-bridges (1-8 μm in length/10-80 nm in width) are generated by "spinning/stretching" under internal microscopic force (F T) interference due to significant temperature difference in the non-uniform cooling medium. The findings provide a novel theoretical basis for controllable polymer "bionic lotus" surface and will further promote practical application in many engineering fields such as drag-reduction and anti-icing. PMID:25114644

  6. Rapid formation of phase-clean 110 K (Bi-2223) powders derived via freeze-drying process

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    1996-01-01

    A process for the preparation of amorphous precursor powders for Pb-doped Bi.sub.2 Sr.sub.2 Ca.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x (2223) includes a freeze-drying process incorporating a splat-freezing step. The process generally includes splat freezing a nitrate solution of Bi, Pb, Sr, Ca, and Cu to form flakes of the solution without any phase separation; grinding the frozen flakes to form a powder; freeze-drying the frozen powder; heating the dried powder to form a dry green precursor powders; denitrating the green-powders; heating the denitrated powders to form phase-clean Bi-2223 powders. The grain boundaries of the 2223 grains appear to be clean, leading to good intergrain contact between 2223 grains.

  7. Rapid formation of phase-clean 110 K (Bi-2223) powders derived via freeze-drying process

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, U.

    1996-06-04

    A process for the preparation of amorphous precursor powders for Pb-doped Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2} Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (2223) includes a freeze-drying process incorporating a splat-freezing step. The process generally includes splat freezing a nitrate solution of Bi, Pb, Sr, Ca, and Cu to form flakes of the solution without any phase separation; grinding the frozen flakes to form a powder; freeze-drying the frozen powder; heating the dried powder to form a dry green precursor powders; denitrating the green-powders; heating the denitrated powders to form phase-clean Bi-2223 powders. The grain boundaries of the 2223 grains appear to be clean, leading to good intergrain contact between 2223 grains. 11 figs.

  8. REINVESTIGATING THE PROCESS IMPACTS FROM OXALIC ACIDHIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK CLEANING

    SciTech Connect

    Ketusky, E

    2008-01-22

    The impacts and acceptability of using oxalic acid to clean the Savannah River Site, High Level Waste Tanks 1-8, were re-investigated using a two-phased approach. For the first phase, using a representative Tank 1-8 sludge, the chemical equilibrium based software, OLI ESP{copyright} and Savannah River Site laboratory test results were used to develop a chemically speciated material balance and a general oxalate mass balance. Using 8 wt% oxalic acid with a 100% molar excess, for every 1 kg of sludge solid that was dissolved, about 3.4 kg of resultant solids would form for eventual vitrification, while about 0.6 kg of soluble oxalate would precipitate in the evaporator system, and form a salt heel. Using available analyses, a list of potential safety and process impacts were developed, screened, and evaluated for acceptability. The results showed that the use of oxalic acid had two distinct types of impacts, those which were safety based and required potential upgrades or additional studies. Assuming such were performed and adequate, no further actions were required. The second type of impacts were also acceptable, but were long-term, and as such, would need to be managed. These impacts were directly caused by the solubility characteristics of oxalate in a concentrated sodium solution and, occurred after pH restoration. Since oxalate destruction methods are commonly available, their use should be considered. Using an oxalate destruction method could enable the benefits of oxalic to applied, while eliminating the long-term impacts that must be managed, and hence should be considered.

  9. Digital processing of SEM images for the assessment of evaluation indexes of cleaning interventions on Pentelic marble surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Moropoulou, A. Delegou, E.T.; Vlahakis, V.; Karaviti, E.

    2007-11-15

    In this work, digital processing of scanning-electron-microscopy images utilized to assess cleaning interventions applied on the Pentelic marble surfaces of the National Archaeological Museum and National Library in Athens, Greece. Beside mineralogical and chemical characterization that took place by scanning-electron-microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, the image-analysis program EDGE was applied for estimating three evaluation indexes of the marble micro-structure. The EDGE program was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for the evaluation of cleaning interventions applied on Philadelphia City Hall. This computer program analyzes scanning-electron-microscopy images of stone specimens cut in cross-section for measuring the fractal dimension of the exposed surfaces, the stone near-surface fracture density, the shape factor (a surface roughness factor) and the friability index which represents the physico-chemical and physico-mechanical stability of the stone surface. The results indicated that the evaluation of the marble surface micro-structure before and after cleaning is achieved by the suggested indexes, while the performance of cleaning interventions on the marble surfaces can be assessed.

  10. Computational study of a self-cleaning process on superhydrophobic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farokhirad, Samaneh

    All substances around us are bounded by interfaces. In general, interface between different phases of materials are categorized as fluid-fluid, solid-fluid, and solid-solid. Fluid-fluid interfaces exhibit a distinct behavior by adapting their shape in response to external stimulus. For example, a liquid droplet on a substrate can undergo different wetting morphologies depending on topography and chemical composition of the surface. Fundamentally, interfacial phenomena arise at the limit between two immiscible phases, namely interface. The interface dynamic governs, to a great extent, physical processes such as impact and spreading of two immiscible media, and stabilization of foams and emulsions from break-up and coalescence. One of the recent challenging problems in the interface-driven fluid dynamics is the self-propulsion mechanism of droplets by means of different types of external forces such as electrical potential, or thermal Marangoni effect. Rapid removal of self-propelled droplet from the surface is an essential factor in terms of expense and efficiency for many applications including self-cleaning and enhanced heat and mass transfer to save energy and natural resources. A recent study on superhydrophobic nature of micro- and nanostructures of cicada wings offers a unique way for the self-propulsion process with no external force, namely coalescence-induced self-propelled jumping of droplet which can act effectively at any orientation. The biological importance of this new mechanism is associated with protecting such surfaces from long term exposure to colloidal particles such as microbial colloids and virus particles. Different interfacial phenomena can occur after out-of-plane jumping of droplet. If the departed droplet is landed back by gravity, it may impact and spread on the surface or coalesce with another droplet and again self-peopled itself to jump away from the surface. The complete removal of the propelled droplet to a sufficient distance

  11. Impact of different cleaning processes on the laser damage threshold of antireflection coatings for Z-Backlighter optics at Sandia National Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Ella; Bellum, John; Kletecka, Damon

    2014-12-01

    We have examined how three different cleaning processes affect the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of antireflection coatings for large dimension, Z-Backlighter laser optics at Sandia National Laboratories. Laser damage thresholds were measured after the coatings were created, and again 4 months later to determine which cleaning processes were most effective. Coatings that received cleaning exhibited the highest LIDTs compared to coatings that were not cleaned. In some cases, there is nearly a twofold increase in the LIDT between the cleaned and uncleaned coatings (19.4 J/cm2 compared to 39.1 J/cm2). Higher LIDTs were realized after 4 months of aging. The most effective cleaning process involved washing the coated surface with mild detergent, and then soaking the optic in a mixture of ethyl alcohol and deionized water. Also, the laser damage results indicate that the presence of nonpropagating (NP) damage sites dominates the LIDTs of almost every optic, despite the cleaning process used. NP damage sites can be attributed to defects such as nodules in the coating or surface contamination, which suggests that pursuing further improvements to the deposition or cleaning processes are worthwhile to achieve even higher LIDTs.

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL AND ECONOMIC COMPARISON OF ADVANCED PROCESSES FOR CONVERSION OF COAL AND BIOMASS INTO CLEAN ENERGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biomass and coal conversion into clean energy is compared on an economic and environmental basis in three regional scenarios: (1) electric power from direct combustion of wood versus conventional coal combustion in the South Central U.S., (2) synthetic pipeline gas from anaerobic...

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW GRAVITY SEDIMENTATION PROCESS FOR DEWATERING FLUE GAS CLEANING WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a project to develop and test a novel system for dewatering flue gas cleaning (FGC) wastes at the pilot plant level. In this new system, the clarification and thickening functions are conducted in separate, but interconnected, pieces of equipment. The ...

  14. Clean surface processing of rubrene single crystal immersed in ionic liquid by using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Yasuyuki; Hara, Hisaya; Morino, Yusuke; Bando, Ken-ichi; Imanishi, Akihito; Fukui, Ken-ichi; Uemura, Takafumi; Takeya, Jun

    2014-06-30

    Surface processing of a rubrene single crystal immersed in ionic liquids is valuable for further development of low voltage transistors operated by an electric double layer. We performed a precise and clean surface processing based on the tip-induced dissolution of rubrene molecules at the ionic liquid/rubrene single crystal interfaces by using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy. Molecular resolution imaging revealed that the tip-induced dissolution proceeded via metastable low density states derived from the anisotropic intermolecular interactions within the crystal structure.

  15. Knack for reticle cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Masumi; Handa, Hitoshi; Shirai, Hisatsugu

    2000-07-01

    Cleaning is one of the most important processes in mask making, because it decides final quality. In cleaning process, it is necessary for reticle cleanliness to not only remove particles from reticle but also prevent adsorption and re-deposition onto reticle. There is the knack for reticle cleaning, and we introduce three keys in this paper. The first key is the rinse after chemical treatment. By the rinse sequence modification, the cleaner was refined and the particle removal ability was improved. The second key is quality control to grasp the situation of cleaner. By the daily check, cleaner's abnormal condition is found at an early stage, quick action is taken, and then stable cleaning quality is kept every day. And the third key is proper choice of cleaners. We have adopted pre-cleaning process and selected the adequate cleaner for each cleaning level and improved cleaning yield and quality.

  16. Plasma Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintze, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Kennedy Space Center has developed two solvent-free precision cleaning techniques: plasma cleaning and supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2), that has equal performance, cost parity, and no environmental liability, as compared to existing solvent cleaning methods.

  17. Ohio Clean Fuels, Inc. , prototype commercial coal/oil co-processing plant project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-11-01

    This report discusses the economics of coal as a source of domestic petroleum products and clean power production. The following topics are discussed: Economic incentives for the use of coal; applications of coal/oil coprocessing including (a) integration with a refinery; (b) cost reduction technique for alternate new supplies of oil; (c) power production meeting acid rain controls and comparative economics of copro powered facilities vs conventional power plant technology; costs of non-conventional supplies of crude and costs of coprocessing compared with offshore conventional oil. 10 refs., 1 fig., 20 tabs.

  18. Manufacturing Assessment of an XeF{sub 2} In-Situ Clean Process for Mitigation of Species Cross Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, James P.; Rolland, James L.; Lundquist, Paul; Bishop, Steve

    2008-11-03

    The residue buildup in an ion source can be energetically transported down the ion implanter beamline delivering unwanted dopants to the target area. Of particular concern are contaminants within one AMU of the target species such as {sup 50}PF{sup +} in a {sup 49}BF{sub 2}{sup +} beam causing counter-doping dose errors. Significant beam currents attributable to memory effect have been observed more than an hour after the species gas has been changed. This paper shows how Atmel Corporation, Colorado Springs, Colorado evaluated a new XeF{sub 2} in-situ clean process as an effective means of reducing the risk of species cross contamination.

  19. Steam generators secondary side chemical cleaning at Point Lepreau using the Siemens high temperature process

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, K.; MacNeil, C.; Odar, S.; Kuhnke, K.

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes the chemical cleaning of the four steam generators at the Point Lepreau facility, which was accomplished as a part of a normal service outage. The steam generators had been in service for twelve years. Sludge samples showed the main elements were Fe, P and Na, with minor amounts of Ca, Mg, Mn, Cr, Zn, Cl, Cu, Ni, Ti, Si, and Pb, 90% in the form of Magnetite, substantial phosphate, and trace amounts of silicates. The steam generators were experiencing partial blockage of broached holes in the TSPs, and corrosion on tube ODs in the form of pitting and wastage. In addition heat transfer was clearly deteriorating. More than 1000 kg of magnetite and 124 kg of salts were removed from the four steam generators.

  20. Black silicon with self-cleaning surface prepared by wetting processes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple method to prepare a hydrophobic surface on black silicon, which is fabricated by metal-assisted wet etching. To increase the reaction rate, the reaction device was placed in a heat collection-constant temperature type magnetic stirrer and set at room temperature. It was demonstrated that the micro- and nanoscale spikes on the black silicon made the surface become hydrophobic. As the reaction rate increases, the surface hydrophobicity becomes more outstanding and presents self-cleaning until the very end. The reflectance of the black silicon is drastically suppressed over a broad spectral range due to the unique geometry, which is effective for the enhancement of absorption. PMID:23941184

  1. Improve the laser damage resistance of fused silica by wet surface cleaning and optimized HF etch process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaolong; Liu, Ying; Rao, Huanle; Fu, Shaojun

    2013-07-01

    Fabrication-induced metal contaminations and subsurface damage are generally identified as the laser damage initiators that are responsible for the laser induced damage in fused silica. In this paper, the removal of those two initiators are realized by two methods: wet chemical surface cleaning and optimized HF-based etch process. Two kinds of chemical leaching are used to removing the Ce and other metal impurities respectively. In order prevent the redeposition of the reactive byproducts during HF etch process, we optimized the traditional HF etch process in two ways: absence of NH4F in etch solution and presence of megasonic and ultrasonic agitation during and after etch respectively. And laser damage tests show that these two treatments greatly improve the laser damage resistance of fused silica.

  2. Rare regions and Griffiths singularities at a clean critical point: the five-dimensional disordered contact process.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Thomas; Igo, John; Hoyos, José A

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the nonequilibrium phase transition of the disordered contact process in five space dimensions by means of optimal fluctuation theory and Monte Carlo simulations. We find that the critical behavior is of mean-field type, i.e., identical to that of the clean five-dimensional contact process. It is accompanied by off-critical power-law Griffiths singularities whose dynamical exponent z' saturates at a finite value as the transition is approached. These findings resolve the apparent contradiction between the Harris criterion, which implies that weak disorder is renormalization-group irrelevant, and the rare-region classification, which predicts unconventional behavior. We confirm and illustrate our theory by large-scale Monte Carlo simulations of systems with up to 70(5) sites. We also relate our results to a recently established general relation between the Harris criterion and Griffiths singularities [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 075702 (2014)], and we discuss implications for other phase transitions. PMID:25122283

  3. Application of ultrasonic techniques to chemical coal cleaning processes. Final report, April 15, 1980-August 15, 1981. [Ultrasonic augmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Tarpley, W.B. Jr.; Twesme, E.N.; Howard, P.L.; Moulder, G.R.

    1981-08-01

    Ultrasonic activation was applied to several coal cleaning processes, including chlorinolysis, oxydesulfurization, and sodium hypochlorite leaching, in small-scale batch treatment processing of Illinois No. 6, Lower Kittanning, and Western Kentucky No. 11 coals. In all cases, ultrasonic energy application demonstrated effects that would translate in production to processing efficiencies and/or capital equipment savings. Specifically, in the chlorinolysis reaction, pyritic sulfur was removed 23 times faster with ultrasonics than without it. (Organic sulfur could not be removed from the coal examined with or without ultrasonics in the chlorinolysis process). In sodium hypochlorite leaching, the total sulfur extraction rate was 3 times faster with ultrasonics. Two separate benefits were seen with oxydesulfurization: ultrasonics doubled the reaction rate and at slightly accelerated rates allowed a pressure reduction from 960 to 500 psi, which would be a significant cost efficiency in production. With these results, it was recommended that ultrasonic processing be investigated with a process involving interactions similarly amenable to ultrasonic enhancement, i.e., molten salt leaching, which is reported to have the potential not only for more extensive sulfur extraction than the other experimental processes, but for ash removal as well.

  4. Tetrachloroethene recovery and hazard reduction of spent powders from dry cleaning process.

    PubMed

    Petrucci, Elisabetta; Scarsella, Marco; De Filippis, Paolo; Di Palma, Luca

    2015-04-01

    Dry cleaning facilities using perchloroethylene produce a solid waste consisting of spent filtering powders with a high content of residual perchloroethylene, together with dyes and non-volatile residues. Untreated spent powders, classified as hazardous waste, cannot be disposed in landfill and incineration represents the only viable alternative. In this study, together with a full characterisation of the waste, the removal and recovery of the residual perchloroethylene by means of different heat treatments was investigated. In particular, tests of distillation and stripping with air and steam were carried out, evaluating the effectiveness of the treatments by quantifying the residual perchloroethylene in the samples treated. The results obtained show that the spent filtering powders contained about 25% wt. of perchloroethylene and that the maximum perchloroethylene recovery was obtained by steam stripping; approximately 98% after only 50 minutes. However, this treatment accounted for the production of a liquid mixture containing perchloroethylene and of a solid waste that required a further washing with boiling water to decrease the residual organic content below the eligibility criteria for landfill disposal. PMID:25690329

  5. How Clean is the Processing Environment and Can We Fix It?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research from our laboratories has shown that shell egg processing facilities should enhance processing plant sanitation practices. A survey of shell egg processing facilities located in the southeastern US found no differences in aerobic bacteria and Enterobacteriaceae levels on plant surfaces bef...

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY INITIATIVE: CHEMICAL-FREE CLEANING OF SEMICONDUCTORS BY THE RADIANCE PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Radiance Process is a patented dry process for removing contaminants from surfaces. It uses light, usually from a pulsed laser and a gas inert to the surface, to entrain released contaminants. The focus of this effort is to assess the applicability of the Radiance Process t...

  7. TREATMENT TANK OFF-GAS TESTING FOR THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.

    2011-08-29

    The purpose of this activity was to provide a bounding estimate of the volume of hydrogen gas generated during Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) of residual sludge remaining in a Type I or Type II treatment tank as well as to provide results independent of the sludge volume in the waste tank to be cleaned. Previous testing to support Chemical Cleaning was based on a 20:1 oxalic acid to sludge ratio. Hydrogen gas evolution is the primary safety concern. Sealed vessel coupon tests were performed to estimate the hydrogen generation rate due to corrosion of carbon steel by 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid. These tests determined the maximum instantaneous hydrogen generation rate, the rate at which the generation rate decays, and the total hydrogen generated. These values were quantified based on a small scale methodology similar to the one described in WSRC-STI-2007-00209, Rev. 0. The measured rates support identified Safety Class functions. The tests were performed with ASTM A285 Grade C carbon steel coupons. Bounding conditions were determined for the solution environment. The oxalic acid concentration was 2.5 wt.% and the test temperature was 75 C. The test solution was agitated and contained no sludge simulant. Duplicate tests were performed and showed excellent reproducibility for the hydrogen generation rate and total hydrogen generated. The results showed that the hydrogen generation rate was initially high, but decayed rapidly within a couple of days. A statistical model was developed to predict the instantaneous hydrogen generation rate as a function of exposure time by combining both sets of data. An upper bound on the maximum hydrogen generation rate was determined from the upper 95% confidence limit. The upper bound confidence limit for the hydrogen generation rate is represented by the following equation. ln (G{sub v}) = -8.22-0.0584 t + 0.0002 t{sup 2}. This equation should be utilized to estimate the instantaneous hydrogen generation rate per unit surface area, G

  8. Process for clean-burning fuel from low-rank coal

    DOEpatents

    Merriam, Norman W.; Sethi, Vijay; Brecher, Lee E.

    1994-01-01

    A process for upgrading and stabilizing low-rank coal involving the sequential processing of the coal through three fluidized beds; first a dryer, then a pyrolyzer, and finally a cooler. The fluidizing gas for the cooler is the exit gas from the pyrolyzer with the addition of water for cooling. Overhead gas from pyrolyzing is likely burned to furnish the energy for the process. The product coal exits with a tar-like pitch sealant to enhance its safety during storage.

  9. Automated cleaning of electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Drotning, W.; Meirans, L.; Wapman, W.; Hwang, Y.; Koenig, L.; Petterson, B.

    1994-07-01

    Environmental and operator safety concerns are leading to the elimination of trichloroethylene and chlorofluorocarbon solvents in cleaning processes that remove rosin flux, organic and inorganic contamination, and particulates from electronic components. Present processes depend heavily on these solvents for manual spray cleaning of small components and subassemblies. Use of alternative solvent systems can lead to longer processing times and reduced quality. Automated spray cleaning can improve the quality of the cleaning process, thus enabling the productive use of environmentally conscious materials, while minimizing personnel exposure to hazardous materials. We describe the development of a prototype robotic system for cleaning electronic components in a spray cleaning workcell. An important feature of the prototype system is the capability to generate the robot paths and motions automatically from the CAD models of the part to be cleaned, and to embed cleaning process knowledge into the automatically programmed operations.

  10. Investigation into environmentally friendly alternative cleaning processes for hybrid microcircuits to replace vapor degreasing with 1,1,1-trichloroethane. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B.E.

    1997-02-01

    Two cleaning processes, one aqueous and one nonaqueous, were investigated as potential replacements for the vapor degreasing process using 1,1,1 trichloroethane (TCA) for hybrid microcircuit assemblies. The aqueous process was based upon saponification chemistry. A 10% solution of either Kester 5768 or Armakleen 2001, heated to 140 F, was sprayed on the hybrid at 450 psig and a flow rate of 5 gpm through a specially designed nozzle which created microdroplets. The nonaqueous process was based upon dissolution chemistry and used d-limonene as the solvent in an immersion and spray process. The d-limonene solvent was followed by an isopropyl alcohol spray rinse to remove the excess d-limonene. The aqueous microdroplet process was found to be successful only for solder reflow profiles that did not exceed 210 C. Furthermore, removal of component marking was a problem and the spray pressure had to be reduced to 130 psig to eliminate damage to capacitor end caps. The d-limonene cleaning was found to be successful for solder reflow temperature up to 250 C when using a four-step cleaning process. The four steps included refluxing the hybrid at 80 C, followed by soaking the hybrid in d-limonene which is heated to 80 C, followed by spray cleaning at 80 psig with room temperature d-limonene, followed by spray cleaning at 80 psig with room temperature IPA was developed to remove residual flux from the hybrid microcircuits. This process was the most robust and most closely matched the cleaning ability of TCA.

  11. Municipal Wastewater Processes. Instructor Guide. Working for Clean Water: An Information Program for Advisory Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoltzfus, Lorna

    Described is a one-hour overview of the unit processes which comprise a municipal wastewater treatment system. Topics covered in this instructor's guide include types of pollutants encountered, treatment methods, and procedures by which wastewater treatment processes are selected. A slide-tape program is available to supplement this component of…

  12. A new multiple-stage electrocoagulation process on anaerobic digestion effluent to simultaneously reclaim water and clean up biogas.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiguo; Stromberg, David; Liu, Xuming; Liao, Wei; Liu, Yan

    2015-03-21

    A new multiple-stage treatment process was developed via integrating electrocoagulation with biogas pumping to simultaneously reclaim anaerobic digestion effluent and clean up biogas. The 1st stage of electrocoagulation treatment under the preferred reaction condition led to removal efficiencies of 30%, 81%, 37% and >99.9% for total solids, chemical oxygen demand, total nitrogen and total phosphorus, respectively. Raw biogas was then used as a reactant and pumped into the effluent to simultaneously neutralize pH of the effluent and remove H2S in the biogas. The 2nd stage of electrocoagulation treatment on the neutralized effluent showed that under the selected reaction condition, additional 60% and 10% of turbidity and chemical oxygen demand were further removed. The study concluded a dual-purpose approach for the first time to synergistically combine biogas purification and water reclamation for anaerobic digestion system, which well addresses the downstream challenges of anaerobic digestion technology. PMID:25540943

  13. Applications of parametric processes to high-quality multicolour ultrashort pulses, pulse cleaning and CEP stable sub-3fs pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Liu, Jun; Okamura, Kotaro

    2012-04-01

    Our recent experimental results of three methods related to and useful for the generation of attosecond pulses are summarized. The pulses obtained by all of them have high qualities in terms of phase, temporal, spectral and spatial properties which are based on the physical principles associated with the parametric processes. First, carrier-envelope phase (CEP) stable sub-5 fs and sub-3 fs pulses by non-collinear optical parametric amplification (NOPA) in the near-infrared and visible spectral range will be described. The mechanism of the passive CEP stabilization is described. Passively stabilized idler and its second harmonic (SH) pulses from NOPAs are compressed to sub-5fs and sub-3fs, respectively. Compression of the idler output from a NOPA and its SH is attained with a specially designed characterization method during the compression. Second, generation of multicolour pulses by the cascaded four-wave mixing process in bulk media is discussed. As short as 15-fs multicoloured femtosecond pulses are obtained with two ˜40 fs pulses incident to a fused-silica glass plate by this method. These broadband multicolour sidebands are expected to provide single-cycle or sub-fs pulses after the Fourier synthesis. Third, a new technique based on self-diffraction in the Kerr medium is used to clean and shorten the femtosecond laser pulse. The cleaned pulse with high temporal contrast is expected to be used as a seed for a background-free petawatt laser system and then used as the laser source for high-energy attosecond pulse generation in a solid target. The mechanisms of CEP stabilization, pulse spectral smoothening and pulse contrast enhancement are comparatively discussed.

  14. Process for clean-burning fuel from low-rank coal

    DOEpatents

    Merriam, N.W.; Sethi, V.; Brecher, L.E.

    1994-06-21

    A process is described for upgrading and stabilizing low-rank coal involving the sequential processing of the coal through three fluidized beds; first a dryer, then a pyrolyzer, and finally a cooler. The fluidizing gas for the cooler is the exit gas from the pyrolyzer with the addition of water for cooling. Overhead gas from pyrolyzing is likely burned to furnish the energy for the process. The product coal exits with a tar-like pitch sealant to enhance its safety during storage. 1 fig.

  15. NATO COMMITTEE ON THE CHALLENGES TO MODERN SOCIETY PILOT STUDY: CLEAN PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Promote cooperation for improving the common pollution landscape by stimulating cross-national dialogues and collaboration. Share knowledge on the methods, tools, and technologies for making cleaner products and processes possible.

  16. DEMONSTRATION OF ALTERNATIVE CLEANING SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report focuses on substitute for solvent degreasing processes that eliminate the use of 33/50 chlorinated organic chemicals. The Center for Clean Products and Clean Technologies performed the technical, environmental, and economic evaluation of the solvent degreasing substit...

  17. Separation processes for recovering alloy steels from grinding sludge: Supercritical carbon dioxide extraction and aqueous cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, H.; Matthews, M.A.

    1999-04-01

    Two separation processes have been developed to remove contaminants (cutting oil with trace phosphorus additive) from high-speed steel grinding sludge. One process uses an aqueous surfactant washing technique, and the second process uses supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO{sub 2}) extraction. Bench-scale aqueous washings have shown that the required phosphorus removal is easily obtained, but a sufficient oil removal is more difficult. The experimental results also indicate a strong dependence of the aqueous washing efficiency on the choice of a suitable surfactant. A mass transfer model is used to simulate a semi-continuous washing process. SCCO{sub 2} extraction at 80 C and 340 atm shows that approximately 80% of the oil can be removed from the sludge during a 60-minute process to produce a batch of recyclable steel, and that the phosphorus removal also reaches the required level. A linear desorption model is used to describe the irreversible desorption of oil from the solid phase into the CO{sub 2} phase, and the simulated results agree very well with the experimental data.

  18. Laser cleaning -- A new surface cleaning method without pollutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Y.F.; Aoyagi, Y.

    1994-12-31

    Surface contaminations are removed by laser irradiation with pulse output and short wavelength from various substrate such as magnetic head slide, glass and metals. Laser cleaning is a new dry process to remove surface organic contaminations without using ultrasonic cleaning in organic solvents. This provides a new dry process to clean different substrate surfaces and can take the place of conventional wet cleaning processes such as ultrasonic cleaning with CFC and other organic solvents. The mechanisms of laser cleaning may include laser photodecomposition, laser ablation and surface vibration due to the impact of laser pulse. It is found that short wavelength and short pulse duration are necessary for effective cleaning. It is also found that an appropriate energy density is critical to achieve effective cleaning without causing surface oxidation and secondary contamination.

  19. Charge generation associated with liquid spraying in tank cleaning and comparable processes - preliminary experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Carsten; Losert, Oswald F. J.

    2015-10-01

    The BG RCI has initiated investigations in order to improve the data basis for assessing the ignition hazard by electrostatic charging processes associated with the spraying of liquids. On the base of preliminary experiments, we established procedures for measurements of electric field strength and charging current in the presence of aerosol particles. Results obtained with three different nozzle types, variation of pressure and with built-in deflecting plate are presented.

  20. Understanding Particle Defect Transport in an Ultra-Clean Sputter Coating Process

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, C; Kearney, P; Folta, J; Sweeney, D; Mirkarimi, P

    2003-03-24

    Low-defect mask blanks remain a key technical challenge to Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL). The mask blank is ion-beam sputter-coated with an 81-layer Mo/Si multilayer stack for high reflectance at {lambda} = 13.4nm. The current mask coating process can achieve a median added defect level of 0.05 defects/cm{sup 2} (12 added defects 90nm or larger on a 200mm Si-wafer test substrate), but this must be reduced by about a factor of 10 to meet mask cost requirements for EUVL. To further reduce the particle defect level, we have studied pathways for particle transport, using test particles and particles native to the coating process, and combined the results into a computational model of particle transport in an ion-beam sputter system. At process pressure, gas drag is negligible for particles above 100nm, so particles travel ballistically until they hit a surface. Bounce from chamber walls allows particles to reach all surfaces in the chamber if they have initial velocities above {approx}100m/s. The ion beam has sufficient momentum to entrain slower particles and accelerate them toward the sputter target, where some can bounce to the substrate. The model shows preliminary agreement with experimental defect distributions on witness wafers at various positions within the coating chamber.

  1. Test rig and particulate deposit and cleaning evaluation processes using the same

    DOEpatents

    Schroder, Mark Stewart; Woodmansee, Donald Ernest; Beadie, Douglas Frank

    2002-01-01

    A rig and test program for determining the amount, if any, of contamination that will collect in the passages of a fluid flow system, such as a power plant fluid delivery system to equipment assemblies or sub-assemblies, and for establishing methods and processes for removing contamination therefrom. In the presently proposed embodiment, the rig and test programs are adapted in particular to utilize a high-pressure, high-volume water flush to remove contamination from substantially the entire fluid delivery system, both the quantity of contamination and as disposed or deposited within the system.

  2. Biofilms of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolated from the processing of ricotta and the control of these pathogens through cleaning and sanitization procedures.

    PubMed

    da Silva Fernandes, Meg; Kabuki, Dirce Yorika; Kuaye, Arnaldo Yoshiteru

    2015-05-01

    The biofilm formation of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolated from the processing of ricotta on stainless steel coupons was evaluated, and the effect of cleaning and sanitization procedures in the control of these biofilms was determined. The formation of biofilms was observed while varying the incubation temperature (7, 25 and 39°C) and time (0, 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 days). At 7°C, the counts of E. faecalis and E. faecium were below 2 log10 CFU/cm(2). For the temperatures of 25 and 39°C, after 1 day, the counts of E. faecalis and E. faecium were 5.75 and 6.07 log10 CFU/cm(2), respectively, which is characteristic of biofilm formation. The tested sanitation procedures a) acid-anionic tensioactive cleaning, b) anionic tensioactive cleaning+sanitizer and c) acid-anionic tensioactive cleaning+sanitizer were effective in removing the biofilms, reducing the counts to levels below 0.4 log10 CFU/cm(2). The sanitizer biguanide was the least effective, and peracetic acid was the most effective. These studies revealed the ability of enterococci to form biofilms and the importance of the cleaning step and the type of sanitizer used in sanitation processes for the effective removal of biofilms. PMID:25702883

  3. Clean combined-cycle SOFC power plant — cell modelling and process analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riensche, E.; Achenbach, E.; Froning, D.; Haines, M. R.; Heidug, W. K.; Lokurlu, A.; von Andrian, S.

    The design principle of a specially adapted solid-oxide fuel cell power plant for the production of electricity from hydrocarbons without the emission of greenhouse gases is described. To achieve CO 2 separation in the exhaust stream, it is necessary to burn the unused fuel without directly mixing it with air, which would introduce nitrogen. Therefore, the spent fuel is passed over a bank of oxygen ion conducting tubes very similar in configuration to the electrochemical tubes in the main stack of the fuel cell. In such an SOFC system, pure CO 2 is produced without the need for a special CO 2 separation process. After liquefaction, CO 2 can be re-injected into an underground reservoir. A plant simulation model consists of four main parts, that is, turbo-expansion of natural gas, fuel cell stack, periphery of the stack, and CO 2 recompression. A tubular SOFC concept is preferred. The spent fuel leaving the cell tube bundle is burned with pure oxygen instead of air. The oxygen is separated from the air in an additional small tube bundle of oxygen separation tubes. In this process, mixing of CO 2 and N 2 is avoided, so that liquefaction of CO 2 becomes feasible. As a design tool, a computer model for tubular cells with an air feed tube has been developed based on an existing planar model. Plant simulation indicates the main contributors to power production (tubular SOFC, exhaust air expander) and power consumption (air compressor, oxygen separation).

  4. Enhanced Chemical Cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Spires, Renee H.

    2010-11-01

    Renee Spires, Project Manager at Savannah River Remediation, opens Session 3 (Accelerated Waste Retrieval and Closure: Key Technologies) at the 2010 EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange with a talk on enhanced chemical cleaning.

  5. Cleaning of Free Machining Brass

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, T

    2005-12-29

    We have investigated four brightening treatments proposed by two cleaning vendors for cleaning free machining brass. The experimental results showed that none of the proposed brightening treatments passed the swipe test. Thus, we maintain the recommendation of not using the brightening process in the cleaning of free machining brass for NIF application.

  6. Clean coal

    SciTech Connect

    Liang-Shih Fan; Fanxing Li

    2006-07-15

    The article describes the physics-based techniques that are helping in clean coal conversion processes. The major challenge is to find a cost- effective way to remove carbon dioxide from the flue gas of power plants. One industrially proven method is to dissolve CO{sub 2} in the solvent monoethanolamine (MEA) at a temperature of 38{sup o}C and then release it from the solvent in another unit when heated to 150{sup o}C. This produces CO{sub 2} ready for sequestration. Research is in progress with alternative solvents that require less energy. Another technique is to use enriched oxygen in place of air in the combustion process which produces CO{sub 2} ready for sequestration. A process that is more attractive from an energy management viewpoint is to gasify coal so that it is partially oxidized, producing a fuel while consuming significantly less oxygen. Several IGCC schemes are in operation which produce syngas for use as a feedstock, in addition to electricity and hydrogen. These schemes are costly as they require an air separation unit. Novel approaches to coal gasification based on 'membrane separation' or chemical looping could reduce the costs significantly while effectively capturing carbon dioxide. 1 ref., 2 figs., 1 photo.

  7. Electron-beam-induced deposition and post-treatment processes to locally generate clean titanium oxide nanostructures on Si(100).

    PubMed

    Schirmer, M; Walz, M-M; Vollnhals, F; Lukasczyk, T; Sandmann, A; Chen, C; Steinrück, H-P; Marbach, H

    2011-02-25

    We have investigated the lithographic generation of TiO(x) nanostructures on Si(100) via electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and local Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). In addition, the fabricated nanostructures were also characterized ex situ via atomic force microscopy (AFM) under ambient conditions. In EBID, a highly focused electron beam is used to locally decompose precursor molecules and thereby to generate a deposit. A drawback of this nanofabrication technique is the unintended deposition of material in the vicinity of the impact position of the primary electron beam due to so-called proximity effects. Herein, we present a post-treatment procedure to deplete the unintended deposits by moderate sputtering after the deposition process. Moreover, we were able to observe the formation of pure titanium oxide nanocrystals (<100 nm) in situ upon heating the sample in a well-defined oxygen atmosphere. While the nanocrystal growth for the as-deposited structures also occurs in the surroundings of the irradiated area due to proximity effects, it is limited to the pre-defined regions, if the sample was sputtered before heating the sample under oxygen atmosphere. The described two-step post-treatment procedure after EBID presents a new pathway for the fabrication of clean localized nanostructures. PMID:21242619

  8. Electron-beam-induced deposition and post-treatment processes to locally generate clean titanium oxide nanostructures on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, M.; Walz, M.-M.; Vollnhals, F.; Lukasczyk, T.; Sandmann, A.; Chen, C.; Steinrück, H.-P.; Marbach, H.

    2011-02-01

    We have investigated the lithographic generation of TiOx nanostructures on Si(100) via electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and local Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). In addition, the fabricated nanostructures were also characterized ex situ via atomic force microscopy (AFM) under ambient conditions. In EBID, a highly focused electron beam is used to locally decompose precursor molecules and thereby to generate a deposit. A drawback of this nanofabrication technique is the unintended deposition of material in the vicinity of the impact position of the primary electron beam due to so-called proximity effects. Herein, we present a post-treatment procedure to deplete the unintended deposits by moderate sputtering after the deposition process. Moreover, we were able to observe the formation of pure titanium oxide nanocrystals (<100 nm) in situ upon heating the sample in a well-defined oxygen atmosphere. While the nanocrystal growth for the as-deposited structures also occurs in the surroundings of the irradiated area due to proximity effects, it is limited to the pre-defined regions, if the sample was sputtered before heating the sample under oxygen atmosphere. The described two-step post-treatment procedure after EBID presents a new pathway for the fabrication of clean localized nanostructures.

  9. Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ultra-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    E.T. Robinson; James P. Meagher; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Siv Aasland; Charles Besecker; Jack Chen Bart A. van Hassel; Olga Polevaya; Rafey Khan; Piyush Pilaniwalla

    2002-12-31

    This topical report summarizes work accomplished for the Program from November 1, 2001 to December 31, 2002 in the following task areas: Task 1: Materials Development; Task 2: Composite Development; Task 4: Reactor Design and Process Optimization; Task 8: Fuels and Engine Testing; 8.1 International Diesel Engine Program; 8.2 Nuvera Fuel Cell Program; and Task 10: Program Management. Major progress has been made towards developing high temperature, high performance, robust, oxygen transport elements. In addition, a novel reactor design has been proposed that co-produces hydrogen, lowers cost and improves system operability. Fuel and engine testing is progressing well, but was delayed somewhat due to the hiatus in program funding in 2002. The Nuvera fuel cell portion of the program was completed on schedule and delivered promising results regarding low emission fuels for transportation fuel cells. The evaluation of ultra-clean diesel fuels continues in single cylinder (SCTE) and multiple cylinder (MCTE) test rigs at International Truck and Engine. FT diesel and a BP oxygenate showed significant emissions reductions in comparison to baseline petroleum diesel fuels. Overall through the end of 2002 the program remains under budget, but behind schedule in some areas.

  10. Polyaniline-Coated Carbon Nanotube Ultrafiltration Membranes: Enhanced Anodic Stability for In Situ Cleaning and Electro-Oxidation Processes.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wenyan; Ronen, Avner; Walker, Sharon; Jassby, David

    2016-08-31

    Electrically conducting membranes (ECMs) have been reported to be efficient in fouling prevention and destruction of aqueous chemical compounds. In the current study, highly conductive and anodically stable composite polyaniline-carbon nanotube (PANI-CNT) ultrafiltration (UF) ECMs were fabricated through a process of electropolymerization of aniline on a CNT substrate under acidic conditions. The resulting PANI-CNT UF ECMs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, a four-point conductivity probe, cyclic voltammetry, and contact angle goniometry. The utilization of the PANI-CNT material led to significant advantages, including: (1) increased electrical conductivity by nearly an order of magnitude; (2) increased surface hydrophilicity while not impacting membrane selectivity or permeability; and (3) greatly improved stability under anodic conditions. The membrane's anodic stability was evaluated in a pH-controlled aqueous environment under a wide range of anodic potentials using a three-electrode cell. Results indicate a significantly reduced degradation rate in comparison to a CNT-poly(vinyl alcohol) ECM under high anodic potentials. Fouling experiments conducted with bovine serum albumin demonstrated the capacity of the PANI-CNT ECMs for in situ oxidative cleaning, with membrane flux restored to its initial value under an applied potential of 3 V. Additionally, a model organic compound (methylene blue) was electrochemically transformed at high efficiency (90%) in a single pass through the anodically charged ECM. PMID:27525344

  11. Precipitation of iron, sodium, and potassium impurities from synthetic solutions modeling spent acid streams from a chemical coal cleaning process

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, G.A.; Richardson, R.G.; Markuszewski, R. ); Levine, A.D. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents experiments on treating model spent acid streams from a chemical coal cleaning process by double salt precipitation which indicated that simple heating of solutions containing Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, and K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} caused jarosite (KFe{sub 3}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 6}) to form preferentially to natrojarosite (NaFe{sub 3}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 6}), and precipitate yields were higher than when Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was the only alkali sulfate present. Virtually all of the K, about 90% of the Fe, and about 30% of the SO{sub 4}{sup 2 {minus}} could be precipitated at 95{degrees}C, while little or no Na was removed. However, simply heating Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}/Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution up to 95{degrees}C for {lt}12 hours did not produce adequate precipitate yields. When Na was the only alkali metal present, the Fe concentration in the solution had to be increased to avoid formation of undesirable iron compounds.

  12. Effect of a new regeneration process by adsorption-coagulation and flocculation on the physicochemical properties and the detergent efficiency of regenerated cleaning solutions.

    PubMed

    Blel, Walid; Dif, Mehdi; Sire, Olivier

    2015-05-15

    Reprocessing soiled cleaning-in-place (CIP) solutions has large economic and environmental costs, and it would be cheaper and greener to recycle them. In food industries, recycling of CIP solutions requires a suitable green process engineered to take into account the extreme physicochemical conditions of cleaning while not altering the process efficiency. To this end, an innovative treatment process combining adsorption-coagulation with flocculation was tested on multiple recycling of acid and basic cleaning solutions. In-depth analysis of time-course evolutions was carried out in the physicochemical properties (concentration, surface tension, viscosity, COD, total nitrogen) of these solutions over the course of successive regenerations. Cleaning and disinfection efficiencies were assessed based on both microbiological analyses and organic matter detachment and solubilization from fouled stainless steel surfaces. Microbiological analyses using a resistant bacterial strain (Bacillus subtilis spores) highlighted that solutions regenerated up to 20 times maintained the same bactericidal efficiency as de novo NaOH solutions. The cleanability of stainless steel surfaces showed that regenerated solutions allow better surface wettability, which goes to explain the improved detachment and solubilization found on different types of organic and inorganic fouling. PMID:25770957

  13. PLUTONIUM CLEANING PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Kolodney, M.

    1959-12-01

    A method is described for rapidly removing iron, nickel, and zinc coatings from plutonium objects while simultaneously rendering the plutonium object passive. The method consists of immersing the coated plutonium object in an aqueous acid solution containing a substantial concentration of nitrate ions, such as fuming nitric acid.

  14. Characterization of flue gas cleaning residues from European solid waste incinerators: assessment of various Ca-based sorbent processes.

    PubMed

    Bodénan, F; Deniard, Ph

    2003-05-01

    For the first time, a set of samples of European flue gas cleaning residues, mainly from the incineration of municipal solid waste (MSW), has undergone a mineralogical study. The residues are the result of the neutralization of acid flue gases by lime, the predominant method adopted in Europe, using dry and semi-dry washing processes. The study protocol combines physico-chemical analytical techniques (XRD, FTIR, DSC/TGA) and global chemical analysis enabling identification of the chemical composition of the main constituents, particularly chlorinated Ca-based phases, as well as establishment of modal distributions of the represented phases, both crystalline and amorphous. The samples are slightly hydrated and values vary for trapped Cl, S and even CO(2). The main crystalline phases are NaCl, KCl, CaSO(4), CaCO(3), Ca(OH)(2) and calcium hydroxychloride CaOHCl. CaOHCl is the main chlorine phase, regardless of the treatment process, filtration mode, and specific surface of the Ca-based sorbent. This phase develops during neutralization of HCl by excess lime present according to the reaction Ca(OH)(2)+HCl-->CaOHCl+H(2)O, to the detriment of a complete yield involving the two lime OH groups with formation of CaCl(2).2H(2)O. In addition, it seems that gas temperatures above 150 degrees C increase competition between lime-based neutralization of HCl, SO(2) acid flue gases and CO(2) trapping, thus reducing washing efficiency. PMID:12597999

  15. Supercritical fluids cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Butner, S.; Hjeresen, D.; Silva, L.; Spall, D.; Stephenson, R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses a proposed multi-party research and development program which seeks to develop supercritical fluid cleaning technology as an alternative to existing solvent cleaning applications. While SCF extraction technology has been in commercial use for several years, the use of these fluids as cleaning agents poses several new technical challenges. Problems inherent in the commercialization of SCF technology include: the cleaning efficacy and compatibility of supercritical working fluids with the parts to be cleaned must be assessed for a variety of materials and components; process parameters and equipment design Have been optimized for extractive applications and must be reconsidered for application to cleaning; and co-solvents and entrainers must be identified to facilitate the removal of polar inorganic and organic contaminants, which are often not well solvated in supercritical systems. The proposed research and development program would address these issues and lead to the development and commercialization of viable SCF-based technology for precision cleaning applications. This paper provides the technical background, program scope, and delineates the responsibilities of each principal participant in the program.

  16. Ultrasonic cleaning: Fundamental theory and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuchs, F. John

    1995-01-01

    This presentation describes: the theory of ultrasonics, cavitation and implosion; the importance and application of ultrasonics in precision cleaning; explanations of ultrasonic cleaning equipment options and their application; process parameters for ultrasonic cleaning; and proper operation of ultrasonic cleaning equipment to achieve maximum results.

  17. Precipitation of jarosite-type double salts from spent acid solutions from a chemical coal cleaning process

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, G.

    1990-09-21

    The precipitation of jarosite compounds to remove Na, K, Fe, and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} impurities from spent acid solutions from a chemical coal cleaning process was studied. Simple heating of model solutions containing Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, and K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} caused jarosite (KFe{sub 3}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 6}) to form preferentially to natrojarosite (NaFe{sub 3}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 6}). Virtually all of the K, about 90% of the Fe, and about 30% of the SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} could be precipitated from those solutions at 95{degree}C, while little or no Na was removed. However, simple heating of model solutions containing only Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} up to 95{degree}C for {le}12 hours produced low yields of jarosite compounds, and the Fe concentration in the solution had to be increased to avoid the formation of undesirable Fe compounds. Precipitate yields could be increased dramatically in model solutions of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} containing excess Fe by using either CaCO{sub 3}, Ca(OH){sub 2}, or ZnO to neutralize H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} released during hydrolysis of the Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} and during the precipitation reactions. Results obtained from the studies with model solutions were applied to spent acids produced during laboratory countercurrent washing of coal which had been leached with a molten NaOH/KOH mixture. Results indicated that jarosite compounds can be precipitated effectively from spent acid solutions by heating for 6 hours at 80{degree}C while maintaining a pH of about 1.5 using CaCO{sub 3}.

  18. The impact of different cleaning processes on the laser damage threshold of antireflection coatings for Z-Backlighter optics at Sandia National Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Ella; Bellum, John; Kletecka, Damon

    2014-09-01

    The Z-Backlighter lasers at Sandia National Laboratories are kilojoule class, pulsed systems operating with ns pulse lengths at 527 nm and ns and sub-ps pulse lengths at 1054 nm (www.z-beamlet.sandia.gov), and are linked to the most powerful and energetic x-ray source in the world, the Z-Accelerator (http://www.sandia.gov/z-machine/). An important Z-Backlighter optic is a flat, fused silica optic measuring 32.5 cm × 32.5 cm × 1 cm with an antireflection (AR) coating on both sides. It is used as a debris shield to protect other Z-Backlighter laser optics from high-velocity particles released by the experiments conducted in the Z-Accelerator. Each experiment conducted in the Z-Accelerator releases enough debris to cloud the surface of a debris shield, which means that a debris shield cannot be used for more than one experiment. Every year, the large optics coating facility [1] at Sandia provides AR coatings for approximately 50 debris shields, in addition to AR coatings for numerous other meter-class Z-Backlighter lenses and windows. As with all Z-Backlighter optical coatings, these AR coatings must have a high laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) in order to withstand the powerful Z-Backlighter laser fluences. Achieving a good LIDT depends not only on the coating deposition processes but also on the polishing and cleaning processes used to prepare the coated and uncoated surfaces [2]. We spend a lot of time, both before and after the coatings have been deposited, manually cleaning the optics, including the debris shields, even though they are an expendable type of optic. Therefore, in this study we have tested new cleaning methods in addition to our current method to determine their impact on the LIDT of AR coatings, and conclude whether a shorter-duration or less labor-intensive cleaning process would suffice.

  19. Cleaning devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Horst W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Cleaning devices are described which include a vacuum cleaner nozzle with a sharp rim for directing incoming air down against the floor; a vacuum cleaner wherein electrostatically charged brushes that brush dirt off a floor, are electrically grounded to remove charges that could tend to hold dirt to the brushes; a vacuum cleaner head having slots that form a pair of counter-rotating vortices, and that includes an outlet that blows a stream of air at the floor region which lies between the vortices; a cleaning device that sweeps a group of brushes against the ground along a first direction, and then sweeps them along the same ground area but in a second direction angled from the first by an amount such as 90.degree., to sweep up particles lying in crevices extending along any direction; a device that gently cleans a surface to remove bacteria for analysis, including an inclined wall along which cleaning fluid flows onto the surface, a vacuum chamber for drawing in the cleaning fluid, and a dividing wall spaced slightly from the surface to separate the fluid source from the vacuum cleaner chamber; and a device for providing pulses of pressured air including a chamber to which pressured air is supplied, a ball that circulates around the chamber to repeatedly close an outlet, and an air source that directs air circumferentially to move the ball around the chamber.

  20. Automated cleaning of electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Drotning, W.

    1994-03-01

    Environmental and operator safety concerns are leading to the elimination of trichloroethylene (TCE) and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) solvents in electronic component cleaning processes that remove rosin flux, organic and inorganic contamination, and particulates. Present processes depend heavily on these solvents for manual spray cleaning of small components and subassemblies. Use of alternative solvent systems can lead to longer processing times and reduced quality. Automated spray cleaning can improve the quality of the cleaning process, thus enabling the productive use of environmentally conscious materials, while minimizing personnel exposure to hazardous materials. In addition, the use of robotic and automated systems can reduce the manual handling of parts that necessitates additional cleaning. We describe the development of a prototype robotic system for cleaning electronic components in a spray cleaning workcell. An important feature of the prototype system is the capability to generate the robot paths and motions automatically from the CAD models of the part to be cleaned, and to embed cleaning process knowledge into the automatically programmed operations.

  1. Study of the petroleum schedules thermal cleaning process from asphalt, ressin and paraffin deposits using low- temperature plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samigullin, A. D.; Galiakbarov, A. T.; Galiakbarov, R. T.

    2016-01-01

    Petroleum industry uses large amount of pumping and compression pipes. Carrying out the whole range of repair works requires cleaning of the pipe inner surface from deposits which appeared in it during operation [1]. The task of asphalt, resin and paraffin deposits control remains one of the most essential for the branch. The article deals with thermal method and device for asphalt, resin and paraffin deposits removal from pumping and compression pipes inner surface, describes and provides the device application scope for cleaning the pumping and compression pipes inner surface. To deal with borehole equipment and pipe systems waxing problem various deposit prevention and removal methods are used, including mechanical, thermal, chemical, combined and nonconventional methods.

  2. Cleaning Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharpton, James L.

    This curriculum guide provides cleaning services instructional materials for a ninth- and tenth-grade Coordinated Vocational Education and Training: Home and Community Services program. It includes 2 sections and 11 instructional units. Each unit of instruction consists of eight basic components: performance objectives, teacher activities,…

  3. Lessons learned from a rigorous peer-review process for building the Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness (CLEAN) collection of high-quality digital teaching materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, A. U.; Ledley, T. S.; McCaffrey, M. S.; Buhr, S. M.; Manduca, C. A.; Niepold, F.; Fox, S.; Howell, C. D.; Lynds, S. E.

    2010-12-01

    The topic of climate change permeates all aspects of our society: the news, household debates, scientific conferences, etc. To provide students with accurate information about climate science and energy awareness, educators require scientifically and pedagogically robust teaching materials. To address this need, the NSF-funded Climate Literacy & Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN) Pathway has assembled a new peer-reviewed digital collection as part of the National Science Digital Library (NSDL) featuring teaching materials centered on climate and energy science for grades 6 through 16. The scope and framework of the collection is defined by the Essential Principles of Climate Science (CCSP 2009) and a set of energy awareness principles developed in the project. The collection provides trustworthy teaching materials on these socially relevant topics and prepares students to become responsible decision-makers. While a peer-review process is desirable for curriculum developer as well as collection builder to ensure quality, its implementation is non-trivial. We have designed a rigorous and transparent peer-review process for the CLEAN collection, and our experiences provide general guidelines that can be used to judge the quality of digital teaching materials across disciplines. Our multi-stage review process ensures that only resources with teaching goals relevant to developing climate literacy and energy awareness are considered. Each relevant resource is reviewed by two individuals to assess the i) scientific accuracy, ii) pedagogic effectiveness, and iii) usability/technical quality. A science review by an expert ensures the scientific quality and accuracy. Resources that pass all review steps are forwarded to a review panel of educators and scientists who make a final decision regarding inclusion of the materials in the CLEAN collection. Results from the first panel review show that about 20% (~100) of the resources that were initially considered for inclusion

  4. Contact cleaning of polymer film solar reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansom, Christopher; Fernández-García, Aránzazu; Sutter, Florian; Almond, Heather; King, Peter

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the accelerated ageing of polymer film reflecting surfaces under the conditions to be found during contact cleaning of Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) collectors in the presence of dust and sand particles. In these situations, contact cleaning using brushes and water is required to clean the reflecting surfaces. Whilst suitable for glass reflectors, this paper discusses the effects of existing cleaning processes on the optical and visual properties of polymer film surfaces, and then describes the development of a more benign but effective contact cleaning process for cleaning polymer reflectors. The effects of a range of cleaning brushes are discussed, with and without the presence of water, in the presence of sand and dust particles from selected representative locations. Reflectance measurements and visual inspection shows that a soft cleaning brush with a small amount of water can clean polymer film reflecting surfaces without inflicting surface damage or reducing specular reflectance.

  5. Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ultra-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    E.T. Robinson; John Sirman; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Dan Corgard; John Hemmings

    2005-05-01

    This final report summarizes work accomplished in the Program from January 1, 2001 through December 31, 2004. Most of the key technical objectives for this program were achieved. A breakthrough material system has lead to the development of an OTM (oxygen transport membrane) compact planar reactor design capable of producing either syngas or hydrogen. The planar reactor shows significant advantages in thermal efficiency and a step change reduction in costs compared to either autothermal reforming or steam methane reforming with CO{sub 2} recovery. Syngas derived ultra-clean transportation fuels were tested in the Nuvera fuel cell modular pressurized reactor and in International Truck and Engine single cylinder test engines. The studies compared emission and engine performance of conventional base fuels to various formulations of ultra-clean gasoline or diesel fuels. A proprietary BP oxygenate showed significant advantage in both applications for reducing emissions with minimal impact on performance. In addition, a study to evaluate new fuel formulations for an HCCI engine was completed.

  6. Healy clean coal project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The objective of the Healy Clean Coal Project is to demonstrate the integration of an advanced combustor and a heat recovery system with both high and low temperature emission control processes. Resulting emission levels of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and particulates are expected to be significantly better than the federal New Source Performance Standards. (VC)

  7. Healy clean coal project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The objective of the Healy Clean Coal Project is to demonstrate the integration of an advanced combustor and heat recovery system with both high and low temperature emission control processes. The emission levels of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and particulates are expected to be significantly better then the federal New Source Performance Standards. (VC)

  8. Clean coal today

    SciTech Connect

    1990-01-01

    This is the first issue of the Clean Coal Today publication. Each issue will provide project status reports, feature articles about certain projects and highlight key events concerning the US Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. Projects described in this publication include: Colorado-Ute Electric Association Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor Project at Nucla, Colorado; Babcock and Wilcox coolside and limestone injection multistage burner process (dry sorbent injection); Coal Tech's Advanced Cyclone Combustor Project; and the TIDD pressurized fluidized bed combustor combined cycle facility in Brilliant, Ohio. The status of other projects is included.

  9. Gas-Liquid Supersonic Cleaning and Cleaning Verification Spray System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Lewis M.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) recently entered into a nonexclusive license agreement with Applied Cryogenic Solutions (ACS), Inc. (Galveston, TX) to commercialize its Gas-Liquid Supersonic Cleaning and Cleaning Verification Spray System technology. This technology, developed by KSC, is a critical component of processes being developed and commercialized by ACS to replace current mechanical and chemical cleaning and descaling methods used by numerous industries. Pilot trials on heat exchanger tubing components have shown that the ACS technology provides for: Superior cleaning in a much shorter period of time. Lower energy and labor requirements for cleaning and de-scaling uper.ninih. Significant reductions in waste volumes by not using water, acidic or basic solutions, organic solvents, or nonvolatile solid abrasives as components in the cleaning process. Improved energy efficiency in post-cleaning heat exchanger operations. The ACS process consists of a spray head containing supersonic converging/diverging nozzles, a source of liquid gas; a novel, proprietary pumping system that permits pumping liquid nitrogen, liquid air, or supercritical carbon dioxide to pressures in the range of 20,000 to 60,000 psi; and various hoses, fittings, valves, and gauges. The size and number of nozzles can be varied so the system can be built in configurations ranging from small hand-held spray heads to large multinozzle cleaners. The system also can be used to verify if a part has been adequately cleaned.

  10. New Tools for Cost-Effective Restroom Cleaning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigger, Alan; Bigger, Linda

    2002-01-01

    Reviews labor-saving innovations and processes in restroom cleaning, including cleaning kits, vapor cleaning technology, and pressure washer/squeegee/vacuuming systems. Also includes a sidebar on choosing better mop equipment. (EV)

  11. Aqueous cleaning design presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maltby, Peter F.

    1995-01-01

    The phase-out of CFC's and other ozone depleting chemicals has prompted industries to re-evaluate their present methods of cleaning. It has become necessary to find effective substitutes for their processes as well as to meet the new cleaning challenges of improved levels of cleanliness and to satisfy concerns about environmental impact of any alternative selected. One of the most popular alternatives being selected is aqueous cleaning. This method offers an alternative for removal of flux, grease/oil, buffing compound, particulates and other soils while minimizing environmental impact. What I will show are methods that can be employed in an aqueous cleaning system that will make it environmentally friendly, relatively simple to maintain and capable of yielding an even higher quality of cleanliness than previously obtained. I will also explore several drying techniques available for these systems and other alternatives along with recent improvements made in this technology. When considering any type of cleaning system, a number of variables should be determined before selecting the basic configuration. Some of these variables are: (1) Soil or contaminants being removed from your parts; (2) The level of cleanliness required; (3) The environmental considerations of your area; (4) Maintenance requirements; and (5) Operating costs.

  12. Demonstration of Innovative Applications of Technology for the CT-121 FGD Process. Project Performance Summary, Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2002-08-01

    This project is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) established to address energy and environmental concerns related to coal use. DOE sought cost-shared partnerships with industry through five nationally competed solicitations to accelerate commercialization of the most promising advanced coal-based power generation and pollution control technologies. The CCTDP, valued at over five billion dollars, has significantly leveraged federal funding by forging effective partnerships founded on sound principles. For every federal dollar invested, CCTDP participants have invested two dollars. These participants include utilities, technology developers, state governments, and research organizations. The project presented here was one of sixteen selected from 55 proposals submitted in 1988 and 1989 in response to the CCTDP second solicitation.

  13. Alternate cleaning methods for LCCAs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B.E.

    1993-04-01

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate DI water followed by isopropyl alcohol (IPA) cleaning and no cleaning of leadless chip carriers (LCCs). Both environmentally safe methods were to be tested against the current chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) material cleaning baseline. Several experiments were run to compare production and electrical yields of LCCs cleaned by all three methods. The critical process steps most affected by cleaning were wire bonding, sealing, particle induced noise detection (PIND), moisture content, and electrical. Yields for the experimental lots cleaned by CFC, DI water plus IPA, and no cleaning were 56%, 72%, and 75%, respectively. The overall results indicated that vapor degreasing/ultrasonic cleaning in CFCs could be replaced by the aqueous method. No cleaning could also be considered if an effective dry method of particle removal could be developed.

  14. Research of laser cleaning technology for steam generator tubing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Suixa; Luo, Jijun; Xu, Jun; Yuan, Bo

    2010-10-01

    Surface cleaning based on the laser-induced breakdown of gas and subsequent shock wave generation can remove small particles from solid surfaces. Accordingly, several studies in steam generator tubes of nuclear power plants were performed to expand the cleaning capability of the process. In this work, experimental apparatus of laser cleaning was designed in order to clean heat tubes in steam generator. The laser cleaning process is monitored by analyzing acoustic emission signal experimentally. Experiments demonstrate that laser cleaning can remove smaller particles from the surface of steam generator tubes better than other cleaning process. It has advantages in saving on much manpower and material resource, and it is a good cleaning method for heat tubes, which can be real-time monitoring in laser cleaning process of heat tubes by AE signal. As a green cleaning process, laser cleaning technology in equipment maintenance will be a good prospect.

  15. EVALUATION OF PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL COAL CLEANING AND FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of evaluations of physical coal cleaning (PCC), chemical coal cleaning (CCC), and coal cleaning combined with flue gas desulfurization (FGD). It includes process descriptions, cleaning performances, comparative capital investments, and annual revenue requ...

  16. Machine Cleans And Degreases Without Toxic Solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurguis, Kamal S.; Higginson, Gregory A.

    1993-01-01

    Appliance uses hot water and biodegradable chemicals to degrease and clean hardware. Spray chamber essentially industrial-scale dishwasher. Front door tilts open, and hardware to be cleaned placed on basket-like tray. During cleaning process, basket-like tray rotates as high-pressure "V" jets deliver steam, hot water, detergent solution, and rust inhibitor as required.

  17. Self-cleaning Metal Organic Framework (MOF) based ultra filtration membranes--a solution to bio-fouling in membrane separation processes.

    PubMed

    Prince, J A; Bhuvana, S; Anbharasi, V; Ayyanar, N; Boodhoo, K V K; Singh, G

    2014-01-01

    Bio-fouling is a serious problem in many membrane-based separation processes for water and wastewater treatment. Current state of the art methods to overcome this are to modify the membranes with either hydrophilic additives or with an antibacterial compound. In this study, we propose and practise a novel concept to prevent bio-fouling by developing a killing and self-cleaning membrane surface incorporating antibacterial silver nanoparticles and highly hydrophilic negatively charged carboxylic and amine functional groups. The innovative surface chemistry helps to reduce the contact angle of the novel membrane by at least a 48% and increase the pure water flux by 39.4% compared to the control membrane. The flux drop for the novel membrane is also lower (16.3% of the initial flux) than the control membrane (55.3% of the initial flux) during the long term experiments with protein solution. Moreover, the novel membrane continues to exhibit inhibition to microbes even after 1320 min of protein filtration. Synthesis of self-cleaning ultrafiltration membrane with long lasting properties opens up a viable solution for bio-fouling in ultrafiltration application for wastewater purification. PMID:25296745

  18. Self-cleaning Metal Organic Framework (MOF) based ultra filtration membranes - A solution to bio-fouling in membrane separation processes

    PubMed Central

    Prince, J. A.; Bhuvana, S.; Anbharasi, V.; Ayyanar, N.; Boodhoo, K. V. K.; Singh, G.

    2014-01-01

    Bio-fouling is a serious problem in many membrane-based separation processes for water and wastewater treatment. Current state of the art methods to overcome this are to modify the membranes with either hydrophilic additives or with an antibacterial compound. In this study, we propose and practise a novel concept to prevent bio-fouling by developing a killing and self-cleaning membrane surface incorporating antibacterial silver nanoparticles and highly hydrophilic negatively charged carboxylic and amine functional groups. The innovative surface chemistry helps to reduce the contact angle of the novel membrane by at least a 48% and increase the pure water flux by 39.4% compared to the control membrane. The flux drop for the novel membrane is also lower (16.3% of the initial flux) than the control membrane (55.3% of the initial flux) during the long term experiments with protein solution. Moreover, the novel membrane continues to exhibit inhibition to microbes even after 1320 min of protein filtration. Synthesis of self-cleaning ultrafiltration membrane with long lasting properties opens up a viable solution for bio-fouling in ultrafiltration application for wastewater purification. PMID:25296745

  19. Self-cleaning Metal Organic Framework (MOF) based ultra filtration membranes - A solution to bio-fouling in membrane separation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, J. A.; Bhuvana, S.; Anbharasi, V.; Ayyanar, N.; Boodhoo, K. V. K.; Singh, G.

    2014-10-01

    Bio-fouling is a serious problem in many membrane-based separation processes for water and wastewater treatment. Current state of the art methods to overcome this are to modify the membranes with either hydrophilic additives or with an antibacterial compound. In this study, we propose and practise a novel concept to prevent bio-fouling by developing a killing and self-cleaning membrane surface incorporating antibacterial silver nanoparticles and highly hydrophilic negatively charged carboxylic and amine functional groups. The innovative surface chemistry helps to reduce the contact angle of the novel membrane by at least a 48% and increase the pure water flux by 39.4% compared to the control membrane. The flux drop for the novel membrane is also lower (16.3% of the initial flux) than the control membrane (55.3% of the initial flux) during the long term experiments with protein solution. Moreover, the novel membrane continues to exhibit inhibition to microbes even after 1320 min of protein filtration. Synthesis of self-cleaning ultrafiltration membrane with long lasting properties opens up a viable solution for bio-fouling in ultrafiltration application for wastewater purification.

  20. Precision Cleaning - Path to Premier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackler, Scott E.

    2008-01-01

    ITT Space Systems Division s new Precision Cleaning facility provides critical cleaning and packaging of aerospace flight hardware and optical payloads to meet customer performance requirements. The Precision Cleaning Path to Premier Project was a 2007 capital project and is a key element in the approved Premier Resource Management - Integrated Supply Chain Footprint Optimization Project. Formerly precision cleaning was located offsite in a leased building. A new facility equipped with modern precision cleaning equipment including advanced process analytical technology and improved capabilities was designed and built after outsourcing solutions were investigated and found lacking in ability to meet quality specifications and schedule needs. SSD cleans parts that can range in size from a single threaded fastener all the way up to large composite structures. Materials that can be processed include optics, composites, metals and various high performance coatings. We are required to provide verification to our customers that we have met their particulate and molecular cleanliness requirements and we have that analytical capability in this new facility. The new facility footprint is approximately half the size of the former leased operation and provides double the amount of throughput. Process improvements and new cleaning equipment are projected to increase 1st pass yield from 78% to 98% avoiding $300K+/yr in rework costs. Cost avoidance of $350K/yr will result from elimination of rent, IT services, transportation, and decreased utility costs. Savings due to reduced staff expected to net $4-500K/yr.

  1. A novel clean and effective syngas production system based on partial oxidation of methane assisted solid oxide co-electrolysis process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yao; Liu, Tong; Fang, Shumin; Xiao, Guoliang; Wang, Huanting; Chen, Fanglin

    2015-03-01

    Development of the syngas production from solid oxide H2O/CO2 co-electrolysis is limited by the intensive energy input and low efficiency. Here, we present a new concept to efficiently generate syngas in both sides of the solid oxide electrolyzer by synergistically combining co-electrolysis with partial oxidation of methane (POM). Thermodynamic calculation and electrochemical measurements for the POM assisted solid oxide co-electrolysis processes on the SFM-SDC/LSGM/SFM-SDC cells exhibited an reduced electric input, increased energy conversion efficiency and decreased cathodic co-electrolysis polarization resistance in comparison with the conventional co-electrolysis. This method will be crucial to establish a clean and effective energy conversion system to meet global sustainable energy needs.

  2. Novel Biomass Conversion Process Results in Commercial Joint Venture; The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-06-01

    Fact sheet describing DuPont/NREL cooperative research and development agreement that resulted in biomass-to-ethanol conversion process used as a basis for DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol, LLC and cellulosic ethanol demonstration plant.

  3. Ultrasonic cleaning of fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Kondoh, Keisuke; Fujita, Chitoshi; Sakai, Hitoshi

    1994-12-31

    During fuel transportation, contamination of the transfer cask can lead to radiation dosage. That is radioactive crud becomes detached from the fuel surface and is deposited inside the cask. To avoid this at the Tsuruga Power Station Unit 1, crud was removed from fuel assemblies in advance of fuel transportation work. An ultrasonic cleaning process was adopted for this purpose; ultrasonic methods excel over other methods for this type of cleaning. Our process is also able to clean fuel assemblies without removing the channel box. Since this is the first time that the ultrasonic method was applied to fuel assemblies at the light water reactor in Japan on a large scale, the efficiency and the impact on plant instrumentation of the method were examined by performing preliminary test. Based on these tests, an optimum cleaning procedure was established.

  4. Ultrasonic cleaning of root canals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaagen, Bram; Boutsioukis, Christos; Jiang, Lei-Meng; Macedo, Ricardo; van der Sluis, Luc; Versluis, Michel

    2011-11-01

    A crucial step during a dental root canal treatment is irrigation, where an antimicrobial fluid is injected into the root canal system to eradicate all bacteria. Agitation of the fluid using an ultrasonically vibrating miniature file has shown significant improvement in cleaning efficacy over conventional syringe irrigation. However, the physical mechanisms underlying the cleaning process, being acoustic streaming, cavitation or chemical activity, and combinations thereof, are not fully understood. High-speed imaging allows us to visualize the flow pattern and cavitation in a root canal model at microscopic scales, at timescales relevant to the cleaning processes (microseconds). MicroPIV measurements of the induced acoustic streaming are coupled to the oscillation characteristics of the file as simulated numerically and measured with a laser vibrometer. The results give new insight into the role of acoustic streaming and the importance of the confinement for the cleaning of root canals.

  5. Clean Cities Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-01-01

    This fact sheet explains the Clean Cities Program and provides contact information for all coalitions and regional offices. It answers key questions such as: What is the Clean Cities Program? What are alternative fuels? How does the Clean Cities Program work? What sort of assistance does Clean Cities offer? What has Clean Cities accomplished? What is Clean Cities International? and Where can I find more information?

  6. Innovative Clean Coal Technologies (ICCT): Demonstration of innovative applications of technology for cost reductions to the CT-121 FGD process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-15

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate on a commercial scale several innovative applications of cost-reducing technology to the Chiyoda Thoroughbred-121 (CT-121) process. CT-121 is a second generation flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process which is considered by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Southern Company Services (SCS) to be one of the most reliable and lowest cost FGD options for high-sulfur coal-fired utility boiler applications. Demonstrations of the innovative design approaches will further reduce the cost and provide a clear advantage to CT121 relative to competing technology.

  7. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of innovative applications of technology for cost reductions to the CT-121 FGD process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-15

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate on a commercial scale several innovative applications of cost-reducing technology to the Chiyoda Thoroughbred-121 (CT-121) process. CT-121 is a second generation flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process which is considered by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Southern Company Services (SCS) to be one of the most reliable and lowest cost FGD options for high-sulfur coal-fired utility boiler applications. Demonstrations of the innovative design approaches will further reduce the cost and provide a clear advantage to CT121 relative to competing technology.

  8. Simulation of a waste incineration process with flue-gas cleaning and heat recovery sections using Aspen Plus.

    PubMed

    Cimini, Silvano; Prisciandaro, Marina; Barba, Diego

    2005-01-01

    In the present paper, the modeling of a dual-purpose plant for the production of electrical and thermal energy from the heat treatment of solid wastes is presented. Particularly, the process has been modeled by using the Aspen Plus Shell, with the aim of performing a study about the applicability of this software in the simulation of a solid waste incineration process, which involves complex gas-solid reactions where the solids are referred to as "non-conventional". The model is developed to analyze and quantify the expected benefits associated with refuse derived fuel (RDF) thermal utilization; thus attention is focused on the performance of the energy recovery section. PMID:15737714

  9. Controlling template erosion with advanced cleaning methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, SherJang; Yu, Zhaoning; Wähler, Tobias; Kurataka, Nobuo; Gauzner, Gene; Wang, Hongying; Yang, Henry; Hsu, Yautzong; Lee, Kim; Kuo, David; Dress, Peter

    2012-03-01

    We studied the erosion and feature stability of fused silica patterns under different template cleaning conditions. The conventional SPM cleaning is compared with an advanced non-acid process. Spectroscopic ellipsometry optical critical dimension (SE-OCD) measurements were used to characterize the changes in pattern profile with good sensitivity. This study confirmed the erosion of the silica patterns in the traditional acid-based SPM cleaning mixture (H2SO4+H2O2) at a rate of ~0.1nm per cleaning cycle. The advanced non-acid clean process however only showed CD shift of ~0.01nm per clean. Contamination removal & pattern integrity of sensitive 20nm features under MegaSonic assisted cleaning is also demonstrated.

  10. Technical support for the Ohio Clean Coal Technology Program. Volume 2, Baseline of knowledge concerning process modification opportunities, research needs, by-product market potential, and regulatory requirements: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Olfenbuttel, R.; Clark, S.; Helper, E.; Hinchee, R.; Kuntz, C.; Means, J.; Oxley, J.; Paisley, M.; Rogers, C.; Sheppard, W.; Smolak, L.

    1989-08-28

    This report was prepared for the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) under Grant Agreement No. CDO/R-88-LR1 and comprises two volumes. Volume 1 presents data on the chemical, physical, and leaching characteristics of by-products from a wide variety of clean coal combustion processes. Volume 2 consists of a discussion of (a) process modification waste minimization opportunities and stabilization considerations; (b) research and development needs and issues relating to clean coal combustion technologies and by-products; (c) the market potential for reusing or recycling by-product materials; and (d) regulatory considerations relating to by-product disposal or reuse.

  11. Green cleaning technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Knipe, R.

    1997-08-01

    Selecting environmentally safe metal cleaning alternatives requires a personal, careful, and comprehensive study. Before the days of depleting-the-ozone studies and volatile organic compound (VOC) regulations, the selection of a cleaning method for a particular metal process was simply tied to cost and result. Little, if any, consideration was given to the personal health of the operator or potential environmental impact. Nothing will ever be as simple as using methyl chloroform or other chlorinated solvents in a vapor degreaser. However, similar results can be achieved with greener technologies, provided that suitable procedures are followed. This article lists the questions to ask to properly evaluate current practices, explains the benefits and limitations of spray and immersion systems, describes environmentally benign aqueous and non-chlorinated solvent applications, and shows how to dispose of wastewater.

  12. Automated carbon dioxide cleaning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, David T.

    1991-01-01

    Solidified CO2 pellets are an effective blast media for the cleaning of a variety of materials. CO2 is obtained from the waste gas streams generated from other manufacturing processes and therefore does not contribute to the greenhouse effect, depletion of the ozone layer, or the environmental burden of hazardous waste disposal. The system is capable of removing as much as 90 percent of the contamination from a surface in one pass or to a high cleanliness level after multiple passes. Although the system is packaged and designed for manual hand held cleaning processes, the nozzle can easily be attached to the end effector of a robot for automated cleaning of predefined and known geometries. Specific tailoring of cleaning parameters are required to optimize the process for each individual geometry. Using optimum cleaning parameters the CO2 systems were shown to be capable of cleaning to molecular levels below 0.7 mg/sq ft. The systems were effective for removing a variety of contaminants such as lubricating oils, cutting oils, grease, alcohol residue, biological films, and silicone. The system was effective on steel, aluminum, and carbon phenolic substrates.

  13. Experimental and simulation studies of printability of buried EUV mask defects and study of EUV reflectivity loss mechanisms due to standard EUV mask cleaning processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyaya, Mihirkant

    There's a big push for development and commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography for high-volume semiconductor manufacturing of 14 nm half-pitch patterning and beyond. One of the primary concerns for making this a reality has been the ability to achieve defect-free masks. My study is focused on two aspects related to the performance degradation of the EUV masks namely EUV mask cleaning induced reflectivity loss mechanisms, and the buried multilayer phase defects in EUV masks. Standard EUV mask cleaning processes involve various steps and chemistries that lead to degradation of the multilayer structure, in turn leading to EUV reflectivity loss, hence impacting the throughput. In this work, we developed an understanding of the root causes of how different cleaning chemistries cause EUV reflectivity loss, and quantified these losses. Upon subjecting the mask blanks to multiple cleaning cycles, multilayer degradation observed was in terms of multilayer etching and pitting, surface roughness increase and surface oxidation. We studied each of these phenomena through experiments and simulations, and correlated the extent of EUV reflectivity loss to each of the degradation phenomena. The second aspect of this work involved investigating the printability behavior of buried native phase defects in EUV mask blanks. Since completely defect-free masks will be hard to achieve, it is essential to have a good understanding of the printability of EUV mask defects. In this work, the printability of native mask defects was studied using a novel level-set multilayer growth model that took into account the tool deposition conditions where the multilayer deposition took place. For this study, the native mask blank defects were characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and cross-section transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the defect printability of these defects was evaluated using simulations implementing the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) and the

  14. Saltstone Clean Cap Formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C

    2005-04-22

    The current operation strategy for using Saltstone Vault 4 to receive 0.2 Ci/gallon salt solution waste involves pouring a clean grout layer over the radioactive grout prior to initiating pour into another cell. This will minimize the radiating surface area and reduce the dose rate at the vault and surrounding area. The Clean Cap will be used to shield about four feet of Saltstone poured into a Z-Area vault cell prior to moving to another cell. The minimum thickness of the Clean Cap layer will be determined by the cesium concentration and resulting dose levels and it is expected to be about one foot thick based on current calculations for 0.1 Ci Saltstone that is produced in the Saltstone process by stabilization of 0.2 Ci salt solution. This report documents experiments performed to identify a formulation for the Clean Cap. Thermal transient calculations, adiabatic temperature rise measurements, pour height, time between pour calculations and shielding calculations were beyond the scope and time limitations of this study. However, data required for shielding calculations (composition and specific gravity) are provided for shielding calculations. The approach used to design a Clean Cap formulation was to produce a slurry from the reference premix (10/45/45 weight percent cement/slag/fly ash) and domestic water that resembled as closely as possible the properties of the Saltstone slurry. In addition, options were investigated that may offer advantages such as less bleed water and less heat generation. The options with less bleed water required addition of dispersants. The options with lower heat contained more fly ash and less slag. A mix containing 10/45/45 weight percent cement/slag/fly ash with a water to premix ratio of 0.60 is recommended for the Clean Cap. Although this mix may generate more than 3 volume percent standing water (bleed water), it has rheological, mixing and flow properties that are similar to previously processed Saltstone. The recommended

  15. Clean solutions to the incoming wafer quality impact on lithography process yield limits in a dynamic copper/low-k research and development environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysaght, Patrick S.; Ybarra, Israel; Sax, Harry; Gupta, Gaurav; West, Michael; Doros, Theodore G.; Beach, James V.; Mello, Jim

    2000-06-01

    The continued growth of the semiconductor manufacturing industry has been due, in large part, to improved lithographic resolution and overlay across increasingly larger chip areas. Optical lithography continues to be the mainstream technology for the industry with extensions of optical lithography being employed to support 180 nm product and process development. While the industry momentum is behind optical extensions to 130 nm, the key challenge will be maintaining an adequate and affordable process latitude (depth of focus/exposure window) necessary for 10% post-etch critical dimension (CD) control. If the full potential of optical lithography is to be exploited, the current lithographic systems can not be compromised by incoming wafer quality. Impurity specifications of novel Low-k dielectric materials, plating solutions, chemical-mechanical planarization (CMP) slurries, and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) precursors are not well understood and more stringent control measures will be required to meet defect density targets as identified in the National Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (NTRS). This paper identifies several specific poor quality wafer issues that have been effectively addressed as a result of the introduction of a set of flexible and reliable wafer back surface clean processes developed on the SEZ Spin-Processor 203 configured for processing of 200 mm diameter wafers. Patterned wafers have been back surface etched by means of a novel spin process contamination elimination (SpCE) technique with the wafer suspended by a dynamic nitrogen (N2) flow, device side down, via the Bernoulli effect. Figure 1 illustrates the wafer-chuck orientation within the process chamber during back side etch processing. This paper addresses a number of direct and immediate benefits to the MicraScan IIITM deep-ultraviolet (DUV) step-and-scan system at SEMATECH. These enhancements have resulted from the resolution of three significant problems: (1) back surface

  16. Clean fractionation of biomass

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The US DOE Alternative Feedstocks (AF) program is forging new links between the agricultural community and the chemicals industry through support of research and development (R&D) that uses green feedstocks to produce chemicals. The program promotes cost-effective industrial use of renewable biomass as feedstocks to manufacture high-volume chemical building blocks. Industrial commercialization of such processes would stimulate the agricultural sector by increasing the demand of agricultural and forestry commodities. A consortium of five DOE national laboratories has been formed with the objectives of providing industry with a broad range of expertise and helping to lower the risk of new process development through federal cost sharing. The AF program is conducting ongoing research on a clean fractionation process, designed to convert biomass into materials that can be used for chemical processes and products. The focus of the clean fractionation research is to demonstrate to industry that one technology can successfully separate all types of feedstocks into predictable types of chemical intermediates.

  17. Steaming Clean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoverson, Rick

    2006-01-01

    Schools can provide a cleaner, more healthful school environment by simply combining heat and water. Steam vapor systems use only tap water with no chemicals added. Low-pressure (12 psi to 65 psi) steam vapor sanitizes and deodorizes. This process can then be used safely in many situations, but is especially suited for restrooms and food-service…

  18. Clean Break

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Erin

    2011-01-01

    An interim president has to perform a particularly difficult balancing act. He or she shoulders the burdens from--or legacy of--the previous president and must also provide a foundation of stability for the new president. Throughout the process, effective communication--both internally and externally--is critical to ensuring a smooth transition.…

  19. Clean fuels from biomass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Y.-Y.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses the U.S. resources to provide fuels from agricultural products, the present status of conversion technology of clean fuels from biomass, and a system study directed to determine the energy budget, and environmental and socioeconomic impacts. Conversion processes are discussed relative to pyrolysis and anaerobic fermentation. Pyrolysis breaks the cellulose molecules to smaller molecules under high temperature in the absence of oxygen, wheras anaerobic fermentation is used to convert biomass to methane by means of bacteria. Cost optimization and energy utilization are also discussed.

  20. Green Solvents for Precision Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandelli, Heather; Maloney, Phillip; DeVor, Robert; Surma, Jan; Hintze, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace machinery used in liquid oxygen (LOX) fuel systems must be precision cleaned to achieve a very low level of non-volatile residue (< 1 mg0.1 m2), especially flammable residue. Traditionally chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) have been used in the precision cleaning of LOX systems, specifically CFC 113 (C2Cl3F3). CFCs have been known to cause the depletion of ozone and in 1987, were banned by the Montreal Protocol due to health, safety and environmental concerns. This has now led to the development of new processes in the precision cleaning of aerospace components. An ideal solvent-replacement is non-flammable, environmentally benign, non-corrosive, inexpensive, effective and evaporates completely, leaving no residue. Highlighted is a green precision cleaning process, which is contaminant removal using supercritical carbon dioxide as the environmentally benign solvent. In this process, the contaminant is dissolved in carbon dioxide, and the parts are recovered at the end of the cleaning process completely dry and ready for use. Typical contaminants of aerospace components include hydrocarbon greases, hydraulic fluids, silicone fluids and greases, fluorocarbon fluids and greases and fingerprint oil. Metallic aerospace components range from small nuts and bolts to much larger parts, such as butterfly valves 18 in diameter. A fluorinated grease, Krytox, is investigated as a model contaminant in these preliminary studies, and aluminum coupons are employed as a model aerospace component. Preliminary studies are presented in which the experimental parameters are optimized for removal of Krytox from aluminum coupons in a stirred-batch process. The experimental conditions investigated are temperature, pressure, exposure time and impeller speed. Temperatures of 308 - 423 K, pressures in the range of 8.3 - 41.4 MPa, exposure times between 5 - 60 min and impeller speeds of 0 - 1000 rpm were investigated. Preliminary results showed up to 86 cleaning efficiency with the

  1. Replacement of hydrogen peroxide cleaning with oxygen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, B. E.

    1992-03-01

    Comparison between the standard peroxide cleaning method and an oxygen plasma modified version was run on thin film bond monitors. The plasma modified version substituted oxygen plasma for the peroxide cleaning step in the process and reduced the DI rinse water temperature from 75 C to 25 C. A direct surface cleanliness comparison was made between the two cleaning methods using Auger spectroscopy. A beam lead and ribbon bonding experiment was also run on plasma-cleaned networks. Results of both experiments indicate that plasma cleaning is superior to peroxide cleaning and that reliable bonding can be done on plasma-cleaned thin film networks.

  2. Cleaning up

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, T.S.

    1993-02-01

    This article reports on the electronics manufacturer's response to findings that chemicals used in manufacturing integrated circuits induced miscarriages in plant workers and other environmental problems such as ozone depletion and the use of heavy metals and toxic gases in manufacturing. The topics of the article include the finding that a photoresist is at fault, the phase-out of ethylene glycol ethers, alternatives to ethylene glycol ethers, ozone-eating CFCs, use of citrus derived substitutes for CFCs, alternative manufacturing processes, substitutes for other ozone depleting chemicals, and the use of heavy metals in electronics manufacturing.

  3. Cleaning Animals' Cages With Little Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, Benjamin J.

    1989-01-01

    Proposed freeze/thaw method for cleaning animals' cages requires little extra weight and consumes little power and water. Cleaning concept developed for maintaining experimental rat cages on extended space missions. Adaptable as well to similar use on Earth. Reduces cleaning time. Makes use of already available facilities such as refrigerator, glove box, and autoclave. Rat waste adheres to steel-wire-mesh floor of cage. Feces removed by loosening action of freezing-and-thawing process, followed by blast of air.

  4. Deriving site-specific soil clean-up values for metals and metalloids: Rationale for including protection of soil microbial processes

    PubMed Central

    Kuperman, Roman G; Siciliano, Steven D; Römbke, Jörg; Oorts, Koen

    2014-01-01

    Although it is widely recognized that microorganisms are essential for sustaining soil fertility, structure, nutrient cycling, groundwater purification, and other soil functions, soil microbial toxicity data were excluded from the derivation of Ecological Soil Screening Levels (Eco-SSL) in the United States. Among the reasons for such exclusion were claims that microbial toxicity tests were too difficult to interpret because of the high variability of microbial responses, uncertainty regarding the relevance of the various endpoints, and functional redundancy. Since the release of the first draft of the Eco-SSL Guidance document by the US Environmental Protection Agency in 2003, soil microbial toxicity testing and its use in ecological risk assessments have substantially improved. A wide range of standardized and nonstandardized methods became available for testing chemical toxicity to microbial functions in soil. Regulatory frameworks in the European Union and Australia have successfully incorporated microbial toxicity data into the derivation of soil threshold concentrations for ecological risk assessments. This article provides the 3-part rationale for including soil microbial processes in the development of soil clean-up values (SCVs): 1) presenting a brief overview of relevant test methods for assessing microbial functions in soil, 2) examining data sets for Cu, Ni, Zn, and Mo that incorporated soil microbial toxicity data into regulatory frameworks, and 3) offering recommendations on how to integrate the best available science into the method development for deriving site-specific SCVs that account for bioavailability of metals and metalloids in soil. Although the primary focus of this article is on the development of the approach for deriving SCVs for metals and metalloids in the United States, the recommendations provided in this article may also be applicable in other jurisdictions that aim at developing ecological soil threshold values for protection of

  5. Cygnus: Electrochemical cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, G.G.; Sokcic-Kostic, M.; Vujic, J.; Solly, F.; Johnson, D.; Philipp, D.

    2000-07-01

    Electrochemical cleaning, commonly referred to as electropolishing, can be used to remove surface contamination by dissolving the underlying metal matrix. This is accomplished in the Cygnus process by passing an electric current through a dilute, acidic electrolyte. In the operation, the surface is polished, thereby removing contamination and irregularities to prevent recontamination. Mechanical decontamination processes, by comparison, leave the surface layer distorted, highly stressed, and contaminated with process media. Techniques employing grinding and particle impingement rework the surface of malleable metals such as stainless steel, folding the contamination into pockets where material is released for uncontrolled use. Solway, Ltd., developed the method to be more effective with respect to waste reduction and cost-effectiveness. Together with NUKEM Nuklear, the method was improved for a decontamination procedure in nuclear technology. One of the applications was the decontamination work at KRN Grundremmingen in Germany. The intensive work has shown that the method is suitable for decontamination services in both defense and commercial areas.

  6. Application of hydrogenation to low-temperature cleaning of the Si(001) surface in the processes of molecular-beam epitaxy: Investigation by scanning tunneling microscopy, reflected high-energy electron diffraction, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Arapkina, L. V.; Krylova, L. A.; Chizh, K. V.; Chapnin, V. A.; Uvarov, O. V.; Yuryev, V. A.

    2012-07-01

    Structural properties of the clean Si(001) surface obtained as a result of low-temperature (470-650 Degree-Sign C) pre-growth annealings of silicon wafers in a molecular-beam epitaxy chamber have been investigated. To decrease the cleaning temperature, a silicon surface was hydrogenated in the process of a preliminary chemical treatment in HF and NH{sub 4}F aqueous solutions. It has been shown that smooth surfaces composed of wide terraces separated by monoatomic steps can be obtained by dehydrogenation at the temperatures Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 600 Degree-Sign C, whereas clean surfaces obtained at the temperatures <600 Degree-Sign C are rough. It has been found that there exists a dependence of structural properties of clean surfaces on the temperature of hydrogen thermal desorption and the process of the preliminary chemical treatment. The frequency of detachment/attachment of Si dimers from/to the steps and effect of the Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier on ad-dimer migration across steps have been found to be the most probable factors determining a degree of the resultant surface roughness.

  7. Guideline implementation: surgical instrument cleaning.

    PubMed

    Cowperthwaite, Liz; Holm, Rebecca L

    2015-05-01

    Cleaning, decontaminating, and handling instructions for instruments vary widely based on the type of instrument and the manufacturer. Processing instruments in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions can help prevent damage and keep devices in good working order. Most importantly, proper cleaning and disinfection may prevent transmission of pathogenic organisms from a contaminated device to a patient or health care worker. The updated AORN "Guideline for cleaning and care of surgical instruments" provides guidance on cleaning, decontaminating, transporting, inspecting, and storing instruments. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel implement appropriate instrument care protocols in their practice settings. The key points address timely cleaning and decontamination of instruments after use; appropriate heating, ventilation, and air conditioning parameters for the decontamination area; processing of ophthalmic instruments and laryngoscopes; and precautions to take with instruments used in cases of suspected prion disease. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures. PMID:25946180

  8. Twelve Home Cleaning Recipes

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Safe and Effective Disinfection Twelve Home Cleaning Recipes Safer alternatives to hazardous cleaning products exist for ... 24 hours at room temperature. All Purpose Cleaner recipes for use on counters, floors and other hard ...

  9. What Is Clean Cities?

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-08-01

    This Clean Cities Program fact sheet describes the purpose and scope of this DOE program. Clean Cities facilitates the use of alternative and advanced fuels and vehicles to displace petroleum in the transportation sector.

  10. Cleaning laser spark spectroscopy for online cleaning quality control method development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutin, T. Y.; Smirnov, V. N.; Veiko, V. P.; Volkov, S. A.

    2010-07-01

    This work is dedicated to spectroscopic investigations of laser spark during the laser cleaning process. The goal is to proof its analytical possibilities for chemical composition determination for online cleaning quality control. Photographic recordings of laser spark were performed to estimate its parameters. Fiber spectrometer was used to analyze the emission of cleaning process established with fiber laser. Conclusions have been made about fiber laser radiation usability for spectroscopic purpose.